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Sample records for e1a dependent transcription

  1. Adenovirus E1A specifically blocks SWI/SNF-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M E; Cairns, B R; Levinson, R S; Yamamoto, K R; Engel, D A; Smith, M M

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the adenovirus E1A243 oncoprotein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces a slow-growth phenotype with accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This effect is due to the N-terminal and CR1 domains of E1A243, which in rodent cells are involved in triggering cellular transformation and also in binding to the cellular transcriptional coactivator p300. A genetic screen was undertaken to identify genes required for the function of E1A243 in S. cerevisiae. This screen identified SNF12, a gene encoding the 73-kDa subunit of the SWI/SNF transcriptional regulatory complex. Mutation of genes encoding known members of the SWI/SNF complex also led to loss of E1A function, suggesting that the SWI/SNF complex is a target of E1A243. Moreover, expression of E1A in wild-type cells specifically blocked transcriptional activation of the INO1 and SUC2 genes, whose activation pathways are distinct but have a common requirement for the SWI/SNF complex. These data demonstrate a specific functional interaction between E1A and the SWI/SNF complex and suggest that a similar interaction takes place in rodent and human cells. PMID:8816487

  2. Adenovirus E1A protein activates transcription of the E1A gene subsequent to transcription complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaack, J; Logan, J; Vakalopoulou, E; Shenk, T

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of transcriptional activation of the adenovirus E1A and E3 genes by E1A protein during infection was examined by using transcription-competition assays. Infection of HeLa cells with one virus led to inhibition of mRNA accumulation from a superinfecting virus. Synthesis of the E1A 289R protein by the first virus to infect reduced inhibition of transcription of the superinfecting virus, indicating that the E1A 289R protein was limiting for E1A-activated transcription. Infection with an E1A- virus, followed 6 h later by superinfection with a wild-type virus, led to preferential transcriptional activation of the E1A gene of the first virus, suggesting that a host transcription component(s) stably associated with the E1A promoter in the absence of E1A protein and that this complex was the substrate for transcriptional activation by E1A protein. The limiting host transcription component(s) bound to the E1A promoter to form a complex with a half-life greater than 24 h in the absence of E1A 289R protein, as demonstrated in a challenge assay with a large excess of superinfecting virus. In the presence of the E1A 289R protein, the E1A gene of the superinfecting virus was gradually activated with a reduction in E1A mRNA accumulation from the first virus. The kinetics of the activation suggest that this was due to an indirect effect rather than to destabilization of stable transcription complexes by the 289R protein. Images PMID:1825853

  3. Transcription activation by the adenovirus E1a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, James W.; Green, Michael R.

    1989-03-01

    The adenovirus Ela protein stimulates transcription of a wide variety of viral and cellular genes. It is shown here that Ela has the two functions characteristic of a typical cellular activator: one direct Ela to the promoter, perhaps by interacting with a DMA-bound protein, and the other, an activating region, enables the bound activator to stimulate transcription.

  4. E1A dependent up-regulation of c-jun/AP-1 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kitabayashi, I; Chiu, R; Gachelin, G; Yokoyama, K

    1991-01-01

    E1A, the early region 1A transcription unit of human adenovirus, exhibits multiple functions that regulate the expression of some cellular genes and promote cell growth and division. We found that E1A stimulated c-jun gene expression at least fifty-fold in rat 3Y1 cells in a serum-independent manner, concomitantly with E1A down-regulation of jun B expression. The E1A-dependent induction of c-jun transcription resulted in increase amount of cJun/AP1. This induction was mediated by the enhancement of the binding activity of the transcription factor cJun/AP1 to an AP1 binding site in the c-jun promoter. Additionally, this induction can be repressed by introducing junB into the cells. Taken collectively, these results suggest that the differential expression of two closely related proteins greatly expands their cellular regulation. Induction of c-jun expression by E1A as well as c-jun autoregulation may amplify the action of E1A during adenovirus infection. Therefore, some of the biological effects of E1A may include mediating the constitutive activation of c-jun, which is important in transcriptional regulation and oncogenic transformation. Images PMID:1826351

  5. Transcription control region within the protein-coding portion of adenovirus E1A genes.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, T F; Arvidson, D N; Tyau, E S; Dunsworth-Browne, M; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    A single-base deletion within the protein-coding region of the adenovirus type 5 early region 1A (E1A) genes, 399 bases downstream from the transcription start site, depresses transcription to 2% of the wild-type rate. Complementation studies demonstrated that this was due to two effects of the mutation: first, inactivation of an E1A protein, causing a reduction by a factor of 5; second, a defect which acts in cis to depress E1A mRNA and nuclear RNA concentrations by a factor of 10. A larger deletion within the protein-coding region of E1A which overlaps the single-base deletion produces the same phenotype. In contrast, a linker insertion which results in a similar truncated E1A protein does not produce the cis-acting defect in E1A transcription. These results demonstrate that a critical cis-acting transcription control region occurs within the protein coding sequence in adenovirus type 5 E1A. The single-base deletion occurs in a sequence which shows extensive homology with a sequence from the enhancer regions of simian virus 40 and polyomavirus. This region is not required for E1A transcription during the late phase of infection. Images PMID:6334230

  6. Transcription factor TFIID is a direct functional target of the adenovirus E1A transcription-repression domain.

    PubMed Central

    Song, C Z; Loewenstein, P M; Toth, K; Green, M

    1995-01-01

    The 243-amino acid adenovirus E1A oncoprotein both positively and negatively modulates the expression of cellular genes involved in the regulation of cell growth. The E1A transcription repression function appears to be linked with its ability to induce cellular DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cell transformation, as well as to inhibit cell differentiation. The mechanism by which E1A represses the transcription of various promoters has proven enigmatic. Here we provide several lines of evidence that the "TATA-box" binding protein (TBP) component of transcription factor TFIID is a cellular target of the E1A repression function encoded within the E1A N-terminal 80 amino acids. (i) The E1A N-terminal 80 amino acids [E1A-(1-80)protein] efficiently represses basal transcription from TATA-containing core promoters in vitro. (ii) TBP reverses completely E1A repression in vitro. (iii) TBP restores transcriptional activity to E1A-(1-80) protein affinity-depleted nuclear extracts. (iv) The N-terminal repression domain of E1A interacts directly and specifically with TBP in vitro. These results may help explain how E1A represses a set of genes that lack common upstream promoter elements. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7479778

  7. E1A RNA transcripts amplify adenovirus-mediated tumor reduction.

    PubMed

    Dion, L D; Goldsmith, K T; Strong, T V; Bilbao, G; Curiel, D T; Garver, R I

    1996-11-01

    Previous work by this group has established that E1-defective, recombinant adenoviruses can be replication-enabled by the codelivery of a plasmid encoding the deleted E1 functions, a strategy now designated conditional replication-enablement system for adenovirus (CRESA). In the studies reported here, the original replication-enabling plasmid was replaced by two separate plasmids that encoded the necessary E1A and E1B functions, respectively. An RNA transcript encoding the requisite E1A functions was shown to substitute functionally for the E1A plasmid without significant loss of new adenovirus production in in vitro experiments. No replication competent adenovirus was detectable in the cells treated with the plasmids, or the RNA and plasmid combinations. Subcutaneous human tumor nodules containing a fraction of cells cotransduced with the replication-enabling RNA + DNA and an adenovirus containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) expression cassette were reduced to a greater extent than control nodules containing the same fraction of cells cotransduced with the virus and an irrelevant plasmid. These experiments show that an E1-defective adenovirus can be conditionally replication-enabled by an RNA transcript encoding the required E1 functions, and that the replication-enablement is sufficient to produce an augmentation of an adenovirus-mediated therapeutic effect in vivo.

  8. The adenovirus E1A N-terminal repression domain represses transcription from a chromatin template in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Loewenstein, Paul M.; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The adenovirus repression domain of E1A 243R at the E1A N-terminus (E1A 1–80) transcriptionally represses genes involved in differentiation and cell cycle progression. E1A 1–80 represses transcription in vitro from naked DNA templates through its interaction with p300 and TFIID. E1A 1–80 can also interact with several chromatin remodeling factors and associates with chromatin in vivo. We show here that E1A 243R and E1A 1–80 can repress transcription from a reconstituted chromatin template in vitro. Temporal analysis reveals strong repression by E1A 1–80 when added at pre-activation, activation and early transcription stages. Interestingly, E1A 1–80 can greatly enhance transcription from chromatin templates, but not from naked DNA, when added at pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation and transcription-initiation stages. These data reveal a new dimension for E1A 1–80's interface with chromatin and may reflect its interaction with key players in PIC formation, p300 and TFIID, and/or possibly a role in chromatin remodeling. PMID:22521914

  9. The adenovirus E1A N-terminal repression domain represses transcription from a chromatin template in vitro.

    PubMed

    Loewenstein, Paul M; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Green, Maurice

    2012-06-20

    The adenovirus repression domain of E1A 243R at the E1A N-terminus (E1A 1-80) transcriptionally represses genes involved in differentiation and cell cycle progression. E1A 1-80 represses transcription in vitro from naked DNA templates through its interaction with p300 and TFIID. E1A 1-80 can also interact with several chromatin remodeling factors and associates with chromatin in vivo. We show here that E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 can repress transcription from a reconstituted chromatin template in vitro. Temporal analysis reveals strong repression by E1A 1-80 when added at pre-activation, activation and early transcription stages. Interestingly, E1A 1-80 can greatly enhance transcription from chromatin templates, but not from naked DNA, when added at pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation and transcription-initiation stages. These data reveal a new dimension for E1A 1-80's interface with chromatin and may reflect its interaction with key players in PIC formation, p300 and TFIID, and/or possibly a role in chromatin remodeling.

  10. E1A enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damage-induced apoptosis through PIDD-dependent caspase-2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Jay R; Siddiqui, Zeba K; Figueroa, Iris; Cook, James L

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the adenoviral protein, E1A, sensitizes mammalian cells to a wide variety of apoptosis-inducing agents through multiple cellular pathways. For example, E1A sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by TNF-superfamily members by inhibiting NF-kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent gene expression. In contrast, E1A sensitization to nitric oxide, an inducer of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, is not dependent upon repression of NF-κB-dependent transcription but rather is dependent upon caspase-2 activation. The latter observation suggested that E1A-induced enhancement of caspase-2 activation might be a critical factor in cellular sensitization to other intrinsic apoptosis pathway-inducing agents. Etoposide and gemcitabine are two DNA damaging agents that induce intrinsic apoptosis. Here we report that E1A-induced sensitization to both of these agents, like NO, is independent of NF-κB activation but dependent on caspase-2 activation. The results show that caspase-2 is a key mitochondrial-injuring caspase during etoposide and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis of E1A-positive cells, and that caspase-2 is required for induction of caspase-3 activity by both chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of PIDD was required for caspase-2 activation, mitochondrial injury and enhanced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, E1A-enhanced sensitivity to injury-induced apoptosis required PIDD cleavage to PIDD-CC. These results define the PIDD/caspase-2 pathway as a key apical, mitochondrial-injuring mechanism in E1A-induced sensitivity of mammalian cells to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27833761

  11. E1A enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damage-induced apoptosis through PIDD-dependent caspase-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Radke, Jay R; Siddiqui, Zeba K; Figueroa, Iris; Cook, James L

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the adenoviral protein, E1A, sensitizes mammalian cells to a wide variety of apoptosis-inducing agents through multiple cellular pathways. For example, E1A sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by TNF-superfamily members by inhibiting NF-kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent gene expression. In contrast, E1A sensitization to nitric oxide, an inducer of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, is not dependent upon repression of NF-κB-dependent transcription but rather is dependent upon caspase-2 activation. The latter observation suggested that E1A-induced enhancement of caspase-2 activation might be a critical factor in cellular sensitization to other intrinsic apoptosis pathway-inducing agents. Etoposide and gemcitabine are two DNA damaging agents that induce intrinsic apoptosis. Here we report that E1A-induced sensitization to both of these agents, like NO, is independent of NF-κB activation but dependent on caspase-2 activation. The results show that caspase-2 is a key mitochondrial-injuring caspase during etoposide and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis of E1A-positive cells, and that caspase-2 is required for induction of caspase-3 activity by both chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of PIDD was required for caspase-2 activation, mitochondrial injury and enhanced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, E1A-enhanced sensitivity to injury-induced apoptosis required PIDD cleavage to PIDD-CC. These results define the PIDD/caspase-2 pathway as a key apical, mitochondrial-injuring mechanism in E1A-induced sensitivity of mammalian cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

  12. Inhibition of adenovirus replication by the E1A antisense transcript initiated from hsp70 and VA-1 promoters.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, O I; Borisenko, A S; Ponomareva, T I; Tikhonenko, T I

    1990-03-01

    The E1A region of the adenoviral genome, important for initiation of virus infection and activation of other viral genes, was chosen as a target for engineering antisense RNA (asRNA) to inhibit adenovirus 5 (Ad5) replication in COS-1 cell culture in vitro. The hsp70 promoter, taken from the appropriate heat-shock-protein gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and the VA-1 RNA promoter, derived from the Ad5 gene coding for low-molecular-mass VA-1 RNA and recognized by RNA polymerase III were used as regulatory elements of transcription. The two types of recombinant constructs contained E1A fragments of 710 bp (hsp70 constructs) or 380 or 740 bp (VA-1 RNA constructs) in reverse orientation relative to the promoter position, as well as a transcription termination signal, the SV40 ori, and the gene controlling Geneticin (antibiotic G418) resistance (G418R). After selection of transfected COS-1 cells in the presence of G418, a number of stable G418R cell lines were raised which expressed engineered asRNAs. Plating of Ad5 suspensions of known titre on monolayers of transfected COS-1 cells clearly showed strong inhibition of adenovirus replication by asRNAs: 75% with the hsp70 promoter and 90% with the VA-1 RNA promoter.

  13. The adenoviral E1A N-terminal domain represses MYC transcription in human cancer cells by targeting both p300 and TRRAP and inhibiting MYC promoter acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M.; Green, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers frequently arise from increased expression of proto-oncogenes, such as MYC and HER2. Understanding the cellular pathways regulating the transcription and expression of proto-oncogenes is important for targeted therapies for cancer treatment. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A 243R (243 aa residues) is a viral oncoprotein that interacts with key regulators of gene transcription and cell proliferation. We have shown previously that the 80 amino acid N-terminal transcriptional repression domain of E1A 243R (E1A 1-80) can target the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 and repress HER2 in the HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Expression of E1A 1-80 induces death of SKBR3 and other cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed total cell RNA sequence analysis and identified MYC as the regulatory gene for cellular proliferation most strongly repressed by E1A 1-80. By RT-quantitative PCR analysis we show that repression of MYC in SKBR3 cells occurs early after expression of E1A 1-80, suggesting that MYC may be an early responder of E1A 1-80-mediated transcriptional repression. Of interest, while E1A 1-80 repression of MYC occurs in all eight human cancer cell lines examined, repression of HER2 is cell-type dependent. We demonstrate by ChIP analysis that MYC transcriptional repression by E1A 1-80 is associated with inhibition of acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16 on the MYC promoter, as well as inhibition of RNA Pol II binding to the MYC promoter. Deletion mutant analysis of E1A 1-80 suggests that both p300/CBP and TRRAP are involved in E1A 1-80 repression of MYC transcription. Further, E1A 1-80 interaction with p300/CBP and TRRAP is correlated with inhibition of H3K18 and H4K16 acetylation on the MYC promoter, respectively. Our results indicate that E1A 1-80 may target two important pathways for histone modification to repress transcription in human cancer cells. PMID:27382434

  14. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. Images PMID:2143540

  15. A bidirectional Tet-dependent promotor construct regulating the expression of E1A for tight control of oncolytic adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Henry; Wang, Xiaomin; Picó, Almudena Hurtado; Wildner, Judith; Suckau, Lennart; Pinkert, Sandra; Sipo, Isaac; Weger, Stefan; Poller, Wolfgang

    2007-01-20

    Tight regulation of oncolytic adenoviruses (oAdV) represents an important requirement for their safe application. Here we describe a new doxycycline (Dox)-dependent oAdV with a bidirectional expression cassette, which drives the expression of the reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator (rtTA(s)-M2) from a lung tumor-specific promoter and, in the opposite direction, the expression of the adenoviral E1A gene from a second generation TetO(7) sequence linked to an isolated TATA box. In H441 lung cancer cells, this oAdV showed a strictly Dox-dependent E1A expression, adenoviral replication, cell killing activity and a 450-fold induction of progeny virus production. The virus could be shut off again by withdrawal of Dox and, in contrast to a control oAdV expressing E1A directly from the SP-B promoter, did not replicate in non-target cells. However, the absolute values of virus production and the cell killing activity in the presence of the inducer were still reduced as compared to the control oAdV. The results demonstrate, for the first time, Dox-dependent oAdV replication from a single adenoviral vector genome. Future improvement of the Dox-dependent E1A regulation cassette should lead to the generation of an oAdV well suited to meet the demands for a highly regulated and efficient oncolytic virus for in vivo applications.

  16. Novel mechanism of JNK pathway activation by adenoviral E1A.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Vasily S; Brichkina, Anna I; Morrison, Helen; Pospelova, Tatiana V; Pospelov, Valery A; Herrlich, Peter

    2014-04-30

    The adenoviral oncoprotein E1A influences cellular regulation by interacting with a number of cellular proteins. In collaboration with complementary oncogenes, E1A fully transforms primary cells. As part of this action, E1A inhibits transcription of c-Jun:Fos target genes while promoting that of c-Jun:ATF2-dependent genes including jun. Both c-Jun and ATF2 are hyperphosphorylated in response to E1A. In the current study, E1A was fused with the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor (E1A-ER) to monitor the immediate effect of E1A activation. With this approach we now show that E1A activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), the upstream kinases MKK4 and MKK7, as well as the small GTPase Rac1. Activation of the JNK pathway requires the N-terminal domain of E1A, and, importantly, is independent of transcription. In addition, it requires the presence of ERM proteins. Downregulation of signaling components upstream of JNK inhibits E1A-dependent JNK/c-Jun activation. Taking these findings together, we show that E1A activates the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway upstream of Rac1 in a transcription-independent manner, demonstrating a novel mechanism of E1A action.

  17. Role of an adenovirus E2 promoter binding factor in E1A-mediated coordinate gene control.

    PubMed Central

    Kovesdi, I; Reichel, R; Nevins, J R

    1987-01-01

    A product of the adenovirus gene E1A is responsible for the stimulation of transcription from six viral promoters as well as at least two cellular promoters. We have detected a HeLa cell factor, termed E2 promoter binding factor (E2F), that appears to mediate the transcriptional stimulation of the viral E2 promoter. Competition experiments revealed that E2F did not recognize and bind to the E1B, E3, E4, or major late promoter sequences. Furthermore, three additional promoters stimulated by E1A, heat shock protein 70, beta-globin, and early simian virus 40, do not bind E2F. In contrast, the factor does recognize sequences in the E1A enhancer, and within the E1A enhancer are duplicated binding sites for E2F. Finally, a single E2F binding site from the E1A enhancer can confer increased transcription to a mouse beta-globin promoter, dependent on the action of the E1A gene product. This stimulation requires binding of E2F since methylation of the binding site, which blocks binding in vitro, reduces transcription stimulation in vivo. We, therefore, conclude that E2F is likely to be responsible for the E1A-mediated stimulation of the E1A gene as well as the E2 gene but is not involved in the activation of the other E1A-inducible promoters. Images PMID:2951737

  18. Suppression of mutations in two Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes by the adenovirus E1A protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zieler, H A; Walberg, M; Berg, P

    1995-01-01

    The protein products of the adenoviral E1A gene are implicated in a variety of transcriptional and cell cycle events, involving interactions with several proteins present in human cells, including parts of the transcriptional machinery and negative regulators of cell division such as the Rb gene product and p107. To determine if there are functional homologs of E1A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have developed a genetic screen for mutants that depend on E1A for growth. The screen is based on a colony color sectoring assay which allows the identification of mutants dependent on the maintenance and expression of an E1A-containing plasmid. Using this screen, we have isolated five mutants that depend on expression of the 12S or 13S cDNA of E1A for growth. A plasmid shuffle assay confirms that the plasmid-dependent phenotype is due to the presence of either the 12S or the 13S E1A cDNA and that both forms of E1A rescue growth of all mutants equally well. The five mutants fall into two classes that were named web1 and web2 (for "wants E1A badly"). Plasmid shuffle assays with mutant forms of E1A show that conserved region 1 (CR1) is required for rescue of the growth of the web1 and web2 E1A-dependent yeast mutants, while the N-terminal 22 amino acids are only partially required; conserved region 2 (CR2) and the C terminus are dispensable. The phenotypes of mutants in both the web1 and the web2 groups are due to a single gene defect, and the yeast genes that fully complement the mutant phenotypes of both groups were cloned. The WEB1 gene sequence encodes a 1,273-amino-acid protein that is identical to SEC31, a protein involved in the budding of transport vesicles from the endoplasmic reticulum. The WEB2 gene encodes a 1,522-amino-acid protein with homology to nucleic acid-dependent ATPases. Deletion of either WEB1 or WEB2 is lethal. Expression of E1A is not able to rescue the lethality of either the web1 or the web2 null allele, implying allele-specific mutations that lead

  19. Stochastic Model of Supercoiling-Dependent Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackley, C. A.; Johnson, J.; Bentivoglio, A.; Corless, S.; Gilbert, N.; Gonnella, G.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a stochastic model for gene transcription coupled to DNA supercoiling, where we incorporate the experimental observation that polymerases create supercoiling as they unwind the DNA helix and that these enzymes bind more favorably to regions where the genome is unwound. Within this model, we show that when the transcriptionally induced flux of supercoiling increases, there is a sharp crossover from a regime where torsional stresses relax quickly and gene transcription is random, to one where gene expression is highly correlated and tightly regulated by supercoiling. In the latter regime, the model displays transcriptional bursts, waves of supercoiling, and up regulation of divergent or bidirectional genes. It also predicts that topological enzymes which relax twist and writhe should provide a pathway to down regulate transcription.

  20. Ad5/35E1aPSESE4: A novel approach to marking circulating prostate tumor cells with a replication competent adenovirus controlled by PSA/PSMA transcription regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Eun; Joung, Jae Young; Shin, Seung-Phil; Choi, Moon-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Yon Hui; Park, Weon Seo; Lee, Sang-Jin; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells serve as useful biomarkers with which to identify disease status associated with survival, metastasis and drug sensitivity. Here, we established a novel application for detecting PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells circulating in peripheral blood employing an adenovirus called Ad5/35E1aPSESE4. Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 utilized PSES, a chimeric enhancer derived from PSA/PSMA promoters that is highly active with and without androgen. A fluorescence signal mediated by GFP expression upon Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection was selectively amplified in PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro and ex vivo. Furthermore, for the in vivo model, blood drawn from TRAMP was tested for CTCs with Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection and was positive for CTCs at week 16. Validation was performed on patient blood at various clinical stages and found out 1-100 CTCs expressing GFP upon Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection. Interestingly, CTC from one patient was confirmed to be sensitive to docetaxel chemotherapeutic reagent and to abundantly express metastasis-related genes like MMP9, Cofilin1, and FCER1G through RNA-seq. Our study established that the usage of Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 is effective in marking PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells in patient blood to improve the efficacy of utilizing CTCs as a biomarker.

  1. DNA Template Dependent Accuracy Variation of Nucleotide Selection in Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mellenius, Harriet; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2015-01-01

    It has been commonly assumed that the effect of erroneous transcription of DNA genes into messenger RNAs on peptide sequence errors are masked by much more frequent errors of mRNA translation to protein. We present a theoretical model of transcriptional accuracy. It uses experimentally estimated standard free energies of double-stranded DNA and RNA/DNA hybrids and predicts a DNA template dependent transcriptional accuracy variation spanning several orders of magnitude. The model also identifies high-error as well a high-accuracy transcription motifs. The source of the large accuracy span is the context dependent variation of the stacking free energy of pairs of correct and incorrect base pairs in the ever moving transcription bubble. Our model predictions have direct experimental support from recent single molecule based identifications of transcriptional errors in the C. elegans transcriptome. Our conclusions challenge the general view that amino acid substitution errors in proteins are mainly caused by translational errors. It suggests instead that transcriptional error hotspots are the dominating source of peptide sequence errors in some DNA template contexts, while mRNA translation is the major cause of protein errors in other contexts. PMID:25799551

  2. DNA template dependent accuracy variation of nucleotide selection in transcription.

    PubMed

    Mellenius, Harriet; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2015-01-01

    It has been commonly assumed that the effect of erroneous transcription of DNA genes into messenger RNAs on peptide sequence errors are masked by much more frequent errors of mRNA translation to protein. We present a theoretical model of transcriptional accuracy. It uses experimentally estimated standard free energies of double-stranded DNA and RNA/DNA hybrids and predicts a DNA template dependent transcriptional accuracy variation spanning several orders of magnitude. The model also identifies high-error as well a high-accuracy transcription motifs. The source of the large accuracy span is the context dependent variation of the stacking free energy of pairs of correct and incorrect base pairs in the ever moving transcription bubble. Our model predictions have direct experimental support from recent single molecule based identifications of transcriptional errors in the C. elegans transcriptome. Our conclusions challenge the general view that amino acid substitution errors in proteins are mainly caused by translational errors. It suggests instead that transcriptional error hotspots are the dominating source of peptide sequence errors in some DNA template contexts, while mRNA translation is the major cause of protein errors in other contexts.

  3. Riboswitches in regulation of Rho-dependent transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Proshkin, Sergey; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    Riboswitches are RNA sensors of small metabolites and ions that regulate gene expression in response to environmental changes. In bacteria, the riboswitch sensor domain usually controls the formation of a strong RNA hairpin that either functions as a potent transcription terminator or sequesters a ribosome-binding site. A recent study demonstrated a novel mechanism by which a riboswitch controls Rho-dependent transcription termination. This riboswitch mechanism is likely a widespread mode of gene regulation that determines whether a protein effector is able to attenuate transcription. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Riboswitches.

  4. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Duong, Son Q.; Sheydina, Anna; Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to cAMP response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcriptional activation. To investigate the spatial and temporal organization of CREB-dependent transcriptional nuclear microdomains, we combined perforated patch-clamp technique and FRET microscopy for monitoring CREB and CREB-binding protein interaction in the nuclei of live cells. The experimental approach to the quantitative assessment of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling evoked by cAMP- and Cav1.2-dependent mechanisms was devised in COS1 cells expressing recombinant Cav1.2 calcium channels. Using continuous 2-dimensional wavelet transform and time series analyses, we found that nuclear CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling is organized differentially in spatially and temporally separated microdomains of 4 distinct types. In rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, CREB-dependent transcription is mediated by the cAMP-initiated CaMKII-sensitive and Cav1.2-initiated CaMKII-insensitive mechanisms. The latter microdomains show a tendency to exhibit periodic behavior correlated with spontaneous contraction of myocytes suggestive of frequency-dependent CREB-dependent transcriptional regulation in the heart.—Kobrinsky, E., Duong, S.Q., Sheydina, A., Soldatov, N. M. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells. PMID:21248242

  5. Transcriptional dynamics with time-dependent reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu; Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2015-02-01

    Transcription is the first step in the process of gene regulation that controls cell response to varying environmental conditions. Transcription is a stochastic process, involving synthesis and degradation of mRNAs, that can be modeled as a birth-death process. We consider a generic stochastic model, where the fluctuating environment is encoded in the time-dependent reaction rates. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the mRNA probability distribution and are able to analyze the response for arbitrary time-dependent protocols. Our analytical results and stochastic simulations confirm that the transcriptional machinery primarily act as a low-pass filter. We also show that depending on the system parameters, the mRNA levels in a cell population can show synchronous/asynchronous fluctuations and can deviate from Poisson statistics.

  6. Modulation of Elk-dependent-transcription by Gene33.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Adam B; Messina, Joseph L

    2005-04-15

    Gene33 is a cytoplasmic protein expressed in many cell types, including those of renal and hepatic origin. Its expression is regulated by a large number of mitogenic and stressful stimuli, both in cultured cells and in vivo. Gene33 protein possesses binding domains for ErbB receptors, 14-3-3 proteins, SH-3 domains, and GTP bound Cdc42, suggesting that it may play a role in signal transduction. Indeed, these regions of Gene33 have been reported to modulate signaling through the ERK, JNK, and NFkappaB pathways. In the present work, epitope-tagged full-length and truncation mutants, as well as wild-type Gene33, were overexpressed in 293 cells. The expression of these proteins was compared to the level of endogenous Gene33 by Western blot using a newly developed polyclonal antibody. As proxies for activity of the ERK and JNK pathways, Elk- and c-Jun-dependent transcription were measured by a luciferase reporter gene. Moderate expression levels of full-length Gene33 caused a twofold increase in Elk-dependent transcription, while at higher levels, c-Jun-dependent transcription was partially inhibited. The C-terminal half of Gene33 significantly increased both Elk- and c-Jun-dependent transcription when expressed at approximately threefold above control levels. This effect on Elk-dependent transcription was lost at higher levels of Gene33 expression. In contrast, higher levels of the C-terminal half of Gene33 caused a progressively greater effect on c-Jun-dependent transcription. These findings suggest that Gene33 may increase ERK activity, and that the C-terminal half of Gene33 may act less specifically in the absence of the N-terminal half, inducing JNK activity.

  7. Retroactivity effects dependency on the transcription factors binding mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Hernández, Libertad; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena; Aguilar-Ibáñez, Carlos F; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; Soria-López, Alberto; Martínez-García, Juan Carlos

    2016-12-07

    Downstream connection effects on transcription are caused by retroactivity. When biomolecular dynamical systems interconnect retroactivity is a property that becomes important. The biological functional meaning of these effects is increasingly becoming an area of interest. Downstream targets, which are operator binding sites in transcriptional networks, may induce behaviors such as ultrasensitive responses or even represent an undesired issue in regulation. To the best of our knowledge, the role of the binding mechanisms of transcription factors in relation to minimizing - or enhancing - retroactivity effects has not been previously addressed. Our aim is to evaluate retroactivity effects considering how the binding mechanism impacts the number of free functional transcription factor (FFTF) molecules using a simple model via deterministic and stochastic simulations. We study four transcription factor binding mechanisms (BM): simple monomer binding (SMB), dimer binding (DB), cooperative sequential binding (CSB) and cooperative sequential binding with dimerization (CSB_D). We consider weak and strong binding regimes for each mechanism, where we contrast the cases when the FFTF is bound or unbound to the downstream loads. Upon interconnection, the number of FFTF molecules changed less for the SMB mechanism while for DB they changed the most. Our results show that for the chosen mechanisms (in terms of the corresponding described dynamics), retroactivity effects depend on transcription binding mechanisms. This contributes to the understanding of how the transcription factor regulatory function-such as decision making-and its dynamic needs for the response, may determine the nature of the selected binding mechanism.

  8. Transcription-dependent and transcription-independent nucleosome disruption induced by dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.E.; Whitlock, J.P. Jr. )

    1992-12-01

    In mouse hepatoma cells, both the regulatory and the transcribed regions of the cyp1a1 gene assume a nucleosomal configuration when the gene is silent; two nucleosomes occupy specific sites at the transcriptional promoter. Activation of transcription by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is accompanied by changes in chromatin structure, which depend upon a functional aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor. In the transcribed region of the gene, nucleosome disruption occurs as a consequence of RNA elongation. In contrast, at the promoter, loss of positioned nucleosomes is independent of transcription and represents an event in the mechanism by which the liganded Ah receptor enhances transcriptional initiation. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  9. E1a induces the expression of epithelial characteristics

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Cells closely resembling epithelia constitute the first specific cell type in a mammalian embryo. Many other cell types emerge via epithelial- mesenchymal differentiation. The transcription factors and signal transduction pathways involved in this differentiation are being elucidated. I have previously reported (Frisch, 1991) that adenovirus E1a is a tumor suppressor gene in certain human cell lines. In the present report, I demonstrate that E1a expression caused diverse human tumor cells (rhabdomyosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, melanoma, osteosarcoma) and fibroblasts to assume at least two of the following epithelial characteristics: (a) epithelioid morphology; (b) epithelial-type intercellular adhesion proteins localized to newly formed junctional complexes; (c) keratin-containing intermediate filaments; and (d) down- regulation of non-epithelial genes. E1a thus appeared to partially convert diverse human tumor cells into an epithelial phenotype. This provides a new system for molecular analysis of epithelial-mesenchymal interconversions. This effect may also contribute to E1a's tumor suppression activity, possibly through sensitization to anoikis (Frisch, S.M., and H. Francis, 1994. J. Cell Biol. 124:619-626). PMID:7525602

  10. Xenopus transcription factor IIIA-dependent DNA renaturation.

    PubMed

    Fiser-Littell, R M; Hanas, J S

    1988-11-15

    Kinetic and titration analyses are used to elucidate the mechanism by which Xenopus transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a protein required for 5 S RNA synthesis by RNA polymerase III, promotes DNA renaturation. TFIIIA promotes 50% renaturation of complementary strands (303 bases) in 45 s. Analyses of the renaturation kinetics indicate the rate-limiting step in this TFIIIA-dependent reaction is first order. TFIIIA-dependent DNA renaturation is a stoichiometric rather than a catalytic process. The renaturation rates for specific and nonspecific DNA are very similar, indicating lack of sequence specificity in this TFIIIA-dependent process. In the nanomolar concentration range of protein and DNA, renaturation occurs at a ratio of about one TFIIIA molecule/single strand (303 bases). Elevated reaction temperatures strongly stimulate TFIIIA-dependent DNA renaturation; at 45 degrees C, renaturation of the 303-base pair fragment nears completion in about 5 s. The ability of TFIIIA to rapidly promote DNA renaturation is unique when compared with Escherichia coli recA protein, single-stranded DNA binding protein, or bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein. This mechanism by which TFIIIA promotes DNA renaturation is compatible with features of 5 S RNA gene transcription.

  11. Developmental-stage-dependent transcriptional response to leukaemic oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Assi, Salam A.; Tsoulaki, Olga; Gilmour, Jane; Lacaud, Georges; Bonifer, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is characterized by a block in myeloid differentiation the stage of which is dependent on the nature of the transforming oncogene and the developmental stage of the oncogenic hit. This is also true for the t(8;21) translocation that gives rise to the RUNX1-ETO fusion protein and initiates the most common form of human AML. Here we study the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells expressing an inducible RUNX1-ETO gene into blood cells as a model, combined with genome-wide analyses of transcription factor binding and gene expression. RUNX1-ETO interferes with both the activating and repressive function of its normal counterpart, RUNX1, at early and late stages of blood cell development. However, the response of the transcriptional network to RUNX1-ETO expression is developmental stage specific, highlighting the molecular mechanisms determining specific target cell expansion after an oncogenic hit. PMID:26018585

  12. Calorie Restriction Suppresses Age-Dependent Hippocampal Transcriptional Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Marissa J.; Dolgalev, Igor; Alldred, Melissa J.; Heguy, Adriana; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) enhances longevity and mitigates aging phenotypes in numerous species. Physiological responses to CR are cell-type specific and variable throughout the lifespan. However, the mosaic of molecular changes responsible for CR benefits remains unclear, particularly in brain regions susceptible to deterioration during aging. We examined the influence of long-term CR on the CA1 hippocampal region, a key learning and memory brain area that is vulnerable to age-related pathologies, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Through mRNA sequencing and NanoString nCounter analysis, we demonstrate that one year of CR feeding suppresses age-dependent signatures of 882 genes functionally associated with synaptic transmission-related pathways, including calcium signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and Creb signaling in wild-type mice. By comparing the influence of CR on hippocampal CA1 region transcriptional profiles at younger-adult (5 months, 2.5 months of feeding) and older-adult (15 months, 12.5 months of feeding) timepoints, we identify conserved upregulation of proteome quality control and calcium buffering genes, including heat shock 70 kDa protein 1b (Hspa1b) and heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 (Hspa5), protein disulfide isomerase family A member 4 (Pdia4) and protein disulfide isomerase family A member 6 (Pdia6), and calreticulin (Calr). Expression levels of putative neuroprotective factors, klotho (Kl) and transthyretin (Ttr), are also elevated by CR in adulthood, although the global CR-specific expression profiles at younger and older timepoints are highly divergent. At a previously unachieved resolution, our results demonstrate conserved activation of neuroprotective gene signatures and broad CR-suppression of age-dependent hippocampal CA1 region expression changes, indicating that CR functionally maintains a more youthful transcriptional state within the hippocampal CA1 sector. PMID:26221964

  13. Quantitative characterization of gene regulation by Rho dependent transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Razika; Lee, Tiffany Y; Lim, Han N

    2015-08-01

    Rho factor dependent transcription termination (RTT) is common within the coding sequences of bacterial genes and it acts to couple transcription and translation levels. Despite the importance of RTT for gene regulation, its effects on mRNA and protein concentrations have not been quantitatively characterized. Here we demonstrate that the exogenous cfp gene encoding the cyan fluorescent protein can serve as a model for gene regulation by RTT. This was confirmed by showing that Psu and bicyclomycin decrease RTT and increase full length cfp mRNAs (but remarkably they have little effect on protein production). We then use cfp to characterize the relationship between its protein and full length mRNA concentrations when the translation initiation rate is varied by sequence modifications of the translation initiation region (TIR). These experiments reveal that the fold change in protein concentration (RP) and the fold change in full length mRNA concentration (Rm) have the relationship RP≈Rm(b), where b is a constant. The average value of b was determined from three separate data sets to be ~3.6. We demonstrate that the above power law function can predict how altering the translation initiation rate of a gene in an operon will affect the mRNA concentrations of downstream genes and specify a lower bound for the associated changes in protein concentrations. In summary, this study defines a simple phenomenological model to help program expression from single genes and operons that are regulated by RTT, and to guide molecular models of RTT.

  14. TOPLESS mediates auxin-dependent transcriptional repression during Arabidopsis embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Szemenyei, Heidi; Hannon, Mike; Long, Jeff A

    2008-03-07

    The transcriptional response to auxin is critical for root and vascular development during Arabidopsis embryogenesis. Auxin induces the degradation of AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (AUX/IAA) transcriptional repressors, freeing their binding partners, the AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) proteins, which can activate transcription of auxin response genes. We show that TOPLESS (TPL) can physically interact with IAA12/BODENLOS (IAA12/BDL) through an ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. TPL can repress transcription in vivo and is required for IAA12/BDL repressive activity. In addition, tpl-1 can suppress the patterning defects of the bdl-1 mutant. Direct interaction between TPL and ARF5/MONOPTEROS, which is regulated by IAA12/BDL, results in a loss-of-function arf5/mp phenotype. These observations show that TPL is a transcriptional co-repressor and further our understanding of how auxin regulates transcription during plant development.

  15. Adenovirus Small E1A Employs the Lysine Acetylases p300/CBP and Tumor Suppressor Rb to Repress Select Host Genes and Promote Productive Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Roberto; Gou, Dawei; Jawdekar, Gauri; Johnson, Sarah A.; Nava, Miguel; Su, Trent; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zemke, Nathan R.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kurdistani, Siavash K.; Berk, Arnold J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogenic transformation by adenovirus small e1a depends on simultaneous interactions with the host lysine acetylases p300/CBP and the tumor suppressor RB. How these interactions influence cellular gene expression remains unclear. We find that e1a displaces RBs from E2F transcription factors and promotes p300 acetylation of RB1 K873/K874 to lock it into a repressing conformation that interacts with repressive chromatin-modifying enzymes. These repressing p300-e1a-RB1 complexes specifically interact with host genes that have unusually high p300 association within the gene body. The TGFβ-, TNF-, and interleukin-signaling pathway components are enriched among such p300-targeted genes. The p300-e1a-RB1 complex condenses chromatin in a manner dependent on HDAC activity, p300 lysine acetylase activity, the p300 bromodomain, and RB K873/K874 and e1a K239 acetylation to repress host genes that would otherwise inhibit productive virus infection. Thus, adenovirus employs e1a to repress host genes that interfere with viral replication. PMID:25525796

  16. Time-Dependent Transcriptional Changes in Axenic Giardia duodenalis Trophozoites

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, Brendan R. E.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Baker, Louise; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Young, Neil D.; Hall, Ross S.; Rojas, Cristian A. A.; Svärd, Staffan G.; Gasser, Robin B.; Jex, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is the most common gastrointestinal protozoan parasite of humans and a significant contributor to the global burden of both diarrheal disease and post-infectious chronic disorders. Although G. duodenalis can be cultured axenically, significant gaps exist in our understanding of the molecular biology and metabolism of this pathogen. The present study employed RNA sequencing to characterize the mRNA transcriptome of G. duodenalis trophozoites in axenic culture, at log (48 h of growth), stationary (60 h), and declining (96 h) growth phases. Using ~400-times coverage of the transcriptome, we identified 754 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs), mainly representing two large DTG groups: 438 that were down-regulated in the declining phase relative to log and stationary phases, and 281 that were up-regulated. Differential transcription of prominent antioxidant and glycolytic enzymes implicated oxygen tension as a key factor influencing the transcriptional program of axenic trophozoites. Systematic bioinformatic characterization of numerous DTGs encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function was achieved using structural homology searching. This powerful approach greatly informed the differential transcription analysis and revealed putative novel antioxidant-coding genes, and the presence of a near-complete two-component-like signaling system that may link cytosolic redox or metabolite sensing to the observed transcriptional changes. Motif searching applied to promoter regions of the two large DTG groups identified different putative transcription factor-binding motifs that may underpin global transcriptional regulation. This study provides new insights into the drivers and potential mediators of transcriptional variation in axenic G. duodenalis and provides context for static transcriptional studies. PMID:26636323

  17. Time-Dependent Transcriptional Changes in Axenic Giardia duodenalis Trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Brendan R E; McConville, Malcolm J; Baker, Louise; Korhonen, Pasi K; Young, Neil D; Hall, Ross S; Rojas, Cristian A A; Svärd, Staffan G; Gasser, Robin B; Jex, Aaron R

    2015-12-01

    Giardia duodenalis is the most common gastrointestinal protozoan parasite of humans and a significant contributor to the global burden of both diarrheal disease and post-infectious chronic disorders. Although G. duodenalis can be cultured axenically, significant gaps exist in our understanding of the molecular biology and metabolism of this pathogen. The present study employed RNA sequencing to characterize the mRNA transcriptome of G. duodenalis trophozoites in axenic culture, at log (48 h of growth), stationary (60 h), and declining (96 h) growth phases. Using ~400-times coverage of the transcriptome, we identified 754 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs), mainly representing two large DTG groups: 438 that were down-regulated in the declining phase relative to log and stationary phases, and 281 that were up-regulated. Differential transcription of prominent antioxidant and glycolytic enzymes implicated oxygen tension as a key factor influencing the transcriptional program of axenic trophozoites. Systematic bioinformatic characterization of numerous DTGs encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function was achieved using structural homology searching. This powerful approach greatly informed the differential transcription analysis and revealed putative novel antioxidant-coding genes, and the presence of a near-complete two-component-like signaling system that may link cytosolic redox or metabolite sensing to the observed transcriptional changes. Motif searching applied to promoter regions of the two large DTG groups identified different putative transcription factor-binding motifs that may underpin global transcriptional regulation. This study provides new insights into the drivers and potential mediators of transcriptional variation in axenic G. duodenalis and provides context for static transcriptional studies.

  18. A Splicing-Dependent Transcriptional Checkpoint Associated with Prespliceosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chathoth, Keerthi T.; Barrass, J. David; Webb, Shaun; Beggs, Jean D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is good evidence for functional interactions between splicing and transcription in eukaryotes, but how and why these processes are coupled remain unknown. Prp5 protein (Prp5p) is an RNA-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) required for prespliceosome formation in yeast. We demonstrate through in vivo RNA labeling that, in addition to a splicing defect, the prp5-1 mutation causes a defect in the transcription of intron-containing genes. We present chromatin immunoprecipitation evidence for a transcriptional elongation defect in which RNA polymerase that is phosphorylated at Ser5 of the largest subunit’s heptad repeat accumulates over introns and that this defect requires Cus2 protein. A similar accumulation of polymerase was observed when prespliceosome formation was blocked by a mutation in U2 snRNA. These results indicate the existence of a transcriptional elongation checkpoint that is associated with prespliceosome formation during cotranscriptional spliceosome assembly. We propose a role for Cus2p as a potential checkpoint factor in transcription. PMID:24560925

  19. Transcriptional Regulatory Cascades in Runx2-Dependent Bone Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The development of the musculoskeletal system is a complex process that involves very precise control of bone formation and growth as well as remodeling during postnatal life. Although the understanding of the transcriptional mechanisms of osteogenesis has increased considerably, the molecular regulatory basis, especially the gene regulatory network of osteogenic differentiation, is still poorly understood. This review provides the reader with an overview of the key transcription factors that govern bone formation, highlighting their function and regulation linked to Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). Runx2 as the master transcription factor of osteoblast differentiation, Twist, Msh homeobox 2 (Msx2), and promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger protein (PLZF) acting upstream of Runx2, Osterix (Osx) acting downstream of Runx2, and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and zinc-finger protein 521 (ZFP521) acting as cofactors of Runx2 are discussed, and their relevance for tissue engineering is presented. References are provided for more in-depth personal study. PMID:23150948

  20. Transcription Independent Insulation at TFIIIC-Dependent Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Lourdes; Dhillon, Namrita; Kamakaka, Rohinton T.

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin insulators separate active from repressed chromatin domains. In yeast the RNA pol III transcription machinery bound to tRNA genes function with histone acetylases and chromatin remodelers to restrict the spread of heterochromatin. Our results collectively demonstrate that binding of TFIIIC is necessary for insulation but binding of TFIIIB along with TFIIIC likely improves the probability of complex formation at an insulator. Insulation by this transcription factor occurs in the absence of RNA polymerase III or polymerase II but requires specific histone acetylases and chromatin remodelers. This analysis identifies a minimal set of factors required for insulation. PMID:19596900

  1. TOR-dependent post-transcriptional regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guowu; McQuiston, Travis; Bernard, Amélie; Park, Yoon-Dong; Qiu, Jin; Vural, Ali; Zhang, Nannan; Waterman, Scott R; Blewett, Nathan H; Myers, Timothy G; Maraia, Richard J; Kehrl, John H; Uzel, Gulbu; Klionsky, Daniel J; Williamson, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of autophagy is required to maintain cellular equilibrium and prevent disease. While extensive study of post-translational mechanisms has yielded important insights into autophagy induction, less is known about post-transcriptional mechanisms that could potentiate homeostatic control. In our study, we showed that the RNA-binding protein, Dhh1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Vad1 in the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is involved in recruitment and degradation of key autophagy mRNAs. In addition, phosphorylation of the decapping protein Dcp2 by the target of rapamycin (TOR), facilitates decapping and degradation of autophagy-related mRNAs, resulting in repression of autophagy under nutrient-replete conditions. The post-transcriptional regulatory process is conserved in both mouse and human cells and plays a role in autophagy-related modulation of the inflammasome product IL1B. These results were then applied to provide mechanistic insight into autoimmunity of a patient with a PIK3CD/p110δ gain-of-function mutation. These results thus identify an important new post-transcriptional mechanism of autophagy regulation that is highly conserved between yeast and mammals.

  2. Coordinate post-transcriptional repression of Dpp-dependent transcription factors attenuates signal range during development.

    PubMed

    Newton, Fay G; Harris, Robin E; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Ashe, Hilary L

    2015-10-01

    Precise control of the range of signalling molecule action is crucial for correct cell fate patterning during development. For example, Drosophila ovarian germline stem cells (GSCs) are maintained by exquisitely short-range BMP signalling from the niche. In the absence of BMP signalling, one GSC daughter differentiates into a cystoblast (CB) and this fate is stabilised by Brain tumour (Brat) and Pumilio (Pum)-mediated post-transcriptional repression of mRNAs, including that encoding the Dpp transducer, Mad. However, the identity of other repressed mRNAs and the mechanism of post-transcriptional repression are currently unknown. Here, we identify the Medea and schnurri mRNAs, which encode transcriptional regulators required for activation and/or repression of Dpp target genes, as additional Pum-Brat targets, suggesting that tripartite repression of the transducers is deployed to desensitise the CB to Dpp. In addition, we show that repression by Pum-Brat requires recruitment of the CCR4 and Pop2 deadenylases, with knockdown of deadenylases in vivo giving rise to ectopic GSCs. Consistent with this, Pum-Brat repression leads to poly(A) tail shortening and mRNA degradation in tissue culture cells, and we detect a reduced number of Mad and shn transcripts in the CB relative to the GSC based on single molecule mRNA quantitation. Finally, we show generality of the mechanism by demonstrating that Brat also attenuates pMad and Dpp signalling range in the early embryo. Together our data serve as a platform for understanding how post-transcriptional repression restricts interpretation of BMPs and other cell signals in order to allow robust cell fate patterning during development.

  3. Pol I Transcription and Pre-rRNA Processing Are Coordinated in a Transcription-dependent Manner in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, K.; Gasiorowski, J. Z.; Chen, D.; Gilmore, R.; Norton, J. T.; Wang, C.; Leary, D. J.; Chan, E.K.L.; Dean, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Pre-rRNA synthesis and processing are key steps in ribosome biogenesis. Although recent evidence in yeast suggests that these two processes are coupled, the nature of their association is unclear. In this report, we analyze the coordination between rDNA transcription and pre-rRNA processing in mammalian cells. We found that pol I transcription factor UBF interacts with pre-rRNA processing factors as analyzed by immunoprecipitations, and the association depends on active rRNA synthesis. In addition, injections of plasmids containing the human rDNA promoter and varying lengths of 18S rDNA into HeLa nuclei show that pol I transcription machinery can be recruited to rDNA promoters regardless of the product that is transcribed, whereas subgroups of pre-rRNA processing factors are recruited to plasmids only when specific pre-rRNA fragments are produced. Our observations suggest a model for sequential recruitment of pol I transcription factors and pre-rRNA processing factors to elongating pre-rRNA on an as-needed basis rather than corecruitment to sites of active transcription. PMID:17108330

  4. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  5. Limited temperature-sensitive transactivation by mutant adenovirus type 2 E1a proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fahnestock, M L; Lewis, J B

    1989-01-01

    A series of linker-scanning and deletion mutations was generated in the transactivating domain of the larger, 289-amino-acid-residue E1a protein of adenovirus type 2. Mutant genes were recombined into virus to assay the ability of the variant E1a proteins to activate expression of an E1a-dependent viral gene during infection. Results of assays performed at 32, 37, and 40 degrees C indicated that at least 2 of the 10 mutants tested showed limited temperature sensitivity for transactivation. Images PMID:2523001

  6. Nuclear Dynamics of BRCA1-Dependent Transcription Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    are ligand- and domain-dependent Z. Dave Sharp1,*, Maureen G. Mancini2,*, Cruz A. Hinojos2,*, Fangyan Dai2, Valeria Berno2, Adam T. Szafran2, Kelly P... Barron et al., 1989; Cao et al., 1987; Crenshaw et al., 1989; Day et al., 1990; Howard and Maurer, 1995; Ingraham et al., 1990; Mangalam et al., 1989...References Barron , E. A., Cao, Z., Schneider, B. G., Kraig, E., Carrillo, A. J. and Sharp, Z. D. (1989). Dual functions of a cis-acting element within the

  7. Chronic Mild Stress Modulates Activity-Dependent Transcription of BDNF in Rat Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Raffaella; Rossetti, Andrea C; Savino, Elisa; Racagni, Giorgio; Calabrese, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Although activity-dependent transcription represents a crucial mechanism for long-lasting experience-dependent changes in the hippocampus, limited data exist on its contribution to pathological conditions. We aim to investigate the influence of chronic stress on the activity-dependent transcription of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The ex vivo methodology of acute stimulation of hippocampal slices obtained from rats exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS) was used to evaluate whether the adverse experience may alter activity-dependent BDNF gene expression. CMS reduces BDNF expression and that acute depolarization significantly upregulates total BDNF mRNA levels only in control animals, showing that CMS exposure may alter BDNF transcription under basal conditions and during neuronal activation. Moreover, while the basal effect of CMS on total BDNF reflects parallel modulations of all the transcripts examined, isoform-specific changes were found after depolarization. This different effect was also observed in the activation of intracellular signaling pathways related to the neurotrophin. In conclusion, our study discloses a functional alteration of BDNF transcription as a consequence of stress. Being the activity-regulated transcription a critical process in synaptic and neuronal plasticity, the different regulation of individual BDNF promoters may contribute to long-lasting changes, which are fundamental for the vulnerability of the hippocampus to stress-related diseases.

  8. Transcription factor Runx3 regulates interleukin-15-dependent natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Levanon, Ditsa; Negreanu, Varda; Lotem, Joseph; Bone, Karen Rae; Brenner, Ori; Leshkowitz, Dena; Groner, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer cells belong to the family of innate lymphoid cells comprising the frontline defense against infected and transformed cells. Development and activation of natural killer cells is highly dependent on interleukin-15 signaling. However, very little is known about the transcription program driving this process. The transcription factor Runx3 is highly expressed in natural killer cells, but its function in these cells is largely unknown. We show that loss of Runx3 impaired interleukin-15-dependent accumulation of mature natural killer cells in vivo and under culture conditions and pregnant Runx3(-/-) mice completely lack the unique population of interleukin-15-dependent uterine natural killer cells. Combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of wild-type versus Runx3-deficient in vivo activated splenic natural killer cells revealed that Runx3 cooperates with ETS and T-box transcription factors to drive the interleukin-15-mediated transcription program during activation of these cells. Runx3 functions as a nuclear regulator during interleukin-15-dependent activation of natural killer cells by regulating the expression of genes involved in proliferation, maturation, and migration. Similar studies with additional transcription factors will allow the construction of a more detailed transcriptional network that controls natural killer cell development and function.

  9. The Sm-like RNA chaperone Hfq mediates transcription antitermination at Rho-dependent terminators

    PubMed Central

    Rabhi, Makhlouf; Espéli, Olivier; Schwartz, Annie; Cayrol, Bastien; Rahmouni, A Rachid; Arluison, Véronique; Boudvillain, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the essential motor protein Rho promotes transcription termination in a tightly controlled manner that is not fully understood. Here, we show that the general post-transcriptional regulatory protein Hfq associates with Rho to regulate Rho function. The Hfq:Rho complex can be further stabilized by RNA bridging both factors in a configuration that inhibits the ATP hydrolysis and duplex unwinding activities of Rho and that mediates transcription antitermination at Rho-dependent terminators in vitro and in vivo. Antitermination at a prototypical terminator (λtR1) requires Hfq binding to an A/U-rich transcript region directly upstream from the terminator. Antitermination is modulated by trans-acting factors (NusG or nucleic acid competitors) that affect Hfq association with Rho or RNA. These data unveil a new Hfq function and a novel transcription regulatory mechanism with potentially important implications for bacterial RNA metabolism, gene silencing, and pathogenicity. PMID:21673658

  10. A mechanism for transcriptional repression dependent on the BRCA1 E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Andrew A; Affar, El Bachir; Heine, George F; Shi, Yang; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2007-04-17

    Loss of function of the tumor suppressor protein BRCA1 is responsible for a high percentage of familial and also sporadic breast cancers. Early work identified a stimulatory transcriptional coactivator function for the BRCA1 protein, and more recently, BRCA1 has been implicated in transcriptional repression, although few examples of repressed genes have been characterized. We recently used an in vitro transcription assay to identify a biochemical mechanism that explained the BRCA1 stimulatory activity. In this study, we identified an ubiquitin-dependent mechanism by which BRCA1 inhibits transcription. BRCA1 ubiquitinates the transcriptional preinitiation complex, preventing stable association of TFIIE and TFIIH, and thus blocks the initiation of mRNA synthesis. What is striking about this mechanism of regulation by BRCA1 is that the ubiquitination of the preinitiation complex is not targeting proteins for degradation by the proteasome, nor are ubiquitin receptors modifying the activity, but rather the ubiquitin moiety itself interferes with the assembly of basal transcription factors at the promoter. Using RNAi to knockdown expression of the endogenous BRCA1 protein, we assessed the level of repression dependent on BRCA1 in the cell, and we found that BRCA1 is at least as significant a transcriptional repressor as it is an activator. These results define a biochemical mechanism by which the BRCA1 enzymatic activity regulates a key cellular process.

  11. INO80-dependent regression of ecdysone-induced transcriptional responses regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Sarah D; Ihry, Robert J; Gruetzmacher, Kelly M; Bashirullah, Arash

    2014-03-15

    Sequential pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone regulate the major developmental transitions in Drosophila, and the duration of each developmental stage is determined by the length of time between ecdysone pulses. Ecdysone regulates biological responses by directly initiating target gene transcription. In turn, these transcriptional responses are known to be self-limiting, with mechanisms in place to ensure regression of hormone-dependent transcription. However, the biological significance of these transcriptional repression mechanisms remains unclear. Here we show that the chromatin remodeling protein INO80 facilitates transcriptional repression of ecdysone-regulated genes during prepupal development. In ino80 mutant animals, inefficient repression of transcriptional responses to the late larval ecdysone pulse delays the onset of the subsequent prepupal ecdysone pulse, resulting in a significantly longer prepupal stage. Conversely, increased expression of ino80 is sufficient to shorten the prepupal stage by increasing the rate of transcriptional repression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing the rate of regression of the mid-prepupal competence factor βFTZ-F1 is sufficient to determine the timing of head eversion and thus the duration of prepupal development. Although ino80 is conserved from yeast to humans, this study represents the first characterization of a bona fide ino80 mutation in any metazoan, raising the possibility that the functions of ino80 in transcriptional repression and developmental timing are evolutionarily conserved.

  12. Silencing E1A mRNA by RNA interference inhibits adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y-S; Kim, M-K; Lee, W-J; Kang, C

    2007-01-01

    The adenovirus family contains 51 human serotypes, and most human adenoviruses cause widespread respiratory tract infections. Adenovirus infections can result in severe complications in some cases, such as in adenovirus type 11 infection in immunocompromised patients. However, effective treatment methods for adenovirus infections are currently unavailable. This prompted the search for antiviral agents effective against adenovirus infections. In the present study, adenovirus E1A was targeted by RNA interference (RNAi) using synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in an attempt to inhibit viral replication, since adenovirus E1A proteins are known to be involved in the transcriptional activation of the viral and cellular genes necessary for controlling the cell cycle and viral replication. The results indicated that the siRNAs effectively reduced the amount of adenovirus E1A mRNA and the levels of replicative intermediates. Additionally, siRNA-mediated gene silencing inhibited adenovirus replication by suppressing the E1A mRNA. These results suggest that the RNAi-mediated targeting of adenovirus E1A may have a potentially therapeutic effect in controlling adenovirus infections.

  13. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Morgan A.; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L.

    2016-01-01

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription. PMID:27334938

  14. Drosophila factor 2, an RNA polymerase II transcript release factor, has DNA-dependent ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z; Price, D

    1997-12-12

    Drosophila factor 2 has been identified as a component of negative transcription elongation factor (N-TEF) that causes the release of RNA polymerase II transcripts in an ATP-dependent manner (Xie, Z. and Price D. H. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 11043-11046). We show here that the transcript release activity of factor 2 requires ATP or dATP and that adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATPgammaS), adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP), or other NTPs do not support the activity. Factor 2 demonstrated a strong DNA-dependent ATPase activity that correlated with its transcript release activity. At 20 microg/ml DNA, the ATPase activity of factor 2 had an apparent Km(ATP) of 28 microM and an estimated Kcat of 140 min-1. Factor 2 caused the release of nascent transcripts associated with elongation complexes generated by RNA polymerase II on a dC-tailed template. Therefore, no other protein cofactors are required for the transcript release activity of factor 2. Using the dC-tailed template assay, it was found that renaturation of the template was required for factor 2 function.

  15. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  16. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-06-07

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin.

  17. DNAPKcs-dependent arrest of RNA polymerase II transcription in the presence of DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Pankotai, Tibor; Bonhomme, Céline; Chen, David; Soutoglou, Evi

    2012-02-12

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair interferes with ongoing cellular processes, including replication and transcription. Although the process of replication stalling upon collision of replication forks with damaged DNA has been extensively studied, the fate of elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) that encounters a DSB is not well understood. We show that the occurrence of a single DSB at a human RNAPII-transcribed gene leads to inhibition of transcription elongation and reinitiation. Upon inhibition of DNA protein kinase (DNAPK), RNAPII bypasses the break and continues transcription elongation, suggesting that it is not the break per se that inhibits the processivity of RNAPII, but the activity of DNAPK. We also show that the mechanism of DNAPK-mediated transcription inhibition involves the proteasome-dependent pathway. The results point to the pivotal role of DNAPK activity in the eviction of RNAPII from DNA upon encountering a DNA lesion.

  18. Concentration- and chromosome-organization-dependent regulator unbinding from DNA for transcription regulation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tai-Yen; Santiago, Ace George; Jung, Won; Krzemiński, Łukasz; Yang, Feng; Martell, Danya J.; Helmann, John D.; Chen, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Binding and unbinding of transcription regulators at operator sites constitute a primary mechanism for gene regulation. While many cellular factors are known to regulate their binding, little is known on how cells can modulate their unbinding for regulation. Using nanometer-precision single-molecule tracking, we study the unbinding kinetics from DNA of two metal-sensing transcription regulators in living Escherichia coli cells. We find that they show unusual concentration-dependent unbinding kinetics from chromosomal recognition sites in both their apo and holo forms. Unexpectedly, their unbinding kinetics further varies with the extent of chromosome condensation, and more surprisingly, varies in opposite ways for their apo-repressor versus holo-activator forms. These findings suggest likely broadly relevant mechanisms for facile switching between transcription activation and deactivation in vivo and in coordinating transcription regulation of resistance genes with the cell cycle. PMID:26145755

  19. Interaction of Adenovirus E1A with the HHV8 Promoter of Latent Genes: E1A Proteins are Able to Activate the HHV-8 LANAp in MV3 Reporter Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koehler-Hansner, Karin; Flore, Ornella; Opalka, Bertram; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma, body cavity-based lymphoma, and Castleman’s disease. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A proteins regulate the activity of cellular and viral promoters/enhancers and transcription factors and can suppress tumorigenicity of human cancers. As (i) HHV-8 and Ad may co-exist in immunocompromised patients and (ii) E1A might be considered as therapeutic transgene for HHV-8-associated neoplasms we investigated whether the promoter of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANAp) controlling expression of vCyclin, vFLIP, and LANA proteins required for latent type infection is regulated by E1A. Transfection experiments in MV3 melanoma cells revealed activation of the LANAp by Ad5 E1A constructs containing an intact N terminus (aa 1-119). In particular, an Ad12 E1A mutant, Spm2, lacking six consecutive alanine residues in the “spacer” region activated the HHV-8 promoter about 15-fold compared to vector controls. In summary, we report the activation of the LANAp by E1A as a novel interaction of E1A with a viral promoter. These data may have relevance for the management of viral infections in immunocompromised patients. A role for E1A as a therapeutic in this context remains to be defined. PMID:19440465

  20. Interaction of Adenovirus E1A with the HHV8 Promoter of Latent Genes: E1A Proteins are Able to Activate the HHV-8 LANAp in MV3 Reporter Cells.

    PubMed

    Koehler-Hansner, Karin; Flore, Ornella; Opalka, Bertram; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, body cavity-based lymphoma, and Castleman's disease. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A proteins regulate the activity of cellular and viral promoters/enhancers and transcription factors and can suppress tumorigenicity of human cancers. As (i) HHV-8 and Ad may co-exist in immunocompromised patients and (ii) E1A might be considered as therapeutic transgene for HHV-8-associated neoplasms we investigated whether the promoter of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANAp) controlling expression of vCyclin, vFLIP, and LANA proteins required for latent type infection is regulated by E1A. Transfection experiments in MV3 melanoma cells revealed activation of the LANAp by Ad5 E1A constructs containing an intact N terminus (aa 1-119). In particular, an Ad12 E1A mutant, Spm2, lacking six consecutive alanine residues in the "spacer" region activated the HHV-8 promoter about 15-fold compared to vector controls. In summary, we report the activation of the LANAp by E1A as a novel interaction of E1A with a viral promoter. These data may have relevance for the management of viral infections in immunocompromised patients. A role for E1A as a therapeutic in this context remains to be defined.

  1. SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling of RNR3 requires TAFIIs and the general transcription machinery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishva Mitra; Li, Bing; Reese, Joseph C.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression requires the recruitment of chromatin remodeling activities and general transcription factors (GTFs) to promoters. Whereas the role of activators in recruiting chromatin remodeling activities has been clearly demonstrated, the contributions of the transcription machinery have not been firmly established. Here we demonstrate that the remodeling of the RNR3 promoter requires a number of GTFs, mediator and RNA polymerase II. We also show that remodeling is dependent upon the SWI/SNF complex, and that TFIID and RNA polymerase II are required for its recruitment to the promoter. In contrast, Gcn5p-dependent histone acetylation occurs independently of TFIID and RNA polymerase II function, and we provide evidence that acetylation increases the extent of nucleosome remodeling, but is not required for SWI/SNF recruitment. Thus, the general transcription machinery can contribute to nucleosome remodeling by mediating the association of SWI/SNF with promoters, thereby revealing a novel pathway for the recruitment of chromatin remodeling activities. PMID:12600943

  2. Lack of dependance of transcription-induced cytosine deaminations on protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mokkapati, Sanath Kumar; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2002-10-31

    Transcription-induced mutations (TIM) is a phenomenon in Escherichia coli in which transcription promotes C to T and other mutations in a strand-specific manner. Because the processes of transcription and translation are coupled in prokaryotes and some models regarding creating a hypermutagenic state in E. coli require new protein synthesis, we tested the possibility that TIM was dependent on efficient synthesis of proteins. We used puromycin to reversibly inhibit protein synthesis and found that it had little effect on mRNA synthesis, plasmid copy-number or TIM. Our results show that TIM is not dependent on efficient translation of mRNA and this helps eliminate certain models concerning the mechanism underlying TIM.

