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Sample records for e1a dependent transcription

  1. E1a promotes c-Myc-dependent replicative stress

    PubMed Central

    Valero, María Llanos; Cimas, Francisco Jose; Arias, Laura; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; García, Elena; Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; García-Cano, Jesús; Serrano-Oviedo, Leticia; Ángel de la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel; Sánchez-Pérez, Isabel; Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The E1a gene from adenovirus is known to be a potent inducer of chemo/radiosensitivity in a wide range of tumors. However, the molecular bases of its radiosensitizer properties are still poorly understood. In an attempt to study this effect, U87MG cells, derived from a radio-resistant tumor as glioblastoma, where infected with lentivirus carrying E1a gene developing an acute sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The induction of radiosensitivity correlated with a marked G2/M phase accumulation and a potent apoptotic response. Our findings demonstrate that c-Myc plays a pivotal role in E1a-associated radiosensitivity through the induction of a replicative stress situation, as our data support by genetic approaches, based in interference and overexpression in U87MG cells. In fact, we present evidence showing that Chk1 is a novel transcriptional target of E1a gene through the effect exerted by this adenoviral protein onto c-Myc. Moreover, c-Myc upregulation also explains the marked phosphorylation of H2AX associated to E1a expression in the absence of DNA damage. Indeed, all these observations were applicable to other experimental models, such as T98G, LN-405 and A172, rendering the same pattern in terms of radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, upregulation of Chk1, c-Myc, and phosphorylation pattern of H2AX. In summary, our data propose a novel mechanism to explain how E1a mediates radiosensitivity through the signaling axis E1a→c-Myc→ replicative stress situation. This novel mechanism of E1a-mediated radiosensitivity could be the key to open new possibilities in the current therapy of glioblastoma. PMID:24196438

  2. Sequence-independent autoregulation of the adenovirus type 5 E1A transcription unit.

    PubMed Central

    Hearing, P; Shenk, T

    1985-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A gene is known to be autoregulated at the level of transcription. Autoregulation was found to be mediated by products of the E1A 13S mRNA, which induced a fivefold increase in E1A transcription rate. Deletion analysis suggested that the autoregulation did not require any specific sequence in the E1A transcriptional control region. This conclusion was reinforced by the demonstration that a cellular alpha-globin gene substituted for the E1A gene on the adenovirus chromosome was also positively regulated by E1A gene products. Images PMID:2943984

  3. The adenovirus E1A protein targets the SAGA but not the ADA transcriptional regulatory complex through multiple independent domains.

    PubMed

    Shuen, Michael; Avvakumov, Nikita; Walfish, Paul G; Brandl, Chris J; Mymryk, Joe S

    2002-08-23

    Expression of the adenovirus E1A protein in the simple eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibits growth. We tested four regions of E1A that alter growth and transcription in mammalian cells for their effects in yeast when expressed as fusions to the Gal4p DNA binding domain. Expression of the N-terminal/conserved region (CR) 1 or CR3, but not of the CR2 or the C-terminal portion of E1A, inhibited yeast growth. Growth inhibition was relieved by deletion of the genes encoding the yGcn5p, Ngg1p, or Spt7p components of the SAGA transcriptional regulatory complex, but not the Ahc1p component of the related ADA complex, indicating that the N-terminal/CR1 and CR3 regions of E1A target the SAGA complex independently. Expression of the pCAF acetyltransferase, a mammalian homologue of yGcn5p, also suppressed growth inhibition by either portion of E1A. Furthermore, the N-terminal 29 residues and the CR3 portion of E1A interacted independently with yGcn5p and pCAF in vitro. Thus, two separate regions of E1A target the yGcn5p component of the SAGA transcriptional activation complex. A subregion of the N-terminal/CR1 fragment spanning residues 30-69 within CR1 also inhibited yeast growth in a SAGA-dependent fashion. However, this region did not interact with yGcn5p or pCAF, suggesting that it makes a third contact with another SAGA component. Our results provide a new model system to elucidate mechanisms by which E1A and the SAGA complex regulate transcription and growth. PMID:12070146

  4. The E1A transcriptional control region is efficiently activated in proliferating tissues of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, A; Krippl, B

    1994-08-01

    To study the in vivo regulation of the adenovirus E1A transcriptional regulatory region in transgenic mice, we have constructed two hybrid genes in which the viral control element regulates the expression of the CAT and the lacZ reporter gene. The fusion constructs were introduced into the mouse germline. The expression of the transgenes were monitored during embryogenesis and during postnatal development as well as in adult organs. We show that the E1A regulatory region is recognized and activated in undifferentiated cells during early embryonic cleavage, in the morula, in the inner cell mass and in the trophectoderm of the blastocyst. Transcription initiation at the E1A promoter leads to higher marker gene expression in proliferative centers in postimplantation embryos at the beginning of the neural tube closure. Analysing marker gene expression during postnatal development, a correlation of transcriptional activity of the E1A regulatory region and cell proliferation could be demonstrated. The expression profile of the transgene in different adult organs parallels with DNA synthesis. Marker gene expression was high in cells of organs known to have a high mitotic rate, such as the intestine, the stomach, the skin and the bone marrow, whereas little activity of the E1A control region was observed in the post-proliferative brain. These results are consistent with the finding that activation of the viral cis-regulating elements dramatically increased in the kidney after mitotic stimulation by folic acid. These observations strongly suggests a cell cycle regulated expression from the E1A enhancer/promoter in the absence of the E1A autoregulatory proteins in the living animal. PMID:8036008

  5. Transcription of interferon-stimulated genes is induced by adenovirus particles but is suppressed by E1A gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, N; Pine, R; Levy, D; Darnell, J E

    1988-01-01

    Interferon treatment of cell cultures results in the rapid transcriptional induction of a specific set of genes. In this paper we explore the effect of cellular infection by several adenoviruses, both wild type and mutant, on the expression of these genes. Infection with adenovirus induces the transcription of the interferon-stimulated genes in the absence of any protein synthesis. In fact, the inhibition of protein synthesis during a wild-type infection produces enhanced stimulation of transcription of these genes. Experiments with viral mutants indicate the ability to specifically suppress this transcription maps to the E1A gene. In addition, the E1A gene products are capable of suppressing the specific transcriptional induction of interferon-stimulated promoters during cotransfection experiments and therefore presumably during viral infection. The dual effect of adenovirus on the expression of interferon-stimulated genes may represent an example of action and evolutionary reaction between virus and host. Images PMID:2446013

  6. Heterogeneity of adenovirus type 5 E1A proteins: multiple serine phosphorylations induce slow-migrating electrophoretic variants but do not affect E1A-induced transcriptional activation or transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, J D; Slavicek, J M; Schneider, J F; Jones, N C

    1988-01-01

    The 289-amino-acid product encoded by the adenovirus E1A 13S mRNA has several pleiotropic activities, including transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, and when acting in concert with certain oncogene products, cell transformation. In all cell types in which E1A has been introduced (except bacteria), E1A protein is extensively posttranslationally modified to yield several isoelectric and molecular weight variants. The most striking variant is one that has a retarded mobility, by about Mr = 2,000, in sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. We have investigated the nature of this modification and have assessed its importance for E1A activity. Phosphorylation is responsible for the altered mobility of E1A, since acid phosphatase treatment eliminates the higher apparent molecular weight products. By using several E1A deletion mutants, we show that at least two seryl residues, residing between residues 86 and 120 and 224 and 289, are the sites of phosphorylation and that each phosphorylation can independently induce the mobility shift. However, E1A mutants lacking these seryl residues transcriptionally activate the adenovirus E3 and E2A promoters and transform baby rat kidney cells to near wild-type levels. Images PMID:2835499

  7. A novel CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal in adenoviral E1A protein regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Olson, Melissa V; Medrano, Diana R; Lee, Ok-Hee; Xu, Jing; Piao, Yuji; Alonso, Marta M; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Hung, Mien-Chie; Yung, W K Alfred; Fueyo, Juan

    2006-12-01

    Adenoviral E1A is a versatile protein that can reprogram host cells for efficient viral replication. The nuclear import of E1A is mediated by a nuclear localization signal; however, whether E1A can be actively exported from the nucleus is unknown. We first reported a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES) in E1A that is conserved in the group C adenoviruses. We showed that CRM1 and E1A coimmunoprecipitated and that blockage of CRM1 function by leptomycin B or small interfering RNA resulted in the nuclear localization of E1A. Through mutational analyses, we identified an active canonical NES element within the E1A protein spanning amino acids 70-80. We further demonstrated that phosphorylation of adjacent serine (S)89 resulted in the cytoplasmic accumulation of E1A. Interestingly, coincident with the accumulation of cells in the S/G2/M phase and histone H1 phosphorylation, E1A was relocated to the cytoplasm at the late stage of the viral cycle, which was blocked by the CDC2/CDK2 inhibitor roscovitine. Importantly, titration of the progenies of the viruses in infected cells showed that the replication efficiency of the NES mutant adenovirus was up to 500-fold lower than that of the wild-type adenovirus. Collectively, our data demonstrate the existence of a NES in E1A that is modulated by the phosphorylation of the S89 residue and the NES plays a role for an efficient viral replication in the host cells.

  8. The adenoviral E1A N-terminal domain represses MYC transcription in human cancer cells by targeting both p300 and TRRAP and inhibiting MYC promoter acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M.; Green, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers frequently arise from increased expression of proto-oncogenes, such as MYC and HER2. Understanding the cellular pathways regulating the transcription and expression of proto-oncogenes is important for targeted therapies for cancer treatment. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A 243R (243 aa residues) is a viral oncoprotein that interacts with key regulators of gene transcription and cell proliferation. We have shown previously that the 80 amino acid N-terminal transcriptional repression domain of E1A 243R (E1A 1-80) can target the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 and repress HER2 in the HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Expression of E1A 1-80 induces death of SKBR3 and other cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed total cell RNA sequence analysis and identified MYC as the regulatory gene for cellular proliferation most strongly repressed by E1A 1-80. By RT-quantitative PCR analysis we show that repression of MYC in SKBR3 cells occurs early after expression of E1A 1-80, suggesting that MYC may be an early responder of E1A 1-80-mediated transcriptional repression. Of interest, while E1A 1-80 repression of MYC occurs in all eight human cancer cell lines examined, repression of HER2 is cell-type dependent. We demonstrate by ChIP analysis that MYC transcriptional repression by E1A 1-80 is associated with inhibition of acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16 on the MYC promoter, as well as inhibition of RNA Pol II binding to the MYC promoter. Deletion mutant analysis of E1A 1-80 suggests that both p300/CBP and TRRAP are involved in E1A 1-80 repression of MYC transcription. Further, E1A 1-80 interaction with p300/CBP and TRRAP is correlated with inhibition of H3K18 and H4K16 acetylation on the MYC promoter, respectively. Our results indicate that E1A 1-80 may target two important pathways for histone modification to repress transcription in human cancer cells. PMID:27382434

  9. A DNA element that regulates expression of an endogenous retrovirus during F9 cell differentiation is E1A dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, B T; Satyamoorthy, K; Solter, D; Basu, A; Xu, M Q; Weinmann, R; Howe, C C

    1992-01-01

    The retinoic acid-induced differentiation of F9 cells into parietal endoderm-like cells activates transcription of the endogenous mouse retrovirus, the intracisternal A-particle (IAP). To investigate the elements that control IAP gene differentiation-specific expression, we used methylation interference, Southwestern (DNA-protein), and transient-transfection assays and identified the IAP-proximal enhancer (IPE) element that directs differentiation-specific expression. We find that the IPE is inactive in undifferentiated F9 cells and active in differentiated parietal endoderm-like PYS-2 cells. Three proteins of 40, 60, and 68 kDa bind to the sequence GAGTAGAC located between nucleotides -53 and -47 within the IPE. The 40- and 68-kDa proteins from both the undifferentiated and differentiated cells exhibit similar DNA-binding activities. However, the 60-kDa protein from differentiated cells has greater binding activity than that from undifferentiated cells, suggesting a role for this protein in F9 differentiation-specific expression of the IAP gene. The IAP gene is negatively regulated by the adenovirus E1A proteins, and the E1A sequence responsible for repression is located at the N terminus, between amino acids 2 and 67. The DNA sequence that is the target of E1A repression also maps to the IPE element. Colocalization of the differentiation-specific and E1A-sensitive elements to the same protein-binding site within the IPE suggests that the E1A-like activity functions in F9 cells to repress IAP gene expression. Activation of the IAP gene may result when the E1A-like activity is lost or inactivated during F9 cell differentiation, followed by binding of the 60-kDa positive regulatory protein to the enhancer element. Images PMID:1406664

  10. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-09-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. PMID:2143540

  11. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. Images PMID:2143540

  12. trans-dominant mutants of E1A provide genetic evidence that the zinc finger of the trans-activating domain binds a transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, L C; Ricciardi, R P

    1991-01-01

    The 289R E1A protein of adenovirus stimulates transcription of early viral and certain cellular genes. trans-Activation requires residues 140 to 188, which encompass a zinc finger. Several studies have indicated that trans-activation by E1A is mediated through cellular transcription factors. In particular, the ability of the trans-dominant E1A point mutant hr5 (Ser-185 to Asn) to inhibit wild-type E1A trans-activation was proposed to result from the sequestration of a cellular factor. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we individually replaced every residue within and flanking the trans-activating domain with a conservative amino acid, revealing 16 critical residues. Six of the individual substitutions lying in a contiguous stretch C terminal to the zinc finger (carboxyl region183-188) imparted a trans-dominant phenotype. trans-Dominance was even produced by deletion of the entire carboxyl region183-188. Conversely, an intact finger region147-177 was absolutely required for trans-dominance, since second-site substitution of every critical residue in this region abrogated the trans-dominant phenotype of the hr5 protein. These data indicate that the finger region147-177 bind a limiting cellular transcription factor and that the carboxyl region183-188 provides a separate and essential function. In addition, we show that four negatively charged residues within the trans-activating domain do not comprise a distinct acidic activating region. We present a model in which the trans-activating domain of E1A binds to two different cellular protein targets through the finger and carboxyl regions. Images PMID:1831535

  13. First and second line imatinib treatment in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients expressing rare e1a2 or e19a2 BCR-ABL transcripts.

    PubMed

    Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Nahajevszky, Sarolta; Szilvási, Anikó; Bors, András; Adám, Emma; Kozma, András; Kajtár, Béla; Barta, Anikó; Poros, Anna; Tordai, Attila

    2007-09-01

    During the formation of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, in the majority of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients, the chromosome 22 breakpoint is located in the major breakpoint cluster region of the BCR gene (M-bcr). Minor and micro breakpoint cluster regions (m-bcr with e1a2 transcript and micro-bcr with e19a2 transcript) are rarely affected and have been suggested to be associated with peculiar CML phenotypes. Despite the different clinical characteristics, it is currently not established, whether different therapeutic options are preferably recommended for the treatment of e1a2 or e19a2 CML. Here we report two patients with e1a2 and one patient with e19a2 translocations, treated with different approaches including imatinib. First and second line imatinib treatments induced haematologic response in all of the three patients, and major cytogenetic response in one patient with e1a2, as well as in the patient with e19a2 CML. However, relapse occurred in the patient with e19a2 CML, possibly caused by the presence of additional chromosomal abnormalities such as an extra Ph chromosome, and loss of chromosome Y. Stem cell transplantation (SCT) therapy caused complete haematologic response with molecular remission; however, the patient died of infectious complication. We conclude that in patients with rare BCR-ABL variants, the effectiveness of imatininb treatment may be influenced by the CML stage besides the actual molecular type of the rare transcript. However, this conclusion cannot be generalized to larger patient groups with rare BCR-ABL variants for which further studies may be needed.

  14. CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) and C/EBPalpha (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) are required for the superstimulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene transcription by adenoviral E1a and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Routes, J M; Colton, L A; Ryan, S; Klemm, D J

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, we observed superstimulated levels of cAMP-stimulated transcription from the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene promoter in cells infected with wild-type adenovirus expressing 12 S and 13 S E1a proteins, or in cells expressing 13 S E1a alone. cAMP-stimulated transcription was inhibited in cells expressing only 12 S E1a, but slightly elevated in cells expressing E1a proteins with mutations in conserved regions 1 or 2, leading us to conclude that the superstimulation was mediated by conserved region 3 of 13 S E1a. E1a failed to enhance cAMP-stimulated transcription from promoters containing mutations that abolish binding by cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) or CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs). This result was supported by experiments in which expression of dominant-negative CREB and/or C/EBP proteins repressed E1a- and cAMP-stimulated transcription from the PEPCK gene promoter. In reconstitution experiments using a Gal4-responsive promoter, E1a enhanced cAMP-stimulated transcription when chimaeric Gal4-CREB and Gal4-C/EBPalpha were co-expressed. Phosphorylation of CREB on serine-133 was stimulated in cells treated with dibutyryl cAMP, whereas phosphorylation of C/EBPalpha was increased by E1a expression. Our data support a model in which cAMP agonists increase CREB activity and stimulate PEPCK gene transcription, a process that is enhanced by E1a through the phosphorylation of C/EBPalpha. PMID:11085926

  15. Induction of E1A-responsive negative factors for transcription of the fibronectin gene in adenovirus E1-transformed rat cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T; Nakajima, T; Tsunoda, S; Nakada, S; Oda, K; Tsurui, H; Wada, A

    1992-01-01

    The level of fibronectin (FN) gene expression is very high in resting rat 3Y1 cells but greatly decreased in adenovirus E1-transformed cells. To study the mechanism of this down-regulation, nuclear factors binding to the 5'-flanking region of the FN gene were analyzed by gel retardation assay and DNase I footprinting. Nuclear factors that were present in the transformed cells but nearly absent in resting 3Y1 cells interacted with multiple sites of the promoter region. Oligonucleotide competition with the FN promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter constructs (pFCAT) for these factors in the transformed cells indicated that all of them had a negative effect on FN gene expression. Of them, a factor(s) (G10BP) binding to the G10 stretch from positions -239 to -230 and to two GC boxes consisting of the G10 stretch with one internal C residue insertion from positions -105 to -95 and -54 to -44 had the strongest repressive activity. Introduction of substitutive mutations into these G-rich sequences resulted in the increase in CAT activity of pFCAT in the transformed cells. The recognition sequences of G10BP and Sp1 overlap in two GC boxes. G10BP has stronger affinity for heparin and GC boxes than does Sp1, suggesting that G10BP may repress FN gene transcription by displacing Sp1. Images PMID:1404598

  16. De-repression of RaRF-mediated RAR repression by adenovirus E1A in the nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Um, Soo-Jong; Youn, Hye Sook; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2014-02-21

    Transcriptional activity of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) is regulated by diverse binding partners, including classical corepressors and coactivators, in response to its ligand retinoic acid (RA). Recently, we identified a novel corepressor of RAR called the retinoic acid resistance factor (RaRF) (manuscript submitted). Here, we report how adenovirus E1A stimulates RAR activity by associating with RaRF. Based on immunoprecipitation (IP) assays, E1A interacts with RaRF through the conserved region 2 (CR2), which is also responsible for pRb binding. The first coiled-coil domain of RaRF was sufficient for this interaction. An in vitro glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assay was used to confirm the direct interaction between E1A and RaRF. Further fluorescence microscopy indicated that E1A and RaRF were located in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus, respectively. However, RaRF overexpression promoted nucleolar translocation of E1A from the nucleoplasm. Both the RA-dependent interaction of RAR with RaRF and RAR translocation to the nucleolus were disrupted by E1A. RaRF-mediated RAR repression was impaired by wild-type E1A, but not by the RaRF binding-defective E1A mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that E1A is sequestered to the nucleolus by RaRF through a specific interaction, thereby leaving RAR in the nucleoplasm for transcriptional activation.

  17. Ad5/35E1aPSESE4: A novel approach to marking circulating prostate tumor cells with a replication competent adenovirus controlled by PSA/PSMA transcription regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Eun; Joung, Jae Young; Shin, Seung-Phil; Choi, Moon-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Yon Hui; Park, Weon Seo; Lee, Sang-Jin; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells serve as useful biomarkers with which to identify disease status associated with survival, metastasis and drug sensitivity. Here, we established a novel application for detecting PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells circulating in peripheral blood employing an adenovirus called Ad5/35E1aPSESE4. Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 utilized PSES, a chimeric enhancer derived from PSA/PSMA promoters that is highly active with and without androgen. A fluorescence signal mediated by GFP expression upon Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection was selectively amplified in PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro and ex vivo. Furthermore, for the in vivo model, blood drawn from TRAMP was tested for CTCs with Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection and was positive for CTCs at week 16. Validation was performed on patient blood at various clinical stages and found out 1-100 CTCs expressing GFP upon Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection. Interestingly, CTC from one patient was confirmed to be sensitive to docetaxel chemotherapeutic reagent and to abundantly express metastasis-related genes like MMP9, Cofilin1, and FCER1G through RNA-seq. Our study established that the usage of Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 is effective in marking PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells in patient blood to improve the efficacy of utilizing CTCs as a biomarker.

  18. Ad5/35E1aPSESE4: A novel approach to marking circulating prostate tumor cells with a replication competent adenovirus controlled by PSA/PSMA transcription regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Eun; Joung, Jae Young; Shin, Seung-Phil; Choi, Moon-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Yon Hui; Park, Weon Seo; Lee, Sang-Jin; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells serve as useful biomarkers with which to identify disease status associated with survival, metastasis and drug sensitivity. Here, we established a novel application for detecting PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells circulating in peripheral blood employing an adenovirus called Ad5/35E1aPSESE4. Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 utilized PSES, a chimeric enhancer derived from PSA/PSMA promoters that is highly active with and without androgen. A fluorescence signal mediated by GFP expression upon Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection was selectively amplified in PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro and ex vivo. Furthermore, for the in vivo model, blood drawn from TRAMP was tested for CTCs with Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection and was positive for CTCs at week 16. Validation was performed on patient blood at various clinical stages and found out 1-100 CTCs expressing GFP upon Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection. Interestingly, CTC from one patient was confirmed to be sensitive to docetaxel chemotherapeutic reagent and to abundantly express metastasis-related genes like MMP9, Cofilin1, and FCER1G through RNA-seq. Our study established that the usage of Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 is effective in marking PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells in patient blood to improve the efficacy of utilizing CTCs as a biomarker. PMID:26723876

  19. Stochastic Model of Supercoiling-Dependent Transcription.

    PubMed

    Brackley, C A; Johnson, J; Bentivoglio, A; Corless, S; Gilbert, N; Gonnella, G; Marenduzzo, D

    2016-07-01

    We propose a stochastic model for gene transcription coupled to DNA supercoiling, where we incorporate the experimental observation that polymerases create supercoiling as they unwind the DNA helix and that these enzymes bind more favorably to regions where the genome is unwound. Within this model, we show that when the transcriptionally induced flux of supercoiling increases, there is a sharp crossover from a regime where torsional stresses relax quickly and gene transcription is random, to one where gene expression is highly correlated and tightly regulated by supercoiling. In the latter regime, the model displays transcriptional bursts, waves of supercoiling, and up regulation of divergent or bidirectional genes. It also predicts that topological enzymes which relax twist and writhe should provide a pathway to down regulate transcription. PMID:27419594

  20. Stochastic Model of Supercoiling-Dependent Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackley, C. A.; Johnson, J.; Bentivoglio, A.; Corless, S.; Gilbert, N.; Gonnella, G.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a stochastic model for gene transcription coupled to DNA supercoiling, where we incorporate the experimental observation that polymerases create supercoiling as they unwind the DNA helix and that these enzymes bind more favorably to regions where the genome is unwound. Within this model, we show that when the transcriptionally induced flux of supercoiling increases, there is a sharp crossover from a regime where torsional stresses relax quickly and gene transcription is random, to one where gene expression is highly correlated and tightly regulated by supercoiling. In the latter regime, the model displays transcriptional bursts, waves of supercoiling, and up regulation of divergent or bidirectional genes. It also predicts that topological enzymes which relax twist and writhe should provide a pathway to down regulate transcription.

  1. Interaction of the Dr1 inhibitory factor with the TATA binding protein is disrupted by adenovirus E1A.

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, V B; Inostroza, J A; Yeung, K; Reinberg, D; Nevins, J R

    1994-01-01

    Past experiments have shown that the adenovirus E1A12S product activates the hsp70 promoter, dependent on the TATA element and dependent on N-terminal E1A sequences. Other experiments have identified a factor termed Dr1 that interacts with and inhibits the transcriptional activity of the TATA-binding protein (TBP). We now find that the E1A12S protein can disrupt the interaction of the Dr1 factor with the TATA-specific TBP factor, allowing the productive interaction of TBP with TFIIA. This E1A-mediated disruption is dependent on N-terminal sequences that are also essential for the TATA-dependent trans-activation of the hsp70 promoter. Moreover, we also find that Dr1 expression in transfected cells can inhibit transcription from the hsp70 promoter and that this can be overcome by coexpression of the wild-type E1A protein, dependent on N-terminal sequences. We conclude that the activation of hsp70 through the TATA element may be mechanistically similar to the activation of the E2 promoter via E2F, in each case involving a release of a transcription factor from an inactive complex. Images PMID:8022773

  2. Program-specific distribution of a transcription factor dependent on partner transcription factor and MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeitlinger, Julia; Simon, Itamar; Harbison, Christopher T; Hannett, Nancy M; Volkert, Thomas L; Fink, Gerald R; Young, Richard A

    2003-05-01

    Specialized gene expression programs are induced by signaling pathways that act on transcription factors. Whether these transcription factors can function in multiple developmental programs through a global switch in promoter selection is not known. We have used genome-wide location analysis to show that the yeast Ste12 transcription factor, which regulates mating and filamentous growth, is bound to distinct program-specific target genes dependent on the developmental condition. This condition-dependent distribution of Ste12 requires concurrent binding of the transcription factor Tec1 during filamentation and is differentially regulated by the MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1. Program-specific distribution across the genome may be a general mechanism by which transcription factors regulate distinct gene expression programs in response to signaling. PMID:12732146

  3. Transcription-Factor-Dependent Control of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Beckervordersandforth, Ruth; Zhang, Chun-Li; Lie, Dieter Chichung

    2015-10-01

    Adult-generated dentate granule neurons have emerged as major contributors to hippocampal plasticity. New neurons are generated from neural stem cells through a complex sequence of proliferation, differentiation, and maturation steps. Development of the new neuron is dependent on the precise temporal activity of transcription factors, which coordinate the expression of stage-specific genetic programs. Here, we review current knowledge in transcription factor-mediated regulation of mammalian neural stem cells and neurogenesis and will discuss potential mechanisms of how transcription factor networks, on one hand, allow for precise execution of the developmental sequence and, on the other hand, allow for adaptation of the rate and timing of adult neurogenesis in response to complex stimuli. Understanding transcription factor-mediated control of neuronal development will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying neurogenesis-dependent plasticity in health and disease.

  4. Heterogeneity of Calcium Channel/cAMP-Dependent Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    The major function of the voltage-gated calcium channels is to provide the Ca(2+) flux into the cell. L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav1) serve as voltage sensors that couple membrane depolarization to many intracellular processes. Electrical activity in excitable cells affects gene expression through signaling pathways involved in the excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. E-T coupling starts with activation of the Cav1 channel and results in initiation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription. In this review we discuss the new quantitative approaches to measuring E-T signaling events. We describe the use of wavelet transform to detect heterogeneity of transcriptional activation in nuclei. Furthermore, we discuss the properties of discovered microdomains of nuclear signaling associated with the E-T coupling and the basis of the frequency-dependent transcriptional regulation.

  5. pRB-E2F1 complexes are resistant to adenovirus E1A-mediated disruption.

    PubMed

    Seifried, L A; Talluri, S; Cecchini, M; Julian, L M; Mymryk, J S; Dick, F A

    2008-05-01

    Disruption of pRB-E2F interactions by E1A is a key event in the adenoviral life cycle that drives expression of early viral transcription and induces cell cycle progression. This function of E1A is complicated by E2F1, an E2F family member that controls multiple processes besides proliferation, including apoptosis and DNA repair. Recently, a second interaction site in pRB that only contacts E2F1 has been discovered, allowing pRB to control proliferation separately from other E2F1-dependent activities. Based on this new insight into pRB-E2F1 regulation, we investigated how E1A affects control of E2F1 by pRB. Our data reveal that pRB-E2F1 interactions are resistant to E1A-mediated disruption. Using mutant forms of pRB that selectively force E2F1 to bind through only one of the two binding sites on pRB, we determined that E1A is unable to disrupt E2F1's unique interaction with pRB. Furthermore, analysis of pRB-E2F complexes during adenoviral infection reveals the selective maintenance of pRB-E2F1 interactions despite the presence of E1A. Our experiments also demonstrate that E2F1 functions to maintain cell viability in response to E1A expression. This suggests that adenovirus E1A's seemingly complex mechanism of disrupting pRB-E2F interactions provides selectivity in promoting viral transcription and cell cycle advancement, while maintaining cell viability.

  6. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST: role of PKC.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2004-10-01

    The Na+-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST plays a major role in the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Short-term, as well as long-term changes in transporter activity are triggered by glutamate. An important locus of regulation is the density of transporter molecules present at the plasma membrane. A substrate-dependent change in the translocation rate of the transporter molecules accounts for the short-term effect, whereas the long-term modulation apparently involves transcriptional regulation. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, we report here that glutamate receptors activation mediate a substantial reduction in the transcriptional activity of the chglast promoter through the Ca2+/diacylglicerol-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling cascade. Overexpression of constitutive active PKC isoforms of mimic the glutamate effect. Accordingly, increased levels of c-Jun or c-Fos, but not Jun-B, Jun-D or Fos-B, lower the chglast promoter activity. Serial deletions and electrophorectic mobility shift assays were used to define a specific region within the 5' proximal region of the chglast promoter, associated with transcriptional repression. A putative glutamate response element could be defined in the proximal promoter stretch more likely between nts -40 and -78. These results demonstrate that GLAST is under glutamate-dependent transcriptional control through PKC, and support the notion of a pivotal role of this neurotransmitter in the regulation of its own removal from the synaptic cleft, thereby modulating, mainly in the long term, glutamatergic transmission.

  7. Repression of TFII-I-dependent transcription by nuclear exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Tussié-Luna, María Isabel; Bayarsaihan, Dashzeveg; Ruddle, Frank H.; Roy, Ananda L.

    2001-01-01

    TFII-I is an unusual transcription factor possessing both basal and signal-induced transcriptional functions. Here we report the characterization of a TFII-I-related factor (MusTRD1/BEN) that regulates transcriptional functions of TFII-I by controlling its nuclear residency. MusTRD1/BEN has five or six direct repeats, each containing helix–loop–helix motifs, and, thus, belongs to the TFII-I family of transcription factors. TFII-I and MusTRD1/BEN, when expressed individually, show predominant nuclear localization. However, when the two proteins are coexpressed ectopically, MusTRD1/BEN locates almost exclusively to the nucleus, whereas TFII-I is largely excluded from the nucleus, resulting in a loss of TFII-I-dependent transcriptional activation of the c-fos promoter. Mutation of a consensus nuclear localization signal in MusTRD1/BEN results in a reversal of nuclear residency of the two proteins and a concomitant gain of c-fos promoter activity. These data suggest a means of transcriptional repression by competition at the level of nuclear occupancy. PMID:11438732

  8. Arhgap36-dependent activation of Gli transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Paul G.; Ni, Jun; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Nguyen, Vien; Crapster, J. Aaron; Hovestadt, Volker; Kool, Marcel; Jones, David T. W.; Mich, John K.; Firestone, Ari J.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Chen, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation and Gli-dependent transcription play critical roles in embryonic patterning, tissue homeostasis, and tumorigenesis. By conducting a genome-scale cDNA overexpression screen, we have identified the Rho GAP family member Arhgap36 as a positive regulator of the Hh pathway in vitro and in vivo. Arhgap36 acts in a Smoothened (Smo)-independent manner to inhibit Gli repressor formation and to promote the activation of full-length Gli proteins. Arhgap36 concurrently induces the accumulation of Gli proteins in the primary cilium, and its ability to induce Gli-dependent transcription requires kinesin family member 3a and intraflagellar transport protein 88, proteins that are essential for ciliogenesis. Arhgap36 also functionally and biochemically interacts with Suppressor of Fused. Transcriptional profiling further reveals that Arhgap36 is overexpressed in murine medulloblastomas that acquire resistance to chemical Smo inhibitors and that ARHGAP36 isoforms capable of Gli activation are up-regulated in a subset of human medulloblastomas. Our findings reveal a new mechanism of Gli transcription factor activation and implicate ARHGAP36 dysregulation in the onset and/or progression of GLI-dependent cancers. PMID:25024229

  9. Activation domains of transcription factors mediate replication dependent transcription from a minimal HIV-1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R D; Lee, B A; Jackson, S P; Proudfoot, N J

    1996-01-01

    Transcription from a minimal HIV-1 promoter containing the three Sp1 binding sites and TATA box can be activated without Tat by template DNA replication. Here we show that this activation can also be mediated by recombinant GAL4 fusion proteins containing the activation domains of Sp1, VP16 or CTF (or by full-length GAL4) targeted to the HIV-1 promoter by replacing the Sp1 sites with five GAL4 binding sites. Thus Sp1 is not unique in its ability to mediate replication activated transcription, although the degree of processivity elicited by the different activators varied significantly from strongly processive (GAL4-VP16) to relatively non-processive (GAL4-Sp1 or -CTF). Processive GAL4-VP16-activated transcription, but not efficient initiation, required multiple GAL4 binding sites. In the presence of Tat, transcription with GAL4-SP1 and GAL4-CTF was further activated (principally at the level of processivity) but GAL4-VP16-potentiated transcription was only slightly stimulated. The Tat-dependent switch from non-processive to fully processive transcription was particularly marked for GAL4-Sp1, an effect which may be relevant to the selection of Sp1 binding sites by the HIV-1 promoter. PMID:8604293

  10. Live imaging of bicoid-dependent transcription in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tanguy; Ferraro, Teresa; Roelens, Baptiste; De Las Heras Chanes, Jose; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Coppey, Mathieu; Dostatni, Nathalie

    2013-11-01

    The early Drosophila embryo is an ideal model to understand the transcriptional regulation of well-defined patterns of gene expression in a developing organism. In this system, snapshots of transcription measurements obtained by RNA FISH on fixed samples cannot provide the temporal resolution needed to distinguish spatial heterogeneity from inherent noise. Here, we used the MS2-MCP system to visualize in living embryos nascent transcripts expressed from the canonical hunchback (hb) promoter under the control of Bicoid (Bcd). The hb-MS2 reporter is expressed as synchronously as endogenous hb in the anterior half of the embryo, but unlike hb it is also active in the posterior, though more heterogeneously and more transiently than in the anterior. The length and intensity of active transcription periods in the anterior are strongly reduced in absence of Bcd, whereas posterior ones are mostly Bcd independent. This posterior noisy signal decreases progressively through nuclear divisions, so that the MS2 reporter expression mimics the known anterior hb pattern at cellularization. We propose that the establishment of the hb pattern relies on Bcd-dependent lengthening of transcriptional activity periods in the anterior and may require two distinct repression mechanisms in the posterior.

  11. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Regulation of Diurnal Transcription in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Frederick R.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed global transcriptome changes during synchronized cell division in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle consists of a long G1 phase, followed by an S/M phase with multiple rapid, alternating rounds of DNA replication and segregation. We found that the S/M period is associated with strong induction of ∼2300 genes, many with conserved roles in DNA replication or cell division. Other genes, including many involved in photosynthesis, are reciprocally downregulated in S/M, suggesting a gene expression split correlating with the temporal separation between G1 and S/M. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle is synchronized by light-dark cycles, so in principle, these transcriptional changes could be directly responsive to light or to metabolic cues. Alternatively, cell-cycle-periodic transcription may be directly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases. To distinguish between these possibilities, we analyzed transcriptional profiles of mutants in the kinases CDKA and CDKB, as well as other mutants with distinct cell cycle blocks. Initial cell-cycle-periodic expression changes are largely CDK independent, but later regulation (induction and repression) is under differential control by CDKA and CDKB. Deviation from the wild-type transcriptional program in diverse cell cycle mutants will be an informative phenotype for further characterization of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. PMID:26475866

  12. Estrogen-dependent transcriptional activation and vitellogenin gene memory.

    PubMed

    Edinger, R S; Mambo, E; Evans, M I

    1997-12-01

    The concept of hepatic memory suggests that a gene responds more rapidly to a second exposure of an inducer than it does during the initial activation. To determine how soon estrogen-dependent DNA/protein interactions occur during the primary response, in vivo dimethylsulfate footprinting was carried out using genomic DNA amplified by ligation-mediated PCR. When estrogen was added to disrupted cells from a hormone-naive liver, changes within and around the estrogen response elements occurred within seconds, indicating a direct and rapid effect on this estrogen-responsive promoter that had never before been activated. Because this effect was so rapid relative to the delayed onset of mRNA accumulation during the primary response, run-on transcription assays were used to determine the transcription profiles for four of the yolk protein genes during the primary and secondary responses to estrogen. As with the accumulation of mRNA, the onset of transcription was delayed for all of these genes after a primary exposure to estrogen. Interestingly, after the secondary exposure to estrogen, the vitellogenin I, vitellogenin II, and very low density apolipoprotein II genes displayed a more rapid onset of transcription, whereas the primary and secondary profiles of apolipoprotein B transcription in response to estrogen were identical. Because the apoB gene is constitutively expressed in the absence of estrogen, and the vitellogenins are quiescent before the administration of the hormone, hepatic memory most likely represents a relatively stable event in the transition to an active state of a gene that is committed for tissue-specific expression.

  13. Developmental-stage-dependent transcriptional response to leukaemic oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Assi, Salam A.; Tsoulaki, Olga; Gilmour, Jane; Lacaud, Georges; Bonifer, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is characterized by a block in myeloid differentiation the stage of which is dependent on the nature of the transforming oncogene and the developmental stage of the oncogenic hit. This is also true for the t(8;21) translocation that gives rise to the RUNX1-ETO fusion protein and initiates the most common form of human AML. Here we study the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells expressing an inducible RUNX1-ETO gene into blood cells as a model, combined with genome-wide analyses of transcription factor binding and gene expression. RUNX1-ETO interferes with both the activating and repressive function of its normal counterpart, RUNX1, at early and late stages of blood cell development. However, the response of the transcriptional network to RUNX1-ETO expression is developmental stage specific, highlighting the molecular mechanisms determining specific target cell expansion after an oncogenic hit. PMID:26018585

  14. The dual effect of adenovirus type 5 E1A 13S protein on NF-kappaB activation is antagonized by E1B 19K.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, M L; Indorf, A; Limbourg, F P; Städtler, H; Traenckner, E B; Baeuerle, P A

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of human adenoviruses encode several regulatory proteins, including the two differentially spliced gene products E1A and E1B. Here, we show that the 13S but not the 12S splice variant of E1A of adenovirus type 5 can activate the human transcription factor NF-kappaB in a bimodal fashion. One mode is the activation of NF-kappaB containing the p65 subunit from the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB-IkappaB complex. This activation required reactive oxygen intermediates and the phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha at serines 32 and 36, followed by IkappaBalpha degradation and the nuclear uptake of NF-kappaB. In addition, 13S E1A stimulated the transcriptional activity of the C-terminal 80 amino acids of p65 at a core promoter with either a TATA box or an initiator (INR) element. The C-terminal 80 amino acids of p65 were found to associate with E1A in vitro. The activation of NF-kappaB-dependent reporter gene transcription by E1A was potently suppressed upon coexpression of the E1B 19-kDa protein (19K). E1B 19K prevented both the activation of NF-kappaB and the E1A-mediated transcriptional enhancement of p65. These inhibitory effects were not found for the 55-kDa splice variant of the E1B protein. We suggest that the inductive effect of E1A 13S on the host factor NF-kappaB, whose activation is important for the transcription of various adenovirus genes, must be counteracted by the suppressive effect of E1B 19K so that the adenovirus-infected cell can escape the immune-stimulatory and apoptotic effects of NF-kappaB. PMID:8754803

  15. Sequence dependence of transcription factor-mediated DNA looping

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephanie; Lindén, Martin; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    DNA is subject to large deformations in a wide range of biological processes. Two key examples illustrate how such deformations influence the readout of the genetic information: the sequestering of eukaryotic genes by nucleosomes and DNA looping in transcriptional regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These kinds of regulatory problems are now becoming amenable to systematic quantitative dissection with a powerful dialogue between theory and experiment. Here, we use a single-molecule experiment in conjunction with a statistical mechanical model to test quantitative predictions for the behavior of DNA looping at short length scales and to determine how DNA sequence affects looping at these lengths. We calculate and measure how such looping depends upon four key biological parameters: the strength of the transcription factor binding sites, the concentration of the transcription factor, and the length and sequence of the DNA loop. Our studies lead to the surprising insight that sequences that are thought to be especially favorable for nucleosome formation because of high flexibility lead to no systematically detectable effect of sequence on looping, and begin to provide a picture of the distinctions between the short length scale mechanics of nucleosome formation and looping. PMID:22718983

  16. Concentration and Length Dependence of DNA Looping in Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin; Garcia, Hernan G.; Blumberg, Seth; Towles, Kevin B.; Beausang, John F.; Nelson, Philip C.; Phillips, Rob

    2009-01-01

    In many cases, transcriptional regulation involves the binding of transcription factors at sites on the DNA that are not immediately adjacent to the promoter of interest. This action at a distance is often mediated by the formation of DNA loops: Binding at two or more sites on the DNA results in the formation of a loop, which can bring the transcription factor into the immediate neighborhood of the relevant promoter. These processes are important in settings ranging from the historic bacterial examples (bacterial metabolism and the lytic-lysogeny decision in bacteriophage), to the modern concept of gene regulation to regulatory processes central to pattern formation during development of multicellular organisms. Though there have been a variety of insights into the combinatorial aspects of transcriptional control, the mechanism of DNA looping as an agent of combinatorial control in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes remains unclear. We use single-molecule techniques to dissect DNA looping in the lac operon. In particular, we measure the propensity for DNA looping by the Lac repressor as a function of the concentration of repressor protein and as a function of the distance between repressor binding sites. As with earlier single-molecule studies, we find (at least) two distinct looped states and demonstrate that the presence of these two states depends both upon the concentration of repressor protein and the distance between the two repressor binding sites. We find that loops form even at interoperator spacings considerably shorter than the DNA persistence length, without the intervention of any other proteins to prebend the DNA. The concentration measurements also permit us to use a simple statistical mechanical model of DNA loop formation to determine the free energy of DNA looping, or equivalently, the for looping. PMID:19479049

  17. Calorie Restriction Suppresses Age-Dependent Hippocampal Transcriptional Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Marissa J.; Dolgalev, Igor; Alldred, Melissa J.; Heguy, Adriana; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) enhances longevity and mitigates aging phenotypes in numerous species. Physiological responses to CR are cell-type specific and variable throughout the lifespan. However, the mosaic of molecular changes responsible for CR benefits remains unclear, particularly in brain regions susceptible to deterioration during aging. We examined the influence of long-term CR on the CA1 hippocampal region, a key learning and memory brain area that is vulnerable to age-related pathologies, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Through mRNA sequencing and NanoString nCounter analysis, we demonstrate that one year of CR feeding suppresses age-dependent signatures of 882 genes functionally associated with synaptic transmission-related pathways, including calcium signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and Creb signaling in wild-type mice. By comparing the influence of CR on hippocampal CA1 region transcriptional profiles at younger-adult (5 months, 2.5 months of feeding) and older-adult (15 months, 12.5 months of feeding) timepoints, we identify conserved upregulation of proteome quality control and calcium buffering genes, including heat shock 70 kDa protein 1b (Hspa1b) and heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 (Hspa5), protein disulfide isomerase family A member 4 (Pdia4) and protein disulfide isomerase family A member 6 (Pdia6), and calreticulin (Calr). Expression levels of putative neuroprotective factors, klotho (Kl) and transthyretin (Ttr), are also elevated by CR in adulthood, although the global CR-specific expression profiles at younger and older timepoints are highly divergent. At a previously unachieved resolution, our results demonstrate conserved activation of neuroprotective gene signatures and broad CR-suppression of age-dependent hippocampal CA1 region expression changes, indicating that CR functionally maintains a more youthful transcriptional state within the hippocampal CA1 sector. PMID:26221964

  18. Calorie Restriction Suppresses Age-Dependent Hippocampal Transcriptional Signatures.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Marissa J; Dolgalev, Igor; Alldred, Melissa J; Heguy, Adriana; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) enhances longevity and mitigates aging phenotypes in numerous species. Physiological responses to CR are cell-type specific and variable throughout the lifespan. However, the mosaic of molecular changes responsible for CR benefits remains unclear, particularly in brain regions susceptible to deterioration during aging. We examined the influence of long-term CR on the CA1 hippocampal region, a key learning and memory brain area that is vulnerable to age-related pathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Through mRNA sequencing and NanoString nCounter analysis, we demonstrate that one year of CR feeding suppresses age-dependent signatures of 882 genes functionally associated with synaptic transmission-related pathways, including calcium signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and Creb signaling in wild-type mice. By comparing the influence of CR on hippocampal CA1 region transcriptional profiles at younger-adult (5 months, 2.5 months of feeding) and older-adult (15 months, 12.5 months of feeding) timepoints, we identify conserved upregulation of proteome quality control and calcium buffering genes, including heat shock 70 kDa protein 1b (Hspa1b) and heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 (Hspa5), protein disulfide isomerase family A member 4 (Pdia4) and protein disulfide isomerase family A member 6 (Pdia6), and calreticulin (Calr). Expression levels of putative neuroprotective factors, klotho (Kl) and transthyretin (Ttr), are also elevated by CR in adulthood, although the global CR-specific expression profiles at younger and older timepoints are highly divergent. At a previously unachieved resolution, our results demonstrate conserved activation of neuroprotective gene signatures and broad CR-suppression of age-dependent hippocampal CA1 region expression changes, indicating that CR functionally maintains a more youthful transcriptional state within the hippocampal CA1 sector. PMID:26221964

  19. Adenovirus Small E1A Employs the Lysine Acetylases p300/CBP and Tumor Suppressor Rb to Repress Select Host Genes and Promote Productive Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Roberto; Gou, Dawei; Jawdekar, Gauri; Johnson, Sarah A.; Nava, Miguel; Su, Trent; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zemke, Nathan R.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kurdistani, Siavash K.; Berk, Arnold J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogenic transformation by adenovirus small e1a depends on simultaneous interactions with the host lysine acetylases p300/CBP and the tumor suppressor RB. How these interactions influence cellular gene expression remains unclear. We find that e1a displaces RBs from E2F transcription factors and promotes p300 acetylation of RB1 K873/K874 to lock it into a repressing conformation that interacts with repressive chromatin-modifying enzymes. These repressing p300-e1a-RB1 complexes specifically interact with host genes that have unusually high p300 association within the gene body. The TGFβ-, TNF-, and interleukin-signaling pathway components are enriched among such p300-targeted genes. The p300-e1a-RB1 complex condenses chromatin in a manner dependent on HDAC activity, p300 lysine acetylase activity, the p300 bromodomain, and RB K873/K874 and e1a K239 acetylation to repress host genes that would otherwise inhibit productive virus infection. Thus, adenovirus employs e1a to repress host genes that interfere with viral replication. PMID:25525796

  20. A position-dependent transcription-activating domain in TFIIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, X; Darby, M K

    1993-01-01

    Transcription of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene by RNA polymerase III requires the gene-specific factor TFIIIA. To identify domains within TFIIIA that are essential for transcriptional activation, we have expressed C-terminal deletion, substitution, and insertion mutants of TFIIIA in bacteria as fusions with maltose-binding protein (MBP). The MBP-TFIIIA fusion protein specifically binds to the 5S RNA gene internal control region and complements transcription in a TFIIIA-depleted oocyte nuclear extract. Random, cassette-mediated mutagenesis of the carboxyl region of TFIIIA, which is not required for promoter binding, has defined a 14-amino-acid region that is critical for transcriptional activation. In contrast to activators of RNA polymerase II, the activity of the TFIIIA activation domain is strikingly sensitive to its position relative to the DNA-binding domain. When the eight amino acids that separate the transcription-activating domain from the last zinc finger are deleted, transcriptional activity is lost. Surprisingly, diverse amino acids can replace these eight amino acids with restoration of full transcriptional activity, suggesting that the length and not the sequence of this region is important. Insertion of amino acids between the zinc finger region and the transcription-activating domain causes a reduction in transcription proportional to the number of amino acids introduced. We propose that to function, the transcription-activating domain of TFIIIA must be correctly positioned at a minimum distance from the DNA-binding domain. Images PMID:8246967

  1. Time-Dependent Transcriptional Changes in Axenic Giardia duodenalis Trophozoites

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, Brendan R. E.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Baker, Louise; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Young, Neil D.; Hall, Ross S.; Rojas, Cristian A. A.; Svärd, Staffan G.; Gasser, Robin B.; Jex, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is the most common gastrointestinal protozoan parasite of humans and a significant contributor to the global burden of both diarrheal disease and post-infectious chronic disorders. Although G. duodenalis can be cultured axenically, significant gaps exist in our understanding of the molecular biology and metabolism of this pathogen. The present study employed RNA sequencing to characterize the mRNA transcriptome of G. duodenalis trophozoites in axenic culture, at log (48 h of growth), stationary (60 h), and declining (96 h) growth phases. Using ~400-times coverage of the transcriptome, we identified 754 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs), mainly representing two large DTG groups: 438 that were down-regulated in the declining phase relative to log and stationary phases, and 281 that were up-regulated. Differential transcription of prominent antioxidant and glycolytic enzymes implicated oxygen tension as a key factor influencing the transcriptional program of axenic trophozoites. Systematic bioinformatic characterization of numerous DTGs encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function was achieved using structural homology searching. This powerful approach greatly informed the differential transcription analysis and revealed putative novel antioxidant-coding genes, and the presence of a near-complete two-component-like signaling system that may link cytosolic redox or metabolite sensing to the observed transcriptional changes. Motif searching applied to promoter regions of the two large DTG groups identified different putative transcription factor-binding motifs that may underpin global transcriptional regulation. This study provides new insights into the drivers and potential mediators of transcriptional variation in axenic G. duodenalis and provides context for static transcriptional studies. PMID:26636323

  2. Transcriptional Regulatory Cascades in Runx2-Dependent Bone Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The development of the musculoskeletal system is a complex process that involves very precise control of bone formation and growth as well as remodeling during postnatal life. Although the understanding of the transcriptional mechanisms of osteogenesis has increased considerably, the molecular regulatory basis, especially the gene regulatory network of osteogenic differentiation, is still poorly understood. This review provides the reader with an overview of the key transcription factors that govern bone formation, highlighting their function and regulation linked to Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). Runx2 as the master transcription factor of osteoblast differentiation, Twist, Msh homeobox 2 (Msx2), and promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger protein (PLZF) acting upstream of Runx2, Osterix (Osx) acting downstream of Runx2, and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and zinc-finger protein 521 (ZFP521) acting as cofactors of Runx2 are discussed, and their relevance for tissue engineering is presented. References are provided for more in-depth personal study. PMID:23150948

  3. Transcription Independent Insulation at TFIIIC-Dependent Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Lourdes; Dhillon, Namrita; Kamakaka, Rohinton T.

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin insulators separate active from repressed chromatin domains. In yeast the RNA pol III transcription machinery bound to tRNA genes function with histone acetylases and chromatin remodelers to restrict the spread of heterochromatin. Our results collectively demonstrate that binding of TFIIIC is necessary for insulation but binding of TFIIIB along with TFIIIC likely improves the probability of complex formation at an insulator. Insulation by this transcription factor occurs in the absence of RNA polymerase III or polymerase II but requires specific histone acetylases and chromatin remodelers. This analysis identifies a minimal set of factors required for insulation. PMID:19596900

  4. Analyzing phosphorylation-dependent regulation of subcellular localization and transcriptional activity of transcriptional coactivator NT-PGC-1α.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ji Suk; Gettys, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a nuclear transcriptional coactivator that regulates the genes involved in energy metabolism. Recent evidence has been provided that alternative splicing of PPARGC1A gene produces a functional but predominantly cytosolic isoform of PGC-1α (NT-PGC-1α). We have demonstrated that transcriptional coactivation capacity of NT-PGC-1α is directly correlated with its nuclear localization in a PKA phosphorylation-dependent manner. In this chapter, we describe quantitative imaging analysis methods that are developed to measure the relative fluorescence intensity of the protein of interest in the nucleus and cytoplasm in a single cell and the frequency distribution of nuclear/cytoplasmic intensity ratios in the population of cells, respectively. This chapter also describes transient cotransfection and dual-luciferase reporter gene assay that examine the ability of coactivators to activate the transcriptional activity of transcription factors.

  5. TOR-dependent post-transcriptional regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guowu; McQuiston, Travis; Bernard, Amélie; Park, Yoon-Dong; Qiu, Jin; Vural, Ali; Zhang, Nannan; Waterman, Scott R; Blewett, Nathan H; Myers, Timothy G; Maraia, Richard J; Kehrl, John H; Uzel, Gulbu; Klionsky, Daniel J; Williamson, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of autophagy is required to maintain cellular equilibrium and prevent disease. While extensive study of post-translational mechanisms has yielded important insights into autophagy induction, less is known about post-transcriptional mechanisms that could potentiate homeostatic control. In our study, we showed that the RNA-binding protein, Dhh1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Vad1 in the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is involved in recruitment and degradation of key autophagy mRNAs. In addition, phosphorylation of the decapping protein Dcp2 by the target of rapamycin (TOR), facilitates decapping and degradation of autophagy-related mRNAs, resulting in repression of autophagy under nutrient-replete conditions. The post-transcriptional regulatory process is conserved in both mouse and human cells and plays a role in autophagy-related modulation of the inflammasome product IL1B. These results were then applied to provide mechanistic insight into autoimmunity of a patient with a PIK3CD/p110δ gain-of-function mutation. These results thus identify an important new post-transcriptional mechanism of autophagy regulation that is highly conserved between yeast and mammals.

  6. Pol I Transcription and Pre-rRNA Processing Are Coordinated in a Transcription-dependent Manner in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, K.; Gasiorowski, J. Z.; Chen, D.; Gilmore, R.; Norton, J. T.; Wang, C.; Leary, D. J.; Chan, E.K.L.; Dean, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Pre-rRNA synthesis and processing are key steps in ribosome biogenesis. Although recent evidence in yeast suggests that these two processes are coupled, the nature of their association is unclear. In this report, we analyze the coordination between rDNA transcription and pre-rRNA processing in mammalian cells. We found that pol I transcription factor UBF interacts with pre-rRNA processing factors as analyzed by immunoprecipitations, and the association depends on active rRNA synthesis. In addition, injections of plasmids containing the human rDNA promoter and varying lengths of 18S rDNA into HeLa nuclei show that pol I transcription machinery can be recruited to rDNA promoters regardless of the product that is transcribed, whereas subgroups of pre-rRNA processing factors are recruited to plasmids only when specific pre-rRNA fragments are produced. Our observations suggest a model for sequential recruitment of pol I transcription factors and pre-rRNA processing factors to elongating pre-rRNA on an as-needed basis rather than corecruitment to sites of active transcription. PMID:17108330

  7. A Glimpse beyond Structures in Auxin-Dependent Transcription.

    PubMed

    Parcy, François; Vernoux, Teva; Dumas, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs), transcription factors (TFs), and their Aux/IAA (IAA) repressors are central components of the auxin signalling pathway. They interact as homo- and heteromultimers. The structure of their interacting domains revealed a PB1 fold mediating electrostatic interactions through positive and negative faces. Detailed structural analysis revealed additional hydrophobic and polar determinants and started unveiling an ARF/IAA interaction code. Structural progress also shed new light on the DNA binding mode of ARFs showing how they dimerize to bind repeated DNA elements. Here, we discuss the in vitro and in vivo significance of these structural properties for the ARF family of TFs and identify some critical missing information on how specificity might be achieved in the auxin signalling pathway. PMID:26994657

  8. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  9. Ste12 and Mcm1 regulate cell cycle-dependent transcription of FAR1.

    PubMed Central

    Oehlen, L J; McKinney, J D; Cross, F R

    1996-01-01

    The transcripts of many genes involved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating were found to fluctuate during the cell cycle. In the absence of a functional Ste12 transcription factor, both the levels and the cell cycle pattern of expression of these genes were affected. FUS1 and AGA1 levels, which are maximally expressed only in G1-phase cells, were strongly reduced in ste12- cells. The cell cycle transcription pattern for FAR1 was changed in ste12- cells: the gene was still significantly expressed in G2/M, but transcript levels were strongly reduced in G1 phase, resulting in a lack of Far1 protein accumulation. G2/M transcription of FAR1 was dependent on the transcription factor Mcm1, and expression of a gene with Mcm1 fused to a strong transcriptional activation domain resulted in increased levels of FAR1 transcription. The pattern of cell cycle-regulated transcription of FAR1 could involve combinatorial control of Ste12 and Mcm1. Forced G1 expression of FAR1 from the GAL1 promoter resorted the ability to arrest in response to pheromone in ste12-cells. This indicates that transcription of FAR1 in the G1 phase is essential for accumulation of the protein and for pheromone-induced cell cycle arrest. PMID:8649392

  10. Regulation of p53-dependent apoptosis, transcriptional repression, and cell transformation by phosphorylation of the 55-kilodalton E1B protein of human adenovirus type 5.

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, J G; Branton, P E

    1997-01-01

    The adenovirus type 5 55-kDa E1B protein (E1B-55kDa) cooperates with E1A gene products to induce cell transformation. E1A proteins stimulate DNA synthesis and cell proliferation; however, they also cause rapid cell death by p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis. It is believed that the role of the E1B-55kDa protein in transformation is to protect against p53-dependent apoptosis by binding to and inactivating p53. It has been shown previously that the 55-kDa polypeptide abrogates p53-mediated transactivation and that mutants defective in p53 binding are unable to cooperate with E1A in transformation. We have previously mapped phosphorylation sites near the carboxy terminus of the E1B-55kDa protein at Ser-490 and Ser-491, which lie within casein kinase II consensus sequences. Conversion of these sites to alanine residues greatly reduced transforming activity, and although the mutant 55-kDa protein was found to interact with p53 at normal levels, it was somewhat defective for suppression of p53 transactivation activity. We now report that a nearby residue, Thr-495, also appears to be phosphorylated. We demonstrate directly that the wild-type 55-kDa protein is able to block E1A-induced p53-dependent apoptosis, whereas cells infected by mutant pm490/1/5A, which contains alanine residues at all three phosphorylation sites, exhibited extensive DNA fragmentation and classic apoptotic cell death. The E1B-55kDa product has been shown to exhibit intrinsic transcriptional repression activity when localized to promoters, such as by fusion with the GAL4 DNA-binding domain, even in the absence of p53. Such repression activity was totally absent with mutant pm490/1/5A. These data suggested that inhibition of p53-dependent apoptosis may depend on the transcriptional repression function of the 55-kDa protein, which appears to be regulated be phosphorylation at the carboxy terminus. PMID:9094635

  11. Exploring comprehensive within-motif dependence of transcription factor binding in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chi; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the binding of transcription factors helps to decipher the control logic behind transcriptional regulatory networks. Position weight matrix is commonly used to describe a binding motif but assumes statistical independence between positions. Although current approaches take within-motif dependence into account for better predictive performance, these models usually rely on prior knowledge and incorporate simple positional dependence to describe binding motifs. The inability to take complex within-motif dependence into account may result in an incomplete representation of binding motifs. In this work, we applied association rule mining techniques and constructed models to explore within-motif dependence for transcription factors in Escherichia coli. Our models can reflect transcription factor-DNA recognition where the explored dependence correlates with the binding specificity. We also propose a graphical representation of the explored within-motif dependence to illustrate the final binding configurations. Understanding the binding configurations also enables us to fine-tune or design transcription factor binding sites, and we attempt to present the configurations through exploring within-motif dependence. PMID:26592556

  12. Exploring comprehensive within-motif dependence of transcription factor binding in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung

    2015-11-23

    Modeling the binding of transcription factors helps to decipher the control logic behind transcriptional regulatory networks. Position weight matrix is commonly used to describe a binding motif but assumes statistical independence between positions. Although current approaches take within-motif dependence into account for better predictive performance, these models usually rely on prior knowledge and incorporate simple positional dependence to describe binding motifs. The inability to take complex within-motif dependence into account may result in an incomplete representation of binding motifs. In this work, we applied association rule mining techniques and constructed models to explore within-motif dependence for transcription factors in Escherichia coli. Our models can reflect transcription factor-DNA recognition where the explored dependence correlates with the binding specificity. We also propose a graphical representation of the explored within-motif dependence to illustrate the final binding configurations. Understanding the binding configurations also enables us to fine-tune or design transcription factor binding sites, and we attempt to present the configurations through exploring within-motif dependence.

  13. Gα13 regulates MEF2-dependent gene transcription in endothelial cells: role in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoquan; Han, Jingyan; Profirovic, Jasmina; Strekalova, Elena; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A.

    2010-01-01

    The α subunit of heterotrimeric G13 protein is required for the embryonic angiogenesis (Offermanns et al., Science 275:533–536, 1997). However, the molecular mechanism of Gα13-dependent angiogenesis is not understood. Here, we show that myocyte-specific enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) mediates Gα13-dependent angiogenesis. Our data showed that constitutively activated Gα13Q226L stimulated MEF2-dependent gene transcription. In addition, downregulation of endogenous Gα13 inhibited thrombin-stimulated MEF2-dependent gene transcription in endothelial cells. Both Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV) and histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) were involved in Gα13-mediated MEF2-dependent gene transcription. Gα13Q226L also increased Ca2+/calmodulin-independent CaMKIV activity, while dominant negative mutant of CaMKIV inhibited MEF2-dependent gene transcription induced by Gα13Q226L. Furthermore, Gα13Q226L was able to derepress HDAC5-mediated repression of gene transcription and induce the translocation of HDAC5 from nucleus to cytoplasm. Finally, downregulation of endogenous Gα13 and MEF2 proteins in endothelial cells reduced cell proliferation and capillary tube formation. Decrease of endothelial cell proliferation that was caused by the Gα13 downregulation was partially restored by the constitutively active MEF2-VP16. Our studies suggest that MEF2 proteins are an important component in Gα13-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:19093215

  14. Exploring comprehensive within-motif dependence of transcription factor binding in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the binding of transcription factors helps to decipher the control logic behind transcriptional regulatory networks. Position weight matrix is commonly used to describe a binding motif but assumes statistical independence between positions. Although current approaches take within-motif dependence into account for better predictive performance, these models usually rely on prior knowledge and incorporate simple positional dependence to describe binding motifs. The inability to take complex within-motif dependence into account may result in an incomplete representation of binding motifs. In this work, we applied association rule mining techniques and constructed models to explore within-motif dependence for transcription factors in Escherichia coli. Our models can reflect transcription factor-DNA recognition where the explored dependence correlates with the binding specificity. We also propose a graphical representation of the explored within-motif dependence to illustrate the final binding configurations. Understanding the binding configurations also enables us to fine-tune or design transcription factor binding sites, and we attempt to present the configurations through exploring within-motif dependence. PMID:26592556

  15. Subregions of the adenovirus E1A transactivation domain target multiple components of the TFIID complex.

    PubMed Central

    Geisberg, J V; Chen, J L; Ricciardi, R P

    1995-01-01

    Transcriptional activation by the adenovirus E1A 289R protein requires direct contacts with the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and also displays a critical requirement for TBP-associated factors (TAFs) (T.G. Boyer and A. J. Berk, Genes Dev. 7:1810-1823, 1993; J. V. Geisberg, W. S. Lee, A. J. Berk, and R. P. Ricciardi, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:2488-2492, 1994; W. S. Lee, C. C. Kao, G. O. Bryant, X. Liu, and A. J. Berk, Cell 67:365-376, 1991; and Q. Zhou, P. M. Lieberman, T. G. Boyer, and A. J. Berk, Genes Dev. 6:1964-1974, 1992). In this report, we demonstrate that the activation domain of E1A (CR3) specifically binds to two TAFs, human TAFII250 (hTAFII250) and Drosophila TAFII110 (dTAFII110). These interactions can take place both in vivo and in vitro and require the carboxy-terminal region of CR3; the zinc finger region of CR3, which binds TBP, is not needed to bind these TAFs. We mapped the E1A-binding sites on hTAFII250 to an internal region that contains a number of structural motifs, including an HMG box, a bromodomain, and direct repeats. This represents the first demonstration that hTAFII250 may serve as a target of a transcriptional activator. We also mapped the E1A binding on dTAFII110 to its C-terminal region. This is of significance since, by contrast, Sp1-mediated activation requires binding to the N-terminal domain of dTAFII110. Thus, distinct surfaces of dTAFII110 can serve as target sites for different activators. Our results indicate that E1A may activate transcription, in part, through direct contacts of the CR3 subdomains with selected components of the TFIID complex. PMID:7565781

  16. Recruitment of CBP/p300, TATA-binding protein, and S8 to distinct regions at the N terminus of adenovirus E1A.

    PubMed

    Rasti, Mozhgan; Grand, Roger J A; Mymryk, Joe S; Gallimore, Phillip H; Turnell, Andrew S

    2005-05-01

    The N-terminal region of the adenovirus (Ad) 12S E1A gene product targets several cellular proteins that are essential for the induction of S phase, cellular immortalization, cellular transformation, transcriptional repression, and transcriptional activation. The precise binding sites for these proteins, however, remain to be resolved. We therefore undertook an extensive site-directed mutagenesis approach to generate specific point mutants and to precisely map the binding sites for CBP, p300, TATA-binding protein (TBP), S4, S8, hGcn5, P/CAF, and Ran within the first 30 amino acids of the Ad5 12S E1A protein. We determined that although common residues within the N-terminal region can form partial binding sites for these proteins, point mutants were also generated that could discriminate between binding sites. These data indicate that AdE1A can target each of these proteins individually through distinct binding sites. It was evident, however, that the mutation of specific hydrophobic residues typically had the greatest effect upon AdE1A's ability to bind individual partners. Indeed, the mutation of L at positions 19 and 20 eliminated the ability of AdE1A to interact with any of the N-terminal binding proteins studied here. Interestingly, although TBP and S8 or CBP/p300 can exist as functional complexes, RNA interference revealed that the recruitment of either TBP, S8, or CBP/p300 to AdE1A was not dependent upon the expression of the other proteins. These data further indicate that AdE1A can target individual partner proteins in vivo and that it does not necessarily recruit these proteins indirectly as components of larger macromolecular complexes. Finally, we took advantage of the fine-mapping data to ascertain which proteins were targeted during the transformation process. Consistent with previous studies, CBP/p300 was found to be targeted by AdE1A during this process, although our data suggest that binding to other N-terminal proteins is also important for

  17. Transcription factor Runx3 regulates interleukin-15-dependent natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Levanon, Ditsa; Negreanu, Varda; Lotem, Joseph; Bone, Karen Rae; Brenner, Ori; Leshkowitz, Dena; Groner, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer cells belong to the family of innate lymphoid cells comprising the frontline defense against infected and transformed cells. Development and activation of natural killer cells is highly dependent on interleukin-15 signaling. However, very little is known about the transcription program driving this process. The transcription factor Runx3 is highly expressed in natural killer cells, but its function in these cells is largely unknown. We show that loss of Runx3 impaired interleukin-15-dependent accumulation of mature natural killer cells in vivo and under culture conditions and pregnant Runx3(-/-) mice completely lack the unique population of interleukin-15-dependent uterine natural killer cells. Combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of wild-type versus Runx3-deficient in vivo activated splenic natural killer cells revealed that Runx3 cooperates with ETS and T-box transcription factors to drive the interleukin-15-mediated transcription program during activation of these cells. Runx3 functions as a nuclear regulator during interleukin-15-dependent activation of natural killer cells by regulating the expression of genes involved in proliferation, maturation, and migration. Similar studies with additional transcription factors will allow the construction of a more detailed transcriptional network that controls natural killer cell development and function.

