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Sample records for e2f1-mediated transcriptional inhibition

  1. HBV core promoter mutations promote cellular proliferation through E2F1-mediated upregulation of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 transcription.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuehua; Tai, Andrew W; Tong, Shuping; Lok, Anna S F

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core promoter (CP) mutations have been associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in clinical studies. We previously reported that a combination of CP mutations seen in HCC patients, expressed in HBx gene, increased SKP2 (S-phase kinase-associated protein 2) expression, thereby promoting cellular proliferation. Here, we investigate the possible mechanisms by which CP mutations upregulate SKP2. We used immunoblotting and ATPlite assay to validate the effect of CP mutations in full-length HBV genome on cell cycle regulator levels and cell proliferation. Activation of SKP2 mRNA was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and HCC cell lines. Effect of CP mutations on SKP2 promoter activity was determined by luciferase assay. Target regulation of E2F1 on SKP2 was analyzed by siRNAs. CP mutations in full-length HBV genome upregulated SKP2 expression, thereby downregulating cell cycle inhibitors and accelerating cellular proliferation. CP mutations enhanced SKP2 promoter activity but had no effect on SKP2 protein stability. Mapping of the SKP2 promoter identified a region necessary for activation by CP mutations that contains an E2F1 response element. Knocking down E2F1 reduced the effects of CP mutations on SKP2 and cellular proliferation. The effect of CP mutations on E2F1 might be mediated through hyperphosphorylation of RB. HBV CP mutations enhance SKP2 transcription by activating the E2F1 transcription factor and in turn downregulate cell cycle inhibitors, thus providing a potential mechanism for an association between CP mutations and HCC. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. E2F1-mediated human POMC expression in ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araki, Takako; Liu, Ning-Ai; Tone, Yukiko; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Heltsley, Roy; Tone, Masahide; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-11-01

    Cushing's syndrome is caused by excessive adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion derived from pituitary corticotroph tumors (Cushing disease) or from non-pituitary tumors (ectopic Cushing's syndrome). Hypercortisolemic features of ectopic Cushing's syndrome are severe, and no definitive treatment for paraneoplastic ACTH excess is available. We aimed to identify subcellular therapeutic targets by elucidating transcriptional regulation of the human ACTH precursor POMC (proopiomelanocortin) and ACTH production in non-pituitary tumor cells and in cell lines derived from patients with ectopic Cushing's syndrome. We show that ectopic hPOMC transcription proceeds independently of pituitary-specific Tpit/Pitx1 and demonstrate a novel E2F1-mediated transcriptional mechanism regulating hPOMC We identify an E2F1 cluster binding to the proximal hPOMC promoter region (-42 to +68), with DNA-binding activity determined by the phosphorylation at Ser-337. hPOMC mRNA expression in cancer cells was upregulated (up to 40-fold) by the co-expression of E2F1 and its heterodimer partner DP1. Direct and indirect inhibitors of E2F1 activity suppressed hPOMC gene expression and ACTH by modifying E2F1 DNA-binding activity in ectopic Cushing's cell lines and primary tumor cells, and also suppressed paraneoplastic ACTH and cortisol levels in xenografted mice. E2F1-mediated hPOMC transcription is a potential target for suppressing ACTH production in ectopic Cushing's syndrome. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. E2f1 mediates high glucose-induced neuronal death in cultured mouse retinal explants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujiao; Zhou, Yi; Xiao, Lirong; Zheng, Shijie; Yan, Naihong; Chen, Danian

    2017-10-02

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common complication of diabetes and remains one of the major causes of blindness in the world; infants born to diabetic mothers have higher risk of developing retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). While hyperglycemia is a major risk factor, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying DR and diabetic ROP are poorly understood. To explore the consequences of retinal cells under high glucose, we cultured wild type or E2f1 -/- mouse retinal explants from postnatal day 8 with normal glucose, high osmotic or high glucose media. Explants were also incubated with cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ) to mimic the hypoxic condition. We showed that, at 7 days post exposure to high glucose, retinal explants displayed elevated cell death, ectopic cell division and intact retinal vascular plexus. Cell death mainly occurred in excitatory neurons, such as ganglion and bipolar cells, which were also ectopically dividing. Many Müller glial cells reentered the cell cycle; some had irregular morphology or migrated to other layers. High glucose inhibited the hyperoxia-induced blood vessel regression of retinal explants. Moreover, inactivation of E2f1 rescued high glucose-induced ectopic division and cell death of retinal neurons, but not ectopic cell division of Müller glial cells and vascular phenotypes. This suggests that high glucose has direct but distinct effects on retinal neurons, glial cells and blood vessels, and that E2f1 mediates its effects on retinal neurons. These findings shed new light onto mechanisms of DR and the fetal retinal abnormalities associated with maternal diabetes, and suggest possible new therapeutic strategies.

  4. TFDP3 was expressed in coordination with E2F1 to inhibit E2F1-mediated apoptosis in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yueyun; Xin, Yijuan; Li, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Yue, Qiaohong; Xiao, Fengjing; Hao, Xiaoke

    2014-03-10

    TFDP3 has been previously identified as an inhibitor of E2F molecules. It has been shown to suppress E2F1-induced apoptosis dependent P53 and to play a potential role in carcinogenesis. However, whether it indeed helps cancer cells tolerate apoptosis stress in cancer tissues remains unknown. TFDP3 expression was assessed by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in normal human tissues, cancer tissues and prostate cancer tissues. The association between TFDP3 and E2F1 in prostate cancer development was analyzed in various stages. Apoptosis was evaluated with annexin-V and propidium iodide staining and flow-cytometry. The results show that, in 96 samples of normal human tissues, TFDP3 could be detected in the cerebrum, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, bronchus, breast, ovary, uterus, and skin, but seldom in the lung, muscles, prostate, and liver. In addition, TFDP3 was highly expressed in numerous cancer tissues, such as brain-keratinous, lung squamous cell carcinoma, testicular seminoma, cervical carcinoma, skin squamous cell carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma, liver cancer, and prostate cancer. Moreover, TFDP3 was positive in 23 (62.2%) of 37 prostate cancer samples regardless of stage. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry results show that TFDP3 was always expressed in coordination with E2F1 at equivalent expression levels in prostate cancer tissues, and was highly expressed particularly in samples of high stage. When E2F1 was extrogenously expressed in LNCap cells, TFDP3 could be induced, and the apoptosis induced by E2F1 was significantly decreased. It was demonstrated that TFDP3 was a broadly expressed protein corresponding to E2F1 in human tissues, and suggested that TFDP3 is involved in prostate cancer cell survival by suppressing apoptosis induced by E2F1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. E2F1-mediated upregulation of p19INK4d determines its periodic expression during cell cycle and regulates cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Carcagno, Abel L; Marazita, Mariela C; Ogara, María F; Ceruti, Julieta M; Sonzogni, Silvina V; Scassa, María E; Giono, Luciana E; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2011-01-01

    A central aspect of development and disease is the control of cell proliferation through regulation of the mitotic cycle. Cell cycle progression and directionality requires an appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators whose expression must fluctuate in a coordinated manner. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, has a unique feature that distinguishes it from the remaining INK4 and makes it a likely candidate for contributing to the directionality of the cell cycle. p19INK4d mRNA and protein levels accumulate periodically during the cell cycle under normal conditions, a feature reminiscent of cyclins. In this paper, we demonstrate that p19INK4d is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1 through two response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter. Ablation of this regulation reduced p19 levels and restricted its expression during the cell cycle, reflecting the contribution of a transcriptional effect of E2F1 on p19 periodicity. The induction of p19INK4d is delayed during the cell cycle compared to that of cyclin E, temporally separating the induction of these proliferative and antiproliferative target genes. Specific inhibition of the E2F1-p19INK4d pathway using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that block E2F1 binding on p19 promoter, stimulated cell proliferation and increased the fraction of cells in S phase. The results described here support a model of normal cell cycle progression in which, following phosphorylation of pRb, free E2F induces cyclin E, among other target genes. Once cyclinE/CDK2 takes over as the cell cycle driving kinase activity, the induction of p19 mediated by E2F1 leads to inhibition of the CDK4,6-containing complexes, bringing the G1 phase to an end. This regulatory mechanism constitutes a new negative feedback loop that terminates the G1 phase proliferative signal, contributing to the proper coordination of the cell cycle and provides an additional mechanism to limit E2F activity.

  6. E2F1-Mediated Upregulation of p19INK4d Determines Its Periodic Expression during Cell Cycle and Regulates Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Carcagno, Abel L.; Marazita, Mariela C.; Ogara, María F.; Ceruti, Julieta M.; Sonzogni, Silvina V.; Scassa, María E.; Giono, Luciana E.; Cánepa, Eduardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Background A central aspect of development and disease is the control of cell proliferation through regulation of the mitotic cycle. Cell cycle progression and directionality requires an appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators whose expression must fluctuate in a coordinated manner. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, has a unique feature that distinguishes it from the remaining INK4 and makes it a likely candidate for contributing to the directionality of the cell cycle. p19INK4d mRNA and protein levels accumulate periodically during the cell cycle under normal conditions, a feature reminiscent of cyclins. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, we demonstrate that p19INK4d is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1 through two response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter. Ablation of this regulation reduced p19 levels and restricted its expression during the cell cycle, reflecting the contribution of a transcriptional effect of E2F1 on p19 periodicity. The induction of p19INK4d is delayed during the cell cycle compared to that of cyclin E, temporally separating the induction of these proliferative and antiproliferative target genes. Specific inhibition of the E2F1-p19INK4d pathway using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that block E2F1 binding on p19 promoter, stimulated cell proliferation and increased the fraction of cells in S phase. Conclusions/Significance The results described here support a model of normal cell cycle progression in which, following phosphorylation of pRb, free E2F induces cyclin E, among other target genes. Once cyclinE/CDK2 takes over as the cell cycle driving kinase activity, the induction of p19 mediated by E2F1 leads to inhibition of the CDK4,6-containing complexes, bringing the G1 phase to an end. This regulatory mechanism constitutes a new negative feedback loop that terminates the G1 phase proliferative signal, contributing to the proper coordination of the cell cycle and provides an

  7. Aromatase Inhibition in a Transcriptional Network Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnow ovaries (FHM, Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using a transcriptional ne...

  8. Piano Transcription with Convolutional Sparse Lateral Inhibition

    DOE PAGES

    Cogliati, Andrea; Duan, Zhiyao; Wohlberg, Brendt Egon

    2017-02-08

    This paper extends our prior work on contextdependent piano transcription to estimate the length of the notes in addition to their pitch and onset. This approach employs convolutional sparse coding along with lateral inhibition constraints to approximate a musical signal as the sum of piano note waveforms (dictionary elements) convolved with their temporal activations. The waveforms are pre-recorded for the specific piano to be transcribed in the specific environment. A dictionary containing multiple waveforms per pitch is generated by truncating a long waveform for each pitch to different lengths. During transcription, the dictionary elements are fixed and their temporal activationsmore » are estimated and post-processed to obtain the pitch, onset and note length estimation. A sparsity penalty promotes globally sparse activations of the dictionary elements, and a lateral inhibition term penalizes concurrent activations of different waveforms corresponding to the same pitch within a temporal neighborhood, to achieve note length estimation. Experiments on the MAPS dataset show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms a state-of-the-art music transcription method trained in the same context-dependent setting in transcription accuracy.« less

  9. Piano Transcription with Convolutional Sparse Lateral Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Cogliati, Andrea; Duan, Zhiyao; Wohlberg, Brendt Egon

    This paper extends our prior work on contextdependent piano transcription to estimate the length of the notes in addition to their pitch and onset. This approach employs convolutional sparse coding along with lateral inhibition constraints to approximate a musical signal as the sum of piano note waveforms (dictionary elements) convolved with their temporal activations. The waveforms are pre-recorded for the specific piano to be transcribed in the specific environment. A dictionary containing multiple waveforms per pitch is generated by truncating a long waveform for each pitch to different lengths. During transcription, the dictionary elements are fixed and their temporal activationsmore » are estimated and post-processed to obtain the pitch, onset and note length estimation. A sparsity penalty promotes globally sparse activations of the dictionary elements, and a lateral inhibition term penalizes concurrent activations of different waveforms corresponding to the same pitch within a temporal neighborhood, to achieve note length estimation. Experiments on the MAPS dataset show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms a state-of-the-art music transcription method trained in the same context-dependent setting in transcription accuracy.« less

  10. IGFBP-3, hypoxia and TNF-{alpha} inhibit adiponectin transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Zappala, Giovanna, E-mail: zappalag@mail.nih.gov; Rechler, Matthew M.; Clinical Endocrinology Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

    2009-05-15

    The thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone, an agonist ligand for the nuclear receptor PPAR-{gamma}, improves insulin sensitivity in part by stimulating transcription of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine adiponectin. It activates PPAR-{gamma}-RXR-{alpha} heterodimers bound to PPAR-{gamma} response elements in the adiponectin promoter. Rosiglitazone-stimulated adiponectin protein synthesis in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes has been shown to be inhibited by IGFBP-3, which can be induced by hypoxia and the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-{alpha}, two inhibitors of adiponectin transcription. The present study demonstrates that IGFBP-3, the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride, and TNF-{alpha} inhibit rosiglitazone-induced adiponectin transcription in mouse embryo fibroblasts that stably express PPAR-{gamma}2. Native IGFBP-3 can bind RXR-{alpha} andmore » inhibited rosiglitazone stimulated promoter activity, whereas an IGFBP-3 mutant that does not bind RXR-{alpha} did not. These results suggest that IGFBP-3 may mediate the inhibition of adiponectin transcription by hypoxia and TNF-{alpha}, and that IGFBP-3 binding to RXR-{alpha} may be required for the observed inhibition.« less

  11. Interleukin 2 transcription factors as molecular targets of cAMP inhibition: delayed inhibition kinetics and combinatorial transcription roles

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Elevation of cAMP can cause gene-specific inhibition of interleukin 2 (IL-2) expression. To investigate the mechanism of this effect, we have combined electrophoretic mobility shift assays and in vivo genomic footprinting to assess both the availability of putative IL-2 transcription factors in forskolin-treated cells and the functional capacity of these factors to engage their sites in vivo. All observed effects of forskolin depended upon protein kinase A, for they were blocked by introduction of a dominant negative mutant subunit of protein kinase A. In the EL4.E1 cell line, we report specific inhibitory effects of cAMP elevation both on NF-kappa B/Rel family factors binding at -200 bp, and on a novel, biochemically distinct "TGGGC" factor binding at -225 bp with respect to the IL-2 transcriptional start site. Neither NF-AT nor AP-1 binding activities are detectably inhibited in gel mobility shift assays. Elevation of cAMP inhibits NF-kappa B activity with delayed kinetics in association with a delayed inhibition of IL-2 RNA accumulation. Activation of cells in the presence of forskolin prevents the maintenance of stable protein- DNA interactions in vivo, not only at the NF-kappa B and TGGGC sites of the IL-2 enhancer, but also at the NF-AT, AP-1, and other sites. This result, and similar results in cyclosporin A-treated cells, imply that individual IL-2 transcription factors cannot stably bind their target sequences in vivo without coengagement of all other distinct factors at neighboring sites. It is proposed that nonhierarchical, cooperative enhancement of binding is a structural basis of combinatorial transcription factor action at the IL-2 locus. PMID:8113685

  12. Pirfenidone exerts antifibrotic effects through inhibition of GLI transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Didiasova, Miroslava; Singh, Rajeev; Wilhelm, Jochen; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Wujak, Lukasz; Zakrzewicz, Dariusz; Schaefer, Liliana; Markart, Philipp; Seeger, Werner; Lauth, Matthias; Wygrecka, Malgorzata

    2017-05-01

    Pirfenidone is an antifibrotic drug, recently approved for the treatment of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Although pirfenidone exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antifibrotic properties, the molecular mechanism underlying its protective effects remains unknown. Here, we link pirfenidone action with the regulation of the profibrotic hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. We demonstrate that pirfenidone selectively destabilizes the glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI)2 protein, the primary activator of Hh-mediated gene transcription. Consequently, pirfenidone decreases overall Hh pathway activity in patients with IPF and in patient-derived primary lung fibroblasts and leads to diminished levels of Hh target genes, such as GLI1, Hh receptor Patched-1, α-smooth muscle actin, and fibronectin, and to reduced cell migration and proliferation. Interestingly, Hh-triggered TGF-β1 expression potentiated Hh responsiveness of primary lung fibroblasts by elevating the available pool of glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI)1/GLI2, thus creating a vicious cycle of amplifying fibrotic processes. Because GLI transcription factors are not only crucial for Hh-mediated changes but are also required as mediators of TGF-β signaling, our findings suggest that pirfenidone exerts its clinically beneficial effects through dual Hh/TGF-β inhibition by targeting the GLI2 protein.-Didiasova, M., Singh, R., Wilhelm, J., Kwapiszewska, G., Wujak, L., Zakrzewicz, D., Schaefer, L., Markart, P., Seeger, W., Lauth, M., Wygrecka, M. Pirfenidone exerts antifibrotic effects through inhibition of GLI transcription factors. © FASEB.

  13. Minor Groove Binder Distamycin Remodels Chromatin but Inhibits Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Parijat; Banerjee, Amrita; Shandilya, Jayasha; Senapati, Parijat; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Kundu, Tapas K.; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2013-01-01

    The condensed structure of chromatin limits access of cellular machinery towards template DNA. This in turn represses essential processes like transcription, replication, repair and recombination. The repression is alleviated by a variety of energy dependent processes, collectively known as “chromatin remodeling”. In a eukaryotic cell, a fine balance between condensed and de-condensed states of chromatin helps to maintain an optimum level of gene expression. DNA binding small molecules have the potential to perturb such equilibrium. We present herein the study of an oligopeptide antibiotic distamycin, which binds to the minor groove of B-DNA. Chromatin mobility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been employed to study the effect of distamycin on chromatosomes, isolated from the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that distamycin is capable of remodeling both chromatosomes and reconstituted nucleosomes, and the remodeling takes place in an ATP-independent manner. Binding of distamycin to the linker and nucleosomal DNA culminates in eviction of the linker histone and the formation of a population of off-centered nucleosomes. This hints at a possible corkscrew type motion of the DNA with respect to the histone octamer. Our results indicate that distamycin in spite of remodeling chromatin, inhibits transcription from both DNA and chromatin templates. Therefore, the DNA that is made accessible due to remodeling is either structurally incompetent for transcription, or bound distamycin poses a roadblock for the transcription machinery to advance. PMID:23460895

  14. Novel Transcriptional Activities of Vitamin E: Inhibition of Cholesterol Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Valastyan, Scott; Thakur, Varsha; Johnson, Amy; Kumar, Karan; Manor, Danny

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin E is a dietary lipid that is essential for vertebrate health and fertility. The biological activity of vitamin E is thought to reflect its ability to quench oxygen- and carbon- based free radicals, and thus to protect the organism from oxidative damage. However, recent reports suggest that vitamin E may also display other biological activities. Here, to examine possible mechanisms that may underlie such non-classical activities of vitamin E, we investigated the possibility that it functions as a specific modulator of gene expression. We show that treatment of cultured hepatocytes with RRR-α-tocopherol alters the expression of multiple genes and that these effects are distinct from those elicited by another antioxidant. Genes modulated by vitamin E include those that encode key enzymes in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. Correspondingly, vitamin E caused a pronounced inhibition of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. The transcriptional activities of vitamin E were mediated by attenuating the post-translational processing of the transcription factor SREBP-2 that, in turn, led to a decreased transcriptional activity of sterol responsive elements in the promoters of target genes. These observations indicate that vitamin E possesses novel transcriptional activities that affect fundamental biological processes. Cross talk between tocopherol levels and cholesterol status may be an important facet of the biological activities of vitamin E. PMID:18095660

  15. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Binds to E2F1 and Inhibits E2F1-induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Jennifer L.; Fan, Yunxia; Chang, Xiaoqing; Peng, Li; Knudsen, Erik S.; Xia, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Cellular stress by DNA damage induces checkpoint kinase-2 (CHK2)-mediated phosphorylation and stabilization of the E2F1 transcription factor, leading to induction of apoptosis by activation of a subset of proapoptotic E2F1 target genes, including Apaf1 and p73. This report characterizes an interaction between the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor (AHR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, and E2F1 that results in the attenuation of E2F1-mediated apoptosis. In Ahr−/− fibroblasts stably transfected with a doxycycline-regulated AHR expression vector, inhibition of AHR expression causes a significant elevation of oxidative stress, γH2A.X histone phosphorylation, and E2F1-dependent apoptosis, which can be blocked by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of E2F1 expression. In contrast, ligand-dependent AHR activation protects these cells from etoposide-induced cell death. In cells expressing both proteins, AHR and E2F1 interact independently of the retinoblastoma protein (RB), because AHR and E2F1 coimmunoprecipitate from extracts of RB-negative cells. Additionally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that AHR and E2F1 bind to the Apaf1 promoter at a region containing a consensus E2F1 binding site but no AHR binding sites. AHR activation represses Apaf1 and TAp73 mRNA induction by a constitutively active CHK2 expression vector. Furthermore, AHR overexpression blocks the transcriptional induction of Apaf1 and p73 and the accumulation of sub-G0/G1 cells resulting from ectopic overexpression of E2F1. These results point to a proproliferative, antiapoptotic function of the Ah receptor that likely plays a role in tumor progression. PMID:18524851

  16. Inhibition of host cell RNA polymerase III-mediated transcription by poliovirus: Inactivation of specific transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkin, L.G.; Yoshinaga, S.K.; Berk, A.J.

    1987-11-01

    The inhibition of transcription by RNA polymerase III in poliovirus-infected cells was studied. Experiments utilizing two different cell lines showed that the initiation step of transcription by RNA polymerase III was impaired by infection of these cells with the virus. The observed inhibition of transcription was not due to shut-off of host cell protein synthesis by poliovirus. Among four distinct components required for accurate transcription in vitro from cloned DNA templates, activities of RNA polymerase III and transcription factor TFIIIA were not significantly affected by virus infection. The activity of transcription factor TFIIIC, the limiting component required for transcription ofmore » RNA polymerase III genes, was severely inhibited in infected cells, whereas that of transcription factor TFIIIB was inhibited to a lesser extent. The sequence-specific DNA-binding of TFIIIC to the adenovirus VA1 gene internal promoted, however, was not altered by infection of cells with the virus. The authors conclude that (i) at least two transcription factors, TFIIIB and TFIIIC, are inhibited by infection of cells with poliovirtus, (ii) inactivation of TFIIIC does not involve destruction of its DNA-binding domain, and (iii) sequence-specific DNA binding by TFIIIC may be necessary but is not sufficient for the formation of productive transcription complexes.« less

  17. The prohibitin-repressive interaction with E2F1 is rapidly inhibited by androgen signalling in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Koushyar, S; Economides, G; Zaat, S; Jiang, W; Bevan, C L; Dart, D A

    2017-01-01

    Prohibitin (PHB) is a tumour suppressor molecule with pleiotropic activities across several cellular compartments including mitochondria, cell membrane and the nucleus. PHB and the steroid-activated androgen receptor (AR) have an interplay where AR downregulates PHB, and PHB represses AR. Additionally, their cellular locations and chromatin interactions are in dynamic opposition. We investigated the mechanisms of cell cycle inhibition by PHB and how this is modulated by AR in prostate cancer. Using a prostate cancer cell line overexpressing PHB, we analysed the gene expression changes associated with PHB-mediated cell cycle arrest. Over 1000 gene expression changes were found to be significant and gene ontology analysis confirmed PHB-mediated repression of genes essential for DNA replication and synthesis, for example, MCMs and TK1, via an E2F1 regulated pathway—agreeing with its G1/S cell cycle arrest activity. PHB is known to inhibit E2F1-mediated transcription, and the PHB:E2F1 interaction was seen in LNCaP nuclear extracts, which was then reduced by androgen treatment. Upon two-dimensional western blot analysis, the PHB protein itself showed androgen-mediated charge differentiation (only in AR-positive cells), indicating a potential dephosphorylation event. Kinexus phosphoprotein array analysis indicated that Src kinase was the main interacting intracellular signalling hub in androgen-treated LNCaP cells, and that Src inhibition could reduce this AR-mediated charge differentiation. PHB charge change may be associated with rapid dissociation from chromatin and E2F1, allowing the cell cycle to proceed. The AR and androgens may deactivate the repressive functions of PHB upon E2F1 leading to cell cycle progression, and indicates a role for AR in DNA replication licensing. PMID:28504694

  18. Transcriptional dysregulation causes altered modulation of inhibition by haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Brady, Lillian J; Bartley, Aundrea F; Li, Qin; McMeekin, Laura J; Hablitz, John J; Cowell, Rita M; Dobrunz, Lynn E

    2016-12-01

    Many neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism involve interneuron transcriptional dysregulation. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α regulates gene expression in GABAergic interneurons, which are important for regulating hippocampal network activity. Genetic deletion of PGC-1α causes a decrease in parvalbumin expression, similar to what is observed in schizophrenia postmortem tissue. Our lab has previously shown that PGC-1α -/- mice have enhanced GABAergic inhibition onto CA1 pyramidal cells, which increases the inhibition/excitation (I/E) ratio, alters hippocampal circuit function, and impairs hippocampal dependent behavior. The typical antipsychotic haloperidol, a dopamine receptor antagonist with selectivity for D2-like receptors, has previously been shown to increase excitation in the CA1 region of hippocampus. We therefore tested whether haloperidol could normalize the I/E balance in CA1 of PGC-1α -/- mice, potentially improving circuit function and behavior. Surprisingly, we discovered instead that interneuron transcriptional dysregulation caused by loss of PGC-1α alters the effects of haloperidol on hippocampal synaptic transmission and circuit function. Acute administration of haloperidol causes disinhibition in CA1 and decreases the I/E ratio onto CA1 pyramidal cells in slices from PGC-1α +/+ mice, but not PGC-1α -/- mice. The spread of activity in CA1, assessed by voltage sensitive dye imaging, is increased by haloperidol in slices from PGC-1α +/+ mice; however haloperidol decreases the spread of activity in slices from PGC-1α -/- mice. Haloperidol increased the power of hippocampal gamma oscillation in slices from PGC-1α +/+ mice but reduced the power of gamma oscillations in slices from PGC-1α -/- mice. Nest construction, an innate hippocampal-dependent behavior, is inhibited by haloperidol in PGC-1α +/+ mice, but not in PGC-1α -/- mice, which already have impaired nest building. The effects of

  19. Transcriptional dysregulation causes altered modulation of inhibition by haloperidol

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Lillian J.; Bartley, Aundrea F.; Li, Qin; McMeekin, Laura J.; Hablitz, John J.; Cowell, Rita M.; Dobrunz, Lynn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism involve interneuron transcriptional dysregulation. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α regulates gene expression in GABAergic interneurons, which are important for regulating hippocampal network activity. Genetic deletion of PGC-1α causes a decrease in parvalbumin expression, similar to what is observed in schizophrenia postmortem tissue. Our lab has previously shown that PGC-1α−/− mice have enhanced GABAergic inhibition onto CA1 pyramidal cells, which increases the inhibition/excitation (I/E) ratio, alters hippocampal circuit function, and impairs hippocampal dependent behavior. The typical antipsychotic haloperidol, a dopamine receptor antagonist with selectivity for D2-like receptors, has previously been shown to increase excitation in the CA1 region of hippocampus. We therefore tested whether haloperidol could normalize the I/E balance in CA1 of PGC-1α−/− mice, potentially improving circuit function and behavior. Surprisingly, we discovered instead that interneuron transcriptional dysregulation caused by loss of PGC-1α alters the effects of haloperidol on hippocampal synaptic transmission and circuit function. Acute administration of haloperidol causes disinhibition in CA1 and decreases the I/E ratio onto CA1 pyramidal cells in slices from PGC-1α+/+ mice, but not PGC-1α−/− mice. The spread of activity in CA1, assessed by voltage sensitive dye imaging, is increased by haloperidol in slices from PGC-1α+/+ mice; however haloperidol decreases the spread of activity in slices from PGC-1α−/− mice. Haloperidol increased the power of hippocampal gamma oscillation in slices from PGC-1α+/+ mice but reduced the power of gamma oscillations in slices from PGC-1α−/− mice. Nest construction, an innate hippocampal-dependent behavior, is inhibited by haloperidol in PGC-1α+/+ mice, but not in PGC-1α−/− mice, which already have impaired nest building

  20. Targeting MYCN-Driven Transcription By BET-Bromodomain Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Henssen, Anton; Althoff, Kristina; Odersky, Andrea; Beckers, Anneleen; Koche, Richard; Speleman, Frank; Schäfers, Simon; Bell, Emma; Nortmeyer, Maike; Westermann, Frank; De Preter, Katleen; Florin, Alexandra; Heukamp, Lukas; Spruessel, Annika; Astrahanseff, Kathy; Lindner, Sven; Sadowski, Natalie; Schramm, Alexander; Astorgues-Xerri, Lucile; Riveiro, Maria E; Eggert, Angelika; Cvitkovic, Esteban; Schulte, Johannes H

    2016-05-15

    Targeting BET proteins was previously shown to have specific antitumoral efficacy against MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma. We here assess the therapeutic efficacy of the BET inhibitor, OTX015, in preclinical neuroblastoma models and extend the knowledge on the role of BRD4 in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma. The efficacy of OTX015 was assessed in in vitro and in vivo models of human and murine MYCN-driven neuroblastoma. To study the effects of BET inhibition in the context of high MYCN levels, MYCN was ectopically expressed in human and murine cells. The effect of OTX015 on BRD4-regulated transcriptional pause release was analyzed using BRD4 and H3K27Ac chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and gene expression analysis in neuroblastoma cells treated with OTX015 compared with vehicle control. OTX015 showed therapeutic efficacy against preclinical MYCN-driven neuroblastoma models. Similar to previously described BET inhibitors, concurrent MYCN repression was observed in OTX015-treated samples. Ectopic MYCN expression, however, did not abrogate effects of OTX015, indicating that MYCN repression is not the only target of BET proteins in neuroblastoma. When MYCN was ectopically expressed, BET inhibition still disrupted MYCN target gene transcription without affecting MYCN expression. We found that BRD4 binds to super-enhancers and MYCN target genes, and that OTX015 specifically disrupts BRD4 binding and transcription of these genes. We show that OTX015 is effective against mouse and human MYCN-driven tumor models and that BRD4 not only targets MYCN, but specifically occupies MYCN target gene enhancers as well as other genes associated with super-enhancers. Clin Cancer Res; 22(10); 2470-81. ©2015 AACR. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Use of ATP analogs to inhibit HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Sampey, Gavin; Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Roman, Jessica; Currer, Robert; Galons, Hervé; Oumata, Nassima; Joseph, Benoît; Meijer, Laurent; Caputi, Massimo; Nekhai, Sergei; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the etiological agent of AIDS. Chronic persistent infection is an important reason for the presence of “latent cell populations” even after Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART). We have analyzed the effect of ATP analogs in inhibiting cdk9/T1 complex in infected cells. A third generation drug named CR8#13 is an effective inhibitor of Tat activated transcription. Following drug treatment, we observed a decreased loading of cdk9 onto the HIV-1 DNA. We found multiple novel cdk9/T1 complexes present in infected and uninfected cells with one complex being unique to infected cells. This complex is sensitive to CR8#13 in kinase assays. Treatment of PBMC with CR8#13 does not kill infected cells as compared to Flavopiridol. Interestingly, there is a difference in sensitivity of various clades to these analogs. Collectively, these results point to targeting novel complexes for inhibition of cellular proteins that are unique to infected cells. PMID:22771113

  2. Structural Basis of Transcription Inhibition by Fidaxomicin (Lipiarmycin A3).

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Das, Kalyan; Degen, David; Mazumder, Abhishek; Duchi, Diego; Wang, Dongye; Ebright, Yon W; Ebright, Richard Y; Sineva, Elena; Gigliotti, Matthew; Srivastava, Aashish; Mandal, Sukhendu; Jiang, Yi; Liu, Yu; Yin, Ruiheng; Zhang, Zhening; Eng, Edward T; Thomas, Dennis; Donadio, Stefano; Zhang, Haibo; Zhang, Changsheng; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Ebright, Richard H

    2018-04-05

    Fidaxomicin is an antibacterial drug in clinical use for treatment of Clostridium difficile diarrhea. The active ingredient of fidaxomicin, lipiarmycin A3 (Lpm), functions by inhibiting bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). Here we report a cryo-EM structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RNAP holoenzyme in complex with Lpm at 3.5-Å resolution. The structure shows that Lpm binds at the base of the RNAP "clamp." The structure exhibits an open conformation of the RNAP clamp, suggesting that Lpm traps an open-clamp state. Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments confirm that Lpm traps an open-clamp state and define effects of Lpm on clamp dynamics. We suggest that Lpm inhibits transcription by trapping an open-clamp state, preventing simultaneous interaction with promoter -10 and -35 elements. The results account for the absence of cross-resistance between Lpm and other RNAP inhibitors, account for structure-activity relationships of Lpm derivatives, and enable structure-based design of improved Lpm derivatives. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Foxo Transcription Factors Blunt Cardiac Hypertrophy by Inhibiting Calcineurin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yan G.; Berenji, Kambeez; Wang, Na; Oh, Misook; Sachan, Nita; Dey, Asim; Cheng, Jun; Lu, Guangrong; Morris, David J.; Castrillon, Diego H.; Gerard, Robert D.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellular hypertrophy requires coordinated regulation of progrowth and antigrowth mechanisms. In cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, Foxo transcription factors trigger an atrophy-related gene program that counters hypertrophic growth. However, downstream molecular events are not yet well defined. Methods and Results Here, we report that expression of either Foxo1 or Foxo3 in cardiomyocytes attenuates calcineurin phosphatase activity and inhibits agonist-induced hypertrophic growth. Consistent with these results, Foxo proteins decrease calcineurin phosphatase activity and repress both basal and hypertrophic agonist-induced expression of MCIP1.4, a direct downstream target of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Furthermore, hearts from Foxo3-null mice exhibit increased MCIP1.4 abundance and a hypertrophic phenotype with normal systolic function at baseline. Together, these results suggest that Foxo proteins repress cardiac growth at least in part through inhibition of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Given that hypertrophic growth of the heart occurs in multiple contexts, our findings also suggest that certain hypertrophic signals are capable of overriding the antigrowth program induced by Foxo. Consistent with this, multiple hypertrophic agonists triggered inactivation of Foxo proteins in cardiomyocytes through a mechanism requiring the PI3K/Akt pathway. In addition, both Foxo1 and Foxo3 are phosphorylated and consequently inactivated in hearts undergoing hypertrophic growth induced by hemodynamic stress. Conclusions This study suggests that inhibition of the calcineurin/NFAT signaling cascade by Foxo and release of this repressive action by the PI3K/Akt pathway are important mechanisms whereby Foxo factors govern cell growth in the heart. PMID:16952979

  4. Foxo transcription factors blunt cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting calcineurin signaling.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan G; Berenji, Kambeez; Wang, Na; Oh, Misook; Sachan, Nita; Dey, Asim; Cheng, Jun; Lu, Guangrong; Morris, David J; Castrillon, Diego H; Gerard, Robert D; Rothermel, Beverly A; Hill, Joseph A

    2006-09-12

    Cellular hypertrophy requires coordinated regulation of progrowth and antigrowth mechanisms. In cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, Foxo transcription factors trigger an atrophy-related gene program that counters hypertrophic growth. However, downstream molecular events are not yet well defined. Here, we report that expression of either Foxo1 or Foxo3 in cardiomyocytes attenuates calcineurin phosphatase activity and inhibits agonist-induced hypertrophic growth. Consistent with these results, Foxo proteins decrease calcineurin phosphatase activity and repress both basal and hypertrophic agonist-induced expression of MCIP1.4, a direct downstream target of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Furthermore, hearts from Foxo3-null mice exhibit increased MCIP1.4 abundance and a hypertrophic phenotype with normal systolic function at baseline. Together, these results suggest that Foxo proteins repress cardiac growth at least in part through inhibition of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Given that hypertrophic growth of the heart occurs in multiple contexts, our findings also suggest that certain hypertrophic signals are capable of overriding the antigrowth program induced by Foxo. Consistent with this, multiple hypertrophic agonists triggered inactivation of Foxo proteins in cardiomyocytes through a mechanism requiring the PI3K/Akt pathway. In addition, both Foxo1 and Foxo3 are phosphorylated and consequently inactivated in hearts undergoing hypertrophic growth induced by hemodynamic stress. This study suggests that inhibition of the calcineurin/NFAT signaling cascade by Foxo and release of this repressive action by the PI3K/Akt pathway are important mechanisms whereby Foxo factors govern cell growth in the heart.

  5. Maribavir Inhibits Epstein-Barr Virus Transcription through the EBV Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Whitehurst, Christopher B.; Sanders, Marcia K.; Law, Mankit; Wang, Fu-Zhang; Xiong, Jie; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2013-01-01

    Maribavir (MBV) inhibits Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication and the enzymatic activity of the viral protein kinase BGLF4. MBV also inhibits expression of multiple EBV transcripts during EBV lytic infection. Here we demonstrate, with the use of a BGLF4 knockout virus, that effects of MBV on transcription take place primarily through inhibition of BGLF4. MBV inhibits viral genome copy numbers and infectivity to levels similar to and exceeding levels produced by BGLF4 knockout virus. PMID:23449792

  6. Tanshinone IIA inhibits cervix carcinoma stem cells migration and invasion via inhibiting YAP transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jinghao; Shi, Hongbing; Xu, Yanjie; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Qing

    2018-06-14

    This study aims to explore the effects and related mechanisms of Tanshinone IIA in cervix carcinoma (CC) stemness-like cells migration, invasion, stemness and chemotherapeutical sensitivity. Here, we found that Tanshinone IIA suppressed CC stemness-like cells migration and invasion in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. And consistent results were obtained in CC cells stemness characterized as the decrease of CC stemness markers expression and cells spheroid formation ability. Mechanistically, we found that Tanshinone IIA suppressed RNA binding protein HuR translocation from nuclear to cytoplasm, and thus reduced YAP mRNAs stability and transcriptional activity. Importantly, overexpression YAP-5SA rescued the inhibition of Tanshinone IIA on CC cells stemness. Furthermore, Tanshinone IIA enhanced adriamycin sensitivity in CC stemness-like cells, this effect was attenuated by YAP-5SA overexpression too. Therefore, Tanshinone IIA could suppress CC stemness-like cells migration and invasion by inhibiting YAP transcriptional activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Inference of a Transcriptional Network Involved in Chemical Inhibition of Estrogen Synthesis in Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using transcriptional network inferen...

  8. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-01-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination. PMID:26276832

  9. TRANSCRIPTIONAL INHIBITION OF INTERLEUKIN-12 PROMOTER ACTIVITY IN LEISHMANIA SPP.-INFECTED MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Asha; Widenmaier, Robyn; Ma, Xiaojing; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    To establish and persist within a host, Leishmania spp. parasites delay the onset of cell-mediated immunity by suppressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) production from host macrophages. Although it is established that Leishmania spp.-infected macrophages have impaired IL-12 production, the mechanisms that account for this suppression remain to be completely elucidated. Using a luciferase reporter assay assessing IL-12 transcription, we report here that Leishmania major, Leishmania donovani, and Leishmania chagasi inhibit IL-12 transcription in response to interferon-gamma, lipopolysaccharide, and CD40 ligand and that Leishmania spp. lipophosphoglycan, phosphoglycans, and major surface protein are not necessary for inhibition. In addition, all the Leishmania spp. strains and life-cycle stages tested inhibited IL-12 promoter activity. Our data further reveal that autocrine-acting host factors play no role in the inhibitory response and that phagocytosis signaling is necessary for inhibition of IL-12. PMID:18372625

  10. Parathyroid hormone inhibition of Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 transcription: Intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factor expression

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, Elida Adalgisa; Bezerra, Camila Nogueira Alves, E-mail: camilab@icb.usp.br; Queiroz-Leite, Gabriella Duarte

    2015-06-12

    The main transport mechanism of reabsorption of sodium bicarbonate and fluid in the renal proximal tubules involves Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 (NHE3), which is acutely and chronically downregulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH). Although PTH is known to exert an inhibitory effect on NHE3 expression and transcription, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that, in opossum kidney proximal tubule (OKP) cells, PTH-induced inhibition of Nhe3 gene promoter occurs even in the core promoter that controls expression of the reporter gene. We found that inhibition of the protein kinase A (PKA) and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator ofmore » transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways transformed PTH from an inhibitor of promoter activity into an activator of that same activity, as did point mutations in the EGR1, Sp1, and Sp3 binding consensus elements in the promoter. In nuclear extracts of PTH-treated OKP cells, we also observed increased expression of EGR1 mRNA and of some Sp3 isoforms. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed a supershift of the −61 to −42-bp probe with an anti-EGR1 antibody in PTH-treated cells, suggesting that EGR1 binding is relevant for the inhibitory activity of PTH. We conclude that PTH-induced inhibition of NHE3 transcription is related to higher EGR1 expression; to EGR1 binding to the proximal and core promoters; and to PKA and JAK/STAT pathway activation. This mechanism might be responsible, at least in part, for lower NHE3 expression and sodium reabsorption in renal proximal tubules in the presence of high PTH levels. - Highlights: • PTH regulation of Nhe3 promoter depends on EGR1 binding. • EGR1, PKA and JAK/STAT are involved in PTH inhibition of the Nhe3 promoter. • PTH alters expression of EGR1 and Sp3. • PTH inhibits the Nhe3 promoter by regulating PKA and JAK/STAT signaling.« less

  11. Molecular mechanism of transcription inhibition by phage T7 gp2 protein.

    PubMed

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Sheppard, Carol; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Severinov, Konstantin

    2011-11-11

    Escherichia coli T7 bacteriophage gp2 protein is a potent inhibitor of host RNA polymerase (RNAP). gp2 inhibits formation of open promoter complex by binding to the β' jaw, an RNAP domain that interacts with downstream promoter DNA. Here, we used an engineered promoter with an optimized sequence to obtain and characterize a specific promoter complex containing RNAP and gp2. In this complex, localized melting of promoter DNA is initiated but does not propagate to include the point of the transcription start. As a result, the complex is transcriptionally inactive. Using a highly sensitive RNAP beacon assay, we performed quantitative real-time measurements of specific binding of the RNAP-gp2 complex to promoter DNA and various promoter fragments. In this way, the effect of gp2 on RNAP interaction with promoters was dissected. As expected, gp2 greatly decreased RNAP affinity to downstream promoter duplex. However, gp2 also inhibited RNAP binding to promoter fragments that lacked downstream promoter DNA that interacts with the β' jaw. The inhibition was caused by gp2-mediated decrease of the RNAP binding affinity to template and non-template strand segments of the transcription bubble downstream of the -10 promoter element. The inhibition of RNAP interactions with single-stranded segments of the transcription bubble by gp2 is a novel effect, which may occur via allosteric mechanism that is set in motion by the gp2 binding to the β' jaw. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Arabidopsis transcription factor ABIG1 relays ABA signaled growth inhibition and drought induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tie; Longhurst, Adam D; Talavera-Rauh, Franklin; Hokin, Samuel A; Barton, M Kathryn

    2016-10-04

    Drought inhibits plant growth and can also induce premature senescence. Here we identify a transcription factor, ABA INSENSITIVE GROWTH 1 (ABIG1) required for abscisic acid (ABA) mediated growth inhibition, but not for stomatal closure. ABIG1 mRNA levels are increased both in response to drought and in response to ABA treatment. When treated with ABA, abig1 mutants remain greener and produce more leaves than comparable wild-type plants. When challenged with drought, abig1 mutants have fewer yellow, senesced leaves than wild-type. Induction of ABIG1 transcription mimics ABA treatment and regulates a set of genes implicated in stress responses. We propose a model in which drought acts through ABA to increase ABIG1 transcription which in turn restricts new shoot growth and promotes leaf senescence. The results have implications for plant breeding: the existence of a mutant that is both ABA resistant and drought resistant points to new strategies for isolating drought resistant genetic varieties.

  13. BET bromodomain inhibition suppresses the functional output of hematopoietic transcription factors in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Jae-Seok; Mercan, Fatih; Rivera, Keith; Pappin, Darryl J.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein BRD4 is a validated drug target in leukemia, yet its regulatory function in this disease is not well understood. Here, we show that BRD4 chromatin occupancy in acute myeloid leukemia closely correlates with the hematopoietic transcription factors (TFs) PU.1, FLI1, ERG, C/EBPα, C/EBPβ, and MYB at nucleosome-depleted enhancer and promoter regions. We provide evidence that these TFs, in conjunction with the lysine acetyltransferase activity of p300/CBP, facilitate BRD4 recruitment to their occupied sites to promote transcriptional activation. Chemical inhibition of BET bromodomains was found to suppress the functional output each hematopoietic TF, thereby interfering with essential lineage-specific transcriptional circuits in this disease. These findings reveal a chromatin-based signaling cascade comprised of hematopoietic TFs, p300/CBP, and BRD4 that supports leukemia maintenance and is suppressed by BET bromodomain inhibition. PMID:25982114

  14. Targeting GLI by GANT61 involves mechanisms dependent on inhibition of both transcription and DNA licensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruowen; Wu, Jiahui; Ferrandon, Sylvain; Glowacki, Katie J; Houghton, Janet A

    2016-12-06

    The GLI genes are transcription factors and in cancers are oncogenes, aberrantly and constitutively activated. GANT61, a specific GLI inhibitor, has induced extensive cytotoxicity in human models of colon cancer. The FOXM1 promoter was determined to be a transcriptional target of GLI1. In HT29 cells, inhibition of GLI1 binding at the GLI consensus sequence by GANT61 led to inhibited binding of Pol II, the pause-release factors DSIF, NELF and p-TEFb. The formation of R-loops (RNA:DNA hybrids, ssDNA), were reduced by GANT61 at the FOXM1 promoter. Pretreatment of HT29 cells with α-amanitin reduced GANT61-induced γH2AX foci. Co-localization of GLI1 and BrdU foci, inhibited by GANT61, indicated GLI1 and DNA replication to be linked. By co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, GLI1 co-localized with the DNA licensing factors ORC4, CDT1, and MCM2. Significant co-localization of GLI1 and ORC4 was inhibited by GANT61, and enrichment of ORC4 occurred at the GLI binding site in the FOXM1 promoter. CDT1 was found to be a transcription target of GLI1. Overexpression of CDT1 in HT29 and SW480 cells reduced GANT61-induced cell death, gH2AX foci, and cleavage of caspase-3. Data demonstrate involvement of transcription and of DNA replication licensing factors by non-transcriptional and transcriptional mechanisms in the GLI-dependent mechanism of action of GANT61.

  15. Inhibition of transcriptional activity of c-JUN by SIRT1

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhanguo; Ye Jianping

    2008-11-28

    c-JUN is a major component of heterodimer transcription factor AP-1 (Activator Protein-1) that activates gene transcription in cell proliferation, inflammation and stress responses. SIRT1 (Sirtuin 1) is a histone deacetylase that controls gene transcription through modification of chromatin structure. However, it is not clear if SIRT1 regulates c-JUN activity in the control of gene transcription. Here, we show that SIRT1 associated with c-JUN in co-immunoprecipitation of whole cell lysate, and inhibited the transcriptional activity of c-JUN in the mammalian two hybridization system. SIRT1 was found in the AP-1 response element in the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) promoter DNA leading to inhibitionmore » of histone 3 acetylation as shown in a ChIP assay. The SIRT1 signal was reduced by the AP-1 activator PMA, and induced by the SIRT1 activator Resveratrol in the promoter DNA. SIRT1-mediaetd inhibition of AP-1 was demonstrated in the MMP9 gene expression at the gene promoter, mRNA and protein levels. In mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) with SIRT1 deficiency (SIRT1{sup -/-}), mRNA and protein of MMP9 were increased in the basal condition, and the inhibitory activity of Resveratrol was significantly attenuated. Glucose-induced MMP9 expression was also inhibited by SIRT1 in response to Resveratrol. These data consistently suggest that SIRT1 directly inhibits the transcriptional activity of AP-1 by targeting c-JUN.« less

  16. CaMKII inhibition promotes neuronal apoptosis by transcriptionally upregulating Bim expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiwei; Zhu, Lin; Yu, Shaojun; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Chong

    2016-09-28

    The effects of Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) on neuronal apoptosis are complex and contradictory, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) is an important proapoptotic protein under many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. However, there is no evidence that CaMKII and Bim are mechanistically linked in neuronal apoptosis. In this study, we showed that CaMKII inhibition by the inhibitors KN-62 and myristoylated autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide promoted apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons in a dose-dependent manner. CaMKII inhibition increased Bim protein and messenger RNA levels. The expression of early growth response factor-1, a transcription factor of Bim, was also induced by CaMKII inhibitors. These data suggested that CaMKII repressed the transcriptional expression of Bim. Moreover, knockdown of Bim using small interfering RNAs attenuated the proapoptotic effects of CaMKII inhibition. Taken together, this is the first report to show that CaMKII inhibition transcriptionally upregulates Bim expression to promote neuronal apoptosis, providing new insights into the proapoptotic mechanism of CaMKII inhibition.

  17. Exploring the utility of organo-polyoxometalate hybrids to inhibit SOX transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background SOX transcription factors constitute an attractive target class for intervention with small molecules as they play a prominent role in the field of regenerative biomedicine and cancer biology. However, rationally engineering specific inhibitors that interfere with transcription factor DNA interfaces continues to be a monumental challenge in the field of transcription factor chemical biology. Polyoxometalates (POMs) are inorganic compounds that were previously shown to target the high-mobility group (HMG) of SOX proteins at nanomolar concentrations. In continuation of this work, we carried out an assessment of the selectivity of a panel of newly synthesized organo-polyoxometalate hybrids in targeting different transcription factor families to enable the usage of polyoxometalates as specific SOX transcription factor drugs. Results The residual DNA-binding activities of 15 different transcription factors were measured after treatment with a panel of diverse polyoxometalates. Polyoxometalates belonging to the Dawson structural class were found to be more potent inhibitors than the Keggin class. Further, organically modified Dawson polyoxometalates were found to be the most potent in inhibiting transcription factor DNA binding activity. The size of the polyoxometalates and its derivitization were found to be the key determinants of their potency. Conclusion Polyoxometalates are highly potent, nanomolar range inhibitors of the DNA binding activity of the Sox-HMG family. However, binding assays involving a limited subset of structurally diverse polyoxometalates revealed a low selectivity profile against different transcription factor families. Further progress in achieving selectivity and deciphering structure-activity relationship of POMs require the identification of POM binding sites on transcription factors using elaborate approaches like X-ray crystallography and multidimensional NMR. In summary, our report reaffirms that transcription factors are

  18. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional upregulation of p27 mediates growth inhibition of isorhapontigenin (ISO) on human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guosong; Huang, Chao; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Haishan; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Yawei; Xie, Fei; Jin, Honglei; Zhu, Junlan; Huang, Chuanshu

    2018-03-08

    There are few approved drugs available for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). Recently, we have demonstrated that isorhapontigenin (ISO), a new derivative isolated from the Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, effectively induces cell-cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and inhibits anchorage-independent cell growth through the miR-137/Sp1/cyclin D1 axis in human MIBC cells. Herein, we found that treatment of bladder cancer (BC) cells with ISO resulted in a significant upregulation of p27, which was also observed in ISO-treated mouse BCs that were induced by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN). Importantly, knockdown of p27 caused a decline in the ISO-induced G0-G1 growth arrest and reversed ISO suppression of anchorage-independent growth in BC cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that ISO promoted p27 expression at mRNA transcription level through increasing direct binding of forkhead box class O1 (FOXO1) to its promoter, while knockdown of FOXO1 attenuated ISO inhibition of BC cell growth. On the other hand, ISO upregulated the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) activity of p27, which was accompanied by a reduction of miR-182 expression. In line with these observations, ectopic expression of miR-182 significantly blocked p27 3'-UTR activity, whereas mutation of the miR-182-binding site at p27 mRNA 3'-UTR effectively reversed this inhibition. Accordingly, ectopic expression of miR-182 also attenuated ISO upregulation of p27 expression and impaired ISO inhibition of BC cell growth. Our results not only provide novel insight into understanding of the underlying mechanism related to regulation of MIBC cell growth but also identify new roles and mechanisms underlying ISO inhibition of BC cell growth.