  3. A p53-independent apoptotic mechanism of adenoviral mutant E1A was involved in its selective antitumor activity for human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Zhao, Jingjing; Ge, Yan; Zhu, Qi; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-01-01

    The conserved regions (CR) of adenoviral E1A had been shown to be necessary for disruption of pRb-E2F transcription factor complexes and induction of the S phase. Here we constructed a mutant adenoviral E1A with Rb-binding ability absent (E1A 30-60aa and 120-127aa deletion, mE1A) and investigated its antitumor capacities in vitro and in vivo. The mE1A suppressed the viability of tumor cells as efficiently as the wild type E1A, and there was no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Although the mE1A arrested tumor cell cycle with the same manner as E1A, the former played a different role on cell cycle regulation compared with E1A in normal cells, which might contribute to its selective antitumor activity. E1A and mE1A had accumulated inactive p53, decreased the expression of mdm2, Cdkn1a (also named p21), increased p21's nuclear distribution and induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpent manner. Further, E1A or mE1A significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft models. Especially, tumor-bearing mice treated with mE1A had higher survival rate than those treated with E1A. Our data demonstrated that mutant adenoviral E1A significantly induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpednt manner and had selective tumor suppressing ability. The observations of adenoviral E1A mutant had provided a novel mechanism for E1A's complex activities during infection. PMID:27340782

  4. The degradation sequence of adenovirus E1A consists of the amino-terminal tetrapeptide Met-Arg-His-Ile.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R; Richter, J D

    1990-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A gene product is a potent transcriptional activator and nuclear oncoprotein. Like other regulatory proteins, E1A has a short half-life, in the range of 30 to 120 min. This short half-life, which was measured in cells synthesizing E1A, is not observed in cells injected with E1A protein made in bacteria or in vitro. In these cases, E1A is essentially refractory to degradation. In an attempt to reconcile this apparent paradox, we suggested that E1A was marked for degradation during its synthesis. Furthermore, we showed that a domain in the amino terminus of E1A was required for rapid degradation in cells translating E1A mRNA (J. M. Slavicek, N. C. Jones, and J. D. Richter, EMBO J. 7:3171-3180, 1988). In this study, we have used Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with mRNAs encoding altered E1A proteins to show that the amino-terminal tetrapeptide Met-Arg-His-Ile is required for E1A degradation. Even conservative amino acid substitutions in this degradation sequence render it nonfunctional. This degradation sequence can function as a transferable signal, since it induces instability when fused to another normally stable protein. Furthermore, the degradation sequence requires a proximity of no more than six residues from the amino terminus for activity. These data suggest that a trans-acting factor recognizes the amino terminus of E1A during the translation of its message to mark the protein for subsequent destruction. Images PMID:2146491

  5. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-04-28

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  6. Transcription-dependent generation of a specialized chromatin structure at the TCRβ locus.

    PubMed

    Zacarías-Cabeza, Joaquin; Belhocine, Mohamed; Vanhille, Laurent; Cauchy, Pierre; Koch, Frederic; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Fenouil, Romain; Bergon, Aurélie; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Eick, Dirk; Imbert, Jean; Ferrier, Pierre; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Spicuglia, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    V(D)J recombination assembles Ag receptor genes during lymphocyte development. Enhancers at AR loci are known to control V(D)J recombination at associated alleles, in part by increasing chromatin accessibility of the locus, to allow the recombination machinery to gain access to its chromosomal substrates. However, whether there is a specific mechanism to induce chromatin accessibility at AR loci is still unclear. In this article, we highlight a specialized epigenetic marking characterized by high and extended H3K4me3 levels throughout the Dβ-Jβ-Cβ gene segments. We show that extended H3K4 trimethylation at the Tcrb locus depends on RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-mediated transcription. Furthermore, we found that the genomic regions encompassing the two DJCβ clusters are highly enriched for Ser(5)-phosphorylated Pol II and short-RNA transcripts, two hallmarks of transcription initiation and early transcription. Of interest, these features are shared with few other tissue-specific genes. We propose that the entire DJCβ regions behave as transcription "initiation" platforms, therefore linking a specialized mechanism of Pol II transcription with extended H3K4 trimethylation and highly accessible Dβ and Jβ gene segments.

  7. Growth phase-dependent transcription of the Streptomyces ramocissimus tuf1 gene occurs from two promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, L N; van Wezel, G P; Bibb, M J; Kraal, B

    1997-01-01

    The str operon of Streptomyces ramocissimus contains the genes for ribosomal proteins S12 (rpsL) and S7 (rpsG) and for the polypeptide chain elongation factors G (EF-G) (fus) and Tu (EF-Tu) (tuf). This kirromycin producer contains three tuf or tuf-like genes; tuf1 encodes the regular EF-Tu and is located immediately downstream of fus. In vivo and in vitro transcription analysis revealed a transcription start site directly upstream of S. ramocissimus tuf1, in addition to the operon promoter rpsLp. Transcription from these promoters appeared to be growth phase dependent, diminishing drastically upon entry into stationary phase and at the onset of production of the EF-Tu-targeted antibiotic kirromycin. In surface-grown cultures, a second round of tuf1 transcription, coinciding with aerial mycelium formation and kirromycin production, was observed. The tuf1-specific promoter (tuf1p) was located in the intercistronic region between fus and tuf1 by high-resolution S1 mapping, in vitro transcription, and in vivo promoter probing. During logarithmic growth, the tuf1p and rpsLp transcripts are present at comparable levels. In contrast to Escherichia coli, which has two almost identical tuf genes, the gram-positive S. ramocissimus contains only tuf1 for its regular EF-Tu. High levels of EF-Tu may therefore be achieved by the compensatory activity of tuf1p. PMID:9171408

  8. Epigenetic repression of ribosomal RNA transcription by ROCK-dependent aberrant cytoskeletal organization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tse-Hsiang; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    It is known that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis is regulated by cellular energy and proliferation status. In this study, we investigated rRNA gene transcription in response to cytoskeletal stress. Our data revealed that the cell shape constrained by isotropic but not elongated micropatterns in HeLa cells led to a significant reduction in rRNA transcription dependent on ROCK. Expression of a dominant-active form of ROCK also repressed rRNA transcription. Isotropic constraint and ROCK over-activation led to different types of aberrant F-actin organization, but their suppression effects on rRNA transcription were similarly reversed by inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) or overexpression of a dominant negative form of Nesprin, which shields the signal transmitted from actin filament to the nuclear interior. We further showed that the binding of HDAC1 to the active fraction of rDNA genes is increased by ROCK over-activation, thus reducing H3K9/14 acetylation and suppressing transcription. Our results demonstrate an epigenetic control of active rDNA genes that represses rRNA transcription in response to the cytoskeletal stress. PMID:27350000

  9. An RNA motif advances transcription by preventing Rho-dependent termination

    PubMed Central

    Sevostyanova, Anastasia; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription termination factor Rho associates with most nascent bacterial RNAs as they emerge from RNA polymerase. However, pharmacological inhibition of Rho derepresses only a small fraction of these transcripts. What, then, determines the specificity of Rho-dependent transcription termination? We now report the identification of a Rho-antagonizing RNA element (RARE) that hinders Rho-dependent transcription termination. We establish that RARE traps Rho in an inactive complex but does not prevent Rho binding to its recruitment sites. Although translating ribosomes normally block Rho access to an mRNA, inefficient translation of an open reading frame in the leader region of the Salmonella mgtCBR operon actually enables transcription of its associated coding region by favoring an RNA conformation that sequesters RARE. The discovery of an RNA element that inactivates Rho signifies that the specificity of nucleic-acid binding proteins is defined not only by the sequences that recruit these proteins but also by sequences that antagonize their activity. PMID:26630006

  10. Cks1-dependent proteasome recruitment and activation of CDC20 transcription in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, May C; Kaiser, Peter; Rudyak, Stanislav; Baskerville, Chris; Watson, Mark H; Reed, Steven I

    2003-06-26

    Cks proteins are small evolutionarily conserved proteins that interact genetically and physically with cyclin-dependent kinases. However, in spite of a large body of genetic, biochemical and structural research, no compelling unifying model of their functions has emerged. Here we show, by investigating the essential role of Cks1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that the protein is primarily involved in promoting mitosis by modulating the transcriptional activation of the APC/C protein-ubiquitin ligase activator Cdc20. Cks1 is required for both the periodic dissociation of Cdc28 kinase from the CDC20 promoter and the periodic association of the proteasome with the promoter. We propose that the essential role of Cks1 is to recruit the proteasome to, and/or dissociate the Cdc28 kinase from, the CDC20 promoter, thus facilitating transcription by remodelling transcriptional complexes or chromatin associated with the CDC20 gene.

  11. High initiation rates at the ribosomal gene promoter do not depend upon spacer transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Labhart, P; Reeder, R H

    1989-01-01

    We report experiments that test the model that in Xenopus laevis, RNA polymerase I is "handed over" in a conservative fashion from the T3 terminator to the adjacent gene promoter. We have introduced transcription-terminating lesions into the ribosomal DNA repeat by irradiating cultured cells with ultraviolet light. We used isolated nuclei to measure the effect of such lesions on transcription. UV damage sufficient to prevent all elongating RNA polymerase from reaching T3 from upstream had no adverse effect on the density of RNA polymerase at the very 5' end of the gene. We conclude that high rates of transcription initiation at the gene promoter do not depend upon polymerase passing from one repeat to the next or on polymerase initiating at the spacer promoters. Images PMID:2470092

  12. Initiator-dependent transcription in vitro by a wheat germ chromatin extract.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, P; Mösinger, E

    1994-04-01

    The development of plant in vitro transcription systems transcribing faithfully and efficiently from a broad range of plant nuclear promoters has remained a challenge. We examined the nucleotide sequence requirements for faithful and efficient transcription in a wheat germ chromatin extract (Yamazaki et al., Plant Mol Biol Rep 8: 114-123). The wheat germ chromatin extract was tested with a series of chimeric promoter constructs containing plant promoter sequences upstream from the TATA box, TATA boxes, and cap-site sequences (from -10 to +14, relative to the major in vivo initiation site) in different combinations. The plant extract transcribed faithfully from several chimeric promoters containing the capsite sequence of the parsley chalcone synthase promoter. The transcription was sensitive to the RNA polymerase II-specific inhibitor alpha-amanitin and was only dependent on the chalcone synthase cap-site sequence which therefore fulfils the operational criteria for a plant initiator element. Mutations of the putative chalcone synthase initiator element defined a core sequence '5'TAACAAC' around the initiation site that was necessary for efficient transcription in vitro. In contrast to the extract, purified wheat germ RNA polymerase II showed no preference for transcription from the major chalcone synthase in vivo initiation site.

  13. Fluorescence circadian imaging reveals a PDF-dependent transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila molecular clock

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Virginie; Vienne, Ludovic; Nunes, José Manuel; Rosbash, Michael; Nagoshi, Emi

    2017-01-01

    Circadian locomotor behaviour is controlled by a pacemaker circuit composed of clock-containing neurons. To interrogate the mechanistic relationship between the molecular clockwork and network communication critical to the operation of the Drosophila circadian pacemaker circuit, we established new fluorescent circadian reporters that permit single-cell recording of transcriptional and post-transcriptional rhythms in brain explants and cultured neurons. Live-imaging experiments combined with pharmacological and genetic manipulations demonstrate that the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) amplifies the molecular rhythms via time-of-day- and activity-dependent upregulation of transcription from E-box-containing clock gene promoters within key pacemaker neurons. The effect of PDF on clock gene transcription and the known role of PDF in enhancing PER/TIM stability occur via independent pathways downstream of the PDF receptor, the former through a cAMP-independent mechanism and the latter through a cAMP-PKA dependent mechanism. These results confirm and extend the mechanistic understanding of the role of PDF in controlling the synchrony of the pacemaker neurons. More broadly, our results establish the utility of the new live-imaging tools for the study of molecular-neural interactions important for the operation of the circadian pacemaker circuit. PMID:28134281

  14. Drosophila Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Multiple Regulators of HIF–Dependent Transcription in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dekanty, Andrés; Romero, Nuria M.; Bertolin, Agustina P.; Thomas, María G.; Leishman, Claudia C.; Perez-Perri, Joel I.; Boccaccio, Graciela L.; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of evolutionary conserved alpha-beta heterodimeric transcription factors that induce a wide range of genes in response to low oxygen tension. Molecular mechanisms that mediate oxygen-dependent HIF regulation operate at the level of the alpha subunit, controlling protein stability, subcellular localization, and transcriptional coactivator recruitment. We have conducted an unbiased genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells aimed to the identification of genes required for HIF activity. After 3 rounds of selection, 30 genes emerged as critical HIF regulators in hypoxia, most of which had not been previously associated with HIF biology. The list of genes includes components of chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription elongation factors, and translational regulators. One remarkable hit was the argonaute 1 (ago1) gene, a central element of the microRNA (miRNA) translational silencing machinery. Further studies confirmed the physiological role of the miRNA machinery in HIF–dependent transcription. This study reveals the occurrence of novel mechanisms of HIF regulation, which might contribute to developing novel strategies for therapeutic intervention of HIF–related pathologies, including heart attack, cancer, and stroke. PMID:20585616

  15. Tamoxifen-regulated adenoviral E1A chimeras for the control of tumor selective oncolytic adenovirus replication in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sipo, I; Wang, X; Hurtado Picó, A; Suckau, L; Weger, S; Poller, W; Fechner, H

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological control is a desirable safety feature of oncolytic adenoviruses (oAdV). It has recently been shown that oAdV replication may be controlled by drug-dependent transcriptional regulation of E1A expression. Here, we present a novel concept that relies on tamoxifen-dependent regulation of E1A activity through functional linkage to the mutated hormone-binding domain of the murine estrogen receptor (Mer). Four different E1A-Mer chimeras (ME, EM, E(DeltaNLS)M, MEM) were constructed and inserted into the adenoviral genome under control of a lung-specific surfactant protein B promoter. The highest degree of regulation in vitro was seen for the corresponding oAdVs Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM, which exhibited an up to 100-fold higher oAdV replication in the presence as compared with the absence of 4-OH-tamoxifen. Moreover, destruction of nontarget cells was six- and 13-fold reduced for Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM, respectively, as compared with Ad.E. Further investigations supported tamoxifen-dependent regulation of Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM in vivo. Induction of Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M inhibited growth of H441 lung tumors as efficient as a control oAdV expressing E1A. E(DeltaNLS)M and the MEM chimeras can be easily inserted into a single vector genome, which extends their application to existing oAdVs and strongly facilitates in vivo application.

  16. NusA-dependent transcription termination prevents misregulation of global gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Smarajit; Yakhnin, Alexander V.; Sebastian, Aswathy; Albert, Istvan; Babitzke, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic transcription terminators consist of an RNA hairpin followed by a U-rich tract, and these signals can trigger termination without the involvement of additional factors. Although NusA is known to stimulate intrinsic termination in vitro, the in vivo targets and global impact of NusA are not known because it is essential for viability. Using genome-wide 3′ end-mapping on an engineered Bacillus subtilis NusA depletion strain, we show that weak suboptimal terminators are the principle NusA substrates. Moreover, a subclass of weak non-canonical terminators was identified that completely depend on NusA for effective termination. NusA-dependent terminators tend to have weak hairpins and/or distal U-tract interruptions, supporting a model in which NusA is directly involved in the termination mechanism. Depletion of NusA altered global gene expression directly and indirectly via readthrough of suboptimal terminators. Readthrough of NusA-dependent terminators caused misregulation of genes involved in essential cellular functions, especially DNA replication and metabolism. We further show that nusA is autoregulated by a transcription attenuation mechanism that does not rely on antiterminator structures. Instead, NusA-stimulated termination in its 5′ UTR dictates the extent of transcription into the operon, thereby ensuring tight control of cellular NusA levels. PMID:27571753

  17. Targeting GLI by GANT61 involves mechanisms dependent on inhibition of both transcription and DNA licensing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruowen; Wu, Jiahui; Ferrandon, Sylvain; Glowacki, Katie J.; Houghton, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    The GLI genes are transcription factors and in cancers are oncogenes, aberrantly and constitutively activated. GANT61, a specific GLI inhibitor, has induced extensive cytotoxicity in human models of colon cancer. The FOXM1 promoter was determined to be a transcriptional target of GLI1. In HT29 cells, inhibition of GLI1 binding at the GLI consensus sequence by GANT61 led to inhibited binding of Pol II, the pause-release factors DSIF, NELF and p-TEFb. The formation of R-loops (RNA:DNA hybrids, ssDNA), were reduced by GANT61 at the FOXM1 promoter. Pretreatment of HT29 cells with α-amanitin reduced GANT61-induced γH2AX foci. Co-localization of GLI1 and BrdU foci, inhibited by GANT61, indicated GLI1 and DNA replication to be linked. By co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, GLI1 co-localized with the DNA licensing factors ORC4, CDT1, and MCM2. Significant co-localization of GLI1 and ORC4 was inhibited by GANT61, and enrichment of ORC4 occurred at the GLI binding site in the FOXM1 promoter. CDT1 was found to be a transcription target of GLI1. Overexpression of CDT1 in HT29 and SW480 cells reduced GANT61-induced cell death, gH2AX foci, and cleavage of caspase-3. Data demonstrate involvement of transcription and of DNA replication licensing factors by non-transcriptional and transcriptional mechanisms in the GLI-dependent mechanism of action of GANT61. PMID:27863397

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rajesh K; Murray, Thomas V A; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M; Brewer, Alison C

    2016-01-22

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production.

  19. β-Catenin-dependent transcription is central to Bmp-mediated formation of venous vessels.

    PubMed

    Kashiwada, Takeru; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Terai, Kenta; Tanaka, Toru; Wakayama, Yuki; Ando, Koji; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hajime; Yuge, Shinya; Saito, Yoshinobu; Gemma, Akihiko; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2015-02-01

    β-catenin regulates the transcription of genes involved in diverse biological processes, including embryogenesis, tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Endothelial cell (EC)-specific gene-targeting analyses in mice have revealed that β-catenin is required for vascular development. However, the precise function of β-catenin-mediated gene regulation in vascular development is not well understood, since β-catenin regulates not only gene expression but also the formation of cell-cell junctions. To address this question, we have developed a novel transgenic zebrafish line that allows the visualization of β-catenin transcriptional activity specifically in ECs and discovered that β-catenin-dependent transcription is central to the bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp)-mediated formation of venous vessels. During caudal vein (CV) formation, Bmp induces the expression of aggf1, a putative causative gene for Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, which is characterized by venous malformation and hypertrophy of bones and soft tissues. Subsequently, Aggf1 potentiates β-catenin transcriptional activity by acting as a transcriptional co-factor, suggesting that Bmp evokes β-catenin-mediated gene expression through Aggf1 expression. Bmp-mediated activation of β-catenin induces the expression of Nr2f2 (also known as Coup-TFII), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, to promote the differentiation of venous ECs, thereby contributing to CV formation. Furthermore, β-catenin stimulated by Bmp promotes the survival of venous ECs, but not that of arterial ECs. Collectively, these results indicate that Bmp-induced activation of β-catenin through Aggf1 regulates CV development by promoting the Nr2f2-dependent differentiation of venous ECs and their survival. This study demonstrates, for the first time, a crucial role of β-catenin-mediated gene expression in the development of venous vessels.

  20. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Rajesh K.; Murray, Thomas V. A.; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R.; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2016-01-01

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production. PMID:26620565

  1. The t(8;21) fusion protein interferes with AML-1B-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S; Lenny, N; Hiebert, S W

    1995-01-01

    The AML-1/CBF beta transcription factor complex is targeted by both the t(8;21) and the inv(16) chromosomal alterations, which are frequently observed in acute myelogenous leukemia. AML-1 is a site-specific DNA-binding protein that recognizes the enhancer core motif TGTGGT. The t(8;21) translocation fuses the first 177 amino acids of AML-1 to MTG8 (also known as ETO), generating a chimeric protein that retains the DNA-binding domain of AML-1. Analysis of endogenous AML-1 DNA-binding complexes suggested the presence of at least two AML-1 isoforms. Accordingly, we screened a human B-cell cDNA library and isolated a larger, potentially alternatively spliced, form of AML1, termed AML1B. AML-1B is a protein of 53 kDa that binds to a consensus AML-1-binding site and complexes with CBF beta. Subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrated that both AML-1 and AML-1/ETO are efficiently extracted from the nucleus under ionic conditions but that AML-1B is localized to a salt-resistant nuclear compartment. Analysis of the transcriptional activities of AML-1, AML-1B, and AML-1/ETO demonstrated that only AML-1B activates transcription from the T-cell receptor beta enhancer. Mixing experiments indicated that AML-1/ETO can efficiently block AML-1B-dependent transcriptional activation, suggesting that the t(8;21) translocation creates a dominant interfering protein. PMID:7891692

  2. Chromatin-dependent regulation of RNA polymerases II and III activity throughout the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Jordán-Pla, Antonio; Gupta, Ishaan; de Miguel-Jiménez, Lola; Steinmetz, Lars M; Chávez, Sebastián; Pelechano, Vicent; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2015-01-01

    The particular behaviour of eukaryotic RNA polymerases along different gene regions and amongst distinct gene functional groups is not totally understood. To cast light onto the alternative active or backtracking states of RNA polymerase II, we have quantitatively mapped active RNA polymerases at a high resolution following a new biotin-based genomic run-on (BioGRO) technique. Compared with conventional profiling with chromatin immunoprecipitation, the analysis of the BioGRO profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that RNA polymerase II has unique activity profiles at both gene ends, which are highly dependent on positioned nucleosomes. This is the first demonstration of the in vivo influence of positioned nucleosomes on transcription elongation. The particular features at the 5' end and around the polyadenylation site indicate that this polymerase undergoes extensive specific-activity regulation in the initial and final transcription elongation phases. The genes encoding for ribosomal proteins show distinctive features at both ends. BioGRO also provides the first nascentome analysis for RNA polymerase III, which indicates that transcription of tRNA genes is poorly regulated at the individual copy level. The present study provides a novel perspective of the transcription cycle that incorporates inactivation/reactivation as an important aspect of RNA polymerase dynamics.

  3. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Eugenio Gómez; Segard, Stéphane; Charavay, Céline; Parcy, François

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus) based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM) formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade.

  4. A Land Plant-Specific Transcription Factor Directly Enhances Transcription of a Pathogenic Noncoding RNA Template by DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase II[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jie; Ji, Shaoyi; Wallace, Andrew J.; Wu, Jian; Li, Yi; Gopalan, Venkat; Ding, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Some DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (DdRPs) possess RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity, as was first discovered in the replication of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) RNA genome in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Recent studies revealed that this activity in bacteria and mammals is important for transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms. Here, we used PSTVd as a model to uncover auxiliary factors essential for RNA-templated transcription by DdRP. PSTVd replication in the nucleoplasm generates (−)-PSTVd intermediates and (+)-PSTVd copies. We found that the Nicotiana benthamiana canonical 9-zinc finger (ZF) Transcription Factor IIIA (TFIIIA-9ZF) as well as its variant TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (+)-PSTVd, but only TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (−)-PSTVd. Suppression of TFIIIA-7ZF reduced PSTVd replication, and overexpression of TFIIIA-7ZF enhanced PSTVd replication in planta. Consistent with the locale of PSTVd replication, TFIIIA-7ZF was found in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus, in contrast to the strictly nucleolar localization of TFIIIA-9ZF. Footprinting assays revealed that only TFIIIA-7ZF bound to a region of PSTVd critical for initiating transcription. Furthermore, TFIIIA-7ZF strongly enhanced the in vitro transcription of circular (+)-PSTVd by partially purified Pol II. Together, our results identify TFIIIA-7ZF as a dedicated cellular transcription factor that acts in DdRP-catalyzed RNA-templated transcription, highlighting both the extraordinary evolutionary adaptation of viroids and the potential of DdRPs for a broader role in cellular processes. PMID:27113774

  5. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching; Yen, Pauline H.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  6. Langerhans cells are generated by two distinct PU.1-dependent transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Michaël; Seillet, Cyril; Chevrier, Stéphane; Wu, Li; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Belz, Gabrielle T; Nutt, Stephen L

    2013-12-16

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the unique dendritic cells found in the epidermis. While a great deal of attention has focused on defining the developmental origins of LCs, reports addressing the transcriptional network ruling their differentiation remain sparse. We addressed the function of a group of key DC transcription factors-PU.1, ID2, IRF4, and IRF8-in the establishment of the LC network. We show that although steady-state LC homeostasis depends on PU.1 and ID2, the latter is dispensable for bone marrow-derived LCs. PU.1 controls LC differentiation by regulating the expression of the critical TGF-β responsive transcription factor RUNX3. PU.1 directly binds to the Runx3 regulatory elements in a TGF-β-dependent manner, whereas ectopic expression of RUNX3 rescued LC differentiation in the absence of PU.1 and promoted LC differentiation from PU.1-sufficient progenitors. These findings highlight the dual molecular network underlying LC differentiation, and show the central role of PU.1 in these processes.

  7. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  8. Erythroblast transformation by FLI-1 depends upon its specific DNA binding and transcriptional activation properties.

    PubMed

    Ano, Sabine; Pereira, Rui; Pironin, Martine; Lesault, Isabelle; Milley, Caroline; Lebigot, Ingrid; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2004-01-23

    FLI-1 is a transcriptional regulator of the ETS family of proteins. Insertional activation at the FLI-1 locus is an early event in F-murine leukemia virus-induced erythroleukemia. Consistent with its essential role in erythroid transformation, enforced expression of FLI-1 in primary erythroblasts strongly impairs the response of these cells to erythropoietin (Epo), a cytokine essential to erythropoiesis. We show here that point mutations in the ETS domain that abolished FLI-1 binding to specific DNA elements (ETS-binding sites) suppressed the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. The exchange of the entire ETS domain (DNA binding domain) of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 changed the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 and impaired FLI-1 transforming properties. In contrast, ETS domain swapping mutants that maintained the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 did not affect the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. Deletion and swapping mutants that failed to inhibit the DNA binding activity of FLI-1 but impaired its transcriptional activation properties were also transformation-defective. Taken together, these results show that both the ability of FLI-1 to inhibit Epo-induced differentiation of erythroblasts and to confer enhanced cell survival in the absence of Epo critically depend upon FLI-1 ETS-binding site-dependent transcriptional activation properties.

  9. Infrequently transcribed long genes depend on the Set2/Rpd3S pathway for accurate transcription

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Gogol, Madelaine; Carey, Mike; Pattenden, Samantha G.; Seidel, Chris; Workman, Jerry L.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of Set2-mediated methylation of H3K36 (K36me) correlates with transcription frequency throughout the yeast genome. K36me targets the Rpd3S complex to deacetylate transcribed regions and suppress cryptic transcription initiation at certain genes. Here, using a genome-wide approach, we report that the Set2–Rpd3S pathway is generally required for controlling acetylation at coding regions. When using acetylation as a functional readout for this pathway, we discovered that longer genes and, surprisingly, genes transcribed at lower frequency exhibit a stronger dependency. Moreover, a systematic screen using high-resolution tiling microarrays allowed us to identify a group of genes that rely on Set2–Rpd3S to suppress spurious transcripts. Interestingly, most of these genes are within the group that depend on the same pathway to maintain a hypoacetylated state at coding regions. These data highlight the importance of using the functional readout of histone codes to define the roles of specific pathways. PMID:17545470

  10. CREB-Dependent Regulation of GAD65 Transcription by BDNF/TrkB in Cortical Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Huertas, Carlos; Rico, Beatriz

    2011-04-01

    In the cerebral cortex, the functional output of projection neurons is fine-tuned by inhibitory neurons present in the network, which use γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their main neurotransmitter. Previous studies have suggested that the expression levels of the rate-limiting GABA synthetic enzyme, GAD65, depend on brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/TrkB activation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this neurotrophic factor and its receptor controls GABA synthesis are still unknown. Here, we show a direct regulation of the GAD65 gene by BDNF-TrkB signaling via CREB in cortical interneurons. Conditional ablation of TrkB in cortical interneurons causes a cell-autonomous decrease in the synaptically enriched GAD65 protein and its transcripts levels, suggesting that transcriptional regulation of the GAD65 gene is altered. Dissection of the intracellular pathway that underlies this process revealed that BDNF/TrkB signaling controls the transcription of GAD65 in a Ras-ERK-CREB-dependent manner. Our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism through which BDNF/TrkB signaling may modulate the maturation and function of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  11. IKK{epsilon} modulates RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu Tianshuang; Liao Suiling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-12-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical I{kappa}B kinase (IKK){epsilon} in modulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKK{epsilon} activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKK{epsilon} results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKK{epsilon} regulates viral-induced cellular signaling.

  12. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent activation of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription by 3-methylcholanthrene.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Jonathan M; Waxman, David J

    2006-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that stimulates transcription directed by xenobiotic response elements upstream of target genes. Recently, AhR ligands were reported to induce formation of an AhR-estrogen receptor (ER) complex, which can bind to estrogen response elements (EREs) and stimulate transcription of ER target genes. Presently, we investigate the effect of the AhR ligands 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (BZ126) on ERE-regulated luciferase reporter activity and endogenous ER target gene expression. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, 3MC induced transcription of ER reporter genes containing native promoter sequences of the ER-responsive genes complement 3 and pS2 and heterologous promoters regulated by isolated EREs. Dose-response studies revealed that the concentration of 3MC required to half-maximally activate transcription (EC(50)) was >100-fold higher for an ER reporter (27-57 muM) than for an AhR reporter (86-250 nM) in both MCF-7 cells and in human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells. 3MC also stimulated expression of the endogenous ER target genes amphiregulin, cathepsin D and progesterone receptor, albeit to a much lower extent than was achieved following stimulation with 17beta-estradiol. In Ishikawa cells, 3MC, but not BZ126 or TCDD, stimulated ERalpha-dependent reporter activity but did not induce expression of endogenous ER target genes. Finally, studies carried out in the AhR-positive rat hepatoma cell line 5L and the AhR-deficient variant BP8 demonstrated that ER reporter activity could be induced by 3MC in a manner that was independent of AhR and thus distinct from the AhR-ER 'hijacking' mechanism described recently. 3MC may thus elicit estrogenic activity by multiple mechanisms.

  13. Tumor Suppressor Cylindromatosis (CYLD) Controls HIV Transcription in an NF-κB-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Manganaro, Lara; Pache, Lars; Herrmann, Tobias; Marlett, John; Hwang, Young; Murry, Jeffrey; Miorin, Lisa; Ting, Adrian T.; König, Renate; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bushman, Frederic D.; Chanda, Sumit K.; Young, John A. T.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Characterizing the cellular factors that play a role in the HIV replication cycle is fundamental to fully understanding mechanisms of viral replication and pathogenesis. Whole-genome small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens have identified positive and negative regulators of HIV replication, providing starting points for investigating new cellular factors. We report here that silencing of the deubiquitinase cylindromatosis protein (CYLD), increases HIV infection by enhancing HIV long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven transcription via the NF-κB pathway. CYLD is highly expressed in CD4+ T lymphocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages, and dendritic cells. We found that CYLD silencing increases HIV replication in T cell lines. We confirmed the positive role of CYLD silencing in HIV infection in primary human CD4+ T cells, in which CYLD protein was partially processed upon activation. Lastly, Jurkat T cells latently infected with HIV (JLat cells) were more responsive to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) reactivation in the absence of CYLD, indicating that CYLD activity could play a role in HIV reactivation from latency. In summary, we show that CYLD acts as a potent negative regulator of HIV mRNA expression by specifically inhibiting NF-κB-driven transcription. These findings suggest a function for this protein in modulating productive viral replication as well as in viral reactivation. IMPORTANCE HIV transcription is regulated by a number of host cell factors. Here we report that silencing of the lysine 63 deubiquitinase CYLD increases HIV transcription in an NF-κB-dependent manner. We show that CYLD is expressed in HIV target cells and that its silencing increases HIV infection in transformed T cell lines as well as primary CD4+ T cells. Similarly, reactivation of latent provirus was facilitated in the absence of CYLD. These data suggest that CYLD, which is highly expressed in CD4+ T cells, can control HIV transcription in productive infection as well as during

  14. Structure and ANR-dependent transcription of the nir genes for denitrification from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Arai, H; Igarashi, Y; Kodama, T

    1994-07-01

    In the denitrification gene cluster from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an operon encoding three open reading frames (nirQ, ORF2, ORF3) was upstream of the structural gene for nitrite reductase (nirS) as a divergent transcriptional organization. A nucleotide-binding protein encoded by nirQ was 76% identical to the Pseudomonas stutzeri nirQ gene product, which was shown to be necessary for activating nitrite and nitric oxide reductases. The gene product of ORF2 was homologous to subunit III of cytochrome oxidases. The nirQ gene was transcribed under denitrifying conditions. The intergenic region of nirS and nirQ has only one binding motif for ANR, a regulatory protein for anaerobic gene expression correspond to FNR in E. coli. Complementation analyses showed that the transcription of both nirS and nirQ completely depended on ANR.

  15. Chromatin-dependent transcription factor accessibility rather than nucleosome remodeling predominates during global transcriptional restructuring in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Karl A; Morozov, Alexandre V; Broach, James R

    2009-08-01

    Several well-studied promoters in yeast lose nucleosomes upon transcriptional activation and gain them upon repression, an observation that has prompted the model that transcriptional activation and repression requires nucleosome remodeling of regulated promoters. We have examined global nucleosome positioning before and after glucose-induced transcriptional reprogramming, a condition under which more than half of all yeast genes significantly change expression. The majority of induced and repressed genes exhibit no change in promoter nucleosome arrangement, although promoters that do undergo nucleosome remodeling tend to contain a TATA box. Rather, we found multiple examples where the pre-existing accessibility of putative transcription factor binding sites before glucose addition determined whether the corresponding gene would change expression in response to glucose addition. These results suggest that selection of appropriate transcription factor binding sites may be dictated to a large extent by nucleosome prepositioning but that regulation of expression through these sites is dictated not by nucleosome repositioning but by changes in transcription factor activity.

  16. Arabidopsis Pol II-Dependent in Vitro Transcription System Reveals Role of Chromatin for Light-Inducible rbcS Gene Transcription.

    PubMed

    Ido, Ayaka; Iwata, Shinya; Iwata, Yuka; Igarashi, Hisako; Hamada, Takahiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Sugiura, Masahiro; Yukawa, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    In vitro transcription is an essential tool to study the molecular mechanisms of transcription. For over a decade, we have developed an in vitro transcription system from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)-cultured cells (BY-2), and this system supported the basic activities of the three RNA polymerases (Pol I, Pol II, and Pol III). However, it was not suitable to study photosynthetic genes, because BY-2 cells have lost their photosynthetic activity. Therefore, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in vitro transcription systems were developed from green and etiolated suspension cells. Sufficient in vitro Pol II activity was detected after the minor modification of the nuclear soluble extracts preparation method; removal of vacuoles from protoplasts and L-ascorbic acid supplementation in the extraction buffer were particularly effective. Surprisingly, all four Arabidopsis Rubisco small subunit (rbcS-1A, rbcS-1B, rbcS-2B, and rbcS-3B) gene members were in vitro transcribed from the naked DNA templates without any light-dependent manner. However, clear light-inducible transcriptions were observed using chromatin template of rbcS-1A gene, which was prepared with a human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP1) and HeLa histones. This suggested that a key determinant of light-dependency through the rbcS gene transcription was a higher order of DNA structure (i.e. chromatin).

  17. Arabidopsis Pol II-Dependent in Vitro Transcription System Reveals Role of Chromatin for Light-Inducible rbcS Gene Transcription1

    PubMed Central

    Ido, Ayaka; Iwata, Shinya; Iwata, Yuka; Igarashi, Hisako; Hamada, Takahiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Sugiura, Masahiro; Yukawa, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    In vitro transcription is an essential tool to study the molecular mechanisms of transcription. For over a decade, we have developed an in vitro transcription system from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)-cultured cells (BY-2), and this system supported the basic activities of the three RNA polymerases (Pol I, Pol II, and Pol III). However, it was not suitable to study photosynthetic genes, because BY-2 cells have lost their photosynthetic activity. Therefore, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in vitro transcription systems were developed from green and etiolated suspension cells. Sufficient in vitro Pol II activity was detected after the minor modification of the nuclear soluble extracts preparation method; removal of vacuoles from protoplasts and L-ascorbic acid supplementation in the extraction buffer were particularly effective. Surprisingly, all four Arabidopsis Rubisco small subunit (rbcS-1A, rbcS-1B, rbcS-2B, and rbcS-3B) gene members were in vitro transcribed from the naked DNA templates without any light-dependent manner. However, clear light-inducible transcriptions were observed using chromatin template of rbcS-1A gene, which was prepared with a human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP1) and HeLa histones. This suggested that a key determinant of light-dependency through the rbcS gene transcription was a higher order of DNA structure (i.e. chromatin). PMID:26662274

  18. Three-dimensional EM Structure of an Intact Activator-dependent Transcription Initiation Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.; Quispe, J; Lara-González, S; Kim, Y; Berman, H; Arnold, E; Ebright, R; Lawson, C

    2009-01-01

    We present the experimentally determined 3D structure of an intact activator-dependent transcription initiation complex comprising the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP), RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and a DNA fragment containing positions -78 to +20 of a Class I CAP-dependent promoter with a CAP site at position -61.5 and a premelted transcription bubble. A 20-{angstrom} electron microscopy reconstruction was obtained by iterative projection-based matching of single particles visualized in carbon-sandwich negative stain and was fitted using atomic coordinate sets for CAP, RNAP, and DNA. The structure defines the organization of a Class I CAP-RNAP-promoter complex and supports previously proposed interactions of CAP with RNAP {alpha} subunit C-terminal domain ({alpha}CTD), interactions of {alpha}CTD with {sigma}70 region 4, interactions of CAP and RNAP with promoter DNA, and phased-DNA-bend-dependent partial wrapping of DNA around the complex. The structure also reveals the positions and shapes of species-specific domains within the RNAP {beta}{prime}, {beta}, and {sigma}70 subunits.

  19. Transcriptional activation of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 by nuclear receptor TLX

    SciTech Connect

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-09-04

    An orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the proliferation and self-renewal of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase, is highly expressed in the NPCs and participates in neurogenesis. Here, we found that TLX colocalized with SIRT1 and knockdown of TLX by small interfering RNAs decreased SIRT1 levels in NPCs. TLX increased the SIRT1 expression by binding to the newly identified TLX-activating element in the SIRT1 gene promoter in HEK293 cells. Thus, TLX is an inducer of SIRT1 and may contribute to neurogenesis both as a transactivator and as a repressor.

  20. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho—a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity—is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal ‘RNA binding’ domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal ‘motor’ domain. We also show that the ‘motor’ domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors. PMID:25999346

  1. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-07-13

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho-a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity-is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal 'RNA binding' domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal 'motor' domain. We also show that the 'motor' domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors.

  2. The Role of Bacterial Enhancer Binding Proteins as Specialized Activators of σ54-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial enhancer binding proteins (bEBPs) are transcriptional activators that assemble as hexameric rings in their active forms and utilize ATP hydrolysis to remodel the conformation of RNA polymerase containing the alternative sigma factor σ54. We present a comprehensive and detailed summary of recent advances in our understanding of how these specialized molecular machines function. The review is structured by introducing each of the three domains in turn: the central catalytic domain, the N-terminal regulatory domain, and the C-terminal DNA binding domain. The role of the central catalytic domain is presented with particular reference to (i) oligomerization, (ii) ATP hydrolysis, and (iii) the key GAFTGA motif that contacts σ54 for remodeling. Each of these functions forms a potential target of the signal-sensing N-terminal regulatory domain, which can act either positively or negatively to control the activation of σ54-dependent transcription. Finally, we focus on the DNA binding function of the C-terminal domain and the enhancer sites to which it binds. Particular attention is paid to the importance of σ54 to the bacterial cell and its unique role in regulating transcription. PMID:22933558

  3. Spt2p defines a new transcription-dependent gross chromosomal rearrangement pathway.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Nilabja; Banerjee, Soma; Zhang, Han; Smith, Stephanie; Myung, Kyungjae

    2008-12-01

    Large numbers of gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) are frequently observed in many cancers. High mobility group 1 (HMG1) protein is a non-histone DNA-binding protein and is highly expressed in different types of tumors. The high expression of HMG1 could alter DNA structure resulting in GCRs. Spt2p is a non-histone DNA binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and shares homology with mammalian HMG1 protein. We found that Spt2p overexpression enhances GCRs dependent on proteins for transcription elongation and polyadenylation. Excess Spt2p increases the number of cells in S phase and the amount of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that might be susceptible to cause DNA damage and GCR. Consistently, RNase H expression, which reduces levels of ssDNA, decreased GCRs in cells expressing high level of Spt2p. Lastly, high transcription in the chromosome V, the location at which GCR is monitored, also enhanced GCR formation. We propose a new pathway for GCR where DNA intermediates formed during transcription can lead to genomic instability.

  4. MicroRNA-Dependent Transcriptional Silencing of Transposable Elements in Drosophila Follicle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mugat, Bruno; Akkouche, Abdou; Serrano, Vincent; Armenise, Claudia; Li, Blaise; Brun, Christine; Fulga, Tudor A.; Van Vactor, David; Pélisson, Alain; Chambeyron, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference-related silencing mechanisms concern very diverse and distinct biological processes, from gene regulation (via the microRNA pathway) to defense against molecular parasites (through the small interfering RNA and the Piwi-interacting RNA pathways). Small non-coding RNAs serve as specificity factors that guide effector proteins to ribonucleic acid targets via base-pairing interactions, to achieve transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Because of the small sequence complementarity required for microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional regulation, thousands of microRNA (miRNA) putative targets have been annotated in Drosophila. In Drosophila somatic ovarian cells, genomic parasites, such as transposable elements (TEs), are transcriptionally repressed by chromatin changes induced by Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that prevent them from invading the germinal genome. Here we show, for the first time, that a functional miRNA pathway is required for the piRNA-mediated transcriptional silencing of TEs in this tissue. Global miRNA depletion, caused by tissue- and stage-specific knock down of drosha (involved in miRNA biogenesis), AGO1 or gawky (both responsible for miRNA activity), resulted in loss of TE-derived piRNAs and chromatin-mediated transcriptional de-silencing of TEs. This specific TE de-repression was also observed upon individual titration (by expression of the complementary miRNA sponge) of two miRNAs (miR-14 and miR-34) as well as in a miR-14 loss-of-function mutant background. Interestingly, the miRNA defects differentially affected TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first indication of possible differences in the biogenesis or stability of TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. This work is one of the examples of detectable phenotypes caused by loss of individual miRNAs in Drosophila and the first genetic evidence that miRNAs have a role in the maintenance of genome stability via piRNA-mediated TE repression. PMID

  5. Promoter architecture and transcriptional regulation of Abf1-dependent ribosomal protein genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina; Dieci, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosomal protein gene (RPG) promoters display binding sites for either Rap1 or Abf1 transcription factors. Unlike Rap1-associated promoters, the small cohort of Abf1-dependent RPGs (Abf1-RPGs) has not been extensively investigated. We show that RPL3, RPL4B, RPP1A, RPS22B and RPS28A/B share a common promoter architecture, with an Abf1 site upstream of a conserved element matching the sequence recognized by Fhl1, a transcription factor which together with Ifh1 orchestrates Rap1-associated RPG regulation. Abf1 and Fhl1 promoter association was confirmed by ChIP and/or gel retardation assays. Mutational analysis revealed a more severe requirement of Abf1 than Fhl1 binding sites for RPG transcription. In the case of RPS22B an unusual Tbf1 binding site promoted both RPS22B and intron-hosted SNR44 expression. Abf1-RPG down-regulation upon TOR pathway inhibition was much attenuated at defective mutant promoters unable to bind Abf1. TORC1 inactivation caused the expected reduction of Ifh1 occupancy at RPS22B and RPL3 promoters, but unexpectedly it entailed largely increased Abf1 association with Abf1-RPG promoters. We present evidence that Abf1 recruitment upon nutritional stress, also observed for representative ribosome biogenesis genes, favours RPG transcriptional rescue upon nutrient replenishment, thus pointing to nutrient-regulated Abf1 dynamics at promoters as a novel mechanism in ribosome biogenesis control. PMID:27016735

  6. MeCP2 regulates activity-dependent transcriptional responses in olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wooje; Yun, Jung-Mi; Woods, Rima; Dunaway, Keith; Yasui, Dag H.; Lasalle, Janine M.; Gong, Qizhi

    2014-01-01

    During postnatal development, neuronal activity controls the remodeling of initially imprecise neuronal connections through the regulation of gene expression. MeCP2 binds to methylated DNA and modulates gene expression during neuronal development and MECP2 mutation causes the autistic disorder Rett syndrome. To investigate a role for MeCP2 in neuronal circuit refinement and to identify activity-dependent MeCP2 transcription regulations, we leveraged the precise organization and accessibility of olfactory sensory axons to manipulation of neuronal activity through odorant exposure in vivo. We demonstrate that olfactory sensory axons failed to develop complete convergence when Mecp2 is deficient in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in an otherwise wild-type animal. Furthermore, we demonstrate that expression of selected adhesion genes was elevated in Mecp2-deficient glomeruli, while acute odor stimulation in control mice resulted in significantly reduced MeCP2 binding to these gene loci, correlating with increased expression. Thus, MeCP2 is required for both circuitry refinement and activity-dependent transcriptional responses in OSNs. PMID:25008110

  7. Developmental- and food-dependent foraging transcript levels in the desert locust.

    PubMed

    Tobback, Julie; Verlinden, Heleen; Vuerinckx, Kristel; Vleugels, Rut; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Huybrechts, Roger

    2013-12-01

    Drastic changes in the environment during a lifetime require developmental and physiological flexibility to ensure animal survival. Desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria, live in an extremely changeable environment, which alternates between periods of rainfall and abundant food and periods of drought and starvation. In order to survive, locusts display an extreme form of phenotypic plasticity that allows them to rapidly cope with these changing conditions by converting from a cryptic solitarious phase to a swarming, voracious gregarious phase. To accomplish this, locusts possess different conserved mediators of phenotypic plasticity. Recently, attention has been drawn to the possible roles of protein kinases in this process. In addition to cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), also cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), which was shown to be involved in changes of food-related behavior in a variety of insects, has been associated with locust phenotypic plasticity. In this article, we study the transcript levels of the S. gregaria orthologue of the foraging gene that encodes a PKG in different food-related, developmental and crowding conditions. Transcript levels of the S. gregaria foraging orthologue are highest in different parts of the gut and differ between isolated and crowd-reared locusts. They change when the availability of food is altered, display a distinct pattern with higher levels after a moult and decrease with age during postembryonic development.

  8. Context-dependent DNA recognition code for C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiajian; Stormo, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Modeling and identifying the DNA-protein recognition code is one of the most challenging problems in computational biology. Several quantitative methods have been developed to model DNA-protein interactions with specific focus on the C2H2 zinc-finger proteins, the largest transcription factor family in eukaryotic genomes. In many cases, they performed well. But the overall the predictive accuracy of these methods is still limited. One of the major reasons is all these methods used weight matrix models to represent DNA-protein interactions, assuming all base-amino acid contacts contribute independently to the total free energy of binding. Results: We present a context-dependent model for DNA–zinc-finger protein interactions that allows us to identify inter-positional dependencies in the DNA recognition code for C2H2 zinc-finger proteins. The degree of non-independence was detected by comparing the linear perceptron model with the non-linear neural net (NN) model for their predictions of DNA–zinc-finger protein interactions. This dependency is supported by the complex base-amino acid contacts observed in DNA–zinc-finger interactions from structural analyses. Using extensive published qualitative and quantitative experimental data, we demonstrated that the context-dependent model developed in this study can significantly improves predictions of DNA binding profiles and free energies of binding for both individual zinc fingers and proteins with multiple zinc fingers when comparing to previous positional-independent models. This approach can be extended to other protein families with complex base-amino acid residue interactions that would help to further understand the transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic genomes. Availability:The software implemented as c programs and are available by request. http://ural.wustl.edu/softwares.html Contact: stormo@ural.wustl.edu PMID:18586699

  9. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent activation of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription by 3-methycholanthrene

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, Jonathan M.; Waxman, David J. . E-mail: djw@bu.edu

    2006-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that stimulates transcription directed by xenobiotic response elements upstream of target genes. Recently, AhR ligands were reported to induce formation of an AhR-estrogen receptor (ER) complex, which can bind to estrogen response elements (EREs) and stimulate transcription of ER target genes. Presently, we investigate the effect of the AhR ligands 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (BZ126) on ERE-regulated luciferase reporter activity and endogenous ER target gene expression. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, 3MC induced transcription of ER reporter genes containing native promoter sequences of the ER-responsive genes complement 3 and pS2 and heterologous promoters regulated by isolated EREs. Dose-response studies revealed that the concentration of 3MC required to half-maximally activate transcription (EC{sub 5}) was >100-fold higher for an ER reporter (27-57 {mu}M) than for an AhR reporter (86-250 nM) in both MCF-7 cells and in human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells. 3MC also stimulated expression of the endogenous ER target genes amphiregulin, cathepsin D and progesterone receptor, albeit to a much lower extent than was achieved following stimulation with 17{beta}-estradiol. In Ishikawa cells, 3MC, but not BZ126 or TCDD, stimulated ER{alpha}-dependent reporter activity but did not induce expression of endogenous ER target genes. Finally, studies carried out in the AhR-positive rat hepatoma cell line 5L and the AhR-deficient variant BP8 demonstrated that ER reporter activity could be induced by 3MC in a manner that was independent of AhR and thus distinct from the AhR-ER 'hijacking' mechanism described recently. 3MC may thus elicit estrogenic activity by multiple mechanisms.

  10. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways: potential mediators of skeletal muscle growth and development.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2009-11-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age and disuse has a significant impact on the physiological and social well-being of the aged; this is an increasingly important problem as the population becomes skewed towards older age. Exercise has psychological benefits but it also impacts on muscle protein synthesis and degradation, increasing muscle tissue volume in both young and older individuals. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy involves an increase in muscle mass and cross-sectional area and associated increased myofibrillar protein content. Attempts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie muscle growth, development and maintenance, have focused on characterising the molecular pathways that initiate, maintain and regenerate skeletal muscle. Such understanding may aid in improving targeted interventional therapies for age-related muscle loss and muscle wasting associated with diseases. Two major routes through which skeletal muscle development and growth are regulated are insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways. Many reviews have focused on understanding the signalling pathways of IGF-I and its receptor, which govern skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, alternative molecular signalling pathways such as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways should also be considered as potential mediators of muscle growth. These latter pathways have received relatively little attention and the purpose herein is to highlight the progress being made in the understanding of these pathways and associated molecules: calmodulin, calmodulin kinases (CaMKs), calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), which are involved in skeletal muscle regulation. We describe: (1) how conformational changes in the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin result in the exposure of binding pockets for the target proteins (CaMKs and calcineurin). (2) How Calmodulin consequently activates either the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases

  11. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luis E. F.; Murray, Peter D.; Zielke, H. Ronald; Roby, Clinton D.; Kingsbury, Tami J.; Krueger, Bruce K.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic AMP can stimulate the transcription of many activity-dependent genes via activation of the transcription factor, CREB. However, in mouse cortical neuron cultures, prior to synaptogenesis, neither cAMP nor dopamine, which acts via cAMP, stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription when NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) were blocked. Stimulation of transcription by cAMP was potentiated by inhibitors of excitatory amino acid uptake, suggesting a role for extracellular glutamate or aspartate in cAMP-induced transcription. Aspartate was identified as the extracellular messenger: enzymatic scavenging of L-aspartate, but not glutamate, blocked stimulation of CREB-dependent gene transcription by cAMP; moreover, cAMP induced aspartate but not glutamate release. Taken together, these results suggest that cAMP acts via an autocrine or paracrine pathway to release aspartate, which activates NR2B-containing NMDARs, leading to Ca2+ entry and activation of transcription. This cAMP/aspartate/NMDAR signaling pathway may mediate the effects of transmitters such as dopamine on axon growth and synaptogenesis in developing neurons or on synaptic plasticity in mature neural networks. PMID:19812345

  12. Synergistic transcriptional enhancement does not depend on the number of acidic activation domains bound to the promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Oliviero, S; Struhl, K

    1991-01-01

    Many eukaryotic transcriptional activator proteins contain a DNA-binding domain that interacts with specific promoter sequences and an acidic activation region that is required to stimulate transcription. Transcriptional enhancement by such activator proteins is often synergistic and promiscuous; promoters containing multiple binding sites for an individual protein or even for unrelated proteins can be 10-100 times more active than promoters with single sites. It has been suggested that such synergy reflects a nonlinear response of the basic transcription machinery to the number and/or quality of acidic activation regions. Here, we determine the transcriptional activity of Jun-Fos heterodimers containing one or two GCN4 acidic activation regions on promoters containing one or two Ap-1 target sites. Surprisingly, heterodimers with one or two acidic regions activate transcription with similar efficiency and are equally synergistic (10- to 15-fold) on promoters containing two target sites. Thus, transcriptional synergy does not depend on the number of acidic activation regions but rather on the number of proteins bound to the promoter. This suggests that synergy is mediated either by cooperative DNA binding or by alternative mechanisms in which the DNA-binding domain plays a more direct role in transcription (e.g., changes in DNA structure, nucleosome displacement, or direct interactions with the transcriptional machinery). Images PMID:1898773

  13. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Regulates AP-1 Dependent Transcriptional Response to Minimally Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp; Almazan, Felicidad; Kim, Jungsu; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turns it into an endogenous ligand recognized by pattern-recognition receptors. We have demonstrated that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) binds to CD14 and mediates TLR4/MD-2-dependent responses in macrophages, many of which are MyD88-independent. We have also demonstrated that the mmLDL activation leads to recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to TLR4 and TLR4 and Syk phosphorylation. In this study, we produced a macrophage-specific Syk knockout mouse and used primary Syk−/− macrophages in our studies. We demonstrated that Syk mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, which in turn phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun, respectively, as assessed by an in vitro kinase assay. c-Jun phosphorylation was also mediated by IKKε. c-Jun and c-Fos bound to consensus DNA sites and thereby completed an AP-1 transcriptional complex and induced expression of CXCL2 and IL-6. These results suggest that Syk plays a key role in TLR4-mediated macrophage responses to host-generated ligands, like mmLDL, with subsequent activation of an AP-1 transcription program. PMID:22384232

  14. Flanking sequence context-dependent transcription factor binding in early Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene expression in the Drosophila embryo is controlled by functional interactions between a large network of protein transcription factors (TFs) and specific sequences in DNA cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). The binding site sequences for any TF can be experimentally determined and represented in a position weight matrix (PWM). PWMs can then be used to predict the location of TF binding sites in other regions of the genome, although there are limitations to this approach as currently implemented. Results In this proof-of-principle study, we analyze 127 CRMs and focus on four TFs that control transcription of target genes along the anterio-posterior axis of the embryo early in development. For all four of these TFs, there is some degree of conserved flanking sequence that extends beyond the predicted binding regions. A potential role for these conserved flanking sequences may be to enhance the specificity of TF binding, as the abundance of these sequences is greatly diminished when we examine only predicted high-affinity binding sites. Conclusions Expanding PWMs to include sequence context-dependence will increase the information content in PWMs and facilitate a more efficient functional identification and dissection of CRMs. PMID:24093548

  15. dRYBP Counteracts Chromatin-Dependent Activation and Repression of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Sarip, Adone; Verrijzer, C. Peter; Busturia, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dependent activation and repression of transcription is regulated by the histone modifying enzymatic activities of the trithorax (trxG) and Polycomb (PcG) proteins. To investigate the mechanisms underlying their mutual antagonistic activities we analyzed the function of Drosophila dRYBP, a conserved PcG- and trxG-associated protein. We show that dRYBP is itself ubiquitylated and binds ubiquitylated proteins. Additionally we show that dRYBP maintains H2A monoubiquitylation, H3K4 monomethylation and H3K36 dimethylation levels and does not affect H3K27 trimethylation levels. Further we show that dRYBP interacts with the repressive SCE and dKDM2 proteins as well as the activating dBRE1 protein. Analysis of homeotic phenotypes and post-translationally modified histones levels show that dRYBP antagonizes dKDM2 and dBRE1 functions by respectively preventing H3K36me2 demethylation and H2B monoubiquitylation. Interestingly, our results show that inactivation of dBRE1 produces trithorax-like related homeotic transformations, suggesting that dBRE1 functions in the regulation of homeotic genes expression. Our findings indicate that dRYBP regulates morphogenesis by counteracting transcriptional repression and activation. Thus, they suggest that dRYBP may participate in the epigenetic plasticity important during normal and pathological development. PMID:25415640

  16. Computational prediction of strain-dependent diffusion of transcription factors through the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nava, Michele M; Fedele, Roberto; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear spreading plays a crucial role in stem cell fate determination. In previous works, we reported evidence of multipotency maintenance for mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on three-dimensional engineered niche substrates, fabricated via two-photon laser polymerization. We correlated maintenance of multipotency to a more roundish morphology of these cells with respect to those cultured on conventional flat substrates. To interpret these findings, here we present a multiphysics model coupling nuclear strains induced by cell adhesion to passive diffusion across the cell nucleus. Fully three-dimensional reconstructions of cultured cells were developed on the basis of confocal images: in particular, the level of nuclear spreading resulted significantly dependent on the cell localization within the niche architecture. We assumed that the cell diffusivity varies as a function of the local volumetric strain. The model predictions indicate that the higher the level of spreading of the cell, the higher the flux across the nucleus of small solutes such as transcription factors. Our results point toward nuclear spreading as a primary mechanism by which the stem cell translates its shape into a fate decision, i.e., by amplifying the diffusive flow of transcriptional activators into the nucleus.

  17. dRYBP counteracts chromatin-dependent activation and repression of transcription.

    PubMed

    Fereres, Sol; Simón, Rocío; Mohd-Sarip, Adone; Verrijzer, C Peter; Busturia, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dependent activation and repression of transcription is regulated by the histone modifying enzymatic activities of the trithorax (trxG) and Polycomb (PcG) proteins. To investigate the mechanisms underlying their mutual antagonistic activities we analyzed the function of Drosophila dRYBP, a conserved PcG- and trxG-associated protein. We show that dRYBP is itself ubiquitylated and binds ubiquitylated proteins. Additionally we show that dRYBP maintains H2A monoubiquitylation, H3K4 monomethylation and H3K36 dimethylation levels and does not affect H3K27 trimethylation levels. Further we show that dRYBP interacts with the repressive SCE and dKDM2 proteins as well as the activating dBRE1 protein. Analysis of homeotic phenotypes and post-translationally modified histones levels show that dRYBP antagonizes dKDM2 and dBRE1 functions by respectively preventing H3K36me2 demethylation and H2B monoubiquitylation. Interestingly, our results show that inactivation of dBRE1 produces trithorax-like related homeotic transformations, suggesting that dBRE1 functions in the regulation of homeotic genes expression. Our findings indicate that dRYBP regulates morphogenesis by counteracting transcriptional repression and activation. Thus, they suggest that dRYBP may participate in the epigenetic plasticity important during normal and pathological development.

  18. "Glucose and ethanol-dependent transcriptional regulation of the astaxanthin biosynthesis pathway in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous"

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is one of the most promising and economically attractive natural sources of astaxanthin. The biosynthesis of this valuable carotenoid is a complex process for which the regulatory mechanisms remain mostly unknown. Several studies have shown a strong correlation between the carbon source present in the medium and the amount of pigments synthesized. Carotenoid production is especially low when high glucose concentrations are used in the medium, while a significant increase is observed with non-fermentable carbon sources. However, the molecular basis of this phenomenon has not been established. Results In this work, we showed that glucose caused transcriptional repression of the three genes involved in the synthesis of astaxanthin from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in X. dendrorhous, which correlates with a complete inhibition of pigment synthesis. Strikingly, this regulatory response was completely altered in mutant strains that are incapable of synthesizing astaxanthin. However, we found that addition of ethanol caused the induction of crtYB and crtS gene expression and promoted de novo synthesis of carotenoids. The induction of carotenogenesis was noticeable as early as 24 h after ethanol addition. Conclusion For the first time, we demonstrated that carbon source-dependent regulation of astaxanthin biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous involves changes at the transcriptional level. Such regulatory mechanism provides an explanation for the strong and early inhibitory effect of glucose on the biosynthesis of this carotenoid. PMID:21861883

  19. MicroRNA-Dependent Regulation of Transcription in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Pastor, Maria Dolores; Hergueta, Marta; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; García-Carbonero, Rocío; Nogal, Ana; Suárez, Rocío; Salinas, Ana; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Lopez-Rios, Fernando; Agulló-Ortuño, Maria Teresa; Ferrer, Irene; Perpiñá, Asunción; Palacios, José; Carnero, Amancio; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) and adenocarcinoma are the most common histological subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and have been traditionally managed in the clinic as a single entity. Increasing evidence, however, illustrates the biological diversity of these two histological subgroups of lung cancer, and supports the need to improve our understanding of the molecular basis beyond the different phenotypes if we aim to develop more specific and individualized targeted therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify microRNA (miRNA)-dependent transcriptional regulation differences between SCC and adenocarcinoma histological lung cancer subtypes. In this work, paired miRNA (667 miRNAs by TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA)) and mRNA profiling (Whole Genome 44 K array G112A, Agilent) was performed in tumor samples of 44 NSCLC patients. Nine miRNAs and 56 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in SCC versus adenocarcinoma samples. Eleven of these 56 mRNA were predicted as targets of the miRNAs identified to be differently expressed in these two histological conditions. Of them, 6 miRNAs (miR-149, miR-205, miR-375, miR-378, miR-422a and miR-708) and 9 target genes (CEACAM6, CGN, CLDN3, ABCC3, MLPH, ACSL5, TMEM45B, MUC1) were validated by quantitative PCR in an independent cohort of 41 lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between mRNAs and microRNAs expression was also validated. These results suggest miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences play an important role in determining key hallmarks of NSCLC, and may provide new biomarkers for personalized treatment strategies. PMID:24625834

  20. MicroRNA-dependent regulation of transcription in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Pastor, Maria Dolores; Hergueta, Marta; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; García-Carbonero, Rocío; Nogal, Ana; Suárez, Rocío; Salinas, Ana; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Lopez-Rios, Fernando; Agulló-Ortuño, Maria Teresa; Ferrer, Irene; Perpiñá, Asunción; Palacios, José; Carnero, Amancio; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) and adenocarcinoma are the most common histological subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and have been traditionally managed in the clinic as a single entity. Increasing evidence, however, illustrates the biological diversity of these two histological subgroups of lung cancer, and supports the need to improve our understanding of the molecular basis beyond the different phenotypes if we aim to develop more specific and individualized targeted therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify microRNA (miRNA)-dependent transcriptional regulation differences between SCC and adenocarcinoma histological lung cancer subtypes. In this work, paired miRNA (667 miRNAs by TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA)) and mRNA profiling (Whole Genome 44 K array G112A, Agilent) was performed in tumor samples of 44 NSCLC patients. Nine miRNAs and 56 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in SCC versus adenocarcinoma samples. Eleven of these 56 mRNA were predicted as targets of the miRNAs identified to be differently expressed in these two histological conditions. Of them, 6 miRNAs (miR-149, miR-205, miR-375, miR-378, miR-422a and miR-708) and 9 target genes (CEACAM6, CGN, CLDN3, ABCC3, MLPH, ACSL5, TMEM45B, MUC1) were validated by quantitative PCR in an independent cohort of 41 lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between mRNAs and microRNAs expression was also validated. These results suggest miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences play an important role in determining key hallmarks of NSCLC, and may provide new biomarkers for personalized treatment strategies.

