Science.gov

Sample records for e1a dependent transcription

  1. Adenovirus E1A specifically blocks SWI/SNF-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M E; Cairns, B R; Levinson, R S; Yamamoto, K R; Engel, D A; Smith, M M

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the adenovirus E1A243 oncoprotein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces a slow-growth phenotype with accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This effect is due to the N-terminal and CR1 domains of E1A243, which in rodent cells are involved in triggering cellular transformation and also in binding to the cellular transcriptional coactivator p300. A genetic screen was undertaken to identify genes required for the function of E1A243 in S. cerevisiae. This screen identified SNF12, a gene encoding the 73-kDa subunit of the SWI/SNF transcriptional regulatory complex. Mutation of genes encoding known members of the SWI/SNF complex also led to loss of E1A function, suggesting that the SWI/SNF complex is a target of E1A243. Moreover, expression of E1A in wild-type cells specifically blocked transcriptional activation of the INO1 and SUC2 genes, whose activation pathways are distinct but have a common requirement for the SWI/SNF complex. These data demonstrate a specific functional interaction between E1A and the SWI/SNF complex and suggest that a similar interaction takes place in rodent and human cells. PMID:8816487

  2. Adenovirus E1A protein activates transcription of the E1A gene subsequent to transcription complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaack, J; Logan, J; Vakalopoulou, E; Shenk, T

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of transcriptional activation of the adenovirus E1A and E3 genes by E1A protein during infection was examined by using transcription-competition assays. Infection of HeLa cells with one virus led to inhibition of mRNA accumulation from a superinfecting virus. Synthesis of the E1A 289R protein by the first virus to infect reduced inhibition of transcription of the superinfecting virus, indicating that the E1A 289R protein was limiting for E1A-activated transcription. Infection with an E1A- virus, followed 6 h later by superinfection with a wild-type virus, led to preferential transcriptional activation of the E1A gene of the first virus, suggesting that a host transcription component(s) stably associated with the E1A promoter in the absence of E1A protein and that this complex was the substrate for transcriptional activation by E1A protein. The limiting host transcription component(s) bound to the E1A promoter to form a complex with a half-life greater than 24 h in the absence of E1A 289R protein, as demonstrated in a challenge assay with a large excess of superinfecting virus. In the presence of the E1A 289R protein, the E1A gene of the superinfecting virus was gradually activated with a reduction in E1A mRNA accumulation from the first virus. The kinetics of the activation suggest that this was due to an indirect effect rather than to destabilization of stable transcription complexes by the 289R protein. Images PMID:1825853

  3. Transcription activation by the adenovirus E1a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, James W.; Green, Michael R.

    1989-03-01

    The adenovirus Ela protein stimulates transcription of a wide variety of viral and cellular genes. It is shown here that Ela has the two functions characteristic of a typical cellular activator: one direct Ela to the promoter, perhaps by interacting with a DMA-bound protein, and the other, an activating region, enables the bound activator to stimulate transcription.

  4. E1A dependent up-regulation of c-jun/AP-1 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kitabayashi, I; Chiu, R; Gachelin, G; Yokoyama, K

    1991-01-01

    E1A, the early region 1A transcription unit of human adenovirus, exhibits multiple functions that regulate the expression of some cellular genes and promote cell growth and division. We found that E1A stimulated c-jun gene expression at least fifty-fold in rat 3Y1 cells in a serum-independent manner, concomitantly with E1A down-regulation of jun B expression. The E1A-dependent induction of c-jun transcription resulted in increase amount of cJun/AP1. This induction was mediated by the enhancement of the binding activity of the transcription factor cJun/AP1 to an AP1 binding site in the c-jun promoter. Additionally, this induction can be repressed by introducing junB into the cells. Taken collectively, these results suggest that the differential expression of two closely related proteins greatly expands their cellular regulation. Induction of c-jun expression by E1A as well as c-jun autoregulation may amplify the action of E1A during adenovirus infection. Therefore, some of the biological effects of E1A may include mediating the constitutive activation of c-jun, which is important in transcriptional regulation and oncogenic transformation. Images PMID:1826351

  5. Transcription control region within the protein-coding portion of adenovirus E1A genes.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, T F; Arvidson, D N; Tyau, E S; Dunsworth-Browne, M; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    A single-base deletion within the protein-coding region of the adenovirus type 5 early region 1A (E1A) genes, 399 bases downstream from the transcription start site, depresses transcription to 2% of the wild-type rate. Complementation studies demonstrated that this was due to two effects of the mutation: first, inactivation of an E1A protein, causing a reduction by a factor of 5; second, a defect which acts in cis to depress E1A mRNA and nuclear RNA concentrations by a factor of 10. A larger deletion within the protein-coding region of E1A which overlaps the single-base deletion produces the same phenotype. In contrast, a linker insertion which results in a similar truncated E1A protein does not produce the cis-acting defect in E1A transcription. These results demonstrate that a critical cis-acting transcription control region occurs within the protein coding sequence in adenovirus type 5 E1A. The single-base deletion occurs in a sequence which shows extensive homology with a sequence from the enhancer regions of simian virus 40 and polyomavirus. This region is not required for E1A transcription during the late phase of infection. Images PMID:6334230

  6. Transcription factor TFIID is a direct functional target of the adenovirus E1A transcription-repression domain.

    PubMed Central

    Song, C Z; Loewenstein, P M; Toth, K; Green, M

    1995-01-01

    The 243-amino acid adenovirus E1A oncoprotein both positively and negatively modulates the expression of cellular genes involved in the regulation of cell growth. The E1A transcription repression function appears to be linked with its ability to induce cellular DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cell transformation, as well as to inhibit cell differentiation. The mechanism by which E1A represses the transcription of various promoters has proven enigmatic. Here we provide several lines of evidence that the "TATA-box" binding protein (TBP) component of transcription factor TFIID is a cellular target of the E1A repression function encoded within the E1A N-terminal 80 amino acids. (i) The E1A N-terminal 80 amino acids [E1A-(1-80)protein] efficiently represses basal transcription from TATA-containing core promoters in vitro. (ii) TBP reverses completely E1A repression in vitro. (iii) TBP restores transcriptional activity to E1A-(1-80) protein affinity-depleted nuclear extracts. (iv) The N-terminal repression domain of E1A interacts directly and specifically with TBP in vitro. These results may help explain how E1A represses a set of genes that lack common upstream promoter elements. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7479778

  7. E1A-responsive elements for repression of rat fibronectin gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, T; Nakamura, T; Tsunoda, S; Nakada, S; Oda, K

    1992-01-01

    The level of fibronectin (FN) gene transcription in resting rat 3Y1 cells is very high but decreases steeply after growth stimulation by serum or by the induction of E1A expression. To study the mechanism of this E1A-mediated down-regulation, the 5' flanking regions of the FN gene with various deletions and substitutions were fused to the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene and introduced into resting 3Y1 cells with E1A expression plasmids. The results indicate that the G10 stretch located from nucleotide position -239 to -230 and two GC boxes from position -105 to -95 and position -54 to -44 are the primary E1A-responsive elements for repression of the FN gene. Two GC boxes also contain a G10 stretch that is interrupted by the presence of an internal C residue. These sequences overlap with the Sp1 motif GGGCGG. Substitution of the sequence GGGG with ATCC or CTTA in these G-rich sequences, leaving the Sp1 motif intact, completely abolished the E1A sensitivity of the promoter. Analysis of the E1A domains by using various E1A deletion mutants indicated that the domain for binding to the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB) is essential for efficient repression. These results suggest that the gene encoding a negative factor(s) binding to the three G-rich sequences in the FN promoter is repressed by RB in resting 3Y1 cells and derepressed by expression of E1A. PMID:1534144

  8. E1A RNA transcripts amplify adenovirus-mediated tumor reduction.

    PubMed

    Dion, L D; Goldsmith, K T; Strong, T V; Bilbao, G; Curiel, D T; Garver, R I

    1996-11-01

    Previous work by this group has established that E1-defective, recombinant adenoviruses can be replication-enabled by the codelivery of a plasmid encoding the deleted E1 functions, a strategy now designated conditional replication-enablement system for adenovirus (CRESA). In the studies reported here, the original replication-enabling plasmid was replaced by two separate plasmids that encoded the necessary E1A and E1B functions, respectively. An RNA transcript encoding the requisite E1A functions was shown to substitute functionally for the E1A plasmid without significant loss of new adenovirus production in in vitro experiments. No replication competent adenovirus was detectable in the cells treated with the plasmids, or the RNA and plasmid combinations. Subcutaneous human tumor nodules containing a fraction of cells cotransduced with the replication-enabling RNA + DNA and an adenovirus containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) expression cassette were reduced to a greater extent than control nodules containing the same fraction of cells cotransduced with the virus and an irrelevant plasmid. These experiments show that an E1-defective adenovirus can be conditionally replication-enabled by an RNA transcript encoding the required E1 functions, and that the replication-enablement is sufficient to produce an augmentation of an adenovirus-mediated therapeutic effect in vivo.

  9. The adenovirus E1A N-terminal repression domain represses transcription from a chromatin template in vitro.

    PubMed

    Loewenstein, Paul M; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Green, Maurice

    2012-06-20

    The adenovirus repression domain of E1A 243R at the E1A N-terminus (E1A 1-80) transcriptionally represses genes involved in differentiation and cell cycle progression. E1A 1-80 represses transcription in vitro from naked DNA templates through its interaction with p300 and TFIID. E1A 1-80 can also interact with several chromatin remodeling factors and associates with chromatin in vivo. We show here that E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 can repress transcription from a reconstituted chromatin template in vitro. Temporal analysis reveals strong repression by E1A 1-80 when added at pre-activation, activation and early transcription stages. Interestingly, E1A 1-80 can greatly enhance transcription from chromatin templates, but not from naked DNA, when added at pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation and transcription-initiation stages. These data reveal a new dimension for E1A 1-80's interface with chromatin and may reflect its interaction with key players in PIC formation, p300 and TFIID, and/or possibly a role in chromatin remodeling.

  10. The adenovirus E1A N-terminal repression domain represses transcription from a chromatin template in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Loewenstein, Paul M.; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The adenovirus repression domain of E1A 243R at the E1A N-terminus (E1A 1–80) transcriptionally represses genes involved in differentiation and cell cycle progression. E1A 1–80 represses transcription in vitro from naked DNA templates through its interaction with p300 and TFIID. E1A 1–80 can also interact with several chromatin remodeling factors and associates with chromatin in vivo. We show here that E1A 243R and E1A 1–80 can repress transcription from a reconstituted chromatin template in vitro. Temporal analysis reveals strong repression by E1A 1–80 when added at pre-activation, activation and early transcription stages. Interestingly, E1A 1–80 can greatly enhance transcription from chromatin templates, but not from naked DNA, when added at pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation and transcription-initiation stages. These data reveal a new dimension for E1A 1–80's interface with chromatin and may reflect its interaction with key players in PIC formation, p300 and TFIID, and/or possibly a role in chromatin remodeling. PMID:22521914

  11. E1A enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damage-induced apoptosis through PIDD-dependent caspase-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Radke, Jay R; Siddiqui, Zeba K; Figueroa, Iris; Cook, James L

    Expression of the adenoviral protein, E1A, sensitizes mammalian cells to a wide variety of apoptosis-inducing agents through multiple cellular pathways. For example, E1A sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by TNF-superfamily members by inhibiting NF-kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent gene expression. In contrast, E1A sensitization to nitric oxide, an inducer of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, is not dependent upon repression of NF-κB-dependent transcription but rather is dependent upon caspase-2 activation. The latter observation suggested that E1A-induced enhancement of caspase-2 activation might be a critical factor in cellular sensitization to other intrinsic apoptosis pathway-inducing agents. Etoposide and gemcitabine are two DNA damaging agents that induce intrinsic apoptosis. Here we report that E1A-induced sensitization to both of these agents, like NO, is independent of NF-κB activation but dependent on caspase-2 activation. The results show that caspase-2 is a key mitochondrial-injuring caspase during etoposide and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis of E1A-positive cells, and that caspase-2 is required for induction of caspase-3 activity by both chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of PIDD was required for caspase-2 activation, mitochondrial injury and enhanced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, E1A-enhanced sensitivity to injury-induced apoptosis required PIDD cleavage to PIDD-CC. These results define the PIDD/caspase-2 pathway as a key apical, mitochondrial-injuring mechanism in E1A-induced sensitivity of mammalian cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

  12. E1A enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damage-induced apoptosis through PIDD-dependent caspase-2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Jay R; Siddiqui, Zeba K; Figueroa, Iris; Cook, James L

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the adenoviral protein, E1A, sensitizes mammalian cells to a wide variety of apoptosis-inducing agents through multiple cellular pathways. For example, E1A sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by TNF-superfamily members by inhibiting NF-kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent gene expression. In contrast, E1A sensitization to nitric oxide, an inducer of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, is not dependent upon repression of NF-κB-dependent transcription but rather is dependent upon caspase-2 activation. The latter observation suggested that E1A-induced enhancement of caspase-2 activation might be a critical factor in cellular sensitization to other intrinsic apoptosis pathway-inducing agents. Etoposide and gemcitabine are two DNA damaging agents that induce intrinsic apoptosis. Here we report that E1A-induced sensitization to both of these agents, like NO, is independent of NF-κB activation but dependent on caspase-2 activation. The results show that caspase-2 is a key mitochondrial-injuring caspase during etoposide and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis of E1A-positive cells, and that caspase-2 is required for induction of caspase-3 activity by both chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of PIDD was required for caspase-2 activation, mitochondrial injury and enhanced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, E1A-enhanced sensitivity to injury-induced apoptosis required PIDD cleavage to PIDD-CC. These results define the PIDD/caspase-2 pathway as a key apical, mitochondrial-injuring mechanism in E1A-induced sensitivity of mammalian cells to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27833761

  13. The adenovirus E1A oncoprotein N-terminal transcriptional repression domain enhances p300 autoacetylation and inhibits histone H3 Lys18 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M.; Green, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the adenovirus E1A N-terminal transcription repression domain alone (E1A 1-80) represses transcription from specific promoters such as HER2 [1] and from reconstituted chromatin [2]. Significantly, E1A 1-80 can induce the death of human breast cancer cells over-expressing the HER2 oncogene [1] as well as other cancer cells. Here, we report that E1A 1-80 alone is sufficient to inhibit H3K18 acetylation in vivo and p300-mediated H3K18 acetylation in reconstituted chromatin. Of interest, hypoacetylation of H3K18 has been correlated with the survival of tumor cells and the poor prognosis of many cancers [3, 4]. E1A 1-80 enhances p300 autoacetylation and concurrently inhibits H3K18 acetylation in chromatin in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-acetylation of p300 by incubation with acetyl-CoA alone reduces p300's ability to acetylate H3K18 in chromatin. Additional acetylation of p300 in the presence of E1A 1-80 produces stronger inhibition of H3K18 acetylation. These findings indicate that autoacetylation of p300 greatly reduces its ability to acetylate H3K18. The results reported here combined with our previous findings suggest that E1A can repress transcription by multiple strategies, including altering the chromatin modifying activity of p300 and dissociating TFIID from the TATA box thus disrupting formation of the transcription pre-initiation complex [5, 6] PMID:25821559

  14. Transcription units of E1a, E1b and pIX regions of bovine adenovirus type 3.

    PubMed

    Zheng, B J; Graham, F L; Prevec, L

    1999-07-01

    The major mRNA species in the E1 region of the genome of bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV3) have been defined by using a combination of PCR, 5' RACE, Northern analysis and DNA sequencing. Independent transcription initiation sites were identified for each of the E1a, E1b and protein IX (pIX) transcription units, but all mRNA species terminated at the same poly(A) addition site immediately downstream of the pIX open reading frame. Thus, the BAV3 E1 region, which consists of the E1a and E1b genes together with that for pIX, functions as a nested overlapping transcription unit. One major mRNA species encoding the E1a protein was found and two mRNAs encoding E1b species, the smaller of which encodes the E1b 17K protein alone and the larger encodes both 17K and 47K E1b proteins, were identified. One mRNA species encodes pIX. The E1a transcript, encoding the predicted 214 residue E1a protein, has four exons. The smaller E1b mRNA has two exons, the second of which corresponds to the last exon of E1a. No introns were detected in the larger E1b mRNA that encodes both the E1b 17K and 47K proteins nor in the mRNA encoding pIX. The relative times of appearance of the mRNAs from the E1-pIX gene region following infection of bovine cells with BAV3 was determined.

  15. Inhibition of adenovirus replication by the E1A antisense transcript initiated from hsp70 and VA-1 promoters.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, O I; Borisenko, A S; Ponomareva, T I; Tikhonenko, T I

    1990-03-01

    The E1A region of the adenoviral genome, important for initiation of virus infection and activation of other viral genes, was chosen as a target for engineering antisense RNA (asRNA) to inhibit adenovirus 5 (Ad5) replication in COS-1 cell culture in vitro. The hsp70 promoter, taken from the appropriate heat-shock-protein gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and the VA-1 RNA promoter, derived from the Ad5 gene coding for low-molecular-mass VA-1 RNA and recognized by RNA polymerase III were used as regulatory elements of transcription. The two types of recombinant constructs contained E1A fragments of 710 bp (hsp70 constructs) or 380 or 740 bp (VA-1 RNA constructs) in reverse orientation relative to the promoter position, as well as a transcription termination signal, the SV40 ori, and the gene controlling Geneticin (antibiotic G418) resistance (G418R). After selection of transfected COS-1 cells in the presence of G418, a number of stable G418R cell lines were raised which expressed engineered asRNAs. Plating of Ad5 suspensions of known titre on monolayers of transfected COS-1 cells clearly showed strong inhibition of adenovirus replication by asRNAs: 75% with the hsp70 promoter and 90% with the VA-1 RNA promoter.

  16. A novel CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal in adenoviral E1A protein regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Olson, Melissa V; Medrano, Diana R; Lee, Ok-Hee; Xu, Jing; Piao, Yuji; Alonso, Marta M; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Hung, Mien-Chie; Yung, W K Alfred; Fueyo, Juan

    2006-12-01

    Adenoviral E1A is a versatile protein that can reprogram host cells for efficient viral replication. The nuclear import of E1A is mediated by a nuclear localization signal; however, whether E1A can be actively exported from the nucleus is unknown. We first reported a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES) in E1A that is conserved in the group C adenoviruses. We showed that CRM1 and E1A coimmunoprecipitated and that blockage of CRM1 function by leptomycin B or small interfering RNA resulted in the nuclear localization of E1A. Through mutational analyses, we identified an active canonical NES element within the E1A protein spanning amino acids 70-80. We further demonstrated that phosphorylation of adjacent serine (S)89 resulted in the cytoplasmic accumulation of E1A. Interestingly, coincident with the accumulation of cells in the S/G2/M phase and histone H1 phosphorylation, E1A was relocated to the cytoplasm at the late stage of the viral cycle, which was blocked by the CDC2/CDK2 inhibitor roscovitine. Importantly, titration of the progenies of the viruses in infected cells showed that the replication efficiency of the NES mutant adenovirus was up to 500-fold lower than that of the wild-type adenovirus. Collectively, our data demonstrate the existence of a NES in E1A that is modulated by the phosphorylation of the S89 residue and the NES plays a role for an efficient viral replication in the host cells.

  17. Multiple transcriptional regulatory domains in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat are involved in basal and E1A/E1B-induced promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kliewer, S; Garcia, J; Pearson, L; Soultanakis, E; Dasgupta, A; Gaynor, R

    1989-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 long terminal repeat (LTR) is the site of activation of the HIV tat protein. However, additional transactivators, such as the adenovirus E1A and herpesvirus ICPO proteins, have also been shown to be capable of activating the HIV LTR. Analysis of adenovirus mutants indicated that complete transactivation of the HIV LTR was dependent on both the E1A and E1B proteins. To determine which regions of the HIV LTR were important for complete E1A/E1B activation, a variety of oligonucleotide-directed mutations in HIV transcriptional regulatory domains were assayed both in vivo and in vitro. S1 nuclease analysis of RNA prepared after transfection of these HIV constructs into HeLa cells infected with wild-type adenovirus indicated that the enhancer, SP1, TATA, and a portion of the transactivation-responsive element were each required for complete E1A/E1B-mediated activation of the HIV LTR. These same promoter elements were required for both basal and E1A/E1B-induced levels of transcription in in vitro transcription reactions performed with cellular extracts prepared from cells infected with dl434, an E1A/E1B deletion mutant, or wild-type adenovirus. No mutations were found that reduced only E1A/E1B-induced expression without proportionally reducing basal levels of transcription, suggesting that E1A/E1B-mediated induction of the HIV LTR requires multiple promoter elements which are also required for basal transcriptional levels. Unlike activation by the tat protein, there was not a rigid dependence on maintenance of the transactivation-responsive stem base pairing for E1A/E1B-mediated activation either in vivo or in vitro, indicating that activation occurs by a mechanism distinct from that of tat induction. Images PMID:2529378

  18. The adenoviral E1A N-terminal domain represses MYC transcription in human cancer cells by targeting both p300 and TRRAP and inhibiting MYC promoter acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M.; Green, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers frequently arise from increased expression of proto-oncogenes, such as MYC and HER2. Understanding the cellular pathways regulating the transcription and expression of proto-oncogenes is important for targeted therapies for cancer treatment. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A 243R (243 aa residues) is a viral oncoprotein that interacts with key regulators of gene transcription and cell proliferation. We have shown previously that the 80 amino acid N-terminal transcriptional repression domain of E1A 243R (E1A 1-80) can target the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 and repress HER2 in the HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Expression of E1A 1-80 induces death of SKBR3 and other cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed total cell RNA sequence analysis and identified MYC as the regulatory gene for cellular proliferation most strongly repressed by E1A 1-80. By RT-quantitative PCR analysis we show that repression of MYC in SKBR3 cells occurs early after expression of E1A 1-80, suggesting that MYC may be an early responder of E1A 1-80-mediated transcriptional repression. Of interest, while E1A 1-80 repression of MYC occurs in all eight human cancer cell lines examined, repression of HER2 is cell-type dependent. We demonstrate by ChIP analysis that MYC transcriptional repression by E1A 1-80 is associated with inhibition of acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16 on the MYC promoter, as well as inhibition of RNA Pol II binding to the MYC promoter. Deletion mutant analysis of E1A 1-80 suggests that both p300/CBP and TRRAP are involved in E1A 1-80 repression of MYC transcription. Further, E1A 1-80 interaction with p300/CBP and TRRAP is correlated with inhibition of H3K18 and H4K16 acetylation on the MYC promoter, respectively. Our results indicate that E1A 1-80 may target two important pathways for histone modification to repress transcription in human cancer cells. PMID:27382434

  19. Induction of sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor alpha by adenovirus E1A is independent of transformation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, R S; Holskin, B; Mitcho, M; Shalloway, D; Chen, M J

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that expression of the adenovirus E1A 12S or 13S products in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces susceptibility to the cytotoxic actions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). A large number of studies have mapped the multiple biological functions of the 12S and 13S products to three highly conserved regions (CR) within the E1A sequence. Here we used plasmids coding for E1A deletion and point mutants in these regions to generate target cell lines for TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays to determine which regions and functions are necessary for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. Expression of CR1 was required for the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity. This finding did not reflect a requirement for transforming or transcriptional repression activity, since some mutants that were defective in both of these properties were able to induce TNF alpha sensitivity. CR2 transformation-defective point mutants, but not a CR2/3 region deletion mutant, were also able to induce sensitivity. In addition, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the retroviral transcription activators tat from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and tax from human T-lymphotropic virus type I were not sensitive to TNF alpha. However, the possibility that E1A-mediated transcriptional activation can augment the induction of TNF alpha sensitivity is not excluded. Comparison of data from previous biological studies with the TNF alpha cytotoxicity assays presented here suggested that the mechanism by which E1A induces sensitivity to TNF alpha in NIH 3T3 cells is independent of many of the known E1A biological functions, including transformation in cooperation with ras, immortalization, induction of DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, and transcriptional repression. A novel E1A-mediated effect may be involved, although our data do not exclude the possibility that sensitization to TNF alpha is mediated through E1A binding to cellular proteins. Images PMID:2143540

  20. Anti-tumor efficacy of a transcriptional replication-competent adenovirus, Ad-OC-E1a, for osteosarcoma pulmonary metastasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiong; Jung, Chaeyong; Liu, You-Hong; Bae, Kyung-Hee; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Hong-Ji; Vanderputten, Dale; Jeng, Meei-Huey; Gardner, Thomas A; Kao, Chinghai

    2006-06-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most frequent type of primary malignant bone tumor and is apt to occur in children and young adults. Pulmonary metastasis (OSPM) is the major reason for its fatal outcome. Osteocalcin (OC) is a major noncollagenous bone protein whose expression is limited almost exclusively to bone marrow and osteotropic tumors. OC is also known to express in cell lines with bone metastasis feathers. Gene therapy strategies with the OC promoter directing the replication of adenovirus in a tumor-specific manner are a potential modality for OSPM therapy. We detected OC mRNA expression by RNA in situ hybridization in OSA and OSPM samples from patients, and tested OC promoter transcriptional activity in OSA and non-OSA cell lines. Then we used a transcriptional replication-competent adenovirus, Ad-OC-E1a, to treat OSPM, and evaluated its tumor-specific replication and killing activities in vitro as well as anti-OSPM efficacy in vivo via systemic delivery. OC mRNA was detected in all types of OSA tissues, including OSPM tissues. The transcriptional activity of the OC promoter was much higher in a OSPM cell line SAOS-2LM7 and primary OSA cell line MG63 than in non-OSA cell lines, including cell lines from breast cancer, colon cancer, and liver cancer. Ad-OC-E1a expressed E1a protein only in MG63 and SAOS-2LM7, which indicated that adenovirus E1a was under strict control by the OC promoter. Ad-OC-E1a demonstrated killing and viral replication activity close to wild-type adenovirus levels in MG63 and SAOS-2LM7, but the killing and viral replication activities were attenuated significantly in cells expressing low OC transcriptional activity. To test whether Ad-OC-E1a could be used to target human OSPM in vivo, SAOS-2LM7 pulmonary metastasis models in nude mice were induced and treated by tail-vein injection with Ad-OC-E1a. Compared to tumor nodules in the lung in groups treated with PBS or control virus, the quantity of metastasized tumor nodules decreased

  1. A bidirectional Tet-dependent promotor construct regulating the expression of E1A for tight control of oncolytic adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Henry; Wang, Xiaomin; Picó, Almudena Hurtado; Wildner, Judith; Suckau, Lennart; Pinkert, Sandra; Sipo, Isaac; Weger, Stefan; Poller, Wolfgang

    2007-01-20

    Tight regulation of oncolytic adenoviruses (oAdV) represents an important requirement for their safe application. Here we describe a new doxycycline (Dox)-dependent oAdV with a bidirectional expression cassette, which drives the expression of the reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator (rtTA(s)-M2) from a lung tumor-specific promoter and, in the opposite direction, the expression of the adenoviral E1A gene from a second generation TetO(7) sequence linked to an isolated TATA box. In H441 lung cancer cells, this oAdV showed a strictly Dox-dependent E1A expression, adenoviral replication, cell killing activity and a 450-fold induction of progeny virus production. The virus could be shut off again by withdrawal of Dox and, in contrast to a control oAdV expressing E1A directly from the SP-B promoter, did not replicate in non-target cells. However, the absolute values of virus production and the cell killing activity in the presence of the inducer were still reduced as compared to the control oAdV. The results demonstrate, for the first time, Dox-dependent oAdV replication from a single adenoviral vector genome. Future improvement of the Dox-dependent E1A regulation cassette should lead to the generation of an oAdV well suited to meet the demands for a highly regulated and efficient oncolytic virus for in vivo applications.

  2. G10BP, an E1A-inducible negative regulator of Sp1, represses transcription of the rat fibronectin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, M; Kuroda, C; Oda, E; Tsunoda, S; Nakamura, T; Nakajima, T; Oda, K

    1995-01-01

    Downregulation of the fibronectin (FN) gene in a rat 3Y1 derivative cell line, XhoC, transformed by the adenovirus E1A and E1B genes seems to be caused by the induction of a negative regulator, G10BP, which binds to three G-rich sequences in the promoter (T. Nakamura, T. Nakajima, S. Tsunoda, S. Nakada, K. Oda, H. Tsurui, and A. Wada, J. Virol. 66:6436-6450, 1992). These are the G10 stretch and two GC boxes consisting of the G10 stretch with one internal C residue insertion. The recognition sequences of G10BP and Sp1 (GGGCGG) overlap in these GC boxes. To analyze the mechanism of the downregulation, G10BP was purified by DNA affinity chromatography, and its molecular mass was estimated to be about 30 kDa. The promoter was modified by substituting the sequence GGGG with ATCC or CTTA in these G-rich sequences, leaving the Sp1 motif intact, and by replacing the Sp1 motif by the T stretch. Transcription of FN promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion genes carrying the base substitution in one or more of these G-rich sequences both in vivo and in vitro revealed that the base substitution in any G-rich sequence results in reduction of promoter activity, although the downstream GC box (GCd) plays a primary role. The addition of G10BP severely inhibited the activities of the FN promoters carrying the wild-type GCd in vitro, while the promoters carrying the mutant GCd were unaffected. The binding affinity of G10BP and Sp1 to each of the G-rich sequences, analyzed by gel shift assays, indicated that G10BP binds strongly to the GCd, moderately to the G10 stretch, and weakly to GCu, while Sp1 binds strongly to GCu, moderately to GCd, and weakly to the G10 stretch. Sp1 binding to GCd and the G10 stretch was inhibited by G10BP, while binding to GCu was unaffected. These results indicate that FN gene transcription is inhibited in XhoC cells primarily by exclusion of Sp1 binding to GCd by G10BP and that G10BP is a new class of Sp1 negative regulator. PMID:7565693

  3. G10BP, an E1A-inducible negative regulator of Sp1, represses transcription of the rat fibronectin gene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Kuroda, C; Oda, E; Tsunoda, S; Nakamura, T; Nakajima, T; Oda, K

    1995-10-01

    Downregulation of the fibronectin (FN) gene in a rat 3Y1 derivative cell line, XhoC, transformed by the adenovirus E1A and E1B genes seems to be caused by the induction of a negative regulator, G10BP, which binds to three G-rich sequences in the promoter (T. Nakamura, T. Nakajima, S. Tsunoda, S. Nakada, K. Oda, H. Tsurui, and A. Wada, J. Virol. 66:6436-6450, 1992). These are the G10 stretch and two GC boxes consisting of the G10 stretch with one internal C residue insertion. The recognition sequences of G10BP and Sp1 (GGGCGG) overlap in these GC boxes. To analyze the mechanism of the downregulation, G10BP was purified by DNA affinity chromatography, and its molecular mass was estimated to be about 30 kDa. The promoter was modified by substituting the sequence GGGG with ATCC or CTTA in these G-rich sequences, leaving the Sp1 motif intact, and by replacing the Sp1 motif by the T stretch. Transcription of FN promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion genes carrying the base substitution in one or more of these G-rich sequences both in vivo and in vitro revealed that the base substitution in any G-rich sequence results in reduction of promoter activity, although the downstream GC box (GCd) plays a primary role. The addition of G10BP severely inhibited the activities of the FN promoters carrying the wild-type GCd in vitro, while the promoters carrying the mutant GCd were unaffected. The binding affinity of G10BP and Sp1 to each of the G-rich sequences, analyzed by gel shift assays, indicated that G10BP binds strongly to the GCd, moderately to the G10 stretch, and weakly to GCu, while Sp1 binds strongly to GCu, moderately to GCd, and weakly to the G10 stretch. Sp1 binding to GCd and the G10 stretch was inhibited by G10BP, while binding to GCu was unaffected. These results indicate that FN gene transcription is inhibited in XhoC cells primarily by exclusion of Sp1 binding to GCd by G10BP and that G10BP is a new class of Sp1 negative regulator.

  4. Adenovirus type 5 E1A and E6 proteins of low-risk cutaneous beta-human papillomaviruses suppress cell transformation through interaction with FOXK1/K2 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Komorek, Jessica; Kuppuswamy, Mohan; Subramanian, T; Vijayalingam, S; Lomonosova, Elena; Zhao, Ling-Jun; Mymryk, Joe S; Schmitt, Kimberly; Chinnadurai, G

    2010-03-01

    The adenovirus (Adv) oncoprotein E1A stimulates cell proliferation and inhibits differentiation. These activities are primarily linked to the N-terminal region (exon 1) of E1A, which interacts with multiple cellular protein complexes. The C terminus (exon 2) of E1A antagonizes these processes, mediated in part through interaction with C-terminal binding proteins 1 and 2 (CtBP1/2). To identify additional cellular E1A targets that are involved in the modulation of E1A C-terminus-mediated activities, we undertook tandem affinity purification of E1A-associated proteins. Through mass spectrometric analysis, we identified several known E1A-interacting proteins as well as novel E1A targets, such as the forkhead transcription factors, FOXK1/K2. We identified a Ser/Thr-containing sequence motif in E1A that mediated interaction with FOXK1/K2. We demonstrated that the E6 proteins of two beta-human papillomaviruses (HPV14 and HPV21) associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis also interacted with FOXK1/K2 through a motif similar to that of E1A. The E1A mutants deficient in interaction with FOXK1/K2 induced enhanced cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation. The hypertransforming activity of the mutant E1A was suppressed by HPV21 E6. An E1A-E6 chimeric protein containing the Ser/Thr domain of the E6 protein in E1A interacted efficiently with FOXK1/K2 and inhibited cell transformation. Our results suggest that targeting FOXK1/K2 may be a common mechanism for certain beta-HPVs and Adv5. E1A exon 2 mutants deficient in interaction with the dual-specificity kinases DYRK1A/1B and their cofactor HAN11 also induced increased cell proliferation and transformation. Our results suggest that the E1A C-terminal region may suppress cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation through interaction with three different cellular protein complexes: FOXK1/K2, DYRK(1A/1B)/HAN11, and CtBP1/2.

  5. Adenovirus Type 5 E1A and E6 Proteins of Low-Risk Cutaneous Beta-Human Papillomaviruses Suppress Cell Transformation through Interaction with FOXK1/K2 Transcription Factors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Komorek, Jessica; Kuppuswamy, Mohan; Subramanian, T.; Vijayalingam, S.; Lomonosova, Elena; Zhao, Ling-jun; Mymryk, Joe S.; Schmitt, Kimberly; Chinnadurai, G.

    2010-01-01

    The adenovirus (Adv) oncoprotein E1A stimulates cell proliferation and inhibits differentiation. These activities are primarily linked to the N-terminal region (exon 1) of E1A, which interacts with multiple cellular protein complexes. The C terminus (exon 2) of E1A antagonizes these processes, mediated in part through interaction with C-terminal binding proteins 1 and 2 (CtBP1/2). To identify additional cellular E1A targets that are involved in the modulation of E1A C-terminus-mediated activities, we undertook tandem affinity purification of E1A-associated proteins. Through mass spectrometric analysis, we identified several known E1A-interacting proteins as well as novel E1A targets, such as the forkhead transcription factors, FOXK1/K2. We identified a Ser/Thr-containing sequence motif in E1A that mediated interaction with FOXK1/K2. We demonstrated that the E6 proteins of two beta-human papillomaviruses (HPV14 and HPV21) associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis also interacted with FOXK1/K2 through a motif similar to that of E1A. The E1A mutants deficient in interaction with FOXK1/K2 induced enhanced cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation. The hypertransforming activity of the mutant E1A was suppressed by HPV21 E6. An E1A-E6 chimeric protein containing the Ser/Thr domain of the E6 protein in E1A interacted efficiently with FOXK1/K2 and inhibited cell transformation. Our results suggest that targeting FOXK1/K2 may be a common mechanism for certain beta-HPVs and Adv5. E1A exon 2 mutants deficient in interaction with the dual-specificity kinases DYRK1A/1B and their cofactor HAN11 also induced increased cell proliferation and transformation. Our results suggest that the E1A C-terminal region may suppress cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation through interaction with three different cellular protein complexes: FOXK1/K2, DYRK(1A/1B)/HAN11, and CtBP1/2. PMID:20053746

  6. Novel mechanism of JNK pathway activation by adenoviral E1A.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Vasily S; Brichkina, Anna I; Morrison, Helen; Pospelova, Tatiana V; Pospelov, Valery A; Herrlich, Peter

    2014-04-30

    The adenoviral oncoprotein E1A influences cellular regulation by interacting with a number of cellular proteins. In collaboration with complementary oncogenes, E1A fully transforms primary cells. As part of this action, E1A inhibits transcription of c-Jun:Fos target genes while promoting that of c-Jun:ATF2-dependent genes including jun. Both c-Jun and ATF2 are hyperphosphorylated in response to E1A. In the current study, E1A was fused with the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor (E1A-ER) to monitor the immediate effect of E1A activation. With this approach we now show that E1A activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), the upstream kinases MKK4 and MKK7, as well as the small GTPase Rac1. Activation of the JNK pathway requires the N-terminal domain of E1A, and, importantly, is independent of transcription. In addition, it requires the presence of ERM proteins. Downregulation of signaling components upstream of JNK inhibits E1A-dependent JNK/c-Jun activation. Taking these findings together, we show that E1A activates the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway upstream of Rac1 in a transcription-independent manner, demonstrating a novel mechanism of E1A action.

  7. Role of an adenovirus E2 promoter binding factor in E1A-mediated coordinate gene control.

    PubMed Central

    Kovesdi, I; Reichel, R; Nevins, J R

    1987-01-01

    A product of the adenovirus gene E1A is responsible for the stimulation of transcription from six viral promoters as well as at least two cellular promoters. We have detected a HeLa cell factor, termed E2 promoter binding factor (E2F), that appears to mediate the transcriptional stimulation of the viral E2 promoter. Competition experiments revealed that E2F did not recognize and bind to the E1B, E3, E4, or major late promoter sequences. Furthermore, three additional promoters stimulated by E1A, heat shock protein 70, beta-globin, and early simian virus 40, do not bind E2F. In contrast, the factor does recognize sequences in the E1A enhancer, and within the E1A enhancer are duplicated binding sites for E2F. Finally, a single E2F binding site from the E1A enhancer can confer increased transcription to a mouse beta-globin promoter, dependent on the action of the E1A gene product. This stimulation requires binding of E2F since methylation of the binding site, which blocks binding in vitro, reduces transcription stimulation in vivo. We, therefore, conclude that E2F is likely to be responsible for the E1A-mediated stimulation of the E1A gene as well as the E2 gene but is not involved in the activation of the other E1A-inducible promoters. Images PMID:2951737

  8. Suppression of mutations in two Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes by the adenovirus E1A protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zieler, H A; Walberg, M; Berg, P

    1995-01-01

    The protein products of the adenoviral E1A gene are implicated in a variety of transcriptional and cell cycle events, involving interactions with several proteins present in human cells, including parts of the transcriptional machinery and negative regulators of cell division such as the Rb gene product and p107. To determine if there are functional homologs of E1A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have developed a genetic screen for mutants that depend on E1A for growth. The screen is based on a colony color sectoring assay which allows the identification of mutants dependent on the maintenance and expression of an E1A-containing plasmid. Using this screen, we have isolated five mutants that depend on expression of the 12S or 13S cDNA of E1A for growth. A plasmid shuffle assay confirms that the plasmid-dependent phenotype is due to the presence of either the 12S or the 13S E1A cDNA and that both forms of E1A rescue growth of all mutants equally well. The five mutants fall into two classes that were named web1 and web2 (for "wants E1A badly"). Plasmid shuffle assays with mutant forms of E1A show that conserved region 1 (CR1) is required for rescue of the growth of the web1 and web2 E1A-dependent yeast mutants, while the N-terminal 22 amino acids are only partially required; conserved region 2 (CR2) and the C terminus are dispensable. The phenotypes of mutants in both the web1 and the web2 groups are due to a single gene defect, and the yeast genes that fully complement the mutant phenotypes of both groups were cloned. The WEB1 gene sequence encodes a 1,273-amino-acid protein that is identical to SEC31, a protein involved in the budding of transport vesicles from the endoplasmic reticulum. The WEB2 gene encodes a 1,522-amino-acid protein with homology to nucleic acid-dependent ATPases. Deletion of either WEB1 or WEB2 is lethal. Expression of E1A is not able to rescue the lethality of either the web1 or the web2 null allele, implying allele-specific mutations that lead

  9. Ad5/35E1aPSESE4: A novel approach to marking circulating prostate tumor cells with a replication competent adenovirus controlled by PSA/PSMA transcription regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Eun; Joung, Jae Young; Shin, Seung-Phil; Choi, Moon-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Yon Hui; Park, Weon Seo; Lee, Sang-Jin; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells serve as useful biomarkers with which to identify disease status associated with survival, metastasis and drug sensitivity. Here, we established a novel application for detecting PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells circulating in peripheral blood employing an adenovirus called Ad5/35E1aPSESE4. Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 utilized PSES, a chimeric enhancer derived from PSA/PSMA promoters that is highly active with and without androgen. A fluorescence signal mediated by GFP expression upon Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection was selectively amplified in PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro and ex vivo. Furthermore, for the in vivo model, blood drawn from TRAMP was tested for CTCs with Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection and was positive for CTCs at week 16. Validation was performed on patient blood at various clinical stages and found out 1-100 CTCs expressing GFP upon Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 infection. Interestingly, CTC from one patient was confirmed to be sensitive to docetaxel chemotherapeutic reagent and to abundantly express metastasis-related genes like MMP9, Cofilin1, and FCER1G through RNA-seq. Our study established that the usage of Ad5/35E1aPSESE4 is effective in marking PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells in patient blood to improve the efficacy of utilizing CTCs as a biomarker.

  10. Stochastic Model of Supercoiling-Dependent Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackley, C. A.; Johnson, J.; Bentivoglio, A.; Corless, S.; Gilbert, N.; Gonnella, G.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a stochastic model for gene transcription coupled to DNA supercoiling, where we incorporate the experimental observation that polymerases create supercoiling as they unwind the DNA helix and that these enzymes bind more favorably to regions where the genome is unwound. Within this model, we show that when the transcriptionally induced flux of supercoiling increases, there is a sharp crossover from a regime where torsional stresses relax quickly and gene transcription is random, to one where gene expression is highly correlated and tightly regulated by supercoiling. In the latter regime, the model displays transcriptional bursts, waves of supercoiling, and up regulation of divergent or bidirectional genes. It also predicts that topological enzymes which relax twist and writhe should provide a pathway to down regulate transcription.

  11. DNA Template Dependent Accuracy Variation of Nucleotide Selection in Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mellenius, Harriet; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2015-01-01

    It has been commonly assumed that the effect of erroneous transcription of DNA genes into messenger RNAs on peptide sequence errors are masked by much more frequent errors of mRNA translation to protein. We present a theoretical model of transcriptional accuracy. It uses experimentally estimated standard free energies of double-stranded DNA and RNA/DNA hybrids and predicts a DNA template dependent transcriptional accuracy variation spanning several orders of magnitude. The model also identifies high-error as well a high-accuracy transcription motifs. The source of the large accuracy span is the context dependent variation of the stacking free energy of pairs of correct and incorrect base pairs in the ever moving transcription bubble. Our model predictions have direct experimental support from recent single molecule based identifications of transcriptional errors in the C. elegans transcriptome. Our conclusions challenge the general view that amino acid substitution errors in proteins are mainly caused by translational errors. It suggests instead that transcriptional error hotspots are the dominating source of peptide sequence errors in some DNA template contexts, while mRNA translation is the major cause of protein errors in other contexts. PMID:25799551

  12. DNA template dependent accuracy variation of nucleotide selection in transcription.

    PubMed

    Mellenius, Harriet; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2015-01-01

    It has been commonly assumed that the effect of erroneous transcription of DNA genes into messenger RNAs on peptide sequence errors are masked by much more frequent errors of mRNA translation to protein. We present a theoretical model of transcriptional accuracy. It uses experimentally estimated standard free energies of double-stranded DNA and RNA/DNA hybrids and predicts a DNA template dependent transcriptional accuracy variation spanning several orders of magnitude. The model also identifies high-error as well a high-accuracy transcription motifs. The source of the large accuracy span is the context dependent variation of the stacking free energy of pairs of correct and incorrect base pairs in the ever moving transcription bubble. Our model predictions have direct experimental support from recent single molecule based identifications of transcriptional errors in the C. elegans transcriptome. Our conclusions challenge the general view that amino acid substitution errors in proteins are mainly caused by translational errors. It suggests instead that transcriptional error hotspots are the dominating source of peptide sequence errors in some DNA template contexts, while mRNA translation is the major cause of protein errors in other contexts.

  13. Riboswitches in regulation of Rho-dependent transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Proshkin, Sergey; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    Riboswitches are RNA sensors of small metabolites and ions that regulate gene expression in response to environmental changes. In bacteria, the riboswitch sensor domain usually controls the formation of a strong RNA hairpin that either functions as a potent transcription terminator or sequesters a ribosome-binding site. A recent study demonstrated a novel mechanism by which a riboswitch controls Rho-dependent transcription termination. This riboswitch mechanism is likely a widespread mode of gene regulation that determines whether a protein effector is able to attenuate transcription. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Riboswitches.

  14. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Duong, Son Q.; Sheydina, Anna; Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to cAMP response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcriptional activation. To investigate the spatial and temporal organization of CREB-dependent transcriptional nuclear microdomains, we combined perforated patch-clamp technique and FRET microscopy for monitoring CREB and CREB-binding protein interaction in the nuclei of live cells. The experimental approach to the quantitative assessment of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling evoked by cAMP- and Cav1.2-dependent mechanisms was devised in COS1 cells expressing recombinant Cav1.2 calcium channels. Using continuous 2-dimensional wavelet transform and time series analyses, we found that nuclear CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling is organized differentially in spatially and temporally separated microdomains of 4 distinct types. In rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, CREB-dependent transcription is mediated by the cAMP-initiated CaMKII-sensitive and Cav1.2-initiated CaMKII-insensitive mechanisms. The latter microdomains show a tendency to exhibit periodic behavior correlated with spontaneous contraction of myocytes suggestive of frequency-dependent CREB-dependent transcriptional regulation in the heart.—Kobrinsky, E., Duong, S.Q., Sheydina, A., Soldatov, N. M. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells. PMID:21248242

  15. Transcriptional dynamics with time-dependent reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Shubhendu; Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2015-02-01

    Transcription is the first step in the process of gene regulation that controls cell response to varying environmental conditions. Transcription is a stochastic process, involving synthesis and degradation of mRNAs, that can be modeled as a birth-death process. We consider a generic stochastic model, where the fluctuating environment is encoded in the time-dependent reaction rates. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the mRNA probability distribution and are able to analyze the response for arbitrary time-dependent protocols. Our analytical results and stochastic simulations confirm that the transcriptional machinery primarily act as a low-pass filter. We also show that depending on the system parameters, the mRNA levels in a cell population can show synchronous/asynchronous fluctuations and can deviate from Poisson statistics.

  16. Modulation of Elk-dependent-transcription by Gene33.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Adam B; Messina, Joseph L

    2005-04-15

    Gene33 is a cytoplasmic protein expressed in many cell types, including those of renal and hepatic origin. Its expression is regulated by a large number of mitogenic and stressful stimuli, both in cultured cells and in vivo. Gene33 protein possesses binding domains for ErbB receptors, 14-3-3 proteins, SH-3 domains, and GTP bound Cdc42, suggesting that it may play a role in signal transduction. Indeed, these regions of Gene33 have been reported to modulate signaling through the ERK, JNK, and NFkappaB pathways. In the present work, epitope-tagged full-length and truncation mutants, as well as wild-type Gene33, were overexpressed in 293 cells. The expression of these proteins was compared to the level of endogenous Gene33 by Western blot using a newly developed polyclonal antibody. As proxies for activity of the ERK and JNK pathways, Elk- and c-Jun-dependent transcription were measured by a luciferase reporter gene. Moderate expression levels of full-length Gene33 caused a twofold increase in Elk-dependent transcription, while at higher levels, c-Jun-dependent transcription was partially inhibited. The C-terminal half of Gene33 significantly increased both Elk- and c-Jun-dependent transcription when expressed at approximately threefold above control levels. This effect on Elk-dependent transcription was lost at higher levels of Gene33 expression. In contrast, higher levels of the C-terminal half of Gene33 caused a progressively greater effect on c-Jun-dependent transcription. These findings suggest that Gene33 may increase ERK activity, and that the C-terminal half of Gene33 may act less specifically in the absence of the N-terminal half, inducing JNK activity.

  17. Retroactivity effects dependency on the transcription factors binding mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Hernández, Libertad; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena; Aguilar-Ibáñez, Carlos F; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; Soria-López, Alberto; Martínez-García, Juan Carlos

    2016-12-07

    Downstream connection effects on transcription are caused by retroactivity. When biomolecular dynamical systems interconnect retroactivity is a property that becomes important. The biological functional meaning of these effects is increasingly becoming an area of interest. Downstream targets, which are operator binding sites in transcriptional networks, may induce behaviors such as ultrasensitive responses or even represent an undesired issue in regulation. To the best of our knowledge, the role of the binding mechanisms of transcription factors in relation to minimizing - or enhancing - retroactivity effects has not been previously addressed. Our aim is to evaluate retroactivity effects considering how the binding mechanism impacts the number of free functional transcription factor (FFTF) molecules using a simple model via deterministic and stochastic simulations. We study four transcription factor binding mechanisms (BM): simple monomer binding (SMB), dimer binding (DB), cooperative sequential binding (CSB) and cooperative sequential binding with dimerization (CSB_D). We consider weak and strong binding regimes for each mechanism, where we contrast the cases when the FFTF is bound or unbound to the downstream loads. Upon interconnection, the number of FFTF molecules changed less for the SMB mechanism while for DB they changed the most. Our results show that for the chosen mechanisms (in terms of the corresponding described dynamics), retroactivity effects depend on transcription binding mechanisms. This contributes to the understanding of how the transcription factor regulatory function-such as decision making-and its dynamic needs for the response, may determine the nature of the selected binding mechanism.

  18. Modelling the CDK-dependent transcription cycle in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sansó, Miriam; Fisher, Robert P

    2013-12-01

    CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases) ensure directionality and fidelity of the eukaryotic cell division cycle. In a similar fashion, the transcription cycle is governed by a conserved subfamily of CDKs that phosphorylate Pol II (RNA polymerase II) and other substrates. A genetic model organism, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, has yielded robust models of cell-cycle control, applicable to higher eukaryotes. From a similar approach combining classical and chemical genetics, fundamental principles of transcriptional regulation by CDKs are now emerging. In the present paper, we review the current knowledge of each transcriptional CDK with respect to its substrate specificity, function in transcription and effects on chromatin modifications, highlighting the important roles of CDKs in ensuring quantity and quality control over gene expression in eukaryotes.

  19. Transcription-dependent and transcription-independent nucleosome disruption induced by dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.E.; Whitlock, J.P. Jr. )

    1992-12-01

    In mouse hepatoma cells, both the regulatory and the transcribed regions of the cyp1a1 gene assume a nucleosomal configuration when the gene is silent; two nucleosomes occupy specific sites at the transcriptional promoter. Activation of transcription by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is accompanied by changes in chromatin structure, which depend upon a functional aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor. In the transcribed region of the gene, nucleosome disruption occurs as a consequence of RNA elongation. In contrast, at the promoter, loss of positioned nucleosomes is independent of transcription and represents an event in the mechanism by which the liganded Ah receptor enhances transcriptional initiation. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Context-dependent transcription: all politics is local.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Marta; Rhodes, Simon J; Bidwell, Joseph P

    2003-08-14

    An organism ultimately reflects the coordinate expression of its genome. The misexpression of a gene can have catastrophic consequences for an organism, yet the mechanics of transcription is a local phenomenon within the cell nucleus. Chromosomal and nuclear position often dictate the activity of a specific gene. Transcription occurs in territories and in discrete localized foci within these territories. The proximity of a gene or trans-acting factor to heterochromatin can have profound functional significance. The organization of heterochromatin changes with cell development, thus conferring temporal changes on gene activity. The protein-protein interactions that engage the trans-acting factor also contribute to context-dependent transcription. Multi-protein assemblages known as enhanceosomes govern gene expression by local committee thus dictating regional transcription factor function. Local DNA architecture can prescribe enhancesome membership. The local bending of the double helix, typically mediated by architectural transcription factors, is often critical for stabilizing enhanceosomes formed from trans-acting proteins separated over small and large distances. The recognition element to which a transcription factor binds is of functional significance because DNA may act as an allosteric ligand influencing the conformation and thus the activity of the transactivation domain of the binding protein, as well as the recruitment of other proteins to the enhanceosome. Here, we review and attempt to integrate these local determinants of gene expression.

  1. E1a induces the expression of epithelial characteristics

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Cells closely resembling epithelia constitute the first specific cell type in a mammalian embryo. Many other cell types emerge via epithelial- mesenchymal differentiation. The transcription factors and signal transduction pathways involved in this differentiation are being elucidated. I have previously reported (Frisch, 1991) that adenovirus E1a is a tumor suppressor gene in certain human cell lines. In the present report, I demonstrate that E1a expression caused diverse human tumor cells (rhabdomyosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, melanoma, osteosarcoma) and fibroblasts to assume at least two of the following epithelial characteristics: (a) epithelioid morphology; (b) epithelial-type intercellular adhesion proteins localized to newly formed junctional complexes; (c) keratin-containing intermediate filaments; and (d) down- regulation of non-epithelial genes. E1a thus appeared to partially convert diverse human tumor cells into an epithelial phenotype. This provides a new system for molecular analysis of epithelial-mesenchymal interconversions. This effect may also contribute to E1a's tumor suppression activity, possibly through sensitization to anoikis (Frisch, S.M., and H. Francis, 1994. J. Cell Biol. 124:619-626). PMID:7525602

  2. Xenopus transcription factor IIIA-dependent DNA renaturation.

    PubMed

    Fiser-Littell, R M; Hanas, J S

    1988-11-15

    Kinetic and titration analyses are used to elucidate the mechanism by which Xenopus transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a protein required for 5 S RNA synthesis by RNA polymerase III, promotes DNA renaturation. TFIIIA promotes 50% renaturation of complementary strands (303 bases) in 45 s. Analyses of the renaturation kinetics indicate the rate-limiting step in this TFIIIA-dependent reaction is first order. TFIIIA-dependent DNA renaturation is a stoichiometric rather than a catalytic process. The renaturation rates for specific and nonspecific DNA are very similar, indicating lack of sequence specificity in this TFIIIA-dependent process. In the nanomolar concentration range of protein and DNA, renaturation occurs at a ratio of about one TFIIIA molecule/single strand (303 bases). Elevated reaction temperatures strongly stimulate TFIIIA-dependent DNA renaturation; at 45 degrees C, renaturation of the 303-base pair fragment nears completion in about 5 s. The ability of TFIIIA to rapidly promote DNA renaturation is unique when compared with Escherichia coli recA protein, single-stranded DNA binding protein, or bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein. This mechanism by which TFIIIA promotes DNA renaturation is compatible with features of 5 S RNA gene transcription.

  3. Developmental-stage-dependent transcriptional response to leukaemic oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Assi, Salam A.; Tsoulaki, Olga; Gilmour, Jane; Lacaud, Georges; Bonifer, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is characterized by a block in myeloid differentiation the stage of which is dependent on the nature of the transforming oncogene and the developmental stage of the oncogenic hit. This is also true for the t(8;21) translocation that gives rise to the RUNX1-ETO fusion protein and initiates the most common form of human AML. Here we study the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells expressing an inducible RUNX1-ETO gene into blood cells as a model, combined with genome-wide analyses of transcription factor binding and gene expression. RUNX1-ETO interferes with both the activating and repressive function of its normal counterpart, RUNX1, at early and late stages of blood cell development. However, the response of the transcriptional network to RUNX1-ETO expression is developmental stage specific, highlighting the molecular mechanisms determining specific target cell expansion after an oncogenic hit. PMID:26018585

  4. Sequence dependence of transcription factor-mediated DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephanie; Lindén, Martin; Phillips, Rob

    2012-09-01

    DNA is subject to large deformations in a wide range of biological processes. Two key examples illustrate how such deformations influence the readout of the genetic information: the sequestering of eukaryotic genes by nucleosomes and DNA looping in transcriptional regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These kinds of regulatory problems are now becoming amenable to systematic quantitative dissection with a powerful dialogue between theory and experiment. Here, we use a single-molecule experiment in conjunction with a statistical mechanical model to test quantitative predictions for the behavior of DNA looping at short length scales and to determine how DNA sequence affects looping at these lengths. We calculate and measure how such looping depends upon four key biological parameters: the strength of the transcription factor binding sites, the concentration of the transcription factor, and the length and sequence of the DNA loop. Our studies lead to the surprising insight that sequences that are thought to be especially favorable for nucleosome formation because of high flexibility lead to no systematically detectable effect of sequence on looping, and begin to provide a picture of the distinctions between the short length scale mechanics of nucleosome formation and looping.

  5. Concentration and length dependence of DNA looping in transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Garcia, Hernan G; Blumberg, Seth; Towles, Kevin B; Beausang, John F; Nelson, Philip C; Phillips, Rob

    2009-05-25

    In many cases, transcriptional regulation involves the binding of transcription factors at sites on the DNA that are not immediately adjacent to the promoter of interest. This action at a distance is often mediated by the formation of DNA loops: Binding at two or more sites on the DNA results in the formation of a loop, which can bring the transcription factor into the immediate neighborhood of the relevant promoter. These processes are important in settings ranging from the historic bacterial examples (bacterial metabolism and the lytic-lysogeny decision in bacteriophage), to the modern concept of gene regulation to regulatory processes central to pattern formation during development of multicellular organisms. Though there have been a variety of insights into the combinatorial aspects of transcriptional control, the mechanism of DNA looping as an agent of combinatorial control in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes remains unclear. We use single-molecule techniques to dissect DNA looping in the lac operon. In particular, we measure the propensity for DNA looping by the Lac repressor as a function of the concentration of repressor protein and as a function of the distance between repressor binding sites. As with earlier single-molecule studies, we find (at least) two distinct looped states and demonstrate that the presence of these two states depends both upon the concentration of repressor protein and the distance between the two repressor binding sites. We find that loops form even at interoperator spacings considerably shorter than the DNA persistence length, without the intervention of any other proteins to prebend the DNA. The concentration measurements also permit us to use a simple statistical mechanical model of DNA loop formation to determine the free energy of DNA looping, or equivalently, the for looping.

  6. Calorie Restriction Suppresses Age-Dependent Hippocampal Transcriptional Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Marissa J.; Dolgalev, Igor; Alldred, Melissa J.; Heguy, Adriana; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) enhances longevity and mitigates aging phenotypes in numerous species. Physiological responses to CR are cell-type specific and variable throughout the lifespan. However, the mosaic of molecular changes responsible for CR benefits remains unclear, particularly in brain regions susceptible to deterioration during aging. We examined the influence of long-term CR on the CA1 hippocampal region, a key learning and memory brain area that is vulnerable to age-related pathologies, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Through mRNA sequencing and NanoString nCounter analysis, we demonstrate that one year of CR feeding suppresses age-dependent signatures of 882 genes functionally associated with synaptic transmission-related pathways, including calcium signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and Creb signaling in wild-type mice. By comparing the influence of CR on hippocampal CA1 region transcriptional profiles at younger-adult (5 months, 2.5 months of feeding) and older-adult (15 months, 12.5 months of feeding) timepoints, we identify conserved upregulation of proteome quality control and calcium buffering genes, including heat shock 70 kDa protein 1b (Hspa1b) and heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 (Hspa5), protein disulfide isomerase family A member 4 (Pdia4) and protein disulfide isomerase family A member 6 (Pdia6), and calreticulin (Calr). Expression levels of putative neuroprotective factors, klotho (Kl) and transthyretin (Ttr), are also elevated by CR in adulthood, although the global CR-specific expression profiles at younger and older timepoints are highly divergent. At a previously unachieved resolution, our results demonstrate conserved activation of neuroprotective gene signatures and broad CR-suppression of age-dependent hippocampal CA1 region expression changes, indicating that CR functionally maintains a more youthful transcriptional state within the hippocampal CA1 sector. PMID:26221964

  7. Influence of the adenovirus 5 E1A oncogene on chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Mymryk, J S; Smith, M M

    1997-01-01

    In the eukaryotic nucleus, compaction of DNA into chromatin can limit the access of trans-acting factors, providing an additional level of regulation to processes such as transcription, replication, and repair. Recent studies have suggested that the protein products of the adenovirus 5 E1A oncogene can influence SWI-SNF and histone acetylase activities, two cellular processes that facilitate transcription in the context of chromatin. This review focuses on the unexpected effects of E1A on cellular processes that remodel chromatin in relation to its transcriptional and transforming activities.

  8. Adenovirus Small E1A Employs the Lysine Acetylases p300/CBP and Tumor Suppressor Rb to Repress Select Host Genes and Promote Productive Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Roberto; Gou, Dawei; Jawdekar, Gauri; Johnson, Sarah A.; Nava, Miguel; Su, Trent; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zemke, Nathan R.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kurdistani, Siavash K.; Berk, Arnold J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogenic transformation by adenovirus small e1a depends on simultaneous interactions with the host lysine acetylases p300/CBP and the tumor suppressor RB. How these interactions influence cellular gene expression remains unclear. We find that e1a displaces RBs from E2F transcription factors and promotes p300 acetylation of RB1 K873/K874 to lock it into a repressing conformation that interacts with repressive chromatin-modifying enzymes. These repressing p300-e1a-RB1 complexes specifically interact with host genes that have unusually high p300 association within the gene body. The TGFβ-, TNF-, and interleukin-signaling pathway components are enriched among such p300-targeted genes. The p300-e1a-RB1 complex condenses chromatin in a manner dependent on HDAC activity, p300 lysine acetylase activity, the p300 bromodomain, and RB K873/K874 and e1a K239 acetylation to repress host genes that would otherwise inhibit productive virus infection. Thus, adenovirus employs e1a to repress host genes that interfere with viral replication. PMID:25525796

  9. Quantitative characterization of gene regulation by Rho dependent transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Razika; Lee, Tiffany Y; Lim, Han N

    2015-08-01

    Rho factor dependent transcription termination (RTT) is common within the coding sequences of bacterial genes and it acts to couple transcription and translation levels. Despite the importance of RTT for gene regulation, its effects on mRNA and protein concentrations have not been quantitatively characterized. Here we demonstrate that the exogenous cfp gene encoding the cyan fluorescent protein can serve as a model for gene regulation by RTT. This was confirmed by showing that Psu and bicyclomycin decrease RTT and increase full length cfp mRNAs (but remarkably they have little effect on protein production). We then use cfp to characterize the relationship between its protein and full length mRNA concentrations when the translation initiation rate is varied by sequence modifications of the translation initiation region (TIR). These experiments reveal that the fold change in protein concentration (RP) and the fold change in full length mRNA concentration (Rm) have the relationship RP≈Rm(b), where b is a constant. The average value of b was determined from three separate data sets to be ~3.6. We demonstrate that the above power law function can predict how altering the translation initiation rate of a gene in an operon will affect the mRNA concentrations of downstream genes and specify a lower bound for the associated changes in protein concentrations. In summary, this study defines a simple phenomenological model to help program expression from single genes and operons that are regulated by RTT, and to guide molecular models of RTT.

  10. TOPLESS mediates auxin-dependent transcriptional repression during Arabidopsis embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Szemenyei, Heidi; Hannon, Mike; Long, Jeff A

    2008-03-07

    The transcriptional response to auxin is critical for root and vascular development during Arabidopsis embryogenesis. Auxin induces the degradation of AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (AUX/IAA) transcriptional repressors, freeing their binding partners, the AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) proteins, which can activate transcription of auxin response genes. We show that TOPLESS (TPL) can physically interact with IAA12/BODENLOS (IAA12/BDL) through an ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. TPL can repress transcription in vivo and is required for IAA12/BDL repressive activity. In addition, tpl-1 can suppress the patterning defects of the bdl-1 mutant. Direct interaction between TPL and ARF5/MONOPTEROS, which is regulated by IAA12/BDL, results in a loss-of-function arf5/mp phenotype. These observations show that TPL is a transcriptional co-repressor and further our understanding of how auxin regulates transcription during plant development.