  18. CDK7-Dependent Transcriptional Addiction in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yubao; Zhang, Tinghu; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J.; Lee, Tong Ihn; Xie, Shaozhen; Yuzugullu, Haluk; Von, Thanh; Li, Heyuan; Lin, Ziao; Stover, Daniel G.; Lim, Elgene; Wang, Zhigang C.; Iglehart, J. Dirk; Young, Richard A.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Zhao, Jean J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive form of breast cancer that exhibits extremely high levels of genetic complexity and yet a relatively uniform transcriptional program. We postulate that TNBC might be highly dependent on uninterrupted transcription of a key set of genes within this gene expression program and might therefore be exceptionally sensitive to inhibitors of transcription. Utilizing kinase inhibitors and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing, we show here that triple-negative but not hormone receptor-positive breast cancer cells are exceptionally dependent on CDK7, a transcriptional cyclin-dependent kinase. TNBC cells are unique in their dependence on this transcriptional CDK and suffer apoptotic cell death upon CDK7 inhibition. An “Achilles cluster” of TNBC-specific genes is especially sensitive to CDK7 inhibition and frequently associated with super-enhancers. We conclude that CDK7 mediates transcriptional addiction to a vital cluster of genes in TNBC and CDK7 inhibition may be a useful therapy for this challenging cancer. PMID:26406377

  19. Enhancement of Transcription by a Splicing-Competent Intron Is Dependent on Promoter Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Neha; Ansari, Athar

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of transcription by a splicing-competent intron is an evolutionarily conserved feature among eukaryotes. The molecular mechanism underlying the phenomenon, however, is not entirely clear. Here we show that the intron is an important regulator of promoter directionality. Employing strand-specific transcription run-on (TRO) analysis, we show that the transcription of mRNA is favored over the upstream anti-sense transcripts (uaRNA) initiating from the promoter in the presence of an intron. Mutation of either the 5′ or 3′ splice site resulted in the reversal of promoter directionality, thereby suggesting that it is not merely the 5′ splice site but the entire splicing-competent intron that regulates transcription directionality. ChIP analysis revealed the recruitment of termination factors near the promoter region in the presence of an intron. Removal of intron or the mutation of splice sites adversely affected the promoter localization of termination factors. We have earlier demonstrated that the intron-mediated enhancement of transcription is dependent on gene looping. Here we show that gene looping is crucial for the recruitment of termination factors in the promoter-proximal region of an intron-containing gene. In a looping-defective mutant, despite normal splicing, the promoter occupancy of factors required for poly(A)-dependent termination of transcription was compromised. This was accompanied by a concomitant loss of transcription directionality. On the basis of these results, we propose that the intron-dependent gene looping places the terminator-bound factors in the vicinity of the promoter region for termination of the promoter-initiated upstream antisense transcription, thereby conferring promoter directionality. PMID:27152651

  20. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-08-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination.

  1. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-08-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination. PMID:26276832

  2. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-01-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination. PMID:26276832

  3. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Morgan A.; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L.

    2016-01-01

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription. PMID:27334938

  4. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L

    2016-08-09

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription.

  5. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST/EAAT1: a role for YY1.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Sandra; Vargas, Miguel A; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2007-05-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain and its extracellular levels are tightly regulated to prevent excitotoxic effects. The Na(+)-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST/EAAT1 is regulated in the short and in the long term by glutamate. A receptors-independent change in its membrane translocation rate, accounts for an acute modulation in GLAST/EAAT1 transport. In contrast, activation of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate subtype of glutamate receptors represses the transcription of the chick glast gene. A glutamate responsive element has been mapped to the promoter region of this gene containing a bonafide binding site for the transcription factor Ying-Yang 1. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glia cells, glutamate elicited a time and dose-dependent increase in Ying-Yang 1 DNA binding consistent with the negative response generated in a reporter gene construct controlled for Ying-Yang 1. Over-expression of this transcription factor leads to a substantial reduction in GLAST/EAAT1 transporter uptake and an important decrease in mRNA levels, all associated with the transcriptional repression of the chick glast promoter activity. These results provide evidence for an involvement of Ying-Yang 1 in the transcriptional response to glutamate in glial cells and favor the notion of a relevant role of this factor in GLAST/EAAT1 transcriptional control.

  6. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  7. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  8. RNA remodeling by bacterial global regulator CsrA promotes Rho-dependent transcription termination

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bossi, Nara; Schwartz, Annie; Guillemardet, Benoit; D’Heygère, François; Bossi, Lionello; Boudvillain, Marc

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding protein CsrA is a key regulator of a variety of cellular processes in bacteria, including carbon and stationary phase metabolism, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and virulence gene expression in pathogens. CsrA binds to bipartite sequence elements at or near the ribosome loading site in messenger RNA (mRNA), most often inhibiting translation initiation. Here we describe an alternative novel mechanism through which CsrA achieves negative regulation. We show that CsrA binding to the upstream portion of the 5′ untranslated region of Escherichia coli pgaA mRNA—encoding a polysaccharide adhesin export protein—unfolds a secondary structure that sequesters an entry site for transcription termination factor Rho, resulting in the premature stop of transcription. These findings establish a new paradigm for bacterial gene regulation in which remodeling of the nascent transcript by a regulatory protein promotes Rho-dependent transcription attenuation. PMID:24888591

  9. Dependence of Enhancer-Mediated Transcription of the Immunoglobulin μ Gene on Nuclear Matrix Attachment Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, William C.; van Genderen, Courtney; Jenuwein, Thomas; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    1994-08-01

    Transcription of the immunoglobulin μ heavy chain locus is regulated by an intronic enhancer that is flanked on both sides by nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs). These MARs have now been shown to be essential for transcription of a rearranged μ gene in transgenic B lymphocytes, but they were not required in stably transfected tissue culture cells. Normal rates of transcriptional initiation at a variable region promoter and the formation of an extended deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I)-sensitive chromatin domain were dependent on MARs, although DNase I hypersensitivity at the enhancer was detected in the absence of MARs. Thus, transcriptional activation of the μ gene during normal lymphoid development requires a synergistic collaboration between the enhancer and flanking MARs.

  10. Mapping neural circuits with activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Masuyama, Kaoru; Zhang, Yi; Rao, Yi; Wang, Jing W

    2012-03-01

    Abstract: Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a calcium-responsive transcription factor. We describe here an NFAT-based neural tracing method-CaLexA (calcium-dependent nuclear import of LexA)-for labeling active neurons in behaving animals. In this system, sustained neural activity induces nuclear import of the chimeric transcription factor LexA-VP16-NFAT, which in turn drives green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter expression only in active neurons. We tested this system in Drosophila and found that volatile sex pheromones excite specific neurons in the olfactory circuit. Furthermore, complex courtship behavior associated with multi-modal sensory inputs activated neurons in the ventral nerve cord. This method harnessing the mechanism of activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor can be used to identify active neurons in specific neuronal population in behaving animals. PMID:22236090

  11. Unusually long-lived pause required for regulation of a Rho-dependent transcription terminator

    PubMed Central

    Hollands, Kerry; Sevostiyanova, Anastasia; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Up to half of all transcription termination events in bacteria rely on the RNA-dependent helicase Rho. However, the nucleic acid sequences that promote Rho-dependent termination remain poorly characterized. Defining the molecular determinants that confer Rho-dependent termination is especially important for understanding how such terminators can be regulated in response to specific signals. Here, we identify an extraordinarily long-lived pause at the site where Rho terminates transcription in the 5′-leader region of the Mg2+ transporter gene mgtA in Salmonella enterica. We dissect the sequence elements required for prolonged pausing in the mgtA leader and establish that the remarkable longevity of this pause is required for a riboswitch to stimulate Rho-dependent termination in the mgtA leader region in response to Mg2+ availability. Unlike Rho-dependent terminators described previously, where termination occurs at multiple pause sites, there is a single site of transcription termination directed by Rho in the mgtA leader. Our data suggest that Rho-dependent termination events that are subject to regulation may require elements distinct from those operating at constitutive Rho-dependent terminators. PMID:24778260

  12. Epigenetic repression of ribosomal RNA transcription by ROCK-dependent aberrant cytoskeletal organization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tse-Hsiang; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    It is known that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis is regulated by cellular energy and proliferation status. In this study, we investigated rRNA gene transcription in response to cytoskeletal stress. Our data revealed that the cell shape constrained by isotropic but not elongated micropatterns in HeLa cells led to a significant reduction in rRNA transcription dependent on ROCK. Expression of a dominant-active form of ROCK also repressed rRNA transcription. Isotropic constraint and ROCK over-activation led to different types of aberrant F-actin organization, but their suppression effects on rRNA transcription were similarly reversed by inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) or overexpression of a dominant negative form of Nesprin, which shields the signal transmitted from actin filament to the nuclear interior. We further showed that the binding of HDAC1 to the active fraction of rDNA genes is increased by ROCK over-activation, thus reducing H3K9/14 acetylation and suppressing transcription. Our results demonstrate an epigenetic control of active rDNA genes that represses rRNA transcription in response to the cytoskeletal stress. PMID:27350000

  13. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand. PMID:25916672

  14. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  15. Rb function is required for E1A-induced S-phase checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Nemajerova, A; Talos, F; Moll, U M; Petrenko, O

    2008-09-01

    It is widely accepted that adenoviral E1A exerts its influence on recipient cells through binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) family proteins, followed by a global release of E2F factors from pocket-protein control. Our study challenges this simple paradigm by demonstrating previously unappreciated complexity. We show that E1A-expressing primary and transformed cells are characterized by the persistence of Rb-E2F1 complexes. We provide evidence that E1A causes Rb stabilization by interfering with its proteasomal degradation. Functional experiments supported by biochemical data reveal not only a dramatic increase in Rb and E2F1 protein levels in E1A-expressing cells but also demonstrate their activation throughout the cell cycle. We further show that E1A activates an Rb- and E2F1-dependent S-phase checkpoint that attenuates the growth of cells that became hyperploid through errors in mitosis and supports the fidelity DNA replication even in the absence of E2F complexes with other Rb family proteins, thereby functionally substituting for the loss of p53. Our results support the essential role of Rb and E2F1 in the regulation of genomic stability and DNA damage checkpoints.

  16. An RNA motif advances transcription by preventing Rho-dependent termination

    PubMed Central

    Sevostyanova, Anastasia; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription termination factor Rho associates with most nascent bacterial RNAs as they emerge from RNA polymerase. However, pharmacological inhibition of Rho derepresses only a small fraction of these transcripts. What, then, determines the specificity of Rho-dependent transcription termination? We now report the identification of a Rho-antagonizing RNA element (RARE) that hinders Rho-dependent transcription termination. We establish that RARE traps Rho in an inactive complex but does not prevent Rho binding to its recruitment sites. Although translating ribosomes normally block Rho access to an mRNA, inefficient translation of an open reading frame in the leader region of the Salmonella mgtCBR operon actually enables transcription of its associated coding region by favoring an RNA conformation that sequesters RARE. The discovery of an RNA element that inactivates Rho signifies that the specificity of nucleic-acid binding proteins is defined not only by the sequences that recruit these proteins but also by sequences that antagonize their activity. PMID:26630006

  17. Gibberelic acid and cGMP-dependent transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, René; Dawe, Adam; Meier, Stuart; Ludidi, Ndiko; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2010-01-01

    An ever increasing amount of transcriptomic data and analysis tools provide novel insight into complex responses of biological systems. Given these resources we have undertaken to review aspects of transcriptional regulation in response to the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) and its second messenger guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in Arabidopsis thaliana, both wild type and selected mutants. Evidence suggests enrichment of GA-responsive (GARE ) elements in promoters of genes that are transcriptionally upregulated in response to cGMP but downregulated in a GA insensitive mutant (ga1-3). In contrast, in the genes upregulated in the mutant, no enrichment in the GARE is observed suggesting that GARE motifs are diagnostic for GA-induced and cGMP-dependent transcriptional upregulation. Further, we review how expression studies of GA-dependent transcription factors and transcriptional networks based on common promoter signatures derived from ab initio analyses can contribute to our understanding of plant responses at the systems level. PMID:20118660

  18. Transcription-dependent DNA transactions in the mitochondrial genome of a yeast hypersuppressive petite mutant.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, E; Clayton, D A

    1998-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains highly conserved sequences, called rep/ori, that are associated with several aspects of its metabolism. These rep/ori sequences confer the transmission advantage exhibited by a class of deletion mutants called hypersuppressive petite mutants. In addition, because they share features with the mitochondrial leading-strand DNA replication origin of mammals, rep/ori sequences have also been proposed to participate in mtDNA replication initiation. Like the mammalian origins, where transcription is used as a priming mechanism for DNA synthesis, yeast rep/ori sequences contain an active promoter. Although transcription is required for maintenance of wild-type mtDNA in yeast, the role of the rep/ori promoter as a cis-acting element involved in the replication of wild-type mtDNA is unclear, since mitochondrial deletion mutants need neither transcription nor a rep/ori sequence to maintain their genome. Similarly, transcription from the rep/ori promoter does not seem to be necessary for biased inheritance of mtDNA. As a step to elucidate the function of the rep/ori promoter, we have attempted to detect transcription-dependent DNA transactions in the mtDNA of a hypersuppressive petite mutant. We have examined the mtDNA of the well-characterized petite mutant a-1/1R/Z1, whose repeat unit shelters the rep/ori sequence ori1, in strains carrying either wild-type or null alleles of the nuclear genes encoding the mitochondrial transcription apparatus. Complex DNA transactions were detected that take place around GC-cluster C, an evolutionarily conserved GC-rich sequence block immediately downstream from the rep/ori promoter. These transactions are strictly dependent upon mitochondrial transcription. PMID:9566917

  19. High initiation rates at the ribosomal gene promoter do not depend upon spacer transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Labhart, P.; Reeder, R.H. )

    1989-05-01

    We report experiments that test the model that in Xenopus laevis, RNA polymerase I is handed over in a conservative fashion from the T3 terminator to the adjacent gene promoter. We have introduced transcription-terminating lesions into the ribosomal DNA repeat by irradiating cultured cells with ultraviolet light. We used isolated nuclei to measure the effect of such lesions on transcription. UV damage sufficient to prevent all elongating RNA polymerase from reaching T3 from upstream had no adverse effect on the density of RNA polymerase at the very 5' end of the gene. We conclude that high rates of transcription initiation at the gene promoter do not depend upon polymerase passing from one repeat to the next or on polymerase initiating at the spacer promoters.

  20. Adenovirus E1A Targets the DREF Nuclear Factor To Regulate Virus Gene Expression, DNA Replication, and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Radko, Sandi; Koleva, Maria; James, Kris M. D.; Jung, Richard; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adenovirus E1A gene is the first gene expressed upon viral infection. E1A remodels the cellular environment to maximize permissivity for viral replication. E1A is also the major transactivator of viral early gene expression and a coregulator of a large number of cellular genes. E1A carries out its functions predominantly by binding to cellular regulatory proteins and altering their activities. The unstructured nature of E1A enables it to bind to a large variety of cellular proteins and form new molecular complexes with novel functions. The C terminus of E1A is the least-characterized region of the protein, with few known binding partners. Here we report the identification of cellular factor DREF (ZBED1) as a novel and direct binding partner of E1A. Our studies identify a dual role for DREF in the viral life cycle. DREF contributes to activation of gene expression from all viral promoters early in infection. Unexpectedly, it also functions as a growth restriction factor for adenovirus as knockdown of DREF enhances virus growth and increases viral genome copy number late in the infection. We also identify DREF as a component of viral replication centers. E1A affects the subcellular distribution of DREF within PML bodies and enhances DREF SUMOylation. Our findings identify DREF as a novel E1A C terminus binding partner and provide evidence supporting a role for DREF in viral replication. IMPORTANCE This work identifies the putative transcription factor DREF as a new target of the E1A oncoproteins of human adenovirus. DREF was found to primarily localize with PML nuclear bodies in uninfected cells and to relocalize into virus replication centers during infection. DREF was also found to be SUMOylated, and this was enhanced in the presence of E1A. Knockdown of DREF reduced the levels of viral transcripts detected at 20 h, but not at 40 h, postinfection, increased overall virus yield, and enhanced viral DNA replication. DREF was also found to localize to

  1. S6 Kinase is essential for MYC-dependent rDNA transcription in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Naomi C; Tchoubrieva, Elissaveta B; Chahal, Arjun; Woods, Simone; Lee, Amanda; Lin, Jane I; Parsons, Linda; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Quinn, Leonie M

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation are fundamental properties of rapidly growing and dividing malignant cells. The MYC oncoprotein drives growth predominantly via its ability to upregulate the ribosome biogenesis program, in particular stimulating the activity of the RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) machinery to increase ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. Although MYC function is known to be highly dependent on the cellular signalling context, the pathways interacting with MYC to regulate transcription of ribosomal genes (rDNA) in vivo in response to growth factor status, nutrient availability and cellular stress are only beginning to be understood. To determine factors critical to MYC-dependent stimulation of rDNA transcription in vivo, we performed a transient expression screen for known oncogenic signalling pathways in Drosophila. Strikingly, from the broad range of pathways tested, we found that ribosomal protein S6 Kinase (S6K) activity, downstream of the TOR pathway, was the only factor rate-limiting for the rapid induction of rDNA transcription due to transiently increased MYC. Further, we demonstrated that one of the mechanism(s) by which MYC and S6K cooperate is through coordinate activation of the essential Pol I transcription initiation factor TIF-1A (RRN 3). As Pol I targeted therapy is now in phase 1 clinical trials in patients with haematological malignancies, including those driven by MYC, these data suggest that therapies dually targeting Pol I transcription and S6K activity may be effective in treating MYC-driven tumours.

  2. S6 Kinase is essential for MYC-dependent rDNA transcription in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Naomi C; Tchoubrieva, Elissaveta B; Chahal, Arjun; Woods, Simone; Lee, Amanda; Lin, Jane I; Parsons, Linda; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Quinn, Leonie M

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation are fundamental properties of rapidly growing and dividing malignant cells. The MYC oncoprotein drives growth predominantly via its ability to upregulate the ribosome biogenesis program, in particular stimulating the activity of the RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) machinery to increase ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. Although MYC function is known to be highly dependent on the cellular signalling context, the pathways interacting with MYC to regulate transcription of ribosomal genes (rDNA) in vivo in response to growth factor status, nutrient availability and cellular stress are only beginning to be understood. To determine factors critical to MYC-dependent stimulation of rDNA transcription in vivo, we performed a transient expression screen for known oncogenic signalling pathways in Drosophila. Strikingly, from the broad range of pathways tested, we found that ribosomal protein S6 Kinase (S6K) activity, downstream of the TOR pathway, was the only factor rate-limiting for the rapid induction of rDNA transcription due to transiently increased MYC. Further, we demonstrated that one of the mechanism(s) by which MYC and S6K cooperate is through coordinate activation of the essential Pol I transcription initiation factor TIF-1A (RRN 3). As Pol I targeted therapy is now in phase 1 clinical trials in patients with haematological malignancies, including those driven by MYC, these data suggest that therapies dually targeting Pol I transcription and S6K activity may be effective in treating MYC-driven tumours. PMID:26215099

  3. Activity-dependent transport of the transcriptional coactivator CRTC1 from synapse to nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, Toh Hean; Uzgil, Besim; Lin, Peter; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K; O'Dell, Thomas J; Martin, Kelsey C

    2012-07-01

    Long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy, such as those underlying long-term memory, require transcription. Activity-dependent transport of synaptically localized transcriptional regulators provides a direct means of coupling synaptic stimulation with changes in transcription. The CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC1), which is required for long-term hippocampal plasticity, binds CREB to potently promote transcription. We show that CRTC1 localizes to synapses in silenced hippocampal neurons but translocates to the nucleus in response to localized synaptic stimulation. Regulated nuclear translocation occurs only in excitatory neurons and requires calcium influx and calcineurin activation. CRTC1 is controlled in a dual fashion with activity regulating CRTC1 nuclear translocation and cAMP modulating its persistence in the nucleus. Neuronal activity triggers a complex change in CRTC1 phosphorylation, suggesting that CRTC1 may link specific types of stimuli to specific changes in gene expression. Together, our results indicate that synapse-to-nuclear transport of CRTC1 dynamically informs the nucleus about synaptic activity.

  4. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation in bergmann glia cells: involvement of p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Rossana C; Barrera, Iliana; Castelán, Francisco; Soto-Cid, Abraham; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2008-07-01

    Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the Central Nervous System (CNS). Ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) are present in neurons and glial cells and are involved in gene expression regulation. Mitogen-activated proteins kinases (MAPK) are critical for all the membrane to nuclei signaling pathways described so far. In cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation is partially dependent on p42/44 MAPK activity. Another member of this kinase family, p38 MAPK is activated by non-mitogenic stimuli through its Thr180/Tyr182 phosphorylation and phosphorylates cytoplasmic and nuclear protein targets involved in translational and transcriptional events. Taking into consideration that the role of p38MAPK in glial cells is not well understood, we demonstrate here that glutamate increases p38 MAPK phosphorylation in a time and dose dependent manner in cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells (BGC). Moreover, p38 MAPK is involved in the glutamate-induced transcriptional activation in these cells. Ionotropic as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors participate in p38 MAPK activation. The present findings demonstrate the involvement of p38 MAPK in glutamate-dependent gene expression regulation in glial cells.

  5. DksA-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation in Salmonella Experiencing Nitrosative Stress.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Matthew A; Henard, Calvin A; Tapscott, Timothy; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Vázquez-Torres, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Redox-based signaling is fundamental to the capacity of bacteria to sense, and respond to, nitrosative and oxidative stress encountered in natural and host environments. The conserved RNA polymerase regulatory protein DksA is a thiol-based sensor of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. DksA-dependent transcriptional control promotes antinitrosative and antioxidative defenses that contribute to Salmonella pathogenesis. The specific adaptive changes mediated by DksA in response to reactive species, however, have not been elucidated. Herein, we characterize DksA-dependent changes in gene expression in Salmonella enterica experiencing nitrosative stress. Genome-wide expression analysis of wild-type and ΔdksA Salmonella exposed to the nitric oxide ((•)NO) donor DETA NONOate demonstrated (•)NO- and DksA-dependent regulatory control of 427 target genes. Transcriptional changes centered primarily on genes encoding aspects of cellular metabolism. Several antioxidants and oxidoreductases important in redox buffering, (•)NO detoxification, and damage repair were also observed to be up-regulated in an (•)NO- and DksA-dependent manner. Compared to wild-type bacteria, (•)NO-treated ΔdksA Salmonella exhibited a de-repression of genes encoding components of iron homeostasis and failed to activate sulfur assimilation and cysteine biosynthetic operons. As cysteine is integral to efficient antinitrosative and antioxidative defense and repair programs, we further examined the redox-responsive transcriptional control of cysteine biosynthesis by DksA. These investigations revealed that the activation of genes comprising cysteine biosynthesis also occurs in response to hydrogen peroxide, is dependent upon the redox-sensing zinc finger motif of DksA, and requires the transcriptional regulator CysB. Our observations demonstrate that DksA mediates global adaptation to nitrosative stress in Salmonella and provide unique insight into a novel regulatory mechanism by which cysteine

  6. DksA-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation in Salmonella Experiencing Nitrosative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Matthew A.; Henard, Calvin A.; Tapscott, Timothy; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Vázquez-Torres, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Redox-based signaling is fundamental to the capacity of bacteria to sense, and respond to, nitrosative and oxidative stress encountered in natural and host environments. The conserved RNA polymerase regulatory protein DksA is a thiol-based sensor of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. DksA-dependent transcriptional control promotes antinitrosative and antioxidative defenses that contribute to Salmonella pathogenesis. The specific adaptive changes mediated by DksA in response to reactive species, however, have not been elucidated. Herein, we characterize DksA-dependent changes in gene expression in Salmonella enterica experiencing nitrosative stress. Genome-wide expression analysis of wild-type and ΔdksA Salmonella exposed to the nitric oxide (•NO) donor DETA NONOate demonstrated •NO- and DksA-dependent regulatory control of 427 target genes. Transcriptional changes centered primarily on genes encoding aspects of cellular metabolism. Several antioxidants and oxidoreductases important in redox buffering, •NO detoxification, and damage repair were also observed to be up-regulated in an •NO- and DksA-dependent manner. Compared to wild-type bacteria, •NO-treated ΔdksA Salmonella exhibited a de-repression of genes encoding components of iron homeostasis and failed to activate sulfur assimilation and cysteine biosynthetic operons. As cysteine is integral to efficient antinitrosative and antioxidative defense and repair programs, we further examined the redox-responsive transcriptional control of cysteine biosynthesis by DksA. These investigations revealed that the activation of genes comprising cysteine biosynthesis also occurs in response to hydrogen peroxide, is dependent upon the redox-sensing zinc finger motif of DksA, and requires the transcriptional regulator CysB. Our observations demonstrate that DksA mediates global adaptation to nitrosative stress in Salmonella and provide unique insight into a novel regulatory mechanism by which cysteine

  7. Drosophila Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Multiple Regulators of HIF–Dependent Transcription in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dekanty, Andrés; Romero, Nuria M.; Bertolin, Agustina P.; Thomas, María G.; Leishman, Claudia C.; Perez-Perri, Joel I.; Boccaccio, Graciela L.; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of evolutionary conserved alpha-beta heterodimeric transcription factors that induce a wide range of genes in response to low oxygen tension. Molecular mechanisms that mediate oxygen-dependent HIF regulation operate at the level of the alpha subunit, controlling protein stability, subcellular localization, and transcriptional coactivator recruitment. We have conducted an unbiased genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells aimed to the identification of genes required for HIF activity. After 3 rounds of selection, 30 genes emerged as critical HIF regulators in hypoxia, most of which had not been previously associated with HIF biology. The list of genes includes components of chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription elongation factors, and translational regulators. One remarkable hit was the argonaute 1 (ago1) gene, a central element of the microRNA (miRNA) translational silencing machinery. Further studies confirmed the physiological role of the miRNA machinery in HIF–dependent transcription. This study reveals the occurrence of novel mechanisms of HIF regulation, which might contribute to developing novel strategies for therapeutic intervention of HIF–related pathologies, including heart attack, cancer, and stroke. PMID:20585616

  8. The arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 regulates CIITA-dependent MHC II transcription.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhiwen; Kong, Xiaocen; Xia, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyan; Li, He; Xu, Huihui; Fang, Mingming; Xu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC II) dependent antigen presentation serves as a key step in mammalian adaptive immunity and host defense. In antigen presenting cells (e.g., macrophages), MHC II transcription can be activated by interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and mediated by class II transactivator (CIITA). The underlying epigenetic mechanism, however, is not completely understood. Here we report that following IFN-γ stimulation, symmetrically dimethylated histone H3 arginine 2 (H3R2Me2s) accumulated on the MHC II promoter along with CIITA. IFN-γ augmented expression, nuclear translocation, and promoter binding of the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 in macrophages. Over-expression of PRMT5 potentiated IFN-γ induced activation of MHC II transcription in an enzyme activity-dependent manner. In contrast, PRMT5 silencing or inhibition of PRMT5 activity by methylthioadenosine (MTA) suppressed MHC II transactivation by IFN-γ. CIITA interacted with and recruited PRMT5 to the MHC II promoter and mediated the synergy between PRMT5 and ASH2/WDR5 to activate MHC II transcription. PRMT5 expression was down-regulated in senescent and H2O2-treated macrophages rendering ineffectual induction of MHC II transcription by IFN-γ. Taken together, our data reveal a pathophysiologically relevant role for PRMT5 in MHC II transactivation in macrophages. PMID:26972221

  9. The Cellular Protein Complex Associated with a Transforming Region of E1A Contains c-MYC

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalingam, S.; Subramanian, T.; Zhao, Ling-jun

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cell-transforming activity of human adenovirus 5 (hAd5) E1A is mediated by the N-terminal half of E1A, which interacts with three different major cellular protein complexes, p300/CBP, TRRAP/p400, and pRb family members. Among these protein interactions, the interaction of pRb family proteins with conserved region 2 (CR2) of E1A is known to promote cell proliferation by deregulating the activities of E2F family transcription factors. The functional consequences of interaction with the other two protein complexes in regulating the transforming activity of E1A are not well defined. Here, we report that the E1A N-terminal region also interacted with the cellular proto-oncoprotein c-MYC and the homolog of enhancer of yellow 2 (ENY2). Our results suggested that these proteins interacted with an essential E1A transforming domain spanning amino acid residues 26 to 35 which also interacted with TRRAP and p400. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of TRRAP reduced c-MYC interaction with E1A, while p400 depletion did not. In contrast, depletion of TRRAP enhanced ENY2 interaction with E1A, suggesting that ENY2 and TRRAP may interact with E1A in a competitive manner. The same E1A region additionally interacted with the constituents of a deubiquitinase complex consisting of USP22, ATXN7, and ATXN7L3 via TRRAP. Acute short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated depletion of c-MYC reduced the E1A transforming activity, while depletion of ENY2 and MAX did not. These results suggested that the association of c-MYC with E1A may, at least partially, play a role in the E1A transformation activity, independently of MAX. IMPORTANCE The transforming region of adenovirus E1A consists of three short modules which complex with different cellular protein complexes. The mechanism by which one of the transforming modules, CR2, promotes cell proliferation, through inactivating the activities of the pRb family proteins, is better understood than the activities of the other domains

  10. Inhibition of acetyl phosphate-dependent transcription by an acetylatable lysine on RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Lima, Bruno P; Thanh Huyen, Tran Thi; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Antelmann, Haike; Wolfe, Alan J

    2012-09-14

    The ability of bacteria to adapt to environmental changes has allowed these organisms to thrive in all parts of the globe. By monitoring their extracellular and intracellular environments, bacteria assure their most appropriate response for each environment. Post-translational modification of proteins is one mechanism by which cells respond to their changing environments. Here, we report that two post-translational modifications regulate transcription of the extracytoplasmic stress-responsive promoter cpxP: (i) acetyl phosphate-dependent phosphorylation of the response regulator CpxR and (ii) acetyl coenzyme A-dependent acetylation of the α subunit of RNA polymerase. Together, these two post-translational modifications fine-tune cpxP transcription in response to changes in the intracellular environment. PMID:22829598

  11. Inhibition of Acetyl Phosphate-dependent Transcription by an Acetylatable Lysine on RNA Polymerase*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Bruno P.; Thanh Huyen, Tran Thi; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Antelmann, Haike; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to adapt to environmental changes has allowed these organisms to thrive in all parts of the globe. By monitoring their extracellular and intracellular environments, bacteria assure their most appropriate response for each environment. Post-translational modification of proteins is one mechanism by which cells respond to their changing environments. Here, we report that two post-translational modifications regulate transcription of the extracytoplasmic stress-responsive promoter cpxP: (i) acetyl phosphate-dependent phosphorylation of the response regulator CpxR and (ii) acetyl coenzyme A-dependent acetylation of the α subunit of RNA polymerase. Together, these two post-translational modifications fine-tune cpxP transcription in response to changes in the intracellular environment. PMID:22829598

  12. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of the chkbp gene: signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Adán; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2002-10-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, induces a signal from the membrane to the nucleus that regulates gene expression. The gene encoding the chick kainate binding protein undergoes a glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation via an activator protein-1 site within its promoter region. To characterize this event, cultured chick Bergmann glia cells were exposed to glutamate, and a dose-dependent increase in promoter activity was established. The glutamate effect is mediated through Ca(2+)-permeable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/kainate receptors. The signaling cascade includes phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase activation. The cAMP response-element binding protein becomes phosphorylated and activates fos transcription. Finally, the activator protein-1 complex binds to the glutamate response element in the chick kainate binding protein promoter region inducing its activity. We propose that the mitogen-activated protein kinase/p90 ribosomal S6 kinase pathway plays a critical role in glutamate-induced gene transcription.

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Rajesh K.; Murray, Thomas V. A.; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R.; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2016-01-01

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production. PMID:26620565

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rajesh K; Murray, Thomas V A; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M; Brewer, Alison C

    2016-01-22

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production.

  15. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Eugenio Gómez; Segard, Stéphane; Charavay, Céline; Parcy, François

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus) based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM) formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade.

  16. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Eugenio Gómez; Segard, Stéphane; Charavay, Céline; Parcy, François

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus) based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM) formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade. PMID:26285209

  17. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription-coupling factor.

    PubMed

    Citterio, E; Van Den Boom, V; Schnitzler, G; Kanaar, R; Bonte, E; Kingston, R E; Hoeijmakers, J H; Vermeulen, W

    2000-10-01

    The Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a DNA-dependent ATPase of the SWI2/SNF2 family. SWI2/SNF2-like proteins are implicated in chromatin remodeling during transcription. Since chromatin structure also affects DNA repair efficiency, chromatin remodeling activities within repair are expected. Here we used purified recombinant CSB protein to investigate whether it can remodel chromatin in vitro. We show that binding of CSB to DNA results in an alteration of the DNA double-helix conformation. In addition, we find that CSB is able to remodel chromatin structure at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Specifically, CSB can alter DNase I accessibility to reconstituted mononucleosome cores and disarrange an array of nucleosomes regularly spaced on plasmid DNA. In addition, we show that CSB interacts not only with double-stranded DNA but also directly with core histones. Finally, intact histone tails play an important role in CSB remodeling. CSB is the first repair protein found to play a direct role in modulating nucleosome structure. The relevance of this finding to the interplay between transcription and repair is discussed. PMID:11003660

  18. UV-B signaling pathways and fluence rate dependent transcriptional regulation of ARIADNE12.

    PubMed

    Lang-Mladek, Christina; Xie, Lisi; Nigam, Neha; Chumak, Nina; Binkert, Melanie; Neubert, Susanne; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2012-08-01

    ARI12 belongs to a family of 'RING between RING fingers' (RBR) domain proteins with E3 ligase activity (Eisenhaber et al. 2007). The Arabidopsis genome codes for 14 ARI genes and two pseudogenes (Mladek et al. 2003). Under standard growth conditions ARI12 is predominantly expressed in roots. In addition, ARI12 is strongly induced in leaves following exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation at dosages similar to those in areas under a reduced ozone layer. With quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses and promoter:reporter constructs we show that the expression of ARI12 peaks 2-4 h after UV-B radiation exposure. To test if ARI12's transcriptional activation depends on key players of the UV-B signaling pathway, ARI12 expression was quantified in mutants of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), HY5 HOMOLOG (HYH) and the UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) genes. ARI12 transcription was reduced by 50-70% in hy5, hyh and hy5/hyh double mutants, but not in uvr8 mutants. However, under low fluence rate UV-B conditions ARI12 is not induced in these mutants. Our results show that ARI12 represents a downstream target of the low fluence rate UVR8/HY5/HYH UV-B signaling pathway while under high fluence rates its expression is regulated by the two bZIP transcription factors HY5 and HYH in an UVR8-independent manner.

  19. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development. PMID:25681390

  20. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2015-02-13

    Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development.

  1. Expression and Stress-Dependent Induction of Potassium Channel Transcripts in the Common Ice Plant1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua; Golldack, Dortje; Katsuhara, Maki; Zhao, Chengsong; Bohnert, Hans J.

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized transcripts for three potassium channel homologs in the AKT/KAT subfamily (Shaker type) from the common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum), with a focus on their expression during salt stress (up to 500 mm NaCl). Mkt1 and 2, Arabidopsis AKT homologs, and Kmt1, a KAT homolog, are members of small gene families with two to three isoforms each. Mkt1 is root specific; Mkt2 is found in leaves, flowers, and seed capsules; and Kmt1 is expressed in leaves and seed capsules. Mkt1 is present in all cells of the root, and in leaves a highly conserved isoform is detected present in all cells with highest abundance in the vasculature. MKT1 for which antibodies were made is localized to the plasma membrane. Following salt stress, MKT1 (transcripts and protein) is drastically down-regulated, Mkt2 transcripts do not change significantly, and Kmt1 is strongly and transiently (maximum at 6 h) up-regulated in leaves and stems. The detection and stress-dependent behavior of abundant transcripts representing subfamilies of potassium channels provides information about tissue specificity and the complex regulation of genes encoding potassium uptake systems in a halophytic plant. PMID:11161018

  2. c-Abl modulates AICD dependent cellular responses: transcriptional induction and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Mary C; Vargas, Lina M; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Alvarez, Alejandra R

    2009-07-01

    APP intracellular domain (AICD) has been proposed as a transcriptional inductor that moves to the nucleus with the adaptor protein Fe65 and regulates transcription. The two proteins, APP and Fe65, can be phosphorylated by c-Abl kinase. Neprilysin has been proposed as a target gene for AICD. We found that AICD expression is decreased by treatment with STI-571, a c-Abl inhibitor, suggesting a modulation of AICD transcription by c-Abl kinase. We observed interaction between c-Abl kinase, the AICD fragment and the Fe65 adaptor protein. In addition, STI-571 reduces apoptosis in APPSw, and the apoptotic response induced by Fe65 over-expression was inhibited by with the expression of a kinase dead (KD) c-Abl and enhanced by over-expression of WT-c-Abl. However, in the APPSw cells, the ability of the KD-c-Abl to protect against Fe65 was reduced. Finally, in APPSw clone, we detected higher trans-activation of the pro-apoptotic p73 isoform, TAp73 promoter. Our results show that c-Abl modulates AICD dependent cellular responses, transcriptional induction as well as the apoptotic response, which could participate in the onset and progression of the neurodegenerative pathology, observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD).

  3. A protein thermometer controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Heather D; Higgins, Darren E

    2011-08-01

    Facultative bacterial pathogens must adapt to multiple stimuli to persist in the environment or establish infection within a host. Temperature is often utilized as a signal to control expression of virulence genes necessary for infection or genes required for persistence in the environment. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that allow bacteria to adapt and respond to temperature fluctuations. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a food-borne, facultative intracellular pathogen that uses flagellar motility to survive in the extracellular environment and to enhance initial invasion of host cells during infection. Upon entering the host, Lm represses transcription of flagellar motility genes in response to mammalian physiological temperature (37°C) with a concomitant temperature-dependent up-regulation of virulence genes. We previously determined that down-regulation of flagellar motility is required for virulence and is governed by the reciprocal activities of the MogR transcriptional repressor and the bifunctional flagellar anti-repressor/glycosyltransferase, GmaR. In this study, we determined that GmaR is also a protein thermometer that controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes. Two-hybrid and gel mobility shift analyses indicated that the interaction between MogR and GmaR is temperature sensitive. Using circular dichroism and limited proteolysis, we determined that GmaR undergoes a temperature-dependent conformational change as temperature is elevated. Quantitative analysis of GmaR in Lm revealed that GmaR is degraded in the absence of MogR and at 37°C (when the MogR:GmaR complex is less stable). Since MogR represses transcription of all flagellar motility genes, including transcription of gmaR, changes in the stability of the MogR:GmaR anti-repression complex, due to conformational changes in GmaR, mediates repression or de-repression of flagellar motility genes in Lm. Thus, GmaR functions as a thermo

  4. A Land Plant-Specific Transcription Factor Directly Enhances Transcription of a Pathogenic Noncoding RNA Template by DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Qu, Jie; Ji, Shaoyi; Wallace, Andrew J; Wu, Jian; Li, Yi; Gopalan, Venkat; Ding, Biao

    2016-05-01

    Some DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (DdRPs) possess RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity, as was first discovered in the replication of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) RNA genome in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Recent studies revealed that this activity in bacteria and mammals is important for transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms. Here, we used PSTVd as a model to uncover auxiliary factors essential for RNA-templated transcription by DdRP PSTVd replication in the nucleoplasm generates (-)-PSTVd intermediates and (+)-PSTVd copies. We found that the Nicotiana benthamiana canonical 9-zinc finger (ZF) Transcription Factor IIIA (TFIIIA-9ZF) as well as its variant TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (+)-PSTVd, but only TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (-)-PSTVd. Suppression of TFIIIA-7ZF reduced PSTVd replication, and overexpression of TFIIIA-7ZF enhanced PSTVd replication in planta. Consistent with the locale of PSTVd replication, TFIIIA-7ZF was found in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus, in contrast to the strictly nucleolar localization of TFIIIA-9ZF. Footprinting assays revealed that only TFIIIA-7ZF bound to a region of PSTVd critical for initiating transcription. Furthermore, TFIIIA-7ZF strongly enhanced the in vitro transcription of circular (+)-PSTVd by partially purified Pol II. Together, our results identify TFIIIA-7ZF as a dedicated cellular transcription factor that acts in DdRP-catalyzed RNA-templated transcription, highlighting both the extraordinary evolutionary adaptation of viroids and the potential of DdRPs for a broader role in cellular processes. PMID:27113774

  5. Adenovirus E1A coding sequences that enable ras and pmt oncogenes to transform cultured primary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zerler, B; Moran, B; Maruyama, K; Moomaw, J; Grodzicker, T; Ruley, H E

    1986-01-01

    Plasmids expressing partial adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) coding sequences were tested for activities which facilitate in vitro establishment (immortalization) of primary baby rat kidney cells and which enable the T24 Harvey ras-related oncogene and the polyomavirus middle T antigen (pmt) gene to transform primary baby rat kidney cells. E1A cDNAs expressing the 289- and 243-amino acid proteins expressed both E1A transforming functions. Mutant hrA, which encodes a 140-amino acid protein derived from the amino-terminal domain shared by the 289- and 243-amino acid proteins, enabled ras (but not pmt) to transform and facilitated in vitro establishment to a low, but detectable, extent. These studies suggest that E1A functions which collaborate with ras oncogenes and those which facilitate establishment are linked. Furthermore, E1A transforming functions are not associated with activities of the 289-amino acid E1A proteins required for efficient transcriptional activation of viral early region promoters. Images PMID:3022137

  6. IKK{epsilon} modulates RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu Tianshuang; Liao Suiling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-12-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical I{kappa}B kinase (IKK){epsilon} in modulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKK{epsilon} activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKK{epsilon} results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKK{epsilon} regulates viral-induced cellular signaling.

  7. Cleavage of a putative metal permease in Chlamydia trachomatis yields an iron-dependent transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher C; Nicod, Sophie S; Malcolm, Denise S; Grieshaber, Scott S; Carabeo, Rey A

    2012-06-26

    The regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for most organisms, because iron is required for a variety of conserved biochemical processes, yet can be toxic at high concentrations. Upon experiencing iron starvation in vitro, the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis exhibits elevated expression of a putative iron-transport system encoded by the ytg operon. The third component of the ytg operon, CT069 (YtgCR), encodes a protein with two distinct domains: a membrane-anchored metal ion permease and a diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR)-like transcriptional repressor. In this report, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of CT069 (YtgR) serves as an iron-dependent autorepressor of the ytg operon. Moreover, the nascent full-length metal permease-transcriptional repressor protein was processed during the course of infection, and heterologously when expressed in Escherichia coli. The products produced by heterologous cleavage in E. coli were functional in the repression of a reporter gene downstream of a putative YtgR operator. We report a bona fide mechanism of iron-dependent regulation of transcription in Chlamydia. Moreover, the unusual membrane permease-DNA-binding polypeptide fusion configuration was found in several bacteria. Therefore, the DNA-binding capability and liberation of the YtgR domain from a membrane-anchored permease in C. trachomatis could represent a previously uncharacterized mechanism for prokaryotic regulation of iron-homeostasis.

  8. Langerhans cells are generated by two distinct PU.1-dependent transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Michaël; Seillet, Cyril; Chevrier, Stéphane; Wu, Li; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Belz, Gabrielle T; Nutt, Stephen L

    2013-12-16

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the unique dendritic cells found in the epidermis. While a great deal of attention has focused on defining the developmental origins of LCs, reports addressing the transcriptional network ruling their differentiation remain sparse. We addressed the function of a group of key DC transcription factors-PU.1, ID2, IRF4, and IRF8-in the establishment of the LC network. We show that although steady-state LC homeostasis depends on PU.1 and ID2, the latter is dispensable for bone marrow-derived LCs. PU.1 controls LC differentiation by regulating the expression of the critical TGF-β responsive transcription factor RUNX3. PU.1 directly binds to the Runx3 regulatory elements in a TGF-β-dependent manner, whereas ectopic expression of RUNX3 rescued LC differentiation in the absence of PU.1 and promoted LC differentiation from PU.1-sufficient progenitors. These findings highlight the dual molecular network underlying LC differentiation, and show the central role of PU.1 in these processes.

  9. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching; Yen, Pauline H.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  10. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  11. Calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, kinases, and transcriptional corepressors involved in T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun O.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The second messenger calcium plays an essential role in mediating the TCR signaling pathway leading to cytokine production and T cell clonal expansion. The immunosuppressive drugs cyclosproin A (CsA) and FK506 have served both as therapeutic agents and as molecular probes for unraveling the protein phosphatase calcineurin as a rate-limiting enzyme involved in the transmission of calcium signal from the cytosol into the nucleus to reprogram gene expression. The use of mouse knockout models has helped to verify and further elucidate the functions of different isoforms of calcineurin in both helper T cell activation and thymocyte development. In addition to calcineurin, three other classes of calmodulin-binding proteins have also been shown to play important roles in calcium signaling in T cells. Thus, Cabin1 and class II HDACs have been found to constitute a novel calcium-signaling module in conjunction with the transcription factor myocyte enhance factor family and the transcriptional coactivator p300 to suppress and activate cytokine gene transcription in a calcium-dependent manner. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) II and IV were also shown to play negative and positive regulatory functions, respectively, in TCR-mediated cytokine production. The crosstalks among these and other signal transducers in T cells form an extensive non-linear signaling network that dictates the final outcome of the TCR signaling pathway. PMID:19290928

  12. Active opsin loci adopt intrachromosomal loops that depend on the photoreceptor transcription factor network.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guang-Hua; Chen, Shiming

    2011-10-25

    Rod and cone opsin genes are expressed in a mutually exclusive manner in their respective photoreceptor subtypes in the mammalian retina. Previous transgenic mouse studies showed that functional interactions between the distal enhancer and proximal promoter of rhodopsin and long/medium-wavelength (L/M) opsin genes are essential for regulating their cell-type-specific transcription. We have used chromosomal conformation capture assays in mouse retinas to investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for this interaction. Here we show that each opsin gene forms intrachromosomal loops in the appropriate photoreceptor subtype, while maintaining a linear configuration in other cell types where it is silent. The enhancer forms physical contacts not only with the promoter but also with the coding regions of each opsin locus. ChIP assays showed that cell-type-specific target binding by three key photoreceptor transcription factors-cone--rod homeobox (CRX), neural retina leucine zipper (NRL), and nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group E, member 3 (NR2E3)--is required for the appropriate local chromosomal organization and transcription of rod and cone opsins. Similar correlations between chromosomal loops and active transcription of opsin genes were also observed in human photoreceptors. Furthermore, quantitative chromosomal conformation capture on human retinas from two male donors showed that the L/M enhancer locus control region (LCR) loops with either the L or M promoter in a near 3:1 ratio, supporting distance-dependent competition between L and M for LCR. Altogether, our results suggest that the photoreceptor transcription factor network cooperatively regulates the chromosomal organization of target genes to precisely control photoreceptor subtype-specific gene expression.

  13. Cold shock protein YB-1 is involved in hypoxia-dependent gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Rauen, Thomas; Frye, Bjoern C; Wang, Jialin; Raffetseder, Ute; Alidousty, Christina; En-Nia, Abdelaziz; Floege, Jürgen; Mertens, Peter R

    2016-09-16

    Hypoxia-dependent gene regulation is largely orchestrated by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), which associate with defined nucleotide sequences of hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Comparison of the regulatory HRE within the 3' enhancer of the human erythropoietin (EPO) gene with known binding motifs for cold shock protein Y-box (YB) protein-1 yielded strong similarities within the Y-box element and 3' adjacent sequences. DNA binding assays confirmed YB-1 binding to both, single- and double-stranded HRE templates. Under hypoxia, we observed nuclear shuttling of YB-1 and co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that YB-1 and HIF-1α physically interact with each other. Cellular YB-1 depletion using siRNA significantly induced hypoxia-dependent EPO production at both, promoter and mRNA level. Vice versa, overexpressed YB-1 significantly reduced EPO-HRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas this effect was minor under normoxia. HIF-1α overexpression induced hypoxia-dependent gene transcription through the same element and accordingly, co-expression with YB-1 reduced HIF-1α-mediated EPO induction under hypoxic conditions. Taken together, we identified YB-1 as a novel binding factor for HREs that participates in fine-tuning of the hypoxia transcriptome. PMID:27524241

  14. The transcription factor IRF1 dictates the IL-21-dependent anticancer functions of TH9 cells.

    PubMed

    Végran, Frédérique; Berger, Hélène; Boidot, Romain; Mignot, Grégoire; Bruchard, Mélanie; Dosset, Magalie; Chalmin, Fanny; Rébé, Cédric; Dérangère, Valentin; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kato, Masashi; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Ghiringhelli, François; Apetoh, Lionel

    2014-08-01

    The TH9 subset of helper T cells was initially shown to contribute to the induction of autoimmune and allergic diseases, but subsequent evidence has suggested that these cells also exert antitumor activities. However, the molecular events that account for their effector properties are elusive. Here we found that the transcription factor IRF1 enhanced the effector function of TH9 cells and dictated their anticancer properties. Under TH9-skewing conditions, interleukin 1β (IL-1β) induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT1 and subsequent expression of IRF1, which bound to the promoters of Il9 and Il21 and enhanced secretion of the cytokines IL-9 and IL-21 from TH9 cells. Furthermore, IL-1β-induced TH9 cells exerted potent anticancer functions in an IRF1- and IL-21-dependent manner. Our findings thus identify IRF1 as a target for controlling the function of TH9 cells.

  15. Arabidopsis Pol II-Dependent in Vitro Transcription System Reveals Role of Chromatin for Light-Inducible rbcS Gene Transcription.

    PubMed

    Ido, Ayaka; Iwata, Shinya; Iwata, Yuka; Igarashi, Hisako; Hamada, Takahiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Sugiura, Masahiro; Yukawa, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    In vitro transcription is an essential tool to study the molecular mechanisms of transcription. For over a decade, we have developed an in vitro transcription system from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)-cultured cells (BY-2), and this system supported the basic activities of the three RNA polymerases (Pol I, Pol II, and Pol III). However, it was not suitable to study photosynthetic genes, because BY-2 cells have lost their photosynthetic activity. Therefore, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in vitro transcription systems were developed from green and etiolated suspension cells. Sufficient in vitro Pol II activity was detected after the minor modification of the nuclear soluble extracts preparation method; removal of vacuoles from protoplasts and L-ascorbic acid supplementation in the extraction buffer were particularly effective. Surprisingly, all four Arabidopsis Rubisco small subunit (rbcS-1A, rbcS-1B, rbcS-2B, and rbcS-3B) gene members were in vitro transcribed from the naked DNA templates without any light-dependent manner. However, clear light-inducible transcriptions were observed using chromatin template of rbcS-1A gene, which was prepared with a human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP1) and HeLa histones. This suggested that a key determinant of light-dependency through the rbcS gene transcription was a higher order of DNA structure (i.e. chromatin). PMID:26662274

  16. Three-dimensional EM Structure of an Intact Activator-dependent Transcription Initiation Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.; Quispe, J; Lara-González, S; Kim, Y; Berman, H; Arnold, E; Ebright, R; Lawson, C

    2009-01-01

    We present the experimentally determined 3D structure of an intact activator-dependent transcription initiation complex comprising the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP), RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and a DNA fragment containing positions -78 to +20 of a Class I CAP-dependent promoter with a CAP site at position -61.5 and a premelted transcription bubble. A 20-{angstrom} electron microscopy reconstruction was obtained by iterative projection-based matching of single particles visualized in carbon-sandwich negative stain and was fitted using atomic coordinate sets for CAP, RNAP, and DNA. The structure defines the organization of a Class I CAP-RNAP-promoter complex and supports previously proposed interactions of CAP with RNAP {alpha} subunit C-terminal domain ({alpha}CTD), interactions of {alpha}CTD with {sigma}70 region 4, interactions of CAP and RNAP with promoter DNA, and phased-DNA-bend-dependent partial wrapping of DNA around the complex. The structure also reveals the positions and shapes of species-specific domains within the RNAP {beta}{prime}, {beta}, and {sigma}70 subunits.

  17. Transcriptional activation of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 by nuclear receptor TLX

    SciTech Connect

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-09-04

    An orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the proliferation and self-renewal of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase, is highly expressed in the NPCs and participates in neurogenesis. Here, we found that TLX colocalized with SIRT1 and knockdown of TLX by small interfering RNAs decreased SIRT1 levels in NPCs. TLX increased the SIRT1 expression by binding to the newly identified TLX-activating element in the SIRT1 gene promoter in HEK293 cells. Thus, TLX is an inducer of SIRT1 and may contribute to neurogenesis both as a transactivator and as a repressor.

  18. Itch promotes the neddylation of JunB and regulates JunB-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiwen; Zhu, Heng; Liu, Yang; He, Fuchu; Xie, Ping; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2016-09-01

    Protein neddylation is essential for the viability of most organisms and is widely involved in the regulation of immunity, DNA damage and repair, cell signaling and cell cycle. Unlike RING-type neddylation ligases, HECT-type neddylation ligase remains less defined. Here, we show that Itch is a novel HECT-type neddylation E3 ligase and we identify JunB as a substrate of Nedd8 modification by Itch. JunB neddylation attenuates its transcriptional activity. In addition, JunB neddylation mediated by Itch promotes its ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Therefore, these findings define a new HECT-type neddylation ligase and its neddylation substrate.

  19. Topographical regulation of cone and rod opsin genes: parallel, position dependent levels of transcription.

    PubMed

    van Ginkel, P R; Timmers, A M; Szél, A; Hauswirth, W W

    1995-10-27

    RNase protection assays were used to follow rhodopsin and red cone opsin mRNA levels during bovine fetal development as a function of retinal position. Following induction, an equivalent radial gradient of rod and cone opsin mRNA is present in the fetal retina. This gradient is maintained in the adult retina even though no corresponding gradient in rod or cone cell density is present. Since the mRNA expression gradient does not progress radially, position dependent levels of photoreceptor-specific transcription is suggested.

  20. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho—a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity—is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal ‘RNA binding’ domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal ‘motor’ domain. We also show that the ‘motor’ domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors. PMID:25999346

  1. Impact of the N-Terminal Domain of STAT3 in STAT3-Dependent Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tiancen; Yeh, Jennifer E.; Pinello, Luca; Jacob, Jaison; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT3 is constitutively active in many cancers, where it mediates important biological effects, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of STAT3 performs multiple functions, such as cooperative DNA binding, nuclear translocation, and protein-protein interactions. However, it is unclear which subsets of STAT3 target genes depend on the NTD for transcriptional regulation. To identify such genes, we compared gene expression in STAT3-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) stably expressing wild-type STAT3 or STAT3 from which NTD was deleted. NTD deletion reduced the cytokine-induced expression of specific STAT3 target genes by decreasing STAT3 binding to their regulatory regions. To better understand the potential mechanisms of this effect, we determined the crystal structure of the STAT3 NTD and identified a dimer interface responsible for cooperative DNA binding in vitro. We also observed an Ni2+-mediated oligomer with an as yet unknown biological function. Mutations on both dimer and Ni2+-mediated interfaces affected the cytokine induction of STAT3 target genes. These studies shed light on the role of the NTD in transcriptional regulation by STAT3 and provide a structural template with which to design STAT3 NTD inhibitors with potential therapeutic value. PMID:26169829

  2. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-07-13

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho-a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity-is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal 'RNA binding' domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal 'motor' domain. We also show that the 'motor' domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors.

  3. MicroRNA-Dependent Transcriptional Silencing of Transposable Elements in Drosophila Follicle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mugat, Bruno; Akkouche, Abdou; Serrano, Vincent; Armenise, Claudia; Li, Blaise; Brun, Christine; Fulga, Tudor A.; Van Vactor, David; Pélisson, Alain; Chambeyron, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference-related silencing mechanisms concern very diverse and distinct biological processes, from gene regulation (via the microRNA pathway) to defense against molecular parasites (through the small interfering RNA and the Piwi-interacting RNA pathways). Small non-coding RNAs serve as specificity factors that guide effector proteins to ribonucleic acid targets via base-pairing interactions, to achieve transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Because of the small sequence complementarity required for microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional regulation, thousands of microRNA (miRNA) putative targets have been annotated in Drosophila. In Drosophila somatic ovarian cells, genomic parasites, such as transposable elements (TEs), are transcriptionally repressed by chromatin changes induced by Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that prevent them from invading the germinal genome. Here we show, for the first time, that a functional miRNA pathway is required for the piRNA-mediated transcriptional silencing of TEs in this tissue. Global miRNA depletion, caused by tissue- and stage-specific knock down of drosha (involved in miRNA biogenesis), AGO1 or gawky (both responsible for miRNA activity), resulted in loss of TE-derived piRNAs and chromatin-mediated transcriptional de-silencing of TEs. This specific TE de-repression was also observed upon individual titration (by expression of the complementary miRNA sponge) of two miRNAs (miR-14 and miR-34) as well as in a miR-14 loss-of-function mutant background. Interestingly, the miRNA defects differentially affected TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first indication of possible differences in the biogenesis or stability of TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. This work is one of the examples of detectable phenotypes caused by loss of individual miRNAs in Drosophila and the first genetic evidence that miRNAs have a role in the maintenance of genome stability via piRNA-mediated TE repression. PMID

  4. MicroRNA-Dependent Transcriptional Silencing of Transposable Elements in Drosophila Follicle Cells.

    PubMed

    Mugat, Bruno; Akkouche, Abdou; Serrano, Vincent; Armenise, Claudia; Li, Blaise; Brun, Christine; Fulga, Tudor A; Van Vactor, David; Pélisson, Alain; Chambeyron, Séverine

    2015-05-01

    RNA interference-related silencing mechanisms concern very diverse and distinct biological processes, from gene regulation (via the microRNA pathway) to defense against molecular parasites (through the small interfering RNA and the Piwi-interacting RNA pathways). Small non-coding RNAs serve as specificity factors that guide effector proteins to ribonucleic acid targets via base-pairing interactions, to achieve transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Because of the small sequence complementarity required for microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional regulation, thousands of microRNA (miRNA) putative targets have been annotated in Drosophila. In Drosophila somatic ovarian cells, genomic parasites, such as transposable elements (TEs), are transcriptionally repressed by chromatin changes induced by Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that prevent them from invading the germinal genome. Here we show, for the first time, that a functional miRNA pathway is required for the piRNA-mediated transcriptional silencing of TEs in this tissue. Global miRNA depletion, caused by tissue- and stage-specific knock down of drosha (involved in miRNA biogenesis), AGO1 or gawky (both responsible for miRNA activity), resulted in loss of TE-derived piRNAs and chromatin-mediated transcriptional de-silencing of TEs. This specific TE de-repression was also observed upon individual titration (by expression of the complementary miRNA sponge) of two miRNAs (miR-14 and miR-34) as well as in a miR-14 loss-of-function mutant background. Interestingly, the miRNA defects differentially affected TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first indication of possible differences in the biogenesis or stability of TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. This work is one of the examples of detectable phenotypes caused by loss of individual miRNAs in Drosophila and the first genetic evidence that miRNAs have a role in the maintenance of genome stability via piRNA-mediated TE repression. PMID

  5. MicroRNA-Dependent Transcriptional Silencing of Transposable Elements in Drosophila Follicle Cells.

    PubMed

    Mugat, Bruno; Akkouche, Abdou; Serrano, Vincent; Armenise, Claudia; Li, Blaise; Brun, Christine; Fulga, Tudor A; Van Vactor, David; Pélisson, Alain; Chambeyron, Séverine

    2015-05-01

    RNA interference-related silencing mechanisms concern very diverse and distinct biological processes, from gene regulation (via the microRNA pathway) to defense against molecular parasites (through the small interfering RNA and the Piwi-interacting RNA pathways). Small non-coding RNAs serve as specificity factors that guide effector proteins to ribonucleic acid targets via base-pairing interactions, to achieve transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Because of the small sequence complementarity required for microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional regulation, thousands of microRNA (miRNA) putative targets have been annotated in Drosophila. In Drosophila somatic ovarian cells, genomic parasites, such as transposable elements (TEs), are transcriptionally repressed by chromatin changes induced by Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that prevent them from invading the germinal genome. Here we show, for the first time, that a functional miRNA pathway is required for the piRNA-mediated transcriptional silencing of TEs in this tissue. Global miRNA depletion, caused by tissue- and stage-specific knock down of drosha (involved in miRNA biogenesis), AGO1 or gawky (both responsible for miRNA activity), resulted in loss of TE-derived piRNAs and chromatin-mediated transcriptional de-silencing of TEs. This specific TE de-repression was also observed upon individual titration (by expression of the complementary miRNA sponge) of two miRNAs (miR-14 and miR-34) as well as in a miR-14 loss-of-function mutant background. Interestingly, the miRNA defects differentially affected TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first indication of possible differences in the biogenesis or stability of TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. This work is one of the examples of detectable phenotypes caused by loss of individual miRNAs in Drosophila and the first genetic evidence that miRNAs have a role in the maintenance of genome stability via piRNA-mediated TE repression.

  6. Effect of salt bridge on transcription activation of CRP-dependent lactose operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tutar, Yusuf; Harman, James G

    2006-09-15

    Expression of catabolite-sensitive operons in Escherichia coli is cAMP-dependent and mediated through the CRP:cAMP complex binding to specific sequences in DNA. Five specific ionic or polar interactions occur in cAMP binding pocket of CRP. E72 interacts with the cAMP 2' OH, R82 and S83 interact with the negatively charged phosphate moiety, and T127 and S128 interact with the adenine ring. There is evidence to suggest that E72 and R82 may mediate an essential CRP molecular switch mechanism. Therefore, stimulation of CRP transcription activation was examined by perturbing these residues. Further, CRP:cAMP complex was treated with a specific DNA sequence containing the lac CRP binding site along with RNA polymerase to mimic in vivo conditions. Biochemical and biophysical results revealed that regulation of transcription activation depends on alignment of CRP tertiary structure through inter-domain communication and it was concluded that positions 72 and 82 are essential in the activation of CRP by cAMP. PMID:16934214

  7. MeCP2 regulates activity-dependent transcriptional responses in olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooje; Yun, Jung-Mi; Woods, Rima; Dunaway, Keith; Yasui, Dag H; Lasalle, Janine M; Gong, Qizhi

    2014-12-01

    During postnatal development, neuronal activity controls the remodeling of initially imprecise neuronal connections through the regulation of gene expression. MeCP2 binds to methylated DNA and modulates gene expression during neuronal development and MECP2 mutation causes the autistic disorder Rett syndrome. To investigate a role for MeCP2 in neuronal circuit refinement and to identify activity-dependent MeCP2 transcription regulations, we leveraged the precise organization and accessibility of olfactory sensory axons to manipulation of neuronal activity through odorant exposure in vivo. We demonstrate that olfactory sensory axons failed to develop complete convergence when Mecp2 is deficient in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in an otherwise wild-type animal. Furthermore, we demonstrate that expression of selected adhesion genes was elevated in Mecp2-deficient glomeruli, while acute odor stimulation in control mice resulted in significantly reduced MeCP2 binding to these gene loci, correlating with increased expression. Thus, MeCP2 is required for both circuitry refinement and activity-dependent transcriptional responses in OSNs.