  19. WIPI1 Coordinates Melanogenic Gene Transcription and Melanosome Formation via TORC1 Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsiang; Kapadia, Rubina; Al-Tahan, Sejad; Ahmad, Safoora; Ganesan, Anand K.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies implicate a role for WD repeat domain, phosphoinositide-interacting 1 (WIPI1) in the biogenesis of melanosomes, cell type-specific lysosome-related organelles. In this study, we determined that WIPI1, an ATG18 homologue that is shown to localize to both autophagosomes and early endosomes, inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR) signaling, leading to increased transcription of melanogenic enzymes and the formation of mature melanosomes. WIPI1 suppressed the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) activity, resulting in glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition, β-Catenin stabilization, and increased transcription of microphthalmia transcription factor and its target genes. WIPI1-depleted cells accumulated stage I melanosomes but lacked stage III-IV melanosomes. Inhibition of TORC1 by rapamycin treatment resulted in the accumulation of stage IV melanosomes but not autophagosomes, whereas starvation resulted in the formation of autophagosomes but not melanin accumulation. Taken together, our studies define a distinct role for WIPI1 and TORC1 signaling in controlling the transcription of melanogenic enzymes and melanosome maturation, a process that is distinct from starvation-induced autophagy. PMID:21317285

  20. The Role of Factor Inhibiting HIF (FIH-1) in Inhibiting HIF-1 Transcriptional Activity in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengming; Wu, Gang; Schroeder, Mark A.; Lau, Julie S.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Jiang, Shi-Wen; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Datta, Kaustubh; Li, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for about 38% of primary brain tumors in the United States. GBM is characterized by extensive angiogenesis induced by vascular growth factors and cytokines. The transcription of these growth factors and cytokines is regulated by the Hypoxia-Inducible-Factor-1(HIF-1), which is a key regulator mediating the cellular response to hypoxia. It is known that Factor Inhibiting HIF-1, or FIH-1, is also involved in the cellular response to hypoxia and has the capability to physically interact with HIF-1 and block its transcriptional activity under normoxic conditions. Delineation of the regulatory role of FIH-1 will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism responsible for tumor growth and progression and may lead to the design of new therapies targeting cellular pathways in response to hypoxia. Previous studies have shown that the chromosomal region of 10q24 containing the FIH-1 gene is often deleted in GBM, suggesting a role for the FIH-1 in GBM tumorigenesis and progression. In the current study, we found that FIH-1 is able to inhibit HIF-mediated transcription of GLUT1 and VEGF-A, even under hypoxic conditions in human glioblastoma cells. FIH-1 has been found to be more potent in inhibiting HIF function than PTEN. This observation points to the possibility that deletion of 10q23-24 and loss or decreased expression of FIH-1 gene may lead to a constitutive activation of HIF-1 activity, an alteration of HIF-1 targets such as GLUT-1 and VEGF-A, and may contribute to the survival of cancer cells in hypoxia and the development of hypervascularization observed in GBM. Therefore FIH-1 can be potential therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM patients with poor prognosis. PMID:24465898

  1. Arsenic trioxide-mediated growth inhibition in gallbladder carcinoma cells via down-regulation of Cyclin D1 transcription mediated by Sp1 transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Zhilong; Lu, Weiqi; Ton, Saixiong

    2007-08-31

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC), an aggressive and mostly lethal malignancy, is known to be resistant to a number of drug stimuli. Here, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide inhibited the proliferation of gallbladder carcinoma in vivo and in vitro as well as the transcription of cell cycle-related protein Cyclin D1. And, Cyclin D1 overexpression inhibited the negative role of arsenic trioxide in cell cycle progression. We further explored the mechanisms by which arsenic trioxide affected Cyclin D1 transcription and found that the Sp1 transcription factor was down-regulated by arsenic trioxide, with a corresponding decrease in Cyclin D1 promoter activity. Taken together, thesemore » results suggested that arsenic trioxide inhibited gallbladder carcinoma cell proliferation via down-regulation of Cyclin D1 transcription in a Sp1-dependent manner, which provided a new mechanism of arsenic trioxide-involved cell proliferation and may have important therapeutic implications in gallbladder carcinoma patients.« less

  2. Targeting the epigenetic readers in Ewing Sarcoma inhibits the oncogenic transcription factor EWS/Fli1

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Camille; Lamoureux, François; Baud’huin, Marc; Calleja, Lidia Rodriguez; Quillard, Thibaut; Amiaud, Jérôme; Tirode, Franck; Rédini, Françoise; Bradner, James E.; Heymann, Dominique; Ory, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Ewing Sarcoma is a rare bone and soft tissue malignancy affecting children and young adults. Chromosomal translocations in this cancer produce fusion oncogenes as characteristic molecular signatures of the disease. The most common case is the translocation t (11; 22) (q24;q12) which yields the EWS-Fli1 chimeric transcription factor. Finding a way to directly target EWS-Fli1 remains a central therapeutic approach to eradicate this aggressive cancer. Here we demonstrate that treating Ewing Sarcoma cells with JQ1(+), a BET bromodomain inhibitor, represses directly EWS-Fli1 transcription as well as its transcriptional program. Moreover, the Chromatin Immuno Precipitation experiments demonstrate for the first time that these results are a consequence of the depletion of BRD4, one of the BET bromodomains protein from the EWS-Fli1 promoter. In vitro, JQ1(+) treatment reduces the cell viability, impairs the cell clonogenic and the migratory abilities, and induces a G1-phase blockage as well as a time- and a dose-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, in our in vivo model, we observed a tumor burden delay, an inhibition of the global vascularization and an increase of the mice overall survival. Taken together, our data indicate that inhibiting the BET bromodomains interferes with EWS-FLi1 transcription and could be a promising strategy in the Ewing tumors context. PMID:27006472

  3. Mechanisms of inhibition of zinc-finger transcription factors by selenium compounds ebselen and selenite.

    PubMed

    Larabee, Jason L; Hocker, James R; Hanas, Jay S

    2009-03-01

    The anti-inflammatory selenium compounds, ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3[2H]-one) and selenite, were found to alter the DNA binding mechanisms and structures of cysteine-rich zinc-finger transcription factors. As assayed by DNase I protection, DNA binding by TFIIIA (transcription factor IIIA, prototypical Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger protein), was inhibited by micromolar amounts of ebselen. In a gel shift assay, ebselen inhibited the Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger-containing DNA binding domain (DBD) of the NF-kappaB mediated transcription factor Sp1. Ebselen also inhibited DNA binding by the p50 subunit of the pro-inflammatory Cys-containing NF-kappaB transcription factor. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was utilized to elucidate mechanisms of chemical interaction between ebselen and a zinc-bound Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger polypeptide modeled after the third finger of Sp1 (Sp1-3). Exposing Sp1-3 to micromolar amounts of ebselen resulted in Zn(2+) release from this peptide and the formation of a disulfide bond by oxidation of zinc finger SH groups, the likely mechanism for DNA binding inhibition. Selenite was shown by ESI-MS to also eject zinc from Sp1-3 as well as induce disulfide bond formation through SH oxidation. The selenite-dependent inhibition/oxidation mechanism differed from that of ebselen by inducing the formation of a stable selenotrisulfide bond. Selenite-induced selenotrisulfide formation was dependent upon the structure of the Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger as alteration in the finger structure enhanced this reaction as well as selenite-dependent zinc release. Ebselen and selenite-dependent inhibition/oxidation of Cys-rich zinc finger proteins, with concomitant release of zinc and finger structural changes, points to mechanisms at the atomic and protein level for selenium-induced alterations in Cys-rich proteins, and possible amelioration of certain inflammatory, neurodegenerative, and oncogenic responses.

  4. Mechanistic Insight into the Host Transcription Inhibition Function of Rift Valley Fever Virus NSs and Its Importance in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Kaori; Ramirez, Sydney I.; Makino, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the genus Phlebovirus within the family Bunyaviridae, causes periodic outbreaks in livestocks and humans in countries of the African continent and Middle East. RVFV NSs protein, a nonstructural protein, is a major virulence factor that exhibits several important biological properties. These include suppression of general transcription, inhibition of IFN-β promoter induction and degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase R. Although each of these biological functions of NSs are considered important for countering the antiviral response in the host, the individual contributions of these functions towards RVFV virulence remains unclear. To examine this, we generated two RVFV MP-12 strain-derived mutant viruses. Each carried mutations in NSs that specifically targeted its general transcription inhibition function without affecting its ability to degrade PKR and inhibit IFN-β promoter induction, through its interaction with Sin3-associated protein 30, a part of the repressor complex at the IFN-β promoter. Using these mutant viruses, we have dissected the transcription inhibition function of NSs and examined its importance in RVFV virulence. Both NSs mutant viruses exhibited a differentially impaired ability to inhibit host transcription when compared with MP-12. It has been reported that NSs suppresses general transcription by interfering with the formation of the transcription factor IIH complex, through the degradation of the p62 subunit and sequestration of the p44 subunit. Our study results lead us to suggest that the ability of NSs to induce p62 degradation is the major contributor to its general transcription inhibition property, whereas its interaction with p44 may not play a significant role in this function. Importantly, RVFV MP-12-NSs mutant viruses with an impaired general transcription inhibition function showed a reduced cytotoxicity in cell culture and attenuated virulence in young mice

  5. Mechanistic Insight into the Host Transcription Inhibition Function of Rift Valley Fever Virus NSs and Its Importance in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Kaori; Ramirez, Sydney I; Makino, Shinji

    2016-10-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the genus Phlebovirus within the family Bunyaviridae, causes periodic outbreaks in livestocks and humans in countries of the African continent and Middle East. RVFV NSs protein, a nonstructural protein, is a major virulence factor that exhibits several important biological properties. These include suppression of general transcription, inhibition of IFN-β promoter induction and degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase R. Although each of these biological functions of NSs are considered important for countering the antiviral response in the host, the individual contributions of these functions towards RVFV virulence remains unclear. To examine this, we generated two RVFV MP-12 strain-derived mutant viruses. Each carried mutations in NSs that specifically targeted its general transcription inhibition function without affecting its ability to degrade PKR and inhibit IFN-β promoter induction, through its interaction with Sin3-associated protein 30, a part of the repressor complex at the IFN-β promoter. Using these mutant viruses, we have dissected the transcription inhibition function of NSs and examined its importance in RVFV virulence. Both NSs mutant viruses exhibited a differentially impaired ability to inhibit host transcription when compared with MP-12. It has been reported that NSs suppresses general transcription by interfering with the formation of the transcription factor IIH complex, through the degradation of the p62 subunit and sequestration of the p44 subunit. Our study results lead us to suggest that the ability of NSs to induce p62 degradation is the major contributor to its general transcription inhibition property, whereas its interaction with p44 may not play a significant role in this function. Importantly, RVFV MP-12-NSs mutant viruses with an impaired general transcription inhibition function showed a reduced cytotoxicity in cell culture and attenuated virulence in young mice

  6. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  7. Inhibition of FoxO1 acetylation by INHAT subunit SET/TAF-Iβ induces p21 transcription.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun-Cheol; Kim, Kee-Beom; Kang, Joo-Young; Kim, Se-Ryeon; Jung, Hyeon-Soo; Seo, Sang-Beom

    2014-08-25

    Post-translational modification of forkhead family transcription factor, FoxO1, is an important regulatory mode for its diverse activities. FoxO1 is acetylated by HAT coactivators and its transcriptional activity is decreased via reduced DNA binding affinity. Here, we report that SET/TAF-Iβ inhibited p300-mediated FoxO1 acetylation in an INHAT domain-dependent manner. SET/TAF-Iβ interacted with FoxO1 and activated transcription of FoxO1 target gene, p21. Moreover, SET/TAF-Iβ inhibited acetylation of FoxO1 and increased p21 transcription induced by oxidative stress. Our results suggest that SET/TAF-Iβ inhibits FoxO1 acetylation and activates its transcriptional activity toward p21. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel mode for transcription inhibition mediated by PNA-induced R-loops with a model in vitro system.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Alicia D; Belotserkovskii, Boris P; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2018-02-01

    The selective inhibition of transcription of a chosen gene by an artificial agent has numerous applications. Usually, these agents are designed to bind a specific nucleotide sequence in the promoter or within the transcribed region of the chosen gene. However, since optimal binding sites might not exist within the gene, it is of interest to explore the possibility of transcription inhibition when the agent is designed to bind at other locations. One of these possibilities arises when an additional transcription initiation site (e.g. secondary promoter) is present upstream from the primary promoter of the target gene. In this case, transcription inhibition might be achieved by inducing the formation of an RNA-DNA hybrid (R-loop) upon transcription from the secondary promoter. The R-loop could extend into the region of the primary promoter, to interfere with promoter recognition by RNA polymerase and thereby inhibit transcription. As a sequence-specific R-loop-inducing agent, a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) could be designed to facilitate R-loop formation by sequestering the non-template DNA strand. To investigate this mode for transcription inhibition, we have employed a model system in which a PNA binding site is localized between the T3 and T7 phage RNA polymerase promoters, which respectively assume the roles of primary and secondary promoters. In accord with our model, we have demonstrated that with PNA-bound DNA substrates, transcription from the T7 promoter reduces transcription from the T3 promoter by 30-fold, while in the absence of PNA binding there is no significant effect of T7 transcription upon T3 transcription. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Triptolide inhibits transcription of hTERT through down-regulation of transcription factor specificity protein 1 in primary effusion lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Cong; Wang, Jingchao; Guo, Wei

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a key component responsible for the regulation of telomerase activity, plays important roles in cellular immortalization and cancer development. Triptolide purified from Tripterygium extracts displays a broad-spectrum bioactivity profile, including immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor. In this study, it is investigated whether triptolide reduces hTERT expression and suppresses its activity in PEL cells. The mRNA and protein levels of hTERT were examined by real time-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The activity of hTERT promoter was determined by Dual luciferase reporter assay. Our results demonstrated thatmore » triptolide decreased expression of hTERT at both mRNA and protein levels. Further gene sequence analysis indicated that the activity of hTERT promoter was suppressed by triptolide. Triptolide also reduced the half-time of hTERT. Additionally, triptolide inhibited the expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1(Sp1) in PEL cells. Furthermore, knock-down of Sp1 by using specific shRNAs resulted in down-regulation of hTERT transcription and protein expression levels. Inhibition of Sp1 by specific shRNAs enhanced triptolide-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of triptolide on hTERT transcription is possibly mediated by inhibition of transcription factor Sp1 in PEL cells. - Highlights: • Triptolide reduces expression of hTERT by decreasing its transcription level. • Triptolide reduces promoter activity and stability of hTERT. • Triptolide down-regulates expression of Sp1. • Special Sp1 shRNAs inhibit transcription and protein expression of hTERT. • Triptolide and Sp1 shRNA2 induce cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis.« less

  10. Thiazolidinediones inhibit REG I{alpha} gene transcription in gastrointestinal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Akiyo; Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sendai 980-8578; Department of Biochemistry, Nara Medical University, Kashihara 634-8521

    2009-02-13

    REG (Regenerating gene) I{alpha} protein functions as a growth factor for gastrointestinal cancer cells, and its mRNA expression is strongly associated with a poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer patients. We here demonstrated that PPAR{gamma}-agonist thiazolidinediones (TZDs) inhibited cell proliferation and REG I{alpha} protein/mRNA expression in gastrointestinal cancer cells. TZDs inhibited the REG I{alpha} gene promoter activity, via its cis-acting element which lacked PPAR response element and could not bind to PPAR{gamma}, in PPAR{gamma}-expressing gastrointestinal cancer cells. The inhibition was reversed by co-treatment with a specific PPAR{gamma}-antagonist GW9662. Although TZDs did not inhibit the REG I{alpha} gene promoter activity in PPAR{gamma}-non-expressingmore » cells, PPAR{gamma} overexpression in the cells recovered their inhibitory effect. Taken together, TZDs inhibit REG I{alpha} gene transcription through a PPAR{gamma}-dependent pathway. The TZD-induced REG I{alpha} mRNA reduction was abolished by cycloheximide, indicating the necessity of novel protein(s) synthesis. TZDs may therefore be a candidate for novel anti-cancer drugs for patients with gastrointestinal cancer expressing both REG I{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}.« less

  11. MSX1 cooperates with histone H1b for inhibition of transcription and myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hansol; Habas, Raymond; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2004-06-11

    During embryogenesis, differentiation of skeletal muscle is regulated by transcription factors that include members of the Msx homeoprotein family. By investigating Msx1 function in repression of myogenic gene expression, we identified a physical interaction between Msx1 and H1b, a specific isoform of mouse histone H1. We found that Msx1 and H1b bind to a key regulatory element of MyoD, a central regulator of skeletal muscle differentiation, where they induce repressed chromatin. Moreover, Msx1 and H1b cooperate to inhibit muscle differentiation in cell culture and in Xenopus animal caps. Our findings define a previously unknown function for "linker" histones in gene-specific transcriptional regulation.

  12. ATXN1L, CIC, and ETS Transcription Factors Modulate Sensitivity to MAPK Pathway Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Belinda; Krall, Elsa Beyer; Aguirre, Andrew James; Kim, Miju; Widlund, Hans Ragnar; Doshi, Mihir Bhavik; Sicinska, Ewa; Sulahian, Rita; Goodale, Amy; Cowley, Glenn Spencer; Piccioni, Federica; Doench, John Gerard; Root, David Edward; Hahn, William Chun

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Intrinsic resistance and RTK-RAS-MAPK pathway reactivation has limited the effectiveness of MEK and RAF inhibitors (MAPKi) in RAS- and RAF-mutant cancers. To identify genes that modulate sensitivity to MAPKi, we performed genome scale CRISPR-Cas9 loss-of-function screens in two KRAS-mutant pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib. Loss of CIC, a transcriptional repressor of ETV1, 4, and 5, promoted survival in the setting of MAPKi in cancer cells derived from several lineages. ATXN1L deletion, which reduces CIC protein, or ectopic expression of ETV1, 4, or 5 also modulated sensitivity to trametinib. ATXN1L expression inversely correlates with response to MAPKi inhibition in clinical studies. These observations identify the ATXN1L-CIC-ETS transcription factor axis as a mediator of resistance to MAPKi. PMID:28178529

  13. Inhibition of master transcription factors in pluripotent cells induces early stage differentiation

    PubMed Central

    De, Debojyoti; Jeong, Myong-Ho; Leem, Young-Eun; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Wemmer, David E.; Kang, Jong-Sun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2014-01-01

    The potential for pluripotent cells to differentiate into diverse specialized cell types has given much hope to the field of regenerative medicine. Nevertheless, the low efficiency of cell commitment has been a major bottleneck in this field. Here we provide a strategy to enhance the efficiency of early differentiation of pluripotent cells. We hypothesized that the initial phase of differentiation can be enhanced if the transcriptional activity of master regulators of stemness is suppressed, blocking the formation of functional transcriptomes. However, an obstacle is the lack of an efficient strategy to block protein–protein interactions. In this work, we take advantage of the biochemical property of seventeen kilodalton protein (Skp), a bacterial molecular chaperone that binds directly to sex determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2). The small angle X-ray scattering analyses provided a low resolution model of the complex and suggested that the transactivation domain of Sox2 is probably wrapped in a cleft on Skp trimer. Upon the transduction of Skp into pluripotent cells, the transcriptional activity of Sox2 was inhibited and the expression of Sox2 and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 was reduced, which resulted in the expression of early differentiation markers and appearance of early neuronal and cardiac progenitors. These results suggest that the initial stage of differentiation can be accelerated by inhibiting master transcription factors of stemness. This strategy can possibly be applied to increase the efficiency of stem cell differentiation into various cell types and also provides a clue to understanding the mechanism of early differentiation. PMID:24434556

  14. Inhibition of forkhead boxO-specific transcription prevents mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Smuder, Ashley J; Sollanek, Kurt J; Min, Kisuk; Nelson, W Bradley; Powers, Scott K

    2015-05-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a lifesaving measure for patients with respiratory failure. However, prolonged mechanical ventilation results in diaphragm weakness, which contributes to problems in weaning from the ventilator. Therefore, identifying the signaling pathways responsible for mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm weakness is essential to developing effective countermeasures to combat this important problem. In this regard, the forkhead boxO family of transcription factors is activated in the diaphragm during mechanical ventilation, and forkhead boxO-specific transcription can lead to enhanced proteolysis and muscle protein breakdown. Currently, the role that forkhead boxO activation plays in the development of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm weakness remains unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that mechanical ventilation-induced increases in forkhead boxO signaling contribute to ventilator-induced diaphragm weakness. University research laboratory. Young adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. Cause and effect was determined by inhibiting the activation of forkhead boxO in the rat diaphragm through the use of a dominant-negative forkhead boxO adeno-associated virus vector delivered directly to the diaphragm. Our results demonstrate that prolonged (12 hr) mechanical ventilation results in a significant decrease in both diaphragm muscle fiber size and diaphragm-specific force production. However, mechanically ventilated animals treated with dominant-negative forkhead boxO showed a significant attenuation of both diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction. In addition, inhibiting forkhead boxO transcription attenuated the mechanical ventilation-induced activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, the autophagy/lysosomal system, and caspase-3. Forkhead boxO is necessary for the activation of key proteolytic systems essential for mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Collectively, these results suggest that

  15. APOBEC3B edits HBV DNA and inhibits HBV replication during reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanmeng; Hu, Jie; Cai, Xuefei; Huang, Yao; Zhou, Xing; Tu, Zeng; Hu, Jieli; Tavis, John E; Tang, Ni; Huang, Ailong; Hu, Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a partially double-stranded DNA virus that replicates by reverse transcription, which occurs within viral core particles in the cytoplasm. The cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B is a cellular restriction factor for HBV. Recently, it was reported that APOBEC3B can edit HBV cccDNA in the nucleus, causing its degradation. However, whether and how it can edit HBV core-associated DNAs during reverse transcription is unclear. Our studies to address this question revealed the following: First, silencing endogenous APOBEC3B in an HBV infection system lead to upregulation of HBV replication. Second, APOBEC3B can inhibit replication of HBV isolates from genotypes (gt) A, B, C, and D as determined by employing transfection of plasmids expressing isolates from four different HBV genotypes. For HBV inhibition, APOBEC3B-mediated inhibition of replication primarily depends on the C-terminal active site of APOBEC3B. In addition, employing the HBV RNaseH-deficient D702A mutant and a polymerase-deficient YMHA mutant, we demonstrated that APOBEC3B can edit both the HBV minus- and plus-strand DNAs, but not the pregenomic RNA in core particles. Furthermore, we found by co-immunoprecipitation assays that APOBEC3B can interact with HBV core protein in an RNA-dependent manner. Our results provide evidence that APOBEC3B can interact with HBV core protein and edit HBV DNAs during reverse transcription. These data suggest that APOBEC3B exerts multifaceted antiviral effects against HBV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sarah A.; Sandesara, Pooja B.; Senf, Sarah M.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Cachexia is characterized by inexorable muscle wasting that significantly affects patient prognosis and increases mortality. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of this muscle wasting is of significant importance. Recent work showed that components of the forkhead box O (FoxO) pathway are increased in skeletal muscle during cachexia. In the current study, we tested the physiological significance of FoxO activation in the progression of muscle atrophy associated with cachexia. FoxO-DNA binding dependent transcription was blocked in the muscles of mice through injection of a dominant negative (DN) FoxO expression plasmid prior to inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells or the induction of sepsis. Expression of DN FoxO inhibited the increased mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, cathepsin L, and/or Bnip3 and inhibited muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis. Interestingly, during control conditions, expression of DN FoxO decreased myostatin expression, increased MyoD expression and satellite cell proliferation, and induced fiber hypertrophy, which required de novo protein synthesis. Collectively, these data show that FoxO-DNA binding-dependent transcription is necessary for normal muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis, and further suggest that basal levels of FoxO play an important role during normal conditions to depress satellite cell activation and limit muscle growth.—Reed, S. A., Sandesara, P. B., Senf, S. F., Judge, A. R. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy. PMID:22102632

  17. Nonselective inhibition of the epigenetic transcriptional regulator BET induces marked lymphoid and hematopoietic toxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong U., E-mail: lee.dong@gene.com

    Bromo and extra terminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4 and BRDT) are epigenetic transcriptional regulators required for efficient expression of growth promoting, cell cycle progression and antiapoptotic genes. Through their bromodomain, these proteins bind to acetylated lysine residues of histones and are recruited to transcriptionally active chromatin. Inhibition of the BET-histone interaction provides a tractable therapeutic strategy to treat diseases that may have epigenetic dysregulation. JQ1 is a small molecule that blocks BET interaction with histones. It has been shown to decrease proliferation of patient-derived multiple myeloma in vitro and to decrease tumor burden in vivo in xenograft mouse models.more » While targeting BET appears to be a viable and efficacious approach, the nonclinical safety profile of BET inhibition remains to be well-defined. We report that mice dosed with JQ1 at efficacious exposures demonstrate dose-dependent decreases in their lymphoid and immune cell compartments. At higher doses, JQ1 was not tolerated and due to induction of significant body weight loss led to early euthanasia. Flow cytometry analysis of lymphoid tissues showed a decrease in both B- and T-lymphocytes with a concomitant decrease in peripheral white blood cells that was confirmed by hematology. Further investigation with the inactive enantiomer of JQ1 showed that these in vivo effects were on-target mediated and not elicited through secondary pharmacology due to chemical structure.« less

  18. Epigenetic targeting of Hedgehog pathway transcriptional output through BET bromodomain inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yujie; Gholamin, Sharareh; Schubert, Simone; Willardson, Minde I.; Lee, Alex; Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Bergthold, Guillame; Masoud, Sabran; Nguyen, Brian; Vue, Nujsaubnusi; Balansay, Brianna; Yu, Furong; Oh, Sekyung; Woo, Pamelyn; Chen, Spenser; Ponnuswami, Anitha; Monje, Michelle; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Mitra, Siddhartha; Cheshier, Samuel H.; Qi, Jun; Beroukhim, Rameen; Tang, Jean Y.; Wechsler-Reya, Rob; Oro, Anthony E.; Link, Brian A.; Bradner, James E.; Cho, Yoon-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling drives oncogenesis in several cancers and strategies targeting this pathway have been developed, most notably through inhibition of Smoothened. However, resistance to Smoothened inhibitors occurs via genetic changes of Smoothened or other downstream Hedgehog components. Here, we overcome these resistance mechanisms by modulating GLI transcription via inhibition of BET bromodomain proteins. We show the BET bromodomain protein, BRD4, regulates GLI transcription downstream of SMO and SUFU and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies reveal BRD4 directly occupies GLI1 and GLI2 promoters, with a substantial decrease in engagement of these sites upon treatment with JQ1, a small molecule inhibitor targeting BRD4. Globally, genes associated with medulloblastoma-specific GLI1 binding sites are downregulated in response to JQ1 treatment, supporting direct regulation of GLI activity by BRD4. Notably, patient- and GEMM-derived Hedgehog-driven tumors (basal cell carcinoma, medulloblastoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor) respond to JQ1 even when harboring genetic lesions rendering them resistant to Smoothened antagonists. PMID:24973920

  19. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome blocks progesterone receptor-dependent transcription through failed recruitment of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Andrew P; Lonard, David M; Nawaz, Zafar; O'Malley, Bert W

    2005-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the involvement of protein degradation via the 26S proteasome during progesterone receptor (PR)-mediated transcription in T-47D cells containing a stably integrated MMTV-CAT reporter construct (CAT0 cells). Progesterone induced CAT and HSD11beta2 transcription while co-treatment with the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, blocked PR-induced transcription in a time-dependent fashion. MG132 treatment also inhibited transcription of beta-actin and cyclophilin, but not two proteasome subunit genes, PSMA1 and PSMC1, indicating that proteasome inhibition affects a subset of RNA polymerase II (RNAP(II))-regulated genes. Progesterone-mediated recruitment of RNAP(II) was blocked by MG132 treatment at time points later than 1 h that was not dependent on the continued presence of PR, associated cofactors, and components of the general transcription machinery, supporting the concept that proteasome-mediated degradation is needed for continued transcription. Surprisingly, progesterone-mediated acetylation of histone H4 was inhibited by MG132 with the concomitant recruitment of HDAC3, NCoR, and SMRT. We demonstrate that the steady-state protein levels of SMRT and NCoR are higher in the presence of MG132 in CAT0 cells, consistent with other reports that SMRT and NCoR are targets of the 26S proteasome. However, inhibition of histone deacetylation by trichostatin A (TSA) treatment or SMRT/NCoR knockdown by siRNA did not restore MG132-inhibited progesterone-dependent transcription. Therefore, events other than histone deacetylation and stability of SMRT and NCoR must also play a role in inhibition of PR-mediated transcription.

  20. Arabidopsis response regulator 22 inhibits cytokinin-regulated gene transcription in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wallmeroth, Niklas; Anastasia, Anna Katharina; Harter, Klaus; Berendzen, Kenneth Wayne; Mira-Rodado, Virtudes

    2017-01-01

    Cytokinin signaling in Arabidopsis is carried out by a two-component system (TCS) multi-step phosphorelay mechanism that involves three different protein families: histidine kinases (AHKs), phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), and response regulators (ARRs) that are in turn, subdivided into A-, B- and C-type ARRs depending on their function and structure. Upon cytokinin perception, AHK proteins autophosphorylate; this phosphate is then transferred from the AHKs to the AHPs to finally reach the ARRs. When B-type ARRs are activated by phosphorylation, they function as transcription factors that regulate the expression of cytokinin-dependent genes such as the A-type ARRs, among many others. In cytokinin signaling, while A- and B-type ARR function is well understood, it is still unclear if C-type ARRs (ARR22 and ARR24) play a role in this mechanism. Here, we describe a novel method suitable to study TCS activity natively as an in vivo system. We also show that ARR22 inhibits gene transcription of an A-type ARR upon cytokinin treatment in vivo. Consequently, we propose that ARR22, by acting as a phosphatase on specific AHPs, disrupts the TCS phosphorelay and prevents B-type ARR phosphorylation, and thus their activation as transcription factors, explaining the observed deactivation of cytokinin-responsive genes.

  1. The AP-1 transcription factor Fra1 inhibits follicular B cell differentiation into plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Grötsch, Bettina; Brachs, Sebastian; Lang, Christiane; Luther, Julia; Derer, Anja; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Bozec, Aline; Fillatreau, Simon; Berberich, Ingolf; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Wagner, Erwin F.; Schett, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The cornerstone of humoral immunity is the differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells. This process is tightly controlled by a regulatory gene network centered on the transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte–induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1). Proliferation of activated B cells is required to foster Blimp1 expression but needs to be terminated to avoid overshooting immune reactions. Activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factors become quickly up-regulated upon B cell activation. We demonstrate that Fra1, a Fos member of AP-1, enhances activation-induced cell death upon induction in activated B cells. Moreover, mice with B cell–specific deletion of Fra1 show enhanced plasma cell differentiation and exacerbated antibody responses. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of Fra1 blocks plasma cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production, which cannot be rescued by Bcl2. On the molecular level, Fra1 represses Blimp1 expression and interferes with binding of the activating AP-1 member c-Fos to the Blimp1 promoter. Conversely, overexpression of c-Fos in Fra1 transgenic B cells releases Blimp1 repression. As Fra1 lacks transcriptional transactivation domains, we propose that Fra1 inhibits Blimp1 expression and negatively controls plasma cell differentiation through binding to the Blimp1 promoter. In summary, we demonstrate that Fra1 negatively controls plasma cell differentiation by repressing Blimp1 expression. PMID:25288397

  2. Arctigenin antagonizes mineralocorticoid receptor to inhibit the transcription of Na/K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ye; Zhou, Meili; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors in cardiovascular disease and is the most common chronic disease. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists have been successfully used in clinic for the treatment of hypertension. Our study aims to investigate whether Arctigenin can antagonize MR and inhibit the transcription of Na/K-ATPase. The yeast two-hybrid assay was used to screen natural products and Arctigenin was identified as an MR antagonist. The direct binding of Arctigenin to MR was determined using assays based on surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence quenching. Furthermore, results from mammalian one-hybrid and transcriptional activation experiments also confirmed that Arctigenin can potently antagonize MR in cells. We demonstrated that Arctigenin can decrease the level of Na/K-ATPase mRNA by antagonizing MR in HK-2 cells. Our findings show that Arctigenin can effectively decrease Na/K-ATPase transcription; thus highlight its potential as an anti-hypertensive drug lead compound. Our current findings demonstrate that Arctigenin is an antagonist of MR and effectively decreases the Na/K-ATPase 1 gene expression. Our work provides a hint for the drug discovery against cardiovascular disease.

  3. Transcriptional activation of mouse mast cell Protease-7 by activin and transforming growth factor-beta is inhibited by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Funaba, Masayuki; Ikeda, Teruo; Murakami, Masaru; Ogawa, Kenji; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Sugino, Hiromu; Abe, Matanobu

    2003-12-26

    Previous studies have revealed that activin A and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) induced migration and morphological changes toward differentiation in bone marrow-derived cultured mast cell progenitors (BMCMCs). Here we show up-regulation of mouse mast cell protease-7 (mMCP-7), which is expressed in differentiated mast cells, by activin A and TGF-beta1 in BMCMCs, and the molecular mechanism of the gene induction of mmcp-7. Smad3, a signal mediator of the activin/TGF-beta pathway, transcriptionally activated mmcp-7. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a tissue-specific transcription factor predominantly expressed in mast cells, melanocytes, and heart and skeletal muscle, inhibited Smad3-mediated mmcp-7 transcription. MITF associated with Smad3, and the C terminus of MITF and the MH1 and linker region of Smad3 were required for this association. Complex formation between Smad3 and MITF was neither necessary nor sufficient for the inhibition of Smad3 signaling by MITF. MITF inhibited the transcriptional activation induced by the MH2 domain of Smad3. In addition, MITF-truncated N-terminal amino acids could associate with Smad3 but did not inhibit Smad3-mediated transcription. The level of Smad3 was decreased by co-expression of MITF but not of dominant-negative MITF, which resulted from proteasomal protein degradation. The changes in the level of Smad3 protein were paralleled by those in Smad3-mediated signaling activity. These findings suggest that MITF negatively regulates Smad-dependent activin/TGF-beta signaling in a tissue-specific manner.

  4. Salidroside Inhibits Myogenesis by Modulating p-Smad3-Induced Myf5 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Wenjiong; Wang, Lu; Liu, Hongju; Gong, Jing; Wang, Fei; Chen, Xiaoping

    2018-01-01

    Aim: Salidroside is an active compound extracted from Rhodiola rosea which is used to alleviate fatigue and enhance endurance in high altitude regions. Some studies have demonstrated that salidroside can affect precursor cell differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells, erythrocytes, and osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salidroside on myoblast differentiation and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of this effect. Methods: C2C12 myoblast cells were treated with different concentrations of salidroside in differentiation media. Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence assay were employed to evaluate the effects of salidroside on C2C12 differentiation. RNA interference was used to reveal the important role of Myf5 in myogenesis inhibited by salidroside. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and dual-luciferase reporter assay were utilized to explore the underlying mechanisms of salidroside-induced upregulation of Myf5. Results: We found that salidroside inhibits myogenesis by downregulating MyoD and myogenin, preserves undifferentiated reserve cell pools by upregulating Myf5. Knocking down Myf5 expression significantly rescued the myogenesis inhibited by salidroside. The effect of salidroside on myogenesis was associated with increased phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3). Both SIS3 (Specific inhibitor of p-Smad3) and dominant negative Smad3 plasmid (DN-Smad3) attenuated the inhibitory effect of salidroside on C2C12 differentiation. Moreover, the induction of Myf5 transcription by salidroside was dependent on a Smad-binding site in the promoter region of Myf5 gene. Conclusion and Implications: Our findings identify a novel role and mechanism for salidroside in regulating myogenesis through p-Smad3-induced Myf5 transcription, which may have implications for its further application in combating degenerative muscular diseases caused by depletion of muscle stem cells, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy or sarcopenia. PMID

  5. Overexpression of Transcription Factor Sp1 Leads to Gene Expression Perturbations and Cell Cycle Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Deniaud, Emmanuelle; Baguet, Joël; Chalard, Roxane; Blanquier, Bariza; Brinza, Lilia; Meunier, Julien; Michallet, Marie-Cécile; Laugraud, Aurélie; Ah-Soon, Claudette; Wierinckx, Anne; Castellazzi, Marc; Lachuer, Joël; Gautier, Christian

    2009-01-01

    induces an inhibition of cell cycle progression that precedes apoptosis and a transcriptional response targeting genes containing Sp1 binding sites in their promoter or not suggesting both direct Sp1-driven transcription and indirect mechanisms. PMID:19753117

  6. Diesel Exhaust Particulate Extracts Inhibit Transcription of Nuclear Respiratory Factor-1 and Cell Viability in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, Kathleen A.; Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2011-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction precedes cardiovascular disease and is accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we tested the hypothesis that diesel exhaust particulate extracts (DEPEs), prepared from a truck run at different speeds and engine loads, would inhibit genomic estrogen receptor activation of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcription in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Additionally, we examined how DEPEs affect NRF-1 regulated TFAM expression and, in turn, Tfam-regulated mtDNA-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI, MTCO1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (NDI) expression as well as cell proliferation and viability. We report that 17β-estradiol (E2), 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), and raloxifene increased NRF-1 transcription in HUVECs in an ER-dependent manner. DEPEs inhibited NRF-1 transcription and this suppression was not ablated by concomitant treatment with E2, 4-OHT, or raloxifene, indicating that the effect was not due to inhibition of ER activity. While E2 increased HUVEC proliferation and viability, DEPEs inhibited viability but not proliferation. Resveratrol increased NRF-1 transcription in an ER-dependent manner in HUVECs, and ablated DEPE inhibition of basal NRF-1 expression. Given that NRF-1 is a key nuclear transcription factor regulating genes involved in mitochondrial activity and biogenesis, these data suggest that DEPEs may adversely affect mitochondrial function leading to endothelial dysfunction and resveratrol may block these effects. PMID:22105178

  7. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K inhibits heat shock-induced transcriptional activity of heat shock factor 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Park, A Young; Kang, Wonmo; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2017-08-04

    When cells are exposed to heat shock and various other stresses, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is activated, and the heat shock response (HSR) is elicited. To better understand the molecular regulation of the HSR, we used 2D-PAGE-based proteome analysis to screen for heat shock-induced post-translationally modified cellular proteins. Our analysis revealed that two protein spots typically present on 2D-PAGE gels and containing heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) with trioxidized Cys 132 disappeared after the heat shock treatment and reappeared during recovery, but the total amount of hnRNP K protein remained unchanged. We next tested whether hnRNP K plays a role in HSR by regulating HSF1 and found that hnRNP K inhibits HSF1 activity, resulting in reduced expression of hsp70 and hsp27 mRNAs. hnRNP K also reduced binding affinity of HSF1 to the heat shock element by directly interacting with HSF1 but did not affect HSF1 phosphorylation-dependent activation or nuclear localization. hnRNP K lost its ability to induce these effects when its Cys 132 was substituted with Ser, Asp, or Glu. These findings suggest that hnRNP K inhibits transcriptional activity of HSF1 by inhibiting its binding to heat shock element and that the oxidation status of Cys 132 in hnRNP K is critical for this inhibition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. ATXN1L, CIC, and ETS Transcription Factors Modulate Sensitivity to MAPK Pathway Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Belinda; Krall, Elsa Beyer; Aguirre, Andrew James; Kim, Miju; Widlund, Hans Ragnar; Doshi, Mihir Bhavik; Sicinska, Ewa; Sulahian, Rita; Goodale, Amy; Cowley, Glenn Spencer; Piccioni, Federica; Doench, John Gerard; Root, David Edward; Hahn, William Chun

    2017-02-07

    Intrinsic resistance and RTK-RAS-MAPK pathway reactivation has limited the effectiveness of MEK and RAF inhibitors (MAPKi) in RAS- and RAF-mutant cancers. To identify genes that modulate sensitivity to MAPKi, we performed genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 loss-of-function screens in two KRAS mutant pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib. Loss of CIC, a transcriptional repressor of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5, promoted survival in the setting of MAPKi in cancer cells derived from several lineages. ATXN1L deletion, which reduces CIC protein, or ectopic expression of ETV1, ETV4, or ETV5 also modulated sensitivity to trametinib. ATXN1L expression inversely correlates with response to MAPKi inhibition in clinical studies. These observations identify the ATXN1L-CIC-ETS transcription factor axis as a mediator of resistance to MAPKi. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic ethanol consumption inhibits glucokinase transcriptional activity by Atf3 and triggers metabolic syndrome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Dae Yeon; Song, Eun Hyun; Park, Keon Jae; Kim, Gyu Hee; Jeong, Eun Ae; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Go, Min Jin; Kim, Dae Jin; Lee, Seong Su; Kim, Bong-Jo; Song, Jihyun; Roh, Gu Seob; Gao, Bin; Kim, Won-Ho

    2014-09-26

    Chronic ethanol consumption induces pancreatic β-cell dysfunction through glucokinase (Gck) nitration and down-regulation, leading to impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance, but the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Gck gene expression and promoter activity in pancreatic β-cells were suppressed by chronic ethanol exposure in vivo and in vitro, whereas expression of activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) and its binding to the putative Atf/Creb site (from -287 to -158 bp) on the Gck promoter were up-regulated. Furthermore, in vitro ethanol-induced Atf3 inhibited the positive effect of Pdx-1 on Gck transcriptional regulation, enhanced recruitment of Hdac1/2 and histone H3 deacetylation, and subsequently augmented the interaction of Hdac1/Pdx-1 on the Gck promoter, which were diminished by Atf3 siRNA. In vivo Atf3-silencing reversed ethanol-mediated Gck down-regulation and β-cell dysfunction, followed by the amelioration of impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Together, we identified that ethanol-induced Atf3 fosters β-cell dysfunction via Gck down-regulation and that its loss ameliorates metabolic syndrome and could be a potential therapeutic target in treating type 2 diabetes. The Atf3 gene is associated with the induction of type 2 diabetes and alcohol consumption-induced metabolic impairment and thus may be the major negative regulator for glucose homeostasis. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5' splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival.

  11. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5′ splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival. PMID:24514149

  12. Transcriptional Inhibition of the Human Papilloma Virus Reactivates Tumor Suppressor p53 in Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kochetkov, D. V.; Ilyinskaya, G. V.; Komarov, P. G.; Strom, E.; Agapova, L. S.; Ivanov, A. V.; Budanov, A. V.; Frolova, E. I.; Chumakov, P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 accompanies the majority of human malignancies. Restoration of p53 function causes death of tumor cells and is potentially suitable for gene therapy of cancer. In cervical carcinoma, human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 facilitates proteasomal degradation of p53. Hence, a possible approach to p53 reactivation is the use of small molecules suppressing the function of viral proteins. HeLa cervical carcinoma cells (HPV-18) with a reporter construct containing the b-galactosidase gene under the control of a p53-responsive promoter were used as a test system to screen a library of small molecules for restoration of the transcriptional activity of p53. The effect of the two most active compounds was studied with cell lines differing in the state of p53-dependent signaling pathways. The compounds each specifically activated p53 in cells expressing HPV-18 and, to a lesser extent, HPV-16 and exerted no effect on control p53-negative cells or cells with the intact p53-dependent pathways. Activation of p53 in cervical carcinoma cells was accompanied by induction of p53-dependent CDKN1 (p21), inhibition of cell proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. In addition, the two compounds dramatically decreased transcription of the HPV genome, which was assumed to cause p53 reactivation. The compounds were low-toxic for normal cells and can be considered as prototypes of new anticancer drugs. PMID:17685229

  13. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is reduced dramatically by hypertonic stress or knockdown of rgpd genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs). Toxin-induced inhibition of translation also activates gpdh-1 expression. Hypertonicity-induced translation inhibition is mediated by general control nonderepressible (GCN)-2 kinase signaling and eIF-2α phosphoryation. Loss of gcn-1 or gcn-2 function prevents eIF-2α phosphorylation, completely blocks reductions in translation, and inhibits gpdh-1 transcription. gpdh-1 expression is regulated by the highly conserved with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) and Ste20 kinases WNK-1 and GCK-3, which function in the GCN-2 signaling pathway downstream from eIF-2α phosphorylation. Our previous work has shown that hypertonic stress causes rapid and dramatic protein damage in C. elegans and that inhibition of translation reduces this damage. The current studies demonstrate that reduced translation also serves as an essential signal for activation of WNK-1/GCK-3 kinase signaling and subsequent transcription of gpdh-1 and possibly other osmoprotective genes. PMID:23076791

  14. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa magnesium transporter MgtE inhibits transcription of the type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gregory G; Yahr, Timothy L; Lovewell, Rustin R; O'Toole, George A

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes life-long pneumonia in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). These long-term infections are maintained by bacterial biofilm formation in the CF lung. We have recently developed a model of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on cultured CF airway epithelial cells. Using this model, we discovered that mutation of a putative magnesium transporter gene, called mgtE, led to increased cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa toward epithelial cells. This altered toxicity appeared to be dependent upon expression of the type III secretion system (T3SS). In this study, we found that mutation of mgtE results in increased T3SS gene transcription. Through epistasis analyses, we discovered that MgtE influences the ExsE-ExsC-ExsD-ExsA gene regulatory system of T3SS by either directly or indirectly inhibiting ExsA activity. While variations in calcium levels modulate T3SS gene expression in P. aeruginosa, we found that addition of exogenous magnesium did not inhibit T3SS activity. Furthermore, mgtE variants that were defective for magnesium transport could still complement the cytotoxicity effect. Thus, the magnesium transport function of MgtE does not fully explain the regulatory effects of MgtE on cytotoxicity. Overall, our results indicate that MgtE modulates expression of T3SS genes.

  15. Acidified nitrite inhibits proliferation of Listeria monocytogenes - Transcriptional analysis of a preservation method.

    PubMed

    Müller-Herbst, Stefanie; Wüstner, Stefanie; Kabisch, Jan; Pichner, Rohtraud; Scherer, Siegfried

    2016-06-02

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) is added as a preservative during raw meat processing such as raw sausage production to inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria. In the present study it was shown in challenge assays that the addition of sodium nitrite indeed inhibited growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes in short-ripened spreadable raw sausages. Furthermore, in vitro growth analyses were performed, which took into account combinations of various parameters of the raw sausage ripening process like temperature, oxygen availability, pH, NaCl concentration, and absence or presence of NaNO2. Data based on 300 growth conditions revealed that the inhibitory effect of nitrite was most prominent in combination with acidification, a combination that is also achieved during short-ripened spreadable raw sausage production. At pH6.0 and below, L. monocytogenes was unable to replicate in the presence of 200mg/l NaNO2. During the adaptation of L. monocytogenes to acidified nitrite stress (pH6.0, 200mg/l NaNO2) in comparison to acid exposure only (pH6.0, 0mg/l NaNO2), a massive transcriptional adaptation was observed using microarray analyses. In total, 202 genes were up-regulated and 204 genes were down-regulated. In accordance with growth inhibition, a down-regulation of genes encoding for proteins which are involved in central cellular processes, like cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, translation and ribosomal structure and biogenesis, transcription, and replication, recombination and repair, was observed. Among the up-regulated genes the most prominent group belonged to poorly characterized genes. A considerable fraction of the up-regulated genes has been shown previously to be up-regulated intracellularly in macrophages, after exposure to acid shock or to be part of the SigB regulon. These data indicate that the adaptation to acidified nitrite partly overlaps with the adaptation to stress conditions being present during host colonization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  16. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-{alpha} and PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sozio, Margaret S; Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to

  17. Shikonins, phytocompounds from Lithospermum erythrorhizon, inhibit the transcriptional activation of human tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter in vivo.

    PubMed

    Staniforth, Vanisree; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2004-02-13

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) contributes to the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic inflammatory diseases and has been a target for the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs. Shikonins, the naphthoquinone pigments present in the root tissues of Lithospermum erythrorhizon Sieb. et Zucc. (Boraginaceae), have been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effects of shikonin and its derivatives on the transcriptional activation of human TNF-alpha promoter in a gene gun-transfected mouse skin system by using a luciferase reporter gene assay. The crude plant extract of L. erythrorhizon as well as derived individual compounds shikonin, isobutyryl shikonin, acetyl shikonin, dimethylacryl shikonin and isovaleryl shikonin showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of TNF-alpha promoter activation. Among the tested compounds, shikonin and isobutyryl shikonin exhibited the highest inhibition of TNF-alpha promoter activation and also showed significant suppression of transgenic human TNF-alpha mRNA expression and protein production. We demonstrated that shikonin-inhibitory response was retained in the core TNF-alpha promoter region containing the TATA box and a 48-bp downstream sequence relative to the transcription start site. Further our results indicated that shikonin suppressed the basal transcription and activator-regulated transcription of TNF-alpha by inhibiting the binding of transcription factor IID protein complex (TATA box-binding protein) to TATA box. These in vivo results suggest that shikonins inhibit the transcriptional activation of the human TNF-alpha promoter through interference with the basal transcription machinery. Thus, shikonins may have clinical potential as anti-inflammatory therapeutics.

  18. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 represses transcription of p21CIP1 by inhibition of transcription activation by p53 and Sp1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-05-08

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1-3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target.

  19. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 Represses Transcription of p21CIP1 by Inhibition of Transcription Activation by p53 and Sp1*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1–3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  20. Role of platinum DNA damage-induced transcriptional inhibition in chemotherapy-induced neuronal atrophy and peripheral neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Johnson J; Ip, Virginia; Jamieson, Stephen M F; McKeage, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs cause peripheral neurotoxicity by damaging sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. The roles of platinum DNA binding, transcription inhibition and altered cell size were investigated in primary cultures of rat DRG cells. Click chemistry quantitative fluorescence imaging of RNA-incorporated 5-ethynyluridine showed high, but wide ranging, global levels of transcription in individual neurons that correlated with their cell body size. Treatment with platinum drugs reduced neuronal transcription and cell body size to an extent that corresponded to the amount of preceding platinum DNA binding, but without any loss of neuronal cells. The effects of platinum drugs on neuronal transcription and cell body size were inhibited by blocking platinum DNA binding with sodium thiosulfate, and mimicked by treatment with a model transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D. In vivo oxaliplatin treatment depleted the total RNA content of DRG tissue concurrently with altering DRG neuronal size. These findings point to a mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, whereby platinum DNA damage induces global transcriptional arrest leading in turn to neuronal atrophy. DRG neurons may be particularly vulnerable to this mechanism of toxicity because of their requirements for high basal levels of global transcriptional activity. Findings point to a new stepwise mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, whereby platinum DNA damage induces global transcriptional arrest leading in turn to neuronal atrophy. Dorsal root ganglion neurons may be particularly vulnerable to this neurotoxicity because of their high global transcriptional outputs, demonstrated in this study by click chemistry quantitative fluorescence imaging. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  1. Testosterone Administration Inhibits Hepcidin Transcription and is Associated with Increased Iron Incorporation into Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen; Bachman, Eric; Li, Michelle; Roy, Cindy N.; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Wong, Siu; Chan, Stephen Y.; Serra, Carlo; Jasuja, Ravi; Travison, Thomas G.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Bhasin, Shalender

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone administration increases hemoglobin levels and has been used to treat anemia of chronic disease. Erythrocytosis is the most frequent adverse event associated with testosterone therapy of hypogonadal men, especially older men. However, the mechanisms by which testosterone increases hemoglobin remain unknown. Testosterone administration in male and female mice was associated with a greater increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit, reticulocyte count, reticulocyte hemoglobin concentration, and serum iron and transferring saturation than placebo. Testosterone downregulated hepatic hepcidin mRNA expression, upregulated renal erythropoietin mRNA expression, and increased erythropoietin levels. Testosterone-induced suppression of hepcidin expression was independent of its effects on erythropoietin or hypoxia-sensing mechanisms. Transgenic mice with liver-specific constitutive hepcidin over-expression failed to exhibit the expected increase in hemoglobin in response to testosterone administration. Testosterone upregulated splenic ferroportin expression and reduced iron retention in spleen. After intravenous administration of transferrin-bound 58Fe, the amount of 58Fe incorporated into red blood cells was significantly greater in testosterone-treated mice than in placebo-treated mice. Serum from testosterone-treated mice stimulated hemoglobin synthesis in K562 erythroleukemia cells more than that from vehicle-treated mice. Testosterone administration promoted the association of androgen receptor (AR) with Smad1 and Smad4 to reduce their binding to BMP-response elements in hepcidin promoter in the liver. Ectopic expression of AR in hepatocytes suppressed hepcidin transcription; this effect was blocked dose-dependently by AR antagonist flutamide. Testosterone did not affect hepcidin mRNA stability. Conclusion: Testosterone inhibits hepcidin transcription through its interaction with BMP-Smad signaling. Testosterone administration is associated with increased iron

  2. Quercetin Represses Apolipoprotein B Expression by Inhibiting the Transcriptional Activity of C/EBPβ

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin is one of the most abundant polyphenolic flavonoids found in fruits and vegetables and has anti-oxidative and anti-obesity effects. Because the small intestine is a major absorptive organ of dietary nutrients, it is likely that highly concentrated food constituents, including polyphenols, are present in the small intestinal epithelial cells, suggesting that food factors may have a profound effect in this tissue. To identify novel targets of quercetin in the intestinal enterocytes, mRNA profiling using human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells was performed. We found that mRNA levels of some apolipoproteins, particularly apolipoprotein B (apoB), are downregulated in the presence of quercetin. On the exposure of Caco-2 cells to quercetin, both mRNA and protein levels of apoB were decreased. Promoter analysis of the human apoB revealed that quercetin response element is localized at the 5′-proximal promoter region, which contains a conserved CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-response element. We found that quercetin reduces the promoter activity of apoB, driven by the enforced expression of C/EBPβ. Quercetin had no effect on either mRNA or protein levels of C/EBPβ. In contrast, we found that quercetin inhibits the transcriptional activity of C/EBPβ but not its recruitment to the apoB promoter. On the exposure of Caco-2 cells to quercetin 3-O-glucuronide, which is in a cell-impermeable form, no notable change in apoB mRNA was observed, suggesting an intracellular action of quercetin. In vitro interaction experiments using quercetin-conjugated beads revealed that quercetin binds to C/EBPβ. Our results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of transcription of apolipoprotein genes by quercetin in the intestinal enterocytes. PMID:25875015

  3. Myostatin inhibits myosatellite cell proliferation and consequently activates differentiation: evidence for endocrine-regulated transcript processing.

    PubMed

    Garikipati, Dilip K; Rodgers, Buel D

    2012-10-01

    Myostatin is a potent negative regulator of muscle growth in mammals. Despite high structural conservation, functional conservation in nonmammalian species is only assumed. This is particularly true for fish due to the presence of several myostatin paralogs: two in most species and four in salmonids (MSTN-1a, -1b, -2a, and -2b). Rainbow trout are a rich source of primary myosatellite cells as hyperplastic muscle growth occurs even in adult fish. These cells were therefore used to determine myostatin's effects on proliferation whereas our earlier studies reported its effects on quiescent cells. As in mammals, recombinant myostatin suppressed proliferation with no changes in cell morphology. Expression of MSTN-1a was several fold higher than the other paralogs and was autoregulated by myostatin, which also upregulated the expression of key differentiation markers: Myf5, MyoD1, myogenin, and myosin light chain. Thus, myostatin-stimulated cellular growth inhibition activates rather than represses differentiation. IGF-1 stimulated proliferation but had minimal and delayed effects on differentiation and its actions were suppressed by myostatin. However, IGF-1 upregulated MSTN-2a expression and the processing of its transcript, which is normally unprocessed. Myostatin therefore appears to partly mediate IGF-stimulated myosatellite differentiation in rainbow trout. This also occurs in mammals, although the IGF-stimulated processing of MSTN-2a transcripts is highly unique and is indicative of subfunctionalization within the gene family. These studies also suggest that the myokine's actions, including its antagonistic relationship with IGF-1, are conserved and that the salmonid gene family is functionally diverging.

  4. Withaferin-A Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Blocking STAT3 Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bu Young; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Withania somnifera (known as Ashwagandha) is a medicinal plant used in the ayurvedic medicines in India. Withaferin-A, a withanolide derived from the leaf extract of W. somnifera, has been reported to exhibit anti-tumor activity against various cancer cells, such as leukemia, breast cancer and colon cancer cells. Methods: We investigated the anti-cancer effects of withaferin-A on the proliferation and migration of human colorectal cancer (HCT116) cells. And we evaluated the effects of withaferin-A on the transcriptional activity of STAT3 and the growth of HCT116 cells in xenograft mouse tumor model. Results: In the present study, we found that withaferin-A inhibited the proliferation and migration of HCT116 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of HCT116 cells with withaferin-A attenuated interleukin-6-induced activation of STAT3, which has been implicated in the development and progression of colon cancer. To examine the effect of withaferin-A on HCT116 cells proliferation in vivo, we generated HCT116 cells xenograft tumors in Balb/c nude mice and treated the tumor bearing mice with or without withaferin-A intraperitoneally. Treatment with withaferin-A exhibited significant decrease in the volume and weight of tumors as compared to untreated controls. Conclusions: The present study suggests that withaferin-A holds the potential to be developed as a small molecule inhibitor of STAT3 for the treatment of HCT116. PMID:26473157

  5. Withaferin-A Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Blocking STAT3 Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bu Young; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Withania somnifera (known as Ashwagandha) is a medicinal plant used in the ayurvedic medicines in India. Withaferin-A, a withanolide derived from the leaf extract of W. somnifera, has been reported to exhibit anti-tumor activity against various cancer cells, such as leukemia, breast cancer and colon cancer cells. We investigated the anti-cancer effects of withaferin-A on the proliferation and migration of human colorectal cancer (HCT116) cells. And we evaluated the effects of withaferin-A on the transcriptional activity of STAT3 and the growth of HCT116 cells in xenograft mouse tumor model. In the present study, we found that withaferin-A inhibited the proliferation and migration of HCT116 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of HCT116 cells with withaferin-A attenuated interleukin-6-induced activation of STAT3, which has been implicated in the development and progression of colon cancer. To examine the effect of withaferin-A on HCT116 cells proliferation in vivo, we generated HCT116 cells xenograft tumors in Balb/c nude mice and treated the tumor bearing mice with or without withaferin-A intraperitoneally. Treatment with withaferin-A exhibited significant decrease in the volume and weight of tumors as compared to untreated controls. The present study suggests that withaferin-A holds the potential to be developed as a small molecule inhibitor of STAT3 for the treatment of HCT116.