  11. Transcriptional Tools: Small Molecules for Modulating CBP KIX-dependent Transcriptional Activators

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Caleb A.; Pomerantz, William C.; Mapp, Anna K.

    2010-01-01

    Previously it was demonstrated that amphipathic isoxazolidines are able to functionally replace the transcriptional activation domains of endogenous transcriptional activators. In addition, in vitro binding studies suggested that a key binding partner of these molecules is the Creb Binding Protein (CBP), more specifically the KIX domain with this protein. Here we show that CBP and the KIX domain play an essential role in the ability of isoxazolidine transcriptional activation domains to activate transcription in cells. Consistent with this model, isoxazolidines are able to function as competitive inhibitors of the activators MLL and Jun, both of which utilize a binding interaction with KIX to up-regulate transcription. Further, modification of the N2 side chain produced two analogs with enhanced potency against Jun-mediated transcription, although increased cytotoxicity was also observed. Collectively these small KIX-binding molecules will be useful tools for dissecting the role of the KIX domain in a variety of pathological processes. PMID:20882601

  12. CDK9-dependent RNA polymerase II pausing controls transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Gressel, Saskia; Schwalb, Björn; Decker, Tim Michael; Qin, Weihua; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Eick, Dirk; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-10-10

    Gene transcription can be activated by decreasing the duration of RNA polymerase II pausing in the promoter-proximal region, but how this is achieved remains unclear. Here we use a 'multi-omics' approach to demonstrate that the duration of polymerase pausing generally limits the productive frequency of transcription initiation in human cells ('pause-initiation limit'). We further engineer a human cell line to allow for specific and rapid inhibition of the P-TEFb kinase CDK9, which is implicated in polymerase pause release. CDK9 activity decreases the pause duration but also increases the productive initiation frequency. This shows that CDK9 stimulates release of paused polymerase and activates transcription by increasing the number of transcribing polymerases and thus the amount of mRNA synthesized per time. CDK9 activity is also associated with long-range chromatin interactions, suggesting that enhancers can influence the pause-initiation limit to regulate transcription.

  13. Time-Dependent Transcriptional Changes in Axenic Giardia duodenalis Trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Brendan R E; McConville, Malcolm J; Baker, Louise; Korhonen, Pasi K; Young, Neil D; Hall, Ross S; Rojas, Cristian A A; Svärd, Staffan G; Gasser, Robin B; Jex, Aaron R

    2015-12-01

    Giardia duodenalis is the most common gastrointestinal protozoan parasite of humans and a significant contributor to the global burden of both diarrheal disease and post-infectious chronic disorders. Although G. duodenalis can be cultured axenically, significant gaps exist in our understanding of the molecular biology and metabolism of this pathogen. The present study employed RNA sequencing to characterize the mRNA transcriptome of G. duodenalis trophozoites in axenic culture, at log (48 h of growth), stationary (60 h), and declining (96 h) growth phases. Using ~400-times coverage of the transcriptome, we identified 754 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs), mainly representing two large DTG groups: 438 that were down-regulated in the declining phase relative to log and stationary phases, and 281 that were up-regulated. Differential transcription of prominent antioxidant and glycolytic enzymes implicated oxygen tension as a key factor influencing the transcriptional program of axenic trophozoites. Systematic bioinformatic characterization of numerous DTGs encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function was achieved using structural homology searching. This powerful approach greatly informed the differential transcription analysis and revealed putative novel antioxidant-coding genes, and the presence of a near-complete two-component-like signaling system that may link cytosolic redox or metabolite sensing to the observed transcriptional changes. Motif searching applied to promoter regions of the two large DTG groups identified different putative transcription factor-binding motifs that may underpin global transcriptional regulation. This study provides new insights into the drivers and potential mediators of transcriptional variation in axenic G. duodenalis and provides context for static transcriptional studies.

  14. Time-Dependent Transcriptional Changes in Axenic Giardia duodenalis Trophozoites

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, Brendan R. E.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Baker, Louise; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Young, Neil D.; Hall, Ross S.; Rojas, Cristian A. A.; Svärd, Staffan G.; Gasser, Robin B.; Jex, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is the most common gastrointestinal protozoan parasite of humans and a significant contributor to the global burden of both diarrheal disease and post-infectious chronic disorders. Although G. duodenalis can be cultured axenically, significant gaps exist in our understanding of the molecular biology and metabolism of this pathogen. The present study employed RNA sequencing to characterize the mRNA transcriptome of G. duodenalis trophozoites in axenic culture, at log (48 h of growth), stationary (60 h), and declining (96 h) growth phases. Using ~400-times coverage of the transcriptome, we identified 754 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs), mainly representing two large DTG groups: 438 that were down-regulated in the declining phase relative to log and stationary phases, and 281 that were up-regulated. Differential transcription of prominent antioxidant and glycolytic enzymes implicated oxygen tension as a key factor influencing the transcriptional program of axenic trophozoites. Systematic bioinformatic characterization of numerous DTGs encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function was achieved using structural homology searching. This powerful approach greatly informed the differential transcription analysis and revealed putative novel antioxidant-coding genes, and the presence of a near-complete two-component-like signaling system that may link cytosolic redox or metabolite sensing to the observed transcriptional changes. Motif searching applied to promoter regions of the two large DTG groups identified different putative transcription factor-binding motifs that may underpin global transcriptional regulation. This study provides new insights into the drivers and potential mediators of transcriptional variation in axenic G. duodenalis and provides context for static transcriptional studies. PMID:26636323

  15. A Splicing-Dependent Transcriptional Checkpoint Associated with Prespliceosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chathoth, Keerthi T.; Barrass, J. David; Webb, Shaun; Beggs, Jean D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is good evidence for functional interactions between splicing and transcription in eukaryotes, but how and why these processes are coupled remain unknown. Prp5 protein (Prp5p) is an RNA-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) required for prespliceosome formation in yeast. We demonstrate through in vivo RNA labeling that, in addition to a splicing defect, the prp5-1 mutation causes a defect in the transcription of intron-containing genes. We present chromatin immunoprecipitation evidence for a transcriptional elongation defect in which RNA polymerase that is phosphorylated at Ser5 of the largest subunit’s heptad repeat accumulates over introns and that this defect requires Cus2 protein. A similar accumulation of polymerase was observed when prespliceosome formation was blocked by a mutation in U2 snRNA. These results indicate the existence of a transcriptional elongation checkpoint that is associated with prespliceosome formation during cotranscriptional spliceosome assembly. We propose a role for Cus2p as a potential checkpoint factor in transcription. PMID:24560925

  16. Transcriptional Regulatory Cascades in Runx2-Dependent Bone Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The development of the musculoskeletal system is a complex process that involves very precise control of bone formation and growth as well as remodeling during postnatal life. Although the understanding of the transcriptional mechanisms of osteogenesis has increased considerably, the molecular regulatory basis, especially the gene regulatory network of osteogenic differentiation, is still poorly understood. This review provides the reader with an overview of the key transcription factors that govern bone formation, highlighting their function and regulation linked to Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). Runx2 as the master transcription factor of osteoblast differentiation, Twist, Msh homeobox 2 (Msx2), and promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger protein (PLZF) acting upstream of Runx2, Osterix (Osx) acting downstream of Runx2, and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and zinc-finger protein 521 (ZFP521) acting as cofactors of Runx2 are discussed, and their relevance for tissue engineering is presented. References are provided for more in-depth personal study. PMID:23150948

  17. Transcription Independent Insulation at TFIIIC-Dependent Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Lourdes; Dhillon, Namrita; Kamakaka, Rohinton T.

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin insulators separate active from repressed chromatin domains. In yeast the RNA pol III transcription machinery bound to tRNA genes function with histone acetylases and chromatin remodelers to restrict the spread of heterochromatin. Our results collectively demonstrate that binding of TFIIIC is necessary for insulation but binding of TFIIIB along with TFIIIC likely improves the probability of complex formation at an insulator. Insulation by this transcription factor occurs in the absence of RNA polymerase III or polymerase II but requires specific histone acetylases and chromatin remodelers. This analysis identifies a minimal set of factors required for insulation. PMID:19596900

  18. Transcription of Nearly All Yeast RNA Polymerase II-Transcribed Genes Is Dependent on Transcription Factor TFIID.

    PubMed

    Warfield, Linda; Ramachandran, Srinivas; Baptista, Tiago; Devys, Didier; Tora, Laszlo; Hahn, Steven

    2017-09-13

    Previous studies suggested that expression of most yeast mRNAs is dominated by either transcription factor TFIID or SAGA. We re-examined the role of TFIID by rapid depletion of S. cerevisiae TFIID subunits and measurement of changes in nascent transcription. We find that transcription of nearly all mRNAs is strongly dependent on TFIID function. Degron-dependent depletion of Taf1, Taf2, Taf7, Taf11, and Taf13 showed similar transcription decreases for genes in the Taf1-depleted, Taf1-enriched, TATA-containing, and TATA-less gene classes. The magnitude of TFIID dependence varies with growth conditions, although this variation is similar genome-wide. Many studies have suggested differences in gene-regulatory mechanisms between TATA and TATA-less genes, and these differences have been attributed in part to differential dependence on SAGA or TFIID. Our work indicates that TFIID participates in expression of nearly all yeast mRNAs and that differences in regulation between these two gene categories is due to other properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural basis for λN-dependent processive transcription antitermination.

    PubMed

    Said, Nelly; Krupp, Ferdinand; Anedchenko, Ekaterina; Santos, Karine F; Dybkov, Olexandr; Huang, Yong-Heng; Lee, Chung-Tien; Loll, Bernhard; Behrmann, Elmar; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Loerke, Justus; Urlaub, Henning; Spahn, Christian M T; Weber, Gert; Wahl, Markus C

    2017-04-28

    λN-mediated processive antitermination constitutes a paradigmatic transcription regulatory event, during which phage protein λN, host factors NusA, NusB, NusE and NusG, and an RNA nut site render elongating RNA polymerase termination-resistant. The structural basis of the process has so far remained elusive. Here we describe a crystal structure of a λN-NusA-NusB-NusE-nut site complex and an electron cryo-microscopic structure of a complete transcription antitermination complex, comprising RNA polymerase, DNA, nut site RNA, all Nus factors and λN, validated by crosslinking/mass spectrometry. Due to intrinsic disorder, λN can act as a multiprotein/RNA interaction hub, which, together with nut site RNA, arranges NusA, NusB and NusE into a triangular complex. This complex docks via the NusA N-terminal domain and the λN C-terminus next to the RNA exit channel on RNA polymerase. Based on the structures, comparative crosslinking analyses and structure-guided mutagenesis, we hypothesize that λN mounts a multipronged strategy to reprogram the transcriptional machinery, which may include (1) the λN C terminus clamping the RNA exit channel, thus stabilizing the DNA:RNA hybrid; (2) repositioning of NusA and RNAP elements, thus redirecting nascent RNA and sequestering the upstream branch of a terminator hairpin; and (3) hindering RNA engagement of termination factor ρ and/or obstructing ρ translocation on the transcript.

  20. Coordinate post-transcriptional repression of Dpp-dependent transcription factors attenuates signal range during development.

    PubMed

    Newton, Fay G; Harris, Robin E; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Ashe, Hilary L

    2015-10-01

    Precise control of the range of signalling molecule action is crucial for correct cell fate patterning during development. For example, Drosophila ovarian germline stem cells (GSCs) are maintained by exquisitely short-range BMP signalling from the niche. In the absence of BMP signalling, one GSC daughter differentiates into a cystoblast (CB) and this fate is stabilised by Brain tumour (Brat) and Pumilio (Pum)-mediated post-transcriptional repression of mRNAs, including that encoding the Dpp transducer, Mad. However, the identity of other repressed mRNAs and the mechanism of post-transcriptional repression are currently unknown. Here, we identify the Medea and schnurri mRNAs, which encode transcriptional regulators required for activation and/or repression of Dpp target genes, as additional Pum-Brat targets, suggesting that tripartite repression of the transducers is deployed to desensitise the CB to Dpp. In addition, we show that repression by Pum-Brat requires recruitment of the CCR4 and Pop2 deadenylases, with knockdown of deadenylases in vivo giving rise to ectopic GSCs. Consistent with this, Pum-Brat repression leads to poly(A) tail shortening and mRNA degradation in tissue culture cells, and we detect a reduced number of Mad and shn transcripts in the CB relative to the GSC based on single molecule mRNA quantitation. Finally, we show generality of the mechanism by demonstrating that Brat also attenuates pMad and Dpp signalling range in the early embryo. Together our data serve as a platform for understanding how post-transcriptional repression restricts interpretation of BMPs and other cell signals in order to allow robust cell fate patterning during development.

  1. Limited temperature-sensitive transactivation by mutant adenovirus type 2 E1a proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fahnestock, M L; Lewis, J B

    1989-01-01

    A series of linker-scanning and deletion mutations was generated in the transactivating domain of the larger, 289-amino-acid-residue E1a protein of adenovirus type 2. Mutant genes were recombined into virus to assay the ability of the variant E1a proteins to activate expression of an E1a-dependent viral gene during infection. Results of assays performed at 32, 37, and 40 degrees C indicated that at least 2 of the 10 mutants tested showed limited temperature sensitivity for transactivation. Images PMID:2523001

  2. Transcription dependent dynamic supercoiling is a short-range genomic force

    PubMed Central

    Kouzine, Fedor; Gupta, Ashutosh; Baranello, Laura; Wojtowicz, Damian; Benaissa, Khadija; Liu, Juhong; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Levens, David

    2013-01-01

    Transcription has the capacity to modify mechanically DNA topology, DNA structure, and nucleosome arrangement. Resulting from ongoing transcription, these modifications in turn, may provide instant feedback to the transcription machinery. To substantiate the connection between transcription and DNA dynamics, we charted an ENCODE map of transcription-dependent dynamic supercoiling in human Burkitt lymphoma cells using psoralen photobinding to probe DNA topology in vivo. Dynamic supercoils spread ~1.5 kb upstream of the start sites of active genes. Low and high output promoters handle this torsional stress differently as shown using inhibitors of transcription and topoisomerases, and by chromatin immunoprecipation of RNA polymerase and topoisomerases I and II. Whereas lower outputs are managed adequately by topoisomerase I, high output promoters additionally require topoisomerase II. The genome-wide coupling between transcription and DNA topology emphasizes the importance of dynamic supercoiling for gene regulation. PMID:23416947

  3. Pol I Transcription and Pre-rRNA Processing Are Coordinated in a Transcription-dependent Manner in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, K.; Gasiorowski, J. Z.; Chen, D.; Gilmore, R.; Norton, J. T.; Wang, C.; Leary, D. J.; Chan, E.K.L.; Dean, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Pre-rRNA synthesis and processing are key steps in ribosome biogenesis. Although recent evidence in yeast suggests that these two processes are coupled, the nature of their association is unclear. In this report, we analyze the coordination between rDNA transcription and pre-rRNA processing in mammalian cells. We found that pol I transcription factor UBF interacts with pre-rRNA processing factors as analyzed by immunoprecipitations, and the association depends on active rRNA synthesis. In addition, injections of plasmids containing the human rDNA promoter and varying lengths of 18S rDNA into HeLa nuclei show that pol I transcription machinery can be recruited to rDNA promoters regardless of the product that is transcribed, whereas subgroups of pre-rRNA processing factors are recruited to plasmids only when specific pre-rRNA fragments are produced. Our observations suggest a model for sequential recruitment of pol I transcription factors and pre-rRNA processing factors to elongating pre-rRNA on an as-needed basis rather than corecruitment to sites of active transcription. PMID:17108330

  4. A Glimpse beyond Structures in Auxin-Dependent Transcription.

    PubMed

    Parcy, François; Vernoux, Teva; Dumas, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs), transcription factors (TFs), and their Aux/IAA (IAA) repressors are central components of the auxin signalling pathway. They interact as homo- and heteromultimers. The structure of their interacting domains revealed a PB1 fold mediating electrostatic interactions through positive and negative faces. Detailed structural analysis revealed additional hydrophobic and polar determinants and started unveiling an ARF/IAA interaction code. Structural progress also shed new light on the DNA binding mode of ARFs showing how they dimerize to bind repeated DNA elements. Here, we discuss the in vitro and in vivo significance of these structural properties for the ARF family of TFs and identify some critical missing information on how specificity might be achieved in the auxin signalling pathway.

  5. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product.

    PubMed

    Braun, Katherine A; Dombek, Kenneth M; Young, Elton T

    2015-12-14

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  7. Deregulated telomere transcription causes replication-dependent telomere shortening and promotes cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Maicher, André; Kastner, Lisa; Dees, Martina; Luke, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres are transcribed into non-coding TElomeric Repeat containing RNAs (TERRA). We have employed a transcriptionally inducible telomere to investigate how telomere transcription affects telomere function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report that telomere shortening resulting from high levels of telomere transcription stems from a DNA replication-dependent loss of telomere tracts, which can occur independent of both telomerase inhibition and homologous recombination. We show that in order for telomere loss to occur, transcription must pass through the telomere tract itself producing a TERRA molecule. We demonstrate that increased telomere transcription of a single telomere leads to a premature cellular senescence in the absence of a telomere maintenance mechanism (telomerase and homology directed repair). Similar rapid senescence and telomere shortening are also seen in sir2Δ cells with compromised telomere maintenance, where TERRA levels are increased at natural telomeres. These data suggest that telomere transcription must be tightly controlled to prevent telomere loss and early onset senescence. PMID:22553368

  8. Silencing E1A mRNA by RNA interference inhibits adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y-S; Kim, M-K; Lee, W-J; Kang, C

    2007-01-01

    The adenovirus family contains 51 human serotypes, and most human adenoviruses cause widespread respiratory tract infections. Adenovirus infections can result in severe complications in some cases, such as in adenovirus type 11 infection in immunocompromised patients. However, effective treatment methods for adenovirus infections are currently unavailable. This prompted the search for antiviral agents effective against adenovirus infections. In the present study, adenovirus E1A was targeted by RNA interference (RNAi) using synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in an attempt to inhibit viral replication, since adenovirus E1A proteins are known to be involved in the transcriptional activation of the viral and cellular genes necessary for controlling the cell cycle and viral replication. The results indicated that the siRNAs effectively reduced the amount of adenovirus E1A mRNA and the levels of replicative intermediates. Additionally, siRNA-mediated gene silencing inhibited adenovirus replication by suppressing the E1A mRNA. These results suggest that the RNAi-mediated targeting of adenovirus E1A may have a potentially therapeutic effect in controlling adenovirus infections.

  9. Nuclear Dynamics of BRCA1-Dependent Transcription Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    are ligand- and domain-dependent Z. Dave Sharp1,*, Maureen G. Mancini2,*, Cruz A. Hinojos2,*, Fangyan Dai2, Valeria Berno2, Adam T. Szafran2, Kelly P... Barron et al., 1989; Cao et al., 1987; Crenshaw et al., 1989; Day et al., 1990; Howard and Maurer, 1995; Ingraham et al., 1990; Mangalam et al., 1989...References Barron , E. A., Cao, Z., Schneider, B. G., Kraig, E., Carrillo, A. J. and Sharp, Z. D. (1989). Dual functions of a cis-acting element within the

  10. Chronic Mild Stress Modulates Activity-Dependent Transcription of BDNF in Rat Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Raffaella; Rossetti, Andrea C; Savino, Elisa; Racagni, Giorgio; Calabrese, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Although activity-dependent transcription represents a crucial mechanism for long-lasting experience-dependent changes in the hippocampus, limited data exist on its contribution to pathological conditions. We aim to investigate the influence of chronic stress on the activity-dependent transcription of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The ex vivo methodology of acute stimulation of hippocampal slices obtained from rats exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS) was used to evaluate whether the adverse experience may alter activity-dependent BDNF gene expression. CMS reduces BDNF expression and that acute depolarization significantly upregulates total BDNF mRNA levels only in control animals, showing that CMS exposure may alter BDNF transcription under basal conditions and during neuronal activation. Moreover, while the basal effect of CMS on total BDNF reflects parallel modulations of all the transcripts examined, isoform-specific changes were found after depolarization. This different effect was also observed in the activation of intracellular signaling pathways related to the neurotrophin. In conclusion, our study discloses a functional alteration of BDNF transcription as a consequence of stress. Being the activity-regulated transcription a critical process in synaptic and neuronal plasticity, the different regulation of individual BDNF promoters may contribute to long-lasting changes, which are fundamental for the vulnerability of the hippocampus to stress-related diseases.

  11. Transcription factor Runx3 regulates interleukin-15-dependent natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Levanon, Ditsa; Negreanu, Varda; Lotem, Joseph; Bone, Karen Rae; Brenner, Ori; Leshkowitz, Dena; Groner, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer cells belong to the family of innate lymphoid cells comprising the frontline defense against infected and transformed cells. Development and activation of natural killer cells is highly dependent on interleukin-15 signaling. However, very little is known about the transcription program driving this process. The transcription factor Runx3 is highly expressed in natural killer cells, but its function in these cells is largely unknown. We show that loss of Runx3 impaired interleukin-15-dependent accumulation of mature natural killer cells in vivo and under culture conditions and pregnant Runx3(-/-) mice completely lack the unique population of interleukin-15-dependent uterine natural killer cells. Combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of wild-type versus Runx3-deficient in vivo activated splenic natural killer cells revealed that Runx3 cooperates with ETS and T-box transcription factors to drive the interleukin-15-mediated transcription program during activation of these cells. Runx3 functions as a nuclear regulator during interleukin-15-dependent activation of natural killer cells by regulating the expression of genes involved in proliferation, maturation, and migration. Similar studies with additional transcription factors will allow the construction of a more detailed transcriptional network that controls natural killer cell development and function.

  12. The Sm-like RNA chaperone Hfq mediates transcription antitermination at Rho-dependent terminators

    PubMed Central

    Rabhi, Makhlouf; Espéli, Olivier; Schwartz, Annie; Cayrol, Bastien; Rahmouni, A Rachid; Arluison, Véronique; Boudvillain, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the essential motor protein Rho promotes transcription termination in a tightly controlled manner that is not fully understood. Here, we show that the general post-transcriptional regulatory protein Hfq associates with Rho to regulate Rho function. The Hfq:Rho complex can be further stabilized by RNA bridging both factors in a configuration that inhibits the ATP hydrolysis and duplex unwinding activities of Rho and that mediates transcription antitermination at Rho-dependent terminators in vitro and in vivo. Antitermination at a prototypical terminator (λtR1) requires Hfq binding to an A/U-rich transcript region directly upstream from the terminator. Antitermination is modulated by trans-acting factors (NusG or nucleic acid competitors) that affect Hfq association with Rho or RNA. These data unveil a new Hfq function and a novel transcription regulatory mechanism with potentially important implications for bacterial RNA metabolism, gene silencing, and pathogenicity. PMID:21673658

  13. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-01-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination. PMID:26276832

  14. Enhancement of Transcription by a Splicing-Competent Intron Is Dependent on Promoter Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Neha; Ansari, Athar

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of transcription by a splicing-competent intron is an evolutionarily conserved feature among eukaryotes. The molecular mechanism underlying the phenomenon, however, is not entirely clear. Here we show that the intron is an important regulator of promoter directionality. Employing strand-specific transcription run-on (TRO) analysis, we show that the transcription of mRNA is favored over the upstream anti-sense transcripts (uaRNA) initiating from the promoter in the presence of an intron. Mutation of either the 5′ or 3′ splice site resulted in the reversal of promoter directionality, thereby suggesting that it is not merely the 5′ splice site but the entire splicing-competent intron that regulates transcription directionality. ChIP analysis revealed the recruitment of termination factors near the promoter region in the presence of an intron. Removal of intron or the mutation of splice sites adversely affected the promoter localization of termination factors. We have earlier demonstrated that the intron-mediated enhancement of transcription is dependent on gene looping. Here we show that gene looping is crucial for the recruitment of termination factors in the promoter-proximal region of an intron-containing gene. In a looping-defective mutant, despite normal splicing, the promoter occupancy of factors required for poly(A)-dependent termination of transcription was compromised. This was accompanied by a concomitant loss of transcription directionality. On the basis of these results, we propose that the intron-dependent gene looping places the terminator-bound factors in the vicinity of the promoter region for termination of the promoter-initiated upstream antisense transcription, thereby conferring promoter directionality. PMID:27152651

  15. c-Jun enhancement of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate response element-dependent transcription induced by transforming growth factor-beta is independent of c-Jun binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Hu, P P; Harvat, B L; Hook, S S; Shen, X; Wang, X F; Means, A R

    1999-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) enhances transcription from reporter genes regulated by a single consensus cAMP-response element (CRE) upon transfection into the immortalized human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. Whereas both CRE-binding protein (CREB) and c-Jun present in extracts of unstimulated cells can complex with a CRE in gel-shift experiments, TGFbeta treatment increases the amount of c-Jun found in the complex. Overexpression of c-Jun is sufficient to increase CRE and GAL4-CREB-dependent transcription and mimics the stimulatory effects of TGFbeta on transcription from either reporter gene. Surprisingly, although a portion of CREB in unstimulated cells is phosphorylated on the activating serine residue, Ser-133, this level of phospho-CREB is not altered by TGFbeta treatment. In fact, the CREB-dependent transcriptional effects of TGFbeta or c-Jun do not require phosphorylation of Ser-133, although CREB-binding protein (CBP) is required as evidenced by the observation that the adenoviral oncoprotein E1A can block the effects of both agents. c-Jun enhancement of CRE or GAL4-CREB-dependent transcription neither requires the DNA-binding nor N-terminal domains of c-Jun. Collectively, these results are consistent with a model in which signaling pathways initiated by TGFbeta can stimulate CREB-dependent transcription by increasing the cellular concentration of c-Jun, which participates in activation of the CBP-containing transcription complex.

  16. A mechanism for transcriptional repression dependent on the BRCA1 E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Andrew A; Affar, El Bachir; Heine, George F; Shi, Yang; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2007-04-17

    Loss of function of the tumor suppressor protein BRCA1 is responsible for a high percentage of familial and also sporadic breast cancers. Early work identified a stimulatory transcriptional coactivator function for the BRCA1 protein, and more recently, BRCA1 has been implicated in transcriptional repression, although few examples of repressed genes have been characterized. We recently used an in vitro transcription assay to identify a biochemical mechanism that explained the BRCA1 stimulatory activity. In this study, we identified an ubiquitin-dependent mechanism by which BRCA1 inhibits transcription. BRCA1 ubiquitinates the transcriptional preinitiation complex, preventing stable association of TFIIE and TFIIH, and thus blocks the initiation of mRNA synthesis. What is striking about this mechanism of regulation by BRCA1 is that the ubiquitination of the preinitiation complex is not targeting proteins for degradation by the proteasome, nor are ubiquitin receptors modifying the activity, but rather the ubiquitin moiety itself interferes with the assembly of basal transcription factors at the promoter. Using RNAi to knockdown expression of the endogenous BRCA1 protein, we assessed the level of repression dependent on BRCA1 in the cell, and we found that BRCA1 is at least as significant a transcriptional repressor as it is an activator. These results define a biochemical mechanism by which the BRCA1 enzymatic activity regulates a key cellular process.

  17. DREAM Controls the On/Off Switch of Specific Activity-Dependent Transcription Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mellström, Britt; Sahún, Ignasi; Ruiz-Nuño, Ana; Murtra, Patricia; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Savignac, Magali; Oliveros, Juan C.; Gonzalez, Paz; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Knafo, Shira; Zhuo, Min; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Errington, Michael L.; Maldonado, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier; Jefferys, John G. R.; Bliss, Tim V. P.; Dierssen, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Changes in nuclear Ca2+ homeostasis activate specific gene expression programs and are central to the acquisition and storage of information in the brain. DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator), also known as calsenilin/KChIP-3 (K+ channel interacting protein 3), is a Ca2+-binding protein that binds DNA and represses transcription in a Ca2+-dependent manner. To study the function of DREAM in the brain, we used transgenic mice expressing a Ca2+-insensitive/CREB-independent dominant active mutant DREAM (daDREAM). Using genome-wide analysis, we show that DREAM regulates the expression of specific activity-dependent transcription factors in the hippocampus, including Npas4, Nr4a1, Mef2c, JunB, and c-Fos. Furthermore, DREAM regulates its own expression, establishing an autoinhibitory feedback loop to terminate activity-dependent transcription. Ablation of DREAM does not modify activity-dependent transcription because of gene compensation by the other KChIP family members. The expression of daDREAM in the forebrain resulted in a complex phenotype characterized by loss of recurrent inhibition and enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus and impaired learning and memory. Our results indicate that DREAM is a major master switch transcription factor that regulates the on/off status of specific activity-dependent gene expression programs that control synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. PMID:24366545

  18. DREAM controls the on/off switch of specific activity-dependent transcription pathways.

    PubMed

    Mellström, Britt; Sahún, Ignasi; Ruiz-Nuño, Ana; Murtra, Patricia; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Savignac, Magali; Oliveros, Juan C; Gonzalez, Paz; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Knafo, Shira; Zhuo, Min; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Errington, Michael L; Maldonado, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier; Jefferys, John G R; Bliss, Tim V P; Dierssen, Mara; Naranjo, Jose R

    2014-03-01

    Changes in nuclear Ca(2+) homeostasis activate specific gene expression programs and are central to the acquisition and storage of information in the brain. DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator), also known as calsenilin/KChIP-3 (K(+) channel interacting protein 3), is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that binds DNA and represses transcription in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To study the function of DREAM in the brain, we used transgenic mice expressing a Ca(2+)-insensitive/CREB-independent dominant active mutant DREAM (daDREAM). Using genome-wide analysis, we show that DREAM regulates the expression of specific activity-dependent transcription factors in the hippocampus, including Npas4, Nr4a1, Mef2c, JunB, and c-Fos. Furthermore, DREAM regulates its own expression, establishing an autoinhibitory feedback loop to terminate activity-dependent transcription. Ablation of DREAM does not modify activity-dependent transcription because of gene compensation by the other KChIP family members. The expression of daDREAM in the forebrain resulted in a complex phenotype characterized by loss of recurrent inhibition and enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus and impaired learning and memory. Our results indicate that DREAM is a major master switch transcription factor that regulates the on/off status of specific activity-dependent gene expression programs that control synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory.

  19. INO80-dependent regression of ecdysone-induced transcriptional responses regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Sarah D; Ihry, Robert J; Gruetzmacher, Kelly M; Bashirullah, Arash

    2014-03-15

    Sequential pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone regulate the major developmental transitions in Drosophila, and the duration of each developmental stage is determined by the length of time between ecdysone pulses. Ecdysone regulates biological responses by directly initiating target gene transcription. In turn, these transcriptional responses are known to be self-limiting, with mechanisms in place to ensure regression of hormone-dependent transcription. However, the biological significance of these transcriptional repression mechanisms remains unclear. Here we show that the chromatin remodeling protein INO80 facilitates transcriptional repression of ecdysone-regulated genes during prepupal development. In ino80 mutant animals, inefficient repression of transcriptional responses to the late larval ecdysone pulse delays the onset of the subsequent prepupal ecdysone pulse, resulting in a significantly longer prepupal stage. Conversely, increased expression of ino80 is sufficient to shorten the prepupal stage by increasing the rate of transcriptional repression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing the rate of regression of the mid-prepupal competence factor βFTZ-F1 is sufficient to determine the timing of head eversion and thus the duration of prepupal development. Although ino80 is conserved from yeast to humans, this study represents the first characterization of a bona fide ino80 mutation in any metazoan, raising the possibility that the functions of ino80 in transcriptional repression and developmental timing are evolutionarily conserved.

  20. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Morgan A.; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L.

    2016-01-01

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription. PMID:27334938

  1. Interaction of Adenovirus E1A with the HHV8 Promoter of Latent Genes: E1A Proteins are Able to Activate the HHV-8 LANAp in MV3 Reporter Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koehler-Hansner, Karin; Flore, Ornella; Opalka, Bertram; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma, body cavity-based lymphoma, and Castleman’s disease. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A proteins regulate the activity of cellular and viral promoters/enhancers and transcription factors and can suppress tumorigenicity of human cancers. As (i) HHV-8 and Ad may co-exist in immunocompromised patients and (ii) E1A might be considered as therapeutic transgene for HHV-8-associated neoplasms we investigated whether the promoter of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANAp) controlling expression of vCyclin, vFLIP, and LANA proteins required for latent type infection is regulated by E1A. Transfection experiments in MV3 melanoma cells revealed activation of the LANAp by Ad5 E1A constructs containing an intact N terminus (aa 1-119). In particular, an Ad12 E1A mutant, Spm2, lacking six consecutive alanine residues in the “spacer” region activated the HHV-8 promoter about 15-fold compared to vector controls. In summary, we report the activation of the LANAp by E1A as a novel interaction of E1A with a viral promoter. These data may have relevance for the management of viral infections in immunocompromised patients. A role for E1A as a therapeutic in this context remains to be defined. PMID:19440465

  2. Interaction of Adenovirus E1A with the HHV8 Promoter of Latent Genes: E1A Proteins are Able to Activate the HHV-8 LANAp in MV3 Reporter Cells.

    PubMed

    Koehler-Hansner, Karin; Flore, Ornella; Opalka, Bertram; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, body cavity-based lymphoma, and Castleman's disease. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A proteins regulate the activity of cellular and viral promoters/enhancers and transcription factors and can suppress tumorigenicity of human cancers. As (i) HHV-8 and Ad may co-exist in immunocompromised patients and (ii) E1A might be considered as therapeutic transgene for HHV-8-associated neoplasms we investigated whether the promoter of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANAp) controlling expression of vCyclin, vFLIP, and LANA proteins required for latent type infection is regulated by E1A. Transfection experiments in MV3 melanoma cells revealed activation of the LANAp by Ad5 E1A constructs containing an intact N terminus (aa 1-119). In particular, an Ad12 E1A mutant, Spm2, lacking six consecutive alanine residues in the "spacer" region activated the HHV-8 promoter about 15-fold compared to vector controls. In summary, we report the activation of the LANAp by E1A as a novel interaction of E1A with a viral promoter. These data may have relevance for the management of viral infections in immunocompromised patients. A role for E1A as a therapeutic in this context remains to be defined.

  3. A p53-independent apoptotic mechanism of adenoviral mutant E1A was involved in its selective antitumor activity for human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Zhao, Jingjing; Ge, Yan; Zhu, Qi; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-01-01

    The conserved regions (CR) of adenoviral E1A had been shown to be necessary for disruption of pRb-E2F transcription factor complexes and induction of the S phase. Here we constructed a mutant adenoviral E1A with Rb-binding ability absent (E1A 30-60aa and 120-127aa deletion, mE1A) and investigated its antitumor capacities in vitro and in vivo. The mE1A suppressed the viability of tumor cells as efficiently as the wild type E1A, and there was no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Although the mE1A arrested tumor cell cycle with the same manner as E1A, the former played a different role on cell cycle regulation compared with E1A in normal cells, which might contribute to its selective antitumor activity. E1A and mE1A had accumulated inactive p53, decreased the expression of mdm2, Cdkn1a (also named p21), increased p21's nuclear distribution and induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpent manner. Further, E1A or mE1A significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft models. Especially, tumor-bearing mice treated with mE1A had higher survival rate than those treated with E1A. Our data demonstrated that mutant adenoviral E1A significantly induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpednt manner and had selective tumor suppressing ability. The observations of adenoviral E1A mutant had provided a novel mechanism for E1A's complex activities during infection. PMID:27340782

  4. The degradation sequence of adenovirus E1A consists of the amino-terminal tetrapeptide Met-Arg-His-Ile.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R; Richter, J D

    1990-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A gene product is a potent transcriptional activator and nuclear oncoprotein. Like other regulatory proteins, E1A has a short half-life, in the range of 30 to 120 min. This short half-life, which was measured in cells synthesizing E1A, is not observed in cells injected with E1A protein made in bacteria or in vitro. In these cases, E1A is essentially refractory to degradation. In an attempt to reconcile this apparent paradox, we suggested that E1A was marked for degradation during its synthesis. Furthermore, we showed that a domain in the amino terminus of E1A was required for rapid degradation in cells translating E1A mRNA (J. M. Slavicek, N. C. Jones, and J. D. Richter, EMBO J. 7:3171-3180, 1988). In this study, we have used Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with mRNAs encoding altered E1A proteins to show that the amino-terminal tetrapeptide Met-Arg-His-Ile is required for E1A degradation. Even conservative amino acid substitutions in this degradation sequence render it nonfunctional. This degradation sequence can function as a transferable signal, since it induces instability when fused to another normally stable protein. Furthermore, the degradation sequence requires a proximity of no more than six residues from the amino terminus for activity. These data suggest that a trans-acting factor recognizes the amino terminus of E1A during the translation of its message to mark the protein for subsequent destruction. Images PMID:2146491

  5. Drosophila factor 2, an RNA polymerase II transcript release factor, has DNA-dependent ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z; Price, D

    1997-12-12

    Drosophila factor 2 has been identified as a component of negative transcription elongation factor (N-TEF) that causes the release of RNA polymerase II transcripts in an ATP-dependent manner (Xie, Z. and Price D. H. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 11043-11046). We show here that the transcript release activity of factor 2 requires ATP or dATP and that adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATPgammaS), adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP), or other NTPs do not support the activity. Factor 2 demonstrated a strong DNA-dependent ATPase activity that correlated with its transcript release activity. At 20 microg/ml DNA, the ATPase activity of factor 2 had an apparent Km(ATP) of 28 microM and an estimated Kcat of 140 min-1. Factor 2 caused the release of nascent transcripts associated with elongation complexes generated by RNA polymerase II on a dC-tailed template. Therefore, no other protein cofactors are required for the transcript release activity of factor 2. Using the dC-tailed template assay, it was found that renaturation of the template was required for factor 2 function.

  6. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-06-07

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin.

  7. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  8. Nuclear extracts lacking DNA-dependent protein kinase are deficient in multiple round transcription.

    PubMed

    Woodard, R L; Anderson, M G; Dynan, W S

    1999-01-01

    We have compared levels of in vitro transcription in nuclear extracts from DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-deficient and DNA-PK-containing Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. DNA-PK-deficient cell lines are radiosensitive mutants lacking either the catalytic subunit or the 80-kDa subunit of the Ku protein regulatory component. Extracts from DNA-PK-deficient cell lines had a 2-7-fold decrease in the level of in vitro transcription when compared with matched controls. This decrease was observed with several promoters. Transcription could be restored to either of the deficient extracts by addition of small amounts of extract from the DNA-PK-containing cell lines. Transcription was not restored by addition of purified DNA-PK catalytic subunit, Ku protein, or individually purified general transcription factors. We conclude that extracts from DNA-PK-deficient cells lack a positively acting regulatory factor or a complex of factors not readily reconstituted with individual proteins. We have also investigated the mechanistic defect in the deficient extracts and have found that the observed differences in transcription levels between Ku-positive and Ku-negative cell lines can be attributed solely to a greater ability of the Ku-positive nuclear extracts to carry out secondary initiation events subsequent to the first round of transcription.

  9. DNAPKcs-dependent arrest of RNA polymerase II transcription in the presence of DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Pankotai, Tibor; Bonhomme, Céline; Chen, David; Soutoglou, Evi

    2012-02-12

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair interferes with ongoing cellular processes, including replication and transcription. Although the process of replication stalling upon collision of replication forks with damaged DNA has been extensively studied, the fate of elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) that encounters a DSB is not well understood. We show that the occurrence of a single DSB at a human RNAPII-transcribed gene leads to inhibition of transcription elongation and reinitiation. Upon inhibition of DNA protein kinase (DNAPK), RNAPII bypasses the break and continues transcription elongation, suggesting that it is not the break per se that inhibits the processivity of RNAPII, but the activity of DNAPK. We also show that the mechanism of DNAPK-mediated transcription inhibition involves the proteasome-dependent pathway. The results point to the pivotal role of DNAPK activity in the eviction of RNAPII from DNA upon encountering a DNA lesion.

  10. RNA remodeling by bacterial global regulator CsrA promotes Rho-dependent transcription termination

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bossi, Nara; Schwartz, Annie; Guillemardet, Benoit; D’Heygère, François; Bossi, Lionello; Boudvillain, Marc

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding protein CsrA is a key regulator of a variety of cellular processes in bacteria, including carbon and stationary phase metabolism, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and virulence gene expression in pathogens. CsrA binds to bipartite sequence elements at or near the ribosome loading site in messenger RNA (mRNA), most often inhibiting translation initiation. Here we describe an alternative novel mechanism through which CsrA achieves negative regulation. We show that CsrA binding to the upstream portion of the 5′ untranslated region of Escherichia coli pgaA mRNA—encoding a polysaccharide adhesin export protein—unfolds a secondary structure that sequesters an entry site for transcription termination factor Rho, resulting in the premature stop of transcription. These findings establish a new paradigm for bacterial gene regulation in which remodeling of the nascent transcript by a regulatory protein promotes Rho-dependent transcription attenuation. PMID:24888591

  11. Concentration- and chromosome-organization-dependent regulator unbinding from DNA for transcription regulation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tai-Yen; Santiago, Ace George; Jung, Won; Krzemiński, Łukasz; Yang, Feng; Martell, Danya J.; Helmann, John D.; Chen, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Binding and unbinding of transcription regulators at operator sites constitute a primary mechanism for gene regulation. While many cellular factors are known to regulate their binding, little is known on how cells can modulate their unbinding for regulation. Using nanometer-precision single-molecule tracking, we study the unbinding kinetics from DNA of two metal-sensing transcription regulators in living Escherichia coli cells. We find that they show unusual concentration-dependent unbinding kinetics from chromosomal recognition sites in both their apo and holo forms. Unexpectedly, their unbinding kinetics further varies with the extent of chromosome condensation, and more surprisingly, varies in opposite ways for their apo-repressor versus holo-activator forms. These findings suggest likely broadly relevant mechanisms for facile switching between transcription activation and deactivation in vivo and in coordinating transcription regulation of resistance genes with the cell cycle. PMID:26145755

  12. Modulation of yeast genome expression in response to defective RNA polymerase III-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Conesa, Christine; Ruotolo, Roberta; Soularue, Pascal; Simms, Tiffany A; Donze, David; Sentenac, André; Dieci, Giorgio

    2005-10-01

    We used genome-wide expression analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to explore whether and how the expression of protein-coding, RNA polymerase (Pol) II-transcribed genes is influenced by a decrease in RNA Pol III-dependent transcription. The Pol II transcriptome was characterized in four thermosensitive, slow-growth mutants affected in different components of the RNA Pol III transcription machinery. Unexpectedly, we found only a modest correlation between altered expression of Pol II-transcribed genes and their proximity to class III genes, a result also confirmed by the analysis of single tRNA gene deletants. Instead, the transcriptome of all of the four mutants was characterized by increased expression of genes known to be under the control of the Gcn4p transcriptional activator. Indeed, GCN4 was found to be translationally induced in the mutants, and deleting the GCN4 gene eliminated the response. The Gcn4p-dependent expression changes did not require the Gcn2 protein kinase and could be specifically counteracted by an increased gene dosage of initiator tRNA(Met). Initiator tRNA(Met) depletion thus triggers a GCN4-dependent reprogramming of genome expression in response to decreased Pol III transcription. Such an effect might represent a key element in the coordinated transcriptional response of yeast cells to environmental changes.

  13. Lack of dependance of transcription-induced cytosine deaminations on protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mokkapati, Sanath Kumar; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2002-10-31

    Transcription-induced mutations (TIM) is a phenomenon in Escherichia coli in which transcription promotes C to T and other mutations in a strand-specific manner. Because the processes of transcription and translation are coupled in prokaryotes and some models regarding creating a hypermutagenic state in E. coli require new protein synthesis, we tested the possibility that TIM was dependent on efficient synthesis of proteins. We used puromycin to reversibly inhibit protein synthesis and found that it had little effect on mRNA synthesis, plasmid copy-number or TIM. Our results show that TIM is not dependent on efficient translation of mRNA and this helps eliminate certain models concerning the mechanism underlying TIM.

  14. SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling of RNR3 requires TAFIIs and the general transcription machinery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishva Mitra; Li, Bing; Reese, Joseph C.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression requires the recruitment of chromatin remodeling activities and general transcription factors (GTFs) to promoters. Whereas the role of activators in recruiting chromatin remodeling activities has been clearly demonstrated, the contributions of the transcription machinery have not been firmly established. Here we demonstrate that the remodeling of the RNR3 promoter requires a number of GTFs, mediator and RNA polymerase II. We also show that remodeling is dependent upon the SWI/SNF complex, and that TFIID and RNA polymerase II are required for its recruitment to the promoter. In contrast, Gcn5p-dependent histone acetylation occurs independently of TFIID and RNA polymerase II function, and we provide evidence that acetylation increases the extent of nucleosome remodeling, but is not required for SWI/SNF recruitment. Thus, the general transcription machinery can contribute to nucleosome remodeling by mediating the association of SWI/SNF with promoters, thereby revealing a novel pathway for the recruitment of chromatin remodeling activities. PMID:12600943

  15. Two transcription pause elements underlie a σ70-dependent pause cycle.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Eric J; Roberts, Jeffrey W

    2015-08-11

    The movement of RNA polymerase (RNAP) during transcription elongation is modulated by DNA-encoded elements that cause the elongation complex to pause. One of the best-characterized pause sequences is a binding site for the σ(70) initiation factor that induces pausing at a site near lambdoid phage late-gene promoters. An essential component of this σ(70)-dependent pause is the elemental pause site (EPS), a sequence that itself induces transcription pausing throughout the Escherichia coli genome and underlies other complex regulatory pause elements, such as the ops and his operon pauses. Here, we identify and provide a detailed kinetic analysis of a transcription cycle analogous to abortive cycling that underlies the σ(70)-dependent pause. We show that, in σ(70)-dependent pausing, the elemental pause acts primarily to modulate the rate at which complexes attempt to disengage the σ(70):DNA interaction. Our findings establish the σ(70)-dependent pause-encoding region as a multipartite element in which several pause-inducing components make distinct mechanistic contributions to the induction and maintenance of a regulatory transcription pause.

  16. Transcription-dependent generation of a specialized chromatin structure at the TCRβ locus.

    PubMed

    Zacarías-Cabeza, Joaquin; Belhocine, Mohamed; Vanhille, Laurent; Cauchy, Pierre; Koch, Frederic; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Fenouil, Romain; Bergon, Aurélie; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Eick, Dirk; Imbert, Jean; Ferrier, Pierre; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Spicuglia, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    V(D)J recombination assembles Ag receptor genes during lymphocyte development. Enhancers at AR loci are known to control V(D)J recombination at associated alleles, in part by increasing chromatin accessibility of the locus, to allow the recombination machinery to gain access to its chromosomal substrates. However, whether there is a specific mechanism to induce chromatin accessibility at AR loci is still unclear. In this article, we highlight a specialized epigenetic marking characterized by high and extended H3K4me3 levels throughout the Dβ-Jβ-Cβ gene segments. We show that extended H3K4 trimethylation at the Tcrb locus depends on RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-mediated transcription. Furthermore, we found that the genomic regions encompassing the two DJCβ clusters are highly enriched for Ser(5)-phosphorylated Pol II and short-RNA transcripts, two hallmarks of transcription initiation and early transcription. Of interest, these features are shared with few other tissue-specific genes. We propose that the entire DJCβ regions behave as transcription "initiation" platforms, therefore linking a specialized mechanism of Pol II transcription with extended H3K4 trimethylation and highly accessible Dβ and Jβ gene segments. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-04-28

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  18. Epigenetic repression of ribosomal RNA transcription by ROCK-dependent aberrant cytoskeletal organization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tse-Hsiang; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    It is known that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis is regulated by cellular energy and proliferation status. In this study, we investigated rRNA gene transcription in response to cytoskeletal stress. Our data revealed that the cell shape constrained by isotropic but not elongated micropatterns in HeLa cells led to a significant reduction in rRNA transcription dependent on ROCK. Expression of a dominant-active form of ROCK also repressed rRNA transcription. Isotropic constraint and ROCK over-activation led to different types of aberrant F-actin organization, but their suppression effects on rRNA transcription were similarly reversed by inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) or overexpression of a dominant negative form of Nesprin, which shields the signal transmitted from actin filament to the nuclear interior. We further showed that the binding of HDAC1 to the active fraction of rDNA genes is increased by ROCK over-activation, thus reducing H3K9/14 acetylation and suppressing transcription. Our results demonstrate an epigenetic control of active rDNA genes that represses rRNA transcription in response to the cytoskeletal stress. PMID:27350000

  19. Growth phase-dependent transcription of the Streptomyces ramocissimus tuf1 gene occurs from two promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, L N; van Wezel, G P; Bibb, M J; Kraal, B

    1997-01-01

    The str operon of Streptomyces ramocissimus contains the genes for ribosomal proteins S12 (rpsL) and S7 (rpsG) and for the polypeptide chain elongation factors G (EF-G) (fus) and Tu (EF-Tu) (tuf). This kirromycin producer contains three tuf or tuf-like genes; tuf1 encodes the regular EF-Tu and is located immediately downstream of fus. In vivo and in vitro transcription analysis revealed a transcription start site directly upstream of S. ramocissimus tuf1, in addition to the operon promoter rpsLp. Transcription from these promoters appeared to be growth phase dependent, diminishing drastically upon entry into stationary phase and at the onset of production of the EF-Tu-targeted antibiotic kirromycin. In surface-grown cultures, a second round of tuf1 transcription, coinciding with aerial mycelium formation and kirromycin production, was observed. The tuf1-specific promoter (tuf1p) was located in the intercistronic region between fus and tuf1 by high-resolution S1 mapping, in vitro transcription, and in vivo promoter probing. During logarithmic growth, the tuf1p and rpsLp transcripts are present at comparable levels. In contrast to Escherichia coli, which has two almost identical tuf genes, the gram-positive S. ramocissimus contains only tuf1 for its regular EF-Tu. High levels of EF-Tu may therefore be achieved by the compensatory activity of tuf1p. PMID:9171408

  20. Rlm1 mediates positive autoregulatory transcriptional feedback that is essential for Slt2-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    García, Raúl; Sanz, Ana Belén; Rodríguez-Peña, José Manuel; Nombela, César; Arroyo, Javier

    2016-04-15

    Activation of the yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway induces an adaptive transcriptional programme that is largely dependent on the transcription factor Rlm1 and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Slt2. Upon cell wall stress, the transcription factor Rlm1 is recruited to the promoters of RLM1 and SLT2, and exerts positive-feedback mechanisms on the expression of both genes. Activation of the MAPK Slt2 by cell wall stress is not impaired in strains with individual blockade of any of the two feedback pathways. Abrogation of the autoregulatory feedback mechanism on RLM1 severely affects the transcriptional response elicited by activation of the CWI pathway. In contrast, a positive trans-acting feedback mechanism exerted by Rlm1 on SLT2 also regulates CWI output responses but to a lesser extent. Therefore, a complete CWI transcriptional response requires not only phosphorylation of Rlm1 by Slt2 but also concurrent SLT2- and RLM1-mediated positive-feedback mechanisms; sustained patterns of gene expression are mainly achieved by positive autoregulatory circuits based on the transcriptional activation of Rlm1. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. An RNA motif advances transcription by preventing Rho-dependent termination

    PubMed Central

    Sevostyanova, Anastasia; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription termination factor Rho associates with most nascent bacterial RNAs as they emerge from RNA polymerase. However, pharmacological inhibition of Rho derepresses only a small fraction of these transcripts. What, then, determines the specificity of Rho-dependent transcription termination? We now report the identification of a Rho-antagonizing RNA element (RARE) that hinders Rho-dependent transcription termination. We establish that RARE traps Rho in an inactive complex but does not prevent Rho binding to its recruitment sites. Although translating ribosomes normally block Rho access to an mRNA, inefficient translation of an open reading frame in the leader region of the Salmonella mgtCBR operon actually enables transcription of its associated coding region by favoring an RNA conformation that sequesters RARE. The discovery of an RNA element that inactivates Rho signifies that the specificity of nucleic-acid binding proteins is defined not only by the sequences that recruit these proteins but also by sequences that antagonize their activity. PMID:26630006

  2. Regulation of the Sre1 hypoxic transcription factor by oxygen-dependent control of DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Yung S.; Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Hughes, Bridget T.; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Regulation of gene expression plays an integral role in adaptation of cells to hypoxic stress. In mammals, prolyl hydroxylases control levels of the central transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) through regulation of HIFα subunit stability. Here, we report that the hydroxylase Ofd1 regulates the Sre1 hypoxic transcription factor in fission yeast by controlling DNA binding. Prolyl hydroxylases require oxygen as a substrate and the activity of Ofd1 regulates Sre1-dependent transcription. In the presence of oxygen, Ofd1 binds the Sre1 N-terminal transcription factor domain (Sre1N) and inhibits Sre1-dependent transcription by blocking DNA binding. In the absence of oxygen, the inhibitor Nro1 binds Ofd1, thereby releasing Sre1N and leading to activation of genes required for hypoxic growth. In contrast to the HIF system where proline hydroxylation is essential for regulation, Ofd1 inhibition of Sre1N does not require hydroxylation, and thus defines a new mechanism for hypoxic gene regulation. PMID:22017871

  3. Transcription-Dependent DNA Transactions in the Mitochondrial Genome of a Yeast Hypersuppressive Petite Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, Eric; Clayton, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains highly conserved sequences, called rep/ori, that are associated with several aspects of its metabolism. These rep/ori sequences confer the transmission advantage exhibited by a class of deletion mutants called hypersuppressive petite mutants. In addition, because they share features with the mitochondrial leading-strand DNA replication origin of mammals, rep/ori sequences have also been proposed to participate in mtDNA replication initiation. Like the mammalian origins, where transcription is used as a priming mechanism for DNA synthesis, yeast rep/ori sequences contain an active promoter. Although transcription is required for maintenance of wild-type mtDNA in yeast, the role of the rep/ori promoter as a cis-acting element involved in the replication of wild-type mtDNA is unclear, since mitochondrial deletion mutants need neither transcription nor a rep/ori sequence to maintain their genome. Similarly, transcription from the rep/ori promoter does not seem to be necessary for biased inheritance of mtDNA. As a step to elucidate the function of the rep/ori promoter, we have attempted to detect transcription-dependent DNA transactions in the mtDNA of a hypersuppressive petite mutant. We have examined the mtDNA of the well-characterized petite mutant a-1/1R/Z1, whose repeat unit shelters the rep/ori sequence ori1, in strains carrying either wild-type or null alleles of the nuclear genes encoding the mitochondrial transcription apparatus. Complex DNA transactions were detected that take place around GC-cluster C, an evolutionarily conserved GC-rich sequence block immediately downstream from the rep/ori promoter. These transactions are strictly dependent upon mitochondrial transcription. PMID:9566917

  4. Transcription-dependent DNA transactions in the mitochondrial genome of a yeast hypersuppressive petite mutant.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, E; Clayton, D A

    1998-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains highly conserved sequences, called rep/ori, that are associated with several aspects of its metabolism. These rep/ori sequences confer the transmission advantage exhibited by a class of deletion mutants called hypersuppressive petite mutants. In addition, because they share features with the mitochondrial leading-strand DNA replication origin of mammals, rep/ori sequences have also been proposed to participate in mtDNA replication initiation. Like the mammalian origins, where transcription is used as a priming mechanism for DNA synthesis, yeast rep/ori sequences contain an active promoter. Although transcription is required for maintenance of wild-type mtDNA in yeast, the role of the rep/ori promoter as a cis-acting element involved in the replication of wild-type mtDNA is unclear, since mitochondrial deletion mutants need neither transcription nor a rep/ori sequence to maintain their genome. Similarly, transcription from the rep/ori promoter does not seem to be necessary for biased inheritance of mtDNA. As a step to elucidate the function of the rep/ori promoter, we have attempted to detect transcription-dependent DNA transactions in the mtDNA of a hypersuppressive petite mutant. We have examined the mtDNA of the well-characterized petite mutant a-1/1R/Z1, whose repeat unit shelters the rep/ori sequence ori1, in strains carrying either wild-type or null alleles of the nuclear genes encoding the mitochondrial transcription apparatus. Complex DNA transactions were detected that take place around GC-cluster C, an evolutionarily conserved GC-rich sequence block immediately downstream from the rep/ori promoter. These transactions are strictly dependent upon mitochondrial transcription.

  5. Tamoxifen-regulated adenoviral E1A chimeras for the control of tumor selective oncolytic adenovirus replication in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sipo, I; Wang, X; Hurtado Picó, A; Suckau, L; Weger, S; Poller, W; Fechner, H

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological control is a desirable safety feature of oncolytic adenoviruses (oAdV). It has recently been shown that oAdV replication may be controlled by drug-dependent transcriptional regulation of E1A expression. Here, we present a novel concept that relies on tamoxifen-dependent regulation of E1A activity through functional linkage to the mutated hormone-binding domain of the murine estrogen receptor (Mer). Four different E1A-Mer chimeras (ME, EM, E(DeltaNLS)M, MEM) were constructed and inserted into the adenoviral genome under control of a lung-specific surfactant protein B promoter. The highest degree of regulation in vitro was seen for the corresponding oAdVs Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM, which exhibited an up to 100-fold higher oAdV replication in the presence as compared with the absence of 4-OH-tamoxifen. Moreover, destruction of nontarget cells was six- and 13-fold reduced for Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM, respectively, as compared with Ad.E. Further investigations supported tamoxifen-dependent regulation of Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM in vivo. Induction of Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M inhibited growth of H441 lung tumors as efficient as a control oAdV expressing E1A. E(DeltaNLS)M and the MEM chimeras can be easily inserted into a single vector genome, which extends their application to existing oAdVs and strongly facilitates in vivo application.

  6. S-phase-dependent action of cycloheximide in relieving chromatin-mediated general transcriptional repression.

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, M; Héliot, L; Meplan, C; Pabion, M; Khochbin, S

    1998-01-01

    Chromatin plays a major role in the tight regulation of gene expression and in constraining inappropriate gene activity. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly ensures maintenance of these functions of chromatin during S phase of the cell cycle. Thus treatment of cells with an inhibitor of translation, such as cycloheximide (CX), would be expected to have a dramatic effect on chromatin structure and function, essentially in S phase of the cell cycle, due to uncoupled DNA replication and chromatin assembly. In this work, we confirm this hypothesis and show that CX can induce a dramatic S-phase-dependent alteration in chromatin structure that is associated with general RNA polymerase II-dependent transcriptional activation. Using two specific RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes, we confirm the above conclusion and show that CX-mediated transcriptional activation is enhanced during the DNA replication phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, we show co-operation between an inhibitor of histone deacetylase and CX in inducing gene expression, which is again S-phase-dependent. The modest effect of CX in inducing the activity of a transiently transfected promoter shows that the presence of the promoter in an endogenous chromatin context is necessary in order to observe transcriptional activation. We therefore suggest that the uncoupled DNA replication and histone synthesis that occur after CX treatment induces a general modification of chromatin structure, and propose that this general disorganization of chromatin structure is responsible for a widespread activation of RNA polymerase II-mediated gene transcription. PMID:9841873

  7. Cks1-dependent proteasome recruitment and activation of CDC20 transcription in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, May C; Kaiser, Peter; Rudyak, Stanislav; Baskerville, Chris; Watson, Mark H; Reed, Steven I

    2003-06-26

    Cks proteins are small evolutionarily conserved proteins that interact genetically and physically with cyclin-dependent kinases. However, in spite of a large body of genetic, biochemical and structural research, no compelling unifying model of their functions has emerged. Here we show, by investigating the essential role of Cks1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that the protein is primarily involved in promoting mitosis by modulating the transcriptional activation of the APC/C protein-ubiquitin ligase activator Cdc20. Cks1 is required for both the periodic dissociation of Cdc28 kinase from the CDC20 promoter and the periodic association of the proteasome with the promoter. We propose that the essential role of Cks1 is to recruit the proteasome to, and/or dissociate the Cdc28 kinase from, the CDC20 promoter, thus facilitating transcription by remodelling transcriptional complexes or chromatin associated with the CDC20 gene.

  8. High initiation rates at the ribosomal gene promoter do not depend upon spacer transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Labhart, P; Reeder, R H

    1989-01-01

    We report experiments that test the model that in Xenopus laevis, RNA polymerase I is "handed over" in a conservative fashion from the T3 terminator to the adjacent gene promoter. We have introduced transcription-terminating lesions into the ribosomal DNA repeat by irradiating cultured cells with ultraviolet light. We used isolated nuclei to measure the effect of such lesions on transcription. UV damage sufficient to prevent all elongating RNA polymerase from reaching T3 from upstream had no adverse effect on the density of RNA polymerase at the very 5' end of the gene. We conclude that high rates of transcription initiation at the gene promoter do not depend upon polymerase passing from one repeat to the next or on polymerase initiating at the spacer promoters. Images PMID:2470092

  9. DNA supercoiling-dependent transcriptional coupling between the divergently transcribed promoters of the ilvYC operon of Escherichia coli is proportional to promoter strengths and transcript lengths.

    PubMed

    Opel, M L; Hatfield, G W

    2001-01-01

    The twin-domain model of Liu and Wang suggested that high levels of DNA supercoiling generated in the region between closely spaced divergently transcribed promoters could serve to couple the activities of these promoters transcriptionally. In this report, we use topoisomer sets of defined superhelical densities as DNA templates in a purified in vitro transcription system to demonstrate transcriptional coupling between the divergently transcribed ilvY and ilvC promoters of the ilvYC operon of Escherichia coli. Current evidence for this type of DNA supercoiling-dependent transcriptional coupling, based largely on the in vivo activities of promoters contained in engineered DNA constructs, suggests that the transcription complex must be physically hindered to generate DNA supercoils and to prevent their diffusion throughout the DNA duplex. However, the in vitro results presented here demonstrate that (i) transcriptional coupling is observed between the divergent promoters of the ilvYC operon in the absence of transcript anchoring; (ii) the magnitude of the negative DNA supercoiling generated in the divergent promoter region is proportional to the sum of the global and transcription-induced superhelicity; and (iii) the magnitude of this transcription-induced superhelicity is proportional to promoter strengths and transcript lengths.

  10. Co-dependent Activators Direct Myoblast Specific MyoD Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Geles, Kenneth G.; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Tjian, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although FoxO and Pax proteins represent two important families of transcription factors in determining cell fate, they had not been functionally or physically linked together in mediating regulation of a common target gene during normal cellular transcription programs. Here we identify MyoD, a key regulator of myogenesis, as a direct target of FoxO3 and Pax3/7 in myoblasts. Our cell based assays and in vitro studies reveal a tight co-dependent partnership between FoxO3 and Pax3/7 to coordinately recruit RNA polymerase II and form a pre-initiation complex (PIC) to activate MyoD transcription in myoblasts. The role of FoxO3 in regulating muscle differentiation is confirmed in vivo by observed defects in muscle regeneration caused by MyoD down-regulation in FoxO3 null mice. These data establish a mutual interdependence and functional link between two families of transcription activators serving as potential signaling sensors and regulators of cell fate commitment in directing tissue specific MyoD transcription. PMID:18854138

  11. Initiator-dependent transcription in vitro by a wheat germ chromatin extract.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, P; Mösinger, E

    1994-04-01

    The development of plant in vitro transcription systems transcribing faithfully and efficiently from a broad range of plant nuclear promoters has remained a challenge. We examined the nucleotide sequence requirements for faithful and efficient transcription in a wheat germ chromatin extract (Yamazaki et al., Plant Mol Biol Rep 8: 114-123). The wheat germ chromatin extract was tested with a series of chimeric promoter constructs containing plant promoter sequences upstream from the TATA box, TATA boxes, and cap-site sequences (from -10 to +14, relative to the major in vivo initiation site) in different combinations. The plant extract transcribed faithfully from several chimeric promoters containing the capsite sequence of the parsley chalcone synthase promoter. The transcription was sensitive to the RNA polymerase II-specific inhibitor alpha-amanitin and was only dependent on the chalcone synthase cap-site sequence which therefore fulfils the operational criteria for a plant initiator element. Mutations of the putative chalcone synthase initiator element defined a core sequence '5'TAACAAC' around the initiation site that was necessary for efficient transcription in vitro. In contrast to the extract, purified wheat germ RNA polymerase II showed no preference for transcription from the major chalcone synthase in vivo initiation site.