  8. Ubiquitin-dependent distribution of the transcriptional coactivator p300 in cytoplasmic inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jihong; Halappanavar, Sabina; Th' ng, John P H; Li, Qiao

    2007-01-01

    The protein level of transcriptional coactivator p300, an essential nuclear protein, is critical to a broad array of cellular activities including embryonic development, cell differentiation and proliferation. We have previously established that histone deacetylase inhibitor such as valproic acid induces p300 degradation through the 26S proteasome pathway. Here, we report the roles of cellular trafficking and spatial redistribution in valproic acid-induced p300 turnover. Our study demonstrates that p300 is redistributed to the cytoplasm prior to valproic acid-induced turnover. Inhibition of proteasome-dependent protein degradation, does not prevent nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of p300, rather sequesters the cytoplasmic p300 to a distinct perinuclear region. In addition, the formation of p300 aggregates in the perinuclear region depends on functional microtubule networks and correlates with p300 ubiquitination. Our work establishes, for the first time, that p300 is also a substrate of the cytoplasmic ubiquitin-proteasome system and provides insight on how cellular trafficking and spatial redistribution regulate the availability and activity of transcriptional coactivator p300.

  9. The Smad4 activation domain (SAD) is a proline-rich, p300-dependent transcriptional activation domain.

    PubMed

    de Caestecker, M P; Yahata, T; Wang, D; Parks, W T; Huang, S; Hill, C S; Shioda, T; Roberts, A B; Lechleider, R J

    2000-01-21

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) family members signal through a unique set of intracellular proteins called Smads. Smad4, previously identified as the tumor suppressor DPC4, is functionally distinct among the Smad family, and is required for the assembly and transcriptional activation of diverse, Smad-DNA complexes. We previously identified a 48-amino acid proline-rich regulatory element within the middle linker domain of this molecule, the Smad4 activation domain (SAD), which is essential for mediating these signaling activities. We now characterize the functional activity of the SAD. Mutants lacking the SAD are still able to form complexes with other Smad family members and associated transcription factors, but cannot activate transcription in these complexes. Furthermore, the SAD itself is able to activate transcription in heterologous reporter assays, identifying it as a proline-rich transcriptional activation domain, and indicating that the SAD is both necessary and sufficient to activate Smad-dependent transcriptional responses. We show that transcriptional activation by the SAD is p300-dependent, and demonstrate that this activity is associated with a physical interaction of the SAD with the amino terminus of p300. These data identify a novel function of the middle linker region of Smad4, and define the role of the SAD as an important locus determining the transcriptional activation of the Smad complex.

  10. Genetic variants in the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene (CARTPT) and cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Bloch, Paul J.; Weller, Andrew E.; Nall, Aleksandra H.; Doyle, Glenn A.; Buono, Russell J.; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Dackis, Charles A.; Oslin, David W.; O'Brien, Charles P.; Berrettini, Wade H.

    2008-01-01

    Dopaminergic brain systems have been implicated to play a major role in drug reward, thus making genes involved in these circuits plausible candidates for susceptibility to substance use disorders. The cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CARTPT) is involved in reward and feeding behavior and has functional characteristics of an endogenous psychostimulant. In this study we tested the hypothesis that variation in the CARTPT gene increases susceptibility to cocaine dependence in individuals of African descent. Genotypes of three HapMap tagging SNPs (rs6894758; rs11575893; rs17358300) across the CARTPT gene region were obtained in cocaine dependent individuals (n=348) and normal controls (n=256). All subjects were of African descent. There were no significant differences in allele, genotype or haplotype frequencies between cases and controls for any of the tested SNPs. Our results do not support an association of the CARTPT gene with cocaine dependence; however, additional studies using larger samples, comprehensive SNP coverage, and different populations are necessary to conclusively rule out CARTPT as a contributing factor in the etiology of cocaine dependence. PMID:18572320

  11. Synergistic transcriptional enhancement does not depend on the number of acidic activation domains bound to the promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Oliviero, S; Struhl, K

    1991-01-01

    Many eukaryotic transcriptional activator proteins contain a DNA-binding domain that interacts with specific promoter sequences and an acidic activation region that is required to stimulate transcription. Transcriptional enhancement by such activator proteins is often synergistic and promiscuous; promoters containing multiple binding sites for an individual protein or even for unrelated proteins can be 10-100 times more active than promoters with single sites. It has been suggested that such synergy reflects a nonlinear response of the basic transcription machinery to the number and/or quality of acidic activation regions. Here, we determine the transcriptional activity of Jun-Fos heterodimers containing one or two GCN4 acidic activation regions on promoters containing one or two Ap-1 target sites. Surprisingly, heterodimers with one or two acidic regions activate transcription with similar efficiency and are equally synergistic (10- to 15-fold) on promoters containing two target sites. Thus, transcriptional synergy does not depend on the number of acidic activation regions but rather on the number of proteins bound to the promoter. This suggests that synergy is mediated either by cooperative DNA binding or by alternative mechanisms in which the DNA-binding domain plays a more direct role in transcription (e.g., changes in DNA structure, nucleosome displacement, or direct interactions with the transcriptional machinery). Images PMID:1898773

  12. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luis E F; Murray, Peter D; Zielke, H Ronald; Roby, Clinton D; Kingsbury, Tami J; Krueger, Bruce K

    2009-10-01

    cAMP can stimulate the transcription of many activity-dependent genes via activation of the transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). However, in mouse cortical neuron cultures, prior to synaptogenesis, neither cAMP nor dopamine, which acts via cAMP, stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription when NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) were blocked. Stimulation of transcription by cAMP was potentiated by inhibitors of excitatory amino acid uptake, suggesting a role for extracellular glutamate or aspartate in cAMP-induced transcription. Aspartate was identified as the extracellular messenger: enzymatic scavenging of l-aspartate, but not glutamate, blocked stimulation of CREB-dependent gene transcription by cAMP; moreover, cAMP induced aspartate but not glutamate release. Together, these results suggest that cAMP acts via an autocrine or paracrine pathway to release aspartate, which activates NR2B-containing NMDARs, leading to Ca(2+) entry and activation of transcription. This cAMP/aspartate/NMDAR signaling pathway may mediate the effects of transmitters such as dopamine on axon growth and synaptogenesis in developing neurons or on synaptic plasticity in mature neural networks.

  13. "Glucose and ethanol-dependent transcriptional regulation of the astaxanthin biosynthesis pathway in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous"

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is one of the most promising and economically attractive natural sources of astaxanthin. The biosynthesis of this valuable carotenoid is a complex process for which the regulatory mechanisms remain mostly unknown. Several studies have shown a strong correlation between the carbon source present in the medium and the amount of pigments synthesized. Carotenoid production is especially low when high glucose concentrations are used in the medium, while a significant increase is observed with non-fermentable carbon sources. However, the molecular basis of this phenomenon has not been established. Results In this work, we showed that glucose caused transcriptional repression of the three genes involved in the synthesis of astaxanthin from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in X. dendrorhous, which correlates with a complete inhibition of pigment synthesis. Strikingly, this regulatory response was completely altered in mutant strains that are incapable of synthesizing astaxanthin. However, we found that addition of ethanol caused the induction of crtYB and crtS gene expression and promoted de novo synthesis of carotenoids. The induction of carotenogenesis was noticeable as early as 24 h after ethanol addition. Conclusion For the first time, we demonstrated that carbon source-dependent regulation of astaxanthin biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous involves changes at the transcriptional level. Such regulatory mechanism provides an explanation for the strong and early inhibitory effect of glucose on the biosynthesis of this carotenoid. PMID:21861883

  14. Cell differentiation and flagellar elongation in Naegleria gruberi. Dependence on transcription and translation

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents evidence that the phenotypic transformation of Naegleria gruberi from amebae to flagellates that occurs when cells are placed in a nutrient-free aqueous environment is dependent on transcription and translation. RNA and protein are synthesized during the hour-long differentiation. Actinomycin D and daunomycin selectively inhibit RNA synthesis, and cycloheximide selectively inhibits protein synthesis, throughout the time required for differentiation. These inhibitors prevent differentiation if added soon after the cells are transferred to nonnutrient buffer but cease to block specific differentiation events at subsequent, reproducible times, the transition points. After each transition point, morphogenesis can occur in the presence of the inhibitor and in the virtual absence of transcription or translation. A map of the transition points indicates that RNA synthesis is required until halfway through the temporal process from initiation to flagellum assembly, and that protein synthesis is required until three-fourths of the way through. Even when flagellum outgrowth can occur in the presence of cycloheximide, the length of the flagella formed is determined by the extent of synthesis of an unknown "limiting precursor." The transition points for formation of flagella and for formation of the streamlined flagellate body shape are temporally separate. These results indicate that differentiation in Naegleria involves a redirection of cell metabolism to produce new RNA and protein molecules that are essential for morphogenesis. PMID:6154711

  15. Computational prediction of strain-dependent diffusion of transcription factors through the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nava, Michele M; Fedele, Roberto; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear spreading plays a crucial role in stem cell fate determination. In previous works, we reported evidence of multipotency maintenance for mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on three-dimensional engineered niche substrates, fabricated via two-photon laser polymerization. We correlated maintenance of multipotency to a more roundish morphology of these cells with respect to those cultured on conventional flat substrates. To interpret these findings, here we present a multiphysics model coupling nuclear strains induced by cell adhesion to passive diffusion across the cell nucleus. Fully three-dimensional reconstructions of cultured cells were developed on the basis of confocal images: in particular, the level of nuclear spreading resulted significantly dependent on the cell localization within the niche architecture. We assumed that the cell diffusivity varies as a function of the local volumetric strain. The model predictions indicate that the higher the level of spreading of the cell, the higher the flux across the nucleus of small solutes such as transcription factors. Our results point toward nuclear spreading as a primary mechanism by which the stem cell translates its shape into a fate decision, i.e., by amplifying the diffusive flow of transcriptional activators into the nucleus.

  16. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Regulates AP-1 Dependent Transcriptional Response to Minimally Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp; Almazan, Felicidad; Kim, Jungsu; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turns it into an endogenous ligand recognized by pattern-recognition receptors. We have demonstrated that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) binds to CD14 and mediates TLR4/MD-2-dependent responses in macrophages, many of which are MyD88-independent. We have also demonstrated that the mmLDL activation leads to recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to TLR4 and TLR4 and Syk phosphorylation. In this study, we produced a macrophage-specific Syk knockout mouse and used primary Syk−/− macrophages in our studies. We demonstrated that Syk mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, which in turn phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun, respectively, as assessed by an in vitro kinase assay. c-Jun phosphorylation was also mediated by IKKε. c-Jun and c-Fos bound to consensus DNA sites and thereby completed an AP-1 transcriptional complex and induced expression of CXCL2 and IL-6. These results suggest that Syk plays a key role in TLR4-mediated macrophage responses to host-generated ligands, like mmLDL, with subsequent activation of an AP-1 transcription program. PMID:22384232

  17. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates domain-specific inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bloodgood, Brenda L.; Sharma, Nikhil; Browne, Heidi Adlman; Trepman, Alissa Z.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    A heterogeneous population of inhibitory neurons controls the flow of information through a neural circuit1–3. Inhibitory synapses that form on pyramidal neuron dendrites modulate the summation of excitatory synaptic potentials4–6 and prevent the generation of dendritic calcium spikes7,8. Precisely timed somatic inhibition limits both the number of action potentials and the time window during which firing can occur8,9. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates inhibitory synapse number and function in cell culture10, but how this transcription factor affects the inhibitory inputs that form on distinct domains of a neuron in vivo was unclear. Here we show that in the mouse hippocampus behaviourally driven expression of NPAS4 coordinates the redistribution of inhibitory synapses made onto a CA1 pyramidal neuron, simultaneously increasing inhibitory synapse number on the cell body while decreasing the number of inhibitory synapses on the apical dendrites. This rearrangement of inhibition is mediated in part by the NPAS4 target gene brain derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), which specifically regulates somatic, and not dendritic, inhibition. These findings indicate that sensory stimuli, by inducing NPAS4 and its target genes, differentially control spatial features of neuronal inhibition in a way that restricts the output of the neuron while creating a dendritic environment that is permissive for plasticity. PMID:24201284

  18. Analysis of rpoS mRNA in Salmonella dublin: identification of multiple transcripts with growth-phase-dependent variation in transcript stability.

    PubMed

    Paesold, G; Krause, M

    1999-02-01

    In Salmonella dublin, rpoS encodes an alternative sigma factor of the RNA polymerase that activates a variety of stationary-phase-induced genes, including some virulence-associated genes. In this work, we studied the regulation and transcriptional organization of rpoS during growth. We found two transcripts, 2.3 and 1.6 kb in length, that represent the complete rpoS sequence. The 2.3-kb transcript is a polycistronic message that also includes the upstream nlpD gene. It is driven by a weak promoter with increasing activity when cells enter early stationary growth. The 1.6-kb message includes 566 bp upstream of the rpoS start codon. It is transcribed from a strong sigma70 RNA polymerase-dependent promoter which is independent of growth. The decay of this transcript decreases substantially in early stationary growth, resulting in a significant net increase in rpoS mRNA levels. These levels are approximately 10-fold higher than the levels of the 2.3-kb mRNA, indicating that the 1.6-kb message is mainly responsible for RpoS upregulation. In addition to the 2.3- and 1.6-kb transcripts, two smaller 1.0- and 0.4-kb RNA species are produced from the nlpD-rpoS locus. They do not allow translation of full-length RpoS; hence their significance for rpoS regulation remains unclear. We conclude that of four transcripts arising from the nlpD-rpoS locus, only one plays a significant role in rpoS expression in S. dublin. Its upregulation when cells enter stationary growth is due primarily to an increase in transcript stability.

  19. Cancer-causing mutations in a novel transcription-dependent nuclear export motif of VHL abrogate oxygen-dependent degradation of hypoxia-inducible factor.

    PubMed

    Khacho, Mireille; Mekhail, Karim; Pilon-Larose, Karine; Payette, Josianne; Lee, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    It is thought that degradation of nuclear proteins by the ubiquitylation system requires nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of E3 ubiquitin ligases. The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein is the substrate recognition component of a Cullin-2-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that recruits hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) for oxygen-dependent degradation. We demonstrated that VHL engages in nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking that requires ongoing transcription to promote efficient HIF degradation. Here, we report the identification of a discreet motif, DXGX(2)DX(2)L, that directs transcription-dependent nuclear export of VHL and which is targeted by naturally occurring mutations associated with renal carcinoma and polycythemia in humans. The DXGX(2)DX(2)L motif is also found in other proteins, including poly(A)-binding protein 1, to direct its transcription-dependent nuclear export. We define DXGX(2)DX(2)L as TD-NEM (transcription-dependent nuclear export motif), since inhibition of transcription by actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole abrogates its nuclear export activity. Disease-causing mutations of key residues of TD-NEM restrain the ability of VHL to efficiently mediate oxygen-dependent degradation of HIF by altering its nuclear export dynamics without affecting interaction with its substrate. These results identify a novel nuclear export motif, further highlight the role of nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of E3 ligases in degradation of nuclear substrates, and provide evidence that disease-causing mutations can target subcellular trafficking.

  20. Tuning of fast-spiking interneuron properties by an activity-dependent transcriptional switch*

    PubMed Central

    Dehorter, Nathalie; Ciceri, Gabriele; Bartolini, Giorgia; Lim, Lynette; del Pino, Isabel; Marín, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The function of neural circuits depends on the generation of specific classes of neurons. Neural identity is typically established near the time when neurons exit the cell cycle to become postmitotic cells, and it is generally accepted that, once the identity of a neuron has been established, its fate is maintained throughout life. Here, we show that network activity dynamically modulates the properties of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons through the postmitotic expression of the transcriptional regulator Er81. In the adult cortex, Er81 protein levels define a spectrum of FS basket cells with different properties, whose relative proportions are, however, continuously adjusted in response to neuronal activity. Our findings therefore suggest that interneuron properties are malleable in the adult cortex, at least to a certain extent. PMID:26359400

  1. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Luda, Katarzyna M; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K; Rivollier, Aymeric; Demiri, Mimoza; Sitnik, Katarzyna M; Pool, Lieneke; Holm, Jacob B; Melo-Gonzalez, Felipe; Richter, Lisa; Lambrecht, Bart N; Kristiansen, Karsten; Travis, Mark A; Svensson-Frej, Marcus; Kotarsky, Knut; Agace, William W

    2016-04-19

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8αβ(+) and CD4(+)CD8αα(+) T cells; the latter requiring β8 integrin expression by migratory IRF8 dependent CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs. SI homing receptor induction was impaired during T cell priming in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), which correlated with a reduction in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by SI-derived MLN DCs, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. These mice also lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 cell responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8 dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis. PMID:27067057

  2. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Luda, Katarzyna M; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K; Rivollier, Aymeric; Demiri, Mimoza; Sitnik, Katarzyna M; Pool, Lieneke; Holm, Jacob B; Melo-Gonzalez, Felipe; Richter, Lisa; Lambrecht, Bart N; Kristiansen, Karsten; Travis, Mark A; Svensson-Frej, Marcus; Kotarsky, Knut; Agace, William W

    2016-04-19

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8αβ(+) and CD4(+)CD8αα(+) T cells; the latter requiring β8 integrin expression by migratory IRF8 dependent CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs. SI homing receptor induction was impaired during T cell priming in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), which correlated with a reduction in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by SI-derived MLN DCs, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. These mice also lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 cell responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8 dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis.

  3. Transcription-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor activation by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Thomas E; Sang, Yingying; Ma, Yongxian; Abounader, Roger; Rosen, Eliot M; Xia, Shuli; Laterra, John

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms and biological implications of coordinated receptor tyrosine kinase coactivation remain poorly appreciated. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-Met are frequently coexpressed in cancers, including those associated with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) overexpression, such as malignant astrocytoma. In a previous analysis of the HGF-induced transcriptome, we found that two EGFR agonists, transforming growth factor-alpha and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), are prominently up-regulated by HGF in human glioma cells. We now report that stimulating human glioblastoma cells with recombinant HGF induces biologically relevant EGFR activation. EGFR phosphorylation at Tyr(845) and Tyr(1068) increased 6 to 24 h after cell stimulation with HGF and temporally coincided with the induction of transforming growth factor-alpha (~5-fold) and HB-EGF (~23-fold) expression. Tyr(845) and Tyr(1068) phosphorylation, in response to HGF, was inhibited by cycloheximide and actinomycin D, consistent with a requirement for DNA transcription and RNA translation. Specifically, blocking HB-EGF binding to EGFR with the antagonist CRM197 inhibited HGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation by 60% to 80% and inhibited HGF-induced S-G(2)-M transition. CRM197 also inhibited HGF-induced anchorage-dependent cell proliferation but had no effect on HGF-mediated cytoprotection. These findings establish that EGFR can be activated with functional consequences by HGF as a result of EGFR ligand expression. This transcription-dependent cross-talk between the HGF receptor c-Met and EGFR expands our understanding of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling networks and may have considerable consequences for oncogenic mechanisms and cancer therapeutics.

  4. Epigenetic control of viral life-cycle by a DNA-methylation dependent transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Flower, Kirsty; Thomas, David; Heather, James; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Jones, Susan; Sinclair, Alison J

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded transcription factor Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1) is the prototype of a class of transcription factor (including C/EBPalpha) that interact with CpG-containing DNA response elements in a methylation-dependent manner. The EBV genome undergoes a biphasic methylation cycle; it is extensively methylated during viral latency but is reset to an unmethylated state following viral lytic replication. Zta is expressed transiently following infection and again during the switch between latency and lytic replication. The requirement for CpG-methylation at critical Zta response elements (ZREs) has been proposed to regulate EBV replication, specifically it could aid the activation of viral lytic gene expression from silenced promoters on the methylated genome during latency in addition to preventing full lytic reactivation from the non-methylated EBV genome immediately following infection. We developed a computational approach to predict the location of ZREs which we experimentally assessed using in vitro and in vivo DNA association assays. A remarkably different binding motif is apparent for the CpG and non-CpG ZREs. Computational prediction of the location of these binding motifs in EBV revealed that the majority of lytic cycle genes have at least one and many have multiple copies of methylation-dependent CpG ZREs within their promoters. This suggests that the abundance of Zta protein coupled with the methylation status of the EBV genome act together to co-ordinate the expression of lytic cycle genes at the majority of EBV promoters. PMID:22022468

  5. Ligand-dependent repression of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 by the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Blobel, G A; Sieff, C A; Orkin, S H

    1995-01-01

    High-dose estrogen administration induces anemia in mammals. In chickens, estrogens stimulate outgrowth of bone marrow-derived erythroid progenitor cells and delay their maturation. This delay is associated with down-regulation of many erythroid cell-specific genes, including alpha- and beta-globin, band 3, band 4.1, and the erythroid cell-specific histone H5. We show here that estrogens also reduce the number of erythroid progenitor cells in primary human bone marrow cultures. To address potential mechanisms by which estrogens suppress erythropoiesis, we have examined their effects on GATA-1, an erythroid transcription factor that participates in the regulation of the majority of erythroid cell-specific genes and is necessary for full maturation of erythrocytes. We demonstrate that the transcriptional activity of GATA-1 is strongly repressed by the estrogen receptor (ER) in a ligand-dependent manner and that this repression is reversible in the presence of 4-hydroxytamoxifen. ER-mediated repression of GATA-1 activity occurs on an artificial promoter containing a single GATA-binding site, as well as in the context of an intact promoter which is normally regulated by GATA-1. GATA-1 and ER bind to each other in vitro in the absence of DNA. In coimmunoprecipitation experiments using transfected COS cells, GATA-1 and ER associate in a ligand-dependent manner. Mapping experiments indicate that GATA-1 and the ER form at least two contacts, which involve the finger region and the N-terminal activation domain of GATA-1. We speculate that estrogens exert effects on erythropoiesis by modulating GATA-1 activity through protein-protein interaction with the ER. Interference with GATA-binding proteins may be one mechanism by which steroid hormones modulate cellular differentiation. PMID:7760810

  6. Studying σ 54-dependent transcription at the single-molecule level using alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilemann, M.; Lymperopoulos, K.; Wigneshweraraj, S. R.; Buck, M.; Kapanidis, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    We present single-molecule fluorescence studies of σ 54-dependent gene-transcription complexes using singlemolecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) spectroscopy. The ability to study one biomolecule at the time allowed us to resolve and analyze sample heterogeneities and extract structural information on subpopulations and transient intermediates of transcription; such information is hidden in bulk experiments. Using site-specifically labeled σ 54 derivatives and site-specifically labeled promoter-DNA fragments, we demonstrate that we can observe single diffusing σ 54-DNA and transcription-initiation RNA polymerase-σ 54- DNA complexes, and that we can measure distances within such complexes; the identity of the complexes has been confirmed using electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays. Our studies pave the way for understanding the mechanism of abortive initiation and promoter escape in σ 54-dependent transcription.

  7. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  8. p202, an interferon-inducible negative regulator of cell growth, is a target of the adenovirus E1A protein.

    PubMed

    Xin, H; D'Souza, S; Fang, L; Lengyel, P; Choubey, D

    2001-10-18

    Studies have revealed that human adenovirus-encoded E1A protein promotes cell proliferation through the targeted interaction with cellular proteins that act as key negative regulators of cell growth. The targets of E1A protein include the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb). Because p202, an interferon (IFN)-inducible murine protein (52-kDa), negatively regulates cell growth in part through the pRb/E2F pathway, we tested whether the p202 is a target of the adenovirus-encoded E1A protein for functional inactivation. Here we report that the expression of E1A protein overcame p202-mediated inhibition of cell growth and this correlated with an alleviation of p202-mediated inhibition of the transcriptional activity of E2F. Furthermore, E1A protein relieved p202-mediated inhibition of the specific DNA-binding activity of E2F complexes, including those containing the pocket proteins. Additionally, the E1A protein bound to p202 both in vitro and in vivo and a deletion of four amino acids in the conserved region 2 (CR2) of E1A protein significantly reduced the binding of E1A to p202. Interestingly, ectopic expression of p202 under reduced serum conditions significantly reduced E1A-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, our observations provide support to the idea that the p202 and adenovirus E1A protein functionally counteract each other and E1A protein targets p202 to promote cell proliferation. PMID:11687962

  9. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-06-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets.

  10. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-01-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets. PMID:23822503

  11. The reverse transcription signature of N-1-methyladenosine in RNA-Seq is sequence dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hauenschild, Ralf; Tserovski, Lyudmil; Schmid, Katharina; Thüring, Kathrin; Winz, Marie-Luise; Sharma, Sunny; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wacheul, Ludivine; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.; Anderson, James; Alfonzo, Juan; Hildebrandt, Andreas; Jäschke, Andres; Motorin, Yuri; Helm, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The combination of Reverse Transcription (RT) and high-throughput sequencing has emerged as a powerful combination to detect modified nucleotides in RNA via analysis of either abortive RT-products or of the incorporation of mismatched dNTPs into cDNA. Here we simultaneously analyze both parameters in detail with respect to the occurrence of N-1-methyladenosine (m1A) in the template RNA. This naturally occurring modification is associated with structural effects, but it is also known as a mediator of antibiotic resistance in ribosomal RNA. In structural probing experiments with dimethylsulfate, m1A is routinely detected by RT-arrest. A specifically developed RNA-Seq protocol was tailored to the simultaneous analysis of RT-arrest and misincorporation patterns. By application to a variety of native and synthetic RNA preparations, we found a characteristic signature of m1A, which, in addition to an arrest rate, features misincorporation as a significant component. Detailed analysis suggests that the signature depends on RNA structure and on the nature of the nucleotide 3′ of m1A in the template RNA, meaning it is sequence dependent. The RT-signature of m1A was used for inspection and confirmation of suspected modification sites and resulted in the identification of hitherto unknown m1A residues in trypanosomal tRNA. PMID:26365242

  12. An enhancer element is located 340 base pairs upstream from the adenovirus-2 E1A capsite.

    PubMed Central

    Hen, R; Borrelli, E; Sassone-Corsi, P; Chambon, P

    1983-01-01

    A chimeric recombinant, containing the 270 bp left-terminal fragment of Adenovirus-2 (Ad2) inserted upstream from the -34 to +33 Ad2 major late promoter (Ad2MLP) element, has been used to characterize the transcription stimulatory element which is located at least 231 bp upstream from the E1A capsite in the left-end of Ad2 (Ref. 1). We demonstrate that this element, which acts in cis, possesses several properties characteristic of transcriptional enhancers. Firstly, it potentiates initiation of transcription from the capsite of the heterologous Ad2MLP and from "cryptic" sites often preceded by TATA box-like sequences. Secondly, although there is no critical distance requirement between the enhancer element and the Ad2MLP, the extent of stimulation decreases as the distance between the two element increases. However, in contrast to the other known viral or cellular enhancers which are bidirectional, the Ad2 enhancer is unidirectional, i.e. it potentiates the Ad2MLP element only when it is inserted in its "natural" orientation with respect to the direction of transcription. Using two convergent series of deletions, we have localized the Ad2 enhancer element within a 24 bp segment located at approximately 160 bp from the Ad2 left-end, i.e. 340 bp upstream from the E1A capsite. This 24 bp segment contains a sequence which exhibits a striking homology with the consensus sequence of several viral and cellular enhancers. Images PMID:6324099

  13. Anaerobic transcription activation in Bacillus subtilis: identification of distinct FNR-dependent and -independent regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Ramos, H; Boursier, L; Moszer, I; Kunst, F; Danchin, A; Glaser, P

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is able to grow anaerobically using alternative electron acceptors, including nitrate or fumarate. We characterized an operon encoding the dissimilatory nitrate reductase subunits homologous to the Escherichia coli narGHJI operon and the narK gene encoding a protein with nitrite extrusion activity. Downstream from narK and co-transcribed with it a gene (fnr) encoding a protein homologous to E.coli FNR was found. Disruption of fnr abolished both nitrate and fumarate utilization as electron acceptors and anaerobic induction of narK. Four putative FNR binding sites were found in B.subtilis sequences. The consensus sequence, centred at position -41.5, is identical to the consensus for the DNA site for E.coli CAP. Bs-FNR contained a four cysteine residue cluster at its C-terminal end. This is in contrast to Ec-FNR, where a similar cluster is present at the N-terminal end. It is possible that oxygen modulates the activity of both activators by a similar mechanism involving iron. Unlike in E.coli, where fnr expression is weakly repressed by anaerobiosis, fnr gene expression in B.subtilis is strongly activated by anaerobiosis. We have identified in the narK-fnr intergenic region a promotor activated by anaerobiosis independently of FNR. Thus induction of genes involved in anaerobic respiration requires in B.subtilis at least two levels of regulation: activation of fnr transcription and activation of FNR to induce transcription of FNR-dependent promoters. Images PMID:8846791

  14. Adenovirus type 5 early region 4 is responsible for E1A-induced p53-independent apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Marcellus, R C; Teodoro, J G; Wu, T; Brough, D E; Ketner, G; Shore, G C; Branton, P E

    1996-01-01

    In the absence of E1B, the 289- and 243-residue E1A products of human adenovirus type 5 induce p53-dependent apoptosis. However, our group has shown recently that the 289-residue E1A protein is also able to induce apoptosis by a p53-independent mechanism (J. G. Teodoro, G. C. Shore, and P. E. Branton, Oncogene 11:467-474, 1995). Preliminary results suggested that p53-independent cell death required expression of one or more additional adenovirus early gene products. Here we show that both the E1B 19-kDa protein and cellular Bcl-2 inhibit or significantly delay p53-independent apoptosis. Neither early region E2 or E3 appeared to be necessary for such cell death. Analysis of a series of E1A mutants indicated that mutations in the transactivation domain and other regions of E1A correlated with E1A-mediated transactivation of E4 gene expression. Furthermore, p53-deficient human SAOS-2 cells infected with a mutant which expresses E1B but none of the E4 gene products remained viable for considerably longer times than those infected with wild-type adenovirus type 5. In addition, an adenovirus vector lacking both E1 and E4 was unable to induce DNA degradation and cell killing in E1A-expressing cell lines. These data showed that an E4 product is essential for E1A-induced p53-independent apoptosis. PMID:8709247

  15. The Ability of Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b To Transactivate Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transcription Depends on a Functional Kinase Domain, Cyclin T1, and Tat

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Cujec, Thomas P.; Peng, Junmin; Garriga, Judit; Price, David H.; Graña, Xavier; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1998-01-01

    By binding to the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA, the transcriptional transactivator (Tat) from the human immunodeficiency virus increases rates of elongation rather than initiation of viral transcription. Two cyclin-dependent serine/threonine kinases, CDK7 and CDK9, which phosphorylate the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, have been implicated in Tat transactivation in vivo and in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate that CDK9, which is the kinase component of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, can activate viral transcription when tethered to the heterologous Rev response element RNA via the regulator of expression of virion proteins (Rev). The kinase activity of CDK9 and cyclin T1 is essential for these effects. Moreover, P-TEFb binds to TAR only in the presence of Tat. We conclude that Tat–P-TEFb complexes bind to TAR, where CDK9 modifies RNA polymerase II for the efficient copying of the viral genome. PMID:9696809

  16. Potentiation of NF-κB-dependent transcription and inflammatory mediator release by histamine in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Holden, N S; Gong, W; King, E M; Kaur, M; Giembycz, M A; Newton, R

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: In asthma, histamine contributes to bronchoconstriction, vasodilatation and oedema, and is associated with the late phase response. The current study investigates possible inflammatory effects of histamine acting on nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-dependent transcription and cytokine release. Experimental approach: Using BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells, NF-κB-dependent transcription and both release and mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-8 were examined by reporter assay, ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR. Histamine receptors were detected using qualitative RT-PCR and function examined using selective agonists and antagonists. Key results: Addition of histamine to TNFα-stimulated BEAS-2B cells maximally potentiated NF-κB-dependent transcription 1.8 fold, whereas IL-6 and IL-8 protein release were enhanced 7.3- and 2.7-fold respectively. These responses were, in part, NF-κB-dependent and were associated with 2.6- and 1.7-fold enhancements of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression. The H1 receptor antagonist, mepyramine, caused a rightward shift in the concentration-response curves of TNFα-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription (pA2=9.91) and release of IL-6 (pA2=8.78) and IL-8 (pA2=8.99). Antagonists of histamine H2, H3 and H4 receptors were without effect. Similarly, H3 and H4 receptor agonists did not affect TNFα-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription, or IL-6 and IL-8 release at concentrations below 10 μM. The anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, inhibited the histamine enhanced NF-κB-dependent transcription and IL-6 and IL-8 release. Conclusions and implications: Potentiation of NF-κB-dependent transcription and inflammatory cytokine release by histamine predominantly involves receptors of the H1 receptor subtype. These data support an anti-inflammatory role for H1 receptor antagonists by preventing the transcription and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:17891168

  17. Activation protein 1-dependent transcriptional activation of interleukin 2 gene by Ca2+/calmodulin kinase type IV/Gr

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) type IV/Gr is selectively expressed in T lymphocytes and is activated after signaling via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), indicating that it mediates some of the Ca(2+)-dependent transcriptional events that follow TCR engagement. Here we show that CaMKIV/Gr induces the transcription factor activation protein 1 (AP-1) alone or in synergy with T cell mitogens and with the p21ras oncoprotein. CaMKIV/ Gr signaling is associated with transcriptional activation of c-fos but is independent of p21ras or calcineurin. AP-1 is an integral component of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcriptional complex, which is required for interleukin 2 gene expression in T cells. We demonstrate that CaMKIV/Gr reconstitutes the capacity of the cytosolic component of NFAT to direct transcription from NFAT sites in non-T cells. These results reveal a central role for CaMKIV/Gr as a Ca(2+)-regulated activator of gene transcription in T lymphocytes. PMID:8691123

  18. Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activation via the BRG1-Dependent Recruitment of TOP2β and Ku70/86.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Kevin W; King, Heather A; Archer, Trevor K

    2015-08-01

    BRG1, the central ATPase of the human SWI/SNF complex, is critical for biological functions, including nuclear receptor (NR)-regulated transcription. Analysis of BRG1 mutants demonstrated that functional motifs outside the ATPase domain are important for transcriptional activity. In the course of experiments examining protein interactions mediated through these domains, Ku70 (XRCC6) was found to associate with a BRG1 fragment encompassing the conserved helicase-SANT-associated (HSA) and BRK domains of BRG1. Subsequent transcriptional activation assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies showed that Ku70/86 and components of the topoisomerase IIβ (TOP2β)/poly(ADP ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) complex are necessary for NR-mediated SWI/SNF-dependent transcriptional activation from endogenous promoters. In addition to establishing Ku-BRG1 binding and TOP2β/PARP1 recruitment by nuclear receptor transactivation, we demonstrate that the transient appearance of glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/BRG1-dependent, TOP2β-mediated double-strand DNA breaks is required for efficient GR-stimulated transcription. Taken together, these results suggest that a direct interaction between Ku70/86 and BRG1 brings together SWI/SNF remodeling capabilities and TOP2β activity to enhance the transcriptional response to hormone stimulation.

  19. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of RNA polymerase II basal transcription activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yonaha, M; Chibazakura, T; Kitajima, S; Yasukochi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II) in eukaryotic cells requires both basal and regulatory transcription factors. In this report we have investigated in vitro pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle by using nuclear extracts from synchronized HeLa cells. It is shown that pol II basal transcription activity is low in the S and G2 phases and high in early G1 phase and TFIID is the rate limiting component of pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle. Further analyses reveal that TFIID exists as a less active form in the S and G2 phases and nuclear extracts from S and G2 phase cells contain a heat-sensitive repressor(s) of TATA box binding protein (TBP). These results suggest that pol II basal transcription activity is regulated by a qualitative change in the TFIID complex, which could involve repression of TBP, during the cell cycle. Images PMID:7479063

  20. Conditional tolerance of temperate phages via transcription-dependent CRISPR-Cas targeting.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Gregory W; Jiang, Wenyan; Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2014-10-30

    A fundamental feature of immune systems is the ability to distinguish pathogenic from self and commensal elements, and to attack the former but tolerate the latter. Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas immune systems defend against phage infection by using Cas nucleases and small RNA guides that specify one or more target sites for cleavage of the viral genome. Temperate phages include viruses that can integrate into the bacterial chromosome, and they can carry genes that provide a fitness advantage to the lysogenic host. However, CRISPR-Cas targeting that relies strictly on DNA sequence recognition provides indiscriminate immunity both to lytic and lysogenic infection by temperate phages-compromising the genetic stability of these potentially beneficial elements altogether. Here we show that the Staphylococcus epidermidis CRISPR-Cas system can prevent lytic infection but tolerate lysogenization by temperate phages. Conditional tolerance is achieved through transcription-dependent DNA targeting, and ensures that targeting is resumed upon induction of the prophage lytic cycle. Our results provide evidence for the functional divergence of CRISPR-Cas systems and highlight the importance of targeting mechanism diversity. In addition, they extend the concept of 'tolerance to non-self' to the prokaryotic branch of adaptive immunity. PMID:25174707

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae phospholipase C regulates transcription of Msn2p-dependent stress-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Demczuk, Agnieszka; Guha, Nilanjan; Nguyen, Peter H; Desai, Parima; Chang, Jennifer; Guzinska, Katarzyna; Rollins, Janet; Ghosh, Chandra C; Goodwin, Leslie; Vancura, Ales

    2008-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphates are involved in signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization, and membrane trafficking. Inositol polyphosphates, produced from phosphatidylinositol phosphates by the phospholipase C-dependent pathway, regulate chromatin remodeling. We used genome-wide expression analysis to further investigate the roles of Plc1p (phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and inositol polyphosphates in transcriptional regulation. Plc1p contributes to the regulation of approximately 2% of yeast genes in cells grown in rich medium. Most of these genes are induced by nutrient limitation and other environmental stresses and are derepressed in plc1 Delta cells. Surprisingly, genes regulated by Plc1p do not correlate with gene sets regulated by Swi/Snf or RSC chromatin remodeling complexes but show correlation with genes controlled by Msn2p. Our results suggest that the increased expression of stress-responsive genes in plc1 Delta cells is mediated by decreased cyclic AMP synthesis and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Msn2p and increased binding of Msn2p to stress-responsive promoters. Accordingly, plc1 Delta cells display other phenotypes characteristic of cells with decreased PKA activity. Our results are consistent with a model in which Plc1p acts together with the membrane receptor Gpr1p and associated G(alpha) protein Gpa2p in a pathway separate from Ras1p/Ras2p and converging on PKA.

  2. The transcription factor E4F1 coordinates CHK1-dependent checkpoint and mitochondrial functions.

    PubMed

    Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Baraibar, Martín; Houlès, Thibault; Lacroix, Matthieu; Delpech, Hélène; Hatchi, Elodie; Arnould, Stéphanie; Severac, Dany; Dubois, Emeric; Caramel, Julie; Julien, Eric; Friguet, Bertrand; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2015-04-14

    Recent data support the notion that a group of key transcriptional regulators involved in tumorigenesis, including MYC, p53, E2F1, and BMI1, share an intriguing capacity to simultaneously regulate metabolism and cell cycle. Here, we show that another factor, the multifunctional protein E4F1, directly controls genes involved in mitochondria functions and cell-cycle checkpoints, including Chek1, a major component of the DNA damage response. Coordination of these cellular functions by E4F1 appears essential for the survival of p53-deficient transformed cells. Acute inactivation of E4F1 in these cells results in CHK1-dependent checkpoint deficiency and multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions that lead to increased ROS production, energy stress, and inhibition of de novo pyrimidine synthesis. This deadly cocktail leads to the accumulation of uncompensated oxidative damage to proteins and extensive DNA damage, ending in cell death. This supports the rationale of therapeutic strategies simultaneously targeting mitochondria and CHK1 for selective killing of p53-deficient cancer cells.

  3. AF4 uses the SL1 components of RNAP1 machinery to initiate MLL fusion- and AEP-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Hiroshi; Kanai, Akinori; Ito, Shinji; Matsui, Hirotaka; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    2015-11-23

    Gene rearrangements generate MLL fusion genes, which can lead to aggressive leukemia. In most cases, MLL fuses with a gene encoding a component of the AEP (AF4 family/ENL family/P-TEFb) coactivator complex. MLL-AEP fusion proteins constitutively activate their target genes to immortalize haematopoietic progenitors. Here we show that AEP and MLL-AEP fusion proteins activate transcription through selectivity factor 1 (SL1), a core component of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) of RNA polymerase I (RNAP1). The pSER domain of AF4 family proteins associates with SL1 on chromatin and loads TATA-binding protein (TBP) onto the promoter to initiate RNA polymerase II (RNAP2)-dependent transcription. These results reveal a previously unknown transcription initiation mechanism involving AEP and a role for SL1 as a TBP-loading factor in RNAP2-dependent gene activation.

  4. Alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation is required for memory consolidation-specific transcription.

    PubMed

    von Hertzen, Laura S J; Giese, K Peter

    2005-08-22

    Autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II switches the kinase into an autonomous activity mode. This molecular switch is important for hippocampal long-term memory formation, which requires de novo gene transcription and protein synthesis. Here, we have studied whether auto-phosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is required for gene transcription induced in the hippocampus by contextual fear conditioning. We have shown that upregulation of a nonassociative transcript, the serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase-1 messenger RNA, is normal in alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation-deficient mutant mice, whereas upregulation of an associative transcript, the nerve growth factor-inducible gene B messenger RNA, is impaired. Thus, we suggest that autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is a biochemical switch that regulates association-specific consolidation processes. PMID:16056150

  5. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription through Lys63 linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Peschiaroli, Angelo; Scialpi, Flavia; Bernassola, Francesca; Sherbini, El Said El; Melino, Gerry

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} WWP1 ubiquitylates {Delta}Np63 through conjugation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. {yields} WWP1 does not control {Delta}Np63 protein stability. {yields} WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription. -- Abstract: The transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family, plays a crucial role in epithelial development and tumorigenesis through the regulation of epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Similarly to p53, p63 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications, including ubiquitylation. Here, we report that the WWP1 E3 ubiquitin ligase binds specifically to {Delta}Np63 isoform but it does not trigger {Delta}Np63 proteasome-dependent degradation. Accordingly, we found that WWP1-dependent ubiquitylation of {Delta}Np63 occurs through the formation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. Importantly, we found that WWP1 is able to increase {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription and depletion of WWP1 in human primary keratinocytes induces cell cycle arrest. All together these results indicate that WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63 transcriptional activity, acting thus as a potential regulator of the proliferation and survival of epithelial-derived cells.

  6. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G0/G1. It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G0. Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G0/G1, but also for activation in S, G2 and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle. PMID:22064854

  7. Transcription-dependent cytosine deamination is a novel mechanism in ultraviolet light-induced mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Giel; Calléja, Fabienne; Besaratinia, Ahmad; Vrieling, Harry; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Mullenders, Leon H F; Jansen, Jacob G; de Wind, Niels

    2010-01-26

    Skin cancer is the most ubiquitous cancer type in the Caucasian population, and its incidence is increasing rapidly [1]. Transcribed proliferation-related genes in dermal stem cells are targets for the induction of ultraviolet light (UV)-induced mutations that drive carcinogenesis. We have recently found that transcription of a gene increases its mutability by UV in mammalian stem cells, suggesting a role of transcription in skin carcinogenesis [2]. Here we show that transcription-associated UV-induced nucleotide substitutions are caused by increased deamination of cytosines to uracil within photolesions at the transcribed strand, presumably at sites of stalled transcription complexes. Additionally, via an independent mechanism, transcription of UV-damaged DNA induces the generation of intragenic deletions. We demonstrate that transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) provides protection against both classes of transcription-associated mutagenesis. Combined, these results unveil the existence of two mutagenic pathways operating specifically at the transcribed DNA strand of active genes. Moreover, these results uncover a novel role for TC-NER in the suppression of UV-induced genome aberrations and provide a rationale for the efficient induction of apoptosis by stalled transcription complexes. PMID:20045328

  8. Describing a Transcription Factor Dependent Regulation of the MicroRNA Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Rozovski, Uri; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Calin, George; Harris, David; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhiming; Keating, Michael J; Estrov, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    While the transcription regulation of protein coding genes was extensively studied, little is known on how transcription factors are involved in transcription of non-coding RNAs, specifically of microRNAs. Here, we propose a strategy to study the potential role of transcription factor in regulating transcription of microRNAs using publically available data, computational resources and high throughput data. We use the H3K4me3 epigenetic signature to identify microRNA promoters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-sequencing data from the ENCODE project to identify microRNA promoters that are enriched with transcription factor binding sites. By transfecting cells of interest with shRNA targeting a transcription factor of interest and subjecting the cells to microRNA array, we study the effect of this transcription factor on the microRNA transcriptome. As an illustrative example we use our study on the effect of STAT3 on the microRNA transcriptome of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. PMID:27341356

  9. Protein Phosphatase 1-Dependent Transcriptional Programs for Long-Term Memory and Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Johannes; Koshibu, Kyoko; Jouvenceau, Anne; Dutar, Patrick; Mansuy, Isabelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is essential for the establishment and the maintenance of long-term memory (LTM) and for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity. The molecular mechanisms that control gene transcription in neuronal cells are complex and recruit multiple signaling pathways in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Protein kinases (PKs) and…

  10. Inhibition of different histone acetyltransferases (HATs) uncovers transcription-dependent and -independent acetylation-mediated mechanisms in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Merschbaecher, Katja; Hatko, Lucyna; Folz, Jennifer; Mueller, Uli

    2016-02-01

    Acetylation of histones changes the efficiency of the transcription processes and thus contributes to the formation of long-term memory (LTM). In our comparative study, we used two inhibitors to characterize the contribution of different histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to appetitive associative learning in the honeybee. For one we applied garcinol, an inhibitor of the HATs of the p300 (EP300 binding protein)/CBP (CREB-binding protein) family, and the HATs of the PCAF (p300/CBP-associated factor) family. As comparative agent we applied C646, a specific inhibitor that selectively blocks HATS of the p300/CBP family. Immunochemical analysis reveals differences in histone H3 acetylation in the honeybee brain, in response to the injection of either C646 or garcinol. Behavioral assessment reveals that the two drugs cause memory impairment of different nature when injected after associative conditioning: processes disturbed by garcinol are annihilated by the established transcription blocker actinomycin D and thus seem to require transcription processes. Actions of C646 are unaltered by actinomycin D, and thus seem to be independent of transcription. The outcome of our different approaches as summarized suggests that distinct HATs contribute to different acetylation-mediated processes in memory formation. We further deduce that the acetylation-mediated processes in memory formation comprise transcription-dependent and transcription-independent mechanisms.

  11. Elongation factor SII-dependent transcription by RNA polymerase II through a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Reines, D; Mote, J

    1993-01-01

    In eukaryotes the genetic material is contained within a coiled, protein-coated structure known as chromatin. RNA polymerases must recognize specific nucleoprotein assemblies and maintain contact with the underlying DNA duplex for many thousands of base pairs. Template-bound lac operon repressor from Escherichia coli arrests RNA polymerase II in vitro and in vivo [Kuhn, A., Bartsch, I. & Grummt, I. (1990) Nature (London) 344, 559-562; Deuschele, U., Hipskind, R. A. & Bujard, H. (1990) Science 248, 480-483]. We show that in a reconstituted transcription system, elongation factor SII enables RNA polymerase II to proceed through this blockage at high efficiency. lac repressor-arrested elongation complexes display an SII-activated transcript cleavage reaction, an activity associated with transcriptional read-through of a previously characterized region of bent DNA. This demonstrates factor-dependent transcription by RNA polymerase II through a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. Nascent transcript cleavage may be a general mechanism by which RNA polymerase II can bypass many transcriptional impediments. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8446609

  12. Transcription Elongation Factor NusA Is a General Antagonist of Rho-dependent Termination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, M Zuhaib; Dey, Debashish; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-04-01

    NusA is an essential protein that binds to RNA polymerase and also to the nascent RNA and influences transcription by inducing pausing and facilitating the process of transcription termination/antitermination. Its participation in Rho-dependent transcription termination has been perceived, but the molecular nature of this involvement is not known. We hypothesized that, because both Rho and NusA are RNA-binding proteins and have the potential to target the same RNA, the latter is likely to influence the global pattern of the Rho-dependent termination. Analyses of the nascent RNA binding properties and consequent effects on the Rho-dependent termination functions of specific NusA-RNA binding domain mutants revealed an existence of Rho-NusA direct competition for the overlappingnut(NusA-binding site) andrut(Rho-binding site) sites on the RNA. This leads to delayed entry of Rho at therutsite that inhibits the latter's RNA release process. High density tiling microarray profiles of these NusA mutants revealed that a significant number of genes, together with transcripts from intergenic regions, are up-regulated. Interestingly, the majority of these genes were also up-regulated when the Rho function was compromised. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of NusA-binding sites in different operons that are also the targets of Rho-dependent terminations. Our data strongly argue in favor of a direct competition between NusA and Rho for the access of specific sites on the nascent transcripts in different parts of the genome. We propose that this competition enables NusA to function as a global antagonist of the Rho function, which is unlike its role as a facilitator of hairpin-dependent termination.

  13. Transcription Elongation Factor NusA Is a General Antagonist of Rho-dependent Termination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, M Zuhaib; Dey, Debashish; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-04-01

    NusA is an essential protein that binds to RNA polymerase and also to the nascent RNA and influences transcription by inducing pausing and facilitating the process of transcription termination/antitermination. Its participation in Rho-dependent transcription termination has been perceived, but the molecular nature of this involvement is not known. We hypothesized that, because both Rho and NusA are RNA-binding proteins and have the potential to target the same RNA, the latter is likely to influence the global pattern of the Rho-dependent termination. Analyses of the nascent RNA binding properties and consequent effects on the Rho-dependent termination functions of specific NusA-RNA binding domain mutants revealed an existence of Rho-NusA direct competition for the overlappingnut(NusA-binding site) andrut(Rho-binding site) sites on the RNA. This leads to delayed entry of Rho at therutsite that inhibits the latter's RNA release process. High density tiling microarray profiles of these NusA mutants revealed that a significant number of genes, together with transcripts from intergenic regions, are up-regulated. Interestingly, the majority of these genes were also up-regulated when the Rho function was compromised. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of NusA-binding sites in different operons that are also the targets of Rho-dependent terminations. Our data strongly argue in favor of a direct competition between NusA and Rho for the access of specific sites on the nascent transcripts in different parts of the genome. We propose that this competition enables NusA to function as a global antagonist of the Rho function, which is unlike its role as a facilitator of hairpin-dependent termination. PMID:26872975

  14. DYRK1A Controls HIV-1 Replication at a Transcriptional Level in an NFAT Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Booiman, Thijs; Loukachov, Vladimir V.; van Dort, Karel A.; van ’t Wout, Angélique B.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transcription of the HIV-1 provirus is regulated by both viral and host proteins and is very important in the context of viral latency. In latently infected cells, viral gene expression is inhibited as a result of the sequestration of host transcription factors and epigenetic modifications. Results In our present study we analyzed the effect of host factor dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) on HIV-1 replication. We show that DYRK1A controls HIV-1 replication by regulating provirus transcription. Downregulation or inhibition of DYRK1A increased LTR-driven transcription and viral replication in cell lines and primary PBMC. Furthermore, inhibition of DYRK1A resulted in reactivation of latent HIV-1 provirus to a similar extent as two commonly used broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitors. We observed that DYRK1A regulates HIV-1 transcription via the Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) by promoting its translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Therefore, inhibition of DYRK1A results in increased nuclear levels of NFAT and increased NFAT binding to the viral LTR and thus increasing viral transcription. Conclusions Our data indicate that host factor DYRK1A plays a role in the regulation of viral transcription and latency. Therefore, DYRK1A might be an attractive candidate for therapeutic strategies targeting the viral reservoir. PMID:26641855

  15. Cell cycle-dependent transcription from the gid and mioC promoters of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, T; Okazaki, T

    1994-01-01

    Transcription from the gid and mioC promoters, which neighbor the origin of replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome (oriC), has been implicated in the control of initiation of replication of minichromosomes. The amounts of transcripts from these two promoters on the chromosome were quantified at various times in a synchronized culture of a temperature-sensitive dnaC mutant strain. Transcription from the gid promoter was most active before the initiation of replication and was inhibited after initiation, during the time corresponding to the period of sequestration of the oriC region from the dam methyltransferase. On the other hand, transcription from the mioC promoter was inhibited before initiation and the inhibition was relieved after initiation prior to the recovery of gid transcription. The strict regulation of transcription from the gid and mioC promoters may be involved in positive and negative control of chromosomal replication, respectively, as has been suggested for minichromosome replication. The DnaA protein was involved in repression of mioC transcription, indicating that the activity of the DnaA protein changes during the cell cycle. Images PMID:8132454

  16. Position dependent expression of a homeobox gene transcript in relation to amphibian limb regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Savard, P; Gates, P B; Brockes, J P

    1988-01-01

    Adult urodele amphibians such as the newt Notophthalmus viridescens are capable of regenerating their limbs and tail by formation of a blastema, a growth zone of mesenchymal progenitor cells. In an attempt to identify genes implicated in specification of the regenerate, we screened a newt forelimb blastema cDNA library with homeobox probes, and isolated and sequenced clones that identify a 1.8 kb polyadenylated transcript containing a homeobox. The transcript is derived from a single gene called NvHbox 1, the newt homologue of XIHbox 1 (Xenopus), HHO.c8 (human) and Hox-6.1 (mouse). The cDNA for the 1.8 kb transcript has two exons as determined by isolation and partial sequencing of a genomic clone. The expression of the transcript shows several interesting features in relation to limb regeneration: (i) Hybridization of Northern blots of poly(A)+ RNA from limb and tail and their respective blastemas shows that the transcript in limb tissues has exons 1 and 2, whereas a 1.8 kb transcript in tail tissues has only exon 2. (ii) The transcript is expressed in limbs of adult newt but not of adult Xenopus, raising the possibility that this contributes to an explanation of the loss of regenerative ability with maturation in adult anurans. (iii) The transcript is expressed at a higher level in a proximal (mid-humerus) blastema than in a distal one (mid-radius). When distal blastemas were proximalized by treatment with retinoic acid, no change in the level of the transcript was detected by Northern analysis at a single time point after amputation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2907476

  17. Coupled Changes in Translation and Transcription during Cobalamin-Dependent Regulation of btuB Expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nou, Xiangwu; Kadner, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    The level of the vitamin B12 transport protein BtuB in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli is strongly reduced by growth in the presence of cobalamins. Previous analyses of regulatory mutants and of btuB-lacZ fusions indicated that the primary site of btuB gene regulation was at the translational level, and this required sequences throughout the 240-nucleotide (nt) leader region. Cobalamin-dependent regulation of transcriptional fusions was of a lesser magnitude but required, in addition to the leader, sequences within the first 100 nt of the coding sequence, termed the translated regulatory region (TRR). To analyze the process of transcription-level regulation of btuB in E. coli, the levels and metabolism of btuB RNA were analyzed by S1 nuclease protection assays, and mutations that alter the coupling of translational and transcriptional control were analyzed. Expression of transcriptional fusions was found to correlate with changes in the level of intact btuB RNA and was related to changes in the metabolic stability of the normally long-lived RNA. Mutational analysis showed that the btuB start codon and a hairpin structure that can sequester the Shine-Dalgarno sequence are necessary for cobalamin-dependent regulation and that translation of the TRR is necessary for extended RNA stability and for expression of the transcriptional fusion. The absence of regulation at the stage of transcription initiation was confirmed by the findings that several truncated btuB RNA fragments were expressed in a constitutive manner and that the normal regulatory response occurred even when the btuB promoter and upstream sequences were replaced by the heterologous bla and lac promoters. Transcription driven by phage T7 RNA polymerase was not regulated by cobalamins, although some regulation at the translational level was retained. Cobalamin-dependent changes in RNA structure were suggested from the RNase III-dependent production of a transcript fragment that is made only in the

  18. Kcnip1 a Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor regulates the size of the neural plate in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Néant, Isabelle; Mellström, Britt; Gonzalez, Paz; Naranjo, Jose R; Moreau, Marc; Leclerc, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    In amphibian embryos, our previous work has demonstrated that calcium transients occurring in the dorsal ectoderm at the onset of gastrulation are necessary and sufficient to engage the ectodermal cells into a neural fate by inducing neural specific genes. Some of these genes are direct targets of calcium. Here we search for a direct transcriptional mechanism by which calcium signals are acting. The only known mechanism responsible for a direct action of calcium on gene transcription involves an EF-hand Ca²⁺ binding protein which belongs to a group of four proteins (Kcnip1 to 4). Kcnip protein can act in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner as a transcriptional repressor by binding to a specific DNA sequence, the Downstream Regulatory Element (DRE) site. In Xenopus, among the four kcnips, we show that only kcnip1 is timely and spatially present in the presumptive neural territories and is able to bind DRE sites in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner. The loss of function of kcnip1 results in the expansion of the neural plate through an increased proliferation of neural progenitors. Later on, this leads to an impairment in the development of anterior neural structures. We propose that, in the embryo, at the onset of neurogenesis Kcnip1 is the Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor that controls the size of the neural plate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  19. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016.

  20. Binding of TFIIIC to SINE Elements Controls the Relocation of Activity-Dependent Neuronal Genes to Transcription Factories

    PubMed Central

    Crepaldi, Luca; Policarpi, Cristina; Coatti, Alessandro; Sherlock, William T.; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Down, Thomas A.; Riccio, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, the timely and accurate expression of genes in response to synaptic activity relies on the interplay between epigenetic modifications of histones, recruitment of regulatory proteins to chromatin and changes to nuclear structure. To identify genes and regulatory elements responsive to synaptic activation in vivo, we performed a genome-wide ChIPseq analysis of acetylated histone H3 using somatosensory cortex of mice exposed to novel enriched environmental (NEE) conditions. We discovered that Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs) located distal to promoters of activity-dependent genes became acetylated following exposure to NEE and were bound by the general transcription factor TFIIIC. Importantly, under depolarizing conditions, inducible genes relocated to transcription factories (TFs), and this event was controlled by TFIIIC. Silencing of the TFIIIC subunit Gtf3c5 in non-stimulated neurons induced uncontrolled relocation to TFs and transcription of activity-dependent genes. Remarkably, in cortical neurons, silencing of Gtf3c5 mimicked the effects of chronic depolarization, inducing a dramatic increase of both dendritic length and branching. These findings reveal a novel and essential regulatory function of both SINEs and TFIIIC in mediating gene relocation and transcription. They also suggest that TFIIIC may regulate the rearrangement of nuclear architecture, allowing the coordinated expression of activity-dependent neuronal genes. PMID:23966877

  1. Negative autoregulation of BMP dependent transcription by SIN3B splicing reveals a role for RBM39

    PubMed Central

    Faherty, Noel; Benson, Matthew; Sharma, Eshita; Lee, Angela; Howarth, Alison; Lockstone, Helen; Ebner, Daniel; Bhattacharya, Shoumo

    2016-01-01

    BMP signalling is negatively autoregulated by several genes including SMAD6, Noggin and Gremlin, and autoregulators are possible targets for enhancing BMP signalling in disorders such as fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. To identify novel negative regulators of BMP signalling, we used siRNA screening in mouse C2C12 cells with a BMP-responsive luciferase reporter. Knockdown of several splicing factors increased BMP4-dependent transcription and target gene expression. Knockdown of RBM39 produced the greatest enhancement in BMP activity. Transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing identified a change in Sin3b exon usage after RBM39 knockdown. SIN3B targets histone deacetylases to chromatin to repress transcription. In mouse, Sin3b produces long and short isoforms, with the short isoform lacking the ability to recruit HDACs. BMP4 induced a shift in SIN3B expression to the long isoform, and this change in isoform ratio was prevented by RBM39 knockdown. Knockdown of long isoform SIN3B enhanced BMP4-dependent transcription, whereas knockdown of the short isoform did not. We propose that BMP4-dependent transcription is negatively autoregulated in part by SIN3B alternative splicing, and that RBM39 plays a role in this process. PMID:27324164

  2. Dynamic subnuclear relocalization of WRKY40, a potential new mechanism of ABA-dependent transcription factor regulation.

    PubMed

    Geilen, Katja; Böhmer, Maik

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone ABA plays a major role during plant development, e.g. seed maturation and seed germination, and during adaptation to abiotic stresses like stomatal aperture regulation. The three closely related WRKY transcription factors WRKY18, WRKY40 and WRKY60 function in ABA signal transduction. We recently demonstrated that WRKY18 and WRKY40 but not WRKY60 localize to nuclear bodies in A. thaliana mesophyll protoplasts. WRKY40, a negative regulator of ABA-dependent inhibition of seed germination, relocalizes from PNBs to the nucleoplasm in the presence of ABA in a dynamic and phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that subnuclear relocalization of WRKY40 might constitute a new regulatory mechanism of ABA-dependent modulation of transcription factor activity. PMID:26479147

  3. 17beta-estradiol-dependent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 in human fetal osteoblasts is dependent on Src kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Angela M; Shogren, Kristen L; Zhang, Minzhi; Turner, Russell T; Spelsberg, Thomas C; Maran, Avudaiappan

    2005-01-01

    Estrogen is essential for normal growth and remodeling of bone. Although the mechanism of estrogen action on bone cells has been widely investigated, the full spectrum of signal transduction pathways activated by estrogen is unknown. In this report, we investigate the effects of the gonadal hormone 17beta-estradiol on the regulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (Stat1) protein in cultured human fetal osteoblast cells, devoid of the classical estrogen receptors (ERs). 17beta-estradiol (10 nM) led to rapid (within 15 min) activation of Stat1 protein as indicated by increases in tyrosine phosphorylation and DNA binding activity. Also, 17beta-estradiol increased gamma-activated sequence-dependent transcription in transient transfection assays, suggesting an increase in Stat protein-dependent transcription. Estrogen-dependent Stat1 activation was blocked in cells that transiently express dominant-negative Stat1 mutant protein. Activation of Stat1 by 17beta-estradiol was not inhibited by ER antagonist ICI 182,780, providing further evidence that it is not dependent on classical ERs. 17beta-Estradiol induced rapid (within 15 min) Stat1 phosphorylation and stimulated gamma-activated sequence-dependent transcription in ER-negative breast cancer cells, indicating that these results are not unique to bone cells. The rapid estrogenic effect involving the phosphorylation and activation of Stat1 was blocked in the presence of Src family kinase inhibitor PP2; activated Stat1 was associated with Src protein in estrogen-treated cells. These findings indicate the requirement for Src kinase pathways in estrogen-mediated Stat1 activation. Thus, the ER-independent activation of Stat1 in 17beta-estradiol-treated osteoblast and breast cancer cells may partially mediate the actions of estrogen on target cells.

  4. Regulation of estrogen-dependent transcription by the LIM cofactors CLIM and RLIM in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Steven A; Güngör, Cenap; Prenzel, Tanja; Riethdorf, Sabine; Riethdorf, Lutz; Taniguchi-Ishigaki, Naoko; Rau, Thomas; Tursun, Baris; Furlow, J David; Sauter, Guido; Scheffner, Martin; Pantel, Klaus; Gannon, Frank; Bach, Ingolf

    2009-01-01

    Mammary oncogenesis is profoundly influenced by signaling pathways controlled by estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). Although it is known that ERalpha exerts its oncogenic effect by stimulating the proliferation of many human breast cancers through the activation of target genes, our knowledge of the underlying transcriptional mechanisms remains limited. Our published work has shown that the in vivo activity of LIM homeodomain transcription factors (LIM-HD) is critically regulated by cofactors of LIM-HD proteins (CLIM) and the ubiquitin ligase RING finger LIM domain-interacting protein (RLIM). Here, we identify CLIM and RLIM as novel ERalpha cofactors that colocalize and interact with ERalpha in primary human breast tumors. We show that both cofactors associate with estrogen-responsive promoters and regulate the expression of endogenous ERalpha target genes in breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, our results indicate opposing functions of LIM cofactors for ERalpha and LIM-HDs: whereas CLIM enhances transcriptional activity of LIM-HDs, it inhibits transcriptional activation mediated by ERalpha on most target genes in vivo. In turn, the ubiquitin ligase RLIM inhibits transcriptional activity of LIM-HDs but enhances transcriptional activation of endogenous ERalpha target genes. Results from a human breast cancer tissue microarray of 1,335 patients revealed a highly significant correlation of elevated CLIM levels to ER/progesterone receptor positivity and poor differentiation of tumors. Combined, these results indicate that LIM cofactors CLIM and RLIM regulate the biological activity of ERalpha during the development of human breast cancer.

  5. Identification and characterization of multiple conserved nuclear localization signals within adenovirus E1A

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kris S.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Greg J.; Todorovic, Biljana; King, Cason R.; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zhang, Zhiying; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-04-15

    The human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) E1A protein has a well defined canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at its C-terminus. We used a genetic assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate that the canonical NLS is present and functional in the E1A proteins of each of the six HAdV species. This assay also detects a previously described non-canonical NLS within conserved region 3 and a novel active NLS within the N-terminal/conserved region 1 portion of HAdV-5 E1A. These activities were also present in the E1A proteins of each of the other five HAdV species. These results demonstrate that, despite substantial differences in primary sequence, HAdV E1A proteins are remarkably consistent in that they contain one canonical and two non-canonical NLSs. By utilizing independent mechanisms, these multiple NLSs ensure nuclear localization of E1A in the infected cell. - Highlights: • HAdV E1A uses multiple mechanisms for nuclear import. • We identified an additional non-canonical NLS in the N-terminal/CR1 portion of E1A. • The new NLS does not contact importin-alpha directly. • All NLSs are functionally conserved in the E1A proteins of all 6 HAdV species.