  6. p160 Myb-Binding Protein Interacts with Prep1 and Inhibits Its Transcriptional Activity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Víctor M.; Mori, Silvia; Longobardi, Elena; Menendez, Guillermo; Ferrai, Carmelo; Keough, Rebecca A.; Bachi, Angela; Blasi, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Prep1 is known to interact in vivo with Pbx1 to regulate development and organogenesis. We have identified a novel Prep1-interacting protein, p160 c-Myb binding protein (p160). p160 and Pbx1 compete for Prep1 in vitro, and p160 inhibits Prep1-dependent HoxB2 expression in retinoic acid-treated NT2-D1 cells. The N-terminal physiologically truncated form of p160, p67, binds the sequence 63LFPLL67 in the HR1 domain of Prep1. Mutation of both L63 and L66 impairs the binding of Prep1 to both p160/p67 and Pbx1. The sequences required to bind Prep1 are mainly located in residues 51 to 151. Immunofluorescence colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation of endogenous p160 and Prep1 are induced by ActD, which translocates p160 from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. These data therefore show that p160 is a novel regulator of Prep1-Pbx1 transcriptional activity. PMID:17875935

  7. p160 Myb-binding protein interacts with Prep1 and inhibits its transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Víctor M; Mori, Silvia; Longobardi, Elena; Menendez, Guillermo; Ferrai, Carmelo; Keough, Rebecca A; Bachi, Angela; Blasi, Francesco

    2007-11-01

    Prep1 is known to interact in vivo with Pbx1 to regulate development and organogenesis. We have identified a novel Prep1-interacting protein, p160 c-Myb binding protein (p160). p160 and Pbx1 compete for Prep1 in vitro, and p160 inhibits Prep1-dependent HoxB2 expression in retinoic acid-treated NT2-D1 cells. The N-terminal physiologically truncated form of p160, p67, binds the sequence 63LFPLL67 in the HR1 domain of Prep1. Mutation of both L63 and L66 impairs the binding of Prep1 to both p160/p67 and Pbx1. The sequences required to bind Prep1 are mainly located in residues 51 to 151. Immunofluorescence colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation of endogenous p160 and Prep1 are induced by ActD, which translocates p160 from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. These data therefore show that p160 is a novel regulator of Prep1-Pbx1 transcriptional activity.

  8. Inhibition of transcription and translation in the striatum after memory reactivation: Lack of evidence of reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A; Medina, Andrea Cristina; Bello-Medina, Paola C; Quirarte, Gina L

    2017-07-01

    It has been found that interference with neural activity after a consolidated memory is retrieved produces an amnestic state; this has been taken has indicative of destabilization of the memory trace that would have been produced by a process of reconsolidation (allowing for maintenance of the original trace). However, a growing body of evidence shows that this is not a reliable effect, and that it is dependent upon some experimental conditions, such as the age of the memory, memory reactivation procedures, the predictability of the reactivation stimulus, and strength of training. In some instances, where post-retrieval treatments induce a retention deficit (which would be suggestive of interference with reconsolidation), memory is rescued by simple passing of time or by repeated retention tests. We now report that post-training and post-retrieval inhibition of transcription and translation in dorsal striatum, a structure where both of these manipulations have not been studied, produce interference with consolidation and a transitory retention deficit, respectively. These results do not give support to the reconsolidation hypothesis and lead to the conclusion that the post-activation deficiencies are due to interference with retrieval of information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. BET bromodomain inhibition suppresses innate inflammatory and profibrotic transcriptional networks in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Qiming; McMahon, Sarah; Anand, Priti; Shah, Hirsh; Thomas, Sean; Salunga, Hazel T.; Huang, Yu; Zhang, Rongli; Sahadevan, Aarathi; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Brown, Jonathan D.; Srivastava, Deepak; Bradner, James E.; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Haldar, Saptarsi M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite current standard of care, the average 5-year mortality after an initial diagnosis of heart failure (HF) is about 40%, reflecting an urgent need for new therapeutic approaches. Previous studies demonstrated that the epigenetic reader protein bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4), an emerging therapeutic target in cancer, functions as a critical coactivator of pathologic gene transactivation during cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. However, the therapeutic relevance of these findings to human disease remained unknown. We demonstrate that treatment with the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 has therapeutic effects during severe, preestablished HF from prolonged pressure overload, as well as after a massive anterior myocardial infarction in mice. Furthermore, JQ1 potently blocks agonist-induced hypertrophy in human induced pluripotent stem cell–derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs). Integrated transcriptomic analyses across animal models and human iPSC-CMs reveal that BET inhibition preferentially blocks transactivation of a common pathologic gene regulatory program that is robustly enriched for NFκB and TGF-β signaling networks, typified by innate inflammatory and profibrotic myocardial genes. As predicted by these specific transcriptional mechanisms, we found that JQ1 does not suppress physiological cardiac hypertrophy in a mouse swimming model. These findings establish that pharmacologically targeting innate inflammatory and profibrotic myocardial signaling networks at the level of chromatin is effective in animal models and human cardiomyocytes, providing the critical rationale for further development of BET inhibitors and other epigenomic medicines for HF. PMID:28515341

  10. Minute Virus of Mice Inhibits Transcription of the Cyclin B1 Gene during Infection.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Matthew S; Majumder, Kinjal; Pintel, David J

    2017-07-15

    Replication of minute virus of mice (MVM) induces a sustained cellular DNA damage response (DDR) which the virus then exploits to prepare the nuclear environment for effective parvovirus takeover. An essential aspect of the MVM-induced DDR is the establishment of a potent premitotic block, which we previously found to be independent of activated p21 and ATR/Chk1 signaling. This arrest, unlike others reported previously, depends upon a significant, specific depletion of cyclin B1 and its encoding RNA, which precludes cyclin B1/CDK1 complex function, thus preventing mitotic entry. We show here that while the stability of cyclin B1 RNA was not affected by MVM infection, the production of nascent cyclin B1 RNA was substantially diminished at late times postinfection. Ectopic expression of NS1 alone did not reduce cyclin B1 expression. MVM infection also reduced the levels of cyclin B1 protein, and RNA levels normally increased in response to DNA-damaging reagents. We demonstrated that at times of reduced cyclin B1 expression during infection, there was a significantly reduced occupancy of RNA polymerase II and the essential mitotic transcription factor FoxM1 on the cyclin B1 gene promoter. Additionally, while total FoxM1 levels remained constant, there was a significant decrease of the phosphorylated, likely active, forms of FoxM1. Targeting of a constitutively active FoxM1 construct or the activation domain of FoxM1 to the cyclin B1 gene promoter via clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-enzymatically inactive Cas9 in MVM-infected cells increased both cyclin B1 protein and RNA levels, implicating FoxM1 as a critical target for cyclin B1 inhibition during MVM infection. IMPORTANCE Replication of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) induces a sustained cellular DNA damage response (DDR) which the virus exploits to prepare the nuclear environment for effective takeover. An essential aspect of the MVM-induced DDR is establishment of a

  11. Minute Virus of Mice Inhibits Transcription of the Cyclin B1 Gene during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Matthew S.; Majumder, Kinjal

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Replication of minute virus of mice (MVM) induces a sustained cellular DNA damage response (DDR) which the virus then exploits to prepare the nuclear environment for effective parvovirus takeover. An essential aspect of the MVM-induced DDR is the establishment of a potent premitotic block, which we previously found to be independent of activated p21 and ATR/Chk1 signaling. This arrest, unlike others reported previously, depends upon a significant, specific depletion of cyclin B1 and its encoding RNA, which precludes cyclin B1/CDK1 complex function, thus preventing mitotic entry. We show here that while the stability of cyclin B1 RNA was not affected by MVM infection, the production of nascent cyclin B1 RNA was substantially diminished at late times postinfection. Ectopic expression of NS1 alone did not reduce cyclin B1 expression. MVM infection also reduced the levels of cyclin B1 protein, and RNA levels normally increased in response to DNA-damaging reagents. We demonstrated that at times of reduced cyclin B1 expression during infection, there was a significantly reduced occupancy of RNA polymerase II and the essential mitotic transcription factor FoxM1 on the cyclin B1 gene promoter. Additionally, while total FoxM1 levels remained constant, there was a significant decrease of the phosphorylated, likely active, forms of FoxM1. Targeting of a constitutively active FoxM1 construct or the activation domain of FoxM1 to the cyclin B1 gene promoter via clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-enzymatically inactive Cas9 in MVM-infected cells increased both cyclin B1 protein and RNA levels, implicating FoxM1 as a critical target for cyclin B1 inhibition during MVM infection. IMPORTANCE Replication of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) induces a sustained cellular DNA damage response (DDR) which the virus exploits to prepare the nuclear environment for effective takeover. An essential aspect of the MVM-induced DDR is establishment

  12. Rift Valley fever virus NSs inhibits host transcription independently of the degradation of dsRNA-dependent Protein Kinase PKR

    PubMed Central

    Kalveram, Birte; Lihoradova, Olga; Indran, Sabarish V.; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Head, Jennifer A.; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) encodes one major virulence factor, the NSs protein. NSs suppresses host general transcription, including interferon (IFN)-β mRNA synthesis, and promotes degradation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). We generated a novel RVFV mutant (rMP12-NSsR173A) specifically lacking the function to promote PKR degradation. rMP12-NSsR173A infection induces early phosphorylation of eIF2α through PKR activation, while retaining the function to inhibit host general transcription including IFN-β gene inhibition. MP-12 NSs but not R173A NSs binds to wt PKR. R173A NSs formed filamentous structure in nucleus in a mosaic pattern, which was distinct from MP-12 NSs filament pattern. Due to early phosphorylation of eIF2α, rMP12-NSsR173A could not efficiently accumulate viral proteins. Our results suggest that NSs-mediated host general transcription suppression occurs independently of PKR degradation, while the PKR degradation is important to inhibit the phosphorylation of eIF2α in infected cells undergoing host general transcription suppression. PMID:23063407

  13. Rift Valley fever virus NSs inhibits host transcription independently of the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase PKR.

    PubMed

    Kalveram, Birte; Lihoradova, Olga; Indran, Sabarish V; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Head, Jennifer A; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-20

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) encodes one major virulence factor, the NSs protein. NSs suppresses host general transcription, including interferon (IFN)-β mRNA synthesis, and promotes degradation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). We generated a novel RVFV mutant (rMP12-NSsR173A) specifically lacking the function to promote PKR degradation. rMP12-NSsR173A infection induces early phosphorylation of eIF2α through PKR activation, while retaining the function to inhibit host general transcription including IFN-β gene inhibition. MP-12 NSs but not R173A NSs binds to wt PKR. R173A NSs formed filamentous structure in nucleus in a mosaic pattern, which was distinct from MP-12 NSs filament pattern. Due to early phosphorylation of eIF2α, rMP12-NSsR173A could not efficiently accumulate viral proteins. Our results suggest that NSs-mediated host general transcription suppression occurs independently of PKR degradation, while the PKR degradation is important to inhibit the phosphorylation of eIF2α in infected cells undergoing host general transcription suppression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Visualizing Inhibition of Nucleosome Mobility and Transcription by Cisplatin-DNA Interstrand Crosslinks in Live Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guangyu; Song, Lina; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used anticancer drug that acts by binding DNA and causing the formation of intrastrand and interstrand (ICL) cross-links, but the precise downstream effects of the latter damage are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the influence of cisplatin ICLs on synthetic nucleosomes that were platinated in a site-specific manner in vitro and on gene transcription in live mammalian cells. Nucleosome core particles (NCPs) that we constructed contained site-specific cisplatin 5′-d(G*pC)/5′-d(G*pC) ICLs, where the asterisk denotes the platinated nucleoside, to examine the influence of platinum lesions on the dynamic behavior of nucleosomes in solution. A cisplatin ICL, but not a 1,2-d(GpG) cross-link, significantly inhibited ATP-independent histone octamer-DNA sliding. We also used a novel linearization-recircularization strategy described here to synthesize mammalian expression vectors containing site-specific cisplatin ICLs. Plasmid vectors were tested in live mammalian cellsto study the transcription inhibition effects of cisplatin ICLs in the context of two different repair backgrounds. Cisplatin ICLs inhibit transcription as effectively as 1,2-d(GpG) cross-links. We determined that nucleotide excision repair plays a key role in the removal of cisplatin ICLs, acting in a replication-independent fashion. We also found that loss of mismatch repair function dramatically attenuatesthe transcription inhibition effects by cisplatin ICLs but not 1,2-d(GpG) intrastrand cross-links. Our results revealed the unique properties of cisplatin ICLs on nucleosome mobility and on transcription, and they defined how these adducts act in a manner completely different from that used for cisplatin 1,2-d(GpG) cross-links. These new findings provide direct support for a role of ICLs in the pharmacological activities of cisplatin, despite the lower frequency of their formation. PMID:23695549

  15. 1E7-03, a low MW compound targeting host protein phosphatase-1, inhibits HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Platonov, Maxim; Ivanov, Andrei; Kont, Yasemin Saygideğer; Kumari, Namita; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kulkarni, Amol A; Üren, Aykut; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Nekhai, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein which recruits the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK9/cyclin T1 to TAR RNA. Tat binds to protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) through the Q35VCF38 sequence and translocates PP1 to the nucleus. PP1 dephosphorylates CDK9 and activates HIV-1 transcription. We have synthesized a low MW compound 1H4, that targets PP1 and prevents HIV-1 Tat interaction with PP1 and inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription. Here, we report our further work with the 1H4-derived compounds and analysis of their mechanism of action. Experimental Approach Using the 1H4-PP1 complex as a model, we iteratively designed and synthesized follow-up libraries that were analysed for the inhibition of HIV-1 transcription and toxicity. We also confirmed the mechanism of action of the PP1-targeting molecules by determining the affinity of binding of these molecules to PP1, by analysing their effects on PP1 activity, disruption of PP1 binding to Tat and shuttling of PP1 to the nucleus. Key Results We identified a tetrahydroquinoline derivative, compound 7, which disrupted the interaction of Tat with PP1. We further optimized compound 7 and obtained compound 7c, renamed 1E7-03, which inhibited HIV-1 with low IC50 (fivefold lower than the previously reported compound, 1H4), showed no cytotoxicity and displayed a plasma half-life greater than 8 h in mice. 1E7-03 bound to PP1 in vitro and prevented shuttling of PP1 into the nucleus. Conclusions and Implications Our study shows that low MW compounds that functionally mimic the PP1-binding RVxF peptide can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating PP1. PMID:25073485

  16. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdk8 Mediator Represses AQY1 Transcription by Inhibiting Set1p-Dependent Histone Methylation.

    PubMed

    Law, Michael J; Finger, Michael A

    2017-03-10

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae , nutrient depletion induces massive transcriptional reprogramming that relies upon communication between transcription factors, post-translational histone modifications, and the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme complex. Histone H3Lys4 methylation (H3Lys4 me), regulated by the Set1p-containing COMPASS methyltransferase complex and Jhd2p demethylase, is one of the most well-studied histone modifications. We previously demonstrated that the RNA polymerase II mediator components cyclin C-Cdk8p inhibit locus-specific H3Lys4 3me independently of Jhd2p Here, we identify loci subject to cyclin C- and Jhd2p-dependent histone H3Lys4 3me inhibition using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq. We further characterized the independent and combined roles of cyclin C and Jhd2p in controlling H3Lys4 3me and transcription in response to fermentable and nonfermentable carbon at multiple loci. These experiments suggest that H3Lys4 3me alone is insufficient to induce transcription. Interestingly, we identified an unexpected role for cyclin C-Cdk8p in repressing AQY1 transcription, an aquaporin whose expression is normally induced during nutrient deprivation. These experiments, combined with previous work in other labs, support a two-step model in which cyclin C-Cdk8p mediate AQY1 transcriptional repression by stimulating transcription factor proteolysis and preventing Set1p recruitment to the AQY1 locus. Copyright © 2017 Law and Finger.

  17. Prospects for inhibiting the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Augustine; Panjaworayan T-Thienprasert, Nattanan; Brown, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    There is a continuing need for novel antivirals to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, as it remains a major health problem worldwide. Ideally new classes of antivirals would target multiple steps in the viral lifecycle. In this review, we consider the steps in which HBV RNAs are processed, exported from the nucleus and translated. These are often overlooked steps in the HBV life-cycle. HBV, like retroviruses, incorporates a number of unusual steps in these processes, which use a combination of viral and host cellular machinery. Some of these unusual steps deserve a closer scrutiny. They may provide alternative targets to existing antiviral therapies, which are associated with increasing drug resistance. The RNA post-transcriptional regulatory element identified 20 years ago promotes nucleocytoplasmic export of all unspliced HBV RNAs. There is evidence that inhibition of this step is part of the antiviral action of interferon. Similarly, the structured RNA epsilon element situated at the 5’ end of the polycistronic HBV pregenomic RNA also performs key roles during HBV replication. The pregenomic RNA, which is the template for translation of both the viral core and polymerase proteins, is also encapsidated and used in replication. This complex process, regulated at the epsilon element, also presents an attractive antiviral target. These RNA elements that mediate and regulate gene expression are highly conserved and could be targeted using novel strategies employing RNAi, miRNAs or aptamers. Such approaches targeting these functionally constrained genomic regions should avoid escape mutations. Therefore understanding these regulatory elements, along with providing potential targets, may also facilitate the development of other new classes of antiviral drugs. PMID:25009369

  18. Knockdown of Immature Colon Carcinoma Transcript 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiantao; Zhang, Shenghui; Yang, Qingbo; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhiyu; Wu, Xintian

    2016-01-01

    Non–small cell lung cancer, as the most frequent type lung cancer, has lower survival rate of 5 years, despite improvements in surgery and chemotherapy. Previous studies showed immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 is closely related to tumorigenesis of human cancer cells. In the present study, we found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues using Oncomine database mining, and the biological effect of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was investigated in non–small cell lung cancer cell lines 95D and A549. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference was used to knock down immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 expression in 95D and A549 cells in vitro, and the knockdown efficiency was determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay. Knockdown of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 significantly suppressed non–small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and colony formation ability confirmed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and colony formation assay. Flow cytometry was applied to measure cell cycle arrest, and the result showed the cell cycle arrested in G2/M phase in 95D cells and arrested in G0/G1 phase in A549 cells. Furthermore, we measured the levels of cell cycle–associated proteins by Western blot analysis and found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1–mediated cell proliferation inhibition appeared due to downregulation of cell cycle activator cyclin D1 and upregulation of cell cycle inhibitor p21. In addition, immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 silencing significantly induced non–small cell lung cancer cell apoptosis by annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin D double-staining assay. All our data suggest that immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 may play an important role for non–small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and could be a potential molecular target for diagnosing and treating human non–small cell lung cancer. PMID:27413166

  19. Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction-Mediated Delivery of a Transcription Factor Decoy Inhibits STAT3 Signaling and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Carson, Andrew R.; McTiernan, Charles F.; Chen, Xucai; Hasjim, Bima; Lavery, Linda; Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in many cancers where it acts to promote tumor progression. A STAT3-specific transcription factor decoy has been developed to suppress STAT3 downstream signaling, but a delivery strategy is needed to improve clinical translation. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) has been shown to enhance image-guided local delivery of molecular therapeutics to a target site. The objective of this study was to deliver STAT3 decoy to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors using UTMD to disrupt STAT3 signaling and inhibit tumor growth. Studies performed demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles inhibited STAT3 signaling in SCC cells in vitro. Studies performed in vivo demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles induced significant tumor growth inhibition (31-51% reduced tumor volume vs. controls, p < 0.05) in mice bearing SCC tumors. Furthermore, expression of STAT3 downstream target genes (Bcl-xL and cyclin D1) was significantly reduced (34-39%, p < 0.05) in tumors receiving UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles compared to controls. In addition, the quantity of radiolabeled STAT3 decoy detected in tumors eight hours after treatment was significantly higher with UTMD treatment compared to controls (70-150%, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that UTMD can increase delivery of a transcription factor decoy to tumors in vivo and that the decoy can inhibit STAT3 signaling and tumor growth. These results suggest that UTMD treatment holds potential for clinical use to increase the concentration of a transcription factor signaling inhibitor in the tumor. PMID:26681983

  20. Transcription factor PU.1 is expressed in white adipose and inhibits adipocyte differentiation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    PU.1 transcription factor is a critical regulator of hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. Because PU.1 interacts with transcription factors GATA-2 and C/EBPa, both of which are involved in the regulation of adipogenesis, we investigated whether PU.1 also plays a role in the regulation of adipocyte diff...

  1. Local Transcriptional Control of YUCCA Regulates Auxin Promoted Root-Growth Inhibition in Response to Aluminium Stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangchao; Gao, Shan; Tian, Huiyu; Wu, Wenwen; Robert, Hélène S; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-10-01

    Auxin is necessary for the inhibition of root growth induced by aluminium (Al) stress, however the molecular mechanism controlling this is largely unknown. Here, we report that YUCCA (YUC), which encodes flavin monooxygenase-like proteins, regulates local auxin biosynthesis in the root apex transition zone (TZ) in response to Al stress. Al stress up-regulates YUC3/5/7/8/9 in the root-apex TZ, which we show results in the accumulation of auxin in the root-apex TZ and root-growth inhibition during the Al stress response. These Al-dependent changes in the regulation of YUCs in the root-apex TZ and YUC-regulated root growth inhibition are dependent on ethylene signalling. Increasing or disruption of ethylene signalling caused either enhanced or reduced up-regulation, respectively, of YUCs in root-apex TZ in response to Al stress. In addition, ethylene enhanced root growth inhibition under Al stress was strongly alleviated in yuc mutants or by co-treatment with yucasin, an inhibitor of YUC activity, suggesting a downstream role of YUCs in this process. Moreover, ethylene-insensitive 3 (EIN3) is involved into the direct regulation of YUC9 transcription in this process. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) functions as a transcriptional activator for YUC5/8/9. PIF4 promotes Al-inhibited primary root growth by regulating the local expression of YUCs and auxin signal in the root-apex TZ. The Al-induced expression of PIF4 in root TZ acts downstream of ethylene signalling. Taken together, our results highlight a regulatory cascade for YUCs-regulated local auxin biosynthesis in the root-apex TZ mediating root growth inhibition in response to Al stress.

  2. THRAP3 interacts with and inhibits the transcriptional activity of SOX9 during chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sono, Takashi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Miura, Shigenori; Deng, Jian Min; Shukunami, Chisa; Hiraki, Yuji; Tsushima, Yu; Azuma, Yoshiaki; Behringer, Richard R; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2018-07-01

    Sex-determining region Y (Sry)-box (Sox)9 is required for chondrogenesis as a transcriptional activator of genes related to chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and cartilage-specific extracellular matrix. Although there have been studies investigating the Sox9-dependent transcriptional complexes, not all their components have been identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein (THRAP)3 is a component of a SOX9 transcriptional complex by liquid chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of FLAG-tagged Sox9-binding proteins purified from FLAG-HA-tagged Sox9 knock-in mice. Thrap3 knockdown in ATDC5 chondrogenic cells increased the expression of Collagen type II alpha 1 chain (Col2a1) without affecting Sox9 expression. THRAP3 and SOX9 overexpression reduced Col2a1 levels to a greater degree than overexpression of SOX9 alone. The negative regulation of SOX9 transcriptional activity by THRAP3 was mediated by interaction between the proline-, glutamine-, and serine-rich domain of SOX9 and the innominate domain of THRAP3. These results indicate that THRAP3 negatively regulates SOX9 transcriptional activity as a cofactor of a SOX9 transcriptional complex during chondrogenesis.

  3. Small-molecule RORγt antagonists inhibit T helper 17 cell transcriptional network by divergent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Sheng; Yosef, Nir; Yang, Jianfei; Wang, Yonghui; Zhou, Ling; Zhu, Chen; Wu, Chuan; Baloglu, Erkan; Schmidt, Darby; Ramesh, Radha; Lobera, Mercedes; Sundrud, Mark S; Tsai, Pei-Yun; Xiang, Zhijun; Wang, Jinsong; Xu, Yan; Lin, Xichen; Kretschmer, Karsten; Rahl, Peter B; Young, Richard A; Zhong, Zhong; Hafler, David A; Regev, Aviv; Ghosh, Shomir; Marson, Alexander; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2014-04-17

    We identified three retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt)-specific inhibitors that suppress T helper 17 (Th17) cell responses, including Th17-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. We systemically characterized RORγt binding in the presence and absence of drugs with corresponding whole-genome transcriptome sequencing. RORγt acts as a direct activator of Th17 cell signature genes and a direct repressor of signature genes from other T cell lineages; its strongest transcriptional effects are on cis-regulatory sites containing the RORα binding motif. RORγt is central in a densely interconnected regulatory network that shapes the balance of T cell differentiation. Here, the three inhibitors modulated the RORγt-dependent transcriptional network to varying extents and through distinct mechanisms. Whereas one inhibitor displaced RORγt from its target loci, the other two inhibitors affected transcription predominantly without removing DNA binding. Our work illustrates the power of a system-scale analysis of transcriptional regulation to characterize potential therapeutic compounds that inhibit pathogenic Th17 cells and suppress autoimmunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Roles of Arenavirus Z Protein in Mediating Virion Budding, Viral Transcription-Inhibition and Interferon-Beta Suppression.

    PubMed

    Shao, Junjie; Liang, Yuying; Ly, Hinh

    2018-01-01

    The smallest arenaviral protein is the zinc-finger protein (Z) that belongs to the RING finger protein family. Z serves as a main component required for virus budding from the membrane of the infected cells through self-oligomerization, a process that can be aided by the viral nucleoprotein (NP) to form the viral matrix of progeny virus particles. Z has also been shown to be essential for mediating viral transcriptional repression activity by locking the L polymerase onto the viral promoter in a catalytically inactive state, thus limiting viral replication. The Z protein has also recently been shown to inhibit the type I interferon-induction pathway by directly binding to the intracellular pathogen-sensor proteins RIG-I and MDA5, and thus inhibiting their normal functions. This chapter describes several assays used to examine the important roles of the arenaviral Z protein in mediating virus budding (i.e., either Z self-budding or NP-Z budding activities), viral transcriptional inhibition in a viral minigenome (MG) assay, and type I IFN suppression in an IFN-β promoter-mediated luciferase reporter assay.

  5. β-Arrestins Negatively Regulate the Toll Pathway in Shrimp by Preventing Dorsal Translocation and Inhibiting Dorsal Transcriptional Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie-Jie; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Yang, Ming-Chong; Niu, Guo-Juan; Ding, Ding; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-01-01

    The Toll signaling pathway plays an important role in the innate immunity of Drosophila melanogaster and mammals. The activation and termination of Toll signaling are finely regulated in these animals. Although the primary components of the Toll pathway were identified in shrimp, the functions and regulation of the pathway are seldom studied. We first demonstrated that the Toll signaling pathway plays a central role in host defense against Staphylococcus aureus by regulating expression of antimicrobial peptides in shrimp. We then found that β-arrestins negatively regulate Toll signaling in two different ways. β-Arrestins interact with the C-terminal PEST domain of Cactus through the arrestin-N domain, and Cactus interacts with the RHD domain of Dorsal via the ankyrin repeats domain, forming a heterotrimeric complex of β-arrestin·Cactus·Dorsal, with Cactus as the bridge. This complex prevents Cactus phosphorylation and degradation, as well as Dorsal translocation into the nucleus, thus inhibiting activation of the Toll signaling pathway. β-Arrestins also interact with non-phosphorylated ERK (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) through the arrestin-C domain to inhibit ERK phosphorylation, which affects Dorsal translocation into the nucleus and phosphorylation of Dorsal at Ser276 that impairs Dorsal transcriptional activity. Our study suggests that β-arrestins negatively regulate the Toll signaling pathway by preventing Dorsal translocation and inhibiting Dorsal phosphorylation and transcriptional activity. PMID:26846853

  6. The hedgehog regulated oncogenes Gli1 and Gli2 block myoblast differentiation by inhibiting MyoD-mediated transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, AN; Wilson, CW; Li, Y-J; Chuang, P-T

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism by which activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway modulates differentiation and promotes oncogenesis in specific tissues is poorly understood. We therefore, analysed rhabdomyosarcomas from mice that were haploinsufficient for the Hh-binding protein, Hip1, or for the Hh receptor, Patched 1 (Ptch1). Transfection of the Hh-regulated transcription factor Gli1, which is expressed in a subset of mouse and human rhabdomyosarcomas, suppressed differentiation of myogenic rhabdomyosarcoma lines generated from Hip1+/− and Ptch1+/− mice. The closely related factor, Gli2, had similar effects. Gli1 and Gli2 inhibited myogenesis by repressing the capacity of MyoD to activate transcription. Deletion analysis of Gli1 indicated that multiple domains of Gli1 are required for efficient inhibition of MyoD. Gli1 reduced the ability of MyoD to heterodimerize with E12 and bind DNA, providing one mechanism whereby the Gli proteins modulate the activity of MyoD. This novel activity of Gli proteins provides new insights into how Hh signaling modulates terminal differentiation through inhibition of tissue-specific factors such as MyoD. This mechanism may contribute to the broad role of Hh signaling and the Gli proteins in differentiation decisions and cancer formation. PMID:16964293

  7. Transcriptional and Functional Analysis of the Effects of Magnolol: Inhibition of Autolysis and Biofilms in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Junchao; Shen, Fengge; Xing, Mingxun; Deng, Xuming; Yu, Lu

    2011-01-01

    Background The targeting of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm structures are now gaining interest as an alternative strategy for developing new types of antimicrobial agents. Magnolol (MOL) shows inhibitory activity against S. aureus biofilms and Triton X-100-induced autolysis in vitro, although there are no data regarding the molecular mechanisms of MOL action in bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings The molecular basis of the markedly reduced autolytic phenotype and biofilm inhibition triggered by MOL were explored using transcriptomic analysis, and the transcription of important genes were verified by real-time RT-PCR. The inhibition of autolysis by MOL was evaluated using quantitative bacteriolytic assays and zymographic analysis, and antibiofilm activity assays and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to elucidate the inhibition of biofilm formation caused by MOL in 20 clinical isolates or standard strains. The reduction in cidA, atl, sle1, and lytN transcript levels following MOL treatment was consistent with the induced expression of their autolytic repressors lrgA, lrgB, arlR, and sarA. MOL generally inhibited or reversed the expression of most of the genes involved in biofilm production. The growth of S. aureus strain ATCC 25923 in the presence of MOL dose-dependently led to decreases in Triton X-100-induced autolysis, extracellular murein hydrolase activity, and the amount of extracellular DNA (eDNA). MOL may impede biofilm formation by reducing the expression of cidA, a murein hydrolase regulator, to inhibit autolysis and eDNA release, or MOL may directly repress biofilm formation. Conclusions/Significance MOL shows in vitro antimicrobial activity against clinical and standard S. aureus strains grown in planktonic and biofilm cultures, suggesting that the structure of MOL may potentially be used as a basis for the development of drugs targeting biofilms. PMID:22046374

  8. Gallic Acid Inhibited Matrix Invasion and AP-1/ETS-1-Mediated MMP-1 Transcription in Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    S. Pang, Jong-Hwei; Yen, Jia-Hau; Wu, Hsiao-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Teng

    2017-01-01

    Gallic acid is a trihydroxybenzoic acid found in natural herbal plants. Gallic acid has been reported to inhibit the migration and invasive capability of various cancers. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of invasion responsible for cancer metastasis via gallic acid. The present study was intended to investigate the anti-invasive effect of gallic acid on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (NPC-BM1) and its related mechanism. Gallic acid inhibited the invasion of NPC-BM1 cells dose- and time-dependently without significant cytotoxic effect. Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray analysis revealed matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) as the most down-regulated gene in NPC-BM1 cells by gallic acid. The cytosolic and secreted MMP-1 levels were both found to be inhibited by gallic acid as demonstrated by western blot analysis and ELISA respectively. The mRNA expression and transcription of MMP-1 gene was also down-regulated as determined by RT/real-time PCR and promoter activity assay. The expression of two major transcription binding factors in the MMP-1 promoter, AP-1 and ETS-1, were demonstrated to be reduced by gallic acid in NPC-BM1 cells. The effect of gallic acid was associated with the inhibition of p38 MAPK signaling pathway. In addition, gallic acid enhanced the gene expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) which further suppressed the MMP-1 activity. These findings may be useful to develop a novel chemotherapeutic agent to inhibit the metastasis of nasopharyngeal cancer. PMID:28672814

  9. Gallic Acid Inhibited Matrix Invasion and AP-1/ETS-1-Mediated MMP-1 Transcription in Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Yen, Jia-Hau; Wu, Hsiao-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Teng

    2017-06-24

    Gallic acid is a trihydroxybenzoic acid found in natural herbal plants. Gallic acid has been reported to inhibit the migration and invasive capability of various cancers. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of invasion responsible for cancer metastasis via gallic acid. The present study was intended to investigate the anti-invasive effect of gallic acid on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (NPC-BM1) and its related mechanism. Gallic acid inhibited the invasion of NPC-BM1 cells dose- and time-dependently without significant cytotoxic effect. Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray analysis revealed matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) as the most down-regulated gene in NPC-BM1 cells by gallic acid. The cytosolic and secreted MMP-1 levels were both found to be inhibited by gallic acid as demonstrated by western blot analysis and ELISA respectively. The mRNA expression and transcription of MMP-1 gene was also down-regulated as determined by RT/real-time PCR and promoter activity assay. The expression of two major transcription binding factors in the MMP-1 promoter, AP-1 and ETS-1, were demonstrated to be reduced by gallic acid in NPC-BM1 cells. The effect of gallic acid was associated with the inhibition of p38 MAPK signaling pathway. In addition, gallic acid enhanced the gene expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) which further suppressed the MMP-1 activity. These findings may be useful to develop a novel chemotherapeutic agent to inhibit the metastasis of nasopharyngeal cancer.

  10. Docosahexaenoic acid antagonizes the boosting effect of palmitic acid on LPS inflammatory signaling by inhibiting gene transcription and ceramide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Junfei; Lu, Zhongyang; Li, Yanchun; Cowart, L. Ashley; Lopes-Virella, Maria F.

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and unsaturated fatty acid, in particular omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), have different effects on inflammatory signaling: SFAs are pro-inflammatory but n-3 PUFAs have strong anti-inflammatory properties. We have reported that palmitic acid (PA), a saturated fatty acid, robustly amplifies lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling to upregulate proinflammatory gene expression in macrophages. We also reported that the increased production of ceramide (CER) via sphingomyelin (SM) hydrolysis and CER de novo synthesis plays a key role in the synergistic effect of LPS and PA on proinflammatory gene expression. However, it remains unclear if n-3 PUFAs are capable of antagonizing the synergistic effect of LPS and PA on gene expression and CER production. In this study, we employed the above macrophage culture system and lipidomical analysis to assess the effect of n-3 PUFAs on proinflammatory gene expression and CER production stimulated by LPS and PA. Results showed that DHA strongly inhibited the synergistic effect of LPS and PA on proinflammatory gene expression by targeting nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB)-dependent gene transcription. Results also showed that DHA inhibited the cooperative effect of LPS and PA on CER production by targeting CER de novo synthesis, but not SM hydrolysis. Furthermore, results showed that myriocin, a specific inhibitor of serine palmitoyltransferase, strongly inhibited both LPS-PA-stimulated CER synthesis and proinflammatory gene expression, indicating that CER synthesis is associated with proinflammatory gene expression and that inhibition of CER synthesis contributes to DHA-inhibited proinflammatory gene expression. Taken together, this study demonstrates that DHA antagonizes the boosting effect of PA on LPS signaling on proinflammatory gene expression by targeting both NFκB-dependent transcription and CER de novo synthesis in macrophages. PMID:29474492

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid antagonizes the boosting effect of palmitic acid on LPS inflammatory signaling by inhibiting gene transcription and ceramide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junfei; Lu, Zhongyang; Li, Yanchun; Cowart, L Ashley; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Huang, Yan

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and unsaturated fatty acid, in particular omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), have different effects on inflammatory signaling: SFAs are pro-inflammatory but n-3 PUFAs have strong anti-inflammatory properties. We have reported that palmitic acid (PA), a saturated fatty acid, robustly amplifies lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling to upregulate proinflammatory gene expression in macrophages. We also reported that the increased production of ceramide (CER) via sphingomyelin (SM) hydrolysis and CER de novo synthesis plays a key role in the synergistic effect of LPS and PA on proinflammatory gene expression. However, it remains unclear if n-3 PUFAs are capable of antagonizing the synergistic effect of LPS and PA on gene expression and CER production. In this study, we employed the above macrophage culture system and lipidomical analysis to assess the effect of n-3 PUFAs on proinflammatory gene expression and CER production stimulated by LPS and PA. Results showed that DHA strongly inhibited the synergistic effect of LPS and PA on proinflammatory gene expression by targeting nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB)-dependent gene transcription. Results also showed that DHA inhibited the cooperative effect of LPS and PA on CER production by targeting CER de novo synthesis, but not SM hydrolysis. Furthermore, results showed that myriocin, a specific inhibitor of serine palmitoyltransferase, strongly inhibited both LPS-PA-stimulated CER synthesis and proinflammatory gene expression, indicating that CER synthesis is associated with proinflammatory gene expression and that inhibition of CER synthesis contributes to DHA-inhibited proinflammatory gene expression. Taken together, this study demonstrates that DHA antagonizes the boosting effect of PA on LPS signaling on proinflammatory gene expression by targeting both NFκB-dependent transcription and CER de novo synthesis in macrophages.

  12. Inhibition of heme biosynthesis prevents transcription of iron uptake genes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Robert J; Pollington, Annette; Galea, Charles; Jaron, Shulamit; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Yuko; Kaplan, Jerry

    2003-11-14

    Yeast are capable of modifying their metabolism in response to environmental changes. We investigated the activity of the oxygen-dependent high-affinity iron uptake system of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of heme depletion. We found that the absence of heme, due to a deletion in the gene that encodes delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase (HEM1), resulted in decreased transcription of genes belonging to both the iron and copper regulons, but not the zinc regulon. Decreased transcription of the iron regulon was not due to decreased expression of the iron sensitive transcriptional activator Aft1p. Expression of the constitutively active allele AFT1-1up was unable to induce transcription of the high affinity iron uptake system in heme-depleted cells. We demonstrated that under heme-depleted conditions, Aft1p-GFP was able to cycle normally between the nucleus and cytosol in response to cytosolic iron. Despite the inability to induce transcription under low iron conditions, chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Aft1p binds to the FET3 promoter in the absence of heme. Finally, we provide evidence that under heme-depleted conditions, yeast are able to regulate mitochondrial iron uptake and do not accumulate pathologic iron concentrations, as is seen when iron-sulfur cluster synthesis is disrupted.

  13. Mitochondrial targeting of HIF-1α inhibits hypoxia-induced apoptosis independently of its transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Sheng; Zhou, Yan-Ni; Li, Lu; Li, Sheng-Fu; Long, Dan; Chen, Xue-Lu; Zhang, Jia-Bi; Li, You-Ping; Feng, Li

    2018-04-25

    The transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) mediates adaptive responses to hypoxia by nuclear translocation and regulation of gene expression. Mitochondrial changes are critical for the adaptive response to hypoxia. However, the transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms by which HIF-1α regulates mitochondria under hypoxia are poorly understood. Here, we examined the subcellular localization of HIF-1α in human cells and identified a small fraction of HIF-1α that translocated to the mitochondria after exposure to hypoxia or hypoxia-mimicking pharmacological agents. To probe the function of this HIF-1α population, we ectopically expressed a mitochondrial-targeted form of HIF-1α (mito-HIF-1α). Expression of mito-HIF-1α was sufficient to attenuate apoptosis induced by exposure to hypoxia or H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative stress. Moreover, mito-HIF-1α expression reduced the production of reactive oxygen species, the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and the expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded mRNA in response to hypoxia. However, these functions of mito-HIF-1α were independent of its conventional transcriptional activity. Finally, the livers of mice with CCl 4 -induced fibrosis showed a progressive increase in HIF-1α association with the mitochondria, indicating the clinical relevance of this finding. These data suggested that mitochondrial HIF-1α protects against apoptosis independently of its well-known role as a transcription factor. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Salinity inhibits post transcriptional processing of chloroplast 16S rRNA in shoot cultures of jojoba (Simmondsia chinesis).

    PubMed

    Mizrahi-Aviv, Ela; Mills, David; Benzioni, Aliza; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2005-03-01

    Chloroplast metabolism is rapidly affected by salt stress. Photosynthesis is one of the first processes known to be affected by salinity. Here, we report that salinity inhibits chloroplast post-transcriptional RNA processing. A differentially expressed 680-bp cDNA, containing the 3' sequence of 16S rRNA, transcribed intergenic spacer, exon 1 and intron of tRNA(Ile), was isolated by differential display reverse transcriptase PCR from salt-grown jojoba (Simmondsia chinesis) shoot cultures. Northern blot analysis indicated that although most rRNA appears to be fully processed, partially processed chloroplast 16S rRNA accumulates in salt-grown cultures. Thus, salinity appears to decrease the processing of the rrn transcript. The possible effect of this decreased processing on physiological processes is, as yet, unknown.

  15. Inhibition of PRMT3 activity selectively impairs LXR-driven transcription of hepatic lipogenic genes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nahon, Joya E; Groeneveldt, Christianne; Geerling, Janine J; Van Eck, Miranda; Hoekstra, Menno

    2018-05-18

    Agonists for the liver X receptor (LXR) are considered promising therapeutic moieties in cholesterol-driven diseases by promoting cellular cholesterol efflux pathways. However, current clinical application of these agents is hampered by the concomitant LXR-induced activation of a lipogenic transcriptional network, leading to hepatic steatosis. Recent studies have suggested that protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3) may act as a selective co-activator of LXR activity. Here we verified the hypothesis that PRMT3 inhibition selectively disrupts the ability of LXR to stimulate lipogenesis, while maintaining the capacity of LXR to modulate macrophage cholesterol homeostasis. A combination of the LXR agonist T0901317 and palm oil was administered to C57BL/6 mice to maximally stimulate LXR and PRMT3 activity. PRMT3 activity was inhibited using the allosteric inhibitor SGC707. Treatment with the PRMT3 inhibitor SGC707 did not negatively influence the T0901317/palm oil induced upregulation of the cholesterol efflux genes ABCA1 and ABCG1 in peritoneal cells. In contrast, SGC707 treatment was associated with a significant decrease in the hepatic expression of the lipogenic gene FAS (-64%). A similar trend was observed for SCD1 and ACC expression (-43%; -56%) This obstruction of lipogenic gene transcription coincided with a significant 2.3-fold decrease in liver triglyceride content as compared to the T0901317 and palm oil treated control group. We have shown that inhibition of PRMT3 activity by SGC707 treatment selectively impairs LXR-driven transcription of hepatic lipogenic genes, while the positive effect of LXR stimulation on macrophage cholesterol efflux pathways is maintained. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Bis-anthracycline WP760 abrogates melanoma cell growth by transcription inhibition, p53 activation and IGF1R downregulation.

    PubMed

    Olbryt, Magdalena; Rusin, Aleksandra; Fokt, Izabela; Habryka, Anna; Tudrej, Patrycja; Student, Sebastian; Sochanik, Aleksander; Zieliński, Rafał; Priebe, Waldemar

    2017-10-01

    Anthracycline chemotherapeutics, e.g. doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are active against a broad spectrum of cancers. Their cytotoxicity is mainly attributed to DNA intercalation, interference with topoisomerase activity, and induction of double-stranded DNA breaks. Since modification of anthracyclines can profoundly affect their pharmacological properties we attempted to elucidate the mechanism of action, and identify possible molecular targets, of bis-anthracycline WP760 which previously demonstrated anti-melanoma activity at low nanomolar concentrations. We studied the effect of WP760 on several human melanoma cell lines derived from tumors in various development stages and having different genetic backgrounds. WP760 inhibited cell proliferation (IC 50  = 1-99 nM), impaired clonogenic cell survival (100 nM), and inhibited spheroid growth (≥300 nM). WP760 did not induce double-stranded DNA breaks but strongly inhibited global transcription. Moreover, WP760 caused nucleolar stress and led to activation of the p53 pathway. PCR array analysis showed that WP760 suppressed transcription of ten genes (ABCC1, MTOR, IGF1R, EGFR, GRB2, PRKCA, PRKCE, HDAC4, TXNRD1, AKT1) associated with, inter alia, cytoprotective mechanisms initiated in cancer cells during chemotherapy. Furthermore, WP760 downregulated IGF1R and upregulated PLK2 expression in most of the tested melanoma cell lines. These results suggest that WP760 exerts anti-melanoma activity by targeting global transcription and activation of the p53 pathway and could become suitable as an effective therapeutic agent.

  17. Massive elimination of multinucleated osteoclasts by eupatilin is due to dual inhibition of transcription and cytoskeletal rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Myeung Su; Baek, Jong Min; Park, Jongtae; Youn, Byung-Soo; Oh, Jaemin

    2015-12-01

    Osteoporosis is an aging-associated disease requiring better therapeutic modality. Eupatilin is a major flavonoid from Artemisia plants such as Artemisia princeps and Artemisia argyi which has been reported to possess various beneficial biological effects including anti-inflammation, anti-tumor, anti-cancer, anti-allergy, and anti-oxidation activity. Complete blockade of RANK-dependent osteoclastogenesis was accomplished upon stimulation prior to the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK)-ligand (RANKL) treatment or post-stimulation of bone marrow macrophages (BMCs) in the presence of RANKL with eupatilin. This blockade was accompanied by inhibition of rapid phosphorylation of Akt, GSK3β, ERK and IκB as well as downregulation of c-Fos and NFATc1 at protein, suggesting that transcriptional suppression is a key mechanism for anti-osteoclastogenesis. Transient reporter assays or gain of function assays confirmed that eupatilin was a potent transcriptional inhibitor in osteoclasts (OC). Surprisingly, when mature osteoclasts were cultured on bone scaffolds in the presence of eupatilin, bone resorption activity was also completely blocked by dismantling the actin rings, suggesting that another major acting site of eupatilin is cytoskeletal rearrangement. The eupatilin-treated mature osteoclasts revealed a shrunken cytoplasm and accumulation of multi-nuclei, eventually becoming fibroblast-like cells. No apoptosis occurred. Inhibition of phosphorylation of cofilin by eupatilin suggests that actin may play an important role in the morphological change of multinucleated cells (MNCs). Human OC similarly responded to eupatilin. However, eupatilin has no effects on osteoblast differentiation and shows cytotoxicity on osteoblast in the concentration of 50 μM. When eupatilin was administered to LPS-induced osteoporotic mice after manifestation of osteoporosis, it prevented bone loss. Ovariectomized (OVX) mice remarkably exhibited bone protection effects. Taken

  18. EWS-FLI1 inhibits TNF{alpha}-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent transcription in Ewing sarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagirand-Cantaloube, Julie, E-mail: julie.cantaloube@crbm.cnrs.fr; Laud, Karine, E-mail: karine.laud@curie.fr; Institut Curie, Genetique et biologie des cancers, Paris

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} EWS-FLI1 interferes with TNF-induced activation of NF{kappa}B in Ewing sarcoma cells. {yields} EWS-FLI1 knockdown in Ewing sarcoma cells increases TNF-induced NF{kappa}B binding to DNA. {yields} EWS-FLI1 reduces TNF-stimulated NF{kappa}B-dependent transcriptional activation. {yields} Constitutive NF{kappa}B activity is not affected by EWS-FLI1. {yields} EWS-FLI1 physically interacts with NF{kappa}B p65 in vivo. -- Abstract: Ewing sarcoma is primarily caused by a t(11;22) chromosomal translocation encoding the EWS-FLI1 fusion protein. To exert its oncogenic function, EWS-FLI1 acts as an aberrant transcription factor, broadly altering the gene expression profile of tumor cells. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF{kappa}B) is a tightly regulated transcription factor controllingmore » cell survival, proliferation and differentiation, as well as tumorigenesis. NF{kappa}B activity is very low in unstimulated Ewing sarcoma cells, but can be induced in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We wondered whether NF{kappa}B activity could be modulated by EWS-FLI1 in Ewing sarcoma. Using a knockdown approach in Ewing sarcoma cells, we demonstrated that EWS-FLI1 has no influence on NF{kappa}B basal activity, but impairs TNF-induced NF{kappa}B-driven transcription, at least in part through inhibition of NF{kappa}B binding to DNA. We detected an in vivo physical interaction between the fusion protein and NF{kappa}B p65, which could mediate these effects. Our findings suggest that, besides directly controlling the activity of its primary target promoters, EWS-FLI1 can also indirectly influence gene expression in tumor cells by modulating the activity of key transcription factors such as NF{kappa}B.« less

  19. Specific Inhibition of the transcription factor Ci by a Cobalt(III)-Schiff base-DNA conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Ryan R.; Harney, Allison S.; Heffern, Marie C.; Holbrook, Robert J.; Holmgren, Robert A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the use of Co(III) Schiff base-DNA conjugates, a versatile class of research tools that target C2H2 transcription factors, to inhibit the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. In developing mammalian embryos, Hh signaling is critical for the formation and development of many tissues and organs. Inappropriate activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway has been implicated in a variety of cancers including medulloblastomas and basal cell carcinomas. It is well known that Hh regulates the activity of the Gli family of C2H2 zinc finger transcription factors in mammals. In Drosophila the function of the Gli proteins is performed by a single transcription factor with an identical DNA binding consensus sequence, Cubitus Interruptus (Ci). We have demonstrated previously that conjugation of a specific 17 base-pair oligonucleotide to a Co(III) Schiff base complex results in a targeted inhibitor of the Snail family C2H2 zinc finger transcription factors. Modification of the oligonucleotide sequence in the Co(III) Schiff base-DNA conjugate to that of Ci’s consensus sequence (Co(III)-Ci) generates an equally selective inhibitor of Ci. Co(III)-Ci irreversibly binds the Ci zinc finger domain and prevents it from binding DNA in vitro. In a Ci responsive tissue culture reporter gene assay, Co(III)-Ci reduces the transcriptional activity of Ci in a concentration dependent manner. In addition, injection of wild-type Drosophila embryos with Co(III)-Ci phenocopies a Ci loss of function phenotype, demonstrating effectiveness in vivo. This study provides evidence that Co(III) Schiff base-DNA conjugates are a versatile class of specific and potent tools for studying zinc finger domain proteins and have potential applications as customizable anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:22214326

  20. Plant extracts from stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), an antirheumatic remedy, inhibit the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Riehemann, K; Behnke, B; Schulze-Osthoff, K

    1999-01-08

    Activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB is elevated in several chronic inflammatory diseases and is responsible for the enhanced expression of many proinflammatory gene products. Extracts from leaves of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) are used as antiinflammatory remedies in rheumatoid arthritis. Standardized preparations of these extracts (IDS23) suppress cytokine production, but their mode of action remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that treatment of different cells with IDS23 potently inhibits NF-kappaB activation. An inhibitory effect was observed in response to several stimuli, suggesting that IDS23 suppressed a common NF-kappaB pathway. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activation by IDS23 was not mediated by a direct modification of DNA binding, but rather by preventing degradation of its inhibitory subunit IkappaB-alpha. Our results suggests that part of the antiinflammatory effect of Urtica extract may be ascribed to its inhibitory effect on NF-kappaB activation.

  1. The viral protein A238L inhibits TNF-alpha expression through a CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivators pathway.

    PubMed

    Granja, Aitor G; Nogal, Maria L; Hurtado, Carolina; Del Aguila, Carmen; Carrascosa, Angel L; Salas, María L; Fresno, Manuel; Revilla, Yolanda

    2006-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is able to inhibit TNF-alpha-induced gene expression through the synthesis of A238L protein. This was shown by the use of deletion mutants lacking the A238L gene from the Vero cell-adapted Ba71V ASFV strain and from the virulent isolate E70. To further analyze the molecular mechanism by which the viral gene controls TNF-alpha, we have used Jurkat cells stably transfected with the viral gene to identify the TNF-alpha regulatory elements involved in the induction of the gene after stimulation with PMA and calcium ionophore. We have thus identified the cAMP-responsive element and kappa3 sites on the TNF-alpha promoter as the responsible of the gene activation, and demonstrate that A238L inhibits TNF-alpha expression through these DNA binding sites. This inhibition was partially reverted by overexpression of the transcriptional factors NF-AT, NF-kappaB, and c-Jun. Furthermore, we present evidence that A238L inhibits the activation of TNF-alpha by modulating NF-kappaB, NF-AT, and c-Jun trans activation through a mechanism that involves CREB binding protein/p300 function, because overexpression of these transcriptional coactivators recovers TNF-alpha promoter activity. In addition, we show that A238L is a nuclear protein that binds to the cyclic AMP-responsive element/kappa3 complex, thus displacing the CREB binding protein/p300 coactivators. Taken together, these results establish a novel mechanism in the control of TNF-alpha gene expression by a viral protein that could represent an efficient strategy used by ASFV to evade the innate immune response.

  2. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Inhibit Growth Hormone and Prolactin Gene Transcription via cAMP/PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Dairy Cow Anterior Pituitary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Fa; Fu, Shou-Peng; Li, Su-Nan; Hu, Zhong-Ming; Xue, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Bing-Xu; Lv, Qing-Kang; Liu, Ju-Xiong; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) play a key role in altering carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, influence endocrine pancreas activity, and as a precursor of ruminant milk fat. However, the effect and detailed mechanisms by which SCFAs mediate bovine growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) gene transcription remain unclear. In this study, we detected the effects of SCFAs (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) on the activity of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, GH, PRL, and Pit-1 gene transcription in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs). The results showed that SCFAs decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in PKA activity. Inhibition of PKA activity decreased CREB phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. Furthermore, PTX blocked SCFAs- inhibited cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. These data showed that the inhibition of GH and PRL gene transcription induced by SCFAs is mediated by Gi activation and that propionate is more potent than acetate and butyrate in inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. In conclusion, this study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulation of SCFAs on bovine GH and PRL gene transcription in DCAPCs, which may serve as one of the factors that regulate pituitary function in accordance with dietary intake. PMID:24177567

  3. Novel mechanism of gene regulation: the protein Rv1222 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits transcription by anchoring the RNA polymerase onto DNA.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2015-07-13

    We propose a novel mechanism of gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where the protein Rv1222 inhibits transcription by anchoring RNA polymerase (RNAP) onto DNA. In contrast to our existing knowledge that transcriptional repressors function either by binding to DNA at specific sequences or by binding to RNAP, we show that Rv1222-mediated transcription inhibition requires simultaneous binding of the protein to both RNAP and DNA. We demonstrate that the positively charged C-terminus tail of Rv1222 is responsible for anchoring RNAP on DNA, hence the protein slows down the movement of RNAP along the DNA during transcription elongation. The interaction between Rv1222 and DNA is electrostatic, thus the protein could inhibit transcription from any gene. As Rv1222 slows down the RNA synthesis, upon expression of the protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis or Escherichia coli, the growth rate of the bacteria is severely impaired. The protein does not possess any significant affinity for DNA polymerase, thus, is unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. The proposed mechanism by which Rv1222 inhibits transcription reveals a new repertoire of prokaryotic gene regulation. © Crown copyright 2015.