  12. An NAD+-dependent transcriptional program governs self-renewal and radiation resistance in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gujar, Amit D.; Le, Son; Mao, Diane D.; Dadey, David Y. A.; Turski, Alice; Sasaki, Yo; Aum, Diane; Luo, Jingqin; Dahiya, Sonika; Yuan, Liya; Rich, Keith M.; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Tran, David D.; Kim, Albert H.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests cancer cells exhibit a dependency on metabolic pathways regulated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Nevertheless, how the regulation of this metabolic cofactor interfaces with signal transduction networks remains poorly understood in glioblastoma. Here, we report nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting step in NAD+ synthesis, is highly expressed in glioblastoma tumors and patient-derived glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs). High NAMPT expression in tumors correlates with decreased patient survival. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of NAMPT decreased NAD+ levels and GSC self-renewal capacity, and NAMPT knockdown inhibited the in vivo tumorigenicity of GSCs. Regulatory network analysis of RNA sequencing data using GSCs treated with NAMPT inhibitor identified transcription factor E2F2 as the center of a transcriptional hub in the NAD+-dependent network. Accordingly, we demonstrate E2F2 is required for GSC self-renewal. Downstream, E2F2 drives the transcription of members of the inhibitor of differentiation (ID) helix–loop–helix gene family. Finally, we find NAMPT mediates GSC radiation resistance. The identification of a NAMPT-E2F2-ID axis establishes a link between NAD+ metabolism and a self-renewal transcriptional program in glioblastoma, with therapeutic implications for this formidable cancer. PMID:27930300

  13. Fluorescence circadian imaging reveals a PDF-dependent transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila molecular clock.

    PubMed

    Sabado, Virginie; Vienne, Ludovic; Nunes, José Manuel; Rosbash, Michael; Nagoshi, Emi

    2017-01-30

    Circadian locomotor behaviour is controlled by a pacemaker circuit composed of clock-containing neurons. To interrogate the mechanistic relationship between the molecular clockwork and network communication critical to the operation of the Drosophila circadian pacemaker circuit, we established new fluorescent circadian reporters that permit single-cell recording of transcriptional and post-transcriptional rhythms in brain explants and cultured neurons. Live-imaging experiments combined with pharmacological and genetic manipulations demonstrate that the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) amplifies the molecular rhythms via time-of-day- and activity-dependent upregulation of transcription from E-box-containing clock gene promoters within key pacemaker neurons. The effect of PDF on clock gene transcription and the known role of PDF in enhancing PER/TIM stability occur via independent pathways downstream of the PDF receptor, the former through a cAMP-independent mechanism and the latter through a cAMP-PKA dependent mechanism. These results confirm and extend the mechanistic understanding of the role of PDF in controlling the synchrony of the pacemaker neurons. More broadly, our results establish the utility of the new live-imaging tools for the study of molecular-neural interactions important for the operation of the circadian pacemaker circuit.

  14. Thioredoxin reductase-1 negatively regulates HIV-1 transactivating protein Tat-dependent transcription in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Parisa; Narayan, Vivek; Natarajan, Sathish K; Muralidhar, Kambadur; Gandhi, Ujjawal H; Vunta, Hema; Henderson, Andrew J; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2008-11-28

    Epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between severity of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and selenium deficiency, indicating a protective role for this anti-oxidant during HIV infection. Here we demonstrate that thioredoxin reductase-1 (TR1), a selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductase that reduces protein disulfides to free thiols, negatively regulates the activity of the HIV-1 encoded transcriptional activator, Tat, in human macrophages. We used a small interfering RNA approach as well as a high affinity substrate of TR1, ebselen, to demonstrate that Tat-dependent transcription and HIV-1 replication were significantly increased in human macrophages when TR1 activity was reduced. The increase in HIV-1 replication in TR1 small interfering RNA-treated cells was independent of the redox-sensitive transcription factor, NF-kappaB. These studies indicate that TR-1 acts as a negative regulator of Tat-dependent transcription. Furthermore, in vitro biochemical assays with recombinant Tat protein confirmed that TR1 targets two disulfide bonds within the Cys-rich motif required for efficient HIV-1 transactivation. Increasing TR1 expression along with other selenoproteins by supplementing with selenium suggests a potential inexpensive adjuvant therapy for HIV/AIDS patients.

  15. Fluorescence circadian imaging reveals a PDF-dependent transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila molecular clock

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Virginie; Vienne, Ludovic; Nunes, José Manuel; Rosbash, Michael; Nagoshi, Emi

    2017-01-01

    Circadian locomotor behaviour is controlled by a pacemaker circuit composed of clock-containing neurons. To interrogate the mechanistic relationship between the molecular clockwork and network communication critical to the operation of the Drosophila circadian pacemaker circuit, we established new fluorescent circadian reporters that permit single-cell recording of transcriptional and post-transcriptional rhythms in brain explants and cultured neurons. Live-imaging experiments combined with pharmacological and genetic manipulations demonstrate that the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) amplifies the molecular rhythms via time-of-day- and activity-dependent upregulation of transcription from E-box-containing clock gene promoters within key pacemaker neurons. The effect of PDF on clock gene transcription and the known role of PDF in enhancing PER/TIM stability occur via independent pathways downstream of the PDF receptor, the former through a cAMP-independent mechanism and the latter through a cAMP-PKA dependent mechanism. These results confirm and extend the mechanistic understanding of the role of PDF in controlling the synchrony of the pacemaker neurons. More broadly, our results establish the utility of the new live-imaging tools for the study of molecular-neural interactions important for the operation of the circadian pacemaker circuit. PMID:28134281

  16. Drosophila Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Multiple Regulators of HIF–Dependent Transcription in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dekanty, Andrés; Romero, Nuria M.; Bertolin, Agustina P.; Thomas, María G.; Leishman, Claudia C.; Perez-Perri, Joel I.; Boccaccio, Graciela L.; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of evolutionary conserved alpha-beta heterodimeric transcription factors that induce a wide range of genes in response to low oxygen tension. Molecular mechanisms that mediate oxygen-dependent HIF regulation operate at the level of the alpha subunit, controlling protein stability, subcellular localization, and transcriptional coactivator recruitment. We have conducted an unbiased genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells aimed to the identification of genes required for HIF activity. After 3 rounds of selection, 30 genes emerged as critical HIF regulators in hypoxia, most of which had not been previously associated with HIF biology. The list of genes includes components of chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription elongation factors, and translational regulators. One remarkable hit was the argonaute 1 (ago1) gene, a central element of the microRNA (miRNA) translational silencing machinery. Further studies confirmed the physiological role of the miRNA machinery in HIF–dependent transcription. This study reveals the occurrence of novel mechanisms of HIF regulation, which might contribute to developing novel strategies for therapeutic intervention of HIF–related pathologies, including heart attack, cancer, and stroke. PMID:20585616

  17. Mecp2 Mediates Experience-Dependent Transcriptional Upregulation of Ryanodine Receptor Type-3.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rodrigo F; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Kerr, Bredford

    2017-01-01

    Mecp2 is a DNA methylation reader that plays a critical role in experience-dependent plasticity. Increasing evidence supports a role for epigenetic modifications in activity-induced gene expression. Hence, candidate genes related to such phenomena are of great interest. Ryanodine receptors are intracellular calcium channels that contribute to hippocampal synaptic plasticity, dendritic spine remodeling, and participate in learning and memory processes. Here we exposed mice to the enriched environment (EE) paradigm, which through increased stimulation induces experience dependent-plasticity, to explore a role for methyl-cytosines, and Mecp2 in directing Ryanodine receptor 3 (Ryr3) transcriptional activity. EE induced a hippocampal-specific increase in the methylation of discrete cytosines located at a Ryr3 isoform promoter; chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that EE increased Mecp2 binding to this Ryr3 isoform promoter. Interestingly, the experimental paradigm induced robust Ryr3 upregulation, accompanied by miR132-dependent suppression of p250GAP, a pathway driving synaptogenesis. In contrast to WT mice, Mecp2-null mice showed diminished levels of Ryr3 and displayed impaired EE-induced Ryr3 upregulation, compromising miR132 dependent suppression of p250GAP and experience-dependent structural plasticity. Based on these results, we propose that Mecp2 acts as a transcriptional activator of Ryr3, contributing to experience-dependent plasticity.

  18. Mecp2 Mediates Experience-Dependent Transcriptional Upregulation of Ryanodine Receptor Type-3

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Rodrigo F.; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Kerr, Bredford

    2017-01-01

    Mecp2 is a DNA methylation reader that plays a critical role in experience-dependent plasticity. Increasing evidence supports a role for epigenetic modifications in activity-induced gene expression. Hence, candidate genes related to such phenomena are of great interest. Ryanodine receptors are intracellular calcium channels that contribute to hippocampal synaptic plasticity, dendritic spine remodeling, and participate in learning and memory processes. Here we exposed mice to the enriched environment (EE) paradigm, which through increased stimulation induces experience dependent-plasticity, to explore a role for methyl-cytosines, and Mecp2 in directing Ryanodine receptor 3 (Ryr3) transcriptional activity. EE induced a hippocampal-specific increase in the methylation of discrete cytosines located at a Ryr3 isoform promoter; chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that EE increased Mecp2 binding to this Ryr3 isoform promoter. Interestingly, the experimental paradigm induced robust Ryr3 upregulation, accompanied by miR132-dependent suppression of p250GAP, a pathway driving synaptogenesis. In contrast to WT mice, Mecp2-null mice showed diminished levels of Ryr3 and displayed impaired EE-induced Ryr3 upregulation, compromising miR132 dependent suppression of p250GAP and experience-dependent structural plasticity. Based on these results, we propose that Mecp2 acts as a transcriptional activator of Ryr3, contributing to experience-dependent plasticity. PMID:28659760

  19. NusA-dependent transcription termination prevents misregulation of global gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Smarajit; Yakhnin, Alexander V.; Sebastian, Aswathy; Albert, Istvan; Babitzke, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic transcription terminators consist of an RNA hairpin followed by a U-rich tract, and these signals can trigger termination without the involvement of additional factors. Although NusA is known to stimulate intrinsic termination in vitro, the in vivo targets and global impact of NusA are not known because it is essential for viability. Using genome-wide 3′ end-mapping on an engineered Bacillus subtilis NusA depletion strain, we show that weak suboptimal terminators are the principle NusA substrates. Moreover, a subclass of weak non-canonical terminators was identified that completely depend on NusA for effective termination. NusA-dependent terminators tend to have weak hairpins and/or distal U-tract interruptions, supporting a model in which NusA is directly involved in the termination mechanism. Depletion of NusA altered global gene expression directly and indirectly via readthrough of suboptimal terminators. Readthrough of NusA-dependent terminators caused misregulation of genes involved in essential cellular functions, especially DNA replication and metabolism. We further show that nusA is autoregulated by a transcription attenuation mechanism that does not rely on antiterminator structures. Instead, NusA-stimulated termination in its 5′ UTR dictates the extent of transcription into the operon, thereby ensuring tight control of cellular NusA levels. PMID:27571753

  20. Targeting GLI by GANT61 involves mechanisms dependent on inhibition of both transcription and DNA licensing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruowen; Wu, Jiahui; Ferrandon, Sylvain; Glowacki, Katie J.; Houghton, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    The GLI genes are transcription factors and in cancers are oncogenes, aberrantly and constitutively activated. GANT61, a specific GLI inhibitor, has induced extensive cytotoxicity in human models of colon cancer. The FOXM1 promoter was determined to be a transcriptional target of GLI1. In HT29 cells, inhibition of GLI1 binding at the GLI consensus sequence by GANT61 led to inhibited binding of Pol II, the pause-release factors DSIF, NELF and p-TEFb. The formation of R-loops (RNA:DNA hybrids, ssDNA), were reduced by GANT61 at the FOXM1 promoter. Pretreatment of HT29 cells with α-amanitin reduced GANT61-induced γH2AX foci. Co-localization of GLI1 and BrdU foci, inhibited by GANT61, indicated GLI1 and DNA replication to be linked. By co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, GLI1 co-localized with the DNA licensing factors ORC4, CDT1, and MCM2. Significant co-localization of GLI1 and ORC4 was inhibited by GANT61, and enrichment of ORC4 occurred at the GLI binding site in the FOXM1 promoter. CDT1 was found to be a transcription target of GLI1. Overexpression of CDT1 in HT29 and SW480 cells reduced GANT61-induced cell death, gH2AX foci, and cleavage of caspase-3. Data demonstrate involvement of transcription and of DNA replication licensing factors by non-transcriptional and transcriptional mechanisms in the GLI-dependent mechanism of action of GANT61. PMID:27863397

  1. β-Catenin-dependent transcription is central to Bmp-mediated formation of venous vessels.

    PubMed

    Kashiwada, Takeru; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Terai, Kenta; Tanaka, Toru; Wakayama, Yuki; Ando, Koji; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hajime; Yuge, Shinya; Saito, Yoshinobu; Gemma, Akihiko; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2015-02-01

    β-catenin regulates the transcription of genes involved in diverse biological processes, including embryogenesis, tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Endothelial cell (EC)-specific gene-targeting analyses in mice have revealed that β-catenin is required for vascular development. However, the precise function of β-catenin-mediated gene regulation in vascular development is not well understood, since β-catenin regulates not only gene expression but also the formation of cell-cell junctions. To address this question, we have developed a novel transgenic zebrafish line that allows the visualization of β-catenin transcriptional activity specifically in ECs and discovered that β-catenin-dependent transcription is central to the bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp)-mediated formation of venous vessels. During caudal vein (CV) formation, Bmp induces the expression of aggf1, a putative causative gene for Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, which is characterized by venous malformation and hypertrophy of bones and soft tissues. Subsequently, Aggf1 potentiates β-catenin transcriptional activity by acting as a transcriptional co-factor, suggesting that Bmp evokes β-catenin-mediated gene expression through Aggf1 expression. Bmp-mediated activation of β-catenin induces the expression of Nr2f2 (also known as Coup-TFII), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, to promote the differentiation of venous ECs, thereby contributing to CV formation. Furthermore, β-catenin stimulated by Bmp promotes the survival of venous ECs, but not that of arterial ECs. Collectively, these results indicate that Bmp-induced activation of β-catenin through Aggf1 regulates CV development by promoting the Nr2f2-dependent differentiation of venous ECs and their survival. This study demonstrates, for the first time, a crucial role of β-catenin-mediated gene expression in the development of venous vessels.

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rajesh K; Murray, Thomas V A; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M; Brewer, Alison C

    2016-01-22

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production.

  3. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Rajesh K.; Murray, Thomas V. A.; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R.; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2016-01-01

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production. PMID:26620565

  4. Targeting TEAD/YAP-transcription-dependent necrosis, TRIAD, ameliorates Huntington's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ying; Chen, Xigui; Xu, Min; Fujita, Kyota; Motoki, Kazumi; Sasabe, Toshikazu; Homma, Hidenori; Murata, Miho; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Tamura, Takuya; Kaye, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steven; Blandino, Giovanni; Sudol, Marius; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-11-01

    Neuronal cell death in neurodegenerative diseases is not fully understood. Here we report that mutant huntingtin (Htt), a causative gene product of Huntington’s diseases (HD) selectively induces a new form of necrotic cell death, in which endoplasmic reticulum (ER) enlarges and cell body asymmetrically balloons and finally ruptures. Pharmacological and genetic analyses revealed that the necrotic cell death is distinct from the RIP1/3 pathway-dependent necroptosis, but mediated by a functional deficiency of TEAD/YAP-dependent transcription. In addition, we revealed that a cell cycle regulator, Plk1, switches the balance between TEAD/YAP-dependent necrosis and p73/YAP-dependent apoptosis by shifting the interaction partner of YAP from TEAD to p73 through YAP phosphorylation at Thr77. In vivo ER imaging with two-photon microscopy detects similar ER enlargement, and viral vector-mediated delivery of YAP as well as chemical inhibitors of the Hippo pathway such as S1P recover the ER instability and necrosis in HD model mice. Intriguingly S1P completely stops the decline of motor function of HD model mice even after the onset of symptom. Collectively, we suggest approaches targeting the signalling pathway of TEAD/YAP-transcription-dependent necrosis (TRIAD) could lead to a therapeutic development against HD.

  5. The t(8;21) fusion protein interferes with AML-1B-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S; Lenny, N; Hiebert, S W

    1995-01-01

    The AML-1/CBF beta transcription factor complex is targeted by both the t(8;21) and the inv(16) chromosomal alterations, which are frequently observed in acute myelogenous leukemia. AML-1 is a site-specific DNA-binding protein that recognizes the enhancer core motif TGTGGT. The t(8;21) translocation fuses the first 177 amino acids of AML-1 to MTG8 (also known as ETO), generating a chimeric protein that retains the DNA-binding domain of AML-1. Analysis of endogenous AML-1 DNA-binding complexes suggested the presence of at least two AML-1 isoforms. Accordingly, we screened a human B-cell cDNA library and isolated a larger, potentially alternatively spliced, form of AML1, termed AML1B. AML-1B is a protein of 53 kDa that binds to a consensus AML-1-binding site and complexes with CBF beta. Subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrated that both AML-1 and AML-1/ETO are efficiently extracted from the nucleus under ionic conditions but that AML-1B is localized to a salt-resistant nuclear compartment. Analysis of the transcriptional activities of AML-1, AML-1B, and AML-1/ETO demonstrated that only AML-1B activates transcription from the T-cell receptor beta enhancer. Mixing experiments indicated that AML-1/ETO can efficiently block AML-1B-dependent transcriptional activation, suggesting that the t(8;21) translocation creates a dominant interfering protein. PMID:7891692

  6. RNA remodeling by bacterial global regulator CsrA promotes Rho-dependent transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Bossi, Nara; Schwartz, Annie; Guillemardet, Benoit; D'Heygère, François; Bossi, Lionello; Boudvillain, Marc

    2014-06-01

    RNA-binding protein CsrA is a key regulator of a variety of cellular processes in bacteria, including carbon and stationary phase metabolism, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and virulence gene expression in pathogens. CsrA binds to bipartite sequence elements at or near the ribosome loading site in messenger RNA (mRNA), most often inhibiting translation initiation. Here we describe an alternative novel mechanism through which CsrA achieves negative regulation. We show that CsrA binding to the upstream portion of the 5' untranslated region of Escherichia coli pgaA mRNA-encoding a polysaccharide adhesin export protein-unfolds a secondary structure that sequesters an entry site for transcription termination factor Rho, resulting in the premature stop of transcription. These findings establish a new paradigm for bacterial gene regulation in which remodeling of the nascent transcript by a regulatory protein promotes Rho-dependent transcription attenuation. © 2014 Figueroa-Bossi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Eugenio Gómez; Segard, Stéphane; Charavay, Céline; Parcy, François

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus) based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM) formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade.

  8. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription-coupling factor.

    PubMed

    Citterio, E; Van Den Boom, V; Schnitzler, G; Kanaar, R; Bonte, E; Kingston, R E; Hoeijmakers, J H; Vermeulen, W

    2000-10-01

    The Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a DNA-dependent ATPase of the SWI2/SNF2 family. SWI2/SNF2-like proteins are implicated in chromatin remodeling during transcription. Since chromatin structure also affects DNA repair efficiency, chromatin remodeling activities within repair are expected. Here we used purified recombinant CSB protein to investigate whether it can remodel chromatin in vitro. We show that binding of CSB to DNA results in an alteration of the DNA double-helix conformation. In addition, we find that CSB is able to remodel chromatin structure at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Specifically, CSB can alter DNase I accessibility to reconstituted mononucleosome cores and disarrange an array of nucleosomes regularly spaced on plasmid DNA. In addition, we show that CSB interacts not only with double-stranded DNA but also directly with core histones. Finally, intact histone tails play an important role in CSB remodeling. CSB is the first repair protein found to play a direct role in modulating nucleosome structure. The relevance of this finding to the interplay between transcription and repair is discussed.

  9. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling by the Cockayne Syndrome B DNA Repair-Transcription-Coupling Factor

    PubMed Central

    Citterio, Elisabetta; Van Den Boom, Vincent; Schnitzler, Gavin; Kanaar, Roland; Bonte, Edgar; Kingston, Robert E.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2000-01-01

    The Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a DNA-dependent ATPase of the SWI2/SNF2 family. SWI2/SNF2-like proteins are implicated in chromatin remodeling during transcription. Since chromatin structure also affects DNA repair efficiency, chromatin remodeling activities within repair are expected. Here we used purified recombinant CSB protein to investigate whether it can remodel chromatin in vitro. We show that binding of CSB to DNA results in an alteration of the DNA double-helix conformation. In addition, we find that CSB is able to remodel chromatin structure at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Specifically, CSB can alter DNase I accessibility to reconstituted mononucleosome cores and disarrange an array of nucleosomes regularly spaced on plasmid DNA. In addition, we show that CSB interacts not only with double-stranded DNA but also directly with core histones. Finally, intact histone tails play an important role in CSB remodeling. CSB is the first repair protein found to play a direct role in modulating nucleosome structure. The relevance of this finding to the interplay between transcription and repair is discussed. PMID:11003660

  10. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency

    PubMed Central

    Minguet, Eugenio Gómez; Segard, Stéphane; Charavay, Céline; Parcy, François

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus) based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM) formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade. PMID:26285209

  11. Expression and Stress-Dependent Induction of Potassium Channel Transcripts in the Common Ice Plant1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua; Golldack, Dortje; Katsuhara, Maki; Zhao, Chengsong; Bohnert, Hans J.

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized transcripts for three potassium channel homologs in the AKT/KAT subfamily (Shaker type) from the common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum), with a focus on their expression during salt stress (up to 500 mm NaCl). Mkt1 and 2, Arabidopsis AKT homologs, and Kmt1, a KAT homolog, are members of small gene families with two to three isoforms each. Mkt1 is root specific; Mkt2 is found in leaves, flowers, and seed capsules; and Kmt1 is expressed in leaves and seed capsules. Mkt1 is present in all cells of the root, and in leaves a highly conserved isoform is detected present in all cells with highest abundance in the vasculature. MKT1 for which antibodies were made is localized to the plasma membrane. Following salt stress, MKT1 (transcripts and protein) is drastically down-regulated, Mkt2 transcripts do not change significantly, and Kmt1 is strongly and transiently (maximum at 6 h) up-regulated in leaves and stems. The detection and stress-dependent behavior of abundant transcripts representing subfamilies of potassium channels provides information about tissue specificity and the complex regulation of genes encoding potassium uptake systems in a halophytic plant. PMID:11161018

  12. Genotype-dependent variation of mitochondrial transcriptional profiles in interpopulation hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Christopher K; Burton, Ronald S

    2008-10-14

    Hybridization between populations can disrupt gene expression, frequently resulting in deleterious hybrid phenotypes. Reduced fitness in interpopulation hybrids of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus has been traced to interactions between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Here, we determine transcript levels of four to six genes involved in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway for a series of parental and inbred hybrid lines using RT-qPCR. Both nuclear and mitochondrial-encoded genes are included in the analysis. Although all genes studied are up-regulated under salinity stress, only expression of genes located on the mtDNA differed among lines. Because mitochondrial genes are transcribed by a dedicated RNA polymerase encoded in the nuclear genome, we compare transcript levels among hybrid lines with different combinations of mitochondrial RNA polymerase and mtDNA genotypes. Lines bearing certain mtDNA-mitochondrial RNA polymerase genotypic combinations show a diminished capacity to up-regulate mitochondrial genes in response to hypoosmotic stress. Effects on the transcriptional profile depend on the specific interpopulation cross and are correlated with viability effects. We hypothesize that disruption of the mitochondrial transcriptional system in F(2) hybrids may play a central role in hybrid breakdown.

  13. Genotype-dependent variation of mitochondrial transcriptional profiles in interpopulation hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Christopher K.; Burton, Ronald S.

    2008-01-01

    Hybridization between populations can disrupt gene expression, frequently resulting in deleterious hybrid phenotypes. Reduced fitness in interpopulation hybrids of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus has been traced to interactions between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Here, we determine transcript levels of four to six genes involved in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway for a series of parental and inbred hybrid lines using RT-qPCR. Both nuclear and mitochondrial-encoded genes are included in the analysis. Although all genes studied are up-regulated under salinity stress, only expression of genes located on the mtDNA differed among lines. Because mitochondrial genes are transcribed by a dedicated RNA polymerase encoded in the nuclear genome, we compare transcript levels among hybrid lines with different combinations of mitochondrial RNA polymerase and mtDNA genotypes. Lines bearing certain mtDNA-mitochondrial RNA polymerase genotypic combinations show a diminished capacity to up-regulate mitochondrial genes in response to hypoosmotic stress. Effects on the transcriptional profile depend on the specific interpopulation cross and are correlated with viability effects. We hypothesize that disruption of the mitochondrial transcriptional system in F2 hybrids may play a central role in hybrid breakdown. PMID:18843106

  14. Chromatin-dependent regulation of RNA polymerases II and III activity throughout the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Jordán-Pla, Antonio; Gupta, Ishaan; de Miguel-Jiménez, Lola; Steinmetz, Lars M; Chávez, Sebastián; Pelechano, Vicent; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2015-01-01

    The particular behaviour of eukaryotic RNA polymerases along different gene regions and amongst distinct gene functional groups is not totally understood. To cast light onto the alternative active or backtracking states of RNA polymerase II, we have quantitatively mapped active RNA polymerases at a high resolution following a new biotin-based genomic run-on (BioGRO) technique. Compared with conventional profiling with chromatin immunoprecipitation, the analysis of the BioGRO profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that RNA polymerase II has unique activity profiles at both gene ends, which are highly dependent on positioned nucleosomes. This is the first demonstration of the in vivo influence of positioned nucleosomes on transcription elongation. The particular features at the 5' end and around the polyadenylation site indicate that this polymerase undergoes extensive specific-activity regulation in the initial and final transcription elongation phases. The genes encoding for ribosomal proteins show distinctive features at both ends. BioGRO also provides the first nascentome analysis for RNA polymerase III, which indicates that transcription of tRNA genes is poorly regulated at the individual copy level. The present study provides a novel perspective of the transcription cycle that incorporates inactivation/reactivation as an important aspect of RNA polymerase dynamics.

  15. A Protein Thermometer Controls Temperature-Dependent Transcription of Flagellar Motility Genes in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Heather D.; Higgins, Darren E.

    2011-01-01

    Facultative bacterial pathogens must adapt to multiple stimuli to persist in the environment or establish infection within a host. Temperature is often utilized as a signal to control expression of virulence genes necessary for infection or genes required for persistence in the environment. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that allow bacteria to adapt and respond to temperature fluctuations. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a food-borne, facultative intracellular pathogen that uses flagellar motility to survive in the extracellular environment and to enhance initial invasion of host cells during infection. Upon entering the host, Lm represses transcription of flagellar motility genes in response to mammalian physiological temperature (37°C) with a concomitant temperature-dependent up-regulation of virulence genes. We previously determined that down-regulation of flagellar motility is required for virulence and is governed by the reciprocal activities of the MogR transcriptional repressor and the bifunctional flagellar anti-repressor/glycosyltransferase, GmaR. In this study, we determined that GmaR is also a protein thermometer that controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes. Two-hybrid and gel mobility shift analyses indicated that the interaction between MogR and GmaR is temperature sensitive. Using circular dichroism and limited proteolysis, we determined that GmaR undergoes a temperature-dependent conformational change as temperature is elevated. Quantitative analysis of GmaR in Lm revealed that GmaR is degraded in the absence of MogR and at 37°C (when the MogR:GmaR complex is less stable). Since MogR represses transcription of all flagellar motility genes, including transcription of gmaR, changes in the stability of the MogR:GmaR anti-repression complex, due to conformational changes in GmaR, mediates repression or de-repression of flagellar motility genes in Lm. Thus, GmaR functions as a thermo

  16. A Land Plant-Specific Transcription Factor Directly Enhances Transcription of a Pathogenic Noncoding RNA Template by DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase II[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jie; Ji, Shaoyi; Wallace, Andrew J.; Wu, Jian; Li, Yi; Gopalan, Venkat; Ding, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Some DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (DdRPs) possess RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity, as was first discovered in the replication of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) RNA genome in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Recent studies revealed that this activity in bacteria and mammals is important for transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms. Here, we used PSTVd as a model to uncover auxiliary factors essential for RNA-templated transcription by DdRP. PSTVd replication in the nucleoplasm generates (−)-PSTVd intermediates and (+)-PSTVd copies. We found that the Nicotiana benthamiana canonical 9-zinc finger (ZF) Transcription Factor IIIA (TFIIIA-9ZF) as well as its variant TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (+)-PSTVd, but only TFIIIA-7ZF interacted with (−)-PSTVd. Suppression of TFIIIA-7ZF reduced PSTVd replication, and overexpression of TFIIIA-7ZF enhanced PSTVd replication in planta. Consistent with the locale of PSTVd replication, TFIIIA-7ZF was found in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus, in contrast to the strictly nucleolar localization of TFIIIA-9ZF. Footprinting assays revealed that only TFIIIA-7ZF bound to a region of PSTVd critical for initiating transcription. Furthermore, TFIIIA-7ZF strongly enhanced the in vitro transcription of circular (+)-PSTVd by partially purified Pol II. Together, our results identify TFIIIA-7ZF as a dedicated cellular transcription factor that acts in DdRP-catalyzed RNA-templated transcription, highlighting both the extraordinary evolutionary adaptation of viroids and the potential of DdRPs for a broader role in cellular processes. PMID:27113774

  17. The E1A-Associated p400 Protein Modulates Cell Fate Decisions by the Regulation of ROS Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Legube, Gaëlle; Ueda, Takeshi; Fukunaga, Rikiro; Chevillard-Briet, Martine; Canitrot, Yvan; Escaffit, Fabrice; Trouche, Didier

    2010-01-01

    The p400 E1A-associated protein, which mediates H2A.Z incorporation at specific promoters, plays a major role in cell fate decisions: it promotes cell cycle progression and inhibits induction of apoptosis or senescence. Here, we show that p400 expression is required for the correct control of ROS metabolism. Depletion of p400 indeed increases intracellular ROS levels and causes the appearance of DNA damage, indicating that p400 maintains oxidative stress below a threshold at which DNA damages occur. Suppression of the DNA damage response using a siRNA against ATM inhibits the effects of p400 on cell cycle progression, apoptosis, or senescence, demonstrating the importance of ATM–dependent DDR pathways in cell fates control by p400. Finally, we show that these effects of p400 are dependent on direct transcriptional regulation of specific promoters and may also involve a positive feedback loop between oxidative stress and DNA breaks since we found that persistent DNA breaks are sufficient to increase ROS levels. Altogether, our results uncover an unexpected link between p400 and ROS metabolism and allow deciphering the molecular mechanisms largely responsible for cell proliferation control by p400. PMID:20548951

  18. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  19. Erythroblast transformation by FLI-1 depends upon its specific DNA binding and transcriptional activation properties.

    PubMed

    Ano, Sabine; Pereira, Rui; Pironin, Martine; Lesault, Isabelle; Milley, Caroline; Lebigot, Ingrid; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2004-01-23

    FLI-1 is a transcriptional regulator of the ETS family of proteins. Insertional activation at the FLI-1 locus is an early event in F-murine leukemia virus-induced erythroleukemia. Consistent with its essential role in erythroid transformation, enforced expression of FLI-1 in primary erythroblasts strongly impairs the response of these cells to erythropoietin (Epo), a cytokine essential to erythropoiesis. We show here that point mutations in the ETS domain that abolished FLI-1 binding to specific DNA elements (ETS-binding sites) suppressed the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. The exchange of the entire ETS domain (DNA binding domain) of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 changed the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 and impaired FLI-1 transforming properties. In contrast, ETS domain swapping mutants that maintained the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 did not affect the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. Deletion and swapping mutants that failed to inhibit the DNA binding activity of FLI-1 but impaired its transcriptional activation properties were also transformation-defective. Taken together, these results show that both the ability of FLI-1 to inhibit Epo-induced differentiation of erythroblasts and to confer enhanced cell survival in the absence of Epo critically depend upon FLI-1 ETS-binding site-dependent transcriptional activation properties.

  20. CREB-Dependent Regulation of GAD65 Transcription by BDNF/TrkB in Cortical Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Huertas, Carlos; Rico, Beatriz

    2011-04-01

    In the cerebral cortex, the functional output of projection neurons is fine-tuned by inhibitory neurons present in the network, which use γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their main neurotransmitter. Previous studies have suggested that the expression levels of the rate-limiting GABA synthetic enzyme, GAD65, depend on brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/TrkB activation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this neurotrophic factor and its receptor controls GABA synthesis are still unknown. Here, we show a direct regulation of the GAD65 gene by BDNF-TrkB signaling via CREB in cortical interneurons. Conditional ablation of TrkB in cortical interneurons causes a cell-autonomous decrease in the synaptically enriched GAD65 protein and its transcripts levels, suggesting that transcriptional regulation of the GAD65 gene is altered. Dissection of the intracellular pathway that underlies this process revealed that BDNF/TrkB signaling controls the transcription of GAD65 in a Ras-ERK-CREB-dependent manner. Our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism through which BDNF/TrkB signaling may modulate the maturation and function of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  1. Infrequently transcribed long genes depend on the Set2/Rpd3S pathway for accurate transcription

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Gogol, Madelaine; Carey, Mike; Pattenden, Samantha G.; Seidel, Chris; Workman, Jerry L.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of Set2-mediated methylation of H3K36 (K36me) correlates with transcription frequency throughout the yeast genome. K36me targets the Rpd3S complex to deacetylate transcribed regions and suppress cryptic transcription initiation at certain genes. Here, using a genome-wide approach, we report that the Set2–Rpd3S pathway is generally required for controlling acetylation at coding regions. When using acetylation as a functional readout for this pathway, we discovered that longer genes and, surprisingly, genes transcribed at lower frequency exhibit a stronger dependency. Moreover, a systematic screen using high-resolution tiling microarrays allowed us to identify a group of genes that rely on Set2–Rpd3S to suppress spurious transcripts. Interestingly, most of these genes are within the group that depend on the same pathway to maintain a hypoacetylated state at coding regions. These data highlight the importance of using the functional readout of histone codes to define the roles of specific pathways. PMID:17545470

  2. Core promoter-selective function of HMGA1 and Mediator in Initiator-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Muyu; Sharma, Priyanka; Pan, Songqin; Malik, Sohail; Roeder, Robert G.; Martinez, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    The factors and mechanisms underlying the differential activity and regulation of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II on different types of core promoters have remained elusive. Here we show that the architectural factor HMGA1 and the Mediator coregulator complex cooperate to enhance basal transcription from core promoters containing both a TATA box and an Initiator (INR) element but not from “TATA-only” core promoters. INR-dependent activation by HMGA1 and Mediator requires the TATA-binding protein (TBP)-associated factors (TAFs) within the TFIID complex and counteracts negative regulators of TBP/TATA-dependent transcription such as NC2 and Topoisomerase I. HMGA1 interacts with TFIID and Mediator and is required for the synergy of TATA and INR elements in mammalian cells. Accordingly, natural HMGA1-activated genes in embryonic stem cells tend to have both TATA and INR elements in a synergistic configuration. Our results suggest a core promoter-specific regulation of Mediator and the basal transcription machinery by HMGA1. PMID:22156211

  3. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching; Yen, Pauline H.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  4. Langerhans cells are generated by two distinct PU.1-dependent transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Michaël; Seillet, Cyril; Chevrier, Stéphane; Wu, Li; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Belz, Gabrielle T; Nutt, Stephen L

    2013-12-16

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the unique dendritic cells found in the epidermis. While a great deal of attention has focused on defining the developmental origins of LCs, reports addressing the transcriptional network ruling their differentiation remain sparse. We addressed the function of a group of key DC transcription factors-PU.1, ID2, IRF4, and IRF8-in the establishment of the LC network. We show that although steady-state LC homeostasis depends on PU.1 and ID2, the latter is dispensable for bone marrow-derived LCs. PU.1 controls LC differentiation by regulating the expression of the critical TGF-β responsive transcription factor RUNX3. PU.1 directly binds to the Runx3 regulatory elements in a TGF-β-dependent manner, whereas ectopic expression of RUNX3 rescued LC differentiation in the absence of PU.1 and promoted LC differentiation from PU.1-sufficient progenitors. These findings highlight the dual molecular network underlying LC differentiation, and show the central role of PU.1 in these processes.

  5. Rho-dependent Termination of ssrS (6S RNA) Transcription in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Huiseok; Han, Kook; Kim, Kwang-sun; Park, Hongmarn; Lee, Jungmin; Lee, Younghoon

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that 6S RNA, a global regulatory noncoding RNA that modulates gene expression in response to the cellular stresses in Escherichia coli, is generated by processing from primary ssrS (6S RNA) transcripts derived from two different promoters. The 5′ processing of 6S RNA from primary transcripts has been well studied; however, it remains unclear how the 3′-end of this RNA is generated although previous studies have suggested that exoribonucleolytic trimming is necessary for 3′ processing. Here, we describe several Rho-dependent termination sites located ∼90 bases downstream of the mature 3′-end of 6S RNA. Our data suggest that the 3′-end of 6S RNA is generated via exoribonucleolytic trimming, rather than endoribonucleolytic cleavage, following the transcription termination events. The termination sites identified in this study are within the open reading frame of the downstream ygfA (putative 5-formyl-tetrahydrofolate cyclo-ligase) gene, a part of the highly conserved bacterial operon ssrS-ygfA, which is up-regulated during the biofilm formation. Our findings reveal that ygfA expression, which also aids the formation of multidrug-tolerant persister cells, could be regulated by Rho-dependent termination activity in the cell. PMID:21036909

  6. IKK{epsilon} modulates RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu Tianshuang; Liao Suiling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-12-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical I{kappa}B kinase (IKK){epsilon} in modulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKK{epsilon} activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKK{epsilon} results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKK{epsilon} regulates viral-induced cellular signaling.

  7. Tumor Suppressor Cylindromatosis (CYLD) Controls HIV Transcription in an NF-κB-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Manganaro, Lara; Pache, Lars; Herrmann, Tobias; Marlett, John; Hwang, Young; Murry, Jeffrey; Miorin, Lisa; Ting, Adrian T.; König, Renate; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bushman, Frederic D.; Chanda, Sumit K.; Young, John A. T.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Characterizing the cellular factors that play a role in the HIV replication cycle is fundamental to fully understanding mechanisms of viral replication and pathogenesis. Whole-genome small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens have identified positive and negative regulators of HIV replication, providing starting points for investigating new cellular factors. We report here that silencing of the deubiquitinase cylindromatosis protein (CYLD), increases HIV infection by enhancing HIV long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven transcription via the NF-κB pathway. CYLD is highly expressed in CD4+ T lymphocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages, and dendritic cells. We found that CYLD silencing increases HIV replication in T cell lines. We confirmed the positive role of CYLD silencing in HIV infection in primary human CD4+ T cells, in which CYLD protein was partially processed upon activation. Lastly, Jurkat T cells latently infected with HIV (JLat cells) were more responsive to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) reactivation in the absence of CYLD, indicating that CYLD activity could play a role in HIV reactivation from latency. In summary, we show that CYLD acts as a potent negative regulator of HIV mRNA expression by specifically inhibiting NF-κB-driven transcription. These findings suggest a function for this protein in modulating productive viral replication as well as in viral reactivation. IMPORTANCE HIV transcription is regulated by a number of host cell factors. Here we report that silencing of the lysine 63 deubiquitinase CYLD increases HIV transcription in an NF-κB-dependent manner. We show that CYLD is expressed in HIV target cells and that its silencing increases HIV infection in transformed T cell lines as well as primary CD4+ T cells. Similarly, reactivation of latent provirus was facilitated in the absence of CYLD. These data suggest that CYLD, which is highly expressed in CD4+ T cells, can control HIV transcription in productive infection as well as during

  8. Active opsin loci adopt intrachromosomal loops that depend on the photoreceptor transcription factor network

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang-Hua; Chen, Shiming

    2011-01-01

    Rod and cone opsin genes are expressed in a mutually exclusive manner in their respective photoreceptor subtypes in the mammalian retina. Previous transgenic mouse studies showed that functional interactions between the distal enhancer and proximal promoter of rhodopsin and long/medium-wavelength (L/M) opsin genes are essential for regulating their cell-type–specific transcription. We have used chromosomal conformation capture assays in mouse retinas to investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for this interaction. Here we show that each opsin gene forms intrachromosomal loops in the appropriate photoreceptor subtype, while maintaining a linear configuration in other cell types where it is silent. The enhancer forms physical contacts not only with the promoter but also with the coding regions of each opsin locus. ChIP assays showed that cell-type–specific target binding by three key photoreceptor transcription factors—cone–rod homeobox (CRX), neural retina leucine zipper (NRL), and nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group E, member 3 (NR2E3)—is required for the appropriate local chromosomal organization and transcription of rod and cone opsins. Similar correlations between chromosomal loops and active transcription of opsin genes were also observed in human photoreceptors. Furthermore, quantitative chromosomal conformation capture on human retinas from two male donors showed that the L/M enhancer locus control region (LCR) loops with either the L or M promoter in a near 3:1 ratio, supporting distance-dependent competition between L and M for LCR. Altogether, our results suggest that the photoreceptor transcription factor network cooperatively regulates the chromosomal organization of target genes to precisely control photoreceptor subtype-specific gene expression. PMID:22006320

  9. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent activation of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription by 3-methylcholanthrene.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Jonathan M; Waxman, David J

    2006-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that stimulates transcription directed by xenobiotic response elements upstream of target genes. Recently, AhR ligands were reported to induce formation of an AhR-estrogen receptor (ER) complex, which can bind to estrogen response elements (EREs) and stimulate transcription of ER target genes. Presently, we investigate the effect of the AhR ligands 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (BZ126) on ERE-regulated luciferase reporter activity and endogenous ER target gene expression. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, 3MC induced transcription of ER reporter genes containing native promoter sequences of the ER-responsive genes complement 3 and pS2 and heterologous promoters regulated by isolated EREs. Dose-response studies revealed that the concentration of 3MC required to half-maximally activate transcription (EC(50)) was >100-fold higher for an ER reporter (27-57 muM) than for an AhR reporter (86-250 nM) in both MCF-7 cells and in human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells. 3MC also stimulated expression of the endogenous ER target genes amphiregulin, cathepsin D and progesterone receptor, albeit to a much lower extent than was achieved following stimulation with 17beta-estradiol. In Ishikawa cells, 3MC, but not BZ126 or TCDD, stimulated ERalpha-dependent reporter activity but did not induce expression of endogenous ER target genes. Finally, studies carried out in the AhR-positive rat hepatoma cell line 5L and the AhR-deficient variant BP8 demonstrated that ER reporter activity could be induced by 3MC in a manner that was independent of AhR and thus distinct from the AhR-ER 'hijacking' mechanism described recently. 3MC may thus elicit estrogenic activity by multiple mechanisms.

  10. Mechanism of ATP-dependent promoter melting by transcription factor IIH.

    PubMed

    Kim, T K; Ebright, R H; Reinberg, D

    2000-05-26

    We show that transcription factor IIH ERCC3 subunit, the DNA helicase responsible for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent promoter melting during transcription initiation, does not interact with the promoter region that undergoes melting but instead interacts with DNA downstream of this region. We show further that promoter melting does not change protein-DNA interactions upstream of the region that undergoes melting but does change interactions within and downstream of this region. Our results rule out the proposal that IIH functions in promoter melting through a conventional DNA-helicase mechanism. We propose that IIH functions as a molecular wrench: rotating downstream DNA relative to fixed upstream protein-DNA interactions, thereby generating torque on, and melting, the intervening DNA.

  11. Structure and ANR-dependent transcription of the nir genes for denitrification from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Arai, H; Igarashi, Y; Kodama, T

    1994-07-01

    In the denitrification gene cluster from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an operon encoding three open reading frames (nirQ, ORF2, ORF3) was upstream of the structural gene for nitrite reductase (nirS) as a divergent transcriptional organization. A nucleotide-binding protein encoded by nirQ was 76% identical to the Pseudomonas stutzeri nirQ gene product, which was shown to be necessary for activating nitrite and nitric oxide reductases. The gene product of ORF2 was homologous to subunit III of cytochrome oxidases. The nirQ gene was transcribed under denitrifying conditions. The intergenic region of nirS and nirQ has only one binding motif for ANR, a regulatory protein for anaerobic gene expression correspond to FNR in E. coli. Complementation analyses showed that the transcription of both nirS and nirQ completely depended on ANR.

  12. Beryllium-Induced TNF-α Production Is Transcription-Dependent in Chronic Beryllium Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Richard T.; Fontenot, Andrew P.; Barnes, Tristan A.; Parsons, Charles E.; Tooker, Brian C.; Maier, Lisa A.; Gillespie, May M.; Gottschall, E. Brigitte; Silveira, Lori; Hagman, James; Newman, Lee S.

    2007-01-01

    Beryllium (Be)-antigen presentation to Be-specific CD4+ T cells from the lungs of patients with chronic beryllium disease (CBD) results in T cell proliferation and TNF-α secretion. We tested the hypothesis that Be-induced, CBD bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) T cell, transcription-dependent, TNF-α secretion was accompanied by specific transcription factor upregulation. After 6 h of Be stimulation, CBD BAL cells produced a median of 883 pg/ml TNF-α (range, 608–1,275 pg/ml) versus 198 pg/ml (range, 116–245 pg/ml) by unstimulated cells. After 12 h CBD BAL cells produced a median of 2,963 pg/ml (range, 99–9,424 pg/ml) TNF-α versus 55 pg/ml (range, 0–454) by unstimulated cells. Using real-time RT-PCR, Be-stimulated TNF-α production at 6 h was preceded by a 5-fold increase in TNF-α pre-mRNA copy number:β-actin copy number (Be median ratio 0.21; unstimulated median ratio 0.04). The median ratio of mature TNF-α mRNA:β-actin mRNA was upregulated 1.4-fold (Be median ratio 0.17; unstimulated median ratio 0.12). Be exposure in the presence of the transcription inhibitor pentoxifylline (PTX) decreased CBD BAL cell TNF-α pre-mRNA levels > 60%, whereas treatment with the mRNA splicing inhibitor 2-aminopurine (2AP) decreased levels 40% relative to Be exposure alone. PTX treatment decreased mature TNF-α mRNA levels 50% while 2AP decreased levels > 80%, relative to Be exposure alone. Beryllium exposure specifically upregulated transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB. The data suggest that Be exposure induces transcription-dependent TNF-α production, potentially due to upregulation of specific transcription factors. PMID:16980557

  13. Chromatin-dependent transcription factor accessibility rather than nucleosome remodeling predominates during global transcriptional restructuring in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Karl A; Morozov, Alexandre V; Broach, James R

    2009-08-01

    Several well-studied promoters in yeast lose nucleosomes upon transcriptional activation and gain them upon repression, an observation that has prompted the model that transcriptional activation and repression requires nucleosome remodeling of regulated promoters. We have examined global nucleosome positioning before and after glucose-induced transcriptional reprogramming, a condition under which more than half of all yeast genes significantly change expression. The majority of induced and repressed genes exhibit no change in promoter nucleosome arrangement, although promoters that do undergo nucleosome remodeling tend to contain a TATA box. Rather, we found multiple examples where the pre-existing accessibility of putative transcription factor binding sites before glucose addition determined whether the corresponding gene would change expression in response to glucose addition. These results suggest that selection of appropriate transcription factor binding sites may be dictated to a large extent by nucleosome prepositioning but that regulation of expression through these sites is dictated not by nucleosome repositioning but by changes in transcription factor activity.

  14. Identification of MYC-Dependent Transcriptional Programs in Oncogene-Addicted Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kress, Theresia R; Pellanda, Paola; Pellegrinet, Luca; Bianchi, Valerio; Nicoli, Paola; Doni, Mirko; Recordati, Camilla; Bianchi, Salvatore; Rotta, Luca; Capra, Thelma; Ravà, Micol; Verrecchia, Alessandro; Radaelli, Enrico; Littlewood, Trevor D; Evan, Gerard I; Amati, Bruno

    2016-06-15

    Tumors driven by activation of the transcription factor MYC generally show oncogene addiction. However, the gene expression programs that depend upon sustained MYC activity remain unknown. In this study, we employed a mouse model of liver carcinoma driven by a reversible tet-MYC transgene, combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation and gene expression profiling to identify MYC-dependent regulatory events. As previously reported, MYC-expressing mice exhibited hepatoblastoma- and hepatocellular carcinoma-like tumors, which regressed when MYC expression was suppressed. We further show that cellular transformation, and thus initiation of liver tumorigenesis, were impaired in mice harboring a MYC mutant unable to associate with the corepressor protein MIZ1 (ZBTB17). Notably, switching off the oncogene in advanced carcinomas revealed that MYC was required for the continuous activation and repression of distinct sets of genes, constituting no more than half of all genes deregulated during tumor progression and an even smaller subset of all MYC-bound genes. Altogether, our data provide the first detailed analysis of a MYC-dependent transcriptional program in a fully developed carcinoma and offer a guide to identifying the critical effectors contributing to MYC-driven tumor maintenance. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3463-72. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Three-dimensional EM Structure of an Intact Activator-dependent Transcription Initiation Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.; Quispe, J; Lara-González, S; Kim, Y; Berman, H; Arnold, E; Ebright, R; Lawson, C

    2009-01-01

    We present the experimentally determined 3D structure of an intact activator-dependent transcription initiation complex comprising the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP), RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and a DNA fragment containing positions -78 to +20 of a Class I CAP-dependent promoter with a CAP site at position -61.5 and a premelted transcription bubble. A 20-{angstrom} electron microscopy reconstruction was obtained by iterative projection-based matching of single particles visualized in carbon-sandwich negative stain and was fitted using atomic coordinate sets for CAP, RNAP, and DNA. The structure defines the organization of a Class I CAP-RNAP-promoter complex and supports previously proposed interactions of CAP with RNAP {alpha} subunit C-terminal domain ({alpha}CTD), interactions of {alpha}CTD with {sigma}70 region 4, interactions of CAP and RNAP with promoter DNA, and phased-DNA-bend-dependent partial wrapping of DNA around the complex. The structure also reveals the positions and shapes of species-specific domains within the RNAP {beta}{prime}, {beta}, and {sigma}70 subunits.

  16. Arabidopsis Pol II-Dependent in Vitro Transcription System Reveals Role of Chromatin for Light-Inducible rbcS Gene Transcription.

    PubMed

    Ido, Ayaka; Iwata, Shinya; Iwata, Yuka; Igarashi, Hisako; Hamada, Takahiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Sugiura, Masahiro; Yukawa, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    In vitro transcription is an essential tool to study the molecular mechanisms of transcription. For over a decade, we have developed an in vitro transcription system from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)-cultured cells (BY-2), and this system supported the basic activities of the three RNA polymerases (Pol I, Pol II, and Pol III). However, it was not suitable to study photosynthetic genes, because BY-2 cells have lost their photosynthetic activity. Therefore, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in vitro transcription systems were developed from green and etiolated suspension cells. Sufficient in vitro Pol II activity was detected after the minor modification of the nuclear soluble extracts preparation method; removal of vacuoles from protoplasts and L-ascorbic acid supplementation in the extraction buffer were particularly effective. Surprisingly, all four Arabidopsis Rubisco small subunit (rbcS-1A, rbcS-1B, rbcS-2B, and rbcS-3B) gene members were in vitro transcribed from the naked DNA templates without any light-dependent manner. However, clear light-inducible transcriptions were observed using chromatin template of rbcS-1A gene, which was prepared with a human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP1) and HeLa histones. This suggested that a key determinant of light-dependency through the rbcS gene transcription was a higher order of DNA structure (i.e. chromatin). © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Transcriptional activation of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 by nuclear receptor TLX

    SciTech Connect

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-09-04

    An orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the proliferation and self-renewal of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase, is highly expressed in the NPCs and participates in neurogenesis. Here, we found that TLX colocalized with SIRT1 and knockdown of TLX by small interfering RNAs decreased SIRT1 levels in NPCs. TLX increased the SIRT1 expression by binding to the newly identified TLX-activating element in the SIRT1 gene promoter in HEK293 cells. Thus, TLX is an inducer of SIRT1 and may contribute to neurogenesis both as a transactivator and as a repressor.

  18. Detecting sequence dependent transcriptional pauses from RNA and protein number time series.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; Häkkinen, Antti; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2012-06-28

    Evidence suggests that in prokaryotes sequence-dependent transcriptional pauses affect the dynamics of transcription and translation, as well as of small genetic circuits. So far, a few pause-prone sequences have been identified from in vitro measurements of transcription elongation kinetics. Using a stochastic model of gene expression at the nucleotide and codon levels with realistic parameter values, we investigate three different but related questions and present statistical methods for their analysis. First, we show that information from in vivo RNA and protein temporal numbers is sufficient to discriminate between models with and without a pause site in their coding sequence. Second, we demonstrate that it is possible to separate a large variety of models from each other with pauses of various durations and locations in the template by means of a hierarchical clustering and a random forest classifier. Third, we introduce an approximate likelihood function that allows to estimate the location of a pause site. This method can aid in detecting unknown pause-prone sequences from temporal measurements of RNA and protein numbers at a genome-wide scale and thus elucidate possible roles that these sequences play in the dynamics of genetic networks and phenotype.

  19. The Role of Bacterial Enhancer Binding Proteins as Specialized Activators of σ54-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial enhancer binding proteins (bEBPs) are transcriptional activators that assemble as hexameric rings in their active forms and utilize ATP hydrolysis to remodel the conformation of RNA polymerase containing the alternative sigma factor σ54. We present a comprehensive and detailed summary of recent advances in our understanding of how these specialized molecular machines function. The review is structured by introducing each of the three domains in turn: the central catalytic domain, the N-terminal regulatory domain, and the C-terminal DNA binding domain. The role of the central catalytic domain is presented with particular reference to (i) oligomerization, (ii) ATP hydrolysis, and (iii) the key GAFTGA motif that contacts σ54 for remodeling. Each of these functions forms a potential target of the signal-sensing N-terminal regulatory domain, which can act either positively or negatively to control the activation of σ54-dependent transcription. Finally, we focus on the DNA binding function of the C-terminal domain and the enhancer sites to which it binds. Particular attention is paid to the importance of σ54 to the bacterial cell and its unique role in regulating transcription. PMID:22933558

  20. A Notch-dependent transcriptional hierarchy promotes mesenchymal transdifferentiation in the cardiac cushion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex C Y; Garside, Victoria C; Fournier, Michele; Smrz, Justin; Vrljicak, Pavle; Umlandt, Patricia; Fuller, Megan; Robertson, Gordon; Zhao, Yongjun; Tam, Angela; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Hoodless, Pamela A; Karsan, Aly

    2014-07-01

    Valvuloseptal defects are the most common congenital heart defects. Notch signaling-induced endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the atrioventricular canal (AVC) cushions at murine embryonic day (E)9.5 is a required step during early valve development. Insights to the transcriptional network that is activated in endocardial cells (EC) during EMT and how these pathways direct valve maturation are lacking. We show that at E11.5, AVC-EC retain the ability to undergo Notch-dependent EMT when explanted on collagen. EC-Notch inhibition at E10.5 blocks expression of known mesenchymal genes in E11.5 AVC-EC. To understand the genetic network and AVC development downstream of Notch signaling beyond E9.5, we constructed Tag-Seq libraries corresponding to different cell types of the E11.5 AVC and atrium in wild-type mice and in EC-Notch inhibited mice. We identified 1,400 potential Notch targets in the AVC-EC, of which 124 are transcription factors (TF). From the 124 TFs, we constructed a transcriptional hierarchy and identify 10 upstream TFs within the network. We validated 4 of the upstream TFs as Notch targets that are enriched in AVC-EC. Functionally, we show these 4 TFs regulate EMT in AVC explant assays. These novel signaling pathways downstream of Notch are potentially relevant to valve development. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho—a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity—is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal ‘RNA binding’ domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal ‘motor’ domain. We also show that the ‘motor’ domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors. PMID:25999346

  2. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-07-13

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho-a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity-is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal 'RNA binding' domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal 'motor' domain. We also show that the 'motor' domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors.

  3. Energy-dependent fitness: a quantitative model for the evolution of yeast transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Ville; Kinney, Justin; Callan, Curtis G; Lässig, Michael

    2008-08-26

    We present a genomewide cross-species analysis of regulation for broad-acting transcription factors in yeast. Our model for binding site evolution is founded on biophysics: the binding energy between transcription factor and site is a quantitative phenotype of regulatory function, and selection is given by a fitness landscape that depends on this phenotype. The model quantifies conservation, as well as loss and gain, of functional binding sites in a coherent way. Its predictions are supported by direct cross-species comparison between four yeast species. We find ubiquitous compensatory mutations within functional sites, such that the energy phenotype and the function of a site evolve in a significantly more constrained way than does its sequence. We also find evidence for substantial evolution of regulatory function involving point mutations as well as sequence insertions and deletions within binding sites. Genes lose their regulatory link to a given transcription factor at a rate similar to the neutral point mutation rate, from which we infer a moderate average fitness advantage of functional over nonfunctional sites. In a wider context, this study provides an example of inference of selection acting on a quantitative molecular trait.

  4. Spt2p defines a new transcription-dependent gross chromosomal rearrangement pathway.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Nilabja; Banerjee, Soma; Zhang, Han; Smith, Stephanie; Myung, Kyungjae

    2008-12-01

    Large numbers of gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) are frequently observed in many cancers. High mobility group 1 (HMG1) protein is a non-histone DNA-binding protein and is highly expressed in different types of tumors. The high expression of HMG1 could alter DNA structure resulting in GCRs. Spt2p is a non-histone DNA binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and shares homology with mammalian HMG1 protein. We found that Spt2p overexpression enhances GCRs dependent on proteins for transcription elongation and polyadenylation. Excess Spt2p increases the number of cells in S phase and the amount of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that might be susceptible to cause DNA damage and GCR. Consistently, RNase H expression, which reduces levels of ssDNA, decreased GCRs in cells expressing high level of Spt2p. Lastly, high transcription in the chromosome V, the location at which GCR is monitored, also enhanced GCR formation. We propose a new pathway for GCR where DNA intermediates formed during transcription can lead to genomic instability.

  5. Treponema denticola TroR is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N; Fenno, J Christopher; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-01-01

    Treponema denticola harbours a genetic locus with significant homology to most of the previously characterized Treponema pallidum tro operon. Within this locus are five genes (troABCDR) encoding for the components of an ATP-binding cassette cation-transport system (troABCD) and a DtxR-like transcriptional regulator (troR). In addition, a σ70-like promoter and an 18 bp region of dyad symmetry were identified upstream of the troA start codon. This putative operator sequence demonstrated similarity to the T. pallidum TroR (TroRTp) binding sequence; however, the position of this motif with respect to the predicted tro promoters differed. Interestingly, unlike the T. pallidum orthologue, T. denticola TroR (TroRTd) possesses a C-terminal Src homology 3-like domain commonly associated with DtxR family members. In the present study, we show that TroRTd is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor using Escherichia coli reporter constructs and in T. denticola. In addition, we demonstrate that although TroRTd possessing various C-terminal deletions maintain metal-sensing capacities, these truncated proteins exhibit reduced repressor activities in comparison with full-length TroRTd. Based upon these findings, we propose that TroRTd represents a novel member of the DtxR family of transcriptional regulators and is likely to play an important role in regulating both manganese and iron homeostases in this spirochaete. PMID:18761626

  6. Treponema denticola TroR is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N; Fenno, J Christopher; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-10-01

    Treponema denticola harbours a genetic locus with significant homology to most of the previously characterized Treponema pallidum tro operon. Within this locus are five genes (troABCDR) encoding for the components of an ATP-binding cassette cation-transport system (troABCD) and a DtxR-like transcriptional regulator (troR). In addition, a sigma(70)-like promoter and an 18 bp region of dyad symmetry were identified upstream of the troA start codon. This putative operator sequence demonstrated similarity to the T. pallidum TroR (TroR(Tp)) binding sequence; however, the position of this motif with respect to the predicted tro promoters differed. Interestingly, unlike the T. pallidum orthologue, T. denticola TroR (TroR(Td)) possesses a C-terminal Src homology 3-like domain commonly associated with DtxR family members. In the present study, we show that TroR(Td) is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor using Escherichia coli reporter constructs and in T. denticola. In addition, we demonstrate that although TroR(Td) possessing various C-terminal deletions maintain metal-sensing capacities, these truncated proteins exhibit reduced repressor activities in comparison with full-length TroR(Td). Based upon these findings, we propose that TroR(Td) represents a novel member of the DtxR family of transcriptional regulators and is likely to play an important role in regulating both manganese and iron homeostases in this spirochaete.

