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Sample records for e2f-hdac complexes negatively

  1. Quantum complexity and negative curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adam R.; Susskind, Leonard; Zhao, Ying

    2017-02-01

    As time passes, once simple quantum states tend to become more complex. For strongly coupled k -local Hamiltonians, this growth of computational complexity has been conjectured to follow a distinctive and universal pattern. In this paper we show that the same pattern is exhibited by a much simpler system—classical geodesics on a compact two-dimensional geometry of uniform negative curvature. This striking parallel persists whether the system is allowed to evolve naturally or is perturbed from the outside.

  2. ESI-MS of Cucurbituril Complexes Under Negative Polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Maria A. A.; Mendes, Débora C.; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, José P.

    2017-07-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful tool to study host-guest supramolecular interactions. ESI-MS can be used for detailed gas-phase reactivity studies, to clarify the structure, or simply to verify the formation of complexes. Depending on the structure of the host and of the guest, negative and/or positive ESI are used. Here we report the unexpected formation of host-guest complexes between cucurbit[n]urils (n = 7, 8, CB[n]) and amine, styryl pyridine, and styryl pyridine dimer cations, under negative ESI. Non-complexed CB[n] form double charged halide (Br-, Cl-, F-) adducts. Under negative ESI, halide ions interact with CB[n] outer surface hydrogen atoms. One to one host-guest complexes (1:1) of CB[n] with positive charged guests were also observed as single and double charged ions under negative ESI. The positive charge of guests is neutralized by ion-pairing with halide anions. Depending on the number of positive charges guests retain in the gas phase, one or two additional halide ions are required for neutralization. Complexes 1:2 of CB[8] with styryl pyridines retain two halide ions in the gas phase, one per guest. Styryl pyridine dimers form 1:1 complexes possessing a single extra halide ion and therefore a single positive charge. Negative ESI is sensitive to small structural differences between complexes, distinguishing between 1:2 complexes of styryl pyridine-CB[8] and corresponding 1:1 complexes with the dimer. Negative ESI gives simpler spectra than positive ESI and allows the determination of guest charge state of CB[n] complexes in the gas phase. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. ESI-MS of Cucurbituril Complexes Under Negative Polarity.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria A A; Mendes, Débora C; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, José P

    2017-07-29

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful tool to study host-guest supramolecular interactions. ESI-MS can be used for detailed gas-phase reactivity studies, to clarify the structure, or simply to verify the formation of complexes. Depending on the structure of the host and of the guest, negative and/or positive ESI are used. Here we report the unexpected formation of host-guest complexes between cucurbit[n]urils (n = 7, 8, CB[n]) and amine, styryl pyridine, and styryl pyridine dimer cations, under negative ESI. Non-complexed CB[n] form double charged halide (Br(-), Cl(-), F(-)) adducts. Under negative ESI, halide ions interact with CB[n] outer surface hydrogen atoms. One to one host-guest complexes (1:1) of CB[n] with positive charged guests were also observed as single and double charged ions under negative ESI. The positive charge of guests is neutralized by ion-pairing with halide anions. Depending on the number of positive charges guests retain in the gas phase, one or two additional halide ions are required for neutralization. Complexes 1:2 of CB[8] with styryl pyridines retain two halide ions in the gas phase, one per guest. Styryl pyridine dimers form 1:1 complexes possessing a single extra halide ion and therefore a single positive charge. Negative ESI is sensitive to small structural differences between complexes, distinguishing between 1:2 complexes of styryl pyridine-CB[8] and corresponding 1:1 complexes with the dimer. Negative ESI gives simpler spectra than positive ESI and allows the determination of guest charge state of CB[n] complexes in the gas phase. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Memory for Negation in Coordinate and Complex Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Richard J.

    1976-01-01

    Two experiments were run to test memory for the negation morpheme "not" in coordinate sentences (e.g., The ballerina had twins and the policewoman did not have triplets) and complex sentences (e.g., The ghost scared Hamlet into not murdering Shakespeare). (Editor)

  5. Memory for Negation in Coordinate and Complex Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Richard J.

    1976-01-01

    Two experiments were run to test memory for the negation morpheme "not" in coordinate sentences (e.g., The ballerina had twins and the policewoman did not have triplets) and complex sentences (e.g., The ghost scared Hamlet into not murdering Shakespeare). (Editor)

  6. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Allison, Timothy M.; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-06-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein.

  7. Complexes of Negatively Charged Polypeptides with Cationic Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, G.; Li, Youli; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    1997-03-01

    Complexes of cationic lipids with oppositely charged proteins are promising candidates for new biomolecular materials. In addition to being used as a direct vehicle for protein transfection, they also find applications as templates for synthesis of molecular sieves. In spite of these wide ranging applications, the structure and interactions in these complexes have largely remained unclear. Here we report on the study of complexes formed between the cationic lipid didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) with negatively charged polypeptide poly glutamic acid (PGA) both in the presence and absence of the neutral lipid dilauroylglycerophosphocholine (DLPC). X-ray diffraction of the complexes indicates a condensed lamellar lipid structure with the polypeptide intercalated between the layers. We present a comprehensive phase diagram on this system based on X-ray diffraction data. This work is supported in part by grants NSF DMR-9624091, PRF-31352 AC7, and CU LAR STP/UC 96-118.

  8. Use of negative complex potential as absorbing potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jiu-Yuan; Zhang, John Z. H.

    1998-01-01

    Exact numerical calculation shows that the use of negative complex potential (NCP) significantly improves the efficiency of wavefunction absorption over that of negative imaginary potential (NIP) in scattering applications. The improvement in absorption is especially significant in the case of low energy scattering with de Broglie wavelength larger than the length of absorbing potential. The addition of a negative real potential to the pure imaginary potential speeds up the absorption of wavefunction by effectively shortening its de Broglie wavelength. Explicit TD numerical calculation for a one-dimensional model demonstrates the effectiveness of the NCP and shows that the reflection from the absorbing potential can effectively be eliminated by using optimized absorbing parameters for the energy in question. In addition, comparison of the exact numerical calculation with semiclassical WKB analysis casts a serious doubt on the quantitative value of using WKB analysis at low energies with de Broglie wavelengths much larger than the absorbing length and/or for polynomial absorbing potentials higher than linear.

  9. [Application of therapy in negative pressure complex wounds in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Fernández Sánchez, Rosario; Muñoz-Miguelsanz, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been widely used in the adult patient, contrary to what happens in children, with just a few long series papers. NPWT avoids long and expensive hospital admissions, reducing the hospital costs; it also decreases the family dynamics and allows for an early return to everyday activities. In this article, we present three clinical cases consisting of a toddler, a child and a teenager with complex wounds treated with NPWT in the pediatric surgery department of the Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital in Granada. The results were excellent, with a good adherence to treatment in all cases, achieving a complete closure in two cases; the third case needed a deferred surgical closure after surgical site preparation, and showed a decrease of the wound size after the NPWT. Moreover, successful pain management was achieved during the wound cleansing, which was done under an ambulatory regime. No general anesthesia was needed. From our experience, we propose the NPWT as an alternative therapy to the classic surgical approach for this type of complex lesions in children, which offers the same advantages and results than in adults.

  10. Negative pressure therapy for the treatment of complex wounds.

    PubMed

    Lima, Renan Victor Kümpel Schmidt; Coltro, Pedro Soler; Farina, Jayme Adriano

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of negative pressure therapy (NPT) in the treatment of complex wounds, with emphasis on its mechanisms of action and main therapeutic indications. We searched the Pubmed / Medline database for articles published from 1997 to 2016, and selected the most relevant ones. The mechanisms of action of NPT involveboth physical effects, such as increased perfusion, control of edema and exudate, reduction of wound dimensions and bacterial clearance, and biological ones, such as the stimulation of granulation tissue formation, microdeformations and reduction of Inflammatory response. The main indications of NPT are complex wounds, such as pressure ulcers, traumatic wounds, operative wound dehiscences, burns, necrotizing wounds, venous ulcers, diabetic wounds, skin grafts, open abdomen, prevention of complications in closed incisions and in the association with instillation of solutions in infected wounds. RESUMO O objetivo desse estudo é avaliar a eficácia da terapia por pressão negativa (TPN) no tratamento de feridas complexas, com ênfase em seus mecanismos de ação e principais indicações terapêuticas. Foi realizada revisão na base de dados Pubmed / Medline, em artigos publicados de 1997 a 2016, e selecionados os mais relevantes. O mecanismo de ação da TPN envolve efeitos físicos, como o aumento da perfusão, controle do edema e do exsudato, redução das dimensões da ferida e depuração bacteriana, e biológicos, como o estímulo à formação de tecido de granulação, microdeformações e redução da resposta inflamatória local. As principais indicações da TPN são as feridas complexas como úlceras por pressão, feridas traumáticas, deiscências de ferida operatória, queimaduras, feridas necrotizantes, úlceras venosas, feridas diabéticas, os enxertos de pele, o abdome aberto, na prevenção de complicações em incisões fechadas e na associação com instilação de soluções em feridas

  11. Complex Teacher Evaluation Systems Can Produce Negative Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine teacher perceptions of the impact on instructional practice when using a complex, standards-based performance evaluation system. The study used expectancy theory to investigate teacher expectancy (did they believe they could enhance their practice to the identified program standards?), instrumentality…

  12. Route complexity and simulated physical ageing negatively influence wayfinding.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Emma; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Krijnen, Wim P; van der Schans, Cees P; Mobach, Mark P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this age-simulation field experiment was to assess the influence of route complexity and physical ageing on wayfinding. Seventy-five people (aged 18-28) performed a total of 108 wayfinding tasks (i.e., 42 participants performed two wayfinding tasks and 33 performed one wayfinding task), of which 59 tasks were performed wearing gerontologic ageing suits. Outcome variables were wayfinding performance (i.e., efficiency and walking speed) and physiological outcomes (i.e., heart and respiratory rates). Analysis of covariance showed that persons on more complex routes (i.e., more floor and building changes) walked less efficiently than persons on less complex routes. In addition, simulated elderly participants perform worse in wayfinding than young participants in terms of speed (p < 0.001). Moreover, a linear mixed model showed that simulated elderly persons had higher heart rates and respiratory rates compared to young people during a wayfinding task, suggesting that simulated elderly consumed more energy during this task. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Electron tomography of negatively stained complex viruses: application in their diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Jan; Demeestere, Lien

    2009-01-01

    Background Electron tomographic analysis can be combined with the simple and rapid negative staining technique used in electron microscopy based virus diagnosis. Methods Standard negative staining of representative examples of parapoxviruses and paramyxoviruses was combined with electron tomographic analysis. Results Digital sectioning of reconstructions of these viruses at a selected height demonstrated the viral ultrastructure in detail, including the characteristic diagnostic features like the surface threads on C-particles of a parapoxvirus and individual glycoproteins and the internal nucleoprotein strand of Newcastle disease virus. For both viruses, deformation and flattening were observed. Conclusion The combination of negative staining of complex viruses with electron tomographic analysis, allows visualizing and measuring artifacts typical for negative staining. This approach allows sharp visualisation of structures in a subnanometer-thick plane, avoiding blurring due to superposition which is inherent to TEM. In selected examples, such analyses can improve diagnosis of viral agents. PMID:19208223

  14. Stealth fast photoswitching of negative photochromic naphthalene-bridged phenoxyl-imidazolyl radical complexes.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Hirao, Yasukazu; Kubo, Takashi; Abe, Jiro

    2016-05-21

    Naphthalene-bridged phenoxyl-imidazolyl radical complex (Np-PIC) is a novel fast switchable negative photochromic compound, which shows the thermal back reaction in the millisecond time scale. Upon UV light irradiation, Np-PIC shows the hypochromic effect in the UVA region due to there being less conjugation in the transient isomer. By replacing the phenoxyl unit with a naphthoxyl unit, the molecular structure has an asymmetric carbon, leading to fast chiroptical switching. This simple molecular design will be a good candidate for the future development of negative photochromic compounds.

  15. Increased anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus activation in Complex PTSD during encoding of negative words

    PubMed Central

    Dorrepaal, Ethy; Draijer, Nel; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Elzinga, Bernet M.; Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; van Balkom, Anton J.; Smit, Johannes H.; Veltman, Dick J.

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with impaired memory performance coupled with functional changes in brain areas involved in declarative memory and emotion regulation. It is not yet clear how symptom severity and comorbidity affect neurocognitive functioning in PTSD. We performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study with an emotional declarative memory task in 28 Complex PTSD patients with comorbid depressive and personality disorders, and 21 healthy non-trauma-exposed controls. In Complex PTSD patients—compared to controls—encoding of later remembered negative words vs baseline was associated with increased blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in the left ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsal ACC extending to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) together with a trend for increased left hippocampus activation. Patients tended to commit more False Alarms to negative words compared to controls, which was associated with enhanced left ventrolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (vlPFC/OFC) responses. Severity of child abuse was positively correlated with left ventral ACC activity and severity of depression with (para) hippocampal and ventral ACC activity. Presented results demonstrate functional abnormalities in Complex PTSD in the frontolimbic brain circuit also implicated in fear conditioning models, but generally in the opposite direction, which may be explained by severity of the trauma and severity of comorbid depression in Complex PTSD. PMID:22156722

  16. Increased anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus activation in Complex PTSD during encoding of negative words.

    PubMed

    Thomaes, Kathleen; Dorrepaal, Ethy; Draijer, Nel; de Ruiter, Michiel B; Elzinga, Bernet M; Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; van Balkom, Anton J; Smit, Johannes H; Veltman, Dick J

    2013-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with impaired memory performance coupled with functional changes in brain areas involved in declarative memory and emotion regulation. It is not yet clear how symptom severity and comorbidity affect neurocognitive functioning in PTSD. We performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study with an emotional declarative memory task in 28 Complex PTSD patients with comorbid depressive and personality disorders, and 21 healthy non-trauma-exposed controls. In Complex PTSD patients--compared to controls--encoding of later remembered negative words vs baseline was associated with increased blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in the left ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsal ACC extending to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) together with a trend for increased left hippocampus activation. Patients tended to commit more False Alarms to negative words compared to controls, which was associated with enhanced left ventrolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (vlPFC/OFC) responses. Severity of child abuse was positively correlated with left ventral ACC activity and severity of depression with (para) hippocampal and ventral ACC activity. Presented results demonstrate functional abnormalities in Complex PTSD in the frontolimbic brain circuit also implicated in fear conditioning models, but generally in the opposite direction, which may be explained by severity of the trauma and severity of comorbid depression in Complex PTSD.

  17. Alteration of complex negative emotions induced by music in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Choppin, Sabine; Trost, Wiebke; Dondaine, Thibaut; Millet, Bruno; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc; Robert, Gabriel; Grandjean, Didier

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown bipolar disorder to be characterized by dysregulation of emotion processing, including biases in facial expression recognition that is most prevalent during depressive and manic states. Very few studies have examined induced emotions when patients are in a euthymic phase, and there has been no research on complex emotions. We therefore set out to test emotional hyperreactivity in response to musical excerpts inducing complex emotions in bipolar disorder during euthymia. We recruited 21 patients with bipolar disorder (BD) in a euthymic phase and 21 matched healthy controls. Participants first rated their emotional reactivity on two validated self-report scales (ERS and MAThyS). They then rated their music-induced emotions on nine continuous scales. The targeted emotions were wonder, power, melancholy and tension. We used a specific generalized linear mixed model to analyze the behavioral data. We found that participants in the euthymic bipolar group experienced more intense complex negative emotions than controls when the musical excerpts induced wonder. Moreover, patients exhibited greater emotional reactivity in daily life (ERS). Finally, a greater experience of tension while listening to positive music seemed to be mediated by greater emotional reactivity and a deficit in executive functions. The heterogeneity of the BD group in terms of clinical characteristics may have influenced the results. Euthymic patients with bipolar disorder exhibit more complex negative emotions than controls in response to positive music. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Warfare-related Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction Using a Bioprosthetic Regenerate Template and Negative Pressure Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Jacob J.; Sheppard, Forest R.; Gage, Fred A.; Kumar, Anand R.; Liston, William A.; Elster, Eric A.; Dunne, James R.; Blankenship, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy of the Department of the Army, Department of the Navy, the Department of Defense, or the United States Government. We are military service members (or employees of the US Government). This work was prepared as part of our official duties. Title 17 U.S.C. 105 provides that “Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government.” Title 17 U.S.C. 101 defines a US Government work as a work prepared by a military service member or employee of the US Government as part of that person's official duties. Warfare-related torso/abdominal wounds are often unique and complex and can pose a significant reconstructive challenge. The objective of this manuscript is to report the unique and successful management of a complex warfare-related abdominal wound. A dermal regenerate template in combination with negative pressure wound therapy was used to reconstitute lateral abdominal wall integrity after radical debridement and control of a necrotizing soft tissue infection of the torso. Adjunctive continuous negative pressure (vacuum assisted closure) therapy was used to provide external coverage and encourage the formation of granulation tissue. With this combination therapy, torso wound size decreased in surface area by 82% and the underlying musculofascial defect decreased by 64%. Neovascularization of a 55-cm2 acellular dermal graft was achieved as evidenced by surface granulation and complete survival of a partial-thickness skin graft. In our patient with a complex war injury, advanced tissue replacement techniques and negative pressure wound therapy resulted in a decreased abdominal wall defect, a restoration of abdominal wall integrity/domain, and allowed for concurrent surgical treatment of complex intra-abdominal injuries. PMID:19529754

  19. Self-Structures, Negative Events, and Adolescent Depression: Clarifying the Role of Self-Complexity in a Prospective, Multiwave Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Joseph R.; Spiegler, Kevin M.; Young, Jami F.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Abela, John R. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this multiwave longitudinal study was to examine the structure of self-complexity and its relation to depressive symptoms in 276 adolescents (M = 12.55; SD = 1.04). Self-complexity, depressive symptoms, and negative events were assessed during a laboratory assessment at baseline, and then depressive symptoms and negative events were…

  20. Trade-off between false positives and false negatives in the linkage analysis of complex traits.

    PubMed

    Todorov, A A; Rao, D C

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the issue of false positives in genomic scans for detecting complex trait loci using subpair linkage methods and investigates the trade-off between the rate of false positives and the rate of false negatives. It highlights the tremendous cost in terms of power brought about by an excessive control of type I error and, at the same time, confirms that a larger number of false positives can occur otherwise in the course of a genomic scan. Finally, it compares the power and rate of false positives obtained in preplanned replicated studies conducted using a liberal significance level to those for single-step studies that use the same total sample size but stricter levels of significance. For the models considered here, replicate studies were found more attractive as long as one is willing to accept a trade-off, exchanging a much lower rate of false negatives for a slight increase in the rate of false positives.

  1. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in a genetically negative tuberous sclerosis complex adult: Case report.

    PubMed

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Jayarao, Mayur; Skrade, Jami; Giannini, Caterina; Workman, Michael J; Morgan, Chad J

    2016-11-01

    The well-described entity of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma (SEGA) in the setting of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is profound in current literature. It has been described in children as well as adults with or without identifiable clinical presentations of tuberous sclerosis. To our knowledge there has not been any report of a negative genetic workup of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex in an adult patient presenting with an isolated SEGA. We present a case of a 25-year-old female with no medical history who presented to the emergency room for headaches. Further workup included gadolinium enhanced MRI of the brain which revealed a homogenously enhancing mass in the left lateral ventricle with eccentric calcification and resultant obstructive hydrocephalus. A left frontal craniotomy with an interhemispheric transcallosal approach was taken for complete removal of the mass. Final pathological diagnosis was SEGA with suggestive cell population, positive GFAP and positive synaptophysin. Genetic testing included TSC1 (MLPA, DNA Sequencing) and TSC2 (MLPA, DNA Sequencing), which were all negative. The panel did not identify mutations associated with Tuberous Sclerosis. Rare cases of isolated SEGA have been reported in patients who do not have typical features of tuberous sclerosis, and may represent minimal penetrance of the disease with an attenuated phenotype. Negative genetic testing, as demonstrated, can be seen in adults with isolated SEGA. With a negative genetic workup of TSC, regular follow up may still be necessary; however this may prove to be low yield for identifying any TSC features in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Zwitterion-dianion complexes and anion-anion clusters with negative dissociation energies.

    PubMed

    Kass, Steven R

    2005-09-28

    Clusters of oxalate and malonate dianions with glycine in its zwitterionic form were found by ab initio and density functional theory calculations. Proton transfer is impeded by an electrostatic barrier, but the resulting anion-anion pairs form complexes despite having negative dissociation energies. A variety of X-/Y- species with exothermic dissociation energies ranging from 10 to 141 kcal mol-1, but large enough barriers to be experimentally produced, are reported. These dianions may represent an unrecognized control element in nature and provide a unique opportunity to probe electrostatic effects and a wealth of novel clusters.

  3. Effects of spectral complexity and sound duration on automatic complex-sound pitch processing in humans - a mismatch negativity study.

    PubMed

    Tervaniemi, M; Schröger, E; Saher, M; Näätänen, R

    2000-08-18

    The pitch of a spectrally rich sound is known to be more easily perceived than that of a sinusoidal tone. The present study compared the importance of spectral complexity and sound duration in facilitated pitch discrimination. The mismatch negativity (MMN), which reflects automatic neural discrimination, was recorded to a 2. 5% pitch change in pure tones with only one sinusoidal frequency component (500 Hz) and in spectrally rich tones with three (500-1500 Hz) and five (500-2500 Hz) harmonic partials. During the recordings, subjects concentrated on watching a silent movie. In separate blocks, stimuli were of 100 and 250 ms in duration. The MMN amplitude was enhanced with both spectrally rich sounds when compared with pure tones. The prolonged sound duration did not significantly enhance the MMN. This suggests that increased spectral rather than temporal information facilitates pitch processing of spectrally rich sounds.

  4. RUNX3 is a novel negative regulator of oncogenic TEAD-YAP complex in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Y; Lin, S J; Chen, Y; Voon, D C-C; Zhu, F; Chuang, L S H; Wang, T; Tan, P; Lee, S C; Yeoh, K G; Sudol, M; Ito, Y

    2016-05-19

    Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is a well-documented tumour suppressor that is frequently inactivated in gastric cancer. Here, we define a novel mechanism by which RUNX3 exerts its tumour suppressor activity involving the TEAD-YAP complex, a potent positive regulator of proliferative genes. We report that the TEAD-YAP complex is not only frequently hyperactivated in liver and breast cancer, but also confers a strong oncogenic activity in gastric epithelial cells. The increased expression of TEAD-YAP in tumour tissues significantly correlates with poorer overall survival of gastric cancer patients. Strikingly, RUNX3 physically interacts with the N-terminal region of TEAD through its Runt domain. This interaction markedly reduces the DNA-binding ability of TEAD that attenuates the downstream signalling of TEAD-YAP complex. Mutation of RUNX3 at Arginine 122 to Cysteine, which was previously identified in gastric cancer, impairs the interaction between RUNX3 and TEAD. Our data reveal that RUNX3 acts as a tumour suppressor by negatively regulating the TEAD-YAP oncogenic complex in gastric carcinogenesis.

  5. Negative regulation of NaF-induced apoptosis by Bad-CAII complex.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, S; Sugiyama, K; Amano, O; Yasui, T; Sakagami, H

    2011-09-05

    Fluoride is used to prevent caries in dentistry. However, its mechanism of cytotoxicity induction is unclear. This study was undertaken to determine whether sodium fluoride (NaF) induces apoptosis in human oral cells and if so, whether Bad protein is involved in the process. NaF showed higher cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity against human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells (HSC-2) than against human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Western blot analysis showed that NaF enhanced the expression and dephosphorylation of Bad protein. This study demonstrates for the first time that Bad protein forms a complex with carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), and NaF stimulates the detachment of CAII from the Bad-CAII complex and the replacement by the formation of Bad-Bcl-2 complex. Knockdown of Bad and CAII mRNA by siRNA inhibited and enhanced the NaF-induced caspase activation, respectively. The present study suggests that CAII negatively regulates the NaF-induced apoptosis by forming a complex with Bad.

  6. The Slx5-Slx8 complex affects sumoylation of DNA repair proteins and negatively regulates recombination.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Rahman, Sadia; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2007-09-01

    Recombination is important for repairing DNA lesions, yet it can also lead to genomic rearrangements. This process must be regulated, and recently, sumoylation-mediated mechanisms were found to inhibit Rad51-dependent recombination. Here, we report that the absence of the Slx5-Slx8 complex, a newly identified player in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) pathway, led to increased Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent recombination. The increases were most striking during S phase, suggesting an accumulation of DNA lesions during replication. Consistent with this view, Slx8 protein localized to replication centers. In addition, like SUMO E2 mutants, slx8Delta mutants exhibited clonal lethality, which was due to the overamplification of 2 microm, an extrachromosomal plasmid. Interestingly, in both SUMO E2 and slx8Delta mutants, clonal lethality was rescued by deleting genes required for Rad51-independent recombination but not those involved in Rad51-dependent events. These results suggest that sumoylation negatively regulates Rad51-independent recombination, and indeed, the Slx5-Slx8 complex affected the sumoylation of several enzymes involved in early steps of Rad51-independent recombination. We propose that, during replication, the Slx5-Slx8 complex helps prevent DNA lesions that are acted upon by recombination. In addition, the complex inhibits Rad51-independent recombination via modulating the sumoylation of DNA repair proteins.

  7. Neurophysiological evidence for whole form retrieval of complex derived words: a mismatch negativity study

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Jeff; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Complex words can be seen as combinations of elementary units, decomposable into stems and affixes according to morphological rules. Alternatively, complex forms may be stored as single lexical entries and accessed as whole forms. This study uses an event-related potential brain response capable of indexing both whole-form retrieval and combinatorial processing, the Mismatch Negativity (MMN), to investigate early brain activity elicited by morphologically complex derived words in German. We presented complex words consisting of stems “sicher” (secure), or “sauber” (clean) combined with abstract nominalizing derivational affixes -heit or -keit, to form either congruent derived words: “Sicherheit” (security) and “Sauberkeit” (cleanliness), or incongruent derived pseudowords: *“Sicherkeit”, and *“Sauberheit”. Using this orthogonal design, it was possible to record brain responses for -heit and -keit in both congruent and incongruent contexts, therefore balancing acoustic variance. Previous research has shown that incongruent combinations of symbols elicit a stronger MMN than congruent combinations, but that single words or constructions stored as whole forms elicit a stronger MMN than pseudowords or non-existent constructions. We found that congruent derived words elicited a stronger MMN than incongruent derived words, beginning about 150 ms after perception of the critical morpheme. This pattern of results is consistent with whole-form storage of morphologically complex derived words as lexical units, or mini-constructions. Using distributed source localization methods, the MMN enhancement for well-formed derivationally complex words appeared to be most prominent in the left inferior anterior-temporal, bilateral superior parietal and bilateral post-central, supra-marginal areas. In addition, neurophysiological results reflected the frequency of derived forms, thus providing further converging evidence for whole form storage and against a

  8. Daily Stress, Coping, and Negative and Positive Affect in Depression: Complex Trigger and Maintenance Patterns.

    PubMed

    Dunkley, David M; Lewkowski, Maxim; Lee, Ihno A; Preacher, Kristopher J; Zuroff, David C; Berg, Jody-Lynn; Foley, J Elizabeth; Myhr, Gail; Westreich, Ruta

    2017-05-01

    Major depressive disorder is characterized by emotional dysfunction, but mood states in daily life are not well understood. This study examined complex explanatory models of daily stress and coping mechanisms that trigger and maintain daily negative affect and (lower) positive affect in depression. Sixty-three depressed patients completed perfectionism measures, and then completed daily questionnaires of stress appraisals, coping, and affect for 7 consecutive days. Multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) demonstrated that, across many stressors, when the typical individual with depression perceives more criticism than usual, he/she uses more avoidant coping and experiences higher event stress than usual, and this is connected to daily increases in negative affect as well as decreases in positive affect. In parallel, results showed that perceived control, less avoidant coping, and problem-focused coping commonly operate together when daily positive affect increases. MSEM also showed that avoidant coping tendencies and ongoing stress, in combination, explain why people with depression and higher self-critical perfectionism maintain daily negative affect and lower positive affect. These findings advance a richer and more detailed understanding of specific stress and coping patterns to target in order to more effectively accomplish the two predominant therapy goals of decreasing patients' distress and strengthening resilience. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Discovering Recurrent Copy Number Aberrations in Complex Patterns via Non-Negative Sparse Singular Value Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jianing; Li, Ao

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent copy number aberrations (RCNAs) in multiple cancer samples are strongly associated with tumorigenesis, and RCNA discovery is helpful to cancer research and treatment. Despite the emergence of numerous RCNA discovering methods, most of them are unable to detect RCNAs in complex patterns that are influenced by complicating factors including aberration in partial samples, co-existing of gains and losses and normal-like tumor samples. Here, we propose a novel computational method, called non-negative sparse singular value decomposition (NN-SSVD), to address the RCNA discovering problem in complex patterns. In NN-SSVD, the measurement of RCNA is based on the aberration frequency in a part of samples rather than all samples, which can circumvent the complexity of different RCNA patterns. We evaluate NN-SSVD on synthetic dataset by comparison on detection scores and Receiver Operating Characteristics curves, and the results show that NN-SSVD outperforms existing methods in RCNA discovery and demonstrate more robustness to RCNA complicating factors. Applying our approach on a breast cancer dataset, we successfully identify a number of genomic regions that are strongly correlated with previous studies, which harbor a bunch of known breast cancer associated genes.

  10. Third target of rapamycin complex negatively regulates development of quiescence in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Barquilla, Antonio; Saldivia, Manuel; Diaz, Rosario; Bart, Jean-Mathieu; Vidal, Isabel; Calvo, Enrique; Hall, Michael N.; Navarro, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    African trypanosomes are protozoan parasites transmitted by a tsetse fly vector to a mammalian host. The life cycle includes highly proliferative forms and quiescent forms, the latter being adapted to host transmission. The signaling pathways controlling the developmental switch between the two forms remain unknown. Trypanosoma brucei contains two target of rapamycin (TOR) kinases, TbTOR1 and TbTOR2, and two TOR complexes, TbTORC1 and TbTORC2. Surprisingly, two additional TOR kinases are encoded in the T. brucei genome. We report that TbTOR4 associates with an Armadillo domain-containing protein (TbArmtor), a major vault protein, and LST8 to form a unique TOR complex, TbTORC4. Depletion of TbTOR4 caused irreversible differentiation of the parasite into the quiescent form. AMP and hydrolysable analogs of cAMP inhibited TbTOR4 expression and induced the stumpy quiescent form. Our results reveal unexpected complexity in TOR signaling and show that TbTORC4 negatively regulates differentiation of the proliferative form into the quiescent form. PMID:22908264

  11. Sterile-water negative pressure instillation therapy for complex wounds and NPWT failures.

    PubMed

    Fluieraru, S; Bekara, F; Naud, M; Herlin, C; Faure, C; Trial, C; Téot, L

    2013-06-01

    To investigate use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) combined with instillation for patients either presenting with a complex wound or after failure of classic NPWT. A retrospective case series study conducted on patients treated using an NPWT instillation system (V.A.C. Instill; KCI Inc.) from January to December 2012. The instillation machine was used with pure saline so as not to interfere with local antibacterial solutions. Two clinical indications-patients presenting either large undermining, deep inaccessible wounds or infected wounds and those for whom conventional NPWT had proved ineffective, were analysed-with efficacy of the promotion of granulation tissue as the primary outcome. Length of instillation time, the rhythm and the amount of liquid to be injected compared with the estimated volume of the cavity were also evaluated. Twenty-four patients were included in this series--12 post-NPWT failures and 12 complex wounds-with positive outcomes in 23 cases. Surgical closure was realised after promotion of granulation tissue, using either flaps or skin grafts alone, or combined with previous application of a dermal substitute. No complications linked to instillation were observed during the period of use. The results of this case series suggests that use of NPWT combined with pure saline instillation could have a positive impact on the healing trajectory of patients with complex wounds or after failure of classic NPWT.

  12. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Doczi, Judit; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Kawamata, Hibiki; Manfredi, Giovanni; Zhang, Steven F.; Gibson, Gary E.; Beal, M. Flint; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    A decline in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) activity has been associated with neurodegeneration. Provision of succinyl-CoA by KGDHC is essential for generation of matrix ATP (or GTP) by substrate-level phosphorylation catalyzed by succinyl-CoA ligase. Here, we demonstrate ATP consumption in respiration-impaired isolated and in situ neuronal somal mitochondria from transgenic mice with a deficiency of either dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (DLST) or dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD) that exhibit a 20–48% decrease in KGDHC activity. Import of ATP into the mitochondrial matrix of transgenic mice was attributed to a shift in the reversal potential of the adenine nucleotide translocase toward more negative values due to diminished matrix substrate-level phosphorylation, which causes the translocase to reverse prematurely. Immunoreactivity of all three subunits of succinyl-CoA ligase and maximal enzymatic activity were unaffected in transgenic mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Therefore, decreased matrix substrate-level phosphorylation was due to diminished provision of succinyl-CoA. These results were corroborated further by the finding that mitochondria from wild-type mice respiring on substrates supporting substrate-level phosphorylation exhibited ∼30% higher ADP-ATP exchange rates compared to those obtained from DLST+/− or DLD+/− littermates. We propose that KGDHC-associated pathologies are a consequence of the inability of respiration-impaired mitochondria to rely on “in-house” mitochondrial ATP reserves.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Doczi, J., Starkov, A. A., Kawamata, H., Manfredi, G., Zhang, S. F., Gibson, G. E., Beal, M. F., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation. PMID:23475850

  13. Complex Negative Regulation of TLR9 by Multiple Proteolytic Cleavage Events.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Siddhartha S; Cameron, Jody; Brooks, James C; Leifer, Cynthia A

    2016-08-15

    TLR9 is an innate immune receptor important for recognizing DNA of host and foreign origin. A mechanism proposed to prevent excessive response to host DNA is the requirement for proteolytic cleavage of TLR9 in endosomes to generate a mature form of the receptor (TLR9(471-1032)). We previously described another cleavage event in the juxtamembrane region of the ectodomain that generated a dominant-negative form of TLR9. Thus, there are at least two independent cleavage events that regulate TLR9. In this study, we investigated whether an N-terminal fragment of TLR9 could be responsible for regulation of the mature or negative-regulatory form. We show that TLR9(471-1032), corresponding to the proteolytically cleaved form, does not function on its own. Furthermore, activity is not rescued by coexpression of the N-terminal fragment (TLR9(1-440)), inclusion of the hinge region (TLR9(441-1032)), or overexpression of UNC93B1, the last of which is critical for trafficking and cleavage of TLR9. TLR9(1-440) coimmunoprecipitates with full-length TLR9 and TLR9(471-1032) but does not rescue the native glycosylation pattern; thus, inappropriate trafficking likely explains why TLR9(471-1032) is nonfunctional. Lastly, we show that TLR9(471-1032) is also a dominant-negative regulator of TLR9 signaling. Together, these data provide a new perspective on the complexity of TLR9 regulation by proteolytic cleavage and offer potential ways to inhibit activity through this receptor, which may dampen autoimmune inflammation.

  14. Macrophage cell lines derived from major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Two bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell lines, C2D and C2Dt, were isolated from major histocompatibility class II negative knock-out mice. The C2D cell line was stabilized by continuous culture in colony-stimulating factor-1 and the C2Dt cell line was transformed with SV40 virus large T antigen. These cells exhibited phenotypic properties of macrophages including morphology and expression of Mac 1 and Mac 2 cell surface molecules. These cells also had comparable growth to the bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line B6MP102. These new cell lines were not spontaneously cytotoxic and were only capable of modest killing of F5b tumor cells when stimulated with LPS and interferon-gamma, but not when stimulated with LPS alone or with staphylococcal exotoxin. C2D and C2Dt cells phagocytosed labeled Staphylococcus aureus similarly to B6MP102 cells but less well than C2D peritoneal macrophages. These cell lines secreted interleukin-6, but not tumor necrosis factor or nitric oxide in response to LPS or staphlococcal enterotoxins A or B C2D(t) cells were tumorigenic in C2D and C57BL/6J mice but C2D cells were not. These data suggest that macrophage cell lines can be established from bone marrow cells of major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice.

  15. Macrophage cell lines derived from major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Two bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell lines, C2D and C2Dt, were isolated from major histocompatibility class II negative knock-out mice. The C2D cell line was stabilized by continuous culture in colony-stimulating factor-1 and the C2Dt cell line was transformed with SV40 virus large T antigen. These cells exhibited phenotypic properties of macrophages including morphology and expression of Mac 1 and Mac 2 cell surface molecules. These cells also had comparable growth to the bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line B6MP102. These new cell lines were not spontaneously cytotoxic and were only capable of modest killing of F5b tumor cells when stimulated with LPS and interferon-gamma, but not when stimulated with LPS alone or with staphylococcal exotoxin. C2D and C2Dt cells phagocytosed labeled Staphylococcus aureus similarly to B6MP102 cells but less well than C2D peritoneal macrophages. These cell lines secreted interleukin-6, but not tumor necrosis factor or nitric oxide in response to LPS or staphlococcal enterotoxins A or B C2D(t) cells were tumorigenic in C2D and C57BL/6J mice but C2D cells were not. These data suggest that macrophage cell lines can be established from bone marrow cells of major histocompatibility complex II-negative mice.

  16. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of the copper-aspartic acid anion and its hydrated complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Haopeng; Bowen, Kit H.; Martínez, Ana; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Schermann, Jean-Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Negative ions of copper-aspartic acid Cu(Asp)- and its hydrated complexes have been produced in the gas phase and studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy. The vertical detachment energies (VDE) of Cu(Asp)- and Cu(Asp)-(H2O)1,2 were determined to be 1.6, 1.95, and 2.20 eV, respectively. The spectral profiles of Cu(Asp)-(H2O)1 and Cu(Asp)-(H2O)2 closely resembled that of Cu(Asp)-, indicating that hydration had not changed the structure of Cu(Asp)- significantly. The successive shifts to higher electron binding energies by the spectra of the hydrated species provided measures of their stepwise solvation energies. Density functional calculations were performed on anionic Cu(Asp)- and on its corresponding neutral. The agreement between the calculated and measured VDE values implied that the structure of the Cu(Asp)- complex originated with a zwitterionic form of aspartic acid in which a copper atom had inserted into the N-H bond.

  17. Parallel calculations of vibrational properties in complex materials: negative thermal expansion and elastic inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    Effects of thermal vibrations are essential to obtain a more complete understanding of the properties of complex materials. For example, they are important in the analysis and simulation of x-ray absorption spectra (XAS). In previous work we introduced an ab initio approach for a variety of vibrational effects, such as crystallographic and XAS Debye-Waller factors, Debye and Einstein temperatures, and thermal expansion coefficients. This approach uses theoretical dynamical matrices from which the locally-projected vibrational densities of states are obtained using a Lanczos recursion algorithm. In this talk I present recent improvements to our implementation, which permit simulations of more complex materials with up to two orders of magnitude larger simulation cells. The method takes advantage of parallelization in calculations of the dynamical matrix with VASP. To illustrate these capabilities we discuss two problems of considerable interest: negative thermal expansion in ZrW2O8; and local inhomogeneities in the elastic properties of supported metal nanoparticles. Both cases highlight the importance of a local treatment of vibrational properties. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER15476, with computer support from DOE-NERSC.

  18. 3D printing the pterygopalatine fossa: a negative space model of a complex structure.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Ross; Parihar, Shivani; Skarparis, Yiannis; Varsou, Ourania; Cezayirli, Enis

    2017-08-30

    The pterygopalatine fossa is one of the most complex anatomical regions to understand. It is poorly visualized in cadaveric dissection and most textbooks rely on schematic depictions. We describe our approach to creating a low-cost, 3D model of the pterygopalatine fossa, including its associated canals and foramina, using an affordable "desktop" 3D printer. We used open source software to create a volume render of the pterygopalatine fossa from axial slices of a head computerised tomography scan. These data were then exported to a 3D printer to produce an anatomically accurate model. The resulting 'negative space' model of the pterygopalatine fossa provides a useful and innovative aid for understanding the complex anatomical relationships of the pterygopalatine fossa. This model was designed primarily for medical students; however, it will also be of interest to postgraduates in ENT, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and radiology. The technical process described may be replicated by other departments wishing to develop their own anatomical models whilst incurring minimal costs.

  19. A Liposome Encapsulated Ruthenium Polypyridine Complex as a Theranostic Platform for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianliang; Kim, Han-Cheon; Wolfram, Joy; Mu, Chaofeng; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Haoran; Xie, Yan; Mai, Junhua; Zhang, Hang; Li, Zhi; Guevara, Maria; Mao, Zong-Wan; Shen, Haifa

    2017-05-10

    Ruthenium coordination complexes have the potential to serve as novel theranostic agents for cancer. However, a major limitation in their clinical implementation is effective tumor accumulation. In this study, we have developed a liposome-based theranostic nanodelivery system for [Ru(phen)2dppz](ClO4)2 (Lipo-Ru). This ruthenium polypyridine complex emits a strong fluorescent signal when incorporated in the hydrophobic lipid bilayer of the delivery vehicle or in the DNA helix, enabling visualization of the therapeutic agent in tumor tissues. Incubation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with Lipo-Ru induced double-strand DNA breaks and triggers apoptosis. In a mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer, treatment with Lipo-Ru dramatically reduced tumor growth. Biodistribution studies of Lipo-Ru revealed that more than 20% of the injected dose accumulated in the tumor. These results suggest that Lipo-Ru could serve as a promising theranostic platform for cancer.

  20. Meta-analysis of mismatch negativity to simple versus complex deviants in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Avissar, Michael; Xie, Shanghong; Vail, Blair; Lopez-Calderon, Javier; Wang, Yuanjia; Javitt, Daniel C

    2017-07-11

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) deficits in schizophrenia (SCZ) have been studied extensively since the early 1990s, with the vast majority of studies using simple auditory oddball task deviants that vary in a single acoustic dimension such as pitch or duration. There has been a growing interest in using more complex deviants that violate more abstract rules to probe higher order cognitive deficits. It is still unclear how sensory processing deficits compare to and contribute to higher order cognitive dysfunction, which can be investigated with later attention-dependent auditory event-related potential (ERP) components such as a subcomponent of P300, P3b. In this meta-analysis, we compared MMN deficits in SCZ using simple deviants to more complex deviants. We also pooled studies that measured MMN and P3b in the same study sample and examined the relationship between MMN and P3b deficits within study samples. Our analysis reveals that, to date, studies using simple deviants demonstrate larger deficits than those using complex deviants, with effect sizes in the range of moderate to large. The difference in effect sizes between deviant types was reduced significantly when accounting for magnitude of MMN measured in healthy controls. P3b deficits, while large, were only modestly greater than MMN deficits (d=0.21). Taken together, our findings suggest that MMN to simple deviants may still be optimal as a biomarker for SCZ and that sensory processing dysfunction contributes significantly to MMN deficit and disease pathophysiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting triple negative breast cancer cells by N3-substituted 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone thiosemicarbazones and their metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrasiabi, Zahra; Stovall, Preston; Finley, Kristen; Choudhury, Amitava; Barnes, Charles; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul; Vyas, Alok; Padhye, Subhash

    2013-10-01

    Novel N3-substituted 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone thiosemicarbazones and their copper, nickel and palladium complexes are structurally characterized and reported along with the single crystal X-ray structures of three ligands and one nickel complex. All compounds were evaluated for their antiproliferative potential against Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) cells which have poor prognosis and no effective drugs to treat with. All compounds exhibited antiproliferative activity against these cells. Among the metal complexes evaluated, redox active copper complexes were found to be more potent. The possible mechanism for such enhanced activity can be attributed to the generation of oxidative stress, which was amenable for targeting through metal complexation.

  2. Use of Closed Incision Management with Negative Pressure Therapy for Complex Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with major comorbidities undergoing complex cardiothoracic surgery, incision management is critical. This retrospective review evaluated negative pressure over closed sternal incisions in cardiac patients with multiple comorbidities within 30 days post-median sternotomy. Methods: Records of post-sternotomy patients treated with Prevena™ Incision Management System (KCI, an Acelity company, San Antonio, TX), a closed incision negative pressure therapy (ciNPT), were reviewed from September 2010 through September 2014. Data collected included demographics, major comorbidities, types of surgery, relevant medical history, incision length, therapy duration, time to follow-up, and incision complications. Descriptive statistics were computed for continuous variables, frequency, and percentages for categorical variables. Results: Twenty-seven patients were treated with ciNPT between September 2010 and September 2014. The mean patient age was 62.5 (SD 7.9), and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 38.5 (SD 4.4) kg/m2. Risk factors included obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, 27/27; 100%), diabetes (25/27; 92.6%), hypertension (16/27; 59.3%), and 20/27 patients (74%) had ≥ 5 comorbidities. Mean ciNPT duration was 5.6 (SD 0.9) days. Within 30 days post-surgery, 21/27 (77.8%) patients had intact incisions with good reapproximation. Two patients experienced minor dehiscences; four cases of superficial cellulitis were treated and resolved. One patient with a dehiscence was readmitted for intravenous antibiotics and five patients were managed successfully with antibiotics as outpatients. All patients had intact incisions with good skin approximation at final follow-up. Conclusions: In this retrospective study of post-sternotomy patients at high risk of developing complications, ciNPT over closed sternal incisions resulted in favorable outcomes within 30 days of surgery. PMID:27026831

  3. Importin beta negatively regulates nuclear membrane fusion and nuclear pore complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Harel, Amnon; Chan, Rene C; Lachish-Zalait, Aurelie; Zimmerman, Ella; Elbaum, Michael; Forbes, Douglass J

    2003-11-01

    Assembly of a eukaryotic nucleus involves three distinct events: membrane recruitment, fusion to form a double nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. We report that importin beta negatively regulates two of these events, membrane fusion and NPC assembly. When excess importin beta is added to a full Xenopus nuclear reconstitution reaction, vesicles are recruited to chromatin but their fusion is blocked. The importin beta down-regulation of membrane fusion is Ran-GTP reversible. Indeed, excess RanGTP (RanQ69L) alone stimulates excessive membrane fusion, leading to intranuclear membrane tubules and cytoplasmic annulate lamellae-like structures. We propose that a precise balance of importin beta to Ran is required to create a correct double nuclear membrane and simultaneously to repress undesirable fusion events. Interestingly, truncated importin beta 45-462 allows membrane fusion but produces nuclei lacking any NPCs. This reveals distinct importin beta-regulation of NPC assembly. Excess full-length importin beta and beta 45-462 act similarly when added to prefused nuclear intermediates, i.e., both block NPC assembly. The importin beta NPC block, which maps downstream of GTPgammaS and BAPTA-sensitive steps in NPC assembly, is reversible by cytosol. Remarkably, it is not reversible by 25 microM RanGTP, a concentration that easily reverses fusion inhibition. This report, using a full reconstitution system and natural chromatin substrates, significantly expands the repertoire of importin beta. Its roles now encompass negative regulation of two of the major events of nuclear assembly: membrane fusion and NPC assembly.

  4. Complexation of 1,4-bis(pyridinium)butanes by negatively charged carboxylatopillar[5]arene.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunju; Shu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jian; Chen, Songhui; Han, Kang; Xu, Min; Hu, Bingjie; Yu, Yihua; Jia, Xueshun

    2011-10-21

    The binding behavior of substituted 1,4-bis(pyridinium)butane derivatives (X-Py(CH(2))(4)Py-X, X = H, 2-methyl, 3-methyl, 4-methyl, 2,6-dimethyl, 4-pyridyl, and 4-COOEthyl) 1(2+)-7(2+), with negatively charged carboxylatopillar[5]arene (CP5A) has been comprehensively investigated by (1)H NMR and 2D ROESY and UV absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy in aqueous phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.2). The results indicated that the position of the substituents attached on pyridinium ring dramatically affects the association constants and binding modes. 3- and 4-Substituted guests (1(2+), 3(2+), 4(2+), 6(2+), 7(2+)) form [2]pseudorotaxane geometries with CP5A host, giving very large association constants (>10(5) M(-1)), while 2,6-dimethyl-substituted 5(2+) forms external complex with relatively small K(a) values [(2.4 ± 0.3) × 10(3) M(-1)] because the 2,6-dimethylpyridinium unit is too bulky to thread the host cavity. Both of the binding geometries mentioned above are observed for 2(2+), having one methyl group in the 2-position of pyridinium. Typically, the association constant of [2]pseudorotaxane 1(2+)⊂CP5A exceeds 10(6) M(-1) in water, which is significantly higher than those of previously reported analogues in organic solvents. The remarkably improved complexation of bis(pyridinium) guests by the anionic host was due to electrostatic attraction forces and hydrophobic interactions.

  5. BRCA1 is a negative modulator of the PRC2 complex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Zeng, Xianzhuo; Chen, Shuai; Ding, Liya; Zhong, Jian; Zhao, Jonathan C; Wang, Liguo; Sarver, Aaron; Koller, Antonius; Zhi, Jizu; Ma, Yupo; Yu, Jindan; Chen, Junjie; Huang, Haojie

    2013-01-01

    The Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is important for maintenance of stem cell pluripotency and suppression of cell differentiation by promoting histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and transcriptional repression of differentiation genes. Here we show that the tumour-suppressor protein BRCA1 interacts with the Polycomb protein EZH2 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) and human breast cancer cells. The BRCA1-binding region in EZH2 overlaps with the noncoding RNA (ncRNA)-binding domain, and BRCA1 expression inhibits the binding of EZH2 to the HOTAIR ncRNA. Decreased expression of BRCA1 causes genome-wide EZH2 re-targeting and elevates H3K27me3 levels at PRC2 target loci in both mouse ES and human breast cancer cells. BRCA1 deficiency blocks ES cell differentiation and enhances breast cancer migration and invasion in an EZH2-dependent manner. These results reveal that BRCA1 is a key negative modulator of PRC2 and that loss of BRCA1 inhibits ES cell differentiation and enhances an aggressive breast cancer phenotype by affecting PRC2 function. PMID:23624935

  6. Negative membrane curvature catalyzes nucleation of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Kai, Hiroyuki; Carlson, Lars-Anders; Groves, Jay T; Hurley, James H

    2015-12-29

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery functions in HIV-1 budding, cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, and other pathways, in the course of which it interacts with concave membrane necks and bud rims. To test the role of membrane shape in regulating ESCRT assembly, we nanofabricated templates for invaginated supported lipid bilayers. The assembly of the core ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B/Snf7 is preferentially nucleated in the resulting 100-nm-deep membrane concavities. ESCRT-II and CHMP6 accelerate CHMP4B assembly by increasing the concentration of nucleation seeds. Superresolution imaging was used to visualize CHMP4B/Snf7 concentration in a negatively curved annulus at the rim of the invagination. Although Snf7 assemblies nucleate slowly on flat membranes, outward growth onto the flat membrane is efficiently nucleated at invaginations. The nucleation behavior provides a biophysical explanation for the timing of ESCRT-III recruitment and membrane scission in HIV-1 budding.

  7. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Doczi, Judit; Starkov, Anatoly A; Kawamata, Hibiki; Manfredi, Giovanni; Zhang, Steven F; Gibson, Gary E; Beal, M Flint; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-06-01

    A decline in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) activity has been associated with neurodegeneration. Provision of succinyl-CoA by KGDHC is essential for generation of matrix ATP (or GTP) by substrate-level phosphorylation catalyzed by succinyl-CoA ligase. Here, we demonstrate ATP consumption in respiration-impaired isolated and in situ neuronal somal mitochondria from transgenic mice with a deficiency of either dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (DLST) or dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD) that exhibit a 20-48% decrease in KGDHC activity. Import of ATP into the mitochondrial matrix of transgenic mice was attributed to a shift in the reversal potential of the adenine nucleotide translocase toward more negative values due to diminished matrix substrate-level phosphorylation, which causes the translocase to reverse prematurely. Immunoreactivity of all three subunits of succinyl-CoA ligase and maximal enzymatic activity were unaffected in transgenic mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Therefore, decreased matrix substrate-level phosphorylation was due to diminished provision of succinyl-CoA. These results were corroborated further by the finding that mitochondria from wild-type mice respiring on substrates supporting substrate-level phosphorylation exhibited ~30% higher ADP-ATP exchange rates compared to those obtained from DLST(+/-) or DLD(+/-) littermates. We propose that KGDHC-associated pathologies are a consequence of the inability of respiration-impaired mitochondria to rely on "in-house" mitochondrial ATP reserves.

  8. Identification of lysine positive non-fermenting gram negative bacilli (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Burkholderia cepacia complex).

    PubMed

    Gautam, V; Ray, P; Vandamme, P; Chatterjee, S S; Das, A; Sharma, K; Rana, S; Garg, R K; Madhup, S K; Mahajan, M; Sharma, M

    2009-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia are closely related groups of non-fermenting gram-negative bacilli (NFGNBs) having a similar spectrum of infections ranging from superficial to deep-seated and disseminated infections. Identification of these lysine decarboxylase-positive NFGNBs lags behind in most Indian laboratories. A simplified identification scheme was devised for these two pathogens that allowed us to isolate them with an increasing frequency at our tertiary care institute. A simple five-tube conventional biochemical identification of these bacteria has been standardized. In the beginning, some of the isolates were confirmed from the International B. cepacia Working group, Belgium. Molecular identification and typing using recA polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was also standardized for BCC. For short-term preservation of BCC, an innovative method of preserving the bacteria in Robertson's cooked medium tubes kept in a domestic refrigerator was developed. Thirty-nine isolates of BCC isolates were obtained from various specimens (30 from blood cultures) and 22 S. maltophilia (13 blood cultures and 9 respiratory isolates) were isolated during the year 2007 alone. BCC and S. maltophilia can be identified with relative ease using a small battery of biochemical reactions. Use of simplified methods will allow greater recognition of their pathogenic potential and correct antimicrobials should be advised in other clinical laboratories and hospitals.

  9. Positive and negative ion mode ESI-MS and MS/MS for studying drug-DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu, Frédéric; Pirotte, Sophie; Pauw, Edwin De; Gabelica, Valérie

    2006-07-01

    We report systematic investigation of duplex DNA complexes with minor groove binders (Hoechsts 33258 and 33342, netropsin and DAPI) and intercalators (daunomycin, doxorubicin, actinomycin D, ethidium, cryptolepine, neocryptolepine, m-Amsacrine, proflavine, ellipticine and mitoxantrone) by ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS in the negative ion mode and in the positive ion mode. The apparent solution phase equilibrium binding constants can be determined by measuring relative intensities in the ESI-MS spectrum. While negative ion mode gives reliable results, positive ion mode gives a systematic underestimation of the binding constants and even a complete suppression of the complexes for intercalators lacking functional groups capable of interacting in the grooves. In the second part of the paper we systematically compare MS/MS fragmentation channels and breakdown curves in the positive and the negative modes, and discuss the possible uses and caveats of MS/MS in drug-DNA complexes. In the negative mode, the drugs can be separated in three groups: (1) those that leave the complex with no net charge; (2) those that leave the complex with a negative charge; and (3) those that remain attached on the strands upon dissociation of the duplex due to their positive charge. In the positive ion mode, all complexes fragment via the loss of protonated drug. Information on the stabilization of the complex by drug-DNA noncovalent interactions can be obtained straightforwardly only in the case of neutral drug loss. In all other cases, proton affinity (in the positive ion mode), gas-phase basicity (in the negative ion mode) and coulombic repulsion are the major factors influencing the fragmentation channel and the dissociation kinetics.