  4. ATR Kinase Inhibition Protects Non-cycling Cells from the Lethal Effects of DNA Damage and Transcription Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Michael G.; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad-3-related) is a protein kinase that maintains genome stability and halts cell cycle phase transitions in response to DNA lesions that block DNA polymerase movement. These DNA replication-associated features of ATR function have led to the emergence of ATR kinase inhibitors as potential adjuvants for DNA-damaging cancer chemotherapeutics. However, whether ATR affects the genotoxic stress response in non-replicating, non-cycling cells is currently unknown. We therefore used chemical inhibition of ATR kinase activity to examine the role of ATR in quiescent human cells. Although ATR inhibition had no obvious effects on the viability of non-cycling cells, inhibition of ATR partially protected non-replicating cells from the lethal effects of UV and UV mimetics. Analyses of various DNA damage response signaling pathways demonstrated that ATR inhibition reduced the activation of apoptotic signaling by these agents in non-cycling cells. The pro-apoptosis/cell death function of ATR is likely due to transcription stress because the lethal effects of compounds that block RNA polymerase movement were reduced in the presence of an ATR inhibitor. These results therefore suggest that whereas DNA polymerase stalling at DNA lesions activates ATR to protect cell viability and prevent apoptosis, the stalling of RNA polymerases instead activates ATR to induce an apoptotic form of cell death in non-cycling cells. These results have important implications regarding the use of ATR inhibitors in cancer chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26940878

  5. Fermented guava leaf extract inhibits LPS-induced COX-2 and iNOS expression in Mouse macrophage cells by inhibition of transcription factor NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Youn; Hwang, Joon-Ho; Park, Soo-Young; Jin, Yeong-Jun; Ko, Hee-Chul; Moon, Sang-Wook; Kim, Se-Jae

    2008-08-01

    The goal of this study was to elucidate the antiinflammatory activities of Psidium guajava L. (guava) leaf. To improve the functionality of guava leaf, it was fermented with Phellinus linteus mycelia, Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ethanol extract from fermented guava leaf inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production. Western blot analysis showed that fermented guava leaf extract decreased LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein level in RAW 264.7 cells. To investigate the mechanism involved, the study examined the effect of fermented guava leaf extract on LPS-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. Fermented guava leaf extract significantly inhibited LPS-induced NF-kappaB transcriptional activity. Immunochemical analysis revealed that fermented guava leaf extract suppressed LPS-induced degradation of I-kappaBalpha. Taken together, the data indicate that fermented guava leaf extract is involved in the inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 via the down-regulation of NF-kappaB pathway, revealing a partial molecular basis for the antiinflammatory properties of fermented guava leaf extract.

  6. An in vitro enzymatic assay to measure transcription inhibition by gallium(III) and H3 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corroles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace Y; Pribisko, Melanie A; Henning, Ryan K; Lim, Punnajit; Termini, John; Gray, Harry B; Grubbs, Robert H

    2015-03-18

    Chemotherapy often involves broad-spectrum cytotoxic agents with many side effects and limited targeting. Corroles are a class of tetrapyrrolic macrocycles that exhibit differential cytostatic and cytotoxic properties in specific cell lines, depending on the identities of the chelated metal and functional groups. The unique behavior of functionalized corroles towards specific cell lines introduces the possibility of targeted chemotherapy. Many anticancer drugs are evaluated by their ability to inhibit RNA transcription. Here we present a step-by-step protocol for RNA transcription in the presence of known and potential inhibitors. The evaluation of the RNA products of the transcription reaction by gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis spectroscopy provides information on inhibitive properties of potential anticancer drug candidates and, with modifications to the assay, more about their mechanism of action. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of action of corrole cytotoxicity. In this experiment, we consider two corrole compounds: gallium(III) 5,10,15-(tris)pentafluorophenylcorrole (Ga(tpfc)) and freebase analogue 5,10,15-(tris)pentafluorophenylcorrole (tpfc). An RNA transcription assay was used to examine the inhibitive properties of the corroles. Five transcription reactions were prepared: DNA treated with Actinomycin D, triptolide, Ga(tpfc), tpfc at a [complex]:[template DNA base] ratio of 0.01, respectively, and an untreated control. The transcription reactions were analyzed after 4 hr using agarose gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis spectroscopy. There is clear inhibition by Ga(tpfc), Actinomycin D, and triptolide. This RNA transcription assay can be modified to provide more mechanistic detail by varying the concentrations of the anticancer complex, DNA, or polymerase enzyme, or by incubating the DNA or polymerase with the complexes prior to RNA transcription; these modifications would differentiate between an inhibition mechanism involving the DNA or the enzyme

  7. Bone morphogenetic protein-induced MSX1 and MSX2 inhibit myocardin-dependent smooth muscle gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken'ichiro; Nakamura, Seiji; Nishida, Wataru; Sobue, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    During the onset and progression of atherosclerosis, the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotype changes from differentiated to dedifferentiated, and in some cases, this change is accompanied by osteogenic transition, resulting in vascular calcification. One characteristic of dedifferentiated VSMCs is the down-regulation of smooth muscle cell (SMC) marker gene expression. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which are involved in the induction of osteogenic gene expression, are detected in calcified vasculature. In this study, we found that the BMP2-, BMP4-, and BMP6-induced expression of Msx transcription factors (Msx1 and Msx2) preceded the down-regulation of SMC marker expression in cultured differentiated VSMCs. Either Msx1 or Msx2 markedly reduced the myocardin-dependent promoter activities of SMC marker genes (SM22alpha and caldesmon). We further investigated interactions between Msx1 and myocardin/serum response factor (SRF)/CArG-box motif (cis element for SRF) using coimmunoprecipitation, gel-shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Our results showed that Msx1 or Msx2 formed a ternary complex with SRF and myocardin and inhibited the binding of SRF or SRF/myocardin to the CArG-box motif, resulting in inhibition of their transcription.

  8. Vibrio parahaemolyticus CalR down regulates the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) gene transcription and thereby inhibits hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiquan; Zhang, Ying; Gao, He; Zhang, Lingyu; Yin, Zhe; Huang, Xinxiang; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Li

    2017-05-20

    TDH, encoded by tdh gene, is a major virulent determinant of V. parahaemolyticus that controls various biological activities, such as hemolytic activity, cytotoxicity, and enterotoxicity. The hemolytic activity on Wagatsuma agar ascribed to TDH is called Kanagawa phenomenon (KP). All KP positive strains contain tdh1 and tdh2 genes, but tdh2 is predominantly responsible for KP. CalR is a regulatory protein that was originally identified as a repressor of swarming motility and T3SS1 gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus. In the present study, the regulation of tdh2 by CalR was investigated using a set of experiments including qRT-PCR, primer extension, LacZ fusion, hemolytic phenotype, EMSA, and DNase I footprinting assays. The results showed that His-CalR protected a single region from 224bp to 318bp upstream of tdh2 against DNase I digestion, and a transcriptional start site located at 42bp upstream of tdh2 was detected and its transcribed activity was inhibited by CalR. Moreover, the KP test results showed that the hemolytic activity of V. parahaemolyticus is also under negative control of CalR. The data demonstrated that CalR is a repressor of the tdh2 transcription and thereby inhibits the hemolytic activity of V. parahaemolyticus. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of adenovirus replication by the E1A antisense transcript initiated from hsp70 and VA-1 promoters.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, O I; Borisenko, A S; Ponomareva, T I; Tikhonenko, T I

    1990-03-01

    The E1A region of the adenoviral genome, important for initiation of virus infection and activation of other viral genes, was chosen as a target for engineering antisense RNA (asRNA) to inhibit adenovirus 5 (Ad5) replication in COS-1 cell culture in vitro. The hsp70 promoter, taken from the appropriate heat-shock-protein gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and the VA-1 RNA promoter, derived from the Ad5 gene coding for low-molecular-mass VA-1 RNA and recognized by RNA polymerase III were used as regulatory elements of transcription. The two types of recombinant constructs contained E1A fragments of 710 bp (hsp70 constructs) or 380 or 740 bp (VA-1 RNA constructs) in reverse orientation relative to the promoter position, as well as a transcription termination signal, the SV40 ori, and the gene controlling Geneticin (antibiotic G418) resistance (G418R). After selection of transfected COS-1 cells in the presence of G418, a number of stable G418R cell lines were raised which expressed engineered asRNAs. Plating of Ad5 suspensions of known titre on monolayers of transfected COS-1 cells clearly showed strong inhibition of adenovirus replication by asRNAs: 75% with the hsp70 promoter and 90% with the VA-1 RNA promoter.

  11. Genome-wide bisulfite sensitivity profiling of yeast suggests bisulfite inhibits transcription.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Mathew, Veena; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Bisulfite, in the form of sodium bisulfite or metabisulfite, is used commercially as a food preservative. Bisulfite is used in the laboratory as a single-stranded DNA mutagen in epigenomic analyses of DNA methylation. Recently it has also been used on whole yeast cells to induce mutations in exposed single-stranded regions in vivo. To understand the effects of bisulfite on live cells we conducted a genome-wide screen for bisulfite sensitive mutants in yeast. Screening the deletion mutant array, and collections of essential gene mutants we define a genetic network of bisulfite sensitive mutants. Validation of screen hits revealed hyper-sensitivity of transcription and RNA processing mutants, rather than DNA repair pathways and follow-up analyses support a role in perturbation of RNA transactions. We propose a model in which bisulfite-modified nucleotides may interfere with transcription or RNA metabolism when used in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nucleolar Association and Transcriptional Inhibition through 5S rDNA in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Fedoriw, Andrew M.; Starmer, Joshua; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the spatial positioning of genes within the mammalian nucleus have been associated with transcriptional differences and thus have been hypothesized as a mode of regulation. In particular, the localization of genes to the nuclear and nucleolar peripheries is associated with transcriptional repression. However, the mechanistic basis, including the pertinent cis- elements, for such associations remains largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that demonstrates a 119 bp 5S rDNA can influence nucleolar association in mammals. We found that integration of transgenes with 5S rDNA significantly increases the association of the host region with the nucleolus, and their degree of association correlates strongly with repression of a linked reporter gene. We further show that this mechanism may be functional in endogenous contexts: pseudogenes derived from 5S rDNA show biased conservation of their internal transcription factor binding sites and, in some cases, are frequently associated with the nucleolus. These results demonstrate that 5S rDNA sequence can significantly contribute to the positioning of a locus and suggest a novel, endogenous mechanism for nuclear organization in mammals. PMID:22275877

  13. Hepatitis B "e" antigen-mediated inhibition of HBV replication fitness and transcription efficiency in vitro.

    PubMed

    Samal, Jasmine; Kandpal, Manish; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2015-10-01

    A mutation at nucleotide 1896 (G1896A) is the most common cause for the loss of HBeAg. In contrast to clinical data, cell culture studies report a high-replicating phenotype for the G1896A mutant. Differences between the wild-type and the G1896A mutant in early steps of HBV replication including the synthesis of pre-genomic RNA and transcripts have not been investigated. The G1896A mutant is associated with higher replication fitness, transcription efficiency and higher levels of secreted HBsAg than the wild-type. Interestingly, trans-complementation of the G1896A mutant with HBeAg lowers the replication fitness and transcriptionefficiency to levels comparable to that of the wild-type. Our results highlight the role of HBeAg in modulating the early steps in HBV replication. In sum, our findings highlight the role of HBeAg in regulating hepatitis B virus replication fitness and transcription efficiency and new insights on the early steps of replication in the G1896A mutant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CREB trans-activation of disruptor of telomeric silencing-1 mediates forskolin inhibition of CTGF transcription in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Kong, Qun; Kone, Bruce C

    2010-03-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) participates in diverse fibrotic processes including glomerulosclerosis. The adenylyl cyclase agonist forskolin inhibits CTGF expression in mesangial cells by unclear mechanisms. We recently reported that the histone H3K79 methyltransferase disruptor of telomeric silencing-1 (Dot1) suppresses CTGF gene expression in collecting duct cells (J Clin Invest 117: 773-783, 2007) and HEK 293 cells (J Biol Chem In press). In the present study, we characterized the involvement of Dot1 in mediating the inhibitory effect of forskolin on CTGF transcription in mouse mesangial cells. Overexpression of Dot1 or treatment with forskolin dramatically suppressed basal CTGF mRNA levels and CTGF promoter-luciferase activity, while hypermethylating H3K79 in chromatin associated with the CTGF promoter. siRNA knockdown of Dot1 abrogated the inhibitory effect of forskolin on CTGF mRNA expression. Analysis of the Dot1 promoter sequence identified a CREB response element (CRE) at -384/-380. Overexpression of CREB enhanced forskolin-stimulated Dot1 promoter activity. A constitutively active CREB mutant (CREB-VP16) strongly induced Dot1 promoter-luciferase activity, whereas overexpression of CREBdLZ-VP16, which lacks the CREB DNA-binding domain, abolished this activation. Mutation of the -384/-380 CRE resulted in 70% lower levels of Dot1 promoter activity. ChIP assays confirmed CREB binding to the Dot1 promoter in chromatin. We conclude that forskolin stimulates CREB-mediated trans-activation of the Dot1 gene, which leads to hypermethylation of histone H3K79 at the CTGF promoter, and inhibition of CTGF transcription. These data are the first to describe regulation of the Dot1 gene, and disclose a complex network of genetic and epigenetic controls on CTGF transcription.

  15. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun; Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4)more » which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.« less

  16. Transcriptional and physiological responses of nitrifying bacteria to heavy metal inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy metals have been shown to inhibit nitrification, a key process in the removal of nitrogen in wastewater treatment plants. In the present study, the effects of nickel, zinc, lead and cadmium on nitrifying enrichment cultures were studied in batch reactors. The transcriptiona...

  17. FOXD3 inhibits SCN2A gene transcription in intractable epilepsy cell models.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Wen, Fang; Zhang, Lingyun; Zhou, Yu

    2018-04-01

    The expression of sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 2 (SCN2A) is closely related to the development of epilepsy. This study investigated regulatory element of the SCN2A gene involved in epilepsy. An intractable epilepsy cell model was constructed using hippocampal primary neurons and the SH-SY5Y cell line. SCN2A protein and gene expression in cells as well as the level of lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) in the cell culture supernatants was detected. Potential regulatory factors of SCN2A and its upstream regulatory elements were identified using the dual-luciferase reporter assay. Finally, the role of the hypothetical transcription factor in epilepsy was examined by using its small interfering RNA (siRNA). Results found that levels of LDH and expression of the hypothetical transcription factor, Forkhead box D3 (FOXD3), was both increased in the model cells, whereas that of SCN2A was decreased. The results of dual-luciferase reporter assays revealed that an upstream region of SCN2A gene spanning from nucleotides -1617 to -1470 was a transcription factor binding region and a trans-acting factor role of FOXD3 was identified in the core region (GGCAAAATTAT). Then the FOXD3 binding site was further verified by the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). After SH-SY5Y cells were transfected with FOXD3 siRNA, the release of LDH into culture supernatants and the LDH expression levels in cells were significantly decreased. SCN2A expression in model cells was increased by knockdown of FOXD3. Therefore, this study demonstrated that FOXD3 is a trans-acting factor of SCN2A, and this mechanism may play a role in cell injury after epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Targeting the Oncogenic Transcriptional Regulator MYB in Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma by Inhibition of IGF1R/AKT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Mattias K; Afshari, Maryam K; Andrén, Ywonne; Wick, Michael J; Stenman, Göran

    2017-09-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive cancer with no curative treatment for patients with recurrent/metastatic disease. The MYB-NFIB gene fusion is the main genomic hallmark and a potential therapeutic target. Oncogenic signaling pathways were studied in cultured cells and/or tumors from 15 ACC patients. Phospho-receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) arrays were used to study the activity of RTKs. Effects of RTK inhibition on cell proliferation were analyzed with AlamarBlue, sphere assays, and two ACC xenograft models (n = 4-9 mice per group). The molecular effects of MYB-NFIB knockdown and IGF1R inhibition were studied with quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, and gene expression microarrays. All statistical tests were two-sided. The MYB-NFIB fusion drives proliferation of ACC cells and is crucial for spherogenesis. Intriguingly, the fusion is regulated through AKT-dependent signaling induced by IGF1R overexpression and is downregulated upon IGF1R-inhibition (% expression of control ± SD = 27.2 ± 1.3, P < .001). MYB-NFIB regulates genes involved in cell cycle control, DNA replication/repair, and RNA processing. The transcriptional program induced by MYB-NFIB affects critical oncogenic mediators normally controlled by MYC and is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of IGF1R. Co-activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and MET promoted proliferation of ACC cells, and combined targeting of IGFR1/EGFR/MET induced differentiation and synergistically inhibited the growth of patient-derived xenografted ACCs (ACCX5M1, % growth of control ± SD = 34.9 ± 20.3, P = .006; ACCX6, % growth of control ± SD = 24.1 ± 17.5, P = .04). MYB-NFIB is an oncogenic driver and a key therapeutic target in ACC that is regulated by AKT-dependent IGF1R signaling. Our studies uncover a new strategy to target an oncogenic transcriptional master regulator and provide new important insights into the biology and treatment of ACC. © The Author

  19. [Inhibiting target gene expression and controlling growth of Epstein-Barr virus transformed cells by antisense RNA transcripts].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-jing; Raab-Traub, Nancy; Yao, Qing-yun; Zhang, Feng; Huang, Mei-ling; Kuang, Zhu-ji; Zhang, Xiao-shi; Ye, Yan-li; Gu, Li

    2002-01-01

    The latent membrane protein gene (LMP) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was thought to play an important role in the carcinogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this study, the authors investigated the effects of antisense RNA (AsRNA) on LMP for down regulating at the target gene over expression in EBV transformed lymphoid cells, and set up an antisense system to inhibit LMP expression. Constructing the single strand antisense transcription system in vitro, the authors have got large amount of AsRNA. Designing and setting up an antisense tracing system in situ (ATSIS), the authors could observe the living particles of AsRNA/sense RNA duplex dimer. With time lapse phase-contrast microscopy, the agglutination phenotype on living cells was easily detected by MTT test, the inhibition rate on EBV transformed cells was calculated. LMP 1.9 fragment ligated into pGEM vector in reverse orientation have been constructed and produced a plentiful amount of AsLMPmRNA which could incorporated into both B95-8 and C1936 cell lines by endophagocytosis and formed the duplex dimer of As/Sense RNA. This particles have been visualized in situ when labelling 35S isotope by ATSIS. When AsLMPmRNA acted as agents for specific inhibition to LMP over expression, the transform phenotype of cell agglutination have been suppressed and MTT particle formatin was apparently reduced both two EBV tansformed cell lines. AsLMPmRNA targets at sense strand have a high effectiveness of down-regulation on EBV-LMP overexpression. This down regulating function of LMP and growth inhibition on transformed cell is demonstrated by the antisenes tracing system in situ (ATSIS). The results provide a clue to overcome the latent EBV infection in human bodies all living long time and to prevent it inducing NPC in high incidence area by antisense strategies.

  20. Inhibition of Breast Cancer by Repression of Angiogenic Hypoxia-Inducible Transcription Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    cancer cells to death receptor-induced apoptosis by inhibition ofNF-KB: Synergistic action of Apo2L/TRAIL, Interferon-y, Aspirin and Apigenin . (Abstract...of !KK0 (with ::leety! ,~81iCy!iC ::H~irl" ASA), and CK2 (with the plant flavonoid, apigenin ), results in loss of NF-KB-dependent expression of BcI...reduction of NF-KS-induced survival proteins by ASA and apigenin synergizes with interferon-y-mediated elevation of death signaling proteins to

  1. Disarming Bacterial Virulence through Chemical Inhibition of the DNA Binding Domain of an AraC-like Transcriptional Activator Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji; Hocking, Dianna M.; Cheng, Catherine; Dogovski, Con; Perugini, Matthew A.; Holien, Jessica K.; Parker, Michael W.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Tauschek, Marija; Robins-Browne, Roy M.

    2013-01-01

    The misuse of antibiotics during past decades has led to pervasive antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Hence, there is an urgent need for the development of new and alternative approaches to combat bacterial infections. In most bacterial pathogens the expression of virulence is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level. Therefore, targeting pathogens with drugs that interfere with virulence gene expression offers an effective alternative to conventional antimicrobial chemotherapy. Many Gram-negative intestinal pathogens produce AraC-like proteins that control the expression of genes required for infection. In this study we investigated the prototypical AraC-like virulence regulator, RegA, from the mouse attaching and effacing pathogen, Citrobacter rodentium, as a potential drug target. By screening a small molecule chemical library and chemical optimization, we identified two compounds that specifically inhibited the ability of RegA to activate its target promoters and thus reduced expression of a number of proteins required for virulence. Biophysical, biochemical, genetic, and computational analyses indicated that the more potent of these two compounds, which we named regacin, disrupts the DNA binding capacity of RegA by interacting with amino acid residues within a conserved region of the DNA binding domain. Oral administration of regacin to mice, commencing 15 min before or 12 h after oral inoculation with C. rodentium, caused highly significant attenuation of intestinal colonization by the mouse pathogen comparable to that of an isogenic regA-deletion mutant. These findings demonstrate that chemical inhibition of the DNA binding domains of transcriptional regulators is a viable strategy for the development of antimicrobial agents that target bacterial pathogens. PMID:24019519

  2. Inhibition of transcription affects synthesis of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, B J; Combs, R; Hales, K H; Hales, D B; Stocco, D M

    1997-11-01

    Hormonal induction of steroidogenesis in the adrenal and gonads is dependent on the synthesis and function of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). As a first approach to investigate the role of translation in the control of StAR expression, we examined StAR protein synthesis and steroid production in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells in the presence of the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D. We show that human CG (hCG)-induced StAR synthesis, as determined by radiolabeling MA-10 cells with [35S]methionine and immunoprecipitation of StAR, is blocked by actinomycin D. The rate of hCG-stimulated progesterone production is also decreased, but not completely blocked, suggesting a possible StAR-independent mechanism that may contribute approximately 10-20% of the acute steroidogenic potential of the cells. When MA-10 cells were pretreated with hCG to increase StAR messenger RNA levels and then the proteins radiolabeled in the presence of hCG or hCG plus actinomycin D, no difference was observed in the amount of the 30-kDa StAR protein synthesized. However, a 50% increase in the precursor form of StAR protein was detected with hCG treatment alone. These data suggest that ongoing StAR protein synthesis is not inhibited by actinomycin D, but that continued synthesis requires transcriptional activity. Progesterone production was inhibited by actinomycin D in the hCG-pretreated cells, supporting the proposal that maintaining StAR protein synthesis is required for optimal steroid production in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  3. Inhibition of Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor/Serum Response Factor Signaling Decreases Lung Fibrosis and Promotes Mesenchymal Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sisson, Thomas H.; Ajayi, Iyabode O.; Subbotina, Natalya; Dodi, Amos E.; Rodansky, Eva S.; Chibucos, Lauren N.; Kim, Kevin K.; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; White, Eric S.; Zhou, Yong; Higgins, Peter D.R.; Larsen, Scott D.; Neubig, Richard R.; Horowitz, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are crucial to the pathogenesis of tissue fibrosis. Their formation of stress fibers results in the release of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a transcriptional coactivator of serum response factor (SRF). MRTF-A (Mkl1)-deficient mice are protected from lung fibrosis. We hypothesized that the SRF/MRTF pathway inhibitor CCG-203971 would modulate myofibroblast function in vitro and limit lung fibrosis in vivo. Normal and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lung fibroblasts were treated with/without CCG-203971 (N-[4-chlorophenyl]-1-[3-(2-furanyl)benzoyl]-3-piperidine carboxamide) and/or Fas-activating antibody in the presence/absence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and apoptosis was assessed. In vivo studies examined the effect of therapeutically administered CCG-203971 on lung fibrosis in two distinct murine models of fibrosis induced by bleomycin or targeted type II alveolar epithelial injury. In vitro, CCG-203971 prevented nuclear localization of MRTF-A; increased the apoptotic susceptibility of normal and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis fibroblasts; blocked TGF-β1–induced myofibroblast differentiation; and inhibited TGF-β1–induced expression of fibronectin, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. TGF-β1 did not protect fibroblasts or myofibroblasts from apoptosis in the presence of CCG-203971. In vivo, CCG-203971 significantly reduced lung collagen content in both murine models while decreasing alveolar plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and promoting myofibroblast apoptosis. These data support a central role of the SRF/MRTF pathway in the pathobiology of lung fibrosis and suggest that its inhibition can help resolve lung fibrosis by promoting fibroblast apoptosis. PMID:25681733

  4. Triptolide abrogates growth of colon cancer and induces cell cycle arrest by inhibiting transcriptional activation of E2F.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Amanda; Beyer, Georg; Chugh, Rohit; Skube, Steven J; Majumder, Kaustav; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sangwan, Veena; Li, Lihua; Dawra, Rajinder; Subramanian, Subbaya; Saluja, Ashok; Dudeja, Vikas

    2015-06-01

    Despite significant progress in diagnostics and therapeutics, over 50 thousand patients die from colorectal cancer annually. Hence, there is urgent need for new lines of treatment. Triptolide, a natural compound isolated from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii, is effective against multiple cancers. We have synthesized a water soluble analog of triptolide, named Minnelide, which is currently in phase I trial against pancreatic cancer. The aims of the current study were to evaluate whether triptolide/Minnelide is effective against colorectal cancer and to elucidate the mechanism by which triptolide induces cell death in colorectal cancer. Efficacy of Minnelide was evaluated in subcutaneous xenograft and liver metastasis model of colorectal cancer. For mechanistic studies, colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 were treated with triptolide and the effect on viability, caspase activation, annexin positivity, lactate dehydrogenase release, and cell cycle progression was evaluated. Effect of triptolide on E2F transcriptional activity, mRNA levels of E2F-dependent genes, E2F1- retinoblastoma protein (Rb) binding, and proteins levels of regulator of G1-S transition was also measured. DNA binding of E2F1 was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Triptolide decreased colon cancer cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Minnelide markedly inhibited the growth of colon cancer in the xenograft and liver metastasis model of colon cancer and more than doubles the median survival of animals with liver metastases from colon cancer. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that at low concentrations triptolide induces apoptotic cell death but at higher concentrations it induces cell cycle arrest. Our data suggest that triptolide is able to induce G1 cell cycle arrest by inhibiting transcriptional activation of E2F1. Our data also show that triptolide downregulates E2F activity by potentially modulating events downstream of DNA binding. Therefore, we conclude

  5. Small-Molecule Inhibition of PD-1 Transcription Is an Effective Alternative to Antibody Blockade in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alison; Rothstein, David; Rudd, Christopher E

    2018-02-01

    The impact of PD-1 immune checkpoint therapy prompts exploration of other strategies to downregulate PD-1 for cancer therapy. We previously showed that the serine/threonine kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, GSK-3α/β, is a central regulator of PD-1 transcription in CD8 + T cells. Here, we show that the use of small-molecule inhibitors of GSK-3α/β (GSK-3i) to reduce pcdc1 (PD-1) transcription and expression was as effective as anti-PD-1 and PD-L1-blocking antibodies in the control of B16 melanoma, or EL4 lymphoma, in primary tumor and metastatic settings. Furthermore, the conditional genetic deletion of GSK-3α/β reduced PD-1 expression on CD8 + T cells and limited B16 pulmonary metastasis to the same degree as PD-1 gene deficiency. In each model, GSK-3i inhibited PD-1 expression on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, while increasing Tbx21 (T-bet) transcription, and the expression of CD107a + (LAMP1) and granzyme B (GZMB) on CD8 + T cells. Finally, the adoptive transfer of T cells treated ex vivo with a GSK-3 inhibitor delayed the onset of EL4 lymphoma growth to a similar extent as anti-PD-1 pretreatment. Overall, our findings show how GSK-3 inhibitors that downregulate PD-1 expression can enhance CD8 + T-cell function in cancer therapy to a similar degree as PD-1-blocking antibodies. Significance: These findings show how GSK-3 inhibitors that downregulate PD-1 expression can enhance CD8 + T-cell function in cancer therapy to a similar degree as PD-1 blocking antibodies, offering a next-generation approach in the design of immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer management. Cancer Res; 78(3); 706-17. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. FOXP3 inhibits cancer stem cell self-renewal via transcriptional repression of COX2 in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Cun; Zhang, Kuo; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Zhaowei; Li, Xiaoju; Cheng, Guang; Wang, Shuning; Xue, Xiaochang; Li, Weina; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi; Xing, Xianghui; Li, Meng; Hao, Qiang

    2017-07-04

    Colon cancer stem cell (cCSC) is considered as the seed cell of colon cancer initiation and metastasis. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), a downstream target of NFκB, is found to be essential in promoting cancer stem cell renewal. However, how COX2 is dysregulated in cCSCs is largely unknown. In this study, we found that the expression of transcription factor FOXP3 was much lower in the spheroids than that in the parental tumor cells. Overexpression of FOXP3 significantly decreased the numbers of spheres, reduced the side population. Accordingly, FOXP3 expression decreased the tumor size and weight in the xenograft model. The tumor inhibitory effects of FOXP3 were rarely seen when COX2 was additionally knocked down. Mechanically, FOXP3 transcriptionally repressed COX2 expression via interacting with and thus inhibiting p65 activity on the putative NFκB response elements in COX2 promoter. Taken together, we here revealed possible involvement of FOXP3 in regulating cCSC self-renewal via tuning COX2 expression, and thus providing a new target for the eradication of colon cancer stem cells.

  7. Potential of Natural Products in the Inhibition of Adipogenesis through Regulation of PPARγ Expression and/or Its Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi; Reuss, Laura; Wang, Yu

    2016-09-23

    Obesity is a global health problem characterized as an increase in the mass of adipose tissue. Adipogenesis is one of the key pathways that increases the mass of adipose tissue, by which preadipocytes mature into adipocytes through cell differentiation. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), the chief regulator of adipogenesis, has been acutely investigated as a molecular target for natural products in the development of anti-obesity treatments. In this review, the regulation of PPARγ expression by natural products through inhibition of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), increased expression of GATA-2 and GATA-3 and activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway were analyzed. Furthermore, the regulation of PPARγ transcriptional activity associated with natural products through the antagonism of PPARγ and activation of Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were discussed. Lastly, regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by natural products, which might regulate both PPARγ expression and PPARγ transcriptional activity, was summarized. Understanding the role natural products play, as well as the mechanisms behind their regulation of PPARγ activity is critical for future research into their therapeutic potential for fighting obesity.

  8. Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthase inhibition results in unique perturbation-specific effects observed on transcript, protein and metabolite levels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe human malaria, has evolved to become resistant to previously successful antimalarial chemotherapies, most notably chloroquine and the antifolates. The prevalence of resistant strains has necessitated the discovery and development of new chemical entities with novel modes-of-action. Although much effort has been invested in the creation of analogues based on existing drugs and the screening of chemical and natural compound libraries, a crucial shortcoming in current Plasmodial drug discovery efforts remains the lack of an extensive set of novel, validated drug targets. A requirement of these targets (or the pathways in which they function) is that they prove essential for parasite survival. The polyamine biosynthetic pathway, responsible for the metabolism of highly abundant amines crucial for parasite growth, proliferation and differentiation, is currently under investigation as an antimalarial target. Chemotherapeutic strategies targeting this pathway have been successfully utilized for the treatment of Trypanosomes causing West African sleeping sickness. In order to further evaluate polyamine depletion as possible antimalarial intervention, the consequences of inhibiting P. falciparum spermidine synthase (PfSpdSyn) were examined on a morphological, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic level. Results Morphological analysis of P. falciparum 3D7 following application of the PfSpdSyn inhibitor cyclohexylamine confirmed that parasite development was completely arrested at the early trophozoite stage. This is in contrast to untreated parasites which progressed to late trophozoites at comparable time points. Global gene expression analyses confirmed a transcriptional arrest in the parasite. Several of the differentially expressed genes mapped to the polyamine biosynthetic and associated metabolic pathways. Differential expression of corresponding parasite proteins involved in polyamine biosynthesis was

  9. Effects of trigonelline inhibition of the Nrf2 transcription factor in vitro on Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wenjuan; Guan, Dongfang; Ma, Rongji; Yang, Rentan; Xing, Guoqiang; Shi, Hongjuan; Tang, Guangyao; Li, Jiajie; Lv, Hailong; Jiang, Yufeng

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of trigonelline (TRG) on Echinococcus granulosus, and to explore the inhibition impact of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway on E. granulosus protoscoleces. Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces were incubated with various concentrations of TRG, and then Nrf2 protein expression and its localization in protoscoleces were detected by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in protoscoleces was measured using ROS detection kit. Caspase-3 activity was measured using a caspase-3 activity assay kit, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO)-1 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 activities in protoscoleces were measured by ELISA. The effect of TRG on protoscoleces viability was investigated using 0.1% eosin staining, and ultrastructural alterations in protoscoleces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Immunolocalization experiment clearly showed that Nrf2 protein was predominantly present in cells of protoscoleces. TRG treatment reduced NQO-1 and HO-1 activities in protoscoleces, but could increase ROS level at early time. Protoscoleces could not survive when treated with 250 μM TRG for 12 days. SEM results showed that TRG-treated protoscoleces presented damage in the protoscoleces region, including hook deformation, lesions, and digitiform protuberance. Nrf2 protein expression was significantly decreased and caspase-3 activity was clearly increased in protoscoleces treated with TRG for 24 and 48 h, respectively, when compared with that in controls (P < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that TRG had scolicidal activity against E. granulosus protoscoleces. Nrf2 protein was mainly expressed in the cells and TRG could efficiently inhibit the Nrf2 signaling pathway in E. granulosus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for

  10. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Magnesium Transporter MgtE Inhibits Transcription of the Type III Secretion System▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Gregory G.; Yahr, Timothy L.; Lovewell, Rustin R.; O'Toole, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes life-long pneumonia in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). These long-term infections are maintained by bacterial biofilm formation in the CF lung. We have recently developed a model of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on cultured CF airway epithelial cells. Using this model, we discovered that mutation of a putative magnesium transporter gene, called mgtE, led to increased cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa toward epithelial cells. This altered toxicity appeared to be dependent upon expression of the type III secretion system (T3SS). In this study, we found that mutation of mgtE results in increased T3SS gene transcription. Through epistasis analyses, we discovered that MgtE influences the ExsE-ExsC-ExsD-ExsA gene regulatory system of T3SS by either directly or indirectly inhibiting ExsA activity. While variations in calcium levels modulate T3SS gene expression in P. aeruginosa, we found that addition of exogenous magnesium did not inhibit T3SS activity. Furthermore, mgtE variants that were defective for magnesium transport could still complement the cytotoxicity effect. Thus, the magnesium transport function of MgtE does not fully explain the regulatory effects of MgtE on cytotoxicity. Overall, our results indicate that MgtE modulates expression of T3SS genes. PMID:20028803

  11. Thyroid hormone receptor inhibits hepatoma cell migration through transcriptional activation of Dickkopf 4

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Liao, Chen-Hsin; Huang, Ya-Hui

    Highlights: •T{sub 3} affects DKK4 mRNA and protein expression in HepG2-TR cells. •Regulation of DKK4 by T{sub 3} is at transcriptional level. •DKK4 overexpression suppresses hepatoma cell metastasis. -- Abstract: Triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) is a potent form of thyroid hormone mediates several physiological processes including cellular growth, development, and differentiation via binding to the nuclear thyroid hormone receptor (TR). Recent studies have demonstrated critical roles of T{sub 3}/TR in tumor progression. Moreover, long-term hypothyroidism appears to be associated with the incidence of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), independent of other major HCC risk factors. Dickkopf (DKK) 4, a secreted protein thatmore » antagonizes the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, is induced by T{sub 3} at both mRNA and protein levels in HCC cell lines. However, the mechanism underlying T{sub 3}-mediated regulation of DKK4 remains unknown. In the present study, the 5′ promoter region of DKK4 was serially deleted, and the reporter assay performed to localize the T{sub 3} response element (TRE). Consequently, we identified an atypical direct repeat TRE between nucleotides −1645 and −1629 conferring T{sub 3} responsiveness to the DKK4 gene. This region was further validated using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Stable DKK4 overexpression in SK-Hep-1 cells suppressed cell invasion and metastatic potential, both in vivo andin vitro, via reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression. Our findings collectively suggest that DKK4 upregulated by T{sub 3}/TR antagonizes the Wnt signal pathway to suppress tumor cell progression, thus providing new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying thyroid hormone activity in HCC.« less

  12. Dexamethasone inhibits inflammatory response via down regulation of AP-1 transcription factor in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajeshwari H; Naveen Kumar, M; Kiran Kumar, K M; Nagesh, Rashmi; Kavya, K; Babu, R L; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Chidananda Sharma, S

    2018-03-01

    The production of inflammatory mediators by epithelial cells in inflammatory lung diseases may represent an important target for the anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids. Activator protein-1 is a major activator of inflammatory genes and has been proposed as a target for inhibition by glucocorticoids. We have used human pulmonary type-II A549 cells to examine the effect of dexamethasone on the phorbol ester (PMA)/Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and AP-1 factors. A549 cells were treated with and without PMA or LPS or dexamethasone and the cell viability and nitric oxide production was measured by MTT assay and Griess reagent respectively. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and AP-1 factors mRNA were measured using semi quantitative RT-PCR. The PMA/LPS treated cells show significant 2-3 fold increase in the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α), cyclo‑oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and specific AP-1 factors (c-Jun, c-Fos and Jun-D). Whereas, pretreatment of cells with dexamethasone significantly inhibited the LPS induced nitric oxide production and PMA/LPS induced mRNAs expression of above pro-inflammatory cytokines, COX-2 and AP-1 factors. Cells treated with dexamethasone alone at both the concentrations inhibit the mRNAs expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α compared to control. Our study reveals that dexamethasone decreased the mRNAs expression of c-Jun and c-Fos available for AP-1 formation suggested that AP-1 is the probable key transcription factor involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of dexamethasone. This may be an important molecular mechanism of steroid action in asthma and other chronic inflammatory lung diseases which may be useful for treatment of lung inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inhibition of transcription of tlr4 in vitro is reversed by dexamethasone and correlates with presence of conserved NFκB binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bonin, Camila P., E-mail: mila_bonin@yahoo.com.br; Baccarin, Raquel Y.A., E-mail: baccarin@usp.br; Nostell, Katarina, E-mail: katarina.nostell@slu.se

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Chimpanzees, horses and humans have regions of similarity on TLR4 and MD2 promoters. ► Rodents have few regions of similarity on TLR4 promoter when compared to primates. ► Conserved NFkB binding sites were found in the promoters of TLR4 and MD2. ► LPS-induced inhibition of TLR4 transcription is reversed by dexamethasone. ► LPS-induced transcription of MD2 is inhibited by dexamethasone. -- Abstract: Engagement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a master trigger of the deleterious effects of septic shock. Horses and humans are considered the most sensitive species to septic shock, but the mechanisms explainingmore » these phenomena remain elusive. Analysis of tlr4 promoters revealed high similarity among LPS-sensitive species (human, chimpanzee, and horse) and low similarity with LPS-resistant species (mouse and rat). Four conserved nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) binding sites were found in the tlr4 promoter and two in the md2 promoter sequences that are likely to be targets for dexamethasone regulation. In vitro treatment of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (eqPBMC) with LPS decreased transcripts of tlr4 and increased transcription of md2 (myeloid differentiation factor 2) and cd14 (cluster of differentiation 14). Treatment with dexamethasone rescued transcription of tlr4 after LPS inhibition. LPS-induced transcription of md2 was inhibited in the presence of dexamethasone. Dexamethasone alone did not affect transcription of tlr4 and md2.« less

  14. The Sox2 high mobility group transcription factor inhibits mature osteoblast function in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Greg; Bromage, Timothy G.; Basilico, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in osteoblasts Sox2 expression can be induced by Fgfs, and can inhibit Wnt signaling and differentiation. Furthermore, in mice in which Sox2 is conditionally deleted in the osteoblastic lineage, bones are osteopenic, and Sox2 inactivation in cultured osteoblasts leads to a loss of proliferative ability with a senescent phenotype. To help understand the role of Sox2 in osteoblast development we have specifically expressed Sox2 in bone from a Col1α1 promoter, which extended Sox2 expression into more mature osteoblasts. In long bones, trabecular cartilage remodeling was delayed and the transition from endochondral to cortical bone was disrupted, resulting in porous and undermineralized cortical bone. Collagen deposition was disorganized, and patterns of osteoclast activity were altered. Calvarial bones were thinner and parietal bones failed to develop the diploic space. Microarray analysis showed significant up- or downregulation of a variety of genes coding for non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins, with a number of genes typical of mature osteoblasts being downregulated. Our results position Sox2 as a negative regulator of osteoblast maturation in vivo. PMID:21703370

  15. Radiation Inhibits Interleukin-12 Production via Inhibition of C-Rel through the Interleukin-6/ Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Signaling Pathway in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Seo Jin; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Kyoung-Jin; Yang, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a potent anti-tumor modality. However, unwanted effects including increased recurrence and metastasis that involve factors such as cytokines, which induce complex molecular mechanisms, have also been reported. In a previous study, we showed that interleukin (IL)-12 and radiotherapy combination treatment suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in a hepatoma mouse model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the IL-12 anti-tumor effect during radiotherapy. In tumor-bearing mice, irradiation decreased IL-12 expression in the tumors and spleens. However, a number of dendritic cells infiltrated into the tumors in which IL-12 expression did not decrease. To further study the underlying detailed mechanism for this decrease in IL-12, LPS-stimulated bone marrow–derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were irradiated, and then IL-12– and IL-6–associated molecules were examined in irradiated tumors and BMDCs. Irradiation resulted in IL-12 suppression and IL-6 increase. IL-6 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inhibitors restored the irradiation-induced IL-12 decrease via suppression of C-Rel activation. Taken together, our study suggests that irradiation-induced IL-6 can decrease IL-12 production through the inhibition of C-Rel phosphorylation by the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:26745884

  16. Direct inhibition of the DNA-binding activity of POU transcription factors Pit-1 and Brn-3 by selective binding of a phenyl-furan-benzimidazole dication.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Paul; Liu, Yang; Depauw, Sabine; Hildebrand, Marie-Paule; Boykin, David W; Bailly, Christian; Wilson, W David; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène

    2008-06-01

    The development of small molecules to control gene expression could be the spearhead of future-targeted therapeutic approaches in multiple pathologies. Among heterocyclic dications developed with this aim, a phenyl-furan-benzimidazole dication DB293 binds AT-rich sites as a monomer and 5'-ATGA sequence as a stacked dimer, both in the minor groove. Here, we used a protein/DNA array approach to evaluate the ability of DB293 to specifically inhibit transcription factors DNA-binding in a single-step, competitive mode. DB293 inhibits two POU-domain transcription factors Pit-1 and Brn-3 but not IRF-1, despite the presence of an ATGA and AT-rich sites within all three consensus sequences. EMSA, DNase I footprinting and surface-plasmon-resonance experiments determined the precise binding site, affinity and stoichiometry of DB293 interaction to the consensus targets. Binding of DB293 occurred as a cooperative dimer on the ATGA part of Brn-3 site but as two monomers on AT-rich sites of IRF-1 sequence. For Pit-1 site, ATGA or AT-rich mutated sequences identified the contribution of both sites for DB293 recognition. In conclusion, DB293 is a strong inhibitor of two POU-domain transcription factors through a cooperative binding to ATGA. These findings are the first to show that heterocyclic dications can inhibit major groove transcription factors and they open the door to the control of transcription factors activity by those compounds.

  17. An In Vitro Enzymatic Assay to Measure Transcription Inhibition by Gallium(III) and H3 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corroles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Grace Y.; Pribisko, Melanie A.; Henning, Ryan K.; Lim, Punnajit; Termini, John; Gray, Harry B.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy often involves broad-spectrum cytotoxic agents with many side effects and limited targeting. Corroles are a class of tetrapyrrolic macrocycles that exhibit differential cytostatic and cytotoxic properties in specific cell lines, depending on the identities of the chelated metal and functional groups. The unique behavior of functionalized corroles towards specific cell lines introduces the possibility of targeted chemotherapy. Many anticancer drugs are evaluated by their ability to inhibit RNA transcription. Here we present a step-by-step protocol for RNA transcription in the presence of known and potential inhibitors. The evaluation of the RNA products of the transcription reaction by gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis spectroscopy provides information on inhibitive properties of potential anticancer drug candidates and, with modifications to the assay, more about their mechanism of action. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of action of corrole cytotoxicity. In this experiment, we consider two corrole compounds: gallium(III) 5,10,15-(tris)pentafluorophenylcorrole (Ga(tpfc)) and freebase analogue 5,10,15-(tris)pentafluorophenylcorrole (tpfc). An RNA transcription assay was used to examine the inhibitive properties of the corroles. Five transcription reactions were prepared: DNA treated with Actinomycin D, triptolide, Ga(tpfc), tpfc at a [complex]:[template DNA base] ratio of 0.01, respectively, and an untreated control. The transcription reactions were analyzed after 4 hr using agarose gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis spectroscopy. There is clear inhibition by Ga(tpfc), Actinomycin D, and triptolide. This RNA transcription assay can be modified to provide more mechanistic detail by varying the concentrations of the anticancer complex, DNA, or polymerase enzyme, or by incubating the DNA or polymerase with the complexes prior to RNA transcription; these modifications would differentiate between an inhibition mechanism involving the DNA or the enzyme

  18. Post-transcriptional control by bacteriophage T4: mRNA decay and inhibition of translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Over 50 years of biological research with bacteriophage T4 includes notable discoveries in post-transcriptional control, including the genetic code, mRNA, and tRNA; the very foundations of molecular biology. In this review we compile the past 10 - 15 year literature on RNA-protein interactions with T4 and some of its related phages, with particular focus on advances in mRNA decay and processing, and on translational repression. Binding of T4 proteins RegB, RegA, gp32 and gp43 to their cognate target RNAs has been characterized. For several of these, further study is needed for an atomic-level perspective, where resolved structures of RNA-protein complexes are awaiting investigation. Other features of post-transcriptional control are also summarized. These include: RNA structure at translation initiation regions that either inhibit or promote translation initiation; programmed translational bypassing, where T4 orchestrates ribosome bypass of a 50 nucleotide mRNA sequence; phage exclusion systems that involve T4-mediated activation of a latent endoribonuclease (PrrC) and cofactor-assisted activation of EF-Tu proteolysis (Gol-Lit); and potentially important findings on ADP-ribosylation (by Alt and Mod enzymes) of ribosome-associated proteins that might broadly impact protein synthesis in the infected cell. Many of these problems can continue to be addressed with T4, whereas the growing database of T4-related phage genome sequences provides new resources and potentially new phage-host systems to extend the work into a broader biological, evolutionary context. PMID:21129205

  19. Transcriptional Downregulation of ORF50/Rta by Methotrexate Inhibits the Switch of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus/Human Herpesvirus 8 from Latency to Lytic Replication

    PubMed Central

    Curreli, Francesca; Cerimele, Francesca; Muralidhar, Sumitra; Rosenthal, Leonard J.; Cesarman, Ethel; Friedman-Kien, Alvin E.; Flore, Ornella

    2002-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a cellular dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) homologue. Methotrexate (MTX), a potent anti-inflammatory agent, inhibits cellular DHFR activity. We investigated the effect of noncytotoxic doses of MTX on latency and lytic KSHV replication in two KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cell lines (BC-3 and BC-1) and in MTX-resistant BC-3 cells (MTX-R-BC-3 cells). Treatment with MTX completely prevented tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-induced viral DNA replication and strongly decreased viral lytic transcript levels, even in MTX-resistant cells. However, the same treatment had no effect on transcription of cellular genes and KSHV latent genes. One of the lytic transcripts inhibited by MTX, ORF50/Rta (open reading frame), is an immediate-early gene encoding a replication-transcription activator required for expression of other viral lytic genes. Therefore, transcription of genes downstream of ORF50/Rta was inhibited, including those encoding the viral G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), viral interleukin-6, and K12/kaposin, which have been shown to be transforming in vitro and oncogenic in mice. Resistance to MTX has been documented in cultured cells and also in patients treated with this drug. However, MTX showed an inhibitory activity even in MTX-R-BC-3 cells. Two currently available antiherpesvirus drugs, cidofovir and foscarnet, had no effect on the transcription of these viral oncogenes and ORF50/Rta. MTX is the first example of a compound shown to downregulate the expression of ORF50/Rta and therefore prevent viral transforming gene transcription. Given that the expression of these genes may be important for tumor development, MTX could play a role in the future management of KSHV-associated malignancies. PMID:11967335

  20. Increased Expression of FoxM1 Transcription Factor in Respiratory Epithelium Inhibits Lung Sacculation and Causes Clara Cell Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I-Ching; Zhang, Yufang; Snyder, Jonathan; Sutherland, Mardi J.; Burhans, Michael S.; Shannon, John M.; Park, Hyun Jung; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    Foxm1 is a member of the Forkhead Box (Fox) family of transcription factors. Foxm1 (previously called Foxm1b, HFH-11B, Trident, Win, or MPP2) is expressed in multiple cell types and plays important roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Genetic deletion of Foxm1 from mouse respiratory epithelium during initial stages of lung development inhibits lung maturation and causes respiratory failure after birth. However, the role of Foxm1 during postnatal lung morphogenesis remains unknown. In the present study, Foxm1 expression was detected in epithelial cells of conducting and peripheral airways and changing dynamically with lung maturation. To discern the biological role of Foxm1 in the prenatal and postnatal lung, a novel transgenic mouse line that expresses a constitutively active form of FoxM1 (FoxM1 N-terminal deletion mutant or FoxM1-ΔN) under the control of lung epithelial-specific SPC promoter was produced. Expression of the FoxM1-ΔN transgene during embryogenesis caused epithelial hyperplasia, inhibited lung sacculation and expression of the type II epithelial marker, pro-SPC. Expression of FoxM1-ΔN mutant during the postnatal period did not influence alveologenesis but caused focal airway hyperplasia and increased proliferation of Clara cells. Likewise, expression of FoxM1-ΔN mutant in conducting airways with Scgb1a1 promoter was sufficient to induce Clara cell hyperplasia. Furthermore, FoxM1-ΔN cooperated with activated K-Ras to induce lung tumor growth in vivo. Increased activity of Foxm1 altered lung sacculation, induced proliferation in the respiratory epithelium and accelerated lung tumor growth, indicating that precise regulation of Foxm1 is critical for normal lung morphogenesis and development of lung cancer. PMID:20816795

  1. Interferon β protects against avascular osteonecrosis through interleukin 6 inhibition and silent information regulator transcript-1 upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Wagle, Sajeev; Moon, Young Jae; Wang, Sung Il; Park, Byung-Hyun; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Jung Ryul

    2018-01-01

    Synovitis of the affected joint is a common in avascular osteonecrosis (AVN). Increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) have been reported in AVN, but the mechanism of this increase remains unclear. Silent information regulator transcript-1 (SIRT1), an NAD-dependent deacetylase, inhibits the release of inflammatory cytokines. Interferon β (IFN-β) has clear anti-inflammatory properties. We sought to investigate the effects of IFN-β treatment on AVN and to evaluate the specific signal pathway relating to IL-6 and SIRT1 affected during AVN. Using a dissection microscope, AVN was surgically induced in the distal femurs of mice. Exogenous IFN-β was administered to the model mice. The effects of exogenous IFN-β on AVN model mice were assessed using hematoxylin eosin and safranin-O staining, and bone resorption activity was measured using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and CD68 staining. Western blots, real-time RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical staining were performed to evaluate the production of SIRT1 and IL-6 in tissues. The RAW 264.7 cell line and bone marrow derived osteoclasts treated with exogenous IFN-β. Histological findings indicated well preserved trabecular bone and decreased osteoclast bone resorption activity in IFN-β treated mice compared with mice in the AVN group. Treatment with IFN-β increased SIRT1 expression and inhibited secretion of IL-6 in this AVN mouse model. IFN-β decreased IL-6 secretion by activating SIRT1 in the RAW 264.7 cell and bone marrow derived osteoclasts. Our work suggests that IFN-β could be used to treat AVN and that both SIRT1 and IL-6 are useful targets for treating patients with AVN. PMID:29423066

  2. Interferon β protects against avascular osteonecrosis through interleukin 6 inhibition and silent information regulator transcript-1 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Wagle, Sajeev; Moon, Young Jae; Wang, Sung Il; Park, Byung-Hyun; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Jung Ryul

    2018-01-09

    Synovitis of the affected joint is a common in avascular osteonecrosis (AVN). Increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) have been reported in AVN, but the mechanism of this increase remains unclear. Silent information regulator transcript-1 (SIRT1), an NAD-dependent deacetylase, inhibits the release of inflammatory cytokines. Interferon β (IFN-β) has clear anti-inflammatory properties. We sought to investigate the effects of IFN-β treatment on AVN and to evaluate the specific signal pathway relating to IL-6 and SIRT1 affected during AVN. Using a dissection microscope, AVN was surgically induced in the distal femurs of mice. Exogenous IFN-β was administered to the model mice. The effects of exogenous IFN-β on AVN model mice were assessed using hematoxylin eosin and safranin-O staining, and bone resorption activity was measured using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and CD68 staining. Western blots, real-time RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical staining were performed to evaluate the production of SIRT1 and IL-6 in tissues. The RAW 264.7 cell line and bone marrow derived osteoclasts treated with exogenous IFN-β. Histological findings indicated well preserved trabecular bone and decreased osteoclast bone resorption activity in IFN-β treated mice compared with mice in the AVN group. Treatment with IFN-β increased SIRT1 expression and inhibited secretion of IL-6 in this AVN mouse model. IFN-β decreased IL-6 secretion by activating SIRT1 in the RAW 264.7 cell and bone marrow derived osteoclasts. Our work suggests that IFN-β could be used to treat AVN and that both SIRT1 and IL-6 are useful targets for treating patients with AVN.