  1. Profiling the MAPK/ERK dependent and independent activity regulated transcriptional programs in the murine hippocampus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Blüthgen, Nils; van Bentum, Mirjam; Merz, Barbara; Kuhl, Dietmar; Hermey, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Activity-dependent alteration of the transcriptional program is central for shaping neuronal connectivity. Constitutively expressed transcription factors orchestrate the initial response to neuronal stimulation and serve as substrates for second messenger-regulated kinase signalling cascades. The mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK conveys signalling from the synapse to the nucleus but its genetic signature following neuronal activity has not been revealed. The goal of the present study was to identify ERK dependent and independent activity regulated transcriptional programs in the murine hippocampus. We used generalized seizures combined with the pharmacological intervention of MEK activation as an in vivo model to determine the complete transcriptional program initiated by ERK after neuronal activity. Our survey demonstrates that the induction of a large number of activity-regulated genes, including Arc/Arg3.1, Arl5b, Gadd45b, Homer1, Inhba and Zwint, is indeed dependent on ERK phosphorylation. In contrast, expression of a small group of genes, including Npas4, Arl4d, Errfi1, and Rgs2, is only partially dependent or completely independent (Ppp1r15a) of this signalling pathway. Among the identified transcripts are long non-coding (lnc) RNAs and induction of LincPint and splice variants of NEAT1 are ERK dependent. Our survey provides a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptomic response conveyed by ERK signalling in the hippocampus. PMID:28349920

  2. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  3. Dissection of TALE-dependent gene activation reveals that they induce transcription cooperatively and in both orientations

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Jana; Baum, Heidi; Grau, Jan; Stuttman, Johannes; Boch, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic Xanthomonas bacteria inject transcription activator-like effector proteins (TALEs) into host cells to specifically induce transcription of plant genes and enhance susceptibility. Although the DNA-binding mode is well-understood it is still ambiguous how TALEs initiate transcription and whether additional promoter elements are needed to support this. To systematically dissect prerequisites for transcriptional initiation the activity of one TALE was compared on different synthetic Bs4 promoter fragments. In addition, a large collection of artificial TALEs spanning the OsSWEET14 promoter was compared. We show that the presence of a TALE alone is not sufficient to initiate transcription suggesting the requirement of additional supporting promoter elements. At the OsSWEET14 promoter TALEs can initiate transcription from various positions, in a synergistic manner of multiple TALEs binding in parallel to the promoter, and even by binding in reverse orientation. TALEs are known to shift the transcriptional start site, but our data show that this shift depends on the individual position of a TALE within a promoter context. Our results implicate that TALEs function like classical enhancer-binding proteins and initiate transcription in both orientations which has consequences for in planta target gene prediction and design of artificial activators. PMID:28301511

  4. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-01-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets. PMID:23822503

  5. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-06-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets.

  6. BTG2 is an LXXLL-dependent co-repressor for androgen receptor transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xu-Dong; Meng, Qing-Hui; Xu, Jia-Ying; Jiao, Yang; Ge, Chun-Min; Jacob, Asha; Wang, Ping; Rosen, Eliot M; Fan, Saijun

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} BTG2 associates with AR, androgen causes an increase of the interaction. {yields} BTG2 as a co-repressor inhibits the AR-mediated transcription activity. {yields} BTG2 inhibits the transcription activity and expression of PSA. {yields} An intact {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif is essential and necessary for these activities of BTG2, while the {sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} motif is not required. {yields} Ectopic expression of BTG2 reduces proliferation of prostate cancer cells. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor gene, BTG2 has been down-regulated in prostate cancer and the ectopic expression of this gene has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth. Sequence analysis revealed that the BTG2 protein contains two leucine-rich motifs ({sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} and {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96}), which are usually found in nuclear receptor co-factors. Based on this, we postulated that there will be an association between BTG2 and AR. In this study, we discovered that BTG2 directly bound to the androgen receptor (AR) in the absence of 5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and in the presence of the androgen, this interaction was increased. BTG2 bearing the mutant {sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} motif bound to AR equally efficient as the wild-type BTG2, while BTG2 bearing the mutant {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif failed to interact with AR. Functional studies indicated that ectopic expression of BTG2 caused a significant inhibition of AR-mediated transcriptional activity and a decreased growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen-induced promoter activation and expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are significantly attenuated by BTG2. The intact {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif is required for these activities. These findings, for the first time, demonstrate that BTG2 complexes with AR via an LxxLL-dependent mechanism and may play a role in prostate cancer via modulating the AR signaling pathway.

  7. Candidate regulatory sequence elements for cell cycle-dependent transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wolfsberg, T G; Gabrielian, A E; Campbell, M J; Cho, R J; Spouge, J L; Landsman, D

    1999-08-01

    Recent developments in genome-wide transcript monitoring have led to a rapid accumulation of data from gene expression studies. Such projects highlight the need for methods to predict the molecular basis of transcriptional coregulation. A microarray project identified the 420 yeast transcripts whose synthesis displays cell cycle-dependent periodicity. We present here a statistical technique we developed to identify the sequence elements that may be responsible for this cell cycle regulation. Because most gene regulatory sites contain a short string of highly conserved nucleotides, any such strings that are involved in gene regulation will occur frequently in the upstream regions of the genes that they regulate, and rarely in the upstream regions of other genes. Our strategy therefore utilizes statistical procedures to identify short oligomers, five or six nucleotides in length, that are over-represented in upstream regions of genes whose expression peaks at the same phase of the cell cycle. We report, with a high level of confidence, that 9 hexamers and 12 pentamers are over-represented in the upstream regions of genes whose expression peaks at the early G(1), late G(1), S, G(2), or M phase of the cell cycle. Some of these sequence elements show a preference for a particular orientation, and others, through a separate statistical test, for a particular position upstream of the ATG start codon. The finding that the majority of the statistically significant sequence elements are located in late G(1) upstream regions correlates with other experiments that identified the late G(1)/early S boundary as a vital cell cycle control point. Our results highlight the importance of MCB, an element implicated previously in late G(1)/early S gene regulation, as most of the late G(1) oligomers contain the MCB sequence or variations thereof. It is striking that most MCB-like sequences localize to a specific region upstream of the ATG start codon. Additional sequences that we have

  8. Comparative genomics of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent transcription factor regulons in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Suvorova, Inna A.

    2016-01-01

    The MocR-subfamily transcription factors (MocR-TFs) characterized by the GntR-family DNA-binding domain and aminotransferase-like sensory domain are broadly distributed among certain lineages of Bacteria. Characterized MocR-TFs bind pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) and control transcription of genes involved in PLP, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine metabolism via binding specific DNA operator sites. To identify putative target genes and DNA binding motifs of MocR-TFs, we performed comparative genomics analysis of over 250 bacterial genomes. The reconstructed regulons for 825 MocR-TFs comprise structural genes from over 200 protein families involved in diverse biological processes. Using the genome context and metabolic subsystem analysis we tentatively assigned functional roles for 38 out of 86 orthologous groups of studied regulators. Most of these MocR-TF regulons are involved in PLP metabolism, as well as utilization of GABA, taurine and ectoine. The remaining studied MocR-TF regulators presumably control genes encoding enzymes involved in reduction/oxidation processes, various transporters and PLP-dependent enzymes, for example aminotransferases. Predicted DNA binding motifs of MocR-TFs are generally similar in each orthologous group and are characterized by two to four repeated sequences. Identified motifs were classified according to their structures. Motifs with direct and/or inverted repeat symmetry constitute the majority of inferred DNA motifs, suggesting preferable TF dimerization in head-to-tail or head-to-head configuration. The obtained genomic collection of in silico reconstructed MocR-TF motifs and regulons in Bacteria provides a basis for future experimental characterization of molecular mechanisms for various regulators in this family. PMID:28348826

  9. Anaerobic transcription activation in Bacillus subtilis: identification of distinct FNR-dependent and -independent regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Ramos, H; Boursier, L; Moszer, I; Kunst, F; Danchin, A; Glaser, P

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is able to grow anaerobically using alternative electron acceptors, including nitrate or fumarate. We characterized an operon encoding the dissimilatory nitrate reductase subunits homologous to the Escherichia coli narGHJI operon and the narK gene encoding a protein with nitrite extrusion activity. Downstream from narK and co-transcribed with it a gene (fnr) encoding a protein homologous to E.coli FNR was found. Disruption of fnr abolished both nitrate and fumarate utilization as electron acceptors and anaerobic induction of narK. Four putative FNR binding sites were found in B.subtilis sequences. The consensus sequence, centred at position -41.5, is identical to the consensus for the DNA site for E.coli CAP. Bs-FNR contained a four cysteine residue cluster at its C-terminal end. This is in contrast to Ec-FNR, where a similar cluster is present at the N-terminal end. It is possible that oxygen modulates the activity of both activators by a similar mechanism involving iron. Unlike in E.coli, where fnr expression is weakly repressed by anaerobiosis, fnr gene expression in B.subtilis is strongly activated by anaerobiosis. We have identified in the narK-fnr intergenic region a promotor activated by anaerobiosis independently of FNR. Thus induction of genes involved in anaerobic respiration requires in B.subtilis at least two levels of regulation: activation of fnr transcription and activation of FNR to induce transcription of FNR-dependent promoters. Images PMID:8846791

  10. A Role for Iron-Sulfur Clusters in the Regulation of Transcription Factor Yap5-dependent High Iron Transcriptional Responses in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangtao; Miao, Ren; Bertram, Sophie; Jia, Xuan; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Yeast respond to increased cytosolic iron by activating the transcription factor Yap5 increasing transcription of CCC1, which encodes a vacuolar iron importer. Using a genetic screen to identify genes involved in Yap5 iron sensing, we discovered that a mutation in SSQ1, which encodes a mitochondrial chaperone involved in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis, prevented expression of Yap5 target genes. We demonstrated that mutation or reduced expression of other genes involved in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster synthesis (YFH1, ISU1) prevented induction of the Yap5 response. We took advantage of the iron-dependent catalytic activity of Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase expressed in yeast to measure changes in cytosolic iron. We determined that reductions in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis did not affect the activity of cytosolic gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase. We show that loss of activity of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly complex proteins or deletion of cytosolic glutaredoxins did not reduce expression of Yap5 target genes. These results suggest that the high iron transcriptional response, as well as the low iron transcriptional response, senses iron-sulfur clusters. PMID:22915593

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdk8 Mediator Represses AQY1 Transcription by Inhibiting Set1p-Dependent Histone Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Law, Michael J.; Finger, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient depletion induces massive transcriptional reprogramming that relies upon communication between transcription factors, post-translational histone modifications, and the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme complex. Histone H3Lys4 methylation (H3Lys4 me), regulated by the Set1p-containing COMPASS methyltransferase complex and Jhd2p demethylase, is one of the most well-studied histone modifications. We previously demonstrated that the RNA polymerase II mediator components cyclin C-Cdk8p inhibit locus-specific H3Lys4 3me independently of Jhd2p. Here, we identify loci subject to cyclin C- and Jhd2p-dependent histone H3Lys4 3me inhibition using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq. We further characterized the independent and combined roles of cyclin C and Jhd2p in controlling H3Lys4 3me and transcription in response to fermentable and nonfermentable carbon at multiple loci. These experiments suggest that H3Lys4 3me alone is insufficient to induce transcription. Interestingly, we identified an unexpected role for cyclin C-Cdk8p in repressing AQY1 transcription, an aquaporin whose expression is normally induced during nutrient deprivation. These experiments, combined with previous work in other labs, support a two-step model in which cyclin C-Cdk8p mediate AQY1 transcriptional repression by stimulating transcription factor proteolysis and preventing Set1p recruitment to the AQY1 locus. PMID:28143948

  12. Transcription-associated recombination is dependent on replication in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gottipati, Ponnari; Cassel, Tobias N; Savolainen, Linda; Helleday, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Transcription can enhance recombination; this is a ubiquitous phenomenon from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. However, the mechanism of transcription-associated recombination in mammalian cells is poorly understood. Here we have developed a construct with a recombination substrate in which levels of recombination can be studied in the presence or absence of transcription. We observed a direct enhancement in recombination when transcription levels through the substrate were increased. This increase in homologous recombination following transcription is locus specific, since homologous recombination at the unrelated hprt gene is unaffected. In addition, we have shown that transcription-associated recombination involves both short-tract and long-tract gene conversions in mammalian cells, which are different from double-strand-break-induced recombination events caused by endonucleases. Transcription fails to enhance recombination in cells that are not in the S phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, inhibition of transcription suppresses induction of recombination at stalled replication forks, suggesting that recombination may be involved in bypassing transcription during replication.

  13. Profilin Is Required for Optimal Actin-Dependent Transcription of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genome RNA

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Emily; Mahoney, Nicole M.; Almo, Steven C.; Barik, Sailen

    2000-01-01

    Transcription of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) genome RNA exhibited an obligatory need for the host cytoskeletal protein actin. Optimal transcription, however, required the participation of another cellular protein that was characterized as profilin by a number of criteria. The amino acid sequence of the protein, purified on the basis of its transcription-optimizing activity in vitro, exactly matched that of profilin. RSV transcription was inhibited 60 to 80% by antiprofilin antibody or poly-l-proline, molecules that specifically bind profilin. Native profilin, purified from extracts of lung epithelial cells by affinity binding to a poly-l-proline matrix, stimulated the actin-saturated RSV transcription by 2.5- to 3-fold. Recombinant profilin, expressed in bacteria, stimulated viral transcription as effectively as the native protein and was also inhibited by poly-l-proline. Profilin alone, in the absence of actin, did not activate viral transcription. It is estimated that at optimal levels of transcription, every molecule of viral genomic RNA associates with approximately the following number of protein molecules: 30 molecules of L, 120 molecules of phosphoprotein P, and 60 molecules each of actin and profilin. Together, these results demonstrated for the first time a cardinal role for profilin, an actin-modulatory protein, in the transcription of a paramyxovirus RNA genome. PMID:10623728

  14. Cryptogein-Induced Transcriptional Reprogramming in Tobacco Is Light Dependent1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Hoeberichts, Frank A.; Davoine, Céline; Vandorpe, Michaël; Morsa, Stijn; Ksas, Brigitte; Stassen, Catherine; Triantaphylidès, Christian; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The fungal elicitor cryptogein triggers a light-dependent hypersensitive response in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). To assess the effect of light on this nonhost resistance in more detail, we studied various aspects of the response under dark and light conditions using the tobacco-cryptogein experimental system. Here, we show that light drastically alters the plant’s transcriptional response to cryptogein, notably by dampening the induction of genes involved in multiple processes, such as ethylene biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and glutathione turnover. Furthermore, chlorophyll fluorescence measurements demonstrated that quantum yield and functioning of the light-harvesting antennae decreased simultaneously, indicating that photoinhibition underlies the observed decreased photosynthesis and that photooxidative damage might be involved in the establishment of the altered response. Analysis of the isomer distribution of hydroxy fatty acids illustrated that, in the light, lipid peroxidation was predominantly due to the production of singlet oxygen. Differences in (reduced) glutathione concentrations and the rapid development of symptoms in the light when cryptogein was coinfiltrated with glutathione biosynthesis inhibitors suggest that glutathione might become a limiting factor during the cryptogein-induced hypersensitive response in the dark and that this response might be modified by an increased antioxidant availability in the light. PMID:23878079

  15. Cyclic AMP induces IPC leukemia cell apoptosis via CRE-and CDK-dependent Bim transcription.

    PubMed

    Huseby, S; Gausdal, G; Keen, T J; Kjærland, E; Krakstad, C; Myhren, L; Brønstad, K; Kunick, C; Schwede, F; Genieser, H-G; Kleppe, R; Døskeland, S O

    2011-12-08

    The IPC-81 cell line is derived from the transplantable BNML model of acute myelogenic leukemia (AML), known to be a reliable predictor of the clinical efficiency of antileukemic agents, like the first-line AML anthracycline drug daunorubicin (DNR). We show here that cAMP acted synergistically with DNR to induce IPC cell death. The DNR-induced death differed from that induced by cAMP by (1) not involving Bim induction, (2) being abrogated by GSK3β inhibitors, (3) by being promoted by the HSP90/p23 antagonist geldanamycin and truncated p23 and (4) by being insensitive to the CRE binding protein (CREB) antagonist ICER and to cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK) inhibitors. In contrast, the apoptosis induced by cAMP correlated tightly with Bim protein expression. It was abrogated by Bim (BCL2L11) downregulation, whether achieved by the CREB antagonist ICER, by CDK inhibitors, by Bim-directed RNAi, or by protein synthesis inhibitor. The forced expression of BimL killed IPC-81(WT) cells rapidly, Bcl2-overexpressing cells being partially resistant. The pivotal role of CREB and CDK activity for Bim transcription is unprecedented. It is also noteworthy that newly developed cAMP analogs specifically activating PKA isozyme I (PKA-I) were able to induce IPC cell apoptosis. Our findings support the notion that AML cells may possess targetable death pathways not exploited by common anti-cancer agents.

  16. The transcription factor E4F1 coordinates CHK1-dependent checkpoint and mitochondrial functions.

    PubMed

    Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Baraibar, Martín; Houlès, Thibault; Lacroix, Matthieu; Delpech, Hélène; Hatchi, Elodie; Arnould, Stéphanie; Severac, Dany; Dubois, Emeric; Caramel, Julie; Julien, Eric; Friguet, Bertrand; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2015-04-14

    Recent data support the notion that a group of key transcriptional regulators involved in tumorigenesis, including MYC, p53, E2F1, and BMI1, share an intriguing capacity to simultaneously regulate metabolism and cell cycle. Here, we show that another factor, the multifunctional protein E4F1, directly controls genes involved in mitochondria functions and cell-cycle checkpoints, including Chek1, a major component of the DNA damage response. Coordination of these cellular functions by E4F1 appears essential for the survival of p53-deficient transformed cells. Acute inactivation of E4F1 in these cells results in CHK1-dependent checkpoint deficiency and multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions that lead to increased ROS production, energy stress, and inhibition of de novo pyrimidine synthesis. This deadly cocktail leads to the accumulation of uncompensated oxidative damage to proteins and extensive DNA damage, ending in cell death. This supports the rationale of therapeutic strategies simultaneously targeting mitochondria and CHK1 for selective killing of p53-deficient cancer cells.

  17. Tumor-induced tolerance and immune suppression depend on the C/EBPbeta transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Bosio, Erika; Solito, Samantha; Mesa, Circe; Fernandez, Audry; Dolcetti, Luigi; Ugel, Stefano; Sonda, Nada; Bicciato, Silvio; Falisi, Erika; Calabrese, Fiorella; Basso, Giuseppe; Zanovello, Paola; Cozzi, Emanuele; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-06-25

    Tumor growth is associated with a profound alteration in myelopoiesis, leading to recruitment of immunosuppressive cells known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We showed that among factors produced by various experimental tumors, the cytokines GM-CSF, G-CSF, and IL-6 allowed a rapid generation of MDSCs from precursors present in mouse and human bone marrow (BM). BM-MDSCs induced by GM-CSF+IL-6 possessed the highest tolerogenic activity, as revealed by the ability to impair the priming of CD8(+) T cells and allow long term acceptance of pancreatic islet allografts. Cytokines inducing MDSCs acted on a common molecular pathway and the immunoregulatory activity of both tumor-induced and BM-derived MDSCs was entirely dependent on the C/EBPbeta transcription factor. Adoptive transfer of tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes resulted in therapy of established tumors only in mice lacking C/EBPbeta in the myeloid compartment, suggesting that C/EBPbeta is a critical regulator of the immunosuppressive environment created by growing cancers.

  18. Nup98 Is a Mobile Nucleoporin with Transcription-dependent DynamicsV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Griffis, Eric R.; Altan, Nihal; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Powers, Maureen A.

    2002-01-01

    Nucleoporin 98 (Nup98), a glycine-leucine-phenylalanine-glycine (GLFG) amino acid repeat-containing nucleoporin, plays a critical part in nuclear trafficking. Injection of antibodies to Nup98 into the nucleus blocks the export of most RNAs. Nup98 contains binding sites for several transport factors; however, the mechanism by which this nucleoporin functions has remained unclear. Multiple subcellular localizations have been suggested for Nup98. Here we show that Nup98 is indeed found both at the nuclear pore complex and within the nucleus. Inside the nucleus, Nup98 associates with a novel nuclear structure that we term the GLFG body because the GLFG domain of Nup98 is required for targeting to this structure. Photobleaching of green fluorescent protein-Nup98 in living cells reveals that Nup98 is mobile and moves between these different localizations. The rate of recovery after photobleaching indicates that Nup98 interacts with other, less mobile, components in the nucleoplasm. Strikingly, given the previous link to nuclear export, the mobility of Nup98 within the nucleus and at the pore is dependent on ongoing transcription by RNA polymerases I and II. These data give rise to a model in which Nup98 aids in direction of RNAs to the nuclear pore and provide the first potential mechanism for the role of a mobile nucleoporin. PMID:11950939

  19. AF4 uses the SL1 components of RNAP1 machinery to initiate MLL fusion- and AEP-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Hiroshi; Kanai, Akinori; Ito, Shinji; Matsui, Hirotaka; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Gene rearrangements generate MLL fusion genes, which can lead to aggressive leukemia. In most cases, MLL fuses with a gene encoding a component of the AEP (AF4 family/ENL family/P-TEFb) coactivator complex. MLL–AEP fusion proteins constitutively activate their target genes to immortalize haematopoietic progenitors. Here we show that AEP and MLL–AEP fusion proteins activate transcription through selectivity factor 1 (SL1), a core component of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) of RNA polymerase I (RNAP1). The pSER domain of AF4 family proteins associates with SL1 on chromatin and loads TATA-binding protein (TBP) onto the promoter to initiate RNA polymerase II (RNAP2)-dependent transcription. These results reveal a previously unknown transcription initiation mechanism involving AEP and a role for SL1 as a TBP-loading factor in RNAP2-dependent gene activation. PMID:26593443

  20. Transcriptional Gene Silencing Maintained by OTS1 SUMO Protease Requires a DNA-Dependent Polymerase V-Dependent Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Yan, Xiaojing; Zhao, Yiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The expression of genes with aberrant structure is prevented at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation levels. Aberrant gene silencing at the posttranscriptional level is well studied; however, it is not well understood how aberrant genes are silenced at the transcriptional level. In this study, through genetic screening a transgenic report line that harbors an aberrant gene (35S-LUC, lacking 3′-untranslated region [3′-UTR]) and lacks luciferase (LUC) activity, we identify that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease OTS1 gene is required for maintaining the silence of the reporter 35S-LUC and an endogenous mutator-like element MULE-F19G14 at the transcriptional level, which requires DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Pol) V and DDR complex, but not Pol IV. The increased transcripts in ots1 mutants are terminated by the 3′-UTRs of downstream genes. In addition to ots1 mutations, mutations in several known or putative SUMO proteases and two SUMO E3 ligases, SIZ1 and MMS21, have similar effects on this silencing regulation. Taken together, our results reveal that the enzymes involved in the SUMOylation process restrain aberrant gene transcription by using a downstream gene 3′-UTR, and this regulation requires a functional Pol V-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PMID:27852949

  1. Activation of polyomavirus DNA replication by yeast GAL4 is dependent on its transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett-Cook, E R; Hassell, J A

    1991-01-01

    The polyomavirus replication origin contains transcriptional regulatory sequences. To determine how these elements function in DNA replication, and to learn whether a common mechanism underlies the activation of transcription and DNA replication, we tested whether a well-characterized transcriptional activator, yeast GAL4, was capable of stimulating DNA replication and transcription in the same mammalian cell line. We observed that GAL4 activated polyomavirus DNA replication in mouse cells when its binding site was juxtaposed to the late border of the polyomavirus origin core. Synergistic activation of DNA replication was achieved by multimerization of the GAL4 binding site. Analysis of GAL4 mutant proteins, GAL4 hybrid proteins and mutants of the latter revealed that the activation domains of these transcriptional activators were required to stimulate DNA replication. In agreement with previously published data, the activation domains of GAL4 were also required to enhance transcription in the same mouse cell line. These observations implicate transcriptional activators in Py DNA replication and suggest that similar mechanisms govern the activation of transcription and DNA replication. Images PMID:1849079

  2. Protein Phosphatase 1-Dependent Transcriptional Programs for Long-Term Memory and Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Johannes; Koshibu, Kyoko; Jouvenceau, Anne; Dutar, Patrick; Mansuy, Isabelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is essential for the establishment and the maintenance of long-term memory (LTM) and for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity. The molecular mechanisms that control gene transcription in neuronal cells are complex and recruit multiple signaling pathways in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Protein kinases (PKs) and…

  3. RNA secondary structures regulate three steps of Rho-dependent transcription termination within a bacterial mRNA leader.

    PubMed

    Kriner, Michelle A; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2017-01-25

    Transcription termination events in bacteria often require the RNA helicase Rho. Typically, Rho promotes termination at the end of coding sequences, but it can also terminate transcription within leader regions to implement regulatory decisions. Rho-dependent termination requires initial recognition of a Rho utilization (rut) site on a nascent RNA by Rho's primary binding surface. However, it is presently unclear what factors determine the location of transcription termination, how RNA secondary structures influence this process and whether mechanistic differences distinguish constitutive from regulated Rho-dependent terminators. We previously demonstrated that the 5' leader mRNA of the Salmonella corA gene can adopt two mutually exclusive conformations that dictate accessibility of a rut site to Rho. We now report that the corA leader also controls two subsequent steps of Rho-dependent termination. First, the RNA conformation that presents an accessible rut site promotes pausing of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at a single Rho-dependent termination site over 100 nt downstream. Second, an additional RNA stem-loop promotes Rho activity and controls the location at which Rho-dependent termination occurs, despite having no effect on initial Rho binding to the corA leader. Thus, the multi-step nature of Rho-dependent termination may facilitate regulation of a given coding region by multiple cytoplasmic signals.

  4. RNA secondary structures regulate three steps of Rho-dependent transcription termination within a bacterial mRNA leader

    PubMed Central

    Kriner, Michelle A.; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2017-01-01

    Transcription termination events in bacteria often require the RNA helicase Rho. Typically, Rho promotes termination at the end of coding sequences, but it can also terminate transcription within leader regions to implement regulatory decisions. Rho-dependent termination requires initial recognition of a Rho utilization (rut) site on a nascent RNA by Rho's primary binding surface. However, it is presently unclear what factors determine the location of transcription termination, how RNA secondary structures influence this process and whether mechanistic differences distinguish constitutive from regulated Rho-dependent terminators. We previously demonstrated that the 5′ leader mRNA of the Salmonella corA gene can adopt two mutually exclusive conformations that dictate accessibility of a rut site to Rho. We now report that the corA leader also controls two subsequent steps of Rho-dependent termination. First, the RNA conformation that presents an accessible rut site promotes pausing of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at a single Rho-dependent termination site over 100 nt downstream. Second, an additional RNA stem-loop promotes Rho activity and controls the location at which Rho-dependent termination occurs, despite having no effect on initial Rho binding to the corA leader. Thus, the multi-step nature of Rho-dependent termination may facilitate regulation of a given coding region by multiple cytoplasmic signals. PMID:28123036

  5. Regulation of human papillomavirus transcription by the differentiation-dependent epithelial factor Epoc-1/skn-1a.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, K; Butz, K; Yasui, T; Kikutani, H; Hoppe-Seyler, F

    1996-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) early gene expression is closely linked to the differentiation status of infected epithelial cells. Typically, HPV type 16 (HPV16) or HPV18 E6 and E7 transcripts are only barely detectable within the undifferentiated basal cell layer, but their levels increase concomitantly with higher degrees of epithelial cell differentiation in suprabasal cells. A similar differentiation-dependent distribution of expression has been reported for the recently cloned epithelial cell specific transcription factor Epoc-1/skn-1a. We therefore examined whether Epoc-1/skn-1a may be directly involved in the activation of HPV E6/E7 transcription. Transient transfection studies showed that Epoc-1/skn-1a specifically stimulated the HPV16 and HPV18 E6/E7 promoters. Moreover, ectopically expressed Epoc-1/skn-1a was sufficient to stimulate HPV transcription also in nonepithelial cells. By deletion analyses, the Epoc-1/skn-1a-responsive element was mapped to the promoter-proximal portion of the HPV18 transcriptional control region. Footprint analyses and gel retardation assays demonstrated direct binding of Epoc-1/skn-1a to a hitherto uncharacterized site within this region. Mutation of the Epoc-1/skn-1a recognition site within the context of the complete HPV18 upstream regulatory region inhibited Epoc-1/skn-1a-mediated transactivation. These results show that Epoc-1/skn-1a can directly activate the E6/E7 promoter by binding to the viral transcriptional control region. Thus, Epoc-1/skn-1a may be involved in the differentiation-dependent regulation of HPV transcription.

  6. Transcription Elongation Factor NusA Is a General Antagonist of Rho-dependent Termination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, M Zuhaib; Dey, Debashish; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-04-08

    NusA is an essential protein that binds to RNA polymerase and also to the nascent RNA and influences transcription by inducing pausing and facilitating the process of transcription termination/antitermination. Its participation in Rho-dependent transcription termination has been perceived, but the molecular nature of this involvement is not known. We hypothesized that, because both Rho and NusA are RNA-binding proteins and have the potential to target the same RNA, the latter is likely to influence the global pattern of the Rho-dependent termination. Analyses of the nascent RNA binding properties and consequent effects on the Rho-dependent termination functions of specific NusA-RNA binding domain mutants revealed an existence of Rho-NusA direct competition for the overlappingnut(NusA-binding site) andrut(Rho-binding site) sites on the RNA. This leads to delayed entry of Rho at therutsite that inhibits the latter's RNA release process. High density tiling microarray profiles of these NusA mutants revealed that a significant number of genes, together with transcripts from intergenic regions, are up-regulated. Interestingly, the majority of these genes were also up-regulated when the Rho function was compromised. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of NusA-binding sites in different operons that are also the targets of Rho-dependent terminations. Our data strongly argue in favor of a direct competition between NusA and Rho for the access of specific sites on the nascent transcripts in different parts of the genome. We propose that this competition enables NusA to function as a global antagonist of the Rho function, which is unlike its role as a facilitator of hairpin-dependent termination.

  7. DYRK1A Controls HIV-1 Replication at a Transcriptional Level in an NFAT Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Booiman, Thijs; Loukachov, Vladimir V.; van Dort, Karel A.; van ’t Wout, Angélique B.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transcription of the HIV-1 provirus is regulated by both viral and host proteins and is very important in the context of viral latency. In latently infected cells, viral gene expression is inhibited as a result of the sequestration of host transcription factors and epigenetic modifications. Results In our present study we analyzed the effect of host factor dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) on HIV-1 replication. We show that DYRK1A controls HIV-1 replication by regulating provirus transcription. Downregulation or inhibition of DYRK1A increased LTR-driven transcription and viral replication in cell lines and primary PBMC. Furthermore, inhibition of DYRK1A resulted in reactivation of latent HIV-1 provirus to a similar extent as two commonly used broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitors. We observed that DYRK1A regulates HIV-1 transcription via the Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) by promoting its translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Therefore, inhibition of DYRK1A results in increased nuclear levels of NFAT and increased NFAT binding to the viral LTR and thus increasing viral transcription. Conclusions Our data indicate that host factor DYRK1A plays a role in the regulation of viral transcription and latency. Therefore, DYRK1A might be an attractive candidate for therapeutic strategies targeting the viral reservoir. PMID:26641855

  8. Abscisic-acid-dependent basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors in plant abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aditya; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep

    2017-01-01

    One of the major causes of significant crop loss throughout the world is the myriad of environmental stresses including drought, salinity, cold, heavy metal toxicity, and ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays. Plants as sessile organisms have evolved various effective mechanism which enable them to withstand this plethora of stresses. Most of such regulatory mechanisms usually follow the abscisic-acid (ABA)-dependent pathway. In this review, we have primarily focussed on the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) activated by the ABA-mediated signalosome. Upon perception of ABA by specialized receptors, the signal is transduced via various groups of Ser/Thr kinases, which phosphorylate the bZIP TFs. Following such post-translational modification of TFs, they are activated so that they bind to specific cis-acting sequences called abscisic-acid-responsive elements (ABREs) or GC-rich coupling elements (CE), thereby influencing the expression of their target downstream genes. Several in silico techniques have been adopted so far to predict the structural features, recognize the regulatory modification sites, undergo phylogenetic analyses, and facilitate genome-wide survey of TF under multiple stresses. Current investigations on the epigenetic regulation that controls greater accessibility of the inducible regions of DNA of the target gene to the bZIP TFs exclusively under stress situations, along with the evolved stress memory responses via genomic imprinting mechanism, have been highlighted. The potentiality of overexpression of bZIP TFs, either in a homologous or in a heterologous background, in generating transgenic plants tolerant to various abiotic stressors have also been addressed by various groups. The present review will provide a coherent documentation on the functional characterization and regulation of bZIP TFs under multiple environmental stresses, with the major goal of generating multiple-stress-tolerant plant cultivars in near future.

  9. Regulation of a Myb transcription factor by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chao-Cheng; Su, Li-Hsin; Huang, Yu-Chang; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2012-02-03

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia parasitizes the human small intestine to cause diseases. It undergoes differentiation into infectious cysts by responding to intestinal stimulation. How the activated signal transduction pathways relate to encystation stimulation remain largely unknown. During encystation, genes encoding cyst wall proteins (CWPs) are coordinately up-regulated by a Myb2 transcription factor. Because cell differentiation is linked to cell cycle regulation, we tried to understand the role of cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), in encystation. We found that the recombinant Myb2 was phosphorylated by Cdk-associated complexes and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. We have identified a putative cdk gene (cdk2) by searching the Giardia genome database. Cdk2 was found to localize in the cytoplasm with higher expression during encystation. Interestingly, overexpression of Cdk2 resulted in a significant increase of the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. In addition, the Cdk2-associated complexes can phosphorylate Myb2 and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. Mutations of important catalytic residues of Cdk2 resulted in a significant decrease of kinase activity and ability of inducing cyst formation. Addition of a Cdk inhibitor, purvalanol A, significantly decreased the Cdk2 kinase activity and the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. Our results suggest that the Cdk2 pathway may be involved in phosphorylation of Myb2, leading to activation of the Myb2 function and up-regulation of cwp genes during encystation. The results provide insights into the use of Cdk inhibitory drugs in disruption of Giardia differentiation into cysts.

  10. Dose- and Time-Dependent Transcriptional Response of Ishikawa Cells Exposed to Genistein.

    PubMed

    Naciff, Jorge M; Khambatta, Zubin S; Carr, Gregory J; Tiesman, Jay P; Singleton, David W; Khan, Sohaib A; Daston, George P

    2016-05-01

    To further define the utility of the Ishikawa cells as a reliable in vitro model to determine the potential estrogenic activity of chemicals of interest, transcriptional changes induced by genistein (GES) in Ishikawa cells at various doses (10 pM, 1 nM, 100 nM, and 10 μM) and time points (8, 24, and 48 h) were identified using a comprehensive microarray approach. Trend analysis indicated that the expression of 5342 unique genes was modified by GES in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P ≤ 0.0001). However, the majority of gene expression changes induced in Ishikawa cells were elicited by the highest dose of GES evaluated (10 μM). The GES' estrogenic activity was identified by comparing the Ishikawa cells' response to GES versus 17 α-ethynyl estradiol (EE, at equipotent doses, ie, 10 μM vs 1 μM, respectively) and was defined by changes in the expression of 284 unique genes elicited by GES and EE in the same direction, although the magnitude of the change for some genes was different. Further, comparing the response of the Ishikawa cells exposed to high doses of GES and EE versus the response of the juvenile rat uterus exposed to EE, we identified 66 unique genes which were up- or down regulated in a similar manner in vivo as well as in vitro Genistein elicits changes in multiple molecular pathways affecting various biological processes particularly associated with cell organization and biogenesis, regulation of translation, cell proliferation, and intracellular transport; processes also affected by estrogen exposure in the uterus of the rat. These results indicate that Ishikawa cells are capable of generating a biologically relevant estrogenic response and offer an in vitro model to assess this mode of action.

  11. NFATc1 Mediates HDAC-Dependent Transcriptional Repression of Osteocalcin Expression During Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Min-Kyung; Yeo, Hyeonju; Zayzafoon, Majd

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that the in vivo and in vitro suppression of Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells (NFAT) signaling increases osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. To investigate the mechanism by which NFATc1 regulates osteoblast differentiation, we established an osteoblast cell line that overexpresses a constitutively active NFATc1 (ca-NFATc1). The activation of NFATc1 significantly inhibits osteoblast differentiation and function, demonstrated by inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization as well as a decrease in gene expression of early and late markers of osteoblast differentiation such as osterix and osteocalcin, respectively. By focusing on the specific role of NFATc1 during late differentiation, we discovered that the inhibition of osteocalcin gene expression by NFATc1 was associated with a repression of the osteocalcin promoter activity, and a decrease in TCF/LEF transactivation. Also, overexpression of NFATc1 completely blocked the decrease in total histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity during osteoblast differentiation and prevented the hyperacetylation of histones H3 and H4. Mechanistically, we show by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay that the overexpression of NFATc1 sustains the binding of HDAC3 on the proximal region of the osteocalcin promoter, resulting in complete hypoacetylation of histones H3 and H4 when compared to GFP-expressing osteoblasts. In contrast, the inhibition of NFATc1 nuclear translocation either by cyclosporin or by using primary mouse osteoblasts with deleted calcineurin b1 prevents HDAC3 from associating with the proximal regulatory site of the osteocalcin promoter. These preliminary results suggest that NFATc1 acts as a transcriptional co-repressor of osteocalcin promoter possibly in an HDAC-dependent manner. PMID:19463978

  12. Snf1-independent, glucose-resistant transcription of Adr1-dependent genes in a mediator mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Young, Elton T; Yen, Kuangyu; Dombek, Kenneth M; Law, G Lynn; Chang, Ella; Arms, Erin

    2009-10-01

    Glucose represses transcription of a network of co-regulated genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ensuring that it is utilized before poorer carbon sources are metabolized. Adr1 is a glucose-regulated transcription factor whose promoter binding and activity require Snf1, the yeast homologue of the AMP-activated protein kinase in higher eukaryotes. In this study we found that a temperature-sensitive allele of MED14, a Mediator middle subunit that tethers the tail to the body, allowed a low level of Adr1-independent ADH2 expression that can be enhanced by Adr1 in a dose-dependent manner. A low level of TATA-independent ADH2 expression was observed in the med14-truncated strain and transcription of ADH2 and other Adr1-dependent genes occurred in the absence of Snf1 and chromatin remodeling coactivators. Loss of ADH2 promoter nucleosomes had occurred in the med14 strain in repressing conditions and did not require ADR1. A global analysis of transcription revealed that loss of Med14 function was associated with both up- and down- regulation of several groups of co-regulated genes, with ADR1-dependent genes being the most highly represented in the upregulated class. Expression of most genes was not significantly affected by the loss of Med14 function.

  13. Binding of TFIIIC to SINE Elements Controls the Relocation of Activity-Dependent Neuronal Genes to Transcription Factories

    PubMed Central

    Crepaldi, Luca; Policarpi, Cristina; Coatti, Alessandro; Sherlock, William T.; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Down, Thomas A.; Riccio, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, the timely and accurate expression of genes in response to synaptic activity relies on the interplay between epigenetic modifications of histones, recruitment of regulatory proteins to chromatin and changes to nuclear structure. To identify genes and regulatory elements responsive to synaptic activation in vivo, we performed a genome-wide ChIPseq analysis of acetylated histone H3 using somatosensory cortex of mice exposed to novel enriched environmental (NEE) conditions. We discovered that Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs) located distal to promoters of activity-dependent genes became acetylated following exposure to NEE and were bound by the general transcription factor TFIIIC. Importantly, under depolarizing conditions, inducible genes relocated to transcription factories (TFs), and this event was controlled by TFIIIC. Silencing of the TFIIIC subunit Gtf3c5 in non-stimulated neurons induced uncontrolled relocation to TFs and transcription of activity-dependent genes. Remarkably, in cortical neurons, silencing of Gtf3c5 mimicked the effects of chronic depolarization, inducing a dramatic increase of both dendritic length and branching. These findings reveal a novel and essential regulatory function of both SINEs and TFIIIC in mediating gene relocation and transcription. They also suggest that TFIIIC may regulate the rearrangement of nuclear architecture, allowing the coordinated expression of activity-dependent neuronal genes. PMID:23966877

  14. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016.

  15. Dynamic subnuclear relocalization of WRKY40, a potential new mechanism of ABA-dependent transcription factor regulation.

    PubMed

    Geilen, Katja; Böhmer, Maik

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone ABA plays a major role during plant development, e.g. seed maturation and seed germination, and during adaptation to abiotic stresses like stomatal aperture regulation. The three closely related WRKY transcription factors WRKY18, WRKY40 and WRKY60 function in ABA signal transduction. We recently demonstrated that WRKY18 and WRKY40 but not WRKY60 localize to nuclear bodies in A. thaliana mesophyll protoplasts. WRKY40, a negative regulator of ABA-dependent inhibition of seed germination, relocalizes from PNBs to the nucleoplasm in the presence of ABA in a dynamic and phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that subnuclear relocalization of WRKY40 might constitute a new regulatory mechanism of ABA-dependent modulation of transcription factor activity.

  16. Dioxin-dependent activation of murine Cyp1a-1 gene transcription requires protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, F; Owens, R A; Nebert, D W; Puga, A

    1992-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of the murine Cyp1a-1 (cytochrome P(1)450) gene by inducers such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (dioxin) requires the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor and the interaction of an inducer-receptor complex with one or more of the Ah-responsive elements (AhREs) located about 1 kb upstream from the transcriptional initiation site. We find that treatment of mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cells with 2-aminopurine, an inhibitor of protein kinase activity, inhibits CYP1A1 mRNA induction by TCDD as well as the concomitant increase in CYP1A1 enzyme activity. Formation of DNA-protein complexes between the Ah receptor and its AhRE target is also inhibited by 2-aminopurine, as determined by gel mobility shift assays. Phosphorylation is required for the formation of Ah receptor-specific complexes, since in vitro dephosphorylation of nuclear extracts from TCDD-treated Hepa-1 cells abolishes the capacity of the Ah receptor to form specific complexes with its cognate AhRE sequences. To determine whether any one of several known protein kinases was involved in the transcriptional regulation of the Cyp1a-1 gene, we treated Hepa-1 cells with nine other protein kinase inhibitors prior to induction with TCDD; nuclear extracts from these cells were analyzed for their capacity to form specific DNA-protein complexes. Only extracts from cells treated with staurosporine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, were unable to form these complexes. In addition, staurosporine completely inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA induction by TCDD. Depletion of protein kinase C by prolonged treatment with phorbol ester led to the complete suppression of CYP1A1 mRNA induction by TCDD. We conclude that (i) phosphorylation is necessary for the formation of a transcriptional complex and for transcriptional activation of the Cyp1a-1 gene; (ii) the phosphorylation site(s) exists on at least one of the proteins constituting the transcriptional complex, possibly the Ah receptor itself; and (iii) the

  17. Transcription reactivation during the first meiotic prophase in bugs is not dependent on synapsis.

    PubMed

    Viera, Alberto; Parra, María Teresa; Rufas, Julio S; Page, Jesús

    2016-02-22

    During meiosis, transcription is precisely regulated in relation to the process of chromosome synapsis. In mammals, transcription is very low until the completion of synapsis in early pachytene, and then reactivates during mid pachytene, up to the end of diplotene. Moreover, chromosomes or chromosomal regions that do not achieve synapsis undergo a specific process of inactivation called meiotic silencing of unpaired chromatin (MSUC). Sex chromosomes, which are mostly unsynapsed, present a special case of inactivation named meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Although processes that are similar to MSUC/MSCI have been described in other species like Sordaria and Caenorhabditis elegans, very few studies have been developed in insects. We present a study on the relationships between synapsis and transcription in two hemipteran species (Graphosoma italicum and Carpocoris fuscispinus) that possess holocentric chromosomes but develop different synaptic patterns. We have found that transcription, revealed by the presence of RNA polymerase II, is very low at the beginning of meiosis, but robustly increases during zygotene, long before the completion of synapsis, excepting in the sex chromosomes. In fact, we show that histone H3 methylation at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) may be present in the sex chromosomes at leptotene, thus acting as a likely epigenetic mark for this inactive state. Our results suggest that the meiotic transcription in these two species is differently regulated from that of mammals and, therefore, offer new opportunities to understand the relationship between synapsis and transcription and the mechanisms that govern MSUC/MSCI processes.

  18. mTOR-dependent activation of the transcription factor TIF-IA links rRNA synthesis to nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christine; Zhao, Jian; Yuan, Xuejun; Grummt, Ingrid

    2004-02-15

    In cycling cells, transcription of ribosomal RNA genes by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is tightly coordinated with cell growth. Here, we show that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates Pol I transcription by modulating the activity of TIF-IA, a regulatory factor that senses nutrient and growth-factor availability. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin inactivates TIF-IA and impairs transcription-initiation complex formation. Moreover, rapamycin treatment leads to translocation of TIF-IA into the cytoplasm. Rapamycin-mediated inactivation of TIF-IA is caused by hypophosphorylation of Se 44 (S44) and hyperphosphorylation of Se 199 (S199). Phosphorylation at these sites affects TIF-IA activity in opposite ways, for example, phosphorylation of S44 activates and S199 inactivates TIF-IA. The results identify a new target formTOR-signaling pathways and elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying mTOR-dependent regulation of RNA synthesis.

  19. Definition of the transcriptional activation domains of three human HOX proteins depends on the DNA-binding context.

    PubMed

    Viganò, M A; Di Rocco, G; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F

    1998-11-01

    Hox proteins control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting as positive or negative regulators of still unidentified downstream target genes. The homeodomain and other small accessory sequences encode the DNA-protein and protein-protein interaction functions which ultimately dictate target recognition and functional specificity in vivo. The effector domains responsible for either positive or negative interactions with the cell transcriptional machinery are unknown for most Hox proteins, largely due to a lack of physiological targets on which to carry out functional analysis. We report the identification of the transcriptional activation domains of three human Hox proteins, HOXB1, HOXB3, and HOXD9, which interact in vivo with the autoregulatory and cross-regulatory enhancers of the murine Hoxb-1 and human HOXD9 genes. Activation domains have been defined both in a homologous context, i.e., within a HOX protein binding as a monomer or as a HOX-PBX heterodimer to the specific target, and in a heterologous context, after translocation to the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain. Transfection analysis indicates that activation domains can be identified in different regions of the three HOX proteins depending on the context in which they interact with the DNA target. These results suggest that Hox proteins may be multifunctional transcriptional regulators, interacting with different cofactors and/or components of the transcriptional machinery depending on the structure of their target regulatory elements.

  20. Transcription activation by the siderophore sensor Btr is mediated by ligand-dependent stimulation of promoter clearance

    PubMed Central

    Gaballa, Ahmed; MacLellan, Shawn; Helmann, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial transcription factors often function as DNA-binding proteins that selectively activate or repress promoters, although the biochemical mechanisms vary. In most well-understood examples, activators function by either increasing the affinity of RNA polymerase (RNAP) for the target promoter, or by increasing the isomerization of the initial closed complex to the open complex. We report that Bacillus subtilis Btr, a member of the AraC family of activators, functions principally as a ligand-dependent activator of promoter clearance. In the presence of its co-activator, the siderophore bacillibactin (BB), the Btr:BB complex enhances productive transcription, while having only modest effects on either RNAP promoter association or the production of abortive transcripts. Btr binds to two direct repeat sequences adjacent to the −35 region; recognition of the downstream motif is most important for establishing a productive interaction between the Btr:BB complex and RNAP. The resulting Btr:BB dependent increase in transcription enables the production of the ferric-BB importer to be activated by the presence of its cognate substrate. PMID:22210890

  1. Exploitation of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Transcription Factor Dependencies by the Novel BET Inhibitor ABBV-075.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Emily J; Wilcox, Denise; Lin, Xiaoyu; Hessler, Paul; Torrent, Maricel; He, Wei; Uziel, Tamar; Albert, Daniel H; McDaniel, Keith; Kati, Warren; Shen, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Competitive inhibitors of acetyl-lysine binding to the bromodomains of the BET (bromodomain and extra terminal) family are being developed for the treatment of solid and hematologic malignancies. The function of BET family member BRD4 at enhancers/superenhancers has been shown to sustain signal-dependent or pathogenic gene expression programs. Here, the hypothesis was tested that the transcription factor drivers of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) clinical progression, including the androgen receptor (AR), are critically dependent on BRD4 and thus represent a sensitive solid tumor indication for the BET inhibitor ABBV-075. DHT-stimulated transcription of AR target genes was inhibited by ABBV-075 without significant effect on AR protein expression. Furthermore, ABBV-075 disrupted DHT-stimulated recruitment of BET family member BRD4 to gene-regulatory regions cooccupied by AR, including the well-established PSA and TMPRSS2 enhancers. Persistent BET inhibition disrupted the composition and function of AR-occupied enhancers as measured by a reduction in AR and H3K27Ac ChIP signal and inhibition of enhancer RNA transcription. ABBV-075 displayed potent antiproliferative activity in multiple models of resistance to second-generation antiandrogens and inhibited the activity of the AR splice variant AR-V7 and ligand-binding domain gain-of-function mutations, F877L and L702H. ABBV-075 was also a potent inhibitor of MYC and the TMPRSS2-ETS fusion protein, important parallel transcription factor drivers of CRPC.

  2. Signal-dependent Elk-1 target genes involved in transcript processing and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kasza, Aneta

    2013-10-01

    Elk-1 was regarded as a transcription factor engaged mainly in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Recent findings show the engagement of Elk-1 in the control of expression of genes encoding proteins involved in transcript turnover, such as MCPIP1/ZC3H12A and tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36). Thus, Elk-1 plays an important role in the control of gene expression not only through the stimulation of expression of transcription factors, but also through regulation of transcript half-live. Moreover, Elk-1 is engaged in the regulation of expression of genes encoding proteins that control proteolytic activity, such as inhibitor of plasminogen activator-1 (PAI-1) and metalloproteinases-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9). This review summarizes the biological roles of proteins with expression regulated by Elk-1, involved in transcripts turnover or in cell migration. The broad range of function of these proteins illustrates the complex role of Elk-1 in the regulation of cancer and inflammation.

  3. DNA methylation regulates phenotype-dependent transcriptional activity in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant K.; Baum, Mary; Carbon, John

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a common epigenetic signaling mechanism associated with silencing of repeated DNA and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes. Here we report that DNA methylation in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is primarily localized within structural genes and modulates transcriptional activity. Major repeat sequences and multigene families are largely free of DNA methylation. Among the genes subject to DNA methylation are those associated with dimorphic transition between yeast and hyphal forms, switching between white and opaque cells, and iron metabolism. Transcriptionally repressed methylated loci showed increased frequency of C-to-T transitions during asexual growth, an evolutionarily stable pattern of repression associated mutation that could bring about genetic alterations under changing environmental or host conditions. Dynamic differential DNA methylation of structural genes may be one factor contributing to morphological plasticity that is cued by nutrition and host interaction. PMID:21730141

  4. Tryptophan Codon-Dependent Transcription in Chlamydia pneumoniae during Gamma Interferon-Mediated Tryptophan Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Rueden, Kelsey J.; Rucks, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    In evolving to an obligate intracellular niche, Chlamydia has streamlined its genome by eliminating superfluous genes as it relies on the host cell for a variety of nutritional needs like amino acids. However, Chlamydia can experience amino acid starvation when the human host cell in which the bacteria reside is exposed to interferon gamma (IFN-γ), which leads to a tryptophan (Trp)-limiting environment via induction of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The stringent response is used to respond to amino acid starvation in most bacteria but is missing from Chlamydia. Thus, how Chlamydia, a Trp auxotroph, responds to Trp starvation in the absence of a stringent response is an intriguing question. We previously observed that C. pneumoniae responds to this stress by globally increasing transcription while globally decreasing translation, an unusual response. Here, we sought to understand this and hypothesized that the Trp codon content of a given gene would determine its transcription level. We quantified transcripts from C. pneumoniae genes that were either rich or poor in Trp codons and found that Trp codon-rich transcripts were increased, whereas those that lacked Trp codons were unchanged or even decreased. There were exceptions, and these involved operons or large genes with multiple Trp codons: downstream transcripts were less abundant after Trp codon-rich sequences. These data suggest that ribosome stalling on Trp codons causes a negative polar effect on downstream sequences. Finally, reassessing previous C. pneumoniae microarray data based on codon content, we found that upregulated transcripts were enriched in Trp codons, thus supporting our hypothesis. PMID:27400720

  5. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  6. Identification and characterization of multiple conserved nuclear localization signals within adenovirus E1A

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kris S.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Greg J.; Todorovic, Biljana; King, Cason R.; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zhang, Zhiying; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-04-15

    The human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) E1A protein has a well defined canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at its C-terminus. We used a genetic assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate that the canonical NLS is present and functional in the E1A proteins of each of the six HAdV species. This assay also detects a previously described non-canonical NLS within conserved region 3 and a novel active NLS within the N-terminal/conserved region 1 portion of HAdV-5 E1A. These activities were also present in the E1A proteins of each of the other five HAdV species. These results demonstrate that, despite substantial differences in primary sequence, HAdV E1A proteins are remarkably consistent in that they contain one canonical and two non-canonical NLSs. By utilizing independent mechanisms, these multiple NLSs ensure nuclear localization of E1A in the infected cell. - Highlights: • HAdV E1A uses multiple mechanisms for nuclear import. • We identified an additional non-canonical NLS in the N-terminal/CR1 portion of E1A. • The new NLS does not contact importin-alpha directly. • All NLSs are functionally conserved in the E1A proteins of all 6 HAdV species.

  7. Context-dependent regulation of the β-catenin transcriptional complex supports diverse functions of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takamasa; Ishitani, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is activated repeatedly during an animal's lifespan, and it controls gene expression through its essential nuclear effector, β-catenin, to regulate embryogenesis, organogenesis, and adult homeostasis. Although the β-catenin transcriptional complex has the ability to induce the expression of many genes to exert its diverse roles, it chooses and transactivates a specific gene set from among its numerous target genes depending on the context. For example, the β-catenin transcriptional complex stimulates the expression of cell cycle-related genes and consequent cell proliferation in neural progenitor cells, while it promotes the expression of neural differentiation-related genes in differentiating neurons. Recent studies using animal and cell culture models have gradually improved our understanding of the molecular basis underlying such context-dependent actions of the β-catenin transcriptional complex. Here, we describe eight mechanisms that support β-catenin-mediated context-dependent gene regulation, and their spatio-temporal regulation during vertebrate development. In addition, we discuss their contribution to the diverse functions of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  8. SMARCAD1 is an ATP-dependent stimulator of nucleosomal H2A acetylation via CBP, resulting in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Doiguchi, Masamichi; Nakagawa, Takeya; Imamura, Yuko; Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Higashi, Miki; Kubota, Kazuishi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Asahara, Hiroshi; Iida, Midori; Fujii, Satoshi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Liu, Ziying; Nandu, Tulip; Kraus, W. Lee; Ueda, Hitoshi; Ito, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, and ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling activity is required for optimal transcription from chromatin. While these two activities have been well characterized, how they are coordinated remains to be determined. We discovered ATP-dependent histone H2A acetylation activity in Drosophila nuclear extracts. This activity was column purified and demonstrated to be composed of the enzymatic activities of CREB-binding protein (CBP) and SMARCAD1, which belongs to the Etl1 subfamily of the Snf2 family of helicase-related proteins. SMARCAD1 enhanced acetylation by CBP of H2A K5 and K8 in nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent fashion. Expression array analysis of S2 cells having ectopically expressed SMARCAD1 revealed up-regulated genes. Using native genome templates of these up-regulated genes, we found that SMARCAD1 activates their transcription in vitro. Knockdown analysis of SMARCAD1 and CBP indicated overlapping gene control, and ChIP-seq analysis of these commonly controlled genes showed that CBP is recruited to the promoter prior to SMARCAD1. Moreover, Drosophila genetic experiments demonstrated interaction between SMARCAD1/Etl1 and CBP/nej during development. The interplay between the remodeling activity of SMARCAD1 and histone acetylation by CBP sheds light on the function of chromatin and the genome-integrity network. PMID:26888216

  9. Onset and organ specificity of Tk2 deficiency depends on Tk1 down-regulation and transcriptional compensation.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Beatriz; Area, Estela; Akman, Hasan O; Hirano, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency of thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a frequent cause of isolated myopathy or encephalomyopathy in children with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. To determine the bases of disease onset, organ specificity and severity of TK2 deficiency, we have carefully characterized Tk2 H126N knockin mice (Tk2-/-). Although normal until postnatal day 8, Tk2-/- mice rapidly develop fatal encephalomyopathy between postnatal days 10 and 13. We have observed that wild-type Tk2 activity is constant in the second week of life, while Tk1 activity decreases significantly between postnatal days 8 and 13. The down-regulation of Tk1 activity unmasks Tk2 deficiency in Tk2-/- mice and correlates with the onset of mtDNA depletion in the brain and the heart. Resistance to pathology in Tk2 mutant organs depends on compensatory mechanisms to the reduced mtDNA level. Our analyses at postnatal day 13 have revealed that Tk2-/- heart significantly increases mitochondrial transcript levels relative to the mtDNA content. This transcriptional compensation allows the heart to maintain normal levels of mtDNA-encoded proteins. The up-regulation in mitochondrial transcripts is not due to increased expression of the master mitochondrial biogenesis regulators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha and nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2, or to enhanced expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors A, B1 or B2. Instead, Tk2-/- heart compensates for mtDNA depletion by down-regulating the expression of the mitochondrial transcriptional terminator transcription factor 3 (MTERF3). Understanding the molecular mechanisms that allow Tk2 mutant organs to be spared may help design therapies for Tk2 deficiency.

  10. Poly(A)-Driven and Poly(A)-Assisted Termination: Two Different Modes of Poly(A)-Dependent Transcription Termination

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, George; Choi, Louis M.; Chao, Lily C.; Park, Noh Jin; Liu, Dahai; Jamil, Amer; Martinson, Harold G.

    1998-01-01

    We mapped the elements that mediate termination of transcription downstream of the chicken βH- and βA-globin gene poly(A) sites. We found no unique element and no segment of 3′-flanking DNA to be significantly more effective than any other. When we replaced the native 3′-flanking DNA with bacterial DNA, it too supported transcription termination. Termination in the bacterial DNA depended on a functional poly(A) signal, which apparently compelled termination to occur in the downstream DNA with little regard for its sequence. We also studied premature termination by poorly processive polymerases close to the promoter. The rate of premature termination varied for different DNA sequences. However, the efficiencies of poly(A)-driven termination and promoter-proximal premature termination varied similarly on different DNAs, suggesting that poly(A)-driven termination functions by returning the transcription complex to a form which resembles a prior state of low processivity. The poly(A)-driven termination described here differs dramatically from the poly(A)-assisted termination previously described for the simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription unit. In the SV40 early transcription unit, essentially no termination occurs downstream of the poly(A) site unless a special termination element is present. The difference between the βH-globin and SV40 modes of termination is governed by sequences in the upstream DNA. For maximum efficiency, the βH-globin poly(A) signal required the assistance of upstream enhancing sequences. Moreover, the SV40 early poly(A) signal also drove termination in βH-globin style when it was placed in a βH-globin sequence context. These studies were facilitated by a rapid, improved method of run-on transcription analysis, based on the use of a vector containing two G-free cassettes. PMID:9418875

  11. c-Myc-dependent transcriptional regulation of cell cycle and nucleosomal histones during oligodendrocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Laura; Gacias, Mar; Wu, Muzhou; Swiss, Victoria A; Janssen, William G; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) have the ability to divide or to arrest growth and differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes in the developing brain. Due to their high number and the persistence of their proliferative capacity in the adult brain, OPCs are being studied as potential targets for myelin repair and also as potential source of brain tumors. This study addresses the molecular mechanisms regulating the transcriptional changes occurring at the critical transition between proliferation and cell cycle exit in cultured OPCs. Using bioinformatic analysis of existing datasets, we identified c-Myc as a key transcriptional regulator of this transition and confirmed direct binding of this transcription factor to identified target genes using chromatin immunoprecipitation. The expression of c-Myc was elevated in proliferating OPCs, where it also bound to the promoter of genes involved in cell cycle regulation (i.e. Cdc2) or chromosome organization (i.e. H2afz). Silencing of c-Myc was associated with decreased histone acetylation at target gene promoters and consequent decrease of gene transcripts. c-Myc silencing induced also a global increase of repressive histone methylation and premature nuclear peripheral chromatin compaction and promoted the progression of OPCs towards differentiation. We conclude that c-Myc is an important modulator of the transition between proliferation and differentiation of OPCs, although its decrease is not sufficient to induce progression into a myelinating phenotype. PMID:24502923

  12. Akirin: a context-dependent link between transcription and chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Scott J; Baylies, Mary K

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic patterning relies upon an exquisitely timed program of gene regulation. While the regulation of this process via the action of transcription factor networks is well understood, new lines of study have highlighted the importance of a concurrently regulated program of chromatin remodeling during development. Chromatin remodeling refers to the manipulation of the chromatin architecture through rearrangement, repositioning, or restructuring of nucleosomes to either favor or hinder the expression of associated genes. While the role of chromatin remodeling pathways during tumor development and cancer progression are beginning to be clarified, the roles of these pathways in the course of tissue specification, morphogenesis and patterning remains relatively unknown. Further, relatively little is understood as to the mechanism whereby developmentally critical transcription factors coordinate with chromatin remodeling factors to optimize target gene loci for gene expression. Such a mechanism might involve direct transcription factor/chromatin remodeling factor interactions, or could likely be mediated via an unknown intermediary. Our group has identified the relatively unknown protein Akirin as a putative member of this latter group: a secondary cofactor that serves as an interface between a developmentally critical transcription factor and the chromatin remodeling machinery. This role for the Akirin protein suggests a novel regulatory mode for regulating gene expression during development.

  13. CAR and PXR-dependent transcriptional changes in the mouse liver after exposure to propiconazole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the conazoles propiconazole and triadimefon but not myclobutanilled to tumors in mice after 2 years. Transcript profiling studies in the livers ofwild-type mice after short-term exposure to the conazoles revealed signatures indicating the involvement ofthe nuclear rec...

  14. p53 inhibits RNA polymerase III-directed transcription in a promoter-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokov, I; Chu, W M; Botchan, M R; Schmid, C W

    1996-01-01

    Wild-type p53 represses Alu template activity in vitro and in vivo. However, upstream activating sequence elements from both the 7SL RNA gene and an Alu source gene relieve p53-mediated repression. p53 also represses the template activity of the U6 RNA gene both in vitro and in vivo but has no effect on in vitro transcription of genes encoding 5S RNA, 7SL RNA, adenovirus VAI RNA, and tRNA. The N-terminal activation domain of p53, which binds TATA-binding protein (TBP), is sufficient for repressing Alu transcription in vitro, and mutation of positions 22 and 23 in this region impairs p53-mediated repression of an Alu template both in vitro and in vivo. p53's N-terminal domain binds TFIIIB, presumably through its known interaction with TBP, and mutation of positions 22 and 23 interferes with TFIIIB binding. These results extend p53's transcriptional role to RNA polymerase III-directed templates and identify an additional level of Alu transcriptional regulation. PMID:8943363

  15. Heat Stress-Induced Cup9-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of SIR2

    PubMed Central

    Laskar, Shyamasree; K, Sheeba; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal K.; Nair, Achuthsankar S.; Dhar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic writer Sir2 maintains the heterochromatin state of chromosome in three chromosomal regions, namely, the silent mating type loci, telomeres, and the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). In this study, we demonstrated the mechanism by which Sir2 is regulated under heat stress. Our study reveals that a transient heat shock causes a drastic reduction in the SIR2 transcript which results in sustained failure to initiate silencing for as long as 90 generations. Hsp82 overexpression, which is the usual outcome of heat shock treatment, leads to a similar downregulation of SIR2 transcription. Using a series of genetic experiments, we have established that heat shock or Hsp82 overexpression causes upregulation of CUP9 that, in turn, represses SIR2 transcription by binding to its upstream activator sequence. We have mapped the cis regulatory element of SIR2. Our study shows that the deletion of cup9 causes reversal of the Hsp82 overexpression phenotype and upregulation of SIR2 expression in heat-induced Hsp82-overexpressing cells. On the other hand, we found that Cup9 overexpression represses SIR2 transcription and leads to a failure in the establishment of heterochromatin. The results of our study highlight the mechanism by which environmental factors amend the epigenetic configuration of chromatin. PMID:25384977

  16. Rift Valley fever virus NSs inhibits host transcription independently of the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase PKR.

    PubMed

    Kalveram, Birte; Lihoradova, Olga; Indran, Sabarish V; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Head, Jennifer A; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-20

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) encodes one major virulence factor, the NSs protein. NSs suppresses host general transcription, including interferon (IFN)-β mRNA synthesis, and promotes degradation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). We generated a novel RVFV mutant (rMP12-NSsR173A) specifically lacking the function to promote PKR degradation. rMP12-NSsR173A infection induces early phosphorylation of eIF2α through PKR activation, while retaining the function to inhibit host general transcription including IFN-β gene inhibition. MP-12 NSs but not R173A NSs binds to wt PKR. R173A NSs formed filamentous structure in nucleus in a mosaic pattern, which was distinct from MP-12 NSs filament pattern. Due to early phosphorylation of eIF2α, rMP12-NSsR173A could not efficiently accumulate viral proteins. Our results suggest that NSs-mediated host general transcription suppression occurs independently of PKR degradation, while the PKR degradation is important to inhibit the phosphorylation of eIF2α in infected cells undergoing host general transcription suppression.