  10. Predicting complex syntactic structure in real time: Processing of negative sentences in Russian.

    PubMed

    Kazanina, Nina

    2016-09-19

    In Russian negative sentences the verb's direct object may appear either in the accusative case, which is licensed by the verb (as is common cross-linguistically), or in the genitive case, which is licensed by the negation (Russian-specific "genitive-of-negation" phenomenon). Such sentences were used to investigate whether case marking is employed for anticipating syntactic structure, and whether lexical heads other than the verb can be predicted on the basis of a case-marked noun phrase. Experiment 1, a completion task, confirmed that genitive-of-negation is part of Russian speakers' active grammatical repertoire. In Experiments 2 and 3, the genitive/accusative case manipulation on the preverbal object led to shorter reading times at the negation and verb in the genitive versus accusative condition. Furthermore, Experiment 3 manipulated linear order of the direct object and the negated verb in order to distinguish whether the abovementioned facilitatory effect was predictive or integrative in nature, and concluded that the parser actively predicts a verb and (otherwise optional) negation on the basis of a preceding genitive-marked object. Similarly to a head-final language, case-marking information on preverbal noun phrases (NPs) is used by the parser to enable incremental structure building in a free-word-order language such as Russian.

  11. Higher platelet reactivity and platelet-monocyte complex formation in Gram-positive sepsis compared to Gram-negative sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tunjungputri, Rahajeng N; van de Heijden, Wouter; Urbanus, Rolf T; de Groot, Philip G; van der Ven, Andre; de Mast, Quirijn

    2016-12-29

    Platelets may play a role in the high risk for vascular complications in Gram-positive sepsis. We compared the platelet reactivity of 15 patients with Gram-positive sepsis, 17 with Gram-negative sepsis and 20 healthy controls using a whole blood flow cytometry-based assay. Patients with Gram-positive sepsis had the highest median fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the platelet membrane expression of P-selectin upon stimulation with high dose adenosine diphosphate (ADP; P = 0.002 vs. Gram-negative and P = 0.005 vs. control groups) and cross-linked collagen-related peptide (CRP-XL; P = 0.02 vs. Gram-negative and P = 0.0001 vs. control groups). The Gram-positive group also demonstrated significantly higher ADP-induced fibrinogen binding (P = 0.001), as wll as platelet-monocyte complex formation (P = 0.02), compared to the Gram-negative group and had the highest plasma levels of platelet factor 4, β-thromboglobulin and soluble P-selectin. In contrast, thrombin-antithrombin complex and C-reactive protein levels were comparable in both patient groups. In conclusion, common Gram-positive pathogens induce platelet hyperreactivity, which may contribute to a higher risk for vascular complications.

  12. Does job complexity mitigate the negative effect of emotion-rule dissonance on employee burnout?

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Bettina; Korunka, Christian

    2015-10-02

    In interactions with clients or patients, human service workers are at risk of experiencing discrepancies between felt and organizationally mandated emotions (i.e. emotion-rule dissonance). Given the documented detrimental effects of such discrepancies on employee strain, the present study investigated whether job complexity mitigates the relation between emotion-rule dissonance and employee burnout using data from a two-wave panel study of eldercare workers (N = 583, 16-month time lag). Structural equation modelling revealed that emotion-rule dissonance at Time 1 preceded emotional exhaustion and depersonalization at Time 2. Beyond that, employees whose work offered job complexity were found to suffer less from emotional exhaustion and depersonalization when encountering discrepancies between felt and stipulated emotions compared to employees who conducted noncomplex work. Thus, designing complex tasks appears to be a crucial starting point for alleviating employee burnout in jobs that provoke emotion-rule dissonance.

  13. Does job complexity mitigate the negative effect of emotion-rule dissonance on employee burnout?

    PubMed Central

    Kubicek, Bettina; Korunka, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In interactions with clients or patients, human service workers are at risk of experiencing discrepancies between felt and organizationally mandated emotions (i.e. emotion-rule dissonance). Given the documented detrimental effects of such discrepancies on employee strain, the present study investigated whether job complexity mitigates the relation between emotion-rule dissonance and employee burnout using data from a two-wave panel study of eldercare workers (N = 583, 16-month time lag). Structural equation modelling revealed that emotion-rule dissonance at Time 1 preceded emotional exhaustion and depersonalization at Time 2. Beyond that, employees whose work offered job complexity were found to suffer less from emotional exhaustion and depersonalization when encountering discrepancies between felt and stipulated emotions compared to employees who conducted noncomplex work. Thus, designing complex tasks appears to be a crucial starting point for alleviating employee burnout in jobs that provoke emotion-rule dissonance. PMID:26681818

  14. Detection of error-related negativity in complex visual stimuli: a new neuroergonomic arrow in the practitioner's quiver.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Ben D; Karwowski, Waldemar; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Hancock, P A

    2017-02-01

    Brain processes responsible for the error-related negativity (ERN) evoked response potential (ERP) have historically been studied in highly controlled laboratory experiments through presentation of simple visual stimuli. The present work describes the first time the ERN has been evoked and successfully detected in visual search of complex stimuli. A letter flanker task and a motorcycle conspicuity task were presented to participants during electroencephalographic (EEG) recording. Direct visual inspection and subsequent statistical analysis of the resultant time-locked ERP data clearly indicated that the ERN was detectable in both groups. Further, the ERN pattern did not differ between groups. Such results show that the ERN can be successfully elicited and detected in visual search of complex static images, opening the door to applied neuroergonomic use. Harnessing the brain's error detection system presents significant opportunities and complex challenges, and implication of such are discussed in the context of human-machine systems. Practitioner Summary: For the first time, error-related negativity (ERN) has been successfully elicited and detected in a visually complex applied search task. Brain-process-based error detection in human-machine systems presents unique challenges, but promises broad neuroergonomic applications.

  15. Pavement crack detection combining non-negative feature with fast LoG in complex scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanli; Zhang, Xiuhua; Hong, Hanyu

    2015-12-01

    Pavement crack detection is affected by much interference in the realistic situation, such as the shadow, road sign, oil stain, salt and pepper noise etc. Due to these unfavorable factors, the exist crack detection methods are difficult to distinguish the crack from background correctly. How to extract crack information effectively is the key problem to the road crack detection system. To solve this problem, a novel method for pavement crack detection based on combining non-negative feature with fast LoG is proposed. The two key novelties and benefits of this new approach are that 1) using image pixel gray value compensation to acquisit uniform image, and 2) combining non-negative feature with fast LoG to extract crack information. The image preprocessing results demonstrate that the method is indeed able to homogenize the crack image with more accurately compared to existing methods. A large number of experimental results demonstrate the proposed approach can detect the crack regions more correctly compared with traditional methods.

  16. CD5-negative blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma with complex CCND1/IGH and MYC aberrations.

    PubMed

    Seok, Yoonmi; Kim, Juwon; Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Yu Ri; Park, Seo-Jin; Kim, Sue Jung; Song, Jaewoo; Lee, Kyung-A

    2012-01-01

    The coexistence of CCND1/IGH and MYC rearrangements in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare finding associated with a very poor prognosis. In this study, a patient with blastoid variant (MCL) is reported. The disease was clinically aggressive and refractory to chemotherapy, and the patient only survived for 1 month following diagnosis. Conventional cytogenetic study, FISH, and multicolor FISH (mFISH) demonstrated the involvement of the BCL1/CCND1 locus in a complex translocation, t(3;11)(q25;p15)t(11;14)(q13;q32). In addition, subclonal abnormalities in the 8q24 region, manifested as a t(8;14)(q24;q32)/MYC rearrangement, were identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first MCL case in Korea bearing these complex genomic aberrations.

  17. CD5-negative Blastoid Variant Mantle Cell Lymphoma with Complex CCND1/IGH and MYC Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Yoonmi; Kim, Juwon; Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Yu Ri; Park, Seo-Jin; Kim, Sue Jung; Song, Jaewoo

    2012-01-01

    The coexistence of CCND1/IGH and MYC rearrangements in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare finding associated with a very poor prognosis. In this study, a patient with blastoid variant (MCL) is reported. The disease was clinically aggressive and refractory to chemotherapy, and the patient only survived for 1 month following diagnosis. Conventional cytogenetic study, FISH, and multicolor FISH (mFISH) demonstrated the involvement of the BCL1/CCND1 locus in a complex translocation, t(3;11)(q25;p15)t(11;14)(q13;q32). In addition, subclonal abnormalities in the 8q24 region, manifested as a t(8;14)(q24;q32)/MYC rearrangement, were identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first MCL case in Korea bearing these complex genomic aberrations. PMID:22259787

  18. Complex mismatch negativity to tone pair deviants in long-term schizophrenia and in the first-episode schizophrenia spectrum.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Dean F; McCathern, Alexis G; Coffman, Brian A; Murphy, Timothy K; Haigh, Sarah M

    2017-05-12

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related potential to stimulus change. MMN to infrequent deviant tones that differs in a simple physical parameter from repetitive standard tones is reduced in patients with long-term schizophrenia (Sz; d=~1). However, this simple MMN is not uniformly reduced at the first-episode of schizophrenia-spectrum psychosis (FESz; d<0.1 for pitch; <0.4 for duration). Deviant stimuli that violate pattern rules also evoke MMN. This complex MMN is evoked by deviations in the relation of sounds to each other. The simplest pattern involves tone pairs. Although the pitch of first tone in the pair varies, the second tone's pitch always follows a rule (e.g., always 3 semitones higher). We measured complex MMN to deviant tone pairs that descended in pitch among standard tone pairs that ascended in pitch, never before examined in Sz or in FESz. Experiment 1 showed significant reductions in complex MMN in 20 Sz compared to 22 matched controls. Experiment 2 replicated smaller complex MMN in a shorter protocol in 24 Sz compared to 21 matched controls, but showed no significant complex MMN reduction in 21 FESz compared to 21 matched controls. Although reduced in Sz, indicating deficits in generation of a simple acoustic pattern rule, the tone pair complex MMN was within normal limits in FESz. This suggests that more complex perceptual pattern analysis processes are, at least partially, still intact at the first break. Future work will determine at what point of pattern complexity subtle auditory perception pathophysiology will be revealed in FESz. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Properties of clusters in the gas phase. V - Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, R. G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-molecules association reactions of the form A(-)(B)n-1 + B = A(-)(B)n were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), and NO2(-) with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO2(-) and SO3(-) with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), NO2(-), CO3(-), and SO3(-) with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions.

  20. VGLL4 functions as a new tumor suppressor in lung cancer by negatively regulating the YAP-TEAD transcriptional complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Gao, Yijun; Li, Peixue; Shi, Zhubing; Guo, Tong; Li, Fei; Han, Xiangkun; Feng, Yan; Zheng, Chao; Wang, Zuoyun; Li, Fuming; Chen, Haiquan; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-03-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide with high incidence and mortality. Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved regulator of organ size in both Drosophila and mammals. Emerging evidence has suggested the significance of Hpo pathway in cancer development. In this study, we identify VGLL4 as a novel tumor suppressor in lung carcinogenesis through negatively regulating the formation of YAP-TEAD complex, the core component of Hpo pathway. Our data show that VGLL4 is frequently observed to be lowly expressed in both mouse and human lung cancer specimens. Ectopic expression of VGLL4 significantly suppresses the growth of lung cancer cells in vitro. More importantly, VGLL4 significantly inhibits lung cancer progression in de novo mouse model. We further find that VGLL4 inhibits the activity of the YAP-TEAD transcriptional complex. Our data show that VGLL4 directly competes with YAP in binding to TEADs and executes its growth-inhibitory function through two TDU domains. Collectively, our study demonstrates that VGLL4 is a novel tumor suppressor for lung cancer through negatively regulating the YAP-TEAD complex formation and thus the Hpo pathway.

  1. VGLL4 functions as a new tumor suppressor in lung cancer by negatively regulating the YAP-TEAD transcriptional complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjing; Gao, Yijun; Li, Peixue; Shi, Zhubing; Guo, Tong; Li, Fei; Han, Xiangkun; Feng, Yan; Zheng, Chao; Wang, Zuoyun; Li, Fuming; Chen, Haiquan; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide with high incidence and mortality. Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved regulator of organ size in both Drosophila and mammals. Emerging evidence has suggested the significance of Hpo pathway in cancer development. In this study, we identify VGLL4 as a novel tumor suppressor in lung carcinogenesis through negatively regulating the formation of YAP-TEAD complex, the core component of Hpo pathway. Our data show that VGLL4 is frequently observed to be lowly expressed in both mouse and human lung cancer specimens. Ectopic expression of VGLL4 significantly suppresses the growth of lung cancer cells in vitro. More importantly, VGLL4 significantly inhibits lung cancer progression in de novo mouse model. We further find that VGLL4 inhibits the activity of the YAP-TEAD transcriptional complex. Our data show that VGLL4 directly competes with YAP in binding to TEADs and executes its growth-inhibitory function through two TDU domains. Collectively, our study demonstrates that VGLL4 is a novel tumor suppressor for lung cancer through negatively regulating the YAP-TEAD complex formation and thus the Hpo pathway. PMID:24458094

  2. Theoretical study of the complementarity in halogen-bonded complexes involving nitrogen and halogen as negative sites.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Vakili, Mahshad; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    This article analyzes the interplay between X···N and X···X halogen bonds interactions in NCX···NCX···XCH3 complexes, where X=Cl and Br. To better understand the properties of these systems, the corresponding dyads were also studied. These effects are studied theoretically in terms of geometric and energetic features of the complexes, which are computed by ab initio methods. The estimated values of cooperative energy (E coop) are all negative with much larger E coop in absolute value for the NCBr···NCBr···BrCH3 system. The effect of X···N on the properties of X···X is larger than that of X···X bonding on the properties of X···N. These results can be understood in terms of the electrostatic potentials of the negative sites with which the positive regions on the halogens are interacting. The nature of halogen bond interactions of the complexes is analyzed using parameters derived from the energy decomposition analysis.

  3. Beta-lactam resistance in the gram negatives: increasing complexity of conditional, composite and multiply resistant phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Iredell, Jon; Thomas, Lee; Espedido, Björn

    2006-12-01

    The greatest impact of microbiology data on clinical care is in the critically ill. Unfortunately, this is also the area in which microbiology laboratories are most often non-contributive. Attempts to move to rapid, culture-independent diagnostics are driven by the need to expedite urgent results. This is difficult in Gram-negative infection because of the complexity of the antibiotic resistance phenotype. Here, we discuss resistance to modern beta-lactams as a case in point. Recent outbreaks of transmissible carbapenem resistance among Gram-negative enteric pathogens in Sydney and Melbourne serve to illustrate the pitfalls of traditional phenotypical approaches. A better understanding of the epidemiology and mosaic nature of antibiotic resistance elements in the microflora is needed for us to move forward.

  4. Plasmonic Complex Fluids of Nematiclike and Helicoidal Self-Assemblies of Gold Nanorods with a Negative Order Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingkun; Senyuk, Bohdan; Tang, Jianwei; Lee, Taewoo; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2012-08-01

    We describe a soft matter system of self-organized oblate micelles and plasmonic gold nanorods that exhibit a negative orientational order parameter. Because of anisotropic surface anchoring interactions, colloidal gold nanorods tend to align perpendicular to the director describing the average orientation of normals to the discoidal micelles. Helicoidal structures of highly concentrated nanorods with a negative order parameter are realized by adding a chiral additive and are further controlled by means of confinement and mechanical stress. Polarization-sensitive absorption, scattering, and two-photon luminescence are used to characterize orientations and spatial distributions of nanorods. Self-alignment and effective-medium optical properties of these hybrid inorganic-organic complex fluids match predictions of a simple model based on anisotropic surface anchoring interactions of nanorods with the structured host medium.

  5. NEGATIVE-PRESSURE WOUND THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF COMPLEX INJURIES AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY.

    PubMed

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Bueno, Daniel Kamura; Giglio, Pedro Nogueira; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2017-01-01

    To present an experience with negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the treatment of surgical wounds in patients treated for infections after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with or without dehiscence and prophylaxis in wounds considered at risk of healing problems. We prospectively evaluated patients with TKA infection with or without surgical wound dehiscence and patients with risk factors for infection or surgical wound complications treated with Pico((r)) device for NPWT in addition to standard treatment of infection or dehiscence in our institution. We considered as an initial favorable outcome the resolution of the infectious process and the closure of the surgical wound dehiscences in the treated cases and the good progression of the wound without complicating events in the prophylactic cases. We evaluated 10 patients who used Pico((r)) in our service. All patients had a favorable outcome according to established criteria. No complications were identified regarding the use of the NPWT device. The mean follow-up of the patients after the use of the device was 10.5 months. The NPWT can be safely used in wound infections and complications following TKA with promising results. Long-term randomized prospective studies should be conducted to prove its effectiveness. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series.

  6. Properties of clusters in the gas phase: V. Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Keesee, R.G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1980-09-01

    Ion--molecules association reactions of the form A/sup -/(B)/sub n1/-+B=A/sup -/(B)/sub n/ were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl/sup -/, I/sup -/, and NO/sub 2//sup -/ with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO/sub 2//sup -/ and SO/sub 3//sup -/ with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl/sup -/, I/sup -/, NO/sub 2//sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup -/, and SO/sub 3//sup -/ with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions. For any given ion, the relative order of the addition enthalpies among the neutrals was found to be dependent on the polarizabilities of the neutrals and on the covalency in the ion-neutral bond. Dispersion of charge via covalent bonding was found to affect significantly the succeeding clustering steps.

  7. Validity of Saha's equation of thermal ionization for negatively charged spherical particles in complex plasmas in thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2011-04-15

    The authors have discussed the validity of Saha's equation for the charging of negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma in thermal equilibrium, even when the tunneling of the electrons, through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle is considered. It is seen that the validity requires the probability of tunneling of an electron through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle to be independent of the direction (inside to outside and vice versa) or in other words the Born's approximation should be valid.

  8. PSD-95 is a negative regulator of the tyrosine kinase Src in the NMDA receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Lorraine V; Pitcher, Graham M; Pelkey, Kenneth A; Salter, Michael W

    2006-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase Src upregulates the activity of the N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor (NMDAR) and tyrosine phosphorylation of this receptor is critical for induction of NMDAR-dependent plasticity of synaptic transmission. A binding partner for Src within the NMDAR complex is the protein PSD-95. Here we demonstrate an interaction of PSD-95 with Src that does not require the well-characterized domains of PSD-95. Rather, we show binding to Src through a 12-amino-acid sequence in the N-terminal region of PSD-95, a region not previously known to participate in protein–protein interactions. This region interacts directly with the Src SH2 domain. Contrary to typical SH2 domain binding, the PSD-95–Src SH2 domain interaction is phosphotyrosine-independent. Binding of the Src-interacting region of PSD-95 inhibits Src kinase activity and reduces NMDAR phosphorylation. Intracellularly administering a peptide matching the Src SH2 domain-interacting region of PSD-95 depresses NMDAR currents in cultured neurons and inhibits induction of long-term potentiation in hippocampus. Thus, the PSD-95–Src SH2 domain interaction suppresses Src-mediated NMDAR upregulation, a finding that may be of broad importance for synaptic transmission and plasticity. PMID:16990796

  9. SHARPIN controls regulatory T cells by negatively modulating the T cell antigen receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon; Jin, Hyung-seung; Lopez, Justine; Lee, Jeeho; Liao, Lujian; Elly, Chris; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2016-01-01

    SHARPIN forms a linear-ubiquitin-chain-assembly complex that promotes signaling via the transcription factor NF-κB. SHARPIN deficiency leads to progressive multi-organ inflammation and immune system malfunction, but how SHARPIN regulates T cell responses is unclear. Here we found that SHARPIN deficiency resulted in a substantial reduction in the number of and defective function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Transfer of SHARPIN-sufficient Treg cells into SHARPIN-deficient mice considerably alleviated their systemic inflammation. SHARPIN-deficient T cells displayed enhanced proximal signaling via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) without an effect on the activation of NF-κB. SHARPIN conjugated with Lys63 (K63)-linked ubiquitin chains, which led to inhibition of the association of TCRζ with the signaling kinase Zap70; this affected the generation of Treg cells. Our study therefore identifies a role for SHARPIN in TCR signaling whereby it maintains immunological homeostasis and tolerance by regulating Treg cells. PMID:26829767

  10. Neuronal CTGF/CCN2 negatively regulates myelination in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Ebru; Han, Juliette M; Di Nardo, Alessia; Winden, Kellen; Han, Min-Joon; Hoyo, Leonie; Saffari, Afshin; Leask, Andrew; Geschwind, Daniel H; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-03-06

    Disruption of myelination during development has been implicated in a range of neurodevelopmental disorders including tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). TSC patients with autism display impairments in white matter integrity. Similarly, mice lacking neuronal Tsc1 have a hypomyelination phenotype. However, the mechanisms that underlie these phenotypes remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that neuronal TSC1/2 orchestrates a program of oligodendrocyte maturation through the regulated secretion of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). We characterize oligodendrocyte maturation both in vitro and in vivo. We find that neuron-specific Tsc1 deletion results in an increase in CTGF secretion that non-cell autonomously stunts oligodendrocyte development and decreases the total number of oligodendrocytes. Genetic deletion of CTGF from neurons, in turn, mitigates the TSC-dependent hypomyelination phenotype. These results show that the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in neurons regulates CTGF production and secretion, revealing a paracrine mechanism by which neuronal signaling regulates oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination in TSC. This study highlights the role of mTOR-dependent signaling between neuronal and nonneuronal cells in the regulation of myelin and identifies an additional therapeutic avenue for this disease.

  11. Requirements for Assembly of Poliovirus Replication Complexes and Negative-Strand RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Teterina, Natalya L.; Egger, Denise; Bienz, Kurt; Brown, David M.; Semler, Bert L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2001-01-01

    HeLa cells were transfected with several plasmids that encoded all poliovirus (PV) nonstructural proteins. Viral RNAs were transcribed by T7 RNA polymerase expressed from recombinant vaccinia virus. All plasmids produced similar amounts of viral proteins that were processed identically; however, RNAs were designed either to serve as templates for replication or to contain mutations predicted to prevent RNA replication. The mutations included substitution of the entire PV 5′ noncoding region (NCR) with the encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosomal entry site, thereby deleting the 5′-terminal cloverleaf-like structure, or insertion of three nucleotides in the 3Dpol coding sequence. Production of viral proteins was sufficient to induce the characteristic reorganization of intracellular membranes into heterogeneous-sized vesicles, independent of RNA replication. The vesicles were stably associated with viral RNA only when RNA replication could occur. Nonreplicating RNAs localized to distinct, nonoverlapping regions in the cell, excluded from the viral protein-membrane complexes. The absence of accumulation of positive-strand RNA from both mutated RNAs in transfected cells was documented. In addition, no minus-strand RNA was produced from the EMCV chimeric template RNA in vitro. These data show that the 5′-terminal sequences of PV RNA are essential for initiation of minus-strand RNA synthesis at its 3′ end. PMID:11264373

  12. p97 Negatively Regulates NRF2 by Extracting Ubiquitylated NRF2 from the KEAP1-CUL3 E3 Complex.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shasha; Liu, Pengfei; Luo, Gang; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Chen, Heping; Wu, Tongde; Tillotson, Joseph; Chapman, Eli; Zhang, Donna D

    2017-04-15

    Activation of the stress-responsive transcription factor NRF2 is the major line of defense to combat oxidative or electrophilic insults. Under basal conditions, NRF2 is continuously ubiquitylated by the KEAP1-CUL3-RBX1 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and is targeted to the proteasome for degradation (the canonical mechanism). However, the path from the CUL3 complex to ultimate proteasomal degradation was previously unknown. p97 is a ubiquitin-targeted ATP-dependent segregase that extracts ubiquitylated client proteins from membranes, protein complexes, or chromatin and has an essential role in autophagy and the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). In this study, we show that p97 negatively regulates NRF2 through the canonical pathway by extracting ubiquitylated NRF2 from the KEAP1-CUL3 E3 complex, with the aid of the heterodimeric cofactor UFD1/NPL4 and the UBA-UBX-containing protein UBXN7, for efficient proteasomal degradation. Given the role of NRF2 in chemoresistance and the surging interest in p97 inhibitors to treat cancers, our results indicate that dual p97/NRF2 inhibitors may offer a more potent and long-term avenue of p97-targeted treatment.

  13. Quantum effects in electron emission from and accretion on negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.; Misra, Shikha

    2012-07-15

    The authors have investigated the electron emissions (thermionic, electric field, photoelectric, and light induced field) from and electron accretion on a charged particle in a complex plasma, on the basis of a three region electrical potential model in and around a charged spherical particle in a complex plasma, characterized by Debye shielding. A continuous variation of the transmission coefficient across the surface of a particle (corresponding to emission and accretion) with the radial electron energy {epsilon}{sub r} has been obtained. It is seen that the numerical values of the emission and accretion transmission coefficients [D({epsilon}{sub r})] are almost the same. This is the necessary and sufficient condition for the validity of Saha's equation for thermal equilibrium of a system of dust and electrons. This is in contrast to the earlier condition, which limited the range of validity of Saha's equation to the range of the applicability of Born approximation. It is seen that D({epsilon}{sub r}) increases with increasing {epsilon}{sub r}, increasing negative electric potential on the surface, decreasing radius, and deceasing Debye length. The electron currents, corresponding to thermionic, electric field, photoelectric and light induced field emission increase with increasing surface potential; this fact may have significant repercussions in complex plasma kinetics. Since numerically D({epsilon}{sub r}) is significantly different from unity in the range of {epsilon}{sub r} of interest, it is necessary to take into account the D({epsilon}{sub r})-{epsilon}{sub r} dependence in complex plasma theory.

  14. Reducing Complexity: A Regularized Non-negative Matrix Approximation (NNMA) Approach to X-ray Spectromicroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Rachel Y. C.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy combines microscopy and spectroscopy to provide rich information about the chemical organization of materials down to the nanoscale. But with richness also comes complexity: natural materials such as biological or environmental science specimens can be composed of complex spectroscopic mixtures of different materials. The challenge becomes how we could meaningfully simplify and interpret this information. Approaches such as principal component analysis and cluster analysis have been used in previous studies, but with some limitations that we will describe. This leads us to develop a new approach based on a development of non-negative matrix approximation (NNMA) analysis with both sparseness and spectra similarity regularizations. We apply this new technique to simulated spectromicroscopy datasets as well as a preliminary study of the large-scale biochemical organization of a human sperm cell. NNMA analysis is able to select major features of the sperm cell without the physically erroneous negative weightings or thicknesses in the calculated image which appeared in previous approaches.

  15. Negative hyperconjugation and red-, blue- or zero-shift in X-Z∙∙∙Y complexes.

    PubMed

    Joy, Jyothish; Jemmis, Eluvathingal D; Vidya, Kaipanchery

    2015-01-01

    A generalized explanation is provided for the existence of the red- and blue-shifting nature of X-Z bonds (Z=H, halogens, chalcogens, pnicogens, etc.) in X-Z∙∙∙Y complexes based on computational studies on a selected set of weakly bonded complexes and analysis of existing literature data. The additional electrons and orbitals available on Z in comparison to H make for dramatic differences between the H-bond and the rest of the Z-bonds. The nature of the X-group and its influence on the X-Z bond length in the parent X-Z molecule largely controls the change in the X-Z bond length on X-Z∙∙∙Y bond formation; the Y-group usually influences only the magnitude of the effects controlled by X. The major factors which control the X-Z bond length change are: (a) negative hyperconjugative donation of electron density from X-group to X-Z σ* antibonding molecular orbital (ABMO) in the parent X-Z, (b) induced negative hyperconjugation from the lone pair of electrons on Z to the antibonding orbitals of the X-group, and (c) charge transfer (CT) from the Y-group to the X-Z σ* orbital. The exchange repulsion from the Y-group that shifts partial electron density at the X-Z σ* ABMO back to X leads to blue-shifting and the CT from the Y-group to the σ* ABMO of X-Z leads to red-shifting. The balance between these two opposing forces decides red-, zero- or blue-shifting. A continuum of behaviour of X-Z bond length variation is inevitable in X-Z∙∙∙Y complexes.

  16. DJBP: a novel DJ-1-binding protein, negatively regulates the androgen receptor by recruiting histone deacetylase complex, and DJ-1 antagonizes this inhibition by abrogation of this complex.

    PubMed

    Niki, Takeshi; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2003-02-01

    DJ-1 was identified by us as a novel oncogene that transforms mouse NIH3T3 cells in cooperation with ras. We later identified PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT)xalpha as a DJ-1-binding protein, and found that DJ-1 restored androgen receptor (AR) transcription activity that was repressed by PIASxalpha. To further characterize the function of DJ-1, we cloned cDNA encoding a novel DJ-1-binding protein, DJBP, by a yeast two-hybrid system. DJBP mRNA was found to be specifically expressed in the testis. In addition to the binding of DJBP to the COOH-terminal region of DJ-1, DJBP was also found to bind in vitro and in vivo to the DNA-binding domain of the AR in a testosterone-dependent manner and to be colocalized with DJ-1 or AR in the nucleus. Furthermore, a co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that the formation of a ternary complex between DJ-1, DJBP, and AR occurred in cells in which DJ-1 bound to the AR via DJBP. It was found that DJBP repressed a testosterone-dependent AR transactivation activity in monkey Cos1 cells by recruiting histone deacetylase (HDAC) complex, including HDAC1 and mSin3, and that DJ-1 partially restored its repressed activity by abrogating DJBP-HDAC complex. These results suggest that AR is positively regulated by DJ-1, which antagonizes the function of negative regulators, including DJBP.

  17. Genetic evaluation of BRCA1-A complex genes with triple-negative breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Zi; Qiao, Feng; Yao, Ling; Cao, Zhi-Gang; Ye, Fu-Gui; Wu, Jiong; Hu, Xin; Wang, Bin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The tumor suppressor BRCA1 plays a pivotal role in maintaining genomic stability and tumor suppression. The BRCA1-A complex is required for recruitment of BRCA1 to DNA damage sites, DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control. Since germline mutations of BRCA1 often lead to breast tumors that are triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) type, we aimed to investigate whether genetic deficiency in genes of the BRCA1-A complex is associated with risk to TNBC development. Results We found that rs7250266 in the promoter region of NBA1 confers a decreased risk to TNBC development, but not to non-TNBC susceptibility. In addition, the haplotypes containing two polymorphisms rs7250266 and rs2278256 are associated with a lower chance of TNBC development specifically. Our studies also showed that the protective alleles of rs7250266 (C > G) and rs2278256 (T > C) down-regulate promoter activity of NBA1 in mammary epithelial cells. Methods We investigated associations between the BRCA1-A complex genes and TNBC developing risk in first case-control study of Chinese Han Women population including 414 patients with TNBC and 354 cancer-free controls. We detected 37 common variants in ABRAXAS, RAP80, BRE, BRCC36 and NBA1/MERIT40 genes encoding the BRCA1-A complex and evaluated their genetic susceptibility to the risk of TNBC. An additional cohort with 652 other types of breast cancer (non-TNBC) cases and 890 controls was used to investigate the associations between TNBC-specific SNPs genotype and non-TNBCs susceptibility. Conclusions Genetic variants in NBA1 may be an important genetic determinant of TNBC susceptibility. Further investigation and validation of these SNPs in larger cohorts may facilitate in predication and prevention of TNBC and in counseling individuals for risk of TNBC development. PMID:26848770

  18. Forskolin-inducible cAMP pathway negatively regulates T-cell proliferation by uncoupling the interleukin-2 receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Georgialina; Ross, Jeremy A; Nagy, Zsuzsanna S; Kirken, Robert A

    2013-03-08

    Cytokine-mediated regulation of T-cell activity involves a complex interplay between key signal transduction pathways. Determining how these signaling pathways cross-talk is essential to understanding T-cell function and dysfunction. In this work, we provide evidence that cross-talk exists between at least two signaling pathways: the Jak3/Stat5 and cAMP-mediated cascades. The adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (Fsk) significantly increased intracellular cAMP levels and reduced proliferation of the human T-cells via inhibition of cell cycle regulatory genes but did not induce apoptosis. To determine this inhibitory mechanism, effects of Fsk on IL-2 signaling was investigated. Fsk treatment of MT-2 and Kit 225 T-cells inhibited IL-2-induced Stat5a/b tyrosine and serine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding activity. Fsk treatment also uncoupled IL-2 induced association of the IL-2Rβ and γc chain, consequently blocking Jak3 activation. Interestingly, phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that Fsk-treated cells resulted in elevated serine phosphorylation of Jak3 but not Stat5, suggesting that Fsk can negatively regulate Jak3 activity possibly mediated through PKA. Indeed, in vitro kinase assays and small molecule inhibition studies indicated that PKA can directly serine phosphorylate and functionally inactivate Jak3. Taken together, these findings suggest that Fsk activation of adenylate cyclase and PKA can negatively regulate IL-2 signaling at multiple levels that include IL-2R complex formation and Jak3/Stat5 activation.

  19. Travelling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry and negative ion fragmentation of hybrid and complex N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Scarff, Charlotte A; Edgeworth, Matthew; Pagel, Kevin; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Struwe, Weston B; Crispin, Max; Scrivens, James H

    2016-11-01

    Nitrogen collisional cross sections (CCSs) of hybrid and complex glycans released from the glycoproteins IgG, gp120 (from human immunodeficiency virus), ovalbumin, α1-acid glycoprotein and thyroglobulin were measured with a travelling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer using dextran as the calibrant. The utility of this instrument for isomer separation was also investigated. Some isomers, such as Man3 GlcNAc3 from chicken ovalbumin and Man3 GlcNAc3 Fuc1 from thyroglobulin could be partially resolved and identified by their negative ion fragmentation spectra obtained by collision-induced decomposition (CID). Several other larger glycans, however, although existing as isomers, produced only asymmetric rather than separated arrival time distributions (ATDs). Nevertheless, in these cases, isomers could often be detected by plotting extracted fragment ATDs of diagnostic fragment ions from the negative ion CID spectra obtained in the transfer cell of the Waters Synapt mass spectrometer. Coincidence in the drift times of all fragment ions with an asymmetric ATD profile in this work, and in the related earlier paper on high-mannose glycans, usually suggested that separations were because of conformers or anomers, whereas symmetrical ATDs of fragments showing differences in drift times indicated isomer separation. Although some significant differences in CCSs were found for the smaller isomeric glycans, the differences found for the larger compounds were usually too small to be analytically useful. Possible correlations between CCSs and structural types were also investigated, and it was found that complex glycans tended to have slightly smaller CCSs than high-mannose glycans of comparable molecular weight. In addition, biantennary glycans containing a core fucose and/or a bisecting GlcNAc residue fell on different mobility-m/z trend lines to those glycans not so substituted with both of these substituents contributing to larger CCSs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons

  20. Negative pressure wound therapy with Bio-Dome dressing technology in the treatment of complex wounds: a case series.

    PubMed

    Penny, H L; Spinazzola, J; Green, A; Rifkah, M; Faretta, M; Youshaw, D; Weaver, A; Zaki, P

    2014-04-01

    The treatment of complex wounds is difficult and not always effective. Various treatment options are used with varying degrees of success. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a cost-efficient and effective way to help treat these wounds. The use of a vacuum device applies the negative pressure to the site of the wound and promotes waste removal and increases circulation and tissue formation. While various NPWT systems are currently on the market, we utilised the ConvaTec Engenex® system with Bio-DomeTM technology; however, our case study is not intended to advocate the specific use of this system, but instead focuses on the use of NPWT as a viable option for wound healing. Each of the following case study patients presented with difficult-to-heal wounds that failed traditional therapeutic approaches. Through the use of NPWT, our patients saw major wound size reductions. Each patient exhibited at least a 94% reduction in wound area, wound volume or both.

  1. Auditory scene analysis and sonified visual images. Does consonance negatively impact on object formation when using complex sonified stimuli?

    PubMed

    Brown, David J; Simpson, Andrew J R; Proulx, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A critical task for the brain is the sensory representation and identification of perceptual objects in the world. When the visual sense is impaired, hearing and touch must take primary roles and in recent times compensatory techniques have been developed that employ the tactile or auditory system as a substitute for the visual system. Visual-to-auditory sonifications provide a complex, feature-based auditory representation that must be decoded and integrated into an object-based representation by the listener. However, we don't yet know what role the auditory system plays in the object integration stage and whether the principles of auditory scene analysis apply. Here we used coarse sonified images in a two-tone discrimination task to test whether auditory feature-based representations of visual objects would be confounded when their features conflicted with the principles of auditory consonance. We found that listeners (N = 36) performed worse in an object recognition task when the auditory feature-based representation was harmonically consonant. We also found that this conflict was not negated with the provision of congruent audio-visual information. The findings suggest that early auditory processes of harmonic grouping dominate the object formation process and that the complexity of the signal, and additional sensory information have limited effect on this.

  2. Auditory scene analysis and sonified visual images. Does consonance negatively impact on object formation when using complex sonified stimuli?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David J.; Simpson, Andrew J. R.; Proulx, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    A critical task for the brain is the sensory representation and identification of perceptual objects in the world. When the visual sense is impaired, hearing and touch must take primary roles and in recent times compensatory techniques have been developed that employ the tactile or auditory system as a substitute for the visual system. Visual-to-auditory sonifications provide a complex, feature-based auditory representation that must be decoded and integrated into an object-based representation by the listener. However, we don’t yet know what role the auditory system plays in the object integration stage and whether the principles of auditory scene analysis apply. Here we used coarse sonified images in a two-tone discrimination task to test whether auditory feature-based representations of visual objects would be confounded when their features conflicted with the principles of auditory consonance. We found that listeners (N = 36) performed worse in an object recognition task when the auditory feature-based representation was harmonically consonant. We also found that this conflict was not negated with the provision of congruent audio–visual information. The findings suggest that early auditory processes of harmonic grouping dominate the object formation process and that the complexity of the signal, and additional sensory information have limited effect on this. PMID:26528202

  3. Linear free energy relationships for metal-ligand complexation: Bidentate binding to negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonaro, Richard F.; Atalay, Yasemin B.; Di Toro, Dominic M.

    2011-05-01

    Stability constants for metal complexation to bidentate ligands containing negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms can be estimated from the following linear free energy relationship (LFER): log KML = χOO( αO log KHL,1 + αO log KHL,2) where KML is the metal-ligand stability constant for a 1:1 complex, KHL,1 and KHL,2 are the proton-ligand stability constants (the ligand p Ka values), and αO is the Irving-Rossotti slope. The parameter χOO is metal specific and has slightly different values for five and six membered chelate rings. LFERs are presented for 21 different metal ions and are accurate to within approximately 0.30 log units in predictions of log KML values. Ligands selected for use in LFER development include dicarboxylic acids, carboxyphenols, and ortho-diphenols. For ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes, α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, and α-ketocarboxylic acids, a modification of the LFER where log KHL,2 is set equal to zero is required. The chemical interpretation of χOO is that it accounts for the extra stability afforded to metal complexes by the chelate effect. Cu-NOM binding constants calculated from the bidentate LFERs are similar in magnitude to those used in WHAM 6. This LFER can be used to make log KML predictions for small organic molecules. Since natural organic matter (NOM) contains many of the same functional groups (i.e. carboxylic acids, phenols, alcohols), the LFER log KML predictions shed light on the range of appropriate values for use in modeling metal partitioning in natural systems.

  4. Linear Free Energy Relationships for Metal-Ligand Complexation: Bidentate Binding to Negatively-Charged Oxygen Donor Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Carbonaro, Richard F.; Atalay, Yasemin B.; Di Toro, Dominic M.

    2011-01-01

    Stability constants for metal complexation to bidentate ligands containing negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms can be estimated from the following linear free energy relationship (LFER): log KML = χOO(αO log KHL,1 + αO log KHL,2) where KML is the metal-ligand stability constant for a 1:1 complex, KHL,1 and KHL,2 are the proton-ligand stability constants (the ligand pKa values), and αO is the Irving-Rossotti slope. The parameter χOO is metal specific and has slightly different values for 5 and 6 membered chelate rings. LFERs are presented for 21 different metal ions and are accurate to within approximately 0.30 log units in predictions of log KML values. Ligands selected for use in LFER development include dicarboxylic acids, carboxyphenols, and ortho-diphenols. For ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes, α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, and α-ketocarboxylic acids, a modification of the LFER where log KHL,2 is set equal to zero is required. The chemical interpretation of χOO is that it accounts for the extra stability afforded to metal complexes by the chelate effect. Cu-NOM binding constants calculated from the bidentate LFERs are similar in magnitude to those used in WHAM 6. This LFER can be used to make log KML predictions for small organic molecules. Since natural organic matter (NOM) contains many of the same functional groups (i.e. carboxylic acids, phenols, alcohols), the LFER log KML predictions shed light on the range of appropriate values for use in modeling metal partitioning in natural systems. PMID:21833149

  5. Array-based identification of triple-negative breast cancer cells using fluorescent nanodot-graphene oxide complexes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yu; Auguste, Debra T

    2016-07-15

    Early and accurate diagnosis of breast cancer holds great promise to improve treatability and curability. Here, we report the usage of six luminescent nanodot-graphene oxide complexes as novel fluorescent nanoprobes in a sensing array capable of effectively identifying healthy, cancerous, and metastatic human breast cells. The sensory system is based on the utilization of nanoprobe-graphene oxide sensor elements that can be disrupted in the presence of breast cells to give fluorescent readouts. Using this multichannel sensor, we have successfully identified breast cancer cells and distinguished between estrogen receptor positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 positive, and triple negative phenotypes. This approach also allows cell identification at high sensitivity (200 cells) with high reproducibility. The unknown cell sample analysis indicates that the sensor is able to identify 49 out of 50 breast cell samples correctly, with a detection accuracy of 98%. Taken together, this array-based luminescent nanoprobe-graphene oxide sensing platform presents a useful cell screening tool with potential applications in biomedical diagnostics.

  6. Processing of positive-causal and negative-causal coherence relations in primary school children and adults: a test of the cumulative cognitive complexity approach in German.

    PubMed

    Knoepke, Julia; Richter, Tobias; Isberner, Maj-Britt; Naumann, Johannes; Neeb, Yvonne; Weinert, Sabine

    2017-03-01

    Establishing local coherence relations is central to text comprehension. Positive-causal coherence relations link a cause and its consequence, whereas negative-causal coherence relations add a contrastive meaning (negation) to the causal link. According to the cumulative cognitive complexity approach, negative-causal coherence relations are cognitively more complex than positive-causal ones. Therefore, they require greater cognitive effort during text comprehension and are acquired later in language development. The present cross-sectional study tested these predictions for German primary school children from Grades 1 to 4 and adults in reading and listening comprehension. Accuracy data in a semantic verification task support the predictions of the cumulative cognitive complexity approach. Negative-causal coherence relations are cognitively more demanding than positive-causal ones. Moreover, our findings indicate that children's comprehension of negative-causal coherence relations continues to develop throughout the course of primary school. Findings are discussed with respect to the generalizability of the cumulative cognitive complexity approach to German.

  7. Regional variations in correlation between photopic negative response of focal electoretinograms and ganglion cell complex in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Machida, Shigeki; Kaneko, Muneyoshi; Kurosaka, Daijiro

    2015-04-01

    To determine regional variations in a structure-function relationship, we correlated the the photopic negative response (PhNR) of the focal electoretinogram (ERG) with the ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness in different retinal regions in patients with open angle glaucoma (OAG). Fifty-one eyes of 51 OAG patients (OAG group) and 17 eyes of 17 normal volunteers (control group) were studied. The OAG patients had different degrees of glaucoma ranging from early to advanced stages. The focal ERGs were elicited by a white, 15° hemispherical stimulus placed superior or inferior to the fovea. Focal ERGs were also elicited by a half annulus placed superior or inferior to the macular region. The diameter of the inner border of the annulus was 15° and that of the outer border was 30°. The average GCC thickness in areas corresponding to the location of the stimuli was measured in SD-OCT images. The PhNR amplitude and PhNR/b-wave amplitude ratio were significantly correlated with the GCC thickness in the superior and inferior hemispherical areas (p < 0.0001). These ERG parameters were weakly correlated with the GCC thickness in the superior and inferior semi-annular areas (p < 0.05). There were significant differences in the slopes of the regression lines plotting the GCC thickness and the PhNR amplitude or the PhNR/b-wave amplitude ratio between the spherical and semi-annular areas (superior: p < 0.01, inferior: p < 0.0005). The thinning of the GCC affects the RGC function measured by the PhNR more strongly in the central retinal area than in the surrounding retinal areas.

  8. Effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation in a complex plasma with negative equilibrium dust charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Subrata; Ghosh, Uttam; Sarkar, Susmita

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves in a complex plasma where equilibrium dust charge is negative. The primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions are Boltzmann distributed, and only dust grains are inertial. Electron-neutral and ion-neutral collisions have been neglected with the assumption that electron and ion mean free paths are very large compared to the plasma Debye length. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic dust charge variations have been separately taken into account. In the case of adiabatic dust charge variation, nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves is governed by the KdV (Korteweg-de Vries) equation, whereas for nonadiabatic dust charge variation, it is governed by the KdV-Burger equation. The solution of the KdV equation gives a dust acoustic soliton, whose amplitude and width depend on the secondary electron yield. Similarly, the KdV-Burger equation provides a dust acoustic shock wave. This dust acoustic shock wave may be monotonic or oscillatory in nature depending on the fact that whether it is dissipation dominated or dispersion dominated. Our analysis shows that secondary electron emission increases nonadiabaticity induced dissipation and consequently increases the monotonicity of the dust acoustic shock wave. Such a dust acoustic shock wave may accelerate charge particles and cause bremsstrahlung radiation in space plasmas whose physical process may be affected by secondary electron emission from dust grains. The effect of the secondary electron emission on the stability of the equilibrium points of the KdV-Burger equation has also been investigated. This equation has two equilibrium points. The trivial equilibrium point with zero potential is a saddle and hence unstable in nature. The nontrivial equilibrium point with constant nonzero potential is a stable node up to a critical value of the wave velocity and a stable focus above it. This critical

  9. Non-negative matrix factorization for the analysis of complex gene expression data: identification of clinically relevant tumor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Frigyesi, Attila; Höglund, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is a relatively new approach to analyze gene expression data that models data by additive combinations of non-negative basis vectors (metagenes). The non-negativity constraint makes sense biologically as genes may either be expressed or not, but never show negative expression. We applied NMF to five different microarray data sets. We estimated the appropriate number metagens by comparing the residual error of NMF reconstruction of data to that of NMF reconstruction of permutated data, thus finding when a given solution contained more information than noise. This analysis also revealed that NMF could not factorize one of the data sets in a meaningful way. We used GO categories and pre defined gene sets to evaluate the biological significance of the obtained metagenes. By analyses of metagenes specific for the same GO-categories we could show that individual metagenes activated different aspects of the same biological processes. Several of the obtained metagenes correlated with tumor subtypes and tumors with characteristic chromosomal translocations, indicating that metagenes may correspond to specific disease entities. Hence, NMF extracts biological relevant structures of microarray expression data and may thus contribute to a deeper understanding of tumor behavior.

  10. False-negative indocyanine green videoangiography among complex unruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms: the importance of further aneurysm inspection.

    PubMed

    Kulwin, Charles; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-10-01

    Successful surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms requires complete occlusion of the aneurysm lumen while maintaining patency of the adjacent branching and perforating arteries. Intraoperative flow assessment allows aneurysm clip repositioning in the event these requirements are not met, avoiding the risk of postoperative rehemorrhage or infarction. A number of modalities have been proposed for primarily intraoperative qualitative blood flow assessment, including microdoppler ultrasonography, intraoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and more recently noninvasive fluorescent angiography including indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent imaging. Puncture of the aneurysm dome to exclude aneurysm sac filling may also assess the efficacy of clip placement. Although a high concordance between ICG and DSA has been reported, there remains an important subset of aneurysms for which negative ICG study may erroneously suggest aneurysm occlusion. A high-risk situation for such a false-negative study is an atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm in which vessel wall plaque interferes with the ICG signal. Furthermore, a decreased flow within the aneurysm may not allow enough emission light for detection under the current technology. In this report, we describe our experience with cases of MCA aneurysms with false-negative ICG-VA studies requiring clip adjustment for optimal surgical treatment and discuss two illustrative cases of MCA aneurysms with intraoperative fluorescence studies that were falsely negative, requiring puncture of the aneurysm to correctly identify incomplete aneurysm occlusion.

  11. Magnitude processing and complex calculation is negatively impacted by mathematics anxiety while retrieval-based simple calculation is not.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungmin; Cho, Soohyun

    2017-01-26

    Mathematics anxiety (MA) refers to the experience of negative affect when engaging in mathematical activity. According to Ashcraft and Kirk (2001), MA selectively affects calculation with high working memory (WM) demand. On the other hand, Maloney, Ansari, and Fugelsang (2011) claim that MA affects all mathematical activities, including even the most basic ones such as magnitude comparison. The two theories make opposing predictions on the negative effect of MA on magnitude processing and simple calculation that make minimal demands on WM. We propose that MA has a selective impact on mathematical problem solving that likely involves processing of magnitude representations. Based on our hypothesis, MA will impinge upon magnitude processing even though it makes minimal demand on WM, but will spare retrieval-based, simple calculation, because it does not require magnitude processing. Our hypothesis can reconcile opposing predictions on the negative effect of MA on magnitude processing and simple calculation. In the present study, we observed a negative relationship between MA and performance on magnitude comparison and calculation with high but not low WM demand. These results demonstrate that MA has an impact on a wide range of mathematical performance, which depends on one's sense of magnitude, but spares over-practiced, retrieval-based calculation.

  12. The Enok acetyltransferase complex interacts with Elg1 and negatively regulates PCNA unloading to promote the G1/S transition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fu; Saraf, Anita; Florens, Laurence; Kusch, Thomas; Swanson, Selene K.; Szerszen, Leanne T.; Li, Ge; Dutta, Arnob; Washburn, Michael P.; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    KAT6 histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are highly conserved in eukaryotes and are involved in cell cycle regulation. However, information regarding their roles in regulating cell cycle progression is limited. Here, we report the identification of subunits of the Drosophila Enok complex and demonstrate that all subunits are important for its HAT activity. We further report a novel interaction between the Enok complex and the Elg1 proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-unloader complex. Depletion of Enok in S2 cells resulted in a G1/S cell cycle block, and this block can be partially relieved by depleting Elg1. Furthermore, depletion of Enok reduced the chromatin-bound levels of PCNA in both S2 cells and early embryos, suggesting that the Enok complex may interact with the Elg1 complex and down-regulate its PCNA-unloading function to promote the G1/S transition. Supporting this hypothesis, depletion of Enok also partially rescued the endoreplication defects in Elg1-depleted nurse cells. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the roles of KAT6 HATs in cell cycle regulation through modulating PCNA levels on chromatin. PMID:27198229

  13. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Reduces the Effectiveness of Traditional Local Antibiotic Depot in a Large Complex Musculoskeletal Wound Animal Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    in particular, local antibiotic delivery via polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). In cases with gross...release of gentamicin from polymethylmethacrylate beads. An experimental and pharmacoki- netic study. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1978;60-B:270 275. 7...diffusion from antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate beads. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1992;278:244 252. Stinner et al J Orthop Trauma Volume

  14. Earlier timbre processing of instrumental tones compared to equally complex spectrally rotated sounds as revealed by the mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Christmann, Corinna A; Lachmann, Thomas; Berti, Stefan

    2014-10-03

    Harmonically rich sounds have been shown to be processed more efficiently by the human brain compared to single sinusoidal tones. To control for stimulus complexity as a potentially confounding factor, tones and equally complex spectrally rotated sounds, have been used in the present study to investigate the role of the overtone series in sensory auditory processing in non-musicians. Timbre differences in instrumental tones with equal pitch elicited a MMN which was earlier compared to that elicited by the spectrally rotated sounds, indicating that harmonically rich tones are processed faster compared to non-musical sounds without an overtone series, even when pitch is not the relevant information.

  15. A genomewide screen for petite-negative yeast strains yields a new subunit of the i-AAA protease complex.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Cory D; Lee, Marina S; Spencer, Forrest A; Jensen, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Unlike many other organisms, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can tolerate the loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Although a few proteins have been identified that are required for yeast cell viability without mtDNA, the mechanism of mtDNA-independent growth is not completely understood. To probe the relationship between the mitochondrial genome and cell viability, we conducted a microarray-based, genomewide screen for mitochondrial DNA-dependent yeast mutants. Among the several genes that we discovered is MGR1, which encodes a novel subunit of the i-AAA protease complex located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. mgr1Delta mutants retain some i-AAA protease activity, yet mitochondria lacking Mgr1p contain a misassembled i-AAA protease and are defective for turnover of mitochondrial inner membrane proteins. Our results highlight the importance of the i-AAA complex and proteolysis at the inner membrane in cells lacking mitochondrial DNA.

  16. The Arabidopsis Leucine-rich Repeat Receptor Kinase BIR3 Negatively Regulates BAK1 Receptor Complex Formation and Stabilizes BAK1.

    PubMed

    Imkampe, Julia; Halter, Thierry; Huang, Shuhua; Schulze, Sarina; Mazzotta, Sara; Schmidt, Nikola; Manstretta, Raffaele; Postel, Sandra; Wierzba, Michael; Yang, Yong; vanDongen, Walter Mam; Stahl, Mark; Zipfel, Cyril; Goshe, Michael B; Clouse, Steven; de Vries, Sacco C; Tax, Frans; Wang, Xiaofeng; Kemmerling, Birgit

    2017-08-25

    BAK1 is a co-receptor and positive regulator of multiple ligand-binding leucine-rich-repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) and is involved in brassinosteroid (BR)-dependent growth and development, innate immunity and cell death control. The BAK1-interacting LRR-RKs BIR2 and BIR3 were previously identified by proteomics analyses of in vivo BAK1 complexes. Here we show that BAK1-related pathways such as innate immunity and cell death control are affected by BIR3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. BIR3 also has a strong negative impact on BR signaling. BIR3 directly interacts with the BR receptor BRI1 and other ligand-binding receptors and negatively regulates BR signaling by competitive inhibition of BRI1. BIR3 is released from BAK1 and BRI1 after ligand exposure and directly affects the formation of BAK1 complexes with BRI1 or FLAGELLIN SENSING2. Double mutants of bak1 and bir3 show spontaneous cell death and constitutive activation of defense responses. BAK1 and its closest homolog BKK1 interact with and are stabilized by BIR3, suggesting that bak1 bir3 double mutants mimic the spontaneous cell death phenotype observed in bak1 bkk1 mutants via destabilization of BIR3 target proteins. Our results provide evidence for a negative regulatory mechanism for BAK1 receptor complexes in which BIR3 interacts with BAK1 and inhibits ligand-binding receptors to prevent BAK1 receptor complex formation. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Negative feedback regulation of ABA biosynthesis in peanut (Arachis hypogaea): a transcription factor complex inhibits AhNCED1 expression during water stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Li, Meijuan; Su, Liangchen; Ge, Kui; Li, Limei; Li, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a key plant stress-signaling hormone, is produced in response to drought and counteracts the effects of this stress. The accumulation of ABA is controlled by the enzyme 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). In Arabidopsis, NCED3 is regulated by a positive feedback mechanism by ABA. In this study in peanut (Arachis hypogaea), we demonstrate that ABA biosynthesis is also controlled by negative feedback regulation, mediated by the inhibitory effect on AhNCED1 transcription of a protein complex between transcription factors AhNAC2 and AhAREB1. AhNCED1 was significantly down-regulated after PEG treatment for 10 h, at which time ABA content reached a peak. A ChIP-qPCR assay confirmed AhAREB1 and AhNAC2 binding to the AhNCED1 promoter in response to ABA. Moreover, the interaction between AhAREB1 and AhNAC2, and a transient expression assay showed that the protein complex could negatively regulate the expression of AhNCED1. The results also demonstrated that AhAREB1 was the key factor in AhNCED1 feedback regulation, while AhNAC2 played a subsidiary role. ABA reduced the rate of AhAREB1 degradation and enhanced both the synthesis and degradation rate of the AhNAC2 protein. In summary, the AhAREB1/AhNAC2 protein complex functions as a negative feedback regulator of drought-induced ABA biosynthesis in peanut. PMID:27892506

  18. Septic arthritis caused by a gram-negative bacterium representing a new species related to the Bordetella-Alcaligenes complex.