  3. Abasic Phosphorothioate Oligomers Inhibit HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and Block Virus Transmission across Polarized Ectocervical Organ Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Mueller, Yvonne M.; Lozenski, Karissa L.; Ratner, Deena; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Hancock, Aidan S.; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Zentner, Isaac J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Chung, Suhman; LeGrice, Stuart F. J.; Snyder, Beth A.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Jones, Natalie M.; Hope, Jennifer L.; Gupta, Phalguni; Anderson, Sharon H.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of universally available antiretroviral (ARV) drugs or a vaccine against HIV-1, microbicides may offer the most immediate hope for controlling the AIDS pandemic. The most advanced and clinically effective microbicides are based on ARV agents that interfere with the earliest stages of HIV-1 replication. Our objective was to identify and characterize novel ARV-like inhibitors, as well as demonstrate their efficacy at blocking HIV-1 transmission. Abasic phosphorothioate 2′ deoxyribose backbone (PDB) oligomers were evaluated in a variety of mechanistic assays and for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection and virus transmission through primary human cervical mucosa. Cellular and biochemical assays were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanisms of action of PDB oligomers against both lab-adapted and primary CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 strains, including a multidrug-resistant isolate. A polarized cervical organ culture was used to test the ability of PDB compounds to block HIV-1 transmission to primary immune cell populations across ectocervical tissue. The antiviral activity and mechanisms of action of PDB-based compounds were dependent on oligomer size, with smaller molecules preventing reverse transcription and larger oligomers blocking viral entry. Importantly, irrespective of molecular size, PDBs potently inhibited virus infection and transmission within genital tissue samples. Furthermore, the PDB inhibitors exhibited excellent toxicity and stability profiles and were found to be safe for vaginal application in vivo. These results, coupled with the previously reported intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties of PDBs, support further investigations in the development of PDB-based topical microbicides for preventing the global spread of HIV-1. PMID:25224013

  4. The tumour suppressor, miR-137, inhibits malignant melanoma migration by targetting the TBX3 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Peres, Jade; Kwesi-Maliepaard, Eliza M; Rambow, Florian; Larue, Lionel; Prince, Sharon

    2017-10-01

    The transcription factor, TBX3, is a key driver of malignant melanoma and any drug that impacts its expression is likely to have an impact on the treatment of this highly aggressive and treatment resistant cancer. Replacement of miRNAs that target oncogenes has gained much attention as a therapy because it is anticipated to be effective with little side-effects since miRNAs are naturally occurring and often target large set of genes in the same oncogenic pathway. Here we show that miR-137 levels correlate inversely with TBX3 mRNA levels in a panel of melanoma cell lines and in a cohort of patients with primary melanoma. Low levels of miR-137 and high levels of TBX3 are shown to be associated with poor patient survival. We show that miR-137 binds a conserved site in the TBX3 3' untranslated region and that a miR-137 mimic significantly reduces endogenous levels of TBX3 and inhibits anchorage independent growth and migration of malignant melanoma cells. Novel data are provided that the miR-137/TBX3/E-cadherin axis plays an important role in melanomagenesis and that miR-137 replacement is a potential therapeutic approach for treating melanomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Olean-18-ene triterpenoids from Celastraceae species inhibit HIV replication targeting NF-kB and Sp1 dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Alex A; Muñóz, Alejandro; Torres-Romero, David; Bedoya, Luis M; Perestelo, Nayra R; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Alcamí, José; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2012-06-01

    In the present study we report the isolation of nine new olean-18-ene triterpenes (1-9), along with three known ones (10-12), from Cassine xylocarpa and Maytenus jelskii. Their stereostructures have been elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques (COSY, ROESY, HSQC and HMBC), and spectrometric methods. The natural compounds and derivatives 13-15 have been tested for their potential as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication. Five compounds from this series displayed potent antiviral activity with IC(50)s in the micromolar range (1, 3, 4, 7 and 8) being 1 and 8 the most active compounds. The target of these compounds was different from antiretroviral drugs currently licensed as they act as inhibitors of enhancer-dependent transcription. The structure-activity relationships were established based on the regiosubstitution and oxidation degree of the triterpene scaffold, revealing that these aspects were able to modulate the selectivity and intensity of HIV inhibition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Downregulation of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Genes by HDAC Inhibition in Prostate Cancer Is Mediated through the E2F1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kachhap, Sushant K.; Rosmus, Nadine; Collis, Spencer J.; Kortenhorst, Madeleine S. Q.; Wissing, Michel D.; Hedayati, Mohammad; Shabbeer, Shabana; Mendonca, Janet; Deangelis, Justin; Marchionni, Luigi; Lin, Jianqing; Höti, Naseruddin; Nortier, Johan W. R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Hammers, Hans; Carducci, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) re-express silenced tumor suppressor genes and are currently undergoing clinical trials. Although HDACis have been known to induce gene expression, an equal number of genes are downregulated upon HDAC inhibition. The mechanism behind this downregulation remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that several DNA repair genes are downregulated by HDAC inhibition and provide a mechanism involving the E2F1 transcription factor in the process. Methodology/Principal Findings Applying Analysis of Functional Annotation (AFA) on microarray data of prostate cancer cells treated with HDACis, we found a number of genes of the DNA damage response and repair pathways are downregulated by HDACis. AFA revealed enrichment of homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair genes of the BRCA1 pathway, as well as genes regulated by the E2F1 transcription factor. Prostate cancer cells demonstrated a decreased DNA repair capacity and an increased sensitization to chemical- and radio-DNA damaging agents upon HDAC inhibition. Recruitment of key HR repair proteins to the site of DNA damage, as well as HR repair capacity was compromised upon HDACi treatment. Based on our AFA data, we hypothesized that the E2F transcription factors may play a role in the downregulation of key repair genes upon HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer cells. ChIP analysis and luciferase assays reveal that the downregulation of key repair genes is mediated through decreased recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor and not through active repression by repressive E2Fs. Conclusions/Significance Our study indicates that several genes in the DNA repair pathway are affected upon HDAC inhibition. Downregulation of the repair genes is on account of a decrease in amount and promoter recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor. Since HDAC inhibition affects several pathways that could potentially have an impact on DNA repair, compromised DNA repair upon HDAC inhibition could

  7. Caprylic acid and medium-chain triglycerides inhibit IL-8 gene transcription in Caco-2 cells: comparison with the potent histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A

    PubMed Central

    Hoshimoto, Aihiro; Suzuki, Yasuo; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Saito, Yasushi

    2002-01-01

    Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) is often administered to patients with Crohn's disease (CD) or short-bowel syndrome. However, little is known about the effects of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) and MCT on intestinal inflammation. In this study we examined whether caprylic acid, one of the MCFAs, and MCT suppress IL-8 secretion by differentiated Caco-2 cells.We found for the first time that caprylic acid and MCT suppress IL-8 secretion by Caco-2 cells at the transcriptional level when precultured together for 24 h. We also tried to clarify the mechanism of IL-8 gene inhibition by examining the activation of NF-κB and other transcription factors by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and found that caprylic acid did not modulate their activation.The result of dual-luciferase assay using Caco-2 cells transfected with IL-8 promoter/luciferase reporter plasmid revealed that caprylic acid inhibited the activation of IL-8 promoter.Similar results were observed when cells were precultured with the well-known potent histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA).We examined the state of H4 acetylation in IL-8 promoter using the technique known as chromatin immunoprecipitation (Chr-IP). TSA rapidly induced H4 acetylation in IL-8 promoter chromatin, whereas caprylic acid did not. These results suggest that the inhibition of IL-8 gene transcription induced by caprylic acid and TSA does not necessarily require the marked suppression of transcription factors, and the mechanism of inhibition of IL-8 gene transcription may be different between caprylic acid and TSA. PMID:12010777

  8. Inhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupperman, Joel J.

    1978-01-01

    Explores the use of the concept of inhibition in moral philosophy. Argues that there are strong practical reasons for basing moral teaching on simple moral rules and for inculcating inhibitions about breaking these rules. (Author)

  9. Overexpression of caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 inhibits the growth of transplanted colorectal tumors in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, JIAN-BAO; QIAO, LI-NA; SUN, XUE-JUN; QI, JIE; REN, HAI-LIANG; WEI, GUANG-BING; ZHOU, PEI-HUA; YAO, JIAN-FENG; ZHANG, LI; JIA, PENG-BO

    2015-01-01

    Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is a transcription factor, which is specifically expressed in the adult intestine. It is essential for the development and homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium and its functions as a tumor suppressor have been demonstrated in the adult colon. The present study aimed to examine the inhibitory effects of the overexpression of CDX2 on subcutaneously-transplanted tumors, derived from LoVo colon cancer cells, in nude mice, and to provide experimental evidence for the biotherapy of colon cancer. A pEGFP-C1-CDX2 eukaryotic expression vector was transfected into the LoVo cells via lipofection, and LoVo cells stably-expressing CDX2 (pEGFP-C1-CDX2 cells) were obtained using G418 selection. A nude mouse subcutaneously-transplanted tumor model was established by inoculating the nude mice with the pEGFP-C1-CDX2 cells, and the effects of overexpression of CDX2 on transplanted tumor growth in the LoVo cells were observed. Western blotting results demonstrated that the protein expression of CDX2 in the LoVo cells was higher in the pEGFP-C1-CDX2 cell group, compared with that in the pEGFP-C1 cell group and the untreated cell group. At 20 days post-inoculation with either pEGFP-C1-CDX2 or pEGFP-C1, the transplanted tumor masses were significantly lower in the pEGFP-C1-CDX2 group, compared with those in the pEGFP-C1 and untreated groups. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression levels of CDX2 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) were detected in each group, and the protein expression of CDX2 was increased in the tumor tissues from the nude mice in the pEGFP-C1-CDX2 group. However the expression of MMP-2 was downregulated in the tumor tissues of the nude mice in the pEGFP-C1-CDX2 group. Taken together, these data suggested that pEGFP-C1-CDX2 cells exhibited suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Overexpression of CDX2 was observed in transplanted tumors in the pEGFP-C1-CDX2 group, and the gene expression of MMP-2 was

  10. Overexpression of caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 inhibits the growth of transplanted colorectal tumors in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Bao; Qiao, Li-Na; Sun, Xue-Jun; Qi, Jie; Ren, Hai-Liang; Wei, Guang-Bing; Zhou, Pei-Hua; Yao, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Li; Jia, Peng-Bo

    2015-09-01

    Caudal‑related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is a transcription factor, which is specifically expressed in the adult intestine. It is essential for the development and homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium and its functions as a tumor suppressor have been demonstrated in the adult colon. The present study aimed to examine the inhibitory effects of the overexpression of CDX2 on subcutaneously‑transplanted tumors, derived from LoVo colon cancer cells, in nude mice, and to provide experimental evidence for the biotherapy of colon cancer. A pEGFP‑C1‑CDX2 eukaryotic expression vector was transfected into the LoVo cells via lipofection, and LoVo cells stably‑expressing CDX2 (pEGFP‑C1‑CDX2 cells) were obtained using G418 selection. A nude mouse subcutaneously‑transplanted tumor model was established by inoculating the nude mice with the pEGFP‑C1‑CDX2 cells, and the effects of overexpression of CDX2 on transplanted tumor growth in the LoVo cells were observed. Western blotting results demonstrated that the protein expression of CDX2 in the LoVo cells was higher in the pEGFP‑C1‑CDX2 cell group, compared with that in the pEGFP‑C1 cell group and the untreated cell group. At 20 days post‑inoculation with either pEGFP‑C1‑CDX2 or pEGFP‑C1, the transplanted tumor masses were significantly lower in the pEGFP‑C1‑CDX2 group, compared with those in the pEGFP‑C1 and untreated groups. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression levels of CDX2 and matrix metalloproteinase‑2 (MMP‑2) were detected in each group, and the protein expression of CDX2 was increased in the tumor tissues from the nude mice in the pEGFP‑C1‑CDX2 group. However the expression of MMP‑2 was downregulated in the tumor tissues of the nude mice in the pEGFP‑C1‑CDX2 group. Taken together, these data suggested that pEGFP‑C1‑CDX2 cells exhibited suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Overexpression of CDX2 was observed in transplanted tumors in the p

  11. BZLF1, an Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early protein, induces p65 nuclear translocation while inhibiting p65 transcriptional function

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Thomas E.; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; Kenney, Shannon C.

    We have previously demonstrated that the Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early BZLF1 protein interacts with, and is inhibited by, the NF-{kappa}B family member p65. However, the effects of BZLF1 on NF-{kappa}B activity have not been intensively studied. Here we show that BZLF1 inhibits p65-dependent gene expression. BZLF1 inhibited the ability of IL-1, as well as transfected p65, to activate the expression of two different NF-{kappa}B-responsive genes, ICAM-1 and I{kappa}B-{alpha}. BZLF1 also reduced the constitutive level of I{kappa}B-{alpha} protein in HeLa and A549 cells, and increased the amount of nuclear NF-{kappa}B to a similar extent as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) treatment. In spitemore » of this BZLF1-associated increase in the nuclear form of NF-{kappa}B, BZLF1 did not induce binding of NF-{kappa}B to NF-{kappa}B responsive promoters (as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay) in vivo, although TNF-{alpha} treatment induced NF-{kappa}B binding as expected. Overexpression of p65 dramatically inhibited the lytic replication cycle of EBV in 293-EBV cells, confirming that NF-{kappa}B also inhibits BZLF1 transcriptional function. Our results are consistent with a model in which BZLF1 inhibits the transcriptional function of p65, resulting in decreased transcription of I{kappa}B-{alpha}, decreased expression of I{kappa}B-{alpha} protein, and subsequent translocation of NF-{kappa}B to the nucleus. This nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B may promote viral latency by negatively regulating BZLF1 transcriptional activity. In situations where p65 activity is limiting in comparison to BZLF1, the ability of BZLF1 to inhibit p65 transcriptional function may protect the virus from the host immune system during the lytic form of infection.« less

  12. The role of the Arabidopsis FUSCA3 transcription factor during inhibition of seed germination at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Rex S; Nahal, Hardeep; Provart, Nicholas J; Gazzarrini, Sonia

    2012-01-27

    Imbibed seeds integrate environmental and endogenous signals to break dormancy and initiate growth under optimal conditions. Seed maturation plays an important role in determining the survival of germinating seeds, for example one of the roles of dormancy is to stagger germination to prevent mass growth under suboptimal conditions. The B3-domain transcription factor FUSCA3 (FUS3) is a master regulator of seed development and an important node in hormonal interaction networks in Arabidopsis thaliana. Its function has been mainly characterized during embryonic development, where FUS3 is highly expressed to promote seed maturation and dormancy by regulating ABA/GA levels. In this study, we present evidence for a role of FUS3 in delaying seed germination at supraoptimal temperatures that would be lethal for the developing seedlings. During seed imbibition at supraoptimal temperature, the FUS3 promoter is reactivated and induces de novo synthesis of FUS3 mRNA, followed by FUS3 protein accumulation. Genetic analysis shows that FUS3 contributes to the delay of seed germination at high temperature. Unlike WT, seeds overexpressing FUS3 (ML1:FUS3-GFP) during imbibition are hypersensitive to high temperature and do not germinate, however, they can fully germinate after recovery at control temperature reaching 90% seedling survival. ML1:FUS3-GFP hypersensitivity to high temperature can be partly recovered in the presence of fluridone, an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis, suggesting this hypersensitivity is due in part to higher ABA level in this mutant. Transcriptomic analysis shows that WT seeds imbibed at supraoptimal temperature activate seed-specific genes and ABA biosynthetic and signaling genes, while inhibiting genes that promote germination and growth, such as GA biosynthetic and signaling genes. In this study, we have uncovered a novel function for the master regulator of seed maturation, FUS3, in delaying germination at supraoptimal temperature. Physiologically, this is

  13. The role of the Arabidopsis FUSCA3 transcription factor during inhibition of seed germination at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Imbibed seeds integrate environmental and endogenous signals to break dormancy and initiate growth under optimal conditions. Seed maturation plays an important role in determining the survival of germinating seeds, for example one of the roles of dormancy is to stagger germination to prevent mass growth under suboptimal conditions. The B3-domain transcription factor FUSCA3 (FUS3) is a master regulator of seed development and an important node in hormonal interaction networks in Arabidopsis thaliana. Its function has been mainly characterized during embryonic development, where FUS3 is highly expressed to promote seed maturation and dormancy by regulating ABA/GA levels. Results In this study, we present evidence for a role of FUS3 in delaying seed germination at supraoptimal temperatures that would be lethal for the developing seedlings. During seed imbibition at supraoptimal temperature, the FUS3 promoter is reactivated and induces de novo synthesis of FUS3 mRNA, followed by FUS3 protein accumulation. Genetic analysis shows that FUS3 contributes to the delay of seed germination at high temperature. Unlike WT, seeds overexpressing FUS3 (ML1:FUS3-GFP) during imbibition are hypersensitive to high temperature and do not germinate, however, they can fully germinate after recovery at control temperature reaching 90% seedling survival. ML1:FUS3-GFP hypersensitivity to high temperature can be partly recovered in the presence of fluridone, an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis, suggesting this hypersensitivity is due in part to higher ABA level in this mutant. Transcriptomic analysis shows that WT seeds imbibed at supraoptimal temperature activate seed-specific genes and ABA biosynthetic and signaling genes, while inhibiting genes that promote germination and growth, such as GA biosynthetic and signaling genes. Conclusion In this study, we have uncovered a novel function for the master regulator of seed maturation, FUS3, in delaying germination at supraoptimal

  14. Albizia lebbeck suppresses histamine signaling by the inhibition of histamine H1 receptor and histidine decarboxylase gene transcriptions.

    PubMed

    Nurul, Islam Mohammed; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Shahriar, Masum; Venkatesh, Pichairajan; Maeyama, Kazutaka; Mukherjee, Pulok K; Hattori, Masashi; Choudhuri, Mohamed Sahabuddin Kabir; Takeda, Noriaki; Fukui, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    Histamine plays major roles in allergic diseases and its action is mediated mainly by histamine H(1) receptor (H1R). We have demonstrated that histamine signaling-related H1R and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) genes are allergic diseases sensitive genes and their expression level affects severity of the allergic symptoms. Therefore, compounds that suppress histamine signaling should be promising candidates as anti-allergic drugs. Here, we investigated the effect of the extract from the bark of Albizia lebbeck (AL), one of the ingredients of Ayruvedic medicines, on H1R and HDC gene expression using toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) sensitized allergy model rats and HeLa cells expressing endogenous H1R. Administration of the AL extract significantly decreased the numbers of sneezing and nasal rubbing. Pretreatment with the AL extract suppressed TDI-induced H1R and HDC mRNA elevations as well as [(3)H]mepyramine binding, HDC activity, and histamine content in the nasal mucosa. AL extract also suppressed TDI-induced up-regulation of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 mRNA. In HeLa cells, AL extract suppressed phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate- or histamine-induced up-regulation of H1R mRNA. Our data suggest that AL alleviated nasal symptoms by inhibiting histamine signaling in TDI-sensitized rats through suppression of H1R and HDC gene transcriptions. Suppression of Th2-cytokine signaling by AL also suggests that it could affect the histamine-cytokine network. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. LHX6, An Independent Prognostic Factor, Inhibits Lung Adenocarcinoma Progression through Transcriptional Silencing of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juntang; Han, Fei; Liu, Wenbin; Zhang, Mingqian; Huang, Yongsheng; Hao, Xianglin; Jiang, Xiao; Yin, Li; Chen, Hongqiang; Cao, Jia; Zhang, Huidong; Liu, Jinyi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Our previous study identified LIM homeobox domain 6 (LHX6) as a frequently epigenetically silenced tumor-suppressor gene in lung cancer. However, its clinical value has never been evaluated, and the in-depth anti-tumor mechanism remains unclear. Methods: Public database was used for lung cancer, lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous carcinoma patients and tissue microarray data was used for lung adenocarcinoma patients to study prognostic outcome of LHX6 expression by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analysis. In vitro proliferation, metastasis and in vivo nude mice model were used to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of LHX6 on lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The mechanisms were explored using western blot, TOP/FOP flash assays and luciferase reporter assays. LHX6 expression and clinical stages data were collected from The Cancer Genome Atlas database (TCGA). Results: Expression of LHX6 was found to be a favorable independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) of total lung adenocarcinoma patients (P=0.014) and patients with negative lymph nodes status (P=0.014) but not related the prognostic outcome of lung squamous cell carcinoma patients. The expression status of LHX6 significantly correlated to histological grade (P<0.01), tumor size (P=0.026), lymph node status (P=0.039) and clinical stages (P<0.01) of lung adenocarcinoma patients. Functionally, LHX6 inhibited the proliferation and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo . Furthermore, LHX6 suppressed the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through transcriptionally silencing the expression of β-catenin, and the promoter region (-1161 bp to +27 bp) was crucial for its inhibitory activity. Conclusions: Our data indicate that the expression of LHX6 may serve as a favorable prognostic biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma patients and provide a novel mechanism of LHX6 involving in the tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma.

  16. LHX6, An Independent Prognostic Factor, Inhibits Lung Adenocarcinoma Progression through Transcriptional Silencing of β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juntang; Han, Fei; Liu, Wenbin; Zhang, Mingqian; Huang, Yongsheng; Hao, Xianglin; Jiang, Xiao; Yin, Li; Chen, Hongqiang; Cao, Jia; Zhang, Huidong; Liu, Jinyi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Our previous study identified LIM homeobox domain 6 (LHX6) as a frequently epigenetically silenced tumor-suppressor gene in lung cancer. However, its clinical value has never been evaluated, and the in-depth anti-tumor mechanism remains unclear. Methods: Public database was used for lung cancer, lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous carcinoma patients and tissue microarray data was used for lung adenocarcinoma patients to study prognostic outcome of LHX6 expression by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analysis. In vitro proliferation, metastasis and in vivo nude mice model were used to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of LHX6 on lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The mechanisms were explored using western blot, TOP/FOP flash assays and luciferase reporter assays. LHX6 expression and clinical stages data were collected from The Cancer Genome Atlas database (TCGA). Results: Expression of LHX6 was found to be a favorable independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) of total lung adenocarcinoma patients (P=0.014) and patients with negative lymph nodes status (P=0.014) but not related the prognostic outcome of lung squamous cell carcinoma patients. The expression status of LHX6 significantly correlated to histological grade (P<0.01), tumor size (P=0.026), lymph node status (P=0.039) and clinical stages (P<0.01) of lung adenocarcinoma patients. Functionally, LHX6 inhibited the proliferation and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, LHX6 suppressed the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through transcriptionally silencing the expression of β-catenin, and the promoter region (-1161 bp to +27 bp) was crucial for its inhibitory activity. Conclusions: Our data indicate that the expression of LHX6 may serve as a favorable prognostic biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma patients and provide a novel mechanism of LHX6 involving in the tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:28900494

  17. Spermine Attenuates the Action of the DNA Intercalator, Actinomycin D, on DNA Binding and the Inhibition of Transcription and DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeremy J. W.; Wu, Wen-Lin; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P.; Su, Wang-Lin; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2012-01-01

    The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular) are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD) as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion. PMID:23144800

  18. Spermine attenuates the action of the DNA intercalator, actinomycin D, on DNA binding and the inhibition of transcription and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Lee, Yueh-Luen; Lai, Yi-Hua; Chen, Jeremy J W; Wu, Wen-Lin; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P; Su, Wang-Lin; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2012-01-01

    The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular) are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD) as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion.

  19. Nitric oxide sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via inhibition of the DR5 transcription repressor Yin Yang 1.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Vega, Mario; Escoto-Chavez, Saul E; Murdock, Benjamin; Sakai, Toshiyuki; Baritaki, Stavroula; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2009-02-01

    Treatment of TRAIL-resistant tumor cells with the nitric oxide donor DETANONOate sensitizes the tumor cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis concomitantly with DR5 upregulation. The mechanism of sensitization was examined based on the hypothesis that DETANONOate inhibits a transcription repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) that negatively regulates DR5 transcription. Treatment of the prostate carcinoma cell lines with DETANONOate inhibited both NF-kappaB and YY1 DNA-binding activities concomitantly with upregulation of DR5 expression. The direct role of YY1 in the regulation of TRAIL resistance was demonstrated in cells treated with YY1 siRNA resulting in TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The role of YY1 in the transcriptional regulation of DR5 was examined in cells treated with a DR5 luciferase reporter system (pDR5) and two constructs, namely, the pDR5/-605 construct with a deletion of the putative YY1 DNA-binding region (-1224 to -605) and a construct pDR5-YY1 with a mutation of the YY1 DNA-binding site. A significant (3-fold) augmentation of luciferase activity over baseline transfection with pDR5 was observed in cells transfected with the modified constructs. ChIP analysis corroborated the YY1 binding to the DR5 promoter. In vivo, tissues from nude mice bearing the PC-3 xenograft and treated with DETANONOate showed inhibition of YY1 and upregulation of DR5. The present findings demonstrate that YY1 negatively regulates DR5 transcription and expression and these correlated with resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. DETANONOate inhibits both NF-kappaB and YY1 and in combination with TRAIL reverses tumor cell resistance to TRAIL apoptosis.

  20. Dual functions of Rift Valley fever virus NSs protein: inhibition of host mRNA transcription and post-transcriptional downregulation of protein kinase PKR.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Narayanan, Krishna; Won, Sungyong; Kamitani, Wataru; Peters, C J; Makino, Shinji

    2009-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is a negative-stranded RNA virus carrying a single-stranded, tripartite RNA genome. RVFV is an important zoonotic pathogen transmitted by mosquitoes and causes large outbreaks among ruminants and humans in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human patients develop an acute febrile illness, followed by a fatal hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or ocular diseases. A viral nonstructural protein, NSs, is a major viral virulence factor. Past studies showed that NSs suppresses the transcription of host mRNAs, including interferon-beta mRNAs. Here we demonstrated that the NSs protein induced post-transcriptional downregulation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), to prevent phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and promoted viral translation in infected cells. These two biological activities of the NSs most probably have a synergistic effect in suppressing host innate immune functions and facilitate efficient viral replication in infected mammalian hosts.

  1. Role of protein phosphatase 1 in dephosphorylation of Ebola virus VP30 protein and its targeting for the inhibition of viral transcription.

    PubMed

    Ilinykh, Philipp A; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Ivanov, Andrey; Ammosova, Tatiana; Obukhov, Yuri; Garron, Tania; Kumari, Namita; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Platonov, Maxim O; Naumchik, Vasiliy S; Freiberg, Alexander N; Nekhai, Sergei; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2014-08-15

    The filovirus Ebola (EBOV) causes the most severe hemorrhagic fever known. The EBOV RNA-dependent polymerase complex includes a filovirus-specific VP30, which is critical for the transcriptional but not replication activity of EBOV polymerase; to support transcription, VP30 must be in a dephosphorylated form. Here we show that EBOV VP30 is phosphorylated not only at the N-terminal serine clusters identified previously but also at the threonine residues at positions 143 and 146. We also show that host cell protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) controls VP30 dephosphorylation because expression of a PP1-binding peptide cdNIPP1 increased VP30 phosphorylation. Moreover, targeting PP1 mRNA by shRNA resulted in the overexpression of SIPP1, a cytoplasm-shuttling regulatory subunit of PP1, and increased EBOV transcription, suggesting that cytoplasmic accumulation of PP1 induces EBOV transcription. Furthermore, we developed a small molecule compound, 1E7-03, that targeted a non-catalytic site of PP1 and increased VP30 dephosphorylation. The compound inhibited the transcription but increased replication of the viral genome and completely suppressed replication of EBOV in cultured cells. Finally, mutations of Thr(143) and Thr(146) of VP30 significantly inhibited EBOV transcription and strongly induced VP30 phosphorylation in the N-terminal Ser residues 29-46, suggesting a novel mechanism of regulation of VP30 phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that targeting PP1 with small molecules is a feasible approach to achieve dysregulation of the EBOV polymerase activity. This novel approach may be used for the development of antivirals against EBOV and other filovirus species. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Protein-bound Polysaccharide-K Inhibits Hedgehog Signaling Through Down-regulation of MAML3 and RBPJ Transcription Under Hypoxia, Suppressing the Malignant Phenotype in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akio; Onishi, Hideya; Imaizumi, Akira; Kawamoto, Makoto; Fujimura, Akiko; Oyama, Yasuhiro; Katano, Mitsuo

    2016-08-01

    Hedgehog signaling is activated in pancreatic cancer and could be a therapeutic target. We previously demonstrated that recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin-kappa-J region (RBPJ) and mastermind-like 3 (MAML3) contribute to the hypoxia-induced up-regulation of Smoothened (SMO) transcription. We have also shown that protein-bound polysaccharide-K (PSK) could be effective for refractory pancreatic cancer that down-regulates SMO transcription under hypoxia. In this study, we evaluated whether the anticancer mechanism of PSK involves inhibiting RBPJ and MAML3 expression under hypoxia. PSK reduced SMO, MAML3 and RBPJ expression in pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxia. PSK also blocked RBPJ-induced invasiveness under hypoxia by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase expression. Lastly, we showed that PSK attenuated RBPJ-induced proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that PSK suppresses Hedgehog signaling through down-regulation of MAML3 and RBPJ transcription under hypoxia, inhibiting the induction of a malignant phenotype in pancreatic cancer. Our results may lead to development of new treatments for refractory pancreatic cancer using PSK as a Hedgehog inhibitor. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Androgen Receptor (AR) Suppresses Normal Human Prostate Epithelial Cell Proliferation via AR/β-catenin/TCF-4 Complex Inhibition of c-MYC Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Lizamma; van der Schoor, Freek; Dalrymple, Susan L.; Isaacs, John T.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Physiologic testosterone continuously stimulates prostate stromal cell secretion of paracrine growth factors (PGFs), which if unopposed would induce hyperplastic overgrowth of normal prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). METHODS Lentiviral shRNA stable knock down of c-MYC, β-catenin, or TCF-4 completely inhibits normal (i.e., non-transformed) human PrECs growth. c-MYC enhancer driven reporter expression and growth is inhibited by two chemically distinct molecules, which prevent β-catenin signaling either by blocking TCF-4 binding (i.e., toxoflavin) or by stimulating degradation (i.e., AVX939). Recombinant DKK1 protein at a dose, which inhibits activation of canonical Wnt signaling does not inhibit PrEC growth. Nuclear β-catenin translocation and PrEC growth is prevented by both lack of PGFs or Akt inhibitor-I. Growth inhibition induced by lack of PGFs, toxoflavin, or Akt inhibitor-I is overcome by constitutive c-MYC transcription. RESULTS In the presence of continuous PGF signaling, PrEC hyperplasia is prevented by androgen binding to AR suppressing c-MYC transcription, resulting in G0 arrest/terminal differentiation independent of Rb, p21, p27, FoxP3, or down regulation of growth factors receptors and instead involves androgen-induced formation of AR/β-catenin/TCF-4 complexes, which suppress c-MYC transcription. Such suppression does not occur when AR is mutated in its zinc-finger binding domain. DISCUSSION Proliferation of non-transformed human PrECs is dependent upon c-MYC transcription via formation/binding of β-catenin/TCF-4 complexes at both 5′ and 3′ c-MYC enhancers stimulated by Wnt-independent, PGF induced Akt signaling. In the presence of continuous PGF signaling, PrEC hyperplasia is prevented by androgen-induced formation of AR/β-catenin/TCF-4 complexes, which retains binding to 3′ c-MYC enhancer, but now suppresses c-MYC transcription. PMID:24913829

  4. Codonolactone, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Chloranthus henryi Hemsl, inhibits breast cancer cell invasion, migration and metastasis by downregulating the transcriptional activity of Runx2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Bin; Zou, Ruolan; Tu, Xiuying; Tan, Songlin; Lu, Hong; Liu, Zhaojie; Fu, Jianjiang

    2014-11-01

    Metastasis is the most insidious aspect of breast cancer, but effective strategies to control this malignant process are still lacking. In previous studies, we screened over 200 extracts from plants of genus Chloranthaceae by bioactivity-guided fractionation, and found that Codonolactone (CLT) exhibited potential antimetastatic properties in breast cancer cells. This sesquiterpene lactone was isolated from Chloranthus henryi Hemsl, and is also found in other medical herbs, such as Codonopsis pilosula, Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz and others. Here, we report that CLT inhibited the ability of invasion and migration in metastatic breast cancer cells. Furthermore, CLT exhibited significant suppression on formation of lung metastatic foci of breast cancer in vivo. We next investigated the mechanism of CLT-induced metastasis inhibitory effects in breast cancer cells. A significant inhibition on activity and expression of MMP-9 and MMP-13 was observed. Moreover, data from western blotting, Runx2 transcription factor assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that binding ability of Runx2 to sequences of the mmp-13 promoter was inhibited by CLT. Collectively, these findings suggested that the antimetastatic properties of CLT in breast cancer were due to the inhibition of MMPs, which might be associated with a downregulation of Runx2 transcriptional activity.

  5. Antisense oligonucleotides effectively inhibit the co-transcriptional splicing of a Candida group I intron in vitro and in vivo: Implications for antifungal therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libin; Leibowitz, Michael J; Zhang, Yi

    2009-02-18

    Self-splicing of group I intron from the 26S rRNA of Candida albicans is essential for maturation of the host RNA. Here, we demonstrated that the co-transcriptional splicing of the intron in vitro was blocked by antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) targeting the P3-P7 core of the intron. The core-targeted AON effectively and specifically inhibited the intron splicing from its host RNA in living C. albicans. Furthermore, flow cytometry experiments showed that the growth inhibition was caused by a fungicidal effect. For the first time, we showed that an AON targeting the ribozyme core folding specifically inhibits the endogenous ribozyme splicing in living cells and specifically kills the intron-containing fungal strains, which sheds light on the development of antifungal drugs in the future.

  6. Dual Functions of Rift Valley Fever Virus NSs Protein: Inhibition of Host mRNA Transcription and Post-transcriptional Downregulation of Protein Kinase PKR

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Narayanan, Krishna; Won, Sungyong; Kamitani, Wataru; Peters, C. J.; Makino, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is a negative-stranded RNA virus carrying a single-stranded, tripartite RNA genome. RVFV is an important zoonotic pathogen transmitted by mosquitoes and causes large outbreaks among ruminants and humans in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human patients develop an acute febrile illness, followed by a fatal hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis or ocular diseases. A viral nonstructural protein, NSs, is a major viral virulence factor. Past studies showed that NSs suppresses the transcription of host mRNAs, including interferon-β mRNAs. Here we demonstrated that the NSs protein induced post-transcriptional downregulation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase, PKR, to prevent phosphorylation of eIF2α and promoted viral translation in infected cells. These two biological activities of the NSs most probably have a synergistic effect in suppressing host innate immune functions and facilitate efficient viral replication in infected mammalian hosts. PMID:19751406

  7. Nuclear MxA proteins form a complex with influenza virus NP and inhibit the transcription of the engineered influenza virus genome

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Kadir; Mibayashi, Masaki; Sugiyama, Kenji; Saito, Shoko; Numajiri, Akiko; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2004-01-01

    Mx proteins belong to the dynamin superfamily of high molecular weight GTPases and interfere with multiplication of a wide variety of viruses. Earlier studies show that nuclear mouse Mx1 and human MxA designed to be localized in the nucleus inhibit the transcription step of the influenza virus genome. Here we set a transient influenza virus transcription system using luciferase as a reporter gene and cells expressing the three RNA polymerase subunits, PB1, PB2 and PA, and NP. We used this reporter assay system and nuclear-localized MxA proteins to get clues for elucidating the anti-influenza virus activity of MxA. Nuclear-localized VP16-MxA and MxA-TAg NLS strongly interfered with the influenza virus transcription. Over-expression of PB2 led to a slight resumption of the transcription inhibition by nuclear MxA, whereas over-expression of PB1 and PA did not affect the MxA activity. Of interest is that the inhibitory activity of the nuclear MxA was markedly neutralized by over-expression of NP. An NP devoid of its C-terminal region, but containing the N-terminal RNA binding domain, also neutralized the VP16-MxA activity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas an NP lacking the N-terminal region did not affect the VP16-MxA activity. Further, not only VP16-MxA but also the wild-type MxA was found to interact with NP in influenza virus-infected cells. This indicates that the nuclear MxA suppresses the influenza virus transcription by interacting with not only PB2 but also NP. PMID:14752052

  8. Rift Valley fever virus NSs protein promotes post-transcriptional downregulation of protein kinase PKR and inhibits eIF2alpha phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Narayanan, Krishna; Won, Sungyong; Kamitani, Wataru; Peters, C J; Makino, Shinji

    2009-02-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) is a negative-stranded RNA virus with a tripartite genome. RVFV is transmitted by mosquitoes and causes fever and severe hemorrhagic illness among humans, and fever and high rates of abortions in livestock. A nonstructural RVFV NSs protein inhibits the transcription of host mRNAs, including interferon-beta mRNA, and is a major virulence factor. The present study explored a novel function of the RVFV NSs protein by testing the replication of RVFV lacking the NSs gene in the presence of actinomycin D (ActD) or alpha-amanitin, both of which served as a surrogate of the host mRNA synthesis suppression function of the NSs. In the presence of the host-transcriptional inhibitors, the replication of RVFV lacking the NSs protein, but not that carrying NSs, induced double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR)-mediated eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)2alpha phosphorylation, leading to the suppression of host and viral protein translation. RVFV NSs promoted post-transcriptional downregulation of PKR early in the course of the infection and suppressed the phosphorylated eIF2alpha accumulation. These data suggested that a combination of RVFV replication and NSs-induced host transcriptional suppression induces PKR-mediated eIF2alpha phosphorylation, while the NSs facilitates efficient viral translation by downregulating PKR and inhibiting PKR-mediated eIF2alpha phosphorylation. Thus, the two distinct functions of the NSs, i.e., the suppression of host transcription, including that of type I interferon mRNAs, and the downregulation of PKR, work together to prevent host innate antiviral functions, allowing efficient replication and survival of RVFV in infected mammalian hosts.

  9. Inhibition of NF-kappaB-mediated transcription and induction of apoptosis in human breast cancer cells by epoxypseudoisoeugenol-2-methyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guoyi; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Husnu Can Baser, K; Kirimer, Nese; Pasco, David S; Khan, Ikhlas A; Khan, Shabana I

    2009-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent woman cancers. Genomic instability, accumulative mutations, and subsequent changes in intracellular signaling cascades play key roles in the development of human breast cancers. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) has been implicated in oncogenesis of breast cancers and is known to be associated with resistance to anticancer agents and apoptosis. Blocking NF-kappaB signaling may represent a therapeutic strategy in breast cancer therapy. The objective of this study is to investigate the in vitro effects of epoxypseudoisoeugenol-2-methyl butyrate (EPB), a phenylpropranoid isolated from Pimpinella corymbosa, on the activation of NF-kappaB, cell growth, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in MCF-7 (estrogen-dependent) and BT-549 (estrogen-independent) breast cancer cells. Transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB was measured by cell based reporter gene assay. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. Cell cycle analysis was carried out by flow cytometry and apoptosis was observed by DAPI staining assy. EPB inhibited the NF-kappaB-mediated transcription activity induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in MCF-7 cells. EPB also inhibited constitutive NF-kappaB transcriptional activity in BT-549 cells. EPB inhibited the proliferation of both MCF-7 and BT-549 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. EPB induced cell cycle arrest in G(1)/G(0) phase and apoptosis in both MCF-7 and BT 549 cells. These in vitro results indicated that EPB has a potential for use against both hormone-dependent and hormone-independent breast cancers and its effects seem to be mediated by inhibiting the NF-kappaB activity.

  10. The B-Cell Specific Transcription Factor, Oct-2, Promotes Epstein-Barr Virus Latency by Inhibiting the Viral Immediate-Early Protein, BZLF1

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Amanda R.; Kwek, Swee Sen; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent-lytic switch is mediated by the BZLF1 immediate-early protein. EBV is normally latent in memory B cells, but cellular factors which promote viral latency specifically in B cells have not been identified. In this report, we demonstrate that the B-cell specific transcription factor, Oct-2, inhibits the function of the viral immediate-early protein, BZLF1, and prevents lytic viral reactivation. Co-transfected Oct-2 reduces the ability of BZLF1 to activate lytic gene expression in two different latently infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, Oct-2 inhibits BZLF1 activation of lytic EBV promoters in reporter gene assays, and attenuates BZLF1 binding to lytic viral promoters in vivo. Oct-2 interacts directly with BZLF1, and this interaction requires the DNA-binding/dimerization domain of BZLF1 and the POU domain of Oct-2. An Oct-2 mutant (Δ262–302) deficient for interaction with BZLF1 is unable to inhibit BZLF1-mediated lytic reactivation. However, an Oct-2 mutant defective for DNA-binding (Q221A) retains the ability to inhibit BZLF1 transcriptional effects and DNA-binding. Importantly, shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Oct-2 expression in several EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cell lines increases the level of lytic EBV gene expression, while decreasing EBNA1 expression. Moreover, treatments which induce EBV lytic reactivation, such as anti-IgG cross-linking and chemical inducers, also decrease the level of Oct-2 protein expression at the transcriptional level. We conclude that Oct-2 potentiates establishment of EBV latency in B cells. PMID:22346751

  11. Triple helix-forming oligonucleotide corresponding to the polypyrimidine sequence in the rat alpha 1(I) collagen promoter specifically inhibits factor binding and transcription.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, A; Kandala, J C; Weber, K T; Guntaka, R V

    1996-01-19

    Type I and III fibrillar collagens are the major structural proteins of the extracellular matrix found in various organs including the myocardium. Abnormal and progressive accumulation of fibrillar type I collagen in the interstitial spaces compromises organ function and therefore, the study of transcriptional regulation of this gene and specific targeting of its expression is of major interest. Transient transfection of adult cardiac fibroblasts indicate that the polypurine-polypyrimidine sequence of alpha 1(I) collagen promoter between nucleotides - 200 and -140 represents an overall positive regulatory element. DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggest that multiple factors bind to different elements of this promoter region. We further demonstrate that the unique polypyrimidine sequence between -172 and -138 of the promoter represents a suitable target for a single-stranded polypurine oligonucleotide (TFO) to form a triple helix DNA structure. Modified electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that this TFO specifically inhibits the protein-DNA interaction within the target region. In vitro transcription assays and transient transfection experiments demonstrate that the transcriptional activity of the promoter is inhibited by this oligonucleotide. We propose that TFOs represent a therapeutic potential to specifically influence the expression of alpha 1(I) collagen gene in various disease states where abnormal type I collagen accumulation is known to occur.

  12. Gas6 Induces Growth, β-Catenin Stabilization, and T-Cell Factor Transcriptional Activation in Contact-Inhibited C57 Mammary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goruppi, Sandro; Chiaruttini, Cristina; Ruaro, Maria Elisabetta; Varnum, Brian; Schneider, Claudio

    2001-01-01

    Gas6 is a growth factor related to protein S that was identified as the ligand for the Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family. In this study, we show that Gas6 induces a growth response in a cultured mammalian mammary cell line, C57MG. The presence of Gas6 in the medium induces growth after confluence and similarly causes cell cycle reentry of density-inhibited C57MG cells. We show that Axl RTK but not Rse is efficiently activated by Gas6 in density-inhibited C57MG cells. We have analyzed the signaling required for the Gas6 proliferative effect and found a requirement for PI3K-, S6K-, and Ras-activated pathways. We also demonstrate that Gas6 activates Akt and concomitantly inhibits GSK3 activity in a wortmannin-dependent manner. Interestingly, Gas6 induces up-regulation of cytosolic β-catenin, while membrane-associated β-catenin remains unaffected. Stabilization of β-catenin in C57MG cells is correlated with activation of a T-cell factor (TCF)-responsive transcriptional element. We thus provide evidence that Gas6 is mitogenic and induces β-catenin proto-oncogene stabilization and subsequent TCF/Lef transcriptional activation in a mammary system. These results suggest that Gas6-Axl interaction, through stabilization of β-catenin, may have a role in mammary development and/or be involved in the progression of mammary tumors. PMID:11154277

  13. Methylglyoxal inhibits seed germination and root elongation and up-regulates transcription of stress-responsive genes in ABA-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hoque, T S; Uraji, M; Tuya, A; Nakamura, Y; Murata, Y

    2012-09-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a highly reactive metabolite derived from glycolysis. In this study, we examined the effect of MG on seed germination, root elongation, chlorosis and stress-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis using an abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutant, aba2-2. In the wild type, 0.1 mm MG did not affect germination but delayed root elongation, whereas 1.0 mm MG inhibited germination and root elongation and induced chlorosis. MG increased transcription levels of RD29B and RAB18 in a dose-dependent manner but did not affect RD29A transcription level. In contrast, in the aba2-2 mutant, MG inhibition of seed germination at 1.0 mm and 10.0 mm and a delay of root elongation at 0.1 mm MG were mitigated, although there was no significant difference in chlorosis between the wild type and mutant. Moreover, the aba2-2 mutation impaired MG-induced RD29B and RAB18 gene expression. These observations suggest that MG not only directly inhibits germination and root elongation but also indirectly modulates these processes via endogenous ABA in Arabidopsis. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  14. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional inhibition of HMGCR and PC biosynthesis by geraniol in 2 Hep-G2 cell proliferation linked pathways.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Rosana; Montero Villegas, Sandra; Abba, Martín C; de Bravo, Margarita G; Polo, Mónica P

    2013-06-01

    Geraniol, present in the essential oils of many aromatic plants, has in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity against several cell lines. We investigated the effects of geraniol on lipid metabolic pathways involved in Hep-G2 cell proliferation and found that geraniol inhibits the mevalonate pathway, phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis, cell growth, and cell cycle progression (with an arrest occurring at the G0/G1 interphase) and increases apoptosis. The expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis, was inhibited at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, as assessed by real-time RT-PCR, Western blots, and [(14)C]HMG-CoA-conversion radioactivity assays. That geraniol decreased cholesterogenesis but increased the incorporation of [(14)C]acetate into other nonsaponifiable metabolites indicated the existence of a second control point between squalene and cholesterol involved in redirecting the flow of cholesterol-derived carbon toward other metabolites of the mevalonate pathway. That exogenous mevalonate failed to restore growth in geraniol-inhibited cells suggests that, in addition to the inhibition of HMGCR, other dose-dependent actions exist through which geraniol can impact the mevalonate pathway and consequently inhibit cell proliferation. These results suggest that geraniol, a nontoxic compound found in many fruits and herbs, exhibits notable potential as a natural agent for combatting cancer and (or) cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Mbd3/NuRD controls lymphoid cell fate and inhibits tumorigenesis by repressing a B cell transcriptional program

    PubMed Central

    Hamey, Fiona K.; Errami, Youssef

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation of lineage-committed cells from multipotent progenitors requires the establishment of accessible chromatin at lineage-specific transcriptional enhancers and promoters, which is mediated by pioneer transcription factors that recruit activating chromatin remodeling complexes. Here we show that the Mbd3/nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) chromatin remodeling complex opposes this transcriptional pioneering during B cell programming of multipotent lymphoid progenitors by restricting chromatin accessibility at B cell enhancers and promoters. Mbd3/NuRD-deficient lymphoid progenitors therefore prematurely activate a B cell transcriptional program and are biased toward overproduction of pro–B cells at the expense of T cell progenitors. The striking reduction in early thymic T cell progenitors results in compensatory hyperproliferation of immature thymocytes and development of T cell lymphoma. Our results reveal that Mbd3/NuRD can regulate multilineage differentiation by constraining the activation of dormant lineage-specific enhancers and promoters. In this way, Mbd3/NuRD protects the multipotency of lymphoid progenitors, preventing B cell–programming transcription factors from prematurely enacting lineage commitment. Mbd3/NuRD therefore controls the fate of lymphoid progenitors, ensuring appropriate production of lineage-committed progeny and suppressing tumor formation. PMID:28899870

  16. PICT-1 triggers a pro-death autophagy through inhibiting rRNA transcription and AKT/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongbo; Duo, Yanhong; Hu, Bo; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Fang; Tsai, Hsiangi; Zhang, Jianping; Zhou, Lanzhen; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Xinyu; Huang, Laiqiang

    2016-11-29

    PICT-1 was originally identified as a tumor suppressor. Here, we found that PICT-1 overexpression triggered pro-death autophagy without nucleolar disruption or p53 accumulation in U251 and MCF7 cells. Truncated PICT-1 fragments 181-346 and 1-346, which partly or totally lack nucleolar localization, showed weaker autophagy-inducing effects than full-length PICT-1 and a well-defined nucleolar mutant (181-479). Furthermore, PICT-1 partly localizes to the nucleolar fibrillar center (FC) and directly binds to ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene loci, where it interacts with upstream binding factor (UBF). Overexpression of PICT-1 or the 181-479 mutant, but not the 1-346 or 181-346 mutants, markedly inhibited the phosphorylation of UBF and the recruitment of rRNA polymerase I (Pol I) to the rDNA promoter in response to serum stimulation, thereby suppressing rRNA transcription, suggesting that rRNA transcription inhibition might be an important contributor to PICT-1-induced autophagy. This is supported by the finding that CX-5461, a specific Pol I inhibitor, also induced autophagy. In addition, both CX-5461 and PICT-1, but not the 1-346 or 181-346 mutants, significantly suppressed the activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Our data show that PICT-1 triggers pro-death autophagy through inhibition of rRNA transcription and the inactivation of AKT/mTOR/p70S6K pathway, independent of nucleolar disruption and p53 activation.

  17. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reductionmore » of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.« less

  18. Inhibition of Different Histone Acetyltransferases (HATs) Uncovers Transcription-Dependent and -Independent Acetylation-Mediated Mechanisms in Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merschbaecher, Katja; Hatko, Lucyna; Folz, Jennifer; Mueller, Uli

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of histones changes the efficiency of the transcription processes and thus contributes to the formation of long-term memory (LTM). In our comparative study, we used two inhibitors to characterize the contribution of different histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to appetitive associative learning in the honeybee. For one we applied…

  19. NF-κB Regulation of YY1 Inhibits Skeletal Myogenesis through Transcriptional Silencing of Myofibrillar Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huating; Hertlein, Erin; Bakkar, Nadine; Sun, Hao; Acharyya, Swarnali; Wang, Jingxin; Carathers, Micheal; Davuluri, Ramana; Guttridge, Denis C.

    2007-01-01

    NF-κB signaling is implicated as an important regulator of skeletal muscle homeostasis, but the mechanisms by which this transcription factor contributes to muscle maturation and turnover remain unclear. To gain insight into these mechanisms, gene expression profiling was examined in C2C12 myoblasts devoid of NF-κB activity. Interestingly, even in proliferating myoblasts, the absence of NF-κB caused the pronounced induction of several myofibrillar genes, suggesting that NF-κB functions as a negative regulator of late-stage muscle differentiation. Although several myofibrillar promoters contain predicted NF-κB binding sites, functional analysis using the troponin-I2 gene as a model revealed that NF-κB-mediated repression does not occur through direct DNA binding. In the search for an indirect mediator, the transcriptional repressor YinYang1 (YY1) was identified. While inducers of NF-κB stimulated YY1 expression in multiple cell types, genetic ablation of the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-κB in both cultured cells and adult skeletal muscle correlated with reduced YY1 transcripts and protein. NF-κB regulation of YY1 occurred at the transcriptional level, mediated by direct binding of the p50/p65 heterodimer complex to the YY1 promoter. Furthermore, YY1 was found associated with multiple myofibrillar promoters in C2C12 myoblasts containing NF-κB activity. Based on these results, we propose that NF-κB regulation of YY1 and transcriptional silencing of myofibrillar genes represent a new mechanism by which NF-κB functions in myoblasts to modulate skeletal muscle differentiation. PMID:17438126

  20. Renin-angiotensin system inhibition ameliorates CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice through the inactivation of nuclear transcription factor kappa B.

    PubMed

    Saber, Sameh; Mahmoud, Amr A A; Helal, Noha S; El-Ahwany, Eman; Abdelghany, Rasha H

    2018-06-01

    Therapeutic interventions for liver fibrosis are still limited due to the complicated molecular pathogenesis. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) seems to contribute to the development of hepatic fibrosis. Therefore, we aimed to examine the effect of RAS inhibition on CCl 4 -induced liver fibrosis. Mice were treated with silymarin (30 mg·kg -1 ), perindopril (1 mg·kg -1 ), fosinopril (2 mg·kg -1 ), or losartan (10 mg·kg -1 ). The administration of RAS inhibitors improved liver histology and decreased protein expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and hepatic content of hydroxyproline. These effects found to be mediated via inactivation of nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway by the inhibition of NFκB p65 phosphorylation at the Ser536 residue and phosphorylation-induced degradation of nuclear factor kappa-B inhibitor alpha (NFκBia) subsequently inhibited NFκB-induced TNF-α and TGF-β1, leading to lower levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We concluded that the tissue affinity of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) has no impact on its antifibrotic activity and that interfering the RAS either through the inhibition of ACE or the blockade of AT1R has the same therapeutic benefit. These results suggest RAS inhibitors as promising candidates for further clinical trials in the management of hepatic fibrosis.

  1. N-(4-bromophenethyl) Caffeamide Inhibits Melanogenesis by Regulating AKT/Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Beta/Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor and Tyrosinase-related Protein 1/Tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Chen, Chien-Chia; Lin, Ping; You, Ya-Jhen; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Skin color is primarily produced by melanin, which is a crucial pigment that protects the skin from UV-induced damage and prevents carcinogenesis. However, accumulated melanin in the skin may cause hyperpigmentation and related disorders. Melanin synthesis comprises consecutive oxidative reactions, and tyrosinase is the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting process of melanogenesis. In this study, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1) and TRP-2 contributed to melanin formation. N-(4-bromophenethyl) caffeamide ((E)-N-(4-bromophenethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acrylamide; K36H), a caffeic acid phenyl amide derivative, inhibited α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-induced melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity in B16F0 cells. In addition, K36H reduced the protein expression of the phospho-cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase, and TRP-1. Moreover, K36H promoted AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting MITF transcription activity. Thus, K36H attenuated α-MSH-induced cAMP pathways, contributing to hypopigmentation. The results of a safety assay revealed that K36H did not exhibit cytotoxicity or irritate the skin or eyes. According to these results, K36H may have the potential to be used as a whitening agent in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

  2. Orientia tsutsugamushi uses two Ank effectors to modulate NF-κB p65 nuclear transport and inhibit NF-κB transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sean M; Rodino, Kyle G; Adcox, Haley E; Carlyon, Jason A

    2018-05-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi causes scrub typhus, a potentially fatal infection that threatens over one billion people. Nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, NF-κB, is the central initiating cellular event in the antimicrobial response. Here, we report that NF-κB p65 nuclear accumulation and NF-κB-dependent transcription are inhibited in O. tsutsugamushi infected HeLa cells and/or primary macrophages, even in the presence of TNFα. The bacterium modulates p65 subcellular localization by neither degrading it nor inhibiting IκBα degradation. Rather, it exploits host exportin 1 to mediate p65 nuclear export, as this phenomenon is leptomycin B-sensitive. O. tsutsugamushi antagonizes NF-κB-activated transcription even when exportin 1 is inhibited and NF-κB consequently remains in the nucleus. Two ankyrin repeat-containing effectors (Anks), Ank1 and Ank6, each of which possess a C-terminal F-box and exhibit 58.5% amino acid identity, are linked to the pathogen's ability to modulate NF-κB. When ectopically expressed, both translocate to the nucleus, abrogate NF-κB-activated transcription in an exportin 1-independent manner, and pronouncedly reduce TNFα-induced p65 nuclear levels by exportin 1-dependent means. Flag-tagged Ank 1 and Ank6 co-immunoprecipitate p65 and exportin 1. Both also bind importin β1, a host protein that is essential for the classical nuclear import pathway. Importazole, which blocks importin β1 activity, abrogates Ank1 and Ank6 nuclear translocation. The Ank1 and Ank6 regions that bind importin β1 also mediate their transport into the nucleus. Yet, these regions are distinct from those that bind p65/exportin 1. The Ank1 and Ank6 F-box and the region that lies between it and the ankyrin repeat domain are essential for blocking p65 nuclear accumulation. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which O. tsutsugamushi modulates the activity and nuclear transport of NF-κB p65 and identify the first microbial proteins that co-opt both

  3. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 inhibits p21{sup WAF1} transcription independently of p53 by inactivating p150{sup Sal2}

    SciTech Connect

    Parroche, Peggy; Institut Federatif de Recherche 128 BioSciences Gerland-Lyon Sud; Touka, Majid

    2011-09-01

    HPV16 E6 deregulates G1/S cell cycle progression through p53 degradation preventing transcription of the CDK inhibitor p21{sup WAF1}. However, additional mechanisms independent of p53 inactivation appear to exist. Here, we report that HPV16 E6 targets the cellular factor p150{sup Sal2}, which positively regulates p21{sup WAF1} transcription. HPV16 E6 associates with p150{sup Sal2}, inducing its functional inhibition by preventing its binding to cis elements on the p21{sup WAF1} promoter. A HPV16 E6 mutant, L110Q, which was unable to bind p150{sup Sal2}, did not affect the ability of the cellular protein to bind p21{sup WAF1} promoter, underlining the linkage between these events.more » These data describe a novel mechanism by which HPV16 E6 induces cell cycle deregulation with a p53-independent pathway. The viral oncoprotein targets p150{sup Sal2}, a positive transcription regulator of p21{sup WAF1} gene, preventing G1/S arrest and allowing cellular proliferation and efficient viral DNA replication.« less

  4. Reciprocal inhibition of p53 and nuclear factor-kappaB transcriptional activities determines cell survival or death in neurons.