  17. Gene transcription is coordinated with, but not dependent on, cell divisions during C. elegans embryonic fate specification.

    PubMed

    Nair, Gautham; Walton, Travis; Murray, John Isaac; Raj, Arjun

    2013-08-01

    Cell differentiation and proliferation are coordinated during animal development, but the link between them remains uncharacterized. To examine this relationship, we combined single-molecule RNA imaging with time-lapse microscopy to generate high-resolution measurements of transcriptional dynamics in Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. We found that globally slowing the overall development rate of the embryo by altering temperature or by mutation resulted in cell proliferation and transcription slowing, but maintaining, their relative timings, suggesting that cell division may directly control transcription. However, using mutants with specific defects in cell cycle pathways that lead to abnormal lineages, we found that the order between cell divisions and expression onset can switch, showing that expression of developmental regulators is not strictly dependent on cell division. Delaying cell divisions resulted in only slight changes in absolute expression time, suggesting that expression and proliferation are independently entrained to a separate clock-like process. These changes in relative timing can change the number of cells expressing a gene at a given time, suggesting that timing may help determine which cells adopt particular transcriptional patterns. Our results place limits on the types of mechanisms that are used during normal development to ensure that division timing and fate specification occur at appropriate times.

  18. Analysis of PBase Binding Profile Indicates an Insertion Target Selection Mechanism Dependent on TTAA, But Not Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Liao, Ruiqi; Zheng, Yun; Sun, Ling; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Transposons and retroviruses are important pathogenic agents and tools for mutagenesis and transgenesis. Insertion target selection is a key feature for a given transposon or retrovirus. The piggyBac (PB) transposon is highly active in mice and human cells, which has a much better genome-wide distribution compared to the retrovirus and P-element. However, the underlying reason is not clear. Utilizing a tagged functional PB transposase (PBase), we were able to conduct genome-wide profiling for PBase binding sites in the mouse genome. We have shown that PBase binding mainly depends on the distribution of the tetranucleotide TTAA, which is not affected by the presence of PB DNA. Furthermore, PBase binding is negatively influenced by the methylation of CG sites in the genome. Analysis of a large collection of PB insertions in mice has revealed an insertion profile similar to the PBase binding profile. Interestingly, this profile is not correlated with transcriptional active genes in the genome or transcriptionally active regions within a transcriptional unit. This differs from what has been previously shown for P-element and retroviruses insertions. Our study provides an explanation for PB's genome-wide insertion distribution and also suggests that PB target selection relies on a new mechanism independent of active transcription and open chromatin structure. PMID:27570481

  19. Association of p107 with Sp1: genetically separable regions of p107 are involved in regulation of E2F- and Sp1-dependent transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Datta, P K; Raychaudhuri, P; Bagchi, S

    1995-01-01

    The retinoblastoma-related protein p107 has been shown to be a regulator of the transcription factor E2F. p107 associates with E2F via its pocket region and represses E2F-dependent transcription. In this study, we provide evidence for a novel interaction between p107 and the transcription factor Sp1. We show that p107 can be found endogenously associated with Sp1 in the extracts of several different cell lines. Moreover, in transient transfection assays, expression of p107 represses Sp1-dependent transcription. This repression of Sp1-dependent transcription does not require the DNA-binding domain of Sp1. Transcription driven by a chimeric protein containing the Ga14 DNA-binding domain and the Sp1 activation domains is inhibited by p107. Interestingly, unlike the repression of E2F-dependent transcription, the repression of Sp1-dependent transcription does not depend on an intact pocket region. We show that distinct regions of p107 are involved in the control of Sp1 and E2F. PMID:7565695

  20. Replication-Dependent and Transcription-Dependent Mechanisms of DNA Double-Strand Break Induction by the Topoisomerase 2-Targeting Drug Etoposide

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, Margaret; Barr, Peri; Ricci, Brett; Yan, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Etoposide is a DNA topoisomerase 2-targeting drug widely used for the treatment of cancer. The cytoxicity of etoposide correlates with the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the mechanism of how it induces DSBs in cells is still poorly understood. Catalytically, etoposide inhibits the re-ligation reaction of Top2 after it nicks the two strands of DNA, trapping it in a cleavable complex consisting of two Top2 subunits covalently linked to the 5’ ends of DNA (Top2cc). Top2cc is not directly recognized as a true DSB by cells because the two subunits interact strongly with each other to hold the two ends of DNA together. In this study we have investigated the cellular mechanisms that convert Top2ccs into true DSBs. Our data suggest that there are two mechanisms, one dependent on active replication and the other dependent on proteolysis and transcription. The relative contribution of each mechanism is affected by the concentration of etoposide. We also find that Top2α is the major isoform mediating the replication-dependent mechanism and both Top2α and Top2 mediate the transcription-dependent mechanism. These findings are potentially of great significance to the improvement of etoposide’s efficacy in cancer therapy. PMID:24244448

  1. Replication-dependent and transcription-dependent mechanisms of DNA double-strand break induction by the topoisomerase 2-targeting drug etoposide.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, Margaret; Barr, Peri; Ricci, Brett; Yan, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Etoposide is a DNA topoisomerase 2-targeting drug widely used for the treatment of cancer. The cytoxicity of etoposide correlates with the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the mechanism of how it induces DSBs in cells is still poorly understood. Catalytically, etoposide inhibits the re-ligation reaction of Top2 after it nicks the two strands of DNA, trapping it in a cleavable complex consisting of two Top2 subunits covalently linked to the 5' ends of DNA (Top2cc). Top2cc is not directly recognized as a true DSB by cells because the two subunits interact strongly with each other to hold the two ends of DNA together. In this study we have investigated the cellular mechanisms that convert Top2ccs into true DSBs. Our data suggest that there are two mechanisms, one dependent on active replication and the other dependent on proteolysis and transcription. The relative contribution of each mechanism is affected by the concentration of etoposide. We also find that Top2α is the major isoform mediating the replication-dependent mechanism and both Top2α and Top2 mediate the transcription-dependent mechanism. These findings are potentially of great significance to the improvement of etoposide's efficacy in cancer therapy.

  2. Interneuron Transcriptional Dysregulation Causes Frequency-Dependent Alterations in the Balance of Inhibition and Excitation in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Aundrea F.; Lucas, Elizabeth K.; Brady, Lillian J.; Li, Qin; Hablitz, John J.; Cowell, Rita M.

    2015-01-01

    Circuit dysfunction in complex brain disorders such as schizophrenia and autism is caused by imbalances between inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission (I/E). Short-term plasticity differentially alters responses from excitatory and inhibitory synapses, causing the I/E ratio to change as a function of frequency. However, little is known about I/E ratio dynamics in complex brain disorders. Transcriptional dysregulation in interneurons, particularly parvalbumin interneurons, is a consistent pathophysiological feature of schizophrenia. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator that in hippocampus is highly concentrated in inhibitory interneurons and regulates parvalbumin transcription. Here, we used PGC-1α−/− mice to investigate effects of interneuron transcriptional dysregulation on the dynamics of the I/E ratio at the synaptic and circuit level in hippocampus. We find that loss of PGC-1α increases the I/E ratio onto CA1 pyramidal cells in response to Schaffer collateral stimulation in slices from young adult mice. The underlying mechanism is enhanced basal inhibition, including increased inhibition from parvalbumin interneurons. This decreases the spread of activation in CA1 and dramatically limits pyramidal cell spiking, reducing hippocampal output. The I/E ratio and CA1 output are partially restored by paired-pulse stimulation at short intervals, indicating frequency-dependent effects. However, circuit dysfunction persists, indicated by alterations in kainate-induced gamma oscillations and impaired nest building. Together, these results show that transcriptional dysregulation in hippocampal interneurons causes frequency-dependent alterations in I/E ratio and circuit function, suggesting that PGC-1α deficiency in psychiatric and neurological disorders contributes to disease by causing functionally relevant alterations in I/E balance. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Alteration in the inhibitory and

  3. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  4. Cartography of hematopoietic stem cell commitment dependent upon a reporter for transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Koichi

    2007-06-01

    A hierarchical hematopoietic developmental tree has been proposed based on the result of prospective purification of lineage-restricted progenitors. For more detailed mapping for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) commitment, we tracked the expression of PU.1, a major granulocyte/monocyte (GM)- and lymphoid-related transcription factor, from the HSC to the myelolymphoid progenitor stages by using a mouse line harboring a knockin reporter for PU.1. This approach enabled us to find a new progenitor population committed to GM and lymphoid lineages within the HSC fraction. This result suggests that there should be another developmental pathway independent of the conventional one with myeloid versus lymphoid bifurcation, represented by common myeloid progenitors and common lymphoid progenitors, respectively. The utilization of the transcription factor expression as a functional marker might be useful to obtain cartography of the hematopoietic development at a higher resolution.

  5. Transcription Termination Signals in the Nin Region of Bacteriophage Lambda: Identification of Rho-Dependent Termination Regions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, SWC.; Court, D. L.; Friedman, D. I.

    1995-01-01

    The ~3-kb nin region of bacteriophage λ, located between genes P and Q contains transcription termination signals as well as 10 open reading frames. Deletions in the nin region frees phage growth from dependence on the λ-encoded N-transcription antitermination system, conferring a Nin phenotype (N-independence). A subregion of nin, roc, is defined by a 1.9-kb deletion (δroc) which partially frees λ growth from the requirement for N antitermination. The roc region has strong transcription termination activity as assayed by a plasmid-based terminator testing system. We report the following features of the roc region: the biologically significant terminators in the roc region are Rho dependent, deletion analysis located the biologically significant termination signals to a 1.2 kb-segment of roc, and analysis of other deletions and point mutations in the roc region suggested at least two biologically significant regions of termination, tR3 (extending from bp 42020 to 42231) and tR4 (extending from bp 42630 to 42825). PMID:7672588

  6. E2F-7 couples DNA damage-dependent transcription with the DNA repair process.

    PubMed

    Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Coutts, Amanda S; Helleday, Thomas; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2013-09-15

    The cellular response to DNA damage, mediated by the DNA repair process, is essential in maintaining the integrity and stability of the genome. E2F-7 is an atypical member of the E2F family with a role in negatively regulating transcription and cell cycle progression under DNA damage. Surprisingly, we found that E2F-7 makes a transcription-independent contribution to the DNA repair process, which involves E2F-7 locating to and binding damaged DNA. Further, E2F-7 recruits CtBP and HDAC to the damaged DNA, altering the local chromatin environment of the DNA lesion. Importantly, the E2F-7 gene is a target for somatic mutation in human cancer and tumor-derived mutant alleles encode proteins with compromised transcription and DNA repair properties. Our results establish that E2F-7 participates in 2 closely linked processes, allowing it to directly couple the expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response with the DNA repair machinery, which has relevance in human malignancy.

  7. Knockout of the transcription factor Nrf2 disrupts spermatogenesis in an age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Brooke N.; Lawson, Gregory; Chan, Jefferson Y.; Banuelos, Jésus; Cortés, Mabel M.; Hoang, Yvonne D.; Ortiz, Laura; Rau, Bogdan A.; Luderer, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs when generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms antioxidant defenses. Oxidative stress has been associated with male infertility. The transcription factor Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) regulates basal and inducible transcription of genes encoding enzymes important for protection against ROS. We hypothesized that deletion of the Nrf2 gene causes testicular and epididymal oxidative stress, which disrupts spermatogenesis. Our results show that male Nrf2−/− mice have decreased fertility compared to wild type and heterozygous littermates, due to accumulating seminiferous tubule damage with increasing age. Testicular sperm head counts, epididymal sperm counts, and epididymal sperm motility in 2 month old Nrf2−/− males did not differ from wild type littermates; however, by age 6 months, Nrf2−/− males had 44% lower testicular sperm head counts, 65% lower epididymal sperm counts, and 66% lower epididymal sperm motility than wild type males. Two to 4 month old Nrf2−/− males had elevated levels of testicular and epididymal lipid peroxidation and testicular germ cell apoptosis, and decreased levels of antioxidants compared to wild type males. These results provide evidence that oxidative stress has deleterious effects on the testis and epididymis and demonstrate a critical role for the transcription factor NRF2 in preventing oxidative disruption of spermatogenesis. PMID:20692336

  8. SRRM4-dependent neuron-specific alternative splicing of protrudin transcripts regulates neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Takafumi; Shirane, Michiko; Nakayama, Keiichi I.

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing gives rise to diversity of the proteome, and it is especially prevalent in the mammalian nervous system. Indeed, many factors that control the splicing process govern nervous system development. Among such factors, SRRM4 is an important regulator of aspects of neural differentiation including neurite outgrowth. The mechanism by which SRRM4 regulates neurite outgrowth has remained poorly understood, however. We now show that SRRM4 regulates the splicing of protrudin gene (Zfyve27) transcripts in neuronal cells. SRRM4 was found to promote splicing of protrudin pre-mRNA so as to include a microexon (exon L) encoding seven amino acids in a neuron-specific manner. The resulting protein (protrudin-L) promotes neurite outgrowth during neurogenesis. Depletion of SRRM4 in Neuro2A cells impaired inclusion of exon L in protrudin mRNA, resulting in the generation of a shorter protein isoform (protrudin-S) that is less effective at promoting neurite extension. SRRM4 was found to recognize a UGC motif that is located immediately upstream of exon L and is necessary for inclusion of exon L in the mature transcript. Deletion of exon L in Neuro2A or embryonic stem cells inhibited neurite outgrowth. Our results suggest that SRRM4 controls neurite outgrowth through regulation of alternative splicing of protrudin transcripts. PMID:28106138

  9. FSH-Receptor Isoforms and FSH-dependent Gene Transcription in Human Monocytes and Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina; Wang, Yujuan; Sharrow, Allison C; Landau, Michael S; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B; Li, Sun; Zaidi, Mone; Blair, Harry C

    2010-01-01

    Cells of the monocyte series respond to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) by poorly characterized mechanisms. We studied FSH-receptors (FSH-R) and FSH response in nontransformed human monocytes and in osteoclasts differentiated from these cells. Western blot and PCR confirmed FSH-R expression on monocytes or osteoclasts, although at low levels relative to ovarian controls. Monocyte and osteoclast FSH-Rs differed from FSH-R from ovarian cells, reflecting variable splicing in exons 8–10. Monocytes produced no cAMP, the major signal in ovarian cells, in response to FSH. However, monocytes or osteoclasts transcribed TNFα in response to the FSH. No relation of expression of osteoclast FSH-R to the sex of cell donors or to exposure to sex hormones was apparent. Controls for FSH purity and endotoxin contamination were negative. Unamplified cRNA screening in adherent CD14 cells after 2 hours in 25 ng/ml FSH showed increased transcription of RANKL signalling proteins. Transcription of key proteins that stimulate bone turnover, TNFα and TSG-6, increased 2–3 fold after FSH treatment. Smaller but significant changes occurred in transcripts of selected signalling, adhesion, and cytoskeletal proteins. We conclude that monocyte and osteoclast FSH response diverges from that of ovarian cells, reflecting, at least in part, varying FSH-R isoforms. PMID:20171950

  10. Thyroid hormone-dependent transcriptional repression of neural cell adhesion molecule during brain maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, T; Caubín, J; Stunnenberg, H G; Zaballos, A; Bernal, J; Muñoz, A

    1996-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) is a main regulator of brain development acting as a transcriptional modulator. However, only a few T3-regulated brain genes are known. Using an improved whole genome PCR approach, we have isolated seven clones encoding sequences expressed in neonatal rat brain which are under the transcriptional control of T3. Six of them, including the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM, alpha-tubulin and four other unidentified sequences (RBA3, RBA4, RBB3 and RBB5) were found to be upregulated in the hypothyroid brain, whereas another (RBE7) was downregulated. Binding sites for the T3 receptor (T3R/c-erbA) were identified in the isolated clones by gel-shift and footprinting assays. Sites in the NCAM (in an intron), alpha-tubulin (in an exon) and RBA4 clones mediated transcriptional regulation by T3 when inserted upstream of a reporter construct. However, no effect of the NCAM clone was found when located downstream of another reporter gene. Northern blotting and in situ hybridization studies showed a higher expression of NCAM in the brain of postnatal hypothyroid rats. Since NCAM is an important morphoregulatory molecule, abnormal NCAM expression is likely to contribute to the alterations present in the brain of thyroid-deficient humans and experimental animals. Images PMID:8861959

  11. Conformational changes accompany activation of reovirus RNA-dependent RNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Israel I.; Weiner, Scott G.; She, Yi-Min; Yeager, Mark; Coombs, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Many critical biologic processes involve dynamic interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. Such dynamic processes are often difficult to delineate by conventional static methods. For example, while a variety of nucleic acid polymerase structures have been determined at atomic resolution, the details of how some multi-protein transcriptase complexes actively produce mRNA, as well as conformational changes associated with activation of such complexes, remain poorly understood. The mammalian reovirus innermost capsid (core) manifests all enzymatic activities necessary to produce mRNA from each of the 10 encased double-stranded RNA genes. We used rapid freezing and electron cryo-microscopy to trap and visualize transcriptionally active reovirus core particles and compared them to inactive core images. Rod-like density centered within actively transcribing core spike channels was attributed to exiting nascent mRNA. Comparative radial density plots of active and inactive core particles identified several structural changes in both internal and external regions of the icosahedral core capsid. Inactive and transcriptionally active cores were partially digested with trypsin and identities of initial tryptic peptides determined by mass spectrometry. Differentially-digested peptides, which also suggest transcription-associated conformational changes, were placed within the known 3-dimensional structures of major core proteins. PMID:18321727

  12. A systematic analysis of factors localized to damaged chromatin reveals PARP-dependent recruitment of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Izhar, Lior; Adamson, Britt; Ciccia, Alberto; Lewis, Jedd; Pontano-Vaites, Laura; Leng, Yumei; Liang, Anthony C.; Westbrook, Thomas F.; Harper, J. Wade; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Localization to sites of DNA damage is a hallmark of DNA damage response (DDR) proteins. To identify new DDR factors, we screened epitope-tagged proteins for localization to sites of chromatin damaged by UV laser microirradiation and found >120 proteins that localize to damaged chromatin. These include the BAF tumor suppressor complex and the ALS candidate protein TAF15. TAF15 contains multiple domains that bind damaged chromatin in a PARP-dependent manner, suggesting a possible role as glue that tethers multiple PAR chains together. Many positives were transcription factors and >70% of randomly tested transcription factors localized to sites of DNA damage and approximately 90% were PARP-dependent for localization. Mutational analyses showed that localization to damaged chromatin is DNA-binding domain-dependent. By examining Hoechst staining patterns at damage sites, we see evidence of chromatin decompaction that is PARP-dependent. We propose that PARP-regulated chromatin remodeling at sites of damage allows transient accessibility of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:26004182

  13. Structural Analysis and Insights into the Oligomeric State of an Arginine-Dependent Transcriptional Regulator from Bacillus halodurans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Woo; Kang, Jina; Yeo, Hyun Ku; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The arginine repressor (ArgR) is an arginine-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the arginine biosynthesis and catabolic pathways. ArgR is a functional homolog of the arginine-dependent repressor/activator AhrC from Bacillus subtilis, and belongs to the ArgR/AhrC family of transcriptional regulators. In this research, we determined the structure of the ArgR (Bh2777) from Bacillus halodurans at 2.41 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The ArgR from B. halodurans appeared to be a trimer in a size exclusion column and in the crystal structure. However, it formed a hexamer in the presence of L-arginine in multi-angle light scattering (MALS) studies, indicating the oligomerization state was dependent on the presence of L-arginine. The trimeric structure showed that the C-terminal domains form the core, which was made by inter-subunit interactions mainly through hydrophobic contacts, while the N-terminal domains containing a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif were arranged around the periphery. The arrangement of trimeric structure in the B. halodurans ArgR was different from those of other ArgR homologs previously reported. We finally showed that the B. halodurans ArgR has an arginine-dependent DNA binding property by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. PMID:27171430

  14. Cdk2-dependent phosphorylation of Id2 modulates activity of E2A-related transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, E; Hall, M; Peters, G

    1997-01-01

    The helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein Id2 is thought to affect the balance between cell growth and differentiation by negatively regulating the function of basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. Id2 acts by forming heterodimers that are unable to bind to specific (E-box) DNA sequences. Here we show that this activity can be overcome by phosphorylation of a serine residue within a consensus target site for cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). In vitro, Id2 can be phosphorylated by either cyclin E-Cdk2 or cyclin A-Cdk2 but not by cyclin D-dependent kinases. Analogous phosphorylation occurs in serum-stimulated human diploid fibroblasts at a time in late G1 consistent with the appearance of active cyclin E-Cdk2. The phosphorylation of Id2 in these cells correlates with the restoration of a distinct E-box-dependent DNA-binding complex, suggesting that the levels of this complex are modulated by both the abundance and phosphorylation status of Id2. These data provide a link between cyclin-dependent kinases and bHLH transcription factors that may be critical for the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:9029153

  15. Gamma-Secretase-Dependent and -Independent Effects of Presenilin1 on β-Catenin·Tcf-4 Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Casagolda, David; del Valle, Beatriz; Baulida, Josep; de Herreros, Antonio García; Duñach, Mireia

    2008-01-01

    Presenilin1 (PS1) is a component of the γ-secretase complex mutated in cases of Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). PS1 is synthesized as a 50 kDa peptide subsequently processed to two 29 and 20 kDa subunits that remain associated. Processing of PS1 is inhibited by several mutations detected in FAD patients. PS1 acts as negative modulator of β-catenin·Tcf-4 transcriptional activity. In this article we show that in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) the mechanisms of action of the processed and non-processed forms of PS1 on β-catenin·Tcf-4 transcription are different. Whereas non-processed PS1 inhibits β-catenin·Tcf-4 activity through a mechanism independent of γ-secretase and associated with the interaction of this protein with plakoglobin and Tcf-4, the effect of processed PS1 is prevented by γ-secretase inhibitors, and requires its interaction with E- or N-cadherin and the generation of cytosolic terminal fragments of these two cadherins, which in turn destabilize the β-catenin transcriptional cofactor CBP. Accordingly, the two forms of PS1 interact differently with E-cadherin or β-catenin and plakoglobin: whereas processed PS1 binds E-cadherin with high affinity and β-catenin or plakoglobin weakly, the non-processed form behaves inversely. Moreover, contrarily to processed PS1, that decreases the levels of c-fos RNA, non-processed PS1 inhibits the expression c-myc, a known target of β-catenin·Tcf-4, and does not block the activity of other transcriptional factors requiring CBP. These results indicate that prevention of PS1 processing in FAD affects the mechanism of repression of the transcriptional activity dependent on β-catenin. PMID:19114997

  16. A Druggable TCF4- and BRD4-Dependent Transcriptional Network Sustains Malignancy in Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Ceribelli, Michele; Hou, Zhiying Esther; Kelly, Priscilla N; Huang, Da Wei; Wright, George; Ganapathi, Karthik; Evbuomwan, Moses O; Pittaluga, Stefania; Shaffer, Arthur L; Marcucci, Guido; Forman, Stephen J; Xiao, Wenming; Guha, Rajarshi; Zhang, Xiaohu; Ferrer, Marc; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Jaffe, Elaine S; Thomas, Craig J; Reizis, Boris; Staudt, Louis M

    2016-11-14

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is an aggressive and largely incurable hematologic malignancy originating from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Using RNAi screening, we identified the E-box transcription factor TCF4 as a master regulator of the BPDCN oncogenic program. TCF4 served as a faithful diagnostic marker of BPDCN, and its downregulation caused the loss of the BPDCN-specific gene expression program and apoptosis. High-throughput drug screening revealed that bromodomain and extra-terminal domain inhibitors (BETis) induced BPDCN apoptosis, which was attributable to disruption of a BPDCN-specific transcriptional network controlled by TCF4-dependent super-enhancers. BETis retarded the growth of BPDCN xenografts, supporting their clinical evaluation in this recalcitrant malignancy.

  17. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-02-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies.

  18. Two mechanisms for putrescine-dependent transcriptional expression of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Sik; Shin, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2014-09-01

    In this study, on evaluating the physiological function and mechanism of putrescine, we found that putrescine supplementation (1 mM) increases transcription of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG. Putrescine-dependent expression was confirmed by measuring β-galactosidase activity and with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To understand the role of putrescine in ygjG expression, we genetically characterized and found that a knockout mutation in an alternative sigma factor, rpoS, abolished putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression. In the rpoS mutant, RpoS overexpression complemented the mutant phenotype. However, RpoS overexpression induced ygjG-lacZ expression with putrescine supplementation but not without supplementation. We also found that the loss of putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression induced by rpoS was completely restored under nitrogen-starvation conditions. The putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ under this condition was clearly dependent on another alternative sigma factor, rpoN, and its cognate activator ntrC. These results show that rpoS is required for putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression, but the effect of putrescine on this expression is not caused by simple modulation of RpoS synthesis. Putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ was controlled by at least two sigma factors: rpoS under excess nitrogen conditions and rpoN under nitrogen-starvation conditions. These results suggest that putrescine plays an important role in the nitrogen regulation system.

  19. Density-dependent interference of aphids with caterpillar-induced defenses in Arabidopsis: involvement of phytohormones and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kroes, Anneke; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    In nature, plants are exposed to attacks by multiple herbivore species at the same time. To cope with these attacks, plants regulate defenses with the production of hormones such as salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA). Because herbivore densities are dynamic in time, this may affect plant-mediated interactions between different herbivores attacking at the same time. In Arabidopsis thaliana, feeding by Brevicoryne brassicae aphids interferes with induced defenses against Plutella xylostella caterpillars. This is density dependent: at a low aphid density, the growth rate of P. xylostella was increased, whereas caterpillars feeding on plants colonized by aphids at a high density have a reduced growth rate. Growth of P. xylostella larvae was unaffected on sid2-1 or on dde2-2 mutant plants when feeding simultaneously with a low or high aphid density. This shows that aphid interference with caterpillar-induced defenses requires both SA and JA signal transduction pathways. Transcriptional analysis revealed that simultaneous feeding by caterpillars and aphids at a low density induced the expression of the SA transcription factor gene WRKY70 whereas expression of WRKY70 was lower in plants induced with both caterpillars and a high aphid density. Interestingly, the expression of the JA transcription factor gene MYC2 was significantly higher in plants simultaneously attacked by aphids at a high density and caterpillars. These results indicate that a lower expression level of WRKY70 leads to significantly higher MYC2 expression through SA-JA cross-talk. Thus, plant-mediated interactions between aphids and caterpillars are density dependent and involve phytohormonal cross-talk and differential activation of transcription factors.

  20. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new

  1. SREBP-2 negatively regulates FXR-dependent transcription of FGF19 in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hata, Tatsuya; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2014-01-10

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor that positively regulates transcription of target genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. In the present study, we have investigated a possible involvement of SREBP-2 in human intestinal expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)19, which is an endocrine hormone involved in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Overexpression of constitutively active SREBP-2 decreased FGF19 mRNA levels in human colon-derived LS174T cells. In reporter assays, active SREBP-2 overexpression suppressed GW4064/FXR-mediated increase in reporter activities in regions containing the IR-1 motif (+848 to +5200) in the FGF19 gene. The suppressive effect disappeared in reporter activities in the region containing the IR-1 motif when the mutation was introduced into the IR-1 motif. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, binding of the FXR/retinoid X receptor α heterodimer to the IR-1 motif was attenuated by adding active SREBP-2, but SREBP-2 binding to the IR-1 motif was not observed. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, specific binding of FXR to the IR-1-containing region of the FGF19 gene (+3214 to +3404) was increased in LS174T cells by treatment with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. Specific binding of SREBP-2 to FXR was observed in glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays. These results suggest that SREBP-2 negatively regulates the FXR-mediated transcriptional activation of the FGF19 gene in human intestinal cells.

  2. Hematopoietic and Leukemic Stem Cells Have Distinct Dependence on Tcf1 and Lef1 Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuyang; Li, Fengyin; Xing, Shaojun; Zhao, Tianyan; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-05-20

    Hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells (HSCs and LSCs) have self-renewal ability to maintain normal hematopoiesis and leukemia propagation, respectively. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors are expressed in HSCs, and targeting both factors modestly expanded the size of the HSC pool due to diminished HSC quiescence. Functional defects of Tcf1/Lef1-deficient HSCs in multi-lineage blood reconstitution was only evident under competitive conditions or when subjected to repeated regenerative stress. These are mechanistically due to direct positive regulation of Egr and Tcf3 by Tcf1 and Lef1, and significantly, forced expression of Egr1 in Tcf1/Lef1-deficient HSCs restored HSC quiescence. In a preclinical CML model, loss of Tcf1/Lef1 did not show strong impact on leukemia initiation and progression. However, when transplanted into secondary recipients, Tcf1/Lef1-deficient LSCs failed to propagate CML. By induced deletion of Tcf1 and Lef1 in pre-established CML, we further demonstrated an intrinsic requirement for these factors in LSC self-renewal. When combined with imatinib therapy, genetic targeting of Tcf1 and Lef1 potently diminished LSCs and conferred better protection to the CML recipients. LSCs are therefore more sensitive to loss of Tcf1 and Lef1 than HSCs in their self-renewal capacity. The differential requirements in HSCs and LSCs thus identify Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors as novel therapeutic targets in treating hematological malignancies, and inhibition of Tcf1/Lef1-regulated transcriptional programs may thus provide a therapeutic window to eliminate LSCs with minimal side effect on normal HSC functions.

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells)-dependent transcription: a role for the transcription factor NFATc4 in neurotrophin-mediated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Groth, Rachel D; Mermelstein, Paul G

    2003-09-03

    A member of the neurotrophin family, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates neuronal survival and differentiation during development. Within the adult brain, BDNF is also important in neuronal adaptive processes, such as the activity-dependent plasticity that underlies learning and memory. These long-term changes in synaptic strength are mediated through alterations in gene expression. However, many of the mechanisms by which BDNF is linked to transcriptional and translational regulation remain unknown. Recently, the transcription factor NFATc4 (nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform 4) was discovered in neurons, where it is believed to play an important role in long-term changes in neuronal function. Interestingly, NFATc4 is particularly sensitive to the second messenger systems activated by BDNF. Thus, we hypothesized that NFAT-dependent transcription may be an important mediator of BDNF-induced plasticity. In cultured rat CA3-CA1 hippocampal neurons, BDNF activated NFAT-dependent transcription via TrkB receptors. Inhibition of calcineurin blocked BDNF-induced nuclear translocation of NFATc4, thus preventing transcription. Further, phospholipase C was a critical signaling intermediate between BDNF activation of TrkB and the initiation of NFAT-dependent transcription. Both inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3)-mediated release of calcium from intracellular stores and activation of protein kinase C were required for BDNF-induced NFAT-dependent transcription. Finally, increased expression of IP3 receptor 1 and BDNF after neuronal exposure to BDNF was linked to NFAT-dependent transcription. These results suggest that NFATc4 plays a crucial role in neurotrophin-mediated synaptic plasticity.

  4. The dose dependence of glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression results from changes in the number of transcriptionally active templates.

    PubMed Central

    Ko, M S; Nakauchi, H; Takahashi, N

    1990-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones induce the transcription of genes having glucocorticoid response elements in a dose dependent manner. To determine whether this dose dependence represents a response of individual templates or of the mass of templates, we introduced a bacterial beta-galactosidase gene linked to the glucocorticoid-inducible enhancer/promoter of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MTV) into Ltk- cells and obtained stable transformants containing a single or a few templates per cell. Visual inspection and flow cytometry analysis by enzyme histochemistry assay for beta-galactosidase revealed that individual cells showed very heterogeneous beta-galactosidase activity after 48 h induction with dexamethasone. When the glucocorticoid concentration was increased, an increasing cell population producing beta-galactosidase was observed. These phenomena were probably not due to heterogeneity of template copy number or to a predetermined cellular state among individual cells, since cells forming a single small colony gave similar results. This was also supported by data showing that recloned cells retained both their responsiveness to the glucocorticoid hormone and their digestion pattern in Southern blotting analyses. These results indicate that the dose dependent increase of glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression is caused by an increase in the number of transcriptionally active templates. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 8. PMID:2167833

  5. Commensal gut bacteria modulate phosphorylation-dependent PPARγ transcriptional activity in human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; de Wouters, Tomas; Jacouton, Elsa; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Lapaque, Nicolas; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2017-01-01

    In healthy subjects, the intestinal microbiota interacts with the host’s epithelium, regulating gene expression to the benefit of both, host and microbiota. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood, however. Although many gut bacteria are not yet cultured, constantly growing culture collections have been established. We selected 57 representative commensal bacterial strains to study bacteria-host interactions, focusing on PPARγ, a key nuclear receptor in colonocytes linking metabolism and inflammation to the microbiota. Conditioned media (CM) were harvested from anaerobic cultures and assessed for their ability to modulate PPARγ using a reporter cell line. Activation of PPARγ transcriptional activity was linked to the presence of butyrate and propionate, two of the main metabolites of intestinal bacteria. Interestingly, some stimulatory CMs were devoid of these metabolites. A Prevotella and an Atopobium strain were chosen for further study, and shown to up-regulate two PPARγ-target genes, ANGPTL4 and ADRP. The molecular mechanisms of these activations involved the phosphorylation of PPARγ through ERK1/2. The responsible metabolites were shown to be heat sensitive but markedly diverged in size, emphasizing the diversity of bioactive compounds found in the intestine. Here we describe different mechanisms by which single intestinal bacteria can directly impact their host’s health through transcriptional regulation. PMID:28266623

  6. Commensal gut bacteria modulate phosphorylation-dependent PPARγ transcriptional activity in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; de Wouters, Tomas; Jacouton, Elsa; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Lapaque, Nicolas; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Blottière, Hervé M

    2017-03-07

    In healthy subjects, the intestinal microbiota interacts with the host's epithelium, regulating gene expression to the benefit of both, host and microbiota. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood, however. Although many gut bacteria are not yet cultured, constantly growing culture collections have been established. We selected 57 representative commensal bacterial strains to study bacteria-host interactions, focusing on PPARγ, a key nuclear receptor in colonocytes linking metabolism and inflammation to the microbiota. Conditioned media (CM) were harvested from anaerobic cultures and assessed for their ability to modulate PPARγ using a reporter cell line. Activation of PPARγ transcriptional activity was linked to the presence of butyrate and propionate, two of the main metabolites of intestinal bacteria. Interestingly, some stimulatory CMs were devoid of these metabolites. A Prevotella and an Atopobium strain were chosen for further study, and shown to up-regulate two PPARγ-target genes, ANGPTL4 and ADRP. The molecular mechanisms of these activations involved the phosphorylation of PPARγ through ERK1/2. The responsible metabolites were shown to be heat sensitive but markedly diverged in size, emphasizing the diversity of bioactive compounds found in the intestine. Here we describe different mechanisms by which single intestinal bacteria can directly impact their host's health through transcriptional regulation.

  7. Cardiac hypertrophy induced by active Raf depends on Yorkie-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph P; Wu, Huihui; Wolf, Matthew J

    2015-02-03

    Organ hypertrophy can result from enlargement of individual cells or from cell proliferation or both. Activating mutations in the serine-threonine kinase Raf cause cardiac hypertrophy and contribute to Noonan syndrome in humans. Cardiac-specific expression of activated Raf also causes hypertrophy in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that Yorkie (Yki), a transcriptional coactivator in the Hippo pathway that regulates organ size, is required for Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy in flies. Although aberrant activation of Yki orthologs stimulates cardiac hyperplasia in mice, cardiac-specific expression of an activated mutant form of Yki in fruit flies caused cardiac hypertrophy without hyperplasia. Knockdown of Yki caused cardiac dilation without loss of cardiomyocytes and prevented Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In flies, Yki-induced cardiac hypertrophy required the TEA domain-containing transcription factor Scalloped, and, in mammalian cells, expression of mouse Raf(L613V), an activated form of Raf with a Noonan syndrome mutation, increased Yki-induced Scalloped activity. Furthermore, overexpression of Tgi (a Tondu domain-containing Scalloped-binding corepressor) in the fly heart abrogated Yki- or Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Thus, crosstalk between Raf and Yki occurs in the heart and can influence Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy.

  8. Maltose-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of the mal Regulon by MalR in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Manzoor, Irfan; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    The maltose regulon (mal regulon) has previously been shown to consist of the mal gene cluster (malMP, malXCD and malAR operons) in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, we have further elucidated the complete mal regulon in S. pneumoniae D39 using microarray analyses and β-galactosidase assays. In addition to the mal gene cluster, the complete mal regulon of S. pneumoniae D39 consists of a pullulanase (PulA), a glucosidase (DexB), a glucokinase (RokB), a PTS component (PtsG) and an amylase (AmyA2). Our microarray studies and β-galactosidase assays further showed that the LacI-family transcriptional regulator MalR represses the expression of the mal regulon in the absence of maltose. Furthermore, the role of the pleiotropic transcriptional regulator CcpA in the regulation of the mal regulon in the presence of maltose was explored. Our microarray analysis with a ΔccpA strain showed that CcpA only represses the expression of the malXCD operon and the pulA gene in the presence of maltose. Hence, we extend the mal regulon now consisting of pulA, dexB, rokB, ptsG and amyA2 in addition to malMP, malXCD and malAR operons.

  9. The adenoviral E1B 55-kilodalton protein controls expression of immune response genes but not p53-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel L; Rickards, Brenden; Mashiba, Michael; Huang, Wenying; Flint, S J

    2009-04-01

    The human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55-kDa protein modulates several cellular processes, including activation of the tumor suppressor p53. Binding of the E1B protein to the activation domain of p53 inhibits p53-dependent transcription. This activity has been correlated with the transforming activity of the E1B protein, but its contribution to viral replication is not well understood. To address this issue, we used microarray hybridization methods to examine cellular gene expression in normal human fibroblasts (HFFs) infected by Ad5, the E1B 55-kDa-protein-null mutant Hr6, or a mutant carrying substitutions that impair repression of p53-dependent transcription. Comparison of the changes in cellular gene expression observed in these and our previous experiments (D. L. Miller et al., Genome Biol. 8:R58, 2007) by significance analysis of microarrays indicated excellent reproducibility. Furthermore, we again observed that Ad5 infection led to efficient reversal of the p53-dependent transcriptional program. As this same response was also induced in cells infected by the two mutants, we conclude that the E1B 55-kDa protein is not necessary to block activation of p53 in Ad5-infected cells. However, groups of cellular genes that were altered in expression specifically in the absence of the E1B protein were identified by consensus k-means clustering of the hybridization data. Statistical analysis of the enrichment of genes associated with specific functions in these clusters established that the E1B 55-kDa protein is necessary for repression of genes encoding proteins that mediate antiviral and immune defenses.

  10. Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR(ER)) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA(+) ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPR(ER) genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA(+) ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPR(ER) genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPR(ER) genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes.

  11. Anaphase promoting complex-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, Denis; Solomon, Mark J

    2011-07-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an essential ubiquitin ligase that targets cell cycle proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation in mitosis and G1. The APC regulates a number of cell cycle processes, including spindle assembly, mitotic exit, and cytokinesis, but the full range of its functions is still unknown. To better understand cellular pathways controlled by the APC, we performed a proteomic screen to identify additional APC substrates. We analyzed cell cycle-regulated proteins whose expression peaked during the period when other APC substrates were expressed. Subsequent analysis identified several proteins, including the transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1, as authentic APC substrates. We found that APC(Cdh1) targeted Nrm1 and Yhp1 for degradation in early G1 through Destruction-box motifs and that the degradation of these repressors coincided with transcriptional activation of MBF and Mcm1 target genes, respectively. In addition, Nrm1 was stabilized by phosphorylation, most likely by the budding yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase, Cdc28. We found that expression of stabilized forms of Nrm1 and Yhp1 resulted in reduced cell fitness, due at least in part to incomplete activation of G1-specific genes. Therefore, in addition to its known functions, APC-mediated targeting of Nrm1 and Yhp1 coordinates transcription of multiple genes in G1 with other cell cycle events.

  12. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, Ubc1, indirectly regulates SNF1 kinase activity via Forkhead-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Rubin; Lobanova, Liubov; Waldner, Amanda; Fu, Anthony; Xiao, Linda; Harkness, Troy A.; Arnason, Terra G.

    2016-01-01

    The SNF1 kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to study the regulation and function of the AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) family of serine-threonine protein kinases. Yeast discoveries regarding the regulation of this non-hormonal sensor of metabolic/environmental stress are conserved in higher eukaryotes, including poly-ubiquitination of the α-subunit of yeast (Snf1) and human (AMPKα) that ultimately effects subunit stability and enzyme activity. The ubiquitin-cascade enzymes responsible for targeting Snf1 remain unknown, leading us to screen for those that impact SNF1 kinase function. We identified the E2, Ubc1, as a regulator of SNF1 kinase function. The decreased Snf1 abundance found upon deletion of Ubc1 is not due to increased degradation, but instead is partly due to impaired SNF1 gene expression, arising from diminished abundance of the Forkhead 1/2 proteins, previously shown to contribute to SNF1 transcription. Ultimately, we report that the Fkh1/2 cognate transcription factor, Hcm1, fails to enter the nucleus in the absence of Ubc1. This implies that Ubc1 acts indirectly through transcriptional effects to modulate SNF1 kinase activity. PMID:28357323

  13. Stem cell-dependent formation of a functional anterior regeneration pole in planarians requires Zic and Forkhead transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Vogg, Matthias C; Owlarn, Suthira; Pérez Rico, Yuvia A; Xie, Jianlei; Suzuki, Yoko; Gentile, Luca; Wu, Wei; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2014-06-15

    Planarians can regenerate their head within days. This process depends on the direction of adult stem cells to wound sites and the orchestration of their progenitors to commit to appropriate lineages and to arrange into patterned tissues. We identified a zinc finger transcription factor, Smed-ZicA, as a downstream target of Smed-FoxD, a Forkhead transcription factor required for head regeneration. Smed-zicA and Smed-FoxD are co-expressed with the Wnt inhibitor notum and the Activin inhibitor follistatin in a cluster of cells at the anterior-most tip of the regenerating head - the anterior regeneration pole - and in surrounding stem cell progeny. Depletion of Smed-zicA and Smed-FoxD by RNAi abolishes notum and follistatin expression at the pole and inhibits head formation downstream of initial polarity decisions. We suggest a model in which ZicA and FoxD transcription factors synergize to control the formation of Notum- and Follistatin-producing anterior pole cells. Pole formation might constitute an early step in regeneration, resulting in a signaling center that orchestrates cellular events in the growing tissue.

  14. A caveolin-dependent and PI3K/AKT-independent role of PTEN in β-catenin transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Perez, Alejandro; Gros, Gwendoline; Longvert, Christine; Pedersen, Malin; Petit, Valérie; Aktary, Zackie; Viros, Amaya; Gesbert, Franck; Delmas, Véronique; Rambow, Florian; Bastian, Boris C.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Colombo, Sophie; Puig, Isabel; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Sansom, Owen; Marais, Richard; Van Kempen, Leon C. L. T.; Larue, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Loss of the tumour suppressor PTEN is frequent in human melanoma, results in MAPK activation, suppresses senescence and mediates metastatic behaviour. How PTEN loss mediates these effects is unknown. Here we show that loss of PTEN in epithelial and melanocytic cell lines induces the nuclear localization and transcriptional activation of β-catenin independent of the PI3K–AKT–GSK3β axis. The absence of PTEN leads to caveolin-1 (CAV1)-dependent β-catenin transcriptional modulation in vitro, cooperates with NRASQ61K to initiate melanomagenesis in vivo and induces efficient metastasis formation associated with E-cadherin internalization. The CAV1-β–catenin axis is mediated by a feedback loop in which β-catenin represses transcription of miR-199a-5p and miR-203, which suppress the levels of CAV1 mRNA in melanoma cells. These data reveal a mechanism by which loss of PTEN increases CAV1-mediated dissociation of β-catenin from membranous E-cadherin, which may promote senescence bypass and metastasis. PMID:26307673

  15. Oxidative stress activates FUS1 and RLM1 transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in an oxidant-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Staleva, Liliana; Hall, Andrea; Orlow, Seth J

    2004-12-01

    Mating in haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs after activation of the pheromone response pathway. Biochemical components of this pathway are involved in other yeast signal transduction networks. To understand more about the coordination between signaling pathways, we used a "chemical genetic" approach, searching for compounds that would activate the pheromone-responsive gene FUS1 and RLM1, a reporter for the cell integrity pathway. We found that catecholamines (l-3,4-hydroxyphenylalanine [l-dopa], dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline) elevate FUS1 and RLM1 transcription. N-Acetyl-cysteine, a powerful antioxidant in yeast, completely reversed this effect, suggesting that FUS1 and RLM1 activation in response to catecholamines is a result of oxidative stress. The oxidant hydrogen peroxide also was found to activate transcription of an RLM1 reporter. Further genetic analysis combined with immunoblotting revealed that Kss1, one of the mating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Mpk1, an MAPK of the cell integrity pathway, participated in l-dopa-induced stimulation of FUS1 and RLM1 transcription. We also report that Mpk1 and Hog1, the high osmolarity MAPK, were phosphorylated upon induction by hydrogen peroxide. Together, our results demonstrate that cells respond to oxidative stress via different signal transduction machinery dependent upon the nature of the oxidant.

  16. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath; Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar; Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  17. Down-regulation of histone H2B by DNA-dependent protein kinase in response to DNA damage through modulation of octamer transcription factor 1.

    PubMed

    Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Shih, Amy; Yarymowich, Nicholas C; Haché, Robert J G

    2003-11-01

    Cells respond to double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) by pausing cell cycle progression to allow the repair machinery to restore genomic integrity. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), comprising a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(cs)) and the Ku antigen regulatory subunit (Ku70/Ku80), is activated in response to DSBs and is required for DNA repair through the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Here we provide evidence that DNA-PK participates in altering specific gene expression in response to DNA damage by modulating the stability and transcriptional regulatory potential of the essential transcription factor octamer transcription factor 1 (Oct-1). Histone H2B and U2 RNA, whose expression are highly dependent on Oct-1, were strongly decreased in response to ionizing radiation in a DNA-PK-dependent manner, and Oct-1-dependent reporter gene transcription was repressed. Furthermore, Oct-1 phosphorylation in response to ionizing radiation increased in a DNA-PK-dependent manner. Paradoxically, down-regulation of transactivation correlated with the rapid DNA-PK-dependent stabilization of Oct-1. Stabilization of Oct-1 was dependent on the NH(2)-terminal region of Oct-1, which contains a transcriptional activation domain and which was phosphorylated by DNA-PK in vitro. These results suggest a mechanism for the regulation of Oct-1 in response to DNA damage through specific phosphorylation within the NH(2)-terminal transcriptional regulatory domain.

  18. The 3' untranslated region of human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Regulatory subunit 1 contains regulatory elements affecting transcript stability

    PubMed Central

    Moncini, Silvia; Bevilacqua, Annamaria; Venturin, Marco; Fallini, Claudia; Ratti, Antonia; Nicolin, Angelo; Riva, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background CDK5R1 plays a central role in neuronal migration and differentiation during central nervous system development. CDK5R1 has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders and proposed as a candidate gene for mental retardation. The remarkable size of CDK5R1 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) suggests a role in post-transcriptional regulation of CDK5R1 expression. Results The bioinformatic study shows a high conservation degree in mammals and predicts several AU-Rich Elements (AREs). The insertion of CDK5R1 3'-UTR into luciferase 3'-UTR causes a decreased luciferase activity in four transfected cell lines. We identified 3'-UTR subregions which tend to reduce the reporter gene expression, sometimes in a cell line-dependent manner. In most cases the quantitative analysis of luciferase mRNA suggests that CDK5R1 3'-UTR affects mRNA stability. A region, leading to a very strong mRNA destabilization, showed a significantly low half-life, indicating an accelerated mRNA degradation. The 3' end of the transcript, containing a class I ARE, specifically displays a stabilizing effect in neuroblastoma cell lines. We also observed the interaction of the stabilizing neuronal RNA-binding proteins ELAV with the CDK5R1 transcript in SH-SY5Y cells and identified three 3'-UTR sub-regions showing affinity for ELAV proteins. Conclusion Our findings evince the presence of both destabilizing and stabilizing regulatory elements in CDK5R1 3'-UTR and support the hypothesis that CDK5R1 gene expression is post-transcriptionally controlled in neurons by ELAV-mediated mechanisms. This is the first evidence of the involvement of 3'-UTR in the modulation of CDK5R1 expression. The fine tuning of CDK5R1 expression by 3'-UTR may have a role in central nervous system development and functioning, with potential implications in neurodegenerative and cognitive disorders. PMID:18053171

  19. Global alterations of the transcriptional landscape during yeast growth and development in the absence of Ume6-dependent chromatin modification.

    PubMed

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Becker, Emmanuelle; Walther, Thomas; Law, Michael J; Xie, Bingning; Demougin, Philippe; Strich, Randy; Primig, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Chromatin modification enzymes are important regulators of gene expression and some are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a major model organism for genome-wide studies that aim at the identification of target genes under the control of conserved epigenetic regulators. Ume6 interacts with the upstream repressor site 1 (URS1) and represses transcription by recruiting both the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 (through the co-repressor Sin3) and the chromatin-remodeling factor Isw2. Cells lacking Ume6 are defective in growth, stress response, and meiotic development. RNA profiling studies and in vivo protein-DNA binding assays identified mRNAs or transcript isoforms that are directly repressed by Ume6 in mitosis. However, a comprehensive understanding of the transcriptional alterations, which underlie the complex ume6Δ mutant phenotype during fermentation, respiration, or sporulation, is lacking. We report the protein-coding transcriptome of a diploid MAT a/α wild-type and ume6/ume6 mutant strains cultured in rich media with glucose or acetate as a carbon source, or sporulation-inducing medium. We distinguished direct from indirect effects on mRNA levels by combining GeneChip data with URS1 motif predictions and published high-throughput in vivo Ume6-DNA binding data. To gain insight into the molecular interactions between successive waves of Ume6-dependent meiotic genes, we integrated expression data with information on protein networks. Our work identifies novel Ume6 repressed genes during growth and development and reveals a strong effect of the carbon source on the derepression pattern of transcripts in growing and developmentally arrested ume6/ume6 mutant cells. Since yeast is a useful model organism for chromatin-mediated effects on gene expression, our results provide a rich source for further genetic and molecular biological work on the regulation of cell growth and cell differentiation in eukaryotes.

  20. The C-terminal region of E1A: a molecular tool for cellular cartography.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Ahmed F; Fonseca, Gregory J; Cohen, Michael J; Mymryk, Joe S

    2012-04-01

    The adenovirus E1A proteins function via protein-protein interactions. By making many connections with the cellular protein network, individual modules of this virally encoded hub reprogram numerous aspects of cell function and behavior. Although many of these interactions have been thoroughly studied, those mediated by the C-terminal region of E1A are less well understood. This review focuses on how this region of E1A affects cell cycle progression, apoptosis, senescence, transformation, and conversion of cells to an epithelial state through interactions with CTBP1/2, DYRK1A/B, FOXK1/2, and importin-α. Furthermore, novel potential pathways that the C-terminus of E1A influences through these connections with the cellular interaction network are discussed.

  1. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2-Dependent and -Independent Functions of Jarid2 in Transcriptional Regulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Mohan, Man; Garrett, Alexander S.; Miller, Caitlynn; Casto, David; Zhang, Ying; Seidel, Christopher; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2012-01-01

    Jarid2 was recently identified as an important component of the mammalian Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), where it has a major effect on PRC2 recruitment in mouse embryonic stem cells. Although Jarid2 is conserved in Drosophila, it has not previously been implicated in Polycomb (Pc) regulation. Therefore, we purified Drosophila Jarid2 and its associated proteins and found that Jarid2 associates with all of the known canonical PRC2 components, demonstrating a conserved physical interaction with PRC2 in flies and mammals. Furthermore, in vivo studies with Jarid2 mutants in flies demonstrate that among several histone modifications tested, only methylation of histone 3 at K27 (H3K27), the mark implemented by PRC2, was affected. Genome-wide profiling of Jarid2, Su(z)12 (Suppressor of zeste 12), and H3K27me3 occupancy by chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicates that Jarid2 and Su(z)12 have very similar distribution patterns on chromatin. However, Jarid2 and Su(z)12 occupancy levels at some genes are significantly different, with Jarid2 being present at relatively low levels at many Pc response elements (PREs) of certain Homeobox (Hox) genes, providing a rationale for why Jarid2 was never identified in Pc screens. Gene expression analyses show that Jarid2 and E(z) (Enhancer of zeste, a canonical PRC2 component) are not only required for transcriptional repression but might also function in active transcription. Identification of Jarid2 as a conserved PRC2 interactor in flies provides an opportunity to begin to probe some of its novel functions in Drosophila development. PMID:22354997

  2. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. - Highlights: • p53 is robustly

  3. Complementary quantitative proteomics reveals that transcription factor AP-4 mediates E-box-dependent complex formation for transcriptional repression of HDM2.

    PubMed

    Ku, Wei-Chi; Chiu, Sung-Kay; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Hsin-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2009-09-01

    Transcription factor activating enhancer-binding protein 4 (AP-4) is a basic helix-loop-helix protein that binds to E-box elements. AP-4 has received increasing attention for its regulatory role in cell growth and development, including transcriptional repression of the human homolog of murine double minute 2 (HDM2), an important oncoprotein controlling cell growth and survival, by an unknown mechanism. Here we demonstrate that AP-4 binds to an E-box located in the HDM2-P2 promoter and represses HDM2 transcription in a p53-independent manner. Incremental truncations of AP-4 revealed that the C-terminal Gln/Pro-rich domain was essential for transcriptional repression of HDM2. To further delineate the molecular mechanism(s) of AP-4 transcriptional control and its potential implications, we used DNA-affinity purification followed by complementary quantitative proteomics, cICAT and iTRAQ labeling methods, to identify a previously unknown E-box-bound AP-4 protein complex containing 75 putative components. The two labeling methods complementarily quantified differentially AP-4-enriched proteins, including the most significant recruitment of DNA damage response proteins, followed by transcription factors, transcriptional repressors/corepressors, and histone-modifying proteins. Specific interaction of AP-4 with CCCTC binding factor, stimulatory protein 1, and histone deacetylase 1 (an AP-4 corepressor) was validated using AP-4 truncation mutants. Importantly, inclusion of trichostatin A did not alleviate AP-4-mediated repression of HDM2 transcription, suggesting a previously unidentified histone deacetylase-independent repression mechanism. In contrast, the complementary quantitative proteomics study suggested that transcription repression occurs via coordination of AP-4 with other transcription factors, histone methyltransferases, and/or a nucleosome remodeling SWI.SNF complex. In addition to previously known functions of AP-4, our data suggest that AP-4 participates in a

  4. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H₂O₂ production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death.

  5. Protein–DNA interfaces: a molecular dynamics analysis of time-dependent recognition processes for three transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Etheve, Loïc; Martin, Juliette; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of three transcription factor–DNA complexes using all-atom, microsecond-scale MD simulations. In each case, the salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions formed at the protein–DNA interface are found to be dynamic, with lifetimes typically in the range of tens to hundreds of picoseconds, although some interactions, notably those involving specific binding to DNA bases, can be a hundred times longer lived. Depending on the complex studied, this dynamics may or may not lead to the existence of distinct conformational substates. Using a sequence threading technique, it has been possible to determine whether DNA sequence recognition is sensitive or not to such conformational changes, and, in one case, to show that recognition appears to be locally dependent on protein-mediated cation distributions. PMID:27658967

  6. Induction of latent memory for conditioned food aversion and its transformation into "active" state depend on translation and transcription processes.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, S V; Nikitin, V P

    2014-05-01

    Mechanisms of induction and retrieval of latent (hidden) memory for conditioned food aversion were investigated in snails. After initial training (single combination of a food stimulus with electric shock), aversive reactions to presentation of the conditioned food stimulus were not revealed. Repeated presentation of the stimuli in 12 days after the first combination was followed by the appearance of aversive food reactions that persisted for at least 14 days. Injections of inhibitors of protein (cycloheximide) or RNA (α-amanitin) synthesis immediately after the first or second combined presentation of the stimuli disturbed skill performance. We hypothesized that single combination of food and reinforcing stimuli led to translation- and transcription-dependent induction of latent conditioned food aversion memory. Transformation of this memory into an active state after repeated presentation of the stimulus combination also depends on the synthesis of new proteins and RNA.

  7. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state.

  8. The ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme Fun30 represses transcription by sliding promoter-proximal nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Boseon; Wang, Wei; Barski, Artem; Ranallo, Ryan T; Bao, Kan; Schones, Dustin E; Zhao, Keji; Wu, Carl; Wu, Wei-Hua

    2013-08-09

    The evolutionarily conserved ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme Fun30 has recently been shown to play important roles in heterochromatin silencing and DNA repair. However, how Fun30 remodels nucleosomes is not clear. Here we report a nucleosome sliding activity of Fun30 and its role in transcriptional repression. We observed that Fun30 repressed the expression of genes involved in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism, the stress response, and meiosis. In addition, Fun30 was localized at the 5' and 3' ends of genes and within the open reading frames of its targets. Consistent with its role in gene repression, we observed that Fun30 target genes lacked histone modifications often associated with gene activation and showed an increased level of ubiquitinated histone H2B. Furthermore, a genome-wide nucleosome mapping analysis revealed that the length of the nucleosome-free region at the 5' end of a subset of genes was changed in Fun30-depleted cells. In addition, the positions of the -1, +2, and +3 nucleosomes at the 5' end of target genes were shifted significantly, whereas the position of the +1 nucleosome remained largely unchanged in the fun30Δ mutant. Finally, we demonstrated that affinity-purified, single-component Fun30 exhibited a nucleosome sliding activity in an ATP-dependent manner. These results define a role for Fun30 in the regulation of transcription and indicate that Fun30 remodels chromatin at the 5' end of genes by sliding promoter-proximal nucleosomes.

  9. Gli2 Acetylation at Lysine 757 Regulates Hedgehog-Dependent Transcriptional Output by Preventing Its Promoter Occupancy

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Davide; Di Magno, Laura; Infante, Paola; De Smaele, Enrico; Giannini, Giuseppe; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    The morphogenic Hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates postnatal cerebellar development and its aberrant activation leads to medulloblastoma. The transcription factors Gli1 and Gli2 are the activators of Hh pathway and their function is finely controlled by different covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination. We show here that Gli2 is endogenously acetylated and that this modification represents a key regulatory step for Hedgehog signaling. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) coactivator p300, but not other HATs, acetylates Gli2 at the conserved lysine K757 thus inhibiting Hh target gene expression. By generating a specific anti acetyl-Gli2(Lys757) antisera we demonstrated that Gli2 acetylation is readily detectable at endogenous levels and is attenuated by Hh agonists. Moreover, Gli2 K757R mutant activity is higher than wild type Gli2 and is no longer enhanced by Hh agonists, indicating that acetylation represents an additional level of control for signal dependent activation. Consistently, in sections of developing mouse cerebella Gli2 acetylation correlates with the activation status of Hedgehog signaling. Mechanistically, acetylation at K757 prevents Gli2 entry into chromatin. Together, these data illustrate a novel mechanism of regulation of the Hh signaling whereby, in concert with Gli1, Gli2 acetylation functions as a key transcriptional checkpoint in the control of morphogen-dependent processes. PMID:23762415

  10. The calcineurin dependent transcription factor TacA is involved in development and the stress response of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Thewes, Sascha; Krohn, Stefanie; Schmith, Anika; Herzog, Sergej; Stach, Thomas; Weissenmayer, Barbara; Mutzel, Rupert

    2012-10-01

    Calcineurin is an important signalling protein in a plethora of Ca(2+)-regulated cellular processes. In contrast to what is known about the function of calcineurin in various organisms, information on calcineurin substrates is still limited. Here we describe the identification and characterisation of the transcription factor activated by calcineurin (TacA) in the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. TacA is a putative zinc-finger transcription factor orthologue of yeast Crz1. In resting unstimulated cells the protein is located in the cytosol and translocates to the nucleus in a calcineurin-dependent manner after Ca(2+)-stimulation. Nuclear export of TacA is partially dependent on GskA, the Dictyostelium orthologue of mammalian GSK3. The expression of tacA is developmentally regulated with its kinetics roughly paralleling calcineurin regulation. Silencing of tacA via RNAi leads to developmental defects and dysregulation of developmentally regulated and Ca(2+)-regulated marker genes. Additionally, TacA is involved in the stress response of D. discoideum during development in a separate pathway to the well-known stress response in Dictyostelium via STATc. Finally we provide evidence that TacA is not only an orthologue of yeast Crz1 but also functionally related to mammalian NFAT.

  11. Context-dependent regulation of Th17-associated genes and IFNγ expression by the transcription factor NFAT5.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, Maria; Iglesias, Marcos; Tejedor, Sonia; Merino, Ramón; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Stress-activated transcription factors influence T-cell function in different physiopathologic contexts. NFAT5, a relative of nuclear factor κB and the calcineurin-activated NFATc transcription factors, protects mammalian cells from hyperosmotic stress caused by the elevation of extracellular sodium levels. In T cells exposed to hypernatremia, NFAT5 not only induces osmoprotective gene products but also cytokines and immune receptors, which raises the question of whether this factor could regulate other T-cell functions in osmostress-independent contexts. Here we have used mice with a conditional deletion of Nfat5 in mature T lymphocytes to explore osmostress-dependent and -independent functions of this factor. In vitro experiments with CD4 T cells stimulated in hyperosmotic medium showed that NFAT5 enhanced the expression of IL-2 and the Th17-associated gene products RORγt and IL-23R. By contrast, NFAT5-deficient CD4 T cells activated in vivo by anti-CD3 antibody exhibited a different activation profile and were skewed towards enhanced interferon γ (IFNγ) and IL-17 expression and attenuated Treg responses. Using a model of experimental colitis, we observed that mice lacking NFAT5 in T cells exhibited exacerbated intestinal colitis and enhanced expression of IFNγ in draining lymph nodes and colon. These results show that NFAT5 can modulate different T-cell responses depending on stress conditions and stimulatory context.

  12. Context-dependent regulation of Th17-associated genes and IFNγ expression by the transcription factor NFAT5

    PubMed Central

    Alberdi, Maria; Iglesias, Marcos; Tejedor, Sonia; Merino, Ramón; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Stress-activated transcription factors influence T-cell function in different physiopathologic contexts. NFAT5, a relative of nuclear factor κB and the calcineurin-activated NFATc transcription factors, protects mammalian cells from hyperosmotic stress caused by the elevation of extracellular sodium levels. In T cells exposed to hypernatremia, NFAT5 not only induces osmoprotective gene products but also cytokines and immune receptors, which raises the question of whether this factor could regulate other T-cell functions in osmostress-independent contexts. Here we have used mice with a conditional deletion of Nfat5 in mature T lymphocytes to explore osmostress-dependent and -independent functions of this factor. In vitro experiments with CD4 T cells stimulated in hyperosmotic medium showed that NFAT5 enhanced the expression of IL-2 and the Th17-associated gene products RORγt and IL-23R. By contrast, NFAT5-deficient CD4 T cells activated in vivo by anti-CD3 antibody exhibited a different activation profile and were skewed towards enhanced interferon γ (IFNγ) and IL-17 expression and attenuated Treg responses. Using a model of experimental colitis, we observed that mice lacking NFAT5 in T cells exhibited exacerbated intestinal colitis and enhanced expression of IFNγ in draining lymph nodes and colon. These results show that NFAT5 can modulate different T-cell responses depending on stress conditions and stimulatory context. PMID:27479742

  13. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration.

    PubMed

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-11-30

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way.

  14. Lysine 246 of the vitamin D receptor is crucial for ligand-dependent interaction with coactivators and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Lara, A M; Aranda, A

    1999-05-07

    Mutant K246A in the predicted helix 3 of the ligand-binding domain, as well as mutants L417S and E420Q in helix 12, which contains the core ligand-dependent transcriptional activation domain (AF-2), were generated to examine AF-2 activity of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). These mutations abolished vitamin D-dependent transactivation. In addition, VDR mediates a ligand-dependent repression of the response of the retinoic acid receptor beta2 promoter to retinoic acid, and the helix 3 and helix 12 mutants were unable to mediate transrepression. Furthermore, the VDR mutants, but not the native receptor, enhanced phorbol ester induction of the activator protein-1-containing collagenase promoter. The helix 3 and helix 12 mutations strikingly reduced the ability of VDR to interact with the coactivators steroid receptor coactivator-1, ACTR, and the CREB-binding protein. As a consequence, overexpression of steroid receptor coactivator-1 increased vitamin D-dependent transactivation by VDR but not by the K246A mutant. These results indicate that the lysine 246 participates, together with residues in helix 12, in the recruitment of coactivators and that AF-2 activity is involved both in ligand-dependent transactivation and in transrepression by VDR.