    PubMed

    Kronvall, G; Hanson, H S; von Stedingk, L V; Törnqvist, E; Falsen, E

    2000-03-01

    A knee-joint exudate culture yielded on two occasions a gram-negative bacterium. Regular methods for speciation did not provide an identification. The infection was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin. The unknown isolate, CCUG 36768, was subjected to further investigation, including 16S rDNA sequencing, protein profiling, cellular fatty acid analysis, and various biochemical tests, in order to produce a species identification. The 1469 bp-long 16S rDNA sequence did not reveal identity with any known species sequence. CCUG 36768 clustered in a group of species, including Alcaligenes defragrans, Denitrobacter permanens, Taylorella equigenitalis, Alcaligenes faecalis, and four strains of Alcaligenes species without a specific species name. Bordetella species also showed a high degree of similarity with CCUG 36768. Protein profiling, cellular fatty acid analysis and computer-assisted analysis of biochemical profiles indicated similarity with Bordetella-Alcaligenes species, often close to B. holmesii and B. avium. API 20 NE indicated the profile of Moraxella species of poor identity. It is concluded that CCUG 36768 represents a new bacterial species of pathogenic potential in humans. It is related to the Bordetella-Alcaligenes group. Powerful new methods for speciation are available and it is recommended that unknown isolates from normally sterile sites be submitted for further analysis. Several isolates are required for the definition of new species.

  19. Peroxiredoxin-6 Negatively Regulates Bactericidal Activity and NF-κB Activity by Interrupting TRAF6-ECSIT Complex

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yoon; Wi, Sae M.; Shin, Dongwoo; Chun, Eunyoung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2017-01-01

    A TRAF6-ECSIT complex is crucial for the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation induced by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Peroxiredoxin-6 (Prdx6) as a member of the peroxiredoxin family of antioxidant enzymes is involved in antioxidant protection and cell signaling. Here, we report on a regulatory role of Prdx6 in mROS production and NF-κB activation by TLR4. Prdx6 was translocated into the mitochondria by TLR4 stimulation and Prdx6-knockdown (Prdx6KD) THP-1 cells had increased level of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels and were resistant to Salmonella typhimurium infection. Biochemical studies revealed Prdx6 interaction with the C-terminal TRAF-C domain of TRAF6, which drove translocation into the mitochondria. Interestingly, Prdx6 competitively interacted with ECSIT to TRAF6 through its C-terminal TRAF-C domain, leading to the interruption of TRAF6-ECSIT interaction. The inhibitory effect was critically implicated in the activation of NF-κB induced by TLR4. Overexpression of Prdx6 led to the inhibition of NF-κB induced by TLR4, whereas Prdx6KD THP-1 cells displayed enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 and -1β, and the up-regulation of NF-κB-dependent genes induced by TLR4 stimulation. Taken together, the data demonstrate that Prdx6 interrupts the formation of TRAF6-ECSIT complex induced by TLR4 stimulation, leading to suppression of bactericidal activity because of inhibited mROS production in mitochondria and the inhibition of NF-κB activation in the cytoplasm. PMID:28393051

  20. Spin-filtering, giant magnetoresistance, rectifying and negative differential resistance effects in planar four-coordinate Fe complex with graphene nanoribbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Wu, Q. H.; Liu, D. S.; Chen, G.

    2014-01-01

    By using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism combined with the density functional theory, we have investigated the spin-polarized transport properties of a planar four-coordinate Fe complex sandwiched between two zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) electrodes, where the ZGNRs are modulated by external magnetic field. The results show that the system can exhibit perfect dual spin-filtering and spin-rectifying effects at a wide bias range, giant magnetoresistance effect with large magnetoresistance ratio at small bias, and obvious negative differential resistance behavior. The mechanisms are proposed for these phenomena.

  1. Purified monomeric ligand.MD-2 complexes reveal molecular and structural requirements for activation and antagonism of TLR4 by Gram-negative bacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Gioannini, Theresa L; Teghanemt, Athmane; Zhang, DeSheng; Esparza, Gregory; Yu, Liping; Weiss, Jerrold

    2014-08-01

    A major focus of work in our laboratory concerns the molecular mechanisms and structural bases of Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin recognition by host (e.g., human) endotoxin-recognition proteins that mediate and/or regulate activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Here, we review studies of wild-type and variant monomeric endotoxin.MD-2 complexes first produced and characterized in our laboratories. These purified complexes have provided unique experimental reagents, revealing both quantitative and qualitative determinants of TLR4 activation and antagonism. This review is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Theresa L. Gioannini (1949-2014) who played a central role in many of the studies and discoveries that are reviewed.

  2. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation negatively regulates Polo-like kinase 2-mediated homeostatic compensation following neonatal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongyu; Kosaras, Bela; Klein, Peter M.; Jensen, Frances E.

    2013-01-01

    Homeostatic plasticity is characterized by compensatory changes in synaptic strength and intrinsic membrane properties in response to chronic changes in neuronal activity. Neonatal seizures are a naturally occurring source of neuronal overactivation and can lead to long-term epilepsy and cognitive deficits. Using a rodent model of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures that results in a persistent increase in AMPA receptor (AMPAR) function in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, we aimed to determine whether there was any evidence of an opposing endogenous homeostatic antiepileptic response. Given that this model results in long-term epilepsy, we also examined mechanisms whereby this homeostasis fails. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from neurons in slices removed at intervals following seizure onset revealed an initial up-regulation of AMPAR function that was followed by a transient dynamic attenuation of this enhancement by 48–72 h, although AMPAR function was still increased compared with nonseizure control baseline. This secondary down-regulation of enhanced AMPAR function was coincident with a marked transient increase in expression and function of the Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2), which has previously been implicated in homeostatic down-regulation of neuronal excitability in cell/slice culture models. The effects were transient and at 1 wk AMPAR function once again became up-regulated, simultaneous with a decrease in PLK2 expression and function. This negative regulation was mediated by subacute postseizure increases in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Application of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin prevented post-hypoxic seizure impairment of homeostasis, suggesting that homeostatic plasticity mechanisms may be potentially modifiable therapeutic targets in epileptogenesis. PMID:23479645

  3. Transforming Growth Factor-β/SMAD Target Gene SKIL Is Negatively Regulated by the Transcriptional Cofactor Complex SNON-SMAD4*

    PubMed Central

    Tecalco-Cruz, Angeles C.; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Ortiz-García, Layla; Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2012-01-01

    The human SKI-like (SKIL) gene encodes the SMAD transcriptional corepressor SNON that antagonizes TGF-β signaling. SNON protein levels are tightly regulated by the TGF-β pathway: whereas a short stimulation with TGF-β decreases SNON levels by its degradation via the proteasome, longer TGF-β treatment increases SNON levels by inducing SKIL gene expression. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the self-regulation of SKIL gene expression by SNON. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the human SKIL gene proximal promoter contains a TGF-β response element (TRE) bearing four groups of SMAD-binding elements that are also conserved in mouse. Two regions of 408 and 648 bp of the human SKIL gene (∼2.4 kb upstream of the ATG initiation codon) containing the core promoter, transcription start site, and the TRE were cloned for functional analysis. Binding of SMAD and SNON proteins to the TRE region of the SKIL gene promoter after TGF-β treatment was demonstrated by ChIP and sequential ChIP assays. Interestingly, the SNON-SMAD4 complex negatively regulated basal SKIL gene expression through binding the promoter and recruiting histone deacetylases. In response to TGF-β signal, SNON is removed from the SKIL gene promoter, and then the activated SMAD complexes bind the promoter to induce SKIL gene expression. Subsequently, the up-regulated SNON protein in complex with SMAD4 represses its own expression as part of the negative feedback loop regulating the TGF-β pathway. Accordingly, when the SNON-SMAD4 complex is absent as in some cancer cells lacking SMAD4 the regulation of some TGF-β target genes is modified. PMID:22674574

  4. Repression of PDGF-R-α after cellular injury involves TNF-α, formation of a c-Fos-YY1 complex, and negative regulation by HDAC.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Chan, Cecilia W S; Sanchez-Guerrero, Estella; Khachigian, Levon M

    2012-06-01

    Wound healing is a complex dynamic process involving a variety of cell types, including fibroblasts that express and respond to cytokines and growth factors in the local microenvironment. The mechanisms controlling gene expression after injury at a transcriptional level are poorly understood. Here we show that decreased expression of a key receptor, PDGF-receptor (R)-α, after fibroblast injury is due to the release and paracrine activity of TNF-α. TNF-α inhibits PDGF-R-α expression and this involves formation of a c-Fos-Yin Yang 1 (YY1) complex and histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. c-Fos, induced by TNF-α, negatively regulates PDGF-R-α transcription. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting c-Fos or the zinc finger transcription factor YY1 inhibits TNF-α suppression of PDGF-R-α expression. Coimmunoprecipitation studies show that TNF-α stimulates the formation of a complex between c-Fos with YY1. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis reveals the enrichment of c-Fos, YY1, and HDAC-1 at the PDGF-R-α promoter in cells exposed to TNF-α. With suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and HDAC-1 siRNA, we demonstrate that HDAC mediates TNF-α repression of PDGF-R-α. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional repression of PDGF-R-α after fibroblast injury involves paracrine activity of endogenous TNF-α, the formation of a c-Fos-YY1 complex, and negative regulatory activity by HDAC.

  5. Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD Target gene SKIL is negatively regulated by the transcriptional cofactor complex SNON-SMAD4.

    PubMed

    Tecalco-Cruz, Angeles C; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Ortiz-García, Layla; Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2012-08-03

    The human SKI-like (SKIL) gene encodes the SMAD transcriptional corepressor SNON that antagonizes TGF-β signaling. SNON protein levels are tightly regulated by the TGF-β pathway: whereas a short stimulation with TGF-β decreases SNON levels by its degradation via the proteasome, longer TGF-β treatment increases SNON levels by inducing SKIL gene expression. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the self-regulation of SKIL gene expression by SNON. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the human SKIL gene proximal promoter contains a TGF-β response element (TRE) bearing four groups of SMAD-binding elements that are also conserved in mouse. Two regions of 408 and 648 bp of the human SKIL gene (∼2.4 kb upstream of the ATG initiation codon) containing the core promoter, transcription start site, and the TRE were cloned for functional analysis. Binding of SMAD and SNON proteins to the TRE region of the SKIL gene promoter after TGF-β treatment was demonstrated by ChIP and sequential ChIP assays. Interestingly, the SNON-SMAD4 complex negatively regulated basal SKIL gene expression through binding the promoter and recruiting histone deacetylases. In response to TGF-β signal, SNON is removed from the SKIL gene promoter, and then the activated SMAD complexes bind the promoter to induce SKIL gene expression. Subsequently, the up-regulated SNON protein in complex with SMAD4 represses its own expression as part of the negative feedback loop regulating the TGF-β pathway. Accordingly, when the SNON-SMAD4 complex is absent as in some cancer cells lacking SMAD4 the regulation of some TGF-β target genes is modified.

  6. The laforin-malin complex negatively regulates glycogen synthesis by modulating cellular glucose uptake via glucose transporters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Sweta; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2012-02-01

    Lafora disease (LD), an inherited and fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by increased cellular glycogen content and the formation of abnormally branched glycogen inclusions, called Lafora bodies, in the affected tissues, including neurons. Therefore, laforin phosphatase and malin ubiquitin E3 ligase, the two proteins that are defective in LD, are thought to regulate glycogen synthesis through an unknown mechanism, the defects in which are likely to underlie some of the symptoms of LD. We show here that laforin's subcellular localization is dependent on the cellular glycogen content and that the stability of laforin is determined by the cellular ATP level, the activity of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase, and the affinity of malin toward laforin. By using cell and animal models, we further show that the laforin-malin complex regulates cellular glucose uptake by modulating the subcellular localization of glucose transporters; loss of malin or laforin resulted in an increased abundance of glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and therefore excessive glucose uptake. Loss of laforin or malin, however, did not affect glycogen catabolism. Thus, the excessive cellular glucose level appears to be the primary trigger for the abnormally higher levels of cellular glycogen seen in LD.

  7. The Kiss-1/Kiss-1R complex as a negative regulator of cell motility and cancer metastasis (Review).

    PubMed

    Ji, Ke; Ye, Lin; Mason, Malcolm D; Jiang, Wen G

    2013-10-01

    Metastasis is a complex multistep process that involves the impairment of cell-cell adhesion in the neoplastic epithelium, invasion into adjacent tissues and the dissemination of cancer cells through the lymphatic and haematogenous routes. The inhibition of the metastatic process at an early stage has become a hot topic in cancer research. The Kiss-1 gene, initially described as a suppressor of metastasis in malignant melanoma, encodes the Kiss-1 protein which can be processed to other peptides, e.g., Kisspeptin-10, Kisspeptin-13, Kisspeptin-14 and Kisspeptin-54. These peptides are endogenous ligands of the Kiss‑1 receptor (Kiss-1R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) also known as hOT7T175, AXOR12 or GPR54. The Kiss-1 gene has been suggested as a suppressor of metastasis in a various types of cancer, including gastric cancer, oesophageal carcinoma, pancreatic, ovarian, bladder and prostate cancer, through the regulation of cellular migration and invasion. In the current review, we summarise the current understanding of the role of Kiss‑1 and Kiss‑1R in cancer and cancer metastasis.

  8. The Laforin-Malin Complex Negatively Regulates Glycogen Synthesis by Modulating Cellular Glucose Uptake via Glucose Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Sweta

    2012-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD), an inherited and fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by increased cellular glycogen content and the formation of abnormally branched glycogen inclusions, called Lafora bodies, in the affected tissues, including neurons. Therefore, laforin phosphatase and malin ubiquitin E3 ligase, the two proteins that are defective in LD, are thought to regulate glycogen synthesis through an unknown mechanism, the defects in which are likely to underlie some of the symptoms of LD. We show here that laforin's subcellular localization is dependent on the cellular glycogen content and that the stability of laforin is determined by the cellular ATP level, the activity of 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase, and the affinity of malin toward laforin. By using cell and animal models, we further show that the laforin-malin complex regulates cellular glucose uptake by modulating the subcellular localization of glucose transporters; loss of malin or laforin resulted in an increased abundance of glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and therefore excessive glucose uptake. Loss of laforin or malin, however, did not affect glycogen catabolism. Thus, the excessive cellular glucose level appears to be the primary trigger for the abnormally higher levels of cellular glycogen seen in LD. PMID:22124153

  9. Negatively charged Ir(iii) cyclometalated complexes containing a chelating bis-tetrazolato ligand: synthesis, photophysics and the study of reactivity with electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Valentina; Zacchini, Stefano; Raiteri, Paolo; Mazzoni, Rita; Zanotti, Valerio; Massi, Massimiliano; Stagni, Stefano

    2016-08-09

    The bis-tetrazolate dianion [1,2 BTB](2-), which is the deprotonated form of 1,2 bis-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)benzene [1,2-H2BTB], is for the first time exploited as an ancillary N^N ligand for negatively charged [Ir(C^N)2(N^N)](-)-type complexes, where C^N is represented by cyclometalated 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) or 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine (F2ppy). The new Ir(iii) complexes [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- and [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- have been fully characterised and the analysis of the X-ray structure of [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- confirmed the coordination of the [1,2 BTB](2-) dianion in a bis chelated fashion through the N-atoms adjacent to each of the tetrazolic carbons. Both of the new anionic Ir(iii) complexes displayed phosphorescence in the visible region, with intense sky-blue (λmax = 460-490 nm) or aqua (λmax = 490-520 nm) emissions originating from [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- and [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]-, respectively. In comparison with our very recent examples of anionic Ir(iii)tetrazolate cyclometalates, the new Ir(iii) tris chelate complexes [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- and [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]-, display an improved robustness, allowing the study of their reactivity toward the addition of electrophiles such as H(+) and CH3(+). In all cases, the electrophilic attacks occurred at the coordinated tetrazolate rings, involving the reversible - by a protonation deprotonation mechanism - or permanent - upon addition of a methyl moiety - switching of their global net charge from negative to positive and, in particular, the concomitant variation of their photoluminescence output. The combination of the anionic complexes [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- or [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- with a deep red emitting (λmax = 686 nm) cationic Ir(iii) tetrazole complex such as [IrTPYZ-Me]+, where TPYZ-Me is 2-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyrazine, gave rise to two fully Ir(iii)-based soft salts capable of displaying additive and O2-sensitive emission colours, with an almost pure white light obtained by the appropriate

  10. A Negative Feedback Loop Controlling bHLH Complexes Is Involved in Vascular Cell Division and Differentiation in the Root Apical Meristem.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hirofumi; Iwamoto, Kuninori; Kariya, Yuka; Asakawa, Tomohiro; Kan, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Hiroo; Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko

    2015-12-07

    Controlling cell division and differentiation in meristems is essential for proper plant growth. Two bHLH heterodimers consisting of LONESOME HIGHWAY (LHW) and TARGET OF MONOPTEROS 5 (TMO5)/TMO5-LIKE1 (T5L1) regulate periclinal cell division in vascular cells in the root apical meristem (RAM). In this study, we further investigated the functions of LHW-T5L1, finding that in addition to controlling cell division, this complex regulates xylem differentiation in the RAM via a novel negative regulatory system. LHW-T5L1 upregulated the thermospermine synthase gene ACAULIS5 (ACL5), as well as SUPPRESSOR OF ACAULIS5 LIKE3 (SACL3), which encodes a bHLH protein, in the RAM. The SACL3 promoter sequence contains a conserved upstream open reading frame (uORF), which blocked translation of the main SACL3 ORF in the absence of thermospermine. Thermospermine eliminated the negative effect of uORF and enhanced SACL3 production. Further genetic and molecular biological analyses indicated that ACL5 and SACL3 suppress the function of LHW-T5L1 through a protein-protein interaction between LHW and SACL3. Finally, we showed that a negative feedback loop consisting of LHW-T5L1, ACL5, SACL3, and LHW-SACL3 contributes to maintain RAM size and proper root growth. These findings suggest that a negative feedback loop regulates the LHW-T5L1 output level to coordinate cell division and differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enzyme-polyelectrolyte complexes in water-ethanol mixtures: negatively charged groups artificially introduced into alpha-chymotrypsin provide additional activation and stabilization effects.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, E V; Gladilin, A K; Vakurov, A V; Heitz, F; Levashov, A V; Mozhaev, V V

    1997-07-20

    Formation of noncovalent complexes between alpha-chymotrypsin (CT) and a polyelectrolyte, polybrene (PB), has been shown to produce two major effects on enzymatic reactions in binary mixtures of polar organic cosolvents with water. (i) At moderate concentrations of organic cosolvents (10% to 30% v/v), enzymatic activity of CT is higher than in aqueous solutions, and this activation effect is more significant for CT in complex with PB (5- to 7-fold) than for free enzyme (1.5- to 2.5-fold). (ii) The range of cosolvent concentrations that the enzyme tolerates without complete loss of catalytic activity is much broader. For enhancement of enzyme stability in the complex with the polycation, the number of negatively charged groups in the protein has been artificially increased by using chemical modification with pyromellitic and succinic anhydrides. Additional activation effect at moderate concentrations of ethanol and enhanced resistance of the enzyme toward inactivation at high concentrations of the organic solvent have been observed for the modified preparations of CT in the complex with PB as compared with an analogous complex of the native enzyme. Structural changes behind alterations in enzyme activity in water-ethanol mixtures have been studied by the method of circular dichroism (CD). Protein conformation of all CT preparations has not changed significantly up to 30% v/v of ethanol where activation effects in enzymatic catalysis were most pronounced. At higher concentrations of ethanol, structural changes in the protein have been observed for different forms of CT that were well correlated with a decrease in enzymatic activity. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 55: 267-277, 1997.

  12. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  13. Lack of cyclin D-Cdk complexes in Rb-negative cells correlates with high levels of p16INK4/MTS1 tumour suppressor gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Parry, D; Bates, S; Mann, D J; Peters, G

    1995-01-01

    D-type cyclins, in association with the cyclin-dependent kinases Cdk4 or Cdk6, regulate events in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and may contribute to the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product (Rb). However, in cells in which the function of Rb has been compromised, either by naturally arising mutations or through binding to proteins encoded by DNA tumour viruses, Cdk4 and Cdk6 are not associated with D cyclins. Instead, both kinases form binary complexes with a stable 16 kDa protein (p16) encoded by the putative tumour suppressor gene INK4/MTS1 on human chromosome 9p21. Here we show an inverse correlation between Rb status and the expression of p16. Since Rb-negative cells express high levels of p16, we suggest that in these cells p16 competes with D cyclins for binding to Cdk4 and Cdk6 and prevents formation of active complexes. In line with these predictions, DNA tumour virus oncoproteins do not disrupt cyclin D1-Cdk4 complexes in cells lacking p16. Images PMID:7859739

  14. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Reveals Remarkable Noninnocence of Ligands in Nickel Bis(dithiolene) Complexes [Ni(dddt)2](-) and [Ni(edo)2](.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2016-05-12

    [Ni(dddt)2](-) (dddt = 5,6-dihydro-1,4-dithiine-2,3-dithiolate) and [Ni(edo)2](-) (edo = 5,6-dihydro-1,4-dioxine-2,3-dithiolate) are two donor-type nickel bis(dithiolene) complexes, with the tendency of donating low binding energy electrons. These two structurally similar complexes differ only with respect to the outer atoms in the ligand framework where the former has four S atoms while the latter has four O atoms. Herein, we report a negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy (NIPES) study on these two complexes to probe the electronic structures of the anions and their corresponding neutrals. The NIPE spectra exhibit the adiabatic electron detachment energy (ADE) or, equivalently, the electron affinity (EA) of the neutral [Ni(L)2](0) to be relatively low for this type of complexes, 2.780 and 2.375 eV for L = dddt and edo, respectively. The 0.4 eV difference in ADEs shows a significant substitution effect for sulfur in dddt by oxygen in edo, i.e., noninnocence of the ligands, which has decreased the electronic stability of [Ni(edo)2](-) by lowering its electron binding energy by ∼0.4 eV. The observed substitution effect on gas-phase EA values correlates well with the measured redox potentials for [Ni(dddt)2](-/0) and [Ni(edo)2](-/0) in solutions. The singlet-triplet splitting (ΔEST) of [Ni(dddt)2](0) and [Ni(edo)2](0) is also determined from the spectra to be 0.57 and 0.53 eV, respectively. Accompanying DFT calculations and molecular orbital (MO) composition analyses show significant ligand contributions to the redox MOs and allow the components of the orbitals involved in each electronic transition and spectral assignments to be identified.

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans lin-35/Rb, efl-1/E2F and other synthetic multivulva genes negatively regulate the anaphase-promoting complex gene mat-3/APC8.

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, David; Doto, Jeffrey B; Sundaram, Meera V

    2004-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb)/E2F complexes repress expression of many genes important for G(1)-to-S transition, but also appear to regulate gene expression at other stages of the cell cycle. In C. elegans, lin-35/Rb and other synthetic Multivulva (SynMuv) group B genes function redundantly with other sets of genes to regulate G(1)/S progression, vulval and pharyngeal differentiation, and other unknown processes required for viability. Here we show that lin-35/Rb, efl-1/E2F, and other SynMuv B genes negatively regulate a component of the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C). The APC/C is a multisubunit complex that promotes metaphase-to-anaphase progression and G(1) arrest by targeting different substrates for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated destruction. The C. elegans APC/C gene mat-3/APC8 has been defined by temperature-sensitive embryonic lethal alleles that strongly affect germline meiosis and mitosis but only weakly affect somatic development. We describe severe nonconditional mat-3 alleles and a hypomorphic viable allele (ku233), all of which affect postembryonic cell divisions including those of the vulval lineage. The ku233 lesion is located outside of the mat-3 coding region and reduces mat-3 mRNA expression. Loss-of-function alleles of lin-35/Rb and other SynMuv B genes suppress mat-3(ku233) defects by restoring mat-3 mRNA to wild-type levels. Therefore, Rb/E2F complexes appear to repress mat-3 expression. PMID:15238519

  16. A dominant-negative clathrin mutant differentially affects trafficking of molecules with distinct sorting motifs in the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, S H; Marks, M S; Brodsky, F M

    1998-03-09

    The role of clathrin in intracellular sorting was investigated by expression of a dominant-negative mutant form of clathrin, termed the hub fragment. Hub inhibition of clathrin-mediated membrane transport was established by demonstrating a block of transferrin internalization and an alteration in the intracellular distribution of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor. Hubs had no effect on uptake of FITC-dextran, adaptor distribution, organelle integrity in the secretory pathway, or cell surface expression of constitutively secreted molecules. Hub expression blocked lysosomal delivery of chimeric molecules containing either the tyrosine-based sorting signal of H2M or the dileucine-based sorting signal of CD3gamma, confirming a role for clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) in recognizing these signals and sorting them to the endocytic pathway. Hub expression was then used to probe the role of CCVs in targeting native molecules bearing these sorting signals in the context of HLA-DM and the invariant chain (I chain) complexed to HLA-DR. The distribution of these molecules was differentially affected. Accumulation of hubs before expression of the DM dimer blocked DM export from the TGN, whereas hubs had no effect on direct targeting of the DR-I chain complex from the TGN to the endocytic pathway. However, concurrent expression of hubs, such that hubs were building to inhibitory concentrations during DM or DR-I chain expression, caused cell surface accumulation of both complexes. These observations suggest that both DM and DR-I chain are directly transported to the endocytic pathway from the TGN, DM in CCVs, and DR-I chain independent of CCVs. Subsequently, both complexes can appear at the cell surface from where they are both internalized by CCVs. Differential packaging in CCVs in the TGN, mediated by tyrosine- and dileucine-based sorting signals, could be a mechanism for functional segregation of DM from DR-I chain until their intended rendezvous in late

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans lin-35/Rb, efl-1/E2F and other synthetic multivulva genes negatively regulate the anaphase-promoting complex gene mat-3/APC8.

    PubMed

    Garbe, David; Doto, Jeffrey B; Sundaram, Meera V

    2004-06-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb)/E2F complexes repress expression of many genes important for G(1)-to-S transition, but also appear to regulate gene expression at other stages of the cell cycle. In C. elegans, lin-35/Rb and other synthetic Multivulva (SynMuv) group B genes function redundantly with other sets of genes to regulate G(1)/S progression, vulval and pharyngeal differentiation, and other unknown processes required for viability. Here we show that lin-35/Rb, efl-1/E2F, and other SynMuv B genes negatively regulate a component of the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C). The APC/C is a multisubunit complex that promotes metaphase-to-anaphase progression and G(1) arrest by targeting different substrates for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated destruction. The C. elegans APC/C gene mat-3/APC8 has been defined by temperature-sensitive embryonic lethal alleles that strongly affect germline meiosis and mitosis but only weakly affect somatic development. We describe severe nonconditional mat-3 alleles and a hypomorphic viable allele (ku233), all of which affect postembryonic cell divisions including those of the vulval lineage. The ku233 lesion is located outside of the mat-3 coding region and reduces mat-3 mRNA expression. Loss-of-function alleles of lin-35/Rb and other SynMuv B genes suppress mat-3(ku233) defects by restoring mat-3 mRNA to wild-type levels. Therefore, Rb/E2F complexes appear to repress mat-3 expression.

  18. Dermal Fenestration With Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: A Technique for Managing Soft Tissue Injuries Associated With High-Energy Complex Foot Fractures.

    PubMed

    Poon, Henrietta; Le Cocq, Heather; Mountain, Alistair J; Sargeant, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Military casualties can sustain complex foot fractures from blast incidents. This frequently involves the calcaneum and is commonly associated with mid-foot fracture dislocations. The foot is at risk of both compartment syndrome and the development of fracture blisters after such injuries. The amount of energy transfer and the environment in which the injury was sustained also predispose patients to potential skin necrosis and deep infection. Decompression of the compartments is a part of accepted practice in civilian trauma to reduce the risk of complications associated with significant soft tissue swelling. The traditional methods of foot fasciotomy, however, are not without significant complications. We report a simple technique of dermal fenestration combined with the use of negative pressure wound therapy, which aims to preserve the skin integrity of the foot without resorting to formal fasciotomy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of nitroaromatic compounds in complex samples using solid-phase microextraction and isotope dilution quantification gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, S; Gustavsson, L; van Bavel, B

    2007-09-14

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method using gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-ECNI-MS) and isotope dilution quantification for the analysis of nitroaromatic compounds in complex, water based samples has been optimised. For ionisation, ECNI was the most sensitive and selective method. SPME was compared to solid-phase extraction (SPE) and found to be more sensitive for these small volume samples. LODs were in the range 0.02-38ngL(-1) for SPME and 6-184ngL(-1) for SPE, respectively. The SPME method was applied on samples in the ngL(-1) level from artificial reed beds treated with sludge containing residues from explosives and pharmaceuticals.

  20. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Seho; Lim, Chunghun; Lee, Jae Young; Song, Yoon-Jae; Park, Junsoo; Choe, Joonho; Seo, Taegun

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  1. Inherited variants in the inner centromere protein (INCENP) gene of the chromosomal passenger complex contribute to the susceptibility of ER-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kabisch, Maria; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Dünnebier, Thomas; Ying, Shibo; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Peeters, Stephanie; Weltens, Caroline; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Purrington, Kristen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Humphreys, Keith; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmé, Frederik; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M.; Arias Perez, Jose I.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Kriege, Mieke; Koppert, Linetta B.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Slettedahl, Seth; Toland, Amanda E.; Vachon, Celine; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Fasching, Peter A.; Ruebner, Matthias; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Swerdlow, Anthony; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Scuvera, Giulietta; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Cai, Qiuyin; Torres, Diana; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Kristensen, Vessela; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Simard, Jacques; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cell division. Therefore, inherited CPC variability could influence tumor development. The present candidate gene approach investigates the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding key CPC components and breast cancer risk. Fifteen SNPs in four CPC genes (INCENP, AURKB, BIRC5 and CDCA8) were genotyped in 88 911 European women from 39 case-control studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Possible associations were investigated in fixed-effects meta-analyses. The synonymous SNP rs1675126 in exon 7 of INCENP was associated with overall breast cancer risk [per A allele odds ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92–0.98, P = 0.007] and particularly with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors (per A allele OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83–0.95, P = 0.0005). SNPs not directly genotyped were imputed based on 1000 Genomes. The SNPs rs1047739 in the 3ʹ untranslated region and rs144045115 downstream of INCENP showed the strongest association signals for overall (per T allele OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, P = 0.0009) and ER-negative breast cancer risk (per A allele OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02–1.10, P = 0.0002). Two genotyped SNPs in BIRC5 were associated with familial breast cancer risk (top SNP rs2071214: per G allele OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.04–1.21, P = 0.002). The data suggest that INCENP in the CPC pathway contributes to ER-negative breast cancer susceptibility in the European population. In spite of a modest contribution of CPC-inherited variants to the total burden of sporadic and familial breast cancer, their potential as novel targets for breast cancer treatment should be further investigated. PMID:25586992

  2. Intakes of vegetables and related nutrients such as vitamin B complex, potassium, and calcium, are negatively correlated with risk of stroke in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Consumption of vegetables and fruits is associated with a reduced risk of stroke, but it is unclear whether their protective effects are due to antioxidant vitamins or folate and metabolically related B vitamins. The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that intake of fruits and vegetables, which are major sources of antioxidant and vitamin B complex vitamins, reduces the risk of stroke. Cases consisted of patients diagnosed with first event of stroke (n = 69). Controls (n = 69) were age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched to cases. Multivariable-adjusted regression analysis showed that subjects who ate four to six servings of vegetable per day had a 32% reduction in the risk of stroke, and those with more than six servings per day had a reduction of 69% after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, and family history of stroke. Intakes of total fat, plant fat, calcium, potassium, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, niacin, and folate were significantly and negatively associated with the risk of stroke. Although the trend was not significant, stroke risk was reduced in the second quartile (1.21-2.66 servings per week) of fish intake. However, intake of fruits (average daily intake of 1.0 serving) and antioxidant vitamins such as carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E was not associated with the risk of stroke. In conclusion, our observational study suggests that intake of fat and vegetables, rich sources of vitamin B complex, calcium, and potassium may protect against stroke. PMID:20827346

  3. Generation of the dominant-negative mutant of hArpNbeta: a component of human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Choi, E Y; Park, J A; Sung, Y H; Kwon, H

    2001-11-15

    hArpNbeta, an actin-related protein located within the nucleus, is a subunit of the human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. hArpNbeta has been proposed to regulate the assembly and activity of the hSWI/SNF complex. Sequence comparisons of the potential ArpN homologs with beta-actin showed that the ArpNs have the divergent subdomains Ib and IIb in addition to the unique N-terminal short insert, MS(G/A)-(V/L)YGG. Since the proposed function of hArpNbeta requires more than two distinct but concurrently operating surfaces, we examined whether the disruption of one operating surface of hArpNbeta results in dominant-negative phenotype. When overexpressed in HeLa or 293T cells, the subdomain Ib or IIb hybrids, in which the subdomain Ib or IIb of hArpNbeta was replaced with that of beta-actin, respectively, showed no effect on cell survival. On the other hand, the overexpression of the N-terminal deletion mutant of hArpNbeta resulted in cell death probably through apoptotic process. These results indicate that the proper function of hArpNbeta is essential for cell survival in human cells. Furthermore, they suggests the possibility that the N-terminal short sequence is indispensable for the chromatin remodeling activity or the assembly of the hSWI/SNF complex after the binding of hArpNbeta with functionally essential partner proteins. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. Roles of Arabidopsis PARC6 in Coordination of the Chloroplast Division Complex and Negative Regulation of FtsZ Assembly1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Froehlich, John E.; TerBush, Allan D.

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast division is driven by the simultaneous constriction of the inner FtsZ ring (Z ring) and the outer DRP5B ring. The assembly and constriction of these rings in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are coordinated partly through the inner envelope membrane protein ACCUMULATION AND REPLICATION OF CHLOROPLASTS6 (ARC6). Previously, we showed that PARC6 (PARALOG OF ARC6), also in the inner envelope membrane, negatively regulates FtsZ assembly and acts downstream of ARC6 to position the outer envelope membrane protein PLASTID DIVISION1 (PDV1), which functions together with its paralog PDV2 to recruit DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN 5B (DRP5B) from a cytosolic pool to the outer envelope membrane. However, whether PARC6, like ARC6, also functions in coordination of the chloroplast division contractile complexes was unknown. Here, we report a detailed topological analysis of Arabidopsis PARC6, which shows that PARC6 has a single transmembrane domain and a topology resembling that of ARC6. The newly identified stromal region of PARC6 interacts not only with ARC3, a direct inhibitor of Z-ring assembly, but also with the Z-ring protein FtsZ2. Overexpression of PARC6 inhibits FtsZ assembly in Arabidopsis but not in a heterologous yeast system (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), suggesting that the negative regulation of FtsZ assembly by PARC6 is a consequence of its interaction with ARC3. A conserved carboxyl-terminal peptide in FtsZ2 mediates FtsZ2 interaction with both PARC6 and ARC6. Consistent with its role in the positioning of PDV1, the intermembrane space regions of PARC6 and PDV1 interact. These findings provide new insights into the functions of PARC6 and suggest that PARC6 coordinates the inner Z ring and outer DRP5B ring through interaction with FtsZ2 and PDV1 during chloroplast division. PMID:26527658

  5. High-throughput database search and large-scale negative polarity liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with ultraviolet photodissociation for complex proteomic samples.

    PubMed

    Madsen, James A; Xu, Hua; Robinson, Michelle R; Horton, Andrew P; Shaw, Jared B; Giles, David K; Kaoud, Tamer S; Dalby, Kevin N; Trent, M Stephen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2013-09-01

    The use of ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) for the activation and dissociation of peptide anions is evaluated for broader coverage of the proteome. To facilitate interpretation and assignment of the resulting UVPD mass spectra of peptide anions, the MassMatrix database search algorithm was modified to allow automated analysis of negative polarity MS/MS spectra. The new UVPD algorithms were developed based on the MassMatrix database search engine by adding specific fragmentation pathways for UVPD. The new UVPD fragmentation pathways in MassMatrix were rigorously and statistically optimized using two large data sets with high mass accuracy and high mass resolution for both MS(1) and MS(2) data acquired on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer for complex Halobacterium and HeLa proteome samples. Negative mode UVPD led to the identification of 3663 and 2350 peptides for the Halo and HeLa tryptic digests, respectively, corresponding to 655 and 645 peptides that were unique when compared with electron transfer dissociation (ETD), higher energy collision-induced dissociation, and collision-induced dissociation results for the same digests analyzed in the positive mode. In sum, 805 and 619 proteins were identified via UVPD for the Halobacterium and HeLa samples, respectively, with 49 and 50 unique proteins identified in contrast to the more conventional MS/MS methods. The algorithm also features automated charge determination for low mass accuracy data, precursor filtering (including intact charge-reduced peaks), and the ability to combine both positive and negative MS/MS spectra into a single search, and it is freely open to the public. The accuracy and specificity of the MassMatrix UVPD search algorithm was also assessed for low resolution, low mass accuracy data on a linear ion trap. Analysis of a known mixture of three mitogen-activated kinases yielded similar sequence coverage percentages for UVPD of peptide anions versus conventional collision-induced dissociation of

  6. High-throughput Database Search and Large-scale Negative Polarity Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Ultraviolet Photodissociation for Complex Proteomic Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, James A.; Xu, Hua; Robinson, Michelle R.; Horton, Andrew P.; Shaw, Jared B.; Giles, David K.; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Dalby, Kevin N.; Trent, M. Stephen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) for the activation and dissociation of peptide anions is evaluated for broader coverage of the proteome. To facilitate interpretation and assignment of the resulting UVPD mass spectra of peptide anions, the MassMatrix database search algorithm was modified to allow automated analysis of negative polarity MS/MS spectra. The new UVPD algorithms were developed based on the MassMatrix database search engine by adding specific fragmentation pathways for UVPD. The new UVPD fragmentation pathways in MassMatrix were rigorously and statistically optimized using two large data sets with high mass accuracy and high mass resolution for both MS1 and MS2 data acquired on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer for complex Halobacterium and HeLa proteome samples. Negative mode UVPD led to the identification of 3663 and 2350 peptides for the Halo and HeLa tryptic digests, respectively, corresponding to 655 and 645 peptides that were unique when compared with electron transfer dissociation (ETD), higher energy collision-induced dissociation, and collision-induced dissociation results for the same digests analyzed in the positive mode. In sum, 805 and 619 proteins were identified via UVPD for the Halobacterium and HeLa samples, respectively, with 49 and 50 unique proteins identified in contrast to the more conventional MS/MS methods. The algorithm also features automated charge determination for low mass accuracy data, precursor filtering (including intact charge-reduced peaks), and the ability to combine both positive and negative MS/MS spectra into a single search, and it is freely open to the public. The accuracy and specificity of the MassMatrix UVPD search algorithm was also assessed for low resolution, low mass accuracy data on a linear ion trap. Analysis of a known mixture of three mitogen-activated kinases yielded similar sequence coverage percentages for UVPD of peptide anions versus conventional collision-induced dissociation of

  7. Z-ligustilide restores tamoxifen sensitivity of ERα negative breast cancer cells by reversing MTA1/IFI16/HDACs complex mediated epigenetic repression of ERα

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Guojun; Wang, Chengqiang; Li, Juan; He, Hui; Wu, Mingxia; Qi, Hongyi

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates epigenetic modification represses estrogen receptor α (ERα) and contributes to the resistance to tamoxifen in aggressive ERα-negative (ERα−) breast cancer. Z-ligustilide is a major compound in Radix Angelica sinensis, an herb from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) most frequently prescribed for breast cancer. However, the role of Z-ligustilide in ERα− breast cancer and epigenetic modification remains largely unknown. Herein we showed, for the first time, that Z-ligustilide restored the growth inhibition of tamoxifen on ERα− breast cancer cells. Apoptosis and S and G2/M phases cell cycle arrest were induced by combinatorial Z-ligustilide and tamoxifen. Importantly, Z-ligustilide reactivated the ERα expression and transcriptional activity, which is proved to be indispensable for restoring the sensitivity to tamoxifen. Interestingly, Z-ligustilide increased Ace-H3 (lys9/14) enrichment in the ERα promoter. Moreover, Z-ligustilide dramatically reduced the enrichment of metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) as well as IFN-γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) onto the ERα promoter. Meanwhile, Z-ligustilide downregulated MTA1, IFI16 and HDACs, which caused destabilization of the corepressor complex. Collectively, our study not only highlights Z-ligustilide as a novel epigenetic modulator, but also opens new possibilities from TCM for treating aggressive tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. PMID:28415616

  8. Z-ligustilide restores tamoxifen sensitivity of ERa negative breast cancer cells by reversing MTA1/IFI16/HDACs complex mediated epigenetic repression of ERa.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Li, Li; Dou, Guojun; Wang, Chengqiang; Li, Juan; He, Hui; Wu, Mingxia; Qi, Hongyi

    2017-04-25

    Emerging evidence indicates epigenetic modification represses estrogen receptor α (ERα) and contributes to the resistance to tamoxifen in aggressive ERα-negative (ERα-) breast cancer. Z-ligustilide is a major compound in Radix Angelica sinensis, an herb from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) most frequently prescribed for breast cancer. However, the role of Z-ligustilide in ERα- breast cancer and epigenetic modification remains largely unknown. Herein we showed, for the first time, that Z-ligustilide restored the growth inhibition of tamoxifen on ERα- breast cancer cells. Apoptosis and S and G2/M phases cell cycle arrest were induced by combinatorial Z-ligustilide and tamoxifen. Importantly, Z-ligustilide reactivated the ERα expression and transcriptional activity, which is proved to be indispensable for restoring the sensitivity to tamoxifen. Interestingly, Z-ligustilide increased Ace-H3 (lys9/14) enrichment in the ERα promoter. Moreover, Z-ligustilide dramatically reduced the enrichment of metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) as well as IFN-γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) onto the ERα promoter. Meanwhile, Z-ligustilide downregulated MTA1, IFI16 and HDACs, which caused destabilization of the corepressor complex. Collectively, our study not only highlights Z-ligustilide as a novel epigenetic modulator, but also opens new possibilities from TCM for treating aggressive tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer.

  9. The Structure of the PanD/PanZ Protein Complex Reveals Negative Feedback Regulation of Pantothenate Biosynthesis by Coenzyme A

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Diana C.F.; Patel, Vijay; Bartlett, Christopher P.; Nozaki, Shingo; Grant, Thomas D.; Gowdy, James A.; Thompson, Gary S.; Kalverda, Arnout P.; Snell, Edward H.; Niki, Hironori; Pearson, Arwen R.; Webb, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Coenzyme A (CoA) is an ubiquitous and essential cofactor, synthesized from the precursor pantothenate. Vitamin biosynthetic pathways are normally tightly regulated, including the pathway from pantothenate to CoA. However, no regulation of pantothenate biosynthesis has been identified. We have recently described an additional component in the pantothenate biosynthetic pathway, PanZ, which promotes the activation of the zymogen, PanD, to form aspartate α-decarboxylase (ADC) in a CoA-dependent manner. Here we report the structure of PanZ in complex with PanD, which reveals the structural basis for the CoA dependence of this interaction and activation. In addition, we show that PanZ acts as a CoA-dependent inhibitor of ADC catalysis. This inhibitory effect can effectively regulate the biosynthetic pathway to pantothenate, and thereby also regulate CoA biosynthesis. This represents a previously unobserved mode of metabolic regulation whereby a cofactor-utilizing protein negatively regulates the biosynthesis of the same cofactor. PMID:25910242

  10. On the structure of the two-stream instability–complex G-Hamiltonian structure and Krein collisions between positive- and negative-action modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ruili; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Jianyuan; Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-07-15

    The two-stream instability is probably the most important elementary example of collective instabilities in plasma physics and beam-plasma systems. For a warm plasma with two charged particle species, the instability diagram of the two-stream instability based on a 1D warm-fluid model exhibits an interesting band structure that has not been explained. We show that the band structure for this instability is the consequence of the Hamiltonian nature of the warm two-fluid system. Interestingly, the Hamiltonian nature manifests as a complex G-Hamiltonian structure in wave-number space, which directly determines the instability diagram. Specifically, it is shown that the boundaries between the stable and unstable regions are locations for Krein collisions between eigenmodes with different Krein signatures. In terms of physics, this rigorously implies that the system is destabilized when a positive-action mode resonates with a negative-action mode, and that this is the only mechanism by which the system can be destabilized. It is anticipated that this physical mechanism of destabilization is valid for other collective instabilities in conservative systems in plasma physics, accelerator physics, and fluid dynamics systems, which admit infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian structures.

  11. Thai Negation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alam, Samsul

    A study analyzed the structure of negative sentences in the Thai language, based on data gathered from two native speakers. It is shown that the Thai negative marker generally occurs between the noun phrase (subject) and the verb phrase in simple active sentences and in passive sentences. Negation of noun phrases is also allowed in Thai, with a…

  12. Negative Regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 by Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Is Implicated in Cell Cycle Phase G2/M Arrest and Abnormal Chromosome Stability.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingling; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Zhao, Jiayao; Su, Jiaming; Wang, Lingyao; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Tong; Wang, Fei; Jin, Jingji; Cai, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified an ATP-dependent human Ino80 (INO80) chromatin remodeling complex which shares a set of core subunits with yeast Ino80 complex. Although research evidence has suggested that INO80 complex functions in gene transcription and genome stability, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Herein, based on gene expression profiles from the INO80 complex-knockdown in HeLa cells, we first demonstrate that INO80 complex negatively regulates the p21Waf1/Cip1 (p21) expression in a p53-mediated mechanism. In chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and a sequential ChIP (Re-ChIP) assays, we determined that the INO80 complex and p53 can bind to the same promoter region of p21 gene (-2.2 kb and -1.0 kb upstream of the p21 promoter region), and p53 is required for the recruitment of the INO80 complex to the p21 promoter. RNAi knockdown strategies of INO80 not only led to prolonged progression of cell cycle phase G2/M to G1, but it also resulted in abnormal chromosome stability. Interestingly, high expression of p21 was observed in most morphologically-changed cells, suggesting that negative regulation of p21 by INO80 complex might be implicated in maintaining the cell cycle process and chromosome stability. Together, our findings will provide a theoretical basis to further elucidate the cellular mechanisms of the INO80 complex.

  13. Negative Regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 by Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Is Implicated in Cell Cycle Phase G2/M Arrest and Abnormal Chromosome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingling; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Zhao, Jiayao; Su, Jiaming; Wang, Lingyao; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Tong; Wang, Fei; Jin, Jingji; Cai, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified an ATP-dependent human Ino80 (INO80) chromatin remodeling complex which shares a set of core subunits with yeast Ino80 complex. Although research evidence has suggested that INO80 complex functions in gene transcription and genome stability, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Herein, based on gene expression profiles from the INO80 complex-knockdown in HeLa cells, we first demonstrate that INO80 complex negatively regulates the p21Waf1/Cip1 (p21) expression in a p53-mediated mechanism. In chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and a sequential ChIP (Re-ChIP) assays, we determined that the INO80 complex and p53 can bind to the same promoter region of p21 gene (-2.2kb and -1.0kb upstream of the p21 promoter region), and p53 is required for the recruitment of the INO80 complex to the p21 promoter. RNAi knockdown strategies of INO80 not only led to prolonged progression of cell cycle phase G2/M to G1, but it also resulted in abnormal chromosome stability. Interestingly, high expression of p21 was observed in most morphologically-changed cells, suggesting that negative regulation of p21 by INO80 complex might be implicated in maintaining the cell cycle process and chromosome stability. Together, our findings will provide a theoretical basis to further elucidate the cellular mechanisms of the INO80 complex. PMID:26340092

  14. Phorbol ester-induced transcription of a fibroblast growth factor-binding protein is modulated by a complex interplay of positive and negative regulatory promoter elements.

    PubMed

    Harris, V K; Liaudet-Coopman, E D; Boyle, B J; Wellstein, A; Riegel, A T

    1998-07-24

    transcription are tightly controlled by a complex interplay of positive elements and a novel negative regulatory element.

  15. Exploring the complexities of body image experiences in middle age and older adult women within an exercise context: The simultaneous existence of negative and positive body images.

    PubMed

    Bailey, K Alysse; Cline, Lindsay E; Gammage, Kimberley L

    2016-06-01

    Despite many body changes that accompany the aging process, the extant research is limited on middle age and older adults' body image experiences. The purpose of the present study was to explore how body image is represented for middle age and older adult women. Using thematic analysis, 10 women over the age of 55 were interviewed within an exercise context. The following themes were found: body dissatisfaction, body satisfaction despite ageist stereotypes, neutral body image within cohort, and positive body image characteristics. Negative and positive body images were experienced simultaneously, with neutral experiences expressed as low levels of dissatisfaction. This supports the contention that negative and positive body images exist on separate continuums and neutral body image is likely on the same continuum as negative body image. Programs that foster a social support network to reduce negative body image and improve positive body image in older female populations are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Incubation time of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex sputum cultures in BACTEC MGIT 960: Four weeks of negative culture is enough for physicians to consider alternative diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Ogwang, Sam; Mubiri, Paul; Bark, Charles M.; Joloba, Moses L.; Boom, W. Henry; Johnson, John L.

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed time to detection of 3747 positive MGIT sputum cultures at a laboratory in a country with heavy burden of tuberculosis. Ninety-nine percent of diagnostic cultures turned positive within 28 days, suggesting that physicians may consider alternative diagnoses if sputum cultures remain negative after 4 weeks of incubation. PMID:26239846

  17. Insulin/receptor binding: the last piece of the puzzle? What recent progress on the structure of the insulin/receptor complex tells us (or not) about negative cooperativity and activation.

    PubMed

    De Meyts, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Progress in solving the structure of insulin bound to its receptor has been slow and stepwise, but a milestone has now been reached with a refined structure of a complex of insulin with a "microreceptor" that contains the primary binding site. The insulin receptor is a dimeric allosteric enzyme that belongs to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The insulin binding process is complex and exhibits negative cooperativity. Biochemical evidence suggested that insulin, through two distinct binding sites, crosslinks two receptor sites located on each α subunit. The structure of the unliganded receptor ectodomain showed a symmetrical folded-over conformation with an antiparallel disposition. Further work resolved the detailed structure of receptor site 1, both without and with insulin. Recently, a missing piece in the puzzle was added: the C-terminal portion of insulin's B-chain known to be critical for binding and negative cooperativity. Here I discuss these findings and their implications.

  18. Negative Certainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariso, José María

    2017-01-01

    The definitions of "negative knowledge" and the studies in this regard published to date have not considered the categorial distinction Wittgenstein established between knowledge and certainty. Hence, the important role that certainty, despite its omission, should have in these definitions and studies has not yet been shown. In this…

  19. Negative Certainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariso, José María

    2017-01-01

    The definitions of "negative knowledge" and the studies in this regard published to date have not considered the categorial distinction Wittgenstein established between knowledge and certainty. Hence, the important role that certainty, despite its omission, should have in these definitions and studies has not yet been shown. In this…

  20. Negative Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Mary J.

    1974-01-01

    Examination of models for representing integers demonstrates that formal operational thought is required for establishing the operations on integers. Advocated is the use of many models for introducing negative numbers but, apart from addition, it is recommended that operations on integers be delayed until the formal operations stage. (JP)

  1. A macromolecular complex involving the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the cytosolic adapter FE65 is a negative regulator of axon branching

    PubMed Central

    Ikin, Annat F.; Sabo, Shasta L.; Lanier, Lorene M.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies suggest a role for the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, but the downstream interactions that mediate the function of APP during neuron development are unknown. By introducing interaction-deficient FE65 into cultured hippocampal neurons using adenovirus, we show that a complex including APP, FE65 and an additional protein is involved in neurite outgrowth at early stages of neuronal development. Both FE65 that is unable to interact with APP (PID2 mutants) or a WW mutant increased axon branching. Although the FE65 mutants did not affect total neurite output, both mutants decreased axon segment length, consistent with an overall slowing of axonal growth cones. FE65 mutants did not alter the localization of either APP or FE65 in axonal growth cones, suggesting that the effects on neurite outgrowth are achieved by alterations in local complex formation within the axonal growth cone. PMID:17383198

  2. Molecular Detection and Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Four Clinically Important Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Species in Smear-Negative Clinical Samples by the GenoType Mycobacteria Direct Test ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bicmen, Can; Gunduz, Ayriz T.; Coskun, Meral; Senol, Gunes; Cirak, A. Kadri; Ozsoz, Ayse

    2011-01-01

    Although the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid amplification assays are high with smear-positive samples, the sensitivity with smear-negative and extrapulmonary samples for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in suspicious tuberculosis cases still remains to be investigated. This study evaluates the performance of the GenoType Mycobacteria Direct (GTMD) test for rapid molecular detection and identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and four clinically important nontuberculous mycobacteria (M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. kansasii, and M. malmoense) in smear-negative samples. A total of 1,570 samples (1,103 bronchial aspiration, 127 sputum, and 340 extrapulmonary samples) were analyzed. When we evaluated the performance criteria in combination with a positive culture result and/or the clinical outcome of the patients, the overall sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were found to be 62.4, 99.5, 95.9, and 93.9%, respectively, whereas they were 63.2, 99.4, 95.7, and 92.8%, respectively, for pulmonary samples and 52.9, 100, 100, and 97.6%, respectively, for extrapulmonary samples. Among the culture-positive samples which had Mycobacterium species detectable by the GTMD test, three samples were identified to be M. intracellulare and one sample was identified to be M. avium. However, five M. intracellulare samples and an M. kansasii sample could not be identified by the molecular test and were found to be negative. The GTMD test has been a reliable, practical, and easy tool for rapid diagnosis of smear-negative pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis so that effective precautions may be taken and appropriate treatment may be initiated. However, the low sensitivity level should be considered in the differentiation of suspected tuberculosis and some other clinical condition until the culture result is found to be negative and a true picture of the clinical outcome is obtained. PMID:21653780

  3. Cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by metallo-intercalator ruthenium(II) complexes containing chloro-substituted phenylazopyridine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the absence of expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Breast cancers with a BRCA1 mutation are also frequently triple-negative. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies and known specific molecular targets for this aggressive breast cancer subtype. To address this concern, we have explored the cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells, and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by the ruthenium(II) complexes containing the bidentate ligand, 5-chloro-2-(phenylazo)pyridine. Methods Triple-negative MDA-MB-231, BRCA1-defective HCC1937 and BRCA1-competent MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were treated with ruthenium(II) complexes. The cytoxoxicity of ruthenium-induced breast cancer cells was evaluated by a real time cellular analyzer (RTCA). Cellular uptake of ruthenium complexes was determined by ICP-MS. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed using propidium iodide and Annexin V flow cytometry. The N-terminal BRCA1 RING protein was used for conformational and functional studies using circular dichroism and in vitro ubiquitination. Results HCC1937 cells were significantly more sensitive to the ruthenium complexes than the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. Treatment demonstrated a higher degree of cytotoxicity than cisplatin against all three cell lines. Most ruthenium atoms were retained in the nuclear compartment, particularly in HCC1937 cells, after 24 h of incubation, and produced a significant block at the G2/M phase. An increased induction of apoptotic cells as well as an upregulation of p53 mRNA was observed in all tested breast cancer cells. It was of interest that BRCA1 mRNA and replication of BRCA1-defective cells were downregulated. Changes in the conformation and binding constants of ruthenium-BRCA1 adducts were observed, causing inactivation of the RING heterodimer BRCA1/BARD1-mediated E3

  4. Cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by metallo-intercalator ruthenium(II) complexes containing chloro-substituted phenylazopyridine.