  6. Chromatin remodeling protein SMAR1 regulates NF-κB dependent Interleukin-8 transcription in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Malonia, Sunil K; Yadav, Bhawna; Sinha, Surajit; Lazennec, Gwendel; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2014-10-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a pleiotropic chemokine involved in metastasis and angiogenesis of breast tumors. The expression of IL-8 is deregulated in metastatic breast carcinomas owing to aberrant NF-κB activity, which is known to positively regulate IL-8 transcription. Earlier, we have shown that tumor suppressor SMAR1 suppresses NF-κB transcriptional activity by modulating IκBα function. Here, we show that NF-κB target gene IL-8, is a direct transcriptional target of SMAR1. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays, we demonstrate that SMAR1 binds to IL-8 promoter MAR (matrix attachment region) and recruits HDAC1 dependent co-repressor complex. Further, we also show that SMAR1 antagonizes p300-mediated acetylation of RelA/p65, a post-translational modification indispensable for IL-8 transactivation. Thus, we decipher a new role of SMAR1 in NF-κB dependent transcriptional regulation of pro-angiogenic chemokine IL-8.

  7. Positional dependence of transcriptional inhibition by DNA torsional stress in yeast chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ricky S; Piña, Benjamin; Roca, Joaquim

    2010-02-17

    How DNA helical tension is constrained along the linear chromosomes of eukaryotic cells is poorly understood. In this study, we induced the accumulation of DNA (+) helical tension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and examined how DNA transcription was affected along yeast chromosomes. The results revealed that, whereas the overwinding of DNA produced a general impairment of transcription initiation, genes situated at <100 kb from the chromosomal ends gradually escaped from the transcription stall. This novel positional effect seemed to be a simple function of the gene distance to the telomere: It occurred evenly in all 32 chromosome extremities and was independent of the atypical structure and transcription activity of subtelomeric chromatin. These results suggest that DNA helical tension dissipates at chromosomal ends and, therefore, provides a functional indication that yeast chromosome extremities are topologically open. The gradual escape from the transcription stall along the chromosomal flanks also indicates that friction restrictions to DNA twist diffusion, rather than tight topological boundaries, might suffice to confine DNA helical tension along eukaryotic chromatin.

  8. In vitro transcription directed from the somatostatin promoter is dependent upon a purified 43-kDa DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Andrisani, O M; Zhu, Z N; Pot, D A; Dixon, J E

    1989-01-01

    In vitro transcription analyses were used to establish the biological function of a 43-kDa affinity-purified DNA-binding protein. The 43-kDa affinity-purified protein protects the region from position -59 to position -35 of the somatostatin promoter from DNase I digestion. This region of the somatostatin promoter harbors the TGACGTCA motif, also found and required for function in a number of other cAMP-responsive and adenovirus E1A-inducible promoters. Efficient and authentic transcription in vitro directed from the somatostatin promoter requires the TGACGTCA promoter element. In vitro transcription assays performed in the presence of somatostatin (positions -60 to -29), enkephalin (positions -105 to -71), and adenovirus type 5 E3 gene (positions -72 to -42) competitor fragments, harboring similar TGACGTCA motifs, selectively inhibit transcription directed from the somatostatin promoter, suggesting that the TGACGTCA element is the site of interaction of a somatostatin gene transactivator. Furthermore, extracts depleted of the TGACGTCA-binding activities by affinity chromatography utilizing a biotinylated oligonucleotide-avidin resin, are incapable of directing transcription from the somatostatin but not from the adenovirus major late promoter. Addition of the purified 43-kDa protein to the affinity-depleted extract restores transcription from the somatostatin promoter. These results are consistent with the 43-kDa protein being a trans-activator of the somatostatin gene. Images PMID:2564679

  9. Transformation by E1A Oncoprotein Involves Ubiquitin-Mediated Proteolysis of the Neuronal and Tumor Repressor REST in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hancheng

    2012-01-01

    The adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) protein promotes cell immortalization and transformation by mediating the activities of key cellular regulators. The repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), which is a major neuronal and tumor suppressor, was previously found mainly in the cytoplasm rather than in the nuclei of adenovirus-transformed rodent cells (22). We now demonstrate that the loss of REST in the nucleus is due to its rapid degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Only nuclear REST, but not its cytoplasmic counterpart, was ubiquitinated and degraded. REST degradation was blocked by the ubiquitination inhibitor PYR-41 and the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 but not by the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B. REST degradation required both of its two C-terminal degrons that are recognized by the ubiquitin ligase SCFβ-TrCP, since deletion or mutation of either degron eliminated degradation. Importantly, E1A was shown to mediate REST ubiquitination and degradation by upregulating β-TrCP. Knockdown of E1A in virus-transformed cells reduced both β-TrCP and ubiquitination of nuclear REST. In contrast, when expressed in HeLa cells, E1A enhanced the degradation of nuclear REST. Reconstitution of REST in virus-transformed cells negatively affected E1A-mediated cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. These data strongly indicate that E1A stimulates ubiquitination and proteolysis of REST in the nucleus, thereby abolishing the tumor suppressor functions of REST. PMID:22419809

  10. Tryptophan Codon-Dependent Transcription in Chlamydia pneumoniae during Gamma Interferon-Mediated Tryptophan Limitation.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Scot P; Rueden, Kelsey J; Rucks, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    In evolving to an obligate intracellular niche, Chlamydia has streamlined its genome by eliminating superfluous genes as it relies on the host cell for a variety of nutritional needs like amino acids. However, Chlamydia can experience amino acid starvation when the human host cell in which the bacteria reside is exposed to interferon gamma (IFN-γ), which leads to a tryptophan (Trp)-limiting environment via induction of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The stringent response is used to respond to amino acid starvation in most bacteria but is missing from Chlamydia Thus, how Chlamydia, a Trp auxotroph, responds to Trp starvation in the absence of a stringent response is an intriguing question. We previously observed that C. pneumoniae responds to this stress by globally increasing transcription while globally decreasing translation, an unusual response. Here, we sought to understand this and hypothesized that the Trp codon content of a given gene would determine its transcription level. We quantified transcripts from C. pneumoniae genes that were either rich or poor in Trp codons and found that Trp codon-rich transcripts were increased, whereas those that lacked Trp codons were unchanged or even decreased. There were exceptions, and these involved operons or large genes with multiple Trp codons: downstream transcripts were less abundant after Trp codon-rich sequences. These data suggest that ribosome stalling on Trp codons causes a negative polar effect on downstream sequences. Finally, reassessing previous C. pneumoniae microarray data based on codon content, we found that upregulated transcripts were enriched in Trp codons, thus supporting our hypothesis. PMID:27400720

  11. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  12. Honeybee royal jelly and nobiletin stimulate CRE-mediated transcription in ERK-independent and -dependent fashions, respectively, in PC12D cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hironori; Kogure, Ako; Sakamoto, Masahiro; Yamakuni, Tohru; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Murata, Kiyoshi; Hitomi, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Kikuji; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    To prove the pharmacological actions of honeybee royal jelly (RJ) on the nervous system, we examined the effects of RJ on CRE-mediated transcription. RJ increased CRE-mediated transcription in PC12D cells. Moreover, CRE-mediated transcriptional activity by RJ was enhanced by nobiletin. U0126, a MEK inhibitor, inhibited CRE-mediated transcription by combining RJ plus nobiletin without affecting transcription by RJ alone. These results suggest that RJ stimulates CRE-mediated transcription via an ERK-independent cascade, whereas the increasing CRE-mediated transcriptional effect by nobiletin is dependent on ERK phosphorylation. Combining RJ plus nobiletin may activate effectively neuronal functions via enhancement of CRE-mediated transcription.

  13. 26 CFR 1.665(e)-1A - Preceding taxable year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preceding taxable year. 1.665(e)-1A Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(e)-1A Preceding taxable year. (a) Definition—(1)...

  14. 26 CFR 1.665(e)-1A - Preceding taxable year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preceding taxable year. 1.665(e)-1A Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(e)-1A Preceding taxable year. (a) Definition—(1)...

  15. 26 CFR 1.665(e)-1A - Preceding taxable year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preceding taxable year. 1.665(e)-1A Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning on Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(e)-1A Preceding taxable year. (a) Definition—(1)...

  16. SMARCAD1 is an ATP-dependent stimulator of nucleosomal H2A acetylation via CBP, resulting in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Doiguchi, Masamichi; Nakagawa, Takeya; Imamura, Yuko; Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Higashi, Miki; Kubota, Kazuishi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Asahara, Hiroshi; Iida, Midori; Fujii, Satoshi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Liu, Ziying; Nandu, Tulip; Kraus, W. Lee; Ueda, Hitoshi; Ito, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, and ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling activity is required for optimal transcription from chromatin. While these two activities have been well characterized, how they are coordinated remains to be determined. We discovered ATP-dependent histone H2A acetylation activity in Drosophila nuclear extracts. This activity was column purified and demonstrated to be composed of the enzymatic activities of CREB-binding protein (CBP) and SMARCAD1, which belongs to the Etl1 subfamily of the Snf2 family of helicase-related proteins. SMARCAD1 enhanced acetylation by CBP of H2A K5 and K8 in nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent fashion. Expression array analysis of S2 cells having ectopically expressed SMARCAD1 revealed up-regulated genes. Using native genome templates of these up-regulated genes, we found that SMARCAD1 activates their transcription in vitro. Knockdown analysis of SMARCAD1 and CBP indicated overlapping gene control, and ChIP-seq analysis of these commonly controlled genes showed that CBP is recruited to the promoter prior to SMARCAD1. Moreover, Drosophila genetic experiments demonstrated interaction between SMARCAD1/Etl1 and CBP/nej during development. The interplay between the remodeling activity of SMARCAD1 and histone acetylation by CBP sheds light on the function of chromatin and the genome-integrity network. PMID:26888216

  17. Cytoplasmic p53 and Activated Bax Regulate p53-dependent, Transcription-independent Neural Precursor Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ying; Walls, K.C.; Ghosh, Arindam P.; Akhtar, Rizwan S.; Klocke, Barbara J.; Roth, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    The prodeath effects of p53 are typically mediated via its transcriptional upregulation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, including PUMA, Noxa, and/or Bax. We previously reported that staurosporine (STS), a broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor and prototypical apoptosis-inducing agent, produced p53-dependent, Bax-dependent, neural precursor cell (NPC) apoptosis, but that this effect occurred independently of new gene transcription and PUMA expression. To further characterize the mechanism by which p53 regulates NPC death, we used primary cerebellar NPCs derived from wild-type, p53-deficient, and Bax-deficient neonatal mice and the mouse cerebellar neural stem cell line, C17.2. We found that STS rapidly increased p53 cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in neuritic-like processes in C17.2 cells, which preceded Bax activation and caspase-3 cleavage. Confocal microscopy analysis of STS-treated cells revealed partial colocalization of p53 with the mitochondrial marker pyruvate dehydrogenase as well as with conformationally altered “activated” Bax, suggesting an interaction between these proapoptotic molecules in triggering apoptotic death. Nucleophosmin (NPM), a CRM1-dependent nuclear chaperone, also exhibited partial colocalization with both activated Bax and p53 following STS treatment. These observations suggest that cytoplasmic p53 can trigger transcription-independent NPC apoptosis through its potential interaction with NPM and activated Bax. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:265–275, 2010) PMID:19901272

  18. Assembly of methylated KDM1A and CHD1 drives androgen receptor-dependent transcription and translocation.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Eric; Willmann, Dominica; McMillan, Joel; Forne, Ignasi; Metzger, Philipp; Gerhardt, Stefan; Petroll, Kerstin; von Maessenhausen, Anne; Urban, Sylvia; Schott, Anne-Kathrin; Espejo, Alexsandra; Eberlin, Adrien; Wohlwend, Daniel; Schüle, Katrin M; Schleicher, Michael; Perner, Sven; Bedford, Mark T; Jung, Manfred; Dengjel, Jörn; Flaig, Ralf; Imhof, Axel; Einsle, Oliver; Schüle, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer evolution is driven by a combination of epigenetic and genetic alterations such as coordinated chromosomal rearrangements, termed chromoplexy. TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions found in human prostate tumors are a hallmark of chromoplexy. TMPRSS2-ERG fusions have been linked to androgen signaling and depend on androgen receptor (AR)-coupled gene transcription. Here, we show that dimethylation of KDM1A at K114 (to form K114me2) by the histone methyltransferase EHMT2 is a key event controlling androgen-dependent gene transcription and TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. We identified CHD1 as a KDM1A K114me2 reader and characterized the KDM1A K114me2-CHD1 recognition mode by solving the cocrystal structure. Genome-wide analyses revealed chromatin colocalization of KDM1A K114me2, CHD1 and AR in prostate tumor cells. Together, our data link the assembly of methylated KDM1A and CHD1 with AR-dependent transcription and genomic translocations, thereby providing mechanistic insight into the formation of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions during prostate-tumor evolution.

  19. Covalent Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) Modification of Maf1 Protein Controls RNA Polymerase III-dependent Transcription Repression*

    PubMed Central

    Rohira, Aarti D.; Chen, Chun-Yuan; Allen, Justin R.; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcribes genes that determine biosynthetic capacity. Induction of these genes is required for oncogenic transformation. The transcriptional repressor, Maf1, plays a central role in the repression of these and other genes that promote oncogenesis. Our studies identify an important new role for SUMOylation in repressing RNA pol III-dependent transcription. We show that a key mechanism by which this occurs is through small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification of Maf1 by both SUMO1 and SUMO2. Mutation of each lysine residue revealed that Lys-35 is the major SUMOylation site on Maf1 and that the deSUMOylase, SENP1, is responsible for controlling Maf1K35 SUMOylation. SUMOylation of Maf1 is unaffected by rapamycin inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and mTOR-dependent Maf1 phosphorylation. By preventing SUMOylation at Lys-35, Maf1 is impaired in its ability to both repress transcription and suppress colony growth. Although SUMOylation does not alter Maf1 subcellular localization, Maf1K35R is defective in its ability to associate with RNA pol III. This impairs Maf1 recruitment to tRNA gene promoters and its ability to facilitate the dissociation of RNA pol III from these promoters. These studies identify a novel role for SUMOylation in controlling Maf1 and RNA pol III-mediated transcription. Given the emerging roles of SENP1, Maf1, and RNA pol III transcription in oncogenesis, our studies support the idea that deSUMOylation of Maf1 and induction of its gene targets play a critical role in cancer development. PMID:23673667

  20. CAR and PXR-dependent transcriptional changes in the mouse liver after exposure to propiconazole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the conazoles propiconazole and triadimefon but not myclobutanilled to tumors in mice after 2 years. Transcript profiling studies in the livers ofwild-type mice after short-term exposure to the conazoles revealed signatures indicating the involvement ofthe nuclear rec...

  1. Effects of Adenovirus Type 5 E1A Isoforms on Viral Replication in Arrested Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Radko, Sandi; Jung, Richard; Olanubi, Oladunni; Pelka, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus has evolved to infect and replicate in terminally differentiated human epithelial cells, predominantly those within the airway, the gut, or the eye. To overcome the block to viral DNA replication present in these cells, the virus expresses the Early 1A proteins (E1A). These immediate early proteins drive cells into S-phase and induce expression of all other viral early genes. During infection, several E1A isoforms are expressed with proteins of 289, 243, 217, 171, and 55 residues being present for human adenovirus type 5. Here we examine the contribution that the two largest E1A isoforms make to the viral life cycle in growth-arrested normal human fibroblasts. Viruses that express E1A289R were found to replicate better than those that do not express this isoform. Importantly, induction of several viral genes was delayed in a virus expressing E1A243R, with several viral structural proteins undetectable by western blot. We also highlight the changes in E1A isoforms detected during the course of viral infection. Furthermore, we show that viral DNA replication occurs more efficiently, leading to higher number of viral genomes in cells infected with viruses that express E1A289R. Finally, induction of S-phase specific genes differs between viruses expressing different E1A isoforms, with those having E1A289R leading to, generally, earlier activation of these genes. Overall, we provide an overview of adenovirus replication using modern molecular biology approaches and further insights into the contribution that E1A isoforms make to the life cycle of human adenovirus in arrested human fibroblasts. PMID:26448631

  2. Identification of a Transcription Factor Controlling pH-Dependent Organic Acid Response in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Lars; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Thykaer, Jette

    2012-01-01

    Acid formation in Aspergillus niger is known to be subjected to tight regulation, and the acid production profiles are fine-tuned to respond to the ambient pH. Based on transcriptome data, putative trans-acting pH responding transcription factors were listed and through knock out studies, mutants exhibiting an oxalate overproducing phenotype were identified. The yield of oxalate was increased up to 158% compared to the wild type and the corresponding transcription factor was therefore entitled Oxalic Acid repression Factor, OafA. Detailed physiological characterization of one of the ΔoafA mutants, compared to the wild type, showed that both strains produced substantial amounts of gluconic acid, but the mutant strain was more efficient in re-uptake of gluconic acid and converting it to oxalic acid, particularly at high pH (pH 5.0). Transcriptional profiles showed that 241 genes were differentially expressed due to the deletion of oafA and this supported the argument of OafA being a trans-acting transcription factor. Furthermore, expression of two phosphoketolases was down-regulated in the ΔoafA mutant, one of which has not previously been described in fungi. It was argued that the observed oxalate overproducing phenotype was a consequence of the efficient re-uptake of gluconic acid and thereby a higher flux through glycolysis. This results in a lower flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, demonstrated by the down-regulation of the phosphoketolases. Finally, the physiological data, in terms of the specific oxygen consumption, indicated a connection between the oxidative phosphorylation and oxalate production and this was further substantiated through transcription analysis. PMID:23251373

  3. Gene transcription is coordinated with, but not dependent on, cell divisions during C. elegans embryonic fate specification

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Gautham; Walton, Travis; Murray, John Isaac; Raj, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    Cell differentiation and proliferation are coordinated during animal development, but the link between them remains uncharacterized. To examine this relationship, we combined single-molecule RNA imaging with time-lapse microscopy to generate high-resolution measurements of transcriptional dynamics in Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. We found that globally slowing the overall development rate of the embryo by altering temperature or by mutation resulted in cell proliferation and transcription slowing, but maintaining, their relative timings, suggesting that cell division may directly control transcription. However, using mutants with specific defects in cell cycle pathways that lead to abnormal lineages, we found that the order between cell divisions and expression onset can switch, showing that expression of developmental regulators is not strictly dependent on cell division. Delaying cell divisions resulted in only slight changes in absolute expression time, suggesting that expression and proliferation are independently entrained to a separate clock-like process. These changes in relative timing can change the number of cells expressing a gene at a given time, suggesting that timing may help determine which cells adopt particular transcriptional patterns. Our results place limits on the types of mechanisms that are used during normal development to ensure that division timing and fate specification occur at appropriate times. PMID:23863485

  4. LexA chimeras reveal the function of Drosophila Fos as a context-dependent transcriptional activator

    PubMed Central

    Szüts, David; Bienz, Mariann

    2000-01-01

    The transcriptional activation potential of proteins can be assayed in chimeras containing a heterologous DNA-binding domain that mediates their recruitment to reporter genes. This approach has been widely used in yeast and in transient mammalian cell assays. Here, we applied it to assay the transactivation potential of proteins in transgenic Drosophila embryos. We found that a chimera between the DNA-binding bacterial LexA protein and the transactivation domain from yeast GAL4 behaved as a potent synthetic activator in all embryonic tissues. In contrast, a LexA chimera containing Drosophila Fos (Dfos) required an unexpected degree of context to function as a transcriptional activator. We provide evidence to suggest that this context is provided by Djun and Mad (a Drosophila Smad), and that these partner factors need to be activated by signaling from Jun N-terminal kinase and decapentaplegic, respectively. Because Dfos behaves as an autonomous transcriptional activator in more artificial assays systems, our data suggest that context-dependence of transcription factors may be more prevalent than previously thought. PMID:10805795

  5. Emergence of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells involves a Chd1-dependent increase in total nascent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Fong Ming; Lizama, Carlos O.; Wong, Priscilla; Hawkins, John S.; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Lineage specification during development involves reprogramming of transcriptional states, but little is known about how this is regulated in vivo. The chromatin remodeler chomodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1 (Chd1) promotes an elevated transcriptional output in mouse embryonic stem cells. Here we report that endothelial-specific deletion of Chd1 leads to loss of definitive hematopoietic progenitors, anemia, and lethality by embryonic day (E)15.5. Mutant embryos contain normal numbers of E10.5 intraaortic hematopoietic clusters that express Runx1 and Kit, but these clusters undergo apoptosis and fail to mature into blood lineages in vivo and in vitro. Hematopoietic progenitors emerging from the aorta have an elevated transcriptional output relative to structural endothelium, and this elevation is Chd1-dependent. In contrast, hematopoietic-specific deletion of Chd1 using Vav-Cre has no apparent phenotype. Our results reveal a new paradigm of regulation of a developmental transition by elevation of global transcriptional output that is critical for hemogenesis and may play roles in other contexts. PMID:25831528

  6. Evaluation of data-dependent versus targeted shotgun proteomic approaches for monitoring transcription factor expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Charanjit; Hewel, Johannes A; Badis, Gwenael; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Liu, Jian; Hughes, Timothy R; Emili, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    In breast cancer, there is a significant degree of molecular diversity among tumors. Multiple perturbations in signal transduction pathways impinge on transcriptional networks that in turn dictate malignant transformation and metastatic progression. Detailed knowledge of the sequence-specific transcription factors that become activated or repressed within a tumor and comparison of their relative levels of expression in cancer versus normal tissue should therefore provide insight into disease mechanisms, improving patient stratification and facilitating personalized treatment. While high-throughput tandem mass spectrometry methods for global proteome profiling have been developed, existing approaches have limited sensitivity and are often unable to detect low-abundance transcription factors in a complex biological specimen like a biopsy or tumor cell extract. To this end, we have undertaken a systematic comparative evaluation of three MS/MS methods for the ability to detect reference transcription factors spiked in known amounts into a cell-free breast cancer nuclear extract: Data-Dependent Acquisition (DDA), wherein precursor ion intensity dictates selection for fragmentation; Targeted Peptide Monitoring (TPM), a directed approach using successive isolation and fragmentation of predefined m/ z ratios; and Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM), in which specific precursor ion to product ion transitions are selectively monitored. Through a series of controlled, parallel benchmarking experiments, we have determined the relative figures-of-merit of each approach, and have established that prior knowledge of signature proteotypic peptides markedly improves overall detection sensitivity, reliability, and quantification.

  7. The dependence of quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens JG on the transcription of luxS gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shu-Jing; Liu, Yu-Chen; Sun, Jiao; Zhu, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria communicate with one another using chemical signal molecules. This phenomenon termed quorum sensing enables the bacteria to monitor the environment for other bacteria and to alter behavior on a population-wide scale in response to cell density. Serratia marcescens JG, a quorum sensing bacterium, can secrete a furanosyl borate diester autoinducer (AI-2) in the exponential phase of growth. In this study, to further investigate the regulation of AI-2 production in S. marcescens JG, the pfs and luxS promoter fusions to an operon luxCDABE reporter were constructed in a low-copy-number vector pBR322K, which allows an examination of transcription of the genes in the pathway for signal synthesis. The results show that the luxS expression is constitutive, and the transcription of luxS is tightly correlated with AI-2 production in S. marcescens JG because the peaks of AI-2 production and transcriptional level of luxS appear at the same time point. The close relation of the profiles of luxS transcription and AI-2 production was also confirmed with real-time PCR technology. These results support the hypothesis that the quorum sensing in S. marcescens JG is luxS dependent.

  8. Analysis of PBase Binding Profile Indicates an Insertion Target Selection Mechanism Dependent on TTAA, But Not Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Liao, Ruiqi; Zheng, Yun; Sun, Ling; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Transposons and retroviruses are important pathogenic agents and tools for mutagenesis and transgenesis. Insertion target selection is a key feature for a given transposon or retrovirus. The piggyBac (PB) transposon is highly active in mice and human cells, which has a much better genome-wide distribution compared to the retrovirus and P-element. However, the underlying reason is not clear. Utilizing a tagged functional PB transposase (PBase), we were able to conduct genome-wide profiling for PBase binding sites in the mouse genome. We have shown that PBase binding mainly depends on the distribution of the tetranucleotide TTAA, which is not affected by the presence of PB DNA. Furthermore, PBase binding is negatively influenced by the methylation of CG sites in the genome. Analysis of a large collection of PB insertions in mice has revealed an insertion profile similar to the PBase binding profile. Interestingly, this profile is not correlated with transcriptional active genes in the genome or transcriptionally active regions within a transcriptional unit. This differs from what has been previously shown for P-element and retroviruses insertions. Our study provides an explanation for PB's genome-wide insertion distribution and also suggests that PB target selection relies on a new mechanism independent of active transcription and open chromatin structure. PMID:27570481

  9. Analysis of PBase Binding Profile Indicates an Insertion Target Selection Mechanism Dependent on TTAA, But Not Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Liao, Ruiqi; Zheng, Yun; Sun, Ling; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Transposons and retroviruses are important pathogenic agents and tools for mutagenesis and transgenesis. Insertion target selection is a key feature for a given transposon or retrovirus. The piggyBac (PB) transposon is highly active in mice and human cells, which has a much better genome-wide distribution compared to the retrovirus and P-element. However, the underlying reason is not clear. Utilizing a tagged functional PB transposase (PBase), we were able to conduct genome-wide profiling for PBase binding sites in the mouse genome. We have shown that PBase binding mainly depends on the distribution of the tetranucleotide TTAA, which is not affected by the presence of PB DNA. Furthermore, PBase binding is negatively influenced by the methylation of CG sites in the genome. Analysis of a large collection of PB insertions in mice has revealed an insertion profile similar to the PBase binding profile. Interestingly, this profile is not correlated with transcriptional active genes in the genome or transcriptionally active regions within a transcriptional unit. This differs from what has been previously shown for P-element and retroviruses insertions. Our study provides an explanation for PB's genome-wide insertion distribution and also suggests that PB target selection relies on a new mechanism independent of active transcription and open chromatin structure. PMID:27570481

  10. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016. PMID:27279631

  11. Human corneal epithelial subpopulations: oxygen dependent ex vivo expansion and transcriptional profiling.

    PubMed

    Bath, Chris

    2013-06-01

    Corneal epithelium is being regenerated throughout life by limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) believed to be located in histologically defined stem cell niches in corneal limbus. Defective or dysfunctional LESCs result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) causing pain and decreased visual acuity. Since the first successful treatment of LSCD by transplantation of ex vivo expanded LESCs in 1997, many attempts have been carried out to optimize culture conditions to improve the outcome of surgery. To date, progress in this field of bioengineering is substantially hindered by both the lack of specific biomarkers of LESCs and the lack of a precise molecular characterization of in situ epithelial subpopulations. The aim of this dissertation was to optimize culture systems with regard to the environmental oxygen concentration for selective ex vivo expansion of LESCs and to analyse in situ subpopulations in human corneal epithelium using a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA sequencing for global transcriptomic profiling. We compared dissociation cultures, using either expansion on γ-irradiated NIH/3T3 feeder cells in serum-rich medium or expansion directly on plastic in serum-free EpiLife medium, using a range of physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations (2%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%). Using immunocytochemistry and advanced fluorescence microscopy, cells were characterized regarding growth, cell cycle distribution, colony-forming efficiency (CFE), phenotypes and cytomorphometry. Limbal epithelial cells expanded in 2% O2 exhibited slow growth, low fraction of cells in S/G2 , high CFE, high expression of stem cell markers ABCG2 and p63α, and low fraction of differentiation marker CK3 resembling a LESC phenotype. The effect of hypoxia to maintain LESCs in culture was not dependent on the system used for propagation (Bath et al. 2013a). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate cellular subpopulations in situ from the spatially defined

  12. Interneuron Transcriptional Dysregulation Causes Frequency-Dependent Alterations in the Balance of Inhibition and Excitation in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Aundrea F.; Lucas, Elizabeth K.; Brady, Lillian J.; Li, Qin; Hablitz, John J.; Cowell, Rita M.

    2015-01-01

    Circuit dysfunction in complex brain disorders such as schizophrenia and autism is caused by imbalances between inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission (I/E). Short-term plasticity differentially alters responses from excitatory and inhibitory synapses, causing the I/E ratio to change as a function of frequency. However, little is known about I/E ratio dynamics in complex brain disorders. Transcriptional dysregulation in interneurons, particularly parvalbumin interneurons, is a consistent pathophysiological feature of schizophrenia. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator that in hippocampus is highly concentrated in inhibitory interneurons and regulates parvalbumin transcription. Here, we used PGC-1α−/− mice to investigate effects of interneuron transcriptional dysregulation on the dynamics of the I/E ratio at the synaptic and circuit level in hippocampus. We find that loss of PGC-1α increases the I/E ratio onto CA1 pyramidal cells in response to Schaffer collateral stimulation in slices from young adult mice. The underlying mechanism is enhanced basal inhibition, including increased inhibition from parvalbumin interneurons. This decreases the spread of activation in CA1 and dramatically limits pyramidal cell spiking, reducing hippocampal output. The I/E ratio and CA1 output are partially restored by paired-pulse stimulation at short intervals, indicating frequency-dependent effects. However, circuit dysfunction persists, indicated by alterations in kainate-induced gamma oscillations and impaired nest building. Together, these results show that transcriptional dysregulation in hippocampal interneurons causes frequency-dependent alterations in I/E ratio and circuit function, suggesting that PGC-1α deficiency in psychiatric and neurological disorders contributes to disease by causing functionally relevant alterations in I/E balance. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Alteration in the inhibitory and

  13. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  14. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  15. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E; Blanchette, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for

  16. The Trihelix Transcription Factor GTL1 Regulates Ploidy-Dependent Cell Growth in the Arabidopsis Trichome[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Christian; Kawamura, Ayako; Ichikawa, Takanari; Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Wada, Takuji; Kondou, Youichi; Muto, Shu; Matsui, Minami; Sugimoto, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    Leaf trichomes in Arabidopsis thaliana develop through several distinct cellular processes, such as patterning, differentiation, and growth. Although recent studies have identified several key transcription factors as regulating early patterning and differentiation steps, it is still largely unknown how these regulatory proteins mediate subsequent trichome development, which is accompanied by rapid cell growth and branching. Here, we report a novel trichome mutation in Arabidopsis, which in contrast with previously identified mutants, increases trichome cell size without altering its overall patterning or branching. We show that the corresponding gene encodes a GT-2-LIKE1 (GTL1) protein, a member of the trihelix transcription factor family. GTL1 is present within the nucleus during the postbranching stages of trichome development, and its loss of function leads to an increase in the nuclear DNA content only in trichomes that have completed branching. Our data further demonstrate that the gtl1 mutation modifies the expression of several cell cycle genes and partially rescues the ploidy defects in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor mutant siamese. Taken together, this study provides the genetic evidence for the requirement of transcriptional regulation in the repression of ploidy-dependent plant cell growth as well as for an involvement of GTL trihelix proteins in this regulation. PMID:19717615

  17. Snf1 Phosphorylates Adenylate Cyclase and Negatively Regulates Protein Kinase A-dependent Transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Raffaele; Tripodi, Farida; Gaggini, Marco; Castoldi, Andrea; Reghellin, Veronica; Nonnis, Simona; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Coccetti, Paola

    2015-10-01

    In eukaryotes, nutrient availability and metabolism are coordinated by sensing mechanisms and signaling pathways, which influence a broad set of cellular functions such as transcription and metabolic pathways to match environmental conditions. In yeast, PKA is activated in the presence of high glucose concentrations, favoring fast nutrient utilization, shutting down stress responses, and boosting growth. On the contrary, Snf1/AMPK is activated in the presence of low glucose or alternative carbon sources, thus promoting an energy saving program through transcriptional activation and phosphorylation of metabolic enzymes. The PKA and Snf1/AMPK pathways share common downstream targets. Moreover, PKA has been reported to negatively influence the activation of Snf1/AMPK. We report a new cross-talk mechanism with a Snf1-dependent regulation of the PKA pathway. We show that Snf1 and adenylate cyclase (Cyr1) interact in a nutrient-independent manner. Moreover, we identify Cyr1 as a Snf1 substrate and show that Snf1 activation state influences Cyr1 phosphorylation pattern, cAMP intracellular levels, and PKA-dependent transcription.

  18. Defective Hfp-dependent transcriptional repression of dMYC is fundamental to tissue overgrowth in Drosophila XPB models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jue Er Amanda; Mitchell, Naomi C; Zaytseva, Olga; Chahal, Arjun; Mendis, Peter; Cartier-Michaud, Amandine; Parsons, Linda M; Poortinga, Gretchen; Levens, David L; Hannan, Ross D; Quinn, Leonie M

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) pathway mutations cause neurodegenerative and progeroid disorders (xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD)), which are inexplicably associated with (XP) or without (CS/TTD) cancer. Moreover, cancer progression occurs in certain patients, but not others, with similar C-terminal mutations in the XPB helicase subunit of transcription and NER factor TFIIH. Mechanisms driving overproliferation and, therefore, cancer associated with XPB mutations are currently unknown. Here using Drosophila models, we provide evidence that C-terminally truncated Hay/XPB alleles enhance overgrowth dependent on reduced abundance of RNA recognition motif protein Hfp/FIR, which transcriptionally represses the MYC oncogene homologue, dMYC. The data demonstrate that dMYC repression and dMYC-dependent overgrowth in the Hfp hypomorph is further impaired in the C-terminal Hay/XPB mutant background. Thus, we predict defective transcriptional repression of MYC by the Hfp orthologue, FIR, might provide one mechanism for cancer progression in XP/CS.

  19. Ozone and nitric oxide induce cGMP-dependent and -independent transcription of defence genes in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Stefania; Meier, Stuart; Gehring, Chris; Madeo, Laura; Fornaciari, Marco; Romano, Bruno; Ederli, Luisa

    2009-03-01

    Here, we analyse the temporal signatures of ozone (O3)-induced hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) and the role of the second messenger guanosine3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in transcriptional changes of genes diagnostic for biotic and abiotic stress responses. Within 90 min O3 induced H2O2 and NO peaks and we demonstrate that NO donors cause rapid H2O2 accumulation in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaf. Ozone also causes highly significant, late (> 2 h) and sustained cGMP increases, suggesting that the second messenger may not be required in all early (< 2 h) responses to O3,but is essential and sufficient for the induction of some O3-dependent pathways.This hypothesis was tested resolving the time course of O3-induced transcript accumulation of alternative oxidase (AOX1a), glutathione peroxidase (GPX),aminocyclopropancarboxylic acid synthase (ACS2) that is critical for the synthesis of ethylene, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PALa) and the pathogenesis-related protein PR1a.The data show that early O3 and NO caused transcriptional activation of the scavenger encoding proteins AOX1a, GPX and the induction of ethylene production through ACS2 are cGMP independent. By contrast, the early response of PALa and the late response of PR1a show critical dependence on cGMP.

  20. Ubiquitin proteasome-dependent degradation of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1{alpha} via the N-terminal pathway.

    PubMed

    Trausch-Azar, Julie; Leone, Teresa C; Kelly, Daniel P; Schwartz, Alan L

    2010-12-17

    PGC-1α is a potent, inducible transcriptional coactivator that exerts control on mitochondrial biogenesis and multiple cellular energy metabolic pathways. PGC-1α levels are controlled in a highly dynamic manner reflecting regulation at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Here, we demonstrate that PGC-1α is rapidly degraded in the nucleus (t(½ 0.3 h) via the ubiquitin proteasome system. An N-terminal deletion mutant of 182 residues, PGC182, as well as a lysine-less mutant form, are nuclear and rapidly degraded (t(½) 0.5 h), consistent with degradation via the N terminus-dependent ubiquitin subpathway. Both PGC-1α and PGC182 degradation rates are increased in cells under low serum conditions. However, a naturally occurring N-terminal splice variant of 270 residues, NT-PGC-1α is cytoplasmic and stable (t(½>7 h), providing additional evidence that PGC-1α is degraded in the nucleus. These results strongly suggest that the nuclear N terminus-dependent ubiquitin proteasome pathway governs PGC-1α cellular degradation. In contrast, the cellular localization of NT-PCG-1α results in a longer-half-life and possible distinct temporal and potentially biological actions.

  1. TRRAP-Dependent and TRRAP-Independent Transcriptional Activation by Myc Family Oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Mikhail A.; Chandriani, Sanjay; Park, Jeonghyeon; Kotenko, Iulia; Matheos, Dina; Johnsson, Anna; McMahon, Steven B.; Cole, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate that transformation-transactivation domain-associated protein (TRRAP) binding and the recruitment of histone H3 and H4 acetyltransferase activities are required for the transactivation of a silent telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene in exponentially growing human fibroblasts by c-Myc or N-Myc protein. However, recruitment of TRRAP by c- or N-Myc is dispensable for the partial induction of several basally expressed genes in exponentially growing primary and immortalized fibroblasts. Furthermore, recruitment of TRRAP is required for c-Myc- or N-Myc-mediated oncogenic transformation but not for the partial restoration of the growth defect in myc-null fibroblasts. A segment of the adenovirus E1A protein fused to a transformation-defective N-Myc protein carrying a small deletion in the transactivation domain specifically restores interaction with TRRAP, activates the silent TERT gene, induces acetylation of histones H3 and H4 at the TERT promoter, and transforms primary cells. Accordingly, wild-type L-Myc is much less efficient in TRRAP binding, activation of the silent TERT gene, and transformation of primary fibroblasts. Nevertheless, L-Myc is a potent activator of several basally expressed genes and can fully restore the growth defect of myc-null cells. These results suggest a differential requirement for TRRAP for several Myc-mediated activities. PMID:12077335

  2. Gamma-secretase-dependent and -independent effects of presenilin1 on beta-catenin.Tcf-4 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Raurell, Imma; Codina, Montserrat; Casagolda, David; Del Valle, Beatriz; Baulida, Josep; de Herreros, Antonio García; Duñach, Mireia

    2008-01-01

    Presenilin1 (PS1) is a component of the gamma-secretase complex mutated in cases of Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). PS1 is synthesized as a 50 kDa peptide subsequently processed to two 29 and 20 kDa subunits that remain associated. Processing of PS1 is inhibited by several mutations detected in FAD patients. PS1 acts as negative modulator of beta-catenin.Tcf-4 transcriptional activity. In this article we show that in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) the mechanisms of action of the processed and non-processed forms of PS1 on beta-catenin.Tcf-4 transcription are different. Whereas non-processed PS1 inhibits beta-catenin.Tcf-4 activity through a mechanism independent of gamma-secretase and associated with the interaction of this protein with plakoglobin and Tcf-4, the effect of processed PS1 is prevented by gamma-secretase inhibitors, and requires its interaction with E- or N-cadherin and the generation of cytosolic terminal fragments of these two cadherins, which in turn destabilize the beta-catenin transcriptional cofactor CBP. Accordingly, the two forms of PS1 interact differently with E-cadherin or beta-catenin and plakoglobin: whereas processed PS1 binds E-cadherin with high affinity and beta-catenin or plakoglobin weakly, the non-processed form behaves inversely. Moreover, contrarily to processed PS1, that decreases the levels of c-fos RNA, non-processed PS1 inhibits the expression c-myc, a known target of beta-catenin.Tcf-4, and does not block the activity of other transcriptional factors requiring CBP. These results indicate that prevention of PS1 processing in FAD affects the mechanism of repression of the transcriptional activity dependent on beta-catenin. PMID:19114997

  3. A systematic analysis of factors localized to damaged chromatin reveals PARP-dependent recruitment of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Izhar, Lior; Adamson, Britt; Ciccia, Alberto; Lewis, Jedd; Pontano-Vaites, Laura; Leng, Yumei; Liang, Anthony C.; Westbrook, Thomas F.; Harper, J. Wade; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Localization to sites of DNA damage is a hallmark of DNA damage response (DDR) proteins. To identify new DDR factors, we screened epitope-tagged proteins for localization to sites of chromatin damaged by UV laser microirradiation and found >120 proteins that localize to damaged chromatin. These include the BAF tumor suppressor complex and the ALS candidate protein TAF15. TAF15 contains multiple domains that bind damaged chromatin in a PARP-dependent manner, suggesting a possible role as glue that tethers multiple PAR chains together. Many positives were transcription factors and >70% of randomly tested transcription factors localized to sites of DNA damage and approximately 90% were PARP-dependent for localization. Mutational analyses showed that localization to damaged chromatin is DNA-binding domain-dependent. By examining Hoechst staining patterns at damage sites, we see evidence of chromatin decompaction that is PARP-dependent. We propose that PARP-regulated chromatin remodeling at sites of damage allows transient accessibility of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:26004182

  4. Transcription Factors Pcr1 and Atf1 Have Distinct Roles in Stress- and Sty1-Dependent Gene Regulation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sansó, Miriam; Gogol, Madelaine; Ayté, José; Seidel, Chris; Hidalgo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase Sty1 is essential for the regulation of transcriptional responses that promote cell survival in response to different types of environmental stimuli in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Upon stress activation, Sty1 reversibly accumulates in the nucleus, where it stimulates gene expression via the Atf1 transcription factor. The Atf1 protein forms a heterodimer with Pcr1, but the specific role of this association is controversial. We have carried out a comparative analysis of strains lacking these proteins individually. We demonstrate that Atf1 and Pcr1 have similar but not identical roles in S. pombe, since cells lacking Pcr1 do not share all the phenotypes reported for Δatf1 cells. Northern blot and microarray analyses demonstrate that the responses to specific stresses of cells lacking either Pcr1 or Atf1 do not fully overlap, and even though most Atf1-dependent genes induced by osmotic stress are also Pcr1 dependent, a subset of genes require only the presence of Atf1 for their induction. Whereas binding of Atf1 to most stress-dependent genes requires the presence of Pcr1, we demonstrate here that Atf1 can bind to the Pcr1-independent promoters in a Δpcr1 strain in vivo. Furthermore, these analyses show that both proteins have a global repressive effect on stress-dependent and stress-independent genes. PMID:18375616

  5. Structural Analysis and Insights into the Oligomeric State of an Arginine-Dependent Transcriptional Regulator from Bacillus halodurans.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Woo; Kang, Jina; Yeo, Hyun Ku; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The arginine repressor (ArgR) is an arginine-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the arginine biosynthesis and catabolic pathways. ArgR is a functional homolog of the arginine-dependent repressor/activator AhrC from Bacillus subtilis, and belongs to the ArgR/AhrC family of transcriptional regulators. In this research, we determined the structure of the ArgR (Bh2777) from Bacillus halodurans at 2.41 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The ArgR from B. halodurans appeared to be a trimer in a size exclusion column and in the crystal structure. However, it formed a hexamer in the presence of L-arginine in multi-angle light scattering (MALS) studies, indicating the oligomerization state was dependent on the presence of L-arginine. The trimeric structure showed that the C-terminal domains form the core, which was made by inter-subunit interactions mainly through hydrophobic contacts, while the N-terminal domains containing a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif were arranged around the periphery. The arrangement of trimeric structure in the B. halodurans ArgR was different from those of other ArgR homologs previously reported. We finally showed that the B. halodurans ArgR has an arginine-dependent DNA binding property by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. PMID:27171430

  6. Structural Analysis and Insights into the Oligomeric State of an Arginine-Dependent Transcriptional Regulator from Bacillus halodurans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Woo; Kang, Jina; Yeo, Hyun Ku; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The arginine repressor (ArgR) is an arginine-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the arginine biosynthesis and catabolic pathways. ArgR is a functional homolog of the arginine-dependent repressor/activator AhrC from Bacillus subtilis, and belongs to the ArgR/AhrC family of transcriptional regulators. In this research, we determined the structure of the ArgR (Bh2777) from Bacillus halodurans at 2.41 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The ArgR from B. halodurans appeared to be a trimer in a size exclusion column and in the crystal structure. However, it formed a hexamer in the presence of L-arginine in multi-angle light scattering (MALS) studies, indicating the oligomerization state was dependent on the presence of L-arginine. The trimeric structure showed that the C-terminal domains form the core, which was made by inter-subunit interactions mainly through hydrophobic contacts, while the N-terminal domains containing a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif were arranged around the periphery. The arrangement of trimeric structure in the B. halodurans ArgR was different from those of other ArgR homologs previously reported. We finally showed that the B. halodurans ArgR has an arginine-dependent DNA binding property by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. PMID:27171430

  7. Transcription factors Pcr1 and Atf1 have distinct roles in stress- and Sty1-dependent gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Sansó, Miriam; Gogol, Madelaine; Ayté, José; Seidel, Chris; Hidalgo, Elena

    2008-05-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase Sty1 is essential for the regulation of transcriptional responses that promote cell survival in response to different types of environmental stimuli in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Upon stress activation, Sty1 reversibly accumulates in the nucleus, where it stimulates gene expression via the Atf1 transcription factor. The Atf1 protein forms a heterodimer with Pcr1, but the specific role of this association is controversial. We have carried out a comparative analysis of strains lacking these proteins individually. We demonstrate that Atf1 and Pcr1 have similar but not identical roles in S. pombe, since cells lacking Pcr1 do not share all the phenotypes reported for Deltaatf1 cells. Northern blot and microarray analyses demonstrate that the responses to specific stresses of cells lacking either Pcr1 or Atf1 do not fully overlap, and even though most Atf1-dependent genes induced by osmotic stress are also Pcr1 dependent, a subset of genes require only the presence of Atf1 for their induction. Whereas binding of Atf1 to most stress-dependent genes requires the presence of Pcr1, we demonstrate here that Atf1 can bind to the Pcr1-independent promoters in a Deltapcr1 strain in vivo. Furthermore, these analyses show that both proteins have a global repressive effect on stress-dependent and stress-independent genes. PMID:18375616

  8. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development

    PubMed Central

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies. PMID:23293292

  9. Salicylic acid-independent induction of pathogenesis-related protein transcripts by sugars is dependent on leaf developmental stage.

    PubMed

    Herbers, K; Meuwly, P; Métraux, J P; Sonnewald, U

    1996-11-18

    Soluble sugars have been found to regulate a number of genes involved in functions associated with sink metabolism, defense reactions and photosynthesis. As viruses and pathogens induce the expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) protein genes and have also been reported to lead to localized sugar accumulation in leaves, it was investigated whether a salicylic acid-independent but sugar-dependent pathway for PR-protein gene induction may exist in plant cells. Leaf discs of tobacco plants were floated on different sugar solutions, transcript accumulation and salicylic acid (SA) levels were subsequently determined. PR-Q and PAR-1 transcripts were found to be inducible by glucose, fructose and sucrose. No significant change in SA content could be detected, following incubation. On the other hand, SAR8.2 transcripts were repressed by elevated levels of soluble sugars and sorbitol, respectively, suggesting sensitivity to turgor pressure. Since leaves undergo sink to source transition during growth, sugar responsiveness was investigated in leaves of different developmental stages. Interestingly, induction of PR-Q and PAR-1 by soluble sugars was essentially restricted to fully expanded leaves and was independent of plant age. Induction by salicylate was not confined to the source capacity of a leaf but was dependent on the age of the respective leaf. Repression of transcripts encoding photosynthetic genes (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcS) and chlorophyll a/b binding protein (cab) by soluble sugars were largely independent from the leaf developmental state. These findings hint to the possibility of salicylic acid-independent defense reactions of plants against pathogens by induction of a set of PR proteins in source leaves. Furthermore, the data suggest different mechanisms for the induction of PR-protein genes and the repression of photosynthetic genes by soluble sugars.

  10. Density-dependent interference of aphids with caterpillar-induced defenses in Arabidopsis: involvement of phytohormones and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kroes, Anneke; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    In nature, plants are exposed to attacks by multiple herbivore species at the same time. To cope with these attacks, plants regulate defenses with the production of hormones such as salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA). Because herbivore densities are dynamic in time, this may affect plant-mediated interactions between different herbivores attacking at the same time. In Arabidopsis thaliana, feeding by Brevicoryne brassicae aphids interferes with induced defenses against Plutella xylostella caterpillars. This is density dependent: at a low aphid density, the growth rate of P. xylostella was increased, whereas caterpillars feeding on plants colonized by aphids at a high density have a reduced growth rate. Growth of P. xylostella larvae was unaffected on sid2-1 or on dde2-2 mutant plants when feeding simultaneously with a low or high aphid density. This shows that aphid interference with caterpillar-induced defenses requires both SA and JA signal transduction pathways. Transcriptional analysis revealed that simultaneous feeding by caterpillars and aphids at a low density induced the expression of the SA transcription factor gene WRKY70 whereas expression of WRKY70 was lower in plants induced with both caterpillars and a high aphid density. Interestingly, the expression of the JA transcription factor gene MYC2 was significantly higher in plants simultaneously attacked by aphids at a high density and caterpillars. These results indicate that a lower expression level of WRKY70 leads to significantly higher MYC2 expression through SA-JA cross-talk. Thus, plant-mediated interactions between aphids and caterpillars are density dependent and involve phytohormonal cross-talk and differential activation of transcription factors.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma abrogates Smad-dependent collagen stimulation by targeting the p300 transcriptional coactivator.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Asish K; Bhattacharyya, Swati; Wei, Jun; Kim, Suyeon; Barak, Yaacov; Mori, Yasuji; Varga, John

    2009-09-01

    Ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) abrogate the stimulation of collagen gene transcription induced by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Here, we delineate the mechanisms underlying this important novel physiological function for PPAR-gamma in connective tissue homeostasis. First, we demonstrated that antagonistic regulation of TGF-beta activity by PPAR-gamma ligands involves cellular PPAR-gamma, since 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) failed to block TGF-beta-induced responses in either primary cultures of PPAR-gamma-null murine embryonic fibroblasts, or in normal human skin fibroblasts with RNAi-mediated knockdown of PPAR-gamma. Next, we examined the molecular basis underlying the abrogation of TGF-beta signaling by PPAR-gamma in normal human fibroblasts in culture. The results demonstrated that Smad-dependent transcriptional responses were blocked by PPAR-gamma without preventing Smad2/3 activation. In contrast, the interaction between activated Smad2/3 and the transcriptional coactivator and histone acetyltransferase p300 induced by TGF-beta, and the accumulation of p300 on consensus Smad-binding DNA sequences and histone H4 hyperacetylation at the COL1A2 locus, were all prevented by PPAR-gamma. Wild-type p300, but not a mutant form of p300 lacking functional histone acetyltransferase, was able to restore TGF-beta-induced stimulation of COL1A2 in the presence of PPAR-gamma ligands. Collectively, these results indicate that PPAR-gamma blocked Smad-mediated transcriptional responses by preventing p300 recruitment and histone H4 hyperacetylation, resulting in the inhibition of TGF-beta-induced collagen gene expression. Pharmacological activation of PPAR-gamma thus may represent a novel therapeutic approach to target p300-dependent TGF-beta profibrotic responses such as stimulation of collagen gene expression.

  12. Ligand-dependent activation of transcription in vitro by retinoic acid receptor α/retinoid X receptor α heterodimers that mimics transactivation by retinoids in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, F. Jeffrey; Fromental-Ramain, Catherine; Remboutsika, Eumorphia; Benecke, Arndt; Chambon, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    All-trans and 9-cis retinoic acids (RA) signals are transduced by retinoic acid receptor/retinoid X receptor (RAR/RXR) heterodimers that act as functional units controlling the transcription of RA-responsive genes. With the aim of elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms, we have developed an in vitro transcription system using a chromatin template made up of a minimal promoter and a direct repeat with 5-spacing-based RA response element. RARα and RXRα were expressed in and purified from baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells, and transcription was carried out by using naked DNA or chromatin templates. Transcription from naked templates was not affected by the presence of RA and/or RAR/RXR heterodimers. In contrast, very little transcription occurred from chromatin templates in the absence of RA or RAR/RXR heterodimers whereas their addition resulted in a dosage-dependent stimulation of transcription that never exceeded that occurring on naked DNA templates. Most importantly, the addition of synthetic agonistic or antagonistic retinoids to the chromatin transcription system mimicked their stimulatory or inhibitory action in vivo, and activation by a RXR-specific retinoid was subordinated to the binding of an agonist ligand to the RAR partner. Moreover, the addition of the p300 coactivator generated a synergistic enhancement of transcription. Thus, the dissection of this transcription system ultimately should lead to the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which RAR/RXR heterodimers control transcription in a ligand-dependent manner. PMID:10051583

  13. Light-dependent transcriptional events during resting egg hatching of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jin; Suga, Koushirou; Kim, Bo-Mi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong; Hagiwara, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Rotifer resting eggs often have to endure harsh environmental conditions during the diapause phase. They are stimulated by light to hatch. In order to study the hatching mechanism, we observed resting eggs and measured their transcriptional expression under different light exposure periods (total darkness, and after 30 min, and 4h light). By using differential-display reverse transcription PCR (DDRT-PCR), we isolated 80 genes that displayed different expression patterns in response to the three light treatments: 20 genes were expressed in total darkness, 40 different genes were differentially expressed under 30 min light, and 20 further genes were expressed after 4h of light. The resting eggs showed no phenotypic differences in embryonic development during the 4h illumination period. In general, the expression patterns of the analyzed genes in resting eggs were differentially modulated by light exposure time. In total darkness, resting eggs mainly expressed genes encoding cell defense and homeostasis functions. In the 30 min illumination group, we found enriched expression of genes encoding fatty acid metabolism-related components, including Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD). Genes encoding cellular and embryonic developmental functions were highly observed in the 30 min-illuminated group but were not observed in the 4h-illuminated group. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that several transcripts such as encoding V-type H(+)-translocating pyrophosphatase (V-PPase) and Meckelin had prolonged expression levels when exposed to light for 4h. In the 4h illuminated group, the RecQ protein-like 5 (RECQL5) gene was enriched. This RECQL5 gene may be expressed to protect the developing embryo from continuous light exposure. The data presented in this study indicate that DDRT-PCR-aided gene screening can be helpful to isolate candidate genes involved in the hatching process.

  14. Hematopoietic and Leukemic Stem Cells Have Distinct Dependence on Tcf1 and Lef1 Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuyang; Li, Fengyin; Xing, Shaojun; Zhao, Tianyan; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-05-20

    Hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells (HSCs and LSCs) have self-renewal ability to maintain normal hematopoiesis and leukemia propagation, respectively. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors are expressed in HSCs, and targeting both factors modestly expanded the size of the HSC pool due to diminished HSC quiescence. Functional defects of Tcf1/Lef1-deficient HSCs in multi-lineage blood reconstitution was only evident under competitive conditions or when subjected to repeated regenerative stress. These are mechanistically due to direct positive regulation of Egr and Tcf3 by Tcf1 and Lef1, and significantly, forced expression of Egr1 in Tcf1/Lef1-deficient HSCs restored HSC quiescence. In a preclinical CML model, loss of Tcf1/Lef1 did not show strong impact on leukemia initiation and progression. However, when transplanted into secondary recipients, Tcf1/Lef1-deficient LSCs failed to propagate CML. By induced deletion of Tcf1 and Lef1 in pre-established CML, we further demonstrated an intrinsic requirement for these factors in LSC self-renewal. When combined with imatinib therapy, genetic targeting of Tcf1 and Lef1 potently diminished LSCs and conferred better protection to the CML recipients. LSCs are therefore more sensitive to loss of Tcf1 and Lef1 than HSCs in their self-renewal capacity. The differential requirements in HSCs and LSCs thus identify Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors as novel therapeutic targets in treating hematological malignancies, and inhibition of Tcf1/Lef1-regulated transcriptional programs may thus provide a therapeutic window to eliminate LSCs with minimal side effect on normal HSC functions. PMID:27044748

  15. The C-terminal region of E1A: a molecular tool for cellular cartography.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Ahmed F; Fonseca, Gregory J; Cohen, Michael J; Mymryk, Joe S

    2012-04-01

    The adenovirus E1A proteins function via protein-protein interactions. By making many connections with the cellular protein network, individual modules of this virally encoded hub reprogram numerous aspects of cell function and behavior. Although many of these interactions have been thoroughly studied, those mediated by the C-terminal region of E1A are less well understood. This review focuses on how this region of E1A affects cell cycle progression, apoptosis, senescence, transformation, and conversion of cells to an epithelial state through interactions with CTBP1/2, DYRK1A/B, FOXK1/2, and importin-α. Furthermore, novel potential pathways that the C-terminus of E1A influences through these connections with the cellular interaction network are discussed.

  16. TATA-binding protein and the retinoblastoma gene product bind to overlapping epitopes on c-Myc and adenovirus E1A protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hateboer, G; Timmers, H T; Rustgi, A K; Billaud, M; van 't Veer, L J; Bernards, R

    1993-01-01

    Using a protein binding assay, we show that the amino-terminal 204 amino acids of the c-Myc protein interact directly with a key component of the basal transcription factor TFIID, the TATA box-binding protein (TBP). Essentially the same region of the c-Myc protein also binds the product of the retinoblastoma gene, the RB protein. c-Myc protein coimmunoprecipitates with TBP in lysates of mammalian cells, demonstrating that the proteins are also complexed in vivo. A short peptide that spans the RB binding site of the E7 protein of human papilloma virus type 16 interferes with the binding of c-Myc to TBP. The same peptide also blocks binding of adenovirus E1A protein to TBP, suggesting that c-Myc and E1A bind to RB and TBP through overlapping epitopes. Furthermore, we show that binding of RB to E1A prevents association of E1A with TBP. Our data suggest that one of the functions of RB and RB-like proteins is to prevent interaction of viral and cellular oncoproteins, such as c-Myc and E1A, with TBP. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7690963

  17. Inflammation-induced up-regulation of hepcidin and down-regulation of ferroportin transcription are dependent on macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Agoro, Rafiou; Mura, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Iron is essential in all organisms. In mammals systemic iron homeostasis relies on hepcidin, a peptide hormone with defensin properties, and its target, the cell iron exporter ferroportin. Hepcidin and ferroportin transcription are both upregulated by high iron levels, but are inversely regulated upon inflammation, leading to hypoferremia. Thus, host iron genes regulation may affect the innate immune responses against infectious microorganisms. Since macrophages, which are crucial innate immune cells, express both hepcidin and ferroportin, we explored in these cells their transcriptional regulation upon inflammation which is not completely understood. Macrophages represent an heterogenous population of immune cells resulting from cytokine and pathogen sensing, indeed macrophages polarized especially into pro-inflammatory M1 and regulatory/anti-inflammatory M2 phenotypes. We found that hepcidin mRNA upregulation depends on M1 polarization and ferroportin mRNA downregulation depends on M2 subtype polarization. All TLR agonists, except TLR2 agonist, polarize to pro-inflammatory macrophages and upregulate hepcidin mRNA expression. Cell pretreatment with IFNγ or inhibitor of PI3K, p38-MAPK and NF-κB pathway involved in M1 polarization prior TLR4 activation, enhanced hepcidin upregulation. Conversely, ferroportin mRNA downregulation upon inflammation was strongly increased by macrophage polarization through TLR2- and 4-PI3K-dependent pathways, or through IL-1β and TNFα priming prior to LPS activation. PMID:27667162

  18. Genes and Small RNA Transcripts Exhibit Dosage-Dependent Expression Pattern in Maize Copy-Number Alterations.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Lithio, Andrew; Dash, Sudhansu; Weber, David F; Wise, Roger; Nettleton, Dan; Peterson, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes which tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplications (<100 kb) often exhibit dosage-dependent expression, whereas large duplications (>50 Mb) are more often dosage compensated. However, little or nothing is known about expression in moderately-sized (1-50 Mb) segmental duplications, and about the response of small RNAs to dosage change. Here, we compared maize (Zea mays) plants with two, three, and four doses of a 14.6-Mb segment of chromosome 1 that contains ∼300 genes. Plants containing the duplicated segment exhibit dosage-dependent effects on ear length and flowering time. Transcriptome analyses using GeneChip and RNA-sequencing methods indicate that most expressed genes and unique small RNAs within the duplicated segments exhibit dosage-dependent transcript levels. We conclude that dosage effect is the predominant regulatory response for both genes and unique small RNA transcripts in the segmental dosage series we tested. To our knowledge this is the first analysis of small RNA expression in plant gene dosage variants. Because segmental duplications comprise a significant proportion of eukaryotic genomes, these findings provide important new insight into the regulation of genes and small RNAs in response to dosage changes. PMID:27129738

  19. Role of SP transcription factors in hormone-dependent modulation of genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fei; Ivanov, Ivan; Xu, Rui; Safe, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) binds estrogen receptor α (ESR1) in MCF-7 cells and increases cell proliferation and survival through induction or repression of multiple genes. ESR1 interactions with DNA-bound specificity protein (SP) transcription factors is a nonclassical genomic estrogenic pathway and the role of SP transcription factors in mediating hormone-dependent activation or repression of genes in MCF-7 cells was investigated by microarrays and RNA interference. MCF-7 cells were transfected with a nonspecific oligonucleotide or a cocktail of small inhibitory RNAs (iSP), which knockdown SP1, SP3, and SP4 proteins, and treated with dimethylsulfoxide or 10 nM E2 for 6 h. E2 induced 62 and repressed 134 genes and the induction or repression was reversed in ∼62% of the genes in cells transfected with iSP (ESR1/SP dependent), whereas hormonal activation or repression of the remaining genes was unaffected by iSP (SP independent). Analysis of the ESR1/SP-dependent and SP-independent genes showed minimal overlap with respect to the GO terms (functional processes) in genes induced or repressed, suggesting that the different genomic pathways may contribute independently to the hormone-induced phenotype in MCF-7 cells. PMID:18952783

  20. Inflammation-induced up-regulation of hepcidin and down-regulation of ferroportin transcription are dependent on macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Agoro, Rafiou; Mura, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Iron is essential in all organisms. In mammals systemic iron homeostasis relies on hepcidin, a peptide hormone with defensin properties, and its target, the cell iron exporter ferroportin. Hepcidin and ferroportin transcription are both upregulated by high iron levels, but are inversely regulated upon inflammation, leading to hypoferremia. Thus, host iron genes regulation may affect the innate immune responses against infectious microorganisms. Since macrophages, which are crucial innate immune cells, express both hepcidin and ferroportin, we explored in these cells their transcriptional regulation upon inflammation which is not completely understood. Macrophages represent an heterogenous population of immune cells resulting from cytokine and pathogen sensing, indeed macrophages polarized especially into pro-inflammatory M1 and regulatory/anti-inflammatory M2 phenotypes. We found that hepcidin mRNA upregulation depends on M1 polarization and ferroportin mRNA downregulation depends on M2 subtype polarization. All TLR agonists, except TLR2 agonist, polarize to pro-inflammatory macrophages and upregulate hepcidin mRNA expression. Cell pretreatment with IFNγ or inhibitor of PI3K, p38-MAPK and NF-κB pathway involved in M1 polarization prior TLR4 activation, enhanced hepcidin upregulation. Conversely, ferroportin mRNA downregulation upon inflammation was strongly increased by macrophage polarization through TLR2- and 4-PI3K-dependent pathways, or through IL-1β and TNFα priming prior to LPS activation.