  7. MicroRNA-Dependent Transcriptional Silencing of Transposable Elements in Drosophila Follicle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mugat, Bruno; Akkouche, Abdou; Serrano, Vincent; Armenise, Claudia; Li, Blaise; Brun, Christine; Fulga, Tudor A.; Van Vactor, David; Pélisson, Alain; Chambeyron, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference-related silencing mechanisms concern very diverse and distinct biological processes, from gene regulation (via the microRNA pathway) to defense against molecular parasites (through the small interfering RNA and the Piwi-interacting RNA pathways). Small non-coding RNAs serve as specificity factors that guide effector proteins to ribonucleic acid targets via base-pairing interactions, to achieve transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Because of the small sequence complementarity required for microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional regulation, thousands of microRNA (miRNA) putative targets have been annotated in Drosophila. In Drosophila somatic ovarian cells, genomic parasites, such as transposable elements (TEs), are transcriptionally repressed by chromatin changes induced by Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that prevent them from invading the germinal genome. Here we show, for the first time, that a functional miRNA pathway is required for the piRNA-mediated transcriptional silencing of TEs in this tissue. Global miRNA depletion, caused by tissue- and stage-specific knock down of drosha (involved in miRNA biogenesis), AGO1 or gawky (both responsible for miRNA activity), resulted in loss of TE-derived piRNAs and chromatin-mediated transcriptional de-silencing of TEs. This specific TE de-repression was also observed upon individual titration (by expression of the complementary miRNA sponge) of two miRNAs (miR-14 and miR-34) as well as in a miR-14 loss-of-function mutant background. Interestingly, the miRNA defects differentially affected TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first indication of possible differences in the biogenesis or stability of TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. This work is one of the examples of detectable phenotypes caused by loss of individual miRNAs in Drosophila and the first genetic evidence that miRNAs have a role in the maintenance of genome stability via piRNA-mediated TE repression. PMID

  8. Promoter architecture and transcriptional regulation of Abf1-dependent ribosomal protein genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina; Dieci, Giorgio

    2016-07-27

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosomal protein gene (RPG) promoters display binding sites for either Rap1 or Abf1 transcription factors. Unlike Rap1-associated promoters, the small cohort of Abf1-dependent RPGs (Abf1-RPGs) has not been extensively investigated. We show that RPL3, RPL4B, RPP1A, RPS22B and RPS28A/B share a common promoter architecture, with an Abf1 site upstream of a conserved element matching the sequence recognized by Fhl1, a transcription factor which together with Ifh1 orchestrates Rap1-associated RPG regulation. Abf1 and Fhl1 promoter association was confirmed by ChIP and/or gel retardation assays. Mutational analysis revealed a more severe requirement of Abf1 than Fhl1 binding sites for RPG transcription. In the case of RPS22B an unusual Tbf1 binding site promoted both RPS22B and intron-hosted SNR44 expression. Abf1-RPG down-regulation upon TOR pathway inhibition was much attenuated at defective mutant promoters unable to bind Abf1. TORC1 inactivation caused the expected reduction of Ifh1 occupancy at RPS22B and RPL3 promoters, but unexpectedly it entailed largely increased Abf1 association with Abf1-RPG promoters. We present evidence that Abf1 recruitment upon nutritional stress, also observed for representative ribosome biogenesis genes, favours RPG transcriptional rescue upon nutrient replenishment, thus pointing to nutrient-regulated Abf1 dynamics at promoters as a novel mechanism in ribosome biogenesis control. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Promoter architecture and transcriptional regulation of Abf1-dependent ribosomal protein genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina; Dieci, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosomal protein gene (RPG) promoters display binding sites for either Rap1 or Abf1 transcription factors. Unlike Rap1-associated promoters, the small cohort of Abf1-dependent RPGs (Abf1-RPGs) has not been extensively investigated. We show that RPL3, RPL4B, RPP1A, RPS22B and RPS28A/B share a common promoter architecture, with an Abf1 site upstream of a conserved element matching the sequence recognized by Fhl1, a transcription factor which together with Ifh1 orchestrates Rap1-associated RPG regulation. Abf1 and Fhl1 promoter association was confirmed by ChIP and/or gel retardation assays. Mutational analysis revealed a more severe requirement of Abf1 than Fhl1 binding sites for RPG transcription. In the case of RPS22B an unusual Tbf1 binding site promoted both RPS22B and intron-hosted SNR44 expression. Abf1-RPG down-regulation upon TOR pathway inhibition was much attenuated at defective mutant promoters unable to bind Abf1. TORC1 inactivation caused the expected reduction of Ifh1 occupancy at RPS22B and RPL3 promoters, but unexpectedly it entailed largely increased Abf1 association with Abf1-RPG promoters. We present evidence that Abf1 recruitment upon nutritional stress, also observed for representative ribosome biogenesis genes, favours RPG transcriptional rescue upon nutrient replenishment, thus pointing to nutrient-regulated Abf1 dynamics at promoters as a novel mechanism in ribosome biogenesis control. PMID:27016735

  10. Analysis of the Mechanism of Action of RPF1: Potentiator of Progesterone Receptor and p53-dependent Transcriptional Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    of the Mechanism of Action of RPFl: Potentiator of Progesterone Receptor and p53-dependent Transcriptional Activity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Maria ...this change. Thank you in advance for your help. Sincerely, Maria R. Huacani Principal Investigator DAMD17-98-1-8072 2 Form Approved REPORT...the Mechanism of Action of RPFl: Potentiator DAMD17-98-1-8072 of Progesterone Receptor and p53-dependent Transcriptional Activity 6. AUTHOR(S) Maria

  11. Rho-dependent transcription termination is essential to prevent excessive genome-wide R-loops in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Leela, J Krishna; Syeda, Aisha H; Anupama, K; Gowrishankar, J

    2013-01-02

    Two pathways of transcription termination, factor-independent and -dependent, exist in bacteria. The latter pathway operates on nascent transcripts that are not simultaneously translated and requires factors Rho, NusG, and NusA, each of which is essential for viability of WT Escherichia coli. NusG and NusA are also involved in antitermination of transcription at the ribosomal RNA operons, as well as in regulating the rates of transcription elongation of all genes. We have used a bisulfite-sensitivity assay to demonstrate genome-wide increase in the occurrence of RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops), including from antisense and read-through transcripts, in a nusG missense mutant defective for Rho-dependent termination. Lethality associated with complete deficiency of Rho and NusG (but not NusA) was rescued by ectopic expression of an R-loop-helicase UvsW, especially so on defined growth media. Our results suggest that factor-dependent transcription termination subserves a surveillance function to prevent translation-uncoupled transcription from generating R-loops, which would block replication fork progression and therefore be lethal, and that NusA performs additional essential functions as well in E. coli. Prevention of R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflicts by cotranscriptional protein engagement of nascent RNA is emerging as a unifying theme among both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  12. TRPC6 mutations associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis cause constitutive activation of NFAT-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Schlöndorff, Johannes; del Camino, Donato; Carrasquillo, Robert; Lacey, Vanessa; Pollak, Martin R.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the canonical transient receptor potential channel TRPC6 lead to an autosomal dominant form of human kidney disease characterized histologically by focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis. Several of these mutations enhance the amplitude and duration of the channel current. However, the effect of these mutations on the downstream target of TRPC6, the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) transcription factors, has not been previously examined. Here we demonstrate that all three TRPC6 mutations previously shown to enhance channel activity lead to enhanced basal NFAT-mediated transcription in several cell lines, including cultured podocytes. These effects are dependent on channel activity and are dominant when mutants are coexpressed with wild-type TRPC6. While TRPC6 mutants do not demonstrate an increase in basal channel currents, a subset of cells expressing the R895C and E897K mutants have elevated basal calcium levels as measured by Fura-2 imaging. Activation of NFAT by TRPC6 mutants is blocked by inhibitors of calcineurin, calmodulin-dependent kinase II, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. PP2 partially inhibits NFAT activation by mutant TRPC6 independently of Src, Yes, or Fyn. Differences in channel glycosylation and surface expression do not explain the ability of mutants to enhance NFAT activation. Taken together, these results identify the activation of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway as a potential mediator of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. PMID:19129465

  13. Molecular Basis of NusG-mediated Regulation of Rho-dependent Transcription Termination in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Valabhoju, Vishalini; Agrawal, Sonia; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-10-21

    The bacterial transcription elongation factor NusG stimulates the Rho-dependent transcription termination through a direct interaction with Rho. The mechanistic basis of NusG dependence of the Rho function is not known. Here, we describe Rho* mutants I168V, R221C/A, and P235H that do not require NusG for their termination function. These Rho* mutants have acquired new properties, which otherwise would have been imparted by NusG. A detailed analyses revealed that they have more stable interactions at the secondary RNA binding sites of Rho, which reduced the lag in initiating its ATPase as well as the translocase activities. These more stable interactions arose from the significant spatial re-orientations of the P, Q, and R structural loops of the Rho central channel. We propose that NusG imparts similar conformational changes in the central channel of Rho, yielding faster isomerization of the open to the closed hexameric states of the latter during its RNA-loading step. This acceleration stabilizes the Rho-RNA interactions at many terminators having suboptimal rut sites, thus making Rho-NusG interactions so essential in vivo Finally, identification of the NusG binding sites on the Rho hexamer led us to conclude that the former exerts its effect allosterically. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Developmental- and food-dependent foraging transcript levels in the desert locust.

    PubMed

    Tobback, Julie; Verlinden, Heleen; Vuerinckx, Kristel; Vleugels, Rut; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Huybrechts, Roger

    2013-12-01

    Drastic changes in the environment during a lifetime require developmental and physiological flexibility to ensure animal survival. Desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria, live in an extremely changeable environment, which alternates between periods of rainfall and abundant food and periods of drought and starvation. In order to survive, locusts display an extreme form of phenotypic plasticity that allows them to rapidly cope with these changing conditions by converting from a cryptic solitarious phase to a swarming, voracious gregarious phase. To accomplish this, locusts possess different conserved mediators of phenotypic plasticity. Recently, attention has been drawn to the possible roles of protein kinases in this process. In addition to cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), also cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), which was shown to be involved in changes of food-related behavior in a variety of insects, has been associated with locust phenotypic plasticity. In this article, we study the transcript levels of the S. gregaria orthologue of the foraging gene that encodes a PKG in different food-related, developmental and crowding conditions. Transcript levels of the S. gregaria foraging orthologue are highest in different parts of the gut and differ between isolated and crowd-reared locusts. They change when the availability of food is altered, display a distinct pattern with higher levels after a moult and decrease with age during postembryonic development.

  15. MeCP2 regulates activity-dependent transcriptional responses in olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wooje; Yun, Jung-Mi; Woods, Rima; Dunaway, Keith; Yasui, Dag H.; Lasalle, Janine M.; Gong, Qizhi

    2014-01-01

    During postnatal development, neuronal activity controls the remodeling of initially imprecise neuronal connections through the regulation of gene expression. MeCP2 binds to methylated DNA and modulates gene expression during neuronal development and MECP2 mutation causes the autistic disorder Rett syndrome. To investigate a role for MeCP2 in neuronal circuit refinement and to identify activity-dependent MeCP2 transcription regulations, we leveraged the precise organization and accessibility of olfactory sensory axons to manipulation of neuronal activity through odorant exposure in vivo. We demonstrate that olfactory sensory axons failed to develop complete convergence when Mecp2 is deficient in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in an otherwise wild-type animal. Furthermore, we demonstrate that expression of selected adhesion genes was elevated in Mecp2-deficient glomeruli, while acute odor stimulation in control mice resulted in significantly reduced MeCP2 binding to these gene loci, correlating with increased expression. Thus, MeCP2 is required for both circuitry refinement and activity-dependent transcriptional responses in OSNs. PMID:25008110

  16. Context-dependent DNA recognition code for C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiajian; Stormo, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Modeling and identifying the DNA-protein recognition code is one of the most challenging problems in computational biology. Several quantitative methods have been developed to model DNA-protein interactions with specific focus on the C2H2 zinc-finger proteins, the largest transcription factor family in eukaryotic genomes. In many cases, they performed well. But the overall the predictive accuracy of these methods is still limited. One of the major reasons is all these methods used weight matrix models to represent DNA-protein interactions, assuming all base-amino acid contacts contribute independently to the total free energy of binding. Results: We present a context-dependent model for DNA–zinc-finger protein interactions that allows us to identify inter-positional dependencies in the DNA recognition code for C2H2 zinc-finger proteins. The degree of non-independence was detected by comparing the linear perceptron model with the non-linear neural net (NN) model for their predictions of DNA–zinc-finger protein interactions. This dependency is supported by the complex base-amino acid contacts observed in DNA–zinc-finger interactions from structural analyses. Using extensive published qualitative and quantitative experimental data, we demonstrated that the context-dependent model developed in this study can significantly improves predictions of DNA binding profiles and free energies of binding for both individual zinc fingers and proteins with multiple zinc fingers when comparing to previous positional-independent models. This approach can be extended to other protein families with complex base-amino acid residue interactions that would help to further understand the transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic genomes. Availability:The software implemented as c programs and are available by request. http://ural.wustl.edu/softwares.html Contact: stormo@ural.wustl.edu PMID:18586699

  17. Stability of barley aleurone transcripts: Dependence on protein synthesis, influence of the starchy endosperm and destabilization by GA3.

    PubMed

    Aalen, R. B.; Salehian, Z.; Steinum, T. M.

    2001-07-01

    We have studied the stability of Barley aleurone and embryo expressed (Balem) transcripts in aleurone layers. The Per1, Ole1 and Ole2 transcripts are abundant during desiccation and in dry resting seeds, while B12D and B22E transcripts are expressed mainly during seed maturation and germination. From 21 to 40 days post anthesis (DPA) incubation of aleurone layers resulted in a substantial, but differential reduction in the levels of these transcripts. In contrast, Balem transcript levels in aleurone layers of incubated embryoless grains were (except for B22E) similar to those of freshly dissected layers. Cycloheximide lowered transcript levels significantly. This indicates that a protein-synthesis-dependent mRNA-stabilizing mechanism is active in the aleurone cells when attached to the starchy endosperm. At the onset of seed desiccation (40 DPA), half-lives of transcripts to be stored in the dry seed were up to several days longer than the half-life of B22E, which decreases during seed maturation. While the Per1, Ole1 and Ole2 transcript levels decline rapidly in the aleurone layers of mature, germinating seeds, the genes are actively transcribed and their transcripts highly stable in the aleurone of incubated embryoless seeds. The expression of Ole1 and Ole2, as well as Per1, can be repressed 100-1 000-fold by gibberellic acid (GA3) in a dose-dependent manner. Abscisic acid can counteract the GA3 repression. Incubations with transcriptional and translational inhibitors indicate that GA3 inhibits the transcription of these genes and at the same time induces a protein-synthesis-dependent mechanism destabilizing their mRNA molecules present.

  18. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent activation of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription by 3-methycholanthrene

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, Jonathan M.; Waxman, David J. . E-mail: djw@bu.edu

    2006-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that stimulates transcription directed by xenobiotic response elements upstream of target genes. Recently, AhR ligands were reported to induce formation of an AhR-estrogen receptor (ER) complex, which can bind to estrogen response elements (EREs) and stimulate transcription of ER target genes. Presently, we investigate the effect of the AhR ligands 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (BZ126) on ERE-regulated luciferase reporter activity and endogenous ER target gene expression. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, 3MC induced transcription of ER reporter genes containing native promoter sequences of the ER-responsive genes complement 3 and pS2 and heterologous promoters regulated by isolated EREs. Dose-response studies revealed that the concentration of 3MC required to half-maximally activate transcription (EC{sub 5}) was >100-fold higher for an ER reporter (27-57 {mu}M) than for an AhR reporter (86-250 nM) in both MCF-7 cells and in human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells. 3MC also stimulated expression of the endogenous ER target genes amphiregulin, cathepsin D and progesterone receptor, albeit to a much lower extent than was achieved following stimulation with 17{beta}-estradiol. In Ishikawa cells, 3MC, but not BZ126 or TCDD, stimulated ER{alpha}-dependent reporter activity but did not induce expression of endogenous ER target genes. Finally, studies carried out in the AhR-positive rat hepatoma cell line 5L and the AhR-deficient variant BP8 demonstrated that ER reporter activity could be induced by 3MC in a manner that was independent of AhR and thus distinct from the AhR-ER 'hijacking' mechanism described recently. 3MC may thus elicit estrogenic activity by multiple mechanisms.

  19. Tumor suppressor cylindromatosis (CYLD) controls HIV transcription in an NF-κB-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Manganaro, Lara; Pache, Lars; Herrmann, Tobias; Marlett, John; Hwang, Young; Murry, Jeffrey; Miorin, Lisa; Ting, Adrian T; König, Renate; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bushman, Frederic D; Chanda, Sumit K; Young, John A T; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Simon, Viviana

    2014-07-01

    Characterizing the cellular factors that play a role in the HIV replication cycle is fundamental to fully understanding mechanisms of viral replication and pathogenesis. Whole-genome small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens have identified positive and negative regulators of HIV replication, providing starting points for investigating new cellular factors. We report here that silencing of the deubiquitinase cylindromatosis protein (CYLD), increases HIV infection by enhancing HIV long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven transcription via the NF-κB pathway. CYLD is highly expressed in CD4(+) T lymphocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages, and dendritic cells. We found that CYLD silencing increases HIV replication in T cell lines. We confirmed the positive role of CYLD silencing in HIV infection in primary human CD4(+) T cells, in which CYLD protein was partially processed upon activation. Lastly, Jurkat T cells latently infected with HIV (JLat cells) were more responsive to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) reactivation in the absence of CYLD, indicating that CYLD activity could play a role in HIV reactivation from latency. In summary, we show that CYLD acts as a potent negative regulator of HIV mRNA expression by specifically inhibiting NF-κB-driven transcription. These findings suggest a function for this protein in modulating productive viral replication as well as in viral reactivation. HIV transcription is regulated by a number of host cell factors. Here we report that silencing of the lysine 63 deubiquitinase CYLD increases HIV transcription in an NF-κB-dependent manner. We show that CYLD is expressed in HIV target cells and that its silencing increases HIV infection in transformed T cell lines as well as primary CD4(+) T cells. Similarly, reactivation of latent provirus was facilitated in the absence of CYLD. These data suggest that CYLD, which is highly expressed in CD4(+) T cells, can control HIV transcription in productive infection as well as during reactivation

  20. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways: potential mediators of skeletal muscle growth and development.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2009-11-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age and disuse has a significant impact on the physiological and social well-being of the aged; this is an increasingly important problem as the population becomes skewed towards older age. Exercise has psychological benefits but it also impacts on muscle protein synthesis and degradation, increasing muscle tissue volume in both young and older individuals. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy involves an increase in muscle mass and cross-sectional area and associated increased myofibrillar protein content. Attempts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie muscle growth, development and maintenance, have focused on characterising the molecular pathways that initiate, maintain and regenerate skeletal muscle. Such understanding may aid in improving targeted interventional therapies for age-related muscle loss and muscle wasting associated with diseases. Two major routes through which skeletal muscle development and growth are regulated are insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways. Many reviews have focused on understanding the signalling pathways of IGF-I and its receptor, which govern skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, alternative molecular signalling pathways such as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways should also be considered as potential mediators of muscle growth. These latter pathways have received relatively little attention and the purpose herein is to highlight the progress being made in the understanding of these pathways and associated molecules: calmodulin, calmodulin kinases (CaMKs), calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), which are involved in skeletal muscle regulation. We describe: (1) how conformational changes in the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin result in the exposure of binding pockets for the target proteins (CaMKs and calcineurin). (2) How Calmodulin consequently activates either the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases

  1. NPAT links cyclin E-Cdk2 to the regulation of replication-dependent histone gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Kennedy, B K; Lawrence, B D; Barbie, D A; Matera, A G; Fletcher, J A; Harlow, E

    2000-09-15

    In eukaryotic cells, histone gene expression is one of the major events that mark entry into S phase. While this process is tightly linked to cell cycle position, how it is regulated by the cell cycle machinery is not known. Here we show that NPAT, a substrate of the cyclin E-Cdk2 complex, is associated with human replication-dependent histone gene clusters on both chromosomes 1 and 6 in S phase. We demonstrate that NPAT activates histone gene transcription and that this activation is dependent on the promoter elements (SSCSs) previously proposed to mediate cell cycle-dependent transcription. Cyclin E is also associated with the histone gene loci, and cyclin E-Cdk2 stimulates the NPAT-mediated activation of histone gene transcription. Thus, our results both show that NPAT is involved in a key S phase event and provide a link between the cell cycle machinery and activation of histone gene transcription.

  2. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luis E. F.; Murray, Peter D.; Zielke, H. Ronald; Roby, Clinton D.; Kingsbury, Tami J.; Krueger, Bruce K.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic AMP can stimulate the transcription of many activity-dependent genes via activation of the transcription factor, CREB. However, in mouse cortical neuron cultures, prior to synaptogenesis, neither cAMP nor dopamine, which acts via cAMP, stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription when NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) were blocked. Stimulation of transcription by cAMP was potentiated by inhibitors of excitatory amino acid uptake, suggesting a role for extracellular glutamate or aspartate in cAMP-induced transcription. Aspartate was identified as the extracellular messenger: enzymatic scavenging of L-aspartate, but not glutamate, blocked stimulation of CREB-dependent gene transcription by cAMP; moreover, cAMP induced aspartate but not glutamate release. Taken together, these results suggest that cAMP acts via an autocrine or paracrine pathway to release aspartate, which activates NR2B-containing NMDARs, leading to Ca2+ entry and activation of transcription. This cAMP/aspartate/NMDAR signaling pathway may mediate the effects of transmitters such as dopamine on axon growth and synaptogenesis in developing neurons or on synaptic plasticity in mature neural networks. PMID:19812345

  3. Synergistic transcriptional enhancement does not depend on the number of acidic activation domains bound to the promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Oliviero, S; Struhl, K

    1991-01-01

    Many eukaryotic transcriptional activator proteins contain a DNA-binding domain that interacts with specific promoter sequences and an acidic activation region that is required to stimulate transcription. Transcriptional enhancement by such activator proteins is often synergistic and promiscuous; promoters containing multiple binding sites for an individual protein or even for unrelated proteins can be 10-100 times more active than promoters with single sites. It has been suggested that such synergy reflects a nonlinear response of the basic transcription machinery to the number and/or quality of acidic activation regions. Here, we determine the transcriptional activity of Jun-Fos heterodimers containing one or two GCN4 acidic activation regions on promoters containing one or two Ap-1 target sites. Surprisingly, heterodimers with one or two acidic regions activate transcription with similar efficiency and are equally synergistic (10- to 15-fold) on promoters containing two target sites. Thus, transcriptional synergy does not depend on the number of acidic activation regions but rather on the number of proteins bound to the promoter. This suggests that synergy is mediated either by cooperative DNA binding or by alternative mechanisms in which the DNA-binding domain plays a more direct role in transcription (e.g., changes in DNA structure, nucleosome displacement, or direct interactions with the transcriptional machinery). Images PMID:1898773

  4. TCP4-dependent induction of CONSTANS transcription requires GIGANTEA in photoperiodic flowering in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae Sung; Song, Yong Hun; Laboy Cintrón, Dianne; Koyama, Tomotsugu; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L.; Kay, Steve A.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Photoperiod is one of the most reliable environmental cues for plants to regulate flowering timing. In Arabidopsis thaliana, CONSTANS (CO) transcription factor plays a central role in regulating photoperiodic flowering. In contrast to posttranslational regulation of CO protein, still little was known about CO transcriptional regulation. Here we show that the CINCINNATA (CIN) clade of class II TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1/ CYCLOIDEA/ PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN FACTOR (TCP) proteins act as CO activators. Our yeast one-hybrid analysis revealed that class II CIN-TCPs, including TCP4, bind to the CO promoter. TCP4 induces CO expression around dusk by directly associating with the CO promoter in vivo. In addition, TCP4 binds to another flowering regulator, GIGANTEA (GI), in the nucleus, and induces CO expression in a GI-dependent manner. The physical association of TCP4 with the CO promoter was reduced in the gi mutant, suggesting that GI may enhance the DNA-binding ability of TCP4. Our tandem affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) analysis identified all class II CIN-TCPs as the components of the in vivo TCP4 complex, and the gi mutant did not alter the composition of the TCP4 complex. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel function of CIN-TCPs as photoperiodic flowering regulators, which may contribute to coordinating plant development with flowering regulation. PMID:28628608

  5. FOX-2 Dependent Splicing of Ataxin-2 Transcript Is Affected by Ataxin-1 Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Franziska; Kaehler, Christian; Isau, Melanie; Hallen, Linda; Lehrach, Hans; Krobitsch, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a fundamental posttranscriptional mechanism for controlling gene expression, and splicing defects have been linked to various human disorders. The splicing factor FOX-2 is part of a main protein interaction hub in a network related to human inherited ataxias, however, its impact remains to be elucidated. Here, we focused on the reported interaction between FOX-2 and ataxin-1, the disease-causing protein in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. In this line, we further evaluated this interaction by yeast-2-hybrid analyses and co-immunoprecipitation experiments in mammalian cells. Interestingly, we discovered that FOX-2 localization and splicing activity is affected in the presence of nuclear ataxin-1 inclusions. Moreover, we observed that FOX-2 directly interacts with ataxin-2, a protein modulating spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 pathogenesis. Finally, we provide evidence that splicing of pre-mRNA of ataxin-2 depends on FOX-2 activity, since reduction of FOX-2 levels led to increased skipping of exon 18 in ataxin-2 transcripts. Most striking, we observed that ataxin-1 overexpression has an effect on this splicing event as well. Thus, our results demonstrate that FOX-2 is involved in splicing of ataxin-2 transcripts and that this splicing event is altered by overexpression of ataxin-1. PMID:22666429

  6. Flanking sequence context-dependent transcription factor binding in early Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene expression in the Drosophila embryo is controlled by functional interactions between a large network of protein transcription factors (TFs) and specific sequences in DNA cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). The binding site sequences for any TF can be experimentally determined and represented in a position weight matrix (PWM). PWMs can then be used to predict the location of TF binding sites in other regions of the genome, although there are limitations to this approach as currently implemented. Results In this proof-of-principle study, we analyze 127 CRMs and focus on four TFs that control transcription of target genes along the anterio-posterior axis of the embryo early in development. For all four of these TFs, there is some degree of conserved flanking sequence that extends beyond the predicted binding regions. A potential role for these conserved flanking sequences may be to enhance the specificity of TF binding, as the abundance of these sequences is greatly diminished when we examine only predicted high-affinity binding sites. Conclusions Expanding PWMs to include sequence context-dependence will increase the information content in PWMs and facilitate a more efficient functional identification and dissection of CRMs. PMID:24093548

  7. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Regulates AP-1 Dependent Transcriptional Response to Minimally Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp; Almazan, Felicidad; Kim, Jungsu; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turns it into an endogenous ligand recognized by pattern-recognition receptors. We have demonstrated that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) binds to CD14 and mediates TLR4/MD-2-dependent responses in macrophages, many of which are MyD88-independent. We have also demonstrated that the mmLDL activation leads to recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to TLR4 and TLR4 and Syk phosphorylation. In this study, we produced a macrophage-specific Syk knockout mouse and used primary Syk−/− macrophages in our studies. We demonstrated that Syk mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, which in turn phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun, respectively, as assessed by an in vitro kinase assay. c-Jun phosphorylation was also mediated by IKKε. c-Jun and c-Fos bound to consensus DNA sites and thereby completed an AP-1 transcriptional complex and induced expression of CXCL2 and IL-6. These results suggest that Syk plays a key role in TLR4-mediated macrophage responses to host-generated ligands, like mmLDL, with subsequent activation of an AP-1 transcription program. PMID:22384232

  8. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates domain-specific inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bloodgood, Brenda L.; Sharma, Nikhil; Browne, Heidi Adlman; Trepman, Alissa Z.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    A heterogeneous population of inhibitory neurons controls the flow of information through a neural circuit1–3. Inhibitory synapses that form on pyramidal neuron dendrites modulate the summation of excitatory synaptic potentials4–6 and prevent the generation of dendritic calcium spikes7,8. Precisely timed somatic inhibition limits both the number of action potentials and the time window during which firing can occur8,9. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates inhibitory synapse number and function in cell culture10, but how this transcription factor affects the inhibitory inputs that form on distinct domains of a neuron in vivo was unclear. Here we show that in the mouse hippocampus behaviourally driven expression of NPAS4 coordinates the redistribution of inhibitory synapses made onto a CA1 pyramidal neuron, simultaneously increasing inhibitory synapse number on the cell body while decreasing the number of inhibitory synapses on the apical dendrites. This rearrangement of inhibition is mediated in part by the NPAS4 target gene brain derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), which specifically regulates somatic, and not dendritic, inhibition. These findings indicate that sensory stimuli, by inducing NPAS4 and its target genes, differentially control spatial features of neuronal inhibition in a way that restricts the output of the neuron while creating a dendritic environment that is permissive for plasticity. PMID:24201284

  9. dRYBP Counteracts Chromatin-Dependent Activation and Repression of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Sarip, Adone; Verrijzer, C. Peter; Busturia, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dependent activation and repression of transcription is regulated by the histone modifying enzymatic activities of the trithorax (trxG) and Polycomb (PcG) proteins. To investigate the mechanisms underlying their mutual antagonistic activities we analyzed the function of Drosophila dRYBP, a conserved PcG- and trxG-associated protein. We show that dRYBP is itself ubiquitylated and binds ubiquitylated proteins. Additionally we show that dRYBP maintains H2A monoubiquitylation, H3K4 monomethylation and H3K36 dimethylation levels and does not affect H3K27 trimethylation levels. Further we show that dRYBP interacts with the repressive SCE and dKDM2 proteins as well as the activating dBRE1 protein. Analysis of homeotic phenotypes and post-translationally modified histones levels show that dRYBP antagonizes dKDM2 and dBRE1 functions by respectively preventing H3K36me2 demethylation and H2B monoubiquitylation. Interestingly, our results show that inactivation of dBRE1 produces trithorax-like related homeotic transformations, suggesting that dBRE1 functions in the regulation of homeotic genes expression. Our findings indicate that dRYBP regulates morphogenesis by counteracting transcriptional repression and activation. Thus, they suggest that dRYBP may participate in the epigenetic plasticity important during normal and pathological development. PMID:25415640

  10. dRYBP counteracts chromatin-dependent activation and repression of transcription.

    PubMed

    Fereres, Sol; Simón, Rocío; Mohd-Sarip, Adone; Verrijzer, C Peter; Busturia, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dependent activation and repression of transcription is regulated by the histone modifying enzymatic activities of the trithorax (trxG) and Polycomb (PcG) proteins. To investigate the mechanisms underlying their mutual antagonistic activities we analyzed the function of Drosophila dRYBP, a conserved PcG- and trxG-associated protein. We show that dRYBP is itself ubiquitylated and binds ubiquitylated proteins. Additionally we show that dRYBP maintains H2A monoubiquitylation, H3K4 monomethylation and H3K36 dimethylation levels and does not affect H3K27 trimethylation levels. Further we show that dRYBP interacts with the repressive SCE and dKDM2 proteins as well as the activating dBRE1 protein. Analysis of homeotic phenotypes and post-translationally modified histones levels show that dRYBP antagonizes dKDM2 and dBRE1 functions by respectively preventing H3K36me2 demethylation and H2B monoubiquitylation. Interestingly, our results show that inactivation of dBRE1 produces trithorax-like related homeotic transformations, suggesting that dBRE1 functions in the regulation of homeotic genes expression. Our findings indicate that dRYBP regulates morphogenesis by counteracting transcriptional repression and activation. Thus, they suggest that dRYBP may participate in the epigenetic plasticity important during normal and pathological development.

  11. "Glucose and ethanol-dependent transcriptional regulation of the astaxanthin biosynthesis pathway in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous"

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is one of the most promising and economically attractive natural sources of astaxanthin. The biosynthesis of this valuable carotenoid is a complex process for which the regulatory mechanisms remain mostly unknown. Several studies have shown a strong correlation between the carbon source present in the medium and the amount of pigments synthesized. Carotenoid production is especially low when high glucose concentrations are used in the medium, while a significant increase is observed with non-fermentable carbon sources. However, the molecular basis of this phenomenon has not been established. Results In this work, we showed that glucose caused transcriptional repression of the three genes involved in the synthesis of astaxanthin from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in X. dendrorhous, which correlates with a complete inhibition of pigment synthesis. Strikingly, this regulatory response was completely altered in mutant strains that are incapable of synthesizing astaxanthin. However, we found that addition of ethanol caused the induction of crtYB and crtS gene expression and promoted de novo synthesis of carotenoids. The induction of carotenogenesis was noticeable as early as 24 h after ethanol addition. Conclusion For the first time, we demonstrated that carbon source-dependent regulation of astaxanthin biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous involves changes at the transcriptional level. Such regulatory mechanism provides an explanation for the strong and early inhibitory effect of glucose on the biosynthesis of this carotenoid. PMID:21861883

  12. Computational prediction of strain-dependent diffusion of transcription factors through the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nava, Michele M; Fedele, Roberto; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear spreading plays a crucial role in stem cell fate determination. In previous works, we reported evidence of multipotency maintenance for mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on three-dimensional engineered niche substrates, fabricated via two-photon laser polymerization. We correlated maintenance of multipotency to a more roundish morphology of these cells with respect to those cultured on conventional flat substrates. To interpret these findings, here we present a multiphysics model coupling nuclear strains induced by cell adhesion to passive diffusion across the cell nucleus. Fully three-dimensional reconstructions of cultured cells were developed on the basis of confocal images: in particular, the level of nuclear spreading resulted significantly dependent on the cell localization within the niche architecture. We assumed that the cell diffusivity varies as a function of the local volumetric strain. The model predictions indicate that the higher the level of spreading of the cell, the higher the flux across the nucleus of small solutes such as transcription factors. Our results point toward nuclear spreading as a primary mechanism by which the stem cell translates its shape into a fate decision, i.e., by amplifying the diffusive flow of transcriptional activators into the nucleus.

  13. A useful approach to identify novel small-molecule inhibitors of Wnt-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Ewan, Kenneth; Pajak, Bozena; Stubbs, Mark; Todd, Helen; Barbeau, Olivier; Quevedo, Camilo; Botfield, Hannah; Young, Rodrigo; Ruddle, Ruth; Samuel, Lee; Battersby, Alysia; Raynaud, Florence; Allen, Nicholas; Wilson, Stephen; Latinkic, Branko; Workman, Paul; McDonald, Edward; Blagg, Julian; Aherne, Wynne; Dale, Trevor

    2010-07-15

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deregulated in cancer due to mutations in genes encoding APC, beta-catenin, and axin. To identify small-molecule inhibitors of Wnt signaling as potential therapeutics, a diverse chemical library was screened using a transcription factor reporter cell line in which the activity of the pathway was induced at the level of Disheveled protein. A series of deconvolution studies was used to focus on three compound series that selectively killed cancer cell lines with constitutive Wnt signaling. Activities of the compounds included the ability to induce degradation of beta-catenin that had been stabilized by a glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitor. This screen illustrates a practical approach to identify small-molecule inhibitors of Wnt signaling that can seed the development of agents suitable to treat patients with Wnt-dependent tumors. (c)2010 AACR.

  14. Stress Increases Peripheral Axon Growth and Regeneration through Glucocorticoid Receptor-Dependent Transcriptional Programs

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessica K.; Madalena, Kathryn M.; Motti, Dario; Quach, Tam; Zha, Alicia; Webster Marketon, Jeanette

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Stress and glucocorticoid (GC) release are common behavioral and hormonal responses to injury or disease. In the brain, stress/GCs can alter neuron structure and function leading to cognitive impairment. Stress and GCs also exacerbate pain, but whether a corresponding change occurs in structural plasticity of sensory neurons is unknown. Here, we show that in female mice (Mus musculus) basal GC receptor (Nr3c1, also known as GR) expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons is 15-fold higher than in neurons in canonical stress-responsive brain regions (M. musculus). In response to stress or GCs, adult DRG neurite growth increases through mechanisms involving GR-dependent gene transcription. In vivo, prior exposure to an acute systemic stress increases peripheral nerve regeneration. These data have broad clinical implications and highlight the importance of stress and GCs as novel behavioral and circulating modifiers of neuronal plasticity. PMID:28828403

  15. Stress Increases Peripheral Axon Growth and Regeneration through Glucocorticoid Receptor-Dependent Transcriptional Programs.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Jessica K; Alexander, Jessica K; Madalena, Kathryn M; Motti, Dario; Quach, Tam; Dhamija, Akhil; Zha, Alicia; Gensel, John C; Webster Marketon, Jeanette; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L; Popovich, Phillip G

    2017-01-01

    Stress and glucocorticoid (GC) release are common behavioral and hormonal responses to injury or disease. In the brain, stress/GCs can alter neuron structure and function leading to cognitive impairment. Stress and GCs also exacerbate pain, but whether a corresponding change occurs in structural plasticity of sensory neurons is unknown. Here, we show that in female mice (Mus musculus) basal GC receptor (Nr3c1, also known as GR) expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons is 15-fold higher than in neurons in canonical stress-responsive brain regions (M. musculus). In response to stress or GCs, adult DRG neurite growth increases through mechanisms involving GR-dependent gene transcription. In vivo, prior exposure to an acute systemic stress increases peripheral nerve regeneration. These data have broad clinical implications and highlight the importance of stress and GCs as novel behavioral and circulating modifiers of neuronal plasticity.

  16. The endothelial transcription factor ERG mediates Angiopoietin-1-dependent control of Notch signalling and vascular stability

    PubMed Central

    Shah, A. V.; Birdsey, G. M.; Peghaire, C.; Pitulescu, M. E.; Dufton, N. P.; Yang, Y.; Weinberg, I.; Osuna Almagro, L.; Payne, L.; Mason, J. C.; Gerhardt, H.; Adams, R. H.; Randi, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Notch and Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1)/Tie2 pathways are crucial for vascular maturation and stability. Here we identify the transcription factor ERG as a key regulator of endothelial Notch signalling. We show that ERG controls the balance between Notch ligands by driving Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) while repressing Jagged1 (Jag1) expression. In vivo, this regulation occurs selectively in the maturing plexus of the mouse developing retina, where Ang1/Tie2 signalling is active. We find that ERG mediates Ang1-dependent regulation of Notch ligands and is required for the stabilizing effects of Ang1 in vivo. We show that Ang1 induces ERG phosphorylation in a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-dependent manner, resulting in ERG enrichment at Dll4 promoter and multiple enhancers. Finally, we demonstrate that ERG directly interacts with Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and β-catenin and is required for Ang1-dependent β-catenin recruitment at the Dll4 locus. We propose that ERG coordinates Ang1, β-catenin and Notch signalling to promote vascular stability. PMID:28695891

  17. Epigenetic control of viral life-cycle by a DNA-methylation dependent transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Flower, Kirsty; Thomas, David; Heather, James; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Jones, Susan; Sinclair, Alison J

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded transcription factor Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1) is the prototype of a class of transcription factor (including C/EBPalpha) that interact with CpG-containing DNA response elements in a methylation-dependent manner. The EBV genome undergoes a biphasic methylation cycle; it is extensively methylated during viral latency but is reset to an unmethylated state following viral lytic replication. Zta is expressed transiently following infection and again during the switch between latency and lytic replication. The requirement for CpG-methylation at critical Zta response elements (ZREs) has been proposed to regulate EBV replication, specifically it could aid the activation of viral lytic gene expression from silenced promoters on the methylated genome during latency in addition to preventing full lytic reactivation from the non-methylated EBV genome immediately following infection. We developed a computational approach to predict the location of ZREs which we experimentally assessed using in vitro and in vivo DNA association assays. A remarkably different binding motif is apparent for the CpG and non-CpG ZREs. Computational prediction of the location of these binding motifs in EBV revealed that the majority of lytic cycle genes have at least one and many have multiple copies of methylation-dependent CpG ZREs within their promoters. This suggests that the abundance of Zta protein coupled with the methylation status of the EBV genome act together to co-ordinate the expression of lytic cycle genes at the majority of EBV promoters.

  18. MicroRNA-Dependent Regulation of Transcription in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Pastor, Maria Dolores; Hergueta, Marta; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; García-Carbonero, Rocío; Nogal, Ana; Suárez, Rocío; Salinas, Ana; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Lopez-Rios, Fernando; Agulló-Ortuño, Maria Teresa; Ferrer, Irene; Perpiñá, Asunción; Palacios, José; Carnero, Amancio; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) and adenocarcinoma are the most common histological subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and have been traditionally managed in the clinic as a single entity. Increasing evidence, however, illustrates the biological diversity of these two histological subgroups of lung cancer, and supports the need to improve our understanding of the molecular basis beyond the different phenotypes if we aim to develop more specific and individualized targeted therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify microRNA (miRNA)-dependent transcriptional regulation differences between SCC and adenocarcinoma histological lung cancer subtypes. In this work, paired miRNA (667 miRNAs by TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA)) and mRNA profiling (Whole Genome 44 K array G112A, Agilent) was performed in tumor samples of 44 NSCLC patients. Nine miRNAs and 56 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in SCC versus adenocarcinoma samples. Eleven of these 56 mRNA were predicted as targets of the miRNAs identified to be differently expressed in these two histological conditions. Of them, 6 miRNAs (miR-149, miR-205, miR-375, miR-378, miR-422a and miR-708) and 9 target genes (CEACAM6, CGN, CLDN3, ABCC3, MLPH, ACSL5, TMEM45B, MUC1) were validated by quantitative PCR in an independent cohort of 41 lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between mRNAs and microRNAs expression was also validated. These results suggest miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences play an important role in determining key hallmarks of NSCLC, and may provide new biomarkers for personalized treatment strategies. PMID:24625834

  19. MicroRNA-dependent regulation of transcription in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Pastor, Maria Dolores; Hergueta, Marta; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; García-Carbonero, Rocío; Nogal, Ana; Suárez, Rocío; Salinas, Ana; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Lopez-Rios, Fernando; Agulló-Ortuño, Maria Teresa; Ferrer, Irene; Perpiñá, Asunción; Palacios, José; Carnero, Amancio; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) and adenocarcinoma are the most common histological subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and have been traditionally managed in the clinic as a single entity. Increasing evidence, however, illustrates the biological diversity of these two histological subgroups of lung cancer, and supports the need to improve our understanding of the molecular basis beyond the different phenotypes if we aim to develop more specific and individualized targeted therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify microRNA (miRNA)-dependent transcriptional regulation differences between SCC and adenocarcinoma histological lung cancer subtypes. In this work, paired miRNA (667 miRNAs by TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA)) and mRNA profiling (Whole Genome 44 K array G112A, Agilent) was performed in tumor samples of 44 NSCLC patients. Nine miRNAs and 56 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in SCC versus adenocarcinoma samples. Eleven of these 56 mRNA were predicted as targets of the miRNAs identified to be differently expressed in these two histological conditions. Of them, 6 miRNAs (miR-149, miR-205, miR-375, miR-378, miR-422a and miR-708) and 9 target genes (CEACAM6, CGN, CLDN3, ABCC3, MLPH, ACSL5, TMEM45B, MUC1) were validated by quantitative PCR in an independent cohort of 41 lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between mRNAs and microRNAs expression was also validated. These results suggest miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences play an important role in determining key hallmarks of NSCLC, and may provide new biomarkers for personalized treatment strategies.

  20. Studying σ 54-dependent transcription at the single-molecule level using alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilemann, M.; Lymperopoulos, K.; Wigneshweraraj, S. R.; Buck, M.; Kapanidis, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    We present single-molecule fluorescence studies of σ 54-dependent gene-transcription complexes using singlemolecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) spectroscopy. The ability to study one biomolecule at the time allowed us to resolve and analyze sample heterogeneities and extract structural information on subpopulations and transient intermediates of transcription; such information is hidden in bulk experiments. Using site-specifically labeled σ 54 derivatives and site-specifically labeled promoter-DNA fragments, we demonstrate that we can observe single diffusing σ 54-DNA and transcription-initiation RNA polymerase-σ 54- DNA complexes, and that we can measure distances within such complexes; the identity of the complexes has been confirmed using electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays. Our studies pave the way for understanding the mechanism of abortive initiation and promoter escape in σ 54-dependent transcription.

  1. Unraveling the Transcriptional Basis of Temperature-Dependent Pinoxaden Resistance in Brachypodium hybridum.

    PubMed

    Matzrafi, Maor; Shaar-Moshe, Lidor; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Climate change endangers food security and our ability to feed the ever-increasing human population. Weeds are the most important biotic stress, reducing crop-plant productivity worldwide. Chemical control, the main approach for weed management, can be strongly affected by temperature. Previously, we have shown that temperature-dependent non-target site (NTS) resistance of Brachypodium hybridum is due to enhanced detoxification of acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors. Here, we explored the transcriptional basis of this phenomenon. Plants were characterized for the transcriptional response to herbicide application, high-temperature and their combination, in an attempt to uncover the genetic basis of temperature-dependent pinoxaden resistance. Even though most of the variance among treatments was due to pinoxaden application (61%), plants were able to survive pinoxaden application only when grown under high-temperatures. Biological pathways and expression patterns of members of specific gene families, previously shown to be involved in NTS metabolic resistance to different herbicides, were examined. Cytochrome P450, glucosyl transferase and glutathione-S-transferase genes were found to be up-regulated in response to pinoxaden application under both control and high-temperature conditions. However, biological pathways related to oxidation and glucose conjugation were found to be significantly enriched only under the combination of pinoxaden application and high-temperature. Analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was conducted at several time points after treatment using a probe detecting H2O2/peroxides. Comparison of ROS accumulation among treatments revealed a significant reduction in ROS quantities 24 h after pinoxaden application only under high-temperature conditions. These results may indicate significant activity of enzymatic ROS scavengers that can be correlated with the activation of herbicide-resistance mechanisms. This study shows that up-regulation of genes

  2. Features of the rho-dependent transcription termination polar element within the hisG cistron of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Ciampi, M S; Alifano, P; Nappo, A G; Bruni, C B; Carlomagno, M S

    1989-01-01

    Previous genetic analysis showed that the polar effects of mutations in the hisG cistron of Salmonella typhimurium are dependent on the presence of a single putative transcription termination element within the hisG gene. In fact, all proximal mutations causing translation termination are strongly polar, whereas distal ones are not. The element was mapped by isolating mutations able to relieve the polar phenotype, and they were found to be small deletions in the region downstream of the translational stop codon (M. S. Ciampi and J. R. Roth, Genetics 118:193-202, 1988). In this study, we analyzed the his-specific RNAs synthesized in vivo in different strains harboring the polar frameshift hisG2148 mutation. The nature of the polarity effects is clearly transcriptional, since shorter RNA molecules were produced. When the hisG2148 mutation was transferred in a rho background or in strains harboring the small distal deletions, an increase in readthrough transcription was observed. The transcriptional termination element was characterized in more detail by performing high-resolution S1 nuclease mapping experiments. This analysis showed that (i) termination or exonucleolytic degradation following termination produced transcripts with heterogeneous 3' ends; (ii) this process is dependent on the transcription termination factor Rho, since relief of termination occurs in a rho background; and (iii) the element appears to function as a transcription terminator, at least to some extent, even in the course of active translation of the hisG cistron. Images PMID:2666402

  3. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  4. Profiling the MAPK/ERK dependent and independent activity regulated transcriptional programs in the murine hippocampus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Blüthgen, Nils; van Bentum, Mirjam; Merz, Barbara; Kuhl, Dietmar; Hermey, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Activity-dependent alteration of the transcriptional program is central for shaping neuronal connectivity. Constitutively expressed transcription factors orchestrate the initial response to neuronal stimulation and serve as substrates for second messenger-regulated kinase signalling cascades. The mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK conveys signalling from the synapse to the nucleus but its genetic signature following neuronal activity has not been revealed. The goal of the present study was to identify ERK dependent and independent activity regulated transcriptional programs in the murine hippocampus. We used generalized seizures combined with the pharmacological intervention of MEK activation as an in vivo model to determine the complete transcriptional program initiated by ERK after neuronal activity. Our survey demonstrates that the induction of a large number of activity-regulated genes, including Arc/Arg3.1, Arl5b, Gadd45b, Homer1, Inhba and Zwint, is indeed dependent on ERK phosphorylation. In contrast, expression of a small group of genes, including Npas4, Arl4d, Errfi1, and Rgs2, is only partially dependent or completely independent (Ppp1r15a) of this signalling pathway. Among the identified transcripts are long non-coding (lnc) RNAs and induction of LincPint and splice variants of NEAT1 are ERK dependent. Our survey provides a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptomic response conveyed by ERK signalling in the hippocampus. PMID:28349920

  5. Dissection of TALE-dependent gene activation reveals that they induce transcription cooperatively and in both orientations

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Jana; Baum, Heidi; Grau, Jan; Stuttman, Johannes; Boch, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic Xanthomonas bacteria inject transcription activator-like effector proteins (TALEs) into host cells to specifically induce transcription of plant genes and enhance susceptibility. Although the DNA-binding mode is well-understood it is still ambiguous how TALEs initiate transcription and whether additional promoter elements are needed to support this. To systematically dissect prerequisites for transcriptional initiation the activity of one TALE was compared on different synthetic Bs4 promoter fragments. In addition, a large collection of artificial TALEs spanning the OsSWEET14 promoter was compared. We show that the presence of a TALE alone is not sufficient to initiate transcription suggesting the requirement of additional supporting promoter elements. At the OsSWEET14 promoter TALEs can initiate transcription from various positions, in a synergistic manner of multiple TALEs binding in parallel to the promoter, and even by binding in reverse orientation. TALEs are known to shift the transcriptional start site, but our data show that this shift depends on the individual position of a TALE within a promoter context. Our results implicate that TALEs function like classical enhancer-binding proteins and initiate transcription in both orientations which has consequences for in planta target gene prediction and design of artificial activators. PMID:28301511

  6. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 8 Module Expression Profiling Reveals Requirement of Mediator Subunits 12 and 13 for Transcription of Serpent-dependent Innate Immunity Genes in Drosophila*

    PubMed Central

    Kuuluvainen, Emilia; Hakala, Heini; Havula, Essi; Sahal Estimé, Michelle; Rämet, Mika; Hietakangas, Ville; Mäkelä, Tomi P.

    2014-01-01

    The Cdk8 (cyclin-dependent kinase 8) module of Mediator integrates regulatory cues from transcription factors to RNA polymerase II. It consists of four subunits where Med12 and Med13 link Cdk8 and cyclin C (CycC) to core Mediator. Here we have investigated the contributions of the Cdk8 module subunits to transcriptional regulation using RNA interference in Drosophila cells. Genome-wide expression profiling demonstrated separation of Cdk8-CycC and Med12-Med13 profiles. However, transcriptional regulation by Cdk8-CycC was dependent on Med12-Med13. This observation also revealed that Cdk8-CycC and Med12-Med13 often have opposite transcriptional effects. Interestingly, Med12 and Med13 profiles overlapped significantly with that of the GATA factor Serpent. Accordingly, mutational analyses indicated that GATA sites are required for Med12-Med13 regulation of Serpent-dependent genes. Med12 and Med13 were also found to be required for Serpent-activated innate immunity genes in defense to bacterial infection. The results reveal a novel role for the Cdk8 module in Serpent-dependent transcription and innate immunity. PMID:24778181

  7. Estrogen receptor subtype- and promoter-specific modulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Wihlén, Björn; Ahmed, Shaimaa; Inzunza, José; Matthews, Jason

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we examined the role of estrogen receptors (ER) in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-dependent transactivation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that AHR agonists differentially induced recruitment of ERalpha to the AHR target genes CYP1A1 and CYP1B1. Cotreatment with 17beta-estradiol significantly increased beta-naphthoflavone (BNF)- and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced recruitment of ERalpha to CYP1A1, whereas 3,3'-diindolylmethane induced promoter occupancy of ERalpha at CYP1A1 that was unaffected by cotreatment with 17beta-estradiol. Cyclical recruitment of AHR and ERalpha to CYP1A1 was only observed in cells treated with BNF. Stable and subtype-specific knockdown of ERalpha or ERbeta using shRNA showed that suppression of ERalpha significantly reduced, whereas knockdown of ERbeta significantly enhanced, AHR agonist-induced Cyp1a1 expression in HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells. AHR agonist-induced Cyp1b1 expression was reduced by ERbeta knockdown but unaffected by ERalpha knockdown. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of ERalpha in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells did not affect 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-dependent regulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA expression. In agreement with our in vitro findings in the HC11 cells, ERalpha knockout mice exhibit reduced BNF-dependent induction of Cyp1a1 mRNA. These results establish ligand- and promoter-specific influences on the cyclical recruitment patterns for AHR and show ER species-, subtype-, and promoter-specific modulation of AHR-dependent transcription.

  8. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-01-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets. PMID:23822503

  9. Long noncoding RNA BCAR4 promotes osteosarcoma progression through activating GLI2-dependent gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fenyong; Mo, Jiadong; Zhang, Li

    2016-10-01

    Despite great advances have been made in the understanding of biology of osteosarcoma, the molecular mechanisms involved in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis and progression are still largely unknown. Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is a new type of RNA molecule, which plays pivotal roles in many tumors. lncRNA BCAR4 has been identified as an oncogenetic lncRNA involved in the progression of breast cancer. However, the functions and clinical significances of BCAR4 in osteosarcoma are unknown now. In this study, we found that BCAR4 was significantly upregulated in osteosarcoma tissues. Increased expression of BCAR4 was significantly correlated with large tumor size, advanced Enneking stage, lung metastasis, and poor prognosis. Functional experiments demonstrated that knockdown of BCAR4 inhibits the proliferation and migration of osteosarcoma cell in vitro. Consistently, knockdown of BCAR4 inhibits osteosarcoma tumorigenesis and lung metastasis in vivo. Chromatin isolation by RNA purification assay showed that BCAR4 physically associates with the promoters of GLI2 target genes. The depletion of BCAR4 inhibits the expression of GLI2 target genes and GLI2 reporter luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of BCAR4 and GLI2 target genes is significantly correlated in osteosarcoma tissues. Depletion of DLI2 abolished the effects of BCAR4 on osteosarcoma. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that BCAR4 promotes osteosarcoma progression via activating GLI2-dependent gene transcription and serves as a potential prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target of osteosarcoma.

  10. Redox signaling regulates transcriptional activity of the Ca2+-dependent repressor DREAM.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Marcos; Aurrekoetxea, Koldo; Mellström, Britt; Naranjo, José R

    2011-04-01

    DREAM/KChIP3 (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator) is a multifunctional Ca(2+)-binding protein that acts in the nucleus as a Ca(2+)-dependent transcriptional repressor. Binding to DNA and repressor activity of DREAM is regulated by Ca(2+), specific post-translational modifications as well as by protein-protein interactions with several nucleoproteins. Here, using the yeast two-hybrid assay, we characterized the interaction of DREAM with peroxiredoxin 3 (Prdx3), an antioxidant enzyme that uses the thioredoxin system as electron donor. Importantly, the DREAM/Prdx3 interaction is Ca(2+) dependent and is blocked by DTT. Coexpression of Prdx3 enhances DREAM binding to DRE sites and its repressor activity in vivo. Two cysteine residues in the N-terminal domain of DREAM are responsible for the redox modulation of its activity. Double Cys to Ser substitution results in a mutant DREAM with stronger repressor activity. Finally, we show that transient DREAM knockdown sensitizes PC12 cells to H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress, suggesting a protective role for DREAM against oxidative damage.

  11. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-06-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets.

  12. Anaerobic transcription activation in Bacillus subtilis: identification of distinct FNR-dependent and -independent regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Ramos, H; Boursier, L; Moszer, I; Kunst, F; Danchin, A; Glaser, P

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is able to grow anaerobically using alternative electron acceptors, including nitrate or fumarate. We characterized an operon encoding the dissimilatory nitrate reductase subunits homologous to the Escherichia coli narGHJI operon and the narK gene encoding a protein with nitrite extrusion activity. Downstream from narK and co-transcribed with it a gene (fnr) encoding a protein homologous to E.coli FNR was found. Disruption of fnr abolished both nitrate and fumarate utilization as electron acceptors and anaerobic induction of narK. Four putative FNR binding sites were found in B.subtilis sequences. The consensus sequence, centred at position -41.5, is identical to the consensus for the DNA site for E.coli CAP. Bs-FNR contained a four cysteine residue cluster at its C-terminal end. This is in contrast to Ec-FNR, where a similar cluster is present at the N-terminal end. It is possible that oxygen modulates the activity of both activators by a similar mechanism involving iron. Unlike in E.coli, where fnr expression is weakly repressed by anaerobiosis, fnr gene expression in B.subtilis is strongly activated by anaerobiosis. We have identified in the narK-fnr intergenic region a promotor activated by anaerobiosis independently of FNR. Thus induction of genes involved in anaerobic respiration requires in B.subtilis at least two levels of regulation: activation of fnr transcription and activation of FNR to induce transcription of FNR-dependent promoters. Images PMID:8846791

  13. Comparative genomics of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent transcription factor regulons in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Suvorova, Inna A.

    2016-01-01

    The MocR-subfamily transcription factors (MocR-TFs) characterized by the GntR-family DNA-binding domain and aminotransferase-like sensory domain are broadly distributed among certain lineages of Bacteria. Characterized MocR-TFs bind pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) and control transcription of genes involved in PLP, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine metabolism via binding specific DNA operator sites. To identify putative target genes and DNA binding motifs of MocR-TFs, we performed comparative genomics analysis of over 250 bacterial genomes. The reconstructed regulons for 825 MocR-TFs comprise structural genes from over 200 protein families involved in diverse biological processes. Using the genome context and metabolic subsystem analysis we tentatively assigned functional roles for 38 out of 86 orthologous groups of studied regulators. Most of these MocR-TF regulons are involved in PLP metabolism, as well as utilization of GABA, taurine and ectoine. The remaining studied MocR-TF regulators presumably control genes encoding enzymes involved in reduction/oxidation processes, various transporters and PLP-dependent enzymes, for example aminotransferases. Predicted DNA binding motifs of MocR-TFs are generally similar in each orthologous group and are characterized by two to four repeated sequences. Identified motifs were classified according to their structures. Motifs with direct and/or inverted repeat symmetry constitute the majority of inferred DNA motifs, suggesting preferable TF dimerization in head-to-tail or head-to-head configuration. The obtained genomic collection of in silico reconstructed MocR-TF motifs and regulons in Bacteria provides a basis for future experimental characterization of molecular mechanisms for various regulators in this family. PMID:28348826

  14. Candidate regulatory sequence elements for cell cycle-dependent transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wolfsberg, T G; Gabrielian, A E; Campbell, M J; Cho, R J; Spouge, J L; Landsman, D

    1999-08-01

    Recent developments in genome-wide transcript monitoring have led to a rapid accumulation of data from gene expression studies. Such projects highlight the need for methods to predict the molecular basis of transcriptional coregulation. A microarray project identified the 420 yeast transcripts whose synthesis displays cell cycle-dependent periodicity. We present here a statistical technique we developed to identify the sequence elements that may be responsible for this cell cycle regulation. Because most gene regulatory sites contain a short string of highly conserved nucleotides, any such strings that are involved in gene regulation will occur frequently in the upstream regions of the genes that they regulate, and rarely in the upstream regions of other genes. Our strategy therefore utilizes statistical procedures to identify short oligomers, five or six nucleotides in length, that are over-represented in upstream regions of genes whose expression peaks at the same phase of the cell cycle. We report, with a high level of confidence, that 9 hexamers and 12 pentamers are over-represented in the upstream regions of genes whose expression peaks at the early G(1), late G(1), S, G(2), or M phase of the cell cycle. Some of these sequence elements show a preference for a particular orientation, and others, through a separate statistical test, for a particular position upstream of the ATG start codon. The finding that the majority of the statistically significant sequence elements are located in late G(1) upstream regions correlates with other experiments that identified the late G(1)/early S boundary as a vital cell cycle control point. Our results highlight the importance of MCB, an element implicated previously in late G(1)/early S gene regulation, as most of the late G(1) oligomers contain the MCB sequence or variations thereof. It is striking that most MCB-like sequences localize to a specific region upstream of the ATG start codon. Additional sequences that we have

  15. BTG2 is an LXXLL-dependent co-repressor for androgen receptor transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xu-Dong; Meng, Qing-Hui; Xu, Jia-Ying; Jiao, Yang; Ge, Chun-Min; Jacob, Asha; Wang, Ping; Rosen, Eliot M; Fan, Saijun

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} BTG2 associates with AR, androgen causes an increase of the interaction. {yields} BTG2 as a co-repressor inhibits the AR-mediated transcription activity. {yields} BTG2 inhibits the transcription activity and expression of PSA. {yields} An intact {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif is essential and necessary for these activities of BTG2, while the {sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} motif is not required. {yields} Ectopic expression of BTG2 reduces proliferation of prostate cancer cells. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor gene, BTG2 has been down-regulated in prostate cancer and the ectopic expression of this gene has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth. Sequence analysis revealed that the BTG2 protein contains two leucine-rich motifs ({sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} and {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96}), which are usually found in nuclear receptor co-factors. Based on this, we postulated that there will be an association between BTG2 and AR. In this study, we discovered that BTG2 directly bound to the androgen receptor (AR) in the absence of 5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and in the presence of the androgen, this interaction was increased. BTG2 bearing the mutant {sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} motif bound to AR equally efficient as the wild-type BTG2, while BTG2 bearing the mutant {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif failed to interact with AR. Functional studies indicated that ectopic expression of BTG2 caused a significant inhibition of AR-mediated transcriptional activity and a decreased growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen-induced promoter activation and expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are significantly attenuated by BTG2. The intact {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif is required for these activities. These findings, for the first time, demonstrate that BTG2 complexes with AR via an LxxLL-dependent mechanism and may play a role in prostate cancer via modulating the AR signaling pathway.

  16. A Role for Iron-Sulfur Clusters in the Regulation of Transcription Factor Yap5-dependent High Iron Transcriptional Responses in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangtao; Miao, Ren; Bertram, Sophie; Jia, Xuan; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Yeast respond to increased cytosolic iron by activating the transcription factor Yap5 increasing transcription of CCC1, which encodes a vacuolar iron importer. Using a genetic screen to identify genes involved in Yap5 iron sensing, we discovered that a mutation in SSQ1, which encodes a mitochondrial chaperone involved in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis, prevented expression of Yap5 target genes. We demonstrated that mutation or reduced expression of other genes involved in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster synthesis (YFH1, ISU1) prevented induction of the Yap5 response. We took advantage of the iron-dependent catalytic activity of Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase expressed in yeast to measure changes in cytosolic iron. We determined that reductions in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis did not affect the activity of cytosolic gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase. We show that loss of activity of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly complex proteins or deletion of cytosolic glutaredoxins did not reduce expression of Yap5 target genes. These results suggest that the high iron transcriptional response, as well as the low iron transcriptional response, senses iron-sulfur clusters. PMID:22915593

  17. Photoperiod-dependent changes in the phase of core clock transcripts and global transcriptional outputs at dawn and dusk in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Flis, Anna; Sulpice, Ronan; Seaton, Daniel D; Ivakov, Alexander A; Liput, Magda; Abel, Christin; Millar, Andrew J; Stitt, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Plants use the circadian clock to sense photoperiod length. Seasonal responses like flowering are triggered at a critical photoperiod when a light-sensitive clock output coincides with light or darkness. However, many metabolic processes, like starch turnover, and growth respond progressively to photoperiod duration. We first tested the photoperiod response of 10 core clock genes and two output genes. qRT-PCR analyses of transcript abundance under 6, 8, 12 and 18 h photoperiods revealed 1-4 h earlier peak times under short photoperiods and detailed changes like rising PRR7 expression before dawn. Clock models recapitulated most of these changes. We explored the consequences for global gene expression by performing transcript profiling in 4, 6, 8, 12 and 18 h photoperiods. There were major changes in transcript abundance at dawn, which were as large as those between dawn and dusk in a given photoperiod. Contributing factors included altered timing of the clock relative to dawn, light signalling and changes in carbon availability at night as a result of clock-dependent regulation of starch degradation. Their interaction facilitates coordinated transcriptional regulation of key processes like starch turnover, anthocyanin, flavonoid and glucosinolate biosynthesis and protein synthesis and underpins the response of metabolism and growth to photoperiod. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdk8 Mediator Represses AQY1 Transcription by Inhibiting Set1p-Dependent Histone Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Law, Michael J.; Finger, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient depletion induces massive transcriptional reprogramming that relies upon communication between transcription factors, post-translational histone modifications, and the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme complex. Histone H3Lys4 methylation (H3Lys4 me), regulated by the Set1p-containing COMPASS methyltransferase complex and Jhd2p demethylase, is one of the most well-studied histone modifications. We previously demonstrated that the RNA polymerase II mediator components cyclin C-Cdk8p inhibit locus-specific H3Lys4 3me independently of Jhd2p. Here, we identify loci subject to cyclin C- and Jhd2p-dependent histone H3Lys4 3me inhibition using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq. We further characterized the independent and combined roles of cyclin C and Jhd2p in controlling H3Lys4 3me and transcription in response to fermentable and nonfermentable carbon at multiple loci. These experiments suggest that H3Lys4 3me alone is insufficient to induce transcription. Interestingly, we identified an unexpected role for cyclin C-Cdk8p in repressing AQY1 transcription, an aquaporin whose expression is normally induced during nutrient deprivation. These experiments, combined with previous work in other labs, support a two-step model in which cyclin C-Cdk8p mediate AQY1 transcriptional repression by stimulating transcription factor proteolysis and preventing Set1p recruitment to the AQY1 locus. PMID:28143948

  19. Replication but not transcription of simian virus 40 DNA is dependent on nuclear domain 10.

    PubMed

    Tang, Q; Bell, P; Tegtmeyer, P; Maul, G G

    2000-10-01

    DNA viruses from several families including herpes simplex virus type 1, adenovirus type 5, and simian virus 40 (SV40), start their transcription and replication adjacent to a specific nuclear domain, ND10. We asked whether a specific viral DNA sequence determines the location of these synthetic activities at such restricted nuclear sites. Partial and overlapping SV40 sequences were introduced into a beta-galactosidase expression vector, and the beta-galactosidase transcripts were localized by in situ hybridization. Transcripts derived from control plasmids were found throughout the nucleus and at highly concentrated sites but not at ND10. SV40 genomic segments supported ND10-associated transcription only when the origin and the coding sequence for the large T antigen were present. When the large T-antigen coding sequence was eliminated but the T antigen was constitutively expressed in COS-7 cells, the viral origin was sufficient to localize transcription and replication to ND10. Deletion analysis showed that only the large T-antigen binding site II (the core origin) was required but the T antigen was needed for detectable transcription at ND10. Large T antigen expressed from plasmids without the viral core origin did not bind or localize to ND10. Blocking of DNA replication prevented the accumulation of transcripts at ND10, indicating that only sites with replicating templates accumulated transcripts. Transcription at ND10 did not enhance total protein synthesis of plasmid transcripts. These findings suggest that viral transcription at ND10 may only be a consequence of viral genomes directed to ND10 for replication. Although plasmid transcription can take place anywhere in the nucleus, T-antigen-directed replication is apparently restricted to ND10.