    PubMed

    Culmsee, Carsten; Siewe, Jan; Junker, Vera; Retiounskaia, Marina; Schwarz, Stephanie; Camandola, Simonetta; El-Metainy, Shahira; Behnke, Hagen; Mattson, Mark P; Krieglstein, Josef

    2003-09-17

    The tumor suppressor and transcription factor p53 is a key modulator of cellular stress responses, and activation of p53 precedes apoptosis in many cell types. Controversial reports exist on the role of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in p53-mediated apoptosis, depending on the cell type and experimental conditions. Therefore, we sought to elucidate the role of NF-kappaB in p53-mediated neuron death. In cultured neurons DNA damaging compounds induced activation of p53, whereas NF-kappaB activity declined significantly. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-alpha (PFT) preserved NF-kappaB activity and protected neurons against apoptosis. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed enhanced p53 binding to the transcriptional cofactor p300 after induction of DNA damage, whereas binding of p300 to NF-kappaB was reduced. In contrast, PFT blocked the interaction of p53 with the cofactor, whereas NF-kappaB binding to p300 was enhanced. Most interestingly, similar results were observed after oxygen glucose deprivation in cultured neurons and in ischemic brain tissue. Ischemia-induced repression of NF-kappaB activity was prevented and brain damage was reduced by the p53 inhibitor PFT in a dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that a balanced competitive interaction of p53 and NF-kappaB with the transcriptional cofactor p300 exists in neurons. Exposure of neurons to lethal stress activates p53 and disrupts NF-kappaB binding to p300, thereby blocking NF-kappaB-mediated survival signaling. Inhibitors of p53 provide pronounced neuroprotective effects because they block p53-mediated induction of cell death and concomitantly enhance NF-kappaB-induced survival signaling.

  5. Apple EIN3 BINDING F-box 1 inhibits the activity of three apple EIN3-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Tacken, Emma J.; Ireland, Hilary S.; Wang, Yen-Yi; Putterill, Jo; Schaffer, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Fruit ripening in Malus× domestica (apple) is controlled by ethylene. Work in model species has shown that following the detection of ethylene, the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3 (EIN3) transcription factor is stabilized, leading to an increase in transcript accumulation of ethylene-responsive genes, such as POLYGALACTURONASE1 (PG1). In the absence of ethylene, the EIN3 BINDING F-box (EBF) proteins rapidly degrade EIN3 via the ubiquitination/SCF (Skp, Cullin, F-Box) proteasome pathway. In this study, we aim to identify and characterize the apple EBF genes, and test their activity against apple EIN3-like proteins (EILs). Methodology The apple genome sequence was mined for EBF-like genes. The expression of EBF-like genes was measured during fruit development. Using a transient assay in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, the activity of three apple EILs was tested against the PG1 promoter, with and without ethylene and EBF1. Principal results Four EBF-like genes in apple were identified and grouped into two sub-clades. Sub-clade I genes had constant expression over fruit development while sub-clade II genes increased in expression at ripening. EBF1 was shown to reduce the transactivation of the apple PG1 promoter by the EIL1, EIL2 and EIL3 transcription factors in the presence of ethylene. Conclusions The apple EBF1 gene identified here is likely to be a functionally conserved EBF orthologue, modulating EIL activity in apples. The activity of EBF1 suggests that it is not specific to a single EIL, instead acting as a global regulator of apple EIL transcription factors. PMID:23585922

  6. The Yersinia pestis Rcs phosphorelay inhibits biofilm formation by repressing transcription of the diguanylate cyclase gene hmsT.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Cheng; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Darby, Creg

    2012-04-01

    Yersinia pestis, which causes bubonic plague, forms biofilms in fleas, its insect vectors, as a means to enhance transmission. Biofilm development is positively regulated by hmsT, encoding a diguanylate cyclase that synthesizes the bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP. Biofilm development is negatively regulated by the Rcs phosphorelay signal transduction system. In this study, we show that Rcs-negative regulation is accomplished by repressing transcription of hmsT.

  7. NOS1-derived nitric oxide promotes NF-κB transcriptional activity through inhibition of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Mirza Saqib; Zaichick, Sofia V.; Mao, Mao; de Abreu, Andre L.; Bakhshi, Farnaz R.; Hart, Peter C.; Saqib, Uzma; Deng, Jing; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Block, Michelle L.; Vogel, Stephen M.; Malik, Asrar B.; Consolaro, Marcia E.L.; Christman, John W.; Minshall, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    The NF-κB pathway is central to the regulation of inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that the low-output nitric oxide (NO) synthase 1 (NOS1 or nNOS) plays a critical role in the inflammatory response by promoting the activity of NF-κB. Specifically, NOS1-derived NO production in macrophages leads to proteolysis of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), alleviating its repression of NF-κB transcriptional activity. As a result, NOS1−/− mice demonstrate reduced cytokine production, lung injury, and mortality when subjected to two different models of sepsis. Isolated NOS1−/− macrophages demonstrate similar defects in proinflammatory transcription on challenge with Gram-negative bacterial LPS. Consistently, we found that activated NOS1−/− macrophages contain increased SOCS1 protein and decreased levels of p65 protein compared with wild-type cells. NOS1-dependent S-nitrosation of SOCS1 impairs its binding to p65 and targets SOCS1 for proteolysis. Treatment of NOS1−/− cells with exogenous NO rescues both SOCS1 degradation and stabilization of p65 protein. Point mutation analysis demonstrated that both Cys147 and Cys179 on SOCS1 are required for its NO-dependent degradation. These findings demonstrate a fundamental role for NOS1-derived NO in regulating TLR4-mediated inflammatory gene transcription, as well as the intensity and duration of the resulting host immune response. PMID:26324446

  8. Anticancer activity of calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb. through downregulation of cyclin D1 via inducing proteasomal degradation and transcriptional inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Bin; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Son, Ho-Jun; Um, Yurry; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2017-09-05

    Although it has been reported to contain high polyphenols, the pharmacological studies of the calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb (DKC) have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we elucidated anti-cancer activity and potential molecular mechanism of DKC against human colorectal cancer cells. Anti-cell proliferative effect of 70% ethanol extracts from the calyx of Diospyros kaki (DKC-E70) was evaluated by MTT assay. The effect of DKC-E70 on the expression of cyclin D1 in the protein and mRNA level was evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. DKC-E70 suppressed the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480, LoVo and HT-29. Although DKC-E70 decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level, decreased level of cyclin D1 protein by DKC-E70 occurred at the earlier time than that of cyclin D1 mRNA, which indicates that DKC-E70-mediated downregulation of cyclin D1 protein may be a consequence of the induction of degradation and transcriptional inhibition of cyclin D1. In cyclin D1 degradation, we found that cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70 was attenuated in presence of MG132. In addition, DKC-E70 phosphorylated threonine-286 (T286) of cyclin D1 and T286A abolished cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70. We also observed that DKC-E70-mediated T286 phosphorylation and subsequent cyclin D1 degradation was blocked in presence of the inhibitors of ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β. In cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition, DKC-E70 inhibited the expression of β-catenin and TCF4, and β-catenin/TCF-dependent luciferase activity. Our results suggest that DKC-E70 may downregulate cyclin D1 as one of the potential anti-cancer targets through cyclin D1 degradation by T286 phosphorylation dependent on ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β, and cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition through Wnt signaling. From these findings, DKC-E70 has potential to be a candidate for the development of chemoprevention or therapeutic agents for human colorectal cancer.

  9. Betulinic acid inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and induces proteasome-dependent and -independent downregulation of specificity proteins (Sp) transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Betulinic acid (BA) inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines and tumors and the effects of BA have been attributed to its mitochondriotoxicity and inhibition of multiple pro-oncogenic factors. Previous studies show that BA induces proteasome-dependent degradation of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in prostate cancer cells and this study focused on the mechanism of action of BA in colon cancer cells. Methods The effects of BA on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis and tumor growth in vivo were determined using standardized assays. The effects of BA on Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analyzed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a) and ZBTB10 mRNA expression. Results BA inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in RKO and SW480 colon cancer cells and inhibited tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing RKO cells as xenograft. BA also decreased expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors which are overexpressed in colon cancer cells and decreased levels of several Sp-regulated genes including survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor, p65 sub-unit of NFκB, epidermal growth factor receptor, cyclin D1, and pituitary tumor transforming gene-1. The mechanism of action of BA was dependent on cell context, since BA induced proteasome-dependent and proteasome-independent downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in SW480 and RKO cells, respectively. In RKO cells, the mechanism of BA-induced repression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 was due to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ROS-mediated repression of microRNA-27a, and induction of the Sp repressor gene ZBTB10. Conclusions These results suggest that the anticancer activity of BA in colon cancer cells is due, in part, to downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors; however, the mechanism of this response is cell context-dependent. PMID:21864401

  10. Advanced glycation end-products suppress autophagic flux in podocytes by activating mammalian target of rapamycin and inhibiting nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingchen; Chen, Yuanhan; Tan, Xiaofan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Hong; Li, Zhilian; Liu, Shuangxin; Li, Ruizhao; Lin, Ting; Liao, Ruyi; Zhang, Qianmei; Dong, Wei; Shi, Wei; Liang, Xinling

    2018-06-01

    Insufficient autophagy in podocytes is related to podocyte injury in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are major factors of podocyte injury in DN. However, the role and mechanism of AGEs in autophagic dysfunction remain unknown. We investigated autophagic flux in AGE-stimulated cultured podocytes using multiple assays: western blotting, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence staining, and electron microscopy. We also utilized chloroquine and a fluorescent probe to monitor the formation and turnover of autophagosomes. Mice of the db/db strain were used to model diabetes mellitus (DM) with high levels of AGEs. To mimic DM with normal levels of AGEs as a control, we treated db/db mice with pyridoxamine to block AGE formation. AGEs impaired autophagic flux in the cultured podocytes. Compared with db/db mice with normal AGEs but high glucose levels, db/db mice with high AGEs and high glucose levels exhibited lower autophagic activity. Aberrant autophagic flux was related to hyperactive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major suppressor of autophagy. Pharmacologic inhibition of mTOR activity restored impaired autophagy. AGEs inhibited the nuclear translocation and activity of the pro-autophagic transcription factor EB (TFEB) and thus suppressed transcription of its several autophagic target genes. Conversely, TFEB overexpression prevented AGE-induced autophagy insufficiency. Attenuating mTOR activity recovered TFEB nuclear translocation under AGE stimulation. Co-immunoprecipitation assays further demonstrated the interaction between mTOR and TFEB in AGE-stimulated podocytes and in glomeruli from db/db mice. In conclusion, AGEs play a crucial part in suppressing podocyte autophagy under DM conditions. AGEs inhibited the formation and turnover of autophagosomes in podocytes by activating mTOR and inhibiting the nuclear translocation of TFEB. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibition modulates histone acetylation at gene promoter regions and affects genome-wide gene transcription in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Letícia; Gomes, Monete Rajão; daSilva, Lucas Ferreira; Pereira, Adriana da Silva Andrade; Mourão, Marina M.; Romier, Christophe; Pierce, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Treatment depends on a single drug, praziquantel, which kills the Schistosoma spp. parasite only at the adult stage. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) such as Trichostatin A (TSA) induce parasite mortality in vitro (schistosomula and adult worms), however the downstream effects of histone hyperacetylation on the parasite are not known. Methodology/Principal findings TSA treatment of adult worms in vitro increased histone acetylation at H3K9ac and H3K14ac, which are transcription activation marks, not affecting the unrelated transcription repression mark H3K27me3. We investigated the effect of TSA HDACi on schistosomula gene expression at three different time points, finding a marked genome-wide change in the transcriptome profile. Gene transcription activity was correlated with changes on the chromatin acetylation mark at gene promoter regions. Moreover, combining expression data with ChIP-Seq public data for schistosomula, we found that differentially expressed genes having the H3K4me3 mark at their promoter region in general showed transcription activation upon HDACi treatment, compared with those without the mark, which showed transcription down-regulation. Affected genes are enriched for DNA replication processes, most of them being up-regulated. Twenty out of 22 genes encoding proteins involved in reducing reactive oxygen species accumulation were down-regulated. Dozens of genes encoding proteins with histone reader motifs were changed, including SmEED from the PRC2 complex. We targeted SmEZH2 methyltransferase PRC2 component with a new EZH2 inhibitor (GSK343) and showed a synergistic effect with TSA, significantly increasing schistosomula mortality. Conclusions/Significance Genome-wide gene expression analyses have identified important pathways and cellular functions that were affected and may explain the schistosomicidal effect of TSA HDACi. The change in expression

  12. R7 Photoreceptor Axon Growth Is Temporally Controlled by the Transcription Factor Ttk69, Which Inhibits Growth in Part by Promoting Transforming Growth Factor-β/Activin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kniss, Jonathan S.; Holbrook, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Work on axon growth has classically focused on understanding how extrinsic cues control growth cone dynamics independent of the cell body. However, more recently, neuron-intrinsic transcription factors have been shown to influence both normal and regenerative axon growth, suggesting that understanding their mechanism of action is of clinical importance. We are studying axon targeting in the Drosophila visual system and here show that the BTB/POZ zinc-finger transcription factor Tramtrack69 (Ttk69) plays an instructive role in inhibiting the growth of R7 photoreceptor axon terminals. Although ttk69 mutant R7 axons project to the correct medullar target layer, M6, their terminals fail to remain retinotopically restricted and instead grow laterally within M6. This overgrowth is not caused by an inability to be repelled by neighboring R7 axons or by an inability to recognize and initiate synapse formation with postsynaptic targets. The overgrowth is progressive and occurs even if contact between ttk69 mutant R7 axons and their normal target layer is disrupted. Ttk69 is first expressed in wild-type R7s after their axons have reached the medulla; ttk69 mutant R7 axon terminal overgrowth begins shortly after this time point. We find that expressing Ttk69 prematurely in R7s collapses their growth cones and disrupts axon extension, indicating that Ttk69 plays an instructive role in this process. A TGF-β/Activin pathway was shown previously to inhibit R7 axon terminal growth. We find that Ttk69 is required for normal activation of this pathway but that Ttk69 likely also inhibits R7 axon growth by a TGF-β/Activin-independent mechanism. PMID:23345225

  13. Naphthol AS-E Phosphate Inhibits the Activity of the Transcription Factor Myb by Blocking the Interaction with the KIX Domain of the Coactivator p300.

    PubMed

    Uttarkar, Sagar; Dukare, Sandeep; Bopp, Bertan; Goblirsch, Michael; Jose, Joachim; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2015-06-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb is highly expressed in hematopoietic progenitor cells and controls the transcription of genes important for lineage determination, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Deregulation of c-Myb has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain other types of human cancer. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction of the c-Myb with the KIX domain of the coactivator p300, making the disruption of this interaction a reasonable strategy for the development of Myb inhibitors. Here, we have used bacterial Autodisplay to develop an in vitro binding assay that mimics the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have used this binding assay to investigate the potential of Naphthol AS-E phosphate, a compound known to bind to the KIX domain, to disrupt the interaction between Myb and p300. Our data show that Naphthol AS-E phosphate interferes with the Myb-KIX interaction in vitro and inhibits Myb activity in vivo. By using several human leukemia cell lines, we demonstrate that Naphthol AS-E phosphate suppresses the expression of Myb target genes and induces myeloid differentiation and apoptosis. Our work identifies Naphthol AS-E phosphate as the first low molecular weight compound that inhibits Myb activity by disrupting its interaction with p300, and suggests that inhibition of the Myb-KIX interaction might be a useful strategy for the treatment of leukemia and other tumors caused by deregulated c-Myb. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. ATXN1L, CIC, and ETS Transcription Factors Modulate Sensitivity to MAPK Pathway Inhibition | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Intrinsic resistance and RTK-RAS-MAPK pathway reactivation has limited the effectiveness of MEK and RAF inhibitors (MAPKi) in RAS- and RAF-mutant cancers. To identify genes that modulate sensitivity to MAPKi, we performed genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 loss-of-function screens in two KRAS mutant pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib. Loss of CIC, a transcriptional repressor of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5, promoted survival in the setting of MAPKi in cancer cells derived from several lineages.

  15. Isorhamnetin inhibits Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 in murine macrophages via anti-inflammatory heme oxygenase-1 induction and inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Jin, J Y; Choi, E Y; Park, H R; Choi, J I; Choi, I S; Kim, S J

    2013-12-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key proinflammatory cytokine that has been considered to be important in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Therefore, host-modulatory agents directed at inhibiting IL-6 appear to be beneficial in terms of attenuating periodontal disease progression and potentially improving disease susceptibility. In the current study, we investigated the effect of the flavonoid isorhamnetin on the production of IL-6 in murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen implicated in inflammatory periodontal disease, and its mechanisms of action. Lipopolysaccharide from P. intermedia ATCC 25611 was isolated using the standard hot phenol-water method. Culture supernatants were collected and assayed for IL-6. We used real-time PCR to quantify IL-6 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA expression. The expression of HO-1 protein and the levels of signaling proteins were monitored using immunoblot analyses. The DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was analyzed using ELISA-based assay kits. Isorhamnetin significantly down-regulated P. intermedia LPS-induced production of IL-6 as well as its mRNA expression in RAW264.7 cells. Isorhamnetin up-regulated the expression of HO-1 at both gene transcription and translation levels in cells stimulated with P. intermedia LPS. In addition, inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphyrin IX blocked the inhibitory effect of isorhamnetin on IL-6 production. Isorhamnetin failed to prevent LPS from activating either c-Jun N-terminal kinase or p38 pathways. Isorhamnetin did not inhibit NF-κB transcriptional activity at the level of inhibitory κB-α degradation. Isorhamnetin suppressed NF-κB signaling through inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB p50 subunit and attenuated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 signaling. Although further research is required to clarify the detailed mechanism of action, we propose

  16. The PDZ protein tax-interacting protein-1 inhibits beta-catenin transcriptional activity and growth of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Mutsumi; Sandy, Peter; Marzinotto, Stefania; Benetti, Roberta; Kai, Chikatoshi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Schneider, Claudio; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2003-10-03

    Wnt signaling is essential during development while deregulation of this pathway frequently leads to the formation of various tumors including colorectal carcinomas. A key component of the pathway is beta-catenin that, in association with TCF-4, directly regulates the expression of Wnt-responsive genes. To identify novel binding partners of beta-catenin that may control its transcriptional activity, we performed a mammalian two-hybrid screen and isolated the Tax-interacting protein (TIP-1). The in vivo complex formation between beta-catenin and TIP-1 was verified by coimmunoprecipitation, and a direct physical association was revealed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments in vitro. By using a panel of deletion mutants of both proteins, we demonstrate that the interaction is mediated by the PDZ (PSD-95/DLG/ZO-1 homology) domain of TIP-1 and requires primarily the last four amino acids of beta-catenin. TIP-1 overexpression resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin when tested on the TOP/FOPFLASH reporter system. Conversely, siRNA-mediated knock-down of endogenous TIP-1 slightly increased endogenous beta-catenin transactivation function. Moreover, we show that overexpression of TIP-1 reduced the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of colorectal cancer cells. These data suggest that TIP-1 may represent a novel regulatory element in the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

  17. Cinnamon Polyphenol Extract Inhibits Hyperlipidemia and Inflammation by Modulation of Transcription Factors in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Tuzcu, Zeynep; Orhan, Cemal; Sahin, Nurhan; Juturu, Vijaya; Sahin, Kazim

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of cinnamon polyphenol extract on hepatic transcription factors expressions including SREBP-1c and LXR- α in rats fed high fat diet (HFD). Twenty-eight Wistar rats were allocated into four groups: (i) normal control: animals fed with normal chow; (ii) cinnamon: animals supplemented with cinnamon polyphenol; (iii) HFD: animals fed a high-fat diet; and (iv) HFD + cinnamon: animals fed a high-fat diet and treated with cinnamon polyphenol. Obesity was linked to hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and oxidative stress as imitated by elevated serum glucose, lipid profile, and serum and liver malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. Cinnamon polyphenol decreased body weight, visceral fat, liver weight and serum glucose and insulin concentrations, liver antioxidant enzymes, and lipid profile ( P < 0.05) and reduced serum and liver MDA concentration compared to HFD rats ( P < 0.05). Cinnamon polyphenol also suppressed the hepatic SREBP-1c, LXR- α , ACLY, FAS, and NF- κ B p65 expressions and enhanced the PPAR- α , IRS-1, Nrf2, and HO-1 expressions in the HFD rat livers ( P < 0.05). In conclusion, cinnamon polyphenol reduces the hyperlipidemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress through activating transcription factors and antioxidative defense signaling pathway in HFD rat liver.

  18. Cinnamon Polyphenol Extract Inhibits Hyperlipidemia and Inflammation by Modulation of Transcription Factors in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tuzcu, Zeynep; Orhan, Cemal; Sahin, Nurhan; Juturu, Vijaya

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of cinnamon polyphenol extract on hepatic transcription factors expressions including SREBP-1c and LXR-α in rats fed high fat diet (HFD). Twenty-eight Wistar rats were allocated into four groups: (i) normal control: animals fed with normal chow; (ii) cinnamon: animals supplemented with cinnamon polyphenol; (iii) HFD: animals fed a high-fat diet; and (iv) HFD + cinnamon: animals fed a high-fat diet and treated with cinnamon polyphenol. Obesity was linked to hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and oxidative stress as imitated by elevated serum glucose, lipid profile, and serum and liver malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. Cinnamon polyphenol decreased body weight, visceral fat, liver weight and serum glucose and insulin concentrations, liver antioxidant enzymes, and lipid profile (P < 0.05) and reduced serum and liver MDA concentration compared to HFD rats (P < 0.05). Cinnamon polyphenol also suppressed the hepatic SREBP-1c, LXR-α, ACLY, FAS, and NF-κB p65 expressions and enhanced the PPAR-α, IRS-1, Nrf2, and HO-1 expressions in the HFD rat livers (P < 0.05). In conclusion, cinnamon polyphenol reduces the hyperlipidemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress through activating transcription factors and antioxidative defense signaling pathway in HFD rat liver. PMID:28396714

  19. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors suppress the AR-V7-mediated transcription and selectively inhibit cell growth in AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Daisuke; Koyama, Ryokichi; Nakayama, Kazuhide; Kitazawa, Satoshi; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Hara, Takahito

    2017-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that androgen receptor (AR) splice variants, including AR-V7, play a pivotal role in resistance to androgen blockade in prostate cancer treatment. The development of new therapeutic agents that can suppress the transcriptional activities of AR splice variants has been anticipated as the next generation treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. High-throughput screening of AR-V7 signaling inhibitors was performed using an AR-V7 reporter system. The effects of a glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitor, LY-2090314, on endogenous AR-V7 signaling were evaluated in an AR-V7-positive cell line, JDCaP-hr, by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relationship between AR-V7 signaling and β-catenin signaling was assessed using RNA interference. The effect of LY-2090314 on cell growth in various prostate cancer cell lines was also evaluated. We identified GSK3 inhibitors as transcriptional suppressors of AR-V7 using a high-throughput screen with an AR-V7 reporter system. LY-2090314 suppressed the reporter activity and endogenous AR-V7 activity in JDCaP-hr cells. Because silencing of β-catenin partly rescued the suppression, it was evident that the suppression was mediated, at least partially, via the activation of β-catenin signaling. AR-V7 signaling and β-catenin signaling reciprocally regulate each other in JDCaP-hr cells, and therefore, GSK3 inhibition can repress AR-V7 transcriptional activity by accumulating intracellular β-catenin. Notably, LY-2090314 selectively inhibited the growth of AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate the potential of GSK3 inhibitors in treating advanced prostate cancer driven by AR splice variants. In vivo evaluation of AR splice variant-positive prostate cancer models will help illustrate the overall significance of GSK3 inhibitors in treating prostate cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Transcriptional inhibition of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} gene (CDKN1) expression by survivin is at least partially p53-dependent: Evidence for survivin acting as a transcription factor or co-factor

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lei; Pre-Doctoral Chinese Fellowship Student, Second West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan; Ling, Xiang

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin inhibits the expression of p21 protein, mRNA and promoter activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin neutralizes p53-induced p21 expression and promoter activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin physically interacts with p53 in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genetic silencing of endogenous survivin upregulates p21 in p53 wild type cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both p53 and survivin interacts on the two p53-binding sites in the p21 promoter. -- Abstract: Growing evidence suggests a role for the antiapoptotic protein survivin in promotion of cancer cell G1/S transition and proliferation. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Further, although upregulation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} by p53 plays an important role inmore » p53-mediated cell G1 arrests in response to various distresses, it is unknown whether survivin plays a role in the regulation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression. Here, we report that exogenous expression of survivin in p53-wild type MCF-7 breast cancer cells inhibits the expression of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} protein, mRNA and promoter activity, while the survivin C84A mutant and antisense failed to do so. Cotransfection experiments in the p53 mutant H1650 lung cancer cell line showed that survivin neutralizes p53-induced p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression and promoter activity. Importantly, genetically silencing of endogenous survivin using lentiviral survivin shRNA also enhances endogenous p21 in p53 wild type cancer cells, suggesting the physiological relevance of the fining. We further demonstrated that both p53 and survivin interacts on the two p53-binding sites in the p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter (-2313 to -2212; -1452 to -1310), and survivin physically interacts with p53 in cancer cells. Together, we propose that survivin may act as a transcription factor or cofactor to interact with p53 on the p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter leading to the inhibition of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1

  1. Overexpression of Transcription Factor Sp2 Inhibits Epidermal Differentiation and Increases Susceptibility to Wound and Carcinogen-Induced Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hyung; Chiera, Shannon L.; Linder, Keith E.; Trempus, Carol S.; Smart, Robert C.; Horowitz, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    Sp proteins are evolutionarily-conserved transcription factors required for the expression of a wide variety of genes that are critical for development and cell-cycle progression. De-regulated expression of certain Sp proteins is associated with the formation of a variety of human tumors, however direct evidence that any given Sp protein is oncogenic has been lacking. Here we report that Sp2 protein abundance in mice increases in concert with the progression of carcinogen-induced murine squamous cell carcinomas. Transgenic mice specifically overexpressing murine Sp2 in epidermal basal keratinocytes were highly susceptible to wound- and carcinogen-induced papillomagenesis. Transgenic animals that were homozygous rather than hemizygous for the Sp2 transgene exhibited a striking arrest in the epidermal differentiation program, perishing within two weeks of birth. Our results directly support the likelihood that Sp2 overexpression occurring in various human cancers has significant functional impact. PMID:20959487

  2. Inhibition of Oncogenic Transcription Factor REL by the Natural Product Derivative Calafianin Monomer 101 Induces Proliferation Arrest and Apoptosis in Human B-Lymphoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Alan T; Chennamadhavuni, Spandan; Whitty, Adrian; Porco, John A; Gilmore, Thomas D

    2015-04-23

    Increased activity of transcription factor NF-κB has been implicated in many B-cell lymphomas. We investigated effects of synthetic compound calafianin monomer (CM101) on biochemical and biological properties of NF-κB. In human 293 cells, CM101 selectively inhibited DNA binding by overexpressed NF-κB subunits REL (human c-Rel) and p65 as compared to NF-κB p50, and inhibition of REL and p65 DNA binding by CM101 required a conserved cysteine residue. CM101 also inhibited DNA binding by REL in human B-lymphoma cell lines, and the sensitivity of several B-lymphoma cell lines to CM101-induced proliferation arrest and apoptosis correlated with levels of cellular and nuclear REL. CM101 treatment induced both phosphorylation and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL, a REL target gene product, in sensitive B-lymphoma cell lines. Ectopic expression of Bcl-XL protected SUDHL-2 B-lymphoma cells against CM101-induced apoptosis, and overexpression of a transforming mutant of REL decreased the sensitivity of BJAB B-lymphoma cells to CM101-induced apoptosis. Lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NF-κB signaling upstream components occurred in RAW264.7 macrophages at CM101 concentrations that blocked NF-κB DNA binding. Direct inhibitors of REL may be useful for treating B-cell lymphomas in which REL is active, and may inhibit B-lymphoma cell growth at doses that do not affect some immune-related responses in normal cells.

  3. ETS transcription factor ELF5 induces lumen formation in a 3D model of mammary morphogenesis and its expression is inhibited by Jak2 inhibitor TG101348.

    PubMed

    Chean, Jennifer; Chen, Charng-Jui; Shively, John E

    2017-10-01

    The loss of expression of a single gene can revert normal tissue to a malignant phenotype. For example, while normal breast has high lumenal expression of CEACAM1, the majority of breast cancers exhibit the early loss of this gene with the concurrent loss of their lumenal phenotype. MCF7 cells that lack CEACAM1 expression and fail to form lumena in 3D culture, regain the normal phenotype when transfected with CEACAM1. In order to probe the mechanism of this gain of function, we treated these cells with the clinically relevant Jak2 inhibitor TG101348 (TG), expecting that disruption of the prolactin receptor signaling pathway would interfere with the positive effects of transfection of MCF7 cells with CEACAM1. Indeed, lumen formation was inhibited, resulting in the down regulation of a set of genes, likely involved in the complex process of lumen formation. As expected, inhibition of the expression of many of these genes also inhibited lumen formation, confirming their involvement in a single pathway. Among the genes identified by the inhibition assay, ETS transcription factor ELF5 stood out, since it has been identified as a master regulator of mammary morphogenesis, and is associated with prolactin receptor signaling. When ELF5 was transfected into the parental MCF7 cells that lack CEACAM1, lumen formation was restored, indicating that ELF5 can replace CEACAM1 in this model system of lumenogenesis. We conclude that the event(s) that led to the loss of expression of CEACAM1 is epistatic in that multiple genes associated with a critical pathway were affected, but that restoration of the normal phenotype can be achieved with reactivation of certain genes at various nodal points in tissue morphogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Combination of Arsenic and Interferon-α Inhibits Expression of KSHV Latent Transcripts and Synergistically Improves Survival of Mice with Primary Effusion Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj, Hiba; Ali, Jihane; Ghantous, Akram; Hodroj, Dana; Daher, Ahmad; Zibara, Kazem; Journo, Chloé; Otrock, Zaher; Zaatari, Ghazi; Mahieux, Renaud; El Sabban, Marwan; Bazarbachi, Ali; Abou Merhi, Raghida

    2013-01-01

    Background Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of primary effusion lymphomas (PEL). PEL cell lines infected with KSHV, but negative for Epstein-Barr virus have a tumorigenic potential in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice and result in efficient engraftment and formation of malignant ascites with notable abdominal distension, consistent with the clinical manifestations of PEL in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings Using this preclinical mouse model, we demonstrate that the combination of arsenic trioxide and interferon-alpha (IFN) inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and downregulates the latent viral transcripts LANA-1, v-FLIP and v-Cyc in PEL cells derived from malignant ascites. Furthermore, this combination decreases the peritoneal volume and synergistically increases survival of PEL mice. Conclusion/Significance These results provide a promising rationale for the therapeutic use of arsenic/IFN in PEL patients. PMID:24250827

  5. Combination of arsenic and interferon-α inhibits expression of KSHV latent transcripts and synergistically improves survival of mice with primary effusion lymphomas.

    PubMed

    El Hajj, Hiba; Ali, Jihane; Ghantous, Akram; Hodroj, Dana; Daher, Ahmad; Zibara, Kazem; Journo, Chloé; Otrock, Zaher; Zaatari, Ghazi; Mahieux, Renaud; El Sabban, Marwan; Bazarbachi, Ali; Abou Merhi, Raghida

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of primary effusion lymphomas (PEL). PEL cell lines infected with KSHV, but negative for Epstein-Barr virus have a tumorigenic potential in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice and result in efficient engraftment and formation of malignant ascites with notable abdominal distension, consistent with the clinical manifestations of PEL in humans. Using this preclinical mouse model, we demonstrate that the combination of arsenic trioxide and interferon-alpha (IFN) inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and downregulates the latent viral transcripts LANA-1, v-FLIP and v-Cyc in PEL cells derived from malignant ascites. Furthermore, this combination decreases the peritoneal volume and synergistically increases survival of PEL mice. These results provide a promising rationale for the therapeutic use of arsenic/IFN in PEL patients.

  6. Nuclear envelope-distributed CD147 interacts with and inhibits the transcriptional function of RING1 and promotes melanoma cell motility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junchen; Peng, Cong; Lei, Li; Zhang, Jianglin; Zeng, Weiqi; Chen, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma accounts for nearly 80% of all deaths associated with skin cancer.CD147 plays a very important role in melanoma progression and the expression level may correlate with tumor malignancy. RING1 can bind DNA and act as a transcriptional repressor, play an important role in the aggressive phenotype in melanoma. The interactions between CD147 and RING1 were identified with a yeast two-hybrid and RING1 interacted with CD147 through the transmembrane domain. RING1 inhibits CD147's capability promoting melanoma cell migration. In conclusion, the study identified novel interactions between CD147 and RING1, recovered CD147 nuclear envelope distribution in melanoma cells, and suggested a new mechanism underlying how cytoplasmic CD147 promotes melanoma development.

  7. Nuclear envelope-distributed CD147 interacts with and inhibits the transcriptional function of RING1 and promotes melanoma cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cong; Lei, Li; Zhang, Jianglin; Zeng, Weiqi; Chen, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma accounts for nearly 80% of all deaths associated with skin cancer.CD147 plays a very important role in melanoma progression and the expression level may correlate with tumor malignancy. RING1 can bind DNA and act as a transcriptional repressor, play an important role in the aggressive phenotype in melanoma. The interactions between CD147 and RING1 were identified with a yeast two-hybrid and RING1 interacted with CD147 through the transmembrane domain. RING1 inhibits CD147’s capability promoting melanoma cell migration. In conclusion, the study identified novel interactions between CD147 and RING1, recovered CD147 nuclear envelope distribution in melanoma cells, and suggested a new mechanism underlying how cytoplasmic CD147 promotes melanoma development. PMID:28832687

  8. NSs protein of Schmallenberg virus counteracts the antiviral response of the cell by inhibiting its transcriptional machinery.

    PubMed

    Barry, Gerald; Varela, Mariana; Ratinier, Maxime; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Caporale, Marco; Seehusen, Frauke; Hahn, Kerstin; Schnettler, Esther; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Kohl, Alain; Palmarini, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Bunyaviruses have evolved a variety of strategies to counteract the antiviral defence systems of mammalian cells. Here we show that the NSs protein of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) induces the degradation of the RPB1 subunit of RNA polymerase II and consequently inhibits global cellular protein synthesis and the antiviral response. In addition, we show that the SBV NSs protein enhances apoptosis in vitro and possibly in vivo, suggesting that this protein could be involved in SBV pathogenesis in different ways. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. Dexamethasone inhibits IL-12p40 production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytic cells by down-regulating the activity of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, the activation protein-1, and NF-kappa B transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Gee, Katrina; Lim, Wilfred; Chambers, Kelly; Angel, Jonathan B; Kozlowski, Maya; Kumar, Ashok

    2004-01-01

    IL-12 plays a critical role in the development of cell-mediated immune responses and in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Dexamethasone (DXM), an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, has been shown to inhibit IL-12p40 production in LPS-stimulated monocytic cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which DXM inhibits IL-12p40 production by studying the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and the key transcription factors involved in human IL-12p40 production in LPS-stimulated monocytic cells. A role for c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK in LPS-induced IL-12p40 regulation in a promonocytic THP-1/CD14 cell line was demonstrated by using specific inhibitors of JNK activation, SP600125 and a dominant-negative stress-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase-1 mutant. To identify transcription factors regulating IL-12p40 gene transcription, extensive deletion analyses of the IL-12p40 promoter was performed. The results revealed the involvement of a sequence encompassing the AP-1-binding site, in addition to that of NF-kappaB. The role of AP-1 in IL-12p40 transcription was confirmed by using antisense c-fos and c-jun oligonucleotides. Studies conducted to understand the regulation of AP-1 and NF-kappaB activation by JNK MAPK revealed that both DXM and SP600125 inhibited IL-12p40 gene transcription by inhibiting the activation of AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription factors as revealed by luciferase reporter and gel mobility shift assays. Taken together, our results suggest that DXM may inhibit IL-12p40 production in LPS-stimulated human monocytic cells by down-regulating the activation of JNK MAPK, the AP-1, and NF-kappaB transcription factors.

  10. Leukemia/lymphoma-related factor, a POZ domain-containing transcriptional repressor, interacts with histone deacetylase-1 and inhibits cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene expression and chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-ju; Prazak, Lisa; Fajardo, Marc; Yu, Shuang; Tyagi, Neetu; Di Cesare, Paul E

    2004-11-05

    Mutations in the human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene have been linked to the development of pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. We previously cloned the promoter region of the COMP gene and delineated a minimal negative regulatory element (NRE) that is both necessary and sufficient to repress its promoter (Issack, P. S., Fang, C. H., Leslie, M. P., and Di Cesare, P. E. (2000) J. Orthop. Res. 18, 345-350; Issack, P. S., Liu, C. J., Prazak, L., and Di Cesare, P. E. (2004) J. Orthop. Res. 22, 751-758). In this study, a yeast one-hybrid screen for proteins that associate with the NRE led to the identification of the leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF), a transcriptional repressor that contains a POZ (poxvirus zinc finger) domain, as an NRE-binding protein. LRF bound directly to the NRE both in vitro and in living cells. Nine nucleotides (GAGGGTCCC) in the 30-bp NRE are essential for binding to LRF. LRF showed dose-dependent inhibition of COMP-specific reporter gene activity, and exogenous overexpression of LRF repressed COMP gene expression in both rat chondrosarcoma cells and bone morphogenetic protein-2-treated C3H10T1/2 progenitor cells. In addition, LRF also inhibited bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced chondrogenesis in high density micromass cultures of C3H10T1/2 cells, as evidenced by lack of expression of other chondrocytic markers, such as aggrecan and collagen types II, IX, X, and XI, and by Alcian blue staining. LRF associated with histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), and experiments utilizing the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A revealed that LRF-mediated repression requires deacetylase activity. LRF is the first transcription factor found to bind directly to the COMP gene promoter, to recruit HDAC1, and to regulate both COMP gene expression and chondrogenic differentiation.

  11. Cellular corepressor TLE2 inhibits replication-and-transcription- activator-mediated transactivation and lytic reactivation of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiheng; Liu, Yunhua; Liang, Deguang; Wang, Zhuo; Robertson, Erle S; Lan, Ke

    2010-02-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) encoded by open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is essential and sufficient to initiate lytic reactivation. RTA activates its target genes through direct binding with high affinity to its responsive elements or by interaction with cellular factors, such as RBP-Jkappa, Ap-1, C/EBP-alpha, and Oct-1. In this study, we identified transducin-like enhancer of split 2 (TLE2) as a novel RTA binding protein by using yeast two-hybrid screening of a human spleen cDNA library. The interaction between TLE2 and RTA was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) binding and coimmunoprecipitation assays. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that TLE2 and RTA were colocalized in the same nuclear compartment in KSHV-infected cells. This interaction recruited TLE2 to RTA bound to its recognition sites on DNA and repressed RTA auto-activation and transactivation activity. Moreover, TLE2 also inhibited the induction of lytic replication and virion production driven by RTA. We further showed that the Q (Gln-rich), SP (Ser-Pro-rich), and WDR (Trp-Asp repeat) domains of TLE2 and the Pro-rich domain of RTA were essential for this interaction. RBP-Jkappa has been shown previously to bind to the same Pro-rich domain of RTA, and this binding can be subject to competition by TLE2. In addition, TLE2 can form a complex with RTA to access the cognate DNA sequence of the RTA-responsive element at different promoters. Intriguingly, the transcription level of TLE2 could be upregulated by RTA during the lytic reactivation process. In conclusion, we identified a new RTA binding protein, TLE2, and demonstrated that TLE2 inhibited replication and transactivation mediated by RTA. This provides another potentially important mechanism for maintenance of KSHV viral latency through interaction with a host protein.

  12. CoGAPS matrix factorization algorithm identifies transcriptional changes in AP-2alpha target genes in feedback from therapeutic inhibition of the EGFR network

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Manjusha; Howard, Jason D.; Kagohara, Luciane T.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel; Ranaweera, Ruchira S.; Hughes, Robert M.; Perez, Jimena; Jones, Siân; Favorov, Alexander V.; Carey, Jacob; Stein-O'Brien, Genevieve; Gaykalova, Daria A.; Ochs, Michael F.; Chung, Christine H.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with oncogene driven tumors are treated with targeted therapeutics including EGFR inhibitors. Genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) demonstrates molecular alterations to EGFR, MAPK, and PI3K pathways in previously untreated tumors. Therefore, this study uses bioinformatics algorithms to delineate interactions resulting from EGFR inhibitor use in cancer cells with these genetic alterations. We modify the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line model to simulate cancer cells with constitutive activation of EGFR, HRAS, and PI3K in a controlled genetic background. We then measure gene expression after treating modified HaCaT cells with gefitinib, afatinib, and cetuximab. The CoGAPS algorithm distinguishes a gene expression signature associated with the anticipated silencing of the EGFR network. It also infers a feedback signature with EGFR gene expression itself increasing in cells that are responsive to EGFR inhibitors. This feedback signature has increased expression of several growth factor receptors regulated by the AP-2 family of transcription factors. The gene expression signatures for AP-2alpha are further correlated with sensitivity to cetuximab treatment in HNSCC cell lines and changes in EGFR expression in HNSCC tumors with low CDKN2A gene expression. In addition, the AP-2alpha gene expression signatures are also associated with inhibition of MEK, PI3K, and mTOR pathways in the Library of Integrated Network-Based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) data. These results suggest that AP-2 transcription factors are activated as feedback from EGFR network inhibition and may mediate EGFR inhibitor resistance. PMID:27650546

  13. Plasmodium circumsporozoite protein suppresses the growth of A549 cells via inhibiting nuclear transcription factor κB.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xu-Feng; Zhou, Dong; Liu, Quan-Xing; Zheng, Hong; Ding, Yan; Xu, Wen-Yue; Min, Jia-Xin; Dai, Ji-Gang

    2018-05-01

    Blocking the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is a promising strategy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. The circumsporozoite protein (CSP), a key component of the sporozoite stage of the malaria parasite, was previously reported to block NF-κB activation in hepatocytes. Therefore, in the present study, the effect of CSP on the growth of the human lung cancer cell line, A549, was investigated. It was demonstrated that transfection with a recombinant plasmid expressing CSP was able to inhibit the proliferation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner and induce the apoptosis of A549 cells. A NF-κB gene reporter assay indicated that CSP and its nuclear localization signal (NLS) motif were able to equally suppress the activation of NF-κB following stimulation with human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in A549 cells. Furthermore, western blot analysis indicated that NLS did not affect the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB, but was able to markedly inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in TNF-α stimulated A549 cells. Therefore, the data suggest that CSP may be investigated as a potential novel NF-κB inhibitor for the treatment of lung cancer.

  14. A monofunctional platinum(II)-based anticancer agent from a salicylanilide derivative: Synthesis, antiproliferative activity, and transcription inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beilei; Wang, Zhigang; Ai, Fujin; Tang, Wai Kin; Zhu, Guangyu

    2015-01-01

    Cationic monofunctional platinum(II)-based anticancer agents with a general formula of cis-[Pt(NH3)2(N-donor)Cl](+) have recently drawn significant attention due to their unique mode of action, distinctive anticancer spectrum, and promising antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of action of novel monofunctional platinum compounds through rational drug design will aid in the further development of active agents. In this study, we synthesized and evaluated a monofunctional platinum-based anticancer agent SA-Pt containing a bulky salicylanilide moiety. The antiproliferative activity of SA-Pt was close to that of cisplatin. Mechanism studies revealed that SA-Pt entered HeLa cells more efficiently than cisplatin, blocked the cell cycle at the S-phase, and induced apoptosis. The compound bound to DNA as effectively as cisplatin, but did not block RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription as strongly as cisplatin, indicating that once the compound formed Pt-DNA lesions, the salicylanilide group was more easily recognized and removed. This study not only enriches the family of monofunctional platinum-based anticancer agents but also guides the design of more potent monofunctional platinum complexes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Salicylic acid and aspirin inhibit the activity of RSK2 kinase and repress RSK2-dependent transcription of cyclic AMP response element binding protein- and NF-kappa B-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, M A; Zhao, M J; Asea, A; Coleman, C N; Calderwood, S K

    1999-11-15

    Sodium salicylate (NaSal) and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) coordinately inhibit the activity of NF-kappa B, activate heat shock transcription factor 1 and suppress cytokine gene expression in activated monocytes and macrophages. Because our preliminary studies indicated that these effects could be mimicked by inhibitors of signal transduction, we have studied the effects of NSAIDs on signaling molecules potentially downstream of LPS receptors in activated macrophages. Our findings indicate that ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2), a 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase with a critical role as an effector of the RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and a regulator of immediate early gene transcription is a target for inhibition by the NSAIDs. NSAIDs inhibited the activity of purified RSK2 kinase in vitro and of RSK2 in mammalian cells and suppressed the phosphorylation of RSK2 substrates cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and I-kappa B alpha in vivo. Additionally, NaSal inhibited the phosphorylation by RSK2 of CREB and I-kappa B alpha on residues crucial for their transcriptional activity in vivo and thus repressed CREB and NF-kappa B-dependent transcription. These experiments suggest that RSK2 is a target for NSAIDs in the inhibition of monocyte-specific gene expression and indicate the importance of RSK2 and related kinases in cell regulation, indicating a new area for anti-inflammatory drug discovery.

  16. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPARδ inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPARδ by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPARδ, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPARδ suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPARδ-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. β-Catenin transcriptional activity is minimal in canine osteosarcoma and its targeted inhibition results in minimal changes to cell line behaviour.

    PubMed

    Piskun, Caroline M; Stein, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    Canine osteosarcoma (OS) is an aggressive malignancy associated with poor outcomes. Therapeutic improvements are likely to develop from an improved understanding of signalling pathways contributing to OS development and progression. The Wnt signalling pathway is of interest for its role in osteoblast differentiation, its dysregulation in numerous cancer types, and the relative frequency of cytoplasmic accumulation of β-catenin in canine OS. This study aimed to determine the biological impact of inhibiting canonical Wnt signalling in canine OS, by utilizing either β-catenin siRNA or a dominant-negative T-cell factor (TCF) construct. There were no consistent, significant changes in cell line behaviour with either method compared to parental cell lines. Interestingly, β-catenin transcriptional activity was three-fold higher in normal canine primary osteoblasts compared to canine OS cell lines. These results suggest canonical Wnt signalling is minimally active in canine OS and its targeted inhibition is not a relevant therapeutic strategy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus inhibits apoptosis by regulating the activating transcription factor 5 signaling pathway in human malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TONGMEI; QIAN, DONGMENG; HU, MING; LI, LING; ZHANG, LI; CHEN, HAO; YANG, RUI; WANG, BIN

    2014-01-01

    The activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5), also termed ATFx, is a member of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family of basic zipper proteins. ATF5 is an anti-apoptotic protein that is highly expressed in malignant glioma and is essential for glioma cell survival. Accumulating evidence indicates that human malignant gliomas are universally infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Recent studies have shown that HCMV may be resistant to the induction of apoptosis by disrupting cellular pathways in glioblastoma. To investigate the potential anti-apoptotic function of HCMV in glioma, malignant U87 glioma cells were infected with HCMV. The present study showed that HCMV infection suppressed apoptosis in glioblastoma U87 cells by regulating the expression of ATF5. Furthermore, in glioblastoma U87 cells, HCMV infection induced cellular proliferation in parallel with an increase in the expression level of ATF5 and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 to Bcl-2-associated X protein ratio. Loss of ATF5 function was achieved using a dominant-negative form of ATF5 in U87 cells, whereby cells appeared to grow marginally following HCMV infection when compared with the control. However, the anti-apoptotic ability was appeared to decline in the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. These results indicate that ATF5 signaling pathways may be important in the anti-apoptotic activity of HCMV-infected glioblastoma cells; therefore, the anti-apoptotic molecular mechanisms of HCMV in human glioblastoma cells were investigated in the current study. Prevention of HCMV infection may present a potential and promising approach for the treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:25120656

  19. Silibinin and its 2,3-Dehydro-derivative Inhibit Basal Cell Carcinoma Growth via Suppression of Mitogenic Signaling and Transcription Factors Activation

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Cynthia; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Chapla; Wempe, Michael F; Biedermann, David; Valentová, Kateřina; Kren, Vladimir; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide, and its current treatment options are insufficient and toxic. Surprisingly, unlike several other malignancies, chemopreventive efforts against BCC are almost lacking. Silibinin, a natural agent from milk thistle seeds, has shown strong efficacy against several cancers including ultraviolet radiation-induced skin (squamous) cancer; however, its potential activity against BCC is not yet examined. Herein, for the first time, we report the efficacy of silibinin and its oxidation product 2,3-dehydrosilibinin (DHS) against BCC both in vitro and in vivo using ASZ (p53 mutated) and BSZ (p53 deleted) cell lines derived from murine BCC tumors. Both silibinin and DHS significantly inhibited cell growth and clonogenicity while inducing apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with DHS showing higher activity at lower concentrations. Both agents also inhibited the mitogenic signaling by reducing EGFR, ERK1/2, Akt, and STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed the activation of transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1. More importantly, in an ectopic allograft model, oral administration of silibinin and DHS (200 mg/kg body weight) strongly inhibited the ASZ tumor growth by 44 and 71% (p<0.05), respectively, and decreased the expression of proliferation biomarkers (PCNA and cyclin D1) as well as NF-κB p50 and c-Fos in the tumor tissues. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence for the efficacy and usefulness of silibinin and its derivative DHS against BCC, and suggest the need for additional studies with these agents in pre-clinical and clinical BCC chemoprevention and therapy models. PMID:25492239

  20. Silibinin and its 2,3-dehydro-derivative inhibit basal cell carcinoma growth via suppression of mitogenic signaling and transcription factors activation.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Cynthia; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Chapla; Wempe, Michael F; Biedermann, David; Valentová, Kateřina; Kren, Vladimir; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide, and its current treatment options are insufficient and toxic. Surprisingly, unlike several other malignancies, chemopreventive efforts against BCC are almost lacking. Silibinin, a natural agent from milk thistle seeds, has shown strong efficacy against several cancers including ultraviolet radiation-induced skin (squamous) cancer; however, its potential activity against BCC is not yet examined. Herein, for the first time, we report the efficacy of silibinin and its oxidation product 2,3-dehydrosilibinin (DHS) against BCC both in vitro and in vivo using ASZ (p53 mutated) and BSZ (p53 deleted) cell lines derived from murine BCC tumors. Both silibinin and DHS significantly inhibited cell growth and clonogenicity while inducing apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with DHS showing higher activity at lower concentrations. Both agents also inhibited the mitogenic signaling by reducing EGFR, ERK1/2, Akt, and STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed the activation of transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1. More importantly, in an ectopic allograft model, oral administration of silibinin and DHS (200 mg/kg body weight) strongly inhibited the ASZ tumor growth by 44% and 71% (P < 0.05), respectively, and decreased the expression of proliferation biomarkers (PCNA and cyclin D1) as well as NF-κB p50 and c-Fos in the tumor tissues. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence for the efficacy and usefulness of silibinin and its derivative DHS against BCC, and suggest the need for additional studies with these agents in pre-clinical and clinical BCC chemoprevention and therapy models. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Gut-derived commensal bacterial products inhibit liver dendritic cell maturation by stimulating hepatic interleukin-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity.

    PubMed

    Lunz, John G; Specht, Susan M; Murase, Noriko; Isse, Kumiko; Demetris, Anthony J

    2007-12-01

    Intraorgan dendritic cells (DCs) monitor the environment and help translate triggers of innate immunity into adaptive immune responses. Liver-based DCs are continually exposed, via gut-derived portal venous blood, to potential antigens and bacterial products that can trigger innate immunity. However, somehow the liver avoids a state of perpetual inflammation and protects central immune organs from overstimulation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that hepatic interleukin-6 (IL-6)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activity increases the activation/maturation threshold of hepatic DCs toward innate immune signals. The results show that the liver nuclear STAT3 activity is significantly higher than that of other organs and is IL-6-dependent. Hepatic DCs in normal IL-6 wild-type (IL-6(+/+)) mice are phenotypically and functionally less mature than DCs from IL-6-deficient (IL-6(-/-)) or STAT3-inhibited IL-6(+/+) mice, as determined by surface marker expression, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and allogeneic T-cell stimulation. IL-6(+/+) liver DCs produce IL-6 in response to exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cytidine phosphate guanosine oligonucleotides (CpG) but are resistant to maturation compared with IL-6(-/-) liver DCs. Conversely, exogenous IL-6 inhibits LPS-induced IL-6(-/-) liver DC maturation. IL-6/STAT3 signaling influences the liver DC expression of toll-like receptor 9 and IL-1 receptor associated kinase-M. The depletion of gut commensal bacteria in IL-6(+/+) mice with oral antibiotics decreased portal blood endotoxin levels, lowered the expression of IL-6 and phospho-STAT3, and significantly increased liver DC maturation. Gut-derived bacterial products, by stimulating hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling, inhibit hepatic DC activation/maturation and thereby elevate the threshold needed for translating triggers of innate immunity into adaptive immune responses. Manipulating gut bacteria may therefore be an effective strategy

  2. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist ofmore » PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.« less

  3. Targeting human respiratory syncytial virus transcription anti-termination factor M2-1 to inhibit in vivo viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, B.; Richard, C.-A.; Sharma, G.; Wang, L.; Johansen, L.; Cao, J.; Pendharkar, V.; Sharma, D.-C.; Galloux, M.; Wang, Y.; Cui, R.; Zou, G.; Guillon, P.; von Itzstein, M.; Eléouët, J.-F.; Altmeyer, R.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a leading cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection in infants, elderly and immunocompromised individuals. To date, no specific antiviral drug is available to treat or prevent this disease. Here, we report that the Smoothened receptor (Smo) antagonist cyclopamine acts as a potent and selective inhibitor of in vitro and in vivo hRSV replication. Cyclopamine inhibits hRSV through a novel, Smo-independent mechanism. It specifically impairs the function of the hRSV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex notably by reducing expression levels of the viral anti-termination factor M2-1. The relevance of these findings is corroborated by the demonstration that a single R151K mutation in M2-1 is sufficient to confer virus resistance to cyclopamine in vitro and that cyclopamine is able to reduce virus titers in a mouse model of hRSV infection. The results of our study open a novel avenue for the development of future therapies against hRSV infection. PMID:27194388

  4. The Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Latency-Associated Transcript Inhibits Phenotypic and Functional Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dervillez, Xavier; Dasgupta, Gargi; Nguyen, Chelsea; Kabbara, Khaled W.; Jiang, Xianzhi; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We recently found that the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) results in exhaustion of virus-specific CD8+ T cells in latently-infected trigeminal ganglia (TG). In this study we sought to determine if this impairment may involve LAT directly and/or indirectly interfering with DC maturation. We found that a small number of HSV-1 antigen-positive DCs are present in the TG of latently-infected CD11c/eYFP mice; however, this does not imply that these DCs are acutely or latently infected. Some CD8+ T cells are adjacent to DCs, suggesting possible interactions. It has previously been shown that wild-type HSV-1 interferes with DC maturation. Here we show for the first time that this is associated with LAT expression, since compared to LAT(−) virus: (1) LAT(+) virus interfered with expression of MHC class I and the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 on the surface of DCs; (2) LAT(+) virus impaired DC production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12, and TNF-α; and (3) DCs infected in vitro with LAT(+) virus had significantly reduced the ability to stimulate HSV-specific CD8+ T cells. While a similar number of DCs was found in LAT(+) and LAT(−) latently-infected TG of CD11c/eYFP transgenic mice, more HSV-1 Ag-positive DCs and more exhausted CD8 T cells were seen with LAT(+) virus. Consistent with these findings, HSV-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the TG of mice latently-infected with LAT(+) virus produced less IFN-γ and TNF-α than those from TG of LAT(−)-infected mice. Together, these results suggest a novel immune-evasion mechanism whereby the HSV-1 LAT increases the number of HSV-1 Ag-positive DCs in latently-infected TG, and interferes with DC phenotypic and functional maturation. The effect of LAT on TG-resident DCs may contribute to the reduced function of HSV-specific CD8+ T cells in the TG of mice latently infected with LAT(+) virus. PMID:22512280

  5. Role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells and activator protein-1 in the inhibition of interleukin-2 gene transcription by cannabinol in EL4 T-cells.