  1. Novel Foxo1–dependent transcriptional programs control Treg cell function

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Weiming; Liao, Will; Luo, Chong T.; Yin, Na; Huse, Morgan; Kim, Myoungjoo V.; Peng, Min; Chan, Pamela; Ma, Qian; Mo, Yifan; Meijer, Dies; Zhao, Keji; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; Atwal, Gurinder; Zhang, Michael Q.; Li, Ming O.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, characterized by expression of the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), maintain immune homeostasis by suppressing self-destructive immune responses1–4. Foxp3 operates as a late-acting differentiation factor controlling Treg cell homeostasis and function5, whereas the early Treg-cell-lineage commitment is regulated by the Akt kinase and the forkhead box O (Foxo) family of transcription factors6–10. However, whether Foxo proteins act beyond the Treg-cell-commitment stage to control Treg cell homeostasis and function remains largely unexplored. Here we show that Foxo1 is a pivotal regulatorof Treg cell function. Treg cells express high amounts of Foxo1 and display reduced T-cell-receptor-induced Akt activation, Foxo1 phosphorylation and Foxo1 nuclear exclusion. Mice with Treg-cell-specific deletion of Foxo1 develop a fatal inflammatory disorder similar in severity to that seen in Foxp3-deficient mice, but without the loss of Treg cells. Genome-wide analysis of Foxo1 binding sites reveals ~300 Foxo1-bound target genes, including the pro-inflammatory cytokine Ifng, that do not seem to be directly regulated by Foxp3. These findings show that the evolutionarily ancient Akt–Foxo1 signalling module controls a novel genetic program indispensable for Treg cell function. PMID:23135404

  2. Subunit dynamics and nucleotide-dependent asymmetry of an AAA(+) transcription complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Joly, Nicolas; Lawton, Edward; Robinson, Carol V; Buck, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial enhancer binding proteins (bEBPs) are transcription activators that belong to the AAA(+) protein family. They form higher-order self-assemblies to regulate transcription initiation at stress response and pathogenic promoters. The precise mechanism by which these ATPases utilize ATP binding and hydrolysis energy to remodel their substrates remains unclear. Here we employed mass spectrometry of intact complexes to investigate subunit dynamics and nucleotide occupancy of the AAA(+) domain of one well-studied bEBP in complex with its substrate, the σ(54) subunit of RNA polymerase. Our results demonstrate that the free AAA(+) domain undergoes significant changes in oligomeric states and nucleotide occupancy upon σ(54) binding. Such changes likely correlate with one transition state of ATP and are associated with an open spiral ring formation that is vital for asymmetric subunit function and interface communication. We confirmed that the asymmetric subunit functionality persists for open promoter complex formation using single-chain forms of bEBP lacking the full complement of intact ATP hydrolysis sites. Outcomes reconcile low- and high-resolution structures and yield a partial sequential ATP hydrolysis model for bEBPs. PMID:24055699

  3. Arc in the nucleus regulates PML dependent GluA1 transcription and homeostatic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Erica; Wilkinson, Carol L.; Delgado, Ryan N.; Lovero, Kathryn L.; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The activity-regulated cytoskeletal protein Arc/Arg3.1 is required for long-term memory formation and synaptic plasticity. Arc expression is robustly induced by activity, and Arc protein localizes both to active synapses and the nucleus. While its synaptic function has been examined, it is not clear why or how Arc is localized to the nucleus. We found that murine Arc nuclear expression is regulated by synaptic activity in vivo and in vitro. We identified distinct regions of Arc that control its localization, including a nuclear localization signal, a nuclear retention domain, and a nuclear export signal. Arc localization to the nucleus promotes an activity-induced increase in promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, which decreases GluA1 transcription and synaptic strength. Finally, we show that Arc nuclear localization regulates homeostatic plasticity. Thus, Arc mediates the homeostatic response to increased activity by translocating to the nucleus, increasing promyelocytic leukemia levels, and decreasing GluA1 transcription, ultimately downscaling synaptic strength. PMID:23749147

  4. Long non-coding RNA-dependent transcriptional regulation in neuronal development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Brian S.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the mammalian transcriptome has revealed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may make up a large fraction of cellular transcripts. Recent years have seen a surge of studies aimed at functionally characterizing the role of lncRNAs in development and disease. In this review, we discuss new findings implicating lncRNAs in controlling development of the central nervous system (CNS). The evolution of the higher vertebrate brain has been accompanied by an increase in the levels and complexities of lncRNAs expressed within the developing nervous system. Although a limited number of CNS-expressed lncRNAs are now known to modulate the activity of proteins important for neuronal differentiation, the function of the vast majority of neuronal-expressed lncRNAs is still unknown. Topics of intense current interest include the mechanism by which CNS-expressed lncRNAs might function in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation during neuronal development, and how gain and loss of function of individual lncRNAs contribute to neurological diseases. PMID:24936207

  5. Thyroid hormone receptor binding to DNA and T3-dependent transcriptional activation are inhibited by uremic toxins

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Guilherme M; Pantoja, Carlos J; Costa e Silva, Aluízio; Rodrigues, Maria C; Ribeiro, Ralff C; Simeoni, Luiz A; Lomri, Noureddine; Neves, Francisco AR

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a substantial clinical overlap between chronic renal failure (CRF) and hypothyroidism, suggesting the presence of hypothyroidism in uremic patients. Although CRF patients have low T3 and T4 levels with normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), they show a higher prevalence of goiter and evidence for blunted tissue responsiveness to T3 action. However, there are no studies examining whether thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) play a role in thyroid hormone dysfunction in CRF patients. To evaluate the effects of an uremic environment on TR function, we investigated the effect of uremic plasma on TRβ1 binding to DNA as heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα) and on T3-dependent transcriptional activity. Results We demonstrated that uremic plasma collected prior to hemodialysis (Pre-HD) significantly reduced TRβ1-RXRα binding to DNA. Such inhibition was also observed with a vitamin D receptor (VDR) but not with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). A cell-based assay confirmed this effect where uremic pre-HD ultrafiltrate inhibited the transcriptional activation induced by T3 in U937 cells. In both cases, the inhibitory effects were reversed when the uremic plasma and the uremic ultrafiltrate were collected and used after hemodialysis (Post-HD). Conclusion These results suggest that dialyzable toxins in uremic plasma selectively block the binding of TRβ1-RXRα to DNA and impair T3 transcriptional activity. These findings may explain some features of hypothyroidism and thyroid hormone resistance observed in CRF patients. PMID:15807894

  6. Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR(ER)) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA(+) ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPR(ER) genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA(+) ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPR(ER) genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPR(ER) genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes.

  7. Stem cell-dependent formation of a functional anterior regeneration pole in planarians requires Zic and Forkhead transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Vogg, Matthias C; Owlarn, Suthira; Pérez Rico, Yuvia A; Xie, Jianlei; Suzuki, Yoko; Gentile, Luca; Wu, Wei; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2014-06-15

    Planarians can regenerate their head within days. This process depends on the direction of adult stem cells to wound sites and the orchestration of their progenitors to commit to appropriate lineages and to arrange into patterned tissues. We identified a zinc finger transcription factor, Smed-ZicA, as a downstream target of Smed-FoxD, a Forkhead transcription factor required for head regeneration. Smed-zicA and Smed-FoxD are co-expressed with the Wnt inhibitor notum and the Activin inhibitor follistatin in a cluster of cells at the anterior-most tip of the regenerating head - the anterior regeneration pole - and in surrounding stem cell progeny. Depletion of Smed-zicA and Smed-FoxD by RNAi abolishes notum and follistatin expression at the pole and inhibits head formation downstream of initial polarity decisions. We suggest a model in which ZicA and FoxD transcription factors synergize to control the formation of Notum- and Follistatin-producing anterior pole cells. Pole formation might constitute an early step in regeneration, resulting in a signaling center that orchestrates cellular events in the growing tissue.

  8. Potato Tuber Blight Resistance Phenotypes Correlate with RB Transgene Transcript Levels in an Age-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Millett, Benjamin P; Gao, Liangliang; Iorizzo, Massimo; Carputo, Domenico; Bradeen, James M

    2015-08-01

    Plants have evolved strategies and mechanisms to detect and respond to pathogen attack. Different organs of the same plant may be subjected to different environments (e.g., aboveground versus belowground) and pathogens with different lifestyles. Accordingly, plants commonly need to tailor defense strategies in an organ-specific manner. Phytophthora infestans, causal agent of potato late blight disease, infects both aboveground foliage and belowground tubers. We examined the efficacy of transgene RB (known for conferring foliar late blight resistance) in defending against tuber late blight disease. Our results indicate that the presence of the transgene has a positive yet only marginally significant effect on tuber disease resistance on average. However, a significant association between transgene transcript levels and tuber resistance was established for specific transformed lines in an age-dependent manner, with higher transcript levels indicating enhanced tuber resistance. Thus, RB has potential to function in both foliage and tuber to impart late blight resistance. Our data suggest that organ-specific resistance might result directly from transcriptional regulation of the resistance gene itself.

  9. Anaphase promoting complex–dependent degradation of transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ostapenko, Denis; Solomon, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an essential ubiquitin ligase that targets cell cycle proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation in mitosis and G1. The APC regulates a number of cell cycle processes, including spindle assembly, mitotic exit, and cytokinesis, but the full range of its functions is still unknown. To better understand cellular pathways controlled by the APC, we performed a proteomic screen to identify additional APC substrates. We analyzed cell cycle–regulated proteins whose expression peaked during the period when other APC substrates were expressed. Subsequent analysis identified several proteins, including the transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1, as authentic APC substrates. We found that APCCdh1 targeted Nrm1 and Yhp1 for degradation in early G1 through Destruction-box motifs and that the degradation of these repressors coincided with transcriptional activation of MBF and Mcm1 target genes, respectively. In addition, Nrm1 was stabilized by phosphorylation, most likely by the budding yeast cyclin–dependent protein kinase, Cdc28. We found that expression of stabilized forms of Nrm1 and Yhp1 resulted in reduced cell fitness, due at least in part to incomplete activation of G1-specific genes. Therefore, in addition to its known functions, APC-mediated targeting of Nrm1 and Yhp1 coordinates transcription of multiple genes in G1 with other cell cycle events. PMID:21562221

  10. Oxidative stress activates FUS1 and RLM1 transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in an oxidant-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Staleva, Liliana; Hall, Andrea; Orlow, Seth J

    2004-12-01

    Mating in haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs after activation of the pheromone response pathway. Biochemical components of this pathway are involved in other yeast signal transduction networks. To understand more about the coordination between signaling pathways, we used a "chemical genetic" approach, searching for compounds that would activate the pheromone-responsive gene FUS1 and RLM1, a reporter for the cell integrity pathway. We found that catecholamines (l-3,4-hydroxyphenylalanine [l-dopa], dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline) elevate FUS1 and RLM1 transcription. N-Acetyl-cysteine, a powerful antioxidant in yeast, completely reversed this effect, suggesting that FUS1 and RLM1 activation in response to catecholamines is a result of oxidative stress. The oxidant hydrogen peroxide also was found to activate transcription of an RLM1 reporter. Further genetic analysis combined with immunoblotting revealed that Kss1, one of the mating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Mpk1, an MAPK of the cell integrity pathway, participated in l-dopa-induced stimulation of FUS1 and RLM1 transcription. We also report that Mpk1 and Hog1, the high osmolarity MAPK, were phosphorylated upon induction by hydrogen peroxide. Together, our results demonstrate that cells respond to oxidative stress via different signal transduction machinery dependent upon the nature of the oxidant. PMID:15385622

  11. Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPRER) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA+ ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPRER genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA+ ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPRER genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPRER genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes. PMID:25652260

  12. Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR(ER)) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA(+) ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPR(ER) genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA(+) ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPR(ER) genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPR(ER) genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes. PMID:25652260

  13. Regulation of RNA splicing by the methylation-dependent transcriptional repressor methyl-CpG binding protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Young, Juan I.; Hong, Eugene P.; Castle, John C.; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Bowman, Aaron B.; Rose, Matthew F.; Kang, Dongcheul; Richman, Ron; Johnson, Jason M.; Berget, Susan; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2005-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the loss of acquired motor and language skills, autistic features, and unusual stereotyped movements. RTT is caused by mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mutations in MECP2 cause a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders including X-linked mental retardation, psychiatric disorders, and some cases of autism. Although MeCP2 was identified as a methylation-dependent transcriptional repressor, transcriptional profiling of RNAs from mice lacking MeCP2 did not reveal significant gene expression changes, suggesting that MeCP2 does not simply function as a global repressor. Changes in expression of a few genes have been observed, but these alterations do not explain the full spectrum of Rett-like phenotypes, raising the possibility that additional MeCP2 functions play a role in pathogenesis. In this study, we show that MeCP2 interacts with the RNA-binding protein Y box-binding protein 1 and regulates splicing of reporter minigenes. Importantly, we found aberrant alternative splicing patterns in a mouse model of RTT. Thus, we uncovered a previously uncharacterized function of MeCP2 that involves regulation of splicing, in addition to its role as a transcriptional repressor. PMID:16251272

  14. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath; Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar; Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  15. Global alterations of the transcriptional landscape during yeast growth and development in the absence of Ume6-dependent chromatin modification.

    PubMed

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Becker, Emmanuelle; Walther, Thomas; Law, Michael J; Xie, Bingning; Demougin, Philippe; Strich, Randy; Primig, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Chromatin modification enzymes are important regulators of gene expression and some are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a major model organism for genome-wide studies that aim at the identification of target genes under the control of conserved epigenetic regulators. Ume6 interacts with the upstream repressor site 1 (URS1) and represses transcription by recruiting both the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 (through the co-repressor Sin3) and the chromatin-remodeling factor Isw2. Cells lacking Ume6 are defective in growth, stress response, and meiotic development. RNA profiling studies and in vivo protein-DNA binding assays identified mRNAs or transcript isoforms that are directly repressed by Ume6 in mitosis. However, a comprehensive understanding of the transcriptional alterations, which underlie the complex ume6Δ mutant phenotype during fermentation, respiration, or sporulation, is lacking. We report the protein-coding transcriptome of a diploid MAT a/α wild-type and ume6/ume6 mutant strains cultured in rich media with glucose or acetate as a carbon source, or sporulation-inducing medium. We distinguished direct from indirect effects on mRNA levels by combining GeneChip data with URS1 motif predictions and published high-throughput in vivo Ume6-DNA binding data. To gain insight into the molecular interactions between successive waves of Ume6-dependent meiotic genes, we integrated expression data with information on protein networks. Our work identifies novel Ume6 repressed genes during growth and development and reveals a strong effect of the carbon source on the derepression pattern of transcripts in growing and developmentally arrested ume6/ume6 mutant cells. Since yeast is a useful model organism for chromatin-mediated effects on gene expression, our results provide a rich source for further genetic and molecular biological work on the regulation of cell growth and cell differentiation in eukaryotes.

  16. Fatty acids regulate CREBh via transcriptional mechanisms that are dependent on proteasome activity and insulin

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, CL; Wang, D; Pfaffenbach, KT; Cox, R; Wei, Y; Pagliassotti, MJ

    2011-01-01

    Excess fatty acids are closely associated with metabolic dysfunction. The deleterious effects of fatty acids relate, in part, to their ability to up-regulate proinflammatory cytokines and propagate a state of systemic inflammation. CREBh is a recently identified transcription factor that appears to be required for hepatic synthesis of C-reactive protein (CRP). Recent data suggest that fatty acids can up-regulate CREBh, thus establishing a potential molecular link between fatty acids and inflammation. The aim of the current study was to examine the nature and mechanisms of fatty acid-mediated regulation of CREBh. H4IIE liver cells were incubated in the absence or presence of varying concentrations (50–500 μM) of albumin-bound, long-chain saturated (palmitate, stearate) or unsaturated (oleate, linoleate) fatty acids (1–16 hours). All fatty acids significantly increased CREBh gene expression via transcriptional mechanisms, at concentrations as low as 50 μM. Palmitate- or oleate-mediated upregulation of CREBh was not inhibited by triacsin C, an inhibitor of long-chain fatty acyl CoA synthetase, or by the PPARα antagonist, MK886. Inhibition of proteasome activity with MG132 or lactacystin, or inclusion of insulin reduced palmitate- and oleate-mediated increases in CREBh mRNA. Finally, we examined fatty acid regulation of CREBh in vivo. Male Wistar rats were exposed to a 4-hour pancreatic clamp combined with infusion of saline or a mixed lipid emulsion. CREBh mRNA and protein were significantly increased in rats exposed to the lipid infusion compared to the saline group. Collectively, these results may have important implications for metabolic diseases characterized by excess fatty acids, insulin resistance and inflammation. PMID:20607591

  17. Polycomb repressive complex 2-dependent and -independent functions of Jarid2 in transcriptional regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Mohan, Man; Garrett, Alexander S; Miller, Caitlynn; Casto, David; Zhang, Ying; Seidel, Christopher; Haug, Jeffrey S; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Shilatifard, Ali

    2012-05-01

    Jarid2 was recently identified as an important component of the mammalian Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), where it has a major effect on PRC2 recruitment in mouse embryonic stem cells. Although Jarid2 is conserved in Drosophila, it has not previously been implicated in Polycomb (Pc) regulation. Therefore, we purified Drosophila Jarid2 and its associated proteins and found that Jarid2 associates with all of the known canonical PRC2 components, demonstrating a conserved physical interaction with PRC2 in flies and mammals. Furthermore, in vivo studies with Jarid2 mutants in flies demonstrate that among several histone modifications tested, only methylation of histone 3 at K27 (H3K27), the mark implemented by PRC2, was affected. Genome-wide profiling of Jarid2, Su(z)12 (Suppressor of zeste 12), and H3K27me3 occupancy by chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicates that Jarid2 and Su(z)12 have very similar distribution patterns on chromatin. However, Jarid2 and Su(z)12 occupancy levels at some genes are significantly different, with Jarid2 being present at relatively low levels at many Pc response elements (PREs) of certain Homeobox (Hox) genes, providing a rationale for why Jarid2 was never identified in Pc screens. Gene expression analyses show that Jarid2 and E(z) (Enhancer of zeste, a canonical PRC2 component) are not only required for transcriptional repression but might also function in active transcription. Identification of Jarid2 as a conserved PRC2 interactor in flies provides an opportunity to begin to probe some of its novel functions in Drosophila development.

  18. Akt regulates Progesterone Receptor B dependent transcription and angiogenesis in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Irene I.; Maniar, Kruti; Lydon, John P.; Kim, J. Julie

    2016-01-01

    Progestins have long been used clinically for the treatment of endometrial cancers, however, the response rates to progestin therapy vary and the molecular mechanisms behind progestin insensitivity are poorly understood. We hypothesized that in PTEN mutated endometrial cancers, hyperactive Akt signaling downregulates Progesterone Receptor B (PRB) transcriptional activity, leading to overall impaired progestin responses. We report that inhibition of Akt with the Akt inhibitor, MK-2206 (MK), in conjunction with progestin (R5020) treatment, is sufficient to upregulate a subset of PRB target genes in Ishikawa cells stably expressing PRB (PRB-Ishikawa). Through gene ontology analysis of Akt-regulated PRB target genes, angiogenesis was found to be the principle process regulated by Akt-PRB. To further interrogate the mechanism by which Akt modulates PRB transcriptional activity, ChIP-Mass Spectrometry was performed to identify potential cofactors that differentially interact with PRB in the presence of the R5020 and MK+R5020. 14-3-3σ was identified as a protein enriched in the MK+R5020 dataset, and it was demonstrated that 14-3-3σ is required for the upregulation in PRB target gene expression following inhibition of Akt. In order to determine the ramifications of MK+R5020 treatment on angiogenesis, in vitro assays were performed and combinatorial MK+R5020 treatment significantly decreased endothelial cell invasion and tube formation more than MK or R5020 treatment alone. Furthermore, we found that combinatorial MK-2206+Progesterone treatments decreased angiogenesis and proliferation in the Ptend/d conditional mouse model of endometrial cancer. Taken together, these findings suggest that a combinatorial therapeutic approach utilizing Akt inhibitors with progestins may improve the efficacy of progestin therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer. PMID:26996671

  19. microRNA-365-targeted nuclear factor I/B transcriptionally represses cyclin-dependent kinase 6 and 4 to inhibit the progression of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Wang, Yinghui; Ou, Chengshan; Lin, Zhixiang; Wang, Jianyu; Liu, Hongxia; Zhou, Meijuan; Ding, Zhenhua

    2015-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases are either post-transcriptionally regulated by interacting with cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors or are transcriptionally regulated by transcription factors, but the latter mechanism has not been extensively investigated. Dysregulated transcription factors resulting from aberrantly expressed microRNAs play critical roles in tumor development and progression. Our previous work identified miR-365 as an oncogenic microRNA that promotes the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma via repression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6, while miR-365 also targets nuclear factor I/B. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of the interaction between nuclear factor I/B and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 are unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that miR-365-regulated nuclear factor I/B transcriptionally inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 by binding to their promoter regions. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that the loss of nuclear factor I/B after miR-365 expression or treatment with small interfering RNAs results in the upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4. This upregulation, in turn, enhances the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein and tumor progression. Characterizing this transcriptional repression of cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 by nuclear factor I/B contributes to the understanding of the transcriptional regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases by transcription factors and also facilitates the development of new therapeutic regimens to improve the clinical treatment of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

  20. microRNA-365-targeted nuclear factor I/B transcriptionally represses cyclin-dependent kinase 6 and 4 to inhibit the progression of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Wang, Yinghui; Ou, Chengshan; Lin, Zhixiang; Wang, Jianyu; Liu, Hongxia; Zhou, Meijuan; Ding, Zhenhua

    2015-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases are either post-transcriptionally regulated by interacting with cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors or are transcriptionally regulated by transcription factors, but the latter mechanism has not been extensively investigated. Dysregulated transcription factors resulting from aberrantly expressed microRNAs play critical roles in tumor development and progression. Our previous work identified miR-365 as an oncogenic microRNA that promotes the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma via repression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6, while miR-365 also targets nuclear factor I/B. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of the interaction between nuclear factor I/B and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 are unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that miR-365-regulated nuclear factor I/B transcriptionally inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 by binding to their promoter regions. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that the loss of nuclear factor I/B after miR-365 expression or treatment with small interfering RNAs results in the upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4. This upregulation, in turn, enhances the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein and tumor progression. Characterizing this transcriptional repression of cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 by nuclear factor I/B contributes to the understanding of the transcriptional regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases by transcription factors and also facilitates the development of new therapeutic regimens to improve the clinical treatment of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26072217

  1. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. - Highlights: • p53 is robustly

  2. Complementary Quantitative Proteomics Reveals that Transcription Factor AP-4 Mediates E-box-dependent Complex Formation for Transcriptional Repression of HDM2*

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Wei-Chi; Chiu, Sung-Kay; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Hsin-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factor activating enhancer-binding protein 4 (AP-4) is a basic helix-loop-helix protein that binds to E-box elements. AP-4 has received increasing attention for its regulatory role in cell growth and development, including transcriptional repression of the human homolog of murine double minute 2 (HDM2), an important oncoprotein controlling cell growth and survival, by an unknown mechanism. Here we demonstrate that AP-4 binds to an E-box located in the HDM2-P2 promoter and represses HDM2 transcription in a p53-independent manner. Incremental truncations of AP-4 revealed that the C-terminal Gln/Pro-rich domain was essential for transcriptional repression of HDM2. To further delineate the molecular mechanism(s) of AP-4 transcriptional control and its potential implications, we used DNA-affinity purification followed by complementary quantitative proteomics, cICAT and iTRAQ labeling methods, to identify a previously unknown E-box-bound AP-4 protein complex containing 75 putative components. The two labeling methods complementarily quantified differentially AP-4-enriched proteins, including the most significant recruitment of DNA damage response proteins, followed by transcription factors, transcriptional repressors/corepressors, and histone-modifying proteins. Specific interaction of AP-4 with CCCTC binding factor, stimulatory protein 1, and histone deacetylase 1 (an AP-4 corepressor) was validated using AP-4 truncation mutants. Importantly, inclusion of trichostatin A did not alleviate AP-4-mediated repression of HDM2 transcription, suggesting a previously unidentified histone deacetylase-independent repression mechanism. In contrast, the complementary quantitative proteomics study suggested that transcription repression occurs via coordination of AP-4 with other transcription factors, histone methyltransferases, and/or a nucleosome remodeling SWI·SNF complex. In addition to previously known functions of AP-4, our data suggest that AP-4 participates in

  3. Valproate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST/EAAT1 expression: involvement of Ying-Yang 1.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Gisela; Rosas, Sandra; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2008-06-01

    Valproate, a widely used anti-epileptic drug also employed in the treatment of neurological diseases such as bipolar disorder and migraine, regulates the glutamatergic and GABAergic systems, although its effects in cell physiology have not been thoroughly characterized. High concentrations of glutamate reached during abnormal neurotransmission if not removed properly, become neurotoxic. Glutamate clearance is carried out by high affinity Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporter systems. The glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST/EAAT1 plays the major role in glutamate removal and is regulated at different levels: transcription, post-translational modifications and cytoplasmic trafficking. The aim of this work was to gain insight into a plausible effect of valproate in GLAST function. Using cultured Bergmann glia cells from chick cerebellum we demonstrate here that valproate exposure elicits a dual regulatory effect on GLAST. In the short-term, valproate increases its Na(+)-dependent [(3)H]-d-aspartate uptake activity in a cytochalasin B-sensitive manner. Interestingly, a synergism between valproate and a histone deacetylase inhibitor was observed. Long-term valproate treatment up-regulates chglast promoter activity, GLAST mRNA levels, GLAST molecules at the plasma membrane and its uptake activity. Furthermore, valproate induces histone 3 lysine 14 acetylation and regulates Ying-Yang 1 (YY1) transcriptional repression on the chglast promoter. These results suggest that valproate elicits its effect through its histone deacetylase inhibitor properties.

  4. Transcriptional expression of myelin basic protein in oligodendrocytes depends on functional syntaxin 4: a potential correlation with autocrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Bijlard, Marjolein; Klunder, Bert; de Jonge, Jenny C; Nomden, Anita; Tyagi, Sanjay; de Vries, Hans; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2015-02-01

    Myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes is essential for saltatory nerve conduction. To form myelin membranes, a coordinated synthesis and subsequent polarized transport of myelin components are necessary. Here, we show that as part of the mechanism to establish membrane polarity, oligodendrocytes exploit a polarized distribution of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) machinery components syntaxins 3 and 4, localizing to the cell body and the myelin membrane, respectively. Our data further reveal that the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), a myelin-specific protein that is synthesized "on site" after transport of its mRNA, depends on the correct functioning of the SNARE machinery, which is not required for mRNA granule assembly and transport per se. Thus, downregulation and overexpression of syntaxin 4 but not syntaxin 3 in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells but not immature oligodendrocytes impeded MBP mRNA transcription, thereby preventing MBP protein synthesis. The expression and localization of another myelin-specific protein, proteolipid protein (PLP), was unaltered. Strikingly, conditioned medium obtained from developing oligodendrocytes was able to rescue the block of MBP mRNA transcription in syntaxin 4-downregulated cells. These findings indicate that the initiation of the biosynthesis of MBP mRNA relies on a syntaxin 4-dependent mechanism, which likely involves activation of an autocrine signaling pathway.

  5. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way. PMID:26616174

  6. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration.

    PubMed

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-11-30

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way.

  7. NF-κB-dependent transcriptional upregulation of cyclin D1 exerts cytoprotection against hypoxic injury upon EGFR activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Dong; Xu, Liang; Tang, Kan-Kai; Gong, Fang-Xiao; Liu, Jing-Quan; Ni, Yin; Jiang, Ling-Zhi; Hong, Jun; Han, Fang; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiang-Hong; Sun, Ren-Hua; Mo, Shi-Jing

    2016-09-10

    Apoptosis of neural cells is one of the main pathological features in hypoxic/ischemic brain injury. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) might be a potential therapeutic target for hypoxic/ischemic brain injury since NF-κB has been found to be inactivated after hypoxia exposure, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms of NF-κB inactivation are largely unknown. Here we report that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation prevents neuron-like PC12 cells apoptosis in response to hypoxia via restoring NF-κB-dependent transcriptional upregulation of cyclin D1. Functionally, EGFR activation by EGF stimulation mitigates hypoxia-induced PC12 cells apoptosis in both dose- and time-dependent manner. Of note, EGFR activation elevates IKKβ phosphorylation, increases IκBα ubiquitination, promotes P65 nuclear translocation and recruitment at cyclin D1 gene promoter as well as upregulates cyclin D1 expression. EGFR activation also abrogates the decrease of IKKβ phosphorylation, reduction of IκBα ubiquitination, blockade of P65 nuclear translocation and recruitment at cyclin D1 gene promoter as well as downregulation of cyclin D1 expression induced by hypoxia. Furthermore, NF-κB-dependent upregulation of cyclin D1 is instrumental for the EGFR-mediated cytoprotection against hypoxic apoptosis. In addition, the dephosphorylation of EGFR induced by either EGF siRNA transfection or anti-HB-EGF neutralization antibody treatment enhances hypoxic cytotoxicity, which are attenuated by EGF administration. Our results highlight the essential role of NF-κB-dependent transcriptional upregulation of cyclin D1 in EGFR-mediated cytoprotective effects under hypoxic preconditioning and support further investigation of EGF in clinical trials of patients with hypoxic/ischemic brain injury.

  8. Differential induction of cytolytic susceptibility by E1A, myc, and ras oncogenes in immortalized cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J L; May, D L; Wilson, B A; Walker, T A

    1989-01-01

    The E1A oncogene of adenovirus serotypes 2 and 5 induces susceptibility to the cytolytic effects of natural killer lymphocytes and activated macrophages when expressed in infected and transformed mammalian cells (cytolysis-susceptible phenotype). E1A and the oncogenes v-myc, long-terminal-repeat-promoted c-myc, and activated c-ras share the ability to immortalize transfected low-passage rodent cells. The cytolytic phenotypes of well-characterized rodent cell lines immortalized by these three oncogenes were defined. In contrast to target cells expressing the intact E1A gene, myc- and ras-expressing, immortalized primary transfectants were resistant to lysis by both types of killer cell populations. The same patterns of susceptibility (E1A) and resistance (myc and ras) to cytolysis were observed in oncogene-transfected continuous rat (REF52) and mouse (NIH 3T3) cell lines, indicating that differences in the cytolytic phenotypes associated with expression of these oncogenes are not due to cell selection during immortalization. The results suggest that the E1A oncogene may possess a functional domain that is different from those of other oncogenes, such as myc and ras, and that the activity linked to this postulated domain is dissociable from the process of immortalization. Images PMID:2526229

  9. Quantitative analysis of regions of adenovirus E1A products involved in interactions with cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, D; Marcellus, R C; Bacchetti, S; Bayley, S T; Branton, P E

    1992-01-01

    Human adenovirus E1A proteins and oncogene products of several other DNA tumour viruses derive much of their oncogenic potential from interactions with cellular polypeptides. E1A proteins form complexes with p105Rb and a related p107 polypeptide, and with at least three other proteins (p60cycA, p130, and p300); all may be required for cell transformation. Using a series of E1A deletion mutants, we have carried out a quantitative analysis of the binding patterns of cellular proteins to E1A products. Binding of most of the proteins was affected at least partially by mutations within the amino terminal 25 residues, amino acids 36-69 within conserved region 1 (CR1), and residues 121-138 in conserved region 2 (CR2). However, the specific binding characteristics of each protein varied considerably. p300 was the only species for which binding was totally eliminated by deletions at the amino terminus. Removal of regions within CR1 eliminated binding of all species except p107 and p60cycA. Deletion of portions of CR2 reduced or eliminated binding of all proteins except p300. Thus, whereas cellular polypeptides generally were found to interact with the same three regions of E1A proteins, specific interactions varied considerably. PMID:1297336

  10. Quiescent center initiation in the Arabidopsis lateral root primordia is dependent on the SCARECROW transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Goh, Tatsuaki; Toyokura, Koichi; Wells, Darren M; Swarup, Kamal; Yamamoto, Mayuko; Mimura, Tetsuro; Weijers, Dolf; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Laplaze, Laurent; Bennett, Malcolm J; Guyomarc'h, Soazig

    2016-09-15

    Lateral root formation is an important determinant of root system architecture. In Arabidopsis, lateral roots originate from pericycle cells, which undergo a program of morphogenesis to generate a new lateral root meristem. Despite its importance for root meristem organization, the onset of quiescent center (QC) formation during lateral root morphogenesis remains unclear. Here, we used live 3D confocal imaging to monitor cell organization and identity acquisition during lateral root development. Our dynamic observations revealed an early morphogenesis phase and a late meristem formation phase as proposed in the bi-phasic growth model. Establishment of lateral root QCs coincided with this developmental phase transition. QC precursor cells originated from the outer layer of stage II lateral root primordia, within which the SCARECROW (SCR) transcription factor was specifically expressed. Disrupting SCR function abolished periclinal divisions in this lateral root primordia cell layer and perturbed the formation of QC precursor cells. We conclude that de novo QC establishment in lateral root primordia operates via SCR-mediated formative cell division and coincides with the developmental phase transition. PMID:27510971

  11. Restraint of angiogenesis by zinc finger transcription factor CTCF-dependent chromatin insulation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Chen, Bo; Pardo, Carolina; Pampo, Christine; Chen, Jing; Lien, Ching-Ling; Wu, Lizi; Wang, Heiman; Yao, Kai; Oh, S. Paul; Seto, Edward; Smith, Lois E. H.; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Kladde, Michael P.; Cepko, Constance L.; Lu, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is meticulously controlled by a fine balance between positive and negative regulatory activities. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a predominant angiogenic factor and its dosage is precisely regulated during normal vascular formation. In cancer, VEGF is commonly overproduced, resulting in abnormal neovascularization. VEGF is induced in response to various stimuli including hypoxia; however, very little is known about the mechanisms that confine its induction to ensure proper angiogenesis. Chromatin insulation is a key transcription mechanism that prevents promiscuous gene activation by interfering with the action of enhancers. Here we show that the chromatin insulator-binding factor CTCF binds to the proximal promoter of VEGF. Consistent with the enhancer-blocking mode of chromatin insulators, CTCF has little effect on basal expression of VEGF but specifically affects its activation by enhancers. CTCF knockdown cells are sensitized for induction of VEGF and exhibit elevated proangiogenic potential. Cancer-derived CTCF missense mutants are mostly defective in blocking enhancers at the VEGF locus. Moreover, during mouse retinal development, depletion of CTCF causes excess angiogenesis. Therefore, CTCF-mediated chromatin insulation acts as a crucial safeguard against hyperactivation of angiogenesis. PMID:21896759

  12. Increased FOG-2 in failing myocardium disrupts thyroid hormone-dependent SERCA2 gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Rouf, Rosanne; Greytak, Sarah; Wooten, Eric C; Wu, Jing; Boltax, Jay; Picard, Michael; Svensson, Eric C; Dillmann, Wolfgang H; Patten, Richard D; Huggins, Gordon S

    2008-08-29

    Reduced expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA)2 and other genes in the adult cardiac gene program has raised consideration of an impaired responsiveness to thyroid hormone (T3) that develops in the advanced failing heart. Here, we show that human and murine cardiomyopathy hearts have increased expression of friend of GATA (FOG)-2, a cardiac nuclear hormone receptor corepressor protein. Cardiac-specific overexpression of FOG-2 in transgenic mice led to depressed cardiac function, activation of the fetal gene program, congestive heart failure, and early death. SERCA2 transcript and protein levels were reduced in FOG-2 transgenic hearts, and FOG-2 overexpression impaired T3-mediated SERCA2 expression in cultured cardiomyocytes. FOG-2 physically interacts with thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 and abrogated even high levels of T3-mediated SERCA2 promoter activity. These results demonstrate that SERCA2 is an important target of FOG-2 and that increased FOG-2 expression may contribute to a decline in cardiac function in end-stage heart failure by impaired T3 signaling.

  13. Phosphorylation within the transactivation domain of adenovirus E1A protein by mitogen-activated protein kinase regulates expression of early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, S G; Marcellus, R C; Whalen, A; Ahn, N G; Ricciardi, R P; Branton, P E

    1997-01-01

    A critical role of the 289-residue (289R) E1A protein of human adenovirus type 5 during productive infection is to transactivate expression of all early viral transcription. Sequences within and proximal to conserved region 3 (CR3) promote expression of these viral genes through interactions with a variety of transcription factors requiring the zinc binding motif in CR3 and in some cases a region at the carboxy-terminal end of CR3, including residues 183 to 188. It is known that 3',5' cyclic AMP (cAMP) reduces the level of phosphorylation of the 289R E1A protein through the activation of protein phosphatase 2A by the E4orf4 protein. This study was designed to identify the E1A phosphorylation sites affected by E4orf4 expression and to determine their importance in regulation of E1A activity. We report here that two previously unidentified sites at Ser-185 and Ser-188 are the targets for decreased phosphorylation in response to cAMP. At least one of these sites, presumably Ser-185, is phosphorylated in vitro by purified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and both are hyperphosphorylated in cells which express a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase. Analysis of E1A-mediated transactivation activity indicated that elevated phosphorylation at these sites increased expression of the E4 promoter but not that of E3. We have recently shown that one or more E4 products induce cell death due to p53-independent apoptosis, and thus it seems likely that one role of the E4orf4 protein is to limit production of toxic E4 products by limiting expression of the E4 promoter. PMID:9094626

  14. The transcriptional activator GCN4 contains multiple activation domains that are critically dependent on hydrophobic amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Drysdale, C M; Dueñas, E; Jackson, B M; Reusser, U; Braus, G H; Hinnebusch, A G

    1995-01-01

    GCN4 is a transcriptional activator in the bZIP family that regulates amino acid biosynthetic genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous work suggested that the principal activation domain of GCN4 is a highly acidic segment of approximately 40 amino acids located in the center of the protein. We conducted a mutational analysis of GCN4 with a single-copy allele expressed under the control of the native promoter and translational control elements. Our results indicate that GCN4 contains two activation domains of similar potency that can function independently to promote high-level transcription of the target genes HIS3 and HIS4. One of these domains is coincident with the acidic activation domain defined previously; the other extends over the N-terminal one-third of the protein. Both domains are partially dependent on the coactivator protein ADA2. Each domain appears to be composed of two or more small subdomains that have additive effects on transcription and that can cooperate in different combinations to promote high-level expression of HIS3 and HIS4. At least three of these subdomains are critically dependent on bulky hydrophobic amino acids for their function. Five of the important hydrophobic residues, Phe-97, Phe-98, Met-107, Tyr-110, and Leu-113, fall within a region of proposed sequence homology between GCN4 and the herpesvirus acidic activator VP16. The remaining three residues, Trp-120, Leu-123, and Phe-124, are highly conserved between GCN4 and its Neurospora counterpart, cpc-1. Because of the functional redundancy in the activation domain, mutations at positions 97 and 98 must be combined with mutations at positions 120 to 124 to observe a substantial reduction in activation by full-length GCN4, and substitution of all eight hydrophobic residues was required to inactivate full-length GCN4. These hydrophobic residues may mediate important interactions between GCN4 and one or more of its target proteins in the transcription initiation complex

  15. The Drosophila Transcription Factor Dimmed Affects Neuronal Growth and Differentiation in Multiple Ways Depending on Neuron Type and Developmental Stage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiting; Luo, Jiangnan; Nässel, Dick R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of postmitotic neurons occurs during different stages of development, including metamorphosis, and may also be part of neuronal plasticity and regeneration. Recently we showed that growth of post-mitotic neuroendocrine cells expressing the basic helix loop helix (bHLH) transcription factor Dimmed (Dimm) in Drosophila could be regulated by insulin/IGF signaling and the insulin receptor (dInR). Dimm is also known to confer a secretory phenotype to neuroendocrine cells and can be part of a combinatorial code specifying terminal differentiation in peptidergic neurons. To further understand the mechanisms of Dimm function we ectopically expressed Dimm or Dimm together with dInR in a wide range of Dimm positive and Dimm negative peptidergic neurons, sensory neurons, interneurons, motor neurons, and gut endocrine cells. We provide further evidence that dInR mediated cell growth occurs in a Dimm dependent manner and that one source of insulin-like peptide (DILP) for dInR mediated cell growth in the CNS is DILP6 from glial cells. Expressing both Dimm and dInR in Dimm negative neurons induced growth of cell bodies, whereas dInR alone did not. We also found that Dimm alone can regulate cell growth depending on specific cell type. This may be explained by the finding that the dInR is a direct target of Dimm. Conditional gene targeting experiments showed that Dimm alone could affect cell growth in certain neuron types during metamorphosis or in the adult stage. Another important finding was that ectopic Dimm inhibits apoptosis of several types of neurons normally destined for programmed cell death (PCD). Taken together our results suggest that Dimm plays multiple transcriptional roles at different developmental stages in a cell type-specific manner. In some cell types ectopic Dimm may act together with resident combinatorial code transcription factors and affect terminal differentiation, as well as act in transcriptional networks that participate in long term maintenance

  16. Discovery Proteomics Identifies a Molecular Link between the Coatomer Protein Complex I and Androgen Receptor-dependent Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Lee, Jinhee; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcription is a hallmark of human prostate cancers. At the molecular level, ligand-mediated AR activation is coordinated through spatial and temporal protein-protein interactions involving AR-interacting proteins, which we designate the “AR-interactome.” Despite many years of research, the ligand-sensitive protein complexes involved in ligand-mediated AR activation in prostate tumor cells have not been clearly defined. Here, we describe the development, characterization, and utilization of a novel human LNCaP prostate tumor cell line, N-AR, which stably expresses wild-type AR tagged at its N terminus with the streptavidin-binding peptide epitope (streptavidin-binding peptide-tagged wild-type androgen receptor; SBP-AR). A bioanalytical workflow involving streptavidin chromatography and label-free quantitative mass spectrometry was used to identify SBP-AR and associated ligand-sensitive cytosolic proteins/protein complexes linked to AR activation in prostate tumor cells. Functional studies verified that ligand-sensitive proteins identified in the proteomic screen encoded modulators of AR-mediated transcription, suggesting that these novel proteins were putative SBP-AR-interacting proteins in N-AR cells. This was supported by biochemical associations between recombinant SBP-AR and the ligand-sensitive coatomer protein complex I (COPI) retrograde trafficking complex in vitro. Extensive biochemical and molecular experiments showed that the COPI retrograde complex regulates ligand-mediated AR transcriptional activation, which correlated with the mobilization of the Golgi-localized ARA160 coactivator to the nuclear compartment of prostate tumor cells. Collectively, this study provides a bioanalytical strategy to validate the AR-interactome and define novel AR-interacting proteins involved in ligand-mediated AR activation in prostate tumor cells. Moreover, we describe a cellular system to study how compartment-specific AR

  17. Toxoplasma Effector Recruits the Mi-2/NuRD Complex to Repress STAT1 Transcription and Block IFN-γ-Dependent Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Olias, Philipp; Etheridge, Ronald D; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J; Sibley, L David

    2016-07-13

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is an essential mediator of host defense against intracellular pathogens, including the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. However, prior T. gondii infection blocks IFN-γ-dependent gene transcription, despite the downstream transcriptional activator STAT1 being activated and bound to cognate nuclear promoters. We identify the parasite effector that blocks STAT1-dependent transcription and show it is associated with recruitment of the Mi-2 nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex, a chromatin-modifying repressor. This secreted effector, toxoplasma inhibitor of STAT1-dependent transcription (TgIST), translocates to the host cell nucleus, where it recruits Mi-2/NuRD to STAT1-dependent promoters, resulting in altered chromatin and blocked transcription. TgIST is conserved across strains, underlying their shared ability to block IFN-γ-dependent transcription. TgIST deletion results in increased parasite clearance in IFN-γ-activated cells and reduced mouse virulence, which is restored in IFN-γ-receptor-deficient mice. These findings demonstrate the importance of both IFN-γ responses and the ability of pathogens to counteract these defenses. PMID:27414498

  18. Epigenetic control of NF-κB-dependent FAS gene transcription during progression of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ettou, Sandrine; Humbrecht, Catherine; Benet, Blandine; Billot, Katy; d'Allard, Diane; Mariot, Virginie; Goodhardt, Michele; Kosmider, Olivier; Mayeux, Patrick; Solary, Eric; Fontenay, Michaela

    2013-07-01

    The death domain containing TNF receptor 6 (CD95/Fas) is a direct target for the NF-κB transcription factor and is repressed in solid tumors such as colon carcinomas. Previously, we reported that the Fas death receptor, while overexpressed in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), becomes undetectable on CD34(+) progenitors when the disease progresses to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study determined the interplay between NF-κB and Fas during MDS progression. We first observed that Fas was induced by TNF-α in the HL60 cell line. In these cells, p65 (RELA) was associated with the FAS promoter, and inhibition of the NF-κB pathway by an IKKα inhibitor (BAY11-7082) or lentiviral expression of a nondegradable mutant of IκBα (IκSR) blocked Fas expression. In contrast, TNF-α failed to induce Fas expression in the colon carcinoma cell line SW480, due to hypermethylation of the FAS promoter. Azacitidine rescued p65 binding on FAS promoter in vitro, and subsequently Fas expression in SW480 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of the NF-κB pathway decreased the expression of Fas in MDS CD45(lo)CD34(+) bone marrow cells. However, despite the nuclear expression of p65, Fas was often low on CD45(lo)CD34(+) AML cells. TNF-α failed to stimulate its expression, while azacitidine efficiently rescued p65 binding and Fas reexpression. Overall, these data suggest that DNA methylation at NF-κB sites is responsible for FAS gene silencing. PMID:23604035

  19. Epigenetic control of NF-κB-dependent FAS gene transcription during progression of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ettou, Sandrine; Humbrecht, Catherine; Benet, Blandine; Billot, Katy; d'Allard, Diane; Mariot, Virginie; Goodhardt, Michele; Kosmider, Olivier; Mayeux, Patrick; Solary, Eric; Fontenay, Michaela

    2013-07-01

    The death domain containing TNF receptor 6 (CD95/Fas) is a direct target for the NF-κB transcription factor and is repressed in solid tumors such as colon carcinomas. Previously, we reported that the Fas death receptor, while overexpressed in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), becomes undetectable on CD34(+) progenitors when the disease progresses to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study determined the interplay between NF-κB and Fas during MDS progression. We first observed that Fas was induced by TNF-α in the HL60 cell line. In these cells, p65 (RELA) was associated with the FAS promoter, and inhibition of the NF-κB pathway by an IKKα inhibitor (BAY11-7082) or lentiviral expression of a nondegradable mutant of IκBα (IκSR) blocked Fas expression. In contrast, TNF-α failed to induce Fas expression in the colon carcinoma cell line SW480, due to hypermethylation of the FAS promoter. Azacitidine rescued p65 binding on FAS promoter in vitro, and subsequently Fas expression in SW480 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of the NF-κB pathway decreased the expression of Fas in MDS CD45(lo)CD34(+) bone marrow cells. However, despite the nuclear expression of p65, Fas was often low on CD45(lo)CD34(+) AML cells. TNF-α failed to stimulate its expression, while azacitidine efficiently rescued p65 binding and Fas reexpression. Overall, these data suggest that DNA methylation at NF-κB sites is responsible for FAS gene silencing.

  20. Identification of Nrf2-dependent airway epithelial adaptive response to proinflammatory oxidant-hypochlorous acid challenge by transcription profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Pi, Jingbo; Wachi, Shinichiro; Andersen, Melvin E; Wu, Reen; Chen, Yin

    2008-03-01

    In inflammatory diseases of the airway, a high level (estimated to be as high as 8 mM) of HOCl can be generated through a reaction catalyzed by the leukocyte granule enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). HOCl, a potent oxidative agent, causes extensive tissue injury through its reaction with various cellular substances, including thiols, nucleotides, and amines. In addition to its physiological source, HOCl can also be generated by chlorine gas inhalation from an accident or a potential terrorist attack. Despite the important role of HOCl-induced airway epithelial injury, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that HOCl induced dose-dependent toxicity in airway epithelial cells. By transcription profiling using GeneChip, we identified a battery of HOCl-inducible antioxidant genes, all of which have been reported previously to be regulated by nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that is critical to the lung antioxidant response. Consistent with this finding, Nrf2 was found to be activated time and dose dependently by HOCl. Although the epidermal growth factor receptor-MAPK pathway was also highly activated by HOCl, it was not involved in Nrf2 activation and Nrf2-dependent gene expression. Instead, HOCl-induced cellular oxidative stress appeared to lead directly to Nrf2 activation. To further understand the functional significance of Nrf2 activation, small interference RNA was used to knock down Nrf2 level by targeting Nrf2 or enhance nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 by targeting its endogenous inhibitor Keap1. By both methods, we conclude that Nrf2 directly protects airway epithelial cells from HOCl-induced toxicity.

  1. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state. - Highlights: • DEX facilitates the transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • GR is involved in DEX-dependent transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • A 17 bp repeat is responsible for the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX. • An NF-I-like protein is involved in the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX.

  2. Helios transcription factor expression depends on Gsx2 and Dlx1&2 function in developing striatal matrix neurons.

    PubMed

    Martín-Ibáñez, Raquel; Crespo, Empar; Esgleas, Miriam; Urban, Noelia; Wang, Bei; Waclaw, Ronald; Georgopoulos, Katia; Martínez, Salvador; Campbell, Kenneth; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos; Alberch, Jordi; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Rubenstein, John L; Canals, Josep M

    2012-08-10

    Development of the nervous system is finely regulated by consecutive expression of cell-specific transcription factors. Here we show that Helios, a member of the Ikaros transcription factor family, is expressed in ectodermal and neuroectodermal-derived tissues. During embryonic development, Helios is expressed by several brain structures including the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE, the striatal anlage); the cingulated, insular and retrosplenial cortex; the hippocampus; and the accessory olfactory bulb. Moreover, Helios is also expressed by Purkinje neurons during postnatal cerebellar development. Within the LGE, Helios expression follows a dynamic spatio-temporal pattern starting at embryonic stages (E14.5), peaking at E18.5, and completely disappearing during postnatal development. Helios is expressed by a small population of nestin-positive neural progenitor cells located in the subventricular zone as well as by a larger population of immature neurons distributed throughout the mantle zone. In the later, Helios is preferentially expressed in the matrix compartment, where it colocalizes with Bcl11b and Foxp1, well-known markers of striatal projection neurons. In addition, we observed that Helios expression is not detected in Dlx1/2 and Gsx2 null mutants, while its expression is maintained in Ascl1 mutants. These findings allow us to introduce a new transcription factor in the cascade of events that take part of striatal development postulating the existence of at least 4 different neural progenitors in the LGE. An Ascl1-independent but Gsx2- & Dlx1/2-dependent precursor will express Helios defining a new lineage for a subset of matrix striatal neurons.

  3. Transcription factor Hes1 modulates osteoarthritis development in cooperation with calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Shurei; Hosaka, Yoko; Okada, Keita; Mori, Daisuke; Yano, Fumiko; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Yuki; Mori, Yoshifumi; Okuma, Tomotake; Chang, Song Ho; Kawata, Manabu; Taketomi, Shuji; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Chung, Ung-il; Tanaka, Sakae; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Ohba, Shinsuke; Saito, Taku

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling modulates skeletal formation and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) through induction of catabolic factors. Here we examined roles of Hes1, a transcription factor and important target of Notch signaling, in these processes. SRY-box containing gene 9 (Sox9)-Cre mice were mated with Hes1fl/fl mice to generate tissue-specific deletion of Hes1 from chondroprogenitor cells; this deletion caused no obvious abnormality in the perinatal period. Notably, OA development was suppressed when Hes1 was deleted from articular cartilage after skeletal growth in type II collagen (Col2a1)-CreERT;Hes1fl/fl mice. In cultured chondrocytes, Hes1 induced metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 5 (Adamts5) and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (Mmp13), which are catabolic enzymes that break down cartilage matrix. ChIP-seq and luciferase assays identified Hes1-responsive regions in intronic sites of both genes; the region in the ADAMTS5 gene contained a typical consensus sequence for Hes1 binding, whereas that in the MMP13 gene did not. Additionally, microarray analysis, together with the ChIP-seq, revealed novel Hes1 target genes, including Il6 and Il1rl1, coding a receptor for IL-33. We further identified calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2δ (CaMK2δ) as a cofactor of Hes1; CaMK2δ was activated during OA development, formed a protein complex with Hes1, and switched it from a transcriptional repressor to a transcriptional activator to induce cartilage catabolic factors. Therefore, Hes1 cooperated with CaMK2δ to modulate OA pathogenesis through induction of catabolic factors, including Adamts5, Mmp13, Il6, and Il1rl1. Our findings have contributed to further understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of OA, and may provide the basis for development of novel treatments for joint disorders. PMID:25733872

  4. An Elk transcription factor is required for Runx-dependent survival signaling in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Francesca; Coffman, James A; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2016-08-01

    Elk proteins are Ets family transcription factors that regulate cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in response to ERK (extracellular-signal regulated kinase)-mediated phosphorylation. Here we report the embryonic expression and function of Sp-Elk, the single Elk gene of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Sp-Elk is zygotically expressed throughout the embryo beginning at late cleavage stage, with peak expression occurring at blastula stage. Morpholino antisense-mediated knockdown of Sp-Elk causes blastula-stage developmental arrest and embryo disintegration due to apoptosis, a phenotype that is rescued by wild-type Elk mRNA. Development is also rescued by Elk mRNA encoding a serine to aspartic acid substitution (S402D) that mimics ERK-mediated phosphorylation of a conserved site that enhances DNA binding, but not by Elk mRNA encoding an alanine substitution at the same site (S402A). This demonstrates both that the apoptotic phenotype of the morphants is specifically caused by Elk depletion, and that phosphorylation of serine 402 of Sp-Elk is critical for its anti-apoptotic function. Knockdown of Sp-Elk results in under-expression of several regulatory genes involved in cell fate specification, cell cycle control, and survival signaling, including the transcriptional regulator Sp-Runt-1 and its target Sp-PKC1, both of which were shown previously to be required for cell survival during embryogenesis. Both Sp-Runt-1 and Sp-PKC1 have sequences upstream of their transcription start sites that specifically bind Sp-Elk. These results indicate that Sp-Elk is the signal-dependent activator of a feed-forward gene regulatory circuit, consisting also of Sp-Runt-1 and Sp-PKC1, which actively suppresses apoptosis in the early embryo. PMID:27235147

  5. MEF2-dependent recruitment of the HAND1 transcription factor results in synergistic activation of target promoters.

    PubMed

    Morin, Steves; Pozzulo, Gina; Robitaille, Lynda; Cross, Jay; Nemer, Mona

    2005-09-16

    HAND proteins are tissue-restricted members of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor family that play critical roles in cell differentiation and organogenesis including placental, cardiovascular, and craniofacial development. Nevertheless, the molecular basis underlying the developmental action of HAND proteins remains undefined. Within the embryo, HAND1 is first detected in the developing heart where it becomes restricted to the atrial and left ventricular compartments, a pattern identical to that of the Nppa gene, which encodes atrial natriuretic factor, the major secretory product of the heart. We hereby report that the cardiac atrial natriuretic factor promoter is directly activated by HAND1, making it the first known HAND1 transcriptional target. The action of HAND1 does not require heterodimerization with class I basic helix-loop-helix factors or DNA binding through E-box elements. Instead, HAND1 is recruited to the promoter via physical interaction with MEF2 proteins. MEF2/HAND1 interaction results in synergistic activation of MEF2-dependent promoters, and MEF2 binding sites are sufficient to mediate this synergy. MEF2 binding to DNA is not enhanced in the presence of HAND1. Instead, cooperativity likely results from corecruitment of co-activators such as CREB-binding protein. The related HAND2 protein can also synergize with MEF2. Thus, HAND proteins act as cell-specific developmental co-activators of the MEF2 family of transcription factors. These findings identify a novel mechanism for HAND action in the heart and provide a general paradigm to understand the mechanism of HAND action in organogenesis.

  6. A role for BAF57 in cell cycle-dependent transcriptional regulation by the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Hah, Nasun; Kolkman, Annemieke; Ruhl, Donald D; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; Heck, Albert J R; Timmers, H Th Marc; Kraus, W Lee

    2010-06-01

    The SWI/SNF complex is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex that plays pivotal roles in gene regulation and cell cycle control. In the present study, we explored the molecular functions of the BAF57 subunit of SWI/SNF in cell cycle control via transcriptional regulation of cell cycle-related genes. We affinity purified SWI/SNF from HeLa cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged BAF47/Ini1 with or without stable short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of BAF57. The subunit composition of the holo-SWI/SNF and BAF57-depleted SWI/SNF complexes from these cells was determined using a quantitative SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-based proteomic approach. Depletion of BAF57 resulted in a significant codepletion of BAF180 from the SWI/SNF complex without decreasing total cellular BAF180 levels. In biochemical assays of SWI/SNF activity, the holo-SWI/SNF and BAF57/BAF180-depleted SWI/SNF complexes exhibited similar activities. However, in cell proliferation assays using HeLa cells, knockdown of BAF57 resulted in an accumulation of cells in the G(2)-M phase, inhibition of colony formation, and impaired growth in soft agar. Knockdown of BAF57 also caused transcriptional misregulation of various cell cycle-related genes, especially genes involved in late G(2). Collectively, our results have identified a new role for BAF57 within the SWI/SNF complex that is required for (a) maintaining the proper subunit composition of the complex and (b) cell cycle progression through the transcriptional regulation of a subset of cell cycle-related genes.

  7. Antibiotic-dependent expression of early transcription factor subunits leads to stringent control of vaccinia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Caitlin J; Titong, Allison; Sarnoski, Ethan A; Verardi, Paulo H

    2014-03-01

    The use of vaccinia virus (VACV) as the vaccine against variola virus resulted in the eradication of smallpox. VACV has since been used in the development of recombinant vaccine and therapeutic vectors, but complications associated with uncontrolled viral replication have constrained its use as a live viral vector. We propose to improve the safety of VACV as a live-replicating vector by using elements of the tet operon to control the transcription of genes that are essential for viral growth. Poxviruses encode all enzymes and factors necessary for their replication within the host cell cytoplasm. One essential VACV factor is the vaccinia early transcription factor (VETF) packaged into the viral core. This heterodimeric protein is required for expression of early VACV genes. VETF is composed of a large subunit encoded by the A7L gene and a small subunit encoded by the D6R gene. Two recombinant VACVs were generated in which either the A7L or D6R gene was placed under the control of tet operon elements to allow their transcription, and therefore viral replication, to be dependent on tetracycline antibiotics such as doxycycline. In the absence of inducers, no plaques were produced but abortively infected cells could be identified by expression of a reporter gene. In the presence of doxycycline, both recombinant viruses replicated indistinguishably from the wild-type strain. This stringent control of VACV replication can be used for the development of safer, next-generation VACV vaccines and therapeutic vectors. Such replication-inducible VACVs would only replicate when administered with tetracycline antibiotics, and if adverse events were to occur, treatment would be as simple as antibiotic cessation.

  8. Lateral root emergence in Arabidopsis is dependent on transcription factor LBD29 regulation of auxin influx carrier LAX3.

    PubMed

    Porco, Silvana; Larrieu, Antoine; Du, Yujuan; Gaudinier, Allison; Goh, Tatsuaki; Swarup, Kamal; Swarup, Ranjan; Kuempers, Britta; Bishopp, Anthony; Lavenus, Julien; Casimiro, Ilda; Hill, Kristine; Benkova, Eva; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Brady, Siobhan M; Scheres, Ben; Péret, Benjamin; Bennett, Malcolm J

    2016-09-15

    Lateral root primordia (LRP) originate from pericycle stem cells located deep within parental root tissues. LRP emerge through overlying root tissues by inducing auxin-dependent cell separation and hydraulic changes in adjacent cells. The auxin-inducible auxin influx carrier LAX3 plays a key role concentrating this signal in cells overlying LRP. Delimiting LAX3 expression to two adjacent cell files overlying new LRP is crucial to ensure that auxin-regulated cell separation occurs solely along their shared walls. Multiscale modeling has predicted that this highly focused pattern of expression requires auxin to sequentially induce auxin efflux and influx carriers PIN3 and LAX3, respectively. Consistent with model predictions, we report that auxin-inducible LAX3 expression is regulated indirectly by AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7). Yeast one-hybrid screens revealed that the LAX3 promoter is bound by the transcription factor LBD29, which is a direct target for regulation by ARF7. Disrupting auxin-inducible LBD29 expression or expressing an LBD29-SRDX transcriptional repressor phenocopied the lax3 mutant, resulting in delayed lateral root emergence. We conclude that sequential LBD29 and LAX3 induction by auxin is required to coordinate cell separation and organ emergence. PMID:27578783

  9. Cbx7 is epigenetically silenced in glioblastoma and inhibits cell migration by targeting YAP/TAZ-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Zahid; Patil, Vikas; Arora, Anjali; Hegde, Alangar S.; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Santosh, Vani; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most malignant form of astrocytomas which are difficult to treat and portend a grave clinical course and poor prognosis. In this study, we identified Chromobox homolog 7 (Cbx7), a member of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), as a downregulated gene in GBM owing to its promoter hypermethylation. Bisulphite sequencing and methylation inhibitor treatment established the hypermethylation of Cbx7 in GBM. Exogenous overexpression of Cbx7 induced cell death, inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and migration/invasion of the glioma cells. GSEA of Cbx7 regulated genes identified Cbx7 as a repressor of transcription co-activators YAP/TAZ, the inhibitory targets of the Hippo signalling pathway. In good correlation, the exogenous expression of Cbx7 repressed the YAP/TAZ-dependent transcription and downregulated CTGF, a bonafide YAP/TAZ target. We also observed reduced levels of phospho-JNK in Cbx7 expressing cells. Additionally, CTGF silencing and pharmacological inhibition of JNK also inhibited glioma cell migration. Further, Cbx7 failed to inhibit cell migration significantly in the presence of exogenously overexpressed CTGF or constitutively active JNK. Thus, our study identifies Cbx7 as an inhibitor of glioma cell migration through its inhibitory effect on YAP/TAZ-CTGF-JNK signalling axis and underscores the importance of epigenetic inactivation of Cbx7 in gliomagenesis. PMID:27291091

  10. Hsf1 and Hsp90 orchestrate temperature-dependent global transcriptional remodelling and chromatin architecture in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Michelle D.; Farrer, Rhys A.; Tan, Kaeling; Miao, Zhengqiang; Walker, Louise A.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Wheeler, Robert T.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Wong, Koon Ho; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Fever is a universal response to infection, and opportunistic pathogens such as Candida albicans have evolved complex circuitry to sense and respond to heat. Here we harness RNA-seq and ChIP-seq to discover that the heat shock transcription factor, Hsf1, binds distinct motifs in nucleosome-depleted promoter regions to regulate heat shock genes and genes involved in virulence in C. albicans. Consequently, heat shock increases C. albicans host cell adhesion, damage and virulence. Hsf1 activation depends upon the molecular chaperone Hsp90 under basal and heat shock conditions, but the effects are opposite and in part controlled at the level of Hsf1 expression and DNA binding. Finally, we demonstrate that Hsp90 regulates global transcription programs by modulating nucleosome levels at promoters of stress-responsive genes. Thus, we describe a mechanism by which C. albicans responds to temperature via Hsf1 and Hsp90 to orchestrate gene expression and chromatin architecture, thereby enabling thermal adaptation and virulence. PMID:27226156

  11. Transcription expression of immune-related genes from Caligus rogercresseyi evidences host-dependent patterns on Atlantic and coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Vera-Bizama, Fredy; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Gonçalves, Ana Teresa; Marambio, Jorge Pino; Hawes, Christopher; Wadsworth, Simon; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2015-12-01

    The transcriptomic response of the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi during the infestation on Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) was evaluated using 27 genes related to immune response, antioxidant system and secretome. Results showed early responses of TLR/IMD signaling pathway in sea lice infesting Atlantic salmon. Overall, genes associated with oxidative stress responses were upregulated in both host species. This pattern suggests that reactive oxygen species emitted by the host as a response to the infestation, could modulate the sea louse antioxidant system. Secretome-related transcripts evidenced upregulation of trypsins and serpins, mainly associated to Atlantic salmon than coho salmon. Interestingly, cathepsins and trypsin2 were downregulated at 7 days post-infection (dpi) in coho salmon. The principal component analysis revealed an inverse time-dependent pattern based on the different responses of C. rogercresseyi infecting both salmon species. Here, Atlantic salmon strongly modulates the transcriptome responses at earlier infection stages; meanwhile coho salmon reveals a less marked modulation, increasing the transcription activity during the infection process. This study evidences transcriptome differences between two salmon host species and provides pivotal knowledge towards elaborating future control strategies. PMID:26492996

  12. Regulatory features underlying pollination-dependent and -independent tomato fruit set revealed by transcript and primary metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Schauer, Nicolas; Usadel, Bjoern; Frasse, Pierre; Zouine, Mohamed; Hernould, Michel; Latché, Alain; Pech, Jean-Claude; Fernie, Alisdair R; Bouzayen, Mondher

    2009-05-01

    Indole Acetic Acid 9 (IAA9) is a negative auxin response regulator belonging to the Aux/IAA transcription factor gene family whose downregulation triggers fruit set before pollination, thus giving rise to parthenocarpy. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that a tissue-specific gradient of IAA9 expression is established during flower development, the release of which upon pollination triggers the initiation of fruit development. Comparative transcriptome and targeted metabolome analysis uncovered important features of the molecular events underlying pollination-induced and pollination-independent fruit set. Comprehensive transcriptomic profiling identified a high number of genes common to both types of fruit set, among which only a small subset are dependent on IAA9 regulation. The fine-tuning of Aux/IAA and ARF genes and the downregulation of TAG1 and TAGL6 MADS box genes are instrumental in triggering the fruit set program. Auxin and ethylene emerged as the most active signaling hormones involved in the flower-to-fruit transition. However, while these hormones affected only a small number of transcriptional events, dramatic shifts were observed at the metabolic and developmental levels. The activation of photosynthesis and sucrose metabolism-related genes is an integral regulatory component of fruit set process. The combined results allow a far greater comprehension of the regulatory and metabolic events controlling early fruit development both in the presence and absence of pollination/fertilization. PMID:19435935

  13. Mechanism of action of a repressor of dioxin-dependent induction of Cyp1a1 gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A J; Weir-Brown, K I; Bannister, R M; Chu, F F; Reisz-Porszasz, S; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Sogawa, K; Hankinson, O

    1992-01-01

    A dominant mutant of Hepa-1 cells, c31, expresses a repressor that prevents 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-dependent stimulation of Cyp1a1 transcription. The repressor acts via the xenobiotic-responsive elements (XREs), which are the DNA-binding sites for the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-TCDD complex during transcriptional activation of the gene. High-salt nuclear extracts prepared from c31 cells grown with TCDD contained normal levels of the Ah receptor which bound the XRE with normal affinity, as judged by in vitro gel mobility shift assays. Furthermore, extracts prepared from these cells, grown either with or without TCDD, contained no novel XRE-binding proteins compared with extracts from wild-type Hepa-1 cells. However, in vivo genomic footprinting demonstrated that TCDD treatment leads to binding of the Ah receptor to the XREs in Hepa-1 but not mutant cells. This finding suggests that the repressor associates with the Ah receptor to prevent its binding to the XREs and that high-salt treatment either causes dissociation of the receptor/repressor complex or fails to extract the repressor from nuclei. The results underscore the importance of using both in vivo and in vitro assays for analyzing DNA-protein interactions. Images PMID:1314949

  14. Rac, PAK and p38 regulate cell contact-dependent nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Attila; Masszi, András; Zulys, Matthew; Yeung, Tony; Speight, Pam; Rotstein, Ori D; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Mucsi, István; Szászi, Katalin; Kapus, András

    2008-01-23

    We investigated the mechanism whereby cell contact injury stimulates the alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) promoter, a key process for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during organ fibrosis. Contact disruption by low-Ca(2+) medium (LCM) activated Rac, PAK and p38 MAPK, and triggered the nuclear accumulation of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), an inducer of the SMA promoter. Dominant negative (DN) Rac, DN-PAK, DN-p38, or the p38 inhibitor SB203580 suppressed the LCM-induced nuclear accumulation of MRTF and the activation of the SMA promoter. These studies define novel pathway(s) involving Rac, PAK, and p38 in the regulation of MRTF and the contact-dependent induction of EMT.