  20. Transcription-associated recombination is dependent on replication in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gottipati, Ponnari; Cassel, Tobias N; Savolainen, Linda; Helleday, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Transcription can enhance recombination; this is a ubiquitous phenomenon from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. However, the mechanism of transcription-associated recombination in mammalian cells is poorly understood. Here we have developed a construct with a recombination substrate in which levels of recombination can be studied in the presence or absence of transcription. We observed a direct enhancement in recombination when transcription levels through the substrate were increased. This increase in homologous recombination following transcription is locus specific, since homologous recombination at the unrelated hprt gene is unaffected. In addition, we have shown that transcription-associated recombination involves both short-tract and long-tract gene conversions in mammalian cells, which are different from double-strand-break-induced recombination events caused by endonucleases. Transcription fails to enhance recombination in cells that are not in the S phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, inhibition of transcription suppresses induction of recombination at stalled replication forks, suggesting that recombination may be involved in bypassing transcription during replication.

  1. Profilin Is Required for Optimal Actin-Dependent Transcription of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genome RNA

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Emily; Mahoney, Nicole M.; Almo, Steven C.; Barik, Sailen

    2000-01-01

    Transcription of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) genome RNA exhibited an obligatory need for the host cytoskeletal protein actin. Optimal transcription, however, required the participation of another cellular protein that was characterized as profilin by a number of criteria. The amino acid sequence of the protein, purified on the basis of its transcription-optimizing activity in vitro, exactly matched that of profilin. RSV transcription was inhibited 60 to 80% by antiprofilin antibody or poly-l-proline, molecules that specifically bind profilin. Native profilin, purified from extracts of lung epithelial cells by affinity binding to a poly-l-proline matrix, stimulated the actin-saturated RSV transcription by 2.5- to 3-fold. Recombinant profilin, expressed in bacteria, stimulated viral transcription as effectively as the native protein and was also inhibited by poly-l-proline. Profilin alone, in the absence of actin, did not activate viral transcription. It is estimated that at optimal levels of transcription, every molecule of viral genomic RNA associates with approximately the following number of protein molecules: 30 molecules of L, 120 molecules of phosphoprotein P, and 60 molecules each of actin and profilin. Together, these results demonstrated for the first time a cardinal role for profilin, an actin-modulatory protein, in the transcription of a paramyxovirus RNA genome. PMID:10623728

  2. Tumor-induced tolerance and immune suppression depend on the C/EBPbeta transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Bosio, Erika; Solito, Samantha; Mesa, Circe; Fernandez, Audry; Dolcetti, Luigi; Ugel, Stefano; Sonda, Nada; Bicciato, Silvio; Falisi, Erika; Calabrese, Fiorella; Basso, Giuseppe; Zanovello, Paola; Cozzi, Emanuele; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-06-25

    Tumor growth is associated with a profound alteration in myelopoiesis, leading to recruitment of immunosuppressive cells known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We showed that among factors produced by various experimental tumors, the cytokines GM-CSF, G-CSF, and IL-6 allowed a rapid generation of MDSCs from precursors present in mouse and human bone marrow (BM). BM-MDSCs induced by GM-CSF+IL-6 possessed the highest tolerogenic activity, as revealed by the ability to impair the priming of CD8(+) T cells and allow long term acceptance of pancreatic islet allografts. Cytokines inducing MDSCs acted on a common molecular pathway and the immunoregulatory activity of both tumor-induced and BM-derived MDSCs was entirely dependent on the C/EBPbeta transcription factor. Adoptive transfer of tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes resulted in therapy of established tumors only in mice lacking C/EBPbeta in the myeloid compartment, suggesting that C/EBPbeta is a critical regulator of the immunosuppressive environment created by growing cancers.

  3. Cyclic AMP induces IPC leukemia cell apoptosis via CRE-and CDK-dependent Bim transcription.

    PubMed

    Huseby, S; Gausdal, G; Keen, T J; Kjærland, E; Krakstad, C; Myhren, L; Brønstad, K; Kunick, C; Schwede, F; Genieser, H-G; Kleppe, R; Døskeland, S O

    2011-12-08

    The IPC-81 cell line is derived from the transplantable BNML model of acute myelogenic leukemia (AML), known to be a reliable predictor of the clinical efficiency of antileukemic agents, like the first-line AML anthracycline drug daunorubicin (DNR). We show here that cAMP acted synergistically with DNR to induce IPC cell death. The DNR-induced death differed from that induced by cAMP by (1) not involving Bim induction, (2) being abrogated by GSK3β inhibitors, (3) by being promoted by the HSP90/p23 antagonist geldanamycin and truncated p23 and (4) by being insensitive to the CRE binding protein (CREB) antagonist ICER and to cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK) inhibitors. In contrast, the apoptosis induced by cAMP correlated tightly with Bim protein expression. It was abrogated by Bim (BCL2L11) downregulation, whether achieved by the CREB antagonist ICER, by CDK inhibitors, by Bim-directed RNAi, or by protein synthesis inhibitor. The forced expression of BimL killed IPC-81(WT) cells rapidly, Bcl2-overexpressing cells being partially resistant. The pivotal role of CREB and CDK activity for Bim transcription is unprecedented. It is also noteworthy that newly developed cAMP analogs specifically activating PKA isozyme I (PKA-I) were able to induce IPC cell apoptosis. Our findings support the notion that AML cells may possess targetable death pathways not exploited by common anti-cancer agents.

  4. Conditional tolerance of temperate phages via transcription-dependent CRISPR-Cas targeting.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Gregory W; Jiang, Wenyan; Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2014-10-30

    A fundamental feature of immune systems is the ability to distinguish pathogenic from self and commensal elements, and to attack the former but tolerate the latter. Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas immune systems defend against phage infection by using Cas nucleases and small RNA guides that specify one or more target sites for cleavage of the viral genome. Temperate phages include viruses that can integrate into the bacterial chromosome, and they can carry genes that provide a fitness advantage to the lysogenic host. However, CRISPR-Cas targeting that relies strictly on DNA sequence recognition provides indiscriminate immunity both to lytic and lysogenic infection by temperate phages-compromising the genetic stability of these potentially beneficial elements altogether. Here we show that the Staphylococcus epidermidis CRISPR-Cas system can prevent lytic infection but tolerate lysogenization by temperate phages. Conditional tolerance is achieved through transcription-dependent DNA targeting, and ensures that targeting is resumed upon induction of the prophage lytic cycle. Our results provide evidence for the functional divergence of CRISPR-Cas systems and highlight the importance of targeting mechanism diversity. In addition, they extend the concept of 'tolerance to non-self' to the prokaryotic branch of adaptive immunity.

  5. The transcription factor E4F1 coordinates CHK1-dependent checkpoint and mitochondrial functions.

    PubMed

    Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Baraibar, Martín; Houlès, Thibault; Lacroix, Matthieu; Delpech, Hélène; Hatchi, Elodie; Arnould, Stéphanie; Severac, Dany; Dubois, Emeric; Caramel, Julie; Julien, Eric; Friguet, Bertrand; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2015-04-14

    Recent data support the notion that a group of key transcriptional regulators involved in tumorigenesis, including MYC, p53, E2F1, and BMI1, share an intriguing capacity to simultaneously regulate metabolism and cell cycle. Here, we show that another factor, the multifunctional protein E4F1, directly controls genes involved in mitochondria functions and cell-cycle checkpoints, including Chek1, a major component of the DNA damage response. Coordination of these cellular functions by E4F1 appears essential for the survival of p53-deficient transformed cells. Acute inactivation of E4F1 in these cells results in CHK1-dependent checkpoint deficiency and multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions that lead to increased ROS production, energy stress, and inhibition of de novo pyrimidine synthesis. This deadly cocktail leads to the accumulation of uncompensated oxidative damage to proteins and extensive DNA damage, ending in cell death. This supports the rationale of therapeutic strategies simultaneously targeting mitochondria and CHK1 for selective killing of p53-deficient cancer cells.

  6. Cryptogein-Induced Transcriptional Reprogramming in Tobacco Is Light Dependent1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Hoeberichts, Frank A.; Davoine, Céline; Vandorpe, Michaël; Morsa, Stijn; Ksas, Brigitte; Stassen, Catherine; Triantaphylidès, Christian; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The fungal elicitor cryptogein triggers a light-dependent hypersensitive response in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). To assess the effect of light on this nonhost resistance in more detail, we studied various aspects of the response under dark and light conditions using the tobacco-cryptogein experimental system. Here, we show that light drastically alters the plant’s transcriptional response to cryptogein, notably by dampening the induction of genes involved in multiple processes, such as ethylene biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and glutathione turnover. Furthermore, chlorophyll fluorescence measurements demonstrated that quantum yield and functioning of the light-harvesting antennae decreased simultaneously, indicating that photoinhibition underlies the observed decreased photosynthesis and that photooxidative damage might be involved in the establishment of the altered response. Analysis of the isomer distribution of hydroxy fatty acids illustrated that, in the light, lipid peroxidation was predominantly due to the production of singlet oxygen. Differences in (reduced) glutathione concentrations and the rapid development of symptoms in the light when cryptogein was coinfiltrated with glutathione biosynthesis inhibitors suggest that glutathione might become a limiting factor during the cryptogein-induced hypersensitive response in the dark and that this response might be modified by an increased antioxidant availability in the light. PMID:23878079

  7. Nup98 Is a Mobile Nucleoporin with Transcription-dependent DynamicsV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Griffis, Eric R.; Altan, Nihal; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Powers, Maureen A.

    2002-01-01

    Nucleoporin 98 (Nup98), a glycine-leucine-phenylalanine-glycine (GLFG) amino acid repeat-containing nucleoporin, plays a critical part in nuclear trafficking. Injection of antibodies to Nup98 into the nucleus blocks the export of most RNAs. Nup98 contains binding sites for several transport factors; however, the mechanism by which this nucleoporin functions has remained unclear. Multiple subcellular localizations have been suggested for Nup98. Here we show that Nup98 is indeed found both at the nuclear pore complex and within the nucleus. Inside the nucleus, Nup98 associates with a novel nuclear structure that we term the GLFG body because the GLFG domain of Nup98 is required for targeting to this structure. Photobleaching of green fluorescent protein-Nup98 in living cells reveals that Nup98 is mobile and moves between these different localizations. The rate of recovery after photobleaching indicates that Nup98 interacts with other, less mobile, components in the nucleoplasm. Strikingly, given the previous link to nuclear export, the mobility of Nup98 within the nucleus and at the pore is dependent on ongoing transcription by RNA polymerases I and II. These data give rise to a model in which Nup98 aids in direction of RNAs to the nuclear pore and provide the first potential mechanism for the role of a mobile nucleoporin. PMID:11950939

  8. AF4 uses the SL1 components of RNAP1 machinery to initiate MLL fusion- and AEP-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Hiroshi; Kanai, Akinori; Ito, Shinji; Matsui, Hirotaka; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Gene rearrangements generate MLL fusion genes, which can lead to aggressive leukemia. In most cases, MLL fuses with a gene encoding a component of the AEP (AF4 family/ENL family/P-TEFb) coactivator complex. MLL–AEP fusion proteins constitutively activate their target genes to immortalize haematopoietic progenitors. Here we show that AEP and MLL–AEP fusion proteins activate transcription through selectivity factor 1 (SL1), a core component of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) of RNA polymerase I (RNAP1). The pSER domain of AF4 family proteins associates with SL1 on chromatin and loads TATA-binding protein (TBP) onto the promoter to initiate RNA polymerase II (RNAP2)-dependent transcription. These results reveal a previously unknown transcription initiation mechanism involving AEP and a role for SL1 as a TBP-loading factor in RNAP2-dependent gene activation. PMID:26593443

  9. Transcription-independent role of Bach1 in mitosis through a nuclear exporter Crm1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Shiraki, Takuma; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-17

    The transcriptional repressor Bach1 mediates various stress responses. Despite its role in transcription, Bach1 is predominantly exported to the cytoplasm in a Crm1-dependent manner, but the functional role of its cytoplasmic retention is still unclear. We found that Bach1 was also excluded from mitotic chromatin by a C-terminal cytoplasmic localization sequence dependent and leptomycin B sensitive process. Bach1 depletion resulted in disordered mitotic chromosome alignment, which was rescued by Bach1 mutants lacking the BTB or DNA binding domains, suggesting its transcription-independent mechanism. We thus revealed a novel role of Bach1 in the regulation of mitotic chromosome dynamics. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcriptional Gene Silencing Maintained by OTS1 SUMO Protease Requires a DNA-Dependent Polymerase V-Dependent Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Yan, Xiaojing; Zhao, Yiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The expression of genes with aberrant structure is prevented at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation levels. Aberrant gene silencing at the posttranscriptional level is well studied; however, it is not well understood how aberrant genes are silenced at the transcriptional level. In this study, through genetic screening a transgenic report line that harbors an aberrant gene (35S-LUC, lacking 3′-untranslated region [3′-UTR]) and lacks luciferase (LUC) activity, we identify that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease OTS1 gene is required for maintaining the silence of the reporter 35S-LUC and an endogenous mutator-like element MULE-F19G14 at the transcriptional level, which requires DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Pol) V and DDR complex, but not Pol IV. The increased transcripts in ots1 mutants are terminated by the 3′-UTRs of downstream genes. In addition to ots1 mutations, mutations in several known or putative SUMO proteases and two SUMO E3 ligases, SIZ1 and MMS21, have similar effects on this silencing regulation. Taken together, our results reveal that the enzymes involved in the SUMOylation process restrain aberrant gene transcription by using a downstream gene 3′-UTR, and this regulation requires a functional Pol V-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PMID:27852949

  11. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription through Lys63 linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Peschiaroli, Angelo; Scialpi, Flavia; Bernassola, Francesca; Sherbini, El Said El; Melino, Gerry

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} WWP1 ubiquitylates {Delta}Np63 through conjugation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. {yields} WWP1 does not control {Delta}Np63 protein stability. {yields} WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription. -- Abstract: The transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family, plays a crucial role in epithelial development and tumorigenesis through the regulation of epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Similarly to p53, p63 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications, including ubiquitylation. Here, we report that the WWP1 E3 ubiquitin ligase binds specifically to {Delta}Np63 isoform but it does not trigger {Delta}Np63 proteasome-dependent degradation. Accordingly, we found that WWP1-dependent ubiquitylation of {Delta}Np63 occurs through the formation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. Importantly, we found that WWP1 is able to increase {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription and depletion of WWP1 in human primary keratinocytes induces cell cycle arrest. All together these results indicate that WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63 transcriptional activity, acting thus as a potential regulator of the proliferation and survival of epithelial-derived cells.

  12. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G0/G1. It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G0. Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G0/G1, but also for activation in S, G2 and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle. PMID:22064854

  13. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Gerd A; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G(0)/G(1). It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G(0). Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G(0)/G(1), but also for activation in S, G(2) and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle.

  14. Transcription-dependent cytosine deamination: a novel mechanism in ultraviolet light-induced mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Giel; Calléja, Fabienne; Besaratinia, Ahmad; Vrieling, Harry; Pfeifer, Gerd P.; Mullenders, Leon H.F.; Jansen, Jacob G.; de Wind, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Summary Skin cancer is the most ubiquitous cancer type in the Caucasian population and its incidence is increasing rapidly [1]. Transcribed, proliferation-related, genes in dermal stem cells are targets for the induction of ultraviolet light (UV)-induced mutations that drive carcinogenesis. We have recently found that gene transcription increases UV-induced mutagenesis in mammalian stem cells, suggesting a role of transcription in skin carcinogenesis [2]. Here we show that transcription-associated, UV-induced, nucleotide substitutions are caused by increased deamination of cytosines to uracil within photolesions at the transcribed strand, presumably at sites of stalled transcription complexes. Additionally, via an independent mechanism, transcription of UV-damaged DNA induces the generation of intragenic deletions. We provide evidence that transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) provides protection against both classes of transcription-associated mutagenesis. Combined, these results unveil the existence of two mutagenic pathways, operating specifically at the transcribed DNA strand of active genes. Moreover, these results uncover a novel role for TC-NER in the suppression of UV light-induced genome aberrations and provide a rationale for the efficient induction of apoptosis by stalled transcription complexes. PMID:20045328

  15. Activation of polyomavirus DNA replication by yeast GAL4 is dependent on its transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett-Cook, E R; Hassell, J A

    1991-01-01

    The polyomavirus replication origin contains transcriptional regulatory sequences. To determine how these elements function in DNA replication, and to learn whether a common mechanism underlies the activation of transcription and DNA replication, we tested whether a well-characterized transcriptional activator, yeast GAL4, was capable of stimulating DNA replication and transcription in the same mammalian cell line. We observed that GAL4 activated polyomavirus DNA replication in mouse cells when its binding site was juxtaposed to the late border of the polyomavirus origin core. Synergistic activation of DNA replication was achieved by multimerization of the GAL4 binding site. Analysis of GAL4 mutant proteins, GAL4 hybrid proteins and mutants of the latter revealed that the activation domains of these transcriptional activators were required to stimulate DNA replication. In agreement with previously published data, the activation domains of GAL4 were also required to enhance transcription in the same mouse cell line. These observations implicate transcriptional activators in Py DNA replication and suggest that similar mechanisms govern the activation of transcription and DNA replication. Images PMID:1849079

  16. Protein Phosphatase 1-Dependent Transcriptional Programs for Long-Term Memory and Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Johannes; Koshibu, Kyoko; Jouvenceau, Anne; Dutar, Patrick; Mansuy, Isabelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is essential for the establishment and the maintenance of long-term memory (LTM) and for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity. The molecular mechanisms that control gene transcription in neuronal cells are complex and recruit multiple signaling pathways in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Protein kinases (PKs) and…

  17. Protein Phosphatase 1-Dependent Transcriptional Programs for Long-Term Memory and Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Johannes; Koshibu, Kyoko; Jouvenceau, Anne; Dutar, Patrick; Mansuy, Isabelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is essential for the establishment and the maintenance of long-term memory (LTM) and for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity. The molecular mechanisms that control gene transcription in neuronal cells are complex and recruit multiple signaling pathways in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Protein kinases (PKs) and…

  18. RNA secondary structures regulate three steps of Rho-dependent transcription termination within a bacterial mRNA leader.

    PubMed

    Kriner, Michelle A; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2017-01-25

    Transcription termination events in bacteria often require the RNA helicase Rho. Typically, Rho promotes termination at the end of coding sequences, but it can also terminate transcription within leader regions to implement regulatory decisions. Rho-dependent termination requires initial recognition of a Rho utilization (rut) site on a nascent RNA by Rho's primary binding surface. However, it is presently unclear what factors determine the location of transcription termination, how RNA secondary structures influence this process and whether mechanistic differences distinguish constitutive from regulated Rho-dependent terminators. We previously demonstrated that the 5' leader mRNA of the Salmonella corA gene can adopt two mutually exclusive conformations that dictate accessibility of a rut site to Rho. We now report that the corA leader also controls two subsequent steps of Rho-dependent termination. First, the RNA conformation that presents an accessible rut site promotes pausing of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at a single Rho-dependent termination site over 100 nt downstream. Second, an additional RNA stem-loop promotes Rho activity and controls the location at which Rho-dependent termination occurs, despite having no effect on initial Rho binding to the corA leader. Thus, the multi-step nature of Rho-dependent termination may facilitate regulation of a given coding region by multiple cytoplasmic signals. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. RNA secondary structures regulate three steps of Rho-dependent transcription termination within a bacterial mRNA leader

    PubMed Central

    Kriner, Michelle A.; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2017-01-01

    Transcription termination events in bacteria often require the RNA helicase Rho. Typically, Rho promotes termination at the end of coding sequences, but it can also terminate transcription within leader regions to implement regulatory decisions. Rho-dependent termination requires initial recognition of a Rho utilization (rut) site on a nascent RNA by Rho's primary binding surface. However, it is presently unclear what factors determine the location of transcription termination, how RNA secondary structures influence this process and whether mechanistic differences distinguish constitutive from regulated Rho-dependent terminators. We previously demonstrated that the 5′ leader mRNA of the Salmonella corA gene can adopt two mutually exclusive conformations that dictate accessibility of a rut site to Rho. We now report that the corA leader also controls two subsequent steps of Rho-dependent termination. First, the RNA conformation that presents an accessible rut site promotes pausing of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at a single Rho-dependent termination site over 100 nt downstream. Second, an additional RNA stem-loop promotes Rho activity and controls the location at which Rho-dependent termination occurs, despite having no effect on initial Rho binding to the corA leader. Thus, the multi-step nature of Rho-dependent termination may facilitate regulation of a given coding region by multiple cytoplasmic signals. PMID:28123036

  20. Dependence of transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling on promoter strength in Escherichia coli topoisomerase I deficient strains.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoduo; Leng, Fenfei

    2013-02-10

    Transcription by RNA polymerase can induce the formation of hypernegatively supercoiled DNA in vitro and in vivo. This phenomenon has been nicely explained by a "twin-supercoiled-domain" model of transcription where a positively supercoiled domain is generated ahead of the RNA polymerase and a negatively supercoiled domain behind it. In Escherichia coli topA strains, DNA gyrase selectively converts the positively supercoiled domain into negative supercoils to produce hypernegatively supercoiled DNA. In this article, in order to examine whether promoter strength affects transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling (TCDS), we developed a two-plasmid system in which a linear, non-supercoiled plasmid was used to express lac repressor constitutively while a circular plasmid was used to gage TCDS in E. coli cells. Using this two-plasmid system, we found that TCDS in topA strains is dependent on promoter strength. We also demonstrated that transcription-coupled hypernegative supercoiling of plasmid DNA did not need the expression of a membrane-insertion protein for strong promoters; however, it might require co-transcriptional synthesis of a polypeptide. Furthermore, we found that for weak promoters the expression of a membrane-insertion tet gene was not sufficient for the production of hypernegatively supercoiled DNA. Our results can be explained by the "twin-supercoiled-domain" model of transcription where the friction force applied to E. coli RNA polymerase plays a critical role in the generation of hypernegatively supercoiled DNA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of human papillomavirus transcription by the differentiation-dependent epithelial factor Epoc-1/skn-1a.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, K; Butz, K; Yasui, T; Kikutani, H; Hoppe-Seyler, F

    1996-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) early gene expression is closely linked to the differentiation status of infected epithelial cells. Typically, HPV type 16 (HPV16) or HPV18 E6 and E7 transcripts are only barely detectable within the undifferentiated basal cell layer, but their levels increase concomitantly with higher degrees of epithelial cell differentiation in suprabasal cells. A similar differentiation-dependent distribution of expression has been reported for the recently cloned epithelial cell specific transcription factor Epoc-1/skn-1a. We therefore examined whether Epoc-1/skn-1a may be directly involved in the activation of HPV E6/E7 transcription. Transient transfection studies showed that Epoc-1/skn-1a specifically stimulated the HPV16 and HPV18 E6/E7 promoters. Moreover, ectopically expressed Epoc-1/skn-1a was sufficient to stimulate HPV transcription also in nonepithelial cells. By deletion analyses, the Epoc-1/skn-1a-responsive element was mapped to the promoter-proximal portion of the HPV18 transcriptional control region. Footprint analyses and gel retardation assays demonstrated direct binding of Epoc-1/skn-1a to a hitherto uncharacterized site within this region. Mutation of the Epoc-1/skn-1a recognition site within the context of the complete HPV18 upstream regulatory region inhibited Epoc-1/skn-1a-mediated transactivation. These results show that Epoc-1/skn-1a can directly activate the E6/E7 promoter by binding to the viral transcriptional control region. Thus, Epoc-1/skn-1a may be involved in the differentiation-dependent regulation of HPV transcription.

  2. Regulation of human papillomavirus transcription by the differentiation-dependent epithelial factor Epoc-1/skn-1a.

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, K; Butz, K; Yasui, T; Kikutani, H; Hoppe-Seyler, F

    1996-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) early gene expression is closely linked to the differentiation status of infected epithelial cells. Typically, HPV type 16 (HPV16) or HPV18 E6 and E7 transcripts are only barely detectable within the undifferentiated basal cell layer, but their levels increase concomitantly with higher degrees of epithelial cell differentiation in suprabasal cells. A similar differentiation-dependent distribution of expression has been reported for the recently cloned epithelial cell specific transcription factor Epoc-1/skn-1a. We therefore examined whether Epoc-1/skn-1a may be directly involved in the activation of HPV E6/E7 transcription. Transient transfection studies showed that Epoc-1/skn-1a specifically stimulated the HPV16 and HPV18 E6/E7 promoters. Moreover, ectopically expressed Epoc-1/skn-1a was sufficient to stimulate HPV transcription also in nonepithelial cells. By deletion analyses, the Epoc-1/skn-1a-responsive element was mapped to the promoter-proximal portion of the HPV18 transcriptional control region. Footprint analyses and gel retardation assays demonstrated direct binding of Epoc-1/skn-1a to a hitherto uncharacterized site within this region. Mutation of the Epoc-1/skn-1a recognition site within the context of the complete HPV18 upstream regulatory region inhibited Epoc-1/skn-1a-mediated transactivation. These results show that Epoc-1/skn-1a can directly activate the E6/E7 promoter by binding to the viral transcriptional control region. Thus, Epoc-1/skn-1a may be involved in the differentiation-dependent regulation of HPV transcription. PMID:8523512

  3. Transcription Elongation Factor NusA Is a General Antagonist of Rho-dependent Termination in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Qayyum, M. Zuhaib; Dey, Debashish; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    NusA is an essential protein that binds to RNA polymerase and also to the nascent RNA and influences transcription by inducing pausing and facilitating the process of transcription termination/antitermination. Its participation in Rho-dependent transcription termination has been perceived, but the molecular nature of this involvement is not known. We hypothesized that, because both Rho and NusA are RNA-binding proteins and have the potential to target the same RNA, the latter is likely to influence the global pattern of the Rho-dependent termination. Analyses of the nascent RNA binding properties and consequent effects on the Rho-dependent termination functions of specific NusA-RNA binding domain mutants revealed an existence of Rho-NusA direct competition for the overlapping nut (NusA-binding site) and rut (Rho-binding site) sites on the RNA. This leads to delayed entry of Rho at the rut site that inhibits the latter's RNA release process. High density tiling microarray profiles of these NusA mutants revealed that a significant number of genes, together with transcripts from intergenic regions, are up-regulated. Interestingly, the majority of these genes were also up-regulated when the Rho function was compromised. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of NusA-binding sites in different operons that are also the targets of Rho-dependent terminations. Our data strongly argue in favor of a direct competition between NusA and Rho for the access of specific sites on the nascent transcripts in different parts of the genome. We propose that this competition enables NusA to function as a global antagonist of the Rho function, which is unlike its role as a facilitator of hairpin-dependent termination. PMID:26872975

  4. Transcription Elongation Factor NusA Is a General Antagonist of Rho-dependent Termination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, M Zuhaib; Dey, Debashish; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-04-08

    NusA is an essential protein that binds to RNA polymerase and also to the nascent RNA and influences transcription by inducing pausing and facilitating the process of transcription termination/antitermination. Its participation in Rho-dependent transcription termination has been perceived, but the molecular nature of this involvement is not known. We hypothesized that, because both Rho and NusA are RNA-binding proteins and have the potential to target the same RNA, the latter is likely to influence the global pattern of the Rho-dependent termination. Analyses of the nascent RNA binding properties and consequent effects on the Rho-dependent termination functions of specific NusA-RNA binding domain mutants revealed an existence of Rho-NusA direct competition for the overlappingnut(NusA-binding site) andrut(Rho-binding site) sites on the RNA. This leads to delayed entry of Rho at therutsite that inhibits the latter's RNA release process. High density tiling microarray profiles of these NusA mutants revealed that a significant number of genes, together with transcripts from intergenic regions, are up-regulated. Interestingly, the majority of these genes were also up-regulated when the Rho function was compromised. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of NusA-binding sites in different operons that are also the targets of Rho-dependent terminations. Our data strongly argue in favor of a direct competition between NusA and Rho for the access of specific sites on the nascent transcripts in different parts of the genome. We propose that this competition enables NusA to function as a global antagonist of the Rho function, which is unlike its role as a facilitator of hairpin-dependent termination.

  5. DYRK1A Controls HIV-1 Replication at a Transcriptional Level in an NFAT Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Booiman, Thijs; Loukachov, Vladimir V.; van Dort, Karel A.; van ’t Wout, Angélique B.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transcription of the HIV-1 provirus is regulated by both viral and host proteins and is very important in the context of viral latency. In latently infected cells, viral gene expression is inhibited as a result of the sequestration of host transcription factors and epigenetic modifications. Results In our present study we analyzed the effect of host factor dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) on HIV-1 replication. We show that DYRK1A controls HIV-1 replication by regulating provirus transcription. Downregulation or inhibition of DYRK1A increased LTR-driven transcription and viral replication in cell lines and primary PBMC. Furthermore, inhibition of DYRK1A resulted in reactivation of latent HIV-1 provirus to a similar extent as two commonly used broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitors. We observed that DYRK1A regulates HIV-1 transcription via the Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) by promoting its translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Therefore, inhibition of DYRK1A results in increased nuclear levels of NFAT and increased NFAT binding to the viral LTR and thus increasing viral transcription. Conclusions Our data indicate that host factor DYRK1A plays a role in the regulation of viral transcription and latency. Therefore, DYRK1A might be an attractive candidate for therapeutic strategies targeting the viral reservoir. PMID:26641855

  6. NFATc1 Mediates HDAC-Dependent Transcriptional Repression of Osteocalcin Expression During Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Min-Kyung; Yeo, Hyeonju; Zayzafoon, Majd

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that the in vivo and in vitro suppression of Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells (NFAT) signaling increases osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. To investigate the mechanism by which NFATc1 regulates osteoblast differentiation, we established an osteoblast cell line that overexpresses a constitutively active NFATc1 (ca-NFATc1). The activation of NFATc1 significantly inhibits osteoblast differentiation and function, demonstrated by inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization as well as a decrease in gene expression of early and late markers of osteoblast differentiation such as osterix and osteocalcin, respectively. By focusing on the specific role of NFATc1 during late differentiation, we discovered that the inhibition of osteocalcin gene expression by NFATc1 was associated with a repression of the osteocalcin promoter activity, and a decrease in TCF/LEF transactivation. Also, overexpression of NFATc1 completely blocked the decrease in total histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity during osteoblast differentiation and prevented the hyperacetylation of histones H3 and H4. Mechanistically, we show by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay that the overexpression of NFATc1 sustains the binding of HDAC3 on the proximal region of the osteocalcin promoter, resulting in complete hypoacetylation of histones H3 and H4 when compared to GFP-expressing osteoblasts. In contrast, the inhibition of NFATc1 nuclear translocation either by cyclosporin or by using primary mouse osteoblasts with deleted calcineurin b1 prevents HDAC3 from associating with the proximal regulatory site of the osteocalcin promoter. These preliminary results suggest that NFATc1 acts as a transcriptional co-repressor of osteocalcin promoter possibly in an HDAC-dependent manner. PMID:19463978

  7. Dose- and Time-Dependent Transcriptional Response of Ishikawa Cells Exposed to Genistein.

    PubMed

    Naciff, Jorge M; Khambatta, Zubin S; Carr, Gregory J; Tiesman, Jay P; Singleton, David W; Khan, Sohaib A; Daston, George P

    2016-05-01

    To further define the utility of the Ishikawa cells as a reliable in vitro model to determine the potential estrogenic activity of chemicals of interest, transcriptional changes induced by genistein (GES) in Ishikawa cells at various doses (10 pM, 1 nM, 100 nM, and 10 μM) and time points (8, 24, and 48 h) were identified using a comprehensive microarray approach. Trend analysis indicated that the expression of 5342 unique genes was modified by GES in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P ≤ 0.0001). However, the majority of gene expression changes induced in Ishikawa cells were elicited by the highest dose of GES evaluated (10 μM). The GES' estrogenic activity was identified by comparing the Ishikawa cells' response to GES versus 17 α-ethynyl estradiol (EE, at equipotent doses, ie, 10 μM vs 1 μM, respectively) and was defined by changes in the expression of 284 unique genes elicited by GES and EE in the same direction, although the magnitude of the change for some genes was different. Further, comparing the response of the Ishikawa cells exposed to high doses of GES and EE versus the response of the juvenile rat uterus exposed to EE, we identified 66 unique genes which were up- or down regulated in a similar manner in vivo as well as in vitro Genistein elicits changes in multiple molecular pathways affecting various biological processes particularly associated with cell organization and biogenesis, regulation of translation, cell proliferation, and intracellular transport; processes also affected by estrogen exposure in the uterus of the rat. These results indicate that Ishikawa cells are capable of generating a biologically relevant estrogenic response and offer an in vitro model to assess this mode of action.

  8. Regulation of a Myb Transcription Factor by Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2 in Giardia lamblia*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chao-Cheng; Su, Li-Hsin; Huang, Yu-Chang; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia parasitizes the human small intestine to cause diseases. It undergoes differentiation into infectious cysts by responding to intestinal stimulation. How the activated signal transduction pathways relate to encystation stimulation remain largely unknown. During encystation, genes encoding cyst wall proteins (CWPs) are coordinately up-regulated by a Myb2 transcription factor. Because cell differentiation is linked to cell cycle regulation, we tried to understand the role of cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), in encystation. We found that the recombinant Myb2 was phosphorylated by Cdk-associated complexes and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. We have identified a putative cdk gene (cdk2) by searching the Giardia genome database. Cdk2 was found to localize in the cytoplasm with higher expression during encystation. Interestingly, overexpression of Cdk2 resulted in a significant increase of the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. In addition, the Cdk2-associated complexes can phosphorylate Myb2 and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. Mutations of important catalytic residues of Cdk2 resulted in a significant decrease of kinase activity and ability of inducing cyst formation. Addition of a Cdk inhibitor, purvalanol A, significantly decreased the Cdk2 kinase activity and the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. Our results suggest that the Cdk2 pathway may be involved in phosphorylation of Myb2, leading to activation of the Myb2 function and up-regulation of cwp genes during encystation. The results provide insights into the use of Cdk inhibitory drugs in disruption of Giardia differentiation into cysts. PMID:22167200

  9. Regulation of a Myb transcription factor by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chao-Cheng; Su, Li-Hsin; Huang, Yu-Chang; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2012-02-03

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia parasitizes the human small intestine to cause diseases. It undergoes differentiation into infectious cysts by responding to intestinal stimulation. How the activated signal transduction pathways relate to encystation stimulation remain largely unknown. During encystation, genes encoding cyst wall proteins (CWPs) are coordinately up-regulated by a Myb2 transcription factor. Because cell differentiation is linked to cell cycle regulation, we tried to understand the role of cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), in encystation. We found that the recombinant Myb2 was phosphorylated by Cdk-associated complexes and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. We have identified a putative cdk gene (cdk2) by searching the Giardia genome database. Cdk2 was found to localize in the cytoplasm with higher expression during encystation. Interestingly, overexpression of Cdk2 resulted in a significant increase of the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. In addition, the Cdk2-associated complexes can phosphorylate Myb2 and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. Mutations of important catalytic residues of Cdk2 resulted in a significant decrease of kinase activity and ability of inducing cyst formation. Addition of a Cdk inhibitor, purvalanol A, significantly decreased the Cdk2 kinase activity and the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. Our results suggest that the Cdk2 pathway may be involved in phosphorylation of Myb2, leading to activation of the Myb2 function and up-regulation of cwp genes during encystation. The results provide insights into the use of Cdk inhibitory drugs in disruption of Giardia differentiation into cysts.

  10. Abscisic-acid-dependent basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors in plant abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aditya; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep

    2017-01-01

    One of the major causes of significant crop loss throughout the world is the myriad of environmental stresses including drought, salinity, cold, heavy metal toxicity, and ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays. Plants as sessile organisms have evolved various effective mechanism which enable them to withstand this plethora of stresses. Most of such regulatory mechanisms usually follow the abscisic-acid (ABA)-dependent pathway. In this review, we have primarily focussed on the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) activated by the ABA-mediated signalosome. Upon perception of ABA by specialized receptors, the signal is transduced via various groups of Ser/Thr kinases, which phosphorylate the bZIP TFs. Following such post-translational modification of TFs, they are activated so that they bind to specific cis-acting sequences called abscisic-acid-responsive elements (ABREs) or GC-rich coupling elements (CE), thereby influencing the expression of their target downstream genes. Several in silico techniques have been adopted so far to predict the structural features, recognize the regulatory modification sites, undergo phylogenetic analyses, and facilitate genome-wide survey of TF under multiple stresses. Current investigations on the epigenetic regulation that controls greater accessibility of the inducible regions of DNA of the target gene to the bZIP TFs exclusively under stress situations, along with the evolved stress memory responses via genomic imprinting mechanism, have been highlighted. The potentiality of overexpression of bZIP TFs, either in a homologous or in a heterologous background, in generating transgenic plants tolerant to various abiotic stressors have also been addressed by various groups. The present review will provide a coherent documentation on the functional characterization and regulation of bZIP TFs under multiple environmental stresses, with the major goal of generating multiple-stress-tolerant plant cultivars in near future.

  11. Identification and characterization of multiple conserved nuclear localization signals within adenovirus E1A

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kris S.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Greg J.; Todorovic, Biljana; King, Cason R.; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zhang, Zhiying; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-04-15

    The human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) E1A protein has a well defined canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at its C-terminus. We used a genetic assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate that the canonical NLS is present and functional in the E1A proteins of each of the six HAdV species. This assay also detects a previously described non-canonical NLS within conserved region 3 and a novel active NLS within the N-terminal/conserved region 1 portion of HAdV-5 E1A. These activities were also present in the E1A proteins of each of the other five HAdV species. These results demonstrate that, despite substantial differences in primary sequence, HAdV E1A proteins are remarkably consistent in that they contain one canonical and two non-canonical NLSs. By utilizing independent mechanisms, these multiple NLSs ensure nuclear localization of E1A in the infected cell. - Highlights: • HAdV E1A uses multiple mechanisms for nuclear import. • We identified an additional non-canonical NLS in the N-terminal/CR1 portion of E1A. • The new NLS does not contact importin-alpha directly. • All NLSs are functionally conserved in the E1A proteins of all 6 HAdV species.

  12. Snf1-independent, glucose-resistant transcription of Adr1-dependent genes in a mediator mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Young, Elton T; Yen, Kuangyu; Dombek, Kenneth M; Law, G Lynn; Chang, Ella; Arms, Erin

    2009-10-01

    Glucose represses transcription of a network of co-regulated genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ensuring that it is utilized before poorer carbon sources are metabolized. Adr1 is a glucose-regulated transcription factor whose promoter binding and activity require Snf1, the yeast homologue of the AMP-activated protein kinase in higher eukaryotes. In this study we found that a temperature-sensitive allele of MED14, a Mediator middle subunit that tethers the tail to the body, allowed a low level of Adr1-independent ADH2 expression that can be enhanced by Adr1 in a dose-dependent manner. A low level of TATA-independent ADH2 expression was observed in the med14-truncated strain and transcription of ADH2 and other Adr1-dependent genes occurred in the absence of Snf1 and chromatin remodeling coactivators. Loss of ADH2 promoter nucleosomes had occurred in the med14 strain in repressing conditions and did not require ADR1. A global analysis of transcription revealed that loss of Med14 function was associated with both up- and down- regulation of several groups of co-regulated genes, with ADR1-dependent genes being the most highly represented in the upregulated class. Expression of most genes was not significantly affected by the loss of Med14 function.

  13. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016.

  14. Binding of TFIIIC to sine elements controls the relocation of activity-dependent neuronal genes to transcription factories.

    PubMed

    Crepaldi, Luca; Policarpi, Cristina; Coatti, Alessandro; Sherlock, William T; Jongbloets, Bart C; Down, Thomas A; Riccio, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, the timely and accurate expression of genes in response to synaptic activity relies on the interplay between epigenetic modifications of histones, recruitment of regulatory proteins to chromatin and changes to nuclear structure. To identify genes and regulatory elements responsive to synaptic activation in vivo, we performed a genome-wide ChIPseq analysis of acetylated histone H3 using somatosensory cortex of mice exposed to novel enriched environmental (NEE) conditions. We discovered that Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs) located distal to promoters of activity-dependent genes became acetylated following exposure to NEE and were bound by the general transcription factor TFIIIC. Importantly, under depolarizing conditions, inducible genes relocated to transcription factories (TFs), and this event was controlled by TFIIIC. Silencing of the TFIIIC subunit Gtf3c5 in non-stimulated neurons induced uncontrolled relocation to TFs and transcription of activity-dependent genes. Remarkably, in cortical neurons, silencing of Gtf3c5 mimicked the effects of chronic depolarization, inducing a dramatic increase of both dendritic length and branching. These findings reveal a novel and essential regulatory function of both SINEs and TFIIIC in mediating gene relocation and transcription. They also suggest that TFIIIC may regulate the rearrangement of nuclear architecture, allowing the coordinated expression of activity-dependent neuronal genes.

  15. Binding of TFIIIC to SINE Elements Controls the Relocation of Activity-Dependent Neuronal Genes to Transcription Factories

    PubMed Central

    Crepaldi, Luca; Policarpi, Cristina; Coatti, Alessandro; Sherlock, William T.; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Down, Thomas A.; Riccio, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, the timely and accurate expression of genes in response to synaptic activity relies on the interplay between epigenetic modifications of histones, recruitment of regulatory proteins to chromatin and changes to nuclear structure. To identify genes and regulatory elements responsive to synaptic activation in vivo, we performed a genome-wide ChIPseq analysis of acetylated histone H3 using somatosensory cortex of mice exposed to novel enriched environmental (NEE) conditions. We discovered that Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs) located distal to promoters of activity-dependent genes became acetylated following exposure to NEE and were bound by the general transcription factor TFIIIC. Importantly, under depolarizing conditions, inducible genes relocated to transcription factories (TFs), and this event was controlled by TFIIIC. Silencing of the TFIIIC subunit Gtf3c5 in non-stimulated neurons induced uncontrolled relocation to TFs and transcription of activity-dependent genes. Remarkably, in cortical neurons, silencing of Gtf3c5 mimicked the effects of chronic depolarization, inducing a dramatic increase of both dendritic length and branching. These findings reveal a novel and essential regulatory function of both SINEs and TFIIIC in mediating gene relocation and transcription. They also suggest that TFIIIC may regulate the rearrangement of nuclear architecture, allowing the coordinated expression of activity-dependent neuronal genes. PMID:23966877

  16. Dioxin-dependent activation of murine Cyp1a-1 gene transcription requires protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, F; Owens, R A; Nebert, D W; Puga, A

    1992-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of the murine Cyp1a-1 (cytochrome P(1)450) gene by inducers such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (dioxin) requires the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor and the interaction of an inducer-receptor complex with one or more of the Ah-responsive elements (AhREs) located about 1 kb upstream from the transcriptional initiation site. We find that treatment of mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cells with 2-aminopurine, an inhibitor of protein kinase activity, inhibits CYP1A1 mRNA induction by TCDD as well as the concomitant increase in CYP1A1 enzyme activity. Formation of DNA-protein complexes between the Ah receptor and its AhRE target is also inhibited by 2-aminopurine, as determined by gel mobility shift assays. Phosphorylation is required for the formation of Ah receptor-specific complexes, since in vitro dephosphorylation of nuclear extracts from TCDD-treated Hepa-1 cells abolishes the capacity of the Ah receptor to form specific complexes with its cognate AhRE sequences. To determine whether any one of several known protein kinases was involved in the transcriptional regulation of the Cyp1a-1 gene, we treated Hepa-1 cells with nine other protein kinase inhibitors prior to induction with TCDD; nuclear extracts from these cells were analyzed for their capacity to form specific DNA-protein complexes. Only extracts from cells treated with staurosporine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, were unable to form these complexes. In addition, staurosporine completely inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA induction by TCDD. Depletion of protein kinase C by prolonged treatment with phorbol ester led to the complete suppression of CYP1A1 mRNA induction by TCDD. We conclude that (i) phosphorylation is necessary for the formation of a transcriptional complex and for transcriptional activation of the Cyp1a-1 gene; (ii) the phosphorylation site(s) exists on at least one of the proteins constituting the transcriptional complex, possibly the Ah receptor itself; and (iii) the

  17. Dynamic subnuclear relocalization of WRKY40, a potential new mechanism of ABA-dependent transcription factor regulation.

    PubMed

    Geilen, Katja; Böhmer, Maik

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone ABA plays a major role during plant development, e.g. seed maturation and seed germination, and during adaptation to abiotic stresses like stomatal aperture regulation. The three closely related WRKY transcription factors WRKY18, WRKY40 and WRKY60 function in ABA signal transduction. We recently demonstrated that WRKY18 and WRKY40 but not WRKY60 localize to nuclear bodies in A. thaliana mesophyll protoplasts. WRKY40, a negative regulator of ABA-dependent inhibition of seed germination, relocalizes from PNBs to the nucleoplasm in the presence of ABA in a dynamic and phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that subnuclear relocalization of WRKY40 might constitute a new regulatory mechanism of ABA-dependent modulation of transcription factor activity.

  18. Regulation of Estrogen-Dependent Transcription by the LIM Cofactors CLIM and RLIM in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Steven A.; Güngör, Cenap; Prenzel, Tanja; Riethdorf, Sabine; Riethdorf, Lutz; Taniguchi-Ishigaki, Naoko; Rau, Thomas; Tursun, Baris; Furlow, J. David; Sauter, Guido; Scheffner, Martin; Pantel, Klaus; Gannon, Frank; Bach, Ingolf

    2009-01-01

    Mammary oncogenesis is profoundly influenced by signaling pathways controlled by Estrogen Receptor-alpha (ERα). Although it is known that ERα exerts its oncogenic effect by stimulating the proliferation of many human breast cancers through the activation of target genes, our knowledge of the underlying transcriptional mechanisms remains limited. Our published work has shown that the in vivo activity of LIM homeodomain transcription factors (LIM-HDs) is critically regulated by Cofactors of LIM-HD proteins (CLIM) and the ubiquitin ligase RING finger LIM domain interacting protein (RLIM). Here, we identify CLIM and RLIM as novel ERα cofactors that co-localize and interact with ERα in primary human breast tumors. We show that both cofactors associate with estrogen responsive promoters and regulate the expression of endogenous ERα target genes in breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, our results indicate opposing functions of LIM cofactors for ERα and LIM-HDs: whereas CLIM enhances transcriptional activity of LIM-HDs, it inhibits transcriptional activation mediated by ERα on most target genes in vivo. In turn, the ubiquitin ligase RLIM inhibits transcriptional activity of LIM-HDs, but enhances transcriptional activation of endogenous ERα target genes. Results from a human breast cancer tissue microarray (TMA) of 1,335 patients revealed a highly significant correlation of elevated CLIM levels to ER/PR positivity and poor differentiation of tumors. Combined, these results indicate that LIM cofactors CLIM and RLIM regulate the biological activity of ERα during the development of human breast cancer. PMID:19117995

  19. An aromatic residue switch in enhancer-dependent bacterial RNA polymerase controls transcription intermediate complex activity

    PubMed Central

    Wiesler, Simone C.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.; Buck, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the open promoter complex (RPo) in which the melted DNA containing the transcription start site is located at the RNA polymerase (RNAP) catalytic centre is an obligatory step in the transcription of DNA into RNA catalyzed by RNAP. In the RPo, an extensive network of interactions is established between DNA, RNAP and the σ-factor and the formation of functional RPo occurs via a series of transcriptional intermediates (collectively ‘RPi’). A single tryptophan is ideally positioned to directly engage with the flipped out base of the non-template strand at the +1 site. Evidence suggests that this tryptophan (i) is involved in either forward translocation or DNA scrunching and (ii) in σ54-regulated promoters limits the transcription activity of at least one intermediate complex (RPi) before the formation of a fully functional RPo. Limiting RPi activity may be important in preventing the premature synthesis of abortive transcripts, suggesting its involvement in a general mechanism driving the RPi to RPo transition for transcription initiation. PMID:23609536

  20. Transcription reactivation during the first meiotic prophase in bugs is not dependent on synapsis.

    PubMed

    Viera, Alberto; Parra, María Teresa; Rufas, Julio S; Page, Jesús

    2016-02-22

    During meiosis, transcription is precisely regulated in relation to the process of chromosome synapsis. In mammals, transcription is very low until the completion of synapsis in early pachytene, and then reactivates during mid pachytene, up to the end of diplotene. Moreover, chromosomes or chromosomal regions that do not achieve synapsis undergo a specific process of inactivation called meiotic silencing of unpaired chromatin (MSUC). Sex chromosomes, which are mostly unsynapsed, present a special case of inactivation named meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Although processes that are similar to MSUC/MSCI have been described in other species like Sordaria and Caenorhabditis elegans, very few studies have been developed in insects. We present a study on the relationships between synapsis and transcription in two hemipteran species (Graphosoma italicum and Carpocoris fuscispinus) that possess holocentric chromosomes but develop different synaptic patterns. We have found that transcription, revealed by the presence of RNA polymerase II, is very low at the beginning of meiosis, but robustly increases during zygotene, long before the completion of synapsis, excepting in the sex chromosomes. In fact, we show that histone H3 methylation at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) may be present in the sex chromosomes at leptotene, thus acting as a likely epigenetic mark for this inactive state. Our results suggest that the meiotic transcription in these two species is differently regulated from that of mammals and, therefore, offer new opportunities to understand the relationship between synapsis and transcription and the mechanisms that govern MSUC/MSCI processes.

  1. mTOR-dependent activation of the transcription factor TIF-IA links rRNA synthesis to nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christine; Zhao, Jian; Yuan, Xuejun; Grummt, Ingrid

    2004-02-15

    In cycling cells, transcription of ribosomal RNA genes by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is tightly coordinated with cell growth. Here, we show that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates Pol I transcription by modulating the activity of TIF-IA, a regulatory factor that senses nutrient and growth-factor availability. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin inactivates TIF-IA and impairs transcription-initiation complex formation. Moreover, rapamycin treatment leads to translocation of TIF-IA into the cytoplasm. Rapamycin-mediated inactivation of TIF-IA is caused by hypophosphorylation of Se 44 (S44) and hyperphosphorylation of Se 199 (S199). Phosphorylation at these sites affects TIF-IA activity in opposite ways, for example, phosphorylation of S44 activates and S199 inactivates TIF-IA. The results identify a new target formTOR-signaling pathways and elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying mTOR-dependent regulation of RNA synthesis.

  2. Control of light-dependent keto carotenoid biosynthesis in Nostoc 7120 by the transcription factor NtcA.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Gerhard; Mautz, Jürgen; Breitenbach, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    In Nostoc PCC 7120, two different ketolases, CrtW and CrtO are involved in the formation of keto carotenoids from β-carotene. In contrast to other cyanobacteria, CrtW catalyzes the formation of monoketo echinenone whereas CrtO is the only enzyme for the synthesis of diketo canthaxanthin. This is the major photo protective carotenoid in this cyanobacterium. Under high-light conditions, basic canthaxanthin formation was transcriptionally up-regulated. Upon transfer to high light, the transcript levels of all investigated carotenogenic genes including those coding for phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase and both ketolases were increased. These transcription changes proceeded via binding of the transcription factor NtcA to the promoter regions of the carotenogenic genes. The binding was absolutely dependent on the presence of reductants and oxo-glutarate. Light-stimulated transcript formation was inhibited by DCMU. Therefore, photosynthetic electron transport is proposed as the sensor for high-light and a changing redox state as a signal for NtcA binding.

  3. Endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression in a nociceptive synapse requires coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic transcription and translation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Sharleen; Burrell, Brian D

    2013-03-06

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) play an important role in long-term regulation of synaptic signaling in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, the role of transcription- and translation-dependent processes in presynaptic versus postsynaptic neurons was examined during eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity in the CNS of the leech. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of non-nociceptive afferents elicits eCB-dependent long-term depression (eCB-LTD) heterosynaptically in nociceptive synapses that lasts at least 2 h. Bath application of emetine, a protein synthesis inhibitor, blocked eCB-LTD after afferent LFS or exogenous eCB application, indicating that this depression was translation dependent. Bath application of actinomycin D, an irreversible RNA synthesis inhibitor, or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole 1-β-d-ribofurandoside (DRB), a reversible RNA synthesis inhibitor, also prevented eCB-LTD. Selective injection of DRB or emetine into the presynaptic or postsynaptic neuron before LFS indicated that eCB-LTD required transcription and translation in the postsynaptic neuron but only translation in the presynaptic cell. Depression observed immediately after LFS was also blocked when these transcription- and translation-dependent processes were inhibited. It is proposed that induction of eCB-LTD in this nociceptive synapse requires the coordination of presynaptic protein synthesis and postsynaptic mRNA and protein synthesis. These findings provide significant insights into both eCB-based synaptic plasticity and understanding how activity in non-nociceptive afferents modulates nociceptive pathways.

  4. E1a is an exogenous in vivo tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Cimas, Francisco J; Callejas-Valera, Juan L; García-Olmo, Dolores C; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; Ruiz-Hidalgo, María J; Pascual-Serra, Raquel; Ortega-Muelas, Marta; Roche, Olga; Marcos, Pilar; Garcia-Gil, Elena; Fernandez-Aroca, Diego M; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Gutkind, J Silvio; Sanchez-Prieto, Ricardo

    2017-07-28

    The E1a gene from adenovirus has become a major tool in cancer research. Since the discovery of E1a, it has been proposed to be an oncogene, becoming a key element in the model of cooperation between oncogenes. However, E1a's in vivo behaviour is consistent with a tumour suppressor gene, due to the block/delay observed in different xenograft models. To clarify this interesting controversy, we have evaluated the effect of the E1a 13s isoform from adenovirus 5 in vivo. Initially, a conventional xenograft approach was performed using previously unreported HCT116 and B16-F10 cells, showing a clear anti-tumour effect regardless of the mouse's immunological background (immunosuppressed/immunocompetent). Next, we engineered a transgenic mouse model in which inducible E1a 13s expression was under the control of cytokeratin 5 to avoid side effects during embryonic development. Our results show that E1a is able to block chemical skin carcinogenesis, showing an anti-tumour effect. The present report demonstrates the in vivo anti-tumour effect of E1a, showing that the in vitro oncogenic role of E1a cannot be extrapolated in vivo, supporting its future use in gene therapy approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Definition of the transcriptional activation domains of three human HOX proteins depends on the DNA-binding context.

    PubMed

    Viganò, M A; Di Rocco, G; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F

    1998-11-01

    Hox proteins control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting as positive or negative regulators of still unidentified downstream target genes. The homeodomain and other small accessory sequences encode the DNA-protein and protein-protein interaction functions which ultimately dictate target recognition and functional specificity in vivo. The effector domains responsible for either positive or negative interactions with the cell transcriptional machinery are unknown for most Hox proteins, largely due to a lack of physiological targets on which to carry out functional analysis. We report the identification of the transcriptional activation domains of three human Hox proteins, HOXB1, HOXB3, and HOXD9, which interact in vivo with the autoregulatory and cross-regulatory enhancers of the murine Hoxb-1 and human HOXD9 genes. Activation domains have been defined both in a homologous context, i.e., within a HOX protein binding as a monomer or as a HOX-PBX heterodimer to the specific target, and in a heterologous context, after translocation to the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain. Transfection analysis indicates that activation domains can be identified in different regions of the three HOX proteins depending on the context in which they interact with the DNA target. These results suggest that Hox proteins may be multifunctional transcriptional regulators, interacting with different cofactors and/or components of the transcriptional machinery depending on the structure of their target regulatory elements.

  6. Exploitation of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Transcription Factor Dependencies by the Novel BET Inhibitor ABBV-075.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Emily J; Wilcox, Denise; Lin, Xiaoyu; Hessler, Paul; Torrent, Maricel; He, Wei; Uziel, Tamar; Albert, Daniel H; McDaniel, Keith; Kati, Warren; Shen, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Competitive inhibitors of acetyl-lysine binding to the bromodomains of the BET (bromodomain and extra terminal) family are being developed for the treatment of solid and hematologic malignancies. The function of BET family member BRD4 at enhancers/superenhancers has been shown to sustain signal-dependent or pathogenic gene expression programs. Here, the hypothesis was tested that the transcription factor drivers of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) clinical progression, including the androgen receptor (AR), are critically dependent on BRD4 and thus represent a sensitive solid tumor indication for the BET inhibitor ABBV-075. DHT-stimulated transcription of AR target genes was inhibited by ABBV-075 without significant effect on AR protein expression. Furthermore, ABBV-075 disrupted DHT-stimulated recruitment of BET family member BRD4 to gene-regulatory regions cooccupied by AR, including the well-established PSA and TMPRSS2 enhancers. Persistent BET inhibition disrupted the composition and function of AR-occupied enhancers as measured by a reduction in AR and H3K27Ac ChIP signal and inhibition of enhancer RNA transcription. ABBV-075 displayed potent antiproliferative activity in multiple models of resistance to second-generation antiandrogens and inhibited the activity of the AR splice variant AR-V7 and ligand-binding domain gain-of-function mutations, F877L and L702H. ABBV-075 was also a potent inhibitor of MYC and the TMPRSS2-ETS fusion protein, important parallel transcription factor drivers of CRPC.

  7. Signal-dependent Elk-1 target genes involved in transcript processing and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kasza, Aneta

    2013-10-01

    Elk-1 was regarded as a transcription factor engaged mainly in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Recent findings show the engagement of Elk-1 in the control of expression of genes encoding proteins involved in transcript turnover, such as MCPIP1/ZC3H12A and tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36). Thus, Elk-1 plays an important role in the control of gene expression not only through the stimulation of expression of transcription factors, but also through regulation of transcript half-live. Moreover, Elk-1 is engaged in the regulation of expression of genes encoding proteins that control proteolytic activity, such as inhibitor of plasminogen activator-1 (PAI-1) and metalloproteinases-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9). This review summarizes the biological roles of proteins with expression regulated by Elk-1, involved in transcripts turnover or in cell migration. The broad range of function of these proteins illustrates the complex role of Elk-1 in the regulation of cancer and inflammation.

  8. Regulation of the 26S proteasome by adenovirus E1A

    PubMed Central

    Turnell, Andrew S.; Grand, Roger J.A.; Gorbea, Carlos; Zhang, Xian; Wang, Wenlan; Mymryk, Joe S.; Gallimore, Phillip H.

    2000-01-01

    We have identified the N-terminus of adenovirus early region 1A (AdE1A) as a region that can regulate the 26S proteasome. Specifically, in vitro and in vivo co-precipitation studies have revealed that the 19S regulatory components of the proteasome, Sug1 (S8) and S4, bind through amino acids (aa) 4–25 of Ad5 E1A. In vivo expression of wild-type (wt) AdE1A, in contrast to the N-terminal AdE1A mutant that does not bind the proteasome, reduces ATPase activity associated with anti-S4 immunoprecipitates relative to mock-infected cells. This reduction in ATPase activity correlates positively with the ability of wt AdE1A, but not the N-terminal deletion mutant, to significantly reduce the ability of HPV16 E6 to target p53 for ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. AdE1A/proteasomal complexes are present in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, suggesting that AdE1A interferes with both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomal degradation. We have also demonstrated that wt AdE1A and the N-terminal AdE1A deletion mutant are substrates for proteasomal-mediated degradation. AdE1A degradation is not, however, mediated through ubiquitylation, but is regulated through phosphorylation of residues within a C-terminal PEST region (aa 224–238). PMID:10970867

  9. DNA methylation regulates phenotype-dependent transcriptional activity in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant K.; Baum, Mary; Carbon, John

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a common epigenetic signaling mechanism associated with silencing of repeated DNA and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes. Here we report that DNA methylation in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is primarily localized within structural genes and modulates transcriptional activity. Major repeat sequences and multigene families are largely free of DNA methylation. Among the genes subject to DNA methylation are those associated with dimorphic transition between yeast and hyphal forms, switching between white and opaque cells, and iron metabolism. Transcriptionally repressed methylated loci showed increased frequency of C-to-T transitions during asexual growth, an evolutionarily stable pattern of repression associated mutation that could bring about genetic alterations under changing environmental or host conditions. Dynamic differential DNA methylation of structural genes may be one factor contributing to morphological plasticity that is cued by nutrition and host interaction. PMID:21730141

  10. Signal-dependent dynamics of transcription factor translocation controls gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Nan; O'Shea, Erin K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Information about environmental stimuli is often transmitted using common signalling molecules, but the mechanisms that ensure signalling specificity are not entirely known. Here we show that the identities and intensities of different stresses are transmitted by modulation of the amplitude, duration or frequency of nuclear translocation of the budding yeast general stress responsive transcription factor Msn2. Through artificial control of the dynamics of Msn2 translocation, we reveal how distinct dynamical schemes differentially affect reporter gene expression. Using a simple model, we predict stress-induced reporter gene expression from single-cell translocation dynamics. We then demonstrate that the response of natural target genes to dynamical modulation of Msn2 translocation is influenced by differences in the kinetics of promoter transitions and transcription factor binding properties. Thus, multiple environmental signals can trigger qualitatively different dynamics of a single transcription factor, and influence gene expression patterns. PMID:22179789

  11. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  12. Tryptophan Codon-Dependent Transcription in Chlamydia pneumoniae during Gamma Interferon-Mediated Tryptophan Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Rueden, Kelsey J.; Rucks, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    In evolving to an obligate intracellular niche, Chlamydia has streamlined its genome by eliminating superfluous genes as it relies on the host cell for a variety of nutritional needs like amino acids. However, Chlamydia can experience amino acid starvation when the human host cell in which the bacteria reside is exposed to interferon gamma (IFN-γ), which leads to a tryptophan (Trp)-limiting environment via induction of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The stringent response is used to respond to amino acid starvation in most bacteria but is missing from Chlamydia. Thus, how Chlamydia, a Trp auxotroph, responds to Trp starvation in the absence of a stringent response is an intriguing question. We previously observed that C. pneumoniae responds to this stress by globally increasing transcription while globally decreasing translation, an unusual response. Here, we sought to understand this and hypothesized that the Trp codon content of a given gene would determine its transcription level. We quantified transcripts from C. pneumoniae genes that were either rich or poor in Trp codons and found that Trp codon-rich transcripts were increased, whereas those that lacked Trp codons were unchanged or even decreased. There were exceptions, and these involved operons or large genes with multiple Trp codons: downstream transcripts were less abundant after Trp codon-rich sequences. These data suggest that ribosome stalling on Trp codons causes a negative polar effect on downstream sequences. Finally, reassessing previous C. pneumoniae microarray data based on codon content, we found that upregulated transcripts were enriched in Trp codons, thus supporting our hypothesis. PMID:27400720

  13. Mutually exclusive binding of APPL(PH) to BAR domain and Reptin regulates β-catenin dependent transcriptional events.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Sajid; Parveen, Zahida; Ferdous, Saba; Bibi, Nousheen

    2013-12-01

    Reptin functions in a wide range of biological processes including chromatin remodelling, nucleolar organization and transcriptional regulation of WNT signalling. As β-catenin dependent transcriptional repression and activation events involve binding of Reptin and histone deacetylase 1 to APPL endocytic proteins, this complex has become an important target to identify molecules governing endocytic processes and WNT signalling. Here, we describe the structural basis of APPL binding to Reptin to explore their mode of binding in context with APPL1/APPL2 dimerization. There is an evidence that both PH and BAR domains of APPL proteins exhibit alternately conserved regions involved in hetero-dimerization process and our in-silico data also corroborate this fact. Moreover, APPL2(PH) domain binds to the BAR domain region encompassing a nuclear localization signal. We conclude that APPL(PH) binding to BAR domain and Reptin is mutually exclusive which regulates the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Reptin. Furthermore, Reptin is unable to bind with membrane-associated APPL proteins. These observations were further expanded by experimental approaches where we identified a novel point mutation D316N lying in the APPL1(PH) domain which resulted in a significantly reduced binding with Reptin. By luciferase assays, we observed that overexpression of APPL1(D316N) and APPL1(WT) stimulated β-catenin/TCF dependent transcriptional activity in a similar manner which suggested that binding of Reptin to APPL1 is not necessary for β-catenin dependent target gene expression. Overall, our data attempt to highlight a comparative role of APPL proteins in controlling β-catenin dependent transcription mechanism which may improve our understanding of gene regulation.