    PubMed

    Nhukeaw, Tidarat; Temboot, Pornvichai; Hansongnern, Kanidtha; Ratanaphan, Adisorn

    2014-02-07

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the absence of expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Breast cancers with a BRCA1 mutation are also frequently triple-negative. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies and known specific molecular targets for this aggressive breast cancer subtype. To address this concern, we have explored the cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells, and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by the ruthenium(II) complexes containing the bidentate ligand, 5-chloro-2-(phenylazo)pyridine. Triple-negative MDA-MB-231, BRCA1-defective HCC1937 and BRCA1-competent MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were treated with ruthenium(II) complexes. The cytoxoxicity of ruthenium-induced breast cancer cells was evaluated by a real time cellular analyzer (RTCA). Cellular uptake of ruthenium complexes was determined by ICP-MS. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed using propidium iodide and Annexin V flow cytometry. The N-terminal BRCA1 RING protein was used for conformational and functional studies using circular dichroism and in vitro ubiquitination. HCC1937 cells were significantly more sensitive to the ruthenium complexes than the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. Treatment demonstrated a higher degree of cytotoxicity than cisplatin against all three cell lines. Most ruthenium atoms were retained in the nuclear compartment, particularly in HCC1937 cells, after 24 h of incubation, and produced a significant block at the G2/M phase. An increased induction of apoptotic cells as well as an upregulation of p53 mRNA was observed in all tested breast cancer cells. It was of interest that BRCA1 mRNA and replication of BRCA1-defective cells were downregulated. Changes in the conformation and binding constants of ruthenium-BRCA1 adducts were observed, causing inactivation of the RING heterodimer BRCA1/BARD1-mediated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity

  5. Binding of cationic pentapeptides with modified side chain lengths to negatively charged lipid membranes: Complex interplay of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Hoernke, Maria; Schwieger, Christian; Kerth, Andreas; Blume, Alfred

    2012-07-01

    Basic amino acids play a key role in the binding of membrane associated proteins to negatively charged membranes. However, side chains of basic amino acids like lysine do not only provide a positive charge, but also a flexible hydrocarbon spacer that enables hydrophobic interactions. We studied the influence of hydrophobic contributions to the binding by varying the side chain length of pentapeptides with ammonium groups starting with lysine to lysine analogs with shorter side chains, namely omithine (Orn), alpha, gamma-diaminobutyric acid (Dab) and alpha, beta-diaminopropionic acid (Dap). The binding to negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membranes was investigated by calorimetry, FT-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and monolayer techniques. The binding was influenced by counteracting and sometimes compensating contributions. The influence of the bound peptides on the lipid phase behavior depends on the length of the peptide side chains. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments showed exothermic and endothermic effects compensating to a different extent as a function of side chain length. The increase in lipid phase transition temperature was more significant for peptides with shorter side chains. FTIR-spectroscopy revealed changes in hydration of the lipid bilayer interface after peptide binding. Using monolayer techniques, the contributions of electrostatic and hydrophobic effects could clearly be observed. Peptides with short side chains induced a pronounced decrease in surface pressure of PG monolayers whereas peptides with additional hydrophobic interactions decreased the surface pressure much less or even lead to an increase, indicating insertion of the hydrophobic part of the side chain into the lipid monolayer.

  6. The Nuclear and Adherent Junction Complex Component Protein Ubinuclein Negatively Regulates the Productive Cycle of Epstein-Barr Virus in Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Gruffat, Henri; Lupo, Julien; Morand, Patrice; Boyer, Véronique; Manet, Evelyne

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) productive cycle is initiated by the expression of the viral trans-activator EB1 (also called Zebra, Zta, or BZLF1), which belongs to the basic leucine zipper transcription factor family. We have previously identified the cellular NACos (nuclear and adherent junction complex components) protein ubinuclein (Ubn-1) as a partner for EB1, but the function of this complex has never been studied. Here, we have evaluated the consequences of this interaction on the EBV productive cycle and find that Ubn-1 overexpression represses the EBV productive cycle whereas Ubn-1 downregulation by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) increases virus production. By a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, we show that Ubn-1 blocks EB1-DNA interaction. We also show that in epithelial cells, relocalization and sequestration of Ubn-1 to the tight junctions of nondividing cells allow increased activation of the productive cycle. We propose a model in which Ubn-1 is a modulator of the EBV productive cycle: in proliferating epithelial cells, Ubn-1 is nuclear and inhibits activation of the productive cycle, whereas in differentiated cells, Ubn-1 is sequestrated to tight junctions, thereby allowing EB1 to fully function in the nucleus. PMID:21084479

  7. The nuclear and adherent junction complex component protein ubinuclein negatively regulates the productive cycle of Epstein-Barr virus in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gruffat, Henri; Lupo, Julien; Morand, Patrice; Boyer, Véronique; Manet, Evelyne

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) productive cycle is initiated by the expression of the viral trans-activator EB1 (also called Zebra, Zta, or BZLF1), which belongs to the basic leucine zipper transcription factor family. We have previously identified the cellular NACos (nuclear and adherent junction complex components) protein ubinuclein (Ubn-1) as a partner for EB1, but the function of this complex has never been studied. Here, we have evaluated the consequences of this interaction on the EBV productive cycle and find that Ubn-1 overexpression represses the EBV productive cycle whereas Ubn-1 downregulation by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) increases virus production. By a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, we show that Ubn-1 blocks EB1-DNA interaction. We also show that in epithelial cells, relocalization and sequestration of Ubn-1 to the tight junctions of nondividing cells allow increased activation of the productive cycle. We propose a model in which Ubn-1 is a modulator of the EBV productive cycle: in proliferating epithelial cells, Ubn-1 is nuclear and inhibits activation of the productive cycle, whereas in differentiated cells, Ubn-1 is sequestrated to tight junctions, thereby allowing EB1 to fully function in the nucleus.

  8. Binding affinity between dietary polyphenols and β-lactoglobulin negatively correlates with the protein susceptibility to digestion and total antioxidant activity of complexes formed.

    PubMed

    Stojadinovic, Marija; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Ognjenovic, Jana; Vesic, Jelena; Prodic, Ivana; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja

    2013-02-15

    Non-covalent interactions between β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and polyphenol extracts of teas, coffee and cocoa were studied by fluorescence and CD spectroscopy at pH values of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The biological implications of non-covalent binding of polyphenols to BLG were investigated by in vitro pepsin and pancreatin digestibility assay and ABTS radical scavenging activity of complexes formed. The polyphenol-BLG systems were stable at pH values of the GIT. The most profound effect of pH on binding affinity was observed for polyphenol extracts rich in phenolic acids. Stronger non-covalent interactions delayed pepsin and pancreatin digestion of BLG and induced β-sheet to α-helix transition at neutral pH. All polyphenols tested protected protein secondary structure at an extremely acidic pH of 1.2. A positive correlation was found between the strength of protein-polyphenol interactions and (a) half time of protein decay in gastric conditions (R(2)=0.85), (b) masking of total antioxidant capacity of protein-polyphenol complexes (R(2)=0.95). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutations within the LINC-HELLP non-coding RNA differentially bind ribosomal and RNA splicing complexes and negatively affect trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Marie; Visser, Allerdien; Buabeng, Kwadwo M L; Poutsma, Ankie; van der Schors, Roel C; Oudejans, Cees B M

    2015-10-01

    LINC-HELLP, showing chromosomal linkage with the pregnancy-specific HELLP syndrome in Dutch families, reduces differentiation from a proliferative to an invasive phenotype of first-trimester extravillous trophoblasts. Here we show that mutations in LINC-HELLP identified in HELLP families negatively affect this trophoblast differentiation either by inducing proliferation rate or by causing cell cycle exit as shown by a decrease in both proliferation and invasion. As LincRNAs predominantly function through interactions with proteins, we identified the directly interacting proteins using chromatin isolation by RNA purification followed by protein mass spectrometry. We found 22 proteins predominantly clustering in two functional networks, i.e. RNA splicing and the ribosome. YBX1, PCBP1, PCBP2, RPS6 and RPL7 were validated, and binding to these proteins was influenced by the HELLP mutations carried. Finally, we show that the LINC-HELLP transcript levels are significantly upregulated in plasma of women in their first trimester of pregnancy compared with non-pregnant women, whereas this upregulation seems absent in a pilot set of patients later developing pregnancy complications, indicative of its functional significance in vivo.

  10. Fragmentation of negative ions from N-linked carbohydrates, part 4. Fragmentation of complex glycans lacking substitution on the 6-antenna.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Jaeken, Jaak; Butler, Mike; Armitage, Alison J; Rudd, Pauline M; Dwek, Raymond A

    2010-05-01

    Negative ion CID spectra of N-linked glycans released from glycoproteins contain many ions that are diagnostic for specific structural features such as the detailed arrangement of antennae and the location of fucose residues. Identification of such ions requires reference glycans that are often difficult to acquire in a pure state. The recent acquisition of a sample of N-glycans from a patient lacking the enzyme N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-2 provided an opportunity to investigate fragmentation of glycans lacking a 6-antenna. These glycans contained one or two galactose-N-acetylglucosamine-chains attached to the 3-linked mannose residue of the trimannosyl-chitobiose core with and without fucose substitution. The spectra from the patient sample clearly defined the antenna distribution and showed striking differences from the spectra of isomeric compounds obtained from normal subjects. Furthermore, they provided additional information on previously identified antenna-specific fragment ions and indicated the presence of additional ions that were diagnostic of fucose substitution. Glycans obtained from such enzyme-deficient patients can, thus, be a valuable way of obtaining spectra of specific isomers in a relatively pure state for interpretation of mass spectra. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The negative feedback molecular mechanism which regulates excitation level in the plant photosynthetic complex LHCII: towards identification of the energy dissipative state.

    PubMed

    Zubik, Monika; Luchowski, Rafal; Puzio, Michal; Janik, Ewa; Bednarska, Joanna; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2013-03-01

    Overexcitation of the photosynthetic apparatus is potentially dangerous because it can cause oxidative damage. Photoprotection realized via the feedback de-excitation in the pigment-protein light-harvesting complex LHCII, embedded in the chloroplast lipid environment, was studied with use of the steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. Illumination of LHCII results in the pronounced singlet excitation quenching, demonstrated by decreased quantum yield of the chlorophyll a fluorescence and shortening of the fluorescence lifetimes. Analysis of the 77K chlorophyll a fluorescence emission spectra reveals that the light-driven excitation quenching in LHCII is associated with the intensity increase of the spectral band in the region of 700nm, relative to the principal band at 680nm. The average chlorophyll a fluorescence lifetime at 700nm changes drastically upon temperature decrease: from 1.04ns at 300K to 3.63ns at 77K. The results of the experiments lead us to conclude that: (i) the 700nm band is associated with the inter-trimer interactions which result in the formation of the chlorophyll low-energy states acting as energy traps and non-radiative dissipation centers; (ii) the Arrhenius analysis, supported by the results of the FTIR measurements, suggests that the photo-reaction can be associated with breaking of hydrogen bonds. Possible involvement of photo-isomerization of neoxanthin, reported previously (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1807 (2011) 1237-1243) in generation of the low-energy traps in LHCII is discussed.

  12. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex, and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2009-09-01

    A forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 was the strongest arsenate- and arsenite-resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knock-out mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by the overexpression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces the enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in the WT, and this arsenic induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5, compared with WT, suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background.

  13. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A forward genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 is the strongest arsenate and arsenite resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and the arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knockout mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by over expression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild type Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in wild type and this arsenic-induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5 compared to WT suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background. PMID:19453443

  14. Energy functions for protein design: adjustment with protein-protein complex affinities, models for the unfolded state, and negative design of solubility and specificity.

    PubMed

    Pokala, Navin; Handel, Tracy M

    2005-03-18

    The development of the EGAD program and energy function for protein design is described. In contrast to most protein design methods, which require several empirical parameters or heuristics such as patterning of residues or rotamers, EGAD has a minimalist philosophy; it uses very few empirical factors to account for inaccuracies resulting from the use of fixed backbones and discrete rotamers in protein design calculations, and describes the unfolded state, aggregates, and alternative conformers explicitly with physical models instead of fitted parameters. This approach unveils important issues in protein design that are often camouflaged by heuristic-emphasizing methods. Inter-atom energies are modeled with the OPLS-AA all-atom forcefield, electrostatics with the generalized Born continuum model, and the hydrophobic effect with a solvent-accessible surface area-dependent term. Experimental characterization of proteins designed with an unmodified version of the energy function revealed problems with under-packing, stability, aggregation, and structural specificity. Under-packing was addressed by modifying the van der Waals function. By optimizing only three parameters, the effects of >400 mutations on protein-protein complex formation were predicted to within 1.0 kcal mol(-1). As an independent test, this modified energy function was used to predict the stabilities of >1500 mutants to within 1.0 kcal mol(-1); this required a physical model of the unfolded state that includes more interactions than traditional tripeptide-based models. Solubility and structural specificity were addressed with simple physical approximations of aggregation and conformational equilibria. The complete energy function can design protein sequences that have high levels of identity with their natural counterparts, and have predicted structural properties more consistent with soluble and uniquely folded proteins than the initial designs.

  15. The avian cardiac alpha-actin promoter is regulated through a pair of complex elements composed of E boxes and serum response elements that bind both positive- and negative-acting factors.

    PubMed

    Moss, J B; McQuinn, T C; Schwartz, R J

    1994-04-29

    The chicken alpha-cardiac actin is one of the earliest contractile protein genes selectively expressed during embryonic skeletal and cardiac muscle differentiation. Cardiac actin promoter elements were examined in these two sarcomeric cell types. A portion of the alpha-cardiac actin promoter responsible for striated muscle specificity has been delineated (1, 2) and shown to contain four serum response elements (SRE). Previously, SRE3 was shown to be part of a complex element in conjunction with a functional E box (2), and we now show that SRE4 is also part of an upstream SRE.E box cis-element complex. The SREs function similarly, but the E boxes have dissimilar properties within and between striated muscle types. The SRE3.E1 box binds myogenic basic helix-loop-helix factors and is required for cardiac actin trans-activation in primary muscle cell cultures but functions as a negative regulatory element in cardiac muscle cells. The SRE4.E2 box, on the other hand, fails to bind basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factors, is negative acting in skeletal muscle cells, and is positive acting in cardiac myocytes. A DNA binding factor similar to HF1a (3) was identified that interacts specifically with the SRE4.E2 box. This study shows that the avian cardiac actin promoter elements are differentially used between skeletal and cardiac striated muscle cell lineages.

  16. Binding of viral antigens to major histocompatibility complex class I H-2Db molecules is controlled by dominant negative elements at peptide non-anchor residues. Implications for peptide selection and presentation.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, D; Mazarguil, H; Laval, F; Oldstone, M B; Gairin, J E

    1996-07-26

    Binding of viral antigens to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is a critical step in the activation process of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this study, we investigated the impact of structural factors at non-anchor residues in peptide-MHC interaction using the model of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of its natural host, the mouse. Altering viral genes by making reassortants, recombinants, and using synthetic peptides, CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes were shown to recognize only three H-2Db-restricted epitopes, GP amino acids 33-41/43, GP 276-286, and NP 396-404. However, LCMV NP and GP proteins contain 31 other peptides bearing the H-2Db motif. These 34 LCMV peptides and 11 other known H2-Db-restricted peptides were synthesized and examined for MHC binding properties. Despite the presence of the H-2Db binding motif, the majority of LCMV peptides showed weak or no affinity for H-2Db. We observed that dominant negative structural elements located at non-anchor positions played a crucial role in peptide-MHC interaction. By comparative sequence analysis of strong versus non-binders and using molecular modeling, we delineated these negative elements and evaluated their impact on peptide-MHC interaction. Our findings were validated by showing that a single mutation of a favorable non-anchor residue in the sequence of known viral epitopes for a negative element resulted in dramatic reduction of antigen presentation properties, while conversely, substitution of one negative for a positive element in the sequence of a non-binder conferred to the peptide an ability to now bind to MHC molecules.

  17. Human lymphocyte subpopulations. Human thymus-lymphoid tissue (HTL) antigen-positive lymphocytes forming rosettes with sheep erythrocytes and HTL antigen-negative lymphocytes interacting with antigen-antibody-complement complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yata, J.; Tsukimoto, I.; Tachibana, T.

    1973-01-01

    Human lymphocytes from various lymphoid tissues were studied for the relationship between the existence of HTL (human thymus-lymphoid tissue) antigen, and binding of sheep erythrocytes (E) or sheep erythrocyte–antibody-complement complexes (EA(IgM)C43). E adhered to the majority of thymus lymphocytes and formed rosettes. These lymphocytes were shown to be HTL antigen positive by immunofluorescence performed simultaneously. In the peripheral lymphoid tissues, 10–30% of lymphocytes formed E rosettes and almost all E rosette-forming lymphocytes were HTL antigen positive. Conversely HTL antigen-negative cells did not form E rosettes. In contrast, the cells binding EA(IgM)C43 were always HTL antigen negative. There were very few HTL antigen-positive or rosette-forming lymphocytes either with E or EA(IgM)C43 in bone marrow. From these data we conclude that E-rosette-forming and HTL antigen-positive lymphocytes are of thymus origin and EA(IgM)C43-rosette-forming cells are not thymus-dependent cells. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4579778

  18. A Sequence within the Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) OriS Is a Negative Regulator of DNA Replication and Is Bound by a Protein Complex Containing the VZV ORF29 Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mohamed I.; Arvin, Ann; Jones, Jeremy; Ruyechan, William T.

    2011-01-01

    The architecture of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) origin of DNA replication (OriS) differs significantly from that of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA replication origin. Novel aspects of the VZV OriS include a GA-rich region, three binding sites for the VZV origin-binding protein (OBP) all on the same strand and oriented in the same direction, and a partial OBP binding site of unknown function. We have designated this partial binding site Box D and have investigated the role it plays in DNA replication and flanking gene expression. This has been done with a model system using a replication-competent plasmid containing OriS and a replication- and transcription-competent dual-luciferase reporter plasmid containing both the OriS and the intergenic region between VZV open reading frames (ORFs) 62 and 63. We have found that (i) Box D is a negative regulator of DNA replication independent of flanking gene expression, (ii) the mutation of Box D results in a decrease in flanking gene expression, thus a sequence within the VZV OriS affects transcription, which is in contrast to results reported for HSV-1, (iii) there is a specific Box D complex formed with infected cell extracts in electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments, (iv) supershift assays show that this complex contains the VZV ORF29 single-strand DNA-binding protein, and (v) the formation of this complex is dependent on the presence of CGC motifs in Box D and its downstream flanking region. These findings show that the VZV ORF29 protein, while required for DNA replication, also plays a novel role in the suppression of that process. PMID:21937644

  19. The C-terminal Domain (CTD) of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Is Required for Forming BERosome Repair Complex with DNA Replication Proteins at the Replicating Genome: DOMINANT NEGATIVE FUNCTION OF THE CTD.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Pavana M; Dutta, Arijit; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Joy; Adhikari, Sanjay; Tomkinson, Alan E; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-08-21

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 was recently demonstrated to initiate prereplicative base excision repair (BER) of oxidized bases in the replicating genome, thus preventing mutagenic replication. A significant fraction of NEIL1 in cells is present in large cellular complexes containing DNA replication and other repair proteins, as shown by gel filtration. However, how the interaction of NEIL1 affects its recruitment to the replication site for prereplicative repair was not investigated. Here, we show that NEIL1 binarily interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamp loader replication factor C, DNA polymerase δ, and DNA ligase I in the absence of DNA via its non-conserved C-terminal domain (CTD); replication factor C interaction results in ∼8-fold stimulation of NEIL1 activity. Disruption of NEIL1 interactions within the BERosome complex, as observed for a NEIL1 deletion mutant (N311) lacking the CTD, not only inhibits complete BER in vitro but also prevents its chromatin association and reduced recruitment at replication foci in S phase cells. This suggests that the interaction of NEIL1 with replication and other BER proteins is required for efficient repair of the replicating genome. Consistently, the CTD polypeptide acts as a dominant negative inhibitor during in vitro repair, and its ectopic expression sensitizes human cells to reactive oxygen species. We conclude that multiple interactions among BER proteins lead to large complexes, which are critical for efficient BER in mammalian cells, and the CTD interaction could be targeted for enhancing drug/radiation sensitivity of tumor cells.

  20. A sequence within the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) OriS is a negative regulator of DNA replication and is bound by a protein complex containing the VZV ORF29 protein.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Arvin, Ann; Jones, Jeremy; Ruyechan, William T

    2011-12-01

    The architecture of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) origin of DNA replication (OriS) differs significantly from that of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA replication origin. Novel aspects of the VZV OriS include a GA-rich region, three binding sites for the VZV origin-binding protein (OBP) all on the same strand and oriented in the same direction, and a partial OBP binding site of unknown function. We have designated this partial binding site Box D and have investigated the role it plays in DNA replication and flanking gene expression. This has been done with a model system using a replication-competent plasmid containing OriS and a replication- and transcription-competent dual-luciferase reporter plasmid containing both the OriS and the intergenic region between VZV open reading frames (ORFs) 62 and 63. We have found that (i) Box D is a negative regulator of DNA replication independent of flanking gene expression, (ii) the mutation of Box D results in a decrease in flanking gene expression, thus a sequence within the VZV OriS affects transcription, which is in contrast to results reported for HSV-1, (iii) there is a specific Box D complex formed with infected cell extracts in electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments, (iv) supershift assays show that this complex contains the VZV ORF29 single-strand DNA-binding protein, and (v) the formation of this complex is dependent on the presence of CGC motifs in Box D and its downstream flanking region. These findings show that the VZV ORF29 protein, while required for DNA replication, also plays a novel role in the suppression of that process.

  1. Neurobiological background of negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Silvana; Merlotti, Eleonora; Mucci, Armida

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating neurobiological bases of negative symptoms of schizophrenia failed to provide consistent findings, possibly due to the heterogeneity of this psychopathological construct. We tried to review the findings published to date investigating neurobiological abnormalities after reducing the heterogeneity of the negative symptoms construct. The literature in electronic databases as well as citations and major articles are reviewed with respect to the phenomenology, pathology, genetics and neurobiology of schizophrenia. We searched PubMed with the keywords "negative symptoms," "deficit schizophrenia," "persistent negative symptoms," "neurotransmissions," "neuroimaging" and "genetic." Additional articles were identified by manually checking the reference lists of the relevant publications. Publications in English were considered, and unpublished studies, conference abstracts and poster presentations were not included. Structural and functional imaging studies addressed the issue of neurobiological background of negative symptoms from several perspectives (considering them as a unitary construct, focusing on primary and/or persistent negative symptoms and, more recently, clustering them into factors), but produced discrepant findings. The examined studies provided evidence suggesting that even primary and persistent negative symptoms include different psychopathological constructs, probably reflecting the dysfunction of different neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, they suggest that complex alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems and genetic variants might influence the expression of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. On the whole, the reviewed findings, representing the distillation of a large body of disparate data, suggest that further deconstruction of negative symptomatology into more elementary components is needed to gain insight into underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  2. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Reveals Remarkable Noninnocence of Ligands in Nickel Bis(dithiolene) Complexes [Ni(dddt) 2 ] - and [Ni(edo) 2 ] -

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xing; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2016-04-21

    [Ni(dddt)2] (dddt = 5,6-dihydro-1,4-dithiine-2,3-dithiolate) and [Ni(edo)2] (edo = 5,6-dihydro-1,4-dioxine-2,3-dithiolate) are two donor-type nickel bis(dithiolene) complexes, with the tendency of donating low binding energy electrons. These two structurally similar complexes differ only with respect to the outer atoms in the ligand framework where the former has four S atoms while the latter has four O atoms. Herein, we report a negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy (NIPES) study on these two complexes to probe electronic structures of the anions and their corresponding neutrals. The NIPE spectra exhibit the adiabatic electron detachment energy (ADE) or, equivalently, the electron affinity (EA) of the neutral [Ni(L)2]0 to be relatively low for this type complexes, 2.780 and 2.375 eV for L = dddt and edo, respectively. The 0.4 eV difference in ADEs shows significant substitution effect for sulfur in dddt by oxygen in edo, i.e., noninnocence of the ligands, which has decreased the electronic stability of [Ni(edo)2] by lowering its electron binding energy by ~0.4 eV. The observed substitution effect on gas-phase EA values correlates well with the measured redox potentials for [Ni(dddt)2]–/0 and [Ni(edo)2]–/0 in solutions. The singlet-triplet splitting (ΔEST) of [Ni(dddt)2]0 and [Ni(edo)2]0 is also determined from the spectra to be 0.57 and 0.53 eV, respectively. Accompanying DFT calculations and molecular orbital (MO) composition analyses show significant ligand contributions to the redox MOs and allow the components of the orbitals involved in each electronic transition and spectral assignments to be identified.

  3. On Multiplying Negative Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Mary L.; Dunn, Kenneth A.

    1985-01-01

    Comments on the history of negative numbers, some methods that can be used to introduce the multiplication of negative numbers to students, and an explanation of why the product of two negative numbers is a positive number are included. (MNS)

  4. [Negative symptoms and cerebral imaging].

    PubMed

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    A number of neuroanatomical and neurofonctional abnormalities have been evidenced by cerebral imaging studies in patients suffering from schizophrenia. Nevertheless, those specifically associated with the negative symptoms of this disease are still insufficiently known. This work is a review of selected studies that have assessed the brain correlates of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Approaches using structural imaging have highlighted reduction of gray matter density or cortical thickness associated with negative symptoms, which is rather sparsely distributed within the frontal and temporal regions, localized nevertheless more particularly in the frontal medial and orbitofrontal areas, as well as the amygdalo-hippocampic complex. These deficits are concurrent with a loss of integrity of the principal paths of white matter tracts between frontal and limbic regions. On the other hand, neurofonctional abnormalities associated with negative symptoms involve especially the frontal areas and limbic striatum. A disturbed functioning within the fronto-striatal loops, related to a striatal dopaminergic deficit, may represent a potential explanatory hypothesis of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as suggested by studies using Positron Emission Tomography on this topic or neuroimaging studies on the effects of antipsychotics. A better identification of the cerebral abnormalities associated with the negative dimension of schizophrenia, with regard to the lateralization of these abnormalities or to their changes during the course of the disease, could offer new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of this dimension which, until now, remains few responsive to conventional pharmacological treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Culture-negative endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the lining of one or more heart valves, but no endocarditis-causing germs can be found ... the heart, where they can settle on damaged heart valves. Alternative Names Endocarditis (culture-negative) Images Culture-negative ...

  6. [Negative symptoms: which antipsychotics?].

    PubMed

    Maurel, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    Treating negative symptoms of schizophrenia is a major issue and a challenge for the functional and social prognosis of the disease, to which they are closely linked. First- and second-generation antipsychotics allow a reduction of all negative symptoms. The hope of acting directly on primary negative symptoms with any antipsychotic is not supported by the literature. However, the effectiveness of first- and second-generation antipsychotics is demonstrated on secondary negative symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, Regan W.

    1984-01-01

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions.

  8. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, R.W.

    1984-05-08

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

  9. Sentential Negation in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowarin, Macaulay

    2009-01-01

    This paper undertakes a detailed analysis of sentential negation in the English language with Chomsky's Government-Binding theory of Transformational Grammar as theoretical model. It distinguishes between constituent and sentential negation in English. The essay identifies the exact position of Negation phrase in an English clause structure. It…

  10. Sentential Negation in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowarin, Macaulay

    2009-01-01

    This paper undertakes a detailed analysis of sentential negation in the English language with Chomsky's Government-Binding theory of Transformational Grammar as theoretical model. It distinguishes between constituent and sentential negation in English. The essay identifies the exact position of Negation phrase in an English clause structure. It…

  11. Negative symptoms: psychopathological models.

    PubMed Central

    Ananth, J; Djenderdjian, A; Shamasunder, P; Costa, J; Herrera, J; Sramek, J

    1991-01-01

    The psychopathological manifestations of schizophrenia have been broadly divided into positive and negative symptom groups. Even though there is no definitive consensus, psychomotor agitation, motor excitement, hallucinations, delusions and thought disorder constitute positive and psychomotor retardation, amotivation, apathy and decreased emotional expression are grouped into negative symptoms. The negative symptoms have been reported to appear late in the course of the illness and resistant to treatment with neuroleptics. While these claims have not been substantiated, the current interest on negative symptoms is related to the fact that many nonfunctioning institutionalized as well as ambulatory schizophrenics manifest negative symptoms. As chronic psychiatric beds have become scarce, many patients with negative symptoms who were harbored in the chronic mental hospitals have been released to the community care and some of these patients live on the streets. Thus their visibility has challenged psychiatry to focus its efforts on the etiology and treatment of negative symptoms. PMID:2049366

  12. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  13. Negative Human Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, John M.

    1972-01-01

    This study is an effort to examine man's most negative experiences as he perceives them. The results indicated that teachers were involved more often than any other person in the most negative experience reported. Improved human relations skills are clearly indicated for those in higher education as well as in public schools. (Author)

  14. Materials with negative stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaglinski, Tim

    Negative stiffness, or a reversal in the usual assumed direction between causal forces and ensuing deformations, has been proposed as a pathway to materials which exceed theoretical performance bounds. Negative stiffness, as a concept, represents a relaxation of tacitly assumed material behavior, but it violates no natural laws. Negative stiffness, normally unstable without constraint, is permissible for stability under special conditions, for example a rigid boundary constraint so long as the material satisfies strong ellipticity in the parlance of elasticity. Hence, negative stiffness is not observed in materials or structures which are not constrained. If negative stiffness is allowed for inclusions of material, which are surrounded by a stabilizing positive stiffness matrix, composite theory predicts large increases in the mechanical damping and composite stiffness. The work herein explores several material systems which possess negative stiffness, and seeks to characterize the composite mechanical properties of these systems. Two metal matrix composite systems, namely Sn-VO2 and Sn-BaTIO3, were investigated. Here, negative stiffness arises from the ferroelastic phase transformations in the ceramic inclusions; stability is imparted by the tin matrix. Polycrystalline In-Tl and BaTIO 3 were also studied. Here, the entire material volume is phase transforming. Constraint is imparted on a small volume fraction of crystallites by the surrounding material. Various manifestations of negative stiffness were observed. Thermally broad damping peaks which depended upon thermal cycling were observed in the Sn-VO2 composites. Furthermore, mechanical instabilities were seen in composites intentionally designed to be unstable. Negative stiffness was indicated in the In-Tl alloy by magnification of damping peaks over those observed in single crystals, increases in damping peaks with increased cooling rates, occurrence of damping peaks before the appearance of martensite and

  15. Negative birefringent polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor); Cheng, Stephen Z. D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A negative birefringent film, useful in liquid crystal displays, and a method for controlling the negative birefringence of a polyimide film is disclosed which allows the matching of an application to a targeted amount of birefringence by controlling the degree of in-plane orientation of the polyimide by the selection of functional groups within both the diamine and dianhydride segments of the polyimide which affect the polyimide backbone chain rigidity, linearity, and symmetry. The higher the rigidity, linearity and symmetry of the polyimide backbone, the larger the value of the negative birefringence of the polyimide film.

  16. Negative tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Grubb, D.P.; Jong, R.A.; Nexsen, W.E.; Porter, G.D.; Simonen, T.C.

    1981-11-30

    A tandem mirror configuration can be created by combining hot electron end cell plasmas with neutral beam pumping. A region of large negative potential formed in each end cell confines electrons in the central cell. The requirement of charge neutrality causes the central cell potential to become negative with respect to ground in order to confine ions as well as electrons. We discuss the method of producing and calculating the desired axial potential profile, and show the calculated axial potential profile and plasma parameters for a negative configuration of TMX-Upgrade.

  17. Atomic negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brage, T.

    1991-01-01

    We review some of the recent progress in the studies of alkaline-earth, negative ions. Computations of autodetachment rates, electron affinities and transition wavelengths are discussed and some new and improved results are given.

  18. Atomic negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brage, T.

    1991-12-31

    We review some of the recent progress in the studies of alkaline-earth, negative ions. Computations of autodetachment rates, electron affinities and transition wavelengths are discussed and some new and improved results are given.

  19. Negative electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Chilenskas, Albert A.

    1982-01-01

    A secondary electrochemical cell and a negative electrode composition for use therewith comprising a positive electrode containing an active material of a chalcogen or a transiton metal chalcogenide, a negative electrode containing a lithium-aluminum alloy and an amount of a ternary alloy sufficient to provide at least about 5 percent overcharge capacity relative to a negative electrode solely of the lithium-aluminum alloy, the ternary alloy comprising lithium, aluminum, and iron or cobalt, and an electrolyte containing lithium ions in contact with both of the positive and the negative electrodes. The ternary alloy is present in the electrode in the range of from about 5 percent to about 50 percent by weight of the electrode composition and may include lithium-aluminum-nickel alloy in combination with either the ternary iron or cobalt alloys. A plurality of series connected cells having overcharge capacity can be equalized on the discharge side without expensive electrical equipment.

  20. Negative linear compressibility.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Andrew B; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2015-08-28

    While all materials reduce their intrinsic volume under hydrostatic (uniform) compression, a select few actually expand along one or more directions during this process of densification. As rare as it is counterintuitive, such "negative compressibility" behaviour has application in the design of pressure sensors, artificial muscles and actuators. The recent discovery of surprisingly strong and persistent negative compressibility effects in a variety of new families of materials has ignited the field. Here we review the phenomenology of negative compressibility in this context of materials diversity, placing particular emphasis on the common structural motifs that recur amongst known examples. Our goal is to present a mechanistic understanding of negative compressibility that will help inform a clear strategy for future materials design.

  1. Logo and Negative Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Candace A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes LOGO's turtle graphics capabilities based on a sixth-grade classroom's activities with negative numbers and Logo programming. A sidebar explains LOGO and offers suggestions to teachers for using LOGO effectively. (LRW)

  2. No to negative data

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2008-04-01

    A frequent criticism in biology is that we don’t publish our negative data. As a result, the literature has become biased towards papers that favor specific hypotheses1. Some scientists have become so concerned about this trend that they have created journals dedicated to publishing negative results (e.g. the Journal of Negative Results in Biomedicine). Personally, I don’t think they should bother. I say this because I believe negative results are not worth publishing. Rest assured that I do not include drug studies that show a lack of effectiveness towards a specific disease or condition. This type of finding is significant in a societal context, not a scientific one, and thus we all have a vested interest in seeing this type of result published. I am talking about a set of experimental results that fail to support a particular hypothesis. The problem with these types of negative results is that they don’t actually advance science. Science is a set of ideas that can be supported by observations. A negative result does not support any specific idea, but only tells you what isn’t right. Well, there are only a small number of potential hypotheses that are correct, but essentially an infinite number of ideas are not correct. I don’t want to waste my time reading a paper about what doesn’t happen, just about those things that do. I can remember a positive result because I can associate it with a specific concept. What do I do with a negative one? It is hard enough to following the current literature. A flood of negative results would make that task all but impossible

  3. Negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Nash N; Mucci, Armida; Diwadkar, Vaibhav; Tandon, Rajiv

    2014-04-01

    Clinical heterogeneity is a confound common to all of schizophrenia research. Deficit schizophrenia has been proposed as a homogeneous disease entity within the schizophrenia syndrome. Utilizing the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome (SDS) has allowed the definition of a subgroup dominated by persistent clusters of negative symptoms. While a number of studies have appeared over the years examining the electrophysiological correlates of the cluster of negative symptoms in schizophrenia, only a few studies have actually focused on the deficit syndrome (DS). PubMed as well as MEDLINE were searched for all reports indexed for "negative symptoms" or "deficit syndrome" and one of the following electrophysiology assessment tools: electroencephalography (EEG), evoked potentials (EPs), or polysomnography (PSG). While this line of research is evidently in its infancy, two significant trends emerge. First, spectral EEG studies link increased slow wave activity during wakefulness to the prevalence of negative symptoms. Secondly, sleep studies point to an association between decrease in slow wave sleep and prevalence of negative symptoms. Several studies also indicate a relationship of negative symptoms with reduced alpha activity. A host of other abnormalities--including sensory gating and P300 attenuation--are less consistently reported. Two studies specifically addressed electrophysiology of the DS. Both studies provided evidence suggesting that the DS may be a separate disease entity and not simply a severe form of schizophrenia.

  4. Characterization of complex, heterogeneous lipid A samples using HPLC-MS/MS technique II. Structural elucidation of non-phosphorylated lipid A by negative-ion mode tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Viktor; Kilár, Anikó; Kilár, Ferenc; Kocsis, Béla; Dörnyei, Ágnes

    2016-08-01

    Non-phosphorylated lipid A species confer reduced inflammatory potential for the bacteria. Knowledge on their chemical structure and presence in bacterial pathogens may contribute to the understanding of bacterial resistance and activation of the host innate immune system. In this study, we report the fragmentation pathways of negatively charged, non-phosphorylated lipid A species under low-energy collision-induced dissociation conditions of an electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight instrument. Charge-promoted consecutive and competitive eliminations of the acyl chains and cross-ring cleavages of the sugar residues were observed. The A-type fragment ion series and the complementary X-type fragment(s) with corresponding deprotonated carboxamide(s) were diagnostic for the distribution of the primary and secondary acyl residues on the non-reducing and the reducing ends, respectively, of the non-phosphorylated lipid A backbone. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography in combination with negative-ion electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry could provide sufficient information on the primary and secondary acyl residues of a non-phosphorylated lipid A. As a standard, the hexa-acylated ion at m/z 1636 with the Escherichia coli-type acyl distribution (from E. coli O111) was used. The method was tested and refined with the analysis of other non-phosphorylated hexa- and several hepta-, penta-, and tetra-acylated lipid A species detected in crude lipid A fractions from E. coli O111 and Proteus morganii O34 bacteria. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Human Herpesvirus 8 LANA Interacts with Proteins of the mSin3 Corepressor Complex and Negatively Regulates Epstein-Barr Virus Gene Expression in Dually Infected PEL Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krithivas, Anita; Young, David B.; Liao, Gangling; Greene, Deborah; Hayward, S. Diane

    2000-01-01

    The human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is expressed in all latently HHV-8 infected cells and in HHV-8-associated tumors, including primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). To better understand the contribution of LANA to tumorigenesis and to the PEL phenotype, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen which identified the corepressor protein SAP30 as a LANA binding protein. SAP30 is a constituent of a large multicomponent complex that brings histone deacetylases to the promoter. Glutathione S-transferase affinity assays confirmed interaction between LANA and SAP30 and also demonstrated interactions between LANA and two other members of the corepressor complex, mSin3A and CIR. The corepressors bound to the amino-terminal 340-amino-acid domain of LANA. In transient expression assays, this same domain of LANA mediated repression when targeted to a 5×Gal4tk-CAT reporter as a GAL4-LANA fusion. PEL cells have the unusual feature that they are frequently dually infected with both HHV-8 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We found that EBV EBNA-1 expression is downregulated in PEL cells at both the RNA and protein levels. In transient expression assays, LANA repressed activated expression from the EBV Qp and Cp latency promoters. Reduction of endogenous Qp activity could also be demonstrated in EBV-infected Rael cells transfected with a LANA expression plasmid. In contrast to the effect of LANA on EBV latency promoters, LANA activated expression from its own promoter. The data indicate that LANA can mediate transcriptional repression through recruitment of an mSin3 corepressor complex and further that LANA-mediated repression is likely to contribute to the low level of EBV latency gene expression seen in dually infected PEL cells. PMID:11000236

  6. Factorials of real negative and imaginary numbers - A new perspective.

    PubMed

    Thukral, Ashwani K

    2014-01-01

    Presently, factorials of real negative numbers and imaginary numbers, except for zero and negative integers are interpolated using the Euler's gamma function. In the present paper, the concept of factorials has been generalised as applicable to real and imaginary numbers, and multifactorials. New functions based on Euler's factorial function have been proposed for the factorials of real negative and imaginary numbers. As per the present concept, the factorials of real negative numbers, are complex numbers. The factorials of real negative integers have their imaginary part equal to zero, thus are real numbers. Similarly, the factorials of imaginary numbers are complex numbers. The moduli of the complex factorials of real negative numbers, and imaginary numbers are equal to their respective real positive number factorials. Fractional factorials and multifactorials have been defined in a new perspective. The proposed concept has also been extended to Euler's gamma function for real negative numbers and imaginary numbers, and beta function.

  7. Negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James T; Marks, Malcolm W

    2007-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy has become an increasingly important part of wound management. Over the last decade, numerous uses for this method of wound management have been reported, ranging from acute and chronic wounds, to closure of open sternal and abdominal wounds, to assistance with skin grafts. The biophysics behind the success of this treatment largely have focused on increased wound blood flow, increased granulation tissue formation, decreased bacterial counts, and stimulation of wound healing pathways through shear stress mechanisms. The overall success of negative pressure wound therapy has led to a multitude of clinical applications, which are discussed in this article.

  8. The Negative Repetition Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  9. The Negative Repetition Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  10. Action Learning, Performativity and Negative Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonstone, John

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines the concept of negative capability as a human capacity for containment and contrasts it with well-valued positive capability as expressed through performativity in organisations and society. It identifies the problem of dispersal--the complex ways we behave in order to avoid the emotional challenges of living with uncertainty.…

  11. An Interpersonal Approach to Writing Negative Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salerno, Douglas

    1988-01-01

    Asserts that textbook advice regarding buffers and negative messages is simplistic and frequently wrong, and analyses 22 job-refusal letters and their effectiveness. Claims that recent research on cognitive complexity and social perspective-taking suggests the need for more sophisticated audience analysis protocols for dealing with the negative…

  12. Action Learning, Performativity and Negative Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonstone, John

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines the concept of negative capability as a human capacity for containment and contrasts it with well-valued positive capability as expressed through performativity in organisations and society. It identifies the problem of dispersal--the complex ways we behave in order to avoid the emotional challenges of living with uncertainty.…

  13. Negative staining and cryo-negative staining: applications in biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin; De Carlo, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    Negative staining is widely applicable to isolated viruses, protein molecules, macromolecular assemblies and fibrils, subcellular membrane fractions, liposomes and artificial membranes, synthetic DNA arrays, and also to polymer solutions and a variety of nanotechnology samples. Techniques are provided for the preparation of the necessary support films (continuous carbon and holey/perforated carbon). The range of suitable negative stains is presented, with some emphasis on the benefit of using ammonium molybdate and of negative stain-trehalose combinations. Protocols are provided for the single droplet negative staining technique (on continuous and holey carbon support films), the floating and carbon sandwich techniques in addition to the negative staining-carbon film (NS-CF) technique for randomly dispersed fragile molecules, 2D crystallization of proteins and for cleavage of cells and organelles. Immuno-negative staining and negative staining of affinity labeled complexes (e.g., biotin-streptavidin) are presented in some detail. The formation of immune complexes in solution for droplet negative staining is given, as is the use of carbon-plastic support films as an adsorption surface on which to perform immunolabeling or affinity experiments, prior to negative staining. Dynamic biological systems can be investigated by negative staining, where the time period is in excess of a few minutes, but there are possibilities to greatly reduce the time by rapid stabilization of molecular systems with uranyl acetate or tannic acid. The more recently developed cryo-negative staining procedures are also included: first, the high concentration ammonium molybdate procedure on holey carbon films and second, the carbon sandwich procedure using uranyl formate. Several electron micrographs showing examples of applications of negative staining techniques are included and the chapter is thoroughly referenced.

  14. Evaluation of the double-disk synergy test for New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 and other metallo-β-lactamase producing gram-negative bacteria by using metal-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Momoko; Sadamoto, Shinya; Hishinuma, Akira

    2013-05-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1), one of the metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), has been identified from clinical isolates worldwide. Rapid detection of NDM-1 producers is necessary to prevent their dissemination. Seven types of EDTA complexes were evaluated as MBL inhibitors in double-disk synergy tests (DDSTs), resulting in detection of the first isolate of NDM-1-producing Escherichia coli (NDM-1 Dok01) in Japan. NDM-1 Dok01 was detected when EDTA magnesium disodium salt tetrahydrate (Mg-EDTA), EDTA calcium disodium salt dihydrate, EDTA cobalt disodium salt tetrahydrate and EDTA copper disodium salt tetrahydrate were used as MBL inhibitors. The sensitivity and specificity of DDSTs using Mg-EDTA for 75 MBL producers and 25 non-MBL producers were 96.0% and 100%, respectively. These findings indicate that the DDST method using Mg-EDTA can detect MBL-producing strains, including NDM-1 producers. © 2013 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Christopher B.; Shahan, David W.; Smith, Sloan P.; Keefe, Andrew C.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness–based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  16. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Christopher B; Shahan, David W; Smith, Sloan P; Keefe, Andrew C; McKnight, Geoffrey P

    2016-02-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness-based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators.

  17. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  18. Negative Emissions Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Danny

    2006-04-01

    Although `negative emissions' of carbon dioxide need not, in principle, involve use of biological processes to draw carbon out of the atmosphere, such `agricultural' sequestration' is the only known way to remove carbon from the atmosphere on time scales comparable to the time scale for anthropogenic increases in carbon emissions. In order to maintain the `negative emissions' the biomass must be used in such a way that the resulting carbon dioxide is separated and permanently sequestered. Two options for sequestration are in the topsoil and via geologic carbon sequestration. The former has multiple benefits, but the latter also is needed. Thus, although geologic carbon sequestration is viewed skeptically by some environmentalists as simply a way to keep using fossil fuels---it may be a key part of reversing accelerating climate forcing if rapid climate change is beginning to occur. I will first review the general approach of agricultural sequestration combined with use of resulting biofuels in a way that permits carbon separation and then geologic sequestration as a negative emissions technology. Then I discuss the process that is the focus of my company---the EPRIDA cycle. If deployed at a sufficiently large scale, it could reverse the increase in CO2 concentrations. I also estimate of benefits --carbon and other---of large scale deployment of negative emissions technologies. For example, using the EPRIDA cycle by planting and soil sequestering carbon in an area abut In 3X the size of Texas would remove the amount of carbon that is being accumulated worldwide each year. In addition to the atmospheric carbon removal, the EPRIDA approach also counters the depletion of carbon in the soil---increasing topsoil and its fertility; reduces the excess nitrogen in the water by eliminating the need for ammonium nitrate fertilizer and reduces fossil fuel reliance by providing biofuel and avoiding natural gas based fertilizer production.

  19. Reactions of Negative Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-17

    AUTHOR(S)* Viggiano , Albert A., Paulson, John F. C 6 UPE E T R O A IOE 18ate SUBo EC TERMS enti t e "Swrme f Ionsar and Efyb l to n in Gases, FIELD...Reactions of Negative Ions Albert A. Viggiano * and John F. Paulson Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts 017310 *Air Force Geophysics...an important process in controlling the electron density in a variety of natural plasmas , such as the earth’s ionosphere and interstellar space, and

  20. Polarized negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberli, W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

  1. Negative magnetoresistivity in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ya-Wen; Yang, Qing

    2016-09-01

    Negative magnetoresistivity is a special magnetotransport property associated with chiral anomaly in four dimensional chiral anomalous systems, which refers to the transport behavior that the DC longitudinal magnetoresistivity decreases with increasing magnetic field. We calculate the longitudinal magnetoconductivity in the presence of back-reactions of the magnetic field to gravity in holographic zero charge and axial charge density systems with and without axial charge dissipation. In the absence of axial charge dissipation, we find that the quantum critical conductivity grows with increasing magnetic field when the backreaction strength is larger than a critical value, in contrast to the monotonically decreasing behavior of quantum critical conductivity in the probe limit. With axial charge dissipation, we find the negative magnetoresistivity behavior. The DC longitudinal magnetoconductivity scales as B in the large magnetic field limit, which deviates from the exact B 2 scaling of the probe limit result. In both cases, the small frequency longitudinal magnetoconductivity still agrees with the formula obtained from the hydrodynamic linear response theory, even in the large magnetic field limit.

  2. Classroom Management and Negative Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Robert T.

    Of the four simple consequences for behavior, none is more misunderstood than negative reinforcement. A Negative Reinforcement Quiz administered to 233 student teachers from two universities revealed that the vast majority of respondents mistakenly viewed negative reinforcement as a synonym for punishment, and believe that negative reinforcement…

  3. Negated bio-events: analysis and identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Negation occurs frequently in scientific literature, especially in biomedical literature. It has previously been reported that around 13% of sentences found in biomedical research articles contain negation. Historically, the main motivation for identifying negated events has been to ensure their exclusion from lists of extracted interactions. However, recently, there has been a growing interest in negative results, which has resulted in negation detection being identified as a key challenge in biomedical relation extraction. In this article, we focus on the problem of identifying negated bio-events, given gold standard event annotations. Results We have conducted a detailed analysis of three open access bio-event corpora containing negation information (i.e., GENIA Event, BioInfer and BioNLP’09 ST), and have identified the main types of negated bio-events. We have analysed the key aspects of a machine learning solution to the problem of detecting negated events, including selection of negation cues, feature engineering and the choice of learning algorithm. Combining the best solutions for each aspect of the problem, we propose a novel framework for the identification of negated bio-events. We have evaluated our system on each of the three open access corpora mentioned above. The performance of the system significantly surpasses the best results previously reported on the BioNLP’09 ST corpus, and achieves even better results on the GENIA Event and BioInfer corpora, both of which contain more varied and complex events. Conclusions Recently, in the field of biomedical text mining, the development and enhancement of event-based systems has received significant interest. The ability to identify negated events is a key performance element for these systems. We have conducted the first detailed study on the analysis and identification of negated bio-events. Our proposed framework can be integrated with state-of-the-art event extraction systems. The

  4. Double-negative acoustic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Li, Jensen; Chan, C T

    2004-11-01

    We show here the existence of acoustic metamaterial, in which both the effective density and bulk modulus are simultaneously negative, in the true and strict sense of an effective medium. Our double-negative acoustic system is an acoustic analogue of Veselago's medium in electromagnetism, and shares many unique consequences, such as negative refractive index. The double negativity in acoustics is derived from low-frequency resonances, as in the case of electromagnetism, but the negative density and modulus are derived from a single resonance structure as distinct from electromagnetism in which the negative permeability and negative permittivity originates from different resonance mechanisms.

  5. Avoiding Negative Dysphagia Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Dennis C; Culbertson, William R

    2014-04-23

    Dysphagia in adults affects their quality of life and can lead to life-threatening conditions. The authors draw on both 30 years of experience as clinicians and also on expert testimony in adult, dysphagia-malpractice cases to make five recommendations with the aim of preventing dysphagia-related deaths. They discuss the importance of informed consent documents and suggest the following nursing actions to reduce these often unnecessary tragedies: consider the importance of diet status; understand and follow speech-language-pathologists' recommendations; be familiar with the dysphagia assessment; be responsive to the need for an instrumental assessment; and ensure dysphagia communication is accurate and disseminated among healthcare professionals. They conclude that most negative dysphagia-management outcomes can be prevented and that nurses play a pivotal role in this prevention.

  6. Negative optical torque.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Ng, Jack; Ding, Kun; Fung, Kin Hung; Lin, Zhifang; Chan, C T

    2014-09-17

    Light carries angular momentum, and as such it can exert torques on material objects. Applications of these opto-mechanical effects were limited initially due to their smallness in magnitude, but later becomes powerful and versatile after the invention of laser. Novel and practical approaches for harvesting light for particle rotation have since been demonstrated, where the structure is always subjected to a positive optical torque along a certain axis if the incident angular momentum has a positive projection on the same axis. We report here an interesting phenomenon of "negative optical torque", meaning that incoming photons carrying angular momentum rotate an object in the opposite sense. Surprisingly this can be realized quite straightforwardly in simple planar structures. Field retardation is a necessary condition and discrete rotational symmetry of material object plays an important role. The optimal conditions are explored and explained.

  7. Negative Entropy of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2015-10-01

    We modify Newtonian gravity to probabilistic quantum mechanical gravity to derive strong coupling. If this approach is valid, we should be able to extend it to the physical body (life) as follows. Using Boltzmann equation, we get the entropy of the universe (137) as if its reciprocal, the fine structure constant (ALPHA), is the hidden candidate representing the negative entropy of the universe which is indicative of the binary information as its basis (http://www.arXiv.org/pdf/physics0210040v5). Since ALPHA relates to cosmology, it must relate to molecular biology too, with the binary system as the fundamental source of information for the nucleotides of the DNA as implicit in the book by the author: ``Quantum Consciousness - The Road to Reality.'' We debate claims of anthropic principle based on the negligible variation of ALPHA and throw light on thermodynamics. We question constancy of G in multiple ways.

  8. Negative Optical Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Ng, Jack; Ding, Kun; Fung, Kin Hung; Lin, Zhifang; Chan, C. T.

    2014-09-01

    Light carries angular momentum, and as such it can exert torques on material objects. Applications of these opto-mechanical effects were limited initially due to their smallness in magnitude, but later becomes powerful and versatile after the invention of laser. Novel and practical approaches for harvesting light for particle rotation have since been demonstrated, where the structure is always subjected to a positive optical torque along a certain axis if the incident angular momentum has a positive projection on the same axis. We report here an interesting phenomenon of ``negative optical torque'', meaning that incoming photons carrying angular momentum rotate an object in the opposite sense. Surprisingly this can be realized quite straightforwardly in simple planar structures. Field retardation is a necessary condition and discrete rotational symmetry of material object plays an important role. The optimal conditions are explored and explained.