  15. Interleukin-8 Induces Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB through a TRAF6-dependent Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Sunil K.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2009-01-01

    Considering the potential role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in inflammation, angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, and metastasis, we investigated the molecular mechanism involved in IL-8-mediated signaling. In this report we provide evidence that like TNF, an inducer of NF-κB and also a NF-κB-dependent gene product, IL-8 induces NF-κB in a unique pathway. IL-8 induces NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner in different cell types as detected by a DNA-protein binding assay. IL-8 induces NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression as well as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and Cox-2 expression. IL-8 also induces IκBα phosphorylation followed by degradation and p65 translocation. IL-8 induces c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IL-8-induced NF-κB activation is for the most part unaltered when cells are transfected with dominant-negative TRADD, FADD, or TRAF2, but is inhibited with dominant-negative TRAF6-, NIK-, IKK-, or IκBα-transfected cells. The data suggest that IL-8-induced NF-κB activation proceeds through a TRAF2-independent but TRAF6-dependent pathway, followed by recruitment of IRAK and activation of IKK. IL-8-induced NF-κB activation is not observed in a cell-permeable peptide that has TRAF6 binding motif-treated cells or IRAK-deficient cells. IL-8-induced NF-κB activation proceeds mostly through interaction with TRAF6 and partially through the Rho-GTPase pathways. This is the first report that IL-8 induces NF-κB in a distinct pathway, and activation of NF-κB and its dependent genes may be one of the pathways of IL-8-induced inflammation and angiogenesis. PMID:15591054

  16. Iron regulation through the back door: iron-dependent metabolite levels contribute to transcriptional adaptation to iron deprivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ihrig, Jessica; Hausmann, Anja; Hain, Anika; Richter, Nadine; Hamza, Iqbal; Lill, Roland; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2010-03-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) responds to iron deprivation both by Aft1-Aft2-dependent transcriptional activation of genes involved in cellular iron uptake and by Cth1-Cth2-specific degradation of certain mRNAs coding for iron-dependent biosynthetic components. Here, we provide evidence for a novel principle of iron-responsive gene expression. This regulatory mechanism is based on the modulation of transcription through the iron-dependent variation of levels of regulatory metabolites. As an example, the LEU1 gene of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis is downregulated under iron-limiting conditions through depletion of the metabolic intermediate alpha-isopropylmalate, which functions as a key transcriptional coactivator of the Leu3 transcription factor. Synthesis of alpha-isopropylmalate involves the iron-sulfur protein Ilv3, which is inactivated under iron deficiency. As another example, decreased mRNA levels of the cytochrome c-encoding CYC1 gene under iron-limiting conditions involve heme-dependent transcriptional regulation via the Hap1 transcription factor. Synthesis of the iron-containing heme is directly correlated with iron availability. Thus, the iron-responsive expression of genes that are downregulated under iron-limiting conditions is conferred by two independent regulatory mechanisms: transcriptional regulation through iron-responsive metabolites and posttranscriptional mRNA degradation. Only the combination of the two processes provides a quantitative description of the response to iron deprivation in yeast.

  17. Quiescent center initiation in the Arabidopsis lateral root primordia is dependent on the SCARECROW transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Goh, Tatsuaki; Toyokura, Koichi; Wells, Darren M; Swarup, Kamal; Yamamoto, Mayuko; Mimura, Tetsuro; Weijers, Dolf; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Laplaze, Laurent; Bennett, Malcolm J; Guyomarc'h, Soazig

    2016-09-15

    Lateral root formation is an important determinant of root system architecture. In Arabidopsis, lateral roots originate from pericycle cells, which undergo a program of morphogenesis to generate a new lateral root meristem. Despite its importance for root meristem organization, the onset of quiescent center (QC) formation during lateral root morphogenesis remains unclear. Here, we used live 3D confocal imaging to monitor cell organization and identity acquisition during lateral root development. Our dynamic observations revealed an early morphogenesis phase and a late meristem formation phase as proposed in the bi-phasic growth model. Establishment of lateral root QCs coincided with this developmental phase transition. QC precursor cells originated from the outer layer of stage II lateral root primordia, within which the SCARECROW (SCR) transcription factor was specifically expressed. Disrupting SCR function abolished periclinal divisions in this lateral root primordia cell layer and perturbed the formation of QC precursor cells. We conclude that de novo QC establishment in lateral root primordia operates via SCR-mediated formative cell division and coincides with the developmental phase transition.

  18. Restraint of angiogenesis by zinc finger transcription factor CTCF-dependent chromatin insulation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Chen, Bo; Pardo, Carolina; Pampo, Christine; Chen, Jing; Lien, Ching-Ling; Wu, Lizi; Wang, Heiman; Yao, Kai; Oh, S. Paul; Seto, Edward; Smith, Lois E. H.; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Kladde, Michael P.; Cepko, Constance L.; Lu, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is meticulously controlled by a fine balance between positive and negative regulatory activities. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a predominant angiogenic factor and its dosage is precisely regulated during normal vascular formation. In cancer, VEGF is commonly overproduced, resulting in abnormal neovascularization. VEGF is induced in response to various stimuli including hypoxia; however, very little is known about the mechanisms that confine its induction to ensure proper angiogenesis. Chromatin insulation is a key transcription mechanism that prevents promiscuous gene activation by interfering with the action of enhancers. Here we show that the chromatin insulator-binding factor CTCF binds to the proximal promoter of VEGF. Consistent with the enhancer-blocking mode of chromatin insulators, CTCF has little effect on basal expression of VEGF but specifically affects its activation by enhancers. CTCF knockdown cells are sensitized for induction of VEGF and exhibit elevated proangiogenic potential. Cancer-derived CTCF missense mutants are mostly defective in blocking enhancers at the VEGF locus. Moreover, during mouse retinal development, depletion of CTCF causes excess angiogenesis. Therefore, CTCF-mediated chromatin insulation acts as a crucial safeguard against hyperactivation of angiogenesis. PMID:21896759

  19. Transcription-dependent radial distribution of TCF7L2 regulated genes in chromosome territories.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Keyvan; Wangsa, Darawalee; Ponsa, Immaculada; Brown, Markus; Bosch, Anna; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Karpova, Tatiana S; Calvo, Maria; Castells, Antoni; Miró, Rosa; Ried, Thomas; Camps, Jordi

    2017-03-25

    Human chromosomes occupy distinct territories in the interphase nucleus. Such chromosome territories (CTs) are positioned according to gene density. Gene-rich CTs are generally located in the center of the nucleus, while gene-poor CTs are positioned more towards the nuclear periphery. However, the association between gene expression levels and the radial positioning of genes within the CT is still under debate. In the present study, we performed three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments in the colorectal cancer cell lines DLD-1 and LoVo using whole chromosome painting probes for chromosomes 8 and 11 and BAC clones targeting four genes with different expression levels assessed by gene expression arrays and RT-PCR. Our results confirmed that the two over-expressed genes, MYC on chromosome 8 and CCND1 on chromosome 11, are located significantly further away from the center of the CT compared to under-expressed genes on the same chromosomes, i.e., DLC1 and SCN3B. When CCND1 expression was reduced after silencing the major transcription factor of the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, TCF7L2, the gene was repositioned and mostly detected in the interior of the CT. Thus, we suggest a non-random distribution in which over-expressed genes are located more towards the periphery of the respective CTs.

  20. Discovery Proteomics Identifies a Molecular Link between the Coatomer Protein Complex I and Androgen Receptor-dependent Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Lee, Jinhee; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcription is a hallmark of human prostate cancers. At the molecular level, ligand-mediated AR activation is coordinated through spatial and temporal protein-protein interactions involving AR-interacting proteins, which we designate the “AR-interactome.” Despite many years of research, the ligand-sensitive protein complexes involved in ligand-mediated AR activation in prostate tumor cells have not been clearly defined. Here, we describe the development, characterization, and utilization of a novel human LNCaP prostate tumor cell line, N-AR, which stably expresses wild-type AR tagged at its N terminus with the streptavidin-binding peptide epitope (streptavidin-binding peptide-tagged wild-type androgen receptor; SBP-AR). A bioanalytical workflow involving streptavidin chromatography and label-free quantitative mass spectrometry was used to identify SBP-AR and associated ligand-sensitive cytosolic proteins/protein complexes linked to AR activation in prostate tumor cells. Functional studies verified that ligand-sensitive proteins identified in the proteomic screen encoded modulators of AR-mediated transcription, suggesting that these novel proteins were putative SBP-AR-interacting proteins in N-AR cells. This was supported by biochemical associations between recombinant SBP-AR and the ligand-sensitive coatomer protein complex I (COPI) retrograde trafficking complex in vitro. Extensive biochemical and molecular experiments showed that the COPI retrograde complex regulates ligand-mediated AR transcriptional activation, which correlated with the mobilization of the Golgi-localized ARA160 coactivator to the nuclear compartment of prostate tumor cells. Collectively, this study provides a bioanalytical strategy to validate the AR-interactome and define novel AR-interacting proteins involved in ligand-mediated AR activation in prostate tumor cells. Moreover, we describe a cellular system to study how compartment-specific AR

  1. The Drosophila Transcription Factor Dimmed Affects Neuronal Growth and Differentiation in Multiple Ways Depending on Neuron Type and Developmental Stage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiting; Luo, Jiangnan; Nässel, Dick R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of postmitotic neurons occurs during different stages of development, including metamorphosis, and may also be part of neuronal plasticity and regeneration. Recently we showed that growth of post-mitotic neuroendocrine cells expressing the basic helix loop helix (bHLH) transcription factor Dimmed (Dimm) in Drosophila could be regulated by insulin/IGF signaling and the insulin receptor (dInR). Dimm is also known to confer a secretory phenotype to neuroendocrine cells and can be part of a combinatorial code specifying terminal differentiation in peptidergic neurons. To further understand the mechanisms of Dimm function we ectopically expressed Dimm or Dimm together with dInR in a wide range of Dimm positive and Dimm negative peptidergic neurons, sensory neurons, interneurons, motor neurons, and gut endocrine cells. We provide further evidence that dInR mediated cell growth occurs in a Dimm dependent manner and that one source of insulin-like peptide (DILP) for dInR mediated cell growth in the CNS is DILP6 from glial cells. Expressing both Dimm and dInR in Dimm negative neurons induced growth of cell bodies, whereas dInR alone did not. We also found that Dimm alone can regulate cell growth depending on specific cell type. This may be explained by the finding that the dInR is a direct target of Dimm. Conditional gene targeting experiments showed that Dimm alone could affect cell growth in certain neuron types during metamorphosis or in the adult stage. Another important finding was that ectopic Dimm inhibits apoptosis of several types of neurons normally destined for programmed cell death (PCD). Taken together our results suggest that Dimm plays multiple transcriptional roles at different developmental stages in a cell type-specific manner. In some cell types ectopic Dimm may act together with resident combinatorial code transcription factors and affect terminal differentiation, as well as act in transcriptional networks that participate in long term maintenance

  2. Influence of the sequence-dependent flexure of DNA on transcription in E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, C M; Molloy, P L; Both, G W; Drew, H R

    1989-01-01

    In order to study the effects of DNA structure on cellular processes such as transcription, we have made a series of plasmids that locate several different kinds of DNA structure (stiff, flexible or curved) near the sites of cleavage by commonly-used restriction enzymes. One can use these plasmids to place any DNA region of interest (e.g., promoter, operator or enhancer) close to certain kinds of DNA structure that may influence its ability to work in a living cell. In the present example, we have placed a promoter from T7 virus next to the special DNA structures; the T7 promoter is then linked to a gene for a marker protein (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase). When plasmids bearing the T7 promoter are grown in cells of E. coli that contain T7 RNA polymerase, the special DNA structures seem to have little or no influence over the activity of the T7 promoter, contrary to our expectations. Yet when the same plasmids are grown in cells of E. coli that do not contain T7 RNA polymerase, some of the DNA structures show a surprising promoter activity of their own. In particular, the favourable flexibility or curvature of DNA, in the close vicinity of potential -35 and -10 promoter regions, seems to be a significant factor in determining where E. coli RNA polymerase starts RNA chains. We show directly, in one example, that loss of curvature between -35 and -10 regions is associated with a nearly-complete loss of promoter activity. These results, and others of their kind, show that the structural and/or vibrational properties of DNA play a much more important role in determining E. coli promoter activity than has previously been supposed. Images PMID:2685760

  3. Dependence of stimulus-transcription coupling on phospholipase D in agonist-stimulated pituitary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cesnjaj, M; Zheng, L; Catt, K J; Stojilkovic, S S

    1995-01-01

    Stimulation of phospholipase D activity is frequently observed during agonist activation of Ca(2+)-mobilizing receptors, but the cellular functions of this signaling pathway are not well defined. Pituitary gonadotrophs express Ca(2+)-mobilizing receptors for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and endothelin (ET), activation of which stimulates luteinizing hormone secretion and transient expression of c-fos. In pituitary cells and alpha T3-1 gonadotrophs, GnRH action was associated with both initial and sustained diacylglycerol (DG) production, whereas ET-1 induced only a transient DG response. Also, phospholipase D activity, estimated by the production of phosphatidylethanol from phosphatidylcholine in the presence of ethanol, was stimulated by GnRH but not ET-1. Such formation of phosphatidylethanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA) during GnRH-induced activation of phospholipase D significantly reduced the production of PA, DG, and cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol. Inhibition of PA-phosphohydrolase activity by propranolol also decreased GnRH-induced DG production and, in contrast to ethanol, increased PA and cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol levels. The fall in DG production caused by ethanol and propranolol was accompanied by inhibition of GnRH-induced c-fos expression, whereas agonist-induced luteinizing hormone release was not affected. In contrast to their inhibitory actions on GnRH-induced early gene expression, neither ethanol nor propranolol affected ET-1-induced c-fos expression, or GnRH- and ET-1-induced inositol trisphosphate/Ca2+ signaling. These findings demonstrate that phospholipase D participates in stimulus-transcription but not stimulus-secretion coupling, and indicate that DG is the primary signal for this action. Images PMID:7579706

  4. A biological function for the neuronal activity-dependent component of Bdnf transcription in the development of cortical inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hong, Elizabeth J; McCord, Alejandra E; Greenberg, Michael E

    2008-11-26

    Neuronal activity-regulated gene expression has been suggested to be an important mediator of long-lasting, experience-dependent changes in the nervous system, but the activity-dependent component of gene transcription has never been selectively isolated and tested for its functional significance. Here, we demonstrate that introduction of a subtle knockin mutation into the mouse Bdnf gene that blocks the ability of the activity-regulated factor CREB to bind Bdnf promoter IV results in an animal in which the sensory experience-dependent induction of Bdnf expression is disrupted in the cortex. Neurons from these animals form fewer inhibitory synapses, have fewer spontaneous inhibitory quantal events, and exhibit reduced expression of inhibitory presynaptic markers in the cortex. These results indicate a specific requirement for activity-dependent Bdnf expression in the development of inhibition in the cortex and demonstrate that the activation of gene expression in response to experience-driven neuronal activity has important biological consequences in the nervous system.

  5. The collection of NFATc1-dependent transcripts in the osteoclast includes numerous genes non-essential to physiologic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Julia F.; Coury, Fabienne; Sulyanto, Rosalyn; Sitara, Despina; Wu, Jing; Brady, Nicholas; Tsang, Kelly; Sigrist, Kirsten; Tollefsen, Douglas M.; He, Li; Storm, Daniel; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are specialized secretory cells of the myeloid lineage important for normal skeletal homeostasis as well as pathologic conditions of bone including osteoporosis, inflammatory arthritis and cancer metastasis. Differentiation of these multinucleated giant cells from precursors is controlled by the cytokine RANKL, which through its receptor RANK initiates a signaling cascade culminating in the activation of transcriptional regulators which induce the expression of the bone degradation machinery. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 (NFATc1) is the master regulator of this process and in its absence osteoclast differentiation is aborted both in vitro and in vivo. Differential mRNA expression analysis by microarray is used to identify genes of potential physiologic relevance across nearly all biologic systems. We compared the gene expression profile of murine wild-type and NFATc1-deficient osteoclast precursors stimulated with RANKL and identified that the majority of the known genes important for osteoclastic bone resorption require NFATc1 for induction. Here, five novel RANKL-induced, NFATc1-dependent transcripts in the osteoclast are described: Nhedc2, Rhoc, Serpind1, Adcy3 and Rab38. Despite reasonable hypotheses for the importance of these molecules in the bone resorption pathway and their dramatic induction during differentiation, the analysis of mice with mutations in these genes failed to reveal a function in osteoclast biology. Compared to littermate controls, none of these mutants demonstrated a skeletal phenotype in vivo or alterations in osteoclast differentiation or function in vitro. These data highlight the need for rigorous validation studies to complement expression profiling results before functional importance can be assigned to highly regulated genes in any biologic process. PMID:22985540

  6. An Elk transcription factor is required for Runx-dependent survival signaling in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Francesca; Coffman, James A; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2016-08-01

    Elk proteins are Ets family transcription factors that regulate cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in response to ERK (extracellular-signal regulated kinase)-mediated phosphorylation. Here we report the embryonic expression and function of Sp-Elk, the single Elk gene of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Sp-Elk is zygotically expressed throughout the embryo beginning at late cleavage stage, with peak expression occurring at blastula stage. Morpholino antisense-mediated knockdown of Sp-Elk causes blastula-stage developmental arrest and embryo disintegration due to apoptosis, a phenotype that is rescued by wild-type Elk mRNA. Development is also rescued by Elk mRNA encoding a serine to aspartic acid substitution (S402D) that mimics ERK-mediated phosphorylation of a conserved site that enhances DNA binding, but not by Elk mRNA encoding an alanine substitution at the same site (S402A). This demonstrates both that the apoptotic phenotype of the morphants is specifically caused by Elk depletion, and that phosphorylation of serine 402 of Sp-Elk is critical for its anti-apoptotic function. Knockdown of Sp-Elk results in under-expression of several regulatory genes involved in cell fate specification, cell cycle control, and survival signaling, including the transcriptional regulator Sp-Runt-1 and its target Sp-PKC1, both of which were shown previously to be required for cell survival during embryogenesis. Both Sp-Runt-1 and Sp-PKC1 have sequences upstream of their transcription start sites that specifically bind Sp-Elk. These results indicate that Sp-Elk is the signal-dependent activator of a feed-forward gene regulatory circuit, consisting also of Sp-Runt-1 and Sp-PKC1, which actively suppresses apoptosis in the early embryo.

  7. Transcriptional response of zebrafish embryos exposed to neurotoxic compounds reveals a muscle activity dependent hspb11 expression.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Nils; Yang, Lixin; Busch, Wibke; Scheffler, Katja; Renner, Patrick; Strähle, Uwe; Scholz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used as pesticides and drugs. Their primary effect is the overstimulation of cholinergic receptors which results in an improper muscular function. During vertebrate embryonic development nerve activity and intracellular downstream events are critical for the regulation of muscle fiber formation. Whether AChE inhibitors and related neurotoxic compounds also provoke specific changes in gene transcription patterns during vertebrate development that allow them to establish a mechanistic link useful for identification of developmental toxicity pathways has, however, yet not been investigated. Therefore we examined the transcriptomic response of a known AChE inhibitor, the organophosphate azinphos-methyl (APM), in zebrafish embryos and compared the response with two non-AChE inhibiting unspecific control compounds, 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DMB) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). A highly specific cluster of APM induced gene transcripts was identified and a subset of strongly regulated genes was analyzed in more detail. The small heat shock protein hspb11 was found to be the most sensitive induced gene in response to AChE inhibitors. Comparison of expression in wildtype, ache and sop(fixe) mutant embryos revealed that hspb11 expression was dependent on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activity. Furthermore, modulators of intracellular calcium levels within the whole embryo led to a transcriptional up-regulation of hspb11 which suggests that elevated intracellular calcium levels may regulate the expression of this gene. During early zebrafish development, hspb11 was specifically expressed in muscle pioneer cells and Hspb11 morpholino-knockdown resulted in effects on slow muscle myosin organization. Our findings imply that a comparative toxicogenomic approach and functional analysis can lead to the identification of molecular mechanisms and specific marker genes for potential neurotoxic compounds.

  8. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state. - Highlights: • DEX facilitates the transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • GR is involved in DEX-dependent transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • A 17 bp repeat is responsible for the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX. • An NF-I-like protein is involved in the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX.

  9. Hsf1 and Hsp90 orchestrate temperature-dependent global transcriptional remodelling and chromatin architecture in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Michelle D.; Farrer, Rhys A.; Tan, Kaeling; Miao, Zhengqiang; Walker, Louise A.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Wheeler, Robert T.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Wong, Koon Ho; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Fever is a universal response to infection, and opportunistic pathogens such as Candida albicans have evolved complex circuitry to sense and respond to heat. Here we harness RNA-seq and ChIP-seq to discover that the heat shock transcription factor, Hsf1, binds distinct motifs in nucleosome-depleted promoter regions to regulate heat shock genes and genes involved in virulence in C. albicans. Consequently, heat shock increases C. albicans host cell adhesion, damage and virulence. Hsf1 activation depends upon the molecular chaperone Hsp90 under basal and heat shock conditions, but the effects are opposite and in part controlled at the level of Hsf1 expression and DNA binding. Finally, we demonstrate that Hsp90 regulates global transcription programs by modulating nucleosome levels at promoters of stress-responsive genes. Thus, we describe a mechanism by which C. albicans responds to temperature via Hsf1 and Hsp90 to orchestrate gene expression and chromatin architecture, thereby enabling thermal adaptation and virulence. PMID:27226156

  10. Bex3 Dimerization Regulates NGF-Dependent Neuronal Survival and Differentiation by Enhancing trkA Gene Transcription.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Laura; Anta, Begoña; López-Benito, Saray; Martín-Rodriguez, Carlos; Lee, Francis S; Pérez, Pilar; Martín-Zanca, Dionisio; Arévalo, Juan C

    2015-05-06

    The development of the nervous system is a temporally and spatially coordinated process that relies on the proper regulation of the genes involved. Neurotrophins and their receptors are directly responsible for the survival and differentiation of sensory and sympathetic neurons; however, it is not fully understood how genes encoding Trk neurotrophin receptors are regulated. Here, we show that rat Bex3 protein specifically regulates TrkA expression by acting at the trkA gene promoter level. Bex3 dimerization and shuttling to the nucleus regulate the transcription of the trkA promoter under basal conditions and also enhance nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated trkA promoter activation. Moreover, qChIP assays indicate that Bex3 associates with the trkA promoter within a 150 bp sequence, immediately upstream from the transcription start site, which is sufficient to mediate the effects of Bex3. Consequently, the downregulation of Bex3 using shRNA increases neuronal apoptosis in NGF-dependent sensory neurons deprived of NGF and compromises PC12 cell differentiation in response to NGF. Our results support an important role for Bex3 in the regulation of TrkA expression and in NGF-mediated functions through modulation of the trkA promoter.

  11. Evidence for a mechanism of recombination during reverse transcription dependent on the structure of the acceptor RNA.

    PubMed

    Moumen, Abdeladim; Polomack, Lucette; Unge, Torsten; Véron, Michel; Buc, Henri; Negroni, Matteo

    2003-05-02

    Genetic recombination is a major force driving retroviral evolution. In retroviruses, recombination proceeds mostly through copy choice during reverse transcription. Using a reconstituted in vitro system, we have studied the mechanism of strand transfer on a major recombination hot spot we previously identified within the genome of HIV-1. We show that on this model sequence the frequency of copy choice is strongly influenced by the folding of the RNA template, namely by the presence of a stable hairpin. This structure must be specifically present on the acceptor template. We previously proposed that strand transfer follows a two-step process: docking of the nascent DNA onto the acceptor RNA and strand invasion. The frequency of recombination under copy choice conditions was not dependent on the concentration of the acceptor RNA, in contrast with strand transfer occurring at strong arrests of reverse transcription. During copy choice strand transfer, the docking step is not rate limiting. We propose that the hairpin present on the acceptor RNA could mediate strand transfer following a mechanism reminiscent of branch migration during DNA recombination.

  12. Lateral root emergence in Arabidopsis is dependent on transcription factor LBD29 regulation of auxin influx carrier LAX3.

    PubMed

    Porco, Silvana; Larrieu, Antoine; Du, Yujuan; Gaudinier, Allison; Goh, Tatsuaki; Swarup, Kamal; Swarup, Ranjan; Kuempers, Britta; Bishopp, Anthony; Lavenus, Julien; Casimiro, Ilda; Hill, Kristine; Benkova, Eva; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Brady, Siobhan M; Scheres, Ben; Péret, Benjamin; Bennett, Malcolm J

    2016-09-15

    Lateral root primordia (LRP) originate from pericycle stem cells located deep within parental root tissues. LRP emerge through overlying root tissues by inducing auxin-dependent cell separation and hydraulic changes in adjacent cells. The auxin-inducible auxin influx carrier LAX3 plays a key role concentrating this signal in cells overlying LRP. Delimiting LAX3 expression to two adjacent cell files overlying new LRP is crucial to ensure that auxin-regulated cell separation occurs solely along their shared walls. Multiscale modeling has predicted that this highly focused pattern of expression requires auxin to sequentially induce auxin efflux and influx carriers PIN3 and LAX3, respectively. Consistent with model predictions, we report that auxin-inducible LAX3 expression is regulated indirectly by AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7). Yeast one-hybrid screens revealed that the LAX3 promoter is bound by the transcription factor LBD29, which is a direct target for regulation by ARF7. Disrupting auxin-inducible LBD29 expression or expressing an LBD29-SRDX transcriptional repressor phenocopied the lax3 mutant, resulting in delayed lateral root emergence. We conclude that sequential LBD29 and LAX3 induction by auxin is required to coordinate cell separation and organ emergence.

  13. Cbx7 is epigenetically silenced in glioblastoma and inhibits cell migration by targeting YAP/TAZ-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Zahid; Patil, Vikas; Arora, Anjali; Hegde, Alangar S.; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Santosh, Vani; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most malignant form of astrocytomas which are difficult to treat and portend a grave clinical course and poor prognosis. In this study, we identified Chromobox homolog 7 (Cbx7), a member of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), as a downregulated gene in GBM owing to its promoter hypermethylation. Bisulphite sequencing and methylation inhibitor treatment established the hypermethylation of Cbx7 in GBM. Exogenous overexpression of Cbx7 induced cell death, inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and migration/invasion of the glioma cells. GSEA of Cbx7 regulated genes identified Cbx7 as a repressor of transcription co-activators YAP/TAZ, the inhibitory targets of the Hippo signalling pathway. In good correlation, the exogenous expression of Cbx7 repressed the YAP/TAZ-dependent transcription and downregulated CTGF, a bonafide YAP/TAZ target. We also observed reduced levels of phospho-JNK in Cbx7 expressing cells. Additionally, CTGF silencing and pharmacological inhibition of JNK also inhibited glioma cell migration. Further, Cbx7 failed to inhibit cell migration significantly in the presence of exogenously overexpressed CTGF or constitutively active JNK. Thus, our study identifies Cbx7 as an inhibitor of glioma cell migration through its inhibitory effect on YAP/TAZ-CTGF-JNK signalling axis and underscores the importance of epigenetic inactivation of Cbx7 in gliomagenesis. PMID:27291091

  14. A common transcriptional activator is located in the coding region of two replication-dependent mouse histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, M M; Bowman, T L; Marzluff, W F

    1991-01-01

    There is a region in the mouse histone H3 gene protein-encoding sequence required for high expression. The 110-nucleotide coding region activating sequence (CRAS) from codons 58 to 93 of the H3.2 gene restored expression when placed 520 nucleotides 5' of the start of transcription in the correct orientation. Since identical mRNA molecules are produced by transcription of the original deletion gene and the deletion gene with the CRAS at -520, effects of the deletions on mRNA stability or other posttranscriptional events are completely ruled out. Inversion of the CRAS sequence in its proper position in the H3 gene resulted in only a threefold increase in expression, and placing the CRAS sequence 5' of the deleted gene in the wrong orientation had no effect on expression. In-frame deletions in the coding region of an H2a.2 gene led to identification of a 105-nucleotide sequence in the coding region between amino acids 50 and 85 necessary for high expression of the gene. Additionally, insertion of the H3 CRAS into the deleted region of the H2a.2 gene restored expression of the H2a gene. Thus, the CRAS element has an orientation-dependent, position-independent effect. Gel mobility shift competition studies indicate that the same proteins interact with both the H3 and H2a CRAS elements, suggesting that a common factor is involved in expression of histone genes. Images PMID:2038312

  15. Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Regulation of the GOLDEN2-LIKE 1 Transcription Factor in Response to Plastid Signals1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tokumaru, Mitsuaki; Adachi, Fumi; Toda, Makoto; Yazu, Fumiko; Hirosawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GOLDEN2-LIKE (GLK) transcription factors promote chloroplast biogenesis by regulating the expression of photosynthesis-related genes. Arabidopsis GLK1 is also known to participate in retrograde signaling from chloroplasts to the nucleus. To elucidate the mechanism by which GLK1 is regulated in response to plastid signals, we biochemically characterized Arabidopsis GLK1 protein. Expression analysis of GLK1 protein indicated that GLK1 accumulates in aerial tissues. Both tissue-specific and Suc-dependent accumulation of GLK1 were regulated primarily at the transcriptional level. In contrast, norflurazon- or lincomycin-treated gun1-101 mutant expressing normal levels of GLK1 mRNA failed to accumulate GLK1 protein, suggesting that plastid signals directly regulate the accumulation of GLK1 protein in a GUN1-independent manner. Treatment of the glk1glk2 mutant expressing functional GFP-GLK1 with a proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, induced the accumulation of polyubiquitinated GFP-GLK1. Furthermore, the level of endogenous GLK1 in plants with damaged plastids was partially restored when those plants were treated with MG-132. Collectively, these data indicate that the ubiquitin-proteasome system participates in the degradation of Arabidopsis GLK1 in response to plastid signals. PMID:27821720

  16. Stimulatory effect of morphine on rat pineal melatonin synthesis via a cyclic AMP-dependent transcription pathway.

    PubMed

    Chetsawang, Banthit; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2005-11-25

    The expression of mRNA of opioid receptors and the existence of opioid binding site in the rat pineal gland have been demonstrated previously. A major finding was that morphine enhanced the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme, N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and increased the level of melatonin in rat pineal gland. An attempt has been made in order to clarify the mechanism of this induction. In the present study, the stimulatory effect of morphine on the expression of NAT mRNA in the rat pineal gland has been demonstrated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR technique. The results showed that both acute and chronic morphine treatments significantly increased NAT mRNA expression in rat pineal gland. In addition, the effect of morphine on the phosphorylation of the transcription factors, cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) was investigated. Western blot analysis showed that morphine significantly increased phosphorylation of CREB. These results indicate that at least one downstream messenger pathway for the activation of opioidergic system on the induction of melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland acts via cyclic AMP-dependent cascade and transcription mechanism.

  17. Medium-dependent regulation of proteinase gene expression in Lactococcus lactis: control of transcription initiation by specific dipeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Marugg, J D; Meijer, W; van Kranenburg, R; Laverman, P; Bruinenberg, P G; de Vos, W M

    1995-01-01

    Transcriptional gene fusions with the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase gene (gusA) were used to study the medium- and growth-dependent expression of the divergently transcribed genes involved in proteinase production (prtP and prtM) of Lactococcus lactis SK11. The results show that both the prtP and prtM genes are controlled at the transcriptional level by the peptide content of the medium and, to a lesser extent, by the growth rate. A more than 10-fold regulation in beta-glucuronidase activity was observed for both prtP and prtM promoters in batch and continuous cultures. The level of expression of the prtP and prtM promoters was high in whey permeate medium with relatively low concentrations of peptides, whereas at increased concentrations the expression of the promoters was repressed. The lowest level of expression was observed in peptide- and amino acid-rich laboratory media, such as glucose-M17 and MRS. The addition of specific dipeptides, such as leucylproline and prolylleucine, to the growth medium negatively affected the expression of the prtP-gusA fusions. The repression by dipeptides was not observed in mutants defective in the uptake of di-tripeptides, indicating that the internal concentration of dipeptides or derivatives is important in the regulation of proteinase production. PMID:7768792

  18. Src promotes castration-recurrent prostate cancer through androgen receptor-dependent canonical and non-canonical transcriptional signatures.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Wang, Jianmin; Qin, Maochun; Gao, Lingqiu; Holtz, Renae; Vessella, Robert L; Leach, Robert W; Gelman, Irwin H

    2017-02-07

    Progression of prostate cancer (PC) to castration-recurrent growth (CRPC) remains dependent on sustained expression and transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR). A major mechanism contributing to CRPC progression is through the direct phosphorylation and activation of AR by Src-family (SFK) and ACK1 tyrosine kinases. However, the AR-dependent transcriptional networks activated by Src during CRPC progression have not been elucidated. Here, we show that activated Src (Src527F) induces androgen-independent growth in human LNCaP cells, concomitant with its ability to induce proliferation/survival genes normally induced by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in androgen-dependent LNCaP and VCaP cells. Src induces additional gene signatures unique to CRPC cell lines, LNCaP-C4-2 and CWR22Rv1, and to CRPC LuCaP35.1 xenografts. By comparing the Src-induced AR-cistrome and/or transcriptome in LNCaP to those in CRPC and LuCaP35.1 tumors, we identified an 11-gene Src-regulated CRPC signature consisting of AR-dependent, AR binding site (ARBS)-associated genes whose expression is altered by DHT in LNCaP[Src527F] but not in LNCaP cells. The differential expression of a subset (DPP4, BCAT1, CNTNAP4, CDH3) correlates with earlier PC metastasis onset and poorer survival, with the expression of BCAT1 required for Src-induced androgen-independent proliferation. Lastly, Src enhances AR binding to non-canonical ARBS enriched for FOXO1, TOP2B and ZNF217 binding motifs; cooperative AR/TOP2B binding to a non-canonical ARBS was both Src- and DHT-sensitive and correlated with increased levels of Src-induced phosphotyrosyl-TOP2B. These data suggest that CRPC progression is facilitated via Src-induced sensitization of AR to intracrine androgen levels, resulting in the engagement of canonical and non-canonical ARBS-dependent gene signatures.

  19. Amino acid-dependent signaling via S6K1 and MYC is essential for regulation of rDNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Kusnadi, Eric P.; Ogden, Allison J.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Bammert, Lukas; Kutay, Ulrike; Hung, Sandy; Sanij, Elaine; Hannan, Ross D.; Hannan, Katherine M.; Pearson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-dependent ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription is a consistent feature of malignant transformation that can be targeted to treat cancer. Understanding how rDNA transcription is coupled to the availability of growth factors and nutrients will provide insight into how ribosome biogenesis is maintained in a tumour environment characterised by limiting nutrients. We demonstrate that modulation of rDNA transcription initiation, elongation and rRNA processing is an immediate, co-regulated response to altered amino acid abundance, dependent on both mTORC1 activation of S6K1 and MYC activity. Growth factors regulate rDNA transcription initiation while amino acids modulate growth factor-dependent rDNA transcription by primarily regulating S6K1-dependent rDNA transcription elongation and processing. Thus, we show for the first time amino acids regulate rRNA synthesis by a distinct, post-initiation mechanism, providing a novel model for integrated control of ribosome biogenesis that has implications for understanding how this process is dysregulated in cancer. PMID:27385002

  20. How do kinases contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of the transcription factor NFAT5?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    NFAT5 plays a critical role in maintaining the renal functions. Its dis-regulation in the kidney leads to or is associated with certain renal diseases or disorders, most notably the urinary concentration defect. Hypertonicity, which the kidney medulla is normally exposed to, activates NFAT5 through phosphorylation of a signaling molecule or NFAT5 itself. Hypotonicity inhibits NFAT5 through a similar mechanism. More than a dozen of protein and lipid kinases have been identified to contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of NFAT5. Hypertonicity activates NFAT5 by increasing its nuclear localization and transactivating activity in the early phase and protein abundance in the late phase. The known mechanism for inhibition of NFAT5 by hypotonicity is a decrease of nuclear NFAT5. The present article reviews the effect of each kinase on NFAT5 nuclear localization, transactivation and protein abundance, and the relationship among these kinases, if known. Cyclosporine A and tacrolimus suppress immune reactions by inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin-dependent activation of NFAT1. It is hoped that this review would stimulate the interest to seek explanations from the NFAT5 regulatory pathways for certain clinical presentations and to explore novel therapeutic approaches based on the pathways. On the basic science front, this review raises two interesting questions. The first one is how these kinases can specifically signal to NFAT5 in the context of hypertonicity or hypotonicity, because they also regulate other cellular activities and even opposite activities in some cases. The second one is why these many kinases, some of which might have redundant functions, are needed to regulate NFAT5 activity. This review reiterates the concept of signaling through cooperation. Cells need these kinases working in a coordinated way to provide the signaling specificity that is lacking in the individual one. Redundancy in regulation of NFAT5 is a critical strategy for cells to

  1. Interaction of the phospholipid scramblase 1 with HIV-1 Tat results in the repression of Tat-dependent transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Shuichi Eizuru, Yoshito

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •PLSCR1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 Tat in vitro and in vivo. •PLSCR1 repressed Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR. •Suppression of PLSCR1 expression enhanced the levels of HIV-1 transcripts. •PLSCR1 reduced the nuclear localization of Tat. -- Abstract: Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene and possesses an IFN-mediated antiviral function. We show here that PLSCR1 directly interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat. This interaction occurs both in vitro and in vivo through amino acids 160–250 of PLSCR1. Overexpression of PLSCR1 efficiently represses the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) and reduces the nuclear translocation of Tat. In addition, shRNA-mediated suppression of endogenous PLSCR1 expression enhances the levels of gag mRNA in an HIV-1-infected T-cell line. These findings indicate that PLSCR1 negatively regulates the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR during HIV-1 infection.

  2. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murano, Tatsuro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  3. Fibronectin upregulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase type Iβ through C/EBP transcription factor activation in contractile cells.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Jorganes, Aranzazu; Calleros, Laura; Griera, Mercedes; Saura, Marta; Luengo, Alicia; Rodriguez-Puyol, D; Rodriguez-Puyol, M

    2011-03-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) pathway exerts most of its cellular actions through the activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Accumulation of extracellular matrix is one of the main structural changes in pathological conditions characterized by a decreased activity of this pathway, such as hypertension, diabetes, or aging, and it is a well-known fact that extracellular matrix proteins modulate cell phenotype through the interaction with membrane receptors such as integrins. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate whether extracellular matrix proteins, particularly fibronectin (FN), modulate PKG expression in contractile cells, 2) to analyze the mechanisms involved, and 3) to evaluate the functional consequences. FN increased type I PKG (PKG-I) protein content in human mesangial cells, an effect dependent on the interaction with β(1)-integrin. The FN upregulation of PKG-I protein content was due to increased mRNA expression, determined by augmented transcriptional activity of the PKG-I promoter region. Akt and the transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) mediated the genesis of these changes. FN also increased PKG-I in another type of contractile cell, rat vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMC). Tirofiban, a pharmacological analog of FN, increased PKG-I protein content in RVSMC and rat aortic walls and magnified the hypotensive effect of dibutyryl cGMP in conscious Wistar rats. The present results provide evidence of a mechanism able to increase PKG-I protein content in contractile cells. Elucidation of this novel mechanism provides a rationale for future pharmacotherapy in certain vascular diseases.

  4. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Song, You; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-11-01

    Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15mGy radiation affected DEGs associated with cellular signaling and immune response; 70mGy radiation affected cell cycle regulation and DNA damage repair, cellular energy production; and 280mGy radiation affected pathways related to cell cycle regulation and DNA

  5. The Fission Yeast Homeodomain Protein Yox1p Binds to MBF and Confines MBF-Dependent Cell-Cycle Transcription to G1-S via Negative Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Aligianni, Sofia; Lackner, Daniel H.; Klier, Steffi; Rustici, Gabriella; Wilhelm, Brian T.; Marguerat, Samuel; Codlin, Sandra; Brazma, Alvis; de Bruin, Robertus A. M.; Bähler, Jürg

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of the G1- to S-phase transition is critical for cell-cycle progression. This transition is driven by a transient transcriptional wave regulated by transcription factor complexes termed MBF/SBF in yeast and E2F-DP in mammals. Here we apply genomic, genetic, and biochemical approaches to show that the Yox1p homeodomain protein of fission yeast plays a critical role in confining MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. The yox1 gene is an MBF target, and Yox1p accumulates and preferentially binds to MBF-regulated promoters, via the MBF components Res2p and Nrm1p, when they are transcriptionally repressed during the cell cycle. Deletion of yox1 results in constitutively high transcription of MBF target genes and loss of their cell cycle–regulated expression, similar to deletion of nrm1. Genome-wide location analyses of Yox1p and the MBF component Cdc10p reveal dozens of genes whose promoters are bound by both factors, including their own genes and histone genes. In addition, Cdc10p shows promiscuous binding to other sites, most notably close to replication origins. This study establishes Yox1p as a new regulatory MBF component in fission yeast, which is transcriptionally induced by MBF and in turn inhibits MBF-dependent transcription. Yox1p may function together with Nrm1p to confine MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle via negative feedback. Compared to the orthologous budding yeast Yox1p, which indirectly functions in a negative feedback loop for cell-cycle transcription, similarities but also notable differences in the wiring of the regulatory circuits are evident. PMID:19714215

  6. Mouse prenatal platelet-forming lineages share a core transcriptional program but divergent dependence on MPL.

    PubMed

    Potts, Kathryn S; Sargeant, Tobias J; Dawson, Caleb A; Josefsson, Emma C; Hilton, Douglas J; Alexander, Warren S; Taoudi, Samir

    2015-08-06

    The thrombopoietic environment of the neonate is established during prenatal life; therefore, a comprehensive understanding of platelet-forming cell development during embryogenesis is critical to understanding the etiology of early-onset thrombocytopenia. The recent discovery that the first platelet-forming cells of the conceptus are not megakaryocytes (MKs) but diploid platelet-forming cells (DPFCs) revealed a previously unappreciated complexity in thrombopoiesis. This raises important questions, including the following. When do conventional MKs appear? Do pathogenic genetic lesions of adult MKs affect DPFCs? What role does myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL), a key regulator of adult megakaryopoiesis, play in prenatal platelet-forming lineages? We performed a comprehensive study to determine the spatial and temporal appearance of prenatal platelet-forming lineages. We demonstrate that DPFCs originate in the yolk sac and then rapidly migrate to other extra- and intraembryonic tissues. Using gene disruption models of Gata1 and Nfe2, we demonstrate that perturbing essential adult MK genes causes an analogous phenotype in the early embryo before the onset of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell-driven (definitive) hematopoiesis. Finally, we present the surprising finding that DPFC and MK commitment from their respective precursors is MPL independent in vivo but that completion of MK differentiation and establishment of the prenatal platelet mass is dependent on MPL expression.

  7. Arsenic Attenuates GLI Signaling, Increasing or Decreasing its Transcriptional Program in a Context-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Giambelli, Camilla; Tang, Bo; Winterbottom, Emily; Long, Jun; Jin, Ke; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fei, Dennis Liang; Nguyen, Dao M; Athar, Mohammad; Wang, Baolin; Subbarayan, Pochi R; Wang, Lily; Rai, Priyamvada; Ardalan, Bach; Capobianco, Anthony J; Robbins, David J

    2016-02-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a worldwide environmental toxicant, exposure to which is associated with many adverse outcomes. Arsenic is also an effective therapeutic agent in certain disease settings. Arsenic was recently shown to regulate the activity of the Hedgehog (HH) signal transduction pathway, and this regulation of HH signaling was proposed to be responsible for a subset of arsenic's biologic effects. Surprisingly, these separate reports proposed contradictory activities for arsenic, as either an agonist or antagonist of HH signaling. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that arsenic acts as a modulator of the activity of the HH effector protein glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger (GLI), activating or inhibiting GLI activity in a context-dependent manner. This arsenic-induced modulation of HH signaling is observed in cultured cells, patients with colorectal cancer who have received arsenic-based therapy, and a mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model. Our results show that arsenic activates GLI signaling when the intrinsic GLI activity is low but inhibits signaling in the presence of high-level GLI activity. Furthermore, we show that this modulation occurs downstream of primary cilia, evidenced by experiments in suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU) deficient cells. Combining our findings with previous reports, we present an inclusive model in which arsenic plays dual roles in GLI signaling modulation: when GLIs are primarily in their repressor form, arsenic antagonizes their repression capacity, leading to low-level GLI activation, but when GLIs are primarily in their activator form, arsenic attenuates their activity.

  8. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase regulates basal and cyclic AMP-stimulated but not phorbol ester-stimulated transcription of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, K S; Tinti, C; Song, B; Cubells, J F; Joh, T H

    1994-09-01

    To define the precise role of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in transcriptional regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, we performed transient cotransfection analyses of a reporter construct containing the upstream 2,400 bp sequence of the rat TH gene with expression plasmids encoding a heat-stable specific inhibitor of PKA (PKI), a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA, or the catalytic subunit of PKA. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of either PKI or mutant regulatory subunit blocked cAMP-stimulated induction and reduced basal transcription of the TH-reporter construct. Expression of the catalytic subunit of PKA induced the expression of the TH-reporter construct up to 50-fold in a dose-dependent manner. Primer extension analysis confirmed that PKA-mediated induction of TH-reporter expression occurred at the correct transcription initiation site. Expression of PKI did not affect induction following phorbol ester treatment, suggesting that PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) induce TH transcription by independent mechanisms. Finally, a double mutation within the cAMP response element (CRE) of TH2400-CAT diminished its basal and forskolin-stimulated transcription to the level of the promoterless plasmid, pBLCAT3, but did not alter the induction following treatment with phorbol ester, indicating that the CRE is not required for PKC-mediated transcriptional induction. Our results indicate that PKA, via the CRE, plays a crucial role for basal and cAMP-inducible transcription of the TH gene.

  9. Arsenic Attenuates GLI Signaling, Increasing or Decreasing its Transcriptional Program in a Context-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Giambelli, Camilla; Tang, Bo; Winterbottom, Emily; Long, Jun; Jin, Ke; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fei, Dennis Liang; Nguyen, Dao M.; Athar, Mohammad; Wang, Baolin; Subbarayan, Pochi R.; Wang, Lily; Rai, Priyamvada; Ardalan, Bach; Capobianco, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a worldwide environmental toxicant, exposure to which is associated with many adverse outcomes. Arsenic is also an effective therapeutic agent in certain disease settings. Arsenic was recently shown to regulate the activity of the Hedgehog (HH) signal transduction pathway, and this regulation of HH signaling was proposed to be responsible for a subset of arsenic’s biologic effects. Surprisingly, these separate reports proposed contradictory activities for arsenic, as either an agonist or antagonist of HH signaling. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that arsenic acts as a modulator of the activity of the HH effector protein glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger (GLI), activating or inhibiting GLI activity in a context-dependent manner. This arsenic-induced modulation of HH signaling is observed in cultured cells, patients with colorectal cancer who have received arsenic-based therapy, and a mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model. Our results show that arsenic activates GLI signaling when the intrinsic GLI activity is low but inhibits signaling in the presence of high-level GLI activity. Furthermore, we show that this modulation occurs downstream of primary cilia, evidenced by experiments in suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU) deficient cells. Combining our findings with previous reports, we present an inclusive model in which arsenic plays dual roles in GLI signaling modulation: when GLIs are primarily in their repressor form, arsenic antagonizes their repression capacity, leading to low-level GLI activation, but when GLIs are primarily in their activator form, arsenic attenuates their activity. PMID:26573582

  10. Spatial memory consolidation is associated with induction of several lysine-acetyltransferase (histone acetyltransferase) expression levels and H2B/H4 acetylation-dependent transcriptional events in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bousiges, Olivier; Vasconcelos, Anne Pereira de; Neidl, Romain; Cosquer, Brigitte; Herbeaux, Karine; Panteleeva, Irina; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence

    2010-12-01

    Numerous genetic studies have shown that the CREB-binding protein (CBP) is an essential component of long-term memory formation, through its histone acetyltransferase (HAT) function. E1A-binding protein p300 and p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) have also recently been involved in memory formation. By contrast, only a few studies have reported on acetylation modifications during memory formation, and it remains unclear as to how the system is regulated during this dynamic phase. We investigated acetylation-dependent events and the expression profiles of these HATs during a hippocampus-dependent task taxing spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze. We found a specific increase in H2B and H4 acetylation in the rat dorsal hippocampus, while spatial memory was being consolidated. This increase correlated with the degree of specific acetylated histones enrichment on some memory/plasticity-related gene promoters. Overall, a global increase in HAT activity was measured during this memory consolidation phase, together with a global increase of CBP, p300, and PCAF expression. Interestingly, these regulations were altered in a model of hippocampal denervation disrupting spatial memory consolidation, making it impossible for the hippocampus to recruit the CBP pathway (CBP regulation and acetylated-H2B-dependent transcription). CBP has long been thought to be present in limited concentrations in the cells. These results show, for the first time, that CBP, p300, and PCAF are dynamically modulated during the establishment of a spatial memory and are likely to contribute to the induction of a specific epigenetic tagging of the genome for hippocampus-dependent (spatial) memory consolidation. These findings suggest the use of HAT-activating molecules in new therapeutic strategies of pathological aging, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Inhibition of p53-dependent transcription by BOX-I phospho-peptide mimetics that bind to p300

    PubMed Central

    Dornan, David; Hupp, Ted R.

    2001-01-01

    The N-terminal BOX-I domain of p53 containing a docking site for the negative regulator MDM2 and the positive effector p300, harbours two recently identified phosphorylation sites at Thr18 or Ser20 whose affect on p300 is undefined. Biochemical assays demonstrate that although MDM2 binding is inhibited by these phosphorylations, p300 binding is strikingly stabilized by Thr18 or Ser20 phosphorylation. Introducing EGFP-BOX-I domain peptides with an aspartate substitution at Thr18 or Ser20 induced a significant inhibition of endogenous p53-dependent transcription in cycling cells, in irradiated cells, as well as in cells transiently co-transfected with p300 and p53. In contrast an EGFP-wild-type BOX-I domain peptide stimulated p53 activity via inhibition of MDM2 protein binding. These results suggest that phosphorylation of p53 at Thr18 or Ser20 can activate p53 by stabilizing the p300–p53 complex and also identify a class of small molecular weight ligands capable of selective discrimination between MDM2- and p300-dependent activities. PMID:11258706

  12. Transcriptional activation of human CYP17 in H295R adrenocortical cells depends on complex formation among p54(nrb)/NonO, protein-associated splicing factor, and SF-1, a complex that also participates in repression of transcription.

    PubMed

    Sewer, Marion B; Nguyen, Viet Q; Huang, Ching-Jung; Tucker, Philip W; Kagawa, Norio; Waterman, Michael R

    2002-04-01

    The first 57 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site of the human CYP17 (hCYP17) gene are essential for both basal and cAMP-dependent transcription. EMSA carried out by incubating H295R adrenocortical cell nuclear extracts with radiolabeled -57/-38 probe from the hCYP17 promoter showed the formation of three DNA-protein complexes. The fastest complex contained steroidogenic factor (SF-1) and p54(nrb)/NonO, the intermediate complex contained p54(nrb)/NonO and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF), and the slowest complex contained an SF-1/PSF/p54(nrb)/NonO complex. (Bu)(2)cAMP treatment resulted in a cAMP-inducible increase in the binding intensity of only the upper complex and also activated hCYP17 gene transcription. SF-1 coimmunoprecipitated with p54(nrb)/NonO, indicating direct interaction between these proteins. Functional assays revealed that PSF represses basal transcription. Further, the repression of hCYP17 promoter-reporter construct luciferase activity resulted from PSF interacting with the corepressor mSin3A. Trichostatin A attenuated the inhibition of basal transcription, suggesting that a histone deacetylase interacts with the SF-1/PSF/p54(nrb)/NonO/mSin3A complex. Our studies lend support to the idea that the balance between transcriptional activation and repression is essential in the control of adrenocortical steroid hormone biosynthesis.

  13. PGC-1-Related Coactivator, a Novel, Serum-Inducible Coactivator of Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1-Dependent Transcription in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ulf; Scarpulla, Richard C.

    2001-01-01

    The thermogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) coactivator 1 (PGC-1) has previously been shown to activate mitochondrial biogenesis in part through a direct interaction with nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1). In order to identify related coactivators that act through NRF-1, we searched the databases for sequences with similarities to PGC-1. Here, we describe the first characterization of a 177-kDa transcriptional coactivator, designated PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC). PRC is ubiquitously expressed in murine and human tissues and cell lines; but unlike PGC-1, PRC was not dramatically up-regulated during thermogenesis in brown fat. However, its expression was down-regulated in quiescent BALB/3T3 cells and was rapidly induced by reintroduction of serum, conditions where PGC-1 was not detected. PRC activated NRF-1-dependent promoters in a manner similar to that observed for PGC-1. Moreover, NRF-1 was immunoprecipitated from cell extracts by antibodies directed against PRC, and both proteins were colocalized to the nucleoplasm by confocal laser scanning microscopy. PRC interacts in vitro with the NRF-1 DNA binding domain through two distinct recognition motifs that are separated by an unstructured proline-rich region. PRC also contains a potent transcriptional activation domain in its amino terminus adjacent to an LXXLL motif. The spatial arrangement of these functional domains coincides with those found in PGC-1, supporting the conclusion that PRC and PGC-1 are structurally and functionally related. We conclude that PRC is a functional relative of PGC-1 that operates through NRF-1 and possibly other activators in response to proliferative signals. PMID:11340167

  14. Progressive inactivation of the expression of an erythroid transcriptional factor in GM- and G-CSF-dependent myeloid cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Crotta, S; Nicolis, S; Ronchi, A; Ottolenghi, S; Ruzzi, L; Shimada, Y; Migliaccio, A R; Migliaccio, G

    1990-01-01

    The transcriptional binding protein NFE-1 (also called GF-1 and Ery-f1) is thought to play a necessary, but not sufficient, role in the regulation of differentiation-related gene expression in a subset of hematopoietic lineages (erythroid, megakaryocytic, and basophil-mast cell). In order to clarify the mechanism which underlies the lineage-specificity of the NFE-1 expression, as well as the relationship between the expression of this factor and growth factor responsiveness, we have evaluated the capacity of erythropoietin (Epo)-, granulomonocytic (GM)-colony stimulating factor (CSF)-, and granulocyte (G)-CSF-dependent subclones derived from the interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent cell line 32D, to express 1) NFE-1 mRNA, 2) NFE-1-related nuclear proteins, and 3) chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) activity when transfected with a CAT gene under the control of NFE-1 cognate sequences. NFE-1 mRNA was found to be expressed not only in cells with mast cell (IL-3-dependent 32D) and erythroid (Epo-dependent 32D Epo1) phenotypes, but also in cells with predominantly granulocyte/macrophage properties, such as the GM-CSF- (early myelomonocytic) and G-CSF- (myelocytic) dependent subclones of 32D. However, a gradient of expression, correlating with the lineage, the stage of differentiation, and the growth factor responsiveness of the cell lines, was found among the different subclones: Epo greater than or equal to IL-3 greater than GM-CSF greater than G-CSF. Binding experiments demonstrated NFE-1 activity in all cell lines except the G-CSF-dependent line. Function of the NFE-1 protein was assessed by the expression of the CAT gene linked to the SV40 promoter and a mutant (-175 T----C) HPFH gamma-globin promoter. High level CAT expression was seen only in the Epo1 cells although low level expression was also seen in the parent 32D. These results demonstrate that the specificity of the expression of NFE-1 for the erythroid--megakaryocytic--mast cell lineages is obtained by

  15. Mammary ductal growth is impaired in mice lacking leptin-dependent signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Stephanie R; Giesy, Sarah L; Myers, Martin G; Boisclair, Yves R

    2010-08-01

    Mice lacking leptin (ob/ob) or its full-length receptor (db/db) are obese and reproductively incompetent. Fertility, pregnancy, and lactation are restored, respectively, in ob/ob mice treated with leptin through mating, d 6.5 post coitum, and pregnancy. Therefore, leptin signaling is needed for lactation, but the timing of its action and the affected mammary process remain unknown. To address this issue, we used s/s mice lacking only leptin-dependent signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 signaling. These mice share many features with db/db mice, including obesity, but differ by retaining sufficient activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis to support reproduction. The s/s mammary epithelium was normal at 3 wk of age but failed to expand through the mammary fat pad (MFP) during the subsequent pubertal period. Ductal growth failure was not corrected by estrogen therapy and did not relate to inadequate IGF-I production by the MFP or to the need for epithelial or stromal leptin-STAT3 signaling. Ductal growth failure coincided with adipocyte hypertrophy and increased MFP production of leptin, TNFalpha, and IL6. These cytokines, however, were unable to inhibit the proliferation of a collection of mouse mammary epithelial cell lines. In conclusion, the very first step of postnatal mammary development fails in s/s mice despite sufficient estrogen IGF-I and an hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis capable of supporting reproduction. This failure is not caused by mammary loss of leptin-dependent STAT3 signaling or by the development of inflammation. These data imply the existence of an unknown mechanism whereby leptin-dependent STAT3 signaling and obesity alter mammary ductal development.

  16. FUS/TLS contributes to replication-dependent histone gene expression by interaction with U7 snRNPs and histone-specific transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Raczynska, Katarzyna Dorota; Ruepp, Marc-David; Brzek, Aleksandra; Reber, Stefan; Romeo, Valentina; Rindlisbacher, Barbara; Heller, Manfred; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Jarmolowski, Artur; Schümperli, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Replication-dependent histone genes are up-regulated during the G1/S phase transition to meet the requirement for histones to package the newly synthesized DNA. In mammalian cells, this increment is achieved by enhanced transcription and 3′ end processing. The non-polyadenylated histone mRNA 3′ ends are generated by a unique mechanism involving the U7 small ribonucleoprotein (U7 snRNP). By using affinity purification methods to enrich U7 snRNA, we identified FUS/TLS as a novel U7 snRNP interacting protein. Both U7 snRNA and histone transcripts can be precipitated by FUS antibodies predominantly in the S phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, FUS depletion leads to decreased levels of correctly processed histone mRNAs and increased levels of extended transcripts. Interestingly, FUS antibodies also co-immunoprecipitate histone transcriptional activator NPAT and transcriptional repressor hnRNP UL1 in different phases of the cell cycle. We further show that FUS binds to histone genes in S phase, promotes the recruitment of RNA polymerase II and is important for the activity of histone gene promoters. Thus, FUS may serve as a linking factor that positively regulates histone gene transcription and 3′ end processing by interacting with the U7 snRNP and other factors involved in replication-dependent histone gene expression. PMID:26250115

  17. A transcription activator-like effector from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola elicits dose-dependent resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aaron W; Wilkins, Katherine E; Wang, Li; Cernadas, R Andres; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    Xanthomonas spp. reduce crop yields and quality worldwide. During infection of their plant hosts, many strains secrete transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors, which enter the host cell nucleus and activate specific corresponding host genes at effector binding elements (EBEs) in the promoter. TAL effectors may contribute to disease by activating the expression of susceptibility genes or trigger resistance associated with the hypersensitive reaction (HR) by activating an executor resistance (R) gene. The rice bacterial leaf streak pathogen X. oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) is known to suppress host resistance, and no host R gene has been identified against it, despite considerable effort. To further investigate Xoc suppression of host resistance, we conducted a screen of effectors from BLS256 and identified Tal2a as an HR elicitor in rice when delivered heterologously by a strain of the closely related rice bacterial blight pathogen X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) or by the soybean pathogen X. axonopodis pv. glycines. The HR required the Tal2a activation domain, suggesting an executor R gene. Tal2a activity was differentially distributed among geographically diverse Xoc isolates, being largely conserved among Asian isolates. We identified four genes induced by Tal2a in next-generation RNA sequencing experiments and confirmed them using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). However, neither individual nor collective activation of these genes by designer TAL effectors resulted in HR. A tal2a knockout mutant of BLS256 showed virulence comparable with the wild-type, but plasmid-based overexpression of tal2a at different levels in the wild-type reduced virulence in a directly corresponding way. Overall, the results reveal that host resistance suppression by Xoc plays a critical role in pathogenesis. Further, the dose-dependent avirulence activity of Tal2a and the apparent lack of a single canonical target that accounts for HR point to

  18. Structure-Function Relationships in the Gas-Sensing Heme-Dependent Transcription Factors RcoM and DNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Hannah E.

    Transition metals play an important role in many biological processes, however, they are also toxic at high concentrations. Therefore, the uptake and efflux of these metals must be tightly regulated by the cell. Bacteria have evolved a variety of pathways and regulatory systems to monitor the presence and concentration of metals in the cellular environment. A key component of those systems are transcription factors that either "sense metals" or use "metal sensors". The first class of these proteins have metals as their allosteric effector ligand. The second class of these proteins utilize transition metal containing cofactors to sense other environmental cues through the specific chemistry afforded by the cofactor. Chapter 1 reviews the current literature regarding both types of transcription factors. The focus of this work has been on two heme-containing, gas-sensing transcription factors found in bacteria, RcoM (regulator of CO metabolism) and DNR (dissimilative nitrate respiration regulator). RcoM is a CO-dependent protein found in Burkholderia xenovorans and sits upstream of the cox operon for oxidative CO metabolism. RcoM senses the presence of CO, as well as changes in redox potential, through a ligand switch process at its heme cofactor. Chapter 2 details spectroscopic characterization of several methionine mutants to identify the Fe(II) ligand trans to His 74. That study concludes that Met104 acts as the CO-replacable ligand. Met105, while not the ligand, does play an important role in reversibility of the ligand switch process. RcoM has a unique tertiary structure that combines a sensory domain and a DNA-binding domain normally found in two-component systems. Chapter 3 provides evidence that RcoM adopts a dimeric state. Further biophysical and structural characterization gives further insight into how the two domains are organized and the implications for the DNA-binding mechanism. DNR is a NO-sensing transcription factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and

  19. Core promoter-specific gene regulation: TATA box selectivity and Initiator-dependent bi-directionality of serum response factor-activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Xu, Muyu; Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Martinez, Ernest

    2016-04-01

    Gene-specific activation by enhancers involves their communication with the basal RNA polymerase II transcription machinery at the core promoter. Core promoters are diverse and may contain a variety of sequence elements such as the TATA box, the Initiator (INR), and the downstream promoter element (DPE) recognized, respectively, by the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors of the TFIID complex. Core promoter elements contribute to the gene selectivity of enhancers, and INR/DPE-specific enhancers and activators have been identified. Here, we identify a TATA box-selective activating sequence upstream of the human β-actin (ACTB) gene that mediates serum response factor (SRF)-induced transcription from TATA-dependent but not INR-dependent promoters and requires the TATA-binding/bending activity of TBP, which is otherwise dispensable for transcription from a TATA-less promoter. The SRF-dependent ACTB sequence is stereospecific on TATA promoters but activates in an orientation-independent manner a composite TATA/INR-containing promoter. More generally, we show that SRF-regulated genes of the actin/cytoskeleton/contractile family tend to have a TATA box. These results suggest distinct TATA-dependent and INR-dependent mechanisms of TFIID-mediated transcription in mammalian cells that are compatible with only certain stereospecific combinations of activators, and that a TBP-TATA binding mechanism is important for SRF activation of the actin/cytoskeleton-related gene family.

  20. σB-Dependent and σB-Independent Mechanisms Contribute to Transcription of Listeria monocytogenes Cold Stress Genes during Cold Shock and Cold Growth▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yvonne C.; Boor, Kathryn J.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The role of the stress response regulator σB (encoded by sigB) in directing the expression of selected putative and confirmed cold response genes was evaluated using Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and an isogenic ΔsigB mutant, which were either cold shocked at 4°C in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth for up to 30 min or grown at 4°C in BHI for 12 days. Transcript levels of the housekeeping genes rpoB and gap, the σB-dependent genes opuCA and bsh, and the cold stress genes ltrC, oppA, and fri were measured using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Transcriptional start sites for ltrC, oppA, and fri were determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. Centrifugation was found to rapidly induce σB-dependent transcription, which necessitated the use of centrifugation-independent protocols to evaluate the contributions of σB to transcription during cold shock. Our data confirmed that transcription of the cold stress genes ltrC and fri is at least partially σB dependent and experimentally identified a σB-dependent ltrC promoter. In addition, our data indicate that (i) while σB activity is induced during 30 min of cold shock, this cold shock does not induce the transcription of σB-dependent or -independent cold shock genes; (ii) σB is not required for L. monocytogenes growth at 4°C in BHI; and (iii) transcription of the putative cold stress genes opuCA, fri, and oppA is σB independent during growth at 4°C, while both bsh and ltrC show growth phase and σB-dependent transcription during growth at 4°C. We conclude that σB-dependent and σB-independent mechanisms contribute to the ability of L. monocytogenes to survive and grow at low temperatures. PMID:17675428

  1. SigmaB-dependent and sigmaB-independent mechanisms contribute to transcription of Listeria monocytogenes cold stress genes during cold shock and cold growth.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne C; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2007-10-01

    The role of the stress response regulator sigma(B) (encoded by sigB) in directing the expression of selected putative and confirmed cold response genes was evaluated using Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and an isogenic DeltasigB mutant, which were either cold shocked at 4 degrees C in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth for up to 30 min or grown at 4 degrees C in BHI for 12 days. Transcript levels of the housekeeping genes rpoB and gap, the sigma(B)-dependent genes opuCA and bsh, and the cold stress genes ltrC, oppA, and fri were measured using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Transcriptional start sites for ltrC, oppA, and fri were determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. Centrifugation was found to rapidly induce sigma(B)-dependent transcription, which necessitated the use of centrifugation-independent protocols to evaluate the contributions of sigma(B) to transcription during cold shock. Our data confirmed that transcription of the cold stress genes ltrC and fri is at least partially sigma(B) dependent and experimentally identified a sigma(B)-dependent ltrC promoter. In addition, our data indicate that (i) while sigma(B) activity is induced during 30 min of cold shock, this cold shock does not induce the transcription of sigma(B)-dependent or -independent cold shock genes; (ii) sigma(B) is not required for L. monocytogenes growth at 4 degrees C in BHI; and (iii) transcription of the putative cold stress genes opuCA, fri, and oppA is sigma(B) independent during growth at 4 degrees C, while both bsh and ltrC show growth phase and sigma(B)-dependent transcription during growth at 4 degrees C. We conclude that sigma(B)-dependent and sigma(B)-independent mechanisms contribute to the ability of L. monocytogenes to survive and grow at low temperatures.