  15. Rac, PAK and p38 regulate cell contact-dependent nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Sebe, Attila; Masszi, András; Zulys, Matthew; Yeung, Tony; Speight, Pam; Rotstein, Ori. D.; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Mucsi, István; Szászi, Katalin; Kapus, András

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism whereby cell contact injury stimulates the α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) promoter, a key process for epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) during organ fibrosis. Contact disruption by low-Ca2+ medium (LCM) activated Rac, PAK and p38 MAPK, and triggered the nuclear accumulation of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), an inducer of the SMA promoter. Dominant negative (DN) Rac, DN-PAK, DN-p38, or the p38 inhibitor SB203580 suppressed the LCM-induced nuclear accumulation of MRTF and the activation of the SMA promoter. These studies define novel pathway(s) involving Rac, PAK, and p38 in the regulation of MRTF and the contact-dependent induction of EMT. PMID:18154735

  16. Selective cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors discriminating between cell cycle and transcriptional kinases: future reality or utopia?

    PubMed

    Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa; Krystof, Vladimír

    2009-08-01

    Progression of the cell cycle is controlled by activating and inhibiting cellular factors. The delicate balance between these positive- and negative-acting regulators warrants proper cell cycle progression in normal cells and facilitates cellular response to a variety of stress stimuli. The increased activity of the positive regulators of the cell cycle in cancer cells is frequently accompanied by the loss or inactivation of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The supplementation of the cellular CDK inhibitors by the pharmacological counterparts is a very promising therapeutic option. The generated pharmacological inhibitors of CDKs belong to different classes of compounds and display various CDK inhibitory features. In this article the action and specificity of CDK inhibitor roscovitine, belonging to the group of purine analogues, is reviewed and the rationale for dissecting the inhibitory action on cell cycle and transcriptional CDKs is discussed.

  17. How do kinases contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of the transcription factor NFAT5?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    NFAT5 plays a critical role in maintaining the renal functions. Its dis-regulation in the kidney leads to or is associated with certain renal diseases or disorders, most notably the urinary concentration defect. Hypertonicity, which the kidney medulla is normally exposed to, activates NFAT5 through phosphorylation of a signaling molecule or NFAT5 itself. Hypotonicity inhibits NFAT5 through a similar mechanism. More than a dozen of protein and lipid kinases have been identified to contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of NFAT5. Hypertonicity activates NFAT5 by increasing its nuclear localization and transactivating activity in the early phase and protein abundance in the late phase. The known mechanism for inhibition of NFAT5 by hypotonicity is a decrease of nuclear NFAT5. The present article reviews the effect of each kinase on NFAT5 nuclear localization, transactivation and protein abundance, and the relationship among these kinases, if known. Cyclosporine A and tacrolimus suppress immune reactions by inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin-dependent activation of NFAT1. It is hoped that this review would stimulate the interest to seek explanations from the NFAT5 regulatory pathways for certain clinical presentations and to explore novel therapeutic approaches based on the pathways. On the basic science front, this review raises two interesting questions. The first one is how these kinases can specifically signal to NFAT5 in the context of hypertonicity or hypotonicity, because they also regulate other cellular activities and even opposite activities in some cases. The second one is why these many kinases, some of which might have redundant functions, are needed to regulate NFAT5 activity. This review reiterates the concept of signaling through cooperation. Cells need these kinases working in a coordinated way to provide the signaling specificity that is lacking in the individual one. Redundancy in regulation of NFAT5 is a critical strategy for cells to

  18. Angiotensin II and norepinephrine activate specific calcineurin-dependent NFAT transcription factor isoforms in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Ida G; Kvaløy, Heidi; Austbø, Bjørg; Christensen, Geir; Carlson, Cathrine R

    2011-11-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) and angiotensin II (ANG II) are primary effectors of the sympathetic adrenergic and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems, mediating hypertrophic, apoptotic, and fibrotic events in the myocardium. As NE and ANG II have been shown to affect intracellular calcium in cardiomyocytes, we hypothesized that they activate the calcium-sensitive, prohypertrophic calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFATc) signaling pathway. More specifically, we have investigated isoform-specific activation of NFAT in NE- and ANG II-stimulated cardiomyocytes, as it is likely that each of the four calcineurin-dependent isoforms, c1-c4, play specific roles. We have stimulated neonatal ventriculocytes from C57/B6 and NFAT-luciferase reporter mice with ANG II or NE and quantified NFAT activity by luciferase activity and phospho-immunoblotting. ANG II and NE increased calcineurin-dependent NFAT activity 2.4- and 1.9-fold, measured as luciferase activity after 24 h of stimulation, and induced protein synthesis, measured by radioactive leucine incorporation after 24 and 72 h. To optimize measurements of NFAT isoforms, we examined the specificity of NFAT antibodies on peptide arrays and by immunoblotting with designed blocking peptides. Western analyses showed that both effectors activate NFATc1 and c4, while NFATc2 activity was regulated by NE only, as measured by phospho-NFAT levels. Neither ANG II nor NE activated NFATc3. As today's main therapies for heart failure aim at antagonizing the adrenergic and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems, understanding their intracellular actions is of importance, and our data, through validating a method for measuring myocardial NFATs, indicate that ANG II and NE activate specific NFATc isoforms in cardiomyocytes.

  19. Transcriptional activation of estrogen receptor ERalpha and ERbeta by polycyclic musks is cell type dependent.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, Richard H M M; Quaedackers, Monique E; Seinen, Willem; van der Burg, Bart

    2002-08-15

    In the past decade the list of chemicals in the environment that are able to mimic the natural hormone estrogen, thereby disrupting endocrine function, has grown rapidly. These chemicals are able to bind to estrogen receptors (ERs) and influence estrogen signaling pathways, although several of them have structures that differ substantially from the endogenous hormone 17beta-estradiol. Because of their polycyclic nature, the polycyclic musks AHTN (6-acetyl-1,1,2,4,4,7-hexamethyltetraline) and HHCB (1,2,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta-gamma-2-benzopyran) were assessed for interaction with estrogen receptors. These compounds are ubiquitously present in surface waters and have been identified in human milk fat and blood. Using sensitive in vitro reporter gene assays, we found that AHTN and HHCB act as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), inducing both estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity dependent on the cell line and the ER subtype targeted. Weak estrogenic effects were observed only at relatively high concentrations (10 microM). Antiestrogenic effects were observed in various cell lines starting at concentrations of 0.1 microM. In comparison with the well-known SERM, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, AHTN and HHCB have a much lower potency in suppressing estradiol-induced transactivation. Results with various mutant ER receptor types suggest that binding sites of the musk compounds differ from 17beta-estradiol and 4-hydroxytamoxifen. The cell type dependency of ER transactivation shows that caution should be exerted when interpreting effects of estrogenic compounds using in vitro systems.

  20. Interaction of the phospholipid scramblase 1 with HIV-1 Tat results in the repression of Tat-dependent transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Shuichi Eizuru, Yoshito

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •PLSCR1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 Tat in vitro and in vivo. •PLSCR1 repressed Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR. •Suppression of PLSCR1 expression enhanced the levels of HIV-1 transcripts. •PLSCR1 reduced the nuclear localization of Tat. -- Abstract: Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene and possesses an IFN-mediated antiviral function. We show here that PLSCR1 directly interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat. This interaction occurs both in vitro and in vivo through amino acids 160–250 of PLSCR1. Overexpression of PLSCR1 efficiently represses the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) and reduces the nuclear translocation of Tat. In addition, shRNA-mediated suppression of endogenous PLSCR1 expression enhances the levels of gag mRNA in an HIV-1-infected T-cell line. These findings indicate that PLSCR1 negatively regulates the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR during HIV-1 infection.

  1. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murano, Tatsuro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  2. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Song, You; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-11-01

    Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15mGy radiation affected DEGs associated with cellular signaling and immune response; 70mGy radiation affected cell cycle regulation and DNA damage repair, cellular energy production; and 280mGy radiation affected pathways related to cell cycle regulation and DNA

  3. Mouse prenatal platelet-forming lineages share a core transcriptional program but divergent dependence on MPL.

    PubMed

    Potts, Kathryn S; Sargeant, Tobias J; Dawson, Caleb A; Josefsson, Emma C; Hilton, Douglas J; Alexander, Warren S; Taoudi, Samir

    2015-08-01

    The thrombopoietic environment of the neonate is established during prenatal life; therefore, a comprehensive understanding of platelet-forming cell development during embryogenesis is critical to understanding the etiology of early-onset thrombocytopenia. The recent discovery that the first platelet-forming cells of the conceptus are not megakaryocytes (MKs) but diploid platelet-forming cells (DPFCs) revealed a previously unappreciated complexity in thrombopoiesis. This raises important questions, including the following. When do conventional MKs appear? Do pathogenic genetic lesions of adult MKs affect DPFCs? What role does myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL), a key regulator of adult megakaryopoiesis, play in prenatal platelet-forming lineages? We performed a comprehensive study to determine the spatial and temporal appearance of prenatal platelet-forming lineages. We demonstrate that DPFCs originate in the yolk sac and then rapidly migrate to other extra- and intraembryonic tissues. Using gene disruption models of Gata1 and Nfe2, we demonstrate that perturbing essential adult MK genes causes an analogous phenotype in the early embryo before the onset of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell-driven (definitive) hematopoiesis. Finally, we present the surprising finding that DPFC and MK commitment from their respective precursors is MPL independent in vivo but that completion of MK differentiation and establishment of the prenatal platelet mass is dependent on MPL expression.

  4. Arsenic Attenuates GLI Signaling, Increasing or Decreasing its Transcriptional Program in a Context-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Giambelli, Camilla; Tang, Bo; Winterbottom, Emily; Long, Jun; Jin, Ke; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fei, Dennis Liang; Nguyen, Dao M; Athar, Mohammad; Wang, Baolin; Subbarayan, Pochi R; Wang, Lily; Rai, Priyamvada; Ardalan, Bach; Capobianco, Anthony J; Robbins, David J

    2016-02-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a worldwide environmental toxicant, exposure to which is associated with many adverse outcomes. Arsenic is also an effective therapeutic agent in certain disease settings. Arsenic was recently shown to regulate the activity of the Hedgehog (HH) signal transduction pathway, and this regulation of HH signaling was proposed to be responsible for a subset of arsenic's biologic effects. Surprisingly, these separate reports proposed contradictory activities for arsenic, as either an agonist or antagonist of HH signaling. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that arsenic acts as a modulator of the activity of the HH effector protein glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger (GLI), activating or inhibiting GLI activity in a context-dependent manner. This arsenic-induced modulation of HH signaling is observed in cultured cells, patients with colorectal cancer who have received arsenic-based therapy, and a mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model. Our results show that arsenic activates GLI signaling when the intrinsic GLI activity is low but inhibits signaling in the presence of high-level GLI activity. Furthermore, we show that this modulation occurs downstream of primary cilia, evidenced by experiments in suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU) deficient cells. Combining our findings with previous reports, we present an inclusive model in which arsenic plays dual roles in GLI signaling modulation: when GLIs are primarily in their repressor form, arsenic antagonizes their repression capacity, leading to low-level GLI activation, but when GLIs are primarily in their activator form, arsenic attenuates their activity.

  5. An RNA polymerase II transcription factor has an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity strongly stimulated by the TATA region of promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1989-01-01

    A transcription factor required for synthesis of accurately initiated run-off transcripts by RNA polymerase II has been purified and shown to have an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity that is strongly stimulated by the TATA region of promoters. This transcription factor, designated delta, was purified more than 3000-fold from extracts of crude rat liver nuclei and has a native molecular mass of approximately 230 kDa. DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) and transcription activities copurify when delta is analyzed by hydrophobic interaction and ion-exchange HPLC, arguing that transcription factor delta possesses an ATPase (dATPase) activity. ATPase (dATPase) is specific for adenine nucleotides; ATP and dATP, but not CTP, UTP, or GTP, are hydrolyzed. ATPase (dATPase) is stimulated by both double-stranded and single-stranded DNAs, including pUC18, ssM13, and poly(dT); however, DNA fragments containing the TATA region of either the adenovirus 2 major late or mouse interleukin 3 promoters stimulate ATPase as much as 10-fold more effectively than DNA fragments containing nonpromoter sequences. These data suggest the intriguing possibility that delta plays a critical role in the ATP (dATP)-dependent activation of run-off transcription through a direct interaction with the TATA region of promoters. Images PMID:2552440

  6. Role of DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases II and III in Transcription of the Adenovirus Genome Late in Productive Infection

    PubMed Central

    Weinmann, Roberto; Raskas, Heschel J.; Roeder, Robert G.

    1974-01-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II, and III were isolated and partially purified from KB (human) cells 18 hr after infection with adenovirus 2. As reported previously for the enzymes from other animal cells, RNA polymerase II was completely sensitive to low concentrations of α-amanitin (50% inhibition at 0.02 μg/ml), RNA polymerase III was completely sensitive to high concentrations of α-amanitin (50% inhibition at 20 μg/ml) and RNA polymerase I was totally resistant to concentrations of α-amanitin less than or equal to 200 μg/ml. RNA synthesis by the endogenous RNA polymerase activities in nuclei isolated from infected cells was completely sensitive to α-amanitin, thus suggesting that RNA polymerase I is not involved in viral DNA transcription even though it is present in these cells. The α-amanitin inhibition curve was biphasic and showed inflection points at about 0.02 and 20 μg/ml, suggesting the participation of both RNA polymerases II and III in the synthesis of RNA in these nuclei. Furthermore, at least a large fraction of the synthesis of the nuclear precursors to viral mRNA, monitored by hybridization to viral DNA, showed the same sensitivity to α-amanitin as did RNA polymerase II; and the synthesis of both viral 5.5S RNA and (presumably cellular) 5S RNA in the isolated nuclei exhibited the same sensitivity to α-amanitin as did purified RNA polymerase III. Thus, these data provide strong supporting evidence for previous studies which suggested the involvement of an RNA polymerase II in transcription of the adenovirus genome and demonstrate the role of an RNA polymerase III activity in the synthesis of viral 5.5S RNA and cellular 5S RNA. PMID:4530313

  7. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of Uraninite by the Chemolithoautotroph Thiobacillus denitrificans: Cell Suspension and Whole-Genome Transcriptional Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Chakicherla, A.; Legler, T. C.; Letain, T. E.; Coleman, M.; Kane, S. R.

    2005-12-01

    Background: In-situ, reductive immobilization of uranium in aquifers, whereby relatively soluble U(VI) species are reduced to poorly soluble uraninite (UO2) by aquifer bacteria, has been the subject of intensive research effort recently. This study explored the possibility that a widespread soil bacterium, Thiobacillus denitrificans, could catalyze anaerobic U re-oxidation in the presence of nitrate, a common co-contaminant with uranium at U.S. DOE sites. Whole-genome, cDNA microarray studies (representing all 2832 ORFs of the 2.9 Mb genome) were conducted to identify genes upregulated during nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation (relative to control conditions of nitrate-dependent thiosulfate oxidation). Methods: Washed cell suspension experiments were carried out under strictly anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH with UO2 and T. denitrificans cells grown under denitrifying conditions and harvested in late exponential phase. Experiments included both sterile controls and live, no-nitrate controls. For microarray analysis, RNA was isolated from cells exposed to either UO2 or thiosulfate under strictly anaerobic, denitrifying conditions. For all samples analyzed with microarrays, chemical analyses were used to confirm that the applicable metabolic activity [i.e., denitrification and either U(IV) or thiosulfate oxidation] was occurring. Reverse transcription, quantitative PCR was used to confirm selected microarray results. Results: In the cell suspension experiments, T. denitrificans cells oxidatively dissolved UO2 in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate ( P<0.01) and was strongly correlated to nitrate consumption (r2 = 0.98). However, U(IV) oxidation and denitrification appeared to be dependent on H2. The microarrays identified 333 genes as upregulated under U(IV)-oxidizing conditions using RMA statistical analysis and a 2-fold ( P<0.0001) cutoff. Notably, 16 of these genes, which were upregulated 5- to 22-fold, were

  8. Transcription of angiogenin and ribonuclease 4 is regulated by RNA polymerase III elements and a CCCTC binding factor (CTCF)-dependent intragenic chromatin loop.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jinghao; Luo, Chi; Jiang, Yuxiang; Hinds, Philip W; Xu, Zhengping; Hu, Guo-fu

    2014-05-01

    Angiogenin (ANG) and ribonuclease 4 (RNASE4), two members of the secreted and vertebrate-specific ribonuclease superfamily, play important roles in cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. The ANG and RNASE4 genes share genetic regions with promoter activities, but the structure and regulation of these putative promotes are unknown. We have characterized the promoter regions, defined the transcription start site, and identified a mechanism of transcription regulation that involves both RNA polymerase III (Pol III) elements and CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) sites. We found that two Pol III elements within the promoter region influence ANG and RNASE4 expression in a position- and orientation-dependent manner. We also provide evidence for the presence of an intragenic chromatin loop between the two CTCF binding sites located in two introns flanking the ANG coding exon. We found that formation of this intragenic loop preferentially enhances ANG transcription. These results suggest a multilayer transcriptional regulation of ANG and RNASE4 gene locus. These data also add more direct evidence to the notion that Pol III elements are able to directly influence Pol II gene transcription. Furthermore, our data indicate that a CTCF-dependent chromatin loop is able to differentially regulate transcription of genes that share the same promoters.

  9. Structure-Function Relationships in the Gas-Sensing Heme-Dependent Transcription Factors RcoM and DNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Hannah E.

    Transition metals play an important role in many biological processes, however, they are also toxic at high concentrations. Therefore, the uptake and efflux of these metals must be tightly regulated by the cell. Bacteria have evolved a variety of pathways and regulatory systems to monitor the presence and concentration of metals in the cellular environment. A key component of those systems are transcription factors that either "sense metals" or use "metal sensors". The first class of these proteins have metals as their allosteric effector ligand. The second class of these proteins utilize transition metal containing cofactors to sense other environmental cues through the specific chemistry afforded by the cofactor. Chapter 1 reviews the current literature regarding both types of transcription factors. The focus of this work has been on two heme-containing, gas-sensing transcription factors found in bacteria, RcoM (regulator of CO metabolism) and DNR (dissimilative nitrate respiration regulator). RcoM is a CO-dependent protein found in Burkholderia xenovorans and sits upstream of the cox operon for oxidative CO metabolism. RcoM senses the presence of CO, as well as changes in redox potential, through a ligand switch process at its heme cofactor. Chapter 2 details spectroscopic characterization of several methionine mutants to identify the Fe(II) ligand trans to His 74. That study concludes that Met104 acts as the CO-replacable ligand. Met105, while not the ligand, does play an important role in reversibility of the ligand switch process. RcoM has a unique tertiary structure that combines a sensory domain and a DNA-binding domain normally found in two-component systems. Chapter 3 provides evidence that RcoM adopts a dimeric state. Further biophysical and structural characterization gives further insight into how the two domains are organized and the implications for the DNA-binding mechanism. DNR is a NO-sensing transcription factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and

  10. Core promoter-specific gene regulation: TATA box selectivity and Initiator-dependent bi-directionality of serum response factor-activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Xu, Muyu; Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Martinez, Ernest

    2016-04-01

    Gene-specific activation by enhancers involves their communication with the basal RNA polymerase II transcription machinery at the core promoter. Core promoters are diverse and may contain a variety of sequence elements such as the TATA box, the Initiator (INR), and the downstream promoter element (DPE) recognized, respectively, by the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors of the TFIID complex. Core promoter elements contribute to the gene selectivity of enhancers, and INR/DPE-specific enhancers and activators have been identified. Here, we identify a TATA box-selective activating sequence upstream of the human β-actin (ACTB) gene that mediates serum response factor (SRF)-induced transcription from TATA-dependent but not INR-dependent promoters and requires the TATA-binding/bending activity of TBP, which is otherwise dispensable for transcription from a TATA-less promoter. The SRF-dependent ACTB sequence is stereospecific on TATA promoters but activates in an orientation-independent manner a composite TATA/INR-containing promoter. More generally, we show that SRF-regulated genes of the actin/cytoskeleton/contractile family tend to have a TATA box. These results suggest distinct TATA-dependent and INR-dependent mechanisms of TFIID-mediated transcription in mammalian cells that are compatible with only certain stereospecific combinations of activators, and that a TBP-TATA binding mechanism is important for SRF activation of the actin/cytoskeleton-related gene family.

  11. A NF-κB-dependent dual promoter-enhancer initiates the lipopolysaccharide-mediated transcriptional activation of the chicken lysozyme in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Witham, James; Ouboussad, Lylia; Lefevre, Pascal F

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activation of the chicken lysozyme gene (cLys) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in macrophages is dependent on transcription of a LPS-Inducible Non-Coding RNA (LINoCR) triggering eviction of the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) from a negative regulatory element upstream of the lysozyme transcription start site. LINoCR is transcribed from a promoter originally characterized as a hormone response enhancer in the oviduct. Herein, we report the characterization of this cis-regulatory element (CRE). In activated macrophages, a 60 bp region bound by NF-κB, AP1 and C/EBPβ controls this CRE, which is strictly dependent on NF-κB binding for its activity in luciferase assays. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase IKKα, known to be recruited by NF-κB to NF-κB-dependent genes is found at the CRE and within the transcribing regions of both cLys and LINoCR. Such repartition suggests a simultaneous promoter and enhancer activity of this CRE, initiating cLys transcriptional activation and driving CTCF eviction. This recruitment was transient despite persistence of both cLys transcription and NF-κB binding to the CRE. Finally, comparing cLys with other LPS-inducible genes indicates that IKKα detection within transcribing regions can be correlated with the presence of the elongating form of RNA polymerase II or concentrated in the 3' end of the gene.

  12. HCF1 and OCT2 Cooperate with EBNA1 To Enhance OriP-Dependent Transcription and Episome Maintenance of Latent Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Sentana-Lledo, Daniel; Cassel, Joel; Messick, Troy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes latent infections as multicopy episomes with complex patterns of viral gene transcription and chromatin structure. The EBV origin of plasmid replication (OriP) has been implicated as a critical control element for viral transcription, as well as viral DNA replication and episome maintenance. Here, we examine cellular factors that bind OriP and regulate histone modification, transcription regulation, and episome maintenance. We found that OriP is enriched for histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation in multiple cell types and latency types. Host cell factor 1 (HCF1), a component of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) histone methyltransferase complex, and transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding transcription factor 2) bound cooperatively with EBNA1 (Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1) at OriP. Depletion of OCT2 or HCF1 deregulated latency transcription and histone modifications at OriP, as well as the OriP-regulated latency type-dependent C promoter (Cp) and Q promoter (Qp). HCF1 depletion led to a loss of histone H3K4me3 (trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4) and H3 acetylation at Cp in type III latency and Qp in type I latency, as well as an increase in heterochromatic H3K9me3 at these sites. HCF1 depletion resulted in the loss of EBV episomes from Burkitt's lymphoma cells with type I latency and reactivation from lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) with type III latency. These findings indicate that HCF1 and OCT2 function at OriP to regulate viral transcription, histone modifications, and episome maintenance. As HCF1 is best known for its function in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene transcription, our findings suggest that EBV latency transcription shares unexpected features with HSV gene regulation. IMPORTANCE EBV latency is associated with several human cancers. Viral latent cycle gene expression is regulated by the epigenetic control of the OriP enhancer region. Here, we show that cellular factors

  13. Viral DNA synthesis-dependent titration of a cellular repressor activates transcription of the human adenovirus type 2 IVa2 gene.

    PubMed

    Iftode, C; Flint, S J

    2004-12-21

    Synthesis of progeny DNA genomes in cells infected by human subgroup C adenoviruses leads to several changes in viral gene expression. These changes include transcription from previously silent, late promoters, such as the IV(a2) promoter, and a large increase in the efficiency of major-late (ML) transcription. Some of these changes appear to take place sequentially, because the product of the IV(a2) gene has been implicated in stimulation of ML transcription. Our previous biochemical studies suggested that IV(a2) transcription is regulated by viral DNA synthesis-dependent relief of transcriptional repression by a cellular protein that we termed IV(a2)-RF. To test the relevance of such a repressor-titration mechanism during the viral infectious cycle, we introduced into the endogenous IV(a2) promoter two mutations that impair in vitro-binding of IV(a2)-RF, but introduce no change (Rep7) or one conservative amino acid substitution (Rep6) into the overlapping coding sequence for the viral DNA polymerase. The results of run-on transcription assays indicated that both mutations induced earlier-than-normal and more efficient IV(a2) transcription. Both mutations were also observed to result in modest increases in the efficiency of viral DNA synthesis. However, measurement of the concentration of IV(a2) transcripts as a function of IV(a2) template concentration demonstrated that the Rep mutations increased by up to 60-fold the efficiency with which IV(a2) templates were used during the initial period of the late phase of infection, as predicted by the repressor titration hypothesis. These mutations also increased the efficiency of ML transcription in infected cells.

  14. Tumor hypoxia induces nuclear paraspeckle formation through HIF-2α dependent transcriptional activation of NEAT1 leading to cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, H; Albukhari, A; Morotti, M; Haider, S; Moralli, D; Smythies, J; Schödel, J; Green, C M; Camps, C; Buffa, F; Ratcliffe, P; Ragoussis, J; Harris, A L; Mole, D R

    2015-08-20

    Activation of cellular transcriptional responses, mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), is common in many types of cancer, and generally confers a poor prognosis. Known to induce many hundreds of protein-coding genes, HIF has also recently been shown to be a key regulator of the non-coding transcriptional response. Here, we show that NEAT1 long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is a direct transcriptional target of HIF in many breast cancer cell lines and in solid tumors. Unlike previously described lncRNAs, NEAT1 is regulated principally by HIF-2 rather than by HIF-1. NEAT1 is a nuclear lncRNA that is an essential structural component of paraspeckles and the hypoxic induction of NEAT1 induces paraspeckle formation in a manner that is dependent upon both NEAT1 and on HIF-2. Paraspeckles are multifunction nuclear structures that sequester transcriptionally active proteins as well as RNA transcripts that have been subjected to adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing. We show that the nuclear retention of one such transcript, F11R (also known as junctional adhesion molecule 1, JAM1), in hypoxia is dependent upon the hypoxic increase in NEAT1, thereby conferring a novel mechanism of HIF-dependent gene regulation. Induction of NEAT1 in hypoxia also leads to accelerated cellular proliferation, improved clonogenic survival and reduced apoptosis, all of which are hallmarks of increased tumorigenesis. Furthermore, in patients with breast cancer, high tumor NEAT1 expression correlates with poor survival. Taken together, these results indicate a new role for HIF transcriptional pathways in the regulation of nuclear structure and that this contributes to the pro-tumorigenic hypoxia-phenotype in breast cancer.

  15. Structure‐function integrity of the adult hippocampus depends on the transcription factor Bcl11b/Ctip2

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R.; Baumann, L.; Fischer, J.; Seigfried, F. A.; De Bruyckere, E.; Liu, P.; Jenkins, N. A.; Copeland, N. G.; Schwegler, H.

    2016-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is one of the only two brain regions where adult neurogenesis occurs. Throughout life, cells of the neuronal stem cell niche undergo proliferation, differentiation and integration into the hippocampal neural circuitry. Ongoing adult neurogenesis is a prerequisite for the maintenance of adult hippocampal functionality. Bcl11b, a zinc finger transcription factor, is expressed by postmitotic granule cells in the developing as well as adult dentate gyrus. We previously showed a critical role of Bcl11b for hippocampal development. Whether Bcl11b is also required for adult hippocampal functions has not been investigated. Using a tetracycline‐dependent inducible mouse model under the control of the forebrain‐specific CaMKIIα promoter, we show here that the adult expression of Bcl11b is essential for survival, differentiation and functional integration of adult‐born granule cell neurons. In addition, Bcl11b is required for survival of pre‐existing mature neurons. Consequently, loss of Bcl11b expression selectively in the adult hippocampus results in impaired spatial working memory. Together, our data uncover for the first time a specific role of Bcl11b in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and function. PMID:26915960

  16. Phosphorylation of p53 by TAF1 inactivates p53-dependent transcription in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Lin, Joy C.; Piluso, Landon G.; Dhahbi, Joseph M.; Bobadilla, Selene; Spindler, Stephen R.; Liu, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Summary While p53 activation has long been studied, the mechanisms by which its targets genes are restored to their pre-activation state are less clear. We report here that TAF1 phosphorylates p53 at Thr55, leading to dissociation of p53 from the p21 promoter and inactivation of transcription late in the DNA damage response. We further show that cellular ATP level might act as a molecular switch for Thr55 phosphorylation on the p21 promoter, indicating that TAF1 is a cellular ATP sensor. Upon DNA damage, cells undergo PARP-1-dependent ATP depletion, which is correlated with reduced TAF1 kinase activity and Thr55 phosphorylation, resulting in p21 activation. As cellular ATP levels recover, TAF1 is able to phosphorylate p53 on Thr55, which leads to dissociation of p53 from the p21 promoter. ChIP-sequencing analysis reveals p53 dissociates from promoters genome-wide as cells recover from DNA damage, suggesting the general nature of this mechanism. PMID:24289924

  17. The δ-Opioid Receptor Affects Epidermal Homeostasis via ERK-Dependent Inhibition of Transcription Factor POU2F3

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Christine; Bigliardi-Qi, Mei; Widmann, Christian; Bigliardi, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides and their receptors are present in human skin, and their importance for cutaneous homeostasis and during wound healing is increasingly appreciated. However, there is currently a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which their signaling modulates keratinocyte function. Here, we show that δ-opioid receptor (DOPr) activation inhibits proliferation of human keratinocytes, resulting in decreased epidermal thickness in an organotypic skin model. DOPr signaling markedly delayed induction of keratin intermediate filament (KRT10) during in vitro differentiation and abolished its induction in the organotypic skin model. This was accompanied by deregulation of involucrin (IVL), loricrin, and filaggrin. Analysis of the transcription factor POU2F3, which is involved in regulation of KRT10, IVL, and profilaggrin expression, revealed a DOPr-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent downregulation of this factor. We propose that DOPr signaling specifically activates the ERK 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway to regulate keratinocyte functions. Complementing our earlier studies in DOPr-deficient mice, these data suggest that DOPr activation in human keratinocytes profoundly influences epidermal morphogenesis and homeostasis. PMID:25178105

  18. Variable Transcriptional Regulation of the Human Aldosterone Synthase Gene Causes Salt-Dependent High Blood Pressure in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mopidevi, Brahmaraju; Kaw, Meenakshi K.; Puri, Nitin; Ponnala, Madhusudan; Jain, Sudhir; Rana, Anita; Keetha, Narsimha R.; Khuder, Sadik A.; Fiering, Steven N.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Background Aldosterone, synthesized in the adrenal cortex by the enzyme CYP11B2, induces positive sodium balance and predisposes to hypertension. Various investigators, using genomic DNA analyses, have linked −344T polymorphism in the hCYP11B2 gene to human hypertension. Human CYP11B2 gene promoter has three SNPs in linkage disequilibrium: T/A at −663, T/C at −470 and C/T at −344. Variants ACT occur together and form the haplotype-I while variants TTC constitute haplotype-II. We hypothesize that these SNPs, when present together, will lead to haplotype-dependent differences in the transcriptional regulation of the hCYP11B2 gene and affect blood pressure regulation. Methods and Results We evaluated differences in tissue expression, in vivo, and consequential effects on blood pressure stemming from the two haplotypes. Novel transgenic (TG) mice with the hCYP11B2 gene, targeted to the mouse HPRT locus, with either haplotype-II or I variant are used in the study. Our results show increased adrenal and renal expression of hCYP11B2 in TG mice with haplotype-I, as compared to mice with haplotype-II. Importantly, we observed increased baseline blood pressure in haplotype-I TG mice, an effect accentuated by a high-salt diet. Pathophysiological impact of elevated aldosterone was corroborated by our results showing up-regulation of proinflammatory markers in renal tissues from the TG mice with haplotype-I. Conclusions These findings characterize haplotype-dependent regulation of the hCYP11B2 gene where −344T serves as a reporter polymorphism and show that haplotype-I leads to increased expression of hCYP11B2, with permissive effects on blood pressure and inflammatory milieu. PMID:25504670

  19. Cis and trans activation of adenovirus IVa2 gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, V; Salzman, N P

    1985-01-01

    The transcriptional control region of the adenovirus IVa2 promoter was analyzed by cloning this promoter in front of a gene coding for bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CATase) and estimating levels of CATase and IVa2 promoter specific RNA synthesized after transfection. To produce detectable amounts of CATase with the IVa2 promoter, an enhancer has to be present in cis. In the absence of enhancer sequences, the adenovirus E1A gene can not stimulate CATase synthesis. When cells were transfected with plasmids containing enhancer sequences and various IVa2 mutant promoters upstream of the CAT gene, we observed that CATase activity was not reduced significantly even after deletion of all sequences upstream of the RNA initiation site. Synthesis of IVa2 specific RNA was dependent on plasmids containing an enhancer (SV40 72 bp repeat) that was present in cis. In the absence of enhancer sequences, co-transfection to provide the adenovirus E1A gene in trans also stimulated IVa2 RNA synthesis. When HeLa cells were transfected with various deletion mutants with an enhancer in cis it was seen that sequences -38 to -64 base pairs upstream of the RNA initiation site are necessary for efficient transcription. The E1A gene in trans and an enhancer in cis have an additive effect on RNA synthesis from both IVa2 and major late promoters. The basis for the conflicting results between transcription and CATase synthesis is discussed. Images PMID:2989786

  20. Prognosis of hormone-dependent breast cancers: implications of the presence of dysfunctional transcriptional networks activated by insulin via the immune transcription factor T-bet.

    PubMed

    McCune, Kasi; Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Thorat, Mangesh A; Nephew, Kenneth P; Badve, Sunil; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2010-01-15

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive breast cancers that co-express transcription factors GATA-3 and FOXA1 have a favorable prognosis. These transcription factors form an autoregulatory hormonal network that influences estrogen responsiveness and sensitivity to hormonal therapy. Disruption of this network may be a mechanism whereby ERalpha-positive breast cancers become resistant to therapy. The transcription factor T-bet is a negative regulator of GATA-3 in the immune system. In this study, we report that insulin increases the expression of T-bet in breast cancer cells, which correlates with reduced expression of GATA-3, FOXA1, and the ERalpha:FOXA1:GATA-3 target gene GREB-1. The effects of insulin on GATA-3 and FOXA1 could be recapitulated through overexpression of T-bet in MCF-7 cells (MCF-7-T-bet). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed reduced ERalpha binding to GREB-1 enhancer regions in MCF-7-T-bet cells and in insulin-treated MCF-7 cells. MCF-7-T-bet cells were resistant to tamoxifen in the presence of insulin and displayed prolonged extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT activation in response to epidermal growth factor treatment. ERalpha-positive cells with intrinsic tamoxifen resistance as well as MCF-7 cells with acquired tamoxifen and fulvestrant resistance expressed elevated levels of T-bet and/or reduced levels of FOXA1 and GATA-3. Analysis of publicly available databases revealed ERalpha-positive/T-bet-positive breast cancers expressing lower levels of FOXA1 (P = 0.0137) and GATA-3 (P = 0.0063) compared with ERalpha-positive/T-bet-negative breast cancers. Thus, T-bet expression in primary tumors and circulating insulin levels may serve as surrogate biomarkers to identify ERalpha-positive breast cancers with a dysfunctional hormonal network, enhanced growth factor signaling, and resistance to hormonal therapy.

  1. Hepatotoxicity of high affinity gapmer antisense oligonucleotides is mediated by RNase H1 dependent promiscuous reduction of very long pre-mRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Sebastien A.; Hart, Christopher E.; Cauntay, Patrick; Hsiao, Jill; Machemer, Todd; Katz, Melanie; Watt, Andy; Bui, Huynh-hoa; Younis, Husam; Sabripour, Mahyar; Freier, Susan M.; Hung, Gene; Dan, Amy; Prakash, T.P.; Seth, Punit P.; Swayze, Eric E.; Bennett, C. Frank; Crooke, Stanley T.; Henry, Scott P.

    2016-01-01

    High affinity antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing bicylic modifications (BNA) such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) designed to induce target RNA cleavage have been shown to have enhanced potency along with a higher propensity to cause hepatotoxicity. In order to understand the mechanism of this hepatotoxicity, transcriptional profiles were collected from the livers of mice treated with a panel of highly efficacious hepatotoxic or non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. We observed highly selective transcript knockdown in mice treated with non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs, while the levels of many unintended transcripts were reduced in mice treated with hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. This transcriptional signature was concurrent with on-target RNA reduction and preceded transaminitis. Remarkably, the mRNA transcripts commonly reduced by toxic LNA ASOs were generally not strongly associated with any particular biological process, cellular component or functional group. However, they tended to have much longer pre-mRNA transcripts. We also demonstrate that the off-target RNA knockdown and hepatotoxicity is attenuated by RNase H1 knockdown, and that this effect can be generalized to high affinity modifications beyond LNA. This suggests that for a certain set of ASOs containing high affinity modifications such as LNA, hepatotoxicity can occur as a result of unintended off-target RNase H1 dependent RNA degradation. PMID:26553810

  2. Alternative promoter usage and differential expression of multiple transcripts of mouse Prkar1a gene.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abdul Rouf; Azim, Shafquat; Tabish, Mohammad

    2011-11-01

    Prkar1a gene encodes regulatory type 1 alpha subunit (RIα) of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in mouse. The role of this gene has been implicated in Carney complex and many cancer types that suggest its involvement in physiological processes like cell cycle regulation, growth and/or proliferation. We have identified and sequenced partial cDNA clones encoding four alternatively spliced transcripts of mouse Prkar1a gene. These transcripts have alternate 5' UTR structure which results from splicing of three exons (designated as E1a, E1b, and E1c) to canonical exon 2. The designated transcripts T1, T2, T3, and T4 contain 5' UTR exons as E1c, E1a + E1b, E1a, and E1b, respectively. The transcript T1 corresponded to earlier reported transcript in GenBank. In silico study of genomic DNA sequence revealed three distinct promoter regions namely, P1, P2, and P3 upstream of the exons E1a, E1b, and E1c, respectively. P1 is non-CpG-related promoter but P2 and P3 are CpG-related promoters; however, all three are TATA less. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of all four transcripts in late postnatal stages; however, these were differentially regulated in early postnatal stages of 0.5 day, 3 day, and 15 day mice in different tissue types. Variations in expression of Prkar1a gene transcripts suggest their regulation from multiple promoters that respond to a variety of signals arising in or out of the cell in tissue and developmental stage-specific manner. PMID:21638026

  3. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Krömmelbein, Natascha; Wiebusch, Lüder; Schiedner, Gudrun; Büscher, Nicole; Sauer, Caroline; Florin, Luise; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Plachter, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP) is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production. PMID:26848680

  4. ALU repeats in promoters are position-dependent co-response elements (coRE) that enhance or repress transcription by dimeric and monomeric progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Britta M; Jambal, Purevsuren; Schittone, Stephanie A; Horwitz, Kathryn B

    2009-07-01

    We have conducted an in silico analysis of progesterone response elements (PRE) in progesterone receptor (PR) up-regulated promoters. Imperfect inverted repeats, direct repeats, and half-site PRE are widespread, not only in PR-regulated, but also in non-PR-regulated and random promoters. Few resemble the commonly used palindromic PRE with three nucleotide (nt) spacers. We speculated that PRE may be necessary but insufficient to control endogenous PR-dependent transcription. A search for PRE partners identified a highly conserved 234-nt sequence invariably located within 1-2 kb of transcription start sites. It resembles ALU repeats and contains binding sites for 11 transcription factors. The 234-nt sequence of the PR-regulated 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase promoter was cloned in the forward or reverse orientation in front of zero, one, or two inverted repeat PRE, and one or tandem PRE half-sites, driving luciferase. Under these conditions the 234-nt sequence functions as a co-response element (coRE). From the PRE or tandem half-sites, the reverse coRE is a strong activator of PR and glucocorticoid receptor-dependent transcription. The forward coRE is a powerful repressor. The prevalence of PRE half-sites in natural promoters suggested that PR monomers regulate transcription. Indeed, dimerization-domain mutant PR monomers were stronger transactivators than wild-type PR on PRE or tandem half-sites. This was repressed by the forward coRE. We propose that in natural promoters the coRE functions as a composite response element with imperfect PRE and half-sites to present variable, orientation-dependent transcription factors for interaction with nearby PR. PMID:19372234

  5. Lithium enhances CRTC oligomer formation and the interaction between the CREB coactivators CRTC and CBP--implications for CREB-dependent gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Annette; von der Heyde, Anne Sophie; Böer, Ulrike; Phu, Do Thanh; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Oetjen, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Lithium salts are important drugs to treat bipolar disorder. Previous work showed that lithium by enforcing the interaction between the transcription factor CREB and its coactivator CRTC1 enhanced cAMP-stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription. Both CREB and CRTC have been implicated in neuronal adaptation, which might underlie lithium's therapeutic action. In the present study the mechanisms of lithium action on cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription were further elucidated. Transient transfection assays revealed that all three CRTC isoforms conferred lithium responsiveness to CREB whereas their intrinsic transcriptional activities remained unchanged by lithium, suggesting a conformational change of CREB or CRTC by lithium. In in vitro protein-protein interaction assays lithium enhanced the interaction between CREB and both coactivators CRTC and CBP. Furthermore, lithium enforced the oligomerization of CRTC, a prerequisite for CREB interaction. For further evaluation it was investigated whether lithium competes with magnesium, which coordinates the conformation of the CREB basic region leucine zipper (bZip). Mutational analysis of the magnesium coordinating lysine-290 within the bZip, in vitro and intracellular interaction assays and luciferase reporter-gene assays revealed that the effect of lithium on the CREB-CRTC interaction or on the transcriptional activity, respectively, was not affected by the mutation, thus excluding a magnesium-lithium competition. However, the CREB-CRTC interaction was strongly increased in lysine-290-mutants thereby extending the CRTC-CREB interaction domain. Taken together the results exclude a competition between lithium and magnesium at the bZip, but suggest that lithium by enforcing the CRTC-oligomer formation and the interaction of CREB-CBP-CRTC enhances cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription.

  6. Adenovirus E1A-induced apoptosis elicits a steep decrease in the topoisomerase II alpha level during the latent phase.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Ohi, N; Arai, T; Nozaki, N; Kikuchi, A; Oda, K

    1995-02-16

    The human KB derivative cell line MA1, established by introduction of the adenovirus E1A 12S cDNA linked to the hormone-inducible promoter, elicits apoptosis upon treatment with dexamethasone. The cell lines partially refractory to apoptosis were established by introducing the expression plasmid for the adenovirus E1B 19k protein to MA1 cells. After induction of E1A in MA1 cells by dexamethasone, the level of p53 increased to about 10-fold within 24 h, and morphological changes characteristics of apoptosis began to be observed within 48 h. Most of cells were killed at 72 h releasing apoptotic bodies. The level of topoisomerase II alpha began to decrease steeply within 36 h, preceding the onset of DNA degradation while its mRNA level unchanged throughout the apoptotic process. E1B 19k protected the decrease in topoisomerase II alpha as well as DNA fragmentation depending on its expression levels. Topoisomerase II alpha is induced specifically at G2/M, and computer search revealed the presence of cyclin B type destruction box in topoisomerase II alpha. These results strongly suggest that E1A or E1A stabilized p53 induces apoptosis by targeting topoisomerase II alpha to the ubiquitination pathway and E1B 19k alleviates its action. PMID:7862442

  7. The Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR2 Is an Important Transcriptional Regulator of Abscisic Acid-Dependent Grape Berry Ripening Processes1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Philippe; Lecourieux, David; Kappel, Christian; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Cramer, Grant; Delrot, Serge; Lecourieux, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    In grape (Vitis vinifera), abscisic acid (ABA) accumulates during fruit ripening and is thought to play a pivotal role in this process, but the molecular basis of this control is poorly understood. This work characterizes ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR2 (VvABF2), a grape basic leucine zipper transcription factor belonging to a phylogenetic subgroup previously shown to be involved in ABA and abiotic stress signaling in other plant species. VvABF2 transcripts mainly accumulated in the berry, from the onset of ripening to the harvesting stage, and were up-regulated by ABA. Microarray analysis of transgenic grape cells overexpressing VvABF2 showed that this transcription factor up-regulates and/or modifies existing networks related to ABA responses. In addition, grape cells overexpressing VvABF2 exhibited enhanced responses to ABA treatment compared with control cells. Among the VvABF2-mediated responses highlighted in this study, the synthesis of phenolic compounds and cell wall softening were the most strongly affected. VvABF2 overexpression strongly increased the accumulation of stilbenes that play a role in plant defense and human health (resveratrol and piceid). In addition, the firmness of fruits from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants overexpressing VvABF2 was strongly reduced. These data indicate that VvABF2 is an important transcriptional regulator of ABA-dependent grape berry ripening. PMID:24276949

  8. Transcription-dependent nucleolar cap localization and possible nuclear function of DExH RNA helicase RHAU

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, Fumiko; Stadler, Michael; Chalupnikova, Katerina; Oakeley, Edward; Nagamine, Yoshikuni

    2008-04-01

    RHAU (RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element) is a DExH protein originally identified as a factor accelerating AU-rich element-mediated mRNA degradation. The discovery that RHAU is predominantly localized in the nucleus, despite mRNA degradation occurring in the cytoplasm, prompted us to consider the nuclear functions of RHAU. In HeLa cells, RHAU was found to be localized throughout the nucleoplasm with some concentrated in nuclear speckles. Transcriptional arrest altered the localization to nucleolar caps, where RHAU is closely localized with RNA helicases p68 and p72, suggesting that RHAU is involved in transcription-related RNA metabolism in the nucleus. To see whether RHAU affects global gene expression transcriptionally or posttranscriptionally, we performed microarray analysis using total RNA from RHAU-depleted HeLa cell lines, measuring both steady-state mRNA levels and mRNA half-lives by actinomycin D chase. There was no change in the half-lives of most transcripts whose steady-state levels were affected by RHAU knockdown, suggesting that these transcripts are subjected to transcriptional regulation. We propose that RHAU has a dual function, being involved in both the synthesis and degradation of mRNA in different subcellular compartments.

  9. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  10. Partition of E1A proteins between soluble and structural fractions of adenovirus-infected and -transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, P K; Flint, S J

    1986-01-01

    The partition of E1A proteins between soluble and structural framework fractions of human cells infected or transformed by subgroup C adenoviruses was investigated by using gentle cell fractionation conditions. A polyclonal antibody raised against a trpE-E1A fusion protein (K.R. Spindler, D.S.E. Rosser, and A. J. Berk, J. Virol. 132-141, 1984) synthesized in Escherichia coli was used to measure the steady-state levels of E1A proteins recovered in the various fractions by immunoblotting. The relative concentration of E1A proteins recovered in the soluble fraction of adenovirus type 2-infected cells was at least fivefold greater than the relative concentration in the corresponding fraction of transformed 293 cells. The observed distribution of E1A proteins was not altered by the sulfhydryl-blocking reagent N-ethylmaleimide. E1A proteins were recovered in nuclear matrix, chromatin, and cytoskeleton fractions after further fractionation of the structural framework fraction. However, the E1A protein species that could be identified by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis were not uniformly distributed among the subcellular fractions examined. The results obtained when fractionation was performed in the presence of the oxidation catalysts Cu2+ or (ortho-phenanthroline)2 Cu2+ indicate that E1A proteins can be efficiently cross-linked, via disulfide bonds, to the structural framework of both adenovirus-infected and adenovirus-transformed cells. Images PMID:3023654

  11. Retinoid X receptor:vitamin D3 receptor heterodimers promote stable preinitiation complex formation and direct 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-dependent cell-free transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, B D; Fondell, J D; Freedman, L P

    1997-01-01

    The numerous members of the steroid/nuclear hormone receptor superfamily act as direct transducers of circulating signals, such as steroids, thyroid hormone, and vitamin or lipid metabolites, and modulate the transcription of specific target genes, primarily as dimeric complexes. The receptors for 9-cis retinoic acid and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], RXR and VDR, respectively, as members of this superfamily, form a heterodimeric complex and bind cooperatively to vitamin D responsive elements (VDREs) to activate or repress the transcription of a multitude of genes which regulate a variety of physiological functions. To directly investigate RXR- and VDR-mediated transactivation, we developed a cell-free transcription system for 1,25(OH)2D3 signaling by utilizing crude nuclear extracts and a G-free cassette-based assay. Transcriptional enhancement in vitro was dependent on purified, exogenous RXR and VDR and was responsive to physiological concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3. We found that RXR and VDR transactivated selectively from VDRE-linked templates exclusively as a heterodimeric complex, since neither receptor alone enhanced transcription in vitro. By the addition of low concentrations of the anionic detergent Sarkosyl to limit cell-free transcription to a single round and the use of agarose gel mobility shift experiments to assay factor complex assembly, we observed that 1,25(OH)2D3 enhanced RXR:VDR-mediated stabilization or assembly of preinitiation complexes to effect transcriptional enhancement from VDRE-linked promoter-containing DNA. PMID:9121440

  12. Celiac disease T-cell epitopes from gamma-gliadins: immunoreactivity depends on the genome of origin, transcript frequency, and flanking protein variation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is caused by an uncontrolled immune response to gluten, a heterogeneous mixture of wheat storage proteins. The CD-toxicity of these proteins and their derived peptides is depending on the presence of specific T-cell epitopes (9-mer peptides; CD epitopes) that mediate the stimulation of HLA-DQ2/8 restricted T-cells. Next to the thoroughly characterized major T-cell epitopes derived from the α-gliadin fraction of gluten, γ-gliadin peptides are also known to stimulate T-cells of celiac disease patients. To pinpoint CD-toxic γ-gliadins in hexaploid bread wheat, we examined the variation of T-cell epitopes involved in CD in γ-gliadin transcripts of developing bread wheat grains. Results A detailed analysis of the genetic variation present in γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (T. aestivum, allo-hexaploid, carrying the A, B and D genome), together with genomic γ-gliadin sequences from ancestrally related diploid wheat species, enabled the assignment of sequence variants to one of the three genomic γ-gliadin loci, Gli-A1, Gli-B1 or Gli-D1. Almost half of the γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (49%) was assigned to locus Gli-D1. Transcripts from each locus differed in CD epitope content and composition. The Gli-D1 transcripts contained the highest frequency of canonical CD epitope cores (on average 10.1 per transcript) followed by the Gli-A1 transcripts (8.6) and the Gli-B1 transcripts (5.4). The natural variants of the major CD epitope from γ-gliadins, DQ2-γ-I, showed variation in their capacity to induce in vitro proliferation of a DQ2-γ-I specific and HLA-DQ2 restricted T-cell clone. Conclusions Evaluating the CD epitopes derived from γ-gliadins in their natural context of flanking protein variation, genome specificity and transcript frequency is a significant step towards accurate quantification of the CD toxicity of bread wheat. This approach can be used to predict relative levels of CD toxicity of individual wheat

  13. Activity-dependent Transcriptional Regulation of M-type (Kv7) K+ Channels by AKAP79/150-mediated NFAT Actions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Shapiro, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary M-type K+ channels, encoded by the KCNQ2-5 (Kv7) gene family, play key roles in regulation of neuronal excitability; however, less is known about the mechanisms controlling their transcriptional expression. Here, we discovered a novel mechanism regulating KCNQ2/3 transcriptional expression by neuronal activity in rodent neurons, involving activation of calcineurin and Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) transcription factors, orchestrated by A-kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP)79/150. The signal requires Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels and both local and global Ca2+ elevations. We postulate increased M-channel expression to act as a negative-feedback to suppress hyper-excitability of neurons, demonstrated by profoundly up-regulated KCNQ2/3 transcription in hippocampi from wild-type mice after drug-induced seizures, an effect nearly eliminated in AKAP150−/− mice. Thus, we suggest a distinct role of AKAP79/150 and the complex it organizes in activity-dependent M-channel transcription, which may potentially serve throughout the nervous system to limit over-excitability associated with disease states such as epilepsy. PMID:23259949

  14. Alteration of BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of RNA Pol III-dependent genes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qian; Shi, Ganggang; Zhang, Yanmei; Lu, Lei; Levy, Daniel; Zhong, Shuping

    2015-02-01

    Emerging evidence has indicated that alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Deregulation of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription enhances cellular Pol III gene production, leading to an increase in translational capacity to promote cell transformation and tumor formation. We have reported that alcohol intake increases Pol III gene transcription to promote cell transformation and tumor formation in vitro and in vivo. Studies revealed that tumor suppressors, pRb, p53, PTEN and Maf1 repress the transcription of Pol III genes. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor and its mutation is tightly related to breast cancer development. However, it is not clear whether BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of Pol III genes. At the present studies, we report that restoring BRCA1 in HCC 1937 cells, which is a BRCA1 deficient cell line, represses Pol III gene transcription. Expressing mutant or truncated BRCA1 in these cells does not affect the ability of repression on Pol III genes. Our analysis has demonstrated that alcohol induces Pol III gene transcription. More importantly, overexpression of BRCA1 in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells (MCF-7) decreases the induction of tRNA(Leu) and 5S rRNA genes by alcohol, whereas reduction of BRCA1 by its siRNA slightly increases the transcription of the class of genes. This suggests that BRCA1 is associated with alcohol-induced deregulation of Pol III genes. These studies for the first time demonstrate the role of BRCA1 in induction of Pol III genes by alcohol and uncover a novel mechanism of alcohol-associated breast cancer.

  15. The orphan nuclear receptor NUR77 regulates hormone-induced StAR transcription in Leydig cells through cooperation with Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I.

    PubMed

    Martin, Luc J; Boucher, Nicolas; Brousseau, Catherine; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2008-09-01

    Cholesterol transport in the mitochondrial membrane, an essential step of steroid biosynthesis, is mediated by a protein complex containing the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. The importance of this transporter is underscored by mutations in the human StAR gene that cause lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia, male pseudohermaphroditism, and adrenal insufficiency. StAR transcription in steroidogenic cells is hormonally regulated and involves several transcription factors. The nuclear receptor NUR77 is present in steroidogenic cells, and its expression is induced by hormones known to activate StAR expression. We have now established that StAR transcription in cAMP-stimulated Leydig cells requires de novo protein synthesis and involves NUR77. We found that cAMP-induced NUR77 expression precedes that of StAR both at the mRNA and protein levels in Leydig cells. In these cells, small interfering RNA-mediated NUR77 knockdown reduces cAMP-induced StAR expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed a cAMP-dependent increase in NUR77 recruitment to the proximal StAR promoter, whereas transient transfections in MA-10 Leydig cells confirmed that NUR77 can activate the StAR promoter and that this requires an element located at -95 bp. cAMP-induced StAR and NUR77 expression in Leydig cells was found to require a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK)-dependent signaling pathway. Consistent with this, we show that within the testis, CaMKI is specifically expressed in Leydig cells. Finally, we report that CaMKI transcriptionally cooperates with NUR77, but not steroidogenic factor 1, to further enhance StAR promoter activity in Leydig cells. All together, our results implicate NUR77 as a mediator of cAMP action on StAR transcription in steroidogenic Leydig cells and identify a role for CaMKI in this process.

  16. Involvement of PpDof1 transcriptional repressor in the nutrient condition-dependent growth control of protonemal filaments in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Takumi; Ishida, Tetsuya; Tabei, Nobumitsu; Shigyo, Mikao; Konishi, Mineko; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2012-05-01

    In higher plants, the Dof transcription factors that harbour a conserved plant-specific DNA-binding domain function in the regulation of diverse biological processes that are unique to plants. Although these factors are present in both higher and lower plants, they have not yet been characterized in lower plants. Here six genes encoding Dof transcription factors in the moss Physcomitrella patens are characterized and two of these genes, PpDof1 and PpDof2, are functionally analysed. The targeted disruption of PpDof1 caused delayed or reduced gametophore formation, accompanied by an effect on development of the caulonema from the chloronema. Furthermore, the ppdof1 disruptants were found to form smaller colonies with a reduced frequency of branching of protonemal filaments, depending on the nutrients in the media. Most of these phenotypes were not apparent in the ppdof2 disruptant, although the ppdof2 disruptants also formed smaller colonies on a particular medium. Transcriptional repressor activity of PpDof1 and PpDof2 and modified expression of a number of genes in the ppdof disruptant lines were also shown. These results thus suggest that the PpDof1 transcriptional repressor has a role in controlling nutrient-dependent filament growth.

  17. Involvement of PpDof1 transcriptional repressor in the nutrient condition-dependent growth control of protonemal filaments in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Takumi; Ishida, Tetsuya; Tabei, Nobumitsu; Shigyo, Mikao; Konishi, Mineko; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    In higher plants, the Dof transcription factors that harbour a conserved plant-specific DNA-binding domain function in the regulation of diverse biological processes that are unique to plants. Although these factors are present in both higher and lower plants, they have not yet been characterized in lower plants. Here six genes encoding Dof transcription factors in the moss Physcomitrella patens are characterized and two of these genes, PpDof1 and PpDof2, are functionally analysed. The targeted disruption of PpDof1 caused delayed or reduced gametophore formation, accompanied by an effect on development of the caulonema from the chloronema. Furthermore, the ppdof1 disruptants were found to form smaller colonies with a reduced frequency of branching of protonemal filaments, depending on the nutrients in the media. Most of these phenotypes were not apparent in the ppdof2 disruptant, although the ppdof2 disruptants also formed smaller colonies on a particular medium. Transcriptional repressor activity of PpDof1 and PpDof2 and modified expression of a number of genes in the ppdof disruptant lines were also shown. These results thus suggest that the PpDof1 transcriptional repressor has a role in controlling nutrient-dependent filament growth. PMID:22345635

  18. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  19. Transcription of fractionated mammalian chromatin by mammalian ribonucleic acid polymerase. Demonstration of temperature-dependent rifampicin-resistant initiation sites in euchromatin deoxyribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Chesterton, C. James; Coupar, Barbara E. H.; Butterworth, Peter H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The chromatin fractionation method of Frenster et al. (1963) as modified by Leake et al. (1972) was used to prepare fragments of euchromatin from rat liver nuclei. These remain soluble in 5mm-MgCl2, and contain DNA of maximum mol.wt. 1×106–2×106. The fragments were separated from condensable chromatin on a sucrose gradient. Euchromatin contains endogenous DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and most of the nascent RNA labelled in vivo or in vitro. Euchromatin fragments allow initiation of transcription by added purified rat liver form-B RNA polymerase and contain temperature-dependent rifampicin-resistant initiation sites for the form-B enzyme. These findings indicate that transcription of the euchromatin regions of interphase chromosomes is not initiated in condensed chromatin, but is initiated within the euchromatin stretches. Condensable chromatin also contains most of these activities, but is not associated with nascent RNA. PMID:4464858

  20. p53 and Cell Cycle Dependent Transcription of kinesin family member 23 (KIF23) Is Controlled Via a CHR Promoter Element Bound by DREAM and MMB Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Quaas, Marianne; Hoffmann, Saskia; Knörck, Arne; Gumhold, Catalina; Rother, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule-dependent molecular motor KIF23 (Kinesin family member 23) is one of two components of the centralspindlin complex assembled during late stages of mitosis. Formation of this complex is known as an essential step for cytokinesis. Here, we identified KIF23 as a new transcriptional target gene of the tumor suppressor protein p53. We showed that p53 reduces expression of KIF23 on the mRNA as well as the protein level in different cell types. Promoter reporter assays revealed that this repression results from downregulation of KIF23 promoter activity. CDK inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 was shown to be necessary to mediate p53-dependent repression. Furthermore, we identified the highly conserved cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) in the KIF23 promoter to be strictly required for p53-dependent repression as well as for cell cycle-dependent expression of KIF23. Cell cycle- and p53-dependent regulation of KIF23 appeared to be controlled by differential binding of DREAM and MMB complexes to the CHR element. With this study, we describe a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation of KIF23. Considering the strongly supporting function of KIF23 in cytokinesis, its p53-dependent repression may contribute to the prevention of uncontrolled cell growth. PMID:23650552

  1. p53 and cell cycle dependent transcription of kinesin family member 23 (KIF23) is controlled via a CHR promoter element bound by DREAM and MMB complexes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin; Grundke, Inga; Sohr, Sindy; Quaas, Marianne; Hoffmann, Saskia; Knörck, Arne; Gumhold, Catalina; Rother, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule-dependent molecular motor KIF23 (Kinesin family member 23) is one of two components of the centralspindlin complex assembled during late stages of mitosis. Formation of this complex is known as an essential step for cytokinesis. Here, we identified KIF23 as a new transcriptional target gene of the tumor suppressor protein p53. We showed that p53 reduces expression of KIF23 on the mRNA as well as the protein level in different cell types. Promoter reporter assays revealed that this repression results from downregulation of KIF23 promoter activity. CDK inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) was shown to be necessary to mediate p53-dependent repression. Furthermore, we identified the highly conserved cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) in the KIF23 promoter to be strictly required for p53-dependent repression as well as for cell cycle-dependent expression of KIF23. Cell cycle- and p53-dependent regulation of KIF23 appeared to be controlled by differential binding of DREAM and MMB complexes to the CHR element. With this study, we describe a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation of KIF23. Considering the strongly supporting function of KIF23 in cytokinesis, its p53-dependent repression may contribute to the prevention of uncontrolled cell growth.

  2. Frizzled-4 C-terminus Distal to KTXXXW Motif is Essential for Normal Dishevelled Recruitment and Norrin-stimulated Activation of Lef/Tcf-dependent Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Milly S.; Gao, Shujuan; Malbon, Craig C.; Wang, Hsien-yu

    2016-01-01

    The carboxy (C)-termini of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) dictate essential functions. The KTXXXW motif C-terminus of Frizzleds (FZD) has been implicated in recruitment of Dishevelled (DVL). Through study of FZD4 and its associated ligand Norrin, we report that a minimum of three residues distal to the KTXXXW motif in the C-terminal tail of Frizzled-4 are essential for DVL recruitment and robust Lef/Tcf-dependent transcriptional activation in response to Norrin. PMID:27096005

  3. Frizzled-4 C-terminus Distal to KTXXXW Motif is Essential for Normal Dishevelled Recruitment and Norrin-stimulated Activation of Lef/Tcf-dependent Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Bertalovitz, Alexander C; Pau, Milly S; Gao, Shujuan; Malbon, Craig C; Wang, Hsien-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The carboxy (C)-termini of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) dictate essential functions. The KTXXXW motif C-terminus of Frizzleds (FZD) has been implicated in recruitment of Dishevelled (DVL). Through study of FZD4 and its associated ligand Norrin, we report that a minimum of three residues distal to the KTXXXW motif in the C-terminal tail of Frizzled-4 are essential for DVL recruitment and robust Lef/Tcf-dependent transcriptional activation in response to Norrin. PMID:27096005

  4. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by Cockayne syndrome protein B and NAP1-like histone chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Iltaeg; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Lake, Robert J; Basheer, Asjad; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2013-04-01

    The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB) protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome--a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB-binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome. PMID:23637612

  5. Human lymphocytes express the transcriptional regulator, Wilms tumor 1: The role of WT1 in mediating nitric oxide-dependent repression of lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Davoine, Francis; Adamko, Darryl J.; Moqbel, Redwan; Befus, A. Dean

    2007-11-16

    The inhibitory roles of nitric oxide (NO) in T cell proliferation have been observed and studied extensively over the last two decades. Despite efforts, the fundamental pathway by which NO exerts its inhibitory actions remains to be elucidated although recent evidence suggests that the transcription factor Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) may be important. WT1 has been linked to numerous developmental pathways in particular nephrogenesis. Due to its roles in development and cell proliferation, polymorphisms within the WT1 gene can result in malignancies such as leukemia and Wilms tumor. WT1 functions as a transcriptional regulator and its activity is controlled through phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). PKA-dependent WT1 phosphorylation results in translocation of WT1 from the nucleus to the cytosol, a process that interferes with WT1 transcriptional activities. In the current study we demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in human lymphocytes. Using the proliferative compound PHA we induced T cell proliferation and growth correlated with an increase in the expression of WT1 measured by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblot. Co-stimulation with the NO donor SNOG at concentrations of 0, 100, 300 and 600 {mu}M reduced in a concentration dependent way the PHA-induced upregulation of WT1 that correlated with a reduction in T cell proliferation. We conclude that WT1 might be an important component of the NO-dependent regulation of T lymphocyte proliferation and potential function.

  6. Iron and FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR-dependent regulation of proteins and genes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    PubMed

    Mai, Hans-Jörg; Lindermayr, Christian; von Toerne, Christine; Fink-Straube, Claudia; Durner, Jörg; Bauer, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and iron deficiency requires a variety of physiological adaptations. FIT (FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR) is essential for the regulation of iron uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. FIT is transcriptionally as well as posttranscriptionally regulated in response to iron supply. To investigate to which extent posttranscriptional regulation upon iron deficiency applies to proteins and to determine the dependency on FIT, we performed a parallel proteomic and transcriptomic study with wild-type, a fit knock-out mutant, and a FIT overexpressing Arabidopsis line. Among 92 proteins differentially regulated by iron and/or FIT, we identified 30 proteins, which displayed differential regulation at the transcriptional level. Eleven protein spots were regulated in at least one of the data points even contrary to the respective genes dependent on FIT. We found ten proteins in at least two forms. The analysis of functional classification showed enriched GO terms among the posttranscriptionally regulated genes and of proteins, that were downregulated or absent in the fit knock-out mutant. Taken together, we provide evidence for iron and FIT-dependent posttranscriptional regulation in iron homeostasis in A. thaliana.

  7. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling by Cockayne Syndrome Protein B and NAP1-Like Histone Chaperones Is Required for Efficient Transcription-Coupled DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Robert J.; Basheer, Asjad; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB) protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome—a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP–dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP–dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB–binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP–dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome. PMID:23637612

  8. Histidine switch controlling pH-dependent protein folding and DNA binding in a transcription factor at the core of synthetic network devices.