  9. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-08-06

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  10. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1984-12-04

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field. 14 figs.

  11. Negative Optical Torque

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Ng, Jack; Ding, Kun; Fung, Kin Hung; Lin, Zhifang; Chan, C. T.

    2014-01-01

    Light carries angular momentum, and as such it can exert torques on material objects. Applications of these opto-mechanical effects were limited initially due to their smallness in magnitude, but later becomes powerful and versatile after the invention of laser. Novel and practical approaches for harvesting light for particle rotation have since been demonstrated, where the structure is always subjected to a positive optical torque along a certain axis if the incident angular momentum has a positive projection on the same axis. We report here an interesting phenomenon of “negative optical torque”, meaning that incoming photons carrying angular momentum rotate an object in the opposite sense. Surprisingly this can be realized quite straightforwardly in simple planar structures. Field retardation is a necessary condition and discrete rotational symmetry of material object plays an important role. The optimal conditions are explored and explained. PMID:25226863

  12. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  13. Do `negative' temperatures exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavenda, B. H.

    1999-06-01

    A modification of the second law is required for a system with a bounded density of states and not the introduction of a `negative' temperature scale. The ascending and descending branches of the entropy versus energy curve describe particle and hole states, having thermal equations of state that are given by the Fermi and logistic distributions, respectively. Conservation of energy requires isentropic states to be isothermal. The effect of adiabatically reversing the field is entirely mechanical because the only difference between the two states is their energies. The laws of large and small numbers, leading to the normal and Poisson approximations, characterize statistically the states of infinite and zero temperatures, respectively. Since the heat capacity also vanishes in the state of maximum disorder, the third law can be generalized in systems with a bounded density of states: the entropy tends to a constant as the temperature tends to either zero or infinity.

  14. Negative Temperature Coefficient in Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenson, I. A.; Sergeev, Gleb B.

    1984-05-01

    A systematic analysis of reactions whose rate decreases with increase of temperature is presented. The possibility of a negative temperature coefficient in the elementary reactions is examined from the standpoint of the transition state theory and of collision theory. The mechanisms of complex reactions in which the temperature dependence of the rate is anomalous are discussed, and possible reasons for the anomaly are examined. The bibliography contains 175 references.

  15. Negative Expertise: Comparing Differently Tenured Elder Care Nurses' Negative Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartmeier, Martin; Lehtinen, Erno; Gruber, Hans; Heid, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Negative expertise is conceptualised as the professional's ability to avoid errors during practice due to certain cognitive agencies. In this study, negative knowledge (i.e. knowledge about what is wrong in a certain context and situation) is conceptualised as one such agency. This study compares and investigates the negative knowledge of elder…

  16. Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, Christine; Peters, Georg

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The definition of the heterogeneous group of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) is still based on diagnostic procedures that fulfill the clinical need to differentiate between Staphylococcus aureus and those staphylococci classified historically as being less or nonpathogenic. Due to patient- and procedure-related changes, CoNS now represent one of the major nosocomial pathogens, with S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus being the most significant species. They account substantially for foreign body-related infections and infections in preterm newborns. While S. saprophyticus has been associated with acute urethritis, S. lugdunensis has a unique status, in some aspects resembling S. aureus in causing infectious endocarditis. In addition to CoNS found as food-associated saprophytes, many other CoNS species colonize the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals and are less frequently involved in clinically manifested infections. This blurred gradation in terms of pathogenicity is reflected by species- and strain-specific virulence factors and the development of different host-defending strategies. Clearly, CoNS possess fewer virulence properties than S. aureus, with a respectively different disease spectrum. In this regard, host susceptibility is much more important. Therapeutically, CoNS are challenging due to the large proportion of methicillin-resistant strains and increasing numbers of isolates with less susceptibility to glycopeptides. PMID:25278577

  17. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Delmore, James E.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  18. Coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Becker, Karsten; Heilmann, Christine; Peters, Georg

    2014-10-01

    The definition of the heterogeneous group of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) is still based on diagnostic procedures that fulfill the clinical need to differentiate between Staphylococcus aureus and those staphylococci classified historically as being less or nonpathogenic. Due to patient- and procedure-related changes, CoNS now represent one of the major nosocomial pathogens, with S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus being the most significant species. They account substantially for foreign body-related infections and infections in preterm newborns. While S. saprophyticus has been associated with acute urethritis, S. lugdunensis has a unique status, in some aspects resembling S. aureus in causing infectious endocarditis. In addition to CoNS found as food-associated saprophytes, many other CoNS species colonize the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals and are less frequently involved in clinically manifested infections. This blurred gradation in terms of pathogenicity is reflected by species- and strain-specific virulence factors and the development of different host-defending strategies. Clearly, CoNS possess fewer virulence properties than S. aureus, with a respectively different disease spectrum. In this regard, host susceptibility is much more important. Therapeutically, CoNS are challenging due to the large proportion of methicillin-resistant strains and increasing numbers of isolates with less susceptibility to glycopeptides.

  19. Improved negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Delmore, J.E.

    1984-05-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  20. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Many wounds are difficult to heal, despite medical and nursing care. They may result from complications of an underlying disease, like diabetes; or from surgery, constant pressure, trauma, or burns. Chronic wounds are more often found in elderly people and in those with immunologic or chronic diseases. Chronic wounds may lead to impaired quality of life and functioning, to amputation, or even to death. The prevalence of chronic ulcers is difficult to ascertain. It varies by condition and complications due to the condition that caused the ulcer. There are, however, some data on condition-specific prevalence rates; for example, of patients with diabetes, 15% are thought to have foot ulcers at some time during their lives. The approximate community care cost of treating leg ulcers in Canada, without reference to cause, has been estimated at upward of $100 million per year. Surgically created wounds can also become chronic, especially if they become infected. For example, the reported incidence of sternal wound infections after median sternotomy is 1% to 5%. Abdominal surgery also creates large open wounds. Because it is sometimes necessary to leave these wounds open and allow them to heal on their own (secondary intention), some may become infected and be difficult to heal. Yet, little is known about the wound healing process, and this makes treating wounds challenging. Many types of interventions are used to treat wounds. Current best practice for the treatment of ulcers and other chronic wounds includes debridement (the removal of dead or contaminated tissue), which can be surgical, mechanical, or chemical; bacterial balance; and moisture balance. Treating the cause, ensuring good nutrition, and preventing primary infection also help wounds to heal. Saline or wet-to-moist dressings are reported as

  1. Negative Ions in Space.

    PubMed

    Millar, Thomas J; Walsh, Catherine; Field, Thomas A

    2017-02-08

    Until a decade ago, the only anion observed to play a prominent role in astrophysics was H(-). The bound-free transitions in H(-) dominate the visible opacity in stars with photospheric temperatures less than 7000 K, including the Sun. The H(-) anion is also believed to have been critical to the formation of molecular hydrogen in the very early evolution of the Universe. Once H2 formed, about 500 000 years after the Big Bang, the expanding gas was able to lose internal gravitational energy and collapse to form stellar objects and "protogalaxies", allowing the creation of heavier elements such as C, N, and O through nucleosynthesis. Although astronomers had considered some processes through which anions might form in interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes, including the important role that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons might play in this, it was the detection in 2006 of rotational line emission from C6H(-) that galvanized a systematic study of the abundance, distribution, and chemistry of anions in the interstellar medium. In 2007, the Cassini mission reported the unexpected detection of anions with mass-to-charge ratios of up to ∼10 000 in the upper atmosphere of Titan; this observation likewise instigated the study of fundamental chemical processes involving negative ions among planetary scientists. In this article, we review the observations of anions in interstellar clouds, circumstellar envelopes, Titan, and cometary comae. We then discuss a number of processes by which anions can be created and destroyed in these environments. The derivation of accurate rate coefficients for these processes is an essential input for the chemical kinetic modeling that is necessary to fully extract physics from the observational data. We discuss such models, along with their successes and failings, and finish with an outlook on the future.

  2. Negative results: negative perceptions limit their potential for increasing reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-07-07

    Negative results are an important building block in the development of scientific thought, primarily because most likely the vast majority of data is negative, i.e., there is not a favorable outcome. Only very limited data is positive, and that is what tends to get published, albeit alongside a sub-set of negative results to emphasize the positive nature of the positive results. Yet, not all negative results get published. Part of the problem lies with a traditional mind-set and rigid publishing frame-work that tends to view negative results in a negative light, or that only tends to reward scientists primarily for presenting positive findings. This opinion piece indicates that in addition to a deficient mind-set, there are also severe limitations in the availability of publishing channels where negative results could get published.

  3. Negative Association in Quebec French.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larrivee, Pierre

    In Quebec French, unlike standard French, sentence negation "pas" ("not") can occur in the same clause as a negative quantifier like "personne" ("nobody"), for instance. This paper proposes that "pas" in these contexts marks negative association in the same way that "ne" does in standard…

  4. Negative ions in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrapak, A. G.; Schmidt, W. F.

    2011-05-01

    The structure of negative ions in liquid 4He is analyzed. The possibility of cluster or bubble formation around impurity ions of both signs is discussed. It is shown that in superfluid helium, bubbles form around negative alkaline earth metal ions and clusters form around halogen ions. The nature of "fast" and "exotic" negative ions is also discussed. It is assumed that "fast" ions are negative ions of helium excimer molecules localized inside bubbles. "Exotic" ions are stable negative impurity ions, which are always present in small amounts in gas discharge plasmas. Bubbles or clusters with radii smaller the radius of electron bubbles develop around these ions.

  5. Double-Negative Mechanical Metamaterials Displaying Simultaneous Negative Stiffness and Negative Poisson's Ratio Properties.

    PubMed

    Hewage, Trishan A M; Alderson, Kim L; Alderson, Andrew; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    A scalable mechanical metamaterial simultaneously displaying negative stiffness and negative Poisson's ratio responses is presented. Interlocking hexagonal subunit assemblies containing 3 alternative embedded negative stiffness (NS) element types display Poisson's ratio values of -1 and NS values over two orders of magnitude (-1.4 N mm(-1) to -160 N mm(-1) ), in good agreement with model predictions.

  6. The negation bias: when negations signal stereotypic expectancies.

    PubMed

    Beukeboom, Camiel J; Finkenauer, Catrin; Wigboldus, Daniël H J

    2010-12-01

    Research on linguistic biases shows that stereotypic expectancies are implicitly reflected in language and are thereby subtly communicated to message recipients. We examined whether these findings extend to the use of negations (e.g., not smart instead of stupid). We hypothesized that people use more negations in descriptions of stereotype-inconsistent behavior than in descriptions of stereotype-consistent behavior. In 3 studies, participants either judged the applicability of experimentally controlled person descriptions or spontaneously produced person descriptions themselves. Results provided support for this hypothesis. Moreover, a 4th study demonstrated that negations have communicative consequences. When a target person's behavior was described with negations, message recipients inferred that this behavior was an exception to the rule and that it was more likely caused by situational circumstances than by dispositional factors. These findings indicate that by using negations people implicitly communicate stereotypic expectancies and that negations play a subtle but powerful role in stereotype maintenance.

  7. Compound negative binomial distribution with negative multinomial summands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, Pavlina K.; Petkova, Monika P.; Stehlík, Milan

    2016-12-01

    The class of Negative Binomial distributions seems to be introduced by Greenwood and Yule in 1920. Due to its wide spread application, investigations of distributions, closely related with it will be always contemporary. Bates, Neyman and Wishart introduce Negative Multinomial distribution. They reach it considering the mixture of independent Poisson distributed random variables with one and the same Gamma mixing variable. This paper investigates a particular case of multivariate compound distribution with one and the same compounding variable. In our case it is Negative Binomial or Sifted Negative Binomial. The summands with equal indexes in different coordinates are Negative Multinomially distributed. In case without shifting, considered as a mixture, the resulting distribution coincides with Mixed Negative Multinomial distribution with scale changed Negative Binomially distributed first parameter. We prove prove that it is Multivariate Power Series Distributed and find explicit form of its parameters. When the summands are geometrically distributed this distribution is stochastically equivalent to a product of independent Bernoulli random variable and appropriate multivariate Geometrically distributed random vector. We show that Compound Shifted Negative Binomial Distribution with Geometric Summands is a particular case of Negative Multinomial distribution with new parameters.

  8. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-15

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  9. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-01

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  10. 24. Duplicate negative of an historic negative. 'AERIAL VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Duplicate negative of an historic negative. 'AERIAL VIEW OF AREA 'B' HOLSTON ORDNANCE WORKS.' 1944. #OCMH 4-12.2ASAV3 in Super Explosives Program RDX and Its Composition A, B, & C, Record Group No. 319, National Archives, Washington, D.C. - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  11. A Negative Result About Some Concepts of Negative Dependence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    It seems that either a very strong negative dependence holds with the monotonicity condition while without it, even a somewhat weak condition does...not hold. This brings out the crucial role played by the PF2 (log concave density) property in conditional negative dependence .

  12. On Negation as Mitigation: The Case of Negative Irony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giora, Rachel; Fein, Ofer; Ganzi, Jonathan; Levi, Natalie Alkeslassy; Sabah, Hadas

    2005-01-01

    Four experiments support the view of negation as mitigation (Giora, Balaban, Fein, & Alkabets, 2004). They show that when irony involves some sizable gap between what is said and what is criticized (He is exceptionally bright said of an idiot), it is rated as highly ironic (Giora, 1995). A negated version of that overstatement (He is not…

  13. Complex networks analysis of language complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amancio, Diego R.; Aluisio, Sandra M.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N., Jr.; Costa, Luciano da F.

    2012-12-01

    Methods from statistical physics, such as those involving complex networks, have been increasingly used in the quantitative analysis of linguistic phenomena. In this paper, we represented pieces of text with different levels of simplification in co-occurrence networks and found that topological regularity correlated negatively with textual complexity. Furthermore, in less complex texts the distance between concepts, represented as nodes, tended to decrease. The complex networks metrics were treated with multivariate pattern recognition techniques, which allowed us to distinguish between original texts and their simplified versions. For each original text, two simplified versions were generated manually with increasing number of simplification operations. As expected, distinction was easier for the strongly simplified versions, where the most relevant metrics were node strength, shortest paths and diversity. Also, the discrimination of complex texts was improved with higher hierarchical network metrics, thus pointing to the usefulness of considering wider contexts around the concepts. Though the accuracy rate in the distinction was not as high as in methods using deep linguistic knowledge, the complex network approach is still useful for a rapid screening of texts whenever assessing complexity is essential to guarantee accessibility to readers with limited reading ability.

  14. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

    1983-11-10

    It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

  15. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-06-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies.

  16. Causality, Nonlocality, and Negative Refraction.

    PubMed

    Forcella, Davide; Prada, Claire; Carminati, Rémi

    2017-03-31

    The importance of spatial nonlocality in the description of negative refraction in electromagnetic materials has been put forward recently. We develop a theory of negative refraction in homogeneous and isotropic media, based on first principles, and that includes nonlocality in its full generality. The theory shows that both dissipation and spatial nonlocality are necessary conditions for the existence of negative refraction. It also provides a sufficient condition in materials with weak spatial nonlocality. These fundamental results should have broad implications in the theoretical and practical analyses of negative refraction of electromagnetic and other kinds of waves.

  17. Brain representations of negative numbers.

    PubMed

    Parnes, Michael; Berger, Andrea; Tzelgov, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    Participants performed a physical comparison task of pairs of positive and pairs of negative one-digit numbers while their electrophysiological brain activity was measured. The numerical value of the presented digits was either congruent or incongruent with the physical size of the digits. Analysis has shown that the earliest event-related potential (ERP) difference between positive and negative numbers was found in the P300 ERP component peak, where there was an inverse effect of congruity in the negative pairs, compared with the positive ones. This pattern of results supports the idea that natural numbers serve as primitives of the human cognitive system, whereas negative numbers are apparently generated if needed.

  18. Neuroimaging correlates of negative priming.

    PubMed

    Steel, C; Haworth, E J; Peters, E; Hemsley, D R; Sharma, T; Gray, J A; Pickering, A; Gregory, L; Simmons, A; Bullmore, E T; Williams, S C

    2001-11-16

    Many theoretical accounts of selective attention and memory retrieval include reference to active inhibitory processes, such as those argued to underlie the negative priming effect. fMRI was used in order to investigate the areas of cortical activation associated with Stroop interference, Stroop facilitation and Stroop negative priming tasks. The most significant activation within the negative priming task was within the inferior parietal lobule, left temporal lobe and frontal lobes. Areas of cortical activation are discussed with reference to theoretical accounts of the negative priming effect.

  19. [Negative symptoms of schizophrenia: historical aspects].

    PubMed

    Pringuey, D; Paquin, N; Cherikh, F; Giordana, B; Belzeaux, R; Cermolacce, M; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    The history of negative symptoms of schizophrenia rises early days of medicine in clinical and pathophysiological differences between positive and negative and their complex joint. Forming a set of typical core of symptoms, and some feature of a syndrome belonging to a specific pathophysiological mechanism, negative symptoms of schizophrenia emerge from old descriptions of clinical pictures, related to the overall look of madness, the heart of alienation, a central sign of early dementia, gradually more precisely describing the strange nature of the autistic withdrawal and schizophrenic apragmatism. At therapeutic era, negative symptoms have taken over the positive symptoms to establish an operational criteria whose importance lies in the progressive severity of this clinical type and in their contribution to therapeutic resistance. Despite the efforts of modern typological classifications, this work rehabilitates the old concept of "unitary psychosis" by defining a common symptomatic core to multiple clinical forms of psychosis, combining deficit of emotional expression and avolition, meaning a native psychopathology and a pathophysiology possibly in a common final way, and calling the arrival of new treatment strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Negative mobility induced by colored thermal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Kostur, M; Luczka, J; Hänggi, P

    2009-11-01

    Anomalous transport of non-Markovian thermal Brownian particle dynamics in spatially periodic symmetric systems that is driven by time-periodic symmetric driving and constant bias is investigated numerically. The Brownian dynamics is modeled by a generalized Langevin equation with exponentially correlated Gaussian thermal noise, obeying the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We study the role of nonzero correlation time of thermal fluctuations for the occurrence of absolute negative (linear) mobility (ANM) near zero bias, negative-valued, nonlinear mobility (NNM), and negative differential mobility (NDM) at finite bias away from equilibrium. We detect that a nonzero thermal correlation time can either enhance or also diminish the value of ANM. Moreover, finite thermal noise correlation can induce NDM and NNM in regions of parameter space for which such ANM and NNM behaviors are distinctly absent for limiting white thermal noise. In parts of the parameter space, we find a complex structure of regions of linear and nonlinear negative mobility: islands and tongues which emerge and vanish under parameters manipulation. While certain such anomalous transport regimes fade away with increasing temperature some specific regions interestingly remain rather robust. Outside those regimes with anomalous mobility, the ac/dc driven transport is either normal or the driven Brownian particles are not transported at all.

  1. Negation-Limited Inverters of Linear Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morizumi, Hiroki; Suzuki, Genki

    An inverter is a circuit which outputs ¬x1, ¬x2, …, ¬xn for any Boolean inputs x1, x2, …, xn. We consider constructing an inverter with AND gates and OR gates and a few NOT gates. Beals, Nishino and Tanaka have given a construction of an inverter which has size O(nlog n) and depth O(log n) and uses ⌈ log(n+1) ⌉ NOT gates. In this paper we give a construction of an inverter which has size O(n) and depth log1+o(1)n and uses log1+o(1)n NOT gates. This is the first negation-limited inverter of linear size using only o(n) NOT gates. We also discuss implications of our construction for negation-limited circuit complexity.

  2. Negation in the Chaamling Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rai, Vishnu S.

    This paper examines the different ways of forming negative sentences in the Chaamling language, an indigenous language spoken in the eastern, hilly districts of Nepal. It explains that negation, or negativization, in the Chaamling language is done with the help of affixation. In imperative sentences, the prefix mi- is added to the verb, which is…

  3. Be Aware of Negative Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipani, Ennio C.

    1995-01-01

    This article examines the concept of negative reinforcement in relation to the maintenance of off-task and disruptive behaviors in classrooms. Suggestions are given for determining whether negative reinforcement (in the form of escape from the instructional task) or teacher attention is maintaining the behavior. Suggestions for making tasks less…

  4. Negative-Frequency Resonant Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, E.; McLenaghan, J.; Kehr, S. C.; Belgiorno, F.; Townsend, D.; Rohr, S.; Kuklewicz, C. E.; Leonhardt, U.; König, F.; Faccio, D.

    2012-06-01

    Optical solitons or solitonlike states shed light to blueshifted frequencies through a resonant emission process. We predict a mechanism by which a second propagating mode is generated. This mode, called negative resonant radiation, originates from the coupling of the soliton mode to the negative-frequency branch of the dispersion relation. Measurements in both bulk media and photonic-crystal fibers confirm our predictions.

  5. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  6. [Cognitive evoked potentials. Perspectives for mismatch negativity].

    PubMed

    Gurtubay, I G

    2009-01-01

    The techniques of cognitive evoked potentials are considered long and technically complex, which is why their use in clinical practice is not very widespread in spite of their potential utility. Recent advances in registering and analysis, together with improvement of the software managing these signals, have appreciably reduced these problems. Mismatch negativity stands out as the most promising of all the cognitive potentials due to its special characteristics regarding its generation requisites and its proven clinical utility. The fact that it can be generated without care requirements makes it especially useful for evaluating subjects with a low level of consciousness; it serves for predicting when they will emerge from a coma, amongst other uses. The incorporation of this technique into the arsenal of neurophysiological techniques for evaluating the state of these subjects will bring a substantial improvement in the evaluation of cases whose management in clinical practice is extremely complex.

  7. Negative ions at Titan and Enceladus: recent results.

    PubMed

    Coates, Andrew J; Wellbrock, Anne; Lewis, Gethyn R; Jones, Geraint H; Young, David T; Crary, Frank J; Waite, J Hunter; Johnson, Robert E; Hille, Thomas W; Sittler, Edward C

    2010-01-01

    The detection of heavy negative ions (up to 13 800 amu) in Titan's ionosphere is one of the tantalizing new results from the Cassini mission. These heavy ions indicate for the first time the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile molecules in this primitive Earth-like atmosphere. These ions were suggested to be precursors of aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and may precipitate to the surface as tholins. We present the evidence for and the analysis of these heavy negative ions at Titan. In addition we examine the variation of the maximum mass of the Titan negative ions with altitude and latitude for the relevant encounters so far, and we discuss the implications for the negative ion formation process. We present data from a recent set of encounters where the latitude was varied between encounters, with other parameters fixed. Models are beginning to explain the low mass negative ions, but the formation process for the higher mass ions is still not understood. It is possible that the structures may be chains, rings or even fullerenes. Negative ions, mainly water clusters in this case, were seen during Cassini's recent close flybys of Enceladus. We present mass spectra from the Enceladus plume, showing water clusters and additional species. As at Titan, the negative ions indicate chemical complexities which were unknown before the Cassini encounters, and are indicative of a complex balance between neutrals and positively and negatively charged ions.

  8. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  9. Isotropic Negative Thermal Expansion Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingling; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2016-07-13

    Negative thermal expansion materials are important and desirable in science and engineering applications. However, natural materials with isotropic negative thermal expansion are rare and usually unsatisfied in performance. Here, we propose a novel method to achieve two- and three-dimensional negative thermal expansion metamaterials via antichiral structures. The two-dimensional metamaterial is constructed with unit cells that combine bimaterial strips and antichiral structures, while the three-dimensional metamaterial is fabricated by a multimaterial 3D printing process. Both experimental and simulation results display isotropic negative thermal expansion property of the samples. The effective coefficient of negative thermal expansion of the proposed models is demonstrated to be dependent on the difference between the thermal expansion coefficient of the component materials, as well as on the circular node radius and the ligament length in the antichiral structures. The measured value of the linear negative thermal expansion coefficient of the three-dimensional sample is among the largest achieved in experiments to date. Our findings provide an easy and practical approach to obtaining materials with tunable negative thermal expansion on any scale.

  10. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  11. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  12. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  13. Tunable acoustic double negativity metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Liang, Z; Willatzen, M; Li, J; Christensen, J

    2012-01-01

    Man-made composite materials called "metamaterials" allow for the creation of unusual wave propagation behavior. Acoustic and elastic metamaterials in particular, can pave the way for the full control of sound in realizing cloaks of invisibility, perfect lenses and much more. In this work we design acousto-elastic surface modes that are similar to surface plasmons in metals and on highly conducting surfaces perforated by holes. We combine a structure hosting these modes together with a gap material supporting negative modulus and collectively producing negative dispersion. By analytical techniques and full-wave simulations we attribute the observed behavior to the mass density and bulk modulus being simultaneously negative.

  14. Cognitive representation of negative numbers.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin H

    2003-05-01

    To understand negative numbers, must we refer to positive number representations (the phylogenetic hypothesis), or do we acquire a negative mental number line (the ontogenetic hypothesis)? In the experiment reported here, participants made lateralized button responses to indicate the larger of two digits from the range -9 to 9. Digit pairs were displayed spatially congruent or incongruent with either a phylogenetic or an ontogenetic mental number line. The pattern of decision latencies suggests that negative numbers become associated with left space, thus supporting the ontogenetic view.

  15. Piezoelectric enhancement under negative pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kvasov, Alexander; McGilly, Leo J.; Wang, Jin; Shi, Zhiyong; Sandu, Cosmin S.; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Setter, Nava

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of ferroelectric properties, both spontaneous polarization and Curie temperature under negative pressure had been predicted in the past from first principles and recently confirmed experimentally. In contrast, piezoelectric properties are expected to increase by positive pressure, through polarization rotation. Here we investigate the piezoelectric response of the classical PbTiO3, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and BaTiO3 perovskite ferroelectrics under negative pressure from first principles and find significant enhancement. Piezoelectric response is then tested experimentally on free-standing PbTiO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 nanowires under self-sustained negative pressure, confirming the theoretical prediction. Numerical simulations verify that negative pressure in nanowires is the origin of the enhanced electromechanical properties. The results may be useful in the development of highly performing piezoelectrics, including lead-free ones. PMID:27396411

  16. Negative Refraction in Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoufie Ukhtary, Muhammad; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically propose that Weyl semimetals may exhibit negative refraction at some frequencies close to the plasmon frequency, allowing transverse magnetic (TM) electromagnetic waves with frequencies smaller than the plasmon frequency to propagate in the Weyl semimetals. The idea is justified by the calculation of reflection spectra, in which negative refractive index at such frequencies gives physically correct spectra. In this case, a TM electromagnetic wave incident to the surface of the Weyl semimetal will be bent with a negative angle of refraction. We argue that the negative refractive index at the specified frequencies of the electromagnetic wave is required to conserve the energy of the wave, in which the incident energy should propagate away from the point of incidence.

  17. Adjective Metaphors Evoke Negative Meanings

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Maki; Utsumi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Previous metaphor studies have paid much attention to nominal metaphors and predicative metaphors, but little attention has been given to adjective metaphors. Although some studies have focused on adjective metaphors, they only examined differences in the acceptability of various types of adjective metaphors. This paper explores the cognitive effects evoked by adjective metaphors. Three psychological experiments revealed that (1) adjective metaphors, especially those modified by color adjectives, tend to evoke negative effect; (2) although the meanings of metaphors are basically affected by the meanings of their vehicles, when a vehicle has a neutral meaning, negative meanings are evoked most frequently for adjective metaphors compared to nominal and predicative metaphors; (3) negative meanings evoked by adjective metaphors are related to poeticness, and poetic metaphors evoke negative meanings more easily than less poetic metaphors. Our research sheds new light on studies of the use of metaphor, which is one of the most basic human cognitive abilities. PMID:24586480

  18. Negative numbers in simple arithmetic.

    PubMed

    Das, Runa; LeFevre, Jo-Anne; Penner-Wilger, Marcie

    2010-10-01

    Are negative numbers processed differently from positive numbers in arithmetic problems? In two experiments, adults (N = 66) solved standard addition and subtraction problems such as 3 + 4 and 7 - 4 and recasted versions that included explicit negative signs-that is, 3 - (-4), 7 + (-4), and (-4) + 7. Solution times on the recasted problems were slower than those on standard problems, but the effect was much larger for addition than subtraction. The negative sign may prime subtraction in both kinds of recasted problem. Problem size effects were the same or smaller in recasted than in standard problems, suggesting that the recasted formats did not interfere with mental calculation. These results suggest that the underlying conceptual structure of the problem (i.e., addition vs. subtraction) is more important for solution processes than the presence of negative numbers.

  19. Piezoelectric enhancement under negative pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasov, Alexander; McGilly, Leo J.; Wang, Jin; Shi, Zhiyong; Sandu, Cosmin S.; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Setter, Nava

    2016-07-01

    Enhancement of ferroelectric properties, both spontaneous polarization and Curie temperature under negative pressure had been predicted in the past from first principles and recently confirmed experimentally. In contrast, piezoelectric properties are expected to increase by positive pressure, through polarization rotation. Here we investigate the piezoelectric response of the classical PbTiO3, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and BaTiO3 perovskite ferroelectrics under negative pressure from first principles and find significant enhancement. Piezoelectric response is then tested experimentally on free-standing PbTiO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 nanowires under self-sustained negative pressure, confirming the theoretical prediction. Numerical simulations verify that negative pressure in nanowires is the origin of the enhanced electromechanical properties. The results may be useful in the development of highly performing piezoelectrics, including lead-free ones.

  20. Piezoelectric enhancement under negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Kvasov, Alexander; McGilly, Leo J; Wang, Jin; Shi, Zhiyong; Sandu, Cosmin S; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K; Setter, Nava

    2016-07-11

    Enhancement of ferroelectric properties, both spontaneous polarization and Curie temperature under negative pressure had been predicted in the past from first principles and recently confirmed experimentally. In contrast, piezoelectric properties are expected to increase by positive pressure, through polarization rotation. Here we investigate the piezoelectric response of the classical PbTiO3, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and BaTiO3 perovskite ferroelectrics under negative pressure from first principles and find significant enhancement. Piezoelectric response is then tested experimentally on free-standing PbTiO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 nanowires under self-sustained negative pressure, confirming the theoretical prediction. Numerical simulations verify that negative pressure in nanowires is the origin of the enhanced electromechanical properties. The results may be useful in the development of highly performing piezoelectrics, including lead-free ones.

  1. Antinuclear Antibody Negative Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, GA; Assassi, S; Wigley, F; Hummers, L; Varga, J; Hinchcliff, M; Khanna, D; Schiopu, E; Phillips, K; Furst, DE; Steen, V; Baron, M; Hudson, M; Taillefer, SS; Pope, J; Jones, N; Docherty, P; Khalidi, NA; Robinson, D; Simms, R; Silver, R; Frech, TM; Fessler, B; Molitor, J; Fritzler, M; Segal, B; Al-Kassab, F; Perry, M; Yang, J; Zamanian, S; Reveille, JD; Arnett, FC; Pedroza, C; Mayes, MD

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the demographic and clinical characteristics of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients without antinuclear antibodies (ANA) compared to ANA positive patients. Methods SSc patients enrolled in the Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository were included. Relevant demographic and clinical data were entered by participating sites or obtained by chart review. ANA and SSc related antibodies were determined in all investigated patients using commercially available kits at our laboratories. Results This study included 3249 patients, of whom 208 (6.4%) were ANA negative. The proportion of male patients was higher in the ANA negative group (OR 1.65; p=0.008). ANA negative patients experienced less vasculopathic manifestations of SSc. The percent predicted diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLco) was higher in ANA negative patients (p=0.03). Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) per right heart catheterization was less common in the ANA negative group (OR= 0.28; p=0.03). Furthermore, patients with negative ANA had a lower prevalence of telangiectasias and digital ulcers/pits (OR= 0.59; p=0.03 and OR=0.38; p=0.01, respectively). Although diffuse cutaneous involvement was more common, the modified Rodnan Skin Score (mRSS) was lower in the ANA negative group (2.4 points lower, p=0.05). Furthermore, they experienced more malabsorption (p=0.05). There was no difference in the frequency of pulmonary fibrosis or scleroderma renal crisis. All-cause mortality was not different between the two groups (p=0.28). Conclusions In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that SSc patients who are ANA negative constitute a distinct subset of SSc with less vasculopathy (less PAH, digital ulcers and fewer telangiectasias), a greater proportion of males and possibly, more frequent lower gastrointestinal involvement. PMID:25578738

  2. Plasma neutralizers for H negative or D negative beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkner, K. H.; Pyle, R. V.; Savas, S. E.; Stalder, K. R.

    1980-10-01

    Plasma neutralizers can produce higher conversion efficiencies than are obtainable with gas neutralizers for the production of high-energy neutral beams from negative hydrogen ions. Little attention has been paid to experimental neutralizer studies because of the more critical problems connected with the development of negative-ion sources. With the prospect of accelerating ampere dc beams from extrapolatable ion sources some time next year, plasma neutralizers are being re-examined. Some basic considerations, two introductory experiments, and a next-step experiment are described.

  3. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  4. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  5. Optical Refraction in Silver: Counterposition, Negative Phase Velocity and Orthogonal Phase Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naqvi, Qaisar A.; Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2011-01-01

    Complex behaviour associated with metamaterials can arise even in commonplace isotropic dielectric materials. We demonstrate how silver, for example, can support negative phase velocity and counterposition, but not negative refraction, at optical frequencies. The transition from positive to negative phase velocity is not accompanied by remarkable…

  6. Optical Refraction in Silver: Counterposition, Negative Phase Velocity and Orthogonal Phase Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naqvi, Qaisar A.; Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2011-01-01

    Complex behaviour associated with metamaterials can arise even in commonplace isotropic dielectric materials. We demonstrate how silver, for example, can support negative phase velocity and counterposition, but not negative refraction, at optical frequencies. The transition from positive to negative phase velocity is not accompanied by remarkable…

  7. Negative Items and Negation Strategies in Nonnative Italian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernini, Giuliano

    2000-01-01

    Acquisition of negation in Italian as a second language (L2) is investigated on the basis of the longitudinal data of five learners with different first languages in the framework of a functional approach focusing on the semantic and pragmatic principles governing the organization of learner varieties and the process of their complexification.…

  8. Resolving the wave vector in negative refractive index media.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, S Anantha; Martin, Olivier J F

    2005-10-01

    We address the general issue of resolving the wave vector in complex electromagnetic media including negative refractive media. This requires us to make a physical choice of the sign of a square root imposed merely by conditions of causality. By considering the analytic behavior of the wave vector in the complex plane, it is shown that there are a total of eight physically distinct cases in the four quadrants of two Riemann sheets.

  9. Communication complexity and information complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Denis

    Information complexity enables the use of information-theoretic tools in communication complexity theory. Prior to the results presented in this thesis, information complexity was mainly used for proving lower bounds and direct-sum theorems in the setting of communication complexity. We present three results that demonstrate new connections between information complexity and communication complexity. In the first contribution we thoroughly study the information complexity of the smallest nontrivial two-party function: the AND function. While computing the communication complexity of AND is trivial, computing its exact information complexity presents a major technical challenge. In overcoming this challenge, we reveal that information complexity gives rise to rich geometrical structures. Our analysis of information complexity relies on new analytic techniques and new characterizations of communication protocols. We also uncover a connection of information complexity to the theory of elliptic partial differential equations. Once we compute the exact information complexity of AND, we can compute exact communication complexity of several related functions on n-bit inputs with some additional technical work. Previous combinatorial and algebraic techniques could only prove bounds of the form theta( n). Interestingly, this level of precision is typical in the area of information theory, so our result demonstrates that this meta-property of precise bounds carries over to information complexity and in certain cases even to communication complexity. Our result does not only strengthen the lower bound on communication complexity of disjointness by making it more exact, but it also shows that information complexity provides the exact upper bound on communication complexity. In fact, this result is more general and applies to a whole class of communication problems. In the second contribution, we use self-reduction methods to prove strong lower bounds on the information

  10. Tunable acoustic double negativity metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Z.; Willatzen, M.; Li, J.; Christensen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Man-made composite materials called “metamaterials” allow for the creation of unusual wave propagation behavior. Acoustic and elastic metamaterials in particular, can pave the way for the full control of sound in realizing cloaks of invisibility, perfect lenses and much more. In this work we design acousto-elastic surface modes that are similar to surface plasmons in metals and on highly conducting surfaces perforated by holes. We combine a structure hosting these modes together with a gap material supporting negative modulus and collectively producing negative dispersion. By analytical techniques and full-wave simulations we attribute the observed behavior to the mass density and bulk modulus being simultaneously negative. PMID:23152948

  11. Negative-Pressure Pulmonary Edema.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Mallar; Kallet, Richard H; Ware, Lorraine B; Matthay, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Negative-pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) or postobstructive pulmonary edema is a well-described cause of acute respiratory failure that occurs after intense inspiratory effort against an obstructed airway, usually from upper airway infection, tumor, or laryngospasm. Patients with NPPE generate very negative airway pressures, which augment transvascular fluid filtration and precipitate interstitial and alveolar edema. Pulmonary edema fluid collected from most patients with NPPE has a low protein concentration, suggesting hydrostatic forces as the primary mechanism for the pathogenesis of NPPE. Supportive care should be directed at relieving the upper airway obstruction by endotracheal intubation or cricothyroidotomy, institution of lung-protective positive-pressure ventilation, and diuresis unless the patient is in shock. Resolution of the pulmonary edema is usually rapid, in part because alveolar fluid clearance mechanisms are intact. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and management of negative-pressure or postobstructive pulmonary edema.

  12. Dose from slow negative muons.

    PubMed

    Siiskonen, T

    2008-01-01

    Conversion coefficients from fluence to ambient dose equivalent, from fluence to maximum dose equivalent and quality factors for slow negative muons are examined in detail. Negative muons, when stopped, produce energetic photons, electrons and a variety of high-LET particles. Contribution from each particle type to the dose equivalent is calculated. The results show that for the high-LET particles the details of energy spectra and decay yields are important for accurate dose estimates. For slow negative muons the ambient dose equivalent does not always yield a conservative estimate for the protection quantities. Especially, the skin equivalent dose is strongly underestimated if the radiation-weighting factor of unity for slow muons is used. Comparisons to earlier studies are presented.

  13. Negativity Bias in Dangerous Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jing; Qu, Weina; Sun, Xianghong; Zhang, Kan; Ge, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The behavioral and cognitive characteristics of dangerous drivers differ significantly from those of safe drivers. However, differences in emotional information processing have seldom been investigated. Previous studies have revealed that drivers with higher anger/anxiety trait scores are more likely to be involved in crashes and that individuals with higher anger traits exhibit stronger negativity biases when processing emotions compared with control groups. However, researchers have not explored the relationship between emotional information processing and driving behavior. In this study, we examined the emotional information processing differences between dangerous drivers and safe drivers. Thirty-eight non-professional drivers were divided into two groups according to the penalty points that they had accrued for traffic violations: 15 drivers with 6 or more points were included in the dangerous driver group, and 23 drivers with 3 or fewer points were included in the safe driver group. The emotional Stroop task was used to measure negativity biases, and both behavioral and electroencephalograph data were recorded. The behavioral results revealed stronger negativity biases in the dangerous drivers than in the safe drivers. The bias score was correlated with self-reported dangerous driving behavior. Drivers with strong negativity biases reported having been involved in mores crashes compared with the less-biased drivers. The event-related potentials (ERPs) revealed that the dangerous drivers exhibited reduced P3 components when responding to negative stimuli, suggesting decreased inhibitory control of information that is task-irrelevant but emotionally salient. The influence of negativity bias provides one possible explanation of the effects of individual differences on dangerous driving behavior and traffic crashes. PMID:26765225

  14. Tunnelling with a negative cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, G. W.

    1996-02-01

    The point of this paper is to see what light new results in hyperbolic geometry may throw on gravitational entropy and whether gravitational entropy is relevant for the quantum origin of the universe. We introduce some new gravitational instantons which mediate the birth from nothing of closed universes containing wormholes and suggest that they may contribute to the density matrix of the universe. We also discuss the connection between their gravitational action and the topological and volumetric entropies introduced in hyperbolic geometry. These coincide for hyperbolic 4-manifolds, and increase with increasing topological complexity of the 4-manifold. We raise the question of whether the action also increases with the topological complexity of the initial 3-geometry, measured either by its 3-volume or its Matveev complexity. We point out, in distinction to the non-supergravity case, that universes with domains of negative cosmological constant separated by supergravity domain walls cannot be born from nothing. Finally we point out that our wormholes provide examples of the type of Perpetual Motion machines envisaged by Frolov and Novikov.

  15. Sigma models with negative curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Jenkins, Elizabeth E.; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2016-05-01

    We construct Higgs Effective Field Theory (HEFT) based on the scalar manifold Hn, which is a hyperbolic space of constant negative curvature. The Lagrangian has a non-compact O (n , 1) global symmetry group, but it gives a unitary theory as long as only a compact subgroup of the global symmetry is gauged. Whether the HEFT manifold has positive or negative curvature can be tested by measuring the S-parameter, and the cross sections for longitudinal gauge boson and Higgs boson scattering, since the curvature (including its sign) determines deviations from Standard Model values.

  16. Negative-viscosity lattice gases

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, D.H. )

    1989-08-01

    A new irreversible collision rule is introduced for lattice-gas automata. The rule maximizes the flux of momentum in the direction of the local momentum gradient, yielding a negative shear viscosity. Numerically results in 2D show that the negative viscosity leads to the spontaneous ordering of the velocity field, with vorticity resolvable down to one lattice-link length. The new rule may be used in conjunction with previously proposed collision rules to yield a positive shear viscosity lower than the previous rules provide. In particular, Poiseuille flow tests demonstrate a decrease in viscosity by more than a factor of 2.

  17. Sigma models with negative curvature

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Jenkins, Elizabeth E.; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2016-03-16

    Here, we construct Higgs Effective Field Theory (HEFT) based on the scalar manifold Hn, which is a hyperbolic space of constant negative curvature. The Lagrangian has a non-compact O(n, 1) global symmetry group, but it gives a unitary theory as long as only a compact subgroup of the global symmetry is gauged. Whether the HEFT manifold has positive or negative curvature can be tested by measuring the S-parameter, and the cross sections for longitudinal gauge boson and Higgs boson scattering, since the curvature (including its sign) determines deviations from Standard Model values.

  18. Patch Test Negative Generalized Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Alison; Mowad, Christen

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common condition in dermatology. Patch testing is the criterion standard for diagnosis. However, dermatitis is not always caused by an allergen, and patch testing does not identify a culprit in every patient. Generalized dermatitis, defined as eczematous dermatitis affecting greater than 3 body sites, is often encountered in dermatology practice, especially patch test referral centers. Management for patients with generalized dermatitis who are patch test negative is challenging. The purpose of this article is to outline an approach to this challenging scenario and summarize the paucity of existing literature on patch test negative generalized dermatitis.

  19. Some Concepts of Negative Dependence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    The theory of positive dependence notions cannot yield useful results for some widely used distributions such as the multinomial, Dirichlet and the...multivariate hypergeometric. Some conditions of negative dependence that are satisfied by these distributions and which have practical meaning are

  20. Negative Geography: Locating Things Elsewhere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Robert H.

    The phenomenon of negative geography--the assertion that any location is better than the one selected--is discussed and ways in which this approach differs from traditional geography methodology are analyzed. Case studies of two citizens' groups which protested the relocation of a city mission and halfway house in their neighborhoods illustrate…

  1. Photonic crystal negative refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Asatsuma, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are multi-dimensional periodic gratings, in which the light propagation is dominated by Bragg diffraction that appears to be refraction at the flat surfaces of the PC. The refraction angle from positive to negative, perfectly or only partially obeying Snell's law, can be tailored using photonic band theory. The negative refraction enables novel prism, collimation, and lens effects. Because PCs usually consist of two transparent media, these effects occur at absorption-free frequencies, affording significant design flexibility for free-space optics. The PC slab, a high-index membrane with a two-dimensional airhole array, must be carefully designed to avoid reflection and diffraction losses. Light focusing based on negative refraction forms a parallel image of a light source, facilitating optical couplers and condenser lenses for wavelength demultiplexing. A compact wavelength demultiplexer can be designed by combining the prism and lens effects. The collimation effect is obtainable not only inside but also outside of the PC by optimizing negative refractive condition.

  2. Questioning Zero and Negative Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Virginia B.

    2008-01-01

    After experiencing a Developing Mathematical Ideas (DMI) class on the construction of algebraic concepts surrounding zero and negative numbers, the author conducted an interview with a first grader to determine the youngster's existing level of understanding about these topics. Uncovering young students' existing understanding can provide focus…

  3. Unimode metamaterials exhibiting negative linear compressibility and negative thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Krzysztof K.; Attard, Daphne; Caruana-Gauci, Roberto; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W.; Grima, Joseph N.

    2016-02-01

    Unimode metamaterials made from rotating rigid triangles are analysed mathematically for their mechanical and thermal expansion properties. It is shown that these unimode systems exhibit positive Poisson’s ratios irrespective of size, shape and angle of aperture, with the Poisson’s ratio exhibiting giant values for certain conformations. When the Poisson’s ratio in one loading direction is larger than +1, the systems were found to exhibit the anomalous property of negative linear compressibility along this direction, that is, the systems expand in this direction when hydrostatically compressed. Also discussed are the thermal expansion properties of these systems under the assumption that the units exhibit increased rotational agitation once subjected to an increase in temperature. The effect of the geometric parameters on the aforementioned thermo-mechanical properties of the system, are discussed, with the aim of identifying negative behaviour.

  4. Complex higher order derivative theories

    SciTech Connect

    Margalli, Carlos A.; Vergara, J. David

    2012-08-24

    In this work is considered a complex scalar field theory with higher order derivative terms and interactions. A procedure is developed to quantize consistently this system avoiding the presence of negative norm states. In order to achieve this goal the original real scalar high order field theory is extended to a complex space attaching a complex total derivative to the theory. Next, by imposing reality conditions the complex theory is mapped to a pair of interacting real scalar field theories without the presence of higher derivative terms.

  5. Negative magnetophoresis in diluted ferrofluid flow.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2015-07-21

    We report magnetic manipulation of non-magnetic particles suspended in diluted ferrofluid. Diamagnetic particles were introduced into a circular chamber to study the extent of their deflection under the effect of a non-uniform magnetic field of a permanent magnet. Since ferrofluid is a paramagnetic medium, it also experiences a bulk magnetic force that in turn induces a secondary flow opposing the main hydrodynamic flow. Sheath flow rate, particle size, and magnetic field strength were varied to examine this complex behaviour. The combined effect of negative magnetophoresis and magnetically induced secondary flow leads to various operation regimes, which can potentially find applications in separation, trapping and mixing of diamagnetic particles such as cells in a microfluidic system.

  6. Metalinguistic Negation in English and Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nedwick, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    Negation is a unique and fascinating property of human language which has been given extensive theoretical and typological treatment. One categorization divides negation use into metalinguistic negation and descriptive negation (Horn, 1985). Descriptive negation (DN) is the truth-functional semantic operator which has received the most attention…

  7. Metalinguistic Negation in English and Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nedwick, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    Negation is a unique and fascinating property of human language which has been given extensive theoretical and typological treatment. One categorization divides negation use into metalinguistic negation and descriptive negation (Horn, 1985). Descriptive negation (DN) is the truth-functional semantic operator which has received the most attention…

  8. Negative propagation effect in nonparaxial Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Vaveliuk, Pablo; Martinez-Matos, Oscar

    2012-11-19

    Negative propagation is an unusual effect concerning the local sign change in the Poynting vector components of an optical beam under free propagation. We report this effect for finite-energy Airy beams in a subwavelength nonparaxial regime. This effect is due to a coupling process between propagating and evanescent plane waves forming the beam in the spectral domain and it is demonstrated for a single TE or TM mode. This is contrary to what happens for vector Bessel beams and vector X-waves, for which a complex superposition of TE and TM modes is mandatory. We also show that evanescent waves cannot contribute to the energy flux density by themselves such that a pure evanescent Airy beam is not physically realizable. The break of the shape-preserving and diffraction-free properties of Airy beams in a nonparaxial regime is exclusively caused by the propagating waves. The negative propagation effect in subwavelength nonparaxial Airy beams opens new capabilities in optical traps and tweezers, optical detection of invisibility cloacks and selective on-chip manipulation of nanoparticles.

  9. Negative effects of positive reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Perone, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Procedures classified as positive reinforcement are generally regarded as more desirable than those classified as aversive-those that involve negative reinforcement or punishment. This is a crude test of the desirability of a procedure to change or maintain behavior. The problems can be identified on the basis of theory, experimental analysis, and consideration of practical cases. Theoretically, the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement has proven difficult (some would say the distinction is untenable). When the distinction is made purely in operational terms, experiments reveal that positive reinforcement has aversive functions. On a practical level, positive reinforcement can lead to deleterious effects, and it is implicated in a range of personal and societal problems. These issues challenge us to identify other criteria for judging behavioral procedures.

  10. Gram-negative flagella glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M

    2014-02-19

    Protein glycosylation had been considered as an eccentricity of a few bacteria. However, through advances in analytical methods and genome sequencing, it is now established that bacteria possess both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation pathways. Both glycosylation pathways can modify multiple proteins, flagellins from Archaea and Eubacteria being one of these. Flagella O-glycosylation has been demonstrated in many polar flagellins from Gram-negative bacteria and in only the Gram-positive genera Clostridium and Listeria. Furthermore, O-glycosylation has also been demonstrated in a limited number of lateral flagellins. In this work, we revised the current advances in flagellar glycosylation from Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the structural diversity of glycans, the O-linked pathway and the biological function of flagella glycosylation.

  11. Negative-ion plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, D. P.; Rynn, N.

    1988-08-01

    Three designs for negative-ion plasma sources are described. Two sources utilize metal hexafluorides such as SF6 and WF6 to scavenge electrons from electron-ion plasmas and the third relies upon surface ionization of alkali halide salts on heated alumina and zirconia. SF6 introduced into electron-ion plasmas yielded negative-ion plasma densities of 10 to the 10th/cu cm with low residual electron densities. On alumina, plasma densities of 10 to the 9th/cu cm were obtained for CsCl, CsI, and KI and 10 to the 9th/cu cm for KCl. On zirconia 10 to the 10th/cu cm densities were obtained for CsCl. For alkali halide sources, electron densities of less than about 10 to the -4th have been achieved.

  12. Gram-Negative Flagella Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation had been considered as an eccentricity of a few bacteria. However, through advances in analytical methods and genome sequencing, it is now established that bacteria possess both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation pathways. Both glycosylation pathways can modify multiple proteins, flagellins from Archaea and Eubacteria being one of these. Flagella O-glycosylation has been demonstrated in many polar flagellins from Gram-negative bacteria and in only the Gram-positive genera Clostridium and Listeria. Furthermore, O-glycosylation has also been demonstrated in a limited number of lateral flagellins. In this work, we revised the current advances in flagellar glycosylation from Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the structural diversity of glycans, the O-linked pathway and the biological function of flagella glycosylation. PMID:24557579

  13. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  14. Negative effects of positive reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Perone, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Procedures classified as positive reinforcement are generally regarded as more desirable than those classified as aversive—those that involve negative reinforcement or punishment. This is a crude test of the desirability of a procedure to change or maintain behavior. The problems can be identified on the basis of theory, experimental analysis, and consideration of practical cases. Theoretically, the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement has proven difficult (some would say the distinction is untenable). When the distinction is made purely in operational terms, experiments reveal that positive reinforcement has aversive functions. On a practical level, positive reinforcement can lead to deleterious effects, and it is implicated in a range of personal and societal problems. These issues challenge us to identify other criteria for judging behavioral procedures. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:22478391

  15. Complex odontoma.

    PubMed

    Preetha, A; Balikai, Bharati S; Sujatha, D; Pai, Anuradha; Ganapathy, K S

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are hamartomatous lesions or malformations composed of mature enamel, dentin, and pulp. They may be compound or complex, depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or their resemblance to normal teeth. The etiology of odontoma is unknown, although several theories have been proposed. This article describes a case of a large infected complex odontoma in the residual mandibular ridge, resulting in considerable mandibular expansion.

  16. Designing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanville, Ranulph

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the nature of complexity and design, as well as relationships between the two, and suggests that design may have much potential as an approach to improving human performance in situations seen as complex. It is developed against two backgrounds. The first is a world view that derives from second order cybernetics and radical…

  17. Complex derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  18. Negative ion chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuitton, V.; Lavvas, P.; Yelle, R. V.; Wellbrock, A.; Lewis, G. R.; Coates, A.; Thissen, R.; Dutuit, O.

    2008-09-01

    In the upper part of atmospheres lies the ionosphere, a region of particular interest for planetary science, because it provides the link between the neutral atmosphere, and the ionizing processes from outer space. On Titan, it is created by the interaction of solar ultraviolet radiation and magnetospheric electrons with the main atmospheric constituents, N2 and CH4. Cassini has revealed that an extremely complex chemistry occurs in Titan's ionosphere. The INMS mass spectrometer detected positively charged hydrocarbons and nitrogen-bearing species with a charge-to-mass ratio (m/z) up to 100 amu [1]. In 2007, the Electron Spectrometer (ELS), one of the sensors making up the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) revealed the existence of numerous negative ions in Titan's upper atmosphere [2]. The data showed evidence for negatively charged ions with m/z up to 10,000 amu and at lower m/z for two distinct peaks below 50 amu, corresponding to a total density of ~200 cm-3, giving an anion to cation ratio of ~0.1. This detection happened almost simultaneously with the surprising discovery of four negative ions in the interstellar medium: C4H-, C6H-, C8H- and C3N- [3; 4; 5; 6; 7]. The possible presence of negative ions in Titan's upper atmosphere had only been briefly discussed before the Cassini-Huygens mission. Three-body electron attachment to radicals or collisional charging of aerosols had been suggested as a source of negatively charged species. Because the first process is negligible at high altitude (neutral densities lower than 1015 cm-3) and because aerosols were not expected above ~500 km, ionospheric models considered the presence of negatively charged species to be highly unlikely. However, the observations clearly show that Titan has the most complex ionosphere of the Solar System with an intense chemistry, leading to an increase of molecular size. By analyzing the optical properties of the detached haze layer observed at 520 km in Titan's mesosphere, Lavvas et

  19. Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Livasy, Chad A

    2009-06-01

    Triple-negative breast carcinomas (TNBCs) comprise approximately 15% to 20% of breast cancers. Accurate assessment of tumor estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status is an essential part of classifying tumors into this group. As a group, these tumors are associated with poor clinical outcomes and have been shown to exhibit an increased propensity for hematogenous metastasis to the brain and lungs. Many TNBCs, particularly ductal, not otherwise specified (NOS), and metaplastic carcinomas, show an overlapping characteristic gene expression pattern when evaluated by cDNA microarrays. This group has been termed basal-like because of the similarity with normal breast basal/myoepithelial cells including basal cytokeratin expression and lack of hormone receptor and HER2 expression. The array data have been used to develop multiple immunohistochemical surrogates to identify basal-like tumors in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, most employing basal cytokeratins and epidermal growth factor receptor. Currently, there is no international consensus on biomarkers used to identify tumors as basal-like, and the routine use of the term basal-like in surgical pathology reports is premature. Tumor morphologic features associated with triple-negative status include Nottingham grade 3 with high mitotic rate, pushing border of invasion, geographic tumor necrosis, solid/sheet-like growth pattern, lymphocytic infiltrate, and large central acellular zone. Most breast cancers arising in patients who have a germ-line BRCA1 mutation show similar histologic features and a triple-negative phenotype. Not all TNBCs are associated with an unfavorable prognosis, drawing attention to the heterogeneity of this tumor group and the continued need to link tumor morphology and grade with triple-negative status. This article focuses on histopathology, molecular characterization, carcinogenesis, clinical behavior, and treatment of these

  20. In defense of negative temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulter, J.

    2016-03-01

    This pedagogical comment highlights three misconceptions concerning the usefulness of the concept of negative temperature, being derived from the usual, often termed Boltzmann, definition of entropy. First, both the Boltzmann and Gibbs entropies must obey the same thermodynamic consistency relation. Second, the Boltzmann entropy does obey the second law of thermodynamics. Third, there exists an integrating factor of the heat differential with both definitions of entropy.