  2. Structure‐function integrity of the adult hippocampus depends on the transcription factor Bcl11b/Ctip2

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R.; Baumann, L.; Fischer, J.; Seigfried, F. A.; De Bruyckere, E.; Liu, P.; Jenkins, N. A.; Copeland, N. G.; Schwegler, H.

    2016-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is one of the only two brain regions where adult neurogenesis occurs. Throughout life, cells of the neuronal stem cell niche undergo proliferation, differentiation and integration into the hippocampal neural circuitry. Ongoing adult neurogenesis is a prerequisite for the maintenance of adult hippocampal functionality. Bcl11b, a zinc finger transcription factor, is expressed by postmitotic granule cells in the developing as well as adult dentate gyrus. We previously showed a critical role of Bcl11b for hippocampal development. Whether Bcl11b is also required for adult hippocampal functions has not been investigated. Using a tetracycline‐dependent inducible mouse model under the control of the forebrain‐specific CaMKIIα promoter, we show here that the adult expression of Bcl11b is essential for survival, differentiation and functional integration of adult‐born granule cell neurons. In addition, Bcl11b is required for survival of pre‐existing mature neurons. Consequently, loss of Bcl11b expression selectively in the adult hippocampus results in impaired spatial working memory. Together, our data uncover for the first time a specific role of Bcl11b in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and function. PMID:26915960

  3. Fragile X mental retardation protein is required for synapse elimination by the activity-dependent transcription factor MEF2.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Brad E; Zang, Tong; Wilkerson, Julia R; Taniguchi, Makoto; Maksimova, Marina A; Smith, Laura N; Cowan, Christopher W; Huber, Kimberly M

    2010-04-29

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common genetic form of mental retardation and autism, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in an RNA-binding protein, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). Neurons from patients and the mouse Fmr1 knockout (KO) model are characterized by an excess of dendritic spines, suggesting a deficit in excitatory synapse elimination. In response to neuronal activity, myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors induce robust synapse elimination. Here, we demonstrate that MEF2 activation fails to eliminate functional or structural excitatory synapses in hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice. Similarly, inhibition of endogenous MEF2 increases synapse number in wild-type but not Fmr1 KO neurons. MEF2-dependent synapse elimination is rescued in Fmr1 KO neurons by acute postsynaptic expression of wild-type but not RNA-binding mutants of FMRP. Our results reveal that active MEF2 and FMRP function together in an acute, cell-autonomous mechanism to eliminate excitatory synapses.

  4. Key role of an ADP - ribose - dependent transcriptional regulator of NAD metabolism for fitness and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Okon, Elza; Dethlefsen, Sarah; Pelnikevich, Anna; Barneveld, Andrea van; Munder, Antje; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    NAD is an essential co-factor of redox reactions and metabolic conversions of NAD-dependent enzymes. NAD biosynthesis in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has yet not been experimentally explored. The in silico search for orthologs in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome identified the operon pncA - pncB1-nadE (PA4918-PA4920) to encode the nicotinamidase, nicotinate phosporibosyltransferase and Nad synthase of salvage pathway I. The functional role of the preceding genes PA4917 and PA4916 was resolved by the characterization of recombinant protein. PA4917 turned out to encode the nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase NadD2 and PA4916 was determined to encode the transcriptional repressor NrtR that binds to an intergenic sequence between nadD2 and pncA. Complex formation between the catalytically inactive Nudix protein NrtR and its DNA binding site was suppressed by the antirepressor ADP-ribose. NrtR plasposon mutagenesis abrogated virulence of P. aeruginosa TBCF10839 in a murine acute airway infection model and constrained its metabolite profile. When grown together with other isogenic plasposon mutants, the nrtR knock-out was most compromised in competitive fitness to persist in nutrient-rich medium in vitro or murine airways in vivo. This example demonstrates how tightly metabolism and virulence can be intertwined by key elements of metabolic control.

  5. Phosphorylation of p53 by TAF1 inactivates p53-dependent transcription in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Lin, Joy C.; Piluso, Landon G.; Dhahbi, Joseph M.; Bobadilla, Selene; Spindler, Stephen R.; Liu, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Summary While p53 activation has long been studied, the mechanisms by which its targets genes are restored to their pre-activation state are less clear. We report here that TAF1 phosphorylates p53 at Thr55, leading to dissociation of p53 from the p21 promoter and inactivation of transcription late in the DNA damage response. We further show that cellular ATP level might act as a molecular switch for Thr55 phosphorylation on the p21 promoter, indicating that TAF1 is a cellular ATP sensor. Upon DNA damage, cells undergo PARP-1-dependent ATP depletion, which is correlated with reduced TAF1 kinase activity and Thr55 phosphorylation, resulting in p21 activation. As cellular ATP levels recover, TAF1 is able to phosphorylate p53 on Thr55, which leads to dissociation of p53 from the p21 promoter. ChIP-sequencing analysis reveals p53 dissociates from promoters genome-wide as cells recover from DNA damage, suggesting the general nature of this mechanism. PMID:24289924

  6. p300 is involved in formation of the TBP-TFIIA-containing basal transcription complex, TAC.

    PubMed

    Mitsiou, Dimitra J; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G

    2003-09-01

    We have recently identified a novel basal transcription complex, TAC, that is present and active in embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells but not in other adult cells such as COS7. In the search for factors involved in TAC formation, we found that expression of the adenoviral 12S E1A oncoprotein abolishes TAC formation in EC cells. This effect of E1A depends on its N-terminal domain that is essential for cell differentiation and that targets the transcriptional coactivators p300 and PCAF. Expression of p300 lacking its major E1A interaction domain, CH3, restores TAC formation in the presence of E1A, in a bromodomain- and HAT domain-dependent manner. Consistently, the unprocessed TFIIAalphabeta precursor that is selectively assembled into TAC is acetylated preferentially compared with the processed subunits present in 'free' TFIIA. Intriguingly, expression of p300 in COS7 cells that do not contain detectable levels of TAC instigates formation of TAC from endogenous components. Our data suggest that p300 plays a role in formation of the TBP-TFIIA-containing basal transcription complex, TAC.

  7. p16(INK4A) enhances the transcriptional and the apoptotic functions of p53 through DNA-dependent interaction.

    PubMed

    Al-Khalaf, Huda H; Nallar, Shreeram C; Kalvakolanu, Dhananjaya V; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2017-02-20

    p16(INK4A) and p53 are two important tumor suppressor proteins that play essential roles during cell proliferation and aging through regulating the expression of several genes. Here, we report that p16(INK4A) and p53 co-regulate a plethora of transcripts. Furthermore, both proteins colocalize in the nucleus of human primary skin fibroblasts and breast luminal cells, and form a heteromer whose level increases in response to genotoxic stress as well as aging of human fibroblasts and various mouse organs. CDK4 is also present in this heteromeric complex, which is formed only in the presence of DNA both in vitro using pure recombinant proteins and in vivo. We have also shown that p16(INK4A) enhances the binding efficiency of p53 to its cognate sequence presents in the CDKN1A promoter in vitro, and both proteins are present at the promoters of CDKN1A and BAX in vivo. Importantly, the fourth ankyrin repeat of p16(INK4A) and the C-terminal domain of p53 were necessary for the physical association between these two proteins. The physiologic importance of this association was revealed by the inability of cancer-associated p16(INK4A) mutants to interact with p53 and to transactivate the expression of its major targets CDKN1A and BAX in the p16-defective U2OS cells expressing either wild-type or mutated p16(INK4A) . Furthermore, the association between p16(INK4A) and p53 was capital for their nuclear colocalization, the X-ray-dependent induction of p21 and Bax proteins as well as the induction of apoptosis in various types of cells. Together, these results show DNA-dependent physical interaction between p16(INK4A) and p53.

  8. In vitro transcription of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 is RNA polymerase II dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Lenzmeier, B A; Nyborg, J K

    1997-01-01

    The HTLV-1 promoter directs RNA polymerase II transcription of viral genomic RNA in vivo. However, it has been reported that in vitro, a unique RNA polymerase, with characteristics of RNA polymerases II and III, is capable of HTLV-1 transcription (G. Piras, F. Kashanchi, M. F. Radonovich, J. F. Duvall, and J. N. Brady, J. Virol. 68:6170-6179, 1994). To further characterize the polymerase involved in HTLV-1 transcription in vitro, runoff transcription assays were performed with a variety of extracts and RNA polymerase inhibitors. Under all in vitro reaction conditions tested, RNA polymerase II appeared to be the only polymerase capable of correct transcriptional initiation from the HTLV-1 promoter. Synthesis of the specific HTLV-1 RNA transcript showed sensitivities to the RNA polymerase inhibitors tagetitoxin and alpha-amanitin that are consistent with RNA polymerase II transcription. Together, these data indicate that in vitro, as in vivo, the HTLV-1 promoter directs transcription by RNA polymerase II. PMID:9032404

  9. Identification of specific adenovirus E1A N-terminal residues critical to the binding of cellular proteins and to the control of cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H G; Rikitake, Y; Carter, M C; Yaciuk, P; Abraham, S E; Zerler, B; Moran, E

    1993-01-01

    Adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) oncogene-encoded sequences essential for transformation- and cell growth-regulating activities are localized at the N terminus and in regions of highly conserved amino acid sequence designated conserved regions 1 and 2. These regions interact to form the binding sites for two classes of cellular proteins: those, such as the retinoblastoma gene product, whose association with the E1A products is specifically dependent on region 2, and another class which so far is known to include only a large cellular DNA-binding protein, p300, whose association with the E1A products is specifically dependent on the N-terminal region. Association between the E1A products and either class of cellular proteins can be disrupted by mutations in conserved region 1. While region 2 has been studied intensively, very little is known so far concerning the nature of the essential residues in the N-terminal region, or about the manner in which conserved region 1 participates in the binding of two distinct sets of cellular proteins. A combination of site-directed point mutagenesis and monoclonal antibody competition experiments reported here suggests that p300 binding is dependent on specific, conserved residues in the N terminus, including positively charged residues at positions 2 and 3 of the E1A proteins, and that p300 and pRB bind to distinct, nonoverlapping subregions within conserved region 1. The availability of precise point mutations disrupting p300 binding supports previous data linking p300 with cell cycle control and enhancer function. Images PMID:8416379

  10. Cloning, sequencing, and growth phase-dependent transcription of the coenzyme F420-dependent N5,N10-methylenetetrahydromethanopterin reductase-encoding genes from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum delta H and Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed Central

    Nölling, J; Pihl, T D; Reeve, J N

    1995-01-01

    The mer genes, which encode the coenzyme F420-dependent N5,N10-methylenetetrahydromethanopterin reductases (CH2 = H4MPT reductases), and their flanking regions have been cloned from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum delta H and Methanopyrus kandleri and sequenced. The mer genes have DNA sequences that are 57% identical and encode polypeptides with amino acid sequences that are 57% identical and 71% similar, with calculated molecular masses of 33.6 and 37.5 kDa, respectively. In M. thermoautotrophicum, mer transcription has been shown to initiate 10 bp upstream from the ATG translation initiating codon and to generate a monocistronic transcript approximately 1 kb in length. This transcript was synthesized at all stages of M. thermoautotrophicum delta H growth in batch cultures but was found to increase in abundance from the earliest stages of exponential growth, reaching a maximum level at the mid-exponential growth phase. For comparison, transcription of the ftr gene from M. thermoautotrophicum delta H that encodes the formylmethanofuran:tetrahydromethanopterin formyltransferase (A. A. DiMarco, K. A. Sment, J. Konisky, and R. S. Wolfe, J. Biol. Chem. 265:472-476, 1990) was included in this study. The ftr transcript was found similarly to be monocistronic and to be approximately 1 kb in length, but, in contrast to the mer transcript, the ftr transcript was present at maximum levels at both the early and the mid-exponential growth stages. PMID:8522533

  11. Glucocorticoid receptor binding to a specific DNA sequence is required for hormone-dependent repression of pro-opiomelanocortin gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, J; Trifiro, M A; Plante, R K; Nemer, M; Eriksson, P; Wrange, O

    1989-01-01

    Glucocorticoids rapidly and specifically inhibit transcription of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene in the anterior pituitary, thus offering a model for studying negative control of transcription in mammals. We have defined an element within the rat POMC gene 5'-flanking region that is required for glucocorticoid inhibition of POMC gene transcription in POMC-expressing pituitary tumor cells (AtT-20). This element contains an in vitro binding site for purified glucocorticoid receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that binding of the receptor to this site located at position base pair -63 is essential for glucocorticoid repression of transcription. Although related to the well-defined glucocorticoid response element (GRE) found in glucocorticoid-inducible genes, the DNA sequence of the POMC negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE) differs significantly from the GRE consensus; this sequence divergence may result in different receptor-DNA interactions and may account at least in part for the opposite transcriptional properties of these elements. Hormone-dependent repression of POMC gene transcription may be due to binding of the receptor over a positive regulatory element of the promoter. Thus, repression may result from mutually exclusive binding of two DNA-binding proteins to overlapping DNA sequences. Images PMID:2586521

  12. Fractionation and reconstitution of factors required for accurate transcription of mammalian ribosomal RNA genes: identification of a species-dependent initiation factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Y; Financsek, I; Kominami, R; Muramatsu, M

    1982-01-01

    Mouse and human cell extracts (S100) can support an accurate and efficient transcription initiation on homologous ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) templates. The cell extracts were fractionated with the aid of a phosphocellulose column into four fractions (termed A, B, C and D), including one containing a major part of the RNA polymerase I activity. Various reconstitution experiments indicate that fraction D is an absolute requirement for the correct and efficient transcription initiation by RNA polymerase I on both mouse and human genes. Fraction B effectively suppresses random initiation on these templates. Fraction A appears to further enhance the transcription which takes place with fractions C and D. Although fractions A, B and C are interchangeable between mouse and human extracts, fraction D is not; i.e. initiation of transcription required the presence of a homologous fraction D for both templates. The factor(s) in fraction D, however, is not literally species-specific, since mouse D fraction is capable of supporting accurate transcription initiation on a rat rDNA template in the presence of all the other fractions from human cell extract under the conditions where human D fraction is unable to support it. We conclude from these experiments that a species-dependent factor in fraction D plays an important role in the initiation of rDNA transcription in each animal species. Images PMID:7177852

  13. RNA processing factors Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize RNA Pol III-dependent transcription and the localization of condensin at Pol III genes.

    PubMed

    Legros, Pénélope; Malapert, Amélie; Niinuma, Sho; Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Condensin-mediated chromosome condensation is essential for genome stability upon cell division. Genetic studies have indicated that the association of condensin with chromatin is intimately linked to gene transcription, but what transcription-associated feature(s) direct(s) the accumulation of condensin remains unclear. Here we show in fission yeast that condensin becomes strikingly enriched at RNA Pol III-transcribed genes when Swd2.2 and Sen1, two factors involved in the transcription process, are simultaneously deleted. Sen1 is an ATP-dependent helicase whose orthologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contributes both to terminate transcription of some RNA Pol II transcripts and to antagonize the formation of DNA:RNA hybrids in the genome. Using two independent mapping techniques, we show that DNA:RNA hybrids form in abundance at Pol III-transcribed genes in fission yeast but we demonstrate that they are unlikely to faciliate the recruitment of condensin. Instead, we show that Sen1 forms a stable and abundant complex with RNA Pol III and that Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize both the interaction of RNA Pol III with chromatin and RNA Pol III-dependent transcription. When Swd2.2 and Sen1 are lacking, the increased concentration of RNA Pol III and condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes is accompanied by the accumulation of topoisomerase I and II and by local nucleosome depletion, suggesting that Pol III-transcribed genes suffer topological stress. We provide evidence that this topological stress contributes to recruit and/or stabilize condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes in the absence of Swd2.2 and Sen1. Our data challenge the idea that a processive RNA polymerase hinders the binding of condensin and suggest that transcription-associated topological stress could in some circumstances facilitate the association of condensin.

  14. Downregulation of E-cadherin is an essential event in activating beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription and expression of its target genes in Pdcd4 knockdown cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Sun, Z-X; Allgayer, H; Yang, H-S

    2010-01-07

    We reported earlier that knockdown of tumor suppressor Pdcd4 (programed cell death 4) downregulates E-cadherin expression and activates beta-catenin/Tcf (T-cell factor)-dependent transcription in colon tumor cells. However, the underlying mechanism of these observations remains unknown. In this study, we showed that knockdown of Pdcd4 downregulates E-cadherin expression through elevated protein level of Snail. Over-expression of Pdcd4 upregulates E-cadherin expression and inhibits beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. We then showed that knockdown of E-cadherin activates beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. Conversely, over-expression of E-cadherin in Pdcd4 knockdown cells inhibits beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. In addition, Pdcd4 knockdown stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) and c-Myc expression, whereas u-PAR and c-Myc expression can be reversed by over-expressing E-cadherin in Pdcd4 knockdown cells. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed that beta-catenin/Tcf4 directly binds to the promoters of u-PAR and c-myc in Pdcd4 knockdown cells. Futhermore, knockdown of u-PAR or c-Myc inhibits invasion in Pdcd4 knockdown cells, suggesting that both u-PAR and c-Myc contribute to invasion induced by Pdcd4 knockdown. Taken together, our data showed that elevated Snail expression by Pdcd4 knockdown leads to downregulation of E-cadherin resulting in activating beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription and stimulating the expression of c-Myc and u-PAR, thus providing molecular explanation of how Pdcd4 suppresses tumor invasion.

  15. Evidence for gene-specific rather than transcription rate-dependent histone H3 exchange in yeast coding regions.

    PubMed

    Gat-Viks, Irit; Vingron, Martin

    2009-02-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, histones are dynamically exchanged independently of DNA replication. Recent reports show that different coding regions differ in their amount of replication-independent histone H3 exchange. The current paradigm is that this histone exchange variability among coding regions is a consequence of transcription rate. Here we put forward the idea that this variability might be also modulated in a gene-specific manner independently of transcription rate. To that end, we study transcription rate-independent replication-independent coding region histone H3 exchange. We term such events relative exchange. Our genome-wide analysis shows conclusively that in yeast, relative exchange is a novel consistent feature of coding regions. Outside of replication, each coding region has a characteristic pattern of histone H3 exchange that is either higher or lower than what was expected by its RNAPII transcription rate alone. Histone H3 exchange in coding regions might be a way to add or remove certain histone modifications that are important for transcription elongation. Therefore, our results that gene-specific coding region histone H3 exchange is decoupled from transcription rate might hint at a new epigenetic mechanism of transcription regulation.

  16. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Krömmelbein, Natascha; Wiebusch, Lüder; Schiedner, Gudrun; Büscher, Nicole; Sauer, Caroline; Florin, Luise; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Plachter, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP) is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production. PMID:26848680

  17. The Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR2 Is an Important Transcriptional Regulator of Abscisic Acid-Dependent Grape Berry Ripening Processes1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Philippe; Lecourieux, David; Kappel, Christian; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Cramer, Grant; Delrot, Serge; Lecourieux, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    In grape (Vitis vinifera), abscisic acid (ABA) accumulates during fruit ripening and is thought to play a pivotal role in this process, but the molecular basis of this control is poorly understood. This work characterizes ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR2 (VvABF2), a grape basic leucine zipper transcription factor belonging to a phylogenetic subgroup previously shown to be involved in ABA and abiotic stress signaling in other plant species. VvABF2 transcripts mainly accumulated in the berry, from the onset of ripening to the harvesting stage, and were up-regulated by ABA. Microarray analysis of transgenic grape cells overexpressing VvABF2 showed that this transcription factor up-regulates and/or modifies existing networks related to ABA responses. In addition, grape cells overexpressing VvABF2 exhibited enhanced responses to ABA treatment compared with control cells. Among the VvABF2-mediated responses highlighted in this study, the synthesis of phenolic compounds and cell wall softening were the most strongly affected. VvABF2 overexpression strongly increased the accumulation of stilbenes that play a role in plant defense and human health (resveratrol and piceid). In addition, the firmness of fruits from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants overexpressing VvABF2 was strongly reduced. These data indicate that VvABF2 is an important transcriptional regulator of ABA-dependent grape berry ripening. PMID:24276949

  18. Transcription-dependent nucleolar cap localization and possible nuclear function of DExH RNA helicase RHAU

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, Fumiko; Stadler, Michael; Chalupnikova, Katerina; Oakeley, Edward; Nagamine, Yoshikuni

    2008-04-01

    RHAU (RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element) is a DExH protein originally identified as a factor accelerating AU-rich element-mediated mRNA degradation. The discovery that RHAU is predominantly localized in the nucleus, despite mRNA degradation occurring in the cytoplasm, prompted us to consider the nuclear functions of RHAU. In HeLa cells, RHAU was found to be localized throughout the nucleoplasm with some concentrated in nuclear speckles. Transcriptional arrest altered the localization to nucleolar caps, where RHAU is closely localized with RNA helicases p68 and p72, suggesting that RHAU is involved in transcription-related RNA metabolism in the nucleus. To see whether RHAU affects global gene expression transcriptionally or posttranscriptionally, we performed microarray analysis using total RNA from RHAU-depleted HeLa cell lines, measuring both steady-state mRNA levels and mRNA half-lives by actinomycin D chase. There was no change in the half-lives of most transcripts whose steady-state levels were affected by RHAU knockdown, suggesting that these transcripts are subjected to transcriptional regulation. We propose that RHAU has a dual function, being involved in both the synthesis and degradation of mRNA in different subcellular compartments.

  19. Transcription Factors Regulating Inflammatory Cytokine Production Are Differentially Expressed in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Behçet Disease Depending on Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Min-Yeong; Yun, Su Jin; Lee, Mi Jin; Kim, Kyongmin

    2017-01-01

    Background Behçet disease (BD) is a relapsing inflammatory disease with increased production of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well known. Objective To analyze whether the differential expression of transcription factors is involved in the increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 production by PBMCs of BD patients compared to healthy controls (HCs). Methods Expression of transcription factors was examined by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Cytokine production by CD11b+ cells transfected with siRNAs against transcription factors was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In the absence of lipopolysaccharide stimulation, the transcript level of CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) β was increased in PBMCs from patients with active BD compared to that in PBMCs from patients with stable BD. The C/EBPδ transcript level was higher in PBMCs from patients with active BD than in those from HCs. The activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) transcript level was increased in PBMCs from patients with stable BD compared to that in PBMCs from HCs. siRNAs targeting C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ significantly reduced the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated CD11b+ cells from patients with BD as well as from HCs. Conclusion We found differential expression of C/EBPβ, C/EBPδ, and ATF3 in PBMCs from patients with BD depending on disease activity, indicating the involvement of these molecules in BD pathogenesis.

  20. Celiac disease T-cell epitopes from gamma-gliadins: immunoreactivity depends on the genome of origin, transcript frequency, and flanking protein variation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is caused by an uncontrolled immune response to gluten, a heterogeneous mixture of wheat storage proteins. The CD-toxicity of these proteins and their derived peptides is depending on the presence of specific T-cell epitopes (9-mer peptides; CD epitopes) that mediate the stimulation of HLA-DQ2/8 restricted T-cells. Next to the thoroughly characterized major T-cell epitopes derived from the α-gliadin fraction of gluten, γ-gliadin peptides are also known to stimulate T-cells of celiac disease patients. To pinpoint CD-toxic γ-gliadins in hexaploid bread wheat, we examined the variation of T-cell epitopes involved in CD in γ-gliadin transcripts of developing bread wheat grains. Results A detailed analysis of the genetic variation present in γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (T. aestivum, allo-hexaploid, carrying the A, B and D genome), together with genomic γ-gliadin sequences from ancestrally related diploid wheat species, enabled the assignment of sequence variants to one of the three genomic γ-gliadin loci, Gli-A1, Gli-B1 or Gli-D1. Almost half of the γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (49%) was assigned to locus Gli-D1. Transcripts from each locus differed in CD epitope content and composition. The Gli-D1 transcripts contained the highest frequency of canonical CD epitope cores (on average 10.1 per transcript) followed by the Gli-A1 transcripts (8.6) and the Gli-B1 transcripts (5.4). The natural variants of the major CD epitope from γ-gliadins, DQ2-γ-I, showed variation in their capacity to induce in vitro proliferation of a DQ2-γ-I specific and HLA-DQ2 restricted T-cell clone. Conclusions Evaluating the CD epitopes derived from γ-gliadins in their natural context of flanking protein variation, genome specificity and transcript frequency is a significant step towards accurate quantification of the CD toxicity of bread wheat. This approach can be used to predict relative levels of CD toxicity of individual wheat

  1. Transcriptional activation of RNA polymerase III-dependent genes by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesfeld, J M; Johnson, D L; Nyborg, J K

    1996-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus-encoded tax protein is a potent activator of many viral and cellular genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We find that both chromatin and cell extracts derived from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected human T lymphocytes support higher levels of 5S rRNA and tRNA gene transcription than chromatin or extracts from uninfected T lymphocytes. The viral protein Tax was likely responsible for this higher level of class II gene transcription, as purified Tax was found to stimulate both genes when added to the uninfected cell extract or in reconstituted systems. Both limiting-component transcription assays and DNA binding assays identified the class III gene transcription factor TFIIIB as the principle target of Tax activity. Surprisingly, we find that Tax increases the effective concentration of active TFIIIB molecules. These data suggest that Tax stimulates RNA polymerase III-dependent gene expression by accelerating the rate and/or extent of transcription initiation complex assembly. PMID:8657153

  2. Alteration of BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of RNA Pol III-dependent genes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qian; Shi, Ganggang; Zhang, Yanmei; Lu, Lei; Levy, Daniel; Zhong, Shuping

    2015-02-01

    Emerging evidence has indicated that alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Deregulation of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription enhances cellular Pol III gene production, leading to an increase in translational capacity to promote cell transformation and tumor formation. We have reported that alcohol intake increases Pol III gene transcription to promote cell transformation and tumor formation in vitro and in vivo. Studies revealed that tumor suppressors, pRb, p53, PTEN and Maf1 repress the transcription of Pol III genes. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor and its mutation is tightly related to breast cancer development. However, it is not clear whether BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of Pol III genes. At the present studies, we report that restoring BRCA1 in HCC 1937 cells, which is a BRCA1 deficient cell line, represses Pol III gene transcription. Expressing mutant or truncated BRCA1 in these cells does not affect the ability of repression on Pol III genes. Our analysis has demonstrated that alcohol induces Pol III gene transcription. More importantly, overexpression of BRCA1 in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells (MCF-7) decreases the induction of tRNA(Leu) and 5S rRNA genes by alcohol, whereas reduction of BRCA1 by its siRNA slightly increases the transcription of the class of genes. This suggests that BRCA1 is associated with alcohol-induced deregulation of Pol III genes. These studies for the first time demonstrate the role of BRCA1 in induction of Pol III genes by alcohol and uncover a novel mechanism of alcohol-associated breast cancer.

  3. Microarray hybridization analysis of light-dependent gene expression in Penicillium chrysogenum identifies bZIP transcription factor PcAtfA.

    PubMed

    Wolfers, Simon; Kamerewerd, Jens; Nowrousian, Minou; Sigl, Claudia; Zadra, Ivo; Kürnsteiner, Hubert; Kück, Ulrich; Bloemendal, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    The fungal velvet complex is a light-dependent master regulator of secondary metabolism and development in the major penicillin producer, Penicillium chrysogenum. However, the light-dependent mechanism is unclear. To identify velvet-dependent transcriptional regulators that show light-regulated expression, we performed microarray hybridizations with RNA isolated from P. chrysogenum ΔPcku70 cultures grown under 13 different long-term, light-dependent growth conditions. We compared these expression data to data from two velvet complex deletion mutants; one lacked a subunit of the velvet complex (ΔPcvelA), and the other lacked a velvet-associated protein (ΔPclaeA). We sought to identify genes that were up-regulated in light, but down-regulated in ΔPcvelA and ΔPclaeA. We identified 148 co-regulated genes that displayed this regulatory pattern. In silico analyses of the co-regulated genes identified six proteins with fungal-specific transcription factor domains. Among these, we selected the bZIP transcription factor, PcAtfA, for functional characterization in deletion and complementation strains. Our data clearly indicates that PcAtfA governs spore germination. This comparative analysis of different microarray hybridization data sets provided results that may be useful for identifying genes for future functional analyses.

  4. Nuclear role of WASp in gene transcription is uncoupled from its ARP2/3-dependent cytoplasmic role in actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Sanjoy; Sarkar, Koustav; Taylor, Matthew; Candotti, Fabio; Vyas, Yatin M

    2014-07-01

    Defects in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp) underlie development of WAS, an X-linked immunodeficiency and autoimmunity disorder of childhood. Nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) of the WASp family generate F-actin in the cytosol via the VCA (verprolin-homology, cofilin-homology, and acidic) domain and support RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription in the nucleus. Whether nuclear-WASp requires the integration of its actin-related protein (ARP)2/3-dependent cytoplasmic function to reprogram gene transcription, however, remains unresolved. Using the model of human TH cell differentiation, we find that WASp has a functional nuclear localizing and nuclear exit sequences, and accordingly, its effects on transcription are controlled mainly at the level of its nuclear entry and exit via the nuclear pore. Human WASp does not use its VCA-dependent, ARP2/3-driven, cytoplasmic effector mechanisms to support histone H3K4 methyltransferase activity in the nucleus of TH1-skewed cells. Accordingly, an isolated deficiency of nuclear-WASp is sufficient to impair the transcriptional reprogramming of TBX21 and IFNG promoters in TH1-skewed cells, whereas an isolated deficiency of cytosolic-WASp does not impair this process. In contrast, nuclear presence of WASp in TH2-skewed cells is small, and its loss does not impair transcriptional reprogramming of GATA3 and IL4 promoters. Our study unveils an ARP2/3:VCA-independent function of nuclear-WASp in TH1 gene activation that is uncoupled from its cytoplasmic role in actin polymerization.

  5. The yeast transcription factor Crz1 is activated by light in a Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent and PKA-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Bodvard, Kristofer; Jörhov, Anna; Blomberg, Anders; Molin, Mikael; Käll, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Light in the visible range can be stressful to non-photosynthetic organisms. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has earlier been reported to respond to blue light via activation of the stress-regulated transcription factor Msn2p. Environmental changes also induce activation of calcineurin, a Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent phosphatase, which in turn controls gene transcription by dephosphorylating the transcription factor Crz1p. We investigated the connection between cellular stress caused by blue light and Ca(2+) signalling in yeast by monitoring the nuclear localization dynamics of Crz1p, Msn2p and Msn4p. The three proteins exhibit distinctly different stress responses in relation to light exposure. Msn2p, and to a lesser degree Msn4p, oscillate rapidly between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in an apparently stochastic fashion. Crz1p, in contrast, displays a rapid and permanent nuclear localization induced by illumination, which triggers Crz1p-dependent transcription of its target gene CMK2. Moreover, increased extracellular Ca(2+) levels stimulates the light-induced responses of all three transcription factors, e.g. Crz1p localizes much quicker to the nucleus and a larger fraction of cells exhibits permanent Msn2p nuclear localization at higher Ca(2+) concentration. Studies in mutants lacking Ca(2+) transporters indicate that influx of extracellular Ca(2+) is crucial for the initial stages of light-induced Crz1p nuclear localization, while mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores appears necessary for a sustained response. Importantly, we found that Crz1p nuclear localization is dependent on calcineurin and the carrier protein Nmd5p, while not being affected by increased protein kinase A activity (PKA), which strongly inhibits light-induced nuclear localization of Msn2/4p. We conclude that the two central signalling pathways, cAMP-PKA-Msn2/4 and Ca(2+)-calcineurin-Crz1, are both activated by blue light illumination.

  6. Genes regulated in neurons undergoing transcription-dependent apoptosis belong to signaling pathways rather than the apoptotic machinery.

    PubMed

    Desagher, Solange; Severac, Dany; Lipkin, Alexey; Bernis, Cyril; Ritchie, William; Le Digarcher, Anne; Journot, Laurent

    2005-02-18

    Neuronal apoptosis has been shown to require de novo RNA/protein synthesis. However, very few genes whose expression is necessary for inducing apoptosis have been identified so far. To systematically identify such genes, we have used genome-scale, long oligonucleotide microarrays and characterized the gene expression profile of cerebellar granule neurons in the early phase of apoptosis elicited by KCl deprivation. We identified 368 significantly differentially expressed genes, including most of the genes previously reported to be transcriptionally regulated in this paradigm. In addition, we identified several hundreds of genes whose transcriptional regulation has never been associated with neuronal apoptosis. We used automated Gene Ontology annotation, analysis of promoter sequences, and statistical tools to characterize these regulations. Although differentially expressed genes included some components of the apoptotic machinery, this functional category was not significantly over-represented among regulated genes. On the other hand, categories related to signal transduction were the most significantly over-represented group. This indicates that the apoptotic machinery is mainly constitutive, whereas molecular pathways that lead to the activation of apoptotic components are transcriptionally regulated. In particular, we show for the first time that signaling pathways known to be involved in the control of neuronal survival are regulated at the transcriptional level and not only by post-translational mechanisms. Moreover, our approach provides insights into novel transcription factors and novel mechanisms, such as the unfolded protein response and cell adhesion, that may contribute to the induction of neuronal apoptosis.

  7. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  8. Transcriptional activation of NtcA-dependent promoters of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 by 2-oxoglutarate in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, Ryohei; Shirokane, Masao; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Omata, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Kan; Takahashi, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    The transcription factor NtcA is a global regulator of nitrogen homeostasis in cyanobacteria. It thus positively regulates the expression of genes related to nitrogen assimilation such as glnA (which encodes glutamine synthetase) and ntcA itself in response to nitrogen shortage or depletion. The binding of NtcA to the glnA and ntcA promoters of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 in vitro now has been shown to be enhanced by 2-oxoglutarate. In vitro analysis of gene transcription also revealed that the interaction of NtcA with its promoter element was not sufficient for activation of transcription, and 2-oxoglutarate was required for transcriptional initiation by NtcA. Given that the intracellular concentration of 2-oxoglutarate is inversely related to nitrogen availability, it is proposed that this metabolite functions as a signaling molecule that transmits information on cellular nitrogen status to NtcA and thereby regulates the transcription of genes related to nitrogen assimilation in cyanobacteria. PMID:11917135

  9. Hormone-Dependent Expression of a Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Natural Antisense Transcript in MA-10 Mouse Tumor Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3′-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5′ and 3′ RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis. PMID:21829656

  10. CDK9-dependent transcriptional elongation in the innate interferon-stimulated gene response to respiratory syncytial virus infection in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Zhao, Yingxin; Kalita, Mridul; Edeh, Chukwudi B; Paessler, Slobodan; Casola, Antonella; Teng, Michael N; Garofalo, Roberto P; Brasier, Allan R

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus responsible for lower respiratory tract infections. During infection, the presence of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) activates the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) transcription factor, an event triggering expression of immediate early, IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). We examine the role of transcriptional elongation in control of IRF3-dependent ISG expression. RSV infection induces ISG54, ISG56, and CIG5 gene expression in an IRF3-dependent manner demonstrated by IRF3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing in both A549 epithelial cells and IRF3(-/-) MEFs. ISG expression was mediated by the recruitment of IRF3, CDK9, polymerase II (Pol II), and phospho-Ser(2) carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) Pol II to the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) binding sites of the IRF3-dependent ISG promoters in native chromatin. We find that RSV infection enhances the activated fraction of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) by promoting its association with bromodomain 4 (BRD4) and disrupting its association with the inhibitory 7SK small nuclear RNA. The requirement of CDK9 activity for ISG expression was shown by siRNA-mediated silencing of CDK9 and by a selective CDK9 inhibitor in A549 cells. In contrast, RSV-induced beta interferon (IFN-β) expression is not influenced by CDK9 inhibition. Using transcript-selective quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) assays for the ISG54 gene, we observed that RSV induces transition from short to fully spliced mRNA transcripts and that this transition is blocked by CDK9 inhibition in both A549 and primary human small airway epithelial cells. These data indicate that transcription elongation plays a major role in RSV-induced ISG expression and is mediated by IRF3-dependent recruitment of activated CDK9. CDK9 activity may be a target for immunomodulation in RSV-induced lung disease.

  11. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  12. Gamma Interferon-Dependent Transcriptional Memory via Relocalization of a Gene Locus to PML Nuclear Bodies▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gialitakis, Manolis; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Makatounakis, Takis; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Memory of past cellular responses is an essential adaptation to repeating environmental stimuli. We addressed the question of whether gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-inducible transcription generates memory that sensitizes cells to a second stimulus. We have found that the major histocompatibility complex class II gene DRA is relocated to promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies upon induction with IFN-γ, and this topology is maintained long after transcription shut off. Concurrent interaction of PML protein with mixed-lineage leukemia generates a prolonged permissive chromatin state on the DRA gene characterized by high promoter histone H3 K4 dimethylation that facilitates rapid expression upon restimulation. We propose that the primary signal-induced transcription generates spatial and epigenetic memory that is maintained through several cell generations and endows the cell with increased responsiveness to future activation signals. PMID:20123968

  13. Rap1 Stabilizes β-catenin and Enhances β-catenin-dependent Transcription and Invasion in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Mitsuo; Mitra, Raj S.; Liu, Min; Lee, Julia; Henson, Bradley S.; Carey, Thomas; Bradford, Carol; Prince, Mark; Wang, Cun-Yu; Fearon, Eric R.; D’Silva, Nisha J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells, Rap1 shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Prior findings suggested that Rap1 may modulate the β-catenin-independent Wnt pathway in some settings, but the role of Rap1 in β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling remains undefined. Experimental Design and Results We observed that β-catenin bound to active Rap1 in vitro and Rap1 activated β-catenin-TCF (T cell factor)-dependent transcription. Immunofluorescence studies showed that ectopic expression of Rap1 increased nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Overexpression of active Rap1 facilitated an increase in β-catenin-mediated transcription that was abrogated by dominant negative TCF4. Conversely, siRNA-mediated inhibition of endogenous Rap1 expression inhibited β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcription as well as invasion of HNSCC. Furthermore, inhibition of Rap1 expression downregulated the expresesion of MMP7, a transcriptional target of β-catenin/TCF. In HNSCC cells stably transfected with β-catenin or treated with lithium chloride or Wnt3A to stabilize endogenous β-catenin, inhibition of Rap1 expression led to decreases in the free pool of β-catenin. Immunohistochemical studies of tissue from HNSCC patients revealed that increased β-catenin intensity correlated with higher tumor stage. Furthermore, the prognostic effect of active Rap1 on tumor N-stage was found to depend on cytosolic β-catenin expression (p<0.013). When β-catenin is high, higher rap1GTP intensity is associated with more advanced N stage. Conclusions The findings suggest that Rap1 enhances β-catenin stability and nuclear localization. In addition to indicating that Rap1 has a significant role in regulating β-catenin and β-catenin-dependent progression to more advanced N-stage lesions, these data highlight Rap1 as a potential therapeutic target in HNSCC. PMID:20028760

  14. Human lymphocytes express the transcriptional regulator, Wilms tumor 1: the role of WT1 in mediating nitric oxide-dependent repression of lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Davoine, Francis; Adamko, Darryl J; Moqbel, Redwan; Befus, A Dean

    2007-11-16

    The inhibitory roles of nitric oxide (NO) in T cell proliferation have been observed and studied extensively over the last two decades. Despite efforts, the fundamental pathway by which NO exerts its inhibitory actions remains to be elucidated although recent evidence suggests that the transcription factor Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) may be important. WT1 has been linked to numerous developmental pathways in particular nephrogenesis. Due to its roles in development and cell proliferation, polymorphisms within the WT1 gene can result in malignancies such as leukemia and Wilms tumor. WT1 functions as a transcriptional regulator and its activity is controlled through phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). PKA-dependent WT1 phosphorylation results in translocation of WT1 from the nucleus to the cytosol, a process that interferes with WT1 transcriptional activities. In the current study we demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in human lymphocytes. Using the proliferative compound PHA we induced T cell proliferation and growth correlated with an increase in the expression of WT1 measured by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblot. Co-stimulation with the NO donor SNOG at concentrations of 0, 100, 300 and 600 microM reduced in a concentration dependent way the PHA-induced upregulation of WT1 that correlated with a reduction in T cell proliferation. We conclude that WT1 might be an important component of the NO-dependent regulation of T lymphocyte proliferation and potential function.

  15. Human lymphocytes express the transcriptional regulator, Wilms tumor 1: The role of WT1 in mediating nitric oxide-dependent repression of lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Davoine, Francis; Adamko, Darryl J.; Moqbel, Redwan; Befus, A. Dean

    2007-11-16

    The inhibitory roles of nitric oxide (NO) in T cell proliferation have been observed and studied extensively over the last two decades. Despite efforts, the fundamental pathway by which NO exerts its inhibitory actions remains to be elucidated although recent evidence suggests that the transcription factor Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) may be important. WT1 has been linked to numerous developmental pathways in particular nephrogenesis. Due to its roles in development and cell proliferation, polymorphisms within the WT1 gene can result in malignancies such as leukemia and Wilms tumor. WT1 functions as a transcriptional regulator and its activity is controlled through phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). PKA-dependent WT1 phosphorylation results in translocation of WT1 from the nucleus to the cytosol, a process that interferes with WT1 transcriptional activities. In the current study we demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in human lymphocytes. Using the proliferative compound PHA we induced T cell proliferation and growth correlated with an increase in the expression of WT1 measured by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblot. Co-stimulation with the NO donor SNOG at concentrations of 0, 100, 300 and 600 {mu}M reduced in a concentration dependent way the PHA-induced upregulation of WT1 that correlated with a reduction in T cell proliferation. We conclude that WT1 might be an important component of the NO-dependent regulation of T lymphocyte proliferation and potential function.

  16. Transcription of the Tollip gene is elevated in intestinal epithelial cells through impaired O-GlcNAcylation-dependent nuclear translocation of the negative regulator Elf-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sugi, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kyoko; Nakano, Kou; Hosono, Akira; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Transcriptional activation of the Tollitip gene is higher in IECs than in monocytes. {yields} Nt -194/-186 region acts as a cis-element and is recognized by Elf-1. {yields} Elf-1 suppresses Tollip gene transcription in monocytes but not in IECs. {yields} O-GlcNAc modification is necessary for nuclear translocation of Elf-1. {yields} O-GlcNAcylation-dependent nuclear translocation of Elf-1 is impaired in IECs. -- Abstract: Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) must be tolerant of the large number of commensal bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract to avoid excessive inflammatory reactions. Toll-interacting protein (Tollip), a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signaling, is known to be expressed at high levels in IECs, and to thereby contribute to the hyporesponsiveness of IECs to commensals. In this study, we analyzed the underlying mechanisms for elevated transcription of the Tollip gene in IECs using a human IEC line, Caco-2, and a human monocyte line, THP-1, as a control. Elf-1 was identified as a transcription factor that negatively regulates Tollip gene expression. The transcription factor Elf-1 was localized in the nucleus by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification, whereas the unmodified form was detected only in the cytoplasm. Comparison of Caco-2 and THP-1 cells revealed that O-GlcNAc modification of Elf-1 was significantly lower in IECs than in monocytes. Collectively, the results indicate that insufficient O-GlcNAc modification prevents Elf-1-mediated transcriptional repression and thereby upregulates Tollip gene expression in IECs.

  17. Inhibition of Different Histone Acetyltransferases (HATs) Uncovers Transcription-Dependent and -Independent Acetylation-Mediated Mechanisms in Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merschbaecher, Katja; Hatko, Lucyna; Folz, Jennifer; Mueller, Uli

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of histones changes the efficiency of the transcription processes and thus contributes to the formation of long-term memory (LTM). In our comparative study, we used two inhibitors to characterize the contribution of different histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to appetitive associative learning in the honeybee. For one we applied…

  18. E2a is necessary for Smad2/3-dependent transcription and the direct repression of lefty during gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Wills, Andrea E; Baker, Julie C

    2015-02-09

    Transcription factor complexes have varied effects on cell fate and behavior, but how this diversification of function occurs is largely unknown. The Nodal signaling pathway has many biological functions that all converge on the transcription factors Smad2/3. Smad2/3 has many cofactors, and alternative usage of these may provide a mechanism for modulating Smad2/3 function. Here, we investigate how perturbation of the cofactor E2a affects global patterns of Smad2/3 binding and gene expression during gastrulation. We find that E2a regulates early development in two ways. E2a changes the position of Smad2/3 binding at the Nodal inhibitor lefty, resulting in direct repression of lefty that is critical for mesendoderm specification. Separately, E2a is necessary to drive transcription of Smad2/3 target genes, including critical regulators of dorsal cell fate and morphogenesis. Overall, we find that E2a functions as both a transcriptional repressor and activator to precisely regulate Nodal signaling.

  19. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is reduced dramatically by hypertonic stress or knockdown of rgpd genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs). Toxin-induced inhibition of translation also activates gpdh-1 expression. Hypertonicity-induced translation inhibition is mediated by general control nonderepressible (GCN)-2 kinase signaling and eIF-2α phosphoryation. Loss of gcn-1 or gcn-2 function prevents eIF-2α phosphorylation, completely blocks reductions in translation, and inhibits gpdh-1 transcription. gpdh-1 expression is regulated by the highly conserved with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) and Ste20 kinases WNK-1 and GCK-3, which function in the GCN-2 signaling pathway downstream from eIF-2α phosphorylation. Our previous work has shown that hypertonic stress causes rapid and dramatic protein damage in C. elegans and that inhibition of translation reduces this damage. The current studies demonstrate that reduced translation also serves as an essential signal for activation of WNK-1/GCK-3 kinase signaling and subsequent transcription of gpdh-1 and possibly other osmoprotective genes. PMID:23076791

  20. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee; Strange, Kevin

    2012-12-15

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is reduced dramatically by hypertonic stress or knockdown of rgpd genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs). Toxin-induced inhibition of translation also activates gpdh-1 expression. Hypertonicity-induced translation inhibition is mediated by general control nonderepressible (GCN)-2 kinase signaling and eIF-2α phosphoryation. Loss of gcn-1 or gcn-2 function prevents eIF-2α phosphorylation, completely blocks reductions in translation, and inhibits gpdh-1 transcription. gpdh-1 expression is regulated by the highly conserved with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) and Ste20 kinases WNK-1 and GCK-3, which function in the GCN-2 signaling pathway downstream from eIF-2α phosphorylation. Our previous work has shown that hypertonic stress causes rapid and dramatic protein damage in C. elegans and that inhibition of translation reduces this damage. The current studies demonstrate that reduced translation also serves as an essential signal for activation of WNK-1/GCK-3 kinase signaling and subsequent transcription of gpdh-1 and possibly other osmoprotective genes.

  1. The L1Tc non-LTR retrotransposon of Trypanosoma cruzi contains an internal RNA-pol II-dependent promoter that strongly activates gene transcription and generates unspliced transcripts.

    PubMed

    Heras, Sara R; López, Manuel C; Olivares, Mónica; Thomas, M Carmen

    2007-01-01

    L1Tc is the best represented autonomous LINE of the Trypanosoma cruzi genome, throughout which several functional copies may exist. In this study, we show that the first 77 bp of L1Tc (Pr77) (also present in the T. cruzi non-autonomous retrotransposon NARTc, in the Trypanosoma brucei RIME/ingi elements, and in the T. cruzi, T. brucei and Leishmania major degenerate L1Tc/ingi-related elements [DIREs]) behave as a promoter element that activates gene transcription. The transcription rate promoted by Pr77 is 10-14-fold higher than that mediated by sequences located upstream from the T. cruzi tandemly repeated genes KMP11 and the GAPDH. The Pr77 promoter-derived mRNAs initiate at nucleotide +1 of L1Tc, are unspliced and translated. L1Tc transcripts show a moderate half life and are RNA pol II dependent. The presence of an internal promoter at the 5' end of L1Tc favors the production of full-length L1Tc RNAs and reinforces the hypothesis that this mobile element may be naturally autonomous in its transposition.

  2. HDAC8 Inhibition Blocks SMC3 Deacetylation and Delays Cell Cycle Progression without Affecting Cohesin-dependent Transcription in MCF7 Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Tanushree; Antony, Jisha; Braithwaite, Antony W; Horsfield, Julia A

    2016-06-10

    Cohesin, a multi-subunit protein complex involved in chromosome organization, is frequently mutated or aberrantly expressed in cancer. Multiple functions of cohesin, including cell division and gene expression, highlight its potential as a novel therapeutic target. The SMC3 subunit of cohesin is acetylated (ac) during S phase to establish cohesion between replicated chromosomes. Following anaphase, ac-SMC3 is deacetylated by HDAC8. Reversal of SMC3 acetylation is imperative for recycling cohesin so that it can be reloaded in interphase for both non-mitotic and mitotic functions. We blocked deacetylation of ac-SMC3 using an HDAC8-specific inhibitor PCI-34051 in MCF7 breast cancer cells, and examined the effects on transcription of cohesin-dependent genes that respond to estrogen. HDAC8 inhibition led to accumulation of ac-SMC3 as expected, but surprisingly, had no influence on the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes that are altered by siRNA targeting of RAD21 or SMC3. Knockdown of RAD21 altered estrogen receptor α (ER) recruitment at SOX4 and IL20, and affected transcription of these genes, while HDAC8 inhibition did not. Rather, inhibition of HDAC8 delayed cell cycle progression, suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that HDAC8 inhibition does not change the estrogen-specific transcriptional role of cohesin in MCF7 cells, but instead, compromises cell cycle progression and cell survival. Our results argue that candidate inhibitors of cohesin function may differ in their effects depending on the cellular genotype and should be thoroughly tested for predicted effects on cohesin's mechanistic roles.

  3. HMGB1-RAGE regulates muscle satellite cell homeostasis through p38-MAPK- and myogenin-dependent repression of Pax7 transcription.

    PubMed

    Riuzzi, Francesca; Sorci, Guglielmo; Sagheddu, Roberta; Donato, Rosario

    2012-03-15

    Expression of the paired-box 7 (PAX7) transcription factor is regulated during both myoblast proliferation and differentiation: high levels of PAX7 compromise myogenic differentiation because of excess and prolonged proliferation, whereas low levels of PAX7 result in precocious differentiation. We showed that myogenin repressed Pax7 transcription in differentiating myoblasts by binding to specific recognition sites in the Pax7 promoter, and that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1)-receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) signaling was required for myogenin induction and myogenin-dependent repression of Pax7 transcription. In addition, PAX7 negatively and myogenin positively regulated RAGE expression. RAGE, a multiligand receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, was not expressed in adult skeletal muscles, and was transiently expressed in activated, proliferating and differentiating satellite cells (SCs) in injured muscles. Compared with wild-type muscles, Rage(-/-) muscles exhibited increased numbers of basal SCs that were further increased in injured Rage(-/-) muscles following elevated myoblast asymmetric division; complete regeneration of injured Rage(-/-) muscles was found to be delayed by ~1 week. Thus, RAGE signaling physiologically repressed Pax7 transcription in SCs by upregulating myogenin, thereby accelerating muscle regeneration and limiting SC self-renewal.

  4. The Expression of KLF11 (TIEG2), an MAO B-transcriptional activator in the Prefrontal Cortex of Human Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Udemgba, Chinelo; Johnson, Shakevia; Stockmeier, Craig A.; Luo, Jia; Albert, Paul R.; Wang, Junming; May, Warren L.; Harris, Sharonda; Sittman, Donald B.; Ou, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Background The biochemical pathways underlying alcohol abuse and dependence are not well understood, although brain cell loss and neurotoxicity have been reported in subjects with alcohol dependence. Monoamine oxidase B (MAO B, which catabolizes neurotransmitters such as dopamine) is consistently increased in this psychiatric illness. MAO B has been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcohol dependence, neurodegenerative diseases and alcohol-induced brain neurotoxicity. Recently, the cell growth-inhibitor protein, Kruppel-like factor 11 (KLF11), has been reported to be an MAO-transcriptional activator. KLF11 is also known as TIEG2 (transforming growth factor-beta-inducible early gene 2) and mediates apoptotic cell death. This study investigates the protein expression of KLF11 and its relationship with MAO B using human postmortem prefrontal cortex from subjects with alcohol dependence. Methods Twelve subjects with alcohol dependence and the respective psychiatrically-normal control subjects were investigated. Expression of KLF11 and MAO B proteins in the prefrontal cortex were measured by Western blot analysis. A correlation study between KLF11 and MAO B protein expression was also performed. Results Levels of KLF11 protein were significantly increased by 44 percent (p<0.03) in the postmortem prefrontal cortex of subjects with alcohol dependence as compared to age- and gender-matched, psychiatrically-normal control subjects. In addition, KLF11 levels were significantly and positively correlated with the increased MAO B protein levels associated with alcohol dependence. Conclusions This novel study shows the important role of KLF11, an MAO-transcriptional activator, in human alcohol dependence. It further supports that the KLF11-MAO B cell death cascade may contribute to chronic alcohol-induced brain damage. This argues a case for KLF11-MAO B inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy that may impact this highly prevalent, often treatment resistant, illness. PMID

  5. Genome-wide lineage-specific transcriptional networks underscore Ikaros-dependent lymphoid priming in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Samuel Yao-Ming; Yoshida, Toshimi; Zhang, Jiangwen; Georgopoulos, Katia

    2009-04-17

    The mechanisms regulating lineage potential during early hematopoiesis were investigated. First, a cascade of lineage-affiliated gene expression signatures, primed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and differentially propagated in lineage-restricted progenitors, was identified. Lymphoid transcripts were primed as early as the HSC, together with myeloid and erythroid transcripts. Although this multilineage priming was resolved upon subsequent lineage restrictions, an unexpected cosegregation of lymphoid and myeloid gene expression and potential past a nominal myeloid restriction point was identified. Finally, we demonstrated that whereas the zinc finger DNA-binding factor Ikaros was required for induction of lymphoid lineage priming in the HSC, it was also necessary for repression of genetic programs compatible with self-renewal and multipotency downstream of the HSC. Taken together, our studies provide new insight into the priming and restriction of lineage potentials during early hematopoiesis and identify Ikaros as a key bivalent regulator of this process.

  6. Two Forkhead transcription factors regulate the division of cardiac progenitor cells by a Polo-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shaad M.; Tansey, Terese R.; Busser, Brian W.; Nolte, Michael T.; Jeffries, Neal; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Rusan, Nasser M.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The development of a complex organ requires the specification of appropriate numbers of each of its constituent cell types, as well as their proper differentiation and correct positioning relative to each other. During Drosophila cardiogenesis, all three of these processes are controlled by jumeau (jumu) and Checkpoint suppressor homologue (CHES-1-like), two genes encoding forkhead transcription factors that we discovered utilizing an integrated genetic, genomic and computational strategy for identifying genes expressed in the developing Drosophila heart. Both jumu and CHES-1-like are required during asymmetric cell division for the derivation of two distinct cardiac cell types from their mutual precursor, and in symmetric cell divisions that produce yet a third type of heart cell. jumu and CHES-1-like control the division of cardiac progenitors by regulating the activity of Polo, a kinase involved in multiple steps of mitosis. This pathway demonstrates how transcription factors integrate diverse developmental processes during organogenesis. PMID:22814603

  7. PRDM16 enhances nuclear receptor-dependent transcription of the brown fat-specific Ucp1 gene through interactions with Mediator subunit MED1

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Satoshi; Chen, Wei; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    PR domain-containing 16 (PRDM16) induces expression of brown fat-specific genes in brown and beige adipocytes, although the underlying transcription-related mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, in vitro studies show that PRDM16, through its zinc finger domains, directly interacts with the MED1 subunit of the Mediator complex, is recruited to the enhancer of the brown fat-specific uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) gene through this interaction, and enhances thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-driven transcription in a biochemically defined system in a Mediator-dependent manner, thus providing a direct link to the general transcription machinery. Complementary cell-based studies show that upon forskolin treatment, PRDM16 induces Ucp1 expression in undifferentiated murine embryonic fibroblasts, that this induction depends on MED1 and TR, and, consistent with a direct effect, that PRDM16 is recruited to the Ucp1 enhancer. Related studies have defined MED1 and PRDM16 interaction domains important for Ucp1 versus Ppargc1a induction by PRDM16. These results reveal novel mechanisms for PRDM16 function through the Mediator complex. PMID:25644605

  8. A specialized form of RNA polymerase I, essential for initiation and growth-dependent regulation of rRNA synthesis, is disrupted during transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Milkereit, P; Tschochner, H

    1998-01-01

    Only a small proportion (<2%) of RNA polymerase I (pol I) from whole-cell extracts appeared to be competent for specific initiation at the ribosomal gene promoter in a yeast reconstituted transcription system. Initiation-competent pol I molecules were found exclusively in salt-resistant complexes that contain the pol I-specific initiation factor Rrn3p. Levels of initiation-competent complexes in extracts were independent of total Rrn3p content and varied with the growth state of the cells. Although extracts from stationary phase cells contained substantial amounts of Rrn3p and pol I, they lacked the pol I-Rrn3p complex and were inactive in promoter-dependent transcription. Activity was restored by adding purified pol I-Rrn3p complex to extracts from stationary phase cells. The pol I-Rrn3p complex dissociated during transcription and lost its capacity for subsequent reinitiation in vitro, suggesting a stoichiometric rather than a catalytic activity in initiation. We propose that the formation and disruption of the pol I-Rrn3p complex reflects a molecular switch for regulating rRNA synthesis and its growth rate-dependent regulation. PMID:9649439

  9. Genome-wide analysis of MEF2 transcriptional program reveals synaptic target genes and neuronal activity-dependent polyadenylation site selection

    PubMed Central

    Flavell, Steven W.; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Gray, Jesse M.; Harmin, David A.; Hemberg, Martin; Hong, Elizabeth J.; Markenscoff-Papadimitriou, Eirene; Bear, Daniel M.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Although many transcription factors are known to control important aspects of neural development, the genome-wide programs that are directly regulated by these factors are not known. We have characterized the genetic program that is activated by MEF2, a key regulator of activity-dependent synapse development. These MEF2 target genes have diverse functions at synapses, revealing a broad role for MEF2 in synapse development. Several of the MEF2 targets are mutated in human neurological disorders including epilepsy and autism-spectrum disorders, suggesting that these disorders may be caused by disruption of an activity-dependent gene program that controls synapse development. Our analyses also reveal that neuronal activity promotes alternative polyadenylation site usage at many of the MEF2 target genes, leading to the production of truncated mRNAs that may have different functions than their full-length counterparts. Taken together, these analyses suggest that the ubiquitously expressed transcription factor MEF2 regulates an intricate transcriptional program in neurons that controls synapse development. PMID:19109909

  10. Role of ligand-dependent GR phosphorylation and half-life in determination of ligand-specific transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Avenant, Chanel; Ronacher, Katharina; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Louw, Ann; Hapgood, Janet P

    2010-10-07

    A central question in glucocorticoid mechanism of action via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is what determines ligand-selective transcriptional responses. Using a panel of 12 GR ligands, we show that the extent of GR phosphorylation at S226 and S211, GR half-life and transcriptional response, occur in a ligand-selective manner. While GR phosphorylation at S226 was shown to inhibit maximal transcription efficacy, phosphorylation at S211 is required for maximal transactivation, but not for transrepression efficacy. Both ligand-selective GR phosphorylation and half-life correlated with efficacy for transactivation and transrepression. For both expressed and endogenous GR, in two different cell lines, agonists resulted in the greatest extent of phosphorylation and the greatest extent of GR downregulation, suggesting a link between these functions. However, using phosphorylation-deficient GR mutants we established that phosphorylation of the GR at S226 or S211 does not determine the rank order of ligand-selective GR transactivation. These results are consistent with a model whereby ligand-selective GR phosphorylation and half-life are a consequence of upstream events, such as ligand-specific GR conformations, which are maintained in the phosphorylation mutants.

  11. DNA damage and replication stress induced transcription of RNR genes is dependent on the Ccr4–Not complex

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Klaas W.; Winkler, G. Sebastiaan; Timmers, H. Th. Marc

    2005-01-01

    Genetic experiments have indicated a role for the Ccr4–Not complex in the response to hydroxyurea (HU) induced replication stress and ionizing radiation in yeast. This response includes transcriptional induction of the four genes constituting the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) enzymatic complex, RNR1-4 and degradation of its inhibitor, Sml1p. The Ccr4–Not complex has originally been described as a negative regulator of RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription, but it has also been implicated in mRNA turnover and protein ubiquitination. We investigated the mechanism of the HU sensitivity conferred by mutation of CCR4-NOT genes. We found that the ubiquitin protein ligase activity of Not4p does not play a role in HU induced Sml1p degradation. We show, however, that the HU sensitivity of ccr4-not mutant strains correlated very well with a defect in accumulation of RNR2, RNR3 and RNR4 mRNA after HU or methyl-methane sulfonate (MMS) treatment. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments show that TBP, pol II and Set1p recruitment to the activated RNR3 locus is defective in cells lacking NOT4. Moreover, RNR3-promoter activity is not induced by HU in these cells. Our experiments show that induction of RNR gene transcription is defective in ccr4-not mutant strains, providing an explanation for their sensitivity to HU. PMID:16275785

  12. Nuclear Perilipin 5 integrates lipid droplet lipolysis with PGC-1α/SIRT1-dependent transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo-Montejano, Violeta I.; Saxena, Geetu; Kusminski, Christine M.; Yang, Chaofeng; McAfee, John L.; Hahner, Lisa; Hoch, Kathleen; Dubinsky, William; Narkar, Vihang A.; Bickel, Perry E.

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctional cellular lipid metabolism contributes to common chronic human diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, fatty liver disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy. How cells balance lipid storage and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is poorly understood. Here we identify the lipid droplet protein Perilipin 5 as a catecholamine-triggered interaction partner of PGC-1α. We report that during catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis, Perilipin 5 is phosphorylated by protein kinase A and forms transcriptional complexes with PGC-1α and SIRT1 in the nucleus. Perilipin 5 promotes PGC-1α co-activator function by disinhibiting SIRT1 deacetylase activity. We show by gain-and-loss of function studies in cells that nuclear Perilipin 5 promotes transcription of genes that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function. We propose that Perilipin 5 is an important molecular link that couples the coordinated catecholamine activation of the PKA pathway and of lipid droplet lipolysis with transcriptional regulation to promote efficient fatty acid catabolism and prevent mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27554864

  13. Temperature-Dependent Model of Multi-step Transcription Initiation in Escherichia coli Based on Live Single-Cell Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Tran, Huy; Ribeiro, Andre S.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription kinetics is limited by its initiation steps, which differ between promoters and with intra- and extracellular conditions. Regulation of these steps allows tuning both the rate and stochasticity of RNA production. We used time-lapse, single-RNA microscopy measurements in live Escherichia coli to study how the rate-limiting steps in initiation of the Plac/ara-1 promoter change with temperature and induction scheme. For this, we compared detailed stochastic models fit to the empirical data in maximum likelihood sense using statistical methods. Using this analysis, we found that temperature affects the rate limiting steps unequally, as nonlinear changes in the closed complex formation suffice to explain the differences in transcription dynamics between conditions. Meanwhile, a similar analysis of the PtetA promoter revealed that it has a different rate limiting step configuration, with temperature regulating different steps. Finally, we used the derived models to explore a possible cause for why the identified steps are preferred as the main cause for behavior modifications with temperature: we find that transcription dynamics is either insensitive or responds reciprocally to changes in the other steps. Our results suggests that different promoters employ different rate limiting step patterns that control not only their rate and variability, but also their sensitivity to environmental changes. PMID:27792724

  14. Hepatitis B virus X protein induces RNA polymerase III-dependent gene transcription and increases cellular TATA-binding protein by activating the Ras signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, H D; Trivedi, A; Johnson, D L

    1997-12-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the hepatitis B virus protein, X, activates all three classes of RNA polymerase III (pol III)-dependent promoters by increasing the cellular level of TATA-binding protein (TBP) (H.-D. Wang et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 15:6720-6728, 1995), a limiting transcription component (A. Trivedi et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 16:6909-6916, 1996). We have investigated whether these X-mediated events are dependent on the activation of the Ras/Raf-1 signaling pathway. Transient expression of a dominant-negative mutant Ras gene (Ras-ala15) in a Drosophila S-2 stable cell line expressing X (X-S2), or incubation of the cells with a Ras farnesylation inhibitor, specifically blocked both the X-dependent activation of a cotransfected tRNA gene and the increase in cellular TBP levels. Transient expression of a constitutively activated form of Ras (Ras-val12) in control S2 cells produced both an increase in tRNA gene transcription and an increase in cellular TBP levels. These events are not cell type specific since X-mediated gene induction was also shown to be dependent on Ras activation in a stable rat 1A cell line expressing X. Furthermore, increases in RNA pol III-dependent gene activity and TBP levels could be restored in X-S2 cells expressing Ras-ala15 by coexpressing a constitutively activated form of Raf-1. These events are serum dependent, and when the cells are serum deprived, the X-mediated effects are augmented. Together, these results demonstrate that the X-mediated induction of RNA pol III-dependent genes and increase in TBP are both dependent on the activation of the Ras/Raf-1 signaling cascade. In addition, these studies define two new and important consequences mediated by the activation of the Ras signal transduction pathway: an increase in the central transcription factor, TBP, and the induction of RNA pol III-dependent gene activity.