    PubMed

    Yea, S S; Yang, K H; Kaminski, N E

    2000-02-01

    We previously reported that immunosuppressive cannabinoids inhibited interleukin (IL)-2 steady-state mRNA expression and secretion by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate plus ionomycin-activated mouse splenocytes and EL4 murine T-cells. Here we show that inhibition of IL-2 production by cannabinol, a modest central nervous system-active cannabinoid, is mediated through the inhibition of IL-2 gene transcription. Moreover, electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that cannabinol markedly inhibited the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NF-AT) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in activated EL4 cells. The inhibitory effects produced by cannabinol on AP-1 DNA binding were quite transient, showing partial recovery by 240 min after cell activation and no effect on the activity of a reporter gene under the control of AP-1. Conversely, cannabinol-mediated inhibition of NF-AT was robust and sustained as demonstrated by an NF-AT-regulated reporter gene. Collectively, these results suggest that decreased IL-2 production by cannabinol in EL4 cells is due to the inhibition of transcriptional activation of the IL-2 gene and is mediated, at least in part, through a transient inhibition of AP-1 and a sustained inhibition of NF-AT.

  6. Transcriptional corepressor SMILE recruits SIRT1 to inhibit nuclear receptor estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma transactivation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuan-Bin; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Kim, Don-Kyu; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Oh, Sangmi; Park, Seung Bum; Shong, Minho; Lee, In-Kyu; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-10-16

    SMILE (small heterodimer partner interacting leucine zipper protein) has been identified as a corepressor of the glucocorticoid receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha. Here we show that SMILE also represses estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma) transactivation. Knockdown of SMILE gene expression increases ERRgamma activity. SMILE directly interacts with ERRgamma in vitro and in vivo. Domain mapping analysis showed that SMILE binds to the AF2 domain of ERRgamma. SMILE represses ERRgamma transactivation partially through competition with coactivators PGC-1alpha, PGC-1beta, and GRIP1. Interestingly, the repression of SMILE on ERRgamma is released by SIRT1 inhibitors, a catalytically inactive SIRT1 mutant, and SIRT1 small interfering RNA but not by histone protein deacetylase inhibitor. In vivo glutathione S-transferase pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays validated that SMILE physically interacts with SIRT1. Furthermore, the ERRgamma inverse agonist GSK5182 enhances the interaction of SMILE with ERRgamma and SMILE-mediated repression. Knockdown of SMILE or SIRT1 blocks the repressive effect of GSK5182. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that GSK5182 augments the association of SMILE and SIRT1 on the promoter of the ERRgamma target PDK4. GSK5182 and adenoviral overexpression of SMILE cooperate to repress ERRgamma-induced PDK4 gene expression, and this repression is released by overexpression of a catalytically defective SIRT1 mutant. Finally, we demonstrated that ERRgamma regulates SMILE gene expression, which in turn inhibits ERRgamma. Overall, these findings implicate SMILE as a novel corepressor of ERRgamma and recruitment of SIRT1 as a novel repressive mechanism for SMILE and ERRgamma inverse agonist.

  7. The activation of OsEIL1 on YUC8 transcription and auxin biosynthesis is required for ethylene-inhibited root elongation in rice early seedling development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Wei, Pengcheng; Huang, Rongfeng

    2017-01-01

    Rice is an important monocotyledonous crop worldwide; it differs from the dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis in many aspects. In Arabidopsis, ethylene and auxin act synergistically to regulate root growth and development. However, their interaction in rice is still unclear. Here, we report that the transcriptional activation of OsEIL1 on the expression of YUC8/REIN7 and indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA)-dependent auxin biosynthesis is required for ethylene-inhibited root elongation. Using an inhibitor of YUC activity, which regulates auxin biosynthesis via the conversion of IPA to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), we showed that ethylene-inhibited primary root elongation is dependent on YUC-based auxin biosynthesis. By screening phenotypes of seedling primary root from mutagenesis libraries following ethylene treatment, we identified a rice ethylene-insensitive mutant, rein7-1, in which YUC8/REIN7 is truncated at its C-terminus. Mutation in YUC8/REIN7 reduced auxin biosynthesis in rice, while YUC8/REIN7 overexpression enhanced ethylene sensitivity in the roots. Moreover, YUC8/REIN7 catalyzed the conversion of IPA to IAA, truncated version at C-terminal end of the YUC8/REIN7 resulted in significant reduction of enzymatic activity, indicating that YUC8/REIN7 is required for IPA-dependent auxin biosynthesis and ethylene-inhibited root elongation in rice early seedlings. Further investigations indicated that ethylene induced YUC8/REIN7 expression and promoted auxin accumulation in roots. Addition of low concentrations of IAA rescued the ethylene response in the rein7-1, strongly demonstrating that ethylene-inhibited root elongation depends on IPA-dependent auxin biosynthesis. Genetic studies revealed that YUC8/REIN7-mediated auxin biosynthesis functioned downstream of OsEIL1, which directly activated the expression of YUC8/REIN7. Thus, our findings reveal a model of interaction between ethylene and auxin in rice seedling primary root elongation, enhancing our understanding of

  8. Sumoylation of the Epstein-Barr Virus BZLF1 Protein Inhibits Its Transcriptional Activity and Is Regulated by the Virus-Encoded Protein Kinase▿

    PubMed Central

    Hagemeier, Stacy R.; Dickerson, Sarah J.; Meng, Qiao; Yu, Xianming; Mertz, Janet E.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immediate-early protein BZLF1 (Z) mediates the switch between latent and lytic EBV infection. Z not only activates early lytic viral gene transcription but also plays a direct role in lytic viral genome replication. Although a small fraction of Z is known to be sumoylated, the effects of this posttranslational modification on various different Z functions have not been well defined. In this report, we show that only the lysine at amino acid residue 12 is required for the sumoylation of Z, and that Z can be sumoylated by SUMO isoforms 1, 2, and 3. We also demonstrate that the sumo-defective Z mutants ZK12A and ZK12R have enhanced transcriptional activity. The sumoylated and nonsumoylated forms of Z were found to have a similar cellular location, both being localized primarily within the nuclear matrix. The Z sumo-defective mutants were, however, partially defective for disrupting promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies compared to the ability of wild-type Z. In addition, we show that lytic viral genome replication does not require the sumoylation of Z, although a Z mutant altered at both amino acids 12 and 13 is replication defective. Furthermore, we show that the sumoylation of Z is greatly increased (from less than 1 to about 11%) in lytically induced 293 cells infected with an EBV mutant virus deleted for the EBV-encoded protein kinase (EBV-PK) compared to that of 293 cells infected with wild-type EBV, and that the overexpression of EBV-PK leads to the reduced sumoylation of Z in EBV-negative cells. Our results suggest that the sumoylation of Z helps to promote viral latency, and that EBV-PK inhibits Z sumoylation during viral reactivation. PMID:20181712

  9. Circular RNA circITGA7 inhibits colorectal cancer growth and metastasis by modulating the Ras pathway and upregulating transcription of its host gene ITGA7.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Wang, Jianjun; Zhang, Chao; Lin, Chun; Zhang, Jianming; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Wenjuan; Lu, Yanxia; Zheng, Lin; Li, Xuenong

    2018-06-26

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are significantly dysregulated in various cancer types. However, the roles and mechanisms of circRNAs in cancer remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that a novel circRNA (circITGA7) and its linear host gene ITGA7 are both significantly downregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues and cell lines. These decreased expression levels correlated with CRC progression. Functional assays demonstrated that ectopic circITGA7 expression suppressed the growth and metastasis of CRC cell in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of circITGA7 or ITGA7 promoted the proliferation and migration of CRC cells in vitro and enhanced CRC growth in vivo. Mechanistically, we found that circITGA7 is a negative regulator of the Ras signalling pathway and ITGA7 is associated with cytokine-related signalling pathways through RNA-seq and KEGG enrichment analysis. In addition, circITGA7 binds to miR-370-3p to antagonize its suppression of NF1, which is a well-known negative regulator of the Ras pathway. Finally, circITGA7 upregulates the transcription of ITGA7 by suppressing RREB1 via the Ras pathway. In conclusion, our findings indicate a suppressor role of circITGA7 and ITGA7 in CRC and reveal that circITGA7 inhibits proliferation and metastasis of CRC cells by suppressing the Ras signalling pathway and promoting the transcription of ITGA7, suggesting that circITGA7 is a potential target for CRC treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. The inhibition of c-MYC transcription factor modulates the expression of glycolytic and glutaminolytic enzymes in FaDu hypopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kleszcz, Robert; Paluszczak, Jarosław; Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2018-05-17

    Cancer cells are dependent on aerobic glycolysis for energy production and increased glutamine consumption. HIF-1α and c-MYC transcription factors regulate the expression of glycolytic and glutaminolytic genes. Their activity may be repressed by SIRT6. Head and neck carcinomas show frequent activation of c-MYC function and SIRT6 down-regulation, which contributes to a strong dependence on glucose and glutamine availability. The aim of this study was to compare the influence of HIF-1α and c-MYC inhibitors (KG-548 and 10058-F4, respectively) and potential SIRT6 inducers - resveratrol and its synthetic derivative DMU-212 with the effect of glycolysis and glutaminolysis inhibitors (2-deoxyglucose and aminooxyacetic acid, respectively) on the metabolism and expression of metabolic enzymes in FaDu hypopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Cell viability was assessed by means of an MTT assay. Quantitative PCR was performed to evaluate the expression of SIRT6, HIF-1α, c-MYC, GLUT1, SLC1A5, HK2, PFKM, PKM2, LDHA, GLS, and GDH. The release of glycolysis and glutaminolysis end-products into the culture medium - lactate and ammonia, respectively - was assessed using standard colorimetric assays. Lactate production was significantly inhibited by 10058-F4, KG-548, and 2-deoxyglucose. Moreover, 10058-F4 strongly reduced the amount of ammonia release. The effects of 10058-F4 activity can be attributed to a reduction in the expression of PKM2 and LDHA. On the other hand, the induction of SIRT6 expression by resveratrol and DMU-212 was not associated with significant modulation of the expression of metabolic enzymes. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the inhibition of c-MYC may be considered to be a promising strategy of the modulation of cancer-related metabolic changes in head and neck carcinomas.

  11. Combination of tolfenamic acid and curcumin induces colon cancer cell growth inhibition through modulating specific transcription factors and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Sankpal, Umesh T; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Gottipolu, Sriharika R; Hurtado, Myrna; Jordan, Christopher G; Simecka, Jerry W; Shoji, Mamoru; El-Rayes, Bassel; Basha, Riyaz

    2016-01-19

    Curcumin (Cur) has been extensively studied in several types of malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC); however its clinical application is greatly affected by low bioavailability. Several strategies to improve the therapeutic response of Cur are being pursued, including its combination with small molecules and drugs. We investigated the therapeutic efficacy of Cur in combination with the small molecule tolfenamic acid (TA) in CRC cell lines. TA has been shown to inhibit the growth of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, via targeting the transcription factor specificity protein1 (Sp1) and suppressing survivin expression. CRC cell lines HCT116 and HT29 were treated with TA and/or Cur and cell viability was measured 24-72 hours post-treatment. While both agents caused a steady reduction in cell viability, following a clear dose/ time-dependent response, the combination of TA+Cur showed higher growth inhibition when compared to either single agent. Effects on apoptosis were determined using flow cytometry (JC-1 staining to measure mitochondrial membrane potential), Western blot analysis (c-PARP expression) and caspase 3/7 activity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured by flow cytometry and the translocation of NF-kB into the nucleus was determined using immunofluorescence. Results showed that apoptotic markers and ROS activity were significantly upregulated following combination treatment, when compared to the individual agents. This was accompanied by decreased expression of Sp1, survivin and NF-kB translocation. The combination of TA+Cur was more effective in HCT116 cells than HT29 cells. These results demonstrate that TA may enhance the anti-proliferative efficacy of Cur in CRC cells.

  12. Long noncoding RNA PVT1 inhibits interferon-α mediated therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interacting with signal transducer and activator of transcription 1.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hongda; Liu, Junpeng; Liu, Baiming; Zeng, Yongchao; Chen, Pengrui; Su, Yang

    2018-06-12

    Long noncoding RNA (LncRNA) PVT1 has recently been reported to be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hsigh expression of oncogenic PVT1 is associated with poor prognosis of HCC. Interferon-α (IFN-α) has been used in clinic for HCC therapy. However, whether PVT1 is involved in the IFN-α therapy for HCC is completely unknown. Our study found that high PVT1 expression in HCC cells is associated with high unmethylation in PVT1 promoter region. IFN-α treatment further increases PVT1 expression in HCC cells by enhancing H3K4me3 modification on the promoter. Furthermore, PVT1 knockdown enhances IFN-α-induced HCC cell apoptosis by promoting phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and upregulating IFN-stimulated genes expression. Moreover, PVT1 specifically interacts with STAT1 in HCC cells. Taken together, these results for the first time indicate that IFN-α treatment promotes oncogenic PVT1 expression in HCC cells, which interacts with STAT1 to inhibit IFN-α signaling, ultimately blocking IFN-α-induced cells apoptosis, suggesting that lncRNA PVT1 may be a potential target to improve IFN-α-mediated HCC immunotherapies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Hair Dyes Resorcinol and Lawsone Reduce Production of Melanin in Melanoma Cells by Tyrosinase Activity Inhibition and Decreasing Tyrosinase and Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor (MITF) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yi-Shyan; Lin, Chih-Chien; Chen, Kuan-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Hair coloring products are one of the most important cosmetics for modern people; there are three major types of hair dyes, including the temporary, semi-permanent and permanent hair dyes. The selected hair dyes (such as ammonium persulfate, sodium persulfate, resorcinol and lawsone) are the important components for hair coloring products. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of these compounds on melanogenesis in B16-F10 melanoma cells. The results proved that hair dyes resorcinol and lawsone can reduce the production of melanin. The results also confirmed that resorcinol and lawsone inhibit mushroom and cellular tyrosinase activities in vitro. Resorcinol and lawsone can also downregulate the protein levels of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) in B16-F10 cells. Thus, we suggest that frequent use of hair dyes may have the risk of reducing natural melanin production in hair follicles. Moreover, resorcinol and lawsone may also be used as hypopigmenting agents to food, agricultural and cosmetic industry in the future. PMID:25584612

  14. Transcriptional profiling analysis of Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of citrus green mold, unravels an inhibited ergosterol biosynthesis pathway in response to citral.

    PubMed

    OuYang, Qiuli; Tao, Nengguo; Jing, Guoxing

    2016-08-11

    Green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum is the most damaging postharvest diseases of citrus fruit. Previously, we have observed that citral dose-dependently inhibited the mycelial growth of P. digitatum, with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 1.78 mg/mL, but the underlying molecular mechanism is barely understood. In this study, the transcriptional profiling of the control and 1/2MIC-citral treated P. digitatum mycelia after 30 min of exposure were analyzed by RNA-Seq. A total of 6355 genes, including 2322 up-regulated and 4033 down-regulated genes, were found to be responsive to citral. These genes were mapped to 155 KEGG pathways, mainly concerning mRNA surveillance, RNA polymerase, RNA transport, aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, ABC transporter, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, citrate cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, sulfur metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, inositol phosphate metabolism, fatty acid biosynthesis, unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis, fatty acid metabolism, and steroid biosynthesis. Particularly, citral exposure affected the expression levels of five ergosterol biosynthetic genes (e.g. ERG7, ERG11, ERG6, ERG3 and ERG5), which corresponds well with the GC-MS results, the reduction in ergosterol content, and accumulation of massive lanosterol. In addition, ERG11, the gene responsible for lanosterol 14α-demethylase, was observed to be the key down-regulated gene in response to citral. Our present finding suggests that citral could exhibit its antifungal activity against P. digitatum by the down-regulation of ergosterol biosynthesis.

  15. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates expression of nuclear factor-erythroid-2 related transcription factor-1 (Nrf1) and inhibits pro-survival function of Nrf1

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Madhurima; Kwong, Erick K.; Park, Eujean

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor-1 (Nrf1) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that is known to regulate antioxidant and cytoprotective gene expression. It was recently shown that Nrf1 is regulated by SCF–Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. However our knowledge of upstream signals that targets Nrf1 for degradation by the UPS is not known. We report here that Nrf1 expression is negatively regulated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) in Fbw7-dependent manner. We show that GSK3 interacts with Nrf1 and phosphorylates the Cdc4 phosphodegron domain (CPD) in Nrf1. Mutation of serine residue in the CPD of Nrf1 to alanine (S350A), blocks Nrf1 frommore » phosphorylation by GSK3, and stabilizes Nrf1. Knockdown of Nrf1 and expression of a constitutively active form of GSK3 results in increased apoptosis in neuronal cells in response to ER stress, while expression of the GSK3 phosphorylation resistant S350A–Nrf1 attenuates apoptotic cell death. Together these data suggest that GSK3 regulates Nrf1 expression and cell survival function in response to stress activation. Highlights: • The effect of GSK3 on Nrf1 expression was examined. • GSK3 destabilizes Nrf1 protein via Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. • GSK3 binds and phosphorylates Nrf1. • Protection from stress-induced apoptosis by Nrf1 is inhibited by GSK3.« less

  16. P2X1 receptor-mediated inhibition of the proliferation of human coronary smooth muscle cells involving the transcription factor NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Hinze, Annette Viktoria; Mayer, Peter; Harst, Anja; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2013-12-01

    Adenine nucleotides acting at P2X1 receptors are potent vasoconstrictors. Recently, we demonstrated that activation of adenosine A2B receptors on human coronary smooth muscle cells inhibits cell proliferation by the induction of the nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 (NR4A1; alternative notation Nur77). In the present study, we searched for long-term effects mediated by P2X1 receptors by analyzing receptor-mediated changes in cell proliferation and in the expression of NR4A1. Cultured human coronary smooth muscle cells were treated with selective receptor ligands. Effects on proliferation were determined by counting cells and measuring changes in impedance. The induction of transcription factors was assessed by qPCR. The P2X receptor agonist α,β-methylene-ATP and its analog β,γ-methylene-ATP inhibited cell proliferation by about 50 % after 5 days in culture with half-maximal concentrations of 0.3 and 0.08 μM, respectively. The effects were abolished or markedly attenuated by the P2X1 receptor antagonist NF449 (carbonylbis-imino-benzene-triylbis-(carbonylimino)tetrakis-benzene-1,3-disulfonic acid; 100 nM and 1 μM). α,β-methylene-ATP and β,γ-methylene-ATP applied for 30 min to 4 h increased the expression of NR4A1; NF449 blocked or attenuated this effect. Small interfering RNA directed against NR4A1 diminished the antiproliferative effects of α,β-methylene-ATP and β,γ-methylene-ATP. α,β-methylene-ATP (0.1 to 30 μM) decreased migration of cultured human coronary smooth muscle cells in a chamber measuring changes in impedance; NF449 blocked the effect. In conclusion, our results demonstrate for the first time that adenine nucleotides acting at P2X1 receptors inhibit the proliferation of human coronary smooth muscle cells via the induction of the early gene NR4A1.

  17. Negative pressure wound therapy inhibits inflammation and upregulates activating transcription factor-3 and downregulates nuclear factor-κB in diabetic patients with foot ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; He, R; Zhao, J; Mei, J C; Shao, M Z; Pan, Y; Zhang, J; Wu, H S; Yu, M; Yan, W C; Liu, L M; Liu, F; Jia, W P

    2017-05-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is one of the most important treatments for diabetic foot, but the underlying mechanisms of its benefits still remain elusive. This study aims to evaluate the inflammatory signals involved in the effects of negative pressure therapy on diabetic foot ulcers. We enrolled 22 patients with diabetic foot ulceration, 11 treated with NPWT and the other 11 treated with traditional debridement. All patients were treated and observed for 1 week. Granulation tissues were harvested and analyzed in both groups, and then were histologically and immunohistochemically analyzed. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot analysis, and real-time PCR were performed to evaluate the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65, I k B-α, and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3). After 7 days of treatment, NPWT could obviously promote diabetic wound healing because of the mild inflammation and the dense cell-deposited matrix. Meanwhile, NPWT significantly decreased the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and iNOS (all P < .05). The result of Western blotting and real-time PCR indicated that NPWT obviously decreased the level of I k B-α and NF-κB p65, and increased the level of ATF-3 (all P < .05). NPWT exerts an anti-inflammatory effect, possibly through the suppression of proinflammatory enzymes and cytokines resulting from I k B-α inhibition and ATF-3 activation, which may prevent the activation of the NF-κB pathway in human diabetic foot wounds. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Gambogic acid-loaded magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles inhibit Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and migration by inactivating transcription factor ETS1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cailian; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Yan; Shi, Fangfang; Chen, Baoan

    2012-01-01

    E26 transformation-specific sequence-1 (ETS1) transcription factor plays important roles in both carcinogenesis and the progression of a wide range of malignancies. Aberrant ETS1 expression correlates with aggressive tumor behavior and a poorer prognosis in patients with various malignancies. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of a drug delivery system utilizing gambogic acid-loaded magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (GA-MNP-Fe(3)O(4)) on the suppression of ETS1-mediated cell proliferation and migration in Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells. The effects caused by GA-MNP-Fe(3)O(4) on the proliferation of Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells were evaluated using a MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay while inhibition of tumor cell migration was investigated in a scratch assay. The expressions of ETS1, cyclin D1, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) were examined by Western blot to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved. In Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells, we observed that application of GA-MNP-Fe(3)O(4) was able to suppress cancer cell proliferation and prevent cells from migrating effectively. After treatment, Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells showed significantly decreased expression of ETS1, as well as its downstream target genes for cyclin D1, u-PA, and VEGF. Our novel finding reaffirmed the significance of ETS1 in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, and application of GA-MNP-Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles targeting ETS1 should be considered as a promising contribution for better pancreatic cancer care.

  19. MicroRNA-34a targets epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TFs) and inhibits breast cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shangyi; Yang, Luquan; Tania, Mousumi; Zhang, Xianqin; Xiao, Xiuli; Zhang, Xianning; Fu, Junjiang

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) plays an essential role against tumorigenesis and progression of cancer metastasis. Here, we analyzed the expression, targets and functional effects of miR-34a on epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TFs), such as TWIST1, SLUG and ZEB1/2, and an EMT-inducing protein NOTCH1 in breast cancer (BC) cell migration and invasion and its correlation with tumorigenesis and clinical outcomes. Expression of miR-34a is downregulated in human metastatic breast cancers (MBC) compared to normal breast tissues and is negatively correlated with clinicopathological features of MBC patients. Ectopic expression of miR-34a in MBC cell-line BT-549 significantly inhibits cell migration and invasion, but exhibits no clear effect on BC cell growth. We found that miR-34a is able to inactivate EMT signaling pathway with mediatory of NOTCH1, TWIST1, and ZEB1 upon 3′-UTR activity in MBC cell lines, but has no inhibitory effects on SLUG and ZEB2. Furthermore, we investigated the synergistic effects of Thymoquinone (TQ) and miR-34a together on the expression of EMT-associated proteins. Results showed that co-delivery of miR-34a and TQ is able to inactivate EMT signaling pathway by directly targeting TWIST1 and ZEB1 in BT-549 cell line, indicating that they might be a promising therapeutic combination against breast cancer metastasis. Epigenetic inactivation of the EMT-TFs/miR-34a pathway can potentially alter the equilibrium of these regulations, facilitating EMT and metastasis in BC. Altogether, our findings suggest that miR-34a alone could serve as a potential therapeutic agent for MBC, and together with TQ, their therapeutic potential is synergistically enhanced. PMID:28423483

  20. MicroRNA-34a targets epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TFs) and inhibits breast cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Imani, Saber; Wei, Chunli; Cheng, Jingliang; Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Fu, Shangyi; Yang, Luquan; Tania, Mousumi; Zhang, Xianqin; Xiao, Xiuli; Zhang, Xianning; Fu, Junjiang

    2017-03-28

    MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) plays an essential role against tumorigenesis and progression of cancer metastasis. Here, we analyzed the expression, targets and functional effects of miR-34a on epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TFs), such as TWIST1, SLUG and ZEB1/2, and an EMT-inducing protein NOTCH1 in breast cancer (BC) cell migration and invasion and its correlation with tumorigenesis and clinical outcomes. Expression of miR-34a is downregulated in human metastatic breast cancers (MBC) compared to normal breast tissues and is negatively correlated with clinicopathological features of MBC patients. Ectopic expression of miR-34a in MBC cell-line BT-549 significantly inhibits cell migration and invasion, but exhibits no clear effect on BC cell growth. We found that miR-34a is able to inactivate EMT signaling pathway with mediatory of NOTCH1, TWIST1, and ZEB1 upon 3'-UTR activity in MBC cell lines, but has no inhibitory effects on SLUG and ZEB2. Furthermore, we investigated the synergistic effects of Thymoquinone (TQ) and miR-34a together on the expression of EMT-associated proteins. Results showed that co-delivery of miR-34a and TQ is able to inactivate EMT signaling pathway by directly targeting TWIST1 and ZEB1 in BT-549 cell line, indicating that they might be a promising therapeutic combination against breast cancer metastasis. Epigenetic inactivation of the EMT-TFs/miR-34a pathway can potentially alter the equilibrium of these regulations, facilitating EMT and metastasis in BC. Altogether, our findings suggest that miR-34a alone could serve as a potential therapeutic agent for MBC, and together with TQ, their therapeutic potential is synergistically enhanced.

  1. Phytomedicines prepared from Arnica flowers inhibit the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappaB and modulate the activity of MMP1 and MMP13 in human and bovine chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Christoph; Hrenn, Andrea; Zwingmann, Jörn; Suter, Andreas; Merfort, Irmgard

    2009-10-01

    Arnica preparations have long been used for the symptomatic treatment of rheumatic complaints and recent clinical trials have demonstrated the beneficial effects of Arnica preparations in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). The efficacy of Arnica is presumed to be mainly due to its anti-inflammatory properties and inhibition of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Here we provide further insights into its molecular mode of action. Arnica preparations suppress MMP1 and MMP13 mRNA levels in bovine and human articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner and in a low concentration range. This suppression may be due to inhibition of DNA binding of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappaB. Interestingly, sesquiterpene lactones present in the preparations were always more active than the pure compounds, demonstrating the advantage of using plant preparations. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  2. Curcumin differentially regulates endoplasmic reticulum stress through transcriptional corepressor SMILE (small heterodimer partner-interacting leucine zipper protein)-mediated inhibition of CREBH (cAMP responsive element-binding protein H).

    PubMed

    Misra, Jagannath; Chanda, Dipanjan; Kim, Don-kyu; Li, Tiangang; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Back, Sung-Hoon; Chiang, John Y L; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2011-12-09

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), is a natural polyphenolic compound. Herein the effect of curcumin on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responsive gene expression was investigated. We report that curcumin induces transcriptional corepressor small heterodimer partner-interacting leucine zipper protein (SMILE) gene expression through liver kinase B1 (LKB1)/adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway and represses ER stress-responsive gene transcription in an ER-bound transcription factor specific manner. cAMP responsive element-binding protein H (CREBH) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) are both ER-bound bZIP family transcription factors that are activated upon ER stress. Of interest, we observed that both curcumin treatment and SMILE overexpression only represses CREBH-mediated transactivation of the target gene but not ATF6-mediated transactivation. Knockdown of endogenous SMILE significantly releases the inhibitory effect of curcumin on CREBH transactivation. Intrinsic repressive activity of SMILE is observed in the Gal4 fusion system, and the intrinsic repressive domain is mapped to the C terminus of SMILE spanning amino acid residues 203-269, corresponding to the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. In vivo interaction assay revealed that through its bZIP domain, SMILE interacts with CREBH and inhibits its transcriptional activity. Interestingly, we observed that SMILE does not interact with ATF6. Furthermore, competition between SMILE and the coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PGC-1α) on CREBH transactivation has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that curcumin decreases the binding of PGC-1α and CREBH on target gene promoter in a SMILE-dependent manner. Overall, for the first time we suggest a novel phenomenon that the curcumin/LKB1/AMPK/SMILE/PGC1α pathway differentially regulates ER

  3. Nipah and Hendra Virus Nucleoproteins Inhibit Nuclear Accumulation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 by Interfering with Their Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sugai, Akihiro; Sato, Hiroki; Takayama, Ikuyo; Yoneda, Misako

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Henipaviruses, such as Nipah (NiV) and Hendra (HeV) viruses, are highly pathogenic zoonotic agents within the Paramyxoviridae family. The phosphoprotein (P) gene products of the paramyxoviruses have been well characterized for their interferon (IFN) antagonist activity and their contribution to viral pathogenicity. In this study, we demonstrated that the nucleoprotein (N) of henipaviruses also prevents the host IFN signaling response. Reporter assays demonstrated that the NiV and HeV N proteins (NiV-N and HeV-N, respectively) dose-dependently suppressed both type I and type II IFN responses and that the inhibitory effect was mediated by their core domains. Additionally, NiV-N prevented the nuclear transport of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2. However, NiV-N did not associate with Impα5, Impβ1, or Ran, which are members of the nuclear transport system for STATs. Although P protein is known as a binding partner of N protein and actively retains N protein in the cytoplasm, the IFN antagonist activity of N protein was not abolished by the coexpression of P protein. This suggests that the IFN inhibition by N protein occurs in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the complex formation of STATs was hampered in the N protein-expressing cells. As a result, STAT nuclear accumulation was reduced, causing a subsequent downregulation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) due to low promoter occupancy by STAT complexes. This novel route for preventing host IFN responses by henipavirus N proteins provides new insight into the pathogenesis of these viruses. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses are well known for suppressing interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immunity with their phosphoprotein (P) gene products, and the henipaviruses also possess P, V, W, and C proteins for evading host antiviral responses. There are numerous studies providing evidence for the relationship between viral pathogenicity and antagonistic activities

  4. Nipah and Hendra Virus Nucleoproteins Inhibit Nuclear Accumulation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 by Interfering with Their Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Akihiro; Sato, Hiroki; Takayama, Ikuyo; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2017-11-01

    Henipaviruses, such as Nipah (NiV) and Hendra (HeV) viruses, are highly pathogenic zoonotic agents within the Paramyxoviridae family. The phosphoprotein (P) gene products of the paramyxoviruses have been well characterized for their interferon (IFN) antagonist activity and their contribution to viral pathogenicity. In this study, we demonstrated that the nucleoprotein (N) of henipaviruses also prevents the host IFN signaling response. Reporter assays demonstrated that the NiV and HeV N proteins (NiV-N and HeV-N, respectively) dose-dependently suppressed both type I and type II IFN responses and that the inhibitory effect was mediated by their core domains. Additionally, NiV-N prevented the nuclear transport of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2. However, NiV-N did not associate with Impα5, Impβ1, or Ran, which are members of the nuclear transport system for STATs. Although P protein is known as a binding partner of N protein and actively retains N protein in the cytoplasm, the IFN antagonist activity of N protein was not abolished by the coexpression of P protein. This suggests that the IFN inhibition by N protein occurs in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the complex formation of STATs was hampered in the N protein-expressing cells. As a result, STAT nuclear accumulation was reduced, causing a subsequent downregulation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) due to low promoter occupancy by STAT complexes. This novel route for preventing host IFN responses by henipavirus N proteins provides new insight into the pathogenesis of these viruses. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses are well known for suppressing interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immunity with their phosphoprotein (P) gene products, and the henipaviruses also possess P, V, W, and C proteins for evading host antiviral responses. There are numerous studies providing evidence for the relationship between viral pathogenicity and antagonistic activities against IFN

  5. Intrathecal administration of AYX2 DNA decoy produces a long-term pain treatment in rat models of chronic pain by inhibiting the KLF6, KLF9, and KLF15 transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Klukinov, Michael; Harris, Scott; Manning, Donald C; Xie, Simon; Pascual, Conrado; Taylor, Bradley K; Donahue, Renee R; Yeomans, David C

    2017-01-01

    Background Nociception is maintained by genome-wide regulation of transcription in the dorsal root ganglia—spinal cord network. Hence, transcription factors constitute a promising class of targets for breakthrough pharmacological interventions to treat chronic pain. DNA decoys are oligonucleotides and specific inhibitors of transcription factor activities. A methodological series of in vivo–in vitro screening cycles was performed with decoy/transcription factor couples to identify targets capable of producing a robust and long-lasting inhibition of established chronic pain. Decoys were injected intrathecally and their efficacy was tested in the spared nerve injury and chronic constriction injury models of chronic pain in rats using repetitive von Frey testing. Results Results demonstrated that a one-time administration of decoys binding to the Kruppel-like transcription factors (KLFs) 6, 9, and 15 produces a significant and weeks–month long reduction in mechanical hypersensitivity compared to controls. In the spared nerve injury model, decoy efficacy was correlated to its capacity to bind KLF15 and KLF9 at a specific ratio, while in the chronic constriction injury model, efficacy was correlated to the combined binding capacity to KLF6 and KLF9. AYX2, an 18-bp DNA decoy binding KLF6, KLF9, and KLF15, was optimized for clinical development, and it demonstrated significant efficacy in these models. Conclusions These data highlight KLF6, KLF9, and KLF15 as transcription factors required for the maintenance of chronic pain and illustrate the potential therapeutic benefits of AYX2 for the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:28814144

  6. The role of FOXO and PPAR transcription factors in diet-mediated inhibition of PDC activation and carbohydrate oxidation during exercise in humans and the role of pharmacological activation of PDC in overriding these changes.

    PubMed

    Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Constantin, Despina; Stephens, Francis; Laithwaite, David; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2012-05-01

    High-fat feeding inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC)-controlled carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation, which contributes to muscle insulin resistance. We aimed to reveal molecular changes underpinning this process in resting and exercising humans. We also tested whether pharmacological activation of PDC overrides these diet-induced changes. Healthy males consumed a control diet (CD) and on two further occasions an isocaloric high-fat diet (HFD). After each diet, subjects cycled for 60 min after intravenous infusion with saline (CD and HFD) or dichloroacetate (HFD+DCA). Quadriceps muscle biopsies obtained before and after 10 and 60 min of exercise were used to estimate CHO use, PDC activation, and mRNAs associated with insulin, fat, and CHO signaling. Compared with CD, HFD increased resting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2), PDK4, forkhead box class O transcription factor 1 (FOXO1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor transcription factor α (PPARα) mRNA and reduced PDC activation. Exercise increased PDC activation and whole-body CHO use in HFD, but to a lower extent than in CD. Meanwhile PDK4 and FOXO1, but not PPARα or PDK2, mRNA remained elevated. HFD+DCA activated PDC throughout and restored whole-body CHO use during exercise. FOXO1 appears to play a role in HFD-mediated muscle PDK4 upregulation and inhibition of PDC and CHO oxidation in humans. Also, pharmacological activation of PDC restores HFD-mediated inhibition of CHO oxidation during exercise.

  7. Inhibition of Nuclear Transcription Factor-κB and Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in HepG2 Cells by Cucurbitane-Type Triterpene Glycosides from Momordica charantia

    PubMed Central

    Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Yen, Pham Hai; Ngan, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Quang, Tran Hong; Kiem, Phan Van; Minh, Chau Van; Tai, Bui Huu; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Song, Seok Bean

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Momordica charantia: is used to treat various diseases, including inflammatory conditions. Previous reports indicated that the extract of this plant inhibits activation of nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB) but activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR). Additionally, cucurbitane-type triterpene glycosides are the main bioactive components of the fruit of M. charantia. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 17 cucurbitane-type triterpene glycosides (1–17) isolated from this plant. Their inhibition of NF-κB and activation of PPAR activities in HepG2 cells were measured using luciferase reporter and PPAR subtype transactivation assays. Compounds 6 and 8 were found to inhibit NF-κB activation stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in a dose-dependent manner. With 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values of 0.4 μM, compounds 6 and 8 were more potent inhibitors than the positive control, sulfasalazine (IC50=0.9 μM). Compounds 4, 6, and 8 also inhibited TNFα-induced expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA. However, only compound 13 significantly increased PPARγ transactivation. PMID:22248180

  8. Suppression of HIV-1 Infection by APOBEC3 Proteins in Primary Human CD4+ T Cells Is Associated with Inhibition of Processive Reverse Transcription as Well as Excessive Cytidine Deamination

    PubMed Central

    Gillick, Kieran; Pollpeter, Darja; Phalora, Prabhjeet; Kim, Eun-Young; Wolinsky, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The Vif protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) promotes viral replication by downregulation of the cell-encoded, antiviral APOBEC3 proteins. These proteins exert their suppressive effects through the inhibition of viral reverse transcription as well as the induction of cytidine deamination within nascent viral cDNA. Importantly, these two effects have not been characterized in detail in human CD4+ T cells, leading to controversies over their possible contributions to viral inhibition in the natural cell targets of HIV-1 replication. Here we use wild-type and Vif-deficient viruses derived from the CD4+ T cells of multiple donors to examine the consequences of APOBEC3 protein function at natural levels of expression. We demonstrate that APOBEC3 proteins impart a profound deficiency to reverse transcription from the initial stages of cDNA synthesis, as well as excessive cytidine deamination (hypermutation) of the DNAs that are synthesized. Experiments using viruses from transfected cells and a novel method for mapping the 3′ termini of cDNAs indicate that the inhibition of reverse transcription is not limited to a few specific sites, arguing that APOBEC3 proteins impede enzymatic processivity. Detailed analyses of mutation spectra in viral cDNA strongly imply that one particular APOBEC3 protein, APOBEC3G, provides the bulk of the antiviral phenotype in CD4+ T cells, with the effects of APOBEC3F and APOBEC3D being less significant. Taken together, we conclude that the dual mechanisms of action of APOBEC3 proteins combine to deliver more effective restriction of HIV-1 than either function would by itself. PMID:23152537

  9. Plasmids encoding PKI(1-31), a specific inhibitor of cAMP-stimulated gene expression, inhibit the basal transcriptional activity of some but not all cAMP-regulated DNA response elements in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Grove, J R; Deutsch, P J; Price, D J; Habener, J F; Avruch, J

    1989-11-25

    Plasmids that encode a bioactive amino-terminal fragment of the heat-stable inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKI(1-31), were employed to characterize the role of this protein kinase in the control of transcriptional activity mediated by three DNA regulatory elements in the JEG-3 human placental cell line. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human collagenase gene contains the heptameric sequence, 5'-TGAGTCA-3', previously identified as a "phorbol ester" response element. Reporter genes containing either the intact 1.2-kilobase 5'-flanking sequence from the human collagenase gene or just the 7-base pair (bp) response element, when coupled to an enhancerless promoter, each exhibit both cAMP and phorbol ester-stimulated expression in JEG-3 cells. Cotransfection of either construct with plasmids encoding PKI(1-31) inhibits cAMP-stimulated but not basal- or phorbol ester-stimulated expression. Pretreatment of cells with phorbol ester for 1 or 2 days abrogates completely the response to rechallenge with phorbol ester but does not alter the basal expression of either construct; cAMP-stimulated expression, while modestly inhibited, remains vigorous. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human chorionic gonadotropin-alpha subunit (HCG alpha) gene has two copies of the sequence, 5'-TGACGTCA-3', contained in directly adjacent identical 18-bp segments, previously identified as a cAMP-response element. Reporter genes containing either the intact 1.5 kilobase of 5'-flanking sequence from the HCG alpha gene, or just the 36-bp tandem repeat cAMP response element, when coupled to an enhancerless promoter, both exhibit a vigorous cAMP stimulation of expression but no response to phorbol ester in JEG-3 cells. Cotransfection with plasmids encoding PKI(1-31) inhibits both basal and cAMP-stimulated expression in a parallel fashion. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human enkephalin gene mediates cAMP-stimulated expression of reporter genes in both JEG-3 and CV-1 cells. Plasmids

  10. Tripartite Motif 24 (Trim24/Tif1α) Tumor Suppressor Protein Is a Novel Negative Regulator of Interferon (IFN)/Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) Signaling Pathway Acting through Retinoic Acid Receptor α (Rarα) Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Tisserand, Johan; Khetchoumian, Konstantin; Thibault, Christelle; Dembélé, Doulaye; Chambon, Pierre; Losson, Régine

    2011-01-01

    Recent genetic studies in mice have established that the nuclear receptor coregulator Trim24/Tif1α suppresses hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting retinoic acid receptor α (Rara)-dependent transcription and cell proliferation. However, Rara targets regulated by Trim24 remain unknown. We report that the loss of Trim24 resulted in interferon (IFN)/STAT pathway overactivation soon after birth (week 5). Despite a transient attenuation of this pathway by the induction of several IFN/STAT pathway repressors later in the disease, this phenomenon became more pronounced in tumors. Remarkably, Rara haplodeficiency, which suppresses tumorigenesis in Trim24−/− mice, prevented IFN/STAT overactivation. Moreover, together with Rara, Trim24 bound to the retinoic acid-responsive element of the Stat1 promoter and repressed its retinoic acid-induced transcription. Altogether, these results identify Trim24 as a novel negative regulator of the IFN/STAT pathway and suggest that this repression through Rara inhibition may prevent liver cancer. PMID:21768647

  11. AtMyb7, a subgroup 4 R2R3 Myb, negatively regulates ABA-induced inhibition of seed germination by blocking the expression of the bZIP transcription factor ABI5.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Hyeok; Hyun, Woo Young; Nguyen, Hoai Nguyen; Jeong, Chan Young; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Suk-Whan; Lee, Hojoung

    2015-03-01

    Various Myb proteins have been shown to play crucial roles in plants, including primary and secondary metabolism, determination of cell fate and identity, regulation of development and involvement in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The 126 R2R3 Myb proteins (with two Myb repeats) have been found in Arabidopsis; however, the functions of most of these proteins remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we characterized the function of AtMyb7 using molecular biological and genetic analyses. We used qRT-PCR to determine the levels of stress-response gene transcripts in wild-type and atmyb7 plants. We showed that Arabidopsis AtMyb7 plays a critical role in seed germination. Under abscisic acid (ABA) and high-salt stress conditions, atmyb7 plants showed a lower germination rate than did wild-type plants. Furthermore, AtMyb7 promoter:GUS seeds exhibited different expression patterns in response to variations in the seed imbibition period. AtMyb7 negatively controls the expression of the gene encoding bZIP transcription factor, ABI5, which is a key transcription factor in ABA signalling and serves as a crucial regulator of germination inhibition in Arabidopsis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Kinome and Transcriptome Profiling Reveal Broad and Distinct Activities of Erlotinib, Sunitinib, and Sorafenib in the Mouse Heart and Suggest Cardiotoxicity From Combined Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Stuhlmiller, Timothy J; Zawistowski, Jon S; Chen, Xin; Sciaky, Noah; Angus, Steven P; Hicks, Sean T; Parry, Traci L; Huang, Wei; Beak, Ju Youn; Willis, Monte S; Johnson, Gary L; Jensen, Brian C

    2017-10-19

    Most novel cancer therapeutics target kinases that are essential to tumor survival. Some of these kinase inhibitors are associated with cardiotoxicity, whereas others appear to be cardiosafe. The basis for this distinction is unclear, as are the molecular effects of kinase inhibitors in the heart. We administered clinically relevant doses of sorafenib, sunitinib (cardiotoxic multitargeted kinase inhibitors), or erlotinib (a cardiosafe epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) to mice daily for 2 weeks. We then compared the effects of these 3 kinase inhibitors on the cardiac transcriptome using RNAseq and the cardiac kinome using multiplexed inhibitor beads coupled with mass spectrometry. We found unexpectedly broad molecular effects of all 3 kinase inhibitors, suggesting that target kinase selectivity does not define either the molecular response or the potential for cardiotoxicity. Using in vivo drug administration and primary cardiomyocyte culture, we also show that the cardiosafety of erlotinib treatment may result from upregulation of the cardioprotective signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway, as co-treatment with erlotinib and a signal transducer and activator of transcription inhibitor decreases cardiac contractile function and cardiomyocyte fatty acid oxidation. Collectively our findings indicate that preclinical kinome and transcriptome profiling may predict the cardiotoxicity of novel kinase inhibitors, and suggest caution for the proposed therapeutic strategy of combined signal transducer and activator of transcription/epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition for cancer treatment. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  13. Perindopril, fosinopril and losartan inhibited the progression of diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocellular carcinoma in mice via the inactivation of nuclear transcription factor kappa-B.

    PubMed

    Saber, Sameh; Mahmoud, Amr A A; Goda, Reham; Helal, Noha S; El-Ahwany, Eman; Abdelghany, Rasha H

    2018-05-31

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major global health problem. Therapeutic interventions of HCC are still limited because of its complicated molecular pathogenesis. Many reports showed that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to the development of different types of malignancies. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the effect of RAS inhibition using perindopril (1 mg/kg), fosinopril (2 mg/kg), or losartan (10 mg/kg) on diethylnitrosamine-induced HCC compared to sorafenib (30 mg/kg). The administration of RAS inhibitors resulted in improved liver function and histologic picture with a reduction in AFP levels. These effects found to be mediated through inactivation of NFкB pathway by the inhibition of NFĸB p65 phosphorylation at the Ser536 residue and inhibition of the phosphorylation-induced degradation of NFĸBia. Consequently, expression levels of cyclin D1 mRNA were significantly lowered. In addition, NFкB-induced TNF-α and TGF-β1 levels were reduced leading to lower levels of MMP-2 and VEGF. We concluded that RAS inhibition either through inhibiting the ACE or the blockade of AT1R has the same therapeutic benefit and that the tissue affinity of the ACEIs has no impact on its anti-tumor activity. These results suggest that ACEIs and ARBs can serve as promising candidates for further clinical trials in the management of HCC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fas Promotes T Helper 17 Cell Differentiation and Inhibits T Helper 1 Cell Development by Binding and Sequestering Transcription Factor STAT1.

    PubMed

    Meyer Zu Horste, Gerd; Przybylski, Dariusz; Schramm, Markus A; Wang, Chao; Schnell, Alexandra; Lee, Youjin; Sobel, Raymond; Regev, Aviv; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2018-03-20

    The death receptor Fas removes activated lymphocytes through apoptosis. Previous transcriptional profiling predicted that Fas positively regulates interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing T helper 17 (Th17) cells. Here, we demonstrate that Fas promoted the generation and stability of Th17 cells and prevented their differentiation into Th1 cells. Mice with T-cell- and Th17-cell-specific deletion of Fas were protected from induced autoimmunity, and Th17 cell differentiation and stability were impaired. Fas-deficient Th17 cells instead developed a Th1-cell-like transcriptional profile, which a new algorithm predicted to depend on STAT1. Experimentally, Fas indeed bound and sequestered STAT1, and Fas deficiency enhanced IL-6-induced STAT1 activation and nuclear translocation, whereas deficiency of STAT1 reversed the transcriptional changes induced by Fas deficiency. Thus, our computational and experimental approach identified Fas as a regulator of the Th17-to-Th1 cell balance by controlling the availability of opposing STAT1 and STAT3 to have a direct impact on autoimmunity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits expression of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and their key transcriptional regulators in FRTL-5 thyrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Gaiping; Eder, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is characterized by the accumulation of misfolded proteins due to an impairment of ER quality control pathways leading to the activation of a defense system, called unfolded protein response (UPR). While thyrocytes are supposed to be highly susceptible to environmental conditions that cause ER stress due to the synthesis of large amounts of secretory proteins required for thyroid hormone synthesis, systematic investigations on the effect of ER stress on expression of key genes of thyroid hormone synthesis and their transcriptional regulators are lacking. Since the aim of the ER stress-induced UPR is to restore ER homeostasis and to facilitate cell survival through transient shutdown of ribosomal protein translation, we hypothesized that the expression of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and their transcriptional regulators, all of which are not essential for cell survival, are down-regulated in thyrocytes during ER stress, while sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are activated during ER stress in thyrocytes. Treatment of FRTL-5 thyrocytes with the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (TM) dose-dependently increased the mRNA and/or protein levels of known UPR target genes, stimulated phosphorylation of the ER stress sensor protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK) and of the PERK target protein eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) and caused splicing of the ER stress-sensitive transcription factor X-box binding protein (XBP-1) (P < 0.05). The mRNA levels and/or protein levels of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis, sodium/iodide symporter (NIS), thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (TG), their transcriptional regulators and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor and the uptake of Na125I were reduced at the highest concentration of TM tested (0.1 μg/mL; P < 0.05). Proteolytic activation of the SREBP-1c pathway was not observed in FRTL-5 cells treated with TM, whereas TM reduced proteolytic activation of

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits expression of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and their key transcriptional regulators in FRTL-5 thyrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gaiping; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is characterized by the accumulation of misfolded proteins due to an impairment of ER quality control pathways leading to the activation of a defense system, called unfolded protein response (UPR). While thyrocytes are supposed to be highly susceptible to environmental conditions that cause ER stress due to the synthesis of large amounts of secretory proteins required for thyroid hormone synthesis, systematic investigations on the effect of ER stress on expression of key genes of thyroid hormone synthesis and their transcriptional regulators are lacking. Since the aim of the ER stress-induced UPR is to restore ER homeostasis and to facilitate cell survival through transient shutdown of ribosomal protein translation, we hypothesized that the expression of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and their transcriptional regulators, all of which are not essential for cell survival, are down-regulated in thyrocytes during ER stress, while sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are activated during ER stress in thyrocytes. Treatment of FRTL-5 thyrocytes with the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (TM) dose-dependently increased the mRNA and/or protein levels of known UPR target genes, stimulated phosphorylation of the ER stress sensor protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK) and of the PERK target protein eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) and caused splicing of the ER stress-sensitive transcription factor X-box binding protein (XBP-1) (P < 0.05). The mRNA levels and/or protein levels of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis, sodium/iodide symporter (NIS), thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (TG), their transcriptional regulators and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor and the uptake of Na125I were reduced at the highest concentration of TM tested (0.1 μg/mL; P < 0.05). Proteolytic activation of the SREBP-1c pathway was not observed in FRTL-5 cells treated with TM, whereas TM reduced proteolytic activation of

  17. Lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius Inhibits Nuclear Transcription Factor-kappa B Activation, Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression and Prostaglandin E2 Production in Stimulated Human Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Naila; Alghasham, Abdullah; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive joint disorder, which remains the leading cause of chronic disability in aged people. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF)-κB is a major cellular event in OA and its activation by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a critical role in cartilage breakdown in these patients. In this study, we examined the effect of lactoferrin on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in stimulated human articular chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were derived from OA articular cartilage and treated with camel lactoferrin and then stimulated with IL-1β. Gene expression was determined by TaqMan assays and protein expression was studied by Western immunoblotting. NF-κB activity and PGE2 levels were determined by ELISA based assays. NF-κB activity was also determined by treatment of chondrocytes with NF-κB specific inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Lactoferrin inhibited IL-1β-induced activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in human OA chondrocytes. Lactoferrin also inhibited mRNA/protein expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. Moreover, Bay 11-7082 also inhibited IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. The inhibitory effect of lactoferrin on the IL-1β induced expression of COX-2 or production of PGE2 was mediated at least in part via suppression of NF-κB activation. Our data determine camel lactoferrin as a novel inhibitor of IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB signaling events and production of cartilage-degrading molecule PGE2 via inhibition of COX-2 expressions. These results may have important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the prevention/treatment of OA and other degenerative/inflammatory diseases. Lactoferrin shows anti-arthritic activity in IL-1β stimulated primary human chondrocytes.Lactoferrin inhibits IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation.Lactoferrin inhibits production of cartilage degrading PGE2 via inhibition of COX-2 expression

  18. Lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius Inhibits Nuclear Transcription Factor-kappa B Activation, Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression and Prostaglandin E2 Production in Stimulated Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Naila; Alghasham, Abdullah; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive joint disorder, which remains the leading cause of chronic disability in aged people. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF)-κB is a major cellular event in OA and its activation by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a critical role in cartilage breakdown in these patients. Objective: In this study, we examined the effect of lactoferrin on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in stimulated human articular chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Human chondrocytes were derived from OA articular cartilage and treated with camel lactoferrin and then stimulated with IL-1β. Gene expression was determined by TaqMan assays and protein expression was studied by Western immunoblotting. NF-κB activity and PGE2 levels were determined by ELISA based assays. NF-κB activity was also determined by treatment of chondrocytes with NF-κB specific inhibitor Bay 11–7082. Results: Lactoferrin inhibited IL-1β-induced activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in human OA chondrocytes. Lactoferrin also inhibited mRNA/protein expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. Moreover, Bay 11–7082 also inhibited IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. The inhibitory effect of lactoferrin on the IL-1β induced expression of COX-2 or production of PGE2 was mediated at least in part via suppression of NF-κB activation. Conclusions: Our data determine camel lactoferrin as a novel inhibitor of IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB signaling events and production of cartilage-degrading molecule PGE2 via inhibition of COX-2 expressions. These results may have important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the prevention/treatment of OA and other degenerative/inflammatory diseases. SUMMARY Lactoferrin shows anti-arthritic activity in IL-1β stimulated primary human chondrocytes.Lactoferrin inhibits IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation.Lactoferrin inhibits

  19. Induction of caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptosis by apigenin through inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling in HER2-overexpressing BT-474 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye-Sook; Jo, Jae Kyung; Ku, Jin Mo; Choi, Han-Seok; Choi, Youn Kyung; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Hyo In; Kang, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Kang Min; Nam, Koong Won; Park, Namkyu; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2015-10-23

    Phytoestrogen intake is known to be beneficial to decrease breast cancer incidence and progression. But its molecular mechanisms of action are still unknown. The present study aimed to examine the effect of apigenin on proliferation and apoptosis in HER2-expressing breast cancer cells. In our experiments, apigenin inhibited the proliferation of BT-474 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apigenin also inhibited clonogenic survival (anchorage-dependent and -independent) of BT-474 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These growth inhibitions were accompanied with an increase in sub-G0/G1 apoptotic populations. Apigenin-induced extrinsic a caspase-dependent apoptosis up-regulating the levels of cleaved caspase-8 and cleaved caspase-3, and inducing the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Whereas, apigenin did not induce apoptosis via intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway since this compound did not decrease mitochondrial membrane potential without affecting the levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX). Apigenin reduced the expression of phospho-JAK1, phospho-JAK2 and phospho-STAT3 and decreased signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) dependent luciferase reporter gene activity in BT-474 cells. Apigenin inhibited CoCl2-induced VEGF secretion and decreased the nuclear translocation of STAT3. Our study indicates that apigenin induces apoptosis through inhibition of STAT3 signalling and could serve as a useful compound to prevent or treat HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. © 2015 Authors.