  1. Negative affect reduces performance in implicit sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Shang, Junchen; Fu, Qiufang; Dienes, Zoltan; Shao, Can; Fu, Xiaolan

    2013-01-01

    It is well documented that positive rather than negative moods encourage integrative processing of conscious information. However, the extent to which implicit or unconscious learning can be influenced by affective states remains unclear. A Serial Reaction Time (SRT) task with sequence structures requiring integration over past trials was adopted to examine the effect of affective states on implicit learning. Music was used to induce and maintain positive and negative affective states. The present study showed that participants in negative rather than positive states learned less of the regularity. Moreover, the knowledge was shown by a Bayesian analysis to be largely unconscious as participants were poor at recognizing the regularity. The results demonstrated that negative rather than positive affect inhibited implicit learning of complex structures. Our findings help to understand the effects of affective states on unconscious or implicit processing.

  2. Negative refraction in semiconductor metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Anthony J; Alekseyev, Leonid; Howard, Scott S; Franz, Kale J; Wasserman, Dan; Podolskiy, Viktor A; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Sivco, Deborah L; Gmachl, Claire

    2007-12-01

    An optical metamaterial is a composite in which subwavelength features, rather than the constituent materials, control the macroscopic electromagnetic properties of the material. Recently, properly designed metamaterials have garnered much interest because of their unusual interaction with electromagnetic waves. Whereas nature seems to have limits on the type of materials that exist, newly invented metamaterials are not bound by such constraints. These newly accessible electromagnetic properties make these materials an excellent platform for demonstrating unusual optical phenomena and unique applications such as subwavelength imaging and planar lens design. 'Negative-index materials', as first proposed, required the permittivity, epsilon, and permeability, mu, to be simultaneously less than zero, but such materials face limitations. Here, we demonstrate a comparatively low-loss, three-dimensional, all-semiconductor metamaterial that exhibits negative refraction for all incidence angles in the long-wave infrared region and requires only an anisotropic dielectric function with a single resonance. Using reflection and transmission measurements and a comprehensive model of the material, we demonstrate that our material exhibits negative refraction. This is furthermore confirmed through a straightforward beam optics experiment. This work will influence future metamaterial designs and their incorporation into optical semiconductor devices.

  3. Exotic negative molecules in AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golser, Robin; Gnaser, Hubert; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Wallner, Anton

    2007-06-01

    "The techniques and equipment developed for AMS studies are well suited for identifying exotic negative ions". With this sentence begins a pioneering paper by Roy Middleton and Jeff Klein (M&K) on small doubly-charged negative carbon clusters [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 123 (1997) 532]. M&K were the first to utilize Accelerator Mass Spectrometry to prove the existence of these clusters and a number of other exotic molecules. We review M&K's efforts and show how their work is being continued at other laboratories. The latest developments are: (1) the discovery of long-lived molecular hydrogen anions H2-,D2-and (2) the unambiguous identification of the smallest doubly-charged negative molecule (LiF3)2-. In particular we show new experimental data for D3-, and for (LiF3)2-, and we try to answer the question why M&K's search for this di-anion was unsuccessful.

  4. Acoustic metamaterial with negative parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Yan, Fei; Gu, Hao; Li, Ying

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present theoretical results on an acoustic metamaterial beam and a bar that exhibit negative effective mass and negative effective stiffness. A one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with an array of spring-mass subsystems was fabricated. The frequency of the acoustic one dimensional metamaterial structure has the same form as that of the permittivity in metals due to the plasma oscillation. We also provide a theory to explain the simulation results. And we use the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers to reveal the actual working mechanism of the acoustic metamaterials. We explain the two vibrate modes which are optical mode and acoustic mode in detail. When the incoming elastic wave in the acoustic metamaterials to resonate the integrated spring-mass-damper absorbers to vibrate in their optical mode at frequencies close to but above their local resonance frequencies to create shear forces and bending moments to straighten the beam and stop the wave propagation. Moreover, we explain the negative parameter in acoustic metamaterials.

  5. Negative Reflecting Meta-Mirrors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Li, Dong; Gao, Dongxing; Zhang, Aofang; Hu, Bowei; Yang, Pei; Lei, Zhenya; Li, Jiacheng

    2017-07-18

    Using the gradient phase discontinuities that meta-mirrors provide, we show that the incident wave can be reflected anomalously with a broad angle range of negative reflections. Such reversed behaviors promote the immediate applications for the planar meta-mirrors to steer the signals more arbitrarily and the convex meta-mirrors to focus and collimate electromagnetic fields. We practically implement these negative reflecting meta-mirrors through an arrangement of subwavelength ring patches and generate the desired phase distribution by also considering the incident angle. Finally, the experiments are carried out to verify the functionality of the convex meta-mirror firstly, and the performances of the planar meta-mirror are also tested by further building up a dual reflector system with the demonstration of obtaining the plane wave from the convex meta-mirror and then having the well collimated beam negative reflected by the planar meta-mirror. The proposed design should be readily applicable to a wide range of electromagnetic problems, especially for devising smart planar illusion devices, and highly directive antennas mounting on convex surfaces of various platforms.

  6. Research priorities for negative emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuss, S.; Jones, C. D.; Kraxner, F.; Peters, G. P.; Smith, P.; Tavoni, M.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Canadell, J. G.; Jackson, R. B.; Milne, J.; Moreira, J. R.; Nakicenovic, N.; Sharifi, A.; Yamagata, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere (CDR)—also known as ‘negative emissions’—features prominently in most 2 °C scenarios and has been under increased scrutiny by scientists, citizens, and policymakers. Critics argue that ‘negative emission technologies’ (NETs) are insufficiently mature to rely on them for climate stabilization. Some even argue that 2 °C is no longer feasible or might have unacceptable social and environmental costs. Nonetheless, the Paris Agreement endorsed an aspirational goal of limiting global warming to even lower levels, arguing that climate impacts—especially for vulnerable nations such as small island states—will be unacceptably severe in a 2 °C world. While there are few pathways to 2 °C that do not rely on negative emissions, 1.5 °C scenarios are barely conceivable without them. Building on previous assessments of NETs, we identify some urgent research needs to provide a more complete picture for reaching ambitious climate targets, and the role that NETs can play in reaching them.

  7. Negative pressure wound therapy in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Asher, Scott A; White, Hilliary N; Golden, Joseph B; Magnuson, J Scott; Carroll, William R; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Negative pressure wound therapy has been shown to accelerate healing. There is a paucity of literature reporting its use as a tool to promote wound healing in head and neck reconstruction. OBJECTIVE To review 1 institution's experience with negative pressure dressings to further describe the indications, safety, and efficacy of this technique in the head and neck. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective case series at a tertiary care academic hospital. One hundred fifteen patients had negative pressure dressings applied between April 2005 and December 2011. Data were gathered, including indications, details of negative pressure dressing use, adverse events, wound healing results, potential risk factors for compromised wound healing (defined as previous radiation therapy, hypothyroidism, or diabetes mellitus), and wound characteristics (complex wounds included those with salivary contamination, bone exposure, great vessel exposure, in the field of previous microvascular free tissue transfer, or in the case of peristomal application in laryngectomy). EXPOSURE Negative pressure wound therapy utilized after head and neck reconstruction. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Indications for therapy, length and number of dressing applications, identification of wound healing risk factors, classification of wound complexity, wound healing results, and adverse events related to the use of the device. RESULTS Negative pressure wound therapy was used primarily for wounds of the neck (94 of 115 patients [81.7%]) in addition to other head and neck locations (14 of 115 patients [12.2%]), and free tissue transfer donor sites (7 of 115 patients [6.1%]). The mean (SD) wound size was 5.6 (5.0) cm. The mean number of negative pressure dressing applications was 1.7 (1.2), with an application length of 3.7 (1.4) days. Potential risk factors for compromised wound healing were present in 82 of 115 patients (71.3%). Ninety-one of 115 patients (79.1%) had complex wounds. Negative

  8. Negative Flare Emissions Observed in Euv By SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Liu, C.; Cao, W.; Jing, J.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we present a large flare showing negative emissions in the EUV passbands observed by SDO/AIA. Contrary to ordinary flare emission represented by an increase of intensity, negative flare emission refers to as a decrease of intensity during flares. In the literature, negative flare emissions were usually reported by stellar observations. Only a few negative solar flares were observed in He I D3 in 1970s and one event observed in the near Infrared at 8542 Å in 2001. On 2014-Jan-07, an X1.2 flare occurred near the solar disk center with a complex magnetic configuration, showing multiple flare ribbons. Among them a remote flare ribbon is located to the southwest from the flare core region. A small portion of the remote ribbon became darkened from about 18:45 UT, while the rest of the ribbon remained bright. This darkening lasted for more than one hour and did not show obvious motion. Therefore, we exclude the possibility of transient coronal hole associated with EUV waves. By comparing with SDO/HMI LOS magnetograms, we find that the negative flare regions are associated with weak magnetic fields, lower than 50 Gauss. In contrast, the bright flare ribbons are co-spatial with strong magnetic fields above 200 Gauss. Furthermore, we investigate the properties of the negative emission by examining the temporal evolution of its intensity and area. Finally, we discuss the possible mechanisms in generating the negative emissions.

  9. Density trends of negative ions at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellbrock, A.; Coates, A. J.; Jones, G. H.; Arridge, C. S.; Lewis, G.; Sittler, E. C.; Young, D. T.

    2012-12-01

    The Electron Spectrometer part of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS-ELS) has revealed the existence of negative ions in Titan's ionosphere (Coates et al, 2007, Waite et al, 2007). These are observed during every encounter when the instrument points in the ram direction at altitudes between 950 and 1400 km. The heaviest ions observed so far have masses up to 13 800 amu/q. This suggests that complex hydrocarbon and nitrile chemical processes take place in Titan's upper atmosphere, probably playing a role in haze formation. Even heavier particles such as tholins can form which fall to lower altitudes and build up on Titan's surface (Coates et al., 2009). Coates et al. (2009) discussed trends in the highest masses observed with solar zenith angle (SZA), altitude and latitude. We are extending this study to density trends of different masses. With data from over 34 encounters and taking advantage of an increase in the duty cycle of measurements during recent flybys we have accumulated a large negative ion database. Groups of masses can be identified because recurrent peaks are observed in the mass-per-charge spectra of different encounters. We have updated these mass groups according to the spectra including the most recent flybys. This includes a heavy group of 625 amu/q and above. We investigate the effects of different controlling parameters such as altitude, solar zenith angle, latitude and possible seasonal effects. The aim of this study is to help constrain the chemical formation and destruction processes of negative ions in Titan's ionosphere. By studying SZA trends we can for example learn about whether nightside reactions or photochemical reactions yield higher densities for the different groups. We present the results and discuss their implications. For instance, the heaviest mass group (>625 amu/q) negative ions are only present at altitudes below 1100 km. Densities of this mass group are highest on the nightside however there are some moderate densities

  10. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kathie L; Fey, Paul D; Rupp, Mark E

    2009-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are differentiated from the closely related but more virulent Staphylococcus aureus by their inability to produce free coagulase. Currently, there are over 40 recognized species of CNS. These organisms typically reside on healthy human skin and mucus membranes, rarely cause disease, and are most frequently encountered by clinicians as contaminants of microbiological cultures. However, CNS have been increasingly recognized to cause clinically significant infections. The conversion of the CNS from symbiont to human pathogen has been a direct reflection of the use of indwelling medical devices. This article deals with the clinical syndromes, epidemiology, prevention, and management of infections caused by this unique group of organisms.

  11. Acoustic metamaterial with negative modulus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sam Hyeon; Park, Choon Mahn; Seo, Yong Mun; Wang, Zhi Guo; Kim, Chul Koo

    2009-04-29

    We present experimental and theoretical results on an acoustic metamaterial that exhibits a negative effective modulus in a frequency range from 0 to 450 Hz. A one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with an array of side holes on a tube was fabricated. We observed that acoustic waves above 450 Hz propagated well in this structure, but no sound below 450 Hz passed through. The frequency characteristics of the metamaterial has the same form as that of the permittivity in metals due to the plasma oscillation. We also provide a theory to explain the experimental results.

  12. Negative mass solitons in gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cebeci, Hakan; Sarioglu, Oezguer; Tekin, Bayram

    2006-03-15

    We first reconstruct the conserved (Abbott-Deser) charges in the spin-connection formalism of gravity for asymptotically (Anti)-de Sitter spaces, and then compute the masses of the AdS soliton and the recently found Eguchi-Hanson solitons in generic odd dimensions, unlike the previous result obtained for only five dimensions. These solutions have negative masses compared to the global AdS or AdS/Z{sub p} spacetimes. As a separate note, we also compute the masses of the recent even dimensional Taub-NUT-Reissner-Nordstroem metrics.

  13. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...     View Larger Image The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired ... MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center in Hampton, VA. Image ...

  14. Softball Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Jim

    1977-01-01

    The Parks and Recreation Department of Montgomery, Alabama, has developed a five-field softball complex as part of a growing community park with facilities for camping, golf, aquatics, tennis, and picnicking. (MJB)

  15. Photosynthesis and negative entropy production.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Robert C; Engelmann, Enrico; Garlaschi, Flavio; Casazza, Anna Paola; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2005-09-30

    The widely held view that the maximum efficiency of a photosynthetic pigment system is given by the Carnot cycle expression (1-T/Tr) for energy transfer from a hot bath (radiation at temperature Tr) to a cold bath (pigment system at temperature T) is critically examined and demonstrated to be inaccurate when the entropy changes associated with the microscopic process of photon absorption and photochemistry at the level of single photosystems are considered. This is because entropy losses due to excited state generation and relaxation are extremely small (DeltaS < T/Tr) and are essentially associated with the absorption-fluorescence Stokes shift. Total entropy changes associated with primary photochemistry for single photosystems are shown to depend critically on the thermodynamic efficiency of the process. This principle is applied to the case of primary photochemistry of the isolated core of higher plant photosystem I and photosystem II, which are demonstrated to have maximal thermodynamic efficiencies of xi > 0.98 and xi > 0.92 respectively, and which, in principle, function with negative entropy production. It is demonstrated that for the case of xi > (1-T/Tr) entropy production is always negative and only becomes positive when xi < (1-T/Tr).

  16. Serotonin, Inhibition, and Negative Mood

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Peter; Huys, Quentin J. M

    2008-01-01

    Pavlovian predictions of future aversive outcomes lead to behavioral inhibition, suppression, and withdrawal. There is considerable evidence for the involvement of serotonin in both the learning of these predictions and the inhibitory consequences that ensue, although less for a causal relationship between the two. In the context of a highly simplified model of chains of affectively charged thoughts, we interpret the combined effects of serotonin in terms of pruning a tree of possible decisions, (i.e., eliminating those choices that have low or negative expected outcomes). We show how a drop in behavioral inhibition, putatively resulting from an experimentally or psychiatrically influenced drop in serotonin, could result in unexpectedly large negative prediction errors and a significant aversive shift in reinforcement statistics. We suggest an interpretation of this finding that helps dissolve the apparent contradiction between the fact that inhibition of serotonin reuptake is the first-line treatment of depression, although serotonin itself is most strongly linked with aversive rather than appetitive outcomes and predictions. PMID:18248087

  17. Negative regulators of cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Cell proliferation is governed by the influence of both mitogens and inhibitors. Although cell contact has long been thought to play a fundamental role in cell cycling regulation, and negative regulators have long been suspected to exist, their isolation and purification has been complicated by a variety of technical difficulties. Nevertheless, over recent years an ever-expanding list of putative negative regulators have emerged. In many cases, their biological inhibitory activities are consistent with density-dependent growth inhibition. Most likely their interactions with mitogenic agents, at an intracellular level, are responsible for either mitotic arrest or continued cell cycling. A review of naturally occurring cell growth inhibitors is presented with an emphasis on those factors shown to be residents of the cell surface membrane. Particular attention is focused on a cell surface sialoglycopeptide, isolated from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells, which has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of an unusually wide range of target cells. The glycopeptide arrest cells obtained from diverse species, both fibroblasts and epithelial cells, and a broad variety of transformed cells. Signal transduction events and a limited spectrum of cells that are refractory to the sialoglycopeptide have provided insight into the molecular events mediated by this cell surface inhibitor.

  18. A Special Sort of Forgetting: Negation in Freud and Augustine.

    PubMed

    Rosengart, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The development from a positive, dualistic theory of memory and forgetting to a concept of memory that includes forgetting as a variety of remembering is traced in two thinkers. Freud's concept of repression is discussed as a complex negation of both remembering and forgetting, and the development of this construct is shown in his letters to Wilhelm Fliess. A close reading of Augustine of Hippo's Confessions shows a similar concept of a special sort of forgetting, in which what is forgotten is remembered nonetheless. Finally, the limits of the comparison are discussed, and a reading of Freud's "Negation" reveals ways in which the unconscious is fundamentally unlike Augustine's interiority.

  19. Some Phenomena on Negative Inversion Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Tae-Soo

    2013-01-01

    We examine the characteristics of NDI (negative degree inversion) and its relation with other inversion phenomena such as SVI (subject-verb inversion) and SAI (subject-auxiliary inversion). The negative element in the NDI construction may be" not," a negative adverbial, or a negative verb. In this respect, NDI has similar licensing…

  20. Double Negative Materials (DNM), Phenomena and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Nanoparticles Formed by Pairs Of Concentric Double-Negative (DNG), Single-Negative ( SNG ) and/or Double-Positive (DPS) Metamaterial Layers.” J. Appl...material RRL Rapid Research Letters SHG second-harmonic generation SNG single-negative SSR split-ring resonator A-1 Appendix A. October 2008...Pairs of Concentric Double-Negative (DNG), Single-Negative ( SNG ), and/or Double-Positive (DPS) Metamaterial Layers.” J. Appl. Phys. 97, no. 9 (May

  1. The Negations of Conjunctions, Conditionals, and Disjunctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-03

    assertion is to negate it, and negation serves an important function in natural language (e.g., Horn, 2001) and in logic (e.g., Aristotle , 1984; Quine...As Aristotle argued (see De Interpretatione in Aristotle , 1984, Vol. 1), negations contradict the negated assertion, i.e., they reverse its truth...may be easier to under stand than the negation of the full assertion, but it is incorrect. As Aristotle argued (see De Interpretatione in Aristotle

  2. Negative affect and drinking drivers: a review and conceptual model linking dissonance, efficacy and negative affect to risk and motivation for change.

    PubMed

    Wells-Parker, Elisabeth; Mann, Robert E; Dill, Patricia L; Stoduto, Gina; Shuggi, Rania; Cross, Ginger W

    2009-05-01

    This review summarizes evidence on negative affect among drinking drivers. Elevations in negative affect, including depressed mood, anxiety and hostility, have long been noted in convicted drinking drivers, and recent evidence suggests an association between negative affect and driving after drinking in the general population. Previous efforts to understand the significance of this negative affective state have ranged from suggestions that it may play a causal role in drinking driving to suggestions that it may interfere with response to treatment and remedial interventions. Recent studies have uncovered an important paradox involving negative affect among convicted drinking drivers (hereafter DUI offenders). DUI offenders with high levels of negative affect recidivated more frequently following a DUI program than did those reporting no or minimal negative affect. However, when a brief supportive motivational intervention was added to the program, offenders with high negative affect levels showed lower recidivism rates than did those with no or minimal negative affect. The review includes studies from the general literature on alcohol treatment in which the same negative affect paradox was reported. In an attempt to understand this paradox, we present a conceptual model involving well-established psychological processes, with a focus on salient discrepancy, the crucial component of cognitive dissonance. In this model, negative affect plays an important role in motivating both continued high-risk drinking as well as therapeutic change. This model suggests that links between motivational states and negative affective processes may be more complex than previously thought. Implications for intervention with DUI offenders are discussed.

  3. Negative illumination thermoradiative solar cell.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tianjun; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Xiaohang; Lin, Bihong; Chen, Jincan

    2017-08-15

    The negative illumination thermoradiative solar cell (NITSC) consisting of a concentrator, an absorber, and a thermoradiative cell (TRC) is established, where the radiation and reflection losses from the absorber to the environment and the radiation loss from the TRC to the environment are taken into consideration. The power output and overall efficiency of the NITSC are analytically derived. The operating temperature of the TRC is determined through the thermal equilibrium equations, and the efficiency of the NITSC is calculated through the optimization of the output voltage of the TRC and the concentrating factor for a given value of the bandgap. Moreover, the maximum efficiencies of the NITSC at different conditions and the optimal values of the bandgap are determined, and consequently, the corresponding optimum operating conditions are obtained. The results obtained here will be helpful for the optimum design and operation of TRCs.

  4. Entanglement negativity in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro E-mail: jonathan.shock@uct.ac.za

    2015-03-01

    We explore quantum entanglement between two causally disconnected regions in the multiverse. We first consider a free massive scalar field, and compute the entanglement negativity between two causally separated open charts in de Sitter space. The qualitative feature of it turns out to be in agreement with that of the entanglement entropy. We then introduce two observers who determine the entanglement between two causally disconnected de Sitter spaces. When one of the observers remains constrained to a region of the open chart in a de Sitter space, we find that the scale dependence enters into the entanglement. We show that a state which is initially maximally entangled becomes more entangled or less entangled on large scales depending on the mass of the scalar field and recovers the initial entanglement in the small scale limit. We argue that quantum entanglement may provide some evidence for the existence of the multiverse.

  5. Entanglement negativity in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Shock, Jonathan P.; Soda, Jiro

    2015-03-10

    We explore quantum entanglement between two causally disconnected regions in the multiverse. We first consider a free massive scalar field, and compute the entanglement negativity between two causally separated open charts in de Sitter space. The qualitative feature of it turns out to be in agreement with that of the entanglement entropy. We then introduce two observers who determine the entanglement between two causally disconnected de Sitter spaces. When one of the observers remains constrained to a region of the open chart in a de Sitter space, we find that the scale dependence enters into the entanglement. We show that a state which is initially maximally entangled becomes more entangled or less entangled on large scales depending on the mass of the scalar field and recovers the initial entanglement in the small scale limit. We argue that quantum entanglement may provide some evidence for the existence of the multiverse.

  6. Complex chimerism

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kimberly K.; Petroff, Margaret G.; Coscia, Lisa A.; Armenti, Vincent T.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of women with organ transplantation have undergone successful pregnancies, however little is known about how the profound immunologic changes associated with pregnancy might influence tolerance or rejection of the allograft. Pregnant women with a solid organ transplant are complex chimeras with multiple foreign cell populations from the donor organ, fetus, and mother of the pregnant woman. We consider the impact of complex chimerism and pregnancy-associated immunologic changes on tolerance of the allograft both during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Mechanisms of allograft tolerance are likely dynamic during pregnancy and affected by the influx of fetal microchimeric cells, HLA relationships (between the fetus, pregnant woman and/or donor), peripheral T cell tolerance to fetal cells, and fetal minor histocompatibility antigens. Further research is necessary to understand the complex immunology during pregnancy and the postpartum period of women with a solid organ transplant. PMID:23974274

  7. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  8. Redox battery including a bromine positive electrode and a chromium ion negative electrode and method

    SciTech Connect

    Giner, J.D.; Stark, H.H.

    1984-09-04

    A redox flow battery with a positive half-cell compartment containing bromide ion, bromine and a complexing organic liquid for bromine, and a negative electrode half-cell compartment containing chromium ion, and including electrolyte fluid communication therebetween.

  9. Complex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Régules, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Complexity science - which describes phenomena such as collective and emergent behaviour - is the focus of a new centre where researchers are examining everything from the spread of influenza to what a healthy heartbeat looks like. Sergio de Régules reports.

  10. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  11. Researching Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumara, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

  12. Researching Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumara, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

  13. Negative refraction in anisotropic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, S. T.

    2004-03-01

    Left-handed materials (LHM) are materials in which the direction of wave propagation S is opposite to the wave vector k . S <0 .[1,2,3] LHM exhibit nagative refraction. Experiments have been carried out on a medium consisting of arrays of metallic rings and wrires.[3] An example of a different class of anisotropic left-handed materials are metallic magnetic granular composites. Based on the effective medium approximation, we show that by incorporating metallic magnetic nanoparticles into an appropriate insulating matrix, it may be possible to prepare a composite medium of low eddy current loss which is left-handed for electromagnetic waves propagating in some special direction and polarization in a frequency region near the ferromagnetic resonance frequency.[4,5] This composite may be easier to make on an industrial scale. In addition, its physical properties may be easily tuned by rotating the magnetization locally. The physics involved seems to be different from the original argument.[1,2] In our argument[5], the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of the metal is much larger than the real part, opposite to the original argument. In anisotropic materials so that some of the susceptibilities are negative, the criterion for LHM may not be the same as that for negative refraction.[6] Ansiotropic materials exhibit a richer manifold of anomlous behaviour[6,7,8] and offers more flexibility in apllications.[8] More recently it was found that negative refraction can occur in anisotropic materials where all the susceptibilities are positive.[9] We found that the range of applicability of this effect is much larger than originally thought.[10] S. T. Chui was supported in part by the Office of Naval Research, by the Army Research Laboratory through the Center of Composite Materials at the University of Delaware, by DARPA and by the NSF. [1] J.B.Pendry, A.J.Holden, W.J.Stewart, and I.Youngs, Phys. Rev. Lett 76, 4773 (1996). [2] V.G.Veselago, Sov. Phys. Usp. 10, 509

  14. Negative Numbers and Antimatter Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsan, Ung Chan

    Dirac's equation states that an electron implies the existence of an antielectron with the same mass (more generally same arithmetic properties) and opposite charge (more generally opposite algebraic properties). Subsequent observation of antielectron validated this concept. This statement can be extended to all matter particles; observation of antiproton, antineutron, antideuton … is in complete agreement with this view. Recently antihypertriton was observed and 38 atoms of antihydrogen were trapped. This opens the path for use in precise testing of nature's fundamental symmetries. The symmetric properties of a matter particle and its mirror antimatter particle seem to be well established. Interactions operate on matter particles and antimatter particles as well. Conservation of matter parallels addition operating on positive and negative numbers. Without antimatter particles, interactions of the Standard Model (electromagnetism, strong interaction and weak interaction) cannot have the structure of group. Antimatter particles are characterized by negative baryonic number A or/and negative leptonic number L. Materialization and annihilation obey conservation of A and L (associated to all known interactions), explaining why from pure energy (A = 0, L = 0) one can only obtain a pair of matter particle antimatter particle — electron antielectron, proton and antiproton — via materialization where the mass of a pair of particle antiparticle gives back to pure energy with annihilation. These two mechanisms cannot change the difference in the number of matter particles and antimatter particles. Thus from pure energy only a perfectly symmetric (in number) universe could be generated as proposed by Dirac but observation showed that our universe is not symmetric, it is a matter universe which is nevertheless neutral. Fall of reflection symmetries shattered the prejudice that there is no way to define in an absolute way right and left or matter and antimatter

  15. Negative Plasma Densities Raise Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-26

    Nearly all the matter encountered on Earth is either a solid, liquid, or gas. Yet plasma-the fourth state of matter-comprises more than 99 percent of the visible universe. Understanding the physical characteristics of plasmas is important to many areas of scientific research, such as the development of fusion as a clean, renewable energy source. Lawrence Livermore scientists study the physics of plasmas in their pursuit to create fusion energy, because plasmas are an integral part of that process. When deuterium and tritium are heated to the extreme temperatures needed to achieve and sustain a fusion reaction (about 100 million degrees), the electrons in these light atoms become separated from the nuclei. This process of separation is called ionization, and the resulting collection of negatively charged free electrons and positively charged nuclei is known as a plasma. Although plasmas and gases have many similar properties, plasmas differ from gases in that they are good conductors of electricity and can generate magnetic fields. For the past decade, x-ray laser interferometry has been used in the laboratory for measuring a plasma's index of refraction to determine plasma density. (The index of refraction for a given material is defined as the wavelength of light in a vacuum divided by the wavelength of light traveling through the material.) Until now, plasma physicists expected to find an index of refraction less than one. Researchers from Livermore and Colorado State University recently conducted experiments on aluminum plasmas at the Laboratory's COMET laser facility and observed results in which the index of refraction was greater than one. This surprising result implied a negative electron density. Livermore physicist Joseph Nilsen and his colleagues from Livermore and the University of Notre Dame have performed sophisticated calculations to explain this phenomenon. Previously, researchers believed that only free electrons contributed to the index of

  16. Complex chemistry with complex compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Robert; Asai, M.; Brand, H.; Chiera, N. M.; Di Nitto, A.; Dressler, R.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Even, J.; Fangli, F.; Goetz, M.; Haba, H.; Hartmann, W.; Jäger, E.; Kaji, D.; Kanaya, J.; Kaneya, Y.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Komori, Y.; Kraus, B.; Kratz, J. V.; Krier, J.; Kudou, Y.; Kurz, N.; Miyashita, S.; Morimoto, K.; Morita, K.; Murakami, M.; Nagame, Y.; Ooe, K.; Piguet, D.; Sato, N.; Sato, T. K.; Steiner, J.; Steinegger, P.; Sumita, T.; Takeyama, M.; Tanaka, K.; Tomitsuka, T.; Toyoshima, A.; Tsukada, K.; Türler, A.; Usoltsev, I.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wiehl, N.; Wittwer, Y.; Yakushev, A.; Yamaki, S.; Yano, S.; Yamaki, S.; Qin, Z.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years gas-phase chemical studies assisted by physical pre-separation allowed for the investigation of fragile single molecular species by gas-phase chromatography. The latest success with the heaviest group 6 transactinide seaborgium is highlighted. The formation of a very volatile hexacarbonyl compound Sg(CO)6 was observed similarly to its lighter homologues molybdenum and tungsten. The interactions of these gaseous carbonyl complex compounds with quartz surfaces were investigated by thermochromatography. Second-generation experiments are under way to investigate the intramolecular bond between the central metal atom of the complexes and the ligands addressing the influence of relativistic effects in the heaviest compounds. Our contribution comprises some aspects of the ongoing challenging experiments as well as an outlook towards other interesting compounds related to volatile complex compounds in the gas phase.

  17. Doubly Excited Resonances in the Positronium Negative Ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y.K.

    2007-01-01

    The recent theoretical studies on the doubly excited states of the Ps' ion are described. The results obtained by using the method of complex coordinate rotation show that the three-lepton system behaves very much like an XYX tri-atomic molecule. Furthermore, the recent investigation on the positronium negative ion embedded in Debye plasma environments is discussed. The problem is modeled by the use of a screened Coulomb potential to represent the interaction between the charge particles.

  18. Negative printing by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jason Kee Yang; Moore, David; Kane, Jennifer; Saraf, Ravi F

    2014-08-27

    In inkless microcontact printing (IμCP) by soft lithography, the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp transfers uncured polymer to a substrate corresponding to its pattern. The spontaneous diffusion of PDMS oligomers to the surface of the stamp that gives rise to this deleterious side effect has been leveraged to fabricate a variety of devices, such as organic thin film transistors, single-electron devices, and biomolecular chips. Here we report an anomalous observation on a partially cured PDMS stamp where the transfer of oligomers onto Au occurred on regions that were not in contact with the stamp, while the surface in contact with the stamp was pristine with no polymer. On the SiO2 surface of the same chip, as expected, the transfer of PDMS occurred exclusively on regions in contact with the stamp. The printing on Au was quantified by a novel method where the submonolayer of PDMS transfer was measured by probing the local electrochemical passivation of the Au. The local transfer of polymer on SiO2 (and also Au) was measured by selective deposition of Au nanoparticle necklaces that exclusively deposited on PDMS at submonolayer sensitivity. It was discovered that the selectivity and sharpness of PDMS deposition on Au for inkless printing (i.e., negative) is significantly better than the traditional (positive) microcontact printing where the stamp is "inked" with low molecular weight PDMS.

  19. Acceleration of absolute negative mobility.

    PubMed

    Regtmeier, Jan; Grauwin, Sebastian; Eichhorn, Ralf; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario; Ros, Alexandra

    2007-07-01

    Recently, the counter intuitive migration phenomenon of absolute negative mobility (ANM) has been demonstrated to occur for colloidal particles in a suitably arranged post array within a microfluidic device [1]. This effect is based on the interplay of Brownian motion, nonlinear dynamics induced through microstructuring, and nonequilibrium driving, and results in a particle movement opposite to an applied static force. Simultaneously, the migration of a different particle species along the direction of the static force is possible [19], thus providing a new tool for particle sorting in microfluidic device format. The so far demonstrated maximum velocities for micrometer-sized spheres are slow, i. e., in the order of 10 nm per second. Here, we investigate numerically, how maximum ANM velocities can be significantly accelerated by a careful adjustment of the post size and shape. Based on this numerical analysis, a post design is developed and tested in a microfluidic device made of PDMS. The experiment reveals an order of magnitude increase in velocity.

  20. Identification of candidate genes associated with positive and negative heterosis in rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heterosis is a complex biological phenomenon in which the offspring show superior performance compared to the inbred parents. Heterosis can be positive or negative. To identify the genes related to positive and negative heterosis, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) libraries were constru...

  1. The Morpho-Syntax and Pragmatics of Levantine Arabic Negation: A Synchronic and Diachronic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alqassas, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the morphosyntax and pragmatics of Levantine Arabic negation from both a synchronic and a diachronic perspective. It is shown that the complex distribution of the negation morphemes "ma," "la" and "-sh" is subject to morphosyntactic and pragmatic constraints. The morphosyntactic…

  2. The Morpho-Syntax and Pragmatics of Levantine Arabic Negation: A Synchronic and Diachronic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alqassas, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the morphosyntax and pragmatics of Levantine Arabic negation from both a synchronic and a diachronic perspective. It is shown that the complex distribution of the negation morphemes "ma," "la" and "-sh" is subject to morphosyntactic and pragmatic constraints. The morphosyntactic…

  3. Complex Questions Promote Complex Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degener, Sophie; Berne, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate-grade teachers often express concerns about meeting the Common Core State Standards for Reading, primarily because of the emphasis on deep understanding of complex texts. No matter how difficult the text, if teachers demand little of the reading, student meaning making is not challenged. This article offers a tool for teachers to…

  4. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  5. Visual content of words delays negation.

    PubMed

    Orenes, Isabel; Santamaría, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have shown the advantage of processing visualizable words over non-visualizables due to the associated image code. The present paper reports the case of negation in which imagery could slow down processing. Negation reverses the truth value of a proposition from false to true or vice versa. Consequently, negation works only on propositions (reversing their truth value) and cannot apply directly to other forms of knowledge representation such as images (although they can be veridical or not). This leads to a paradoxical hypothesis: despite the advantage of visualizable words for general processing, the negation of clauses containing words related to the representation of an image would be more difficult than negation containing non-visualizable words. Two experiments support this hypothesis by showing that sentences with a previously negated visualizable word took longer to be read than sentences with previously negated non-visualizable words. The results suggest that a verbal code is used to process negation.

  6. Negative dysphotopsia after temporal corneal incisions.

    PubMed

    Cooke, David L

    2010-04-01

    Temporal incisions made during cataract extraction have been purported to cause negative dysphotopsia. A case in which negative dysphotopsia occurred after superior scleral tunnel incisions is described. The dystopsia symptoms resolved immediately after intraocular lens exchange using temporal corneal incisions.

  7. Negative refraction in a laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    This work is concerned with the reflection and transmission of waves at a plane interface between a homogeneous elastic half-space and a half-space of elastic material that is periodically laminated. The lamination is always in the direction of the x1-coordinate axis and the displacement is always longitudinal shear, so that the only non-zero displacement component is u3(x1 ,x2 , t). After an initial discussion of Floquet-Bloch waves in the laminated material, brief consideration is given to the reflection-transmission problem, when the interface between the two media is the plane x1 = 0. Nothing unusual emerges: there are just a single reflected wave and a single transmitted wave, undergoing positive group-velocity refraction. Then, the problem is considered when the interface between the two media is the plane x2 = 0. The periodic structure of the interface induces an infinite set of reflected waves and an infinite set of transmitted waves. All need to be taken into account, but most decay exponentially away from the interface. It had previously been recognized that, if the incident wave had appropriate frequency and angle of incidence, a propagating transmitted wave would be generated that would undergo negative group-velocity refraction - behaviour usually associated with a metamaterial. It is established by an example in this work that there is, in addition, a propagating transmitted wave with smaller wavelength but larger group velocity that undergoes positive group-velocity refraction. The work concludes with a brief discussion of this finding, including its implications for the utility (or not) of "effective medium" theory.

  8. Negative Transportation and Tag-Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cattell, Ray

    The author considers the rule of negative transportation in English and discusses his ideas about such a rule in contrast to the theories set forth by Robin Lakoff. The rule of negative transportation allows the shifting of a negative, under certain conditions, from a lower clause into a higher one. The discussion centers around the occurrence of…

  9. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  10. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  11. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  12. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  13. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  14. 40 CFR 62.06 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Negative declarations. 62.06 Section 62....06 Negative declarations. A State may submit to the Administrator a letter certifying that no designated facilities exist in the State if such is the case. The negative declaration will be in lieu of...

  15. Communicating the Challenges and Opportunities of Negative Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, T. J.; Larson, E. D.

    2016-12-01

    The Paris agreement sets goals of limiting the global temperature increase to well below 2°C and of pursuing efforts to limit the increase to 1.5°C. Emissions pathways consistent with these goals will likely require sustained globally net-negative emissions beginning after mid-century. Scientific and technical assessments of the feasibility, potential, and risks associated with negative emissions options have begun. However, communication strategies to broader, non-technical audiences around the need for negative emissions and options for achieving them remain largely absent. This is a critical need, as basic understanding by a broad set of stakeholders in the policy-making process is a pre-requisite for the deployment of negative emissions options that will need to begin in the next decade or two in order for them to be able to be scaled-up to the levels needed later in the century. Building on Climate Central's experience in developing communications tools for general audiences addressing complex science and technology issues relating to climate change and energy, we propose a visual and interactive communications framework for synthesizing scientific knowledge around the need and potential for negative emissions options, as well as the technical and socio-economic challenges in developing and deploying them.

  16. A biopsychosocial model based on negative feedback and control

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Timothy A.; Mansell, Warren; Tai, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the biopsychosocial model has been a popular topic of discussion for over four decades it has not had the traction in fields of research that might be expected of such an intuitively appealing idea. One reason for this might be the absence of an identified mechanism or a functional architecture that is authentically biopsychosocial. What is needed is a robust mechanism that is equally important to biochemical processes as it is to psychological and social processes. Negative feedback may be the mechanism that is required. Negative feedback has been implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitters as well as important psychological and social processes such as emotional regulation and the relationship between a psychotherapist and a client. Moreover, negative feedback is purported to also govern the activity of all other organisms as well as humans. Perceptual Control Theory (PCT) describes the way in which negative feedback establishes control at increasing levels of perceptual complexity. Thus, PCT may be the first biopsychosocial model to be articulated in functional terms. In this paper we outline the working model of PCT and explain how PCT provides an embodied hierarchical neural architecture that utilizes negative feedback to control physiological, psychological, and social variables. PCT has major implications for both research and practice and, importantly, provides a guide by which fields of research that are currently separated may be integrated to bring about substantial progress in understanding the way in which the brain alters, and is altered by, its behavioral and environmental context. PMID:24616685

  17. Corrugator activity confirms immediate negative affect in surprise

    PubMed Central

    Topolinski, Sascha; Strack, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The emotion of surprise entails a complex of immediate responses, such as cognitive interruption, attention allocation to, and more systematic processing of the surprising stimulus. All these processes serve the ultimate function to increase processing depth and thus cognitively master the surprising stimulus. The present account introduces phasic negative affect as the underlying mechanism responsible for this switch in operating mode. Surprising stimuli are schema-discrepant and thus entail cognitive disfluency, which elicits immediate negative affect. This affect in turn works like a phasic cognitive tuning switching the current processing mode from more automatic and heuristic to more systematic and reflective processing. Directly testing the initial elicitation of negative affect by surprising events, the present experiment presented high and low surprising neutral trivia statements to N = 28 participants while assessing their spontaneous facial expressions via facial electromyography. High compared to low surprising trivia elicited higher corrugator activity, indicative of negative affect and mental effort, while leaving zygomaticus (positive affect) and frontalis (cultural surprise expression) activity unaffected. Future research shall investigate the mediating role of negative affect in eliciting surprise-related outcomes. PMID:25762956

  18. A circuit mechanism for differentiating positive and negative associations.

    PubMed

    Namburi, Praneeth; Beyeler, Anna; Yorozu, Suzuko; Calhoon, Gwendolyn G; Halbert, Sarah A; Wichmann, Romy; Holden, Stephanie S; Mertens, Kim L; Anahtar, Melodi; Felix-Ortiz, Ada C; Wickersham, Ian R; Gray, Jesse M; Tye, Kay M

    2015-04-30

    The ability to differentiate stimuli predicting positive or negative outcomes is critical for survival, and perturbations of emotional processing underlie many psychiatric disease states. Synaptic plasticity in the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) mediates the acquisition of associative memories, both positive and negative. Different populations of BLA neurons may encode fearful or rewarding associations, but the identifying features of these populations and the synaptic mechanisms of differentiating positive and negative emotional valence have remained unknown. Here we show that BLA neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens (NAc projectors) or the centromedial amygdala (CeM projectors) undergo opposing synaptic changes following fear or reward conditioning. We find that photostimulation of NAc projectors supports positive reinforcement while photostimulation of CeM projectors mediates negative reinforcement. Photoinhibition of CeM projectors impairs fear conditioning and enhances reward conditioning. We characterize these functionally distinct neuronal populations by comparing their electrophysiological, morphological and genetic features. Overall, we provide a mechanistic explanation for the representation of positive and negative associations within the amygdala.

  19. A Circuit Mechanism for Differentiating Positive and Negative Associations

    PubMed Central

    Namburi, Praneeth; Beyeler, Anna; Yorozu, Suzuko; Calhoon, Gwendolyn G.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Wichmann, Romy; Holden, Stephanie S.; Mertens, Kim L.; Anahtar, Melodi; Felix-Ortiz, Ada C.; Wickersham, Ian R.; Gray, Jesse M.; Tye, Kay M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentiate stimuli predicting positive or negative outcomes is critical for survival, and perturbations of emotional processing underlie many psychiatric disease states. Synaptic plasticity in the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) mediates the acquisition of associative memories, both positive1,2 and negative3–7. Different populations of BLA neurons may encode fearful or rewarding associations8–10, but the identifying features of these populations and the synaptic mechanisms of differentiating positive and negative emotional valence have remained an enigma. Here, we show that BLA neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens (NAc projectors) or the centromedial amygdala (CeM projectors) underwent opposing synaptic changes following fear or reward conditioning. We found that photostimulation of NAc projectors supports positive reinforcement while photostimulation of CeM projectors mediates negative reinforcement. Photoinhibition of CeM projectors impaired fear conditioning and enhanced reward conditioning. We then characterized these functionally-distinct neuronal populations by comparing their electrophysiological, morphological and genetic features. We provide a mechanistic explanation for the representation of positive and negative associations within the amygdala. PMID:25925480

  20. Humic acid protein complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, W. F.; Koopal, L. K.; Weng, L. P.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Norde, W.

    2008-04-01

    Interactions of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) with lysozyme (LSZ) are investigated. In solution LSZ is moderately positively and PAHA negatively charged at the investigated pH values. The proton binding of PAHA and of LSZ is determined by potentiometric proton titrations at various KCl concentrations. It is also measured for two mixtures of PAHA-LSZ and compared with theoretically calculated proton binding assuming no mutual interaction. The charge adaptation due to PAHA-LSZ interaction is relatively small and only significant at low and high pH. Next to the proton binding, the mass ratio PAHA/LSZ at the iso-electric point (IEP) of the complex at given solution conditions is measured together with the pH using the Mütek particle charge detector. From the pH changes the charge adaptation due to the interaction can be found. Also these measurements show that the net charge adaptation is weak for PAHA-LSZ complexes at their IEP. PAHA/LSZ mass ratios in the complexes at the IEP are measured at pH 5 and 7. At pH 5 and 50 mmol/L KCl the charge of the complex is compensated for 30-40% by K +; at pH 7, where LSZ has a rather low positive charge, this is 45-55%. At pH 5 and 5 mmol/L KCl the PAHA/LSZ mass ratio at the IEP of the complex depends on the order of addition. When LSZ is added to PAHA about 25% K + is included in the complex, but no K + is incorporated when PAHA is added to LSZ. The flocculation behavior of the complexes is also different. After LSZ addition to PAHA slow precipitation occurs (6-24 h) in the IEP, but after addition of PAHA to LSZ no precipitation can be seen after 12 h. Clearly, PAHA/LSZ complexation and the colloidal stability of PAHA-LSZ aggregates depend on the order of addition. Some implications of the observed behavior are discussed.

  1. Personality, Negative Interactions, and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Karen D.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that an individual’s personality traits may mediate the relationship between social support and mental health. This study uses two national data sets to test a conceptual model that integrates personality, social support, negative interactions, and psychological distress. Results suggest that, beyond the influence of personality, social support is negatively associated with psychological distress, and negative interactions are positively associated with such distress. The findings also suggest that personality has direct and indirect effects, through social support and negative interactions, on psychological distress. Findings specify how positive and negative facets of relationships and personality influence mental health outcomes. PMID:21151733

  2. Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Ary L.

    2006-01-01

    Physiologic systems in health and disease display an extraordinary range of temporal behaviors and structural patterns that defy understanding based on linear constructs, reductionist strategies, and classical homeostasis. Application of concepts and computational tools derived from the contemporary study of complex systems, including nonlinear dynamics, fractals and “chaos theory,” is having an increasing impact on biology and medicine. This presentation provides a brief overview of an emerging area of biomedical research, including recent applications to cardiopulmonary medicine and chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:16921107

  3. [Negative symptoms: clinical and psychometric aspects].

    PubMed

    Adida, M; Azorin, J-M; Belzeaux, R; Fakra, E

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations performing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis have suggested that negative symptoms are multidimensional, including evidence for at least two distinct negative symptom subdomains: diminished expression and amotivation. Guidance for selection of instruments for measurement of negative symptoms is rapidly evolving. As there are continuing advances in the description of negative symptoms, new instruments are under development, and new data on the performance of instruments emerge from clinical trials. The Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment-16 (NSA-16) are considered to be reliable and valid measures for negative symptom trials but differ with respect to their domain coverage, use of informants, integration of global scores, administration time and comprehensiveness of their structured interviews. In response to the 2005 NIMH - MATRICS consensus statement, work groups are field testing and refining two new measures, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) and the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS). Both address the five currently recognized domains of negative symptoms, differentiate appetitive from consummatory aspects of anhedonia and address desire for social relationships. Thus far, both have exhibited promising psychometric properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Negative Poisson's Ratio in Modern Functional Materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuanwei; Chen, Lang

    2016-10-01

    Materials with negative Poisson's ratio attract considerable attention due to their underlying intriguing physical properties and numerous promising applications, particularly in stringent environments such as aerospace and defense areas, because of their unconventional mechanical enhancements. Recent progress in materials with a negative Poisson's ratio are reviewed here, with the current state of research regarding both theory and experiment. The inter-relationship between the underlying structure and a negative Poisson's ratio is discussed in functional materials, including macroscopic bulk, low-dimensional nanoscale particles, films, sheets, or tubes. The coexistence and correlations with other negative indexes (such as negative compressibility and negative thermal expansion) are also addressed. Finally, open questions and future research opportunities are proposed for functional materials with negative Poisson's ratios.

  5. Translating Ribosomes Inhibit Poliovirus Negative-Strand RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Barton, David J.; Morasco, B. Joan; Flanegan, James B.

    1999-01-01

    Poliovirus has a single-stranded RNA genome of positive polarity that serves two essential functions at the start of the viral replication cycle in infected cells. First, it is translated to synthesize viral proteins and, second, it is copied by the viral polymerase to synthesize negative-strand RNA. We investigated these two reactions by using HeLa S10 in vitro translation-RNA replication reactions. Preinitiation RNA replication complexes were isolated from these reactions and then used to measure the sequential synthesis of negative- and positive-strand RNAs in the presence of different protein synthesis inhibitors. Puromycin was found to stimulate RNA replication overall. In contrast, RNA replication was inhibited by diphtheria toxin, cycloheximide, anisomycin, and ricin A chain. Dose-response experiments showed that precisely the same concentration of a specific drug was required to inhibit protein synthesis and to either stimulate or inhibit RNA replication. This suggested that the ability of these drugs to affect RNA replication was linked to their ability to alter the normal clearance of translating ribosomes from the input viral RNA. Consistent with this idea was the finding that the protein synthesis inhibitors had no measurable effect on positive-strand synthesis in normal RNA replication complexes. In marked contrast, negative-strand synthesis was stimulated by puromycin and was inhibited by cycloheximide. Puromycin causes polypeptide chain termination and induces the dissociation of polyribosomes from mRNA. Cycloheximide and other inhibitors of polypeptide chain elongation “freeze” ribosomes on mRNA and prevent the normal clearance of ribosomes from viral RNA templates. Therefore, it appears that the poliovirus polymerase was not able to dislodge translating ribosomes from viral RNA templates and mediate the switch from translation to negative-strand synthesis. Instead, the initiation of negative-strand synthesis appears to be coordinately regulated

  6. Impact of negation salience and cognitive resources on negation during attitude formation.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Kathryn L; Rydell, Robert J

    2012-10-01

    Because of the increased cognitive resources required to process negations, past research has shown that explicit attitude measures are more sensitive to negations than implicit attitude measures. The current work demonstrated that the differential impact of negations on implicit and explicit attitude measures was moderated by (a) the extent to which the negation was made salient and (b) the amount of cognitive resources available during attitude formation. When negations were less visually salient, explicit but not implicit attitude measures reflected the intended valence of the negations. When negations were more visually salient, both explicit and implicit attitude measures reflected the intended valence of the negations, but only when perceivers had ample cognitive resources during encoding. Competing models of negation processing, schema-plus-tag and fusion, were examined to determine how negation salience impacts the processing of negations.

  7. Mathematicians, Attributional Complexity, and Gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalder, Daniel R.

    Given indirect indications in sex role and soda! psychology research that mathematical-deductive reasoning may negatively relate to social acuity, Study 1 investigated whether mathematicians were less attributionally complex than nonmathematicians. Study 1 administered the Attributional Complexity Scale, a measure of social acuity, to female and male faculty members and graduate students in four Midwestern schools. Atlrihutional complexity (AC) is the ability and motivation to give complex explanations for behavior. Study 1 found a significant interaction between field and gender. Only among women did mathematicians score lower on AC. In addition, an established gender difference in AC (that women score higher than men) was present only among nonmathematicians. Studies 2 and 3 offered some preliminary support for the possibility that it is generally female students who score tow on AC who aspire to he mathematicians and for the underlying view that female students' perceived similarity to mathematicians can influence their vocational choices.

  8. Forman curvature for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, R. P.; Mohanraj, Karthikeyan; Jost, Jürgen; Saucan, Emil; Samal, Areejit

    2016-06-01

    We adapt Forman’s discretization of Ricci curvature to the case of undirected networks, both weighted and unweighted, and investigate the measure in a variety of model and real-world networks. We find that most nodes and edges in model and real networks have a negative curvature. Furthermore, the distribution of Forman curvature of nodes and edges is narrow in random and small-world networks, while the distribution is broad in scale-free and real-world networks. In most networks, Forman curvature is found to display significant negative correlation with degree and centrality measures. However, Forman curvature is uncorrelated with clustering coefficient in most networks. Importantly, we find that both model and real networks are vulnerable to targeted deletion of nodes with highly negative Forman curvature. Our results suggest that Forman curvature can be employed to gain novel insights on the organization of complex networks.

  9. Arabinogalactan proteins are incorporated in negatively charged coffee brew melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Bekedam, E Koen; De Laat, Marieke P F C; Schols, Henk A; Van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Smit, Gerrit

    2007-02-07

    The charge properties of melanoidins in high molecular weight (HMw) coffee brew fractions, isolated by diafiltration and membrane dialysis, were studied. Ion exchange chromatography experiments with the HMw fractions showed that coffee brew melanoidins were negatively charged whereas these molecules did not expose any positive charge at the pH of coffee brew. Fractions with different ionic charges were isolated and subsequently characterized by means of the specific extinction coefficient (K(mix 405nm)), sugar composition, phenolic group content, nitrogen content, and the arabinogalactan protein (AGP) specific Yariv gel-diffusion assay. The isolated fractions were different in composition and AGP was found to be present in one of the HMw fractions. The AGP accounted for 6% of the coffee brew dry matter and had a moderate negative charge, probably caused by the presence of uronic acids. As the fraction that precipitated with Yariv was brown (K(mix 405nm) = 1.2), compared to a white color in the green bean, it was concluded that these AGPs had undergone Maillard reaction resulting in an AGP-melanoidin complex. The presence of mannose (presumably from galactomannan) indicates the incorporation of galactomannans in the AGP-melanoidin complex. As the uronic acid content in the more negatively charged melanoidin-rich, AGP-poor HMw fractions decreased, it was hypothesized that acidic groups are formed or incorporated during melanoidin formation.

  10. Electrochemical cell and negative electrode therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1982-01-01

    A secondary electrochemical cell with the positive and negative electrodes separated by a molten salt electrolyte with the negative electrode comprising a particulate mixture of lithium-aluminum alloy and electrolyte and an additive selected from graphitized carbon, Raney iron or mixtures thereof. The lithium-aluminum alloy is present in the range of from about 45 to about 80 percent by volume of the negative electrode, and the electrolyte is present in an amount not less than about 10 percent by volume of the negative electrode. The additive of graphitized carbon is present in the range of from about 1 to about 10 percent by volume of the negative electrode, and the Raney iron additive is present in the range of from about 3 to about 10 percent by volume of the negative electrode.

  11. Production systems need negation as failure

    SciTech Connect

    Phan Minh Dung; Mancarella, P.