  15. Time-dependent cellular and transcriptional changes in the osteoblast lineage associated with sclerostin antibody treatment in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Scott; Ominsky, Michael S; Hu, Rong; Pacheco, Efrain; He, Yudong D; Brown, Danielle L; Aguirre, J Ignacio; Wronski, Thomas J; Buntich, Sabina; Afshari, Cynthia A; Pyrah, Ian; Nioi, Paul; Boyce, Rogely Waite

    2016-03-01

    Inhibition of sclerostin with sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) has been shown to stimulate bone formation, decrease bone resorption, and increase bone mass in both animals and humans. To obtain insight into the temporal cellular and transcriptional changes in the osteoblast (OB) lineage associated with long-term Scl-Ab treatment, stereological and transcriptional analyses of the OB lineage were performed on lumbar vertebrae from aged ovariectomized rats. Animals were administered Scl-Ab 3 or 50mg/kg/wk or vehicle (VEH) for up to 26weeks (d183), followed by a treatment-free period (TFP). At 50mg/kg/wk, bone volume (BV/total volume [TV]) increased through d183 and declined during the TFP. Bone formation rate (BFR/bone surface [BS]) and total OB number increased through d29, then progressively declined, coincident with a decrease in total osteoprogenitor (OP) numbers from d29 through d183. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from microarray analysis of mRNA isolated from laser capture microdissection samples enriched for OB, lining cells, and osteocytes (OCy) revealed modules of genes that correlated with BFR/BS, BV/TV, and osteoblastic surface (Ob.S)/BS. Expression change of canonical Wnt target genes was similar in all three cell types at d8, including upregulation of Twist1 and Wisp1. At d29, the pattern of Wnt target gene expression changed in the OCy, with Twist1 returning to VEH level, sustained upregulation of Wisp1, and upregulation of several other Wnt targets that continued into the TFP. Predicted activation of pathways recognized to integrate with and regulate canonical Wnt signaling were also activated at d29 in the OCy. The most significantly affected pathways represented transcription factor signaling known to inhibit cell cycle progression (notably p53) and mitogenesis (notably c-Myc). These changes occurred at the time of peak BFR/BS and continued as BFR/BS declined during treatment, then trended toward VEH level in the TFP. Concurrent with

  16. Hepatic Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs: High Promoter Conservation and Dynamic, Sex-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation by Growth Hormone.

    PubMed

    Melia, Tisha; Hao, Pengying; Yilmaz, Feyza; Waxman, David J

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are increasingly recognized as key chromatin regulators, yet few studies have characterized lincRNAs in a single tissue under diverse conditions. Here, we analyzed 45 mouse liver RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data sets collected under diverse conditions to systematically characterize 4,961 liver lincRNAs, 59% of them novel, with regard to gene structures, species conservation, chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, and epigenetic states. To investigate the potential for functionality, we focused on the responses of the liver lincRNAs to growth hormone stimulation, which imparts clinically relevant sex differences to hepatic metabolism and liver disease susceptibility. Sex-biased expression characterized 247 liver lincRNAs, with many being nuclear RNA enriched and regulated by growth hormone. The sex-biased lincRNA genes are enriched for nearby and correspondingly sex-biased accessible chromatin regions, as well as sex-biased binding sites for growth hormone-regulated transcriptional activators (STAT5, hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 [HNF6], FOXA1, and FOXA2) and transcriptional repressors (CUX2 and BCL6). Repression of female-specific lincRNAs in male liver, but not that of male-specific lincRNAs in female liver, was associated with enrichment of H3K27me3-associated inactive states and poised (bivalent) enhancer states. Strikingly, we found that liver-specific lincRNA gene promoters are more highly species conserved and have a significantly higher frequency of proximal binding by liver transcription factors than liver-specific protein-coding gene promoters. Orthologs for many liver lincRNAs were identified in one or more supraprimates, including two rat lincRNAs showing the same growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased expression as their mouse counterparts. This integrative analysis of liver lincRNA chromatin states, transcription factor occupancy, and growth hormone regulation provides novel insights into the

  17. Parathyroid hormone activation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 transcription requires the histone acetyltransferase activity of p300 and PCAF and p300-dependent acetylation of PCAF.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minnkyong; Partridge, Nicola C

    2010-12-03

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) regulates the transcription of many genes involved in bone remodeling in osteoblasts. One of these genes is matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), which is involved in bone remodeling and early stages of endochondral bone formation. We have previously shown that Mmp-13 gene expression is highly induced by PTH treatment in osteoblastic UMR 106-01 cells, as well as primary osteoblasts. Here, we show that p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), in addition to p300 and Runx2, is required for PTH activation of Mmp-13 transcription. PCAF was increasingly recruited to the MMP-13 proximal promoter region after PTH treatment, and this was associated with an increase in RNA polymerase II recruitment and histone acetylation. In addition, PTH treatment increased the acetylation of PCAF, a process that required p300. Knockdown of PCAF, p300, or Runx2 by siRNA decreased Mmp-13 mRNA expression after PTH treatment in both UMR 106-01 cells and primary osteoblasts. We found that there is a mutual dependence between p300 and PCAF to be recruited to the Mmp-13 promoter after PTH treatment. In promoter-reporter assays, p300 and PCAF had an additive effect on PTH stimulation of MMP-13 promoter activity, and this required their histone acetyltransferase activity. Our findings demonstrate that PCAF acts downstream of PTH signaling as a transcriptional coactivator that is required for PTH stimulation of MMP-13 transcription. PCAF cooperates with p300 and Runx2 to mediate PTH activation of MMP-13 transcription.

  18. A novel application of E1A in combination therapy with EGFR-TKI treatment in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Ming; Chang, Ting-Yu; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Hui-Huang; Li, Jie-Ning; Lyu, Yu-Jhen; Kuo, Kuang-Tai; Huang, Ming-Te; Su, Jen-Liang; Chen, Pai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is commonly overexpressed in breast cancer and is associated with poor clinical outcomes; however, an increasing number of patients have shown a poor effective response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI). Here, we found that AXL expression was positively correlated with poor progression in breast cancer patients. Suppression of AXL by an anti-tumor protein, E1A, enhanced EGFR-TKI (gefitinib, erlotinib and lapatinib) sensitization, resulting in significant inhibition of tumor growth in breast cancer cells. Additionally, AXL overexpression dramatically impaired E1A-mediated EGFR-TKI sensitization. These findings show that downregulation of AXL expression by E1A contributes to sensitization to EGFR-TKI in breast cancer, suggesting that combinatorial therapy of AXL inhibitors or E1A gene therapy with EGFR-TKI may be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of breast cancer patients. PMID:27590506

  19. 11 CFR 300.61 - Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)). 300.61 Section 300.61 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF... elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)). No person described in 11 CFR 300.60 shall solicit, receive,...

  20. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Dependent and -Independent Signaling of mRNA Stability of AU-Rich Element-Containing Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Frevel, Mathias A. E.; Bakheet, Tala; Silva, Aristobolo M.; Hissong, John G.; Khabar, Khalid S. A.; Williams, Bryan R. G.

    2003-01-01

    Adenylate/uridylate-rich element (ARE)-mediated mRNA turnover is an important regulatory component of gene expression for innate and specific immunity, in the hematopoietic system, in cellular growth regulation, and for many other cellular processes. This diversity is reflected in the distribution of AREs in the human genome, which we have established as a database of more than 900 ARE-containing genes that may utilize AREs as a means of controlling cellular mRNA levels. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) pathway has been implicated in regulating the stability of nine ARE-containing transcripts. Here we explored the entire spectrum of ARE-containing genes for p38-dependent regulation of ARE-mediated mRNA turnover with a custom cDNA array containing probes for 950 ARE mRNAs. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used as a reproducible cellular model system that allowed us to precisely control the conditions of mRNA induction and decay in the absence and presence of the p38 inhibitor SB203580. This approach allowed us to establish an LPS-induced ARE mRNA expression profile in human monocytes and determine the half-lives of 470 AU-rich mRNAs. Most importantly, we identified 42 AU-rich genes, previously unrecognized, that show p38-dependent mRNA stabilization. In addition to a number of cytokines, several interesting novel AU-rich transcripts likely to play a role in macrophage activation by LPS exhibited p38-dependent transcript stabilization, including macrophage-specific colony-stimulating factor 1, carbonic anhydrase 2, Bcl2, Bcl2-like 2, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2. Finally, the identification of the p38-dependent upstream activator MAP kinase kinase 6 as a member of this group identifies a positive feedback loop regulating macrophage signaling via p38 MAP kinase-dependent transcript stabilization. PMID:12509443

  1. E1A-engineered human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells as carriers and amplifiers for adenovirus suppress hepatocarcinoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenzhen; Ye, Zhou; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Qing; Fan, Dongmei; Zhang, Yanjun; Luo, Hongbo R.; Yuan, Xiangfei; Li, Zongfang; Xiong, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive approach for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Nevertheless, efficient transgene delivery remains a challenge. In this study, we explored a new targeted system based on human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs), which were engineered to deliver adenovirus to tumor sites, and to replicate and assemble into new adenovirus against HCC. Our results showed that HUMSCs infected by Ad-hTERTp-IL24 followed by LentiR.E1A infection could specifically migrate to HepG2 tumor cells and support adenoviral replication in vitro and in vivo 36 h after LentiR.E1A infection. Ad-hTERTp-IL24 specifically inhibited HepG2 cells growth, and this inhibitory effect was enhanced by low doses of 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), because the expression levels of coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) and integrin ανβ3 on tumor cells were significantly increased, causing higher viral uptake. Compared with the no treatment groups, Ad-hTERTp-IL24 and LentiR.E1A co-loaded HUMSCs exhibited significant anti-tumor activity in vivo, particularly in combination with low doses of 5-Fu. In summary, this study provides a promising targeted gene therapeutic strategy dependent on the tumor tropism of HUMSCs, to improve the outcome of virotherapy for tumor patients especially those with metastatic diseases. PMID:27322080

  2. Wild soybean roots depend on specific transcription factors and oxidation reduction related genesin response to alkaline stress.

    PubMed

    DuanMu, Huizi; Wang, Yang; Bai, Xi; Cheng, Shufei; Deyholos, Michael K; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Li, Dan; Zhu, Dan; Li, Ran; Yu, Yang; Cao, Lei; Chen, Chao; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-11-01

    Soil alkalinity is an important environmental problem limiting agricultural productivity. Wild soybean (Glycine soja) shows strong alkaline stress tolerance, so it is an ideal plant candidate for studying the molecular mechanisms of alkaline tolerance and identifying alkaline stress-responsive genes. However, limited information is available about G. soja responses to alkaline stress on a genomic scale. Therefore, in the present study, we used RNA sequencing to compare transcript profiles of G. soja root responses to sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) at six time points, and a total of 68,138,478 pairs of clean reads were obtained using the Illumina GAIIX. Expression patterns of 46,404 G. soja genes were profiled in all six samples based on RNA-seq data using Cufflinks software. Then, t12 transcription factors from MYB, WRKY, NAC, bZIP, C2H2, HB, and TIFY families and 12 oxidation reduction related genes were chosen and verified to be induced in response to alkaline stress by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The GO functional annotation analysis showed that besides "transcriptional regulation" and "oxidation reduction," these genes were involved in a variety of processes, such as "binding" and "response to stress." This is the first comprehensive transcriptome profiling analysis of wild soybean root under alkaline stress by RNA sequencing. Our results highlight changes in the gene expression patterns and identify a set of genes induced by NaHCO3 stress. These findings provide a base for the global analyses of G. soja alkaline stress tolerance mechanisms.

  3. Cell-dependent gag mutants of HIV-1 are crucially defective at the stage of uncoating/reverse transcription in non-permissive cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, K; Miyaura, M; Yoshida, A; Sakurai, A; Fujita, M; Adachi, A

    2000-10-01

    We have previously shown that some of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gag matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) mutants display host-cell-dependent replication potential, and that they are defective at the early phase of the virus replication cycle in non-permissive cells. To determine the defective replication stage of the cell-dependent mutants precisely, the processes of virus entry into cells and virus DNA synthesis were monitored by the highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction amplification analysis. The results obtained indicated that all the cell-dependent MA, CA and NC mutants are defective at the stage of uncoating/reverse transcription, and that a cellular factor(s) is involved in this process.

  4. Transcriptional regulation and signal-peptide-dependent secretion of exolevanase (LsdB) in the endophyte Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Carmen; Banguela, Alexander; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hernández, Lázaro

    2009-03-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus utilizes plant sucrose with a constitutively expressed levansucrase (LsdA), producing extracellular levan, which may be degraded under energetically unfavored conditions. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that lsdA and the downstream exolevanase gene (lsdB) form an operon. lsdB transcription was induced during growth with low fructose concentrations (0.44 to 33 mM) and repressed by glucose. Transport of LsdB to the periplasm involved N-terminal signal peptide cleavage. Type II secretion mutants failed to transfer LsdB across the outer membrane, impeding levan hydrolysis.

  5. Transcriptional Regulation and Signal-Peptide-Dependent Secretion of Exolevanase (LsdB) in the Endophyte Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus▿

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez, Carmen; Banguela, Alexander; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hernández, Lázaro

    2009-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus utilizes plant sucrose with a constitutively expressed levansucrase (LsdA), producing extracellular levan, which may be degraded under energetically unfavored conditions. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that lsdA and the downstream exolevanase gene (lsdB) form an operon. lsdB transcription was induced during growth with low fructose concentrations (0.44 to 33 mM) and repressed by glucose. Transport of LsdB to the periplasm involved N-terminal signal peptide cleavage. Type II secretion mutants failed to transfer LsdB across the outer membrane, impeding levan hydrolysis. PMID:19139238

  6. The Transcription Factor ABI4 Is Required for the Ascorbic Acid–Dependent Regulation of Growth and Regulation of Jasmonate-Dependent Defense Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kerchev, Pavel I.; Pellny, Till K.; Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Kiddle, Guy; Hedden, Peter; Driscoll, Simon; Vanacker, Hélène; Verrier, Paul; Hancock, Robert D.; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular redox homeostasis is a hub for signal integration. Interactions between redox metabolism and the ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE-4 (ABI4) transcription factor were characterized in the Arabidopsis thaliana vitamin c defective1 (vtc1) and vtc2 mutants, which are defective in ascorbic acid synthesis and show a slow growth phenotype together with enhanced abscisic acid (ABA) levels relative to the wild type (Columbia-0). The 75% decrease in the leaf ascorbate pool in the vtc2 mutants was not sufficient to adversely affect GA metabolism. The transcriptome signatures of the abi4, vtc1, and vtc2 mutants showed significant overlap, with a large number of transcription factors or signaling components similarly repressed or induced. Moreover, lincomycin-dependent changes in LIGHT HARVESTING CHLOROPHYLL A/B BINDING PROTEIN 1.1 expression were comparable in these mutants, suggesting overlapping participation in chloroplast to nucleus signaling. The slow growth phenotype of vtc2 was absent in the abi4 vtc2 double mutant, as was the sugar-insensitive phenotype of the abi4 mutant. Octadecanoid derivative-responsive AP2/ERF-domain transcription factor 47 (ORA47) and AP3 (an ABI5 binding factor) transcripts were enhanced in vtc2 but repressed in abi4 vtc2, suggesting that ABI4 and ascorbate modulate growth and defense gene expression through jasmonate signaling. We conclude that low ascorbate triggers ABA- and jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways that together regulate growth through ABI4. Moreover, cellular redox homeostasis exerts a strong influence on sugar-dependent growth regulation. PMID:21926335

  7. Trx2p-dependent Regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Oxidative Stress Response by the Skn7p Transcription Factor under Respiring Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Garre, Elena; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Matallana, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    The whole genome analysis has demonstrated that wine yeasts undergo changes in promoter regions and variations in gene copy number, which make them different to lab strains and help them better adapt to stressful conditions during winemaking, where oxidative stress plays a critical role. Since cytoplasmic thioredoxin II, a small protein with thiol-disulphide oxidoreductase activity, has been seen to perform important functions under biomass propagation conditions of wine yeasts, we studied the involvement of Trx2p in the molecular regulation of the oxidative stress transcriptional response on these strains. In this study, we analyzed the expression levels of several oxidative stress-related genes regulated by either Yap1p or the co-operation between Yap1p and Skn7p. The results revealed a lowered expression for all the tested Skn7p dependent genes in a Trx2p-deficient strain and that Trx2p is essential for the oxidative stress response during respiratory metabolism in wine yeast. Additionally, activity of Yap1p and Skn7p dependent promoters by β-galactosidase assays clearly demonstrated that Skn7p-dependent promoter activation is affected by TRX2 gene deficiency. Finally we showed that deleting the TRX2 gene causes Skn7p hyperphosphorylation under oxidative stress conditions. We propose Trx2p to be a new positive efector in the regulation of the Skn7p transcription factor that controls phosphorylation events and, therefore, modulates the oxidative stress response in yeast. PMID:24376879

  8. Cell density-dependent transcriptional activation of endocrine-related genes in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sagar; Dean, Angela; Walter, Marc; Bao, Yongde; Hu, Yanfen; Ruan, Jianhua; Li, Rong

    2010-08-01

    Adipose tissue is recognized as an endocrine organ that plays an important role in human diseases such as type II diabetes and cancer. Human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs), a distinct cell population in adipose tissue, are capable of differentiating into multiple lineages including adipogenesis. When cultured in vitro under a confluent condition, ASCs reach a commitment stage for adipogenesis, which can be further induced into terminally differentiated adipocytes by a cocktail of adipogenic factors. Here we report that the confluent state of ASCs triggers transcriptional activation cascades for genes that are responsible for the endocrine function of adipose tissue. These include insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and aromatase (Cyp19), a key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. Despite similar adipogenic potentials, ASCs from different individuals display huge variations in activation of these endocrine-related genes. Bioinformatics and experimental data suggest that transcription factor Foxo1 controls a large number of "early" confluency-response genes, which subsequently induce "late" response genes. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Foxo1 substantially compromises the ability of committed ASCs to stimulate tumor cell migration in vitro. Thus, our work suggests that cell density is an important determinant of the endocrine potential of ASCs.

  9. The structural basis of acyl coenzyme A-dependent regulation of the transcription factor FadR

    PubMed Central

    van Aalten, Daan M.F.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Knudsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    FadR is an acyl-CoA-responsive transcription factor, regulating fatty acid biosynthetic and degradation genes in Escherichia coli. The apo-protein binds DNA as a homodimer, an interaction that is disrupted by binding of acyl-CoA. The recently described structure of apo-FadR shows a DNA binding domain coupled to an acyl-CoA binding domain with a novel fold, but does not explain how binding of the acyl-CoA effector molecule >30 Å away from the DNA binding site affects transcriptional regulation. Here, we describe the structures of the FadR–operator and FadR– myristoyl-CoA binary complexes. The FadR–DNA complex reveals a novel winged helix–turn–helix protein–DNA interaction, involving sequence-specific contacts from the wing to the minor groove. Binding of acyl-CoA results in dramatic conformational changes throughout the protein, with backbone shifts up to 4.5 Å. The net effect is a rearrangement of the DNA binding domains in the dimer, resulting in a change of 7.2 Å in separation of the DNA recognition helices and the loss of DNA binding, revealing the molecular basis of acyl-CoA-responsive regulation. PMID:11296236

  10. SWI/SNF remodeling and p300-dependent transcription of histone variant H2ABbd nucleosomal arrays

    PubMed Central

    Angelov, Dimitar; Verdel, André; An, Woojin; Bondarenko, Vladimir; Hans, Fabienne; Doyen, Cécile-Marie; Studitsky, Vassily M; Hamiche, Ali; Roeder, Robert G; Bouvet, Philippe; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    A histone variant H2ABbd was recently identified, but its function is totally unknown. Here we have studied the structural and functional properties of nucleosome and nucleosomal arrays reconstituted with this histone variant. We show that H2ABbd can replace the conventional H2A in the nucleosome, but this replacement results in alterations of the nucleosomal structure. The remodeling complexes SWI/SNF and ACF are unable to mobilize the variant H2ABbd nucleosome. However, SWI/SNF was able to increase restriction enzyme access to the variant nucleosome and assist the transfer of variant H2ABbd–H2B dimer to a tetrameric histone H3–H4 particle. In addition, the p300- and Gal4-VP16-activated transcription appeared to be more efficient for H2ABbd nucleosomal arrays than for conventional H2A arrays. The intriguing mechanisms by which H2ABbd affects both nucleosome remodeling and transcription are discussed. PMID:15372075

  11. Excess of Yra1 RNA-Binding Factor Causes Transcription-Dependent Genome Instability, Replication Impairment and Telomere Shortening.

    PubMed

    Gavaldá, Sandra; Santos-Pereira, José M; García-Rubio, María L; Luna, Rosa; Aguilera, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    Yra1 is an essential nuclear factor of the evolutionarily conserved family of hnRNP-like export factors that when overexpressed impairs mRNA export and cell growth. To investigate further the relevance of proper Yra1 stoichiometry in the cell, we overexpressed Yra1 by transforming yeast cells with YRA1 intron-less constructs and analyzed its effect on gene expression and genome integrity. We found that YRA1 overexpression induces DNA damage and leads to a transcription-associated hyperrecombination phenotype that is mediated by RNA:DNA hybrids. In addition, it confers a genome-wide replication retardation as seen by reduced BrdU incorporation and accumulation of the Rrm3 helicase. In addition, YRA1 overexpression causes a cell senescence-like phenotype and telomere shortening. ChIP-chip analysis shows that overexpressed Yra1 is loaded to transcribed chromatin along the genome and to Y' telomeric regions, where Rrm3 is also accumulated, suggesting an impairment of telomere replication. Our work not only demonstrates that a proper stoichiometry of the Yra1 mRNA binding and export factor is required to maintain genome integrity and telomere homeostasis, but suggests that the cellular imbalance between transcribed RNA and specific RNA-binding factors may become a major cause of genome instability mediated by co-transcriptional replication impairment.

  12. Excess of Yra1 RNA-Binding Factor Causes Transcription-Dependent Genome Instability, Replication Impairment and Telomere Shortening

    PubMed Central

    Gavaldá, Sandra; Santos-Pereira, José M.; García-Rubio, María L.; Luna, Rosa; Aguilera, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Yra1 is an essential nuclear factor of the evolutionarily conserved family of hnRNP-like export factors that when overexpressed impairs mRNA export and cell growth. To investigate further the relevance of proper Yra1 stoichiometry in the cell, we overexpressed Yra1 by transforming yeast cells with YRA1 intron-less constructs and analyzed its effect on gene expression and genome integrity. We found that YRA1 overexpression induces DNA damage and leads to a transcription-associated hyperrecombination phenotype that is mediated by RNA:DNA hybrids. In addition, it confers a genome-wide replication retardation as seen by reduced BrdU incorporation and accumulation of the Rrm3 helicase. In addition, YRA1 overexpression causes a cell senescence-like phenotype and telomere shortening. ChIP-chip analysis shows that overexpressed Yra1 is loaded to transcribed chromatin along the genome and to Y’ telomeric regions, where Rrm3 is also accumulated, suggesting an impairment of telomere replication. Our work not only demonstrates that a proper stoichiometry of the Yra1 mRNA binding and export factor is required to maintain genome integrity and telomere homeostasis, but suggests that the cellular imbalance between transcribed RNA and specific RNA-binding factors may become a major cause of genome instability mediated by co-transcriptional replication impairment. PMID:27035147

  13. 14-3-3 Proteins are essential for regulation of RTG3-dependent transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, G P; Steensma, H Y

    2001-12-01

    14-3-3 proteins comprise a family of highly conserved proteins that bind more than 60 different, mostly phosphorylated, proteins. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two genes, BMH1 and BMH2, encoding 14-3-3 proteins. Disruption of both genes together is lethal. In this study we constructed a mutant with a single, temperature-sensitive bmh allele. Recessive mutations in SIN4 and RTG3 can suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype of this mutant. These genes encode a global transcriptional regulator and a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, respectively. The yeast 14-3-3 proteins were shown to bind to the Rtg3 protein. Overexpression of RTG3 is lethal even in wild-type cells. These genetic and biochemical data are consistent with a model in which the 14-3-3 proteins are required to keep the Rtg3 protein in an inactive state, which is (one of) the essential function(s) of the 14-3-3 proteins.

  14. Zinc-Finger Transcription Factor ZAT6 Positively Regulates Cadmium Tolerance through the Glutathione-Dependent Pathway in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Yan, Xingxing; Liu, Yunlei; Wang, Ren; Fan, Tingting; Ren, Yongbing; Tang, Xiaofeng; Xiao, Fangming

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental pollutant with high toxicity to animals and plants. It has been established that the glutathione (GSH)-dependent phytochelatin (PC) synthesis pathway is one of the most important mechanisms contributing to Cd accumulation and tolerance in plants. However, the transcription factors involved in regulating GSH-dependent PC synthesis pathway remain largely unknown. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Cd-resistant mutant xcd2-D (XVE system-induced cadmium-tolerance2) using a forward genetics approach. The mutant gene underlying xcd2-D mutation was revealed to encode a known zinc-finger transcription factor, ZAT6. Transgenic plants overexpressing ZAT6 showed significant increase of Cd tolerance, whereas loss of function of ZAT6 led to decreased Cd tolerance. Increased Cd accumulation and tolerance in ZAT6-overexpressing lines was GSH dependent and associated with Cd-activated synthesis of PC, which was correlated with coordinated activation of PC-synthesis related gene expression. By contrast, loss of function of ZAT6 reduced Cd accumulation and tolerance, which was accompanied by abolished PC synthesis and gene expression. Further analysis revealed that ZAT6 positively regulates the transcription of GSH1, GSH2, PCS1, and PCS2, but ZAT6 is capable of specifically binding to GSH1 promoter in vivo. Consistently, overexpression of GSH1 has been shown to restore Cd sensitivity in the zat6-1 mutant, suggesting that GSH1 is a key target of ZAT6. Taken together, our data provide evidence that ZAT6 coordinately activates PC synthesis-related gene expression and directly targets GSH1 to positively regulate Cd accumulation and tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:26983992

  15. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of a Feeding State-Dependent Chemoreceptor Gene via MEF-2 and bHLH Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Matthew; Grubbs, Jeremy; McDonagh, Aja; Valdes, Dominic; Winbush, Ari; van der Linden, Alexander M

    2016-08-01

    Food and feeding-state dependent changes in chemoreceptor gene expression may allow Caenorhabditis elegans to modify their chemosensory behavior, but the mechanisms essential for these expression changes remain poorly characterized. We had previously shown that expression of a feeding state-dependent chemoreceptor gene, srh-234, in the ADL sensory neuron of C. elegans is regulated via the MEF-2 transcription factor. Here, we show that MEF-2 acts together with basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to regulate srh-234 expression as a function of feeding state. We identify a cis-regulatory MEF2 binding site that is necessary and sufficient for the starvation-induced down regulation of srh-234 expression, while an E-box site known to bind bHLH factors is required to drive srh-234 expression in ADL. We show that HLH-2 (E/Daughterless), HLH-3 and HLH-4 (Achaete-scute homologs) act in ADL neurons to regulate srh-234 expression. We further demonstrate that the expression levels of srh-234 in ADL neurons are regulated remotely by MXL-3 (Max-like 3 homolog) and HLH-30 (TFEB ortholog) acting in the intestine, which is dependent on insulin signaling functioning specifically in ADL neurons. We also show that this intestine-to-neuron feeding-state regulation of srh-234 involves a subset of insulin-like peptides. These results combined suggest that chemoreceptor gene expression is regulated by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous transcriptional mechanisms mediated by MEF2 and bHLH factors, which may allow animals to fine-tune their chemosensory responses in response to changes in their feeding state.

  16. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of a Feeding State-Dependent Chemoreceptor Gene via MEF-2 and bHLH Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Winbush, Ari; van der Linden, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Food and feeding-state dependent changes in chemoreceptor gene expression may allow Caenorhabditis elegans to modify their chemosensory behavior, but the mechanisms essential for these expression changes remain poorly characterized. We had previously shown that expression of a feeding state-dependent chemoreceptor gene, srh-234, in the ADL sensory neuron of C. elegans is regulated via the MEF-2 transcription factor. Here, we show that MEF-2 acts together with basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to regulate srh-234 expression as a function of feeding state. We identify a cis-regulatory MEF2 binding site that is necessary and sufficient for the starvation-induced down regulation of srh-234 expression, while an E-box site known to bind bHLH factors is required to drive srh-234 expression in ADL. We show that HLH-2 (E/Daughterless), HLH-3 and HLH-4 (Achaete-scute homologs) act in ADL neurons to regulate srh-234 expression. We further demonstrate that the expression levels of srh-234 in ADL neurons are regulated remotely by MXL-3 (Max-like 3 homolog) and HLH-30 (TFEB ortholog) acting in the intestine, which is dependent on insulin signaling functioning specifically in ADL neurons. We also show that this intestine-to-neuron feeding-state regulation of srh-234 involves a subset of insulin-like peptides. These results combined suggest that chemoreceptor gene expression is regulated by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous transcriptional mechanisms mediated by MEF2 and bHLH factors, which may allow animals to fine-tune their chemosensory responses in response to changes in their feeding state. PMID:27487365

  17. Sepsis increases the expression and activity of the transcription factor Forkhead Box O 1 (FOXO1) in skeletal muscle by a glucocorticoid-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ira J; Alamdari, Nima; O'Neal, Patrick; Gonnella, Patricia; Aversa, Zaira; Hasselgren, Per-Olof

    2010-05-01

    Sepsis-induced muscle wasting has severe clinical consequences, including muscle weakness, need for prolonged ventilatory support and stay in the intensive care unit, and delayed ambulation with risk for pulmonary and thromboembolic complications. Understanding molecular mechanisms regulating loss of muscle mass in septic patients therefore has significant clinical implications. Forkhead Box O (FOXO) transcription factors have been implicated in muscle wasting, partly reflecting upregulation of the ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1. The influence of sepsis on FOXO transcription factors in skeletal muscle is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that sepsis upregulates expression and activity of FOXO transcription factors in skeletal muscle by a glucocorticoid-dependent mechanism. Sepsis in rats increased muscle FOXO1 and 3a mRNA and protein levels but did not influence FOXO4 expression. Nuclear FOXO1 levels and DNA binding activity were increased in septic muscle whereas FOXO3a nuclear levels were not increased during sepsis. Sepsis-induced expression of FOXO1 was reduced by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU38486 and treatment of rats with dexamethasone increased FOXO1 mRNA levels suggesting that the expression of FOXO1 is regulated by glucocorticoids. Reducing FOXO1, but not FOXO3a, expression by siRNA in cultured L6 myotubes inhibited dexamethasone-induced atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression, further supporting a role of FOXO1 in glucocorticoid-regulated muscle wasting. Results suggest that sepsis increases FOXO1 expression and activity in skeletal muscle by a glucocorticoid-dependent mechanism and that glucocorticoid-dependent upregulation of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in skeletal muscle is regulated by FOXO1. The study is significant because it provides novel information about molecular mechanisms involved in sepsis-induced muscle wasting.

  18. [Persistent Shallot virus X infection correlates with transcriptional repression of plant cell RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and DCL proteins in plant roots].

    PubMed

    Arkhipov, A V; Solovyev, A G; Vishnichenko, V K

    2017-01-01

    Shallot virus X is a typical representative of Allexiviruses. The transcription levels of principal genes involved in the RNA silencing in healthy and shallot virus X-infected plants have been quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. There is a negative correlation between the reproduction rates of RNA virus and the levels of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and DCL proteins in roots and leaves of infected plants. These observations indicate that Shallot X virus employs noncanonical ways of overcoming the antiviral defense of the plant by systemic RNA silencing.

  19. Transcription patterns of genes encoding four metallothionein homologs in Daphnia pulex exposed to copper and cadmium are time- and homolog- dependent

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, Jana; Shaw, Joseph R.; Glaholt, Stephen P.; Colbourne, John K.; De Schamphelaere, Karel AC.

    2013-01-01

    Metallothioneins are proteins that play an essential role in metal homeostasis and detoxification in nearly all organisms studied to date. Yet discrepancies between outcomes of chronic and acute exposure experiments hamper the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of their isoforms following metal exposure. Here, we investigated transcriptional differences among four identified homologs (mt1–mt4) in Daphnia pulex exposed across time to copper and cadmium relative to a control. Transcriptional upregulation of mt1 and mt3 was detected on day four following exposure to cadmium, whereas that of mt2 and mt4 was detected on day two and day eight following exposure to copper. These results confirm temporal and metal-specific differences in the transcriptional induction of genes encoding metallothionein homologs upon metal exposure which should be considered in ecotoxicological monitoring programs of metal-contaminated water bodies. Indeed, the mRNA expression patterns observed here illustrate the complex regulatory system associated with metallothioneins, as these patterns are not only dependent on the metal, but also on exposure time and the homolog studied. Further phylogenetic analysis and analysis of regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions revealed a high degree of similarity between metallothionein genes of Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna, a species belonging to the same genus. These findings, combined with a limited amount of available expression data for D. magna metallothionein genes, tentatively suggest a potential generalization of the metallothionein response system between these Daphnia species. PMID:24113165

  20. Transcription patterns of genes encoding four metallothionein homologs in Daphnia pulex exposed to copper and cadmium are time- and homolog-dependent.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; Shaw, Joseph R; Glaholt, Stephen P; Colbourne, John K; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2013-10-15

    Metallothioneins are proteins that play an essential role in metal homeostasis and detoxification in nearly all organisms studied to date. Yet discrepancies between outcomes of chronic and acute exposure experiments hamper the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of their isoforms following metal exposure. Here, we investigated transcriptional differences among four identified homologs (mt1-mt4) in Daphnia pulex exposed across time to copper and cadmium relative to a control. Transcriptional upregulation of mt1 and mt3 was detected on day four following exposure to cadmium, whereas that of mt2 and mt4 was detected on day two and day eight following exposure to copper. These results confirm temporal and metal-specific differences in the transcriptional induction of genes encoding metallothionein homologs upon metal exposure which should be considered in ecotoxicological monitoring programs of metal-contaminated water bodies. Indeed, the mRNA expression patterns observed here illustrate the complex regulatory system associated with metallothioneins, as these patterns are not only dependent on the metal, but also on exposure time and the homolog studied. Further phylogenetic analysis and analysis of regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions revealed a high degree of similarity between metallothionein genes of Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna, a species belonging to the same genus. These findings, combined with a limited amount of available expression data for D. magna metallothionein genes, tentatively suggest a potential generalization of the metallothionein response system between these Daphnia species.

  1. Molecular and functional analysis of the XPBC/ERCC-3 promoter: transcription activity is dependent on the integrity of an Sp1-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L; Weeda, G; Jochemsen, A G; Bootsma, D; Hoeijmakers, J H; van der Eb, A J

    1992-01-01

    The human XPBC/ERCC-3 gene, which corrects the excision-repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum group B cells and the UV-sensitive CHO mutant 27-1 cells, appears to be expressed constitutively in various cell types and tissues. We have analysed the structure and functionality of the XPBC/ERCC-3 promoter. Transcription of the XPBC/ERCC-3 gene is initiated from heterogeneous sites, with a major startpoint mapped at position -54 (relative to the translation start codon ATG). The promoter region does not possess classical TATA and CAAT elements, but it is GC-rich and contains three putative Sp1-binding sites. In addition, there are two elements related to the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-response element (CRE) and the 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate-response element (TRE) in the 5'-flanking region. Transient expression analysis of XPBC/ERCC-3 promoter-CAT chimeric plasmids revealed that a 127-bp fragment, spanning position -129 to -3, is minimally required for the promoter activity. Transcription of the XPBC/ERCC-3 promoter depends on the integrity of a putative Sp1-binding site in close proximity to the major cap site. Band shift assays showed that this putative Sp1-binding site can interact specifically with a nuclear factor, most likely transcription factor Sp1 (or an Sp1-like factor) in vitro. Images PMID:1741247

  2. Noncoding RNA. piRNA-guided slicing specifies transcripts for Zucchini-dependent, phased piRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mohn, Fabio; Handler, Dominik; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-05-15

    In animal gonads, PIWI-clade Argonaute proteins repress transposons sequence-specifically via bound Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These are processed from single-stranded precursor RNAs by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we show that primary piRNA biogenesis is a 3'-directed and phased process that, in the Drosophila germ line, is initiated by secondary piRNA-guided transcript cleavage. Phasing results from consecutive endonucleolytic cleavages catalyzed by Zucchini, implying coupled formation of 3' and 5' ends of flanking piRNAs. Unexpectedly, Zucchini also participates in 3' end formation of secondary piRNAs. Its function can, however, be bypassed by downstream piRNA-guided precursor cleavages coupled to exonucleolytic trimming. Our data uncover an evolutionarily conserved piRNA biogenesis mechanism in which Zucchini plays a central role in defining piRNA 5' and 3' ends.

  3. Transcription of the phage-encoded Panton-Valentine leukocidin of Staphylococcus aureus is dependent on the phage life-cycle and on the host background.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Christiane; Witte, Wolfgang; Wolz, Christiane; Goerke, Christiane

    2009-11-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a pore-forming, bi-component toxin secreted by Staphylococcus aureus strains epidemiologically associated with diseases such as necrotizing pneumonia and skin and soft-tissue infections. Here we demonstrate that transcription of the phage-encoded PVL (encoded in the luk-PV operon) is dependent on two major determinants: the phage life-cycle and the host chromosomal background. Mitomycin C induction of PVL-encoding prophages from different community-acquired MRSA strains led to an increase in the amount of luk-PV mRNA as a result of read-through transcription from latent phage promoters and an increase in phage copy numbers. Failing prophage excision was reflected in a constant expression of luk-PV as in the case of strain USA300, suggesting that phi Sa2USA300 is a replication-defective prophage. Additionally, we could show that luk-PV transcription is influenced by the S. aureus global virulence regulators agr and sae. We found a strong impact of the host background on prophage induction and replication when analysing PVL phages in different S. aureus strains. For example phage phi Sa2mw was greatly induced by mitomycin C in its native host MW2 and in strain Newman but to a considerably lesser extent in strains 8325-4, RN6390 and ISP479c. This discrepancy was not linked to the SOS response of the bacteria since recA transcription did not vary between the strains. These results suggest a fine tuning between certain phages and their host, with major impact on the expression of phage-encoded virulence genes.

  4. Survivin expression promotes VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis via PI3K/Akt enhanced β-catenin/Tcf-Lef dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Jaime G; Rodríguez, Diego A; Valenzuela, Manuel; Calderon, Claudia; Urzúa, Ulises; Munroe, David; Rosas, Carlos; Lemus, David; Díaz, Natalia; Wright, Mathew C; Leyton, Lisette; Tapia, Julio C; Quest, Andrew Fg

    2014-09-09

    Early in cancer development, tumour cells express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secreted molecule that is important in all stages of angiogenesis, an essential process that provides nutrients and oxygen to the nascent tumor and thereby enhances tumor-cell survival and facilitates growth. Survivin, another protein involved in angiogenesis, is strongly expressed in most human cancers, where it promotes tumor survival by reducing apoptosis as well as favoring endothelial cell proliferation and migration. The mechanisms by which cancer cells induce VEGF expression and angiogenesis upon survivin up-regulation remain to be fully established. Since the PI3K/Akt signalling and β-catenin-Tcf/Lef dependent transcription have been implicated in the expression of many cancer-related genes, including survivin and VEGF, we evaluated whether survivin may favor VEGF expression, release from tumor cells and induction of angiogenesis in a PI3K/Akt-β-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent manner. Here, we provide evidence linking survivin expression in tumor cells to increased β-catenin protein levels, β-catenin-Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity and expression of several target genes of this pathway, including survivin and VEGF, which accumulates in the culture medium. Alternatively, survivin downregulation reduced β-catenin protein levels and β-catenin-Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity. Also, using inhibitors of PI3K and the expression of dominant negative Akt, we show that survivin acts upstream in an amplification loop to promote VEGF expression. Moreover, survivin knock-down in B16F10 murine melanoma cells diminished the number of blood vessels and reduced VEGF expression in tumors formed in C57BL/6 mice. Finally, in the chick chorioallantoid membrane assay, survivin expression in tumor cells enhanced VEGF liberation and blood vessel formation. Importantly, the presence of neutralizing anti-VEGF antibodies precluded survivin-enhanced angiogenesis in this assay. These

  5. Sorafenib induces endometrial carcinoma apoptosis by inhibiting Elk-1-dependent Mcl-1 transcription and inducing Akt/GSK3β-dependent protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Nian-Kang; Huang, Shang-Lang; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2013-08-01

    Endometrial carcinoma (EC) is one of the main gynecologic malignancies affecting women, but effective treatments are currently lacking. In the present study, we investigated the effect of sorafenib, a general kinase inhibitor, on several EC cell lines (HEC1A, HEC1B, and RL95-2). Sorafenib induced cell death in EC cells with the following order of sensitivity: HEC1A > HEC1B > RL95-2. Sorafenib suppressed several anti-apoptotic proteins in HEC1A cells, including myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1). Ectopic overexpression of Mcl-1 prevented the cell killing effect of sorafenib. Sorafenib suppressed Mcl-1 at the gene transactivation level by inactivating the ERK/Elk-1 pathway. Accordingly, the inhibitory effect of sorafenib on Mcl-1 expression decreased following knockdown of Elk-1 using short-hairpin RNA (shRNA). Elk-1 overexpression rescued both the inhibitory effect of sorafenib on Mcl-1 expression and the cell killing effect of sorafenib. Furthermore, sorafenib reduced the stability of the Mcl-1 protein by enhancing its ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome via the AKT/GSK3β and the ERK pathways. Similar results were detected in other EC cell lines. These results indicate that sorafenib induces apoptosis in EC cells by down-regulating the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 via transcriptional inhibition and protein degradation. Our results thus support the notion that sorafenib may be used in endometrial cancer therapy.

  6. Angiogenesis Induced by Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5A (STAT5A) Is Dependent on Autocrine Activity of Proliferin*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinhai; Qiao, Dianhua; Meyer, Kristy; Pier, Thomas; Keles, Sunduz; Friedl, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Multiple secreted factors induce the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis). The signal transduction events that orchestrate the numerous cellular activities required for angiogenesis remain incompletely understood. We have shown previously that STAT5 plays a pivotal role in angiogenesis induced by FGF2 and FGF8b. To delineate the signaling pathway downstream of STAT5, we expressed constitutively active (CA) or dominant-negative (DN) mutant STAT5A in mouse brain endothelial cells (EC). We found that the conditioned medium from CA-STAT5A but not from dominant-negative STAT5A overexpressing EC is sufficient to induce EC invasion and tube formation, indicating that STAT5A regulates the secretion of autocrine proangiogenic factors. Conversely, CA-STAT5A-induced conditioned medium had no effect on EC proliferation. Using a comparative genome-wide transcription array screen, we identified the prolactin family member proliferin (PLF1 and PLF4) as a candidate autocrine factor. The CA-STAT5A-dependent transcription and secretion of PLF by EC was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. CA-STAT5A binds to the PLF1 promoter region, suggesting a direct transcriptional regulation. Knockdown of PLF expression by shRNA or by blocking of PLF activity with neutralizing antibodies removed the CA-STAT5A-dependent proangiogenic activity from the conditioned medium of EC. Similarly, the ability of concentrated conditioned medium from CA-STAT5A transfected EC to induce angiogenesis in Matrigel plugs in vivo was abolished when PLF was depleted from the medium. These observations demonstrate a FGF/STAT5/PLF signaling cascade in EC and implicate PLF as autocrine regulator of EC invasion and tube formation. PMID:22199350

  7. Sigma54-dependent transcription activator phage shock protein F of Escherichia coli: a fragmentation approach to identify sequences that contribute to self-association.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Patricia; Wigneshweraraj, Siva R; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin

    2004-03-15

    Proteins that belong to the AAA (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) superfamily of mechanochemical enzymes are versatile and control a wide array of cellular functions. Many AAA proteins share the common property of self-association into oligomeric structures and use nucleotide binding and hydrolysis to regulate their biological output. The Escherichia coli transcription activator PspF (phage shock protein F) is a member of the sigma54-dependent transcriptional activators that belong to the AAA protein family. Nucleotide interactions condition the functional state of PspF, enabling it to self-associate and interact with its target, the sigma54-RNAP (RNA polymerase) closed complex. The self-association determinants within the AAA domain of sigma54-dependent activators remain poorly characterized. In the present study, we have used a fragment of the AAA domain of PspF as a probe to study the nucleotide-conditioned self-association of PspF. Results show that the PspF fragment acts in trans to inhibit specifically self-association of PspF. The PspF fragment prevented efficient binding of nucleotides to PspF, consistent with the observation that the site for nucleotide interactions within an oligomer of AAA proteins is created between two protomers. Using proximity-based footprinting and cross-linking techniques, we demonstrate that the sequences represented in this fragment are close to one protomer-protomer interface within a PspF oligomer. As the sequences represented in this PspF fragment also contain a highly conserved motif that interacts with the sigma54-RNAP closed complex, we suggest that PspF may be organized to link nucleotide interactions and self-association to sigma54-RNAP binding and transcription activation.

  8. E-cadherin is required for caveolin-1-mediated down-regulation of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin via reduced beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente A; Tapia, Julio C; Rodriguez, Diego A; Lladser, Alvaro; Arredondo, Cristian; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2007-11-01

    Caveolin-1 reportedly acts as a tumor suppressor and promotes events associated with tumor progression, including metastasis. The molecular mechanisms underlying such radical differences in function are not understood. Recently, we showed that caveolin-1 inhibits expression of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin via a transcriptional mechanism involving the beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef pathway. Surprisingly, while caveolin-1 expression decreased survivin mRNA and protein levels in HT29(ATCC) human colon cancer cells, this was not the case in metastatic HT29(US) cells. Survivin down-regulation was paralleled by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of caveolin-1 with beta-catenin in HT29(ATCC) but not HT29(US) cells. Unlike HT29(ATCC) cells, HT29(US) cells expressed small amounts of E-cadherin that accumulated in intracellular patches rather than at the cell surface. Re-expression of E-cadherin in HT29(US) cells restored the ability of caveolin-1 to down-regulate beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription and survivin expression, as seen in HT29(ATCC) cells. In addition, coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization between caveolin-1 and beta-catenin increased upon E-cadherin expression in HT29(US) cells. In human embryonic kidney HEK293T and HT29(US) cells, caveolin-1 and E-cadherin cooperated in suppressing beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription as well as survivin expression. Finally, mouse melanoma B16-F10 cells, another metastatic cell model with low endogenous caveolin-1 and E-cadherin levels, were characterized. In these cells, caveolin-1-mediated down-regulation of survivin in the presence of E-cadherin coincided with increased apoptosis. Thus, the absence of E-cadherin severely compromises the ability of caveolin-1 to develop activities potentially relevant to its role as a tumor suppressor.

  9. Mad3 and Mad4: novel Max-interacting transcriptional repressors that suppress c-myc dependent transformation and are expressed during neural and epidermal differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Hurlin, P J; Quéva, C; Koskinen, P J; Steingrímsson, E; Ayer, D E; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Eisenman, R N

    1995-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLHZip) protein Max associates with members of the Myc family, as well as with the related proteins Mad (Mad1) and Mxi1. Whereas both Myc:Max and Mad:Max heterodimers bind related E-box sequences, Myc:Max activates transcription and promotes proliferation while Mad:Max represses transcription and suppresses Myc dependent transformation. Here we report the identification and characterization of two novel Mad1- and Mxi1-related proteins, Mad3 and Mad4. Mad3 and Mad4 interact with both Max and mSin3 and repress transcription from a promoter containing CACGTG binding sites. Using a rat embryo fibroblast transformation assay, we show that both Mad3 and Mad4 inhibit c-Myc dependent cell transformation. An examination of the expression patterns of all mad genes during murine embryogenesis reveals that mad1, mad3 and mad4 are expressed primarily in growth-arrested differentiating cells. mxi1 is also expressed in differentiating cells, but is co-expressed with either c-myc, N-myc, or both in proliferating cells of the developing central nervous system and the epidermis. In the developing central nervous system and epidermis, downregulation of myc genes occurs concomitant with upregulation of mad family genes. These expression patterns, together with the demonstrated ability of Mad family proteins to interfere with the proliferation promoting activities of Myc, suggest that the regulated expression of Myc and Mad family proteins function in a concerted fashion to regulate cell growth in differentiating tissues. Images PMID:8521822

  10. Activation of 12/23-RSS-dependent RAG cleavage by hSWI/SNF complex in the absence of transcription.

    PubMed

    Du, Hansen; Ishii, Haruhiko; Pazin, Michael J; Sen, Ranjan

    2008-09-05

    Maintenance of genomic integrity during antigen receptor gene rearrangements requires (1) regulated access of the V(D)J recombinase to specific loci and (2) generation of double-strand DNA breaks only after recognition of a pair of matched recombination signal sequences (RSSs). Here we recapitulate both key aspects of regulated recombinase accessibility in a cell-free system using plasmid substrates assembled into chromatin. We show that recruitment of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex to both RSSs increases coupled cleavage by RAG1 and RAG2 proteins. SWI/SNF functions by altering local chromatin structure in the absence of RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription or histone modifications. These observations demonstrate a direct role for cis-sequence-regulated local chromatin remodeling in RAG1/2-dependent initiation of V(D)J recombination.

  11. p38 and JNK pathways control E-selectin-dependent extravasation of colon cancer cells by modulating miR-31 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Liang; Simoneau, Bryan; Huot, Jacques; Simard, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to vascular endothelial cells. It requires the interaction between adhesion receptors such as E-selectin present on endothelial cells and their ligands on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin influences the metastatic potential of breast, bladder, gastric, pancreatic, and colorectal carcinoma as well as of leukemia and lymphoma. Here, we show that E-selectin expression induced by the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β is directly and negatively regulated by miR-31. The transcription of miR-31 is activated by IL-1β. This activation depends on p38 and JNK MAP kinases, and their downstream transcription factors GATA2, c-Fos and c-Jun. The miR-31-mediated repression of E-selectin impairs the metastatic potential of colon cancer cells by decreasing their adhesion to, and migration through, the endothelium. These results highlight for the first time that microRNA mediates E-selectin-dependent extravasation of colon cancer cells. PMID:27926494

  12. Identification of host transcriptional networks showing concentration-dependent regulation by HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins in basal cervical squamous epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen P; Scarpini, Cinzia G; Groves, Ian J; Odle, Richard I; Coleman, Nicholas

    2016-07-26

    Development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma requires increased expression of the major high-risk human-papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 in basal cervical epithelial cells. We used a systems biology approach to identify host transcriptional networks in such cells and study the concentration-dependent changes produced by HPV16-E6 and -E7 oncoproteins. We investigated sample sets derived from the W12 model of cervical neoplastic progression, for which high quality phenotype/genotype data were available. We defined a gene co-expression matrix containing a small number of highly-connected hub nodes that controlled large numbers of downstream genes (regulons), indicating the scale-free nature of host gene co-expression in W12. We identified a small number of 'master regulators' for which downstream effector genes were significantly associated with protein levels of HPV16 E6 (n = 7) or HPV16 E7 (n = 5). We validated our data by depleting E6/E7 in relevant cells and by functional analysis of selected genes in vitro. We conclude that the network of transcriptional interactions in HPV16-infected basal-type cervical epithelium is regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by E6/E7, via a limited number of central master-regulators. These effects are likely to be significant in cervical carcinogenesis, where there is competitive selection of cells with elevated expression of virus oncoproteins.

  13. Transcriptional profiling and miRNA-dependent regulatory network analysis of longissimus dorsi muscle during prenatal and adult stages in two distinct pig breeds.

    PubMed

    Siengdee, P; Trakooljul, N; Murani, E; Schwerin, M; Wimmers, K; Ponsuksili, S

    2013-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNAs establish a complex regulatory network influencing diverse biological pathways including muscle development and growth. Elucidating miRNA-dependent regulatory networks involved in muscle development could provide additional insights into muscle traits largely predefined during prenatal development. The present study aimed to determine differentially expressed transcripts and functional miRNA-mRNA relationships associated with different stages of skeletal muscle development in two pig breeds, German Landrace and Pietrain, distinct in muscle characteristics. A comparative transcriptional profiling of longissimus dorsi muscle tissues from fetuses at 35, 63 and 91 days post-conception as well as adult pigs (180 days postnatum) was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip porcine genome microarray. Differential expression patterns were identified to be associated with muscularly developmental stages and breed types. The integration of miRNA expression data and ingenuity pathways analysis (ipa) pathway analysis revealed several miRNA-dependent regulatory networks related to muscle growth and development. The present results provide insights into muscle biology for further improvement of porcine meat quality.

  14. Identification of host transcriptional networks showing concentration-dependent regulation by HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins in basal cervical squamous epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen P.; Scarpini, Cinzia G.; Groves, Ian J.; Odle, Richard I.; Coleman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma requires increased expression of the major high-risk human-papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 in basal cervical epithelial cells. We used a systems biology approach to identify host transcriptional networks in such cells and study the concentration-dependent changes produced by HPV16-E6 and -E7 oncoproteins. We investigated sample sets derived from the W12 model of cervical neoplastic progression, for which high quality phenotype/genotype data were available. We defined a gene co-expression matrix containing a small number of highly-connected hub nodes that controlled large numbers of downstream genes (regulons), indicating the scale-free nature of host gene co-expression in W12. We identified a small number of ‘master regulators’ for which downstream effector genes were significantly associated with protein levels of HPV16 E6 (n = 7) or HPV16 E7 (n = 5). We validated our data by depleting E6/E7 in relevant cells and by functional analysis of selected genes in vitro. We conclude that the network of transcriptional interactions in HPV16-infected basal-type cervical epithelium is regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by E6/E7, via a limited number of central master-regulators. These effects are likely to be significant in cervical carcinogenesis, where there is competitive selection of cells with elevated expression of virus oncoproteins. PMID:27457222

  15. Reciprocal light-dark transcriptional control of nif and rbc expression and light-dependent posttranslational control of nitrogenase activity in Synechococcus sp. strain RF-1.

    PubMed

    Chow, T J; Tabita, F R

    1994-10-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain RF-1 exhibits a circadian rhythm of N2 fixation when cells are grown under a light-dark cycle, with nitrogenase activity observed only during the dark period. This dark-dependent activity correlated with nif gene transcription in strain RF-1. By using antibodies against dinitrogenase reductase (the Fe protein of the nitrogenase complex), it was found that there was a distinct shift in the mobility of this protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels during the light-dark cycle. The Fe protein was present only when cells were incubated in the dark. Upon illumination, there was a conversion of all Fe protein to a modified form, after which it rapidly disappeared from extracts. These studies indicated that all nitrogenase activity present during the dark cycle resulted from de novo synthesis of nitrogenase. Upon entering the light phase, cells appeared to quickly degrade the modified form of Fe protein, perhaps as a result of activating or inducing a protease. By contrast, transcription of the rbcL gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of the key enzyme of CO2 fixation (a light-dependent process), was enhanced in the light.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of the cyclin D1 promoter by STAT5: its involvement in cytokine-dependent growth of hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, I; Kitamura, T; Wakao, H; Tanaka, H; Hashimoto, K; Albanese, C; Downward, J; Pestell, R G; Kanakura, Y

    1999-01-01

    STAT5 is a member of a family of transcription factors that participate in the signal transduction pathways of many hormones and cytokines. Although STAT5 is suggested to play a crucial role in the biological effects of cytokines, its downstream target(s) associated with cell growth control is largely unknown. In a human interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent cell line F-36P-mpl, the induced expression of dominant-negative (dn)-STAT5 and of dn-ras led to inhibition of IL-3-dependent cell growth, accompanying the reduced expression of cyclin D1 mRNA. Also, both constitutively active forms of STAT5A (1*6-STAT5A) and ras (H-rasG12V) enabled F-36P-mpl cells to proliferate without added growth factors. In NIH 3T3 cells, 1*6-STAT5A and H-rasG12V individually and cooperatively transactivated the cyclin D1 promoter in luciferase assays. Both dn-STAT5 and dn-ras suppressed IL-3-induced cyclin D1 promoter activities in F-36P-mpl cells. Using a series of mutant cyclin D1 promoters, 1*6-STAT5A was found to transactivate the cyclin D1 promoter through the potential STAT-binding sequence at -481 bp. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, STAT5 bound to the element in response to IL-3. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of dn-STAT5 on IL-3-dependent growth was restored by expression of cyclin D1. Thus STAT5, in addition to ras signaling, appears to mediate transcriptional regulation of cyclin D1, thereby contributing to cytokine-dependent growth of hematopoietic cells. PMID:10064602

  17. tRNA processing defects induce replication stress and Chk2-dependent disruption of piRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Molla-Herman, Anahi; Vallés, Ana Maria; Ganem-Elbaz, Carine; Antoniewski, Christophe; Huynh, Jean-René

    2015-12-14

    RNase P is a conserved endonuclease that processes the 5' trailer of tRNA precursors. We have isolated mutations in Rpp30, a subunit of RNase P, and find that these induce complete sterility in Drosophila females. Here, we show that sterility is not due to a shortage of mature tRNAs, but that atrophied ovaries result from the activation of several DNA damage checkpoint proteins, including p53, Claspin, and Chk2. Indeed, we find that tRNA processing defects lead to increased replication stress and de-repression of transposable elements in mutant ovaries. We also report that transcription of major piRNA sources collapse in mutant germ cells and that this correlates with a decrease in heterochromatic H3K9me3 marks on the corresponding piRNA-producing loci. Our data thus link tRNA processing, DNA replication, and genome defense by small RNAs. This unexpected connection reveals constraints that could shape genome organization during evolution.

  18. Evidence for karyoplasmic homeostasis during endoreduplication and a ploidy-dependent increase in gene transcription during tomato fruit growth.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, Matthieu; Pirrello, Julien; Cheniclet, Catherine; Coriton, Olivier; Bourge, Mickaël; Brown, Spencer; Moïse, Adeline; Peypelut, Martine; Rouyère, Valérie; Renaudin, Jean-Pierre; Chevalier, Christian; Frangne, Nathalie

    2012-10-01

    Endopolyploidy is a widespread process that corresponds to the amplification of the genome in the absence of mitosis. In tomato, very high ploidy levels (up to 256C) are reached during fruit development, concomitant with very large cell sizes. Using cellular approaches (fluorescence and electron microscopy) we provide a structural analysis of endoreduplicated nuclei at the level of chromatin and nucleolar organisation, nuclear shape and relationship with other cellular organelles such as mitochondria. We demonstrate that endopolyploidy in pericarp leads to the formation of polytene chromosomes and markedly affects nuclear structure. Nuclei manifest a complex shape, with numerous deep grooves that are filled with mitochondria, affording a fairly constant ratio between nuclear surface and nuclear volume. We provide the first direct evidence that endopolyploidy plays a role in increased transcription of rRNA and mRNA on a per-nucleus basis. Overall, our results provide quantitative evidence in favour of the karyoplasmic theory and show that endoreduplication is associated with complex cellular organisation during tomato fruit development.

  19. ODZ1 allows glioblastoma to sustain invasiveness through a Myc-dependent transcriptional upregulation of RhoA.

    PubMed

    Talamillo, A; Grande, L; Ruiz-Ontañon, P; Velasquez, C; Mollinedo, P; Torices, S; Sanchez-Gomez, P; Aznar, A; Esparis-Ogando, A; Lopez-Lopez, C; Lafita, C; Berciano, M T; Montero, J A; Vazquez-Barquero, A; Segura, V; Villagra, N T; Pandiella, A; Lafarga, M; Leon, J; Martinez-Climent, J A; Sanz-Moreno, V; Fernandez-Luna, J L

    2017-03-23

    Long-term survival remains low for most patients with glioblastoma (GBM), which reveals the need for markers of disease outcome and novel therapeutic targets. We describe that ODZ1 (also known as TENM1), a type II transmembrane protein involved in fetal brain development, plays a crucial role in the invasion of GBM cells. Differentiation of glioblastoma stem-like cells drives the nuclear translocation of an intracellular fragment of ODZ1 through proteolytic cleavage by signal peptide peptidase-like 2a. The intracellular fragment of ODZ1 promotes cytoskeletal remodelling of GBM cells and invasion of the surrounding environment both in vitro and in vivo. Absence of ODZ1 by gene deletion or downregulation of ODZ1 by small interfering RNAs drastically reduces the invasive capacity of GBM cells. This activity is mediated by an ODZ1-triggered transcriptional pathway, through the E-box binding Myc protein, that promotes the expression and activation of Ras homolog family member A (RhoA) and subsequent activation of Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK). Overexpression of ODZ1 in GBM cells reduced survival of xenografted mice. Consistently, analysis of 122 GBM tumour samples revealed that the number of ODZ1-positive cells inversely correlated with overall and progression-free survival. Our findings establish a novel marker of invading GBM cells and consequently a potential marker of disease progression and a therapeutic target in GBM.

  20. MALT1 auto-proteolysis is essential for NF-κB-dependent gene transcription in activated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Baens, Mathijs; Bonsignore, Luca; Somers, Riet; Vanderheydt, Charlotte; Weeks, Stephen D; Gunnarsson, Jenny; Nilsson, Ewa; Roth, Robert G; Thome, Margot; Marynen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue 1 (MALT1) controls antigen receptor-mediated signalling to nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) through both its adaptor and protease function. Upon antigen stimulation, MALT1 forms a complex with BCL10 and CARMA1, which is essential for initial IκBα phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Parallel induction of MALT1 protease activity serves to inactivate negative regulators of NF-κB signalling, such as A20 and RELB. Here we demonstrate a key role for auto-proteolytic MALT1 cleavage in B- and T-cell receptor signalling. MALT1 cleavage occurred after Arginine 149, between the N-terminal death domain and the first immunoglobulin-like region, and did not affect its proteolytic activity. Jurkat T cells expressing an un-cleavable MALT1-R149A mutant showed unaltered initial IκBα phosphorylation and normal nuclear accumulation of NF-κB subunits. Nevertheless, MALT1 cleavage was required for optimal activation of NF-κB reporter genes and expression of the NF-κB targets IL-2 and CSF2. Transcriptome analysis confirmed that MALT1 cleavage after R149 was required to induce NF-κB transcriptional activity in Jurkat T cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that auto-proteolytic MALT1 cleavage controls antigen receptor-induced expression of NF-κB target genes downstream of nuclear NF-κB accumulation.

  1. Syn, anti, and finally both conformations of cyclic AMP are involved in the CRP-dependent transcription initiation mechanism in E. coli lac operon.