    PubMed

    Deochand, D K; Perera, I C; Crochet, R B; Gilbert, N C; Newcomer, M E; Grove, A

    2016-07-19

    Therapeutic strategies have been reported that depend on synthetic network devices in which a urate-sensing transcriptional regulator detects pathological levels of urate and triggers production or release of urate oxidase. The transcription factor involved, HucR, is a member of the multiple antibiotic resistance (MarR) protein family. We show that protonation of stacked histidine residues at the pivot point of long helices that form the scaffold of the dimer interface leads to reversible formation of a molten globule state and significantly attenuated DNA binding at physiological temperatures. We also show that binding of urate to symmetrical sites in each protein lobe is communicated via the dimer interface. This is the first demonstration of regulation of a MarR family transcription factor by pH-dependent interconversion between a molten globule and a compact folded state. Our data further suggest that HucR may be utilized in synthetic devices that depend on detection of pH changes. PMID:27282811

  9. Transcription of the Tollip gene is elevated in intestinal epithelial cells through impaired O-GlcNAcylation-dependent nuclear translocation of the negative regulator Elf-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sugi, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kyoko; Nakano, Kou; Hosono, Akira; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Transcriptional activation of the Tollitip gene is higher in IECs than in monocytes. {yields} Nt -194/-186 region acts as a cis-element and is recognized by Elf-1. {yields} Elf-1 suppresses Tollip gene transcription in monocytes but not in IECs. {yields} O-GlcNAc modification is necessary for nuclear translocation of Elf-1. {yields} O-GlcNAcylation-dependent nuclear translocation of Elf-1 is impaired in IECs. -- Abstract: Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) must be tolerant of the large number of commensal bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract to avoid excessive inflammatory reactions. Toll-interacting protein (Tollip), a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signaling, is known to be expressed at high levels in IECs, and to thereby contribute to the hyporesponsiveness of IECs to commensals. In this study, we analyzed the underlying mechanisms for elevated transcription of the Tollip gene in IECs using a human IEC line, Caco-2, and a human monocyte line, THP-1, as a control. Elf-1 was identified as a transcription factor that negatively regulates Tollip gene expression. The transcription factor Elf-1 was localized in the nucleus by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification, whereas the unmodified form was detected only in the cytoplasm. Comparison of Caco-2 and THP-1 cells revealed that O-GlcNAc modification of Elf-1 was significantly lower in IECs than in monocytes. Collectively, the results indicate that insufficient O-GlcNAc modification prevents Elf-1-mediated transcriptional repression and thereby upregulates Tollip gene expression in IECs.

  10. Serum-dependent transcriptional networks identify distinct functional roles for H-Ras and N-Ras during initial stages of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we compared transcriptional profiles corresponding to the initial cell cycle stages of mouse fibroblasts lacking the small GTPases H-Ras and/or N-Ras with those of matching, wild-type controls. Results Serum-starved wild-type and knockout ras fibroblasts had very similar transcriptional profiles, indicating that H-Ras and N-Ras do not significantly control transcriptional responses to serum deprivation stress. In contrast, genomic disruption of H-ras or N-ras, individually or in combination, determined specific differential gene expression profiles in response to post-starvation stimulation with serum for 1 hour (G0/G1 transition) or 8 hours (mid-G1 progression). The absence of N-Ras caused significantly higher changes than the absence of H-Ras in the wave of transcriptional activation linked to G0/G1 transition. In contrast, the absence of H-Ras affected the profile of the transcriptional wave detected during G1 progression more strongly than did the absence of N-Ras. H-Ras was predominantly functionally associated with growth and proliferation, whereas N-Ras had a closer link to the regulation of development, the cell cycle, immunomodulation and apoptosis. Mechanistic analysis indicated that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (Stat1) mediates the regulatory effect of N-Ras on defense and immunity, whereas the pro-apoptotic effects of N-Ras are mediated through ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Conclusions Our observations confirm the notion of an absolute requirement for different peaks of Ras activity during the initial stages of the cell cycle and document the functional specificity of H-Ras and N-Ras during those processes. PMID:19895680

  11. Inhibition of Different Histone Acetyltransferases (HATs) Uncovers Transcription-Dependent and -Independent Acetylation-Mediated Mechanisms in Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merschbaecher, Katja; Hatko, Lucyna; Folz, Jennifer; Mueller, Uli

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of histones changes the efficiency of the transcription processes and thus contributes to the formation of long-term memory (LTM). In our comparative study, we used two inhibitors to characterize the contribution of different histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to appetitive associative learning in the honeybee. For one we applied…

  12. Drosophila melanogaster cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal protein essential for fly development

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski-Nimmerfall, Elisabeth; Schähs, Philipp; Maresch, Daniel; Rendic, Dubravko; Krämer, Helmut; Mach, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal glycoprotein implicated in cellular growth and differentiation. The genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster encodes a putative orthologue (dCREG), suggesting evolutionarily conserved physiological functions of this protein. In D. melanogaster S2 cells, dCREG was found to localize in lysosomes. Further studies revealed that intracellular dCREG is subject of proteolytic maturation. Processing and turnover could be substantially reduced by RNAi-mediated silencing of cathepsin L. In contrast to mammalian cells, lysosomal delivery of dCREG does not depend on its carbohydrate moiety. Furthermore, depletion of the putative D. melanogaster lysosomal sorting receptor lysosomal enzyme receptor protein did not compromise cellular retention of dCREG. We also investigated the developmental consequences of dCREG ablation in whole D. melanogaster flies. Ubiquitous depletion of dCREG proved lethal at the late pupal stage once a knock-down efficiency of > 95% was achieved. These results demonstrate that dCREG is essential for proper completion of fly development. PMID:25173815

  13. Frequency-Dependent Regulation of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β by Pulsatile Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Is Mediated by Functional Antagonism of bZIP Transcription Factors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Xu, Shuyun; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Carroll, Rona S.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2010-01-01

    Oscillatory synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), under the control of pulsatile hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), is essential for normal reproductive development and fertility. The molecular mechanisms by which various patterns of pulsatile GnRH regulate gonadotrope responsiveness remain poorly understood. In contrast to the α and LHβ subunit genes, FSHβ subunit transcription is preferentially stimulated at low rather than high frequencies of pulsatile GnRH. In this study, mutation of a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) within the FSHβ promoter resulted in the loss of preferential GnRH stimulation at low pulse frequencies. We hypothesized that high GnRH pulse frequencies might stimulate a transcriptional repressor(s) to attenuate the action of CRE binding protein (CREB) and show that inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) fulfills such a role. ICER was not detected under basal conditions, but pulsatile GnRH stimulated ICER to a greater extent at high than at low pulse frequencies. ICER binds to the FSHβ CRE site to reduce CREB occupation and abrogates both maximal GnRH stimulation and GnRH pulse frequency-dependent effects on FSHβ transcription. These data suggest that ICER production antagonizes the stimulatory action of CREB to attenuate FSHβ transcription at high GnRH pulse frequencies, thereby playing a critical role in regulating cyclic reproductive function. PMID:20008557

  14. Transcriptomic Profiling and H3K27me3 Distribution Reveal Both Demethylase-Dependent and Independent Regulation of Developmental Gene Transcription in Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jin Choul; Kim, Sun Hwa; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The removal of histone H3 trimethylation at lysine residue 27 (H3K27me3) plays a critical role in the transcriptional initiation of developmental genes. The H3K27me3-specific KDM6 demethylases JMJD3 and UTX are responsible for the transcriptional initiation of various developmental genes, but some genes are expressed in a KDM6 demethylase-independent manner. To address the role of H3K27me3 in the retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation of the human carcinoma NCCIT cell line, we inhibited JMJD3 and UTX using the H3K27me3 demethylase inhibitor GSK-J4. The commitment of JMJD3/UTX-inhibited cells to a specific fate was delayed, and transcriptome profiling also revealed the differential expression of genes related to cell fate specification in demethylase-inactivated cells; the expression levels of RA metabolism and HOX family genes significantly decreased. We observed a weak correlation between H3K27me3 enrichment and transcriptional repression in the control and JMJD/UTX-inhibited cells, except for a few sets of developmental genes that are indispensable for cell fate specification. Taken together, these results provide the H3K27me3 landscape of a differentiating cell line and suggest that both demethylase-dependent and demethylase-independent transcriptional regulation play a role in early differentiation and developmental gene expression activated by H3K27me3 demethylation. PMID:26263556

  15. 11 CFR 300.61 - Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)). No person described in 11 CFR 300.60 shall solicit, receive, direct... any Federal election activity as defined in 11 CFR 100.24, unless the amounts consist of Federal funds... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A))....

  16. Auxin-Dependent Cell Cycle Reactivation through Transcriptional Regulation of Arabidopsis E2Fa by Lateral Organ Boundary Proteins[W

    PubMed Central

    Berckmans, Barbara; Vassileva, Valya; Schmid, Stephan P.C.; Maes, Sara; Parizot, Boris; Naramoto, Satoshi; Magyar, Zoltan; Kamei, Claire Lessa Alvim; Koncz, Csaba; Bögre, Laszlo; Persiau, Geert; De Jaeger, Geert; Friml, Jiří; Simon, Rüdiger; Beeckman, Tom; De Veylder, Lieven

    2011-01-01

    Multicellular organisms depend on cell production, cell fate specification, and correct patterning to shape their adult body. In plants, auxin plays a prominent role in the timely coordination of these different cellular processes. A well-studied example is lateral root initiation, in which auxin triggers founder cell specification and cell cycle activation of xylem pole–positioned pericycle cells. Here, we report that the E2Fa transcription factor of Arabidopsis thaliana is an essential component that regulates the asymmetric cell division marking lateral root initiation. Moreover, we demonstrate that E2Fa expression is regulated by the LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARY DOMAIN18/LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARY DOMAIN33 (LBD18/LBD33) dimer that is, in turn, regulated by the auxin signaling pathway. LBD18/LBD33 mediates lateral root organogenesis through E2Fa transcriptional activation, whereas E2Fa expression under control of the LBD18 promoter eliminates the need for LBD18. Besides lateral root initiation, vascular patterning is disrupted in E2Fa knockout plants, similarly as it is affected in auxin signaling and lbd mutants, indicating that the transcriptional induction of E2Fa through LBDs represents a general mechanism for auxin-dependent cell cycle activation. Our data illustrate how a conserved mechanism driving cell cycle entry has been adapted evolutionarily to connect auxin signaling with control of processes determining plant architecture. PMID:22003076

  17. Caveolin-1-mediated suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 via a beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcriptional mechanism reduced prostaglandin E2 production and survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Diego A; Tapia, Julio C; Fernandez, Jaime G; Torres, Vicente A; Muñoz, Nicolas; Galleguillos, Daniela; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2009-04-01

    Augmented expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and enhanced production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) are associated with increased tumor cell survival and malignancy. Caveolin-1 is a scaffold protein that has been proposed to function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer cells, although mechanisms underlying this ability remain controversial. Intriguingly, the possibility that caveolin-1 regulates the expression of COX-2 has not been explored. Here we show that augmented caveolin-1 expression in cells with low basal levels of this protein, such as human colon cancer (HT29, DLD-1), breast cancer (ZR75), and embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells reduced COX-2 mRNA and protein levels and beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef and COX-2 gene reporter activity, as well as the production of PGE(2) and cell proliferation. Moreover, COX-2 overexpression or PGE(2) supplementation increased levels of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin by a transcriptional mechanism, as determined by PCR analysis, survivin gene reporter assays and Western blotting. Furthermore, addition of PGE(2) to the medium prevented effects attributed to caveolin-1-mediated inhibition of beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription. Finally, PGE(2) reduced the coimmunoprecipitation of caveolin-1 with beta-catenin and their colocalization at the plasma membrane. Thus, by reducing COX-2 expression, caveolin-1 interrupts a feedback amplification loop involving PGE(2)-induced signaling events linked to beta-catenin/Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription of tumor survival genes including cox-2 itself and survivin. PMID:19244345

  18. Nuclear Perilipin 5 integrates lipid droplet lipolysis with PGC-1α/SIRT1-dependent transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Montejano, Violeta I; Saxena, Geetu; Kusminski, Christine M; Yang, Chaofeng; McAfee, John L; Hahner, Lisa; Hoch, Kathleen; Dubinsky, William; Narkar, Vihang A; Bickel, Perry E

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctional cellular lipid metabolism contributes to common chronic human diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, fatty liver disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy. How cells balance lipid storage and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is poorly understood. Here we identify the lipid droplet protein Perilipin 5 as a catecholamine-triggered interaction partner of PGC-1α. We report that during catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis, Perilipin 5 is phosphorylated by protein kinase A and forms transcriptional complexes with PGC-1α and SIRT1 in the nucleus. Perilipin 5 promotes PGC-1α co-activator function by disinhibiting SIRT1 deacetylase activity. We show by gain-and-loss of function studies in cells that nuclear Perilipin 5 promotes transcription of genes that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function. We propose that Perilipin 5 is an important molecular link that couples the coordinated catecholamine activation of the PKA pathway and of lipid droplet lipolysis with transcriptional regulation to promote efficient fatty acid catabolism and prevent mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27554864

  19. Temperature-Dependent Model of Multi-step Transcription Initiation in Escherichia coli Based on Live Single-Cell Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Tran, Huy; Ribeiro, Andre S.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription kinetics is limited by its initiation steps, which differ between promoters and with intra- and extracellular conditions. Regulation of these steps allows tuning both the rate and stochasticity of RNA production. We used time-lapse, single-RNA microscopy measurements in live Escherichia coli to study how the rate-limiting steps in initiation of the Plac/ara-1 promoter change with temperature and induction scheme. For this, we compared detailed stochastic models fit to the empirical data in maximum likelihood sense using statistical methods. Using this analysis, we found that temperature affects the rate limiting steps unequally, as nonlinear changes in the closed complex formation suffice to explain the differences in transcription dynamics between conditions. Meanwhile, a similar analysis of the PtetA promoter revealed that it has a different rate limiting step configuration, with temperature regulating different steps. Finally, we used the derived models to explore a possible cause for why the identified steps are preferred as the main cause for behavior modifications with temperature: we find that transcription dynamics is either insensitive or responds reciprocally to changes in the other steps. Our results suggests that different promoters employ different rate limiting step patterns that control not only their rate and variability, but also their sensitivity to environmental changes. PMID:27792724

  20. Regulation of epithelial cell polarity by PAR-3 depends on Girdin transcription and Girdin-Gαi3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazunori; Kakuwa, Taku; Akimoto, Kazunori; Koga, Hisashi; Ohno, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial apicobasal polarity has fundamental roles in epithelial physiology and morphogenesis. The PAR complex, comprising PAR-3, PAR-6 and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), is involved in determining cell polarity in various biological contexts, including in epithelial cells. However, it is not fully understood how the PAR complex induces apicobasal polarity. In this study, we found that PAR-3 regulates the protein expression of Girdin (also known as GIV or CCDC88A), a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) for heterotrimeric Gαi subunits, at the transcriptional level by cooperating with the AP-2 transcription factor. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-3 physically interacts with Girdin, and show that Girdin, together with the Gαi3 (also known as GNAI3), controls tight junction formation, apical domain development and actin organization downstream of PAR-3. Taken together, our findings suggest that transcriptional upregulation of Girdin expression and Girdin-Gαi3 signaling play crucial roles in regulating epithelial apicobasal polarity through the PAR complex.

  1. Nuclear Perilipin 5 integrates lipid droplet lipolysis with PGC-1α/SIRT1-dependent transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo-Montejano, Violeta I.; Saxena, Geetu; Kusminski, Christine M.; Yang, Chaofeng; McAfee, John L.; Hahner, Lisa; Hoch, Kathleen; Dubinsky, William; Narkar, Vihang A.; Bickel, Perry E.

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctional cellular lipid metabolism contributes to common chronic human diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, fatty liver disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy. How cells balance lipid storage and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is poorly understood. Here we identify the lipid droplet protein Perilipin 5 as a catecholamine-triggered interaction partner of PGC-1α. We report that during catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis, Perilipin 5 is phosphorylated by protein kinase A and forms transcriptional complexes with PGC-1α and SIRT1 in the nucleus. Perilipin 5 promotes PGC-1α co-activator function by disinhibiting SIRT1 deacetylase activity. We show by gain-and-loss of function studies in cells that nuclear Perilipin 5 promotes transcription of genes that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function. We propose that Perilipin 5 is an important molecular link that couples the coordinated catecholamine activation of the PKA pathway and of lipid droplet lipolysis with transcriptional regulation to promote efficient fatty acid catabolism and prevent mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27554864

  2. Regulation of epithelial cell polarity by PAR-3 depends on Girdin transcription and Girdin-Gαi3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazunori; Kakuwa, Taku; Akimoto, Kazunori; Koga, Hisashi; Ohno, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial apicobasal polarity has fundamental roles in epithelial physiology and morphogenesis. The PAR complex, comprising PAR-3, PAR-6 and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), is involved in determining cell polarity in various biological contexts, including in epithelial cells. However, it is not fully understood how the PAR complex induces apicobasal polarity. In this study, we found that PAR-3 regulates the protein expression of Girdin (also known as GIV or CCDC88A), a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) for heterotrimeric Gαi subunits, at the transcriptional level by cooperating with the AP-2 transcription factor. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-3 physically interacts with Girdin, and show that Girdin, together with the Gαi3 (also known as GNAI3), controls tight junction formation, apical domain development and actin organization downstream of PAR-3. Taken together, our findings suggest that transcriptional upregulation of Girdin expression and Girdin-Gαi3 signaling play crucial roles in regulating epithelial apicobasal polarity through the PAR complex. PMID:25977476

  3. Hepatic Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs: High Promoter Conservation and Dynamic, Sex-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation by Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Melia, Tisha; Hao, Pengying; Yilmaz, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are increasingly recognized as key chromatin regulators, yet few studies have characterized lincRNAs in a single tissue under diverse conditions. Here, we analyzed 45 mouse liver RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data sets collected under diverse conditions to systematically characterize 4,961 liver lincRNAs, 59% of them novel, with regard to gene structures, species conservation, chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, and epigenetic states. To investigate the potential for functionality, we focused on the responses of the liver lincRNAs to growth hormone stimulation, which imparts clinically relevant sex differences to hepatic metabolism and liver disease susceptibility. Sex-biased expression characterized 247 liver lincRNAs, with many being nuclear RNA enriched and regulated by growth hormone. The sex-biased lincRNA genes are enriched for nearby and correspondingly sex-biased accessible chromatin regions, as well as sex-biased binding sites for growth hormone-regulated transcriptional activators (STAT5, hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 [HNF6], FOXA1, and FOXA2) and transcriptional repressors (CUX2 and BCL6). Repression of female-specific lincRNAs in male liver, but not that of male-specific lincRNAs in female liver, was associated with enrichment of H3K27me3-associated inactive states and poised (bivalent) enhancer states. Strikingly, we found that liver-specific lincRNA gene promoters are more highly species conserved and have a significantly higher frequency of proximal binding by liver transcription factors than liver-specific protein-coding gene promoters. Orthologs for many liver lincRNAs were identified in one or more supraprimates, including two rat lincRNAs showing the same growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased expression as their mouse counterparts. This integrative analysis of liver lincRNA chromatin states, transcription factor occupancy, and growth hormone regulation provides novel insights into the

  4. Melanin biosynthesis in the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus depends on two mitogen-activated protein kinases, Chk1 and Mps1, and the transcription factor Cmr1.

    PubMed

    Eliahu, Noa; Igbaria, Aeid; Rose, Mark S; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Lev, Sophie

    2007-03-01

    The maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus requires two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Chk1 and Mps1, to produce normal pigmentation. Young colonies of mps1 and chk1 deletion mutants have a white and autolytic appearance, which was partially rescued by a hyperosmotic environment. We isolated the transcription factor Cmr1, an ortholog of Colletotrichum lagenarium Cmr1 and Magnaporthe grisea Pig1, which regulates melanin biosynthesis in C. heterostrophus. Deletion of CMR1 in C. heterostrophus resulted in mutants that lacked dark pigmentation and acquired an orange-pink color. In cmr1 deletion strains the expression of putative scytalone dehydratase (SCD1) and hydroxynaphthalene reductase (BRN1 and BRN2) genes involved in melanin biosynthesis was undetectable, whereas expression of PKS18, encoding a polyketide synthase, was only moderately reduced. In chk1 and mps1 mutants expression of PKS18, SCD1, BRN1, BRN2, and the transcription factor CMR1 itself was very low in young colonies, slightly up-regulated in aging colonies, and significantly induced in hyperosmotic conditions, compared to invariably high expression in the wild type. These findings indicate that two MAPKs, Chk1 and Mps1, affect Cmr1 at the transcriptional level and this influence is partially overridden in stress conditions including aging culture and hyperosmotic environment. Surprisingly, we found that the CMR1 gene was transcribed in both sense and antisense directions, apparently producing mRNA as well as a long noncoding RNA transcript. Expression of the antisense CMR1 was also Chk1 and Mps1 dependent. Analysis of chromosomal location of the melanin biosynthesis genes in C. heterostrophus resulted in identification of a small gene cluster comprising BRN1, CMR1, and PKS18. Since expression of all three genes depends on Chk1 and Mps1 MAPKs, we suggest their possible epigenetic regulation. PMID:17237364

  5. Regulation of human papillomavirus type 31 gene expression during the differentiation-dependent life cycle through histone modifications and transcription factor binding.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Tonia R; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2008-05-10

    The life cycle of high-risk human papillomaviruses is linked to epithelial differentiation with virion production restricted to highly differentiated suprabasal cells. Two major viral promoters direct high-risk HPV gene expression and their activities are dependent upon differentiation. The early promoter controls initiation of transcripts at sites upstream of the E6 open reading frame and is active in both undifferentiated as well as differentiated cells. The late viral promoter directs transcription from a series of heterogeneous start sites in E7 and is activated upon differentiation. In this study, the state of histones as well as the spectrum of transcription factors bound to the two major HPV 31 viral promoters in undifferentiated and differentiated cells were examined using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Our studies indicate that, in undifferentiated cells, the chromatin surrounding both promoter regions is in an open, transcriptionally active state as indicated by the presence of dimethylated forms of histone H3 K4 as well as acetylated H3 and acetylated H4. Upon differentiation, there was an increase of four to six fold in the levels of dimethylated H3K4 and acetylated H3 respectively around both promoter regions as well as an increase of approximately nine fold in acetylated H4 at the early promoter. This suggests that nucleosomes of both promoter regions are further activated through histone modifications during differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were also used to examine the binding of transcription factors to the keratinocyte enhancer (KE)/early promoter region in the upstream regulatory region (URR) and late promoter sequences throughout differentiation. Our results suggest that a dynamic change in transcription factor binding occurs in both regions upon differentiation; most notably a significant increase in C/EBP-beta binding to the KE/early promoter region as well as C/EBP-alpha binding to the late promoter region upon

  6. A Temperature Sensitive Variant of p53 Drives p53-Dependent MicroRNA Expression without Evidence of Widespread Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Cabrita, Miguel A; Vanzyl, Erin J; Hamill, Jeff D; Pan, Elysia; Marcellus, Kristen A; Tolls, Victoria J; Alonzi, Rhea C; Pastic, Alyssa; Rambo, Teeghan M E; Sayed, Hadil; McKay, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor is a transcription factor that can regulate the expression of numerous genes including many encoding proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs). The predominant outcomes of a typical p53 response are the initiation of apoptotic cascades and the activation of cell cycle checkpoints. HT29-tsp53 cells express a temperature sensitive variant of p53 and in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, these cells preferentially undergo G1 phase cell cycle arrest at the permissive temperature that correlates with increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1. Recent evidence also suggests that a variety of miRNAs can induce G1 arrest by inhibiting the expression of proteins like CDK4 and CDK6. Here we used oligonucleotide microarrays to identify p53-regulated miRNAs that are induced in these cells undergoing G1 arrest. At the permissive temperature, the expression of several miRNAs was increased through a combination of either transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. In particular, miR-34a-5p, miR-143-3p and miR-145-5p were strongly induced and they reached levels comparable to that of reference miRNAs (miR-191 and miR-103). Importantly, miR-34a-5p and miR-145-5p are known to silence the Cdk4 and/or Cdk6 G1 cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). Surprisingly, there was no p53-dependent decrease in the expression of either of these G1 cdks. To search for other potential targets of p53-regulated miRNAs, p53-downregulated mRNAs were identified through parallel microarray analysis of mRNA expression. Once again, there was no clear effect of p53 on the repression of mRNAs under these conditions despite a remarkable increase in p53-induced mRNA expression. Therefore, despite a strong p53 transcriptional response, there was no clear evidence that p53-responsive miRNA contributed to gene silencing. Taken together, the changes in cell cycle distribution in this cell line at the permissive temperature is likely attributable to transcriptional

  7. A Temperature Sensitive Variant of p53 Drives p53-Dependent MicroRNA Expression without Evidence of Widespread Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Cabrita, Miguel A.; Vanzyl, Erin J.; Hamill, Jeff D.; Pan, Elysia; Marcellus, Kristen A.; Tolls, Victoria J.; Alonzi, Rhea C.; Pastic, Alyssa; Rambo, Teeghan M. E.; Sayed, Hadil; McKay, Bruce C.

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor is a transcription factor that can regulate the expression of numerous genes including many encoding proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs). The predominant outcomes of a typical p53 response are the initiation of apoptotic cascades and the activation of cell cycle checkpoints. HT29-tsp53 cells express a temperature sensitive variant of p53 and in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, these cells preferentially undergo G1 phase cell cycle arrest at the permissive temperature that correlates with increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1. Recent evidence also suggests that a variety of miRNAs can induce G1 arrest by inhibiting the expression of proteins like CDK4 and CDK6. Here we used oligonucleotide microarrays to identify p53-regulated miRNAs that are induced in these cells undergoing G1 arrest. At the permissive temperature, the expression of several miRNAs was increased through a combination of either transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. In particular, miR-34a-5p, miR-143-3p and miR-145-5p were strongly induced and they reached levels comparable to that of reference miRNAs (miR-191 and miR-103). Importantly, miR-34a-5p and miR-145-5p are known to silence the Cdk4 and/or Cdk6 G1 cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). Surprisingly, there was no p53-dependent decrease in the expression of either of these G1 cdks. To search for other potential targets of p53-regulated miRNAs, p53-downregulated mRNAs were identified through parallel microarray analysis of mRNA expression. Once again, there was no clear effect of p53 on the repression of mRNAs under these conditions despite a remarkable increase in p53-induced mRNA expression. Therefore, despite a strong p53 transcriptional response, there was no clear evidence that p53-responsive miRNA contributed to gene silencing. Taken together, the changes in cell cycle distribution in this cell line at the permissive temperature is likely attributable to transcriptional

  8. Herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcription unit promotes anatomical site-dependent establishment and reactivation from latency.

    PubMed Central

    Sawtell, N M; Thompson, R L

    1992-01-01

    Defined herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mutants KOS/1 and KOS/62 (positive and negative, respectively, for latency-associated transcripts [LATs]) express the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) gene during latency. These mutants were employed to assess the functions of the latency-associated transcription unit on establishment and maintenance of and reactivation from the latent state. It was found that in the trigeminal ganglia, the frequencies of hyperthermia-induced reactivation of KOS/62 and an additional LATs- mutant (KOS/29) were reduced by at least 80%. Quantification of latently infected neurons expressing the beta-Gal gene revealed that the LATs- mutant KOS/62 established approximately 80% fewer latent infections in the trigeminal ganglia than did KOS/1 (LATs+). This reduction in establishment which is evident in the trigeminal ganglia could account for the reduced frequency of reactivation from this site. In striking contrast, both LATs- mutants reactivated with wild-type frequencies from lumbosacral ganglia. Quantification of beta-Gal-positive neurons at this site revealed that KOS/62 established as many as or more latent infections than the LATs+ virus, KOS/1. Colocalization of HSV antigen and beta-Gal suggested that the decreased establishment by LATs- mutants in trigeminal ganglia was the result of inefficient viral shutoff. Thus, one function of the HSV-1 LATs transcription unit is to promote the establishment of latency in trigeminal but not lumbosacral ganglia. Such a function may be relevant to understanding the distinct clinical recurrent disease patterns of HSV-1 and HSV-2. Images PMID:1312626

  9. Transcriptional regulation of NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase: comparative genetics and identification of DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Hameister, Steffen; Becker, Beril; Holtgrefe, Simone; Strodtkötter, Inga; Linke, Vera; Backhausen, Jan E; Scheibe, Renate

    2007-10-01

    The transcriptional regulation of NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) was analyzed in Arabidopsis ecotypes and other Brassicaceae. The amount of transcript increased twofold after transfer into low temperature (12 degrees C) or high light (750 microE) in all species. Analysis of the genomic DNA reveals that the NADP-MDH gene (At5g58330 in A. thaliana) in Brassicaceae is located between two other genes (At5g58320 and At5g58340 in Arabidopsis), both encoded on the opposite DNA strand. No promoter elements were identified in 5' direction of the NADP-MDH gene, and the expression of NADP-MDH was not affected in knock-out plants carrying a DNA insert in the 5' region. A yeast-one hybrid approach yielded only three DNA-binding proteins for the 500-bp fragment located upstream of the ATG sequence, but 34 proteins for its coding region. However, in Chlamydomonas and in some Poaceae, which do not possess any genes within the 1200 bp upstream region, typical promoter elements were identified. Alignments of genomic DNA reveal that, in contrast to Poaceae, the introns are highly conserved within Brassicaceae. We conclude that in Brassicaceae the majority of regulatory elements are located within the coding region. The NADP-MDH gene of both families evolved from a common precursor, similar to the gene in Chlamydomonas. Changes in the selection pressure allowed the insertion of At5g58340 into the promoter region of a common ancestor. When the demand for transcriptional regulation increased, At5g58340 disappeared in Poaceae, and a promoter developed in the 5' region. In contrast, Brassicaceae maintained At5g58340 and shifted all regulatory elements into the coding region of NADP-MDH.

  10. DEP-induced fra-1 expression correlates with a distinct activation of AP-1-dependent gene transcription in the lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Kleeberger, Steven R; Reddy, Sekhar P

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies indicate a potential role for Fra-1, a heterodimeric partner of activator protein (AP)-1, in toxicant-induced epithelial injury, repair, and cellular transformation. Here we have investigated the effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on fra-1 expression in C10 cells, a murine lung epithelial cell line. DEP markedly upregulated fra-1, but not fra-2, expression. The increase in fra-1 mRNA expression correlated well with its protein- and DNA-binding activity. DNA-binding assays also revealed a predominant presence of Jun-B and Jun-D in the AP-1 complex. Interestingly, DEP did not alter Jun-B and Jun-D protein levels. Transcriptional analysis revealed that fra-1 induction is regulated in part at the transcriptional level. The -379 to +32 bp 5'-flanking region mediated this induction. Furthermore, inhibitors of ERK1/2, JNK1, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) significantly suppressed DEP-stimulated fra-1 transcription, suggesting their involvement in the induction process. Consistent with this finding, DEP stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1, and p38 MAPKs with a distinct activation pattern. Overexpression of Fra-1 downregulated c-Jun and Nrf2 enhanced AP-1- and ARE-mediated reporter gene expression, respectively. In contrast, Fra-1 had the opposite effect on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 promoter activity. In particular, it bound to the functional AP-1 site of the MMP-9 promoter after DEP stimulation. Consistent with this result, DEP also markedly upregulated MMP-9 promoter activity. Collectively, these findings suggest that fra-1 induction by DEP may play a role in selectively regulating gene expression involved in alveolar epithelial cell injury and repair. PMID:14565943

  11. Combinatorial action of transcription factors orchestrates cell cycle-dependent expression of the ribosomal protein genes and ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Nagisa; Kapoor, Neetu R; Kumar, Vijay

    2014-05-01

    Nucleolar assembly begins at the early G1 phase of the cell cycle and is a hub of ribosomal DNA transcription and rRNA biosynthesis. The newly-formed rRNAs together with ribosomal proteins (RPs) constitute the building block of the ribosomal machinery. Although RPs play a major role in protein biosynthesis, their own regulation and expression is rather poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of RP genes RPS27a, RPS24, RPS6, RPL9 and RPL4 in synchronized mammalian cell culture. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated their expression during the mid to late G1 phase, whereas the rRNA genes were expressed during the early G1 phase of the cell cycle. The promoter reporter analysis of the RPS27a gene revealed that it could be synergistically stimulated by the transcription factors specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). However, E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) appeared to negatively regulate gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the promoter occupancy of Sp1, CREB and E2F1. Although Sp1 and CREB binding enhanced the promoter occupancy of histone acetyltransferases PCAF, p300 and CREB binding protein, E2F1 facilitated the recruitment of histone deacetylases. Both acetylation (histone H4 pan-acetyl, histone H3 acetyl Lys 14) and methylation (histone H3 trimethyl Lys 9) marks were observed in the RPS27a promoter region, suggesting their important regulatory role in gene expression. Because the promoter regions of most RP genes are well conserved, we propose that their orchestrated regulation and synthesis during the cell cycle facilitates ribosome biogenesis. PMID:24646001

  12. Wild soybean roots depend on specific transcription factors and oxidation reduction related genesin response to alkaline stress.

    PubMed

    DuanMu, Huizi; Wang, Yang; Bai, Xi; Cheng, Shufei; Deyholos, Michael K; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Li, Dan; Zhu, Dan; Li, Ran; Yu, Yang; Cao, Lei; Chen, Chao; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-11-01

    Soil alkalinity is an important environmental problem limiting agricultural productivity. Wild soybean (Glycine soja) shows strong alkaline stress tolerance, so it is an ideal plant candidate for studying the molecular mechanisms of alkaline tolerance and identifying alkaline stress-responsive genes. However, limited information is available about G. soja responses to alkaline stress on a genomic scale. Therefore, in the present study, we used RNA sequencing to compare transcript profiles of G. soja root responses to sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) at six time points, and a total of 68,138,478 pairs of clean reads were obtained using the Illumina GAIIX. Expression patterns of 46,404 G. soja genes were profiled in all six samples based on RNA-seq data using Cufflinks software. Then, t12 transcription factors from MYB, WRKY, NAC, bZIP, C2H2, HB, and TIFY families and 12 oxidation reduction related genes were chosen and verified to be induced in response to alkaline stress by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The GO functional annotation analysis showed that besides "transcriptional regulation" and "oxidation reduction," these genes were involved in a variety of processes, such as "binding" and "response to stress." This is the first comprehensive transcriptome profiling analysis of wild soybean root under alkaline stress by RNA sequencing. Our results highlight changes in the gene expression patterns and identify a set of genes induced by NaHCO3 stress. These findings provide a base for the global analyses of G. soja alkaline stress tolerance mechanisms.

  13. The Transcription Factor ABI4 Is Required for the Ascorbic Acid–Dependent Regulation of Growth and Regulation of Jasmonate-Dependent Defense Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kerchev, Pavel I.; Pellny, Till K.; Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Kiddle, Guy; Hedden, Peter; Driscoll, Simon; Vanacker, Hélène; Verrier, Paul; Hancock, Robert D.; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular redox homeostasis is a hub for signal integration. Interactions between redox metabolism and the ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE-4 (ABI4) transcription factor were characterized in the Arabidopsis thaliana vitamin c defective1 (vtc1) and vtc2 mutants, which are defective in ascorbic acid synthesis and show a slow growth phenotype together with enhanced abscisic acid (ABA) levels relative to the wild type (Columbia-0). The 75% decrease in the leaf ascorbate pool in the vtc2 mutants was not sufficient to adversely affect GA metabolism. The transcriptome signatures of the abi4, vtc1, and vtc2 mutants showed significant overlap, with a large number of transcription factors or signaling components similarly repressed or induced. Moreover, lincomycin-dependent changes in LIGHT HARVESTING CHLOROPHYLL A/B BINDING PROTEIN 1.1 expression were comparable in these mutants, suggesting overlapping participation in chloroplast to nucleus signaling. The slow growth phenotype of vtc2 was absent in the abi4 vtc2 double mutant, as was the sugar-insensitive phenotype of the abi4 mutant. Octadecanoid derivative-responsive AP2/ERF-domain transcription factor 47 (ORA47) and AP3 (an ABI5 binding factor) transcripts were enhanced in vtc2 but repressed in abi4 vtc2, suggesting that ABI4 and ascorbate modulate growth and defense gene expression through jasmonate signaling. We conclude that low ascorbate triggers ABA- and jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways that together regulate growth through ABI4. Moreover, cellular redox homeostasis exerts a strong influence on sugar-dependent growth regulation. PMID:21926335

  14. The N-terminal Domain of SIRT1 Is a Positive Regulator of Endogenous SIRT1-dependent Deacetylation and Transcriptional Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Ghisays, Fiorella; Brace, Cynthia S.; Yackly, Shawn M.; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Mills, Kathryn F.; Kashentseva, Elena; Dimitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 regulates energy metabolism, responses to stress, and aging by deacetylating many different proteins, including histones and transcription factors. The mechanisms controlling SIRT1 enzymatic activity are complex and incompletely characterized, yet essential for understanding how to develop therapeutics that target SIRT1. Here we demonstrate that the N-terminal domain of SIRT1 (NTERM) can trans-activate deacetylation activity by physically interacting with endogenous SIRT1 and promoting its association with the deacetylation substrate NF-κB p65. Two motifs within the NTERM domain contribute to activation of SIRT1-dependent activities, and expression of one of these motifs in mice is sufficient to lower fasting glucose levels and improve glucose tolerance in a manner similar to overexpression of SIRT1. Our results provide new insights into the regulation of SIRT1 activity and a rationale for pharmacological control of SIRT1-dependent activities. PMID:25772354

  15. Transcriptional regulation and signal-peptide-dependent secretion of exolevanase (LsdB) in the endophyte Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Carmen; Banguela, Alexander; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hernández, Lázaro

    2009-03-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus utilizes plant sucrose with a constitutively expressed levansucrase (LsdA), producing extracellular levan, which may be degraded under energetically unfavored conditions. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that lsdA and the downstream exolevanase gene (lsdB) form an operon. lsdB transcription was induced during growth with low fructose concentrations (0.44 to 33 mM) and repressed by glucose. Transport of LsdB to the periplasm involved N-terminal signal peptide cleavage. Type II secretion mutants failed to transfer LsdB across the outer membrane, impeding levan hydrolysis.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation and Signal-Peptide-Dependent Secretion of Exolevanase (LsdB) in the Endophyte Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus▿

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez, Carmen; Banguela, Alexander; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hernández, Lázaro

    2009-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus utilizes plant sucrose with a constitutively expressed levansucrase (LsdA), producing extracellular levan, which may be degraded under energetically unfavored conditions. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that lsdA and the downstream exolevanase gene (lsdB) form an operon. lsdB transcription was induced during growth with low fructose concentrations (0.44 to 33 mM) and repressed by glucose. Transport of LsdB to the periplasm involved N-terminal signal peptide cleavage. Type II secretion mutants failed to transfer LsdB across the outer membrane, impeding levan hydrolysis. PMID:19139238

  17. Indirect p53-dependent transcriptional repression of Survivin, CDC25C, and PLK1 genes requires the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21/CDKN1A and CDE/CHR promoter sites binding the DREAM complex

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Annina; Engeland, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 is central to cell cycle control by downregulation of cell cycle-promoting genes upon cell stress such as DNA damage. Survivin (BIRC5), CDC25C, and PLK1 encode important cell cycle regulators that are repressed following p53 activation. Here, we provide evidence that p53-dependent repression of these genes requires activation of p21 (CDKN1A, WAF1, CIP1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data indicate that promoter binding of B-MYB switches to binding of E2F4 and p130 resulting in a replacement of the MMB (Myb-MuvB) by the DREAM complex. We demonstrate that this replacement depends on p21. Furthermore, transcriptional repression by p53 requires intact DREAM binding sites in the target promoters. The CDE and CHR cell cycle promoter elements are the sites for DREAM binding. These elements as well as the p53 response of Survivin, CDC25C, and PLK1 are evolutionarily conserved. No binding of p53 to these genes is detected by ChIP and mutation of proposed p53 binding sites does not alter the p53 response. Thus, a mechanism for direct p53-dependent transcriptional repression is not supported by the data. In contrast, repression by DREAM is consistent with most previous findings and unifies models based on p21-, E2F4-, p130-, and CDE/CHR-dependent repression by p53. In conclusion, the presented data suggest that the p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway regulates p53-dependent repression of Survivin, CDC25C, and PLK1. PMID:26595675

  18. Indirect p53-dependent transcriptional repression of Survivin, CDC25C, and PLK1 genes requires the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21/CDKN1A and CDE/CHR promoter sites binding the DREAM complex.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin; Quaas, Marianne; Nickel, Annina; Engeland, Kurt

    2015-12-01

    The transcription factor p53 is central to cell cycle control by downregulation of cell cycle-promoting genes upon cell stress such as DNA damage. Survivin (BIRC5), CDC25C, and PLK1 encode important cell cycle regulators that are repressed following p53 activation. Here, we provide evidence that p53-dependent repression of these genes requires activation of p21 (CDKN1A, WAF1, CIP1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data indicate that promoter binding of B-MYB switches to binding of E2F4 and p130 resulting in a replacement of the MMB (Myb-MuvB) by the DREAM complex. We demonstrate that this replacement depends on p21. Furthermore, transcriptional repression by p53 requires intact DREAM binding sites in the target promoters. The CDE and CHR cell cycle promoter elements are the sites for DREAM binding. These elements as well as the p53 response of Survivin, CDC25C, and PLK1 are evolutionarily conserved. No binding of p53 to these genes is detected by ChIP and mutation of proposed p53 binding sites does not alter the p53 response. Thus, a mechanism for direct p53-dependent transcriptional repression is not supported by the data. In contrast, repression by DREAM is consistent with most previous findings and unifies models based on p21-, E2F4-, p130-, and CDE/CHR-dependent repression by p53. In conclusion, the presented data suggest that the p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway regulates p53-dependent repression of Survivin, CDC25C, and PLK1.

  19. Trx2p-dependent Regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Oxidative Stress Response by the Skn7p Transcription Factor under Respiring Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Garre, Elena; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Matallana, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    The whole genome analysis has demonstrated that wine yeasts undergo changes in promoter regions and variations in gene copy number, which make them different to lab strains and help them better adapt to stressful conditions during winemaking, where oxidative stress plays a critical role. Since cytoplasmic thioredoxin II, a small protein with thiol-disulphide oxidoreductase activity, has been seen to perform important functions under biomass propagation conditions of wine yeasts, we studied the involvement of Trx2p in the molecular regulation of the oxidative stress transcriptional response on these strains. In this study, we analyzed the expression levels of several oxidative stress-related genes regulated by either Yap1p or the co-operation between Yap1p and Skn7p. The results revealed a lowered expression for all the tested Skn7p dependent genes in a Trx2p-deficient strain and that Trx2p is essential for the oxidative stress response during respiratory metabolism in wine yeast. Additionally, activity of Yap1p and Skn7p dependent promoters by β-galactosidase assays clearly demonstrated that Skn7p-dependent promoter activation is affected by TRX2 gene deficiency. Finally we showed that deleting the TRX2 gene causes Skn7p hyperphosphorylation under oxidative stress conditions. We propose Trx2p to be a new positive efector in the regulation of the Skn7p transcription factor that controls phosphorylation events and, therefore, modulates the oxidative stress response in yeast. PMID:24376879

  20. Trx2p-dependent regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae oxidative stress response by the Skn7p transcription factor under respiring conditions.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Garre, Elena; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Matallana, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    The whole genome analysis has demonstrated that wine yeasts undergo changes in promoter regions and variations in gene copy number, which make them different to lab strains and help them better adapt to stressful conditions during winemaking, where oxidative stress plays a critical role. Since cytoplasmic thioredoxin II, a small protein with thiol-disulphide oxidoreductase activity, has been seen to perform important functions under biomass propagation conditions of wine yeasts, we studied the involvement of Trx2p in the molecular regulation of the oxidative stress transcriptional response on these strains. In this study, we analyzed the expression levels of several oxidative stress-related genes regulated by either Yap1p or the co-operation between Yap1p and Skn7p. The results revealed a lowered expression for all the tested Skn7p dependent genes in a Trx2p-deficient strain and that Trx2p is essential for the oxidative stress response during respiratory metabolism in wine yeast. Additionally, activity of Yap1p and Skn7p dependent promoters by β-galactosidase assays clearly demonstrated that Skn7p-dependent promoter activation is affected by TRX2 gene deficiency. Finally we showed that deleting the TRX2 gene causes Skn7p hyperphosphorylation under oxidative stress conditions. We propose Trx2p to be a new positive efector in the regulation of the Skn7p transcription factor that controls phosphorylation events and, therefore, modulates the oxidative stress response in yeast. PMID:24376879

  1. Methylation-dependent regulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha gene expression by the transcription factor Kaiso.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Christina C; Longo, Joseph; Bassey-Archibong, Blessing I; Hallett, Robin M; Milosavljevic, Snezana; Beatty, Laura; Hassell, John A; Daniel, Juliet M

    2015-12-01

    Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) is a common characteristic of solid tumors and strongly correlates with poor prognosis and resistance to treatment. In response to hypoxia, cells initiate a cascade of transcriptional events regulated by the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) heterodimer. Since the oxygen-sensitive HIF-1α subunit is stabilized during hypoxia, it functions as the regulatory subunit of the protein. To date, while the mechanisms governing HIF-1α protein stabilization and function have been well studied, those governing HIF1A gene expression are not fully understood. However, recent studies have suggested that methylation of a HIF-1 binding site in the HIF1A promoter prevents its autoregulation. Here we report that the POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso modulates HIF1A gene expression by binding to the methylated HIF1A promoter in a region proximal to the autoregulatory HIF-1 binding site. Interestingly, Kaiso's regulation of HIF1A occurs primarily during hypoxia, which is consistent with the finding that Kaiso protein levels peak after 4 h of hypoxic incubation and return to normoxic levels after 24 h. Our data thus support a role for Kaiso in fine-tuning HIF1A gene expression after extended periods of hypoxia.

  2. Recurrent mutations, including NPM1c, activate a BRD4-dependent core transcriptional program in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, M A; Gudgin, E J; Horton, S J; Giotopoulos, G; Meduri, E; Robson, S; Cannizzaro, E; Osaki, H; Wiese, M; Putwain, S; Fong, C Y; Grove, C; Craig, J; Dittmann, A; Lugo, D; Jeffrey, P; Drewes, G; Lee, K; Bullinger, L; Prinjha, R K; Kouzarides, T; Vassiliou, G S; Huntly, B J P

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that inhibition of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) epigenetic readers may have clinical utility against acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we validate this hypothesis, demonstrating the efficacy of the BET inhibitor I-BET151 across a variety of AML subtypes driven by disparate mutations. We demonstrate that a common ‘core' transcriptional program, which is HOX gene independent, is downregulated in AML and underlies sensitivity to I-BET treatment. This program is enriched for genes that contain ‘super-enhancers', recently described regulatory elements postulated to control key oncogenic driver genes. Moreover, our program can independently classify AML patients into distinct cytogenetic and molecular subgroups, suggesting that it contains biomarkers of sensitivity and response. We focus AML with mutations of the Nucleophosmin gene (NPM1) and show evidence to suggest that wild-type NPM1 has an inhibitory influence on BRD4 that is relieved upon NPM1c mutation and cytosplasmic dislocation. This leads to the upregulation of the core transcriptional program facilitating leukemia development. This program is abrogated by I-BET therapy and by nuclear restoration of NPM1. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of I-BET151 in a unique murine model and in primary patient samples of NPM1c AML. Taken together, our data support the use of BET inhibitors in clinical trials in AML. PMID:24220271

  3. Excess of Yra1 RNA-Binding Factor Causes Transcription-Dependent Genome Instability, Replication Impairment and Telomere Shortening

    PubMed Central

    Gavaldá, Sandra; Santos-Pereira, José M.; García-Rubio, María L.; Luna, Rosa; Aguilera, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Yra1 is an essential nuclear factor of the evolutionarily conserved family of hnRNP-like export factors that when overexpressed impairs mRNA export and cell growth. To investigate further the relevance of proper Yra1 stoichiometry in the cell, we overexpressed Yra1 by transforming yeast cells with YRA1 intron-less constructs and analyzed its effect on gene expression and genome integrity. We found that YRA1 overexpression induces DNA damage and leads to a transcription-associated hyperrecombination phenotype that is mediated by RNA:DNA hybrids. In addition, it confers a genome-wide replication retardation as seen by reduced BrdU incorporation and accumulation of the Rrm3 helicase. In addition, YRA1 overexpression causes a cell senescence-like phenotype and telomere shortening. ChIP-chip analysis shows that overexpressed Yra1 is loaded to transcribed chromatin along the genome and to Y’ telomeric regions, where Rrm3 is also accumulated, suggesting an impairment of telomere replication. Our work not only demonstrates that a proper stoichiometry of the Yra1 mRNA binding and export factor is required to maintain genome integrity and telomere homeostasis, but suggests that the cellular imbalance between transcribed RNA and specific RNA-binding factors may become a major cause of genome instability mediated by co-transcriptional replication impairment. PMID:27035147

  4. Recurrent mutations, including NPM1c, activate a BRD4-dependent core transcriptional program in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dawson, M A; Gudgin, E J; Horton, S J; Giotopoulos, G; Meduri, E; Robson, S; Cannizzaro, E; Osaki, H; Wiese, M; Putwain, S; Fong, C Y; Grove, C; Craig, J; Dittmann, A; Lugo, D; Jeffrey, P; Drewes, G; Lee, K; Bullinger, L; Prinjha, R K; Kouzarides, T; Vassiliou, G S; Huntly, B J P

    2014-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that inhibition of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) epigenetic readers may have clinical utility against acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we validate this hypothesis, demonstrating the efficacy of the BET inhibitor I-BET151 across a variety of AML subtypes driven by disparate mutations. We demonstrate that a common 'core' transcriptional program, which is HOX gene independent, is downregulated in AML and underlies sensitivity to I-BET treatment. This program is enriched for genes that contain 'super-enhancers', recently described regulatory elements postulated to control key oncogenic driver genes. Moreover, our program can independently classify AML patients into distinct cytogenetic and molecular subgroups, suggesting that it contains biomarkers of sensitivity and response. We focus AML with mutations of the Nucleophosmin gene (NPM1) and show evidence to suggest that wild-type NPM1 has an inhibitory influence on BRD4 that is relieved upon NPM1c mutation and cytosplasmic dislocation. This leads to the upregulation of the core transcriptional program facilitating leukemia development. This program is abrogated by I-BET therapy and by nuclear restoration of NPM1. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of I-BET151 in a unique murine model and in primary patient samples of NPM1c AML. Taken together, our data support the use of BET inhibitors in clinical trials in AML.

  5. Tissue- and time-dependent transcription in Ixodes ricinus salivary glands and midguts when blood feeding on the vertebrate host

    PubMed Central

    Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Schwarz, Alexandra; Erhart, Jan; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes ricinus is a tick that transmits the pathogens of Lyme and several arboviral diseases. Pathogens invade the tick midgut, disseminate through the hemolymph, and are transmitted to the vertebrate host via the salivary glands; subverting these processes could be used to interrupt pathogen transfer. Here, we use massive de novo sequencing to characterize the transcriptional dynamics of the salivary and midgut tissues of nymphal and adult I. ricinus at various time points after attachment on the vertebrate host. Members of a number of gene families show stage- and time-specific expression. We hypothesize that gene expression switching may be under epigenetic control and, in support of this, identify 34 candidate proteins that modify histones. I. ricinus-secreted proteins are encoded by genes that have a non-synonymous to synonymous mutation rate even greater than immune-related genes. Midgut transcriptome (mialome) analysis reveals several enzymes associated with protein, carbohydrate, and lipid digestion, transporters and channels that might be associated with nutrient uptake, and immune-related transcripts including antimicrobial peptides. This publicly available dataset supports the identification of protein and gene targets for biochemical and physiological studies that exploit the transmission lifecycle of this disease vector for preventative and therapeutic purposes. PMID:25765539

  6. Genome-Wide Transcript Profiling of Endosperm without Paternal Contribution Identifies Parent-of-Origin–Dependent Regulation of AGAMOUS-LIKE36

    PubMed Central

    Shirzadi, Reza; Andersen, Ellen D.; Bjerkan, Katrine N.; Gloeckle, Barbara M.; Heese, Maren; Ungru, Alexander; Winge, Per; Koncz, Csaba; Aalen, Reidunn B.; Schnittger, Arp; Grini, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Seed development in angiosperms is dependent on the interplay among different transcriptional programs operating in the embryo, the endosperm, and the maternally-derived seed coat. In angiosperms, the embryo and the endosperm are products of double fertilization during which the two pollen sperm cells fuse with the egg cell and the central cell of the female gametophyte. In Arabidopsis, analyses of mutants in the cell-cycle regulator CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A;1 (CKDA;1) have revealed the importance of a paternal genome for the effective development of the endosperm and ultimately the seed. Here we have exploited cdka;1 fertilization as a novel tool for the identification of seed regulators and factors involved in parent-of-origin–specific regulation during seed development. We have generated genome-wide transcription profiles of cdka;1 fertilized seeds and identified approximately 600 genes that are downregulated in the absence of a paternal genome. Among those, AGAMOUS-LIKE (AGL) genes encoding Type-I MADS-box transcription factors were significantly overrepresented. Here, AGL36 was chosen for an in-depth study and shown to be imprinted. We demonstrate that AGL36 parent-of-origin–dependent expression is controlled by the activity of METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1) maintenance DNA methyltransferase and DEMETER (DME) DNA glycosylase. Interestingly, our data also show that the active maternal allele of AGL36 is regulated throughout endosperm development by components of the FIS Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), revealing a new type of dual epigenetic regulation in seeds. PMID:21379330

  7. Zinc-Finger Transcription Factor ZAT6 Positively Regulates Cadmium Tolerance through the Glutathione-Dependent Pathway in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Yan, Xingxing; Liu, Yunlei; Wang, Ren; Fan, Tingting; Ren, Yongbing; Tang, Xiaofeng; Xiao, Fangming

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental pollutant with high toxicity to animals and plants. It has been established that the glutathione (GSH)-dependent phytochelatin (PC) synthesis pathway is one of the most important mechanisms contributing to Cd accumulation and tolerance in plants. However, the transcription factors involved in regulating GSH-dependent PC synthesis pathway remain largely unknown. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Cd-resistant mutant xcd2-D (XVE system-induced cadmium-tolerance2) using a forward genetics approach. The mutant gene underlying xcd2-D mutation was revealed to encode a known zinc-finger transcription factor, ZAT6. Transgenic plants overexpressing ZAT6 showed significant increase of Cd tolerance, whereas loss of function of ZAT6 led to decreased Cd tolerance. Increased Cd accumulation and tolerance in ZAT6-overexpressing lines was GSH dependent and associated with Cd-activated synthesis of PC, which was correlated with coordinated activation of PC-synthesis related gene expression. By contrast, loss of function of ZAT6 reduced Cd accumulation and tolerance, which was accompanied by abolished PC synthesis and gene expression. Further analysis revealed that ZAT6 positively regulates the transcription of GSH1, GSH2, PCS1, and PCS2, but ZAT6 is capable of specifically binding to GSH1 promoter in vivo. Consistently, overexpression of GSH1 has been shown to restore Cd sensitivity in the zat6-1 mutant, suggesting that GSH1 is a key target of ZAT6. Taken together, our data provide evidence that ZAT6 coordinately activates PC synthesis-related gene expression and directly targets GSH1 to positively regulate Cd accumulation and tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:26983992

  8. The long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist, indacaterol, enhances glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription in human airway epithelial cells in a gene- and agonist-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, T; Johnson, M; Newton, R; Giembycz, M A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Inhaled glucocorticoid (ICS)/long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination therapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with moderate/severe asthma in whom adequate control cannot be achieved by an ICS alone. Previously, we discovered that LABAs can augment dexamethasone-inducible gene expression and proposed that this effect may explain how these two drugs interact to deliver superior clinical benefit. Herein, we extended that observation by analysing, pharmacodynamically, the effect of the LABA, indacaterol, on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene transcription induced by seven ligands with intrinsic activity values that span the spectrum of full agonism to antagonism. Experimental Approach BEAS-2B human airway epithelial cells stably transfected with a 2× glucocorticoid response element luciferase reporter were used to model gene transcription together with an analysis of several glucocorticoid-inducible genes. Key Results Indacaterol augmented glucocorticoid-induced reporter activation in a manner that was positively related to the intrinsic activity of the GR agonist. This effect was demonstrated by an increase in response maxima without a change in GR agonist affinity or efficacy. Indacaterol also enhanced glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression. However, the magnitude of this effect was dependent on both the GR agonist and the gene of interest. Conclusions and Implications These data suggest that indacaterol activates a molecular rheostat, which increases the transcriptional competency of GR in an agonist- and gene-dependent manner without apparently changing the relationship between fractional GR occupancy and response. These findings provide a platform to rationally design ICS/LABA combination therapy that is based on the generation of agonist-dependent gene expression profiles in target and off-target tissues. PMID:25598440

  9. CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 enhances CREB-dependent gene expression in spinal cord to maintain the bone cancer pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ying; Liu, Yue; Hou, Bailing; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Ming; Sun, Yu-E; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Background cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene expression plays an important role in central sensitization. CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) dramatically increases CREB-mediated transcriptional activity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B, and miRNA-212/132, which are highly CREB responsive, function downstream from CREB/CRTC1 to mediate activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and in turn loops back to amplify CREB/CRTC1 signaling. This study aimed to investigate the role of spinal CRTC1 in the maintenance of bone cancer pain using an RNA interference method. Results Osteosarcoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right femurs of C3H/HeNCrlVr mice to induce bone cancer pain. Western blotting was applied to examine the expression of spinal phospho-Ser133 CREB and CRTC1. We further investigated effects of repeated intrathecal administration with Adenoviruses expressing CRTC1-small interfering RNA (siRNA) on nociceptive behaviors and on the upregulation of CREB/CRTC1-target genes associated with bone cancer pain. Inoculation of osteosarcoma cells induced progressive mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain, and resulted in upregulation of spinal p-CREB and CRTC1. Repeated intrathecal administration with Adenoviruses expressing CRTC1-siRNA attenuated bone cancer–evoked pain behaviors, and reduced CREB/CRTC1-target genes expression in spinal cord, including BDNF, NR2B, and miR-212/132. Conclusions Upregulation of CRTC1 enhancing CREB-dependent gene transcription in spinal cord may play an important role in bone cancer pain. Inhibition of spinal CRTC1 expression reduced bone cancer pain. Interruption to the positive feedback circuit between CREB/CRTC1 and its targets may contribute to the analgesic effects. These findings may provide further insight into the mechanisms and treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:27060162

  10. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of a Feeding State-Dependent Chemoreceptor Gene via MEF-2 and bHLH Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Winbush, Ari; van der Linden, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Food and feeding-state dependent changes in chemoreceptor gene expression may allow Caenorhabditis elegans to modify their chemosensory behavior, but the mechanisms essential for these expression changes remain poorly characterized. We had previously shown that expression of a feeding state-dependent chemoreceptor gene, srh-234, in the ADL sensory neuron of C. elegans is regulated via the MEF-2 transcription factor. Here, we show that MEF-2 acts together with basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to regulate srh-234 expression as a function of feeding state. We identify a cis-regulatory MEF2 binding site that is necessary and sufficient for the starvation-induced down regulation of srh-234 expression, while an E-box site known to bind bHLH factors is required to drive srh-234 expression in ADL. We show that HLH-2 (E/Daughterless), HLH-3 and HLH-4 (Achaete-scute homologs) act in ADL neurons to regulate srh-234 expression. We further demonstrate that the expression levels of srh-234 in ADL neurons are regulated remotely by MXL-3 (Max-like 3 homolog) and HLH-30 (TFEB ortholog) acting in the intestine, which is dependent on insulin signaling functioning specifically in ADL neurons. We also show that this intestine-to-neuron feeding-state regulation of srh-234 involves a subset of insulin-like peptides. These results combined suggest that chemoreceptor gene expression is regulated by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous transcriptional mechanisms mediated by MEF2 and bHLH factors, which may allow animals to fine-tune their chemosensory responses in response to changes in their feeding state. PMID:27487365

  11. Salinity-dependent copper accumulation in the guppy Poecilia vivipara is associated with CTR1 and ATP7B transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Evelise Sampaio; Abril, Sandra Isabel Moreno; Zanette, Juliano; Bianchini, Adalto

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) accumulation and regulation of key-genes involved in Cu homeostasis were evaluated in freshwater- and saltwater-acclimated guppies Poecilia vivipara. Fish were exposed (96h) to environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved Cu (0, 5.0, 9.0 and 20.0μg/L). In freshwater guppies, gill and liver Cu accumulation was dependent on Cu concentration in the exposure medium. In saltwater guppies, this dependence was observed only in the gut. These findings indicate that Cu accumulation was salinity- and tissue-dependent. Key genes involved in Cu metabolism were sequenced for the first time in P. vivipara. Transcripts coding for the high-affinity copper transporter (CTR1) and copper-transporting ATPase (ATP7B) were identified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. The full-length CTR1 open reading frame (1560bp) and a partial ATP7B (690bp) were discovered. Predicted amino acid sequences shared high identities with the CTR1 of Fundulus heteroclitus (81%) and the ATP7B of Sparus aurata (87%). Basal transcriptional levels addressed by RT-qPCR in control fish indicate that CTR1 and ATP7B was highly transcribed in liver of freshwater guppies while CTR1 was highly transcribed in gut of saltwater guppies. This could explain the higher Cu accumulation observed in liver of freshwater guppies and in gut of saltwater guppies, because CTR1 is involved in Cu uptake. Reduced gill mRNA expression of CTR1 was observed in freshwater guppies exposed to 20.0μg/L Cu and in saltwater guppies exposed to 5.0μg/L Cu. In turn, reduced mRNA expression of gut ATP7B was observed in freshwater and salt water guppies exposed to 9.0 and 20.0μg/L Cu. Liver CTR1 and ATP7B transcription were not affected by Cu exposure. These findings suggest that gill CTR1 and gut ATP7B are down-regulated to limit Cu absorption after exposure to dissolved Cu, while liver CTR1 and ATP7B levels are maintained to allow Cu storage and detoxification. In conclusion, findings reported here

  12. Bacillus subtilis GabR, a protein with DNA-binding and aminotransferase domains, is a PLP-dependent transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, Boris R

    2004-07-16

    Bacillus subtilis GabR is a member of a poorly characterized but widespread family of chimeric bacterial proteins that have apparent DNA binding and aminotransferase domains. GabR positively regulates expression of the gabTD operon responsible for utilization of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and represses the divergently transcribed gabR gene. Purified GabR bound specifically to the DNA region overlapping the -35 region of the gabT promoter and the -10 and +1 regions of the gabR promoter. Two 6 bp direct repeats located at the ends of this region appeared to be essential for GabR binding. In transcription reactions in vitro, GabR alone repressed expression from the gabR promoter but activated expression from the gabT promoter only in the presence of GABA and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, an essential cofactor of aminotransferases. A similar requirement for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and GABA for GabR-mediated transcription activation was shown in vivo. In vitro this requirement could be partially satisfied with pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate and succinic semialdehyde, the products of a GABA-dependent aminotransferase half-reaction. We hypothesize that the GabR-catalyzed aminotransferase-like reaction between GABA and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is essential for GabR action as a transcriptional activator.

  13. Arginine aminoacylation identity is context-dependent and ensured by alternate recognition sets in the anticodon loop of accepting tRNA transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Sissler, M; Giegé, R; Florentz, C

    1996-01-01

    Yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase recognizes the non-modified wild-type transcripts derived from both yeast tRNA(Arg) and tRNA(Asp) with equal efficiency. It discriminates its cognate natural substrate, tRNA(Arg), from non-cognate tRNA(Asp) by a negative discrimination mechanism whereby a single methyl group acts as an anti-determinant. Considering these facts, recognition elements responsible for specific arginylation in yeast have been searched by studying the in vitro arginylation properties of a series of transcripts derived from yeast tRNA(Asp), considered as an arginine isoacceptor tRNA. In parallel, experiments on similar tRNA(Arg) transcripts were performed. Unexpectedly, in the tRNA(Arg) context, arginylation is basically linked to the presence of residue C35, whereas in the tRNA(Asp) context, it is deeply related to that of C36 and G37 but is insensitive to the nucleotide at position 35. Each of these nucleotides present in one host, is absent in the other host tRNA. Thus, arginine identity is dependent on two different specific recognition sets according to the tRNA framework investigated. Images PMID:8890180

  14. Transcription patterns of genes encoding four metallothionein homologs in Daphnia pulex exposed to copper and cadmium are time- and homolog- dependent

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, Jana; Shaw, Joseph R.; Glaholt, Stephen P.; Colbourne, John K.; De Schamphelaere, Karel AC.