    1996-12-31

    We study action rule based systems with two forms of negation, namely classical negation and {open_quotes}negation as failure to find a course of actions{close_quotes}. We show by several examples that adding negation as failure to such systems increase their expressiveness, in the sense that real life problems can be represented in a natural and simple way. Then, we address the problem of providing a formal declarative semantics to these extended systems, by adopting an argumentation based approach, which has been shown to be a simple unifying framework for understanding the declarative semantics of various nonmonotonic formalisms. In this way, we naturally define the grounded (well-founded), stable and preferred semantics for production systems with negation as failure. Next, we characterize the class of stratified production systems, which enjoy the properties that the above mentioned semantics coincide and that negation as failure can be computed by a simple bottom-up operator.

  12. Nonlinear negative refraction by difference frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jianjun; Shen, Dongyi; Feng, Yaming; Wan, Wenjie

    2016-05-09

    Negative refraction has attracted much interest for its promising capability in imaging applications. Such an effect can be implemented by negative index meta-materials, however, which are usually accompanied by high loss and demanding fabrication processes. Recently, alternative nonlinear approaches like phase conjugation and four wave mixing have shown advantages of low-loss and easy-to-implement, but associated problems like narrow accepting angles can still halt their practical applications. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a scheme to realize negative refraction by nonlinear difference frequency generation with wide tunability, where a thin Beta barium borate slice serves as a negative refraction layer bending the input signal beam to the idler beam at a negative angle. Furthermore, we realize optical focusing effect using such nonlinear negative refraction, which may enable many potential applications in imaging science.

  13. Heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere: Altitude and latitude dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Lewis, G. R.; Jones, G. H.; Young, D. T.; Crary, F. J.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-12-01

    One of the unexpected results of the Cassini mission was the discovery of negative ions at altitudes between 950 and 1400 km in Titan's ionosphere with masses up to 10,000 amu/q [Coates, A.J., Crary, F.J., Lewis, G.R., Young, D.T., Waite Jr., J.H., Sittler Jr., E.C., 2007. Discovery of heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere. Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L22103, doi:10.1029/2007GL030978; Waite Jr., J.H., Young, D. T., Coates, A. J., Crary, F. J., Magee, B. A., Mandt, K. E., Westlake, J. H., 2008. The Source of Heavy Organics and Aerosols in Titan's Atmosphere, submitted to Organic Matter in Space, Proceedings IAU Symposium no. 251]. These ions are detected at low altitudes during Cassini's closest Titan encounters by the Cassini plasma spectrometer (CAPS) electron spectrometer. This result is important as it is indicative of complex hydrocarbon and nitrile chemical processes at work in Titan's high atmosphere. They may play a role in haze formation and ultimately in the formation of heavy particles (tholins), which fall through Titan's atmosphere and build up on the surface. During Cassini's prime mission negative ions were observed on 23 Titan encounters, including 7 in addition to those reported by Coates et al. [Coates, A.J., Crary, F.J., Lewis, G.R., Young, D.T., Waite Jr., J.H., Sittler Jr., E.C., 2007. Discovery of heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere. Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L22103, doi:10.1029/2007GL030978]. Here, we also examine the altitude and latitude dependence of the high-mass negative ions observed in Titan's ionosphere, and we examine the implications of these results. We find that the maximum negative ion mass is higher at low altitude and at high latitudes. We also find a weaker dependence of the maximum mass on solar zenith angle.

  14. Negation, questions, and structure building in a homesign system

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Amy; Giannakidou, Anastasia; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Deaf children whose hearing losses are so severe that they cannot acquire spoken language, and whose hearing parents have not exposed them to sign language, use gestures called homesigns to communicate. Homesigns have been shown to contain many of the properties of natural languages. Here we ask whether homesign has structure building devices for negation and questions. We identify two meanings (negation, question) that correspond semantically to propositional functions, that is, to functions that apply to a sentence (whose semantic value is a proposition, φ) and yield another proposition that is more complex (¬φ for negation; ?φ for question). Combining φ with¬ or ? thus involves sentence modification. We propose that these negative and question functions are structure building operators, and we support this claim with data from an American homesigner. We show that: (a) each meaning is marked by a particular form in the child’s gesture system (side-to-side headshake for negation, manual flip for question); (b) the two markers occupy systematic, and different, positions at the periphery of the gesture sentences (headshake at the beginning, flip at the end); and (c) the flip is extended from questions to other uses associated with the wh-form (exclamatives, referential expressions of location) and thus functions like a category in natural languages. If what we see in homesign is a language creation process (Goldin-Meadow, 2003), and if negation and question formation involve sentential modification, then our analysis implies that homesign has at least this minimal sentential syntax. Our findings thus contribute to ongoing debates about properties that are fundamental to language and language learning. PMID:23630971

  15. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-2-0035 TITLE: Gram -Negative Bacterial Wound Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Luis A. Actis CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...DATE May 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 May 2014 - 30 Apr 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gram -negative bacterial wound infections 5a...acquisition and biofilm functions expressed by Gram -negative pathogens play in the pathogenesis of severe infections in the Wounded Warrior because of

  16. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-2-0035 TITLE: Gram -Negative Bacterial Wound...SUBTITLE Gram -negative bacterial wound infections 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0035 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0035 5c. PROGRAM...determine the role iron acquisition and biofilm functions expressed by Gram -negative pathogens play in the pathogenesis of severe infections in the

  17. An advanced negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexey A. Dobrovolsky, Andrey N.; Goretskii, Victor P.

    2016-02-15

    The results of investigation of emission productivity of negative particles source with cesiated combined discharge are presented. A cylindrical beam of negative hydrogen ions with density about 2 A/cm{sup 2} in low noise mode on source emission aperture is obtained. The total beam current values are up to 200 mA for negative hydrogen ions and up to 1.5 A for all negative particles with high divergence after source. The source has simple design and can produce stable discharge with low level of oscillation.

  18. Negative appendectomy rate: influence of CT scans.

    PubMed

    McGory, Marcia L; Zingmond, David S; Nanayakkara, Darshani; Maggard, Melinda A; Ko, Clifford Y

    2005-10-01

    Negative appendectomy rate varies significantly depending on patient age and sex. However, the impact of computed tomography (CT) scans on the diagnosis of appendicitis is unknown. The goal of this study was to examine the negative appendectomy rate using a statewide database and analyze the association of receipt of CT scan. Using the California Inpatient File, all patients undergoing appendectomy in 1999-2000 were identified (n = 75,452). Demographic and clinical data were analyzed, including procedure approach (open vs laparoscopic) and appendicitis type (negative, simple, abscess, peritonitis). Patients with CT scans performed were identified to compare the negative appendectomy rate. For the entire cohort, appendicitis type was 59 per cent simple, 10 per cent with abscess, 18.7 per cent with peritonitis, and 9.3 per cent negative. Males had a lower rate of negative appendicitis than females (6.0% vs 13.4%, P < 0.0001). The use of CT scans was associated with an overall lower negative appendectomy rate for females, especially in the < 5 years and > 45 years age categories. Use of CT scans in males does not appear to be efficacious, as the negative appendectomy rates were similar across all age categories. In conclusion, use of CT was associated with lower rate of negative appendectomy, depending on patient age and sex.

  19. A negative ion model in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, H.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-12-01

    There are a number of problems in the electricity of the stratosphere at middle latitudes; e.g., the positive relation between the seasonal variations of negative polar conductivity and that of ozone density, the observed dependence of the daytime variation of conductivity on the solar zenith angle, and the interaction between the ions and aerosols, particularly the processes of the conversion from negative ions to the sulfate aerosols; e.g., ion-nucleation and the growth through multi-ion complexes. As a basic tool for investigating these problems, a negative ion chemical model was constructed in the altitude region of 15 to 30 km. Recently, the success of in situ mass analysis of stratospheric ions has revealed the nature of the most abundant ions in the stratosphere. Further, the height variations of negative ion composition between 15 and 34 km were obtained with the balloon-borne mass spectrometer by another researcher. A comparison of the calculated result with the observed result is given.

  20. The influence of positive vs. negative affect on multitasking.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brent; D'Mello, Sidney K

    2016-10-01

    Considerable research has investigated how affect influences performance on a single task; however, little is known about the role of affect in complex multitasking environments. In this paper, 178 participants multitasked in a synthetic work environment (SYNWORK) consisting of memory, visual monitoring, auditory monitoring, and math tasks. Participants multitasked for a 3-min baseline phase (MT1), following which they were randomly assigned to watch one of three affect-induction videos: positive, neutral, or negative. Participants then resumed multitasking for two additional critical phases (MT2, MT3; 3min each). In MT2, performance of the positive and neutral conditions was statistically equivalent and higher than the negative condition. In MT3, the positive condition performed better than the negative condition, with the neutral condition not significantly different from the other two. The differences in overall multitasking scores were largely driven by errors in the Math task (the most cognitively demanding task) in MT2 and the Memory task in MT3. These findings have implications for how positive and negative affective states influence processing in a cognitively demanding multitasking environment.

  1. A negative ion model in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamoto, H.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-01-01

    There are a number of problems in the electricity of the stratosphere at middle latitudes; e.g., the positive relation between the seasonal variations of negative polar conductivity and that of ozone density, the observed dependence of the daytime variation of conductivity on the solar zenith angle, and the interaction between the ions and aerosols, particularly the processes of the conversion from negative ions to the sulfate aerosols; e.g., ion-nucleation and the growth through multi-ion complexes. As a basic tool for investigating these problems, a negative ion chemical model was constructed in the altitude region of 15 to 30 km. Recently, the success of in situ mass analysis of stratospheric ions has revealed the nature of the most abundant ions in the stratosphere. Further, the height variations of negative ion composition between 15 and 34 km were obtained with the balloon-borne mass spectrometer by another researcher. A comparison of the calculated result with the observed result is given.

  2. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Ortín, Juan; Martín-Benito, Jaime

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  3. Community detection in networks with positive and negative links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traag, V. A.; Bruggeman, Jeroen

    2009-09-01

    Detecting communities in complex networks accurately is a prime challenge, preceding further analyses of network characteristics and dynamics. Until now, community detection took into account only positively valued links, while many actual networks also feature negative links. We extend an existing Potts model to incorporate negative links as well, resulting in a method similar to the clustering of signed graphs, as dealt with in social balance theory, but more general. To illustrate our method, we applied it to a network of international alliances and disputes. Using data from 1993-2001, it turns out that the world can be divided into six power blocs similar to Huntington’s civilizations, with some notable exceptions.

  4. 5. Photographic copy of a photograph taken from pasteup negatives ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photographic copy of a photograph taken from paste-up negatives for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers document GF-500-MCP, entitled "Grand Forks Site RLS Army Operating Drawings, Master Composite Photographs for SAFEGUARD TSE Systems and Equipment," Page 9, dated 1 September 1974 (original document and negatives in possession of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntsville, AL). Photographer unknown. View of pneumatic control panel regulating entrance to waiting room #116. The panel activated the pneumatic cylinder for opening and closing of blast doors #116 and #118. A rotary air motor actuated locking and unlocking of the doors. - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Remote Launch Operations Building, Near Service Road exit from Patrol Road, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  5. [Behavioral therapy of ticks with negative reinforcement in children].

    PubMed

    Nabieva, T N; Mukhin, E I

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-two children suffering from motor and vocal ticks exhibited weakness and distonia of ticks-prone muscles were examined. Based on the results obtained earlier, a complex of physical exercises has been worked out and conducted for 20 days. The patients were divided into 3 groups: 1st (n = 10) group did the exercises daily for training the ticks-prone muscles; the 2nd one (n = 10) exercised only after tick's appearance--negative reinforcement; 3rd group (n = 12) did exercises after tick's appearance as well but on irregular basis--probable negative reinforcement. In the 1st group, the exercising resulted in muscle strengthening and decrease of tick's number. The patients of the 2nd group got rid of ticks for 20 days. The probable tick's reinforcement in children of the 3rd group did not change pathological muscle activity. The central mechanisms of cortical plasticity in behavioral therapy of ticks are discussed.

  6. 4. Photographic copy of a photograph taken from pasteup negatives ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photographic copy of a photograph taken from paste-up negatives for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers document GF-500-MCP, entitled "Grand Forks Site RLS Army Operating Drawings, Master Composite Photographs for SAFEGUARD TSE Systems and Equipment," Page 9, dated 1 September 1974 (original document and negatives in possession of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntsville, AL). Photographer unknown. View of remote launch operations building exterior (southwest corner), prior to earth mounding. A,B,C, and D are heat exchangers HX-1102B, HX-1102A, HX-1101B, and HX-1101 A, respectively. The heat exchangers transferred heat from the cooling water to the outside air during the normal operating mode. On the far right is the air exhaust shaft - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Remote Launch Operations Building, Near Service Road exit from Patrol Road, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  7. Daily Negative Work Events and Employees' Physiological and Psychological Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Volmer, Judith; Fritsche, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Scholars have accumulated an abundant amount of knowledge on the association between work stressors and employees' health and well-being. However, notions of the complex interplay of physiological and psychological components of stress reactions are still in their infancy. Building on the Allostatic Load (AL) model, the present study considers short-term within-person effects of negative work events (NWEs) on indicators of both physiological (i.e., salivary cortisol) and psychological distress responses (i.e., negative affect and emotional exhaustion). Multilevel findings from an experience sampling study with 83 healthcare professionals suggest that reported NWEs predict employees' psychological but not endocrine stress responses. Results contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of employees' daily response patterns to occupational stressors. PMID:27877145

  8. [Negative pressure therapy. A step forward in the burn units].

    PubMed

    Varga del Hoyo, Raquel; Peñas Raigoso, M Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This work has been the winner of the Award of 2012 Negative Pressure Therapy in its fourth edition. This award is organized by Revista ROL de Enfermería and has the endorsement of the Spanish Association of Vascular Nursing (AEEV) and the collaboration of KCI Clínic Spain. The objective of this work is to show a clinical case in which the therapy pressure negative topical (PTN), known by the initials of its name in English (Vacuum Assisted Closure), as the system VAC has helped simplify the cutaneous coverage of a patient who has a very deep and extensive burns in the back, avoiding the use of complex reconstructive media.

  9. 40 CFR 52.122 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Negative declarations. 52.122 Section 52.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.122 Negative declarations. (a) The following...

  10. Criticism and the Ethics of Negative Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to work through my own angst at a negative review of my "Education, Philosophy and Politics," reviewed recently by Ian Stronach for the "British Educational Research Journal," and to provide a therapeutic reading of the ethics of negative reviews. What of "shots in the dark" and should there…

  11. Negative Priming in Free Recall Reconsidered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanczakowski, Maciej; Beaman, C. Philip; Jones, Dylan M.

    2016-01-01

    Negative priming in free recall is the finding of impaired memory performance when previously ignored auditory distracters become targets of encoding and retrieval. This negative priming has been attributed to an aftereffect of deploying inhibitory mechanisms that serve to suppress auditory distraction and minimize interference with learning and…

  12. Negative Priming in Free Recall Reconsidered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanczakowski, Maciej; Beaman, C. Philip; Jones, Dylan M.

    2016-01-01

    Negative priming in free recall is the finding of impaired memory performance when previously ignored auditory distracters become targets of encoding and retrieval. This negative priming has been attributed to an aftereffect of deploying inhibitory mechanisms that serve to suppress auditory distraction and minimize interference with learning and…

  13. Negative ion spectrometry for detecting nitrated explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, H. G.; Yinon, J.

    1975-01-01

    Ionization procedure is modified to produce mainly negative ions by electron capture. Peaks of negative ions are monitored conventionally. Nitrated organic materials could be identified directly from sample sniff inlet stream by suitably modified mass spectrometer because of unique electronegativity which nitro group imparts to organic material.

  14. Negative Automaintenance Omission Training Is Effective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanabria, Federico; Sitomer, Matthew T.; Killeen, Peter R.

    2006-01-01

    Twelve pigeons were exposed to negative automaintenance contingencies for 17-27 sessions immediately after brief (14-16 sessions) or extended (168-237 sessions) exposure to positive automaintenance contingencies, or after 4-10 sessions of instrumental training. In all conditions, negative automaintenance contingencies virtually eliminated…

  15. Negative resistance in an organic thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Ehara, S. ); Takagi, T. ); Yoshida, T.; Inaba, H.; Naito, H.; Okuda, M. )

    1992-08-20

    This paper reports that the negative resistance of the tunneling currents was observed in a semiconducting organic thin film on a graphite substrate by an STM (Scanning Tunneling Microscopy). This negative resistance may be understood by the theory of a molecular resonance tunneling effect.

  16. 40 CFR 52.2900 - Negative declaration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Negative declaration. 52.2900 Section... § 52.2900 Negative declaration. (a) Air Pollution Implementation Plan for the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. (1) Letter of December 15, 1982, from the Governor to EPA, which is a...

  17. Human Concept Formation: Negative Instances. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumway, Richard J.

    The role of negative instances in the acquisition of the mathematical concepts of distributivity and homomorphism was examined. Two treatment levels for distributivity (positive instances and positive and negative instances) and the same treatment levels for homomorphism were crossed to form a 2 x 2 factorial design with 23 subjects per cell.…

  18. Complexity in language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alexander; Lappin, Shalom

    2013-01-01

    Learning theory has frequently been applied to language acquisition, but discussion has largely focused on information theoretic problems-in particular on the absence of direct negative evidence. Such arguments typically neglect the probabilistic nature of cognition and learning in general. We argue first that these arguments, and analyses based on them, suffer from a major flaw: they systematically conflate the hypothesis class and the learnable concept class. As a result, they do not allow one to draw significant conclusions about the learner. Second, we claim that the real problem for language learning is the computational complexity of constructing a hypothesis from input data. Studying this problem allows for a more direct approach to the object of study--the language acquisition device-rather than the learnable class of languages, which is epiphenomenal and possibly hard to characterize. The learnability results informed by complexity studies are much more insightful. They strongly suggest that target grammars need to be objective, in the sense that the primitive elements of these grammars are based on objectively definable properties of the language itself. These considerations support the view that language acquisition proceeds primarily through data-driven learning of some form. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  19. Negative Ion Beam Extraction and Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Andrew J. T.

    2007-08-10

    The use of magnetic fields to both aid the production of negative ions and suppress the co-extracted electrons causes the emittance and hence the divergence of the negative ion beam to increase significantly due to the plasma non-uniformity from jxB drift. This drift distorts the beam-plasma meniscus and experimental results of the beam emittance are presented, which show that non-uniformity causes the square of the emittance to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the extracted current density. This can cause the divergence of the negative ion beam to be significantly larger than its positive ion counterpart. By comparing results from positive and negative ion beam emittances from the same source, it is also possible to draw conclusions about their vulnerability to magnetic effects. Finally emittances of caesiated and un-caesiated negative ion beams are compared to show how the surface and volume modes of production interact.

  20. Negative incidental emotions augment fairness sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuizhen; Chai, Jing Wen; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that task-unrelated emotions induced incidentally exert carryover effects on individuals’ subsequent decisions in financial negotiations. However, the specificity of these emotion effects are not clear. In three experiments, we systematically investigated the role of seven transiently induced basic emotions (disgust, sadness, anger, fear, happiness, surprise and neutral) on rejection of unfair offers using the ultimatum game. We found that all negative emotions (disgust, sadness, anger and fear), but not happiness or surprise, significantly increased rejection rates, suggesting that the effect of incidental negative emotions on fairness is not specific to the type of negative emotion. Our findings highlight the role of fleeting emotions in biasing decision-making processes and suggest that all incidental negative emotions exert similar effects on fairness sensitivity, possibly by potentiating attention towards negative aspects of the situation. PMID:27101931

  1. Social Support, Negative Interactions, and Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ken; Sugisawa, Hidehiro; Sugihara, Yoko; Yanagisawa, Shizuko; Shimmei, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the additive effects of social support and negative interactions in various relationship domains and the cross-domain buffering effects of social support on the detrimental impact of negative interactions on mental health among older adults in Japan. Data were obtained from a survey of residents of 30 municipalities in the Tokyo metropolitan area ( N = 1,592). The results indicated that family members living together may share ambivalent social ties, anchored in positive sentiments and serving as sources of support but where criticism and excessive demands may occur. We found that negative interactions had a more potent additive effect on mental health. Moreover, the interaction effects of negative interactions with family and social support from other relatives suggested reverse buffering. Our findings suggest that interventions might be more necessary to cope with the negative social exchanges of close kin relationships among the elderly Japanese.

  2. Methodological Issues in Negative Symptom Trials

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Stephen R.; Daniel, David G.; Alphs, Larry; Awad, A. George; Keefe, Richard S. E.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals from academia, the pharmaceutical industry, and the US Food and Drug Administration used a workshop format to discuss important methodological issues in the design of trials of pharmacological agents for improving negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The issues addressed included the need for a coprimary functional measure for registration trials; the characteristics of individuals who should enter negative symptom trials; the optimal duration for a proof-of-concept or registration trial; the optimal design of a study of a broad-spectrum agent that treats both positive and negative symptoms or a co-medication that is added to an antipsychotic; the relative strengths and weaknesses of available instruments for measuring negative symptoms; the definition of clinically meaningful improvement for these trials; and whether drugs can be approved for a subdomain of negative symptoms. PMID:21270473

  3. Methodological issues in negative symptom trials.

    PubMed

    Marder, Stephen R; Daniel, David G; Alphs, Larry; Awad, A George; Keefe, Richard S E

    2011-03-01

    Individuals from academia, the pharmaceutical industry, and the US Food and Drug Administration used a workshop format to discuss important methodological issues in the design of trials of pharmacological agents for improving negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The issues addressed included the need for a coprimary functional measure for registration trials; the characteristics of individuals who should enter negative symptom trials; the optimal duration for a proof-of-concept or registration trial; the optimal design of a study of a broad-spectrum agent that treats both positive and negative symptoms or a co-medication that is added to an antipsychotic; the relative strengths and weaknesses of available instruments for measuring negative symptoms; the definition of clinically meaningful improvement for these trials; and whether drugs can be approved for a subdomain of negative symptoms.

  4. Negative incidental emotions augment fairness sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuizhen; Chai, Jing Wen; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-04-22

    Previous studies have shown that task-unrelated emotions induced incidentally exert carryover effects on individuals' subsequent decisions in financial negotiations. However, the specificity of these emotion effects are not clear. In three experiments, we systematically investigated the role of seven transiently induced basic emotions (disgust, sadness, anger, fear, happiness, surprise and neutral) on rejection of unfair offers using the ultimatum game. We found that all negative emotions (disgust, sadness, anger and fear), but not happiness or surprise, significantly increased rejection rates, suggesting that the effect of incidental negative emotions on fairness is not specific to the type of negative emotion. Our findings highlight the role of fleeting emotions in biasing decision-making processes and suggest that all incidental negative emotions exert similar effects on fairness sensitivity, possibly by potentiating attention towards negative aspects of the situation.

  5. Conscientiousness predicts greater recovery from negative emotion.

    PubMed

    Javaras, Kristin N; Schaefer, Stacey M; van Reekum, Carien M; Lapate, Regina C; Greischar, Lawrence L; Bachhuber, David R; Love, Gayle Dienberg; Ryff, Carol D; Davidson, Richard J

    2012-10-01

    Greater levels of conscientiousness have been associated with lower levels of negative affect. We focus on one mechanism through which conscientiousness may decrease negative affect: effective emotion regulation, as reflected by greater recovery from negative stimuli. In 273 adults who were 35-85 years old, we collected self-report measures of personality including conscientiousness and its self-control facet, followed on average 2 years later by psychophysiological measures of emotional reactivity and recovery. Among middle-aged adults (35-65 years old), the measures of conscientiousness and self-control predicted greater recovery from, but not reactivity to, negative emotional stimuli. The effect of conscientiousness and self-control on recovery was not driven by other personality variables or by greater task adherence on the part of high conscientiousness individuals. In addition, the effect was specific to negative emotional stimuli and did not hold for neutral or positive emotional stimuli.

  6. Small membranes under negative surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avital, Yotam Y.; Farago, Oded

    2015-03-01

    We use computer simulations and a simple free energy model to study the response of a bilayer membrane to the application of a negative (compressive) mechanical tension. Such a tension destabilizes the long wavelength undulation modes of giant vesicles, but it can be sustained when small membranes and vesicles are considered. Our negative tension simulation results reveal two regimes—(i) a weak negative tension regime characterized by stretching-dominated elasticity and (ii) a strong negative tension regime featuring bending-dominated elastic behavior. This resembles the findings of the classic Evans and Rawicz micropipette aspiration experiment in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) [E. Evans and W. Rawicz, Phys, Rev. Lett. 64, 2094 (1990)]. However, in GUVs the crossover between the two elasticity regimes occurs at a small positive surface tension, while in smaller membranes it takes place at a moderate negative tension. Another interesting observation concerning the response of a small membrane to negative surface tension is related to the relationship between the mechanical and fluctuation tensions, which are equal to each other for non-negative values. When the tension decreases to negative values, the fluctuation tension γ drops somewhat faster than the mechanical tension τ in the small negative tension regime, before it saturates (and becomes larger than τ) for large negative tensions. The bending modulus exhibits an "opposite" trend. It remains almost unchanged in the stretching-dominated elastic regime, and decreases in the bending-dominated regime. Both the amplitudes of the thermal height undulations and the projected area variations diverge at the onset of mechanical instability.

  7. Vorticity alignment and negative normal stresses in sheared attractive emulsions.

    PubMed

    Montesi, Alberto; Peña, Alejandro A; Pasquali, Matteo

    2004-02-06

    Attractive emulsions near the colloidal glass transition are investigated by rheometry and optical microscopy under shear. We find that (i) the apparent viscosity eta drops with increasing shear rate, then remains approximately constant in a range of shear rates, then continues to decay; (ii) the first normal stress difference N1 transitions sharply from nearly zero to negative in the region of constant shear viscosity; and (iii) correspondingly, cylindrical flocs form, align along the vorticity, and undergo a log-rolling movement. An analysis of the interplay between steric constraints, attractive forces, and composition explains this behavior, which seems universal to several other complex systems.

  8. How Do Negative Emotions Impair Self-Control? A Neural Model of Negative Urgency

    PubMed Central

    Chester, David S.; Lynam, Donald R.; Milich, Richard; Powell, David K.; Andersen, Anders H.; DeWall, C. Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Self-control often fails when people experience negative emotions. Negative urgency represents the dispositional tendency to experience such self-control failure in response to negative affect. The neural underpinnings of negative urgency are not fully understood, nor is the more general phenomenon of self-control failure in response to negative emotions. Previous theorizing suggests that an insufficient, inhibitory response from the prefrontal cortex may be the culprit behind such self-control failure. However, we entertained an alternative hypothesis: negative emotions lead to self-control failure because they excessively tax inhibitory regions of the prefrontal cortex. Using fMRI, we compared the neural activity of people high in negative urgency with controls on an emotional, inhibitory Go/No-Go task. While experiencing negative (but not positive or neutral) emotions, participants high in negative urgency showed greater recruitment of inhibitory brain regions than controls. Suggesting a compensatory function, inhibitory accuracy among participants high in negative urgency was associated with greater prefrontal recruitment. Greater activity in the anterior insula on negatively-valenced, inhibitory trials predicted greater substance abuse one month and one year after the MRI scan among individuals high in negative urgency. These results suggest that, among people whose negative emotions often lead to self-control failure, excessive reactivity of the brain’s regulatory resources may be the culprit. PMID:26892861

  9. How do negative emotions impair self-control? A neural model of negative urgency.

    PubMed

    Chester, David S; Lynam, Donald R; Milich, Richard; Powell, David K; Andersen, Anders H; DeWall, C Nathan

    2016-05-15

    Self-control often fails when people experience negative emotions. Negative urgency represents the dispositional tendency to experience such self-control failure in response to negative affect. Neither the neural underpinnings of negative urgency nor the more general phenomenon of self-control failure in response to negative emotions are fully understood. Previous theorizing suggests that an insufficient, inhibitory response from the prefrontal cortex may be the culprit behind such self-control failure. However, we entertained an alternative hypothesis: negative emotions lead to self-control failure because they excessively tax inhibitory regions of the prefrontal cortex. Using fMRI, we compared the neural activity of people high in negative urgency with controls on an emotional, inhibitory Go/No-Go task. While experiencing negative (but not positive or neutral) emotions, participants high in negative urgency showed greater recruitment of inhibitory brain regions than controls. Suggesting a compensatory function, inhibitory accuracy among participants high in negative urgency was associated with greater prefrontal recruitment. Greater activity in the anterior insula on negatively-valenced, inhibitory trials predicted greater substance abuse one month and one year after the MRI scan among individuals high in negative urgency. These results suggest that, among people whose negative emotions often lead to self-control failure, excessive reactivity of the brain's regulatory resources may be the culprit.

  10. Electromagnetic waves: Negative refraction by photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    2004-03-01

    Recently left-handed materials (LHM) attracted great attention since these materials exhibit negative effective index, which is due to simultaneously negative permeability and permittivity. Pendry proposed that negative effective index in left-handed materials can be used for constructing a perfect lens, which is not limited by diffraction(J. B. Pendry, Negative refraction makes a perfect lens, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 85, 3966 (2000)). Negative refraction is also achievable in a dielectric photonic crystal (PC) that has a periodically modulated positive permittivity and a permeability of unity. Luo et al. has studied negative refraction and subwavelength imaging in photonic crystals(C. Luo, S. G. Johnson, J. D. Joannopoulos, J. B. Pendry, Subwavelength Imaging in Photonic Crystals Phys. Rev. B 68, 045115 (2003)). In this presentation, we report our experimental and theoretical investigation of negative refraction and subwavelength focusing of electromagnetic waves in a 2D PC. Our structure consists of a square array of dielectric rods in air. Transmission measurements are performed for experimentally verifying the predicted negative refraction behavior in our structure. Negative index of refraction determined from the experiment is -1.94 which is very close to the theoretical value of -2.06. Negative refraction is observed for the incidence angles of > 20°(Ertugrul Cubukcu, Koray Aydin, Ekmel Ozbay, S. Foteinopolou, and Costas Soukoulis, Negative Refraction by Photonic Crystals, Nature, vol. 423, 604 (2003)). Since we know the optimum frequency for a broad angle negative refraction, we can use our crystal to test the superlensing effect that was predicted for negative refractive materials. Scanning transmission measurement technique is used to measure the spatial power distribution of the focused electromagnetic waves that radiate from a point source. Full width at half maximum of the focused beam is measured to be 0.21λ, which is in good agreement with the finite

  11. The Default Computation of Negated Meanings.

    PubMed

    Papeo, Liuba; Hochmann, Jean-Rémy; Battelli, Lorella

    2016-12-01

    Negation is a fundamental component of human reasoning and language. Yet, current neurocognitive models, conceived to account for the cortical representation of meanings (e.g., writing), hardly accommodate the representation of negated meanings (not writing). One main hypothesis, known as the two-step model, proposes that, for negated meanings, the corresponding positive representation is first fully activated and then modified to reflect negation. Recast in neurobiological terms, this model predicts that, in the initial stage of semantic processing, the neural representation of a stimulus' meaning is indistinguishable from the neural representation of that meaning following negation. Although previous work has shown that pragmatic and task manipulations can favor or hinder a two-step processing, we just do not know how the brain processes an utterance as simple as "I am not writing." We implemented two methodologies based on chronometric TMS to measure motor excitability (Experiment 1) and inhibition (Experiment 2) as physiological markers of semantic access to action-related meanings. We used elementary sentences (Adverb + Verb) and a passive reading task. For the first time, we defined action word-related motor activity in terms of increased excitability and concurrently reduced inhibition. Moreover, we showed that this pattern changes already in the earliest stage of semantic processing, when action meanings were negated. Negation modifies the neural representation of the argument in its scope, as soon as semantic effects are observed in the brain.

  12. Information Filtering Based on Users' Negative Opinions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiang; Li, Yang; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2013-05-01

    The process of heat conduction (HC) has recently found application in the information filtering [Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.99, 154301 (2007)], which is of high diversity but low accuracy. The classical HC model predicts users' potential interested objects based on their interesting objects regardless to the negative opinions. In terms of the users' rating scores, we present an improved user-based HC (UHC) information model by taking into account users' positive and negative opinions. Firstly, the objects rated by users are divided into positive and negative categories, then the predicted interesting and dislike object lists are generated by the UHC model. Finally, the recommendation lists are constructed by filtering out the dislike objects from the interesting lists. By implementing the new model based on nine similarity measures, the experimental results for MovieLens and Netflix datasets show that the new model considering negative opinions could greatly enhance the accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, from 0.049 to 0.036 for Netflix and from 0.1025 to 0.0570 for Movielens dataset, reduced by 26.53% and 44.39%, respectively. Since users prefer to give positive ratings rather than negative ones, the negative opinions contain much more information than the positive ones, the negative opinions, therefore, are very important for understanding users' online collective behaviors and improving the performance of HC model.

  13. [Negative hallucination, denial of reality and scotomization].

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, A; Manus, A

    1980-02-01

    In this paper, the authors intended to outline the history of three psychiatric and psycho-analytical concepts (negative hallucination, disavowal and scotomisation) and to analyse the psychic processes that they stand for. Historical study: Bernheim coined the expression negative hallucination in 1884. Freud used it from 1895 until 1917 when he discarded it. Freud put forward the concept of disavowal in 1914. In its wider meaning it is equivalent to negative hallucination. In its more specific meaning it designates the simultaneous acknowledgement and non-acknowledgement of a traumatic perception. Scotomisation, introduced by Pichon and Laforgue, is identical to negative hallucination. Freud and Laforgue had a long and polemical discussion about it. Psychological, metapsychological and psychopathological study: Only the concepts of negative hallucination and disavowal, in their more specific meaning, ought to be considered here. In their first phases, both processes are identical. The first phase is a "preliminary position", a conception of things, related to wishes and the pleasure principle. The second phase is marked by a stimulus which is unconsciously perceived as "unbearable". During the third phase, perception is suspended by various processes. It is with the fourth phase that the mechanisms differ. In the negative hallucination, the ego keeps the perception unconscious whereas in disavowal (in its specific meaning) it is split, one part acknowledges the perception, the other disavows it. The authors stress the importance of the negative hallucination and disavowal for psychopathology and psychoanalysis.

  14. Publications presenting negative impacts of pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Guérin, A; Leroux, A; Lebel, D; Bussières, J-F

    2016-11-01

    The main objective was to evaluate the rate of publications with at least one indicator of the negative impact of clinical pharmaceutics activity. This is a descriptive and retrospective literature review. A literature search was conducted using Pubmed. Articles published between 2009-2014 that described the role and impacts of pharmacists were included. We calculated the rate of publication containing at least one negative indicator. We collected the indicators with negative results. A total of 203 articles were included. Nine articles (4%) that had at least one indicator of negative impact were identified. A total of 66% (6/9) were conducted in the United States. The study designs of the articles included were a meta-analysis (n=1), a systematic review (n=1), randomized studies (n=2), pre-post studies (n=3), a cohort study (n=1) and a survey (n=1). Nine indicators of negative impact were identified. There were nine publications with at least one negative indicator of the impact of clinical pharmacy activity. While there are a large number of studies about the positive impact of clinical pharmacy activities; the publication of negative results should be encouraged. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The relationship of negative schizophrenia to parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Kay, S R

    1990-11-01

    The positive-negative distinction of schizophrenia has emerged as a valid means of clarifying its heterogeneity. Despite evidence that the two symptom classes may reflect different dimensions of the disease, there is presently no integrated model for understanding of the pathophysiology of these symptoms and their co-occurrence in schizophrenia. We propose that negative phenomena of schizophrenia may be a variant of Parkinsonism. This view is supported by the overlap with Parkinsonism in terms of clinical features, neurochemistry, pharmacology, as well as neuroradiological and neuropathological aspects. As such, negative symptoms may be a manifestation of disease of the basal ganglia and constitute the core pathology in schizophrenia. Positive symptoms, conversely, may reflect an "accessory" process related to a compensatory increase in striatal and limbic dopamine activity following an injury to the dopaminergic system. In the present communication we present a series of studies that support the association of negative schizophrenia and Parkinsonism. Based on this evidence, we suggest that schizophrenic patients with prominent negative symptoms might be managed like patients with Parkinson's disease, namely, with dopaminergic drugs and MAO-B inhibitors. Finally, the association of negative schizophrenia with Parkinsonism raises the possibility that adrenal medullary tissue transplantation, which may benefit a selected group of Parkinsonian patients, may be a future promising therapy for refractory negative schizophrenia.

  16. Negative HPV screening test predicts low cervical cancer risk better than negative Pap test

    Cancer.gov

    Based on a study that included more than 1 million women, investigators at NCI have determined that a negative test for HPV infection compared to a negative Pap test provides greater safety, or assurance, against future risk of cervical cancer.

  17. Perceived Social Competence, Negative Social Interactions and Negative Cognitive Style Predict Depressive Symptoms during Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Adabel; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Mermelstein, Robin J.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined whether negative interactions with parents and peers would mediate the longitudinal association between perceived social competence and depressive symptoms and whether a negative cognitive style would moderate the longitudinal association between negative interactions with parents and increases in depressive symptoms. Youth (N=350; 6th-10th graders) completed self-report measures of perceived social competence, negative interactions with parents and peers, negative cognitive style, and depressive symptoms at three time points. Results indicated that the relationship between perceived social competence and depressive symptoms was partially mediated by negative interactions with parents but not peers. Further, baseline negative cognitive style interacted with greater negative parent interactions to predict later depressive symptoms. PMID:20706914

  18. Negative staining and Cryo-negative Staining of Macromolecules and Viruses for TEM

    PubMed Central

    De Carlo, Sacha; Harris, J. Robin

    2010-01-01

    In this review we cover the technical background to negative staining of biomolecules and viruses, and then expand upon the different possibilities and limitations. Topics range from conventional air-dry negative staining of samples adsorbed to carbon support films, the variant termed the “negative staining-carbon film” technique and negative staining of samples spread across the holes of holey carbon support films, to a consideration of dynamic/time-dependent negative staining. For each of these approaches examples of attainable data are given. The cryo-negative staining technique for the specimen preparation of frozen-hydrated/vitrified samples is also presented. A detailed protocol to successfully achieve cryo-negative staining with ammonium molybdate is given, as well as examples of data, which support the claim that cryo-negative staining provides a useful approach for the high-resolution study of macromolecular and viral structure. PMID:20634082

  19. Lateralization of cortical negative motor areas.

    PubMed

    Borggraefe, Ingo; Catarino, Claudia B; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Peraud, Aurelia; Winkler, Peter A; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-10-01

    The lateral and mesial aspects of the central and frontal cortex were studied by direct electrical stimulation of the cortex in epilepsy surgery candidates in order to determine the localization of unilateral and bilateral negative motor responses. Results of electrical cortical stimulation were examined in epilepsy surgery candidates in whom invasive electrodes were implanted. The exact localization of subdural electrodes was defined by fusion of 3-dimensional reconstructed MRI and CT images in 13 patients and by analysis of plane skull X-rays and intraoperative visual localization of the electrodes in another 7 patients. Results of electrical stimulation of the cortex were evaluated in a total of 128 patients in whom invasive electrodes were implanted for planning resective epilepsy surgery. Twenty patients, in whom negative motor responses were obtained, were included in the study. Bilateral upper limb negative motor responses were more often elicited from stimulation of the mesial frontal cortex whereas stimulation of the lateral central cortex leads to contralateral upper limb negative motor responses (p<0.0001). Bilateral negative motor responses were exclusively found in the superior frontal gyrus whereas contralateral negative motor responses localized predominantly in the anterior part of the precentral gyrus (p<0.0001). Exact localization using 3-D fusion methods revealed that negative motor areas are widely distributed throughout the precentral gyrus and the mesial fronto-central cortex showing functional differences with regard to unilateral and bilateral upper limb representation. The lateral fronto-central negative motor area serves predominantly contralateral upper limb motor control whereas the mesial frontal negative motor area represents bilateral upper limb movement control. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Negative Urgency Is Associated With Heightened Negative Affect and Urge During Tobacco Abstinence in Regular Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Annie D.; Farrahi, Layla N.; Pang, Raina D.; Guillot, Casey R.; Aguirre, Claudia G.; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Negative urgency—the tendency to act rashly during negative affective states—is a risk factor for regular cigarette smoking. This human laboratory study tested a novel theoretical model of the underlying mechanisms linking negative urgency and smoking motivation, which purports that smokers with high negative urgency are at increased susceptibility to abstinence-induced increases in negative affect, which, in turn, provokes the urge to smoke to suppress negative affect. Method: Smokers (N = 180, >10 cigarettes/day) attended a baseline session at which they completed self-report measures of negative urgency and other co-factors and subsequently attended two counterbalanced within-subject experimental sessions (i.e., 16 hours of smoking abstinence or smoking as usual). At both experimental sessions, self-reported tobacco withdrawal symptoms, affect, and smoking urge were assessed. Results: Negative urgency was associated with larger abstinence-induced increases in tobacco withdrawal symptoms, negative affect, and urge to smoke to alleviate negative affect, both with and without controlling for anxiety, depression, tobacco dependence, and sensation seeking (βs > .18, ps < .05). The association between negative urgency and abstinence-induced increases in urge to smoke to alleviate negative affect was mediated by greater abstinence-induced increases in negative affect (βs > .062, ps = .01). Conclusions: These results provide initial support of this model by providing evidence that smokers with higher (vs. lower) negative urgency may be more prone to greater negative affect during withdrawal, which in turn may promote urge to smoke to suppress negative emotion. Research extending this model to other settings, measures, and methodological approaches may be fruitful. PMID:27588535

  1. Negative Poisson's ratio materials via isotropic interactions.

    PubMed

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Stillinger, Frank H; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-08-22

    We show that under tension a classical many-body system with only isotropic pair interactions in a crystalline state can, counterintuitively, have a negative Poisson's ratio, or auxetic behavior. We derive the conditions under which the triangular lattice in two dimensions and lattices with cubic symmetry in three dimensions exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio. In the former case, the simple Lennard-Jones potential can give rise to auxetic behavior. In the latter case, a negative Poisson's ratio can be exhibited even when the material is constrained to be elastically isotropic.

  2. Negative and positive cesium ion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, D. G.; Sutliff, D. E.; Chanin, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analyses have been performed on the positive and negative species from discharges in Cs, He-Cs, and He-H2-Cs mixtures. Sampling was conducted through the electrodes of normal glow discharges and from close-spaced heated-cathode conditions, which approximate a cesium thermionic converter. No negative Cs ions were observed for Cs pressures less than .01 torr. Identified species included Cs(+), Cs2(+), Cs(-), and what appeared to be multiply charged ions. Low-mass negative and positive ions attributed to H2 were observed when an He-H2 mixture was also present in the discharge region.

  3. Reversible negative photochromic sulfo-substituted spiropyrans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongqi; Guo, Tianqi; Chen, Yun; Kong, Yangyang; Peng, Zhihong

    2016-11-01

    A series of sulfonyl-containing spiropyrans exhibiting negative photochromism were designed and synthesized. The prepared compounds show more stability for the brightly colored state in the dark-adapted than the colorless state under visible irradiation. Negative photochromic properties and fatigue resistance of these compounds in solution were confirmed by UV spectroscopy with time variation. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, NMR and variable-time absorption spectra studies suggest that the negative photochromism of the compounds involved a ring-opening spiro Csbnd O bond cleavage of the spiropyran followed by an intramolecular proton transfer.

  4. Negative symptom assessment of chronic schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Raskin, A; Pelchat, R; Sood, R; Alphs, L D; Levine, J

    1993-01-01

    A new scale for assessing negative symptoms in schizophrenia, the Negative Symptom Assessment (NSA), was administered to 101 male chronic, inpatient schizophrenia patients. Factor analysis of the NSA yielded seven factors, but most of the explained variance resided in Factor 1, Restricted Affect/Emotion. The factors that emerged from this study closely resembled NSA factors derived from an earlier study of outpatient schizophrenia patients, which indicates the factor structure of the NSA is robust. A constellation of variables reflecting long-term or chronic illness were significantly related to six of the seven factors. These results suggest that "institutionalism" may play a role in the evolution of some negative symptoms.

  5. Negative Generalization and Symptoms of Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fulford, Daniel; Rosen, Rebecca K.; Johnson, Sheri L.; Carver, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    The tendency to generalize from a single failure to one's entire self-worth is an important correlate and predictor of depression. Despite conceptual overlap between cognitive biases in anxiety and depression, little research has examined whether negative generalization relates to anxiety symptoms. We examined associations of negative generalization with symptoms of several anxiety disorders, above and beyond its association with lifetime symptoms of depression, among 248 undergraduates. After controlling for lifetime symptoms of major depression, negative generalization was significantly correlated with symptoms of each anxiety disorder tested, most notably generalized anxiety and social phobia. PMID:24340170

  6. Negative refraction in Möbius molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. N.; Shen, Yao; Ai, Qing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically show the negative refraction existing in Möbius molecules. The negative refractive index is induced by the nontrivial topology of the molecules. With the Möbius boundary condition, the effective electromagnetic fields felt by the electron in a Möbius ring is spatially inhomogeneous. In this regard, the DN symmetry is broken in Möbius molecules and thus the magnetic response is induced through the effective magnetic field. Our findings provide an alternative architecture for negative refractive index materials based on the nontrivial topology of Möbius molecules.

  7. Negative temperatures and the definition of entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swendsen, Robert H.; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    The concept of negative temperature has recently received renewed interest in the context of debates about the correct definition of the thermodynamic entropy in statistical mechanics. Several researchers have identified the thermodynamic entropy exclusively with the ;volume entropy; suggested by Gibbs, and have further concluded that by this definition, negative temperatures violate the principles of thermodynamics. We disagree with these conclusions. We demonstrate that volume entropy is inconsistent with the postulates of thermodynamics for systems with non-monotonic energy densities, while a definition of entropy based on the probability distributions of macroscopic variables does satisfy the postulates of thermodynamics. Our results confirm that negative temperature is a valid extension of thermodynamics.

  8. Anxiety Sensitivity and Negative Urgency: A Pathway to Negative Reinforcement-Related Smoking Expectancies

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Casey R.; Pang, Raina D.; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Anxiety sensitivity—fear of anxiety symptoms—may increase motivation to smoke by influencing the development of cognitive expectations regarding smoking’s negative reinforcing effects; yet, the nature and mechanisms of this pathway are unclear. We hypothesized that relations between anxiety sensitivity and negative reinforcement-related smoking expectancies would be mediated by negative urgency, i.e., a trait tendency to act impulsively during negative affect. Methods In a cross-sectional design, we administered self-report measures of anxiety sensitivity, negative urgency, and negative reinforcement-related smoking outcome and abstinence expectancies to 205 smokers (≥10 cig/day, 34% female, M age = 44.4 years). Results Anxiety sensitivity was associated with stronger expectancies that smoking alleviates negative affect (β = .30, p < .0001) and smoking abstinence exacerbates aversive withdrawal symptoms (β = .24, p = .0004). Negative urgency partially mediated the relation between anxiety sensitivity and both types of negative reinforcement-related smoking expectancies (βs ≥ .057, ps ≤ .007). Results remained significant after statistically controlling for anxiety and nicotine dependence symptoms. Conclusions Smokers high in anxiety sensitivity tend to display negative urgency, which in turn is related to greater expectations of negative reinforcement consequences of smoking and smoking abstinence. Treatments which mitigate fear of anxiety symptoms and the tendency to act impulsively in response to negative affect (e.g., interoceptive exposure, distress tolerance skills training, and mindfulness training) may be particularly useful in assisting with smoking cessation for high-anxiety sensitivity smokers. PMID:24662369

  9. The Negative Testing and Negative Generation Effects Are Eliminated by Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Although retrieval often enhances subsequent memory (the testing effect), a negative testing effect has recently been documented in which prior retrieval harms later recall compared with restudying. The negative testing effect was predicated on the negative generation effect and the item-specific-relational framework. The present experiments…

  10. The Negative Testing and Negative Generation Effects Are Eliminated by Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Although retrieval often enhances subsequent memory (the testing effect), a negative testing effect has recently been documented in which prior retrieval harms later recall compared with restudying. The negative testing effect was predicated on the negative generation effect and the item-specific-relational framework. The present experiments…

  11. Perceived Social Competence, Negative Social Interactions, and Negative Cognitive Style Predict Depressive Symptoms during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Adabel; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Mermelstein, Robin J.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined whether negative interactions with parents and peers would mediate the longitudinal association between perceived social competence and depressive symptoms and whether a negative cognitive style would moderate the longitudinal association between negative interactions with parents and increases in depressive symptoms.…

  12. EFFECT OF NEGATIVE ION ATMOSPHERIC LOADING ON COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, A. Chitra; Fernandes, Charlotte; Verghese, Leila; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    1992-01-01

    Negative ion atmospheric loading has been reported to affect a range of psychological functions, from alertness to circadian rhythms, and has been suggested to benefit a variety of medical conditions, from allergies to migraine. In a double-blind study planned to assess the effect of negative ions on cognitive performance in human volunteers, 65 female graduate course students were randomized into ionized atmosphere (n = 34) and control (n = 31) groups. The following cognitive tasks were administered: Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Addition Test, Visual Memory (Complex Figure) Test, Verbal Memeory (Complex Passage) Test, Ideational Fluency Test and Clerical Speed and Accuracy test. On all but the last two tests, the negative ion groupperfonned significantly better (to a 15-40% extent) than controls. It is concluded that negative ionization of the atmosphere by artificial means may be of benefit in certain common, practical situation in which depletion of these ions occurs. PMID:21776128

  13. 40 CFR 52.222 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... following air pollution control districts submitted negative declarations for volatile organic compound... County Air Pollution Control District. (i) Industrial Wastewater, Plastic Parts Coating: Business... Pollution Control District. (i) Aerospace Coatings; Industrial Waste Water Treatment; Plastic Parts...

  14. 40 CFR 52.222 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... following air pollution control districts submitted negative declarations for volatile organic compound..., 2012. (3) Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District. (i) Industrial Wastewater, Plastic Parts..., 2002. (4) Placer County Air Pollution Control District. (i) Aerospace Coatings; Industrial Waste...

  15. 40 CFR 52.222 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following air pollution control districts submitted negative declarations for volatile organic compound..., 2012. (3) Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District. (i) Industrial Wastewater, Plastic Parts..., 2002. (4) Placer County Air Pollution Control District. (i) Aerospace Coatings; Industrial Waste...

  16. An Interpersonal Approach to Writing Negative Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salerno, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    Examines commonly held notions about writing negative messages and suggests that these notions could be improved by incorporating research in audience analysis and interpersonal communication. Argues that letter writing is not simply information transfer. (MS)

  17. [Strategy for avoidance of negative appendectomies].

    PubMed

    Wente, M N; Waleczek, H

    2009-07-01

    Appendectomy is the most commonly performed emergency surgical procedure. Even in the era of laparoscopic surgery and modern computed tomography, the rate of negative appendectomies, defined as the removal of a non-inflamed appendix, remains high (10-15%). The general problem and incidence, as well as the influence of modern diagnostic modalities on the rate of negative appendectomies are of particular clinical relevance. Several clinical scoring systems have been developed, but they did not find their way into the daily clinical routine. A proposed diagnostic algorithm could support further efforts to reduce the rate of negative appendectomies. The risk of overtreatment in the reduction of the negative appendectomy rate might potentially lead to acceptance of a higher perforation rate.

  18. Production of negatively charged radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Stracener, D. W.; Stora, T.

    2017-08-01

    Beams of short-lived radioactive nuclei are needed for frontier experimental research in nuclear structure, reactions, and astrophysics. Negatively charged radioactive ion beams have unique advantages and allow for the use of a tandem accelerator for post-acceleration, which can provide the highest beam quality and continuously variable energies. Negative ion beams can be obtained with high intensity and some unique beam purification techniques based on differences in electronegativity and chemical reactivity can be used to provide beams with high purity. This article describes the production of negative radioactive ion beams at the former holifield radioactive ion beam facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the CERN ISOLDE facility with emphasis on the development of the negative ion sources employed at these two facilities. ).

  19. Microwave gain medium with negative refractive index.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dexin; Chang, Kihun; Ran, Lixin; Xin, Hao

    2014-12-19

    Artificial effective media are attractive because of the fantastic applications they may enable, such as super lensing and electromagnetic invisibility. However, the inevitable loss due to their strongly dispersive nature is one of the fundamental challenges preventing such applications from becoming a reality. In this study, we demonstrate an effective gain medium based on negative resistance, to overcompensate the loss of a conventional passive metamaterial, meanwhile keeping its original negative-index property. Energy conservation-based theory, full-wave simulation and experimental measurement show that a fabricated sample consisting of conventional sub-wavelength building blocks with embedded microwave tunnel diodes exhibits a band-limited Lorentzian dispersion simultaneously with a negative refractive index and a net gain. Our work provides experimental evidence to the assertion that a stable net gain in negative-index gain medium is achievable, proposing a potential solution for the critical challenge current metamateiral technology faces in practical applications.

  20. 40 CFR 52.122 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air pollution control districts submitted negative declarations for volatile organic compound source... County Environmental Services Department. (i) Refinery Sources (Refinery Process Turnarounds), Automobile..., Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) Batch Processing, SOCMI Reactors, and...

  1. Negative feedback system reduces pump oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenmann, W.

    1967-01-01

    External negative feedback system counteracts low frequency oscillations in rocket engine propellant pumps. The system uses a control piston to sense pump discharge fluid on one side and a gas pocket on the other.

  2. Heart Disease Linked to Anxiety, Negative Feelings

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an assistant professor of medical and clinical psychology at Tilburg University in the Netherlands. Mommersteeg added ... poor health, anxiety and negative emotions combined with social inhibition compared to people in the control group. ...

  3. Negative Priming in Free Recall Reconsidered

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Negative priming in free recall is the finding of impaired memory performance when previously ignored auditory distracters become targets of encoding and retrieval. This negative priming has been attributed to an aftereffect of deploying inhibitory mechanisms that serve to suppress auditory distraction and minimize interference with learning and retrieval of task-relevant information. In 6 experiments, we tested the inhibitory account of the effect of negative priming in free recall against alternative accounts. We found that ignoring auditory distracters is neither sufficient nor necessary to produce the effect of negative priming in free recall. Instead, the effect is more readily accounted for by a buildup of proactive interference occurring whenever 2 successively presented lists of words are drawn from the same semantic category. PMID:26595066

  4. Negative ion formation processes: A general review

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    The principal negative ion formation processes will be briefly reviewed. Primary emphasis will be placed on the more efficient and universal processes of charge transfer and secondary ion formation through non-thermodynamic surface ionization. 86 refs., 20 figs.

  5. 40 CFR 52.122 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) Batch Processing, SOCMI Reactors, and SOCMI... air pollution control districts submitted negative declarations for volatile organic compound source... and Light Duty Trucks, Magnet Wire, Flatwood Paneling, Pharmaceuticals and Cosmetic Manufacturing...

  6. 40 CFR 52.2900 - Negative declaration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands... Northern Mariana Islands. (1) Letter of December 15, 1982, from the Governor to EPA, which is a negative...