  14. Positive inotropism induced by androgens in isolated left atrium of rat: evidence for a cAMP-dependent transcriptional mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rubín, J M; Hidalgo, A; Bordallo, C; Cantabrana, B; Sánchez, M

    1999-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert their biological actions via intracellular receptors modulation of transcription. In addition, a number of molecular interactions, and the existence of membrane receptors in several tissues, support the hypothesis of nongenomic action of steroids. The androgens, 5alpha- and 5beta-dihydrotestosterone (0.1 to 100 microM), induce a rapid positive inotropism in the isolated left atrium of male Wistar rats whose time course of response might suggest that it is a non-genomic effect. However, the fact that the facilitation of contractility was inhibited by actinomycin D (5 microg/ml) and cycloheximide (10 microg/ml) indicates that a transcriptional component might play a role. The existence of a rapid functional genomic role would be somewhat surprising. However, rapid transcriptional mechanisms were also observed in certain cAMP-dependent responses. In the left atrium of rat, Rp-cAMPS (10 microM), a cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, antagonized 5alpha- but not 5beta-dihydrotestosterone-induced positive inotropism. The inhibition by Rp-cAMPS of isoproterenol- and forskolin-induced positive inotropism, and the fact that these cAMP-dependent effects were also inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, suggest that a cAMP-dependent transcriptional component may be partly involved in the positive inotropism induced by 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. In addition, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone might increase the basal adenylyl cyclase activity by acting on unoccupied beta-adrenoceptor-G-protein-adenylyl cyclase complexes, since the elicited inotropism was inhibited by a beta-blocker, atenolol (1 microM), a G-protein inhibitor, pertussis toxin (2 microg/ml, 3 h), and an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, dideoxy-adenosine (10 microM).

  15. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP1 regulates ΔNp63-dependent transcription through Lys63 linkages.

    PubMed

    Peschiaroli, Angelo; Scialpi, Flavia; Bernassola, Francesca; El Sherbini, El Said; Melino, Gerry

    2010-11-12

    The transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family, plays a crucial role in epithelial development and tumorigenesis through the regulation of epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Similarly to p53, p63 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications, including ubiquitylation. Here, we report that the WWP1 E3 ubiquitin ligase binds specifically to ΔNp63 isoform but it does not trigger ΔNp63 proteasome-dependent degradation. Accordingly, we found that WWP1-dependent ubiquitylation of ΔNp63 occurs through the formation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. Importantly, we found that WWP1 is able to increase ΔNp63-dependent transcription and depletion of WWP1 in human primary keratinocytes induces cell cycle arrest. All together these results indicate that WWP1 regulates ΔNp63 transcriptional activity, acting thus as a potential regulator of the proliferation and survival of epithelial-derived cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. SMARCAD1 is an ATP-dependent stimulator of nucleosomal H2A acetylation via CBP, resulting in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Doiguchi, Masamichi; Nakagawa, Takeya; Imamura, Yuko; Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Higashi, Miki; Kubota, Kazuishi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Asahara, Hiroshi; Iida, Midori; Fujii, Satoshi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Liu, Ziying; Nandu, Tulip; Kraus, W. Lee; Ueda, Hitoshi; Ito, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, and ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling activity is required for optimal transcription from chromatin. While these two activities have been well characterized, how they are coordinated remains to be determined. We discovered ATP-dependent histone H2A acetylation activity in Drosophila nuclear extracts. This activity was column purified and demonstrated to be composed of the enzymatic activities of CREB-binding protein (CBP) and SMARCAD1, which belongs to the Etl1 subfamily of the Snf2 family of helicase-related proteins. SMARCAD1 enhanced acetylation by CBP of H2A K5 and K8 in nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent fashion. Expression array analysis of S2 cells having ectopically expressed SMARCAD1 revealed up-regulated genes. Using native genome templates of these up-regulated genes, we found that SMARCAD1 activates their transcription in vitro. Knockdown analysis of SMARCAD1 and CBP indicated overlapping gene control, and ChIP-seq analysis of these commonly controlled genes showed that CBP is recruited to the promoter prior to SMARCAD1. Moreover, Drosophila genetic experiments demonstrated interaction between SMARCAD1/Etl1 and CBP/nej during development. The interplay between the remodeling activity of SMARCAD1 and histone acetylation by CBP sheds light on the function of chromatin and the genome-integrity network. PMID:26888216

  17. Context-dependent regulation of the β-catenin transcriptional complex supports diverse functions of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takamasa; Ishitani, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is activated repeatedly during an animal's lifespan, and it controls gene expression through its essential nuclear effector, β-catenin, to regulate embryogenesis, organogenesis, and adult homeostasis. Although the β-catenin transcriptional complex has the ability to induce the expression of many genes to exert its diverse roles, it chooses and transactivates a specific gene set from among its numerous target genes depending on the context. For example, the β-catenin transcriptional complex stimulates the expression of cell cycle-related genes and consequent cell proliferation in neural progenitor cells, while it promotes the expression of neural differentiation-related genes in differentiating neurons. Recent studies using animal and cell culture models have gradually improved our understanding of the molecular basis underlying such context-dependent actions of the β-catenin transcriptional complex. Here, we describe eight mechanisms that support β-catenin-mediated context-dependent gene regulation, and their spatio-temporal regulation during vertebrate development. In addition, we discuss their contribution to the diverse functions of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  18. c-Myc represses transcription in vivo by a novel mechanism dependent on the initiator element and Myc box II.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L H; Nerlov, C; Prendergast, G; MacGregor, D; Ziff, E B

    1994-01-01

    We show that c-Myc, in addition to activating transcription through E-box Myc binding sites (Ems), also represses transcription by a mechanism dependent on initiator (Inr) elements of the basal promoters of susceptible genes. Repression was first observed as a component of c-Myc biphasic regulation of the adenovirus-2 major late promoter (MLP), which contains both Inr and Ems sequences. Two differentiation-specific genes containing Inr, the C/EBP alpha and albumin genes, are repressed through their basal promoters by c-Myc, but are activated by the related B-HLH-LZ factor, USF. Repression requires both the B-HLH-LZ and Myc box II (MBII) domains. Significantly, a MBII deletion mutant which is deficient in repression, but transactivates normally, fails to cooperate with an activated ras gene to transform primary fibroblasts. Thus Myc-dependent transactivation is insufficient for Ras cooperation and the novel transcription repression function is implicated in Ras cooperation as well as the suppression of Inr-dependent genes. Images PMID:8076602

  19. Growth phase-dependent variations in transcript profiles for thioredoxin- and glutathione-dependent redox systems followed by budding and hyphal Candida albicans cultures.

    PubMed

    Michán, Carmen; Pueyo, Carmen

    2009-10-01

    We report the absolute transcription profiles of 24 genes coding for putative thioredoxin (Trx)- and glutathione (GSH)-dependent redox system components, accompanying the Candida albicans batch culture growth, under either yeast or hyphal conditions. All mRNAs investigated (plus the housekeeping ACT1) displayed significant alterations in their steady-state copy number. Collectively, these quantifications show that: (1) the most abundant mRNAs during active growth coded for putative thiol peroxidases (TSA1, PRX1, AHP11 and AHP12) and for donor thioredoxin Trx1p, i.e. those five mRNAs represented >74% of all transcript molecules quantified in a late exponential phase; (2) the transcripts under study differed between budding and hyphal cells not only in their abundance but also in their profiles throughout the growth stages; (3) mRNA amounts for four GSH-transferase putative genes (GTT12, GTT13, GTT14 and GST3) increased in the stationary phase in yeast but not under filamentous conditions. Hydrogen peroxide resistance, plus GSH, GSSG and reactive oxygen species contents, throughout yeast and hyphal growth, were also studied, and the differences observed were related to the transcript profiles.

  20. Onset and organ specificity of Tk2 deficiency depends on Tk1 down-regulation and transcriptional compensation.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Beatriz; Area, Estela; Akman, Hasan O; Hirano, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency of thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a frequent cause of isolated myopathy or encephalomyopathy in children with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. To determine the bases of disease onset, organ specificity and severity of TK2 deficiency, we have carefully characterized Tk2 H126N knockin mice (Tk2-/-). Although normal until postnatal day 8, Tk2-/- mice rapidly develop fatal encephalomyopathy between postnatal days 10 and 13. We have observed that wild-type Tk2 activity is constant in the second week of life, while Tk1 activity decreases significantly between postnatal days 8 and 13. The down-regulation of Tk1 activity unmasks Tk2 deficiency in Tk2-/- mice and correlates with the onset of mtDNA depletion in the brain and the heart. Resistance to pathology in Tk2 mutant organs depends on compensatory mechanisms to the reduced mtDNA level. Our analyses at postnatal day 13 have revealed that Tk2-/- heart significantly increases mitochondrial transcript levels relative to the mtDNA content. This transcriptional compensation allows the heart to maintain normal levels of mtDNA-encoded proteins. The up-regulation in mitochondrial transcripts is not due to increased expression of the master mitochondrial biogenesis regulators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha and nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2, or to enhanced expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors A, B1 or B2. Instead, Tk2-/- heart compensates for mtDNA depletion by down-regulating the expression of the mitochondrial transcriptional terminator transcription factor 3 (MTERF3). Understanding the molecular mechanisms that allow Tk2 mutant organs to be spared may help design therapies for Tk2 deficiency.

  1. CAR and PXR-dependent transcriptional changes in the mouse liver after exposure to propiconazole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the conazoles propiconazole and triadimefon but not myclobutanilled to tumors in mice after 2 years. Transcript profiling studies in the livers ofwild-type mice after short-term exposure to the conazoles revealed signatures indicating the involvement ofthe nuclear rec...

  2. BRF1 mutations alter RNA polymerase III–dependent transcription and cause neurodevelopmental anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Hög, Friederike; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Tan, Perciliz L.; Sowada, Nadine; Medeira, Ana; Gueneau, Lucie; Thiele, Holger; Kousi, Maria; Lepri, Francesca; Wenzeck, Larissa; Blumenthal, Ian; Radicioni, Antonio; Schwarzenberg, Tito Livio; Mandriani, Barbara; Fischetto, Rita; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J.; Altmüller, Janine; Reymond, Alexandre; Nürnberg, Peter; Merla, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Katsanis, Nicholas; Cramer, Patrick; Kubisch, Christian

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) synthesizes tRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs to regulate protein synthesis. Dysregulation of Pol III transcription has been linked to cancer, and germline mutations in genes encoding Pol III subunits or tRNA processing factors cause neurogenetic disorders in humans, such as hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and pontocerebellar hypoplasia. Here we describe an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and intellectual disability, as well as facial dysmorphic features, short stature, microcephaly, and dental anomalies. Whole-exome sequencing revealed biallelic missense alterations of BRF1 in three families. In support of the pathogenic potential of the discovered alleles, suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletion of brf1 in zebrafish embryos recapitulated key neurodevelopmental phenotypes; in vivo complementation showed all four candidate mutations to be pathogenic in an apparent isoform-specific context. BRF1 associates with BDP1 and TBP to form the transcription factor IIIB (TFIIIB), which recruits Pol III to target genes. We show that disease-causing mutations reduce Brf1 occupancy at tRNA target genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and impair cell growth. Moreover, BRF1 mutations reduce Pol III–related transcription activity in vitro. Taken together, our data show that BRF1 mutations that reduce protein activity cause neurodevelopmental anomalies, suggesting that BRF1-mediated Pol III transcription is required for normal cerebellar and cognitive development. PMID:25561519

  3. Akirin: a context-dependent link between transcription and chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Scott J; Baylies, Mary K

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic patterning relies upon an exquisitely timed program of gene regulation. While the regulation of this process via the action of transcription factor networks is well understood, new lines of study have highlighted the importance of a concurrently regulated program of chromatin remodeling during development. Chromatin remodeling refers to the manipulation of the chromatin architecture through rearrangement, repositioning, or restructuring of nucleosomes to either favor or hinder the expression of associated genes. While the role of chromatin remodeling pathways during tumor development and cancer progression are beginning to be clarified, the roles of these pathways in the course of tissue specification, morphogenesis and patterning remains relatively unknown. Further, relatively little is understood as to the mechanism whereby developmentally critical transcription factors coordinate with chromatin remodeling factors to optimize target gene loci for gene expression. Such a mechanism might involve direct transcription factor/chromatin remodeling factor interactions, or could likely be mediated via an unknown intermediary. Our group has identified the relatively unknown protein Akirin as a putative member of this latter group: a secondary cofactor that serves as an interface between a developmentally critical transcription factor and the chromatin remodeling machinery. This role for the Akirin protein suggests a novel regulatory mode for regulating gene expression during development.

  4. c-Myc-dependent transcriptional regulation of cell cycle and nucleosomal histones during oligodendrocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Laura; Gacias, Mar; Wu, Muzhou; Swiss, Victoria A; Janssen, William G; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) have the ability to divide or to arrest growth and differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes in the developing brain. Due to their high number and the persistence of their proliferative capacity in the adult brain, OPCs are being studied as potential targets for myelin repair and also as potential source of brain tumors. This study addresses the molecular mechanisms regulating the transcriptional changes occurring at the critical transition between proliferation and cell cycle exit in cultured OPCs. Using bioinformatic analysis of existing datasets, we identified c-Myc as a key transcriptional regulator of this transition and confirmed direct binding of this transcription factor to identified target genes using chromatin immunoprecipitation. The expression of c-Myc was elevated in proliferating OPCs, where it also bound to the promoter of genes involved in cell cycle regulation (i.e. Cdc2) or chromosome organization (i.e. H2afz). Silencing of c-Myc was associated with decreased histone acetylation at target gene promoters and consequent decrease of gene transcripts. c-Myc silencing induced also a global increase of repressive histone methylation and premature nuclear peripheral chromatin compaction and promoted the progression of OPCs towards differentiation. We conclude that c-Myc is an important modulator of the transition between proliferation and differentiation of OPCs, although its decrease is not sufficient to induce progression into a myelinating phenotype. PMID:24502923

  5. CAR and PXR-dependent transcriptional changes in the mouse liver after exposure to propiconazole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the conazoles propiconazole and triadimefon but not myclobutanilled to tumors in mice after 2 years. Transcript profiling studies in the livers ofwild-type mice after short-term exposure to the conazoles revealed signatures indicating the involvement ofthe nuclear rec...

  6. Heat Stress-Induced Cup9-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of SIR2

    PubMed Central

    Laskar, Shyamasree; K, Sheeba; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal K.; Nair, Achuthsankar S.; Dhar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic writer Sir2 maintains the heterochromatin state of chromosome in three chromosomal regions, namely, the silent mating type loci, telomeres, and the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). In this study, we demonstrated the mechanism by which Sir2 is regulated under heat stress. Our study reveals that a transient heat shock causes a drastic reduction in the SIR2 transcript which results in sustained failure to initiate silencing for as long as 90 generations. Hsp82 overexpression, which is the usual outcome of heat shock treatment, leads to a similar downregulation of SIR2 transcription. Using a series of genetic experiments, we have established that heat shock or Hsp82 overexpression causes upregulation of CUP9 that, in turn, represses SIR2 transcription by binding to its upstream activator sequence. We have mapped the cis regulatory element of SIR2. Our study shows that the deletion of cup9 causes reversal of the Hsp82 overexpression phenotype and upregulation of SIR2 expression in heat-induced Hsp82-overexpressing cells. On the other hand, we found that Cup9 overexpression represses SIR2 transcription and leads to a failure in the establishment of heterochromatin. The results of our study highlight the mechanism by which environmental factors amend the epigenetic configuration of chromatin. PMID:25384977

  7. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new

  8. Human corneal epithelial subpopulations: oxygen dependent ex vivo expansion and transcriptional profiling.

    PubMed

    Bath, Chris

    2013-06-01

    Corneal epithelium is being regenerated throughout life by limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) believed to be located in histologically defined stem cell niches in corneal limbus. Defective or dysfunctional LESCs result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) causing pain and decreased visual acuity. Since the first successful treatment of LSCD by transplantation of ex vivo expanded LESCs in 1997, many attempts have been carried out to optimize culture conditions to improve the outcome of surgery. To date, progress in this field of bioengineering is substantially hindered by both the lack of specific biomarkers of LESCs and the lack of a precise molecular characterization of in situ epithelial subpopulations. The aim of this dissertation was to optimize culture systems with regard to the environmental oxygen concentration for selective ex vivo expansion of LESCs and to analyse in situ subpopulations in human corneal epithelium using a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA sequencing for global transcriptomic profiling. We compared dissociation cultures, using either expansion on γ-irradiated NIH/3T3 feeder cells in serum-rich medium or expansion directly on plastic in serum-free EpiLife medium, using a range of physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations (2%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%). Using immunocytochemistry and advanced fluorescence microscopy, cells were characterized regarding growth, cell cycle distribution, colony-forming efficiency (CFE), phenotypes and cytomorphometry. Limbal epithelial cells expanded in 2% O2 exhibited slow growth, low fraction of cells in S/G2 , high CFE, high expression of stem cell markers ABCG2 and p63α, and low fraction of differentiation marker CK3 resembling a LESC phenotype. The effect of hypoxia to maintain LESCs in culture was not dependent on the system used for propagation (Bath et al. 2013a). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate cellular subpopulations in situ from the spatially defined

  9. Rift Valley fever virus NSs inhibits host transcription independently of the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase PKR.

    PubMed

    Kalveram, Birte; Lihoradova, Olga; Indran, Sabarish V; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Head, Jennifer A; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-20

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) encodes one major virulence factor, the NSs protein. NSs suppresses host general transcription, including interferon (IFN)-β mRNA synthesis, and promotes degradation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). We generated a novel RVFV mutant (rMP12-NSsR173A) specifically lacking the function to promote PKR degradation. rMP12-NSsR173A infection induces early phosphorylation of eIF2α through PKR activation, while retaining the function to inhibit host general transcription including IFN-β gene inhibition. MP-12 NSs but not R173A NSs binds to wt PKR. R173A NSs formed filamentous structure in nucleus in a mosaic pattern, which was distinct from MP-12 NSs filament pattern. Due to early phosphorylation of eIF2α, rMP12-NSsR173A could not efficiently accumulate viral proteins. Our results suggest that NSs-mediated host general transcription suppression occurs independently of PKR degradation, while the PKR degradation is important to inhibit the phosphorylation of eIF2α in infected cells undergoing host general transcription suppression.

  10. Emergence of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells involves a Chd1-dependent increase in total nascent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Fong Ming; Lizama, Carlos O.; Wong, Priscilla; Hawkins, John S.; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Lineage specification during development involves reprogramming of transcriptional states, but little is known about how this is regulated in vivo. The chromatin remodeler chomodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1 (Chd1) promotes an elevated transcriptional output in mouse embryonic stem cells. Here we report that endothelial-specific deletion of Chd1 leads to loss of definitive hematopoietic progenitors, anemia, and lethality by embryonic day (E)15.5. Mutant embryos contain normal numbers of E10.5 intraaortic hematopoietic clusters that express Runx1 and Kit, but these clusters undergo apoptosis and fail to mature into blood lineages in vivo and in vitro. Hematopoietic progenitors emerging from the aorta have an elevated transcriptional output relative to structural endothelium, and this elevation is Chd1-dependent. In contrast, hematopoietic-specific deletion of Chd1 using Vav-Cre has no apparent phenotype. Our results reveal a new paradigm of regulation of a developmental transition by elevation of global transcriptional output that is critical for hemogenesis and may play roles in other contexts. PMID:25831528

  11. Analysis of PBase Binding Profile Indicates an Insertion Target Selection Mechanism Dependent on TTAA, But Not Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Liao, Ruiqi; Zheng, Yun; Sun, Ling; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Transposons and retroviruses are important pathogenic agents and tools for mutagenesis and transgenesis. Insertion target selection is a key feature for a given transposon or retrovirus. The piggyBac (PB) transposon is highly active in mice and human cells, which has a much better genome-wide distribution compared to the retrovirus and P-element. However, the underlying reason is not clear. Utilizing a tagged functional PB transposase (PBase), we were able to conduct genome-wide profiling for PBase binding sites in the mouse genome. We have shown that PBase binding mainly depends on the distribution of the tetranucleotide TTAA, which is not affected by the presence of PB DNA. Furthermore, PBase binding is negatively influenced by the methylation of CG sites in the genome. Analysis of a large collection of PB insertions in mice has revealed an insertion profile similar to the PBase binding profile. Interestingly, this profile is not correlated with transcriptional active genes in the genome or transcriptionally active regions within a transcriptional unit. This differs from what has been previously shown for P-element and retroviruses insertions. Our study provides an explanation for PB's genome-wide insertion distribution and also suggests that PB target selection relies on a new mechanism independent of active transcription and open chromatin structure. PMID:27570481

  12. Huntingtin modulates transcription, occupies gene promoters in vivo and binds directly to DNA in a polyglutamine-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Caroline L.; Sun, Tingting; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; McFarland, Karen N.; DiRocco, Derek P.; Yohrling, George J.; Clark, Timothy W.; Bouzou, Bérengère; Cha, Jang-Ho J.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional dysregulation is a central pathogenic mechanism in Huntington’s disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder associated with polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. In this study, we show that mutant Htt alters the normal expression of specific mRNA species at least partly by disrupting the binding activities of many transcription factors which govern the expression of the dysregulated mRNA species. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrates Htt occupation of gene promoters in vivo in a polyQ-dependent manner and furthermore, ChIP-on-chip and ChIP subcloning reveal that wild-type and mutant Htt exhibit differential genomic distributions. Exon 1 Htt binds DNA directly in the absence of other proteins and alters DNA conformation. PolyQ expansion increases Htt-DNA interactions, with binding to recognition elements of transcription factors whose function is altered in HD. Taken together; these findings suggest mutant Htt modulates gene expression through abnormal interactions with genomic DNA, altering DNA conformation and transcription factor binding. PMID:18923047

  13. Bacteriophage T5 encodes a homolog of the eukaryotic transcription coactivator PC4 implicated in recombination-dependent DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Steigemann, Birthe; Schulz, Annina; Werten, Sebastiaan

    2013-11-15

    The RNA polymerase II cofactor PC4 globally regulates transcription of protein-encoding genes through interactions with unwinding DNA, the basal transcription machinery and transcription activators. Here, we report the surprising identification of PC4 homologs in all sequenced representatives of the T5 family of bacteriophages, as well as in an archaeon and seven phyla of eubacteria. We have solved the crystal structure of the full-length T5 protein at 1.9Å, revealing a striking resemblance to the characteristic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding core domain of PC4. Intriguing novel structural features include a potential regulatory region at the N-terminus and a C-terminal extension of the homodimerisation interface. The genome organisation of T5-related bacteriophages points at involvement of the PC4 homolog in recombination-dependent DNA replication, strongly suggesting that the protein corresponds to the hitherto elusive replicative ssDNA-binding protein of the T5 family. Our findings imply that PC4-like factors intervene in multiple unwinding-related processes by acting as versatile modifiers of nucleic acid conformation and raise the possibility that the eukaryotic transcription coactivator derives from ancestral DNA replication, recombination and repair factors. © 2013.

  14. Gene transcription is coordinated with, but not dependent on, cell divisions during C. elegans embryonic fate specification.

    PubMed

    Nair, Gautham; Walton, Travis; Murray, John Isaac; Raj, Arjun

    2013-08-01

    Cell differentiation and proliferation are coordinated during animal development, but the link between them remains uncharacterized. To examine this relationship, we combined single-molecule RNA imaging with time-lapse microscopy to generate high-resolution measurements of transcriptional dynamics in Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. We found that globally slowing the overall development rate of the embryo by altering temperature or by mutation resulted in cell proliferation and transcription slowing, but maintaining, their relative timings, suggesting that cell division may directly control transcription. However, using mutants with specific defects in cell cycle pathways that lead to abnormal lineages, we found that the order between cell divisions and expression onset can switch, showing that expression of developmental regulators is not strictly dependent on cell division. Delaying cell divisions resulted in only slight changes in absolute expression time, suggesting that expression and proliferation are independently entrained to a separate clock-like process. These changes in relative timing can change the number of cells expressing a gene at a given time, suggesting that timing may help determine which cells adopt particular transcriptional patterns. Our results place limits on the types of mechanisms that are used during normal development to ensure that division timing and fate specification occur at appropriate times.

  15. Ligand-dependent corepressor (LCoR) represses the transcription factor C/EBPβ during early adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongchao; Zhang, Shengjie; Shan, Shifang; Sun, Chao; Li, Yan; Wang, Hui; Yu, Shuxian; Liu, Yi; Guo, Feifan; Zhai, Qiwei; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Jiang, Jingjing; Wang, Hui; Yan, Jun; Liu, Wei; Ying, Hao

    2017-09-26

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate gene transcription by recruiting coregulators, involved in chromatin remodeling and assembly of the basal transcription machinery. The NR-associated protein ligand-dependent corepressor (LCoR) has previously been shown to suppress hepatic lipogenesis by decreasing the binding of steroid receptor coactivators to thyroid hormone receptor. However, the role of LCoR in adipogenesis has not been established. Here, we show that LCoR expression is reduced in the early stage of adipogenesis in vitro. LCoR overexpression inhibited 3T3L1 adipocyte differentiation, while LCoR knockdown promoted it. Using an unbiased affinity purification approach, we identified CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ), a key transcriptional regulator in early adipogenesis, and corepressor C-terminal-binding proteins (CtBPs) as potential components of a LCoR-containing complex in 3T3L1 adipocytes. We found that LCoR directly interacts with C/EBPβ through its C-terminal HTH domain, required for LCoR's the inhibitory effects on adipogenesis. LCoR overexpression also inhibited C/EBPβ transcriptional activity, leading to inhibition of mitotic clonal expansion and transcriptional repression of C/EBPα and peroxisome proliferator- activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2). However, LCoR overexpression did not affect the recruitment of C/EBPβ to the promoters of C/EBPα and PPARγ2 in 3T3L1 adipocytes. Of note, restoration of PPARγ2 or C/EBPα expression attenuated the inhibitory effect of LCoR on adipogenesis. Mechanistically, LCoR suppressed C/EBPβ-mediated transcription by recruiting CtBPs to the C/EBPα and PPARγ2 promoters and by modulating histone modifications. Taken together, our results indicate that LCoR negatively regulates early adipogenesis by repressing C/EBPβ transcriptional activity and add LCoR to the growing list of transcriptional corepressors of adipogenesis. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Replication-dependent and transcription-dependent mechanisms of DNA double-strand break induction by the topoisomerase 2-targeting drug etoposide.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, Margaret; Barr, Peri; Ricci, Brett; Yan, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Etoposide is a DNA topoisomerase 2-targeting drug widely used for the treatment of cancer. The cytoxicity of etoposide correlates with the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the mechanism of how it induces DSBs in cells is still poorly understood. Catalytically, etoposide inhibits the re-ligation reaction of Top2 after it nicks the two strands of DNA, trapping it in a cleavable complex consisting of two Top2 subunits covalently linked to the 5' ends of DNA (Top2cc). Top2cc is not directly recognized as a true DSB by cells because the two subunits interact strongly with each other to hold the two ends of DNA together. In this study we have investigated the cellular mechanisms that convert Top2ccs into true DSBs. Our data suggest that there are two mechanisms, one dependent on active replication and the other dependent on proteolysis and transcription. The relative contribution of each mechanism is affected by the concentration of etoposide. We also find that Top2α is the major isoform mediating the replication-dependent mechanism and both Top2α and Top2 mediate the transcription-dependent mechanism. These findings are potentially of great significance to the improvement of etoposide's efficacy in cancer therapy.

  17. Replication-Dependent and Transcription-Dependent Mechanisms of DNA Double-Strand Break Induction by the Topoisomerase 2-Targeting Drug Etoposide

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, Margaret; Barr, Peri; Ricci, Brett; Yan, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Etoposide is a DNA topoisomerase 2-targeting drug widely used for the treatment of cancer. The cytoxicity of etoposide correlates with the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the mechanism of how it induces DSBs in cells is still poorly understood. Catalytically, etoposide inhibits the re-ligation reaction of Top2 after it nicks the two strands of DNA, trapping it in a cleavable complex consisting of two Top2 subunits covalently linked to the 5’ ends of DNA (Top2cc). Top2cc is not directly recognized as a true DSB by cells because the two subunits interact strongly with each other to hold the two ends of DNA together. In this study we have investigated the cellular mechanisms that convert Top2ccs into true DSBs. Our data suggest that there are two mechanisms, one dependent on active replication and the other dependent on proteolysis and transcription. The relative contribution of each mechanism is affected by the concentration of etoposide. We also find that Top2α is the major isoform mediating the replication-dependent mechanism and both Top2α and Top2 mediate the transcription-dependent mechanism. These findings are potentially of great significance to the improvement of etoposide’s efficacy in cancer therapy. PMID:24244448

  18. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  19. Blue and Red Light Modulates SigB-Dependent Gene Transcription, Swimming Motility and Invasiveness in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Ondrusch, Nicolai; Kreft, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Background In a number of gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria, the general stress response is regulated by the alternative sigma factor B (SigB). Common stressors which lead to the activation of SigB and the SigB-dependent regulon are high osmolarity, acid and several more. Recently is has been shown that also blue and red light activates SigB in Bacillus subtilis. Methodology/Principal Findings By qRT-PCR we analyzed the transcriptional response of the pathogen L. monocytogenes to blue and red light in wild type bacteria and in isogenic deletion mutants for the putative blue-light receptor Lmo0799 and the stress sigma factor SigB. It was found that both blue (455 nm) and red (625 nm) light induced the transcription of sigB and SigB-dependent genes, this induction was completely abolished in the SigB mutant. The blue-light effect was largely dependent on Lmo0799, proving that this protein is a genuine blue-light receptor. The deletion of lmo0799 enhanced the red-light effect, the underlying mechanism as well as that of SigB activation by red light remains unknown. Blue light led to an increased transcription of the internalin A/B genes and of bacterial invasiveness for Caco-2 enterocytes. Exposure to blue light also strongly inhibited swimming motility of the bacteria in a Lmo0799- and SigB-dependent manner, red light had no effect there. Conclusions/Significance Our data established that visible, in particular blue light is an important environmental signal with an impact on gene expression and physiology of the non-phototrophic bacterium L. monocytogenes. In natural environments these effects will result in sometimes random but potentially also cyclic fluctuations of gene activity, depending on the light conditions prevailing in the respective habitat. PMID:21264304

  20. Interneuron Transcriptional Dysregulation Causes Frequency-Dependent Alterations in the Balance of Inhibition and Excitation in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Aundrea F.; Lucas, Elizabeth K.; Brady, Lillian J.; Li, Qin; Hablitz, John J.; Cowell, Rita M.

    2015-01-01

    Circuit dysfunction in complex brain disorders such as schizophrenia and autism is caused by imbalances between inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission (I/E). Short-term plasticity differentially alters responses from excitatory and inhibitory synapses, causing the I/E ratio to change as a function of frequency. However, little is known about I/E ratio dynamics in complex brain disorders. Transcriptional dysregulation in interneurons, particularly parvalbumin interneurons, is a consistent pathophysiological feature of schizophrenia. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator that in hippocampus is highly concentrated in inhibitory interneurons and regulates parvalbumin transcription. Here, we used PGC-1α−/− mice to investigate effects of interneuron transcriptional dysregulation on the dynamics of the I/E ratio at the synaptic and circuit level in hippocampus. We find that loss of PGC-1α increases the I/E ratio onto CA1 pyramidal cells in response to Schaffer collateral stimulation in slices from young adult mice. The underlying mechanism is enhanced basal inhibition, including increased inhibition from parvalbumin interneurons. This decreases the spread of activation in CA1 and dramatically limits pyramidal cell spiking, reducing hippocampal output. The I/E ratio and CA1 output are partially restored by paired-pulse stimulation at short intervals, indicating frequency-dependent effects. However, circuit dysfunction persists, indicated by alterations in kainate-induced gamma oscillations and impaired nest building. Together, these results show that transcriptional dysregulation in hippocampal interneurons causes frequency-dependent alterations in I/E ratio and circuit function, suggesting that PGC-1α deficiency in psychiatric and neurological disorders contributes to disease by causing functionally relevant alterations in I/E balance. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Alteration in the inhibitory and

  1. Cartography of hematopoietic stem cell commitment dependent upon a reporter for transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Koichi

    2007-06-01

    A hierarchical hematopoietic developmental tree has been proposed based on the result of prospective purification of lineage-restricted progenitors. For more detailed mapping for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) commitment, we tracked the expression of PU.1, a major granulocyte/monocyte (GM)- and lymphoid-related transcription factor, from the HSC to the myelolymphoid progenitor stages by using a mouse line harboring a knockin reporter for PU.1. This approach enabled us to find a new progenitor population committed to GM and lymphoid lineages within the HSC fraction. This result suggests that there should be another developmental pathway independent of the conventional one with myeloid versus lymphoid bifurcation, represented by common myeloid progenitors and common lymphoid progenitors, respectively. The utilization of the transcription factor expression as a functional marker might be useful to obtain cartography of the hematopoietic development at a higher resolution.

  2. Collier/OLF/EBF-dependent transcriptional dynamics control pharyngeal muscle specification from primed cardiopharyngeal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Razy-Krajka, Florian; Lam, Karen; Wang, Wei; Stolfi, Alberto; Joly, Marine; Bonneau, Richard; Christiaen, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In vertebrates, pluripotent pharyngeal mesoderm progenitors produce the cardiac precursors of the second heart field as well as the branchiomeric head muscles and associated stem cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the transition from multipotent progenitors to distinct muscle precursors remain obscured by the complexity of vertebrate embryos. Using Ciona intestinalis as a simple chordate model, we show that bipotent cardiopharyngeal progenitors are primed to activate both heart and pharyngeal muscle transcriptional programs, which progressively become restricted to corresponding precursors. The transcription factor COE (Collier/OLF/EBF) orchestrates the transition to pharyngeal muscle fate both by promoting an MRF-associated myogenic program in myoblasts and by maintaining an undifferentiated state in their sister cells through Notch-mediated lateral inhibition. The latter are stem cell-like muscle precursors that form most of the juvenile pharyngeal muscles. We discuss the implications of our findings for the development and evolution of the chordate cardiopharyngeal mesoderm. PMID:24794633

  3. Conformational changes accompany activation of reovirus RNA-dependent RNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Israel I.; Weiner, Scott G.; She, Yi-Min; Yeager, Mark; Coombs, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Many critical biologic processes involve dynamic interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. Such dynamic processes are often difficult to delineate by conventional static methods. For example, while a variety of nucleic acid polymerase structures have been determined at atomic resolution, the details of how some multi-protein transcriptase complexes actively produce mRNA, as well as conformational changes associated with activation of such complexes, remain poorly understood. The mammalian reovirus innermost capsid (core) manifests all enzymatic activities necessary to produce mRNA from each of the 10 encased double-stranded RNA genes. We used rapid freezing and electron cryo-microscopy to trap and visualize transcriptionally active reovirus core particles and compared them to inactive core images. Rod-like density centered within actively transcribing core spike channels was attributed to exiting nascent mRNA. Comparative radial density plots of active and inactive core particles identified several structural changes in both internal and external regions of the icosahedral core capsid. Inactive and transcriptionally active cores were partially digested with trypsin and identities of initial tryptic peptides determined by mass spectrometry. Differentially-digested peptides, which also suggest transcription-associated conformational changes, were placed within the known 3-dimensional structures of major core proteins. PMID:18321727

  4. SRRM4-dependent neuron-specific alternative splicing of protrudin transcripts regulates neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Takafumi; Shirane, Michiko; Nakayama, Keiichi I.

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing gives rise to diversity of the proteome, and it is especially prevalent in the mammalian nervous system. Indeed, many factors that control the splicing process govern nervous system development. Among such factors, SRRM4 is an important regulator of aspects of neural differentiation including neurite outgrowth. The mechanism by which SRRM4 regulates neurite outgrowth has remained poorly understood, however. We now show that SRRM4 regulates the splicing of protrudin gene (Zfyve27) transcripts in neuronal cells. SRRM4 was found to promote splicing of protrudin pre-mRNA so as to include a microexon (exon L) encoding seven amino acids in a neuron-specific manner. The resulting protein (protrudin-L) promotes neurite outgrowth during neurogenesis. Depletion of SRRM4 in Neuro2A cells impaired inclusion of exon L in protrudin mRNA, resulting in the generation of a shorter protein isoform (protrudin-S) that is less effective at promoting neurite extension. SRRM4 was found to recognize a UGC motif that is located immediately upstream of exon L and is necessary for inclusion of exon L in the mature transcript. Deletion of exon L in Neuro2A or embryonic stem cells inhibited neurite outgrowth. Our results suggest that SRRM4 controls neurite outgrowth through regulation of alternative splicing of protrudin transcripts. PMID:28106138

  5. FSH-Receptor Isoforms and FSH-dependent Gene Transcription in Human Monocytes and Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina; Wang, Yujuan; Sharrow, Allison C; Landau, Michael S; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B; Li, Sun; Zaidi, Mone; Blair, Harry C

    2010-01-01

    Cells of the monocyte series respond to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) by poorly characterized mechanisms. We studied FSH-receptors (FSH-R) and FSH response in nontransformed human monocytes and in osteoclasts differentiated from these cells. Western blot and PCR confirmed FSH-R expression on monocytes or osteoclasts, although at low levels relative to ovarian controls. Monocyte and osteoclast FSH-Rs differed from FSH-R from ovarian cells, reflecting variable splicing in exons 8–10. Monocytes produced no cAMP, the major signal in ovarian cells, in response to FSH. However, monocytes or osteoclasts transcribed TNFα in response to the FSH. No relation of expression of osteoclast FSH-R to the sex of cell donors or to exposure to sex hormones was apparent. Controls for FSH purity and endotoxin contamination were negative. Unamplified cRNA screening in adherent CD14 cells after 2 hours in 25 ng/ml FSH showed increased transcription of RANKL signalling proteins. Transcription of key proteins that stimulate bone turnover, TNFα and TSG-6, increased 2–3 fold after FSH treatment. Smaller but significant changes occurred in transcripts of selected signalling, adhesion, and cytoskeletal proteins. We conclude that monocyte and osteoclast FSH response diverges from that of ovarian cells, reflecting, at least in part, varying FSH-R isoforms. PMID:20171950

  6. Knockout of the transcription factor Nrf2 disrupts spermatogenesis in an age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Brooke N.; Lawson, Gregory; Chan, Jefferson Y.; Banuelos, Jésus; Cortés, Mabel M.; Hoang, Yvonne D.; Ortiz, Laura; Rau, Bogdan A.; Luderer, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs when generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms antioxidant defenses. Oxidative stress has been associated with male infertility. The transcription factor Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) regulates basal and inducible transcription of genes encoding enzymes important for protection against ROS. We hypothesized that deletion of the Nrf2 gene causes testicular and epididymal oxidative stress, which disrupts spermatogenesis. Our results show that male Nrf2−/− mice have decreased fertility compared to wild type and heterozygous littermates, due to accumulating seminiferous tubule damage with increasing age. Testicular sperm head counts, epididymal sperm counts, and epididymal sperm motility in 2 month old Nrf2−/− males did not differ from wild type littermates; however, by age 6 months, Nrf2−/− males had 44% lower testicular sperm head counts, 65% lower epididymal sperm counts, and 66% lower epididymal sperm motility than wild type males. Two to 4 month old Nrf2−/− males had elevated levels of testicular and epididymal lipid peroxidation and testicular germ cell apoptosis, and decreased levels of antioxidants compared to wild type males. These results provide evidence that oxidative stress has deleterious effects on the testis and epididymis and demonstrate a critical role for the transcription factor NRF2 in preventing oxidative disruption of spermatogenesis. PMID:20692336

  7. Thyroid hormone-dependent transcriptional repression of neural cell adhesion molecule during brain maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, T; Caubín, J; Stunnenberg, H G; Zaballos, A; Bernal, J; Muñoz, A

    1996-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) is a main regulator of brain development acting as a transcriptional modulator. However, only a few T3-regulated brain genes are known. Using an improved whole genome PCR approach, we have isolated seven clones encoding sequences expressed in neonatal rat brain which are under the transcriptional control of T3. Six of them, including the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM, alpha-tubulin and four other unidentified sequences (RBA3, RBA4, RBB3 and RBB5) were found to be upregulated in the hypothyroid brain, whereas another (RBE7) was downregulated. Binding sites for the T3 receptor (T3R/c-erbA) were identified in the isolated clones by gel-shift and footprinting assays. Sites in the NCAM (in an intron), alpha-tubulin (in an exon) and RBA4 clones mediated transcriptional regulation by T3 when inserted upstream of a reporter construct. However, no effect of the NCAM clone was found when located downstream of another reporter gene. Northern blotting and in situ hybridization studies showed a higher expression of NCAM in the brain of postnatal hypothyroid rats. Since NCAM is an important morphoregulatory molecule, abnormal NCAM expression is likely to contribute to the alterations present in the brain of thyroid-deficient humans and experimental animals. Images PMID:8861959

  8. E2F-7 couples DNA damage-dependent transcription with the DNA repair process.

    PubMed

    Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Coutts, Amanda S; Helleday, Thomas; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2013-09-15

    The cellular response to DNA damage, mediated by the DNA repair process, is essential in maintaining the integrity and stability of the genome. E2F-7 is an atypical member of the E2F family with a role in negatively regulating transcription and cell cycle progression under DNA damage. Surprisingly, we found that E2F-7 makes a transcription-independent contribution to the DNA repair process, which involves E2F-7 locating to and binding damaged DNA. Further, E2F-7 recruits CtBP and HDAC to the damaged DNA, altering the local chromatin environment of the DNA lesion. Importantly, the E2F-7 gene is a target for somatic mutation in human cancer and tumor-derived mutant alleles encode proteins with compromised transcription and DNA repair properties. Our results establish that E2F-7 participates in 2 closely linked processes, allowing it to directly couple the expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response with the DNA repair machinery, which has relevance in human malignancy.

  9. cAMP/PKA signaling balances respiratory activity with mitochondria dependent apoptosis via transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Leadsham, Jane E; Gourlay, Campbell W

    2010-11-25

    Appropriate control of mitochondrial function, morphology and biogenesis are crucial determinants of the general health of eukaryotic cells. It is therefore imperative that we understand the mechanisms that co-ordinate mitochondrial function with environmental signaling systems. The regulation of yeast mitochondrial function in response to nutritional change can be modulated by PKA activity. Unregulated PKA activity can lead to the production of mitochondria that are prone to the production of ROS, and an apoptotic form of cell death. We present evidence that mitochondria are sensitive to the level of cAMP/PKA signaling and can respond by modulating levels of respiratory activity or committing to self execution. The inappropriate activation of one of the yeast PKA catalytic subunits, Tpk3p, is sufficient to commit cells to an apoptotic death through transcriptional changes that promote the production of dysfunctional, ROS producing mitochondria. Our data implies that cAMP/PKA regulation of mitochondrial function that promotes apoptosis engages the function of multiple transcription factors, including HAP4, SOK2 and SCO1. We propose that in yeast, as is the case in mammalian cells, mitochondrial function and biogenesis are controlled in response to environmental change by the concerted regulation of multiple transcription factors. The visualization of cAMP/TPK3 induced cell death within yeast colonies supports a model that PKA regulation plays a physiological role in coordinating respiratory function and cell death with nutritional status in budding yeast.

  10. Binding site specificity and factor redundancy in activator protein-1-driven human papillomavirus chromatin-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Ming; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2011-11-25

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) regulates diverse gene responses triggered by environmental cues and virus-induced cellular stress. Although many signaling events leading to AP-1 activation have been described, the fundamental features underlying binding site selection and factor recruitment of dimeric AP-1 complexes to their target genes remain mostly uncharacterized. Using recombinant full-length human AP-1 dimers formed between c-Jun and Fos family members (c-Fos, FosB, Fra-1, Fra-2) for DNA binding and transcriptional analysis, we found that each of these AP-1 complex exhibits differential activity for distinct non-consensus AP-1 sites present in human papillomavirus (HPV), and each AP-1 complex is capable of activating transcription from in vitro-reconstituted HPV chromatin in a p300- and acetyl-CoA-dependent manner. Transcription from HPV chromatin requires AP-1-dependent and contact-driven recruitment of p300. Acetylation of dimeric AP-1 complexes by p300 enhances AP-1 binding to DNA. Using a human C-33A cervical cancer-derived cell line harboring the episomal HPV type 11 genome, we illustrate binding site selectivity recognized by c-Jun, JunB, JunD, and various Fos family members in a combinatorial and unique pattern, highlighting the diversity and importance of non-canonical binding site recognition by various AP-1 family proteins.

  11. FisR activates σ(54) -dependent transcription of sulfide-oxidizing genes in Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanjie; Li, Juan; Lü, Chuanjuan; Xia, Yongzhen; Xin, Yufeng; Liu, Honglei; Xun, Luying; Liu, Huaiwei

    2017-08-01

    Some heterotrophic bacteria are able to oxidize sulfide (H2 S, HS(-) and S(2-) ) to sulfite and thiosulfate via polysulfide. The genes coding for the oxidation enzymes in Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 have recently been identified; however, their regulation is unknown. A regulator gene is adjacent to the operon of the sulfide-oxidizing genes, encoding a σ(54) -dependent transcription factor (FisR) with three domains: an R domain, an AAA+ domain and a DNA-binding domain. Here it is reported that the regulator responds to the presence of sulfide and activates the sulfide-oxidizing genes. FisR binds to its cognate operator at -114 to -135 bp of the transcription start of the operon. When polysulfide reacts with the R domain of FisR through the three conserved cysteine residues (C53, C64 and C71), FisR activates the expression of the operon. FisR is highly sensitive to polysulfide, activating σ(54) -dependent transcription of sulfide-oxidizing genes for sulfide removal. Further, sequence analysis indicates that FisR-type regulators are relatively common for controlling sulfide-oxidizing genes under sulfide stress in the Proteobacteria. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Transcription Termination Signals in the Nin Region of Bacteriophage Lambda: Identification of Rho-Dependent Termination Regions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, SWC.; Court, D. L.; Friedman, D. I.

    1995-01-01

    The ~3-kb nin region of bacteriophage λ, located between genes P and Q contains transcription termination signals as well as 10 open reading frames. Deletions in the nin region frees phage growth from dependence on the λ-encoded N-transcription antitermination system, conferring a Nin phenotype (N-independence). A subregion of nin, roc, is defined by a 1.9-kb deletion (δroc) which partially frees λ growth from the requirement for N antitermination. The roc region has strong transcription termination activity as assayed by a plasmid-based terminator testing system. We report the following features of the roc region: the biologically significant terminators in the roc region are Rho dependent, deletion analysis located the biologically significant termination signals to a 1.2 kb-segment of roc, and analysis of other deletions and point mutations in the roc region suggested at least two biologically significant regions of termination, tR3 (extending from bp 42020 to 42231) and tR4 (extending from bp 42630 to 42825). PMID:7672588

  13. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of the forkhead transcription factor FOXK2 by CDK·cyclin complexes.

    PubMed

    Marais, Anett; Ji, Zongling; Child, Emma S; Krause, Eberhard; Mann, David J; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2010-11-12

    Several mammalian forkhead transcription factors have been shown to impact on cell cycle regulation and are themselves linked to cell cycle control systems. Here we have investigated the little studied mammalian forkhead transcription factor FOXK2 and demonstrate that it is subject to control by cell cycle-regulated protein kinases. FOXK2 exhibits a periodic rise in its phosphorylation levels during the cell cycle, with hyperphosphorylation occurring in mitotic cells. Hyperphosphorylation occurs in a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)·cyclin-dependent manner with CDK1·cyclin B as the major kinase complex, although CDK2 and cyclin A also appear to be important. We have mapped two CDK phosphorylation sites, serines 368 and 423, which play a role in defining FOXK2 function through regulating its stability and its activity as a transcriptional repressor protein. These two CDK sites appear vital for FOXK2 function because expression of a mutant lacking these sites cannot be tolerated and causes apoptosis.

  14. The C-terminal region of E1A: a molecular tool for cellular cartography.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Ahmed F; Fonseca, Gregory J; Cohen, Michael J; Mymryk, Joe S

    2012-04-01

    The adenovirus E1A proteins function via protein-protein interactions. By making many connections with the cellular protein network, individual modules of this virally encoded hub reprogram numerous aspects of cell function and behavior. Although many of these interactions have been thoroughly studied, those mediated by the C-terminal region of E1A are less well understood. This review focuses on how this region of E1A affects cell cycle progression, apoptosis, senescence, transformation, and conversion of cells to an epithelial state through interactions with CTBP1/2, DYRK1A/B, FOXK1/2, and importin-α. Furthermore, novel potential pathways that the C-terminus of E1A influences through these connections with the cellular interaction network are discussed.

  15. Cdk2-dependent phosphorylation of Id2 modulates activity of E2A-related transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, E; Hall, M; Peters, G

    1997-01-01

    The helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein Id2 is thought to affect the balance between cell growth and differentiation by negatively regulating the function of basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. Id2 acts by forming heterodimers that are unable to bind to specific (E-box) DNA sequences. Here we show that this activity can be overcome by phosphorylation of a serine residue within a consensus target site for cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). In vitro, Id2 can be phosphorylated by either cyclin E-Cdk2 or cyclin A-Cdk2 but not by cyclin D-dependent kinases. Analogous phosphorylation occurs in serum-stimulated human diploid fibroblasts at a time in late G1 consistent with the appearance of active cyclin E-Cdk2. The phosphorylation of Id2 in these cells correlates with the restoration of a distinct E-box-dependent DNA-binding complex, suggesting that the levels of this complex are modulated by both the abundance and phosphorylation status of Id2. These data provide a link between cyclin-dependent kinases and bHLH transcription factors that may be critical for the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:9029153

  16. Structural Analysis and Insights into the Oligomeric State of an Arginine-Dependent Transcriptional Regulator from Bacillus halodurans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Woo; Kang, Jina; Yeo, Hyun Ku; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The arginine repressor (ArgR) is an arginine-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the arginine biosynthesis and catabolic pathways. ArgR is a functional homolog of the arginine-dependent repressor/activator AhrC from Bacillus subtilis, and belongs to the ArgR/AhrC family of transcriptional regulators. In this research, we determined the structure of the ArgR (Bh2777) from Bacillus halodurans at 2.41 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The ArgR from B. halodurans appeared to be a trimer in a size exclusion column and in the crystal structure. However, it formed a hexamer in the presence of L-arginine in multi-angle light scattering (MALS) studies, indicating the oligomerization state was dependent on the presence of L-arginine. The trimeric structure showed that the C-terminal domains form the core, which was made by inter-subunit interactions mainly through hydrophobic contacts, while the N-terminal domains containing a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif were arranged around the periphery. The arrangement of trimeric structure in the B. halodurans ArgR was different from those of other ArgR homologs previously reported. We finally showed that the B. halodurans ArgR has an arginine-dependent DNA binding property by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. PMID:27171430

  17. A systematic analysis of factors localized to damaged chromatin reveals PARP-dependent recruitment of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Izhar, Lior; Adamson, Britt; Ciccia, Alberto; Lewis, Jedd; Pontano-Vaites, Laura; Leng, Yumei; Liang, Anthony C.; Westbrook, Thomas F.; Harper, J. Wade; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Localization to sites of DNA damage is a hallmark of DNA damage response (DDR) proteins. To identify new DDR factors, we screened epitope-tagged proteins for localization to sites of chromatin damaged by UV laser microirradiation and found >120 proteins that localize to damaged chromatin. These include the BAF tumor suppressor complex and the ALS candidate protein TAF15. TAF15 contains multiple domains that bind damaged chromatin in a PARP-dependent manner, suggesting a possible role as glue that tethers multiple PAR chains together. Many positives were transcription factors and >70% of randomly tested transcription factors localized to sites of DNA damage and approximately 90% were PARP-dependent for localization. Mutational analyses showed that localization to damaged chromatin is DNA-binding domain-dependent. By examining Hoechst staining patterns at damage sites, we see evidence of chromatin decompaction that is PARP-dependent. We propose that PARP-regulated chromatin remodeling at sites of damage allows transient accessibility of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:26004182

  18. Genome-wide analysis of growth phase-dependent translational and transcriptional regulation in halophilic archaea

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background Differential expression of genes can be regulated on many different levels. Most global studies of gene regulation concentrate on transcript level regulation, and very few global analyses of differential translational efficiencies exist. The studies have revealed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and human cell lines translational regulation plays a significant role. Additional species have not been investigated yet. Particularly, until now no global study of translational control with any prokaryotic species was available. Results A global analysis of translational control was performed with two haloarchaeal model species, Halobacterium salinarum and Haloferax volcanii. To identify differentially regulated genes, exponentially growing and stationary phase cells were compared. More than 20% of H. salinarum transcripts are translated with non-average efficiencies. By far the largest group is comprised of genes that are translated with above-average efficiency specifically in exponential phase, including genes for many ribosomal proteins, RNA polymerase subunits, enzymes, and chemotaxis proteins. Translation of 1% of all genes is specifically repressed in either of the two growth phases. For comparison, DNA microarrays were also used to identify differential transcriptional regulation in H. salinarum, and 17% of all genes were found to have non-average transcript levels in exponential versus stationary phase. In H. volcanii, 12% of all genes are translated with non-average efficiencies. The overlap with H. salinarum is negligible. In contrast to H. salinarum, 4.6% of genes have non-average translational efficiency in both growth phases, and thus they might be regulated by other stimuli than growth phase. Conclusion For the first time in any prokaryotic species it was shown that a significant fraction of genes is under differential translational control. Groups of genes with different regulatory patterns were discovered. However

  19. Gamma-Secretase-Dependent and -Independent Effects of Presenilin1 on β-Catenin·Tcf-4 Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Casagolda, David; del Valle, Beatriz; Baulida, Josep; de Herreros, Antonio García; Duñach, Mireia

    2008-01-01

    Presenilin1 (PS1) is a component of the γ-secretase complex mutated in cases of Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). PS1 is synthesized as a 50 kDa peptide subsequently processed to two 29 and 20 kDa subunits that remain associated. Processing of PS1 is inhibited by several mutations detected in FAD patients. PS1 acts as negative modulator of β-catenin·Tcf-4 transcriptional activity. In this article we show that in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) the mechanisms of action of the processed and non-processed forms of PS1 on β-catenin·Tcf-4 transcription are different. Whereas non-processed PS1 inhibits β-catenin·Tcf-4 activity through a mechanism independent of γ-secretase and associated with the interaction of this protein with plakoglobin and Tcf-4, the effect of processed PS1 is prevented by γ-secretase inhibitors, and requires its interaction with E- or N-cadherin and the generation of cytosolic terminal fragments of these two cadherins, which in turn destabilize the β-catenin transcriptional cofactor CBP. Accordingly, the two forms of PS1 interact differently with E-cadherin or β-catenin and plakoglobin: whereas processed PS1 binds E-cadherin with high affinity and β-catenin or plakoglobin weakly, the non-processed form behaves inversely. Moreover, contrarily to processed PS1, that decreases the levels of c-fos RNA, non-processed PS1 inhibits the expression c-myc, a known target of β-catenin·Tcf-4, and does not block the activity of other transcriptional factors requiring CBP. These results indicate that prevention of PS1 processing in FAD affects the mechanism of repression of the transcriptional activity dependent on β-catenin. PMID:19114997

  20. EWS-FLI1 inhibits TNF{alpha}-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent transcription in Ewing sarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagirand-Cantaloube, Julie; Laud, Karine; Lilienbaum, Alain; Tirode, Franck; Delattre, Olivier; Auclair, Christian; Kryszke, Marie-Helene

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} EWS-FLI1 interferes with TNF-induced activation of NF{kappa}B in Ewing sarcoma cells. {yields} EWS-FLI1 knockdown in Ewing sarcoma cells increases TNF-induced NF{kappa}B binding to DNA. {yields} EWS-FLI1 reduces TNF-stimulated NF{kappa}B-dependent transcriptional activation. {yields} Constitutive NF{kappa}B activity is not affected by EWS-FLI1. {yields} EWS-FLI1 physically interacts with NF{kappa}B p65 in vivo. -- Abstract: Ewing sarcoma is primarily caused by a t(11;22) chromosomal translocation encoding the EWS-FLI1 fusion protein. To exert its oncogenic function, EWS-FLI1 acts as an aberrant transcription factor, broadly altering the gene expression profile of tumor cells. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF{kappa}B) is a tightly regulated transcription factor controlling cell survival, proliferation and differentiation, as well as tumorigenesis. NF{kappa}B activity is very low in unstimulated Ewing sarcoma cells, but can be induced in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We wondered whether NF{kappa}B activity could be modulated by EWS-FLI1 in Ewing sarcoma. Using a knockdown approach in Ewing sarcoma cells, we demonstrated that EWS-FLI1 has no influence on NF{kappa}B basal activity, but impairs TNF-induced NF{kappa}B-driven transcription, at least in part through inhibition of NF{kappa}B binding to DNA. We detected an in vivo physical interaction between the fusion protein and NF{kappa}B p65, which could mediate these effects. Our findings suggest that, besides directly controlling the activity of its primary target promoters, EWS-FLI1 can also indirectly influence gene expression in tumor cells by modulating the activity of key transcription factors such as NF{kappa}B.

  1. A Druggable TCF4- and BRD4-Dependent Transcriptional Network Sustains Malignancy in Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Ceribelli, Michele; Hou, Zhiying Esther; Kelly, Priscilla N; Huang, Da Wei; Wright, George; Ganapathi, Karthik; Evbuomwan, Moses O; Pittaluga, Stefania; Shaffer, Arthur L; Marcucci, Guido; Forman, Stephen J; Xiao, Wenming; Guha, Rajarshi; Zhang, Xiaohu; Ferrer, Marc; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Jaffe, Elaine S; Thomas, Craig J; Reizis, Boris; Staudt, Louis M

    2016-11-14

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is an aggressive and largely incurable hematologic malignancy originating from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Using RNAi screening, we identified the E-box transcription factor TCF4 as a master regulator of the BPDCN oncogenic program. TCF4 served as a faithful diagnostic marker of BPDCN, and its downregulation caused the loss of the BPDCN-specific gene expression program and apoptosis. High-throughput drug screening revealed that bromodomain and extra-terminal domain inhibitors (BETis) induced BPDCN apoptosis, which was attributable to disruption of a BPDCN-specific transcriptional network controlled by TCF4-dependent super-enhancers. BETis retarded the growth of BPDCN xenografts, supporting their clinical evaluation in this recalcitrant malignancy.

  2. Two mechanisms for putrescine-dependent transcriptional expression of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Sik; Shin, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2014-09-01

    In this study, on evaluating the physiological function and mechanism of putrescine, we found that putrescine supplementation (1 mM) increases transcription of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG. Putrescine-dependent expression was confirmed by measuring β-galactosidase activity and with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To understand the role of putrescine in ygjG expression, we genetically characterized and found that a knockout mutation in an alternative sigma factor, rpoS, abolished putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression. In the rpoS mutant, RpoS overexpression complemented the mutant phenotype. However, RpoS overexpression induced ygjG-lacZ expression with putrescine supplementation but not without supplementation. We also found that the loss of putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression induced by rpoS was completely restored under nitrogen-starvation conditions. The putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ under this condition was clearly dependent on another alternative sigma factor, rpoN, and its cognate activator ntrC. These results show that rpoS is required for putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression, but the effect of putrescine on this expression is not caused by simple modulation of RpoS synthesis. Putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ was controlled by at least two sigma factors: rpoS under excess nitrogen conditions and rpoN under nitrogen-starvation conditions. These results suggest that putrescine plays an important role in the nitrogen regulation system.

  3. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-02-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies.

  4. HDAC dependent transcriptional repression of Bmp-7 potentiates TGF-β mediated renal fibrosis in obstructive uropathy.

    PubMed

    Manson, Scott R; Song, Joseph B; Hruska, Keith A; Austin, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant BMP-7 inhibits the pathogenesis of renal injury in response to various stimuli. However, little is known about the molecular regulation of endogenous BMP-7 and its renal protective functions. We examined transcriptional regulation of Bmp-7 and its role in the pathogenesis of renal injury resulting from urinary tract dysfunction. Obstruction induced renal injury was modeled in vivo in mice by unilateral ureteral obstruction and in vitro in primary kidney cells by treatment with transforming growth factor-β, a profibrotic cytokine that is increased in the obstructed kidney. Unilateral ureteral obstruction resulted in the loss of BMP-7 expression in conjunction with histone deacetylation and transcriptional repression of the Bmp-7 promoter. The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A stimulated Bmp-7 expression in primary kidney cells. Trichostatin A also inhibited the expression of transforming growth factor-β dependent profibrotic genes in a manner that depended on BMP receptor signaling. These findings extended to the obstructed kidney in vivo, in which trichostatin A treatment restored the expression of Bmp-7 along with BMP-7 mediated suppression of transforming growth factor-β dependent signaling pathways. Finally, trichostatin A stimulated activation of the BMP-7 pathway the ameliorated obstruction induced renal injury by preventing disruption of the renal architecture and the development of renal fibrosis. These findings show that histone deacetylase dependent repression of Bmp-7 transcription is a critical event during the pathogenesis of renal injury in obstructive uropathy. Accordingly, treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors represents a potentially effective strategy to restore BMP-7 expression and its renal protective functions during treatment of obstructive uropathy. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Density-dependent interference of aphids with caterpillar-induced defenses in Arabidopsis: involvement of phytohormones and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kroes, Anneke; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    In nature, plants are exposed to attacks by multiple herbivore species at the same time. To cope with these attacks, plants regulate defenses with the production of hormones such as salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA). Because herbivore densities are dynamic in time, this may affect plant-mediated interactions between different herbivores attacking at the same time. In Arabidopsis thaliana, feeding by Brevicoryne brassicae aphids interferes with induced defenses against Plutella xylostella caterpillars. This is density dependent: at a low aphid density, the growth rate of P. xylostella was increased, whereas caterpillars feeding on plants colonized by aphids at a high density have a reduced growth rate. Growth of P. xylostella larvae was unaffected on sid2-1 or on dde2-2 mutant plants when feeding simultaneously with a low or high aphid density. This shows that aphid interference with caterpillar-induced defenses requires both SA and JA signal transduction pathways. Transcriptional analysis revealed that simultaneous feeding by caterpillars and aphids at a low density induced the expression of the SA transcription factor gene WRKY70 whereas expression of WRKY70 was lower in plants induced with both caterpillars and a high aphid density. Interestingly, the expression of the JA transcription factor gene MYC2 was significantly higher in plants simultaneously attacked by aphids at a high density and caterpillars. These results indicate that a lower expression level of WRKY70 leads to significantly higher MYC2 expression through SA-JA cross-talk. Thus, plant-mediated interactions between aphids and caterpillars are density dependent and involve phytohormonal cross-talk and differential activation of transcription factors.