    PubMed

    Tutar, Yusuf

    2008-06-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli regulates the activity of more than 150 genes. Allosteric changes in CRP structure accompanied by cAMP binding, initiate transcription through protein binding to specific DNA sequences. Initially, researchers proposed a two-site cAMP-binding model for CRP-dependent transcription activation since biophysical methods showed two transitions during titration experiments. Three conformational states were considered; apo-CRP, CRP:(cAMP)(1) and CRP:(cAMP)(2), and CRP:(cAMP)(1) was proposed as the active form in this initial model. X-ray data indicated an anti conformation and in contrast NMR experiments suggested a syn conformation for bound cAMPs. For years this paradigm about ligand conformation has been ambiguous. When CRP was crystallized with four bound cAMP in the last decade, two cAMPs were assigned to syn and the other two to anti conformations. Again three conformational states were suggested; apo-CRP, CRP:(cAMP)(2), and CRP:(cAMP)(4). This new structure changed the view of CRP allosteric activation from a two-site model to a four-site model in the literature and the new model has been supported by biochemical and genetic data so far. According to the accepted model, binding of the first two cAMP molecules displays positive cooperativity, however, binding of the last two cAMP molecules shows negative cooperativity. This resolved the conflict between dynamic and static experimental observations. However, this new model cannot explain the initiation mechanism as previously proposed because functionally active CRP has only one cAMP equivalent. Gene regulation and transcription factors are involved in regulating both prokaryotic and eukaryotic metabolism. Although gene regulation and expression are much more complex in eukaryotes, CRP-mediated transcription initiation is a model of general interest to life sciences and medicine. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize recent works and developments on

  2. The Psu protein of bacteriophage P4 is an antitermination factor for rho-dependent transcription termination.

    PubMed Central

    Linderoth, N A; Calendar, R L

    1991-01-01

    A 0.7-kbp DNA fragment from bacteriophage P4 that contained the polarity suppression (psu) gene was cloned in an expression plasmid. Induction of the plasmid-borne psu gene resulted in the overproduction of a protein having the biological properties of the P4-induced polarity suppressor. In vivo, Psu protein acted in trans to suppress rho-dependent polarity in the late genes of an infecting P2 phage, in plasmid operons, and in the host chromosome. Psu action did not require the presence of other P2 or P4 phage genes. Psu caused efficient readthrough (antitermination) by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase at the rho-dependent terminators tR1 and TIS2, individually and in tandem, but did not affect termination at rho-independent sites. Neither the conserved antitermination sequence boxA nor any unique promoter or utilization sequence was required for Psu activity. Images FIG. 2 PMID:1938879

  3. Thyroid hormones regulate phosphate homoeostasis through transcriptional control of the renal type IIa sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter (Npt2a) gene.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Mariko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Masuda, Masashi; Kozai, Mina; Takei, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Sarasa; Sato, Tadatoshi; Segawa, Hiroko; Taketani, Yutaka; Arai, Hidekazu; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Takeda, Eiji

    2010-03-15

    The type IIa renal sodium-dependent phosphate (Na/Pi) co-transporter Npt2a is implicated in the control of serum phosphate levels. It has been demonstrated previously that renal Npt2a protein and its mRNA expression are both up-regulated by the thyroid hormone T3 (3,3',5-tri-iodothyronine) in rats. However, it has never been established whether the induction was mediated by a direct effect of thyroid hormones on the Npt2a promoter. To address the role of Npt2a in T3-dependent regulation of phosphate homoeostasis and to identify the molecular mechanisms by which thyroid hormones modulate Npt2a gene expression, mice were rendered pharmacologically hypo- and hyper-thyroid. Hypothyroid mice showed low levels of serum phosphate and a marked decrease in renal Npt2a protein abundance. Importantly, we also showed that Npt2a-deficient mice had impaired serum phosphate responsiveness to T3 compared with wild-type mice. Promoter analysis with a luciferase assay revealed that the transcriptional activity of a reporter gene containing the Npt2a promoter and intron 1 was dependent upon TRs (thyroid hormone receptors) and specifically increased by T3 in renal cells. Deletion analysis and EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) determined that there were unique TREs (thyroid-hormone-responsive elements) within intron 1 of the Npt2a gene. These results suggest that Npt2a plays a critical role as a T3-target gene, to control phosphate homoeostasis, and that T3 transcriptionally activates the Npt2a gene via TRs in a renal cell-specific manner.

  4. Global Rsh-dependent transcription profile of Brucella suis during stringent response unravels adaptation to nutrient starvation and cross-talk with other stress responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the intracellular pathogen Brucella spp., the activation of the stringent response, a global regulatory network providing rapid adaptation to growth-affecting stress conditions such as nutrient deficiency, is essential for replication in the host. A single, bi-functional enzyme Rsh catalyzes synthesis and hydrolysis of the alarmone (p)ppGpp, responsible for differential gene expression under stringent conditions. Results cDNA microarray analysis allowed characterization of the transcriptional profiles of the B. suis 1330 wild-type and Δrsh mutant in a minimal medium, partially mimicking the nutrient-poor intramacrophagic environment. A total of 379 genes (11.6% of the genome) were differentially expressed in a rsh-dependent manner, of which 198 were up-, and 181 were down-regulated. The pleiotropic character of the response was confirmed, as the genes encoded an important number of transcriptional regulators, cell envelope proteins, stress factors, transport systems, and energy metabolism proteins. Virulence genes such as narG and sodC, respectively encoding respiratory nitrate reductase and superoxide dismutase, were under the positive control of (p)ppGpp, as well as expression of the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase, essential for chronic murine infection. Methionine was the only amino acid whose biosynthesis was absolutely dependent on stringent response in B. suis. Conclusions The study illustrated the complexity of the processes involved in adaptation to nutrient starvation, and contributed to a better understanding of the correlation between stringent response and Brucella virulence. Most interestingly, it clearly indicated (p)ppGpp-dependent cross-talk between at least three stress responses playing a central role in Brucella adaptation to the host: nutrient, oxidative, and low-oxygen stress. PMID:23834488

  5. The acidosis of chronic renal failure activates muscle proteolysis in rats by augmenting transcription of genes encoding proteins of the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J L; Wang, X; England, B K; Price, S R; Ding, X; Mitch, W E

    1996-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with negative nitrogen balance and loss of lean body mass. To identify specific proteolytic pathways activated by CRF, protein degradation was measured in incubated epitrochlearis muscles from CRF and sham-operated, pair-fed rats. CRF stimulated muscle proteolysis, and inhibition of lysosomal and calcium-activated proteases did not eliminate this increase. When ATP production was blocked, proteolysis in CRF muscles fell to the same level as that in control muscles. Increased proteolysis was also prevented by feeding CRF rats sodium bicarbonate, suggesting that activation depends on acidification. Evidence that the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is stimulated by the acidemia of CRF includes the following findings: (a) An inhibitor of the proteasome eliminated the increase in muscle proteolysis; and (b) there was an increase in mRNAs encoding ubiquitin (324%) and proteasome subunits C3 (137%) and C9 (251%) in muscle. This response involved gene activation since transcription of mRNAs for ubiquitin and the C3 subunit were selectively increased in muscle of CRF rats. We conclude that CRF stimulates muscle proteolysis by activating the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent pathway. The mechanism depends on acidification and increased expression of genes encoding components of the system. These responses could contribute to the loss of muscle mass associated with CRF. PMID:8617877

  6. Chronic restraint stress impairs neurogenesis and hippocampus-dependent fear memory in mice: possible involvement of a brain-specific transcription factor Npas4.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jaesuk; Koike, Hiroyuki; Ibi, Daisuke; Toth, Erika; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Nitta, Atsumi; Yoneyama, Masanori; Ogita, Kiyokazu; Yoneda, Yukio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Nagai, Taku; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2010-09-01

    Neurogenesis in the hippocampus occurs throughout life in a wide range of species and could be associated with hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Stress is well established to seriously perturb physiological/psychological homeostasis and affect hippocampal function. In the present study, to investigate the effect of chronic restraint stress in early life on hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampus-dependent memory, 3-week-old mice were subjected to restraint stress 6 days a week for 4 weeks. The chronic restraint stress significantly decreased the hippocampal volume by 6.3% and impaired hippocampal neurogenesis as indicated by the reduced number of Ki67-, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine- and doublecortin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus. The chronic restraint stress severely impaired hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory without affecting hippocampus-independent fear memory. The expression level of brain-specific transcription factor neuronal PAS domain protein 4 (Npas4) mRNA in the hippocampus was down-regulated by the restraint stress or by acute corticosterone treatment. Npas4 immunoreactivity was detected in progenitors, immature and mature neurons of the dentate gyrus in control and stressed mice. Our findings suggest that the chronic restraint stress decreases hippocampal neurogenesis, leading to an impairment of hippocampus-dependent fear memory in mice. Corticosterone-induced down-regulation of Npas4 expression may play a role in stress-induced impairment of hippocampal function.

  7. The transcription factor HIF-1α plays a critical role in the growth factor-dependent regulation of both aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Julian J.; Bui, Thi; Gruber, Michaela; Gordan, John D.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Covello, Kelly L.; Simon, M. Celeste; Thompson, Craig B.

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells are believed to have a cell-intrinsic ability to increase glucose metabolism in response to hypoxia. Here we show that the ability of hematopoietic cells to up-regulate anaerobic glycolysis in response to hypoxia is dependent on receptor-mediated signal transduction. In the absence of growth factor signaling, hematopoietic cells fail to express hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (Hif-1α) mRNA. Growth factor-deprived hematopoietic cells do not engage in glucose-dependent anabolic synthesis and neither express Hif-1α mRNA nor require HIF-1α protein to regulate cell survival in response to hypoxia. However, HIF-1α is adaptive for the survival of growth factor-stimulated cells, as suppression of HIF-1α results in death when growing cells are exposed to hypoxia. Growth factor-dependent HIF-1α expression reprograms the intracellular fate of glucose, resulting in decreased glucose-dependent anabolic synthesis and increased lactate production, an effect that is enhanced when HIF-1α protein is stabilized by hypoxia. Together, these data suggest that HIF-1α contributes to the regulation of growth factor-stimulated glucose metabolism even in the absence of hypoxia. PMID:17437992

  8. Post-transcriptional regulation of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 and proliferation of human cancer cells depend on IMP-3 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Rivera Vargas, T; Boudoukha, S; Simon, A; Souidi, M; Cuvellier, S; Pinna, G; Polesskaya, A

    2014-05-29

    RNA-binding proteins of the IMP family (insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA-binding proteins 1-3) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Multiple studies have linked high expression of IMP proteins, and especially of IMP-3, to an unfavorable prognosis in numerous types of cancer. The specific importance of IMP-3 for cancer transformation remains poorly understood. We here show that all three IMPs can directly bind the mRNAs of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 (CCND1, D3 and G1) in vivo and in vitro, and yet only IMP-3 regulates the expression of these cyclins in a significant manner in six human cancer cell lines of different origins. In the absence of IMP-3, the levels of CCND1, D3 and G1 proteins fall dramatically, and the cells accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to almost complete proliferation arrest. Our results show that, compared with IMP-1 and IMP-2, IMP-3 is enriched in the nucleus, where it binds the transcripts of CCND1, D3 and G1. The nuclear localization of IMP-3 depends on its protein partner HNRNPM and is indispensable for the post-transcriptional regulation of expression of the cyclins. Cytoplasmic retention of IMP-3 and HNRNPM in human cancer cells leads to significant drop in proliferation. In conclusion, a nuclear IMP-3-HNRNPM complex is important for the efficient synthesis of CCND1, D3 and G1 and for the proliferation of human cancer cells.

  9. FlrA, a sigma54-dependent transcriptional activator in Vibrio fischeri, is required for motility and symbiotic light-organ colonization.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Deborah S; Ruby, Edward G

    2003-06-01

    Flagellum-mediated motility of Vibrio fischeri is an essential factor in the bacterium's ability to colonize its host, the Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes. To begin characterizing the nature of the flagellar regulon, we have cloned a gene, designated flrA, from V. fischeri that encodes a putative sigma(54)-dependent transcriptional activator. Genetic arrangement of the flrA locus in V. fischeri is similar to motility master-regulator operons of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. In addition, examination of regulatory regions of a number of flagellar operons in V. fischeri revealed apparent sigma(54) recognition motifs, suggesting that the flagellar regulatory hierarchy is controlled by a similar mechanism to that described in V. cholerae. However, in contrast to its closest known relatives, flrA mutant strains of V. fischeri ES114 were completely abolished in swimming capability. Although flrA provided in trans restored motility to the flrA mutant, the complemented strain was unable to reach wild-type levels of symbiotic colonization in juvenile squid, suggesting a possible role for the proper expression of FlrA in regulating symbiotic colonization factors in addition to those required for motility. Comparative RNA arbitrarily primed PCR analysis of the flrA mutant and its wild-type parent revealed several differentially expressed transcripts. These results define a regulon that includes both flagellar structural genes and other genes apparently not involved in flagellum elaboration or function. Thus, the transcriptional activator FlrA plays an essential role in regulating motility, and apparently in modulating other symbiotic functions, in V. fischeri.

  10. Expression of Ceramide Synthase 6 Transcriptionally Activates Acid Ceramidase in a c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Tirodkar, Tejas S.; Lu, Ping; Bai, Aiping; Scheffel, Matthew J.; Gencer, Salih; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Bielawska, Alicja; Ogretmen, Besim; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A family of six ceramide synthases with distinct but overlapping substrate specificities is responsible for generation of ceramides with acyl chains ranging from ∼14–26 carbons. Ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) preferentially generates C14- and C16-ceramides, and we have previously shown that down-regulation of this enzyme decreases apoptotic susceptibility. In this study, we further evaluated how increased CerS6 expression impacts sphingolipid composition and metabolism. Overexpression of CerS6 in HT29 colon cancer cells resulted in increased apoptotic susceptibility and preferential generation of C16-ceramide, which occurred at the expense of very long chain, saturated ceramides. These changes were also reflected in sphingomyelin composition. HT-CerS6 cells had increased intracellular levels of sphingosine, which is generated by ceramidases upon hydrolysis of ceramide. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that only expression of acid ceramidase (ASAH1) was increased. The increase in acid ceramidase was confirmed by expression and activity analyses. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK (SP600125) or curcumin reduced transcriptional up-regulation of acid ceramidase. Using an acid ceramidase promoter driven luciferase reporter plasmid, we demonstrated that CerS1 has no effect on transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase and that CerS2 slightly but significantly decreased the luciferase signal. Similar to CerS6, overexpression of CerS3–5 resulted in an ∼2-fold increase in luciferase reporter gene activity. Exogenous ceramide failed to induce reporter activity, while a CerS inhibitor and a catalytically inactive mutant of CerS6 failed to reduce it. Taken together, these results suggest that increased expression of CerS6 can mediate transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase in a JNK-dependent manner that is independent of CerS6 activity. PMID:25839235

  11. Expression of Ceramide Synthase 6 Transcriptionally Activates Acid Ceramidase in a c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Tirodkar, Tejas S; Lu, Ping; Bai, Aiping; Scheffel, Matthew J; Gencer, Salih; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Bielawska, Alicja; Ogretmen, Besim; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2015-05-22

    A family of six ceramide synthases with distinct but overlapping substrate specificities is responsible for generation of ceramides with acyl chains ranging from ∼14-26 carbons. Ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) preferentially generates C14- and C16-ceramides, and we have previously shown that down-regulation of this enzyme decreases apoptotic susceptibility. In this study, we further evaluated how increased CerS6 expression impacts sphingolipid composition and metabolism. Overexpression of CerS6 in HT29 colon cancer cells resulted in increased apoptotic susceptibility and preferential generation of C16-ceramide, which occurred at the expense of very long chain, saturated ceramides. These changes were also reflected in sphingomyelin composition. HT-CerS6 cells had increased intracellular levels of sphingosine, which is generated by ceramidases upon hydrolysis of ceramide. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that only expression of acid ceramidase (ASAH1) was increased. The increase in acid ceramidase was confirmed by expression and activity analyses. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK (SP600125) or curcumin reduced transcriptional up-regulation of acid ceramidase. Using an acid ceramidase promoter driven luciferase reporter plasmid, we demonstrated that CerS1 has no effect on transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase and that CerS2 slightly but significantly decreased the luciferase signal. Similar to CerS6, overexpression of CerS3-5 resulted in an ∼2-fold increase in luciferase reporter gene activity. Exogenous ceramide failed to induce reporter activity, while a CerS inhibitor and a catalytically inactive mutant of CerS6 failed to reduce it. Taken together, these results suggest that increased expression of CerS6 can mediate transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase in a JNK-dependent manner that is independent of CerS6 activity.

  12. Breed-dependent transcriptional regulation of 5'-untranslated GR (NR3C1) exon 1 mRNA variants in the liver of newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huafeng; Li, Runsheng; Jia, Yimin; Yang, Xiaojing; Ni, Yingdong; Cong, Rihua; Soloway, Paul D; Zhao, Ruqian

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are vital for life and regulate an array of physiological functions by binding to the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid receptor (GR, also known as NR3C1). Previous studies demonstrate striking breed differences in plasma cortisol levels in pigs. However, investigation into the breed-dependent GR transcriptional regulation is hampered by lacking porcine GR promoter information. In this study, we sequenced 5.3 kb upstream of the translation start codon of the porcine GR gene, and identified seven alternative 5'-untranslated exons 1-4, 1-5, 1-6, 1-7, 1-8, 1-9,10 and 1-11. Among all these mRNA variants, exons 1-4 and 1-5, as well as the total GR were expressed significantly (P<0.05) higher in the liver of newborn piglets of Large White (LW) compared with Erhualian, a Chinese indigenous breed. Overall level of CpG methylation in the region flanking exons 1-4 and 1-5 did not show breed difference. However, nuclear content of Sp1, p-CREB and GR in the liver was significantly (P<0.05) higher in LW piglets, associated with enhanced binding of p-CREB, and higher level of histone H3 acetylation in 1-4 and 1-5 promoters. In contrast, GR binding to promoters of exons 1-4 and 1-5 was significantly diminished in LW piglets, implicating the presence of negative GREs. These results indicate that the difference in the hepatic expression of GR transcript variants between two breeds of pigs is determined, at least partly, by the disparity in the binding of transcription factors and the enrichment of histone H3 acetylation to the promoters.

  13. Epithelial Expression of Human ABO Blood Group Genes Is Dependent upon a Downstream Regulatory Element Functioning through an Epithelial Cell-specific Transcription Factor, Elf5.

    PubMed

    Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Kubo, Rieko; Kobayashi, Momoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Takeshita, Haruo; Ogasawara, Kenichi; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2016-10-21

    The human ABO blood group system is of great importance in blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The ABO system is composed of complex carbohydrate structures that are biosynthesized by A- and B-transferases encoded by the ABO gene. However, the mechanisms regulating ABO gene expression in epithelial cells remain obscure. On the basis of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in and around ABO in epithelial cells, we prepared reporter plasmid constructs including these sites. Subsequent luciferase assays and histone modifications indicated a novel positive regulatory element, designated the +22.6-kb site, downstream from ABO, and this was shown to enhance ABO promoter activity in an epithelial cell-specific manner. Expression of ABO and B-antigen was reduced in gastric cancer KATOIII cells by biallelic deletion of the +22.6-kb site using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the site bound to an epithelial cell-specific transcription factor, Elf5. Mutation of the Ets binding motifs to abrogate binding of this factor reduced the regulatory activity of the +22.6-kb site. Furthermore, ELF5 knockdown with shRNA reduced both endogenous transcription from ABO and B-antigen expression in KATOIII cells. Thus, Elf5 appeared to be involved in the enhancer potential of the +22.6-kb site. These results support the contention that ABO expression is dependent upon a downstream positive regulatory element functioning through a tissue-restricted transcription factor, Elf5, in epithelial cells.

  14. Preclinical safety assessment of Ad[I/PPT-E1A], a novel oncolytic adenovirus for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Kraaij, Robert; Adamson, Rachel; Maitland, Norman J; Bangma, Chris H

    2014-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in the Western world. Patients can be cured only when the tumor has not metastasized outside the prostate. However, treatment with curative intent fails in a significant number of men, often resulting in untreatable progressive disease with a fatal outcome. Oncolytic adenovirus therapy may be a promising adjuvant treatment to reduce local failure or the outgrowth of micrometastatic disease. Within the European gene therapy consortium GIANT, we have developed a novel prostate-specific oncolytic adenovirus: Ad[I/PPT-E1A]. This adenovirus specifically kills prostate cells via prostate-specific replication. This article describes the clinical development of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] with particular reference to the preclinical safety assessment of this novel virus. The preclinical safety assessment involved an efficacy study in a human orthotopic xenograft mouse model, a specificity study in human primary cells, and a toxicity study in normal mice. These studies confirmed that Ad[I/PPT-E1A] efficiently kills prostate tumor cells in vivo, is not harmful to other organs, and is well tolerated in mice after systemic delivery. The safety, as well as the immunological effects of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] as a local adjuvant therapy, will now be studied in a phase I dose-escalating trial in patients with localized prostate cancer who are scheduled for curative radical prostatectomy and can be used as an updated paradigm for similar therapeutic viruses.

  15. Contribution of Egr1/zif268 to Activity-Dependent Arc/Arg3.1 Transcription in the Dentate Gyrus and Area CA1 of the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Penke, Zsuzsa; Chagneau, Carine; Laroche, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Egr1, a member of the Egr family of transcription factors, and Arc are immediate early genes known to play major roles in synaptic plasticity and memory. Despite evidence that Egr family members can control Arc transcriptional regulation, demonstration of a selective role of Egr1 alone is lacking. We investigated the extent to which activity-dependent Arc expression is dependent on Egr1 by analyzing Arc mRNA expression using fluorescence in situ hybridization in the dorsal dentate gyrus and CA1 of wild-type (WT) and Egr1 knockout mice. Following electroconvulsive shock, we found biphasic expression of Arc in area CA1 in mice, consisting in a rapid (30 min) and transient wave followed by a second late-phase of expression (8 h), and a single but prolonged wave of expression in the dentate gyrus. Egr1 deficiency abolished the latest, but not the early wave of Arc expression in CA1, and curtailed that of the dentate gyrus. Since the early wave of Arc expression was not affected in Egr1 mutant mice, we next analyzed behaviorally induced Arc expression patterns as an index of neural ensemble activation in the dentate gyrus and area CA1 of WT and Egr1 mutant mice. Spatial exploration of novel or familiar environments induced in mice a single early and transient wave of Arc expression in the dentate gyrus and area CA1, which were not affected in Egr1 mutant mice. Analyses of Arc-expressing cells revealed that exploration recruits similar size dentate gyrus and CA1 neural ensembles in WT and Egr1 knockout mice. These findings suggest that hippocampal neural ensembles are normally activated immediately following spatial exploration in Egr1 knockout mice, indicating normal hippocampal encoding of information. They also provide evidence that in condition of strong activation Egr1 alone can control late-phases of activity-dependent Arc transcription in the dentate gyrus and area CA1 of the hippocampus. PMID:21887136

  16. RNA-seq dependent transcriptional analysis unveils gene expression profile in the intestine of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus during aestivation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ye; Yang, Hongsheng; Storey, Kenneth B; Chen, Muyan

    2014-06-01

    The seasonal marine, the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka, 1867), cycles annually between periods of torpor when water temperature is above about 25°C in summer and active life when temperature is below about 18°C. This species is a good candidate model organism for studies of environmentally-induced aestivation in marine invertebrates. Previous studies have examined various aspects of aestivation of A. japonicus, however, knowledge of the molecular regulation underpinning these events is still fragmentary. In the present study, we constructed a global gene expression profile of the intestine tissue of A. japonicus using RNA-seq to identify transcriptional responses associated with transitions between different states: non-aestivation (NA), deep-aestivation (DA), and arousal from aestivation (AA). The analysis identified 1245 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between DA vs. NA states, 1338 DEGs between AA vs. DA, and 1321 DEGs between AA vs. NA using the criteria |Log2Ratio|≥1 and FDR≤0.001. Of these, 25 of the most significant DEGs were verified by real-time PCR, showing trends in expression patterns that were almost in full concordance between the two techniques. GO analysis revealed that for DA vs. NA, 24 metabolic associated processes were highly enriched (corrected p value<0.05) whereas for AA vs. NA, 12 transport and metabolism associated processes were significantly enriched (corrected p value<0.05). Pathways associated with aestivation were also mined, and indicated that most DEGs were enriched in metabolic and signal transduction pathways in the deep aestivation stage. Two up pathways were significantly enriched at the arousal stage (ribosome and metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 pathway). A set of key DEGs was identified that may play vital roles in aestivation; these involved metabolism, detoxification and tissue protection, and energy-expensive processes. Our work presents an overview of dynamic gene expression in torpor

  17. Nitric oxide regulation of gene transcription via soluble guanylate cyclase and type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Idriss, S D; Gudi, T; Casteel, D E; Kharitonov, V G; Pilz, R B; Boss, G R

    1999-04-02

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates the expression of multiple genes but in most cases its precise mechanism of action is unclear. We used baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which have very low soluble guanylate cyclase and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase) activity, and CS-54 arterial smooth muscle cells, which express these two enzymes, to study NO regulation of the human fos promoter. The NO-releasing agent Deta-NONOate (ethanamine-2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazone)bis-) had no effect on a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene under control of the fos promoter in BHK cells transfected with an empty vector or in cells transfected with a G-kinase Ibeta expression vector. In BHK cells transfected with expression vectors for guanylate cyclase, Deta-NONOate markedly increased the intracellular cGMP concentration and caused a small (2-fold) increase in CAT activity; the increased CAT activity appeared to be from cGMP activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In BHK cells co-transfected with guanylate cyclase and G-kinase expression vectors, CAT activity was increased 5-fold in the absence of Deta-NONOate and 7-fold in the presence of Deta-NONOate. Stimulation of CAT activity in the absence of Deta-NONOate appeared to be largely from endogenous NO since we found that: (i) BHK cells produced high amounts of NO; (ii) CAT activity was partially inhibited by a NO synthase inhibitor; and (iii) the inhibition by the NO synthase inhibitor was reversed by exogenous NO. In CS-54 cells, we found that NO increased fos promoter activity and that the increase was prevented by a guanylate cyclase inhibitor. In summary, we found that NO activates the fos promoter by a guanylate cyclase- and G-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  18. Palbociclib treatment of FLT3-ITD+ AML cells uncovers a kinase-dependent transcriptional regulation of FLT3 and PIM1 by CDK6

    PubMed Central

    Uras, Iris Z.; Walter, Gina J.; Scheicher, Ruth; Bellutti, Florian; Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Tigan, Anca S.; Valent, Peter; Heidel, Florian H.; Kubicek, Stefan; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Up to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia have constitutively activating internal tandem duplications (ITDs) of the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase. Such mutations are associated with a poor prognosis and a high propensity to relapse after remission. FLT3 inhibitors are being developed as targeted therapy for FLT3-ITD+ acute myeloid leukemia; however, their use is complicated by rapid development of resistance, which illustrates the need for additional therapeutic targets. We show that the US Food and Drug Administration–approved CDK4/6 kinase inhibitor palbociclib induces apoptosis of FLT3-ITD leukemic cells. The effect is specific for FLT3-mutant cells and is ascribed to the transcriptional activity of CDK6: CDK6 but not its functional homolog CDK4 is found at the promoters of the FLT3 and PIM1 genes, another important leukemogenic driver. There CDK6 regulates transcription in a kinase-dependent manner. Of potential clinical relevance, combined treatment with palbociclib and FLT3 inhibitors results in synergistic cytotoxicity. Simultaneously targeting two critical signaling nodes in leukemogenesis could represent a therapeutic breakthrough, leading to complete remission and overcoming resistance to FLT3 inhibitors. PMID:27099147

  19. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates the transcriptional activity of the mineralocorticoid receptor and regulates expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Kino, Tomoshige; Jaffe, Howard; Amin, Niranjana D; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Zheng, Ya-Li; Chrousos, George P; Pant, Harish C

    2010-05-01

    Glucocorticoids, major end effectors of the stress response, play an essential role in the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to memory consolidation and emotional control through their intracellular receptors, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), on the other hand, plays important roles in the morphogenesis and functions of the central nervous system, and its aberrant activation has been associated with development of neurodegenerative disorders. We previously reported that CDK5 phosphorylated the glucocorticoid receptor and modulated its transcriptional activity. Here we found that CDK5 also regulated mineralocorticoid receptor-induced transcriptional activity by phosphorylating multiple serine and threonine residues located in its N-terminal domain through physical interaction. Aldosterone and dexamethasone, respectively, increased and suppressed mRNA/protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat cortical neuronal cells, whereas the endogenous glucocorticoid corticosterone showed a biphasic effect. CDK5 enhanced the effect of aldosterone and dexamethasone on BDNF expression. Because this neurotrophic factor plays critical roles in neuronal viability, synaptic plasticity, consolidation of memory, and emotional changes, we suggest that aberrant activation of CDK5 might influence these functions through corticosteroid receptors/BDNF.

  20. Inhibition of myogenesis by transforming growth factor β is density-dependent and related to the translocation of transcription factor MEF2 to the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Luciana; Borghi, Serena; Melchionna, Roberta; Berghella, Libera; Baccarani-Contri, Miranda; Parise, Flavia; Ferrari, Stefano; Cossu, Giulio

    1998-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) was found to inhibit differentiation of myogenic cells only when they were grown to high density. Inhibition also occurred when myogenic cells were cocultured with other types of mesenchymal cells but not when they were cocultured with epithelial cells. It is therefore possible that some density-dependent signaling mediates the intracellular response to TGF-β. Within 30 min of treatment, TGF-β induced translocation of MEF2, but not MyoD, myogenin, or p21, to the cytoplasm of myogenic cells grown to high density. Translocation was reversible on withdrawal of TGF-β. By using immune electron microscopy and Western blot analysis on subcellular fractions, MEF2 was shown to be tightly associated with cytoskeleton membrane components. To test whether MEF2 export from the nucleus was causally related to the inhibitory action of TGF-β, we transfected C2C12 myoblasts with MEF2C containing the nuclear localization signal of simian virus 40 large T antigen (nlsSV40). Myogenic cells expressing the chimerical MEF2C/nlsSV40, but not wild-type MEF2C, retained this transcription factor in the nucleus and were resistant to the inhibitory action of TGF-β. We propose a mechanism in which the inhibition of myogenesis by TGF-β is mediated through MEF2 localization to the cytoplasm, thus preventing it from participating in an active transcriptional complex. PMID:9770491

  1. Identification of Cyproheptadine as an Inhibitor of SET Domain Containing Lysine Methyltransferase 7/9 (Set7/9) That Regulates Estrogen-Dependent Transcription.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Yasushi; Ito, Akihiro; Niwa, Hideaki; Okamura, Mutsumi; Fujiwara, Takashi; Hirano, Tomoya; Handa, Noriko; Umehara, Takashi; Sonoda, Takeshi; Ogawa, Kenji; Tariq, Mohammad; Nishino, Norikazu; Dan, Shingo; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Yamori, Takao; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yoshida, Minoru

    2016-04-28

    SET domain containing lysine methyltransferase 7/9 (Set7/9), a histone lysine methyltransferase (HMT), also methylates non-histone proteins including estrogen receptor (ER) α. ERα methylation by Set7/9 stabilizes ERα and activates its transcriptional activities, which are involved in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer. We identified cyproheptadine, a clinically approved antiallergy drug, as a Set7/9 inhibitor in a high-throughput screen using a fluorogenic substrate-based HMT assay. Kinetic and X-ray crystallographic analyses revealed that cyproheptadine binds in the substrate-binding pocket of Set7/9 and inhibits its enzymatic activity by competing with the methyl group acceptor. Treatment of human breast cancer cells (MCF7 cells) with cyproheptadine decreased the expression and transcriptional activity of ERα, thereby inhibiting estrogen-dependent cell growth. Our findings suggest that cyproheptadine can be repurposed for breast cancer treatment or used as a starting point for the discovery of an anti-hormone breast cancer drug through lead optimization.

  2. hERG1/Kv11.1 activation stimulates transcription of p21waf/cip in breast cancer cells via a calcineurin-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Neut, Mathew; Rao, Vidhya R.; Gentile, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    The function of Kv11.1 is emerging in breast cancer biology, as a growing body of evidence indicates that the hERG1/Kv11.1 potassium channel is aberrantly expressed in several cancer types including breast cancers. The biological effects of Kv11.1 channel blockers and their associated side effects are very well known but the potential use of Kv11.1 activators as an anticancer strategy are still unexplored. In our previous work, we have established that stimulation of the Kv11.1 potassium channel activates a senescent-like program that is characterized by a significant increase in tumor suppressor protein levels, such as p21waf/cip and p16INK4A. In this study we investigated the mechanism linking Kv11.1 stimulation to augmentation of p21waf/cip protein level. We have demonstrated that the Kv11.1 channel activator NS1643 activates a calcineurin-dependent transcription of p21waf/cip and that this event is fundamental for the inhibitory effect of NS1643 on cell proliferation. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which stimulation of Kv11.1 channel leads to transcription of a potent tumor suppressor and suggest a potential therapeutic use for Kv11.1 channel activators. PMID:25945833

  3. The REF-1 family of bHLH transcription factors pattern C. elegans embryos through Notch-dependent and Notch-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Neves, Alexandre; Priess, James R

    2005-06-01

    Much of the patterning of early C. elegans embryos involves a series of Notch interactions that occur in rapid succession and have distinct outcomes; however, none of the targets for these interactions have been identified. We show that the REF-1 family of bHLH transcription factors is a major target of Notch signaling in all these interactions and that most examples of Notch-mediated transcriptional repression can be attributed to REF-1 activities. The REF-1 family is expressed and has similar functions in both Notch-dependent and Notch-independent pathways, and this dual mode of deployment is used repeatedly to pattern the embryo. REF-1 proteins are unusual in that they contain two different bHLH domains and lack the distinguishing characteristics of Hairy/Enhancer of Split (HES) bHLH proteins that are Notch targets in other systems. Our results show that the highly divergent REF-1 proteins are nonetheless HES-like bHLH effectors of Notch signaling.

  4. Transcriptional profiles discriminate patients with pulmonary tuberculosis from non-tuberculous individuals depending on the presence of non-insulin diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Carmen J; Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Macías-Segura, Noé; González-Curiel, Rosa Angélica; Martínez-Balderas, Víctor Yordani; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Small, Peter; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to identify transcriptional biomarkers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that discriminate individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) from those with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and in individuals without NIDDM. Using gene expression microarrays we identified differentially expressed genes from lungs of mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) or a mutant (ΔsigH) representing a non-inflammatory model. Genes expressed in blood, with inflammatory related functions were evaluated in humans by RT-qPCR. NCF1 and ORM transcripts have the better discriminatory capacity to identify PTB subjects from LTBI and non-infected controls (NICs) independently of the presence of NIDDM. The sequential evaluation of the mRNA levels of NCF1 and ORM as multiple diagnostic tests showed 95% Sensitivity (Se) and 80% Specificity (Sp). In addition, FPR2 promises to be a good biomarker for the PTB detection in subjects with NIDDM (Se=100%; Sp=90%).

  5. DNA double helix unwinding triggers transcription block-dependent apoptosis: a semiquantitative probe of the response of ATM, RNAPII, and p53 to two DNA intercalators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhichao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Song, Ting; Gao, Jin; Wu, Guiye; Zhang, Jing; Qian, Xuhong

    2009-03-16

    We have previously shown the binding modes of two DNA interacting analogues (1)a {3-(4-methyl-piperazin)-8-oxo-8H-acenaphtho[1,2-b]pyrrole-9-carbonitrile} and (3)a {3-(3-dimethylamino-propylamino)-8-oxo-8H-acenaphtho[1,2-b]pyrrole-9-carbonitrile} with the DNA double helix. In this study, we have determined the notably different DNA damage signal pathway elicited by (1)a and (3)a due to the different extents to which they unwind the DNA double helix. First, we have identified that ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) protein kinase can respond to DNA double helix unwinding caused by both (1)a and (3)a. In addition, the amount of ATM activation is consistent with the degree to which the DNA double helix was unwound. Consequently, we used (1)a and (3)a to semiquantitatively probe the response of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and p53 toward DNA double helix unwinding in vivo. By means of flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, ChIP, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analyses, we measured the level of p53 and RNAPII phosphorylation, in addition to the dynamics of the RNAPII distribution along the c-Myc gene. These results provided novel evidence for the impact of subtle DNA structural changes on the activity of RNAPII and p53. Moreover, DNA double helix conformational damage-dependent apoptosis was studied for the first time. These results indicated that (1)a can induce transcriptional blockage following a shift of the unphosphorylated IIa form of RNAPII to the phosphorylated IIo form, while (3)a is unable to induce the same effect. Subsequently, p53 accumulation and phosphorylation events occur that lead to apoptosis in the case of (1)a exposure. This suggests that the transcriptional blockage is also correlated to the degree of double helix unwinding. Furthermore, we found that the degree of DNA conformational damage determines whether or not apoptosis occurs through transcriptional blockage. Under our experimental conditions, ATM does not

  6. Conserved homeodomain proteins interact with MADS box protein Mcm1 to restrict ECB-dependent transcription to the M/G1 phase of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Pramila, Tata; Miles, Shawna; GuhaThakurta, Debraj; Jemiolo, Dave; Breeden, Linda L.

    2002-01-01

    Two homeodomain proteins, Yox1 and Yhp1, act as repressors at early cell cycle boxes (ECBs) to restrict their activity to the M/G1 phase of the cell cycle in budding yeast. These proteins bind to Mcm1 and to a typical homeodomain binding site. The expression of Yox1 is periodic and directly correlated with its binding to, and repression of, ECB activity. The absence of Yox1 and Yhp1 or the constitutive expression of Yox1 leads to the loss of cell-cycle regulation of ECB activity. Therefore, the cell-cycle-regulated expression of these repressors defines the interval of ECB-dependent transcription. Twenty-eight genes, including MCM2-7, CDC6, SWI4, CLN3, and a number of genes required during late M phase have been identified that are coordinately regulated by this pathway. PMID:12464633

  7. Farnesoid X receptor-dependent and -independent pathways mediate the transcriptional control of human fibroblast growth factor 19 by vitamin A.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Daniel; Sutor, Dominic; Dorbath, Donata; Weiß, Johannes; Götze, Oliver; Schmitt, Johannes; Hermanns, Heike M; Geier, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a gut-derived hormone that controls bile acid (BA), carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Whereas strong evidence supports a key role of BAs and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) for the control of FGF19 expression, information on other regulators is limited. In mice, FGF15 expression (ortholog of human FGF19) is induced by vitamin A (VitA) in an FXR-dependent manner. However, the significance of this finding for human FGF19 is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that VitA derivatives induce FGF19 in human intestinal cell lines by a direct transcriptional mechanism. In contrast to mouse FGF15, however, this direct regulation is not dependent on FXR but mediated by retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and their interaction with a novel DR-5 element in the human FGF19 gene. In addition to this direct effect, VitA derivatives impacted on the BA-mediated control of FGF19 by regulation of FXR protein levels. In conclusion, VitA regulates human FGF19 expression through FXR-dependent and -independent pathways. Moreover, we suggest that considerable mechanistic differences exist between humans and mice with regard to the nuclear receptors controlling the VitA-FGF15/19 axis. These findings may implicate a clinical relevance of RAR-activating VitA derivatives for the regulation of FGF19 levels in humans.

  8. Human I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with KSHV LANA and affect its regulation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Shuichi; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2010-06-04

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein has been reported to interact with glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and to negatively regulate its activity, leading to stimulation of GSK-3{beta}-dependent {beta}-catenin degradation. We show here that the I-mfa domain proteins, HIC (human I-mfa domain-containing protein) and I-mfa (inhibitor of MyoD family a), interacted in vivo with LANA through their C-terminal I-mfa domains. This interaction affected the intracellular localization of HIC, inhibited the LANA-dependent transactivation of a {beta}-catenin-regulated reporter construct, and decreased the level of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex. These data reveal for the first time that I-mfa domain proteins interact with LANA and negatively regulate LANA-mediated activation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription by inhibiting the formation of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex.

  9. Apigenin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis by inhibiting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling in HER2-overexpressing SKBR3 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye-Sook; Ku, Jin Mo; Choi, Han-Seok; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Go, Hoyeon; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2015-08-01

    Phytoestrogens have been demonstrated to inhibit tumor induction; however, their molecular mechanisms of action have remained elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a phytoestrogen, apigenin, on proliferation and apoptosis of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-expressing breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Proliferation assay, MTT assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and ELISA assay were used in the present study. The results of the present study indicated that apigenin inhibited the proliferation of SKBR3 cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner. This inhibition of growth was accompanied by an increase in the sub-G0/G1 apoptotic population. Furthermore, apigenin enhanced the expression levels of cleaved caspase-8 and -3, and induced the cleavage of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase in SKBR3 cells, confirming that apigenin promotes apoptosis via a caspase-dependent pathway. Apigenin additionally reduced the expression of phosphorylated (p)-janus kinase 2 and p-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), inhibited CoCl2-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion and decreased the nuclear localization of STAT3. The STAT3 inhibitor S31-201 decreased the cellular proliferation rate and reduced the expression of p-STAT3 and VEGF. Therefore, these results suggested that apigenin induced apoptosis via the inhibition of STAT3 signaling in SKBR3 cells. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that apigenin may be a potentially useful compound for the prevention or treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer.

  10. Tumor-suppressive p53 Signaling Empowers Metastatic Inhibitor KLF17-dependent Transcription to Overcome Tumorigenesis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Bhatti, Muhammad Zeeshan; Shah, Abdus Saboor; Duong, Hong-Quan; Alkreathy, Huda Mohammad; Mohammad, Shah Faisal; Khan, Rahmat Ali; Ahmad, Ayaz

    2015-08-28

    Metastasis, which is controlled by concerted action of multiple genes, is a complex process and is an important cause of cancer death. Krüppel-like factor 17 (KLF17) is a negative regulator of metastasis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during cancer progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanism and biological relevance of KLF17 in cancer cells are poorly understood. Here, we show that tumor suppressor protein p53 plays an integral role to induce KLF17 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). p53 is recruited to the KLF17 promoter and results in the formation of p53-DNA complex. p53 enhances binding of p300 and favors histone acetylation on the KLF17 promoter. Mechanistically, p53 physically interacts with KLF17 and thereby enhances the anti-metastatic function of KLF17. p53 empowers KLF17-mediated EMT genes transcription via enhancing physical association of KLF17 with target gene promoters. Nutlin-3 recruits KLF17 to EMT target gene promoters and results in the formation of KLF17-DNA complex via a p53-dependent pathway. p53 depletion abrogates DNA binding affinity of KLF17 to EMT target gene promoters. KLF17 is critical for p53 cellular activities in NSCLC. Importantly, KLF17 enhances p53 transcription to generate a novel positive feedback loop. KLF17 depletion accelerates lung cancer cell growth in response to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, we found that KLF17 increases the expression of tumor suppressor genes p53, p21, and pRB. Functionally, KLF17 required p53 to suppress cancer cell invasion and migration in NSCLC. In conclusion, our study highlights a novel insight into the anti-EMT effect of KLF17 via a p53-dependent pathway in NSCLC, and KLF17 may be a new therapeutic target in NSCLC with p53 status.

  11. Activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 signaling induces CD46 expression and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Ralf; Huang, Mei; Gritsko, Tanya; Karras, Jim; Enkemann, Steve; Mesa, Tania; Nam, Sangkil; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2007-08-01

    CD46 is one of the complement-regulatory proteins expressed on the surface of normal and tumor cells for protection against complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Cancer cells need to access the blood circulation for continued growth and metastasis, thus exposing themselves to destruction by complement system components. Previous studies have established that the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor is persistently activated in a wide variety of human cancer cells and primary tumor tissues compared with their normal counterparts. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified the CD46 gene as a target for activated STAT3 signaling in human breast and prostate cancer cells. The CD46 promoter contains two binding sites for activated STAT3 and mutations introduced into the major site abolished STAT3 binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirms binding of STAT3 to the CD46 promoter. CD46 promoter activity is induced by activation of STAT3 and blocked by a dominant-negative form of STAT3 in luciferase reporter assays. CD46 mRNA expression is induced by interleukin-6 and by transient transfection of normal human epithelial cells with a persistently active mutant construct of STAT3, STAT3C. Furthermore, we show that inhibition of STAT3-mediated CD46 cell surface expression sensitizes DU145 prostate cancer cells to cytotoxicity in an in vitro complement lysis assay using rabbit anti-DU145 antiserum and rabbit complement. These results show that activated STAT3 signaling induces the CD46 promoter and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity, suggesting a potential mechanism whereby oncogenic signaling contributes to tumor cell evasion of antibody-mediated immunity.

  12. Long non-coding RNA colon cancer-associated transcript 1 functions as a competing endogenous RNA to regulate cyclin-dependent kinase 1 expression by sponging miR-490-3p in hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Dou, Chunqing; Sun, Liyuan; Jin, Xin; Han, Mingming; Zhang, Bao; Li, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is an aggressive neoplasm and is one of the most common human cancers. Recently, long non-coding RNAs have been demonstrated to participate in pathogenesis of many diseases including the progression in several cancers. In this study, we found that the long non-coding RNA colon cancer-associated transcript 1 was upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues (p < 0.05), and high colon cancer-associated transcript 1 expression level was positively associated with tumor volume (p < 0.05) and American Joint Committee on Cancer stage (p < 0.05) in hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Luciferase reporter assays and RNA-pulldown assays showed that colon cancer-associated transcript 1 is a target of miR-490-3p. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis indicated that colon cancer-associated transcript 1 regulated cyclin-dependent kinase 1 expression as a competing endogenous RNA by sponging miR-490-3p in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Furthermore, colon cancer-associated transcript 1 silencing decreased hepatocellular carcinoma cells proliferation and invasion and overexpression promoted cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. These data demonstrated that the colon cancer-associated transcript 1/miR-490-3p/cyclin-dependent kinase 1 regulatory pathway promotes the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. Inhibition of colon cancer-associated transcript 1 expression may be a novel therapeutic strategy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Can Mimic E1A Effects on E2F

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase is well known to promote viral replication by degrading an increasing number of cellular proteins that inhibit the efficient production of viral progeny. We report here a new function of the adenovirus 5 (Ad5) viral ligase complex that, although at lower levels, mimics effects of E1A products on E2F transcription factors. When expressed in the absence of E1A, the E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K binds E2F, disrupts E2F/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) complexes, and induces hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny of E1/E3-defective adenovirus vectors. These new and previously undescribed functions of the E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase could play an important role in promoting the replication of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE During the course of work on the adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins, we found, very surprisingly, that expression of these species was sufficient to permit low levels of replication of an adenovirus vector lacking E1A, the central regulator of infection. E1A products uncouple E2F transcription factors from Rb repression complexes, thus stimulating viral gene expression and cell and viral DNA synthesis. We found that the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase mimics these functions. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for the ligase in regulating adenovirus replication. PMID:27303679

  14. veA-dependent RNA-pol II transcription elongation factor like protein, RtfA, is associated with secondary metabolism and morphological development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Vellaisamy; Shantappa, Sourabha; Dhingra, Sourabh; Calvo, Ana M.

    2012-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans the global regulatory gene veA is necessary for the biosynthesis of several secondary metabolites, including the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin (ST). In order to identify additional veA-dependent genetic elements involved in regulating ST production, we performed a mutagenesis on a deletion veA (ΔveA) strain to obtain revertant mutants (RM) that regained the capability to produce toxin. Genetic analysis and molecular characterization of one of the revertant mutants, RM3, revealed that a point mutation occurred at the coding region of the rtfA gene, encoding a RNA-pol II transcription elongation factor like protein, similar to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtf1. The A. nidulans rtfA gene product accumulates in nuclei. Deletion of rtfA gene in a ΔveA background restored mycotoxin production in a medium-dependent manner. rtfA also affects the production of other metabolites including penicillin. Biosynthesis of this antibiotic decreased in the absence of rtfA. Furthermore, rtfA is necessary for normal morphological development. Deletion of the rtfA gene in wild-type strains (veA+) resulted in a slight decrease in growth rate, drastic reduction in conidiation, and complete loss of sexual development. This is the first study of an Rtf1 like gene in filamentous fungi. We found rtfA putative orthologs extensively conserved in numerous fungal species. PMID:22783880

  15. Transcription factor Elk-1 participates in the interleukin-1β-dependent regulation of expression of immediate early response gene 3 (IER3).

    PubMed

    Kochan, Jakub; Wawro, Mateusz; Kolka, Agnieszka; Maczuga, Piotr; Kasza, Aneta

    2014-12-01

    Immediate early response gene 3 (IER3) encodes a protein involved in the regulation of apoptosis and differentiation. Recently the role of IER3 in the regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) was discovered. IER3 prolongs ERKs activation by inhibition of phosphatase PP2A. Here we show that interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced IER3 expression is mediated by the ERK1/2 target, transcription factor Elk-1. We identified sequences in the IER3 promoter responsible for its ERKs-dependent activation, namely ETS5/6. Elk-1 binds to these sequences and is phosphorylated following IL-1β stimulation. Mutation of ETS5/6 binding site abolishes activation of IER3 promoter by IL-1β as well as by the constitutively active form of Elk-1 (Elk-VP16). Thus IER3 acts not only as a regulator of ERKs activation, but also as a ERKs-Elk-1-dependent downstream effector.

  16. Phosphorylation of a NAC Transcription Factor by a Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Regulates Abscisic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Maize.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Yan, Jingwei; Liu, Weijuan; Liu, Lei; Sheng, Yu; Sun, Yue; Li, Yanyun; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Jiang, Mingyi; Hou, Xilin; Ni, Lan; Zhang, Aying

    2016-07-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) has been shown to play an important role in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defense and enhance the tolerance of plants to drought stress. However, its downstream molecular events are poorly understood. Here, we identify a NAC transcription factor, ZmNAC84, in maize (Zea mays), which physically interacts with ZmCCaMK in vitro and in vivo. ZmNAC84 displays a partially overlapping expression pattern with ZmCCaMK after ABA treatment, and H2O2 is required for ABA-induced ZmNAC84 expression. Functional analysis reveals that ZmNAC84 is essential for ABA-induced antioxidant defense in a ZmCCaMK-dependent manner. Furthermore, ZmCCaMK directly phosphorylates Ser-113 of ZmNAC84 in vitro, and Ser-113 is essential for the ABA-induced stimulation of antioxidant defense by ZmCCaMK. Moreover, overexpression of ZmNAC84 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) can improve drought tolerance and alleviate drought-induced oxidative damage of transgenic plants. These results define a mechanism for ZmCCaMK function in ABA-induced antioxidant defense, where ABA-produced H2O2 first induces expression of ZmCCaMK and ZmNAC84 and activates ZmCCaMK. Subsequently, the activated ZmCCaMK phosphorylates ZmNAC84 at Ser-113, thereby inducing antioxidant defense by activating downstream genes.

  17. Sub-lethal oxidative stress induces lysosome biogenesis via a lysosomal membrane permeabilization-cathepsin-caspase 3-transcription factor EB-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Leow, San Min; Chua, Shu Xian Serene; Venkatachalam, Gireedhar; Shen, Liang; Luo, Le; Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2016-12-18

    Here we provide evidence to link sub-lethal oxidative stress to lysosomal biogenesis. Exposure of cells to sub-lethal concentrations of exogenously added hydrogen peroxide resulted in cytosol to nuclear translocation of the Transcription Factor EB (TFEB), the master controller of lysosome biogenesis and function. Nuclear translocation of TFEB was dependent upon the activation of a cathepsin-caspase 3 signaling pathway, downstream of a lysosomal membrane permeabilization and accompanied by a significant increase in lysosome numbers as well as induction of TFEB dependent lysosome-associated genes expression such as Ctsl, Lamp2 and its spliced variant Lamp2a, Neu1and Ctsb and Sqstm1 and Atg9b. The effects of sub-lethal oxidative stress on lysosomal gene expression and biogenesis were rescued upon gene silencing of caspase 3 and TFEB. Notably, caspase 3 activation was not associated with phenotypic hallmarks of apoptosis, evidenced by the absence of caspase 3 substrate cleavage, such as PARP, Lamin A/C or gelsolin. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time an unexpected and non-canonical role of a cathepsin-caspase 3 axis in the nuclear translocation of TFEB leading to lysosomes biogenesis under conditions of sub-lethal oxidative stress.

  18. Transcriptional control and essential roles of the Escherichia coli ccm gene products in formate-dependent nitrite reduction and cytochrome c synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Tanapongpipat, S; Reid, E; Cole, J A; Crooke, H

    1998-01-01

    The eight ccm genes located at minute 47 on the Escherichia coli chromosome, in the order ccmABCDEFGH, encode homologues of proteins which are essential for cytochrome c assembly in other bacteria. The ccm genes are immediately downstream from the napFDAGHBC genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase. CcmH was previously shown to be essential for cytochrome c assembly. Deletion analysis and a two-plasmid strategy have now been used to demonstrate that CcmA, B, D, E, F and G are also essential for cytochrome c assembly, and hence for cytochrome-c-dependent nitrite reduction. The ccm genes are transcribed from a ccmA promoter located within the adjacent gene, napC, which is the structural gene for a 24 kDa membrane-bound c-type cytochrome, NapC. Transcription from this ccmA promoter is induced approximately 5-fold during anaerobic growth, independently of a functional Fnr protein: it is also not regulated by the ArcB-ArcA two-component regulatory system. The ccmA promoter is an example of the 'extended -10 sequence' group of promoters with a TGX motif immediately upstream of the -10 sequence. Mutagenesis of the TG motif to TC, CT or CC resulted in loss of about 50% of the promoter activity. A weak second promoter is suggested to permit transcription of the downstream ccmEFGH genes in the absence of transcription readthrough from the upstream napF and ccmA promoters. The results are consistent with, but do not prove, the current view that CcmA, B, C and D are part of an essential haem transport mechanism, that CcmE, F and H are required for covalent haem attachment to cysteine-histidine motifs in cytochrome c apoproteins in the periplasm, and that CcmG is required for the reduction of cysteine residues on apocytochromes c in preparation for haem ligation. PMID:9716493

  19. The Epigenetic Regulator HDAC1 Modulates Transcription of a Core Cardiogenic Program in Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Through a p53-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joseph B; Zhao, John; Keith, Matthew C L; Amraotkar, Alok R; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Hong, Kyung U; Bolli, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) regulation is an essential process in myogenic differentiation. Inhibitors targeting the activity of specific HDAC family members have been shown to enhance the cardiogenic differentiation capacity of discrete progenitor cell types; a key property of donor cell populations contributing to their afforded benefits in cardiac cell therapy applications. The influence of HDAC inhibition on cardiac-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (CMC) transdifferentiation or the role of specific HDAC family members in dictating cardiovascular cell lineage specification has not been investigated. In the current study, the consequences of HDAC inhibition on patient-derived CMC proliferation, cardiogenic program activation, and cardiovascular differentiation/cell lineage specification were investigated using pharmacologic and genetic targeting approaches. Here, CMCs exposed to the pan-HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate exhibited induction of a cardiogenic transcriptional program and heightened expression of myocyte and endothelial lineage-specific markers when coaxed to differentiate in vitro. Further, shRNA knockdown screens revealed CMCs depleted of HDAC1 to promote the induction of a cardiogenic transcriptional program characterized by enhanced expression of cardiomyogenic- and vasculogenic-specific markers, a finding which depended on and correlated with enhanced acetylation and stabilization of p53. Cardiogenic gene activation and elevated p53 expression levels observed in HDAC1-depleted CMCs were associated with improved aptitude to assume a cardiomyogenic/vasculogenic cell-like fate in vitro. These results suggest that HDAC1 depletion-induced p53 expression alters CMC cell fate decisions and identify HDAC1 as a potential exploitable target to facilitate CMC-mediated myocardial repair in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Stem Cells 2016;34:2916-2929.

  20. Retinoid X receptor alpha represses GATA-4-mediated transcription via a retinoid-dependent interaction with the cardiac-enriched repressor FOG-2.

    PubMed

    Clabby, Martha L; Robison, Trevor A; Quigley, Heather F; Wilson, David B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2003-02-21

    Dietary vitamin A and its derivatives, retinoids, regulate cardiac growth and development. To delineate mechanisms involved in retinoid-mediated control of cardiac gene expression, the regulatory effects of the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha) on atrial naturietic factor (ANF) gene transcription was investigated. The transcriptional activity of an ANF promoter-reporter in rat neonatal ventricular myocytes was repressed by RXR alpha in the presence of 9-cis-RA and by the constitutively active mutant RXR alpha F318A indicating that liganded RXR confers the regulatory effect. The RXR alpha-mediated repression mapped to the proximal 147 bp of the rat ANF promoter, a region lacking a consensus retinoid response element but containing several known cardiogenic cis elements including a well characterized GATA response element. Glutathione S-transferase "pull-down" assays revealed that RXR alpha interacts directly with GATA-4, in a ligand-independent manner, via the DNA binding domain of RXR alpha and the second zinc finger of GATA-4. Liganded RXR alpha repressed the activity of a heterologous promoter-reporter construct containing GATA-response element recognition sites in cardiac myocytes but not in several other cell types, suggesting that additional cardiac-enriched factors participate in the repression complex. Co-transfection of liganded RXR alpha and the known cardiac-enriched GATA-4 repressor, FOG-2, resulted in additive repression of GATA-4 activity in ventricular myocytes. In addition, RXR alpha was found to bind FOG-2, in a 9-cis-RA-dependent manner. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which retinoids regulate cardiogenic gene expression through direct interaction with GATA-4 and its co-repressor, FOG-2.

  1. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced MUC5AC expression: aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent/EGFR/ERK/p38-dependent SP1-based transcription.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong C; Oslund, Karen L; Thai, Philip; Velichko, Sharlene; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Duong, Trang; Denison, Michael S; Wu, Reen

    2011-08-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent environmental toxicant. Epidemiological studies have associated TCDD exposure with the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which is manifested by mucous/goblet cell hyperplasia. The purpose of this research was to elucidate the pathway/mechanisms that lead to TCDD-induced gene expression in both primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells and an immortalized cell line, HBE1, under air-liquid interface conditions. TCDD exposure induced a time-dependent elevation of MUC5AC mRNA and protein synthesis, and cytochrome p450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression in these cells. Treatment with an aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist had no effect on TCDD-induced MUC5AC expression, but significantly suppressed CYP1A1 induction. However, treatments with inhibitors of signaling pathways and the expression of dominant negative mutants of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, but not the inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway, abrogated MUC5AC induction, but not that of CYP1A1. These effects also occurred at the MUC5AC promoter-reporter level using the chimeric construct for a transient transfection study. Western blot analysis confirmed the phosphorylation of activated EGFR, ERK, and p38 signaling molecules, but not the c-Jun N-terminal kinase, in cells after TCDD exposure. Specificity protein 1 (Sp1) phosphorylation also occurred in cells after TCDD exposure. Both MUC5AC expression and the promoter activity were inhibited by mithramycin A, an inhibitor specific to Sp1-based transcription. These results lead to the conclusion that TCDD induced MUC5AC expression through a noncanonical aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent, EGFR/ERK/p38-mediated signaling pathway-mediated/Sp1-based transcriptional mechanism.

  2. Interferon-γ promotes double-stranded RNA-induced TLR3-dependent apoptosis via upregulation of transcription factor Runx3 in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Huachen; Hao, Qin; Idell, Steven; Tang, Hua

    2016-12-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections are the most common illness in humans. Infection of the respiratory viruses results in accumulation of viral replicative double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is one of the important components of infecting viruses for the induction of lung epithelial cell apoptosis and innate immune response, including the production of interferon (IFN). In the present study, we have investigated the regulation of dsRNA-induced airway epithelial cell apoptosis by IFN. We found that transcription factor Runx3 was strongly induced by type-II IFNγ, slightly by type-III IFNλ, but essentially not by type-I IFNα in airway epithelial cells. IFNγ-induced expression of Runx3 was predominantly mediated by JAK-STAT1 pathway and partially by NF-κB pathway. Interestingly, Runx3 can be synergistically induced by IFNγ with a synthetic analog of viral dsRNA polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) through both JAK-STAT1 and NF-κB pathways. We further found that dsRNA poly(I:C)-induced apoptosis of airway epithelial cells was mediated by dsRNA receptor toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and was markedly augmented by IFNγ through the enhanced expression of TLR3 and subsequent activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. Last, we demonstrated that upregulation of Runx3 by IFNγ promoted TLR3 expression, thus amplifying the dsRNA-induced apoptosis in airway epithelial cells. These novel findings indicate that IFNγ promotes dsRNA-induced TLR3-dependent apoptosis via upregulation of transcription factor Runx3 in airway epithelial cells. Findings from our study may provide new insights into the regulation of airway epithelial cell apoptosis by IFNγ during viral respiratory tract infection.

  3. The dual role of LSD1 and HDAC3 in STAT5-dependent transcription is determined by protein interactions, binding affinities, motifs and genomic positions

    PubMed Central

    Nanou, Aikaterini; Toumpeki, Chrisavgi; Lavigne, Matthieu D.; Lazou, Vassiliki; Demmers, Jeroen; Paparountas, Triantafillos; Thanos, Dimitris; Katsantoni, Eleni

    2017-01-01

    STAT5 interacts with other factors to control transcription, and the mechanism of regulation is of interest as constitutive active STAT5 has been reported in malignancies. Here, LSD1 and HDAC3 were identified as novel STAT5a interacting partners in pro-B cells. Characterization of STAT5a, LSD1 and HDAC3 target genes by ChIP-seq and RNA-seq revealed gene subsets regulated by independent or combined action of the factors and LSD1/HDAC3 to play dual role in their activation or repression. Genes bound by STAT5a alone or in combination with weakly associated LSD1 or HDAC3 were enriched for the canonical STAT5a GAS motif, and such binding induced activation or repression. Strong STAT5 binding was seen more frequently in intergenic regions, which might function as distal enhancer elements. Groups of genes bound weaker by STAT5a and stronger by LSD1/HDAC3 showed an absence of the GAS motif, and were differentially regulated based on their genomic binding localization and binding affinities. These genes exhibited increased binding frequency in promoters, and in conjunction with the absence of GAS sites, the data indicate a requirement for stabilization by additional factors, which might recruit LSD1/HDAC3. Our study describes an interaction network of STAT5a/LSD1/HDAC3 and a dual function of LSD1/HDAC3 on STAT5-dependent transcription, defined by protein–protein interactions, genomic binding localization/affinity and motifs. PMID:27651463

  4. c-Myc represses FOXO3a-mediated transcription of the gene encoding the p27(Kip1) cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi; Mineva, Nora D; Burke, Brian; Jeay, Sébastien; Wu, Min; Shen, Jian; Yang, William; Hann, Stephen R; Sonenshein, Gail E

    2008-08-15

    The p27(Kip1) (p27) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and c-Myc oncoprotein play essential roles in control of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Induction of p27 (CDKN1B) gene transcription by Forkhead box O proteins such as FOXO3a leads to growth arrest and apoptosis. Previously, we observed that B cell receptor (surface IgM) engagement of WEHI 231 immature B lymphoma cells with an anti-IgM antibody results in activation of FOXO3a, growth arrest and apoptosis. As ectopic c-Myc expression in these cells prevented anti-IgM induction of p27 and cell death, we hypothesized that c-Myc represses FOXO3a-mediated transcription. Here we show that c-Myc inhibits FOXO3a-mediated activation of the p27 promoter in multiple cell lines. The mechanism of this repression was explored using a combination of co-immunoprecipitation, oligonucleotide precipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. The studies demonstrate a functional association of FOXO3a and c-Myc on a proximal Forkhead binding element in the p27 promoter. This association involves the Myc box II domain of c-Myc and the N-terminal DNA-binding portion of FOXO3a. Analysis of publicly available microarray datasets showed an inverse pattern of c-MYC and p27 RNA expression in primary acute myeloid leukemia, prostate cancer and tongue squamous cell carcinoma samples. The inhibition of FOXO3a-mediated activation of the p27 gene by the high aberrant expression of c-Myc in many tumor cells likely contributes to their uncontrolled proliferation and invasive phenotype.

  5. bldA-dependent expression of the Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 lipase gene (lipA) is mediated by the product of a contiguous gene, lipR, encoding a putative transcriptional activator.

    PubMed Central

    Servín-González, L; Castro, C; Pérez, C; Rubio, M; Valdez, F

    1997-01-01

    Extracellular lipase synthesis by Streptomyces lividans 66 carrying the cloned lipase gene (lipA) from Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 was found to be growth phase dependent, since lipase was secreted into the medium mainly during the stationary phase; S1 nuclease protection experiments revealed abundant lipA transcripts in RNA preparations obtained during the stationary phase but not in those obtained during exponential growth. Transcription from the lipA promoter was dependent on the presence of lipR, a contiguous downstream gene with a very high guanine-plus-cytosine content (80.2%). The deduced lipR product consists of a protein of 934 amino acids that shows similarity to known transcriptional activators and has a strong helix-turn-helix motif at its C terminus; this motif is part of a domain homologous to DNA-binding domains of bacterial regulators of the UhpA/LuxR superfamily. The lipR sequence revealed the presence of a leucine residue, encoded by the rare TTA codon, which caused bldA dependence of lipA transcription in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2); replacement of the TTA codon by the alternate CTC leucine codon alleviated bidA dependence but not the apparent growth phase-dependent regulation of lipA transcription. When lipR expression was induced in a controlled fashion during the exponential growth phase, by placing it under the inducible tipA promoter, lipase synthesis was shifted to the exponential growth phase, indicating that the timing of lipR expression, and not its bldA dependence, is the main cause for stationary-phase transcription of lipA. PMID:9401043

  6. Reverse of age-dependent memory impairment and mitochondrial DNA damage in microglia by an overexpression of human mitochondrial transcription factor a in mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Masayoshi; Yamato, Mayumi; Ide, Tomomi; Wu, Zhou; Ochi-Shindou, Mayumi; Kanki, Tomotake; Kang, Dongchon; Sunagawa, Kenji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2008-08-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is highly susceptible to injury induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). During aging, mutations of mtDNA accumulate to induce dysfunction of the respiratory chain, resulting in the enhanced ROS production. Therefore, age-dependent memory impairment may result from oxidative stress derived from the respiratory chain. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is now known to have roles not only in the replication of mtDNA but also its maintenance. We herein report that an overexpression of TFAM in HeLa cells significantly inhibited rotenone-induced mitochondrial ROS generation and the subsequent NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) nuclear translocation. Furthermore, TFAM transgenic (TG) mice exhibited a prominent amelioration of an age-dependent accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and a decline in the activities of complexes I and IV in the brain. In the aged TG mice, deficits of the motor learning memory, the working memory, and the hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) were also significantly improved. The expression level of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) a