  7. Negative pressure pulmonary oedema after septoplasty.

    PubMed

    García de Hombre, Alina M; Cuffini, Alejandro; Bonadeo, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Negative pressure pulmonary oedema (NPPO) is an anaesthetic complication due to acute obstruction of the upper airway, whose main cause is laryngospasm. The pathophysiology involves a strong negative intrapleural pressure during inspiration against a closed glottis, which triggers excessive pressure in the pulmonary microvasculature. Although its diagnosis can be difficult, its recognition helps to minimise morbidity and mortality. This article presents a case of NPPO due to postextubation laryngospasm.

  8. Negative ion sound solitary waves revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, R. A.; Cairns

    2013-12-01

    Some years ago, a group including the present author and Padma Shukla showed that a suitable non-thermal electron distribution allows the formation of ion sound solitary waves with either positive or negative density perturbations, whereas with Maxwellian electrons only a positive density perturbation is possible. The present paper discusses the qualitative features of this distribution allowing the negative waves and shared with suitable two-temperature distributions.

  9. Negative permeability from random particle composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Shahid

    2017-04-01

    Artificial media, such as those composed of periodically-spaced wires for negative permittivity and split ring resonators for negative permeability have been extensively investigated for negative refractive index (NRI) applications (Smith et al., 2004; Pendry et al., 1999) [1,2]. This paper presents an alternative method for producing negative permeability: granular (or particulate) composites incorporating magnetic fillers. Artificial media, such as split-ring resonators, are designed to produce a magnetic resonance feature, which results in negative permeability over a narrow frequency range about the resonance frequency. The position of the feature is dependent upon the size of the inclusion. The material in this case is anisotropic, such that the feature is only observable when the materials are orientated in a specific direction relative to the applied field. A similar resonance can be generated in magnetic granular (particulate) materials: ferromagnetic resonance from the natural spin resonance of particles. Although the theoretical resonance profiles in granular composites shows the permeability dipping to negative values, this is rarely observed experimentally due to resonance damping effects. Results are presented for iron in spherical form and in flake form, dispersed in insulating host matrices. The two particle shapes show different permeability performance, with the magnetic flakes producing a negative contribution. This is attributed to the stronger coupling with the magnetic field resulting from the high aspect ratio of the flakes. The accompanying ferromagnetic resonance is strong enough to overcome the effects of damping and produce negative permeability. The size of random particle composites is not dictated by the wavelength of the applied field, so the materials are potentially much thinner than other, more traditional artificial composites at microwave frequencies.

  10. Controlling plasmon hybridization for negative refraction metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanté, B.; Burokur, S. N.; Sellier, A.; de Lustrac, A.; Lourtioz, J.-M.

    2009-02-01

    The hybridization scheme of plasmon modes in cut-wire-based left-handed metamaterials is shown to critically depend on the coupling between paired cut wires. We show that an inverted hybridization scheme obtained with an asymmetric alignment of paired cut wires is the most appropriate to negative refraction. This is validated (numerically and experimentally) by the first demonstration of negative refraction in the microwave domain using only periodic ensembles of cut wires.

  11. Superconductive microstrip exhibiting negative differential resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Huebener, R.P.; Gallus, D.E.

    1975-10-28

    A device capable of exhibiting negative differential electrical resistivity over a range of values of current and voltage is formed by vapor- depositing a thin layer of a material capable of exhibiting superconductivity on an insulating substrate, establishing electrical connections at opposite ends of the deposited strip, and cooling the alloy into its superconducting range. The device will exhibit negative differential resistivity when biased in the current- induced resistive state.

  12. Antinuclear antibody-negative systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Gloria A; Assassi, Shervin; Wigley, Fredrick; Hummers, Laura; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique; Khanna, Dinesh; Schiopu, Elena; Phillips, Kristine; Furst, Daniel E; Steen, Virginia; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Taillefer, Suzanne S; Pope, Janet; Jones, Niall; Docherty, Peter; Khalidi, Nader A; Robinson, David; Simms, Robert W; Silver, Richard M; Frech, Tracy M; Fessler, Barri J; Molitor, Jerry A; Fritzler, Marvin J; Segal, Barbara M; Al-Kassab, Firas; Perry, Marilyn; Yang, Jeremy; Zamanian, Sara; Reveille, John D; Arnett, Frank C; Pedroza, Claudia; Mayes, Maureen D

    2015-06-01

    To examine the demographic and clinical characteristics of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients without antinuclear antibodies (ANA) compared to ANA-positive patients. SSc patients enrolled in the Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository were included. Relevant demographic and clinical data were entered by participating sites or obtained by chart review. ANA and SSc-related antibodies were determined in all investigated patients using commercially available kits at our laboratories. This study included 3249 patients, of whom 208 (6.4%) were ANA negative. The proportion of male patients was higher in the ANA-negative group (OR = 1.65; p = 0.008). ANA-negative patients experienced less vasculopathic manifestations of SSc. The percent predicted diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) was higher in ANA-negative patients (p = 0.03). Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) per right heart catheterization was less common in the ANA-negative group (OR = 0.28; p = 0.03). Furthermore, patients with negative ANA had a lower prevalence of telangiectasias and digital ulcers/pits (OR = 0.59, p = 0.03 and OR = 0.38, p = 0.01, respectively). Although diffuse cutaneous involvement was more common, the modified Rodnan Skin Score (mRSS) was lower in the ANA-negative group (2.4 points lower, p = 0.05). Furthermore, they experienced more malabsorption (p = 0.05). There was no difference in the frequency of pulmonary fibrosis or scleroderma renal crisis. All-cause mortality was not different between the 2 groups (p = 0.28). In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that SSc patients who are ANA negative constitute a distinct subset of SSc with less vasculopathy (less PAH, digital ulcers, and fewer telangiectasias), a greater proportion of males, and possibly, more frequent lower gastrointestinal involvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Negative and non-positive epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Axelson, Olav

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and discuss validity aspects on so called negative and non-positive studies. Arguments and examples are drawn from experiences in occupational health epidemiology regarding the interpretation of more or less equivocal study results. A negative study may be defined as showing a result that goes against the investigated hypothesis of an increased (or prevented) risk. Traditionally, studies with a risk estimate (relative risk or odds ratio) above, but close to unity are also referred to as negative, given a narrow confidence interval (CI) that includes unity. A risk estimate above unity with the CI including unity is non-positive, however, but an estimate below unity with upper CI bond exceeding unity might be seen as possibly negative or non-negative. A weaker "significance" than usually required should perhaps be accepted when evaluating serious hazards. In contrast to positive studies, the negative and non-positive studies tend to escape criticism in spite of questionable validity that may have obscured existing risks (or preventive effects). Even stronger arguments can be made in criticising negative and non-positive studies than positive studies, for example, regarding selection phenomena, and observational problems regarding exposure and outcome. Negative confounding should be considered although usually weak. In case-control studies, so called over-matching may obscure an existing risk as could the "healthy worker effect" in cohort studies. Small scale non-positive studies should be made available for meta-analyses and when considering studies that do not convincingly show a risk; those who are exposed should be given the "benefit of the doubt".

  14. Nonlinear Optics in Negative Index Metamaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-05

    analytical model and solutions for nonlinear wave propagation in waveguide couplers with opposite signs of the linear refractive index, non-zero phase... couplers based on either double-negative or strongly anisotropic metamaterials that are likely to enable ultra-compact optical strorage and memory...Venugopal, Zhaxylyk Kudyshev, Natalia Litchinitser. Asymmetric Positive-Negative IndexNonlinear Waveguide Couplers , IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in

  15. Waves in geomaterials exhibiting negative stiffness behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, Maxim; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Negative stiffness denotes the type of material behaviour when the force applied to the body decreases the body's deformation increases. Some geomaterials, for instance, rocks, demonstrate behaviour of this type at certain loads: during the compression tests the loading curves exhibit descending branch (post-peak softening). One of the possible mechanisms of the negative stiffness appearance in geomaterials is rotation of non-spherical grains. It is important to emphasize that in this case the descending branch may be reversible given that the testing machine is stiff enough (in general case it means an importance of boundary conditions). Existence of geomaterials with a negative modulus associated with rotations may have significant importance. In particular, important is understanding of the wave propagation in such materials. We study the stability of geomaterials with negative stiffness inclusions and wave propagation in it using two approaches: Cosserat continuum and discrete mass-spring models. In both cases we consider the rotational degrees of freedom in addition to the conventional translational ones. We show that despite non positiveness of the energy the materials with negative stiffness elements can be stable if certain conditions are met. In the case of Cosserat continuum the Cosserat shear modulus (the modulus relating the non-symmetrical part of shear stress and internal rotations) is allowed to assume negative values as long as its value does not exceed the value of the standard (positive) shear modulus. In the case of discrete mass-spring systems (with translational and rotational springs) the concentration of negative stiffness springs and the absolute values of negative spring stiffness are limited. The critical concentration when the system loses stability and the amplitude of the oscillations tends to infinity is equal to 1/2 and 3/5 for two- and three-dimensional cases respectively.

  16. Optical Negative Refraction in Ferrofluids with Magnetocontrollability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-22

    Optical Negative Refraction in Ferrofluids with Magnetocontrollability Y. Gao,1,2 J. P. Huang,1,* Y.M. Liu,3 L. Gao,4 K.W. Yu,2 and X. Zhang3...China (Received 5 October 2009; published 20 January 2010) We numerically demonstrate optical negative refraction in ferrofluids containing isotropic...certain soft materials. As a result, we reveal, for the first time, a new class of all-angle broadband optical nega- tive refraction in ferrofluids with

  17. Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Metabolic Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0167 TITLE: Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Metabolic Regulation... Breast Cancer and Metabolic Regulation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0167 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Amy...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents 20-25% of sporadic breast

  18. What makes dreams positive or negative: relations to fundamental dimensions of positive and negative mood.

    PubMed

    Kallmeyer, R J; Chang, E C

    1998-02-01

    The present study examined the general emotional content of dreams reported by individuals who typically experience "positive" versus "negative" dreams. Self-reports of the 153 participants indicated that positive versus negative dreamers (ns = 42 and 24, respectively) generally experienced more positive emotions, e.g., joviality, self-assurance, and fewer negative emotions, e.g., fear, sadness. No differences were found in the self-reports of the participants in the experience of surprise, guilt, fatigue, and shyness between the groups, hence, positive and negative dreams do not appear to reflect simply more positive and fewer negative emotions, respectively.

  19. Negative Thermophoresis in Concentric Carbon Nanotube Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jiantao; Guo, Zhengrong; Zhang, Hongwei; Chang, Tienchong; Guo, Xingming; Gao, Huajian

    2016-10-12

    Positive and negative thermophoresis in fluids has found widespread applications from mass transport to molecule manipulation. In solids, although positive thermophoresis has been recently discovered in both theoretical and experimental studies, negative thermophoresis has never been reported. Here we reveal via molecular dynamics simulations that negative thermophoresis does exist in solids. We consider the motion of a single walled carbon nanotube nested inside of two separate outer tubes held at different temperatures. It is found that a sufficiently long inner tube will undergo negative thermophoresis, whereas positive thermophoresis is favorable for a relatively short inner tube. Mechanisms for the observed positive thermophoresis and negative thermophoresis are shown to be totally different. In positive thermophoresis, the driving force comes mainly from the thermally induced edge force and the interlayer attraction force, whereas the driving force for negative thermophoresis is mainly due to the thermal gradient force. These findings have enriched our knowledge of the fundamental driving mechanisms for thermophoresis in solids and may stimulate its further applications in nanotechnology.

  20. Entanglement negativity in random spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Paola; Alba, Vincenzo; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the logarithmic negativity in strongly disordered spin chains in the random-singlet phase. We focus on the spin-1/2 random Heisenberg chain and the random X X chain. We find that for two arbitrary intervals, the disorder-averaged negativity and the mutual information are proportional to the number of singlets shared between the two intervals. Using the strong-disorder renormalization group (SDRG), we prove that the negativity of two adjacent intervals grows logarithmically with the intervals' length. In particular, the scaling behavior is the same as in conformal field theory, but with a different prefactor. For two disjoint intervals the negativity is given by a universal simple function of the cross ratio, reflecting scale invariance. As a function of the distance of the two intervals, the negativity decays algebraically in contrast with the exponential behavior in clean models. We confirm our predictions using a numerical implementation of the SDRG method. Finally, we also implement density matrix renormalization group simulations for the negativity in open spin chains. The chains accessible in the presence of strong disorder are not sufficiently long to provide a reliable confirmation of the SDRG results.

  1. [Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-negative adults].

    PubMed

    Rouyer, M; Stoclin, A; Blanc, F-X

    2015-12-01

    In HIV-negative adults, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia can be observed when immunodeficiency is present, especially in case of drug-induced immune suppression (steroids, chemotherapy, transplantation). Clinical, radiological, and biological presentations are different in HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals with different immunodeficiency profiles. In HIV-negative patients, dyspnea occurs more quickly (median duration of 5 days to get a diagnosis), diagnosis is more difficult because of less Pneumocystis in bronchoalveolar lavage, and mortality is higher than in HIV-positive individuals. Lung CT-scan typically shows diffuse ground glass opacities, but peri-bronchovascular condensations or ground glass opacities clearly limited by interlobular septa can also be observed. Lymphopenia is common but CD4+ T-cells count is rarely performed. HIV-negative patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia are co-infected with bacteria, viruses or fungi in about 30% cases. Bronchoalveolar lavage is often more neutrophilic than in HIV-positive individuals. PCR and β-D-glucan have good sensitivity but poor specificity to diagnose Pneumocystis pneumonia. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remains the first choice of treatment. Duration is 14 days in HIV-negative patients whereas it is typically of 21 days in HIV-positive individuals. Adjunctive corticosteroids are of beneficial effect in HIV-positive adult patients with substantial hypoxaemia but are not recommended in HIV-negative patients, as they could be deleterious in some individuals.

  2. Detecting Negative Obstacles by Use of Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittskus, Anthony; Lux, James

    2006-01-01

    Robotic land vehicles would be equipped with small radar systems to detect negative obstacles, according to a proposal. The term "negative obstacles" denotes holes, ditches, and any other terrain features characterized by abrupt steep downslopes that could be hazardous for vehicles. Video cameras and other optically based obstacle-avoidance sensors now installed on some robotic vehicles cannot detect obstacles under adverse lighting conditions. Even under favorable lighting conditions, they cannot detect negative obstacles. A radar system according to the proposal would be of the frequency-modulation/ continuous-wave (FM/CW) type. It would be installed on a vehicle, facing forward, possibly with a downward slant of the main lobe(s) of the radar beam(s) (see figure). It would utilize one or more wavelength(s) of the order of centimeters. Because such wavelengths are comparable to the characteristic dimensions of terrain features associated with negative hazards, a significant amount of diffraction would occur at such features. In effect, the diffraction would afford a limited ability to see corners and to see around corners. Hence, the system might utilize diffraction to detect corners associated with negative obstacles. At the time of reporting the information for this article, preliminary analyses of diffraction at simple negative obstacles had been performed, but an explicit description of how the system would utilize diffraction was not available.

  3. Negative capacitance in multidomain ferroelectric superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, Pavlo; Wojdeł, Jacek C.; Hadjimichael, Marios; Fernandez-Pena, Stéphanie; Sené, Anaïs; Luk'Yanchuk, Igor; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    The stability of spontaneous electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is fundamental to many of their current applications, which range from the simple electric cigarette lighter to non-volatile random access memories. Research on nanoscale ferroelectrics reveals that their behaviour is profoundly different from that in bulk ferroelectrics, which could lead to new phenomena with potential for future devices. As ferroelectrics become thinner, maintaining a stable polarization becomes increasingly challenging. On the other hand, intentionally destabilizing this polarization can cause the effective electric permittivity of a ferroelectric to become negative, enabling it to behave as a negative capacitance when integrated in a heterostructure. Negative capacitance has been proposed as a way of overcoming fundamental limitations on the power consumption of field-effect transistors. However, experimental demonstrations of this phenomenon remain contentious. The prevalent interpretations based on homogeneous polarization models are difficult to reconcile with the expected strong tendency for domain formation, but the effect of domains on negative capacitance has received little attention. Here we report negative capacitance in a model system of multidomain ferroelectric-dielectric superlattices across a wide range of temperatures, in both the ferroelectric and paraelectric phases. Using a phenomenological model, we show that domain-wall motion not only gives rise to negative permittivity, but can also enhance, rather than limit, its temperature range. Our first-principles-based atomistic simulations provide detailed microscopic insight into the origin of this phenomenon, identifying the dominant contribution of near-interface layers and paving the way for its future exploitation.

  4. [Neural correlates of "negative" formal thought disorder].

    PubMed

    Kircher, T; Liddle, P; Brammer, M; Murray, R; McGuire, P

    2003-09-01

    Formal thought disorder (FTD) is a core feature of schizophrenia, but its pathophysiology is poorly understood. It can be conceptualised as 'positive' (e.g. incoherence, neologisms) or 'negative' (e.g. poverty of thought) thought disorder. We investigated the neural correlates of negative FTD. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while six patients with schizophrenia and six healthy control subjects spoke about seven Rorschach inkblots for 3 min each. Varying degrees of thought-disordered speech were elicited during each run. In a within-subject design, the degree of negative thought disorder, conceptualised as 'poverty of speech' (Liddle et al. (2002) Thought and Language Index. Br J Psychiatry) was correlated with BOLD contrast in the two runs per patient showing the highest variance in this phenomenon. The degree of poverty of speech correlated positively mainly with activation in the right inferior parietal lobe (BA 40), middle frontal gyrus (BA 46), cuneus (BA 18), and the left posterior cingulate (BA 31). Negative correlations were evident in the left hippocampal/fusiform gyrus (BA 35/36/37). The severity of negative FTD correlates with activation in areas previously implicated in autobiographic episodic memory. During symptoms behaviourally characterised as negative, patients may experience rich memories and associations.

  5. Negative capacitance in multidomain ferroelectric superlattices.

    PubMed

    Zubko, Pavlo; Wojdeł, Jacek C; Hadjimichael, Marios; Fernandez-Pena, Stéphanie; Sené, Anaïs; Luk'yanchuk, Igor; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2016-06-23

    The stability of spontaneous electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is fundamental to many of their current applications, which range from the simple electric cigarette lighter to non-volatile random access memories. Research on nanoscale ferroelectrics reveals that their behaviour is profoundly different from that in bulk ferroelectrics, which could lead to new phenomena with potential for future devices. As ferroelectrics become thinner, maintaining a stable polarization becomes increasingly challenging. On the other hand, intentionally destabilizing this polarization can cause the effective electric permittivity of a ferroelectric to become negative, enabling it to behave as a negative capacitance when integrated in a heterostructure. Negative capacitance has been proposed as a way of overcoming fundamental limitations on the power consumption of field-effect transistors. However, experimental demonstrations of this phenomenon remain contentious. The prevalent interpretations based on homogeneous polarization models are difficult to reconcile with the expected strong tendency for domain formation, but the effect of domains on negative capacitance has received little attention. Here we report negative capacitance in a model system of multidomain ferroelectric-dielectric superlattices across a wide range of temperatures, in both the ferroelectric and paraelectric phases. Using a phenomenological model, we show that domain-wall motion not only gives rise to negative permittivity, but can also enhance, rather than limit, its temperature range. Our first-principles-based atomistic simulations provide detailed microscopic insight into the origin of this phenomenon, identifying the dominant contribution of near-interface layers and paving the way for its future exploitation.

  6. Negative Correlations in Visual Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chelaru, Mircea I.; Dragoi, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    The amount of information encoded by cortical circuits depends critically on the capacity of nearby neurons to exhibit trial-to-trial (noise) correlations in their responses. Depending on their sign and relationship to signal correlations, noise correlations can either increase or decrease the population code accuracy relative to uncorrelated neuronal firing. Whereas positive noise correlations have been extensively studied using experimental and theoretical tools, the functional role of negative correlations in cortical circuits has remained elusive. We addressed this issue by performing multiple-electrode recording in the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) of alert monkey. Despite the fact that positive noise correlations decayed exponentially with the difference in the orientation preference between cells, negative correlations were uniformly distributed across the population. Using a statistical model for Fisher Information estimation, we found that a mild increase in negative correlations causes a sharp increase in network accuracy even when mean correlations were held constant. To examine the variables controlling the strength of negative correlations, we implemented a recurrent spiking network model of V1. We found that increasing local inhibition and reducing excitation causes a decrease in the firing rates of neurons while increasing the negative noise correlations, which in turn increase the population signal-to-noise ratio and network accuracy. Altogether, these results contribute to our understanding of the neuronal mechanism involved in the generation of negative correlations and their beneficial impact on cortical circuit function. PMID:25217468

  7. A negative stain for electron microscopic tomography.

    PubMed

    Fera, Andrea; Farrington, Jane E; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Reese, Thomas S

    2012-04-01

    While negative staining can provide detailed, two-dimensional images of biological structures, the potential of combining tomography with negative staining to provide three-dimensional views has yet to be fully realized. Basic requirements of a negative stain for tomography are that the density and atomic number of the stain are optimal, and that the stain does not degrade or rearrange with the intensive electron dose (~10⁶ e/nm²) needed to collect a full set of tomographic images. A commercially available, tungsten-based stain appears to satisfy these prerequisites. Comparison of the surface structure of negatively stained influenza A virus with previous structural results served to evaluate this negative stain. The combination of many projections of the same structure yielded detailed images of single proteins on the viral surface. Corresponding surface renderings are a good fit to images of the viral surface derived from cryomicroscopy as well as to the shapes of crystallized surface proteins. Negative stain tomography with the appropriate stain yields detailed images of individual molecules in their normal setting on the surface of the influenza A virus.

  8. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  9. Negative affective stress reactivity: The dampening effect of snacking.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Saskia; Jacobs, Nele; Duif, Mira; Lechner, Lilian; Thewissen, Viviane

    2017-10-03

    The present study sets out to further elucidate the complex relationship between daily hassles, snacking, and negative affect (NA). The aim of the present study was to examine whether or not moment-to-moment energy intake from snacks moderates the association between momentary stress and NA. And, if so, can this moderating effect be replicated by using the amount of macronutrient intake (i.e., carbohydrates, fat, and protein) as moderator on the association between momentary stress and NA? Adults (N = 269), aged 20-50 years, participated in this study. Stress, NA, and snack intake were assessed 10 times a day for 7 consecutive days in daily life with an experience sampling smartphone application. Multilevel regression analyses were performed to assess the hypothesized associations. Our study revealed a dampening effect of snacking on negative affective stress reactivity. However, this dampening effect could not be replicated by the amount of macronutrient intake from snacks. On the contrary, the amount of carbohydrates has an enhancing effect on negative affective stress reactivity. In the end, our study suggests that the critical question is which mechanisms are decisive in the dampening role of snacking on stress reactivity. A multidisciplinary approach may provide a full perspective. © 2017 The Authors. Stress and Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Negative Campaigning and the Logic of Retaliation in Multiparty Competition

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Martin; Ennser-Jedenastik, Laurenz; Müller, Wolfgang C.

    2016-01-01

    The extant literature has demonstrated that the logic of retaliation is a core feature of negative campaigning. Attacks by one side induce counterattacks by the other. Yet most research on the interactive nature of negative campaigning is limited to two-party competition and provides little theoretical justification for why political actors should respond to attacks with counterattacks. The present paper addresses these research gaps. We argue that the negativity bias in human information processing and the zero-sum nature of elections make retaliation a rational strategy. Importantly, these arguments also imply that retaliation may not be the only plausible response to attacks in multiparty systems. Rather, parties may prefer to react to attacks from one competitor by attacking another. To grasp empirically how being attacked and attacking are related, we conduct a highly disaggregated time series analysis of such instances while controlling for other factors that may influence actor behavior. Our analyses draw on several thousand party press releases issued during three national election campaigns in Austria, a typical European multiparty system. They show that retaliation is an important strategy also in multiparty politics. Yet in such context, parties do not exclusively follow a tit-for-tat approach but rather display more complex patterns of attack behavior. PMID:27904657

  11. Napping and the selective consolidation of negative aspects of scenes.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jessica D; Kensinger, Elizabeth A; Wamsley, Erin J; Spreng, R Nathan; Alger, Sara E; Gibler, Kyle; Schacter, Daniel L; Stickgold, Robert

    2015-04-01

    After information is encoded into memory, it undergoes an offline period of consolidation that occurs optimally during sleep. The consolidation process not only solidifies memories, but also selectively preserves aspects of experience that are emotionally salient and relevant for future use. Here, we provide evidence that an afternoon nap is sufficient to trigger preferential memory for emotional information contained in complex scenes. Selective memory for negative emotional information was enhanced after a nap compared with wakefulness in 2 control conditions designed to carefully address interference and time-of-day confounds. Although prior evidence has connected negative emotional memory formation to REM sleep physiology, we found that non-REM delta activity and the amount of slow wave sleep (SWS) in the nap were robustly related to the selective consolidation of negative information. These findings suggest that the mechanisms underlying memory consolidation benefits associated with napping and nighttime sleep are not always the same. Finally, we provide preliminary evidence that the magnitude of the emotional memory benefit conferred by sleep is equivalent following a nap and a full night of sleep, suggesting that selective emotional remembering can be economically achieved by taking a nap.

  12. Overlapping spectra resolution using non-negative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Tao; Li, Tong-Hua; Chen, Kai; Li, Wei-Guang; Bi, Xian

    2005-03-31

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), with the constraints of non-negativity, has been recently proposed for multi-variate data analysis. Because it allows only additive, not subtractive, combinations of the original data, NMF is capable of producing region or parts-based representation of objects. It has been used for image analysis and text processing. Unlike PCA, the resolutions of NMF are non-negative and can be easily interpreted and understood directly. Due to multiple solutions, the original algorithm of NMF [D.D. Lee, H.S. Seung, Nature 401 (1999) 788] is not suitable for resolving chemical mixed signals. In reality, NMF has never been applied to resolving chemical mixed signals. It must be modified according to the characteristics of the chemical signals, such as smoothness of spectra, unimodality of chromatograms, sparseness of mass spectra, etc. We have used the modified NMF algorithm to narrow the feasible solution region for resolving chemical signals, and found that it could produce reasonable and acceptable results for certain experimental errors, especially for overlapping chromatograms and sparse mass spectra. Simulated two-dimensional (2-D) data and real GUJINGGONG alcohol liquor GC-MS data have been resolved soundly by NMF technique. Butyl caproate and its isomeric compound (butyric acid, hexyl ester) have been identified from the overlapping spectra. The result of NMF is preferable to that of Heuristic evolving latent projections (HELP). It shows that NMF is a promising chemometric resolution method for complex samples.

  13. Negative Evaluations of Negative Alcohol Consequences Lead to Subsequent Reductions in Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Nancy P.; Merrill, Jennifer E.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Colby, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use during young adulthood may reflect a learning process whereby positive and negative alcohol-related experiences and interpretations of those experiences drive subsequent behavior. Understanding the effect of consequences and the evaluation of consequences could be informative for intervention approaches. Objective To examine the extent to which the number of positive and negative alcohol consequences experienced and the evaluation of those consequences predict subsequent alcohol use and consequences in college students. Method Students at three colleges (N = 679) completed biweekly web-based surveys on alcohol use, positive and negative consequences, and consequence evaluations for two academic years. Hierarchical linear modeling tested whether consequences and evaluations in a given week predicted changes in alcohol use and consequences at the next assessment. Moderation by gender and class year also were evaluated. Results Evaluating past-week negative consequences more negatively than one’s average resulted in decreases in alcohol use at the next assessment. More negative evaluation of negative consequences was followed in the subsequent observation by a higher number of positive consequences for females but not males. A higher number of positive consequences in a given week was followed by a higher number of both positive and negative consequences in the subsequent observation. Number of negative consequences experienced and evaluation of positive consequences had no effect on later behavior. Conclusions Salient negative consequences may drive naturalistic reductions in alcohol use, suggesting the possible efficacy of programs designed to increase the salience of the negative effects of alcohol. PMID:26168225

  14. Sensitivity of Negative Subsequent Memory and Task-Negative Effects to Age and Associative Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    de Chastelaine, Marianne; Mattson, Julia T.; Wang, Tracy H.; Donley, Brian E.; Rugg, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The present fMRI experiment employed associative recognition to investigate the relationships between age and encoding-related negative subsequent memory effects and task-negative effects. Young, middle-aged and older adults (total n = 136) were scanned while they made relational judgments on visually presented word pairs. In a later memory test, the participants made associative recognition judgments on studied, rearranged (items studied on different trials) and new pairs. Several regions, mostly localized to the default mode network, demonstrated negative subsequent memory effects in an across age-group analysis. All but one of these regions also demonstrated task-negative effects, although there was no correlation between the size of the respective effects. Whereas negative subsequent memory effects demonstrated a graded attenuation with age, task-negative effects declined markedly between the young and the middle-aged group, but showed no further reduction in the older group. Negative subsequent memory effects did not correlate with memory performance within any age group. By contrast, in the older group only, task-negative effects predicted later memory performance. The findings demonstrate that negative subsequent memory and task-negative effects depend on dissociable neural mechanisms and likely reflect distinct cognitive processes. The relationship between task-negative effects and memory performance in the older group might reflect the sensitivity of these effects to variations in amount of age-related neuropathology. PMID:25264353

  15. Sensitivity of negative subsequent memory and task-negative effects to age and associative memory performance.

    PubMed

    de Chastelaine, Marianne; Mattson, Julia T; Wang, Tracy H; Donley, Brian E; Rugg, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    The present fMRI experiment employed associative recognition to investigate the relationships between age and encoding-related negative subsequent memory effects and task-negative effects. Young, middle-aged and older adults (total n=136) were scanned while they made relational judgments on visually presented word pairs. In a later memory test, the participants made associative recognition judgments on studied, rearranged (items studied on different trials) and new pairs. Several regions, mostly localized to the default mode network, demonstrated negative subsequent memory effects in an across age-group analysis. All but one of these regions also demonstrated task-negative effects, although there was no correlation between the size of the respective effects. Whereas negative subsequent memory effects demonstrated a graded attenuation with age, task-negative effects declined markedly between the young and the middle-aged group, but showed no further reduction in the older group. Negative subsequent memory effects did not correlate with memory performance within any age group. By contrast, in the older group only, task-negative effects predicted later memory performance. The findings demonstrate that negative subsequent memory and task-negative effects depend on dissociable neural mechanisms and likely reflect distinct cognitive processes. The relationship between task-negative effects and memory performance in the older group might reflect the sensitivity of these effects to variations in amount of age-related neuropathology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Negative-permittivity plasma generation in negative-permeability space with high-energy metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Osamu; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Akinori; Iio, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Plasma generation by electromagnetic waves in negative-permeability space is analyzed using experimental results and theoretical models. Installation of negative-permeability metamaterials triggers drastic changes to the propagation of electromagnetic waves. Unlike usual cases in which permeability is  +1, negative permeability induces evanescent modes in a space without plasma. However, if permittivity becomes negative due to high-electron-density or overdense plasma, electromagnetic waves can propagate because negative-refractive-index states emerge. In this study, reviewing our previous experimental data, we study the underlying physical processes in plasma generation in terms of wave propagation and parameters of wave media. We confirm nonlinear (transition) processes in the phase of density evolution up to the negative permittivity state and negative-refractive-index states in the quasi-steady phase. We also note that such energetic metamaterials are built up when we use plasma, unlike conventional metamaterials composed of solid-state materials.

  17. Histone deacetylase 9 is a negative regulator of adipogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tapan K; Idelman, Gila; Blanco, Victor; Blomkalns, Andra L; Piegore, Mark G; Weintraub, Daniel S; Kumar, Santosh; Rajsheker, Srinivas; Manka, David; Rudich, Steven M; Tang, Yaoliang; Hui, David Y; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N; Lingrel, Jerry B; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Weintraub, Neal L

    2011-08-05

    Differentiation of preadipocytes into mature adipocytes capable of efficiently storing lipids is an important regulatory mechanism in obesity. Here, we examined the involvement of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs) in the regulation of adipogenesis. We find that among the various members of the HDAC and HAT families, only HDAC9 exhibited dramatic down-regulation preceding adipogenic differentiation. Preadipocytes from HDAC9 gene knock-out mice exhibited accelerated adipogenic differentiation, whereas HDAC9 overexpression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes suppressed adipogenic differentiation, demonstrating its direct role as a negative regulator of adipogenesis. HDAC9 expression was higher in visceral as compared with subcutaneous preadipocytes, negatively correlating with their potential to undergo adipogenic differentiation in vitro. HDAC9 localized in the nucleus, and its negative regulation of adipogenesis segregates with the N-terminal nuclear targeting domain, whereas the C-terminal deacetylase domain is dispensable for this function. HDAC9 co-precipitates with USF1 and is recruited with USF1 at the E-box region of the C/EBPα gene promoter in preadipocytes. Upon induction of adipogenic differentiation, HDAC9 is down-regulated, leading to its dissociation from the USF1 complex, whereas p300 HAT is up-regulated to allow its association with USF1 and accumulation at the E-box site of the C/EBPα promoter in differentiated adipocytes. This reciprocal regulation of HDAC9 and p300 HAT in the USF1 complex is associated with increased C/EBPα expression, a master regulator of adipogenic differentiation. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation and document a critical regulatory role for HDAC9 in adipogenic differentiation through a deacetylase-independent mechanism.

  18. Heavy positive and negative ions in Titan ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuitton, V.; Yelle, R.; Dutuit, O.; Thissen, R.

    2007-08-01

    Titan has long been known to harbor the richest atmospheric chemistry in the solar system that culminates in the generation of thick haze layers. Until recently, it was believed that the bulk of the chemistry occurred in the stratosphere, where Far Ultra-Violet (FUV) solar radiation dissociates the major neutral species (nitrogen and methane). Minor hydrocarbon and nitriles would then subsequently be produced through neutral chemistry that would eventually lead to the formation of micrometer size organic aerosols. However, some discrepancies persist. For example, it has been difficult for photochemical models to reproduce the haze production altitude required by microphysical models. Recent measurements by the Cassini spacecraft are drastically changing our understanding of haze formation. The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and the CAssini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) performed the first composition measurements of Titan's upper atmosphere. They revealed an extraordinary complex ionospheric composition. INMS detected roughly 50 positive ions with m/z < 100 and a density higher than 0.1 cm-3. CAPS provided evidence for 3 low mass negative ions, heavy (100-350 amu) positively charged and negatively charged (20-8000 amu) ions. The Ultra-VIolet Spectrometer (UVIS) and the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) showed that the haze extends to 1000 km altitude, and possibly higher. These observations all indicate that Titan ionospheric chemistry is incredibly complex and that aerosol growth starts in the upper atmosphere rather than at lower altitude. While the formation of positive ions can be understood as a direct consequence of the presence of heavy neutrals, the detection of negative ions still remains to be explained. Nor is it at present clear what are the processes leading to macromolecules formation.We review our current knowledge on Titan ionospheric chemistry. We base our discussion on laboratory data, as well as models of Titan's lower

  19. Potential negative ecological effects of corridors.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nick M; Brudvig, Lars A; Damschen, Ellen I; Evans, Daniel M; Johnson, Brenda L; Levey, Douglas J; Orrock, John L; Resasco, Julian; Sullivan, Lauren L; Tewksbury, Josh J; Wagner, Stephanie A; Weldon, Aimee J

    2014-10-01

    Despite many studies showing that landscape corridors increase dispersal and species richness for disparate taxa, concerns persist that corridors can have unintended negative effects. In particular, some of the same mechanisms that underlie positive effects of corridors on species of conservation interest may also increase the spread and impact of antagonistic species (e.g., predators and pathogens), foster negative effects of edges, increase invasion by exotic species, increase the spread of unwanted disturbances such as fire, or increase population synchrony and thus reduce persistence. We conducted a literature review and meta-analysis to evaluate the prevalence of each of these negative effects. We found no evidence that corridors increase unwanted disturbance or non-native species invasion; however, these have not been well-studied concerns (1 and 6 studies, respectively). Other effects of corridors were more often studied and yielded inconsistent results; mean effect sizes were indistinguishable from zero. The effect of edges on abundances of target species was as likely to be positive as negative. Corridors were as likely to have no effect on antagonists or population synchrony as they were to increase those negative effects. We found 3 deficiencies in the literature. First, despite studies on how corridors affect predators, there are few studies of related consequences for prey population size and persistence. Second, properly designed studies of negative corridor effects are needed in natural corridors at scales larger than those achievable in experimental systems. Third, studies are needed to test more targeted hypotheses about when corridor-mediated effects on invasive species or disturbance may be negative for species of management concern. Overall, we found no overarching support for concerns that construction and maintenance of habitat corridors may result in unintended negative consequences. Negative edge effects may be mitigated by widening

  20. Social identity complexity and outgroup tolerance.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Marilynn B; Pierce, Kathleen P

    2005-03-01

    Social identity complexity refers to the way in which individuals subjectively represent the relationships among their multiple ingroup memberships. More specifically, individuals with low social identity complexity see their ingroups as highly overlapping and convergent, whereas those with high complexity see their different ingroups as distinct and cross-cutting membership groups. The present study tested the hypothesis that perceived overlap among ingroup memberships would be negatively related to ingroup inclusiveness and tolerance for outgroups, such that individuals with high overlap (low complexity) would be less tolerant and accepting of outgroups in general than those with low overlap (high complexity). Results from a telephone interview survey of adult residents of the state of Ohio supported this hypothesis. Individual differences in complexity of perception of their national, religious, occupational, political, and recreational social identities were systematically related to their attitudes toward ethnic outgroups and diversity.

  1. Auxetic polyethylene: The effect of a negative Poisson's ratio on hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, K.L.; Pickles, A.P.; Neale, P.J.; Evans, K.E. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    Recent papers have described a particular form of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) which possesses a large negative Poisson's ratio ([nu]) because of its complex microstructure. Classical elasticity theory predicts that this should lead to enhancements in certain mechanical properties and this paper examines one such property -- that of ball indentation resistance or hardness. The hardness of auxetic UHMWPE with a negative [nu], compression molded UHMWPE and a microporous form of UHMWPE with a positive [nu] was measured. It was found that the presence of a negative [nu] resulted in enhancements of the hardness by up to a factor of 2 over conventional UHMWPE.

  2. Studying Positive and Negative Direct and Extended Contact: Complementing Self-Reports With Social Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wölfer, Ralf; Jaspers, Eva; Blaylock, Danielle; Wigoder, Clarissa; Hughes, Joanne; Hewstone, Miles

    2017-07-01

    Traditionally, studies of intergroup contact have primarily relied on self-reports, which constitute a valid method for studying intergroup contact, but has limitations, especially if researchers are interested in negative or extended contact. In three studies, we apply social network analyses to generate alternative contact parameters. Studies 1 and 2 examine self-reported and network-based parameters of positive and negative contact using cross-sectional datasets ( N = 291, N = 258), indicating that both methods help explain intergroup relations. Study 3 examines positive and negative direct and extended contact using the previously validated network-based contact parameters in a large-scale, international, and longitudinal dataset ( N = 12,988), demonstrating that positive and negative direct and extended contact all uniquely predict intergroup relations (i.e., intergroup attitudes and future outgroup contact). Findings highlight the value of social network analysis for examining the full complexity of contact including positive and negative forms of direct and extended contact.

  3. Negative refractive index designed in a periodic composite of lossy microplasmas and microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Osamu; Shimomura, Takuya; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2010-12-15

    A novel metamaterial with negative refractive index was designed using a spatially periodic composite of microplasmas and microresonators. Microresonators, which are double-helix metal wires in this report, work as an origin of macroscopic negative permeability material, as well as discharge electrodes. If a resonance frequency of the resonators is well below electron plasma frequency of the microplasmas where their permittivity is negative in the real part with a certain imaginary part, the macroscopic refractive index becomes negative just above the resonance frequency where the macroscopic permeability is negative, even if microplasmas are fairly lossy; due to such a loss or conductive component in permittivity, electromagnetic waves are not evanescent but propagating. This result indicates that plasmas can play important roles in parameter control of a metamaterial with a complex refractive index.

  4. Detecting negative ions on board small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepri, S. T.; Raines, J. M.; Gilbert, J. A.; Cutler, J.; Panning, M.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2017-04-01

    Recent measurements near comets, planets, and their satellites have shown that heavy ions, energetic neutral atoms, molecular ions, and charged dust contain a wealth of information about the origin, evolution, and interaction of celestial bodies with their space environment. Using highly sensitive plasma instruments, positively charged heavy ions have been used to trace exospheric and surface composition of comets, planets, and satellites as well as the composition of interplanetary and interstellar dust. While positive ions dominate throughout the heliosphere, negative ions are also produced from surface interactions. In fact, laboratory experiments have shown that oxygen released from rocky surfaces is mostly negatively charged. Negative ions and negatively charged nanograins have been detected with plasma electron analyzers in several different environments (e.g., by Cassini and Rosetta), though more extensive studies have been challenging without instrumentation dedicated to negative ions. We discuss an adaptation of the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) flown on MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) for the measurement of negatively charged particles. MESSENGER/FIPS successfully measured the plasma environment of Mercury from 2011 until 2015, when the mission ended, and has been used to map multiple ion species (H+ through Na+ and beyond) throughout Mercury's space environment. Modifications to the existing instrument design fits within a 3U CubeSat volume and would provide a low mass, low power instrument, ideal for future CubeSat or distributed sensor missions seeking, for the first time, to characterize the contribution of negative particles in the heliospheric plasmas near the planets, moons, comets, and other sources.

  5. [Negative hallucination, self-onsciousness and ageing].

    PubMed

    Hazif-Thomas, C; Stephan, F; Walter, M; Thomas, P

    2015-04-01

    Negative hallucinations are characterized by a defect in perception of an object or a person, or a denial of the existence of their perception. Negative hallucinations create blank spaces, due to both an impossible representation and an incapability of investment in reality. They have a close relationship with Cotard's syndrome, delusional theme of organ denial observed in melancholic syndromes in the elderly. Phenomenological approach. The phenomenology of negative hallucinations provides quite an amount of information on the origin of the psychotic symptoms when one is rather old. The connections between hallucinations, mood disorders and negative symptoms are often difficult to live with for the nearest and dearest. Negative hallucinations require a strict approach to identify their expression that is crucial because a wide heterogeneity exists within the pathological pictures, as in Cotard's syndrome. Although the negative hallucination has an anti traumatic function in elderly people fighting against mental pain, it still represents a deficiency in symbolization. The prevalence of this symptom is without doubt underestimated, although its presence often underlines thymic suffering that is more striking. These hallucinatory symptoms have an important impact on the patients' daily life, and they appear to be prisoners of a suffering, which cannot be revealed. We propose in this article to review the clinical symptoms of negative hallucinations in the elderly and the way to manage them. The medicinal approaches are not always effective. A greater place must be given to what is in connection with the body, aiming at a strong impact and thus to offer non-pharmacological approaches, such as somatic ones, which can be either invasive (electroconvulsive therapy) or not (transcranial magnetic stimulation). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Negatively-Biased Credulity and the Cultural Evolution of Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Daniel M. T.; Pisor, Anne C.; Navarrete, Carlos David

    2014-01-01

    The functions of cultural beliefs are often opaque to those who hold them. Accordingly, to benefit from cultural evolution’s ability to solve complex adaptive problems, learners must be credulous. However, credulity entails costs, including susceptibility to exploitation, and effort wasted due to false beliefs. One determinant of the optimal level of credulity is the ratio between the costs of two types of errors: erroneous incredulity (failing to believe information that is true) and erroneous credulity (believing information that is false). This ratio can be expected to be asymmetric when information concerns hazards, as the costs of erroneous incredulity will, on average, exceed the costs of erroneous credulity; no equivalent asymmetry characterizes information concerning benefits. Natural selection can therefore be expected to have crafted learners’ minds so as to be more credulous toward information concerning hazards. This negatively-biased credulity extends general negativity bias, the adaptive tendency for negative events to be more salient than positive events. Together, these biases constitute attractors that should shape cultural evolution via the aggregated effects of learners’ differential retention and transmission of information. In two studies in the U.S., we demonstrate the existence of negatively-biased credulity, and show that it is most pronounced in those who believe the world to be dangerous, individuals who may constitute important nodes in cultural transmission networks. We then document the predicted imbalance in cultural content using a sample of urban legends collected from the Internet and a sample of supernatural beliefs obtained from ethnographies of a representative collection of the world’s cultures, showing that beliefs about hazards predominate in both. PMID:24736596

  7. Negatively-biased credulity and the cultural evolution of beliefs.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Daniel M T; Pisor, Anne C; Navarrete, Carlos David

    2014-01-01

    The functions of cultural beliefs are often opaque to those who hold them. Accordingly, to benefit from cultural evolution's ability to solve complex adaptive problems, learners must be credulous. However, credulity entails costs, including susceptibility to exploitation, and effort wasted due to false beliefs. One determinant of the optimal level of credulity is the ratio between the costs of two types of errors: erroneous incredulity (failing to believe information that is true) and erroneous credulity (believing information that is false). This ratio can be expected to be asymmetric when information concerns hazards, as the costs of erroneous incredulity will, on average, exceed the costs of erroneous credulity; no equivalent asymmetry characterizes information concerning benefits. Natural selection can therefore be expected to have crafted learners' minds so as to be more credulous toward information concerning hazards. This negatively-biased credulity extends general negativity bias, the adaptive tendency for negative events to be more salient than positive events. Together, these biases constitute attractors that should shape cultural evolution via the aggregated effects of learners' differential retention and transmission of information. In two studies in the U.S., we demonstrate the existence of negatively-biased credulity, and show that it is most pronounced in those who believe the world to be dangerous, individuals who may constitute important nodes in cultural transmission networks. We then document the predicted imbalance in cultural content using a sample of urban legends collected from the Internet and a sample of supernatural beliefs obtained from ethnographies of a representative collection of the world's cultures, showing that beliefs about hazards predominate in both.

  8. Perceptual Negativity Predicts Greater Reactivity to Negative Events in Daily Life.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael D; Liu, Tianwei

    2013-11-01

    Reinforcement sensitivity theory includes the idea that people differ in their sensitivity to negative events, but relevant process-based assessments have not been developed. The present studies assessed sensitivity to negative events in terms of the extent to which negative word stimuli were perceived to be larger than neutral word stimuli. There was a general tendency to overestimate the size of negative relative to neutral words, but individuals differed substantially in this form of what is termed perceptual negativity. Of more importance, two studies (total N = 151) found systematic relationships between individual differences in perceptual negativity and reactivity to negative events in daily diary protocols. Study 1 found that within-person variations in the occurrence of daily negative events undermined goal-related optimism to a greater extent at higher, relative to lower, levels of perceptual negativity. Study 2 conceptually replicated this interaction in the context of within-person associations between the occurrence of daily negative events and antisocial behavior. These findings are important in advancing reinforcement sensitivity theory, in operationalizing a particular component of it, and in extending it to reactivity processes in daily life.

  9. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  10. Manual Skill Generalization Enhanced by Negative Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Patton, James L.; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent human-machine interaction studies have suggested that movement augmented with negative viscosity can enhance performance and can even promote better motor learning. To test this, we investigated how negative viscosity influences motor adaptation to an environment where forces acted only in one axis of motion. Using a force-feedback device, subjects performed free exploratory movements with a purely inertia generating forces proportional to hand acceleration, negative viscosity generating destabilizing forces proportional to hand velocity, or a combination of the acceleration and velocity fields. After training, we evaluated each subject's ability to perform circular movements in only the inertial field. Combined training resulted in lowest error and revealed similar responses as inertia training in catch trials. These findings are remarkable because negative viscosity, available only during training, evidently enhanced learning when combined with inertia. This success in generalization is consistent with the ability of the nervous system to decompose the perturbing forces into velocity and acceleration dependent components. Compared with inertia, the combined group exhibited a broader range of speeds along the direction of maximal perturbing force. Broader exploration was also correlated with better performance in subsequent evaluation trials; this suggests that negative viscosity improved performance by enhancing identification of each force field. These findings shed light on a new way to enhance sensorimotor adaptation through robot-applied augmentation of mechanics. PMID:20660429

  11. Negative obstacle detection by thermal signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthies, Larry; Rankin, A.

    2003-01-01

    Detecting negative obstacles (ditches, potholes, and other depressions) is one of the most difficult problems in perception for autonomous, off-road navigation. Past work has largely relied on range imagery, because that is based on the geometry of the obstacle, is largely insensitive to illumination variables, and because there have not been other reliable alternatives. However, the visible aspect of negative obstacles shrinks rapidly with range, making them impossible to detect in time to avoid them at high speed. To relive this problem, we show that the interiors of negative obstacles generally remain warmer than the surrounding terrain throughout the night, making thermal signature a stable property for night-time negative obstacle detection. Experimental results to date have achieved detection distances 45% greater by using thermal signature than by using range data alone. Thermal signature is the first known observable with potential to reveal a deep negative obstacle without actually seeing far into it. Modeling solar illumination has potential to extend the usefulness of thermal signature through daylight hours.

  12. Negative obstacle detection by thermal signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthies, Larry; Rankin, A.

    2003-01-01

    Detecting negative obstacles (ditches, potholes, and other depressions) is one of the most difficult problems in perception for autonomous, off-road navigation. Past work has largely relied on range imagery, because that is based on the geometry of the obstacle, is largely insensitive to illumination variables, and because there have not been other reliable alternatives. However, the visible aspect of negative obstacles shrinks rapidly with range, making them impossible to detect in time to avoid them at high speed. To relive this problem, we show that the interiors of negative obstacles generally remain warmer than the surrounding terrain throughout the night, making thermal signature a stable property for night-time negative obstacle detection. Experimental results to date have achieved detection distances 45% greater by using thermal signature than by using range data alone. Thermal signature is the first known observable with potential to reveal a deep negative obstacle without actually seeing far into it. Modeling solar illumination has potential to extend the usefulness of thermal signature through daylight hours.

  13. Mismatch negativity to pitch pattern deviants in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Sarah M; Matteis, Mario De; Coffman, Brian A; Murphy, Timothy K; Butera, Christiana D; Ward, Kayla L; Leiter-McBeth, Justin R; Salisbury, Dean F

    2017-09-01

    Simple mismatch negativity (MMN) to infrequent pitch deviants is impaired in individuals with long-term schizophrenia (Sz). The complex MMN elicited by pattern deviance often manifes is cut from here]->ts later after deviant onset than simple MMN and can ascertain deficits in abstracting relationships between stimuli. Sz exhibit reduced complex MMN, but so far this has only been measured when deviance detection relies on a grouping rule. We measured MMN to deviants in pitch-based rules to see whether MMN is also abnormal in Sz under these conditions. Three experiments were conducted. Twenty-seven Sz and 28 healthy matched controls (HC) participated in Experiments 1 and 2, and 24 Sz and 26 HC participated in Experiment 3. Experiment 1 was a standard pitch MMN task, and Sz showed the expected MMN reduction (~ 115 ms) in the simple pitch deviant compared to HC. Experiment 2 comprised standard groups of six tones that ascended in pitch, and deviant groups where the last tone descended in pitch. Complex MMN was late (~ 510 ms) and significantly blunted in Sz. Experiment 3 comprised standard groups of 12 tones (six tones ascending in pitch followed by six tones descending in pitch, like a scale), and deviant groups containing two repetitions of six ascending tones (the scale restarted midstream). Complex MMN was also late (~ 460 ms) and significantly blunted in Sz. These results identify a late pitch pattern deviance-related MMN that is deficient in schizophrenia. This suggests specific deficits in later more complex deviance detection in schizophrenia for abstract patterns. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

  15. On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

  16. Effects of compassionate thinking on negative emotions.

    PubMed

    Arimitsu, Kohki; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2017-01-01

    The present study compared the effect of compassionate thinking with other methods traditionally used in cognitive behavioural therapy (cognitive reappraisal, responsibility reattribution, and self-deflection). An instructional manipulation was used, and 207 undergraduate students were randomly assigned to one of these thinking styles or a control condition. The results revealed that participants who engaged in compassionate thinking and cognitive reappraisal reported significantly lower levels of negative emotions compared to those in the responsibility reattribution and control conditions. Furthermore, results of hierarchical regression analyses suggested that habitual use of self-compassion reduced negative emotions in all conditions. These findings suggest that self-compassion and reappraisal reduce negative emotions more than reattribution and self-deflection.

  17. The science of negative index materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukoulis, Costas M.; Zhou, Jiangfeng; Koschny, Thomas; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2008-07-01

    Metamaterials are designed to have structures that make available properties not found in Nature. Their unique properties (such as negative index of refraction, n) can be extended from GHz all the way to optical frequencies. We review the scaling properties of metamaterials that have been fabricated and give negative n and negative permeability, μ. It is found that most of the experimentally realized metamaterials have λ/a between 2 (THz and optical region) and 12 (GHz region), where λ is the operation wavelength and a is the size of the unit cell. The transmission losses for the experimental structures and the ratio λ/a for the simulated structures are presented. Finally, a comparison of the different metamaterial designs (fishnet, cut and/or continuous wires, and split-ring resonators and wires) is given.

  18. Carrier heating and negative photoconductivity in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Heyman, J. N.; Stein, J. D.; Kaminski, Z. S.; Banman, A. R.; Massari, A. M.; Robinson, J. T.

    2015-01-07

    We investigated negative photoconductivity in graphene using ultrafast terahertz techniques. Infrared transmission was used to determine the Fermi energy, carrier density, and mobility of p-type chemical vapor deposition graphene samples. Time-resolved terahertz photoconductivity measurements using a tunable mid-infrared pump probed these samples at photon energies between 0.35 eV and 1.55 eV, approximately one-half to three times the Fermi energy of the samples. Although interband optical transitions in graphene are blocked for pump photon energies less than twice the Fermi energy, we observe negative photoconductivity at all pump photon energies investigated, indicating that interband excitation is not required to observe this effect. Our results are consistent with a thermalized free-carrier population that cools by electron-phonon scattering, but are inconsistent with models of negative photoconductivity based on population inversion.

  19. Fabrication of a micromold using negative PMER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young A.; Chae, Kyoung-Soo; Jeoung, Dae S.; Kim, Jong Y.; Moon, Sung

    2001-10-01

    We fabricated a micro mold using UV-lithography process with a novel mold material, negative PMER. Negative PMER(TOK, PMER N-CA3000) is a chemically amplified negative tone photoresist on a novolak resin base. It can be processed using standard equipment such as standard spin coater, baking with ovens or hotplates, and immersion development tools. Good quality resist patterns of up to 36μm thickness were achieved by means of this equipment in a short time. The conditions of this process were pre-exposure bake of 110 degree(s)C/12min, exposure dose of 675mJ/cm2 post-exposure bake of 100 degree(s)C/9min, and development for 10min.

  20. Negative coupled inductors for polyphase choppers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamieson, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A technique for negatively coupling the outputs of polyphase choppers is disclosed, wherein the output inductance of each phase is divided into two windings, and each winding is negatively coupled to a corresponding winding of a neighboring phase. In a preferred embodiment for a three-phase chopper circuit, the output inductance of phase A is divided into windings 100 and 102, the output inductance of phase B is divided into windings 110 and 112, and the output inductance of phase C is divided into windings 120 and 122. Pairs of windings 100 and 110, 112 and 120, and 102 and 122 are respectively disposed in transformers arranged for negatively coupling the windings of each pair.