  6. SREBP-2 negatively regulates FXR-dependent transcription of FGF19 in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hata, Tatsuya; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2014-01-10

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor that positively regulates transcription of target genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. In the present study, we have investigated a possible involvement of SREBP-2 in human intestinal expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)19, which is an endocrine hormone involved in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Overexpression of constitutively active SREBP-2 decreased FGF19 mRNA levels in human colon-derived LS174T cells. In reporter assays, active SREBP-2 overexpression suppressed GW4064/FXR-mediated increase in reporter activities in regions containing the IR-1 motif (+848 to +5200) in the FGF19 gene. The suppressive effect disappeared in reporter activities in the region containing the IR-1 motif when the mutation was introduced into the IR-1 motif. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, binding of the FXR/retinoid X receptor α heterodimer to the IR-1 motif was attenuated by adding active SREBP-2, but SREBP-2 binding to the IR-1 motif was not observed. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, specific binding of FXR to the IR-1-containing region of the FGF19 gene (+3214 to +3404) was increased in LS174T cells by treatment with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. Specific binding of SREBP-2 to FXR was observed in glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays. These results suggest that SREBP-2 negatively regulates the FXR-mediated transcriptional activation of the FGF19 gene in human intestinal cells.

  7. A GATA-dependent right ventricular enhancer controls dHAND transcription in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D G; Charité, J; Richardson, J A; Srivastava, D; Firulli, A B; Olson, E N

    2000-12-01

    Heart formation in vertebrates is believed to occur in a segmental fashion, with discreet populations of cardiac progenitors giving rise to different chambers of the heart. However, the mechanisms involved in specification of different chamber lineages are unclear. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor dHAND is expressed in cardiac precursors throughout the cardiac crescent and the linear heart tube, before becoming restricted to the right ventricular chamber at the onset of looping morphogenesis. dHAND is also expressed in the branchial arch neural crest, which contributes to craniofacial structures and the aortic arch arteries. Using a series of dHAND-lacZ reporter genes in transgenic mice, we show that cardiac and neural crest expression of dHAND are controlled by separate upstream enhancers and we describe a composite cardiac-specific enhancer that directs lacZ expression in a pattern that mimics that of the endogenous dHAND gene throughout heart development. Deletion analysis reduced this enhancer to a 1.5 kb region and identified subregions responsible for expression in the right ventricle and cardiac outflow tract. Comparison of mouse regulatory elements required for right ventricular expression to the human dHAND upstream sequence revealed two conserved consensus sites for binding of GATA transcription factors. Mutation of these sites abolished transgene expression in the right ventricle, identifying dHAND as a direct transcriptional target of GATA factors during right ventricle development. Since GATA factors are not chamber-restricted, these findings suggest the existence of positive and/or negative coregulators that cooperate with GATA factors to control right ventricular-specific gene expression in the developing heart.

  8. Hematopoietic and Leukemic Stem Cells Have Distinct Dependence on Tcf1 and Lef1 Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuyang; Li, Fengyin; Xing, Shaojun; Zhao, Tianyan; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-05-20

    Hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells (HSCs and LSCs) have self-renewal ability to maintain normal hematopoiesis and leukemia propagation, respectively. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors are expressed in HSCs, and targeting both factors modestly expanded the size of the HSC pool due to diminished HSC quiescence. Functional defects of Tcf1/Lef1-deficient HSCs in multi-lineage blood reconstitution was only evident under competitive conditions or when subjected to repeated regenerative stress. These are mechanistically due to direct positive regulation of Egr and Tcf3 by Tcf1 and Lef1, and significantly, forced expression of Egr1 in Tcf1/Lef1-deficient HSCs restored HSC quiescence. In a preclinical CML model, loss of Tcf1/Lef1 did not show strong impact on leukemia initiation and progression. However, when transplanted into secondary recipients, Tcf1/Lef1-deficient LSCs failed to propagate CML. By induced deletion of Tcf1 and Lef1 in pre-established CML, we further demonstrated an intrinsic requirement for these factors in LSC self-renewal. When combined with imatinib therapy, genetic targeting of Tcf1 and Lef1 potently diminished LSCs and conferred better protection to the CML recipients. LSCs are therefore more sensitive to loss of Tcf1 and Lef1 than HSCs in their self-renewal capacity. The differential requirements in HSCs and LSCs thus identify Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors as novel therapeutic targets in treating hematological malignancies, and inhibition of Tcf1/Lef1-regulated transcriptional programs may thus provide a therapeutic window to eliminate LSCs with minimal side effect on normal HSC functions.

  9. Commensal gut bacteria modulate phosphorylation-dependent PPARγ transcriptional activity in human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; de Wouters, Tomas; Jacouton, Elsa; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Lapaque, Nicolas; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2017-01-01

    In healthy subjects, the intestinal microbiota interacts with the host’s epithelium, regulating gene expression to the benefit of both, host and microbiota. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood, however. Although many gut bacteria are not yet cultured, constantly growing culture collections have been established. We selected 57 representative commensal bacterial strains to study bacteria-host interactions, focusing on PPARγ, a key nuclear receptor in colonocytes linking metabolism and inflammation to the microbiota. Conditioned media (CM) were harvested from anaerobic cultures and assessed for their ability to modulate PPARγ using a reporter cell line. Activation of PPARγ transcriptional activity was linked to the presence of butyrate and propionate, two of the main metabolites of intestinal bacteria. Interestingly, some stimulatory CMs were devoid of these metabolites. A Prevotella and an Atopobium strain were chosen for further study, and shown to up-regulate two PPARγ-target genes, ANGPTL4 and ADRP. The molecular mechanisms of these activations involved the phosphorylation of PPARγ through ERK1/2. The responsible metabolites were shown to be heat sensitive but markedly diverged in size, emphasizing the diversity of bioactive compounds found in the intestine. Here we describe different mechanisms by which single intestinal bacteria can directly impact their host’s health through transcriptional regulation. PMID:28266623

  10. Cardiac hypertrophy induced by active Raf depends on Yorkie-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph P; Wu, Huihui; Wolf, Matthew J

    2015-02-03

    Organ hypertrophy can result from enlargement of individual cells or from cell proliferation or both. Activating mutations in the serine-threonine kinase Raf cause cardiac hypertrophy and contribute to Noonan syndrome in humans. Cardiac-specific expression of activated Raf also causes hypertrophy in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that Yorkie (Yki), a transcriptional coactivator in the Hippo pathway that regulates organ size, is required for Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy in flies. Although aberrant activation of Yki orthologs stimulates cardiac hyperplasia in mice, cardiac-specific expression of an activated mutant form of Yki in fruit flies caused cardiac hypertrophy without hyperplasia. Knockdown of Yki caused cardiac dilation without loss of cardiomyocytes and prevented Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In flies, Yki-induced cardiac hypertrophy required the TEA domain-containing transcription factor Scalloped, and, in mammalian cells, expression of mouse Raf(L613V), an activated form of Raf with a Noonan syndrome mutation, increased Yki-induced Scalloped activity. Furthermore, overexpression of Tgi (a Tondu domain-containing Scalloped-binding corepressor) in the fly heart abrogated Yki- or Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Thus, crosstalk between Raf and Yki occurs in the heart and can influence Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. KDM2B promotes pancreatic cancer via Polycomb-dependent and -independent transcriptional programs

    PubMed Central

    Tzatsos, Alexandros; Paskaleva, Polina; Ferrari, Francesco; Deshpande, Vikram; Stoykova, Svetlana; Contino, Gianmarco; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Lan, Fei; Trojer, Patrick; Park, Peter J.; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms mediate heritable control of cell identity in normal cells and cancer. We sought to identify epigenetic regulators driving the pathogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), one of the most lethal human cancers. We found that KDM2B (also known as Ndy1, FBXL10, and JHDM1B), an H3K36 histone demethylase implicated in bypass of cellular senescence and somatic cell reprogramming, is markedly overexpressed in human PDAC, with levels increasing with disease grade and stage, and highest expression in metastases. KDM2B silencing abrogated tumorigenicity of PDAC cell lines exhibiting loss of epithelial differentiation, whereas KDM2B overexpression cooperated with KrasG12D to promote PDAC formation in mouse models. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments coupled to genome-wide gene expression and ChIP studies revealed that KDM2B drives tumorigenicity through 2 different transcriptional mechanisms. KDM2B repressed developmental genes through cobinding with Polycomb group (PcG) proteins at transcriptional start sites, whereas it activated a module of metabolic genes, including mediators of protein synthesis and mitochondrial function, cobound by the MYC oncogene and the histone demethylase KDM5A. These results defined epigenetic programs through which KDM2B subverts cellular differentiation and drives the pathogenesis of an aggressive subset of PDAC. PMID:23321669

  12. Commensal gut bacteria modulate phosphorylation-dependent PPARγ transcriptional activity in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; de Wouters, Tomas; Jacouton, Elsa; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Lapaque, Nicolas; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Blottière, Hervé M

    2017-03-07

    In healthy subjects, the intestinal microbiota interacts with the host's epithelium, regulating gene expression to the benefit of both, host and microbiota. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood, however. Although many gut bacteria are not yet cultured, constantly growing culture collections have been established. We selected 57 representative commensal bacterial strains to study bacteria-host interactions, focusing on PPARγ, a key nuclear receptor in colonocytes linking metabolism and inflammation to the microbiota. Conditioned media (CM) were harvested from anaerobic cultures and assessed for their ability to modulate PPARγ using a reporter cell line. Activation of PPARγ transcriptional activity was linked to the presence of butyrate and propionate, two of the main metabolites of intestinal bacteria. Interestingly, some stimulatory CMs were devoid of these metabolites. A Prevotella and an Atopobium strain were chosen for further study, and shown to up-regulate two PPARγ-target genes, ANGPTL4 and ADRP. The molecular mechanisms of these activations involved the phosphorylation of PPARγ through ERK1/2. The responsible metabolites were shown to be heat sensitive but markedly diverged in size, emphasizing the diversity of bioactive compounds found in the intestine. Here we describe different mechanisms by which single intestinal bacteria can directly impact their host's health through transcriptional regulation.

  13. Cardiac hypertrophy induced by active Raf depends on Yorkie-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph P.; Wu, Huihui; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Organ hypertrophy can result from enlargement of individual cells or from cell proliferation or both. Activating mutations in the serine-threonine kinase Raf cause cardiac hypertrophy and contribute to Noonan syndrome in humans. Cardiac-specific expression of activated Raf also causes hypertrophy in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that Yorkie (Yki), a transcriptional coactivator in the Hippo pathway that regulates organ size, is required for Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy in flies. Although aberrant activation of Yki orthologs stimulates cardiac hyperplasia in mice, cardiac-specific expression of an activated mutant form of Yki in fruit flies caused cardiac hypertrophy without hyperplasia. Knockdown of Yki caused cardiac dilation without loss of cardiomyocytes and prevented Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In flies, Yki-induced cardiac hypertrophy required the TEA domain–containing transcription factor Scalloped, and, in mammalian cells, expression of mouse RafL613V, an activated form of Raf with a Noonan syndrome mutation, increased Yki-induced Scalloped activity. Furthermore, overexpression of Tgi (a Tondu domain–containing Scalloped-binding corepressor) in the fly heart abrogated Yki- or Raf-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Thus, crosstalk between Raf and Yki occurs in the heart and can influence Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25650441

  14. Maltose-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of the mal Regulon by MalR in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Manzoor, Irfan; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    The maltose regulon (mal regulon) has previously been shown to consist of the mal gene cluster (malMP, malXCD and malAR operons) in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, we have further elucidated the complete mal regulon in S. pneumoniae D39 using microarray analyses and β-galactosidase assays. In addition to the mal gene cluster, the complete mal regulon of S. pneumoniae D39 consists of a pullulanase (PulA), a glucosidase (DexB), a glucokinase (RokB), a PTS component (PtsG) and an amylase (AmyA2). Our microarray studies and β-galactosidase assays further showed that the LacI-family transcriptional regulator MalR represses the expression of the mal regulon in the absence of maltose. Furthermore, the role of the pleiotropic transcriptional regulator CcpA in the regulation of the mal regulon in the presence of maltose was explored. Our microarray analysis with a ΔccpA strain showed that CcpA only represses the expression of the malXCD operon and the pulA gene in the presence of maltose. Hence, we extend the mal regulon now consisting of pulA, dexB, rokB, ptsG and amyA2 in addition to malMP, malXCD and malAR operons.

  15. Genes and Small RNA Transcripts Exhibit Dosage-Dependent Expression Pattern in Maize Copy-Number Alterations.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Lithio, Andrew; Dash, Sudhansu; Weber, David F; Wise, Roger; Nettleton, Dan; Peterson, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes which tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplications (<100 kb) often exhibit dosage-dependent expression, whereas large duplications (>50 Mb) are more often dosage compensated. However, little or nothing is known about expression in moderately-sized (1-50 Mb) segmental duplications, and about the response of small RNAs to dosage change. Here, we compared maize (Zea mays) plants with two, three, and four doses of a 14.6-Mb segment of chromosome 1 that contains ∼300 genes. Plants containing the duplicated segment exhibit dosage-dependent effects on ear length and flowering time. Transcriptome analyses using GeneChip and RNA-sequencing methods indicate that most expressed genes and unique small RNAs within the duplicated segments exhibit dosage-dependent transcript levels. We conclude that dosage effect is the predominant regulatory response for both genes and unique small RNA transcripts in the segmental dosage series we tested. To our knowledge this is the first analysis of small RNA expression in plant gene dosage variants. Because segmental duplications comprise a significant proportion of eukaryotic genomes, these findings provide important new insight into the regulation of genes and small RNAs in response to dosage changes. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. The dose dependence of glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression results from changes in the number of transcriptionally active templates.

    PubMed Central

    Ko, M S; Nakauchi, H; Takahashi, N

    1990-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones induce the transcription of genes having glucocorticoid response elements in a dose dependent manner. To determine whether this dose dependence represents a response of individual templates or of the mass of templates, we introduced a bacterial beta-galactosidase gene linked to the glucocorticoid-inducible enhancer/promoter of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MTV) into Ltk- cells and obtained stable transformants containing a single or a few templates per cell. Visual inspection and flow cytometry analysis by enzyme histochemistry assay for beta-galactosidase revealed that individual cells showed very heterogeneous beta-galactosidase activity after 48 h induction with dexamethasone. When the glucocorticoid concentration was increased, an increasing cell population producing beta-galactosidase was observed. These phenomena were probably not due to heterogeneity of template copy number or to a predetermined cellular state among individual cells, since cells forming a single small colony gave similar results. This was also supported by data showing that recloned cells retained both their responsiveness to the glucocorticoid hormone and their digestion pattern in Southern blotting analyses. These results indicate that the dose dependent increase of glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression is caused by an increase in the number of transcriptionally active templates. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 8. PMID:2167833

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells)-dependent transcription: a role for the transcription factor NFATc4 in neurotrophin-mediated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Groth, Rachel D; Mermelstein, Paul G

    2003-09-03

    A member of the neurotrophin family, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates neuronal survival and differentiation during development. Within the adult brain, BDNF is also important in neuronal adaptive processes, such as the activity-dependent plasticity that underlies learning and memory. These long-term changes in synaptic strength are mediated through alterations in gene expression. However, many of the mechanisms by which BDNF is linked to transcriptional and translational regulation remain unknown. Recently, the transcription factor NFATc4 (nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform 4) was discovered in neurons, where it is believed to play an important role in long-term changes in neuronal function. Interestingly, NFATc4 is particularly sensitive to the second messenger systems activated by BDNF. Thus, we hypothesized that NFAT-dependent transcription may be an important mediator of BDNF-induced plasticity. In cultured rat CA3-CA1 hippocampal neurons, BDNF activated NFAT-dependent transcription via TrkB receptors. Inhibition of calcineurin blocked BDNF-induced nuclear translocation of NFATc4, thus preventing transcription. Further, phospholipase C was a critical signaling intermediate between BDNF activation of TrkB and the initiation of NFAT-dependent transcription. Both inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3)-mediated release of calcium from intracellular stores and activation of protein kinase C were required for BDNF-induced NFAT-dependent transcription. Finally, increased expression of IP3 receptor 1 and BDNF after neuronal exposure to BDNF was linked to NFAT-dependent transcription. These results suggest that NFATc4 plays a crucial role in neurotrophin-mediated synaptic plasticity.

  18. The adenoviral E1B 55-kilodalton protein controls expression of immune response genes but not p53-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel L; Rickards, Brenden; Mashiba, Michael; Huang, Wenying; Flint, S J

    2009-04-01

    The human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55-kDa protein modulates several cellular processes, including activation of the tumor suppressor p53. Binding of the E1B protein to the activation domain of p53 inhibits p53-dependent transcription. This activity has been correlated with the transforming activity of the E1B protein, but its contribution to viral replication is not well understood. To address this issue, we used microarray hybridization methods to examine cellular gene expression in normal human fibroblasts (HFFs) infected by Ad5, the E1B 55-kDa-protein-null mutant Hr6, or a mutant carrying substitutions that impair repression of p53-dependent transcription. Comparison of the changes in cellular gene expression observed in these and our previous experiments (D. L. Miller et al., Genome Biol. 8:R58, 2007) by significance analysis of microarrays indicated excellent reproducibility. Furthermore, we again observed that Ad5 infection led to efficient reversal of the p53-dependent transcriptional program. As this same response was also induced in cells infected by the two mutants, we conclude that the E1B 55-kDa protein is not necessary to block activation of p53 in Ad5-infected cells. However, groups of cellular genes that were altered in expression specifically in the absence of the E1B protein were identified by consensus k-means clustering of the hybridization data. Statistical analysis of the enrichment of genes associated with specific functions in these clusters established that the E1B 55-kDa protein is necessary for repression of genes encoding proteins that mediate antiviral and immune defenses.

  19. Rfx6 is an Ngn3-dependent winged helix transcription factor required for pancreatic islet cell development

    PubMed Central

    Soyer, Josselin; Flasse, Lydie; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Beucher, Anthony; Orvain, Christophe; Peers, Bernard; Ravassard, Philippe; Vermot, Julien; Voz, Marianne L.; Mellitzer, Georg; Gradwohl, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor neurogenin 3 (Neurog3 or Ngn3) controls islet cell fate specification in multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells in the mouse embryo. However, our knowledge of the genetic programs implemented by Ngn3, which control generic and islet subtype-specific properties, is still fragmentary. Gene expression profiling in isolated Ngn3-positive progenitor cells resulted in the identification of the uncharacterized winged helix transcription factor Rfx6. Rfx6 is initially expressed broadly in the gut endoderm, notably in Pdx1-positive cells in the developing pancreatic buds, and then becomes progressively restricted to the endocrine lineage, suggesting a dual function in both endoderm development and islet cell differentiation. Rfx6 is found in postmitotic islet progenitor cells in the embryo and is maintained in all developing and adult islet cell types. Rfx6 is dependent on Ngn3 and acts upstream of or in parallel with NeuroD, Pax4 and Arx transcription factors during islet cell differentiation. In zebrafish, the Rfx6 ortholog is similarly found in progenitors and hormone expressing cells of the islet lineage. Loss-of-function studies in zebrafish revealed that rfx6 is required for the differentiation of glucagon-, ghrelin- and somatostatin-expressing cells, which, in the absence of rfx6, are blocked at the progenitor stage. By contrast, beta cells, whose number is only slightly reduced, were no longer clustered in a compact islet. These data unveil Rfx6 as a novel regulator of islet cell development. PMID:20040487

  20. Rfx6 is an Ngn3-dependent winged helix transcription factor required for pancreatic islet cell development.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Josselin; Flasse, Lydie; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Beucher, Anthony; Orvain, Christophe; Peers, Bernard; Ravassard, Philippe; Vermot, Julien; Voz, Marianne L; Mellitzer, Georg; Gradwohl, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor neurogenin 3 (Neurog3 or Ngn3) controls islet cell fate specification in multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells in the mouse embryo. However, our knowledge of the genetic programs implemented by Ngn3, which control generic and islet subtype-specific properties, is still fragmentary. Gene expression profiling in isolated Ngn3-positive progenitor cells resulted in the identification of the uncharacterized winged helix transcription factor Rfx6. Rfx6 is initially expressed broadly in the gut endoderm, notably in Pdx1-positive cells in the developing pancreatic buds, and then becomes progressively restricted to the endocrine lineage, suggesting a dual function in both endoderm development and islet cell differentiation. Rfx6 is found in postmitotic islet progenitor cells in the embryo and is maintained in all developing and adult islet cell types. Rfx6 is dependent on Ngn3 and acts upstream of or in parallel with NeuroD, Pax4 and Arx transcription factors during islet cell differentiation. In zebrafish, the Rfx6 ortholog is similarly found in progenitors and hormone expressing cells of the islet lineage. Loss-of-function studies in zebrafish revealed that rfx6 is required for the differentiation of glucagon-, ghrelin- and somatostatin-expressing cells, which, in the absence of rfx6, are blocked at the progenitor stage. By contrast, beta cells, whose number is only slightly reduced, were no longer clustered in a compact islet. These data unveil Rfx6 as a novel regulator of islet cell development.

  1. Oxidative stress activates FUS1 and RLM1 transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in an oxidant-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Staleva, Liliana; Hall, Andrea; Orlow, Seth J

    2004-12-01

    Mating in haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs after activation of the pheromone response pathway. Biochemical components of this pathway are involved in other yeast signal transduction networks. To understand more about the coordination between signaling pathways, we used a "chemical genetic" approach, searching for compounds that would activate the pheromone-responsive gene FUS1 and RLM1, a reporter for the cell integrity pathway. We found that catecholamines (l-3,4-hydroxyphenylalanine [l-dopa], dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline) elevate FUS1 and RLM1 transcription. N-Acetyl-cysteine, a powerful antioxidant in yeast, completely reversed this effect, suggesting that FUS1 and RLM1 activation in response to catecholamines is a result of oxidative stress. The oxidant hydrogen peroxide also was found to activate transcription of an RLM1 reporter. Further genetic analysis combined with immunoblotting revealed that Kss1, one of the mating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Mpk1, an MAPK of the cell integrity pathway, participated in l-dopa-induced stimulation of FUS1 and RLM1 transcription. We also report that Mpk1 and Hog1, the high osmolarity MAPK, were phosphorylated upon induction by hydrogen peroxide. Together, our results demonstrate that cells respond to oxidative stress via different signal transduction machinery dependent upon the nature of the oxidant.

  2. Control of embryonic stem cell identity by BRD4-dependent transcriptional elongation of super-enhancer-associated pluripotency genes.

    PubMed

    Di Micco, Raffaella; Fontanals-Cirera, Barbara; Low, Vivien; Ntziachristos, Panagiotis; Yuen, Stephanie K; Lovell, Claudia D; Dolgalev, Igor; Yonekubo, Yoshiya; Zhang, Guangtao; Rusinova, Elena; Gerona-Navarro, Guillermo; Cañamero, Marta; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Aifantis, Iannis; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Hernando, Eva

    2014-10-09

    Transcription factors and chromatin-remodeling complexes are key determinants of embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity. Here, we demonstrate that BRD4, a member of the bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) family of epigenetic readers, regulates the self-renewal ability and pluripotency of ESCs. BRD4 inhibition resulted in induction of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and commitment to the neuroectodermal lineage while reducing the ESC multidifferentiation capacity in teratoma assays. BRD4 maintains transcription of core stem cell genes such as OCT4 and PRDM14 by occupying their super-enhancers (SEs), large clusters of regulatory elements, and recruiting to them Mediator and CDK9, the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), to allow Pol-II-dependent productive elongation. Our study describes a mechanism of regulation of ESC identity that could be applied to improve the efficiency of ESC differentiation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stem cell-dependent formation of a functional anterior regeneration pole in planarians requires Zic and Forkhead transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Vogg, Matthias C; Owlarn, Suthira; Pérez Rico, Yuvia A; Xie, Jianlei; Suzuki, Yoko; Gentile, Luca; Wu, Wei; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2014-06-15

    Planarians can regenerate their head within days. This process depends on the direction of adult stem cells to wound sites and the orchestration of their progenitors to commit to appropriate lineages and to arrange into patterned tissues. We identified a zinc finger transcription factor, Smed-ZicA, as a downstream target of Smed-FoxD, a Forkhead transcription factor required for head regeneration. Smed-zicA and Smed-FoxD are co-expressed with the Wnt inhibitor notum and the Activin inhibitor follistatin in a cluster of cells at the anterior-most tip of the regenerating head - the anterior regeneration pole - and in surrounding stem cell progeny. Depletion of Smed-zicA and Smed-FoxD by RNAi abolishes notum and follistatin expression at the pole and inhibits head formation downstream of initial polarity decisions. We suggest a model in which ZicA and FoxD transcription factors synergize to control the formation of Notum- and Follistatin-producing anterior pole cells. Pole formation might constitute an early step in regeneration, resulting in a signaling center that orchestrates cellular events in the growing tissue.

  4. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, Ubc1, indirectly regulates SNF1 kinase activity via Forkhead-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Rubin; Lobanova, Liubov; Waldner, Amanda; Fu, Anthony; Xiao, Linda; Harkness, Troy A.; Arnason, Terra G.

    2016-01-01

    The SNF1 kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to study the regulation and function of the AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) family of serine-threonine protein kinases. Yeast discoveries regarding the regulation of this non-hormonal sensor of metabolic/environmental stress are conserved in higher eukaryotes, including poly-ubiquitination of the α-subunit of yeast (Snf1) and human (AMPKα) that ultimately effects subunit stability and enzyme activity. The ubiquitin-cascade enzymes responsible for targeting Snf1 remain unknown, leading us to screen for those that impact SNF1 kinase function. We identified the E2, Ubc1, as a regulator of SNF1 kinase function. The decreased Snf1 abundance found upon deletion of Ubc1 is not due to increased degradation, but instead is partly due to impaired SNF1 gene expression, arising from diminished abundance of the Forkhead 1/2 proteins, previously shown to contribute to SNF1 transcription. Ultimately, we report that the Fkh1/2 cognate transcription factor, Hcm1, fails to enter the nucleus in the absence of Ubc1. This implies that Ubc1 acts indirectly through transcriptional effects to modulate SNF1 kinase activity. PMID:28357323

  5. Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR(ER)) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA(+) ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPR(ER) genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA(+) ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPR(ER) genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPR(ER) genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes.

  6. A caveolin-dependent and PI3K/AKT-independent role of PTEN in β-catenin transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Perez, Alejandro; Gros, Gwendoline; Longvert, Christine; Pedersen, Malin; Petit, Valérie; Aktary, Zackie; Viros, Amaya; Gesbert, Franck; Delmas, Véronique; Rambow, Florian; Bastian, Boris C.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Colombo, Sophie; Puig, Isabel; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Sansom, Owen; Marais, Richard; Van Kempen, Leon C. L. T.; Larue, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Loss of the tumour suppressor PTEN is frequent in human melanoma, results in MAPK activation, suppresses senescence and mediates metastatic behaviour. How PTEN loss mediates these effects is unknown. Here we show that loss of PTEN in epithelial and melanocytic cell lines induces the nuclear localization and transcriptional activation of β-catenin independent of the PI3K–AKT–GSK3β axis. The absence of PTEN leads to caveolin-1 (CAV1)-dependent β-catenin transcriptional modulation in vitro, cooperates with NRASQ61K to initiate melanomagenesis in vivo and induces efficient metastasis formation associated with E-cadherin internalization. The CAV1-β–catenin axis is mediated by a feedback loop in which β-catenin represses transcription of miR-199a-5p and miR-203, which suppress the levels of CAV1 mRNA in melanoma cells. These data reveal a mechanism by which loss of PTEN increases CAV1-mediated dissociation of β-catenin from membranous E-cadherin, which may promote senescence bypass and metastasis. PMID:26307673

  7. Potato Tuber Blight Resistance Phenotypes Correlate with RB Transgene Transcript Levels in an Age-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Millett, Benjamin P; Gao, Liangliang; Iorizzo, Massimo; Carputo, Domenico; Bradeen, James M

    2015-08-01

    Plants have evolved strategies and mechanisms to detect and respond to pathogen attack. Different organs of the same plant may be subjected to different environments (e.g., aboveground versus belowground) and pathogens with different lifestyles. Accordingly, plants commonly need to tailor defense strategies in an organ-specific manner. Phytophthora infestans, causal agent of potato late blight disease, infects both aboveground foliage and belowground tubers. We examined the efficacy of transgene RB (known for conferring foliar late blight resistance) in defending against tuber late blight disease. Our results indicate that the presence of the transgene has a positive yet only marginally significant effect on tuber disease resistance on average. However, a significant association between transgene transcript levels and tuber resistance was established for specific transformed lines in an age-dependent manner, with higher transcript levels indicating enhanced tuber resistance. Thus, RB has potential to function in both foliage and tuber to impart late blight resistance. Our data suggest that organ-specific resistance might result directly from transcriptional regulation of the resistance gene itself.

  8. Anaphase promoting complex-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, Denis; Solomon, Mark J

    2011-07-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an essential ubiquitin ligase that targets cell cycle proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation in mitosis and G1. The APC regulates a number of cell cycle processes, including spindle assembly, mitotic exit, and cytokinesis, but the full range of its functions is still unknown. To better understand cellular pathways controlled by the APC, we performed a proteomic screen to identify additional APC substrates. We analyzed cell cycle-regulated proteins whose expression peaked during the period when other APC substrates were expressed. Subsequent analysis identified several proteins, including the transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1, as authentic APC substrates. We found that APC(Cdh1) targeted Nrm1 and Yhp1 for degradation in early G1 through Destruction-box motifs and that the degradation of these repressors coincided with transcriptional activation of MBF and Mcm1 target genes, respectively. In addition, Nrm1 was stabilized by phosphorylation, most likely by the budding yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase, Cdc28. We found that expression of stabilized forms of Nrm1 and Yhp1 resulted in reduced cell fitness, due at least in part to incomplete activation of G1-specific genes. Therefore, in addition to its known functions, APC-mediated targeting of Nrm1 and Yhp1 coordinates transcription of multiple genes in G1 with other cell cycle events.

  9. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath; Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar; Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  10. Down-regulation of histone H2B by DNA-dependent protein kinase in response to DNA damage through modulation of octamer transcription factor 1.

    PubMed

    Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Shih, Amy; Yarymowich, Nicholas C; Haché, Robert J G

    2003-11-01

    Cells respond to double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) by pausing cell cycle progression to allow the repair machinery to restore genomic integrity. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), comprising a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(cs)) and the Ku antigen regulatory subunit (Ku70/Ku80), is activated in response to DSBs and is required for DNA repair through the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Here we provide evidence that DNA-PK participates in altering specific gene expression in response to DNA damage by modulating the stability and transcriptional regulatory potential of the essential transcription factor octamer transcription factor 1 (Oct-1). Histone H2B and U2 RNA, whose expression are highly dependent on Oct-1, were strongly decreased in response to ionizing radiation in a DNA-PK-dependent manner, and Oct-1-dependent reporter gene transcription was repressed. Furthermore, Oct-1 phosphorylation in response to ionizing radiation increased in a DNA-PK-dependent manner. Paradoxically, down-regulation of transactivation correlated with the rapid DNA-PK-dependent stabilization of Oct-1. Stabilization of Oct-1 was dependent on the NH(2)-terminal region of Oct-1, which contains a transcriptional activation domain and which was phosphorylated by DNA-PK in vitro. These results suggest a mechanism for the regulation of Oct-1 in response to DNA damage through specific phosphorylation within the NH(2)-terminal transcriptional regulatory domain.

  11. Flower colour intensity depends on specialized cell shape controlled by a Myb-related transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Noda, K; Glover, B J; Linstead, P; Martin, C

    1994-06-23

    Flower colour is determined primarily by the production of pigments, usually anthocyanins or carotenoids, but the shade and intensity of the colour are often changed by other factors such as vacuolar compounds, pH and metal ions. Pigmentation can also be affected by the shape of epidermal cells, especially those facing prospective pollinators. A conical shape is believed to increase the proportion of incident light that enters the epidermal cells, enhancing light absorption by the floral pigments, and thus the intensity of their colour. We have identified a gene (mixta) that affects the intensity of pigmentation of epidermal cells in Antirrhinum majus petals. The cells of the corolla lobes fail to differentiate into their normal conical form in mixta mutants. We have cloned the mixta gene by transposon tagging; its sequence reveals that it encodes a Myb-related protein that probably participates in the transcriptional control of epidermal cell shape.

  12. BR-dependent phosphorylation modulates PIF4 transcriptional activity and shapes diurnal hypocotyl growth.

    PubMed

    Bernardo-García, Stella; de Lucas, Miguel; Martínez, Cristina; Espinosa-Ruiz, Ana; Davière, Jean-Michel; Prat, Salomé

    2014-08-01

    Signaling by the hormones brassinosteroid (BR) and gibberellin (GA) is critical to normal plant growth and development and is required for hypocotyl elongation in response to dark and elevated temperatures. Active BR signaling is essential for GA promotion of hypocotyl growth and suppresses the dwarf phenotype of GA mutants. Cross-talk between these hormones occurs downstream from the DELLAs, as GA-induced destabilization of these GA signaling repressors is not affected by BRs. Here we show that the light-regulated PIF4 (phytochrome-interacting factor 4) factor is a phosphorylation target of the BR signaling kinase BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 2 (BIN2), which marks this transcriptional regulator for proteasome degradation. Expression of a mutated PIF41A protein lacking a conserved BIN2 phosphorylation consensus causes a severe elongated phenotype and strongly up-regulated expression of the gene targets. However, PIF41A is not able to suppress the dwarf phenotype of the bin2-1 mutant with constitutive activation of this kinase. PIFs were shown to be required for the constitutive BR response of bes1-D and bzr1-1D mutants, these factors acting in an interdependent manner to promote cell elongation. Here, we show that bes1-D seedlings are still repressed by the inhibitor BRZ in the light and that expression of the nonphosphorylatable PIF41A protein makes this mutant fully insensitive to brassinazole (BRZ). PIF41A is preferentially stabilized at dawn, coinciding with the diurnal time of maximal growth. These results uncover a main role of BRs in antagonizing light signaling by inhibiting BIN2-mediated destabilization of the PIF4 factor. This regulation plays a prevalent role in timing hypocotyl elongation to late night, before light activation of phytochrome B (PHYB) and accumulation of DELLAs restricts PIF4 transcriptional activity. © 2014 Bernardo-García et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2-Dependent and -Independent Functions of Jarid2 in Transcriptional Regulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Mohan, Man; Garrett, Alexander S.; Miller, Caitlynn; Casto, David; Zhang, Ying; Seidel, Christopher; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2012-01-01

    Jarid2 was recently identified as an important component of the mammalian Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), where it has a major effect on PRC2 recruitment in mouse embryonic stem cells. Although Jarid2 is conserved in Drosophila, it has not previously been implicated in Polycomb (Pc) regulation. Therefore, we purified Drosophila Jarid2 and its associated proteins and found that Jarid2 associates with all of the known canonical PRC2 components, demonstrating a conserved physical interaction with PRC2 in flies and mammals. Furthermore, in vivo studies with Jarid2 mutants in flies demonstrate that among several histone modifications tested, only methylation of histone 3 at K27 (H3K27), the mark implemented by PRC2, was affected. Genome-wide profiling of Jarid2, Su(z)12 (Suppressor of zeste 12), and H3K27me3 occupancy by chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicates that Jarid2 and Su(z)12 have very similar distribution patterns on chromatin. However, Jarid2 and Su(z)12 occupancy levels at some genes are significantly different, with Jarid2 being present at relatively low levels at many Pc response elements (PREs) of certain Homeobox (Hox) genes, providing a rationale for why Jarid2 was never identified in Pc screens. Gene expression analyses show that Jarid2 and E(z) (Enhancer of zeste, a canonical PRC2 component) are not only required for transcriptional repression but might also function in active transcription. Identification of Jarid2 as a conserved PRC2 interactor in flies provides an opportunity to begin to probe some of its novel functions in Drosophila development. PMID:22354997

  14. Global alterations of the transcriptional landscape during yeast growth and development in the absence of Ume6-dependent chromatin modification

    PubMed Central

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Becker, Emmanuelle; Walther, Thomas; Law, Michael J.; Xie, Bingning; Demougin, Philippe; Strich, Randy

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin modification enzymes are important regulators of gene expression and some are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a major model organism for genome-wide studies that aim at the identification of target genes under the control of conserved epigenetic regulators. Ume6 interacts with the upstream repressor site 1 (URS1) and represses transcription by recruiting both the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 (through the co-repressor Sin3) and the chromatin-remodeling factor Isw2. Cells lacking Ume6 are defective in growth, stress response, and meiotic development. RNA profiling studies and in vivo protein-DNA binding assays identified mRNAs or transcript isoforms that are directly repressed by Ume6 in mitosis. However, a comprehensive understanding of the transcriptional alterations, which underlie the complex ume6Δ mutant phenotype during fermentation, respiration, or sporulation, is lacking. We report the protein-coding transcriptome of a diploid MATa/α wild-type and ume6/ume6 mutant strains cultured in rich media with glucose or acetate as a carbon source, or sporulation-inducing medium. We distinguished direct from indirect effects on mRNA levels by combining GeneChip data with URS1 motif predictions and published high-throughput in vivo Ume6-DNA binding data. To gain insight into the molecular interactions between successive waves of Ume6-dependent meiotic genes, we integrated expression data with information on protein networks. Our work identifies novel Ume6 repressed genes during growth and development and reveals a strong effect of the carbon source on the derepression pattern of transcripts in growing and developmentally arrested ume6/ume6 mutant cells. Since yeast is a useful model organism for chromatin-mediated effects on gene expression, our results provide a rich source for further genetic and molecular biological work on the regulation of cell growth and cell differentiation in eukaryotes. PMID:25957495

  15. The 3' untranslated region of human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Regulatory subunit 1 contains regulatory elements affecting transcript stability

    PubMed Central

    Moncini, Silvia; Bevilacqua, Annamaria; Venturin, Marco; Fallini, Claudia; Ratti, Antonia; Nicolin, Angelo; Riva, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background CDK5R1 plays a central role in neuronal migration and differentiation during central nervous system development. CDK5R1 has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders and proposed as a candidate gene for mental retardation. The remarkable size of CDK5R1 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) suggests a role in post-transcriptional regulation of CDK5R1 expression. Results The bioinformatic study shows a high conservation degree in mammals and predicts several AU-Rich Elements (AREs). The insertion of CDK5R1 3'-UTR into luciferase 3'-UTR causes a decreased luciferase activity in four transfected cell lines. We identified 3'-UTR subregions which tend to reduce the reporter gene expression, sometimes in a cell line-dependent manner. In most cases the quantitative analysis of luciferase mRNA suggests that CDK5R1 3'-UTR affects mRNA stability. A region, leading to a very strong mRNA destabilization, showed a significantly low half-life, indicating an accelerated mRNA degradation. The 3' end of the transcript, containing a class I ARE, specifically displays a stabilizing effect in neuroblastoma cell lines. We also observed the interaction of the stabilizing neuronal RNA-binding proteins ELAV with the CDK5R1 transcript in SH-SY5Y cells and identified three 3'-UTR sub-regions showing affinity for ELAV proteins. Conclusion Our findings evince the presence of both destabilizing and stabilizing regulatory elements in CDK5R1 3'-UTR and support the hypothesis that CDK5R1 gene expression is post-transcriptionally controlled in neurons by ELAV-mediated mechanisms. This is the first evidence of the involvement of 3'-UTR in the modulation of CDK5R1 expression. The fine tuning of CDK5R1 expression by 3'-UTR may have a role in central nervous system development and functioning, with potential implications in neurodegenerative and cognitive disorders. PMID:18053171

  16. Global alterations of the transcriptional landscape during yeast growth and development in the absence of Ume6-dependent chromatin modification.

    PubMed

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Becker, Emmanuelle; Walther, Thomas; Law, Michael J; Xie, Bingning; Demougin, Philippe; Strich, Randy; Primig, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Chromatin modification enzymes are important regulators of gene expression and some are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a major model organism for genome-wide studies that aim at the identification of target genes under the control of conserved epigenetic regulators. Ume6 interacts with the upstream repressor site 1 (URS1) and represses transcription by recruiting both the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 (through the co-repressor Sin3) and the chromatin-remodeling factor Isw2. Cells lacking Ume6 are defective in growth, stress response, and meiotic development. RNA profiling studies and in vivo protein-DNA binding assays identified mRNAs or transcript isoforms that are directly repressed by Ume6 in mitosis. However, a comprehensive understanding of the transcriptional alterations, which underlie the complex ume6Δ mutant phenotype during fermentation, respiration, or sporulation, is lacking. We report the protein-coding transcriptome of a diploid MAT a/α wild-type and ume6/ume6 mutant strains cultured in rich media with glucose or acetate as a carbon source, or sporulation-inducing medium. We distinguished direct from indirect effects on mRNA levels by combining GeneChip data with URS1 motif predictions and published high-throughput in vivo Ume6-DNA binding data. To gain insight into the molecular interactions between successive waves of Ume6-dependent meiotic genes, we integrated expression data with information on protein networks. Our work identifies novel Ume6 repressed genes during growth and development and reveals a strong effect of the carbon source on the derepression pattern of transcripts in growing and developmentally arrested ume6/ume6 mutant cells. Since yeast is a useful model organism for chromatin-mediated effects on gene expression, our results provide a rich source for further genetic and molecular biological work on the regulation of cell growth and cell differentiation in eukaryotes.

  17. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. - Highlights: • p53 is robustly

  18. Blue Light–Dependent Interaction between Cryptochrome2 and CIB1 Regulates Transcription and Leaf Senescence in Soybean[W

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yingying; Li, Hongyu; Wang, Qin; Liu, Bin; Lin, Chentao

    2013-01-01

    Cryptochromes are blue light receptors that regulate light responses in plants, including various crops. The molecular mechanism of plant cryptochromes has been extensively investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana, but it has not been reported in any crop species. Here, we report a study of the mechanism of soybean (Glycine max) cryptochrome2 (CRY2a). We found that CRY2a regulates leaf senescence, which is a life history trait regulated by light and photoperiods via previously unknown mechanisms. We show that CRY2a undergoes blue light–dependent interaction with the soybean basic helix-loop-helix transcription activator CIB1 (for cryptochrome-interacting bHLH1) that specifically interacts with the E-box (CANNTG) DNA sequences. Analyses of transgenic soybean plants expressing an elevated or reduced level of the CRY2a or CIB1 demonstrate that CIB1 promotes leaf senescence, whereas CRY2a suppresses leaf senescence. Results of the gene expression and molecular interaction analyses support the hypothesis that CIB1 activates transcription of senescence-associated genes, such as WRKY DNA BINDING PROTEIN53b (WRKY53b), and leaf senescence. CIB1 interacts with the E-box–containing promoter sequences of the WRKY53b chromatin, whereas photoexcited CRY2a interacts with CIB1 to inhibit its DNA binding activity. These findings argue that CIB-dependent transcriptional regulation is an evolutionarily conserved CRY-signaling mechanism in plants, and this mechanism is opted in evolution to mediate light regulation of different aspects of plant development in different plant species. PMID:24272488

  19. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H₂O₂ production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death.

  20. Dynamics of the STAT3 Transcription Factor: Nuclear Import Dependent on Ran and Importin-β1

    PubMed Central

    Cimica, Velasco; Chen, Hui-Chen; Iyer, Janaki K.; Reich, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) induces transcription of genes that control differentiation, inflammation, proliferation, and tumor cell invasion. Cytokines such as interleukin-6 and interferon stimulate the specific tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3, which confers its ability to bind consensus DNA targets. In addition, unphosphorylated STAT3 has been demonstrated to induce specific gene expression. STAT3 must gain entrance to the nucleus to impact transcription, however access to the nucleus is a tightly regulated process. Because nuclear trafficking is critical to the function of STAT3, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which STAT3 is imported to the nucleus. Live cell imaging techniques were used with STAT3 tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP) or photoactivatable GFP to follow the cellular dynamics of both unphosphorylated and tyrosine phosphorylated forms. Cytokine activation did not alter the rate of STAT3 nuclear import or nuclear export. In addition, Förster resonance energy transfer experiments revealed homomeric interaction of unphosphorylated STAT3 dependent on its amino terminus, but this dimerization is not necessary for its nuclear import. Previous work demonstrated the adapter importin-α3 binds to STAT3 and is required for nuclear import. To determine whether STAT3 nuclear import is mediated by the importin-α/importin-β1 heterodimer, the effects of siRNA to importin-β1 were evaluated. Results indicate STAT3 nuclear import is dependent on the function of importin-β1. Since the Ran GTPase is necessary to bind importin-β1 in the nucleus for release of importin-α-cargo, the effect of a GTPase deficient mutant of Ran was tested. Expression of the Ran interfering mutant inhibited STAT3 nuclear import. This study defines importin-α/importin-β1/Ran as the molecular mechanism by which STAT3 traffics to the nucleus. PMID:21625522

  1. Complementary quantitative proteomics reveals that transcription factor AP-4 mediates E-box-dependent complex formation for transcriptional repression of HDM2.

    PubMed

    Ku, Wei-Chi; Chiu, Sung-Kay; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Hsin-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2009-09-01

    Transcription factor activating enhancer-binding protein 4 (AP-4) is a basic helix-loop-helix protein that binds to E-box elements. AP-4 has received increasing attention for its regulatory role in cell growth and development, including transcriptional repression of the human homolog of murine double minute 2 (HDM2), an important oncoprotein controlling cell growth and survival, by an unknown mechanism. Here we demonstrate that AP-4 binds to an E-box located in the HDM2-P2 promoter and represses HDM2 transcription in a p53-independent manner. Incremental truncations of AP-4 revealed that the C-terminal Gln/Pro-rich domain was essential for transcriptional repression of HDM2. To further delineate the molecular mechanism(s) of AP-4 transcriptional control and its potential implications, we used DNA-affinity purification followed by complementary quantitative proteomics, cICAT and iTRAQ labeling methods, to identify a previously unknown E-box-bound AP-4 protein complex containing 75 putative components. The two labeling methods complementarily quantified differentially AP-4-enriched proteins, including the most significant recruitment of DNA damage response proteins, followed by transcription factors, transcriptional repressors/corepressors, and histone-modifying proteins. Specific interaction of AP-4 with CCCTC binding factor, stimulatory protein 1, and histone deacetylase 1 (an AP-4 corepressor) was validated using AP-4 truncation mutants. Importantly, inclusion of trichostatin A did not alleviate AP-4-mediated repression of HDM2 transcription, suggesting a previously unidentified histone deacetylase-independent repression mechanism. In contrast, the complementary quantitative proteomics study suggested that transcription repression occurs via coordination of AP-4 with other transcription factors, histone methyltransferases, and/or a nucleosome remodeling SWI.SNF complex. In addition to previously known functions of AP-4, our data suggest that AP-4 participates in a

  2. Protein–DNA interfaces: a molecular dynamics analysis of time-dependent recognition processes for three transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Etheve, Loïc; Martin, Juliette; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of three transcription factor–DNA complexes using all-atom, microsecond-scale MD simulations. In each case, the salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions formed at the protein–DNA interface are found to be dynamic, with lifetimes typically in the range of tens to hundreds of picoseconds, although some interactions, notably those involving specific binding to DNA bases, can be a hundred times longer lived. Depending on the complex studied, this dynamics may or may not lead to the existence of distinct conformational substates. Using a sequence threading technique, it has been possible to determine whether DNA sequence recognition is sensitive or not to such conformational changes, and, in one case, to show that recognition appears to be locally dependent on protein-mediated cation distributions. PMID:27658967

  3. The PspA Protein of Escherichia coli Is a Negative Regulator of ς54-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Jonathan; Jovanovic, Goran; Model, Peter

    2000-01-01

    In Eubacteria, expression of genes transcribed by an RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing the alternate sigma factor ς54 is positively regulated by proteins belonging to the family of enhancer-binding proteins (EBPs). These proteins bind to upstream activation sequences and are required for the initiation of transcription at the ς54-dependent promoters. They are typically inactive until modified in their N-terminal regulatory domain either by specific phosphorylation or by the binding of a small effector molecule. EBPs lacking this domain, such as the PspF activator of the ς54-dependent pspA promoter, are constitutively active. We describe here the in vivo and in vitro properties of the PspA protein of Escherichia coli, which negatively regulates expression of the pspA promoter without binding DNA directly. PMID:10629175

  4. Induction of latent memory for conditioned food aversion and its transformation into "active" state depend on translation and transcription processes.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, S V; Nikitin, V P

    2014-05-01

    Mechanisms of induction and retrieval of latent (hidden) memory for conditioned food aversion were investigated in snails. After initial training (single combination of a food stimulus with electric shock), aversive reactions to presentation of the conditioned food stimulus were not revealed. Repeated presentation of the stimuli in 12 days after the first combination was followed by the appearance of aversive food reactions that persisted for at least 14 days. Injections of inhibitors of protein (cycloheximide) or RNA (α-amanitin) synthesis immediately after the first or second combined presentation of the stimuli disturbed skill performance. We hypothesized that single combination of food and reinforcing stimuli led to translation- and transcription-dependent induction of latent conditioned food aversion memory. Transformation of this memory into an active state after repeated presentation of the stimulus combination also depends on the synthesis of new proteins and RNA.

  5. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way. PMID:26616174

  6. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration.

    PubMed

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-11-30

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way.

  7. The calcineurin dependent transcription factor TacA is involved in development and the stress response of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Thewes, Sascha; Krohn, Stefanie; Schmith, Anika; Herzog, Sergej; Stach, Thomas; Weissenmayer, Barbara; Mutzel, Rupert

    2012-10-01

    Calcineurin is an important signalling protein in a plethora of Ca(2+)-regulated cellular processes. In contrast to what is known about the function of calcineurin in various organisms, information on calcineurin substrates is still limited. Here we describe the identification and characterisation of the transcription factor activated by calcineurin (TacA) in the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. TacA is a putative zinc-finger transcription factor orthologue of yeast Crz1. In resting unstimulated cells the protein is located in the cytosol and translocates to the nucleus in a calcineurin-dependent manner after Ca(2+)-stimulation. Nuclear export of TacA is partially dependent on GskA, the Dictyostelium orthologue of mammalian GSK3. The expression of tacA is developmentally regulated with its kinetics roughly paralleling calcineurin regulation. Silencing of tacA via RNAi leads to developmental defects and dysregulation of developmentally regulated and Ca(2+)-regulated marker genes. Additionally, TacA is involved in the stress response of D. discoideum during development in a separate pathway to the well-known stress response in Dictyostelium via STATc. Finally we provide evidence that TacA is not only an orthologue of yeast Crz1 but also functionally related to mammalian NFAT.

  8. The ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme Fun30 represses transcription by sliding promoter-proximal nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Boseon; Wang, Wei; Barski, Artem; Ranallo, Ryan T; Bao, Kan; Schones, Dustin E; Zhao, Keji; Wu, Carl; Wu, Wei-Hua

    2013-08-09

    The evolutionarily conserved ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme Fun30 has recently been shown to play important roles in heterochromatin silencing and DNA repair. However, how Fun30 remodels nucleosomes is not clear. Here we report a nucleosome sliding activity of Fun30 and its role in transcriptional repression. We observed that Fun30 repressed the expression of genes involved in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism, the stress response, and meiosis. In addition, Fun30 was localized at the 5' and 3' ends of genes and within the open reading frames of its targets. Consistent with its role in gene repression, we observed that Fun30 target genes lacked histone modifications often associated with gene activation and showed an increased level of ubiquitinated histone H2B. Furthermore, a genome-wide nucleosome mapping analysis revealed that the length of the nucleosome-free region at the 5' end of a subset of genes was changed in Fun30-depleted cells. In addition, the positions of the -1, +2, and +3 nucleosomes at the 5' end of target genes were shifted significantly, whereas the position of the +1 nucleosome remained largely unchanged in the fun30Δ mutant. Finally, we demonstrated that affinity-purified, single-component Fun30 exhibited a nucleosome sliding activity in an ATP-dependent manner. These results define a role for Fun30 in the regulation of transcription and indicate that Fun30 remodels chromatin at the 5' end of genes by sliding promoter-proximal nucleosomes.

  9. Gli2 Acetylation at Lysine 757 Regulates Hedgehog-Dependent Transcriptional Output by Preventing Its Promoter Occupancy

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Davide; Di Magno, Laura; Infante, Paola; De Smaele, Enrico; Giannini, Giuseppe; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    The morphogenic Hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates postnatal cerebellar development and its aberrant activation leads to medulloblastoma. The transcription factors Gli1 and Gli2 are the activators of Hh pathway and their function is finely controlled by different covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination. We show here that Gli2 is endogenously acetylated and that this modification represents a key regulatory step for Hedgehog signaling. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) coactivator p300, but not other HATs, acetylates Gli2 at the conserved lysine K757 thus inhibiting Hh target gene expression. By generating a specific anti acetyl-Gli2(Lys757) antisera we demonstrated that Gli2 acetylation is readily detectable at endogenous levels and is attenuated by Hh agonists. Moreover, Gli2 K757R mutant activity is higher than wild type Gli2 and is no longer enhanced by Hh agonists, indicating that acetylation represents an additional level of control for signal dependent activation. Consistently, in sections of developing mouse cerebella Gli2 acetylation correlates with the activation status of Hedgehog signaling. Mechanistically, acetylation at K757 prevents Gli2 entry into chromatin. Together, these data illustrate a novel mechanism of regulation of the Hh signaling whereby, in concert with Gli1, Gli2 acetylation functions as a key transcriptional checkpoint in the control of morphogen-dependent processes. PMID:23762415

  10. Context-dependent regulation of Th17-associated genes and IFNγ expression by the transcription factor NFAT5.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, Maria; Iglesias, Marcos; Tejedor, Sonia; Merino, Ramón; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Stress-activated transcription factors influence T-cell function in different physiopathologic contexts. NFAT5, a relative of nuclear factor κB and the calcineurin-activated NFATc transcription factors, protects mammalian cells from hyperosmotic stress caused by the elevation of extracellular sodium levels. In T cells exposed to hypernatremia, NFAT5 not only induces osmoprotective gene products but also cytokines and immune receptors, which raises the question of whether this factor could regulate other T-cell functions in osmostress-independent contexts. Here we have used mice with a conditional deletion of Nfat5 in mature T lymphocytes to explore osmostress-dependent and -independent functions of this factor. In vitro experiments with CD4 T cells stimulated in hyperosmotic medium showed that NFAT5 enhanced the expression of IL-2 and the Th17-associated gene products RORγt and IL-23R. By contrast, NFAT5-deficient CD4 T cells activated in vivo by anti-CD3 antibody exhibited a different activation profile and were skewed towards enhanced interferon γ (IFNγ) and IL-17 expression and attenuated Treg responses. Using a model of experimental colitis, we observed that mice lacking NFAT5 in T cells exhibited exacerbated intestinal colitis and enhanced expression of IFNγ in draining lymph nodes and colon. These results show that NFAT5 can modulate different T-cell responses depending on stress conditions and stimulatory context.

  11. Context-dependent regulation of Th17-associated genes and IFNγ expression by the transcription factor NFAT5

    PubMed Central

    Alberdi, Maria; Iglesias, Marcos; Tejedor, Sonia; Merino, Ramón; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Stress-activated transcription factors influence T-cell function in different physiopathologic contexts. NFAT5, a relative of nuclear factor κB and the calcineurin-activated NFATc transcription factors, protects mammalian cells from hyperosmotic stress caused by the elevation of extracellular sodium levels. In T cells exposed to hypernatremia, NFAT5 not only induces osmoprotective gene products but also cytokines and immune receptors, which raises the question of whether this factor could regulate other T-cell functions in osmostress-independent contexts. Here we have used mice with a conditional deletion of Nfat5 in mature T lymphocytes to explore osmostress-dependent and -independent functions of this factor. In vitro experiments with CD4 T cells stimulated in hyperosmotic medium showed that NFAT5 enhanced the expression of IL-2 and the Th17-associated gene products RORγt and IL-23R. By contrast, NFAT5-deficient CD4 T cells activated in vivo by anti-CD3 antibody exhibited a different activation profile and were skewed towards enhanced interferon γ (IFNγ) and IL-17 expression and attenuated Treg responses. Using a model of experimental colitis, we observed that mice lacking NFAT5 in T cells exhibited exacerbated intestinal colitis and enhanced expression of IFNγ in draining lymph nodes and colon. These results show that NFAT5 can modulate different T-cell responses depending on stress conditions and stimulatory context. PMID:27479742

  12. Lysine 246 of the vitamin D receptor is crucial for ligand-dependent interaction with coactivators and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Lara, A M; Aranda, A

    1999-05-07

    Mutant K246A in the predicted helix 3 of the ligand-binding domain, as well as mutants L417S and E420Q in helix 12, which contains the core ligand-dependent transcriptional activation domain (AF-2), were generated to examine AF-2 activity of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). These mutations abolished vitamin D-dependent transactivation. In addition, VDR mediates a ligand-dependent repression of the response of the retinoic acid receptor beta2 promoter to retinoic acid, and the helix 3 and helix 12 mutants were unable to mediate transrepression. Furthermore, the VDR mutants, but not the native receptor, enhanced phorbol ester induction of the activator protein-1-containing collagenase promoter. The helix 3 and helix 12 mutations strikingly reduced the ability of VDR to interact with the coactivators steroid receptor coactivator-1, ACTR, and the CREB-binding protein. As a consequence, overexpression of steroid receptor coactivator-1 increased vitamin D-dependent transactivation by VDR but not by the K246A mutant. These results indicate that the lysine 246 participates, together with residues in helix 12, in the recruitment of coactivators and that AF-2 activity is involved both in ligand-dependent transactivation and in transrepression by VDR.

  13. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state.

  14. Interleukin-8 Induces Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB through a TRAF6-dependent Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Sunil K.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2009-01-01

    Considering the potential role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in inflammation, angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, and metastasis, we investigated the molecular mechanism involved in IL-8-mediated signaling. In this report we provide evidence that like TNF, an inducer of NF-κB and also a NF-κB-dependent gene product, IL-8 induces NF-κB in a unique pathway. IL-8 induces NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner in different cell types as detected by a DNA-protein binding assay. IL-8 induces NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression as well as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and Cox-2 expression. IL-8 also induces IκBα phosphorylation followed by degradation and p65 translocation. IL-8 induces c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IL-8-induced NF-κB activation is for the most part unaltered when cells are transfected with dominant-negative TRADD, FADD, or TRAF2, but is inhibited with dominant-negative TRAF6-, NIK-, IKK-, or IκBα-transfected cells. The data suggest that IL-8-induced NF-κB activation proceeds through a TRAF2-independent but TRAF6-dependent pathway, followed by recruitment of IRAK and activation of IKK. IL-8-induced NF-κB activation is not observed in a cell-permeable peptide that has TRAF6 binding motif-treated cells or IRAK-deficient cells. IL-8-induced NF-κB activation proceeds mostly through interaction with TRAF6 and partially through the Rho-GTPase pathways. This is the first report that IL-8 induces NF-κB in a distinct pathway, and activation of NF-κB and its dependent genes may be one of the pathways of IL-8-induced inflammation and angiogenesis. PMID:15591054

  15. Automated incorporation of pairwise dependency in transcription factor binding site prediction using dinucleotide weight tensors

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Saeed; Zavolan, Mihaela; Pachkov, Mikhail; Breda, Jeremie; Berger, Severin

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks are ultimately encoded by the sequence-specific binding of (TFs) to short DNA segments. Although it is customary to represent the binding specificity of a TF by a position-specific weight matrix (PSWM), which assumes each position within a site contributes independently to the overall binding affinity, evidence has been accumulating that there can be significant dependencies between positions. Unfortunately, methodological challenges have so far hindered the development of a practical and generally-accepted extension of the PSWM model. On the one hand, simple models that only consider dependencies between nearest-neighbor positions are easy to use in practice, but fail to account for the distal dependencies that are observed in the data. On the other hand, models that allow for arbitrary dependencies are prone to overfitting, requiring regularization schemes that are difficult to use in practice for non-experts. Here we present a new regulatory motif model, called dinucleotide weight tensor (DWT), that incorporates arbitrary pairwise dependencies between positions in binding sites, rigorously from first principles, and free from tunable parameters. We demonstrate the power of the method on a large set of ChIP-seq data-sets, showing that DWTs outperform both PSWMs and motif models that only incorporate nearest-neighbor dependencies. We also demonstrate that DWTs outperform two previously proposed methods. Finally, we show that DWTs inferred from ChIP-seq data also outperform PSWMs on HT-SELEX data for the same TF, suggesting that DWTs capture inherent biophysical properties of the interactions between the DNA binding domains of TFs and their binding sites. We make a suite of DWT tools available at dwt.unibas.ch, that allow users to automatically perform ‘motif finding’, i.e. the inference of DWT motifs from a set of sequences, binding site prediction with DWTs, and visualization of DWT ‘dilogo’ motifs. PMID:28753602

  16. Iron regulation through the back door: iron-dependent metabolite levels contribute to transcriptional adaptation to iron deprivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ihrig, Jessica; Hausmann, Anja; Hain, Anika; Richter, Nadine; Hamza, Iqbal; Lill, Roland; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2010-03-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) responds to iron deprivation both by Aft1-Aft2-dependent transcriptional activation of genes involved in cellular iron uptake and by Cth1-Cth2-specific degradation of certain mRNAs coding for iron-dependent biosynthetic components. Here, we provide evidence for a novel principle of iron-responsive gene expression. This regulatory mechanism is based on the modulation of transcription through the iron-dependent variation of levels of regulatory metabolites. As an example, the LEU1 gene of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis is downregulated under iron-limiting conditions through depletion of the metabolic intermediate alpha-isopropylmalate, which functions as a key transcriptional coactivator of the Leu3 transcription factor. Synthesis of alpha-isopropylmalate involves the iron-sulfur protein Ilv3, which is inactivated under iron deficiency. As another example, decreased mRNA levels of the cytochrome c-encoding CYC1 gene under iron-limiting conditions involve heme-dependent transcriptional regulation via the Hap1 transcription factor. Synthesis of the iron-containing heme is directly correlated with iron availability. Thus, the iron-responsive expression of genes that are downregulated under iron-limiting conditions is conferred by two independent regulatory mechanisms: transcriptional regulation through iron-responsive metabolites and posttranscriptional mRNA degradation. Only the combination of the two processes provides a quantitative description of the response to iron deprivation in yeast.

  17. Restraint of angiogenesis by zinc finger transcription factor CTCF-dependent chromatin insulation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Chen, Bo; Pardo, Carolina; Pampo, Christine; Chen, Jing; Lien, Ching-Ling; Wu, Lizi; Wang, Heiman; Yao, Kai; Oh, S. Paul; Seto, Edward; Smith, Lois E. H.; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Kladde, Michael P.; Cepko, Constance L.; Lu, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is meticulously controlled by a fine balance between positive and negative regulatory activities. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a predominant angiogenic factor and its dosage is precisely regulated during normal vascular formation. In cancer, VEGF is commonly overproduced, resulting in abnormal neovascularization. VEGF is induced in response to various stimuli including hypoxia; however, very little is known about the mechanisms that confine its induction to ensure proper angiogenesis. Chromatin insulation is a key transcription mechanism that prevents promiscuous gene activation by interfering with the action of enhancers. Here we show that the chromatin insulator-binding factor CTCF binds to the proximal promoter of VEGF. Consistent with the enhancer-blocking mode of chromatin insulators, CTCF has little effect on basal expression of VEGF but specifically affects its activation by enhancers. CTCF knockdown cells are sensitized for induction of VEGF and exhibit elevated proangiogenic potential. Cancer-derived CTCF missense mutants are mostly defective in blocking enhancers at the VEGF locus. Moreover, during mouse retinal development, depletion of CTCF causes excess angiogenesis. Therefore, CTCF-mediated chromatin insulation acts as a crucial safeguard against hyperactivation of angiogenesis. PMID:21896759

  18. Quiescent center initiation in the Arabidopsis lateral root primordia is dependent on the SCARECROW transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Goh, Tatsuaki; Toyokura, Koichi; Wells, Darren M; Swarup, Kamal; Yamamoto, Mayuko; Mimura, Tetsuro; Weijers, Dolf; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Laplaze, Laurent; Bennett, Malcolm J; Guyomarc'h, Soazig

    2016-09-15

    Lateral root formation is an important determinant of root system architecture. In Arabidopsis, lateral roots originate from pericycle cells, which undergo a program of morphogenesis to generate a new lateral root meristem. Despite its importance for root meristem organization, the onset of quiescent center (QC) formation during lateral root morphogenesis remains unclear. Here, we used live 3D confocal imaging to monitor cell organization and identity acquisition during lateral root development. Our dynamic observations revealed an early morphogenesis phase and a late meristem formation phase as proposed in the bi-phasic growth model. Establishment of lateral root QCs coincided with this developmental phase transition. QC precursor cells originated from the outer layer of stage II lateral root primordia, within which the SCARECROW (SCR) transcription factor was specifically expressed. Disrupting SCR function abolished periclinal divisions in this lateral root primordia cell layer and perturbed the formation of QC precursor cells. We conclude that de novo QC establishment in lateral root primordia operates via SCR-mediated formative cell division and coincides with the developmental phase transition.