    2013-01-01

    Metallothioneins are proteins that play an essential role in metal homeostasis and detoxification in nearly all organisms studied to date. Yet discrepancies between outcomes of chronic and acute exposure experiments hamper the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of their isoforms following metal exposure. Here, we investigated transcriptional differences among four identified homologs (mt1–mt4) in Daphnia pulex exposed across time to copper and cadmium relative to a control. Transcriptional upregulation of mt1 and mt3 was detected on day four following exposure to cadmium, whereas that of mt2 and mt4 was detected on day two and day eight following exposure to copper. These results confirm temporal and metal-specific differences in the transcriptional induction of genes encoding metallothionein homologs upon metal exposure which should be considered in ecotoxicological monitoring programs of metal-contaminated water bodies. Indeed, the mRNA expression patterns observed here illustrate the complex regulatory system associated with metallothioneins, as these patterns are not only dependent on the metal, but also on exposure time and the homolog studied. Further phylogenetic analysis and analysis of regulatory elements in upstream promoter regions revealed a high degree of similarity between metallothionein genes of Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna, a species belonging to the same genus. These findings, combined with a limited amount of available expression data for D. magna metallothionein genes, tentatively suggest a potential generalization of the metallothionein response system between these Daphnia species. PMID:24113165

  15. Rac1-dependent transcriptional up-regulation of p27Kip1 by homophilic cell-cell contact in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Mayumi; Kanaide, Hideo; Hirano, Katsuya

    2007-10-01

    The mechanism for the transcriptional up-regulation of p27Kip1 due to the formation of the cell-cell contact was investigated in vascular endothelial cells. The induction of the cell-cell contact by adding an extra number of endothelial cells activated Rac1, up-regulated p27Kip1 mRNA and protein, and also facilitated the cell cycle arrest. Transduction of the Rac1 inhibitor protein using the cell-penetrating peptide or treatment with a Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 inhibited the p27Kip1 up-regulation and delayed the cell cycle arrest. Rac1 was therefore suggested to mediate the contact-induced transcriptional up-regulation of p27Kip1. The role of Rac1 in the regulation of the p27Kip1 promoter activity was next examined with a luciferase reporter assay. The promoter activity was increased by inducing the cell-cell contact, which was significantly inhibited by the Rac1 inhibitory protein and NSC23766. The evaluation of various truncated promoter regions determined region -620 to -573 nucleotides from the initiation codon to be responsible for the contact-induced, Rac1-dependent activation of the p27Kip1 promoter. The present study thus demonstrated for the first time that the activation of Rac1 due to the cell-cell contact plays a critical role in the transcriptional up-regulation of p27Kip1 in vascular endothelial cells.

  16. Transforming growth factor-alpha-induced transcriptional activation of the vascular permeability factor (VPF/VEGF) gene requires AP-2-dependent DNA binding and transactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Gille, J; Swerlick, R A; Caughman, S W

    1997-01-01

    The endothelial cell-specific mitogen vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF) represents a central regulator of cutaneous angiogenesis. Increased VPF/VEGF expression has recently been reported in psoriatic skin and healing wounds, both conditions in which transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF alpha) and its ligand, the epidermal growth factor receptor, are markedly up-regulated. Since TGF alpha strongly induces VPF/VEGF synthesis in keratinocytes, TGF alpha-mediated VPF/VEGF expression is likely to play a significant role in the initiation and maintenance of increased vascular hyperpermeability and hyperproliferation in skin biology. The objectives of the present studies were to determine the molecular mechanisms responsible for TGF alpha-induced transcriptional activation of the VPF/VEGF gene. We have identified a GC-rich TGF alpha-responsive region between -88 bp and -65 bp of the VPF/VEGF promoter that is necessary for constitutive and TGF alpha-inducible transcriptional activation. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, this region binds Sp1-dependent protein complexes constitutively and an additional TGF alpha-inducible protein complex that is distinct from Sp1 protein. Both AP-2 and Egr-1 transcription factors were detected as components of the TGF alpha-inducible protein complex in supershift EMSA studies. In co-transfection studies, an AP-2 but not an Egr-1 expression vector activated VPF/VEGF transcription, thus indicating that AP-2 protein is functionally important in TGF alpha-induced VPF/VEGF gene expression. By clarifying regulatory mechanisms that are critical for angiogenic processes in the skin, these studies may form the basis for new therapeutic strategies to modulate VPF/VEGF expression in cutaneous inflammation and wound healing. PMID:9049304

  17. Transcription Antitermination by a Phosphorylated Response Regulator and Cobalamin-Dependent Termination at a B12 Riboswitch Contribute to Ethanolamine Utilization in Enterococcus faecalis▿†

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kris Ann; Perego, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to utilize ethanolamine (EA) as a carbon and nitrogen source may confer an advantage for survival, colonization, and pathogenicity in the human intestinal tract. Enterococcus faecalis, a Gram-positive human commensal organism, depends on a two-component signaling system (TCS-17) for sensing EA and regulating the expression of the ethanolamine utilization genes. Multiple promoters participate in eut gene expression in the presence of EA as the sole carbon source and cobalamin (CoB12), an essential cofactor in the enzymatic degradation process. By means of in vivo and in vitro approaches, this study characterized the transcriptional activity identified in the eutT-eutG intergenic region of the E. faecalis eut cluster. Two novel promoters in this region were shown to be active in vivo. The distal P2-1 promoter was associated with a B12 riboswitch that terminated transcription in the presence of CoB12. Transcription elongation from the proximal P2-2 promoter was regulated by antitermination mediated by the phosphorylated form of the response regulator of TCS-17 (RR17). 3′-Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) analyses of the terminated RNA products allowed precise identification of the hairpin loop structures involved in termination/antitermination. The results uncovered the role of the B12 riboswitch and RR17 in eut gene expression, adding to the complexity of this regulatory pathway and extending the knowledge of possible means of transcription regulation in Gram-positive organisms. PMID:21441515

  18. Noncoding RNA. piRNA-guided slicing specifies transcripts for Zucchini-dependent, phased piRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mohn, Fabio; Handler, Dominik; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-05-15

    In animal gonads, PIWI-clade Argonaute proteins repress transposons sequence-specifically via bound Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These are processed from single-stranded precursor RNAs by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we show that primary piRNA biogenesis is a 3'-directed and phased process that, in the Drosophila germ line, is initiated by secondary piRNA-guided transcript cleavage. Phasing results from consecutive endonucleolytic cleavages catalyzed by Zucchini, implying coupled formation of 3' and 5' ends of flanking piRNAs. Unexpectedly, Zucchini also participates in 3' end formation of secondary piRNAs. Its function can, however, be bypassed by downstream piRNA-guided precursor cleavages coupled to exonucleolytic trimming. Our data uncover an evolutionarily conserved piRNA biogenesis mechanism in which Zucchini plays a central role in defining piRNA 5' and 3' ends. PMID:25977553

  19. Glucose-based regulation of miR-451/AMPK signaling depends on the OCT1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Khairul I; Ogawa, Daisuke; Rooj, Arun K; Lawler, Sean E; Krichevsky, Anna M; Johnson, Mark D; Chiocca, E Antonio; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Godlewski, Jakub

    2015-05-12

    In aggressive, rapidly growing solid tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), cancer cells face frequent dynamic changes in their microenvironment, including the availability of glucose and other nutrients. These challenges require that tumor cells have the ability to adapt in order to survive periods of nutrient/energy starvation. We have identified a reciprocal negative feedback loop mechanism in which the levels of microRNA-451 (miR-451) are negatively regulated through the phosphorylation and inactivation of its direct transcriptional activator OCT1 by 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is activated by glucose depletion-induced metabolic stress. Conversely, in a glucose-rich environment, unrestrained expression of miR-451 suppresses AMPK pathway activity. These findings uncover miR-451 as a major effector of glucose-regulated AMPK signaling, allowing tumor cell adaptation to variations in nutrient availability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25937278

  20. Noncoding RNA. piRNA-guided slicing specifies transcripts for Zucchini-dependent, phased piRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mohn, Fabio; Handler, Dominik; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-05-15

    In animal gonads, PIWI-clade Argonaute proteins repress transposons sequence-specifically via bound Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These are processed from single-stranded precursor RNAs by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we show that primary piRNA biogenesis is a 3'-directed and phased process that, in the Drosophila germ line, is initiated by secondary piRNA-guided transcript cleavage. Phasing results from consecutive endonucleolytic cleavages catalyzed by Zucchini, implying coupled formation of 3' and 5' ends of flanking piRNAs. Unexpectedly, Zucchini also participates in 3' end formation of secondary piRNAs. Its function can, however, be bypassed by downstream piRNA-guided precursor cleavages coupled to exonucleolytic trimming. Our data uncover an evolutionarily conserved piRNA biogenesis mechanism in which Zucchini plays a central role in defining piRNA 5' and 3' ends.

  1. Survivin expression promotes VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis via PI3K/Akt enhanced β-catenin/Tcf-Lef dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Jaime G; Rodríguez, Diego A; Valenzuela, Manuel; Calderon, Claudia; Urzúa, Ulises; Munroe, David; Rosas, Carlos; Lemus, David; Díaz, Natalia; Wright, Mathew C; Leyton, Lisette; Tapia, Julio C; Quest, Andrew Fg

    2014-09-09

    Early in cancer development, tumour cells express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secreted molecule that is important in all stages of angiogenesis, an essential process that provides nutrients and oxygen to the nascent tumor and thereby enhances tumor-cell survival and facilitates growth. Survivin, another protein involved in angiogenesis, is strongly expressed in most human cancers, where it promotes tumor survival by reducing apoptosis as well as favoring endothelial cell proliferation and migration. The mechanisms by which cancer cells induce VEGF expression and angiogenesis upon survivin up-regulation remain to be fully established. Since the PI3K/Akt signalling and β-catenin-Tcf/Lef dependent transcription have been implicated in the expression of many cancer-related genes, including survivin and VEGF, we evaluated whether survivin may favor VEGF expression, release from tumor cells and induction of angiogenesis in a PI3K/Akt-β-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent manner. Here, we provide evidence linking survivin expression in tumor cells to increased β-catenin protein levels, β-catenin-Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity and expression of several target genes of this pathway, including survivin and VEGF, which accumulates in the culture medium. Alternatively, survivin downregulation reduced β-catenin protein levels and β-catenin-Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity. Also, using inhibitors of PI3K and the expression of dominant negative Akt, we show that survivin acts upstream in an amplification loop to promote VEGF expression. Moreover, survivin knock-down in B16F10 murine melanoma cells diminished the number of blood vessels and reduced VEGF expression in tumors formed in C57BL/6 mice. Finally, in the chick chorioallantoid membrane assay, survivin expression in tumor cells enhanced VEGF liberation and blood vessel formation. Importantly, the presence of neutralizing anti-VEGF antibodies precluded survivin-enhanced angiogenesis in this assay. These

  2. Differential control of Mincle-dependent cord factor recognition and macrophage responses by the transcription factors C/EBPβ and HIF1α.

    PubMed

    Schoenen, Hanne; Huber, Alexandra; Sonda, Nada; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Jantsch, Jonathan; Lepenies, Bernd; Bronte, Vincenzo; Lang, Roland

    2014-10-01

    Trehalose-6,6-dimycolate (TDM), the mycobacterial cord factor, and its synthetic analog Trehalose-6,6-dibehenate (TDB) bind to the C-type lectin receptors macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) and Mcl to activate macrophages. Genetically, the transcriptional response to TDB/TDM has been defined to require FcRγ-Syk-Card9 signaling. However, TDB/TDM-triggered kinase activation has not been studied well, and it is largely unknown which transcriptional regulators bring about inflammatory gene expression. In this article, we report that TDB/TDM caused only weak Syk-phosphorylation in resting macrophages, consistent with low basal Mincle expression. However, LPS-priming caused MYD88-dependent upregulation of Mincle, resulting in enhanced TDB/TDM-induced kinase activation and more rapid inflammatory gene expression. TLR-induced Mincle expression partially circumvented the requirement for Mcl in the response to TDB/TDM. To dissect transcriptional responses to TDB/TDM, we mined microarray data and identified early growth response (Egr) family transcription factors as direct Mincle target genes, whereas upregulation of Cebpb and Hif1a required new protein synthesis. Macrophages and dendritic cells lacking C/EBPβ showed nearly complete abrogation of TDB/TDM responsiveness, but also failed to upregulate Mincle. Retroviral rescue of Mincle expression in Cebpb-deficient cells restored induction of Egr1, but not of G-CSF. This pattern of C/EBPβ dependence was also observed after stimulation with the Dectin-1 ligand Curdlan. Inducible expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) also required C/EBPβ. In turn, HIF1α was not required for Mincle expression, kinase activation, and Egr1 or Csf3 expression, but critically contributed to NO production. Taken together, we identify C/EBPβ as central hub in Mincle expression and inflammatory gene induction, whereas HIF1α controls Nos2 expression. C/EBPβ also connects TLR signals to cord factor responsiveness through MYD

  3. Survivin expression promotes VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis via PI3K/Akt enhanced β-catenin/Tcf-Lef dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Jaime G; Rodríguez, Diego A; Valenzuela, Manuel; Calderon, Claudia; Urzúa, Ulises; Munroe, David; Rosas, Carlos; Lemus, David; Díaz, Natalia; Wright, Mathew C; Leyton, Lisette; Tapia, Julio C; Quest, Andrew Fg

    2014-01-01

    Early in cancer development, tumour cells express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secreted molecule that is important in all stages of angiogenesis, an essential process that provides nutrients and oxygen to the nascent tumor and thereby enhances tumor-cell survival and facilitates growth. Survivin, another protein involved in angiogenesis, is strongly expressed in most human cancers, where it promotes tumor survival by reducing apoptosis as well as favoring endothelial cell proliferation and migration. The mechanisms by which cancer cells induce VEGF expression and angiogenesis upon survivin up-regulation remain to be fully established. Since the PI3K/Akt signalling and β-catenin-Tcf/Lef dependent transcription have been implicated in the expression of many cancer-related genes, including survivin and VEGF, we evaluated whether survivin may favor VEGF expression, release from tumor cells and induction of angiogenesis in a PI3K/Akt-β-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent manner. Here, we provide evidence linking survivin expression in tumor cells to increased β-catenin protein levels, β-catenin-Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity and expression of several target genes of this pathway, including survivin and VEGF, which accumulates in the culture medium. Alternatively, survivin downregulation reduced β-catenin protein levels and β-catenin-Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity. Also, using inhibitors of PI3K and the expression of dominant negative Akt, we show that survivin acts upstream in an amplification loop to promote VEGF expression. Moreover, survivin knock-down in B16F10 murine melanoma cells diminished the number of blood vessels and reduced VEGF expression in tumors formed in C57BL/6 mice. Finally, in the chick chorioallantoid membrane assay, survivin expression in tumor cells enhanced VEGF liberation and blood vessel formation. Importantly, the presence of neutralizing anti-VEGF antibodies precluded survivin-enhanced angiogenesis in this assay. These

  4. Krüppel-like factor 6 is a co-activator of NF-κB that mediates p65-dependent transcription of selected downstream genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Lei, Cao-Qi; Hu, Yun-Hong; Xia, Tian; Li, Mi; Zhong, Bo; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2014-05-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB plays a pivotal role in a broad range of physiological and pathological processes, including development, inflammation, and immunity. How NF-κB integrates activating signals to expression of specific sets of target genes is of great interest. Here, we identified Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) as a co-activator of NF-κB after TNFα and IL-1β stimulation. Overexpression of KLF6 enhanced TNFα- and IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB and transcription of a subset of downstream genes, whereas knockdown of KLF6 had opposite effects. KLF6 interacted with p65 in the nucleus and bound to the promoters of target genes. Upon IL-1β stimulation, KLF6 was recruited to promoters of a subset of NF-κB target genes in a p65-dependent manner, which was in turn required for the optimal binding of p65 to the target gene promoters. Our findings thus identified KLF6 as a previously unknown but essential co-activator of NF-κB and provided new insight into the molecular regulation of p65-dependent gene expression.

  5. Identification of host transcriptional networks showing concentration-dependent regulation by HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins in basal cervical squamous epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen P.; Scarpini, Cinzia G.; Groves, Ian J.; Odle, Richard I.; Coleman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma requires increased expression of the major high-risk human-papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 in basal cervical epithelial cells. We used a systems biology approach to identify host transcriptional networks in such cells and study the concentration-dependent changes produced by HPV16-E6 and -E7 oncoproteins. We investigated sample sets derived from the W12 model of cervical neoplastic progression, for which high quality phenotype/genotype data were available. We defined a gene co-expression matrix containing a small number of highly-connected hub nodes that controlled large numbers of downstream genes (regulons), indicating the scale-free nature of host gene co-expression in W12. We identified a small number of ‘master regulators’ for which downstream effector genes were significantly associated with protein levels of HPV16 E6 (n = 7) or HPV16 E7 (n = 5). We validated our data by depleting E6/E7 in relevant cells and by functional analysis of selected genes in vitro. We conclude that the network of transcriptional interactions in HPV16-infected basal-type cervical epithelium is regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by E6/E7, via a limited number of central master-regulators. These effects are likely to be significant in cervical carcinogenesis, where there is competitive selection of cells with elevated expression of virus oncoproteins. PMID:27457222

  6. Poly(A) Signal-Dependent Transcription Termination Occurs through a Conformational Change Mechanism that Does Not Require Cleavage at the Poly(A) Site.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Rigo, Frank; Martinson, Harold G

    2015-08-01

    Transcription termination for genes encoding polyadenylated mRNAs requires a functional poly(A) signal (PAS) in the nascent pre-mRNA. Often called PAS-dependent termination, or PADT, it is widely assumed that the PAS requirement reflects an obligatory poly(A) site cleavage requirement for termination. Cleavage is thought to provide entry for a 5'-to-3' exonuclease that targets RNA polymerase II via the nascent transcript-i.e., the torpedo model. To assess the role of cleavage in PADT, we developed a PADT assay using HeLa nuclear extract. Here we examine the basal mechanism of PADT and show that cleavage at the poly(A) site is not required for PADT. Isolated elongation complexes undergo termination in a PAS-dependent manner when incubated in buffer, in the absence of extract, nucleotides, or cleavage at the poly(A) site. Thus, PADT-proficient complexes undergo a conformational change that triggers termination. PADT is inhibited by α-amanitin, which presumably blocks the required conformational change. PMID:26166703

  7. Dependence of Proximal GC Boxes and Binding Transcription Factors in the Regulation of Basal and Valproic Acid-Induced Expression of t-PA.

    PubMed

    Ulfhammer, Erik; Larsson, Pia; Magnusson, Mia; Karlsson, Lena; Bergh, Niklas; Jern, Sverker

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) release is a pivotal response to protect the circulation from occluding thrombosis. We have shown that the t-PA gene is epigenetically regulated and greatly induced by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA). We now investigated involvement of known t-PA promoter regulatory elements and evaluated dependence of potential interacting transcription factors/cofactors. Methods. A reporter vector with an insert, separately mutated at either the t-PA promoter CRE or GC box II or GC box III elements, was transfected into HT-1080 and HUVECs and challenged with VPA. HUVECs were targeted with siRNA against histone acetyl transferases (HAT) and selected transcription factors from the Sp/KLF family. Results. An intact VPA-response was observed with CRE mutated constructs, whereas mutation of GC boxes II and III reduced the magnitude of the induction by 54 and 79% in HT-1080 and 49 and 50% in HUVECs, respectively. An attenuated induction of t-PA mRNA was observed after Sp2, Sp4, and KLF5 depletion. KLF2 and p300 (HAT) were identified as positive regulators of basal t-PA expression and Sp4 and KLF9 as repressors. Conclusion. VPA-induced t-PA expression is dependent on the proximal GC boxes in the t-PA promoter and may involve interactions with Sp2, Sp4, and KLF5.

  8. Reciprocal light-dark transcriptional control of nif and rbc expression and light-dependent posttranslational control of nitrogenase activity in Synechococcus sp. strain RF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, T J; Tabita, F R

    1994-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain RF-1 exhibits a circadian rhythm of N2 fixation when cells are grown under a light-dark cycle, with nitrogenase activity observed only during the dark period. This dark-dependent activity correlated with nif gene transcription in strain RF-1. By using antibodies against dinitrogenase reductase (the Fe protein of the nitrogenase complex), it was found that there was a distinct shift in the mobility of this protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels during the light-dark cycle. The Fe protein was present only when cells were incubated in the dark. Upon illumination, there was a conversion of all Fe protein to a modified form, after which it rapidly disappeared from extracts. These studies indicated that all nitrogenase activity present during the dark cycle resulted from de novo synthesis of nitrogenase. Upon entering the light phase, cells appeared to quickly degrade the modified form of Fe protein, perhaps as a result of activating or inducing a protease. By contrast, transcription of the rbcL gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of the key enzyme of CO2 fixation (a light-dependent process), was enhanced in the light. Images PMID:7928999

  9. PML involvement in the p73-mediated E1A-induced suppression of EGFR and induction of apoptosis in head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Klanrit, P; Taebunpakul, P; Flinterman, MB; Odell, EW; Riaz, MA; Melino, G; Salomoni, P; Mymryk, JS; Gäken, J; Farzaneh, F; Tavassoli, M

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase is commonly overexpressed in human cancers; however, the cellular mechanisms regulating EGFR expression remain unclear. p53, p63 and p73 are transcription factors regulating many cellular targets involved in controlling the cell cycle and apoptosis. p53 activates EGFR expression, whereas TAp63 represses EGFR transcription. The involvement of p73 in the regulation of EGFR has not been reported. Here, a strong correlation between EGFR overexpression and increased levels of the oncogenic ΔNp73 isoform in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines was observed. Ectopic expression of TAp73, particularly TAp73β, resulted in suppression of the EGFR promoter, significant downregulation of EGFR protein and efficient induction of cell death in all six EGFR-overexpressing HNSCC cell lines. EGFR overexpression from a heterologous LTR promoter protected lung cancer cells from TAp73β-induced EGFR suppression and apoptosis. Expression of TAp73β efficiently induced promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein expression and PML knockdown by shRNA attenuated the downregulation of EGFR and induction of apoptosis by p73 in HNSCC cells. Furthermore, PML was found to be important for E1A-induced suppression of EGFR and subsequent killing of HNSCC cells. Our data therefore suggest a novel pathway involving PML and p73 in the regulation of EGFR expression. PMID:19597475

  10. A novel c-Jun-dependent signal transduction pathway necessary for the transcriptional activation of interferon gamma response genes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Daniel J; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Ko, Enoch Yi-No; Arthur, Helen A; Schreiber, Robert D; Trapani, Joseph A; Clarke, Christopher J P; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2007-01-12

    The biological effects of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) are mediated by interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), many of which are activated downstream of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling. Herein we have shown that IFNgamma rapidly activated AP-1 DNA binding that required c-Jun but was independent of JAK1 and STAT1. IFNgamma-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and AP-1 DNA binding required the MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, whereas the JNK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were dispensable. The induction of several ISGs, including ifi-205 and iNOS, was impaired in IFNgamma-treated c-Jun-/- cells, but others, such as IP-10 and SOCS3, were unaffected, and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c-Jun binds to the iNOS promoter following treatment with IFNgamma. Thus, IFNgamma induced JAK1- and STAT1-independent activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, phosphorylation of c-Jun, and activation of AP-1 DNA binding, which are important for the induction of a subset of ISGs. This represents a novel signal transduction pathway induced by IFNgamma that proceeds in parallel with conventional JAK/STAT signaling to activate ISGs.

  11. Transcription factor Spi-B-dependent and -independent pathways for the development of Peyer's patch M cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Kaneto, S; Shibata, N; Takahashi, Y; Okura, H; Yuki, Y; Kunisawa, J; Kiyono, H

    2013-07-01

    Although many of the biological features of microfold cells (M cells) have been known for many years, the molecular mechanisms of M-cell development and antigen recognition have remained unclear. Here, we report that Umod is a novel M-cell-specific gene, the translation products of which might contribute to the uptake function of M cells. Transcription factor Spi-B was also specifically expressed in M cells among non-hematopoietic lineages. Spi-B-deficient mice showed reduced expression of most, but not all, other M-cell-specific genes and M-cell surface markers. Whereas uptake of Salmonella Typhimurium via M cells was obviously reduced in Spi-B-deficient mice, the abundance of intratissue cohabiting bacteria was comparable between wild-type and Spi-B-deficient mice. These data indicate that there is a small M-cell population with developmental regulation that is Spi-B independent; however, Spi-B is probably a candidate master regulator of M-cell functional maturation and development by another pathway.

  12. A novel c-Jun-dependent signal transduction pathway necessary for the transcriptional activation of interferon gamma response genes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Daniel J; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Ko, Enoch Yi-No; Arthur, Helen A; Schreiber, Robert D; Trapani, Joseph A; Clarke, Christopher J P; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2007-01-12

    The biological effects of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) are mediated by interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), many of which are activated downstream of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling. Herein we have shown that IFNgamma rapidly activated AP-1 DNA binding that required c-Jun but was independent of JAK1 and STAT1. IFNgamma-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and AP-1 DNA binding required the MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, whereas the JNK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were dispensable. The induction of several ISGs, including ifi-205 and iNOS, was impaired in IFNgamma-treated c-Jun-/- cells, but others, such as IP-10 and SOCS3, were unaffected, and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c-Jun binds to the iNOS promoter following treatment with IFNgamma. Thus, IFNgamma induced JAK1- and STAT1-independent activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, phosphorylation of c-Jun, and activation of AP-1 DNA binding, which are important for the induction of a subset of ISGs. This represents a novel signal transduction pathway induced by IFNgamma that proceeds in parallel with conventional JAK/STAT signaling to activate ISGs. PMID:17105733

  13. A comprehensive study design reveals treatment- and transcript abundance–dependent concordance between RNA-seq and microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charles; Gong, Binsheng; Bushel, Pierre R.; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Xu, Joshua; Fang, Hong; Hong, Huixiao; Shen, Jie; Su, Zhenqiang; Meehan, Joe; Li, Xiaojin; Yang, Lu; Li, Haiqing; Łabaj, Paweł P.; Kreil, David P.; Megherbi, Dalila; Florian, Caiment; Gaj, Stan; van Delft, Joost; Kleinjans, Jos; Scherer, Andreas; Viswanath, Devanarayan; Wang, Jian; Yang, Yong; Qian, Hui-Rong; Lancashire, Lee J.; Bessarabova, Marina; Nikolsky, Yuri; Furlanello, Cesare; Chierici, Marco; Albanese, Davide; Jurman, Giuseppe; Riccadonna, Samantha; Filosi, Michele; Visintainer, Roberto; Zhang, Ke K.; Li, Jianying; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Svoboda, Daniel L.; Fuscoe, James C.; Deng, Youping; Shi, Leming; Paules, Richard S.; Auerbach, Scott S.; Tong, Weida

    2014-01-01

    RNA-seq facilitates unbiased genome-wide gene-expression profiling. However, its concordance with the well-established microarray platform must be rigorously assessed for confident uses in clinical and regulatory application. Here we use a comprehensive study design to generate Illumina RNA-seq and Affymetrix microarray data from the same set of liver samples of rats under varying degrees of perturbation by 27 chemicals representing multiple modes of action (MOA). The cross-platform concordance in terms of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) or enriched pathways is highly correlated with treatment effect size, gene-expression abundance and the biological complexity of the MOA. RNA-seq outperforms microarray (90% versus 76%) in DEG verification by quantitative PCR and the main gain is its improved accuracy for low expressed genes. Nonetheless, predictive classifiers derived from both platforms performed similarly. Therefore, the endpoint studied and its biological complexity, transcript abundance, and intended application are important factors in transcriptomic research and for decision-making. PMID:25150839

  14. Temperature dependent changes in cocaine- and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) peptide in the brain of tadpole, Sylvirana temporalis.

    PubMed

    Shewale, Swapnil A; Gaupale, Tekchand C; Bhargava, Shobha

    2015-09-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CARTp) has emerged as a novel neurotransmitter in the brain. Although the physiological role of the peptide has been intensely investigated in mammals, its role in amphibians has not been investigated. In the present study, an attempt has been undertaken to study the expression of CART in the tadpole brain of frog Sylvirana temporalis, subjected to thermal stress. Cells with strong CART-immunoreactivity were observed in the nucleus preoptic area (NPO) of tadpoles exposed to high temperature (37±2°C) as compared to those in the tadpoles exposed to low (12±2°C) and normal (24±2°C) temperatures. In the ventromedial thalamic nucleus (VM) and nucleus posterocentralis thalami (NPC), moderate CART-ir cells were observed in the control groups while number of cells and intensity of immunoreactivity was increased in tadpoles at low and high temperatures. In the nucleus infundibularis ventralis (NIV) and raphe nucleus (RA), CART immunoreactivity increased in the low as well as high temperature treated groups. Intensely stained CART cells were observed in the pituitary of tadpoles exposed to high temperature as compared to low temperature and control groups. We suggest that CART system in the brain and pituitary of tadpole may play a very important role in mediating responses to temperature variations in the environment. PMID:24983774

  15. Differential, Positional-Dependent Transcriptional Response of Antigenic Variation (var) Genes to Biological Stress in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Oshrit; Sinay, Rosa; Cowman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    1% of the genes of the human malaria causing agent Plasmodium falciparum belong to the heterogeneous var gene family which encodes P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PFEMP1). This protein mediates part of the pathogenesis of the disease by causing adherence of infected erythrocytes (IE) to the host endothelium. At any given time, only one copy of the family is expressed on the IE surface. The cues which regulate the allelic exclusion of these genes are not known. We show the existence of a differential expression pattern of these genes upon exposure to biological stress in relation to their positional placement on the chromosome – expression of centrally located var genes is induced while sub-telomeric copies of the family are repressed - this phenomenon orchestrated by the histone deacetylase pfsir2. Moreover, stress was found to cause a switch in the pattern of the expressed var genes thus acting as a regulatory cue. By using pharmacological compounds which putatively affect pfsir2 activity, distinct changes of var gene expression patterns were achieved which may have therapeutic ramifications. As disease severity is partly associated with expression of particular var gene subtypes, manipulation of the IE environment may serve as a mechanism to direct transcription towards less virulent genes. PMID:19730749

  16. PutA protein, a membrane-associated flavin dehydrogenase, acts as a redox-dependent transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky de Spicer, P; Maloy, S

    1993-01-01

    The proline utilization (put) operon of Salmonella typhimurium is transcriptionally repressed by PutA protein in the absence of proline. PutA protein also carries out the enzymatic steps in proline catabolism. These two roles require different cellular localizations of PutA. Catabolism of proline requires PutA to associate with the membrane because reoxidation of the FAD cofactor in PutA needs the presence of an electron acceptor. Repression of the put operon requires PutA to bind to the put control-region DNA in the cytoplasm. The presence of proline, the inducer, is necessary but not sufficient for PutA to discriminate between its roles as an enzyme or as a repressor. Two conditions that prevent PutA protein binding to the put control region are (i) when proline and an electron acceptor or the cytoplasmic membrane are present or (ii) when PutA is reduced by dithionite. These two conditions increase the relative hydrophobicity of PutA protein, favoring membrane association and therefore enzymatic activity. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8483946

  17. Ubiquitin-independent- versus ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation of the c-Fos and Fra-1 transcription factors: is there a unique answer?

    PubMed

    Basbous, Jihane; Jariel-Encontre, Isabelle; Gomard, Tiphanie; Bossis, Guillaume; Piechaczyk, Marc

    2008-02-01

    The Fos family of transcription factors comprises c-Fos, Fra-1, Fra-2 and FosB, which are all intrinsically unstable proteins. Fos proteins heterodimerize with a variety of other transcription factors to control genes encoding key cell regulators. Their best known partners are the Jun family proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD). At the cellular level, Fos-involving dimers control proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and responses to environmental cues. At the organism level, they play paramount parts in organogenesis, immune responses and cognitive functions, among others. fos family genes are subjected to exquisite, complex and intermingled transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations, which are necessary to avoid pathological effects. In particular, the Fos proteins undergo to numerous post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylations and sumoylation, regulating their transcriptional activity, their subcellular localization and their turnover. The mechanisms whereby c-Fos and Fra-1 are degraded have been studied in detail. Contrasting with the classical scenario, according to which most unstable key cell regulators are hydrolyzed by the proteasome after conjugation of polyubiquitin chains, the bulk of c-Fos and Fra-1 can be hydrolyzed independently of any prior ubiquitylation in different situations. c-Fos and Fra-1 share a common destabilizing domain whose primary sequence is conserved in Fra-2 and FosB, suggesting that similar breakdown mechanisms might be at play in the latter two proteins. However, a database search indicates that this domain is not found in any other protein, suggesting that the mechanisms underlying Fos protein destruction may be specific to this family. Interestingly, under particular conditions, a fraction of cytoplasmic c-Fos is ubiquitylated, leading to faster turnover. This poses the question of the multiplicity of degradation pathways that can target the same substrate depending on its activation state, its protein

  18. Differences in the expression of cathepsin B in B16 melanoma metastatic variants depend on transcription factor Sp1.

    PubMed

    Sitabkhan, Yasmin; Frankfater, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Cathepsin B contributes to the invasiveness of B16 melanoma cells in mice, with the highly metastatic B16a melanoma producing six- to eightfold more cathepsin B mRNA and protein than the less metastatic B16F1 variant. The proximal promoter region of the cathepsin B (Ctsb) gene (-149 to +94) was previously found to be capable of reproducing this pattern of differential gene activation in B16 melanoma variants. The binding of B16 melanoma nuclear proteins to this promoter region has now been mapped to three GC-boxes (Sp1 transcription factor binding sites) and a potential X-box [tax response element (TRE)/c-AMP responsive element (CRE) site]. Mutation of the GC-boxes at -55 and -37 independently decreased the expression of a luciferase reporter gene in B16a cells to the level observed in B16F1 cells. Promoter activity was also attenuated by mutations within the GC-rich segment between +6 and +16, but not by mutation of the putative X-box. Both Sp1 and Sp3 bound the GC-boxes in the Ctsb promoter, and western blotting showed the level of Sp1 to be greater in B16a compared to B16F1 cells. B16F1 cells that were made to express Sp1 at levels observed in B16a cells produced corresponding increased amounts of endogenous cathepsin B mRNA and enzyme activity. Thus, the difference in cathepsin B expression between high and low metastatic B16 melanoma variants is largely due to different levels of Sp1. PMID:17691867

  19. Aquaporin family genes exhibit developmentally-regulated and host-dependent transcription patterns in the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi.

    PubMed

    Farlora, Rodolfo; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Chávez-Mardones, Jacqueline; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins are small integral membrane proteins that function as pore channels for the transport of water and other small solutes across the cell membrane. Considering the important roles of these proteins in several biological processes, including host-parasite interactions, there has been increased research on aquaporin proteins recently. The present study expands on the knowledge of aquaporin family genes in parasitic copepods, examining diversity and expression during the ontogeny of the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi. Furthermore, aquaporin expression was evaluated during the early infestation of Atlantic (Salmo salar) and Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Deep transcriptome sequencing data revealed eight full length and two partial open reading frames belonging to the aquaporin protein family. Clustering analyses with identified Caligidae sequences revealed three major clades of aquaglyceroporins (Cr-Glp), classical aquaporin channels (Cr-Bib and Cr-PripL), and unorthodox aquaporins (Cr-Aqp12-like). In silico analysis revealed differential expression of aquaporin genes between developmental stages and between sexes. Male-biased expression of Cr-Glp1_v1 and female-biased expression of Cr-Bib were further confirmed in adults by RT-qPCR. Additionally, gene expressions were measured for seven aquaporins during the early infestation stage. The majority of aquaporin genes showed significant differential transcription expressions between sea lice parasitizing different hosts, with Atlantic salmon sea lice exhibiting overall reduced expression as compared to Coho salmon. The observed differences in the regulation of aquaporin genes may reveal osmoregulatory adaptations associated with nutrient ingestion and metabolite waste export, exposing complex host-parasite relationships in C. rogercresseyi. PMID:27016299

  20. Thyroid hormones regulate phosphate homoeostasis through transcriptional control of the renal type IIa sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter (Npt2a) gene.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Mariko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Masuda, Masashi; Kozai, Mina; Takei, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Sarasa; Sato, Tadatoshi; Segawa, Hiroko; Taketani, Yutaka; Arai, Hidekazu; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Takeda, Eiji

    2010-03-15

    The type IIa renal sodium-dependent phosphate (Na/Pi) co-transporter Npt2a is implicated in the control of serum phosphate levels. It has been demonstrated previously that renal Npt2a protein and its mRNA expression are both up-regulated by the thyroid hormone T3 (3,3',5-tri-iodothyronine) in rats. However, it has never been established whether the induction was mediated by a direct effect of thyroid hormones on the Npt2a promoter. To address the role of Npt2a in T3-dependent regulation of phosphate homoeostasis and to identify the molecular mechanisms by which thyroid hormones modulate Npt2a gene expression, mice were rendered pharmacologically hypo- and hyper-thyroid. Hypothyroid mice showed low levels of serum phosphate and a marked decrease in renal Npt2a protein abundance. Importantly, we also showed that Npt2a-deficient mice had impaired serum phosphate responsiveness to T3 compared with wild-type mice. Promoter analysis with a luciferase assay revealed that the transcriptional activity of a reporter gene containing the Npt2a promoter and intron 1 was dependent upon TRs (thyroid hormone receptors) and specifically increased by T3 in renal cells. Deletion analysis and EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) determined that there were unique TREs (thyroid-hormone-responsive elements) within intron 1 of the Npt2a gene. These results suggest that Npt2a plays a critical role as a T3-target gene, to control phosphate homoeostasis, and that T3 transcriptionally activates the Npt2a gene via TRs in a renal cell-specific manner.

  1. DNA binding of the cell cycle transcriptional regulator GcrA depends on N6-adenosine methylation in Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Fumeaux, Coralie; Mohapatra, Saswat S; Bompard, Coralie; Brilli, Matteo; Frandi, Antonio; Castric, Vincent; Villeret, Vincent; Viollier, Patrick H; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2013-05-01

    Several regulators are involved in the control of cell cycle progression in the bacterial model system Caulobacter crescentus, which divides asymmetrically into a vegetative G1-phase (swarmer) cell and a replicative S-phase (stalked) cell. Here we report a novel functional interaction between the enigmatic cell cycle regulator GcrA and the N6-adenosine methyltransferase CcrM, both highly conserved proteins among Alphaproteobacteria, that are activated early and at the end of S-phase, respectively. As no direct biochemical and regulatory relationship between GcrA and CcrM were known, we used a combination of ChIP (chromatin-immunoprecipitation), biochemical and biophysical experimentation, and genetics to show that GcrA is a dimeric DNA-binding protein that preferentially targets promoters harbouring CcrM methylation sites. After tracing CcrM-dependent N6-methyl-adenosine promoter marks at a genome-wide scale, we show that these marks recruit GcrA in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that, in the presence of a methylated target, GcrA recruits the RNA polymerase to the promoter, consistent with its role in transcriptional activation. Since methylation-dependent DNA binding is also observed with GcrA orthologs from other Alphaproteobacteria, we conclude that GcrA is the founding member of a new and conserved class of transcriptional regulators that function as molecular effectors of a methylation-dependent (non-heritable) epigenetic switch that regulates gene expression during the cell cycle.

  2. Global Rsh-dependent transcription profile of Brucella suis during stringent response unravels adaptation to nutrient starvation and cross-talk with other stress responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the intracellular pathogen Brucella spp., the activation of the stringent response, a global regulatory network providing rapid adaptation to growth-affecting stress conditions such as nutrient deficiency, is essential for replication in the host. A single, bi-functional enzyme Rsh catalyzes synthesis and hydrolysis of the alarmone (p)ppGpp, responsible for differential gene expression under stringent conditions. Results cDNA microarray analysis allowed characterization of the transcriptional profiles of the B. suis 1330 wild-type and Δrsh mutant in a minimal medium, partially mimicking the nutrient-poor intramacrophagic environment. A total of 379 genes (11.6% of the genome) were differentially expressed in a rsh-dependent manner, of which 198 were up-, and 181 were down-regulated. The pleiotropic character of the response was confirmed, as the genes encoded an important number of transcriptional regulators, cell envelope proteins, stress factors, transport systems, and energy metabolism proteins. Virulence genes such as narG and sodC, respectively encoding respiratory nitrate reductase and superoxide dismutase, were under the positive control of (p)ppGpp, as well as expression of the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase, essential for chronic murine infection. Methionine was the only amino acid whose biosynthesis was absolutely dependent on stringent response in B. suis. Conclusions The study illustrated the complexity of the processes involved in adaptation to nutrient starvation, and contributed to a better understanding of the correlation between stringent response and Brucella virulence. Most interestingly, it clearly indicated (p)ppGpp-dependent cross-talk between at least three stress responses playing a central role in Brucella adaptation to the host: nutrient, oxidative, and low-oxygen stress. PMID:23834488

  3. The NAD-Dependent Deacetylase Sirtuin-1 Regulates the Expression of Osteogenic Transcriptional Activator Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (Runx2) and Production of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 in Chondrocytes in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Koh; Kobayashi, Hajime; Yatabe, Kanaka; Yui, Naoko; Fujiya, Hiroto; Niki, Hisateru; Musha, Haruki; Yudoh, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Aging is one of the major pathologic factors associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Recently, numerous reports have demonstrated the impact of sirtuin-1 (Sirt1), which is the NAD-dependent deacetylase, on human aging. It has been demonstrated that Sirt1 induces osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. However, the role of Sirt1 in the OA chondrocytes still remains unknown. We postulated that Sirt1 regulates a hypertrophic chondrocyte lineage and degeneration of articular cartilage through the activation of osteogenic transcriptional activator Runx2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 in OA chondrocytes. To verify whether sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) regulates chondrocyte activity in OA, we studied expressions of Sirt1, Runx2 and production of MMP-13, and their associations in human OA chondrocytes. The expression of Sirt1 was ubiquitously observed in osteoarthritic chondrocytes; in contrast, Runx2 expressed in the osteophyte region in patients with OA and OA model mice. OA relating catabolic factor IL-1βincreased the expression of Runx2 in OA chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, which were pretreated with Sirt1 inhibitor, inhibited the IL-1β-induced expression of Runx2 compared to the control. Since the Runx2 is a promotor of MMP-13 expression, Sirt1 inactivation may inhibit the Runx2 expression and the resultant down-regulation of MMP-13 production in chondrocytes. Our findings suggest thatSirt1 may regulate the expression of Runx2, which is the osteogenic transcription factor, and the production of MMP-13 from chondrocytes in OA. Since Sirt1 activity is known to be affected by several stresses, including inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as aging, SIRT may be involved in the development of OA. PMID:27367673

  4. Breed-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of 5′-Untranslated GR (NR3C1) Exon 1 mRNA Variants in the Liver of Newborn Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ni, Yingdong; Cong, Rihua; Soloway, Paul D.; Zhao, Ruqian

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are vital for life and regulate an array of physiological functions by binding to the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid receptor (GR, also known as NR3C1). Previous studies demonstrate striking breed differences in plasma cortisol levels in pigs. However, investigation into the breed-dependent GR transcriptional regulation is hampered by lacking porcine GR promoter information. In this study, we sequenced 5.3 kb upstream of the translation start codon of the porcine GR gene, and identified seven alternative 5′-untranslated exons 1–4, 1–5, 1–6, 1–7, 1–8, 1–9,10 and 1–11. Among all these mRNA variants, exons 1–4 and 1–5, as well as the total GR were expressed significantly (P<0.05) higher in the liver of newborn piglets of Large White (LW) compared with Erhualian, a Chinese indigenous breed. Overall level of CpG methylation in the region flanking exons 1–4 and 1–5 did not show breed difference. However, nuclear content of Sp1, p-CREB and GR in the liver was significantly (P<0.05) higher in LW piglets, associated with enhanced binding of p-CREB, and higher level of histone H3 acetylation in 1–4 and 1–5 promoters. In contrast, GR binding to promoters of exons 1–4 and 1–5 was significantly diminished in LW piglets, implicating the presence of negative GREs. These results indicate that the difference in the hepatic expression of GR transcript variants between two breeds of pigs is determined, at least partly, by the disparity in the binding of transcription factors and the enrichment of histone H3 acetylation to the promoters. PMID:22792317

  5. Breed-dependent transcriptional regulation of 5'-untranslated GR (NR3C1) exon 1 mRNA variants in the liver of newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huafeng; Li, Runsheng; Jia, Yimin; Yang, Xiaojing; Ni, Yingdong; Cong, Rihua; Soloway, Paul D; Zhao, Ruqian

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are vital for life and regulate an array of physiological functions by binding to the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid receptor (GR, also known as NR3C1). Previous studies demonstrate striking breed differences in plasma cortisol levels in pigs. However, investigation into the breed-dependent GR transcriptional regulation is hampered by lacking porcine GR promoter information. In this study, we sequenced 5.3 kb upstream of the translation start codon of the porcine GR gene, and identified seven alternative 5'-untranslated exons 1-4, 1-5, 1-6, 1-7, 1-8, 1-9,10 and 1-11. Among all these mRNA variants, exons 1-4 and 1-5, as well as the total GR were expressed significantly (P<0.05) higher in the liver of newborn piglets of Large White (LW) compared with Erhualian, a Chinese indigenous breed. Overall level of CpG methylation in the region flanking exons 1-4 and 1-5 did not show breed difference. However, nuclear content of Sp1, p-CREB and GR in the liver was significantly (P<0.05) higher in LW piglets, associated with enhanced binding of p-CREB, and higher level of histone H3 acetylation in 1-4 and 1-5 promoters. In contrast, GR binding to promoters of exons 1-4 and 1-5 was significantly diminished in LW piglets, implicating the presence of negative GREs. These results indicate that the difference in the hepatic expression of GR transcript variants between two breeds of pigs is determined, at least partly, by the disparity in the binding of transcription factors and the enrichment of histone H3 acetylation to the promoters.

  6. Time-dependent transcriptional profiles of genes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to fadrozole and 17beta-trenbolone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Hecker, Markus; Park, June-Woo; Tompsett, Amber R; Jones, Paul D; Newsted, John; Au, Doris W T; Kong, Richard; Wu, Rudolf S S; Giesy, John P

    2008-12-01

    Both the anabolic androgen 17beta-trenbolone (TRB) and the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (FAD) can cause decreased plasma concentrations of estrogen (E2) and reduce fecundity of fish. However, the underlying mechanisms and the molecular pathways involved are largely unknown. The present study was designed to assess time-dependent effects of FAD and TRB on the transcriptional responses of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). Fourteen-week-old Japanese medaka were exposed to 50 microg FAD/L or 2 microg TRB/L in a 7-d static renewal test, and the expression profiles of 36 HPG axis genes were measured by means of a medaka HPG real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction array after 8 h, 32 h, or 7 d of exposure. Exposure to TRB or FAD caused lesser fecundity of Japanese medaka and down-regulated transcription of vitellogenin and choriogenin (CHG) gene expression in the liver of females. Exposure to FAD for 8 h resulted in an 8-fold and 71-fold down-regulation of expression of estrogen receptor alpha and choriogenin L (CHG L), respectively, in female liver. 17beta-Trenbolone caused similar down-regulation of these genes, but the effects were not observed until 32 h of exposure. These results support the hypothesis that FAD reduces plasma E2 more quickly by inhibiting aromatase enzyme activity than does TRB, which inhibits the production of the E2 precursor testosterone. Exposure to FAD and TRB resulted in rapid (after 8 h) down-regulation of luteinizing hormone receptor and low-density-lipoprotein receptor in the testis to compensate for excessive androgen levels. Overall, the molecular responses observed in the present study differentiate the mechanisms of the reduced fecundity by TRB and FAD.

  7. Preferential repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of a gene in yeast chromosomes and plasmids is dependent on transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Sweder, K S; Hanawalt, P C

    1992-01-01

    While preferential repair of the transcribed strands within active genes has been demonstrated in organisms as diverse as humans and Escherichia coli, it has not previously been shown to occur in chromosomal genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of the expressed RPB2 gene in the chromosome of a repair-proficient strain is much more rapid than that in the nontranscribed strand. Furthermore, a copy of the RPB2 gene borne on a centromeric ARS1 plasmid showed the same strand bias in repair. To investigate the relation of this strand bias to transcription, we studied repair in a yeast strain with the temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. When exponentially growing rpb1-1 cells are shifted to the nonpermissive temperature, they rapidly cease mRNA synthesis. At the permissive temperature, both rpb1-1 and the wild-type, parental cells exhibited rapid, proficient repair in the transcribed strand of chromosomal and plasmid-borne copies of the RPB2 gene. At the nonpermissive temperature, the rate of repair in the transcribed strand in rpb1-1 cells was reduced to that in the nontranscribed strand. These findings establish the dependence of strand bias in repair on transcription by RNA polymerase II in the chromosomes and in plasmids, and they validate the use of plasmids for analysis of the relation of repair to transcription in yeast. Images PMID:1438266

  8. Post-transcriptional regulation of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 and proliferation of human cancer cells depend on IMP-3 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Rivera Vargas, T; Boudoukha, S; Simon, A; Souidi, M; Cuvellier, S; Pinna, G; Polesskaya, A

    2014-05-29

    RNA-binding proteins of the IMP family (insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA-binding proteins 1-3) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Multiple studies have linked high expression of IMP proteins, and especially of IMP-3, to an unfavorable prognosis in numerous types of cancer. The specific importance of IMP-3 for cancer transformation remains poorly understood. We here show that all three IMPs can directly bind the mRNAs of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 (CCND1, D3 and G1) in vivo and in vitro, and yet only IMP-3 regulates the expression of these cyclins in a significant manner in six human cancer cell lines of different origins. In the absence of IMP-3, the levels of CCND1, D3 and G1 proteins fall dramatically, and the cells accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to almost complete proliferation arrest. Our results show that, compared with IMP-1 and IMP-2, IMP-3 is enriched in the nucleus, where it binds the transcripts of CCND1, D3 and G1. The nuclear localization of IMP-3 depends on its protein partner HNRNPM and is indispensable for the post-transcriptional regulation of expression of the cyclins. Cytoplasmic retention of IMP-3 and HNRNPM in human cancer cells leads to significant drop in proliferation. In conclusion, a nuclear IMP-3-HNRNPM complex is important for the efficient synthesis of CCND1, D3 and G1 and for the proliferation of human cancer cells.

  9. Function of the Bacillus subtilis transcription elongation factor NusG in hairpin-dependent RNA polymerase pausing in the trp leader.

    PubMed

    Yakhnin, Alexander V; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2008-10-21

    NusA and NusG are transcription elongation factors that bind to RNA polymerase (RNAP) after sigma subunit release. Escherichia coli NusA (NusA(Ec)) stimulates intrinsic termination and RNAP(Ec) pausing, whereas NusG(Ec) promotes Rho-dependent termination and pause escape. Both Nus factors also participate in the formation of RNAP(Ec) antitermination complexes. We showed that Bacillus subtilis NusA (NusA(Bs)) stimulates intrinsic termination and RNAP(Bs) pausing at U107 and U144 in the trpEDCFBA operon leader. Pausing at U107 and U144 participates in the transcription attenuation and translational control mechanisms, respectively, presumably by providing additional time for trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) to bind to the nascent trp leader transcript. Here, we show that NusG(Bs) causes modest pause stimulation at U107 and dramatic pause stimulation at U144. NusA(Bs) and NusG(Bs) act synergistically to increase the U107 and U144 pause half-lives. NusG(Bs)-stimulated pausing at U144 requires RNAP(Bs), whereas NusA(Bs) stimulates pausing of RNAP(Bs) and RNAP(Ec) at the U144 and E. coli his pause sites. Although NusG(Ec) does not stimulate pausing at U144, it competes with NusG(Bs)-stimulated pausing, suggesting that both proteins bind to the same surface of RNAP(Bs). Inactivation of nusG results in the loss of RNAP pausing at U144 in vivo and elevated trp operon expression, whereas plasmid-encoded NusG complements the mutant defects. Overexpression of nusG reduces trp operon expression to a larger extent than overexpression of nusA. PMID:18852477

  10. Evaluation of potential implication of membrane estrogen binding sites on ERE-dependent transcriptional activity and intracellular estrogen receptor-alpha regulation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye Sook; Leclercq, Guy

    2002-01-01

    The potential involvement of membrane estrogen binding sites in the induction of ERE-dependent transcriptional activity as well as in the regulation of intracellular estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) level under estradiol (E2) stimulation was investigated. Our approach relied upon the use of two DCC-treated E2-BSA (bovine serum albumin) solutions (E2-6-BSA and E2-17-BSA). The absence of detectable free E2 in these solutions was established. Both E2-BSA conjugates led to a transient dose-dependent stimulation of the expression of ERE-luciferase (LUC) reporter gene in MVLN cells (MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a pVit-tk-LUC reporter plasmid), a property not recorded with free E2, which maintained enhanced transcriptional activity during the whole experiment. A very low concentration of E2 (10 pM) synergistically acted with E2-BSA conjugates. Hence, ERE-dependent transcriptional activity induced by these conjugates appeared to result from their known interactions with membrane estrogen binding sites. Anti-estrogens (AEs: 4-OH-TAM and RU 58,668), which antagonize genomic ER responses, abrogated the luciferase activity induced by E2-BSA conjugates, confirming a potential relationship between membrane-related signals and intracellular ER. Moreover, induction of luciferase was recorded when the cells were exposed to IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) and cyclic nucleotides (cAMP/cGMP), suggesting the implication of the latter in the signal transduction pathway leading to the expression of the reporter gene. Growth factors (IGF-I, EGF and TGF-alpha) also slightly stimulated luciferase and synergistically acted with 10 pM E2, or 1 microM E2-BSA conjugates, in agreement with the concept of a cross-talk between steroids and peptides acting on the cell membrane. Remarkably, E2-BSA conjugates, IBMX and all investigated growth factors failed to down-regulate intracellular ER in MCF-7 cells, indicating the need for a direct intracellular interaction of the ligand with the

  11. Inhibition of myogenesis by transforming growth factor β is density-dependent and related to the translocation of transcription factor MEF2 to the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Luciana; Borghi, Serena; Melchionna, Roberta; Berghella, Libera; Baccarani-Contri, Miranda; Parise, Flavia; Ferrari, Stefano; Cossu, Giulio

    1998-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) was found to inhibit differentiation of myogenic cells only when they were grown to high density. Inhibition also occurred when myogenic cells were cocultured with other types of mesenchymal cells but not when they were cocultured with epithelial cells. It is therefore possible that some density-dependent signaling mediates the intracellular response to TGF-β. Within 30 min of treatment, TGF-β induced translocation of MEF2, but not MyoD, myogenin, or p21, to the cytoplasm of myogenic cells grown to high density. Translocation was reversible on withdrawal of TGF-β. By using immune electron microscopy and Western blot analysis on subcellular fractions, MEF2 was shown to be tightly associated with cytoskeleton membrane components. To test whether MEF2 export from the nucleus was causally related to the inhibitory action of TGF-β, we transfected C2C12 myoblasts with MEF2C containing the nuclear localization signal of simian virus 40 large T antigen (nlsSV40). Myogenic cells expressing the chimerical MEF2C/nlsSV40, but not wild-type MEF2C, retained this transcription factor in the nucleus and were resistant to the inhibitory action of TGF-β. We propose a mechanism in which the inhibition of myogenesis by TGF-β is mediated through MEF2 localization to the cytoplasm, thus preventing it from participating in an active transcriptional complex. PMID:9770491

  12. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Modulates the Transcriptional Activity of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Regulates Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Tomoshige; Jaffe, Howard; Amin, Niranjana D.; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Zheng, Ya-Li; Chrousos, George P.; Pant, Harish C.

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, major end effectors of the stress response, play an essential role in the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to memory consolidation and emotional control through their intracellular receptors, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), on the other hand, plays important roles in the morphogenesis and functions of the central nervous system, and its aberrant activation has been associated with development of neurodegenerative disorders. We previously reported that CDK5 phosphorylated the glucocorticoid receptor and modulated its transcriptional activity. Here we found that CDK5 also regulated mineralocorticoid receptor-induced transcriptional activity by phosphorylating multiple serine and threonine residues located in its N-terminal domain through physical interaction. Aldosterone and dexamethasone, respectively, increased and suppressed mRNA/protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat cortical neuronal cells, whereas the endogenous glucocorticoid corticosterone showed a biphasic effect. CDK5 enhanced the effect of aldosterone and dexamethasone on BDNF expression. Because this neurotrophic factor plays critical roles in neuronal viability, synaptic plasticity, consolidation of memory, and emotional changes, we suggest that aberrant activation of CDK5 might influence these functions through corticosteroid receptors/BDNF. PMID:20357208

  13. Structural and mechanistic basis of anti-termination of Rho-dependent transcription termination by bacteriophage P4 capsid protein Psu

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Amitabh; Sharma, Savita; Banerjee, Ramanuj; Sen, Udayaditya; Sen, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    The conserved bacterial transcription terminator, Rho, is a potent target for bactericidal agents. Psu, a bacteriophage P4 capsid protein, is capable of inducing anti-termination to the Rho-dependent transcription termination. Knowledge of structural and mechanistic basis of this anti-termination is required to design peptide-inhibitor(s) of Rho from Psu. Using suppressor genetics, cross-linking, protein foot-printing and FRET analyses, we describe a conserved disordered structure, encompassing 139–153 amino acids of Rho, as the primary docking site for Psu. Also a neighbouring helical structure, comprising 347–354 amino acids, lining its central channel, plays a supportive role in the Rho–Psu complex formation. Based on the crystal structure of Psu, its conformation in the capsid of the P4 phage, and its interacting regions on Rho, we build an energy-minimized structural model of the Rho:Psu complex. In this model, a V-shaped dimer of Psu interacts with the two diagonally opposite subunits of a hexameric Rho, enabling Psu to form a ‘lid’ on the central channel of the latter. We show that this configuration of Psu makes the central channel of Rho inaccessible, and it causes a mechanical impediment to its translocase activity. PMID:23703205

  14. Palbociclib treatment of FLT3-ITD+ AML cells uncovers a kinase-dependent transcriptional regulation of FLT3 and PIM1 by CDK6.

    PubMed

    Uras, Iris Z; Walter, Gina J; Scheicher, Ruth; Bellutti, Florian; Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Tigan, Anca S; Valent, Peter; Heidel, Florian H; Kubicek, Stefan; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Sexl, Veronika

    2016-06-01

    Up to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia have constitutively activating internal tandem duplications (ITDs) of the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase. Such mutations are associated with a poor prognosis and a high propensity to relapse after remission. FLT3 inhibitors are being developed as targeted therapy for FLT3-ITD(+) acute myeloid leukemia; however, their use is complicated by rapid development of resistance, which illustrates the need for additional therapeutic targets. We show that the US Food and Drug Administration-approved CDK4/6 kinase inhibitor palbociclib induces apoptosis of FLT3-ITD leukemic cells. The effect is specific for FLT3-mutant cells and is ascribed to the transcriptional activity of CDK6: CDK6 but not its functional homolog CDK4 is found at the promoters of the FLT3 and PIM1 genes, another important leukemogenic driver. There CDK6 regulates transcription in a kinase-dependent manner. Of potential clinical relevance, combined treatment with palbociclib and FLT3 inhibitors results in synergistic cytotoxicity. Simultaneously targeting two critical signaling nodes in leukemogenesis could represent a therapeutic breakthrough, leading to complete remission and overcoming resistance to FLT3 inhibitors. PMID:27099147

  15. Identification of Cyproheptadine as an Inhibitor of SET Domain Containing Lysine Methyltransferase 7/9 (Set7/9) That Regulates Estrogen-Dependent Transcription.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Yasushi; Ito, Akihiro; Niwa, Hideaki; Okamura, Mutsumi; Fujiwara, Takashi; Hirano, Tomoya; Handa, Noriko; Umehara, Takashi; Sonoda, Takeshi; Ogawa, Kenji; Tariq, Mohammad; Nishino, Norikazu; Dan, Shingo; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Yamori, Takao; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yoshida, Minoru

    2016-04-28

    SET domain containing lysine methyltransferase 7/9 (Set7/9), a histone lysine methyltransferase (HMT), also methylates non-histone proteins including estrogen receptor (ER) α. ERα methylation by Set7/9 stabilizes ERα and activates its transcriptional activities, which are involved in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer. We identified cyproheptadine, a clinically approved antiallergy drug, as a Set7/9 inhibitor in a high-throughput screen using a fluorogenic substrate-based HMT assay. Kinetic and X-ray crystallographic analyses revealed that cyproheptadine binds in the substrate-binding pocket of Set7/9 and inhibits its enzymatic activity by competing with the methyl group acceptor. Treatment of human breast cancer cells (MCF7 cells) with cyproheptadine decreased the expression and transcriptional activity of ERα, thereby inhibiting estrogen-dependent cell growth. Our findings suggest that cyproheptadine can be repurposed for breast cancer treatment or used as a starting point for the discovery of an anti-hormone breast cancer drug through lead optimization.

  16. Photosynthesis-dependent/independent control of stomatal responses to CO2 in mutant barley with surplus electron transport capacity and reduced SLAH3 anion channel transcript.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Javier; Molina-Cano, José-Luis; Pérez, Pilar; Morcuende, Rosa; Moralejo, Marian; Savé, Robert; Martínez-Carrasco, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms of stomatal sensitivity to CO2 are yet to be fully understood. The role of photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic factors in stomatal responses to CO2 was investigated in wild-type barley (Hordeum vulgare var. Graphic) and in a mutant (G132) with decreased photochemical and Rubisco capacities. The CO2 and DCMU responses of stomatal conductance (gs), gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and levels of ATP, with a putative transcript for stomatal opening were analysed. G132 had greater gs than the wild-type, despite lower photosynthesis rates and higher intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci). The mutant had Rubisco-limited photosynthesis at very high CO2 levels, and higher ATP contents than the wild-type. Stomatal sensitivity to CO2 under red light was lower in G132 than in the wild-type, both in photosynthesizing and DCMU-inhibited leaves. Under constant Ci and red light, stomatal sensitivity to DCMU inhibition was higher in G132. The levels of a SLAH3-like slow anion channel transcript, involved in stomatal closure, decreased sharply in G132. The results suggest that stomatal responses to CO2 depend partly on the balance of photosynthetic electron transport to carbon assimilation capacities, but are partially regulated by the CO2 signalling network. High gs can improve the adaptation to climate change in well-watered conditions.

  17. Photosynthesis-dependent/independent control of stomatal responses to CO2 in mutant barley with surplus electron transport capacity and reduced SLAH3 anion channel transcript.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Javier; Molina-Cano, José-Luis; Pérez, Pilar; Morcuende, Rosa; Moralejo, Marian; Savé, Robert; Martínez-Carrasco, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms of stomatal sensitivity to CO2 are yet to be fully understood. The role of photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic factors in stomatal responses to CO2 was investigated in wild-type barley (Hordeum vulgare var. Graphic) and in a mutant (G132) with decreased photochemical and Rubisco capacities. The CO2 and DCMU responses of stomatal conductance (gs), gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and levels of ATP, with a putative transcript for stomatal opening were analysed. G132 had greater gs than the wild-type, despite lower photosynthesis rates and higher intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci). The mutant had Rubisco-limited photosynthesis at very high CO2 levels, and higher ATP contents than the wild-type. Stomatal sensitivity to CO2 under red light was lower in G132 than in the wild-type, both in photosynthesizing and DCMU-inhibited leaves. Under constant Ci and red light, stomatal sensitivity to DCMU inhibition was higher in G132. The levels of a SLAH3-like slow anion channel transcript, involved in stomatal closure, decreased sharply in G132. The results suggest that stomatal responses to CO2 depend partly on the balance of photosynthetic electron transport to carbon assimilation capacities, but are partially regulated by the CO2 signalling network. High gs can improve the adaptation to climate change in well-watered conditions. PMID:26398787

  18. Expression of the autophagy substrate SQSTM1/p62 is restored during prolonged starvation depending on transcriptional upregulation and autophagy-derived amino acids.

    PubMed

    Sahani, Mayurbhai Himatbhai; Itakura, Eisuke; Mizushima, Noboru

    2014-03-01

    SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) is a multifunctional signaling molecule, involved in a variety of cellular pathways. SQSTM1 is one of the best-known autophagic substrates, and is therefore widely used as an indicator of autophagic degradation. Here we report that the expression level of SQSTM1 can be restored during prolonged starvation. Upon starvation, SQSTM1 is initially degraded by autophagy. However, SQSTM1 is restored back to basal levels during prolonged starvation in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and HepG2 cells, but not in HeLa and HEK293 cells. Restoration of SQSTM1 depends on its transcriptional upregulation, which is triggered by amino acid starvation. Furthermore, amino acids derived from the autophagy-lysosome pathway are used for de novo synthesis of SQSTM1 under starvation conditions. The restoration of SQSTM1 is independent of reactivation of MTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1). These results suggest that the expression level of SQSTM1 in starved cells is determined by at least 3 factors: autophagic degradation, transcriptional upregulation, and availability of lysosomal-derived amino acids. The results of this study also indicate that the expression level of SQSTM1 does not always inversely correlate with autophagic activity.

  19. Transcriptional profiles discriminate patients with pulmonary tuberculosis from non-tuberculous individuals depending on the presence of non-insulin diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Carmen J; Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Macías-Segura, Noé; González-Curiel, Rosa Angélica; Martínez-Balderas, Víctor Yordani; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Small, Peter; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to identify transcriptional biomarkers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that discriminate individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) from those with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and in individuals without NIDDM. Using gene expression microarrays we identified differentially expressed genes from lungs of mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) or a mutant (ΔsigH) representing a non-inflammatory model. Genes expressed in blood, with inflammatory related functions were evaluated in humans by RT-qPCR. NCF1 and ORM transcripts have the better discriminatory capacity to identify PTB subjects from LTBI and non-infected controls (NICs) independently of the presence of NIDDM. The sequential evaluation of the mRNA levels of NCF1 and ORM as multiple diagnostic tests showed 95% Sensitivity (Se) and 80% Specificity (Sp). In addition, FPR2 promises to be a good biomarker for the PTB detection in subjects with NIDDM (Se=100%; Sp=90%).

  20. Transcriptional profiles discriminate patients with pulmonary tuberculosis from non-tuberculous individuals depending on the presence of non-insulin diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Carmen J; Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Macías-Segura, Noé; González-Curiel, Rosa Angélica; Martínez-Balderas, Víctor Yordani; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Small, Peter; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to identify transcriptional biomarkers in peripheral blood mo