  19. Transcription-dependent R-loop formation at mammalian class switch sequences

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Robert B.; Lieber, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switching is mediated by recombination between switch sequences located immediately upstream of the immunoglobulin constant heavy chain genes. Targeting of recombination to particular switch sequences is associated temporally with transcription through these regions. We recently have provided evidence for inducible and stable RNA–DNA hybrid formation at switch sequences in the mouse genome that are mechanistically important for class switching in vivo. Here, we define in vitro the precise configuration of the DNA and RNA strands within this hybrid structure at the Sμ, Sγ3 and Sγ2b mouse switch sequences. We find that the G–rich (non-template) DNA strand of each switch sequence is hypersensitive to probes throughout much of its length, while the C–rich (template) DNA strand is essentially resistant. These results demonstrate formation of an R–loop, whereby the G–rich RNA strand forms a stable heteroduplex with its C–rich DNA strand counterpart, and the G–rich DNA strand exists primarily in a single-stranded state. We propose that the organized structure of the R–loop is essential for targeting the class switch recombination machinery to these sequences. PMID:10698946

  20. Bryostatin-1 stimulates the transcription of cyclooxygenase-2: evidence for an activator protein-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Mariana S; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2003-10-15

    Bryostatin-1 (bryostatin) is a macrocyclic lactone derived from Bugula neritina, a marine bryozoan. On the basis of the strength of in vitro and animal studies, bryostatin is being investigated as a possible treatment for a variety of human malignancies. Severe myalgias are a common dose-limiting side effect. Because cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandins can cause pain, we investigated whether bryostatin induced COX-2. Bryostatin (1-10 nM) induced COX-2 mRNA, COX-2 protein, and prostaglandin biosynthesis. These effects were observed in macrophages as well as in a series of human cancer cell lines. Transient transfections localized the stimulatory effects of bryostatin to the cyclic AMP response element of the COX-2 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and supershift experiments revealed a marked increase in the binding of activator protein-1 (AP-1)(c-Jun/c-Fos) to the cyclic AMP response element of the COX-2 promoter. Pharmacological and transient transfection studies indicated that bryostatin stimulated COX-2 transcription via the protein kinase C-->mitogen-activated protein kinase-->AP-1 pathway. All-trans-retinoic acid, a prototypic AP-1 antagonist, blocked bryostatin-mediated induction of COX-2. Taken together, these results suggest that bryostatin-mediated induction of COX-2 can help to explain the myalgias that are commonly associated with treatment. Moreover, it will be worthwhile to evaluate whether the addition of a selective COX-2 inhibitor can increase the antitumor activity of bryostatin.

  1. Transcription-dependent radial distribution of TCF7L2 regulated genes in chromosome territories.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Keyvan; Wangsa, Darawalee; Ponsa, Immaculada; Brown, Markus; Bosch, Anna; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Karpova, Tatiana S; Calvo, Maria; Castells, Antoni; Miró, Rosa; Ried, Thomas; Camps, Jordi

    2017-03-25

    Human chromosomes occupy distinct territories in the interphase nucleus. Such chromosome territories (CTs) are positioned according to gene density. Gene-rich CTs are generally located in the center of the nucleus, while gene-poor CTs are positioned more towards the nuclear periphery. However, the association between gene expression levels and the radial positioning of genes within the CT is still under debate. In the present study, we performed three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments in the colorectal cancer cell lines DLD-1 and LoVo using whole chromosome painting probes for chromosomes 8 and 11 and BAC clones targeting four genes with different expression levels assessed by gene expression arrays and RT-PCR. Our results confirmed that the two over-expressed genes, MYC on chromosome 8 and CCND1 on chromosome 11, are located significantly further away from the center of the CT compared to under-expressed genes on the same chromosomes, i.e., DLC1 and SCN3B. When CCND1 expression was reduced after silencing the major transcription factor of the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, TCF7L2, the gene was repositioned and mostly detected in the interior of the CT. Thus, we suggest a non-random distribution in which over-expressed genes are located more towards the periphery of the respective CTs.

  2. The Drosophila Transcription Factor Dimmed Affects Neuronal Growth and Differentiation in Multiple Ways Depending on Neuron Type and Developmental Stage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiting; Luo, Jiangnan; Nässel, Dick R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of postmitotic neurons occurs during different stages of development, including metamorphosis, and may also be part of neuronal plasticity and regeneration. Recently we showed that growth of post-mitotic neuroendocrine cells expressing the basic helix loop helix (bHLH) transcription factor Dimmed (Dimm) in Drosophila could be regulated by insulin/IGF signaling and the insulin receptor (dInR). Dimm is also known to confer a secretory phenotype to neuroendocrine cells and can be part of a combinatorial code specifying terminal differentiation in peptidergic neurons. To further understand the mechanisms of Dimm function we ectopically expressed Dimm or Dimm together with dInR in a wide range of Dimm positive and Dimm negative peptidergic neurons, sensory neurons, interneurons, motor neurons, and gut endocrine cells. We provide further evidence that dInR mediated cell growth occurs in a Dimm dependent manner and that one source of insulin-like peptide (DILP) for dInR mediated cell growth in the CNS is DILP6 from glial cells. Expressing both Dimm and dInR in Dimm negative neurons induced growth of cell bodies, whereas dInR alone did not. We also found that Dimm alone can regulate cell growth depending on specific cell type. This may be explained by the finding that the dInR is a direct target of Dimm. Conditional gene targeting experiments showed that Dimm alone could affect cell growth in certain neuron types during metamorphosis or in the adult stage. Another important finding was that ectopic Dimm inhibits apoptosis of several types of neurons normally destined for programmed cell death (PCD). Taken together our results suggest that Dimm plays multiple transcriptional roles at different developmental stages in a cell type-specific manner. In some cell types ectopic Dimm may act together with resident combinatorial code transcription factors and affect terminal differentiation, as well as act in transcriptional networks that participate in long term maintenance

  3. Discovery Proteomics Identifies a Molecular Link between the Coatomer Protein Complex I and Androgen Receptor-dependent Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Lee, Jinhee; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcription is a hallmark of human prostate cancers. At the molecular level, ligand-mediated AR activation is coordinated through spatial and temporal protein-protein interactions involving AR-interacting proteins, which we designate the “AR-interactome.” Despite many years of research, the ligand-sensitive protein complexes involved in ligand-mediated AR activation in prostate tumor cells have not been clearly defined. Here, we describe the development, characterization, and utilization of a novel human LNCaP prostate tumor cell line, N-AR, which stably expresses wild-type AR tagged at its N terminus with the streptavidin-binding peptide epitope (streptavidin-binding peptide-tagged wild-type androgen receptor; SBP-AR). A bioanalytical workflow involving streptavidin chromatography and label-free quantitative mass spectrometry was used to identify SBP-AR and associated ligand-sensitive cytosolic proteins/protein complexes linked to AR activation in prostate tumor cells. Functional studies verified that ligand-sensitive proteins identified in the proteomic screen encoded modulators of AR-mediated transcription, suggesting that these novel proteins were putative SBP-AR-interacting proteins in N-AR cells. This was supported by biochemical associations between recombinant SBP-AR and the ligand-sensitive coatomer protein complex I (COPI) retrograde trafficking complex in vitro. Extensive biochemical and molecular experiments showed that the COPI retrograde complex regulates ligand-mediated AR transcriptional activation, which correlated with the mobilization of the Golgi-localized ARA160 coactivator to the nuclear compartment of prostate tumor cells. Collectively, this study provides a bioanalytical strategy to validate the AR-interactome and define novel AR-interacting proteins involved in ligand-mediated AR activation in prostate tumor cells. Moreover, we describe a cellular system to study how compartment-specific AR

  4. Selective Impairment of Nuclear Factor-κB-Dependent Gene Transcription in Adult Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, Jimena; Goren, Nora; Prieto, Patricia; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Boscá, Lisardo

    2007-01-01

    The ability of neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes to activate the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway in response to lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1β challenge has been investigated and compared with that of peritoneal macrophages. The activation of the IκB kinase and the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα and IκBβ was much lower in adult cardiomyocytes than in the neonatal counterparts and macrophages. This restricted activation of the NF-κB pathway resulted in a significant reduction in the time of nuclear activation of NF-κB, as deduced by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and in the transcription of target genes, such as IκBα, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and nitric-oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2). Studies on chromatin immunoprecipitation showed binding of NF-κB proteins to the regulatory κB sites identified in the promoters of the IκBα, COX-2, and NOS-2 genes in macrophages and, to a lower extent, in neonatal cardiomyocytes. The binding to these κB sites in adult cardiomyocytes was observed only in the IκBα promoter and was minimal or absent in the COX-2 and NOS-2 promoters, respectively, suggesting a restricted activation of NF-κB-regulated genes in these cells. These data indicate that the function of the NF-κB pathway in adult cardiomyocytes is limited in time, which results in the expression of a reduced number of genes and provides a functional explanation for the absence of NOS-2 inducibility in these cells under proinflammatory conditions. PMID:17675583

  5. Dependence of stimulus-transcription coupling on phospholipase D in agonist-stimulated pituitary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cesnjaj, M; Zheng, L; Catt, K J; Stojilkovic, S S

    1995-01-01

    Stimulation of phospholipase D activity is frequently observed during agonist activation of Ca(2+)-mobilizing receptors, but the cellular functions of this signaling pathway are not well defined. Pituitary gonadotrophs express Ca(2+)-mobilizing receptors for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and endothelin (ET), activation of which stimulates luteinizing hormone secretion and transient expression of c-fos. In pituitary cells and alpha T3-1 gonadotrophs, GnRH action was associated with both initial and sustained diacylglycerol (DG) production, whereas ET-1 induced only a transient DG response. Also, phospholipase D activity, estimated by the production of phosphatidylethanol from phosphatidylcholine in the presence of ethanol, was stimulated by GnRH but not ET-1. Such formation of phosphatidylethanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA) during GnRH-induced activation of phospholipase D significantly reduced the production of PA, DG, and cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol. Inhibition of PA-phosphohydrolase activity by propranolol also decreased GnRH-induced DG production and, in contrast to ethanol, increased PA and cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol levels. The fall in DG production caused by ethanol and propranolol was accompanied by inhibition of GnRH-induced c-fos expression, whereas agonist-induced luteinizing hormone release was not affected. In contrast to their inhibitory actions on GnRH-induced early gene expression, neither ethanol nor propranolol affected ET-1-induced c-fos expression, or GnRH- and ET-1-induced inositol trisphosphate/Ca2+ signaling. These findings demonstrate that phospholipase D participates in stimulus-transcription but not stimulus-secretion coupling, and indicate that DG is the primary signal for this action. Images PMID:7579706

  6. Influence of the sequence-dependent flexure of DNA on transcription in E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, C M; Molloy, P L; Both, G W; Drew, H R

    1989-01-01

    In order to study the effects of DNA structure on cellular processes such as transcription, we have made a series of plasmids that locate several different kinds of DNA structure (stiff, flexible or curved) near the sites of cleavage by commonly-used restriction enzymes. One can use these plasmids to place any DNA region of interest (e.g., promoter, operator or enhancer) close to certain kinds of DNA structure that may influence its ability to work in a living cell. In the present example, we have placed a promoter from T7 virus next to the special DNA structures; the T7 promoter is then linked to a gene for a marker protein (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase). When plasmids bearing the T7 promoter are grown in cells of E. coli that contain T7 RNA polymerase, the special DNA structures seem to have little or no influence over the activity of the T7 promoter, contrary to our expectations. Yet when the same plasmids are grown in cells of E. coli that do not contain T7 RNA polymerase, some of the DNA structures show a surprising promoter activity of their own. In particular, the favourable flexibility or curvature of DNA, in the close vicinity of potential -35 and -10 promoter regions, seems to be a significant factor in determining where E. coli RNA polymerase starts RNA chains. We show directly, in one example, that loss of curvature between -35 and -10 regions is associated with a nearly-complete loss of promoter activity. These results, and others of their kind, show that the structural and/or vibrational properties of DNA play a much more important role in determining E. coli promoter activity than has previously been supposed. Images PMID:2685760

  7. Defective human retinoblastoma protein identified by lack of interaction with the E1A oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Paggi, M G; Martelli, F; Fanciulli, M; Felsani, A; Sciacchitano, S; Varmi, M; Bruno, T; Carapella, C M; Floridi, A

    1994-02-15

    Inactivating mutations of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (Rb) are involved in the pathogenesis of hereditary and sporadic retinoblastoma. Alterations in the Rb gene have also been found in several other human tumors occurring with epidemiological incidence higher than that of retinoblastoma. Four human malignant glioma cell lines were examined for abnormalities in the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb), using a procedure based on the interaction of pRb with an in vitro-translated adenovirus E1A oncoprotein. In the CRS-A2 cell line, derived from a glioblastoma multiforme, pRb did not bind with the in vitro-translated E1A protein. Restriction analysis of the CRS-A2 Rb gene and Rb mRNA expression provided patterns that could not be distinguished from the other glioma cell lines. Further investigation revealed the presence of a truncated pRb in the CRS-A2 cell line, due to a nucleotide insertion in the coding sequence at position 2550. In addition, this truncated Rb protein was undetectable in phosphorylated form. The binding assay with the in vitro-translated E1A was also used to study other cell lines with known mutations in the Rb gene. This method, which evaluates the interaction between in vitro-translated E1A and the pRb, is proposed as a rapid screening for detecting functional alterations in the retinoblastoma protein.

  8. Distinct regulation of activity-dependent transcription of immediate early genes in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Mamoru; Sanabe, Tomofumi; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Kubota, Takane; Tabuchi, Akiko; Tsuda, Masaaki

    2017-08-26

    The activity-regulated expression of immediate early genes (IEGs) contributes to long-lasting neuronal functions underlying long-term memory. However, their response properties following neuronal activity are unique and remain poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, here we further investigated the response properties of two representative IEGs, c-fos and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). Treatment of cultured cortical cells with KCl produces a depolarization process that results in the increase of intracellular calcium concentration in a KCl concentration-dependent manner. Consistent with this increase, c-fos expression was induced in a KCl concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, however, Bdnf expression was optimally activated by both 25 and 50 mM concentration of KCl. Similar results were observed when the cells were treated with okadaic acid, which inhibits protein phosphatases and elicits the hyper-phosphorylation of signaling molecules. Thus, Bdnf expression is strictly regulated by a neuronal activity threshold in an all or nothing manner, whereas c-fos expression is activated in a neuronal activity-dependent manner. Our findings also suggest that these differential responses might be due to the presence or absence of a TATA box. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A biological function for the neuronal activity-dependent component of Bdnf transcription in the development of cortical inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hong, Elizabeth J; McCord, Alejandra E; Greenberg, Michael E

    2008-11-26

    Neuronal activity-regulated gene expression has been suggested to be an important mediator of long-lasting, experience-dependent changes in the nervous system, but the activity-dependent component of gene transcription has never been selectively isolated and tested for its functional significance. Here, we demonstrate that introduction of a subtle knockin mutation into the mouse Bdnf gene that blocks the ability of the activity-regulated factor CREB to bind Bdnf promoter IV results in an animal in which the sensory experience-dependent induction of Bdnf expression is disrupted in the cortex. Neurons from these animals form fewer inhibitory synapses, have fewer spontaneous inhibitory quantal events, and exhibit reduced expression of inhibitory presynaptic markers in the cortex. These results indicate a specific requirement for activity-dependent Bdnf expression in the development of inhibition in the cortex and demonstrate that the activation of gene expression in response to experience-driven neuronal activity has important biological consequences in the nervous system.

  10. An Elk transcription factor is required for Runx-dependent survival signaling in the sea urchin embryo

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Francesca; Coffman, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Elk proteins are Ets family transcription factors that regulate cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in response to ERK (extracellular-signal regulated kinase)-mediated phosphorylation. Here we report the embryonic expression and function of Sp-Elk, the single Elk gene of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Sp-Elk is zygotically expressed throughout the embryo beginning at late cleavage stage, with peak expression occurring at blastula stage. Morpholino antisense-mediated knockdown of Sp-Elk causes blastula-stage developmental arrest and embryo disintegration due to apoptosis, a phenotype that is rescued by wild-type Elk mRNA. Development is also rescued by Elk mRNA encoding a serine to aspartic acid substitution (S402D) that mimics ERK-mediated phosphorylation of a conserved site that enhances DNA binding, but not by Elk mRNA encoding an alanine substitution at the same site (S402A). This demonstrates both that the apoptotic phenotype of the morphants is specifically caused by Elk depletion, and that phosphorylation of serine 402 of Sp-Elk is critical for its anti-apoptotic function. Knockdown of Sp-Elk results in under-expression of several regulatory genes involved in cell fate specification, cell cycle control, and survival signaling, including the transcriptional regulator Sp-Runt-1 and its target Sp-PKC1, both of which were shown previously to be required for cell survival during embryogenesis. Both Sp-Runt-1 and Sp-PKC1 have sequences upstream of their transcription start sites that specifically bind Sp-Elk. These results indicate that Sp-Elk is the signal-dependent activator of a feed-forward gene regulatory circuit, consisting also of Sp-Runt-1 and Sp-PKC1, which actively suppresses apoptosis in the early embryo. PMID:27235147

  11. Transcriptional response of zebrafish embryos exposed to neurotoxic compounds reveals a muscle activity dependent hspb11 expression.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Nils; Yang, Lixin; Busch, Wibke; Scheffler, Katja; Renner, Patrick; Strähle, Uwe; Scholz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used as pesticides and drugs. Their primary effect is the overstimulation of cholinergic receptors which results in an improper muscular function. During vertebrate embryonic development nerve activity and intracellular downstream events are critical for the regulation of muscle fiber formation. Whether AChE inhibitors and related neurotoxic compounds also provoke specific changes in gene transcription patterns during vertebrate development that allow them to establish a mechanistic link useful for identification of developmental toxicity pathways has, however, yet not been investigated. Therefore we examined the transcriptomic response of a known AChE inhibitor, the organophosphate azinphos-methyl (APM), in zebrafish embryos and compared the response with two non-AChE inhibiting unspecific control compounds, 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DMB) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). A highly specific cluster of APM induced gene transcripts was identified and a subset of strongly regulated genes was analyzed in more detail. The small heat shock protein hspb11 was found to be the most sensitive induced gene in response to AChE inhibitors. Comparison of expression in wildtype, ache and sop(fixe) mutant embryos revealed that hspb11 expression was dependent on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activity. Furthermore, modulators of intracellular calcium levels within the whole embryo led to a transcriptional up-regulation of hspb11 which suggests that elevated intracellular calcium levels may regulate the expression of this gene. During early zebrafish development, hspb11 was specifically expressed in muscle pioneer cells and Hspb11 morpholino-knockdown resulted in effects on slow muscle myosin organization. Our findings imply that a comparative toxicogenomic approach and functional analysis can lead to the identification of molecular mechanisms and specific marker genes for potential neurotoxic compounds.

  12. An Elk transcription factor is required for Runx-dependent survival signaling in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Francesca; Coffman, James A; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2016-08-01

    Elk proteins are Ets family transcription factors that regulate cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in response to ERK (extracellular-signal regulated kinase)-mediated phosphorylation. Here we report the embryonic expression and function of Sp-Elk, the single Elk gene of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Sp-Elk is zygotically expressed throughout the embryo beginning at late cleavage stage, with peak expression occurring at blastula stage. Morpholino antisense-mediated knockdown of Sp-Elk causes blastula-stage developmental arrest and embryo disintegration due to apoptosis, a phenotype that is rescued by wild-type Elk mRNA. Development is also rescued by Elk mRNA encoding a serine to aspartic acid substitution (S402D) that mimics ERK-mediated phosphorylation of a conserved site that enhances DNA binding, but not by Elk mRNA encoding an alanine substitution at the same site (S402A). This demonstrates both that the apoptotic phenotype of the morphants is specifically caused by Elk depletion, and that phosphorylation of serine 402 of Sp-Elk is critical for its anti-apoptotic function. Knockdown of Sp-Elk results in under-expression of several regulatory genes involved in cell fate specification, cell cycle control, and survival signaling, including the transcriptional regulator Sp-Runt-1 and its target Sp-PKC1, both of which were shown previously to be required for cell survival during embryogenesis. Both Sp-Runt-1 and Sp-PKC1 have sequences upstream of their transcription start sites that specifically bind Sp-Elk. These results indicate that Sp-Elk is the signal-dependent activator of a feed-forward gene regulatory circuit, consisting also of Sp-Runt-1 and Sp-PKC1, which actively suppresses apoptosis in the early embryo.

  13. The collection of NFATc1-dependent transcripts in the osteoclast includes numerous genes non-essential to physiologic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Julia F.; Coury, Fabienne; Sulyanto, Rosalyn; Sitara, Despina; Wu, Jing; Brady, Nicholas; Tsang, Kelly; Sigrist, Kirsten; Tollefsen, Douglas M.; He, Li; Storm, Daniel; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are specialized secretory cells of the myeloid lineage important for normal skeletal homeostasis as well as pathologic conditions of bone including osteoporosis, inflammatory arthritis and cancer metastasis. Differentiation of these multinucleated giant cells from precursors is controlled by the cytokine RANKL, which through its receptor RANK initiates a signaling cascade culminating in the activation of transcriptional regulators which induce the expression of the bone degradation machinery. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 (NFATc1) is the master regulator of this process and in its absence osteoclast differentiation is aborted both in vitro and in vivo. Differential mRNA expression analysis by microarray is used to identify genes of potential physiologic relevance across nearly all biologic systems. We compared the gene expression profile of murine wild-type and NFATc1-deficient osteoclast precursors stimulated with RANKL and identified that the majority of the known genes important for osteoclastic bone resorption require NFATc1 for induction. Here, five novel RANKL-induced, NFATc1-dependent transcripts in the osteoclast are described: Nhedc2, Rhoc, Serpind1, Adcy3 and Rab38. Despite reasonable hypotheses for the importance of these molecules in the bone resorption pathway and their dramatic induction during differentiation, the analysis of mice with mutations in these genes failed to reveal a function in osteoclast biology. Compared to littermate controls, none of these mutants demonstrated a skeletal phenotype in vivo or alterations in osteoclast differentiation or function in vitro. These data highlight the need for rigorous validation studies to complement expression profiling results before functional importance can be assigned to highly regulated genes in any biologic process. PMID:22985540

  14. Mid1p-dependent regulation of the M-G1 transcription wave in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Monica; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Mayeux, Adeline; Vajrala, Vasanthi; Quintana, Daniela M; Paoletti, Anne; McInerny, Christopher J

    2010-12-15

    The control of gene expression at certain times during the mitotic cell division cycle is a common feature in eukaryotes. In fission yeast, at least five waves of gene expression have been described, with one transcribed at the M-G1 interval under the control of the PBF transcription factor complex. PBF consists of at least three transcription factors, two forkhead-like proteins Sep1p and Fkh2p, and a MADS box-like protein Mbx1p, and binds to PCB motifs found in the gene promoters. Mbx1p is under the direct control of the polo-like kinase Plo1p and the Cdc14p-like phosphatase Clp1p (Flp1p). Here, we show that M-G1 gene expression in fission yeast is also regulated by the anillin-like protein, Mid1p (Dmf1p). Mid1p binds in vivo to both Fkh2p and Sep1p, and to the promoter regions of M-G1 transcribed genes. Mid1p promoter binding is dependent on Fkh2p, Plo1p and Clp1p. The absence of mid1(+) in cells results in partial loss of M-G1 specific gene expression, suggesting that it has a negative role in controlling gene expression. This phenotype is exacerbated by also removing clp1(+), suggesting that Mid1p and Clp1p have overlapping functions in controlling transcription. As mid1(+) is itself expressed at M-G1, these observations offer a new mechanism whereby Mid1p contributes to controlling cell cycle-specific gene expression as part of a feedback loop.

  15. Helios Transcription Factor Expression Depends on Gsx2 and Dlx1&2 Function in Developing Striatal Matrix Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Ibáñez, Raquel; Crespo, Empar; Esgleas, Miriam; Urban, Noelia; Wang, Bei; Waclaw, Ronald; Georgopoulos, Katia; Martínez, Salvador; Campbell, Kenneth; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos; Alberch, Jordi; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Rubenstein, John L.

    2012-01-01

    Development of the nervous system is finely regulated by consecutive expression of cell-specific transcription factors. Here we show that Helios, a member of the Ikaros transcription factor family, is expressed in ectodermal and neuroectodermal-derived tissues. During embryonic development, Helios is expressed by several brain structures including the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE, the striatal anlage); the cingulated, insular and retrosplenial cortex; the hippocampus; and the accessory olfactory bulb. Moreover, Helios is also expressed by Purkinje neurons during postnatal cerebellar development. Within the LGE, Helios expression follows a dynamic spatio-temporal pattern starting at embryonic stages (E14.5), peaking at E18.5, and completely disappearing during postnatal development. Helios is expressed by a small population of nestin-positive neural progenitor cells located in the subventricular zone as well as by a larger population of immature neurons distributed throughout the mantle zone. In the later, Helios is preferentially expressed in the matrix compartment, where it colocalizes with Bcl11b and Foxp1, well-known markers of striatal projection neurons. In addition, we observed that Helios expression is not detected in Dlx1/2 and Gsx2 null mutants, while its expression is maintained in Ascl1 mutants. These findings allow us to introduce a new transcription factor in the cascade of events that take part of striatal development postulating the existence of at least 4 different neural progenitors in the LGE. An Ascl1-independent but Gsx2- & Dlx1/2-dependent precursor will express Helios defining a new lineage for a subset of matrix striatal neurons. PMID:22142223

  16. Arginine methylation regulates c-Myc-dependent transcription by altering promoter recruitment of the acetyltransferase p300.

    PubMed

    Tikhanovich, Irina; Zhao, Jie; Bridges, Brian; Kumer, Sean; Roberts, Ben; Weinman, Steven A

    2017-08-11

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is an essential enzyme controlling about 85% of the total cellular arginine methylation in proteins. We have shown previously that PRMT1 is an important regulator of innate immune responses and that it is required for M2 macrophage differentiation. c-Myc is a transcription factor that is critical in regulating cell proliferation and also regulates the M2 transcriptional program in macrophages. Here, we sought to determine whether c-Myc in myeloid cells is regulated by PRMT1-dependent arginine methylation. We found that PRMT1 activity was necessary for c-Myc binding to the acetyltransferase p300. PRMT1 inhibition decreased p300 recruitment to c-Myc target promoters and increased histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) recruitment, thereby decreasing transcription at these sites. Moreover, PRMT1 inhibition blocked c-Myc-mediated induction of several of its target genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG) and mannose receptor C-type 1 (MRC1), suggesting that PRMT1 is necessary for c-Myc function in M2 macrophage differentiation. Of note, in primary human blood monocytes, p300-c-Myc binding was strongly correlated with PRMT1 expression, and in liver sections, PRMT1, c-Myc, and M2 macrophage levels were strongly correlated with each other. Both PRMT1 levels and M2 macrophage numbers were significantly lower in livers from individuals with a history of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, known to have defective cellular immunity. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that PRMT1 is an important regulator of c-Myc function in myeloid cells. PRMT1 loss in individuals with cirrhosis may contribute to their immune defects. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state. - Highlights: • DEX facilitates the transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • GR is involved in DEX-dependent transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • A 17 bp repeat is responsible for the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX. • An NF-I-like protein is involved in the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX.

  18. Time-dependent c-Myc transactomes mapped by Array-based nuclear run-on reveal transcriptional modules in human B cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinshui; Zeller, Karen; Chen, Yu-Chi; Watkins, Tonya; Barnes, Kathleen C; Becker, Kevin G; Dang, Chi V; Cheadle, Chris

    2010-03-15

    The definition of transcriptional networks through measurements of changes in gene expression profiles and mapping of transcription factor binding sites is limited by the moderate overlap between binding and gene expression changes and the inability to directly measure global nuclear transcription (coined "transactome"). We developed a method to measure nascent nuclear gene transcription with an Array-based Nuclear Run-On (ANRO) assay using commercial microarray platforms. This strategy provides the missing component, the transactome, to fully map transcriptional networks. ANRO measurements in an inducible c-Myc expressing human P493-6 B cell model reveals time-dependent waves of transcription, with a transactome early after c-Myc induction that does not persist at a late, steady-state phase, when genes that are regulated by c-Myc and E2F predominate. Gene set matrix analysis further uncovers functionally related groups of genes putatively regulated by waves of transcription factor motifs following Myc induction, starting with AP1 and CREB that are followed by EGR1, NFkB and STAT, and ending with E2F, Myc and ARNT/HIF motifs. By coupling ANRO with previous global mapping of c-Myc binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in P493-6 cells, we define a set of transcriptionally regulated direct c-Myc target genes and pave the way for the use of ANRO to comprehensively map any transcriptional network.

  19. Hsf1 and Hsp90 orchestrate temperature-dependent global transcriptional remodelling and chromatin architecture in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Michelle D.; Farrer, Rhys A.; Tan, Kaeling; Miao, Zhengqiang; Walker, Louise A.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Wheeler, Robert T.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Wong, Koon Ho; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Fever is a universal response to infection, and opportunistic pathogens such as Candida albicans have evolved complex circuitry to sense and respond to heat. Here we harness RNA-seq and ChIP-seq to discover that the heat shock transcription factor, Hsf1, binds distinct motifs in nucleosome-depleted promoter regions to regulate heat shock genes and genes involved in virulence in C. albicans. Consequently, heat shock increases C. albicans host cell adhesion, damage and virulence. Hsf1 activation depends upon the molecular chaperone Hsp90 under basal and heat shock conditions, but the effects are opposite and in part controlled at the level of Hsf1 expression and DNA binding. Finally, we demonstrate that Hsp90 regulates global transcription programs by modulating nucleosome levels at promoters of stress-responsive genes. Thus, we describe a mechanism by which C. albicans responds to temperature via Hsf1 and Hsp90 to orchestrate gene expression and chromatin architecture, thereby enabling thermal adaptation and virulence. PMID:27226156

  20. Rhinovirus stimulation of interleukin-6 in vivo and in vitro. Evidence for nuclear factor kappa B-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Z; Tang, W; Ray, A; Wu, Y; Einarsson, O; Landry, M L; Gwaltney, J; Elias, J A

    1996-01-01

    To further understand the biology of rhinovirus (RV), we determined whether IL-6 was produced during RV infections and characterized the mechanism by which RV stimulates lung cell IL-6 production. In contrast to normals and minimally symptomatic volunteers, IL-6 was detected in the nasal washings from patients who developed colds after RV challenge. RV14 and RV1A, major and minor receptor group RVs, respectively, were potent stimulators of IL-6 protein production in vitro. These effects were associated with significant increases in IL-6 mRNA accumulation and gene transcription. RV was also a potent stimulator of IL-6 promoter-driven luciferase activity. This stimulation was modestly decreased by mutation of the nuclear factor (NF)-IL-6 site and abrogated by mutation of the NF-kappa B site in this promoter. An NF-kappa B-DNA binding activity, mediated by p65, p50, and p52 NF-kappa B moieties, was rapidly induced in RV-infected cells. Activator protein 1-DNA binding was not similarly altered. These studies demonstrate that IL-6 is produced during symptomatic RV infections, that RVs are potent stimulators of IL-6 elaboration, and that RV stimulation IL-6 production is mediated by an NF-kappa B-dependent transcriptional stimulation pathway. IL-6 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of RV infection, and NF-kappa B activation is likely to be an important event in RV-induced pathologies. PMID:8567963

  1. Cbx7 is epigenetically silenced in glioblastoma and inhibits cell migration by targeting YAP/TAZ-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Zahid; Patil, Vikas; Arora, Anjali; Hegde, Alangar S.; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Santosh, Vani; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most malignant form of astrocytomas which are difficult to treat and portend a grave clinical course and poor prognosis. In this study, we identified Chromobox homolog 7 (Cbx7), a member of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), as a downregulated gene in GBM owing to its promoter hypermethylation. Bisulphite sequencing and methylation inhibitor treatment established the hypermethylation of Cbx7 in GBM. Exogenous overexpression of Cbx7 induced cell death, inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and migration/invasion of the glioma cells. GSEA of Cbx7 regulated genes identified Cbx7 as a repressor of transcription co-activators YAP/TAZ, the inhibitory targets of the Hippo signalling pathway. In good correlation, the exogenous expression of Cbx7 repressed the YAP/TAZ-dependent transcription and downregulated CTGF, a bonafide YAP/TAZ target. We also observed reduced levels of phospho-JNK in Cbx7 expressing cells. Additionally, CTGF silencing and pharmacological inhibition of JNK also inhibited glioma cell migration. Further, Cbx7 failed to inhibit cell migration significantly in the presence of exogenously overexpressed CTGF or constitutively active JNK. Thus, our study identifies Cbx7 as an inhibitor of glioma cell migration through its inhibitory effect on YAP/TAZ-CTGF-JNK signalling axis and underscores the importance of epigenetic inactivation of Cbx7 in gliomagenesis. PMID:27291091

  2. Lateral root emergence in Arabidopsis is dependent on transcription factor LBD29 regulation of auxin influx carrier LAX3.

    PubMed

    Porco, Silvana; Larrieu, Antoine; Du, Yujuan; Gaudinier, Allison; Goh, Tatsuaki; Swarup, Kamal; Swarup, Ranjan; Kuempers, Britta; Bishopp, Anthony; Lavenus, Julien; Casimiro, Ilda; Hill, Kristine; Benkova, Eva; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Brady, Siobhan M; Scheres, Ben; Péret, Benjamin; Bennett, Malcolm J

    2016-09-15

    Lateral root primordia (LRP) originate from pericycle stem cells located deep within parental root tissues. LRP emerge through overlying root tissues by inducing auxin-dependent cell separation and hydraulic changes in adjacent cells. The auxin-inducible auxin influx carrier LAX3 plays a key role concentrating this signal in cells overlying LRP. Delimiting LAX3 expression to two adjacent cell files overlying new LRP is crucial to ensure that auxin-regulated cell separation occurs solely along their shared walls. Multiscale modeling has predicted that this highly focused pattern of expression requires auxin to sequentially induce auxin efflux and influx carriers PIN3 and LAX3, respectively. Consistent with model predictions, we report that auxin-inducible LAX3 expression is regulated indirectly by AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7). Yeast one-hybrid screens revealed that the LAX3 promoter is bound by the transcription factor LBD29, which is a direct target for regulation by ARF7. Disrupting auxin-inducible LBD29 expression or expressing an LBD29-SRDX transcriptional repressor phenocopied the lax3 mutant, resulting in delayed lateral root emergence. We conclude that sequential LBD29 and LAX3 induction by auxin is required to coordinate cell separation and organ emergence.

  3. Phytochrome dependent quantitative control of Hd3a transcription is the basis of the night break effect in rice flowering.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Shinomura, Tomoko; Takano, Makoto; Shimamoto, Ko

    2009-04-01

    A short exposure to light during relative night (night break; NB) delays flowering in the short day plant rice. NB acts by downregulating Heading date 3a (Hd3a) expression. Because phytochrome B mutants do not respond to NB and their flowering time is not affected even under NB conditions, phyB is required for the suppression of Hd3a expression. The effect of NB is quantitatively controlled by light quality and by either light intensity or duration. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these interactions are poorly understood. Here, we examine the roles of phytochromes in the regulation of Hd3a transcription under NB conditions using monochromatic red, far-red and blue light. Red and blue light downregulated Hd3a expression, but far-red light NB did not. The effect of red light NB on Hd3a is dependent on photon fluence and is restored by subsequent far-red light irradiation. Our results suggest that quantitative effect of light on flowering in rice NB is mediated by the regulation of Hd3a transcription by phyB.

  4. Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Regulation of the GOLDEN2-LIKE 1 Transcription Factor in Response to Plastid Signals1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tokumaru, Mitsuaki; Adachi, Fumi; Toda, Makoto; Yazu, Fumiko; Hirosawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GOLDEN2-LIKE (GLK) transcription factors promote chloroplast biogenesis by regulating the expression of photosynthesis-related genes. Arabidopsis GLK1 is also known to participate in retrograde signaling from chloroplasts to the nucleus. To elucidate the mechanism by which GLK1 is regulated in response to plastid signals, we biochemically characterized Arabidopsis GLK1 protein. Expression analysis of GLK1 protein indicated that GLK1 accumulates in aerial tissues. Both tissue-specific and Suc-dependent accumulation of GLK1 were regulated primarily at the transcriptional level. In contrast, norflurazon- or lincomycin-treated gun1-101 mutant expressing normal levels of GLK1 mRNA failed to accumulate GLK1 protein, suggesting that plastid signals directly regulate the accumulation of GLK1 protein in a GUN1-independent manner. Treatment of the glk1glk2 mutant expressing functional GFP-GLK1 with a proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, induced the accumulation of polyubiquitinated GFP-GLK1. Furthermore, the level of endogenous GLK1 in plants with damaged plastids was partially restored when those plants were treated with MG-132. Collectively, these data indicate that the ubiquitin-proteasome system participates in the degradation of Arabidopsis GLK1 in response to plastid signals. PMID:27821720

  5. A common transcriptional activator is located in the coding region of two replication-dependent mouse histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, M M; Bowman, T L; Marzluff, W F

    1991-01-01

    There is a region in the mouse histone H3 gene protein-encoding sequence required for high expression. The 110-nucleotide coding region activating sequence (CRAS) from codons 58 to 93 of the H3.2 gene restored expression when placed 520 nucleotides 5' of the start of transcription in the correct orientation. Since identical mRNA molecules are produced by transcription of the original deletion gene and the deletion gene with the CRAS at -520, effects of the deletions on mRNA stability or other posttranscriptional events are completely ruled out. Inversion of the CRAS sequence in its proper position in the H3 gene resulted in only a threefold increase in expression, and placing the CRAS sequence 5' of the deleted gene in the wrong orientation had no effect on expression. In-frame deletions in the coding region of an H2a.2 gene led to identification of a 105-nucleotide sequence in the coding region between amino acids 50 and 85 necessary for high expression of the gene. Additionally, insertion of the H3 CRAS into the deleted region of the H2a.2 gene restored expression of the H2a gene. Thus, the CRAS element has an orientation-dependent, position-independent effect. Gel mobility shift competition studies indicate that the same proteins interact with both the H3 and H2a CRAS elements, suggesting that a common factor is involved in expression of histone genes. Images PMID:2038312

  6. Evidence for a mechanism of recombination during reverse transcription dependent on the structure of the acceptor RNA.

    PubMed

    Moumen, Abdeladim; Polomack, Lucette; Unge, Torsten; Véron, Michel; Buc, Henri; Negroni, Matteo

    2003-05-02

    Genetic recombination is a major force driving retroviral evolution. In retroviruses, recombination proceeds mostly through copy choice during reverse transcription. Using a reconstituted in vitro system, we have studied the mechanism of strand transfer on a major recombination hot spot we previously identified within the genome of HIV-1. We show that on this model sequence the frequency of copy choice is strongly influenced by the folding of the RNA template, namely by the presence of a stable hairpin. This structure must be specifically present on the acceptor template. We previously proposed that strand transfer follows a two-step process: docking of the nascent DNA onto the acceptor RNA and strand invasion. The frequency of recombination under copy choice conditions was not dependent on the concentration of the acceptor RNA, in contrast with strand transfer occurring at strong arrests of reverse transcription. During copy choice strand transfer, the docking step is not rate limiting. We propose that the hairpin present on the acceptor RNA could mediate strand transfer following a mechanism reminiscent of branch migration during DNA recombination.

  7. Bex3 Dimerization Regulates NGF-Dependent Neuronal Survival and Differentiation by Enhancing trkA Gene Transcription.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Laura; Anta, Begoña; López-Benito, Saray; Martín-Rodriguez, Carlos; Lee, Francis S; Pérez, Pilar; Martín-Zanca, Dionisio; Arévalo, Juan C

    2015-05-06

    The development of the nervous system is a temporally and spatially coordinated process that relies on the proper regulation of the genes involved. Neurotrophins and their receptors are directly responsible for the survival and differentiation of sensory and sympathetic neurons; however, it is not fully understood how genes encoding Trk neurotrophin receptors are regulated. Here, we show that rat Bex3 protein specifically regulates TrkA expression by acting at the trkA gene promoter level. Bex3 dimerization and shuttling to the nucleus regulate the transcription of the trkA promoter under basal conditions and also enhance nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated trkA promoter activation. Moreover, qChIP assays indicate that Bex3 associates with the trkA promoter within a 150 bp sequence, immediately upstream from the transcription start site, which is sufficient to mediate the effects of Bex3. Consequently, the downregulation of Bex3 using shRNA increases neuronal apoptosis in NGF-dependent sensory neurons deprived of NGF and compromises PC12 cell differentiation in response to NGF. Our results support an important role for Bex3 in the regulation of TrkA expression and in NGF-mediated functions through modulation of the trkA promoter.

  8. Stimulatory effect of morphine on rat pineal melatonin synthesis via a cyclic AMP-dependent transcription pathway.

    PubMed

    Chetsawang, Banthit; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2005-11-25

    The expression of mRNA of opioid receptors and the existence of opioid binding site in the rat pineal gland have been demonstrated previously. A major finding was that morphine enhanced the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme, N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and increased the level of melatonin in rat pineal gland. An attempt has been made in order to clarify the mechanism of this induction. In the present study, the stimulatory effect of morphine on the expression of NAT mRNA in the rat pineal gland has been demonstrated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR technique. The results showed that both acute and chronic morphine treatments significantly increased NAT mRNA expression in rat pineal gland. In addition, the effect of morphine on the phosphorylation of the transcription factors, cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) was investigated. Western blot analysis showed that morphine significantly increased phosphorylation of CREB. These results indicate that at least one downstream messenger pathway for the activation of opioidergic system on the induction of melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland acts via cyclic AMP-dependent cascade and transcription mechanism.

  9. Medium-dependent regulation of proteinase gene expression in Lactococcus lactis: control of transcription initiation by specific dipeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Marugg, J D; Meijer, W; van Kranenburg, R; Laverman, P; Bruinenberg, P G; de Vos, W M

    1995-01-01

    Transcriptional gene fusions with the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase gene (gusA) were used to study the medium- and growth-dependent expression of the divergently transcribed genes involved in proteinase production (prtP and prtM) of Lactococcus lactis SK11. The results show that both the prtP and prtM genes are controlled at the transcriptional level by the peptide content of the medium and, to a lesser extent, by the growth rate. A more than 10-fold regulation in beta-glucuronidase activity was observed for both prtP and prtM promoters in batch and continuous cultures. The level of expression of the prtP and prtM promoters was high in whey permeate medium with relatively low concentrations of peptides, whereas at increased concentrations the expression of the promoters was repressed. The lowest level of expression was observed in peptide- and amino acid-rich laboratory media, such as glucose-M17 and MRS. The addition of specific dipeptides, such as leucylproline and prolylleucine, to the growth medium negatively affected the expression of the prtP-gusA fusions. The repression by dipeptides was not observed in mutants defective in the uptake of di-tripeptides, indicating that the internal concentration of dipeptides or derivatives is important in the regulation of proteinase production. PMID:7768792

  10. Src promotes castration-recurrent prostate cancer through androgen receptor-dependent canonical and non-canonical transcriptional signatures.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Wang, Jianmin; Qin, Maochun; Gao, Lingqiu; Holtz, Renae; Vessella, Robert L; Leach, Robert W; Gelman, Irwin H

    2017-02-07

    Progression of prostate cancer (PC) to castration-recurrent growth (CRPC) remains dependent on sustained expression and transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR). A major mechanism contributing to CRPC progression is through the direct phosphorylation and activation of AR by Src-family (SFK) and ACK1 tyrosine kinases. However, the AR-dependent transcriptional networks activated by Src during CRPC progression have not been elucidated. Here, we show that activated Src (Src527F) induces androgen-independent growth in human LNCaP cells, concomitant with its ability to induce proliferation/survival genes normally induced by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in androgen-dependent LNCaP and VCaP cells. Src induces additional gene signatures unique to CRPC cell lines, LNCaP-C4-2 and CWR22Rv1, and to CRPC LuCaP35.1 xenografts. By comparing the Src-induced AR-cistrome and/or transcriptome in LNCaP to those in CRPC and LuCaP35.1 tumors, we identified an 11-gene Src-regulated CRPC signature consisting of AR-dependent, AR binding site (ARBS)-associated genes whose expression is altered by DHT in LNCaP[Src527F] but not in LNCaP cells. The differential expression of a subset (DPP4, BCAT1, CNTNAP4, CDH3) correlates with earlier PC metastasis onset and poorer survival, with the expression of BCAT1 required for Src-induced androgen-independent proliferation. Lastly, Src enhances AR binding to non-canonical ARBS enriched for FOXO1, TOP2B and ZNF217 binding motifs; cooperative AR/TOP2B binding to a non-canonical ARBS was both Src- and DHT-sensitive and correlated with increased levels of Src-induced phosphotyrosyl-TOP2B. These data suggest that CRPC progression is facilitated via Src-induced sensitization of AR to intracrine androgen levels, resulting in the engagement of canonical and non-canonical ARBS-dependent gene signatures.

  11. A Useful Approach To Identify Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors Of Wnt-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, Kenneth; Pająk, Bożena; Stubbs, Mark; Todd, Helen; Barbeau, Olivier; Quevedo, Camilo; Botfield, Hannah; Young, Rodrigo; Ruddle, Ruth; Samuel, Lee; Battersby, Alysia; Raynaud, Florence; Allen, Nicholas; Wilson, Stephen W.; Latinkic, Branko; Workman, Paul; McDonald, Edward; Blagg, Julian; Aherne, Wynne; Dale, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deregulated in cancer due to mutations in the genes encoding APC, β-catenin and axin. To identify small molecule inhibitors of Wnt signaling as potential therapeutics, a diverse chemical library was screened using a TCF-reporter cell line in which the activity of the pathway was induced at the level of the Disheveled protein. A series of deconvolution studies was used to focus on 3 compound series that selectively killed cancer cell lines with constitutive Wnt signaling. Activities of the compounds included the ability to induce degradation of β-catenin that had been stabilized by a GSK-3 inhibitor. This screen illustrates a practical approach to identify small molecule inhibitors of Wnt signaling that can seed the development of agents suitable to treat patients with Wnt-dependent tumors. PMID:20610623

  12. How do kinases contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of the transcription factor NFAT5?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    NFAT5 plays a critical role in maintaining the renal functions. Its dis-regulation in the kidney leads to or is associated with certain renal diseases or disorders, most notably the urinary concentration defect. Hypertonicity, which the kidney medulla is normally exposed to, activates NFAT5 through phosphorylation of a signaling molecule or NFAT5 itself. Hypotonicity inhibits NFAT5 through a similar mechanism. More than a dozen of protein and lipid kinases have been identified to contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of NFAT5. Hypertonicity activates NFAT5 by increasing its nuclear localization and transactivating activity in the early phase and protein abundance in the late phase. The known mechanism for inhibition of NFAT5 by hypotonicity is a decrease of nuclear NFAT5. The present article reviews the effect of each kinase on NFAT5 nuclear localization, transactivation and protein abundance, and the relationship among these kinases, if known. Cyclosporine A and tacrolimus suppress immune reactions by inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin-dependent activation of NFAT1. It is hoped that this review would stimulate the interest to seek explanations from the NFAT5 regulatory pathways for certain clinical presentations and to explore novel therapeutic approaches based on the pathways. On the basic science front, this review raises two interesting questions. The first one is how these kinases can specifically signal to NFAT5 in the context of hypertonicity or hypotonicity, because they also regulate other cellular activities and even opposite activities in some cases. The second one is why these many kinases, some of which might have redundant functions, are needed to regulate NFAT5 activity. This review reiterates the concept of signaling through cooperation. Cells need these kinases working in a coordinated way to provide the signaling specificity that is lacking in the individual one. Redundancy in regulation of NFAT5 is a critical strategy for cells to

  13. How do kinases contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of the transcription factor NFAT5?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-01-06

    NFAT5 plays a critical role in maintaining the renal functions. Its dis-regulation in the kidney leads to or is associated with certain renal diseases or disorders, most notably the urinary concentration defect. Hypertonicity, which the kidney medulla is normally exposed to, activates NFAT5 through phosphorylation of a signaling molecule or NFAT5 itself. Hypotonicity inhibits NFAT5 through a similar mechanism. More than a dozen of protein and lipid kinases have been identified to contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of NFAT5. Hypertonicity activates NFAT5 by increasing its nuclear localization and transactivating activity in the early phase and protein abundance in the late phase. The known mechanism for inhibition of NFAT5 by hypotonicity is a decrease of nuclear NFAT5. The present article reviews the effect of each kinase on NFAT5 nuclear localization, transactivation and protein abundance, and the relationship among these kinases, if known. Cyclosporine A and tacrolimus suppress immune reactions by inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin-dependent activation of NFAT1. It is hoped that this review would stimulate the interest to seek explanations from the NFAT5 regulatory pathways for certain clinical presentations and to explore novel therapeutic approaches based on the pathways. On the basic science front, this review raises two interesting questions. The first one is how these kinases can specifically signal to NFAT5 in the context of hypertonicity or hypotonicity, because they also regulate other cellular activities and even opposite activities in some cases. The second one is why these many kinases, some of which might have redundant functions, are needed to regulate NFAT5 activity. This review reiterates the concept of signaling through cooperation. Cells need these kinases working in a coordinated way to provide the signaling specificity that is lacking in the individual one. Redundancy in regulation of NFAT5 is a critical strategy for cells to

  14. Amino acid-dependent signaling via S6K1 and MYC is essential for regulation of rDNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Kusnadi, Eric P.; Ogden, Allison J.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Bammert, Lukas; Kutay, Ulrike; Hung, Sandy; Sanij, Elaine; Hannan, Ross D.; Hannan, Katherine M.; Pearson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-dependent ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription is a consistent feature of malignant transformation that can be targeted to treat cancer. Understanding how rDNA transcription is coupled to the availability of growth factors and nutrients will provide insight into how ribosome biogenesis is maintained in a tumour environment characterised by limiting nutrients. We demonstrate that modulation of rDNA transcription initiation, elongation and rRNA processing is an immediate, co-regulated response to altered amino acid abundance, dependent on both mTORC1 activation of S6K1 and MYC activity. Growth factors regulate rDNA transcription initiation while amino acids modulate growth factor-dependent rDNA transcription by primarily regulating S6K1-dependent rDNA transcription elongation and processing. Thus, we show for the first time amino acids regulate rRNA synthesis by a distinct, post-initiation mechanism, providing a novel model for integrated control of ribosome biogenesis that has implications for understanding how this process is dysregulated in cancer. PMID:27385002

  15. Interaction of the phospholipid scramblase 1 with HIV-1 Tat results in the repression of Tat-dependent transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Shuichi Eizuru, Yoshito

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •PLSCR1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 Tat in vitro and in vivo. •PLSCR1 repressed Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR. •Suppression of PLSCR1 expression enhanced the levels of HIV-1 transcripts. •PLSCR1 reduced the nuclear localization of Tat. -- Abstract: Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene and possesses an IFN-mediated antiviral function. We show here that PLSCR1 directly interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat. This interaction occurs both in vitro and in vivo through amino acids 160–250 of PLSCR1. Overexpression of PLSCR1 efficiently represses the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) and reduces the nuclear translocation of Tat. In addition, shRNA-mediated suppression of endogenous PLSCR1 expression enhances the levels of gag mRNA in an HIV-1-infected T-cell line. These findings indicate that PLSCR1 negatively regulates the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR during HIV-1 infection.

  16. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murano, Tatsuro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  17. Fibronectin upregulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase type Iβ through C/EBP transcription factor activation in contractile cells.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Jorganes, Aranzazu; Calleros, Laura; Griera, Mercedes; Saura, Marta; Luengo, Alicia; Rodriguez-Puyol, D; Rodriguez-Puyol, M

    2011-03-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) pathway exerts most of its cellular actions through the activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Accumulation of extracellular matrix is one of the main structural changes in pathological conditions characterized by a decreased activity of this pathway, such as hypertension, diabetes, or aging, and it is a well-known fact that extracellular matrix proteins modulate cell phenotype through the interaction with membrane receptors such as integrins. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate whether extracellular matrix proteins, particularly fibronectin (FN), modulate PKG expression in contractile cells, 2) to analyze the mechanisms involved, and 3) to evaluate the functional consequences. FN increased type I PKG (PKG-I) protein content in human mesangial cells, an effect dependent on the interaction with β(1)-integrin. The FN upregulation of PKG-I protein content was due to increased mRNA expression, determined by augmented transcriptional activity of the PKG-I promoter region. Akt and the transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) mediated the genesis of these changes. FN also increased PKG-I in another type of contractile cell, rat vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMC). Tirofiban, a pharmacological analog of FN, increased PKG-I protein content in RVSMC and rat aortic walls and magnified the hypotensive effect of dibutyryl cGMP in conscious Wistar rats. The present results provide evidence of a mechanism able to increase PKG-I protein content in contractile cells. Elucidation of this novel mechanism provides a rationale for future pharmacotherapy in certain vascular diseases.

  18. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Song, You; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-11-01

    Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15mGy radiation affected DEGs associated with cellular signaling and immune response; 70mGy radiation affected cell cycle regulation and DNA damage repair, cellular energy production; and 280mGy radiation affected pathways related to cell cycle regulation and DNA

  19. A plant basal in vitro system supporting accurate transcription of both RNA polymerase II- and III-dependent genes: supplement of green leaf component(s) drives accurate transcription of a light-responsive rbcS gene.

    PubMed

    Fan, H; Sugiura, M

    1995-03-01

    An in vitro transcription initiation system has been developed from nuclei of rapidly growing, non-green tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultured (BY-2) cells. Conditions for nuclear extraction and in vitro transcription reaction have been optimized with a tobacco beta-1,3-glucanase gene, a constitutively expressed gene in BY-2 cells. The in vitro system supports accurate transcription of RNA polymerase II-dependent promoters from not only plant genes (tobacco beta-1,3-glucanase gene, cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter) but also animal genes (adenovirus 2 major late promoter, simian virus 40 early major promoter). In addition, this system drives accurate transcription of an RNA polymerase III-dependent Arabidopsis thaliana U6 snRNA gene. As BY-2 cells do not differentiate in response to light or any other stimuli, they would provide a basal transcription system which lacks tissue-specific and light-responsive nuclear signals as well as chloroplast-derived signals. Consequently, the BY-2 cell-free system is unable to transcribe the tomato gene encoding the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcS3C) whose expression is tissue-specific and light-inducible. However, the transcription of rbcS3C was obtained by supplementing the BY-2 system with a nuclear extract of light-grown tomato seedlings. The promoter regions necessary for rbcS transcription was mapped in vitro using a series of 5' deletion mutants. The 351 bp upstream sequence is essential and the further upstream region from -351 to -441 enhances its transcription. The in vitro basal system will be useful to identify specific signals from both the nucleus and chloroplast in green leaves and other organs/tissues.

  20. Mouse prenatal platelet-forming lineages share a core transcriptional program but divergent dependence on MPL.

    PubMed

    Potts, Kathryn S; Sargeant, Tobias J; Dawson, Caleb A; Josefsson, Emma C; Hilton, Douglas J; Alexander, Warren S; Taoudi, Samir

    2015-08-06

    The thrombopoietic environment of the neonate is established during prenatal life; therefore, a comprehensive understanding of platelet-forming cell development during embryogenesis is critical to understanding the etiology of early-onset thrombocytopenia. The recent discovery that the first platelet-forming cells of the conceptus are not megakaryocytes (MKs) but diploid platelet-forming cells (DPFCs) revealed a previously unappreciated complexity in thrombopoiesis. This raises important questions, including the following. When do conventional MKs appear? Do pathogenic genetic lesions of adult MKs affect DPFCs? What role does myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL), a key regulator of adult megakaryopoiesis, play in prenatal platelet-forming lineages? We performed a comprehensive study to determine the spatial and temporal appearance of prenatal platelet-forming lineages. We demonstrate that DPFCs originate in the yolk sac and then rapidly migrate to other extra- and intraembryonic tissues. Using gene disruption models of Gata1 and Nfe2, we demonstrate that perturbing essential adult MK genes causes an analogous phenotype in the early embryo before the onset of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell-driven (definitive) hematopoiesis. Finally, we present the surprising finding that DPFC and MK commitment from their respective precursors is MPL independent in vivo but that completion of MK differentiation and establishment of the prenatal platelet mass is dependent on MPL expression.

  1. Arsenic Attenuates GLI Signaling, Increasing or Decreasing its Transcriptional Program in a Context-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Giambelli, Camilla; Tang, Bo; Winterbottom, Emily; Long, Jun; Jin, Ke; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fei, Dennis Liang; Nguyen, Dao M; Athar, Mohammad; Wang, Baolin; Subbarayan, Pochi R; Wang, Lily; Rai, Priyamvada; Ardalan, Bach; Capobianco, Anthony J; Robbins, David J

    2016-02-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a worldwide environmental toxicant, exposure to which is associated with many adverse outcomes. Arsenic is also an effective therapeutic agent in certain disease settings. Arsenic was recently shown to regulate the activity of the Hedgehog (HH) signal transduction pathway, and this regulation of HH signaling was proposed to be responsible for a subset of arsenic's biologic effects. Surprisingly, these separate reports proposed contradictory activities for arsenic, as either an agonist or antagonist of HH signaling. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that arsenic acts as a modulator of the activity of the HH effector protein glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger (GLI), activating or inhibiting GLI activity in a context-dependent manner. This arsenic-induced modulation of HH signaling is observed in cultured cells, patients with colorectal cancer who have received arsenic-based therapy, and a mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model. Our results show that arsenic activates GLI signaling when the intrinsic GLI activity is low but inhibits signaling in the presence of high-level GLI activity. Furthermore, we show that this modulation occurs downstream of primary cilia, evidenced by experiments in suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU) deficient cells. Combining our findings with previous reports, we present an inclusive model in which arsenic plays dual roles in GLI signaling modulation: when GLIs are primarily in their repressor form, arsenic antagonizes their repression capacity, leading to low-level GLI activation, but when GLIs are primarily in their activator form, arsenic attenuates their activity.

  2. The Fission Yeast Homeodomain Protein Yox1p Binds to MBF and Confines MBF-Dependent Cell-Cycle Transcription to G1-S via Negative Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Aligianni, Sofia; Lackner, Daniel H.; Klier, Steffi; Rustici, Gabriella; Wilhelm, Brian T.; Marguerat, Samuel; Codlin, Sandra; Brazma, Alvis; de Bruin, Robertus A. M.; Bähler, Jürg

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of the G1- to S-phase transition is critical for cell-cycle progression. This transition is driven by a transient transcriptional wave regulated by transcription factor complexes termed MBF/SBF in yeast and E2F-DP in mammals. Here we apply genomic, genetic, and biochemical approaches to show that the Yox1p homeodomain protein of fission yeast plays a critical role in confining MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. The yox1 gene is an MBF target, and Yox1p accumulates and preferentially binds to MBF-regulated promoters, via the MBF components Res2p and Nrm1p, when they are transcriptionally repressed during the cell cycle. Deletion of yox1 results in constitutively high transcription of MBF target genes and loss of their cell cycle–regulated expression, similar to deletion of nrm1. Genome-wide location analyses of Yox1p and the MBF component Cdc10p reveal dozens of genes whose promoters are bound by both factors, including their own genes and histone genes. In addition, Cdc10p shows promiscuous binding to other sites, most notably close to replication origins. This study establishes Yox1p as a new regulatory MBF component in fission yeast, which is transcriptionally induced by MBF and in turn inhibits MBF-dependent transcription. Yox1p may function together with Nrm1p to confine MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle via negative feedback. Compared to the orthologous budding yeast Yox1p, which indirectly functions in a negative feedback loop for cell-cycle transcription, similarities but also notable differences in the wiring of the regulatory circuits are evident. PMID:19714215

  3. Arsenic Attenuates GLI Signaling, Increasing or Decreasing its Transcriptional Program in a Context-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Giambelli, Camilla; Tang, Bo; Winterbottom, Emily; Long, Jun; Jin, Ke; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fei, Dennis Liang; Nguyen, Dao M.; Athar, Mohammad; Wang, Baolin; Subbarayan, Pochi R.; Wang, Lily; Rai, Priyamvada; Ardalan, Bach; Capobianco, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a worldwide environmental toxicant, exposure to which is associated with many adverse outcomes. Arsenic is also an effective therapeutic agent in certain disease settings. Arsenic was recently shown to regulate the activity of the Hedgehog (HH) signal transduction pathway, and this regulation of HH signaling was proposed to be responsible for a subset of arsenic’s biologic effects. Surprisingly, these separate reports proposed contradictory activities for arsenic, as either an agonist or antagonist of HH signaling. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that arsenic acts as a modulator of the activity of the HH effector protein glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger (GLI), activating or inhibiting GLI activity in a context-dependent manner. This arsenic-induced modulation of HH signaling is observed in cultured cells, patients with colorectal cancer who have received arsenic-based therapy, and a mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model. Our results show that arsenic activates GLI signaling when the intrinsic GLI activity is low but inhibits signaling in the presence of high-level GLI activity. Furthermore, we show that this modulation occurs downstream of primary cilia, evidenced by experiments in suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU) deficient cells. Combining our findings with previous reports, we present an inclusive model in which arsenic plays dual roles in GLI signaling modulation: when GLIs are primarily in their repressor form, arsenic antagonizes their repression capacity, leading to low-level GLI activation, but when GLIs are primarily in their activator form, arsenic attenuates their activity. PMID:26573582

  4. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase regulates basal and cyclic AMP-stimulated but not phorbol ester-stimulated transcription of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, K S; Tinti, C; Song, B; Cubells, J F; Joh, T H

    1994-09-01

    To define the precise role of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in transcriptional regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, we performed transient cotransfection analyses of a reporter construct containing the upstream 2,400 bp sequence of the rat TH gene with expression plasmids encoding a heat-stable specific inhibitor of PKA (PKI), a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA, or the catalytic subunit of PKA. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of either PKI or mutant regulatory subunit blocked cAMP-stimulated induction and reduced basal transcription of the TH-reporter construct. Expression of the catalytic subunit of PKA induced the expression of the TH-reporter construct up to 50-fold in a dose-dependent manner. Primer extension analysis confirmed that PKA-mediated induction of TH-reporter expression occurred at the correct transcription initiation site. Expression of PKI did not affect induction following phorbol ester treatment, suggesting that PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) induce TH transcription by independent mechanisms. Finally, a double mutation within the cAMP response element (CRE) of TH2400-CAT diminished its basal and forskolin-stimulated transcription to the level of the promoterless plasmid, pBLCAT3, but did not alter the induction following treatment with phorbol ester, indicating that the CRE is not required for PKC-mediated transcriptional induction. Our results indicate that PKA, via the CRE, plays a crucial role for basal and cAMP-inducible transcription of the TH gene.

  5. Spatial memory consolidation is associated with induction of several lysine-acetyltransferase (histone acetyltransferase) expression levels and H2B/H4 acetylation-dependent transcriptional events in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bousiges, Olivier; Vasconcelos, Anne Pereira de; Neidl, Romain; Cosquer, Brigitte; Herbeaux, Karine; Panteleeva, Irina; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence

    2010-12-01

    Numerous genetic studies have shown that the CREB-binding protein (CBP) is an essential component of long-term memory formation, through its histone acetyltransferase (HAT) function. E1