  20. Induction of caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptosis by apigenin through inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling in HER2-overexpressing BT-474 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hye-Sook; Jo, Jae Kyung; Ku, Jin Mo; Choi, Han-Seok; Choi, Youn Kyung; Woo, Jong-Kyu; in Kim, Hyo; Kang, Soo-yeon; Lee, Kang min; Nam, Koong Won; Park, Namkyu; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Phytoestrogen intake is known to be beneficial to decrease breast cancer incidence and progression. But its molecular mechanisms of action are still unknown. The present study aimed to examine the effect of apigenin on proliferation and apoptosis in HER2-expressing breast cancer cells. In our experiments, apigenin inhibited the proliferation of BT-474 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apigenin also inhibited clonogenic survival (anchorage-dependent and -independent) of BT-474 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These growth inhibitions were accompanied with an increase in sub-G0/G1 apoptotic populations. Apigenin-induced extrinsic a caspase-dependent apoptosis up-regulating the levels of cleaved caspase-8 and cleaved caspase-3, and inducing the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Whereas, apigenin did not induce apoptosis via intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway since this compound did not decrease mitochondrial membrane potential without affecting the levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX). Apigenin reduced the expression of phospho-JAK1, phospho-JAK2 and phospho-STAT3 and decreased signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) dependent luciferase reporter gene activity in BT-474 cells. Apigenin inhibited CoCl2-induced VEGF secretion and decreased the nuclear translocation of STAT3. Our study indicates that apigenin induces apoptosis through inhibition of STAT3 signalling and could serve as a useful compound to prevent or treat HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. PMID:26500281

  1. All-trans-retinoic acid inhibits collapsin response mediator protein-2 transcriptional activity during SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fontán-Gabás, Lorena; Oliemuller, Erik; Martínez-Irujo, Juan José; de Miguel, Carlos; Rouzaut, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells composed of two structurally and functionally distinct parts, the axon and the dendrite. The establishment of this asymmetric structure is a tightly regulated process. In fact, alterations in the proteins involved in the configuration of the microtubule lattice are frequent in neuro-oncologic diseases. One of these cytoplasmic mediators is the protein known as collapsin response mediator protein-2, which interacts with and promotes tubulin polymerization. In this study, we investigated collapsin response mediator protein-2 transcriptional regulation during all-trans-retinoic acid-induced differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. All-trans-retinoic acid is considered to be a potential preventive and therapeutic agent, and has been extensively used to differentiate neuroblastoma cells in vitro. Therefore, we first demonstrated that collapsin response mediator protein-2 mRNA levels are downregulated during the differentiation process. After completion of deletion construct analysis and mutagenesis and mobility shift assays, we concluded that collapsin response mediator protein-2 basal promoter activity is regulated by the transcription factors AP-2 and Pax-3, whereas E2F, Sp1 and NeuroD1 seem not to participate in its regulation. Furthermore, we finally established that reduced expression of collapsin response mediator protein-2 after all-trans-retinoic acid exposure is associated with impaired Pax-3 and AP-2 binding to their consensus sequences in the collapsin response mediator protein-2 promoter. Decreased attachment of AP-2 is a consequence of its accumulation in the cytoplasm. On the other hand, Pax-3 shows lower binding due to all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated transcriptional repression. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms behind the action of all-trans-retinoic acid on neuroblastoma cells may well offer new perspectives for its clinical application.

  2. trans-Resveratrol Protects Ischemic PC12 Cells by Inhibiting the Hypoxia Associated Transcription Factors and Increasing the Levels of Antioxidant Defense Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    An in vitro model of ischemic cerebral stroke [oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 6 h followed by 24 h reoxygenation (R)] with PC12 cells increases Ca2+ influx by upregulating native L-type Ca2+ channels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This reactive oxygen species generation and increase in intracellular Ca2+ triggers the expression of hypoxic homeostasis transcription factors such as hypoxia induced factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), Cav-beta 3 (Cav β3), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), heat shock protein 27 (hsp-27), and cationic channel transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7). OGD insulted PC12 cells were subjected to biologically safe doses (5, 10, and 25 μM) of trans-resveratrol in three different treatment groups: 24 h prior to OGD (pre-treatment); 24 h post OGD (post-treatment); and from 24 h before OGD to end of reoxygenation period (whole-treatment). Here, we demonstrated that OGD-R-induced neuronal injury/death is by reactive oxygen species generation, increase in intracellular calcium levels, and decrease in antioxidant defense enzymes. trans-Resveratrol increases the viability of OGD-R insulted PC12 cells, which was assessed by using MTT, NRU, and LDH release assay. In addition, trans-resveratrol significantly decreases reactive oxygen species generation, intracellular Ca2+ levels, and hypoxia associated transcription factors and also increases the level of antioxidant defense enzymes. Our data shows that the whole-treatment group of trans-resveratrol is most efficient in decreasing hypoxia induced cell death through its antioxidant properties. PMID:23421680

  3. The α-Glucan Phosphorylase MalP of Corynebacterium glutamicum Is Subject to Transcriptional Regulation and Competitive Inhibition by ADP-Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Clermont, Lina; Macha, Arthur; Müller, Laura M.; Derya, Sami M.; von Zaluskowski, Philipp; Eck, Alexander; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT α-Glucan phosphorylases contribute to degradation of glycogen and maltodextrins formed in the course of maltose metabolism in bacteria. Accordingly, bacterial α-glucan phosphorylases are classified as either glycogen or maltodextrin phosphorylase, GlgP or MalP, respectively. GlgP and MalP enzymes follow the same catalytic mechanism, and thus their substrate spectra overlap; however, they differ in their regulation: GlgP genes are constitutively expressed and the enzymes are controlled on the activity level, whereas expression of MalP genes are transcriptionally controlled in response to the carbon source used for cultivation. We characterize here the modes of control of the α-glucan phosphorylase MalP of the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum. In accordance to the proposed function of the malP gene product as MalP, we found transcription of malP to be regulated in response to the carbon source. Moreover, malP transcription is shown to depend on the growth phase and to occur independently of the cell glycogen content. Surprisingly, we also found MalP activity to be tightly regulated competitively by the presence of ADP-glucose, an intermediate of glycogen synthesis. Since the latter is considered a typical feature of GlgPs, we propose that C. glutamicum MalP acts as both maltodextrin and glycogen phosphorylase and, based on these findings, we question the current system for classification of bacterial α-glucan phosphorylases. IMPORTANCE Bacterial α-glucan phosphorylases have been classified conferring to their purpose as either glycogen or maltodextrin phosphorylases. We found transcription of malP in C. glutamicum to be regulated in response to the carbon source, which is recognized as typical for maltodextrin phosphorylases. Surprisingly, we also found MalP activity to be tightly regulated competitively by the presence of ADP-glucose, an intermediate of glycogen synthesis. The latter is considered a typical feature of GlgPs. These findings

  4. Members of miR-169 family are induced by high salinity and transiently inhibit the NF-YA transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Botao; Ge, Liangfa; Liang, Ruqiang; Li, Wei; Ruan, Kangcheng; Lin, Hongxuan; Jin, Youxin

    2009-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small RNAs with a length of about 21 nt. MiRNAs silence their target genes at the post-transcriptional level. In plants, miRNAs play various developmental and physiological roles by cleavaging mRNAs predominantly. Drought and high salinity are the most severe environmental abiotic stresses and cause crop losses all over the world. Results In this study, we identified miR-169g and miR-169n (o) as high salinity-responsive miRNAs in rice. MiR-169n and miR169o were in a miRNA cluster with a distance of 3707 base pairs (bp). The high degree of conservation and close phylogenic distance of pre-miR-169n and pre-miR-169o indicated that they were derived from a very recent tandem duplication evolutionary event. The existence of a cis-acting abscisic acid responsive element (ABRE) in the upstream region of miR-169n (o) suggested that miR-169n (o) may be regulated by ABA. In our previous study, we found that miR-169g was induced by the osmotic stress caused by drought via a dehydration-responsive element (DRE). Thus, our data showed that there were both overlapping and distinct responses of the miR-169 family to drought and salt stresses. We also showed that these miR-169 members selectively cleaved one of the NF-YA genes, Os03g29760, which is a CCAAT-box binding transcription factor and participates in transcriptional regulation of large number genes. Finally, we found one or more ath-miR-169 member that was also induced by high salinity. Conclusion We identified members of the miR-169 family as salt-induced miRNAs and analyzed their evolution, gene organization, expression, transcriptional regulation motif and target gene. Our data also indicated that the salt-induction of some miR-169 members was a general property in plants. PMID:19351418

  5. Members of miR-169 family are induced by high salinity and transiently inhibit the NF-YA transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Botao; Ge, Liangfa; Liang, Ruqiang; Li, Wei; Ruan, Kangcheng; Lin, Hongxuan; Jin, Youxin

    2009-04-08

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small RNAs with a length of about 21 nt. MiRNAs silence their target genes at the post-transcriptional level. In plants, miRNAs play various developmental and physiological roles by cleavaging mRNAs predominantly. Drought and high salinity are the most severe environmental abiotic stresses and cause crop losses all over the world. In this study, we identified miR-169g and miR-169n (o) as high salinity-responsive miRNAs in rice. MiR-169n and miR169o were in a miRNA cluster with a distance of 3707 base pairs (bp). The high degree of conservation and close phylogenic distance of pre-miR-169n and pre-miR-169o indicated that they were derived from a very recent tandem duplication evolutionary event. The existence of a cis-acting abscisic acid responsive element (ABRE) in the upstream region of miR-169n (o) suggested that miR-169n (o) may be regulated by ABA. In our previous study, we found that miR-169g was induced by the osmotic stress caused by drought via a dehydration-responsive element (DRE). Thus, our data showed that there were both overlapping and distinct responses of the miR-169 family to drought and salt stresses. We also showed that these miR-169 members selectively cleaved one of the NF-YA genes, Os03g29760, which is a CCAAT-box binding transcription factor and participates in transcriptional regulation of large number genes. Finally, we found one or more ath-miR-169 member that was also induced by high salinity. We identified members of the miR-169 family as salt-induced miRNAs and analyzed their evolution, gene organization, expression, transcriptional regulation motif and target gene. Our data also indicated that the salt-induction of some miR-169 members was a general property in plants.

  6. Black raspberry extracts inhibit benzo(a)pyrene diol-epoxide-induced activator protein 1 activation and VEGF transcription by targeting the phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuanshu; Li, Jingxia; Song, Lun; Zhang, Dongyun; Tong, Qiangsong; Ding, Min; Bowman, Linda; Aziz, Robeena; Stoner, Gary D

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that freeze-dried black raspberry extract fractions inhibit benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells and benzo(a)pyrene diol-epoxide [B(a)PDE]-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity in mouse epidermal Cl 41 cells. The phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)/Akt pathway is critical for B(a)PDE-induced AP-1 activation in mouse epidermal Cl 41 cells. In the present study, we determined the potential involvement of PI-3K and its downstream kinases on the inhibition of AP-1 activation by black raspberry fractions, RO-FOO3, RO-FOO4, RO-ME, and RO-DM. In addition, we investigated the effects of these fractions on the expression of the AP-1 target genes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Pretreatment of Cl 41 cells with fractions RO-F003 and RO-ME reduced activation of AP-1 and the expression of VEGF, but not iNOS. In contrast, fractions RO-F004 and RO-DM had no effect on AP-1 activation or the expression of either VEGF or iNOS. Consistent with inhibition of AP-1 activation, the RO-ME fraction markedly inhibited activation of PI-3K, Akt, and p70 S6 kinase (p70(S6k)). In addition, overexpression of the dominant negative PI-3K mutant delta p85 reduced the induction of VEGF by B(a)PDE. It is likely that the inhibitory effects of fractions RO-FOO3 and RO-ME on B(a)PDE-induced AP-1 activation and VEGF expression are mediated by inhibition of the PI-3K/Akt pathway. In view of the important roles of AP-1 and VEGF in tumor development, one mechanism for the chemopreventive activity of black raspberries may be inhibition of the PI-3K/Akt/AP-1/VEGF pathway.

  7. DNA hypomethylation of a transcription factor binding site within the promoter of a gout risk gene NRBP1 upregulates its expression by inhibition of TFAP2A binding.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Meng, Weida; Liu, Peiru; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Yun; Zou, Hejian

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified dozens of loci associated with gout, but for most cases, the risk genes and the underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to these associations are unknown. This study sought to understand the molecular mechanism of a common genetic variant, rs780093, in the development of gout, both in vitro and in vivo. Nuclear receptor binding protein 1 ( NRBP1 ), as a gout risk gene, and its regulatory region, 72 bp upstream of the transcription start site, designated as B1, were identified through integrative analyses of genome-wide genotype and DNA methylation data. We observed elevated NRBP1 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from gout patients. In vitro luciferase reporter and protein pulldown assay results showed that DNA methylation could increase the binding of the transcription factor TFAP2A to B1, leading to suppressed gene expression. There results were further confirmed by in vivo bisulfite pyrosequencing showing that hypomethylation on B1 is associated with increased NRBP1 expression in gout patients. Hypomethylation at the promoter region of NRBP1 reduces the binding of TFAP2A and thus leads to elevated NRBP1 expression, which might contribute to the development of gout.

  8. Icaritin inhibits the expression of alpha-fetoprotein in hepatitis B virus-infected hepatoma cell lines through post-transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Hui; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaowei; Li, Gang

    2016-12-13

    Although it has showed that icaritin can apparently suppress growth of HCC by reducing the level of AFP, the intrinsic mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we explored the possible mechanism of miRNAs on post-transcriptional regulation of AFP gene, as well as the effects of HBV infection and icaritin in hepatoma cells. The results showed that miR-620, miR-1236 and miR-1270 could bind target sites in the range of 9-18 nt and 131-151 nt downstream of the stop codon in the AFP mRNA 3'-UTR to suppress the expression of AFP. Mutation of these target sites could reverse the effects of these miRNAs. Icaritin (10 μM) might reduce the stability and translational activity of AFP mRNA by increasing the expression levels of these mentioned miRNAs. HBV infection resulted in apparent decreases of these miRNAs and, consequently, increased AFP expression. The results indicated that miR-620, miR-1236 and miR-1270 are critical factors in the post-transcriptional regulation of AFP. Icaritin can counteract the effect of HBV. These findings will contribute to full understanding of the regulatory mechanism of AFP expression in hepatoma cells. And also it revealed a synergistic mechanism of HBV infection and elevation of AFP in the pathogenesis of HCC, as well as the potential clinical significance of icaritin on the therapy of HCC induced by HBV.

  9. Loss of tumor suppressor KDM6A amplifies PRC2-regulated transcriptional repression in bladder cancer and can be targeted through inhibition of EZH2.

    PubMed

    Ler, Lian Dee; Ghosh, Sujoy; Chai, Xiaoran; Thike, Aye Aye; Heng, Hong Lee; Siew, Ee Yan; Dey, Sucharita; Koh, Liang Kai; Lim, Jing Quan; Lim, Weng Khong; Myint, Swe Swe; Loh, Jia Liang; Ong, Pauline; Sam, Xin Xiu; Huang, Dachuan; Lim, Tony; Tan, Puay Hoon; Nagarajan, Sanjanaa; Cheng, Christopher Wai Sam; Ho, Henry; Ng, Lay Guat; Yuen, John; Lin, Po-Hung; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Weng, Wen-Hui; Rozen, Steven G; Tan, Patrick; Creasy, Caretha L; Pang, See-Tong; McCabe, Michael T; Poon, Song Ling; Teh, Bin Tean

    2017-02-22

    Trithorax-like group complex containing KDM6A acts antagonistically to Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) containing EZH2 in maintaining the dynamics of the repression and activation of gene expression through H3K27 methylation. In urothelial bladder carcinoma, KDM6A (a H3K27 demethylase) is frequently mutated, but its functional consequences and therapeutic targetability remain unknown. About 70% of KDM6A mutations resulted in a total loss of expression and a consequent loss of demethylase function in this cancer type. Further transcriptome analysis found multiple deregulated pathways, especially PRC2/EZH2, in KDM6A -mutated urothelial bladder carcinoma. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis revealed enrichment of H3K27me3 at specific loci in KDM6A -null cells, including PRC2/EZH2 and their downstream targets. Consequently, we targeted EZH2 (an H3K27 methylase) and demonstrated that KDM6A -null urothelial bladder carcinoma cell lines were sensitive to EZH2 inhibition. Loss- and gain-of-function assays confirmed that cells with loss of KDM6A are vulnerable to EZH2. IGFBP3, a direct KDM6A/EZH2/H3K27me3 target, was up-regulated by EZH2 inhibition and contributed to the observed EZH2-dependent growth suppression in KDM6A -null cell lines. EZH2 inhibition delayed tumor onset in KDM6A -null cells and caused regression of KDM6A -null bladder tumors in both patient-derived and cell line xenograft models. In summary, our study demonstrates that inactivating mutations of KDM6A , which are common in urothelial bladder carcinoma, are potentially targetable by inhibiting EZH2. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Circumvention of the multidrug-resistance protein (MRP-1) by an antitumor drug through specific inhibition of gene transcription in breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, Sylvia; Rojas, Marta; Bataller, Marc; Priebe, Waldemar; Portugal, José

    2007-04-01

    Multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MRP-1) confers resistance to a number of clinically important chemotherapeutic agents. The promoter of the mrp-1 gene contains an Sp1-binding site, which we targeted using the antitumor bis-anthracycline WP631. When MCF-7/VP breast cancer cells, which overexpress MRP-1 protein, were incubated with WP631 the expression of the multidrug-resistance protein gene decreased. Conversely, doxorubicin did not alter mrp-1 gene expression. The inhibition of gene expression was followed by a decrease in the activity of the MRP-1 protein. The IC(75) for WP631 (drug concentration required to inhibit cell growth by 75%) circumvented the drug-efflux pump, without addition of resistant modifiers. After treatment with WP631, MCF-7/VP cells were committed to die after entering mitosis (mitotic catastrophe), while treatment with doxorubicin did not affect cell growth. This is the first report on an antitumor drug molecule inhibiting the mrp-1 gene directly, rather than being simply a poor substrate for the transporter-mediated efflux. However, both situations appeared to coexist, thereby a superior cytotoxic effect was attained. Ours results suggest that WP631 offers great potential for the clinical treatment of tumors displaying a multidrug-resistance phenotype.

  11. Tiron Inhibits UVB-Induced AP-1 Binding Sites Transcriptional Activation on MMP-1 and MMP-3 Promoters by MAPK Signaling Pathway in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Mei; Zhang, Quan-Wu; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Recent research found that Tiron was an effective antioxidant that could act as the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger or alleviate the acute toxic metal overload in vivo. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Tiron on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 expression in human dermal fibroblast cells. Western blot and ELISA analysis revealed that Tiron inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced protein expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed that Tiron could inhibit UVB-induced mRNA expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Furthermore, Tiron significantly blocked UVB-induced activation of the MAPK signaling pathway and activator protein (AP)-1 in the downstream of this transduction pathway in fibroblasts. Through the AP-1 binding site mutation, it was found that Tiron could inhibit AP-1-induced upregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression through blocking AP-1 binding to the AP-1 binding sites in the MMP-1 and MMP-3 promoter region. In conclusion, Tiron may be a novel antioxidant for preventing and treating skin photoaging UV-induced. PMID:27486852

  12. The p65 Subunit of NF-κB Inhibits COL1A1 Gene Transcription in Human Dermal and Scleroderma Fibroblasts through Its Recruitment on Promoter by Protein Interaction with Transcriptional Activators (c-Krox, Sp1, and Sp3)*

    PubMed Central

    Beauchef, Gallic; Bigot, Nicolas; Kypriotou, Magdalini; Renard, Emmanuelle; Porée, Benoît; Widom, Russell; Dompmartin-Blanchere, Anne; Oddos, Thierry; Maquart, François-Xavier; Demoor, Magali; Boumediene, Karim; Galera, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional mechanisms regulating type I collagen genes expression in physiopathological situations are not completely known. In this study, we have investigated the role of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor on type I collagen expression in adult normal human (ANF) and scleroderma (SF) fibroblasts. We demonstrated that NF-κB, a master transcription factor playing a major role in immune response/apoptosis, down-regulates COL1A1 expression by a transcriptional control involving the −112/−61 bp sequence. This 51-bp region mediates the action of two zinc fingers, Sp1 (specific protein-1) and Sp3, acting as trans-activators of type I collagen expression in ANF and SF. Knockdown of each one of these trans factors by siRNA confirmed the trans-activating effect of Sp1/Sp3 and the p65 subunit of NF-κB trans-inhibiting effect on COL1A1 expression. Despite no existing κB consensus sequence in the COL1A1 promoter, we found that Sp1/Sp3/c-Krox and NF-κB bind and/or are recruited on the proximal promoter in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Attempts to elucidate whether interactions between Sp1/Sp3/c-Krox and p65 are necessary to mediate the NF-κB inhibitory effect on COL1A1 in ANF and SF were carried out; in this regard, immunoprecipitation assays revealed that they interact, and this was validated by re-ChIP. Finally, the knockdown of Sp1/Sp3/c-Krox prevents the p65 inhibitory effect on COL1A1 transcription in ANF, whereas only the siRNAs targeting Sp3 and c-Krox provoked the same effect in SF, suggesting that particular interactions are characteristic of the scleroderma phenotype. In conclusion, our findings highlight a new mechanism for COL1A1 transcriptional regulation by NF-κB, and these data could allow the development of new antifibrotic strategies. PMID:22139845

  13. Divergent transcription is associated with promoters of transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Divergent transcription is a wide-spread phenomenon in mammals. For instance, short bidirectional transcripts are a hallmark of active promoters, while longer transcripts can be detected antisense from active genes in conditions where the RNA degradation machinery is inhibited. Moreover, many described long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcribed antisense from coding gene promoters. However, the general significance of divergent lncRNA/mRNA gene pair transcription is still poorly understood. Here, we used strand-specific RNA-seq with high sequencing depth to thoroughly identify antisense transcripts from coding gene promoters in primary mouse tissues. Results We found that a substantial fraction of coding-gene promoters sustain divergent transcription of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA)/mRNA gene pairs. Strikingly, upstream antisense transcription is significantly associated with genes related to transcriptional regulation and development. Their promoters share several characteristics with those of transcriptional developmental genes, including very large CpG islands, high degree of conservation and epigenetic regulation in ES cells. In-depth analysis revealed a unique GC skew profile at these promoter regions, while the associated coding genes were found to have large first exons, two genomic features that might enforce bidirectional transcription. Finally, genes associated with antisense transcription harbor specific H3K79me2 epigenetic marking and RNA polymerase II enrichment profiles linked to an intensified rate of early transcriptional elongation. Conclusions We concluded that promoters of a class of transcription regulators are characterized by a specialized transcriptional control mechanism, which is directly coupled to relaxed bidirectional transcription. PMID:24365181

  14. Ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn lowers serum cholesterol in mice by inhibiting transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase via nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai-Jie; Luo, Xue-Gang; Dong, Qing-Qing; Mu, Ai; Shi, Guo-Long; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun; Pan, Li-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Hawthorn is a berry-like fruit from the species of Crataegus. In China, it has another more famous name, Shan-Zha, which has been used to improve digestion as a traditional Chinese medicine or food for thousands of years. Moreover, during the last decades, hawthorn has received more attention because of its potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, currently, only fruits of C. pinnatifida and C. pinnatifida var. major are included as Shan-Zha in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In this study, our results showed that the ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn, a novel grafted cultivar of C. cuneata (wild Shan-Zha), could markedly reduce body weight and levels of serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver cholesterol of hyperlipidemia mice. It could suppress the stimulation effect of high-fat diet on the transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and p65, and counteract the downregulation of CYP7A1 and LDLR. In addition, the results of luciferase reporter assay and Western blot showed that the transcriptional activity of HMGCR promoter was inhibited by Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract in a dose-dependent manner, while overexpression of p65 could reverse this transcriptional repression effect. These results suggested that Zhongtian hawthorn could provide health benefits by counteracting the high-fat diet-induced hypercholesteolemic and hyperlipidemic effects in vivo, and the mechanism underlying this event was mainly dependent on the suppressive effect of Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract on the transcription of HMGCR via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway. Therefore, this novel cultivar of hawthorn cultivar which has much bigger fruits, early bearing, high yield, cold resistance, and drought resistance, might be considered as a good alternative to Shan-Zha and has great value in the food and medicine industry. In addition, to our best knowledge, this is also the first report that the

  15. Ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn lowers serum cholesterol in mice by inhibiting transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase via nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-Jie; Dong, Qing-Qing; Mu, Ai; Shi, Guo-Long; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2016-01-01

    Hawthorn is a berry-like fruit from the species of Crataegus. In China, it has another more famous name, Shan-Zha, which has been used to improve digestion as a traditional Chinese medicine or food for thousands of years. Moreover, during the last decades, hawthorn has received more attention because of its potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, currently, only fruits of C. pinnatifida and C. pinnatifida var. major are included as Shan-Zha in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In this study, our results showed that the ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn, a novel grafted cultivar of C. cuneata (wild Shan-Zha), could markedly reduce body weight and levels of serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver cholesterol of hyperlipidemia mice. It could suppress the stimulation effect of high-fat diet on the transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and p65, and counteract the downregulation of CYP7A1 and LDLR. In addition, the results of luciferase reporter assay and Western blot showed that the transcriptional activity of HMGCR promoter was inhibited by Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract in a dose-dependent manner, while overexpression of p65 could reverse this transcriptional repression effect. These results suggested that Zhongtian hawthorn could provide health benefits by counteracting the high-fat diet-induced hypercholesteolemic and hyperlipidemic effects in vivo, and the mechanism underlying this event was mainly dependent on the suppressive effect of Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract on the transcription of HMGCR via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway. Therefore, this novel cultivar of hawthorn cultivar which has much bigger fruits, early bearing, high yield, cold resistance, and drought resistance, might be considered as a good alternative to Shan-Zha and has great value in the food and medicine industry. In addition, to our best knowledge, this is also the first report that the

  16. Translation of the mRNA of the maize transcriptional activator Opaque-2 is inhibited by upstream open reading frames present in the leader sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Lohmer, S; Maddaloni, M; Motto, M; Salamini, F; Thompson, R D

    1993-01-01

    The protein encoded by the Opaque-2 (O2) gene is a transcription factor, translated from an mRNA that possesses an unusually long 5' leader sequence containing three upstream open reading frames (uORFs). The efficiency of translation of O2 mRNA has been tested in vivo by a transient assay in which the level of activation of the b32 promoter, a natural target of O2 protein, is measured. We show that uORF-less O2 alleles possess a higher transactivation value than the wild-type allele and that the reduction in transactivation due to the uORFs is a cis-dominant effect. The data presented indicate that both uORF1 and uORF2 are involved in the reducing effect and suggest that both are likely to be translated. PMID:8439744

  17. Negative feedback regulation of ABA biosynthesis in peanut (Arachis hypogaea): a transcription factor complex inhibits AhNCED1 expression during water stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Li, Meijuan; Su, Liangchen; Ge, Kui; Li, Limei; Li, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a key plant stress-signaling hormone, is produced in response to drought and counteracts the effects of this stress. The accumulation of ABA is controlled by the enzyme 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). In Arabidopsis, NCED3 is regulated by a positive feedback mechanism by ABA. In this study in peanut (Arachis hypogaea), we demonstrate that ABA biosynthesis is also controlled by negative feedback regulation, mediated by the inhibitory effect on AhNCED1 transcription of a protein complex between transcription factors AhNAC2 and AhAREB1. AhNCED1 was significantly down-regulated after PEG treatment for 10 h, at which time ABA content reached a peak. A ChIP-qPCR assay confirmed AhAREB1 and AhNAC2 binding to the AhNCED1 promoter in response to ABA. Moreover, the interaction between AhAREB1 and AhNAC2, and a transient expression assay showed that the protein complex could negatively regulate the expression of AhNCED1. The results also demonstrated that AhAREB1 was the key factor in AhNCED1 feedback regulation, while AhNAC2 played a subsidiary role. ABA reduced the rate of AhAREB1 degradation and enhanced both the synthesis and degradation rate of the AhNAC2 protein. In summary, the AhAREB1/AhNAC2 protein complex functions as a negative feedback regulator of drought-induced ABA biosynthesis in peanut. PMID:27892506

  18. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide in the nucleus accumbens shell inhibits cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization to transient over-expression of α-Ca2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lixia; Meng, Qing; Sun, Xi; Lu, Xiangtong; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Qinghua; Yang, Jianhua; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hu, Zhenzhen

    2018-01-04

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide is a widely distributed neurotransmitter that attenuates cocaine-induced locomotor activity when injected into the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Our previous work first confirmed that the inhibitory mechanism of the CART peptide on cocaine-induced locomotor activity is related to a reduction in cocaine-enhanced phosphorylated Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinaseIIα (pCaMKIIα) and the enhancement of cocaine-induced D3R function. This study investigated whether CART peptide inhibited cocaine-induced locomotor activity via inhibition of interactions between pCaMKIIα and the D3 dopamine receptor (D3R). We demonstrated that lentivirus-mediated gene transfer transiently increased pCaMKIIα expression, which peaked at 10 days after microinjection into the rat NAc shell, and induced a significant increase in Ca 2+ influx along with greater behavioral sensitivity in the open field test after intraperitoneal injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg). However, western blot analysis and coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated that CART peptide treatment in lentivirus-transfected CaMKIIα-over-expressing NAc rat tissues or cells prior to cocaine administration inhibited the cocaine-induced Ca 2+ influx and attenuated the cocaine-increased pCaMKIIα expression in lentivirus-transfected CaMKIIα-over-expressing cells. CART peptide decreased the cocaine-enhanced phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) expression via inhibition of the pCaMKIIα-D3R interaction, which may account for the prolonged locomotor sensitization induced by repeated cocaine treatment in lentivirus-transfected CaMKIIα-over-expressing cells. These results provide strong evidence for the inhibitory modulation of CART peptide in cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. © 2018 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  19. HSPA6 augments garlic extract-induced inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion of bladder cancer EJ cells; Implication for cell cycle dysregulation, signaling pathway alteration, and transcription factor-associated MMP-9 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Byungdoo; Noh, Dae-Hwa; Park, Sung Lyea; Kim, Won Tae; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Although recent studies have demonstrated the anti-tumor effects of garlic extract (GE), the exact molecular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism associated with the inhibitory action of GE against bladder cancer EJ cell responses. Treatment with GE significantly inhibited proliferation of EJ cells dose-dependently through G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest. This G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest by GE was due to the activation of ATM and CHK2, which appears to inhibit phosphorylation of Cdc25C (Ser216) and Cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr15), this in turn was accompanied by down-regulation of cyclin B1 and up-regulation of p21WAF1. Furthermore, GE treatment was also found to induce phosphorylation of MAPK (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK) and AKT. In addition, GE impeded the migration and invasion of EJ cells via inhibition of MMP-9 expression followed by decreased binding activities of AP-1, Sp-1, and NF-κB motifs. Based on microarray datasets, we selected Heat shock protein A6 (HSPA6) as the most up-regulated gene responsible for the inhibitory effects of GE. Interestingly, overexpression of HSPA6 gene resulted in an augmentation effect with GE inhibiting proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells. The augmentation effect of HSPA6 was verified by enhancing the induction of G2/M-phase-mediated ATM-CHK2-Cdc25C-p21WAF1-Cdc2 cascade, phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT signaling, and suppression of transcription factor-associated MMP-9 regulation in response to GE in EJ cells. Overall, our novel results indicate that HSPA6 reinforces the GE-mediated inhibitory effects of proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells and may provide a new approach for therapeutic treatment of malignancies. PMID:28187175

  20. Inhibition of the transcription factor c-Jun by the MAPK family, and not the NF-κB pathway, suggests that peanut extract has anti-inflammatory properties.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Úrsula; Fernández-Castillejo, Sara; Anglès, Neus; Morelló, Jose Ramón; Yebras, Martí; Solà, Rosa

    2012-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is involved in inflammatory responses in atherosclerosis. We propose an in vitro cellular assay to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of potential modifiers such as food extracts. In the current model we assessed an anti-inflammatory effect of polyphenol-rich peanut extract in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced THP-1 monocytes. THP-1 monocytes were incubated with peanut extract (5, 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL) consisting of 39% flavonols, 37% flavanols and 24% phenolic acid (or BAY 11-7082 (5 μM) as experiment control) for 1 h and then stimulated with LPS (500 ng/mL) for 4 h. Cytotoxicity was measured as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity release. NF-κB and MAPK family were determined by TransAm kit while TNF-α mRNA levels and its mRNA stability by RT-PCR. Intra- and extracellular TNF-α protein was measured by ELISA, and TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) activity by a fluorimetric assay. Peanut extract inhibited the maximal LPS-induced extracellular TNF-α protein secretion by 18%, 29% and 47% at 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL, respectively (P<0.05). LPS stimulation revealed that 85% of TNF-α was released extracellularly while 15% remained intracellular. Peanut extract did not modify NF-κB but, instead, reduced c-Jun transcription factor activity (P<0.05), decreased TNF-α mRNA (albeit non-significantly) and had no effect on mRNA stability and TACE activity. Polyphenol-rich peanut extract reduces extracellular TNF-α protein by inhibiting c-Jun transcription factor from MAPK family, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect. The proposed THP-1 monocyte model could be used to assess food extract impact (site and size effects) on the inflammation pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitex rotundifolia Fruit Suppresses the Proliferation of Human Colorectal Cancer Cells through Down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and CDK4 via Proteasomal-Dependent Degradation and Transcriptional Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Song, Hun Min; Park, Gwang Hun; Park, Su Bin; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Son, Ho-Jun; Um, Yurry; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2018-01-01

    Viticis Fructus (VF) as the dried fruit from Vitex rotundifolia L. used as a traditional medicine for treating inflammation, headache, migraine, chronic bronchitis, eye pain, and gastrointestinal infections has been reported to have antiproliferative effects against various cancer cells, including breast, lung and colorectal cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which VF mediates the inhibitory effect of the proliferation of cancer cells have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of VF on the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 level associated with cancer cell proliferation. VF suppressed the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116 and SW480. VF induced decrease in cyclin D1 and CDK4 in both protein and mRNA levels. However, the protein levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4 were decreased by VF at an earlier time than the change of mRNA levels; rather it suppressed the expression of cyclin D1 and CDK4 via the proteasomal degradation. In cyclin D1 and CDK4 degradation, we found that Thr286 phosphorylation of cyclin D1 plays a pivotal role in VF-mediated cyclin D1 degradation. Subsequent experiments with several kinase inhibitors suggest that VF-mediated degradation of cyclin D1 may be dependent on GSK3[Formula: see text] and VF-mediated degradation of CDK4 is dependent on ERK1/2, p38 and GSK3[Formula: see text]. In the transcriptional regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4, we found that VF inhibited Wnt activation associated with cyclin D1 transcriptional regulation through TCF4 down-regulation. In addition, VF treatment down-regulated c-myc expression associated CDK4 transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that VF has potential to be a candidate for the development of chemoprevention or therapeutic agents for human colorectal cancer.

  2. Nuclear factor kappa B: a pro-inflammatory, transcription factor-mediated signalling pathway in lung carcinogenesis and its inhibition by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Setia, Shruti; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2012-01-01

    9,10-Dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA), when injected intratracheally once at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, is found to induce lung cancer in rats. Two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), indomethacin and etoricoxib, are given orally daily as chemopreventive agents at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg body weight and 2 mg/kg body weight, respectively, along with DMBA. Morphologic and histologic analysis revealed the occurence of tumors and intense cellular proliferation in the DMBA-treated animals, whereas no such features were observed in the other groups. Nuclear factor κB, a nuclear transcription factor, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a cell proliferation antigen, were studied by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry and their levels were markedly elevated in the DMBA group compared with the others. Oxidative stress parameters, as studied by the inducible nitric oxide synthase activity, and the levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were found to be suppressed in the DMBA group. Furthermore, fluorescent staining of the isolated lung cells from bronchoalveolar lavage was performed to study apoptosis and alterations in the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the DMBA-induced lung cancer was found to be associated with high inner mitochondrial membrane potential and a suppressed level of apoptosis.

  3. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates expression of nuclear factor-erythroid-2 related transcription factor-1 (Nrf1) and inhibits pro-survival function of Nrf1

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Madhurima; Kwong, Erick K.; Park, Eujean; Nagra, Parminder; Chan, Jefferson Y.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor-1 (Nrf1) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that is known to regulate antioxidant and cytoprotective gene expression. It was recently shown that Nrf1 is regulated by SCF-Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. However our knowledge of upstream signals that targets Nrf1 for degradation by the UPS is not known. We report here that Nrf1 expression is negatively regulated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) in Fbw7-dependent manner. We show that GSK3 interacts with Nrf1 and phosphorylates the Cdc4 phosphodegron domain (CPD) in Nrf1. Mutation of serine residue in the CPD of Nrf1 to alanine (S350A), blocks Nrf1 from phosphorylation by GSK3, and stabilizes Nrf1. Knockdown of Nrf1 and expression of a constitutively active form of GSK3 results in increased apoptosis in neuronal cells in response to ER stress, while expression of the GSK3 phosphorylation resistant S350A–Nrfl attenuates apoptotic cell death. Together these data suggest that GSK3 regulates Nrf1 expression and cell survival function in response to stress activation. PMID:23623971

  4. IFN-λ Inhibits MiR-122 Transcription through a Stat3-HNF4α Inflammatory Feedback Loop in an IFN-α Resistant HCV Cell Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Aboulnasr, Fatma; Hazari, Sidhartha; Nayak, Satyam; Chandra, Partha K.; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Ferraris, Pauline; Chava, Srinivas; Kurt, Ramazan; Song, Kyongsub; Dash, Asha; Balart, Luis A.; Garry, Robert F.; Wu, Tong; Dash, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Background HCV replication in persistently infected cell culture remains resistant to IFN-α/RBV combination treatment, whereas IFN-λ1 induces viral clearance. The antiviral mechanisms by which IFN-λ1 induces sustained HCV clearance have not been determined. Aim To investigate the mechanisms by which IFN-λ clears HCV replication in an HCV cell culture model. Methods IFN-α sensitive (S3-GFP) and resistant (R4-GFP) cells were treated with equivalent concentrations of either IFN-α or IFN-λ. The relative antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-λ1 were compared by measuring the HCV replication, quantification of HCV-GFP expression by flow cytometry, and viral RNA levels by real time RT-PCR. Activation of Jak-Stat signaling, interferon stimulated gene (ISG) expression, and miRNA-122 transcription in S3-GFP and R4-GFP cells were examined. Results We have shown that IFN-λ1 induces HCV clearance in IFN-α resistant and sensitive replicon cell lines in a dose dependent manner through Jak-Stat signaling, and induces STAT 1 and STAT 2 activation, ISRE-luciferase promoter activation and ISG expression. Stat 3 activation is also involved in IFN-λ1 induced antiviral activity in HCV cell culture. IFN-λ1 induced Stat 3 phosphorylation reduces the expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) through miR-24 in R4-GFP cells. Reduced expression of HNF4α is associated with decreased expression of miR-122 resulting in an anti-HCV effect. Northern blot analysis confirms that IFN-λ1 reduces miR-122 levels in R4-GFP cells. Our results indicate that IFN-λ1 activates the Stat 3-HNF4α feedback inflammatory loop to inhibit miR-122 transcription in HCV cell culture. Conclusions In addition to the classical Jak–Stat antiviral signaling pathway, IFN-λ1 inhibits HCV replication through the suppression of miRNA-122 transcription via an inflammatory Stat 3–HNF4α feedback loop. Inflammatory feedback circuits activated by IFNs during chronic inflammation expose non

  5. Nitrogen Starvation and TorC1 Inhibition Differentially Affect Nuclear Localization of the Gln3 and Gat1 Transcription Factors Through the Rare Glutamine tRNACUG in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Jennifer J.; Rai, Rajendra; Cooper, Terrance G.

    2015-01-01

    A leucine, leucyl-tRNA synthetase–dependent pathway activates TorC1 kinase and its downstream stimulation of protein synthesis, a major nitrogen consumer. We previously demonstrated, however, that control of Gln3, a transcription activator of catabolic genes whose products generate the nitrogenous precursors for protein synthesis, is not subject to leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. This led us to conclude that excess nitrogen-dependent down-regulation of Gln3 occurs via a second mechanism that is independent of leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. A major site of Gln3 and Gat1 (another GATA-binding transcription activator) control occurs at their access to the nucleus. In excess nitrogen, Gln3 and Gat1 are sequestered in the cytoplasm in a Ure2-dependent manner. They become nuclear and activate transcription when nitrogen becomes limiting. Long-term nitrogen starvation and treatment of cells with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (Msx) also elicit nuclear Gln3 localization. The sensitivity of Gln3 localization to glutamine and inhibition of glutamine synthesis prompted us to investigate the effects of a glutamine tRNA mutation (sup70-65) on nitrogen-responsive control of Gln3 and Gat1. We found that nuclear Gln3 localization elicited by short- and long-term nitrogen starvation; growth in a poor, derepressive medium; Msx or rapamycin treatment; or ure2Δ mutation is abolished in a sup70-65 mutant. However, nuclear Gat1 localization, which also exhibits a glutamine tRNACUG requirement for its response to short-term nitrogen starvation or growth in proline medium or a ure2Δ mutation, does not require tRNACUG for its response to rapamycin. Also, in contrast with Gln3, Gat1 localization does not respond to long-term nitrogen starvation. These observations demonstrate the existence of a specific nitrogen-responsive component participating in the control of Gln3 and Gat1 localization and their downstream production of nitrogenous precursors

  6. An aqueous stem bark extract of Mangifera indica (Vimang) inhibits T cell proliferation and TNF-induced activation of nuclear transcription factor NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Gabino; Blanco-Molina, Magdalena; Sancho, Rocío; Macho, Antonio; Delgado, René; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2005-03-01

    A commercial aqueous stem bark extract of Mangifera indica L. (Vimang) has been reported to have antiinflammatory, immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities. The molecular basis for these diverse properties is still unknown. This study shows that a stem bark extract of M. indica inhibits early and late events in T cell activation, including CD25 cell surface expression, progression to the S-phase of the cell cycle and proliferation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. Moreover, the extract prevented TNFalpha-induced IkappaBalpha degradation and the binding of NF-kappaB to the DNA. This study may help to explain at the molecular level some of the biological activities attributed to the aqueous stem bark extract of M. indica (Vimang).

  7. Inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) Attenuates Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced Collagen Synthesis and Resultant Hypertrophy in Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Saiful Anam; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Mitra, Arkadeep; Pathak, Kanchan; Mahata, Sushil K.; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2012-01-01

    IL-6 has been shown to play a major role in collagen up-regulation process during cardiac hypertrophy, although the precise mechanism is still not known. In this study we have analyzed the mechanism by which IL-6 modulates cardiac hypertrophy. For the in vitro model, IL-6-treated cultured cardiac fibroblasts were used, whereas the in vivo cardiac hypertrophy model was generated by renal artery ligation in adult male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus). During induction of hypertrophy, increased phosphorylation of STAT1, STAT3, MAPK, and ERK proteins was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of fibroblasts with specific inhibitors for STAT1 (fludarabine, 50 μm), STAT3 (S31-201, 10 μm), p38 MAPK (SB203580, 10 μm), and ERK1/2 (U0126, 10 μm) resulted in down-regulation of IL-6-induced phosphorylation of specific proteins; however, only S31-201 and SB203580 inhibited collagen biosynthesis. In ligated rats in vivo, only STAT3 inhibitors resulted in significant decrease in collagen synthesis and hypertrophy markers such as atrial natriuretic factor and β-myosin heavy chain. In addition, decreased heart weight to body weight ratio and improved cardiac function as measured by echocardiography was evident in animals treated with STAT3 inhibitor or siRNA. Compared with IL-6 neutralization, more pronounced down-regulation of collagen synthesis and regression of hypertrophy was observed with STAT3 inhibition, suggesting that STAT3 is the major downstream signaling molecule and a potential therapeutic target for cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:22157761

  8. The IKK Inhibitor Bay 11-7082 Induces Cell Death Independent from Inhibition of Activation of NFκB Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rauert-Wunderlich, Hilka; Siegmund, Daniela; Maier, Eduard; Giner, Tina; Bargou, Ralf C.; Wajant, Harald; Stühmer, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) displays an NFκB activity-related gene expression signature and about 20% of primary MM samples harbor genetic alterations conducive to intrinsic NFκB signaling activation. The relevance of blocking the classical versus the alternative NFκB signaling pathway and the molecular execution mechanisms involved, however, are still poorly understood. Here, we comparatively tested NFκB activity abrogation through TPCA-1 (an IKK2 inhibitor), BAY 11-7082 (an IKK inhibitor poorly selective for IKK1 and IKK2), and MLN4924 (an NEDD8 activating enzyme (NAE)-inhibitor), and analyzed their anti-MM activity. Whereas TPCA-1 interfered selectively with activation of the classical NFκB pathway, the other two compounds inhibited classical and alternative NFκB signaling without significant discrimination. Noteworthy, whereas TPCA-1 and MLN4924 elicited rather mild anti-MM effects with slight to moderate cell death induction after 1 day BAY 11-7082 was uniformly highly toxic to MM cell lines and primary MM cells. Treatment with BAY 11-7082 induced rapid cell swelling and its initial effects were blocked by necrostatin-1 or the ROS scavenger BHA, but a lasting protective effect was not achieved even with additional blockade of caspases. Because MLN4924 inhibits the alternative NFκB pathway downstream of IKK1 at the level of p100 processing, the quite discordant effects between MLN4924 and BAY 11-7082 must thus be due to blockade of IKK1-mediated NFκB-independent necrosis-inhibitory functions or represent an off-target effect of BAY 11-7082. In accordance with the latter, we further observed that concomitant knockdown of IKK1 and IKK2 did not have any major short-term adverse effect on the viability of MM cells. PMID:23527154

  9. Mechanisms for type-II vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone suppression of vitellogenin transcription in shrimp hepatopancreas: Crosstalk of GC/cGMP pathway with different MAPK-dependent cascades.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Ren, Chunhua; Jiang, Xiao; Zhang, Lvping; Li, Hongmei; Huang, Wen; Hu, Chaoqun

    2018-01-01

    Vitellogenesis is the process of yolk formation via accumulating vitellin (Vn) with nutrients in the oocytes. Expression of vitellogenin (Vg), the precursor of Vn, is one of the indicators for the start of vitellogenesis. In Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), the type-II vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH-2) effectively suppresses hepatopancreatic Vg mRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate the increasing transcript levels of hepatopancreatic Vg during L. vannamei ovarian development, suggesting that the hepatopancreas-derived Vg/Vn may also contribute to vitellogenesis in this species. Using a combination of in vivo injections and in vitro primary cell cultures, we provide evidences that the inhibition of VIH-2 on hepatopancreatic Vg gene expression is mediated through a functional coupling of the GC/cGMP pathway with different MAPK-dependent cascades in female shrimp. In VIH-2 signaling, the NO-independent GC/cGMP/PKG cascades were upstream of the MAPKs. Activations of the MAPK signal by VIH-2 include the phosphorylation of JNK and the mRNA/protein expression of P38MAPK. Additionally, the cAMP/PKA pathway is another positive intracellular signal for hepatopancreatic Vg mRNA expression but is independent of its VIH-2 regulation. Our findings establish a model for the signal transduction mechanism of Vg regulation by VIH and shed light on the biological functions and signaling of the CHH family in crustaceans.

  10. Mechanisms for type-II vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone suppression of vitellogenin transcription in shrimp hepatopancreas: Crosstalk of GC/cGMP pathway with different MAPK-dependent cascades

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chunhua; Jiang, Xiao; Zhang, Lvping; Li, Hongmei; Huang, Wen; Hu, Chaoqun

    2018-01-01

    Vitellogenesis is the process of yolk formation via accumulating vitellin (Vn) with nutrients in the oocytes. Expression of vitellogenin (Vg), the precursor of Vn, is one of the indicators for the start of vitellogenesis. In Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), the type-II vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH-2) effectively suppresses hepatopancreatic Vg mRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate the increasing transcript levels of hepatopancreatic Vg during L. vannamei ovarian development, suggesting that the hepatopancreas-derived Vg/Vn may also contribute to vitellogenesis in this species. Using a combination of in vivo injections and in vitro primary cell cultures, we provide evidences that the inhibition of VIH-2 on hepatopancreatic Vg gene expression is mediated through a functional coupling of the GC/cGMP pathway with different MAPK-dependent cascades in female shrimp. In VIH-2 signaling, the NO-independent GC/cGMP/PKG cascades were upstream of the MAPKs. Activations of the MAPK signal by VIH-2 include the phosphorylation of JNK and the mRNA/protein expression of P38MAPK. Additionally, the cAMP/PKA pathway is another positive intracellular signal for hepatopancreatic Vg mRNA expression but is independent of its VIH-2 regulation. Our findings establish a model for the signal transduction mechanism of Vg regulation by VIH and shed light on the biological functions and signaling of the CHH family in crustaceans. PMID:29590153

  11. Lithium-induced neuroprotection in stroke involves increased miR-124 expression, reduced RE1-silencing transcription factor abundance and decreased protein deubiquitination by GSK3β inhibition-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Doeppner, Thorsten R; Kaltwasser, Britta; Sanchez-Mendoza, Eduardo H; Caglayan, Ahmet B; Bähr, Mathias; Hermann, Dirk M

    2017-03-01

    Lithium promotes acute poststroke neuronal survival, which includes mechanisms that are not limited to GSK3β inhibition. However, whether lithium induces long-term neuroprotection and enhanced brain remodeling is unclear. Therefore, mice were exposed to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and lithium (1 mg/kg bolus followed by 2 mg/kg/day over up to 7 days) was intraperitoneally administered starting 0-9 h after reperfusion onset. Delivery of lithium no later than 6 h reduced infarct volume on day 2 and decreased brain edema, leukocyte infiltration, and microglial activation, as shown by histochemistry and flow cytometry. Lithium-induced neuroprotection persisted throughout the observation period of 56 days and was associated with enhanced neurological recovery. Poststroke angioneurogenesis and axonal plasticity were also enhanced by lithium. On the molecular level, lithium increased miR-124 expression, reduced RE1-silencing transcription factor abundance, and decreased protein deubiquitination in cultivated cortical neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation and in brains of mice exposed to cerebral ischemia. Notably, this effect was not mimicked by pharmacological GSK3β inhibition. This study for the first time provides efficacy data for lithium in the postacute ischemic phase, reporting a novel mechanism of action, i.e. increased miR-124 expression facilitating REST degradation by which lithium promotes postischemic neuroplasticity and angiogenesis.

  12. Lithium-induced neuroprotection in stroke involves increased miR-124 expression, reduced RE1-silencing transcription factor abundance and decreased protein deubiquitination by GSK3β inhibition-independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kaltwasser, Britta; Sanchez-Mendoza, Eduardo H; Caglayan, Ahmet B; Bähr, Mathias; Hermann, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Lithium promotes acute poststroke neuronal survival, which includes mechanisms that are not limited to GSK3β inhibition. However, whether lithium induces long-term neuroprotection and enhanced brain remodeling is unclear. Therefore, mice were exposed to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and lithium (1 mg/kg bolus followed by 2 mg/kg/day over up to 7 days) was intraperitoneally administered starting 0–9 h after reperfusion onset. Delivery of lithium no later than 6 h reduced infarct volume on day 2 and decreased brain edema, leukocyte infiltration, and microglial activation, as shown by histochemistry and flow cytometry. Lithium-induced neuroprotection persisted throughout the observation period of 56 days and was associated with enhanced neurological recovery. Poststroke angioneurogenesis and axonal plasticity were also enhanced by lithium. On the molecular level, lithium increased miR-124 expression, reduced RE1-silencing transcription factor abundance, and decreased protein deubiquitination in cultivated cortical neurons exposed to oxygen–glucose deprivation and in brains of mice exposed to cerebral ischemia. Notably, this effect was not mimicked by pharmacological GSK3β inhibition. This study for the first time provides efficacy data for lithium in the postacute ischemic phase, reporting a novel mechanism of action, i.e. increased miR-124 expression facilitating REST degradation by which lithium promotes postischemic neuroplasticity and angiogenesis. PMID:27126323

  13. MicroRNA-20b-5p inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-induced proliferation of human fetal airway smooth muscle cells by targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin; Luo, Lingying

    2018-06-01

    Pediatric asthma is still a health threat to the pediatric population in recent years. The airway remodeling induced by abnormal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation is an important cause of asthma. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of ASM cell proliferation. Numerous studies have reported that miR-20b-5p is a critical regulator for cell proliferation. However, whether miR-20b-5p is involved in regulating ASM cell proliferation remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential role of miR-20b-5p in regulating the proliferation of fetal ASM cell induced by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Here, we showed that miR-20b-5p was significantly decreased in fetal ASM cells treated with PDGF. Biological experiments showed that the overexpression of miR-20b-5p inhibited the proliferation while miR-20b-5p inhibition markedly promoted the proliferation of fetal ASM cells. Bioinformatics analysis and luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-20b-5p directly targeted the 3'-UTR of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Further data showed that miR-20b-5p negatively regulated the expression of STAT3 in fetal ASM cells. Moreover, miR-20b-5p regulates the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in fetal ASM cells. Overexpression of STAT3 reversed the inhibitory effect of miR-20b-5p overexpression on fetal ASM cell proliferation while the knockdown of STAT3 abrogated the promoted effect of miR-20b-5p inhibition on fetal ASM cell proliferation. Overall, our results show that miR-20b-5p impedes PDGF-induced proliferation of fetal ASM cells through targeting STAT3. Our study suggests that miR-20b-5p may play an important role in airway remodeling during asthma and suggests that miR-20b-5p may serve as a potential therapeutic target for pediatric asthma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification and Small Molecule Inhibition of an Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4)-dependent Pathway to Age-related Skeletal Muscle Weakness and Atrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Murry, Daryl J.; Fox, Daniel K.; Bongers, Kale S.; Lira, Vitor A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Talley, John J.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Aging reduces skeletal muscle mass and strength, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we used mouse models to investigate molecular mechanisms of age-related skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy as well as new potential interventions for these conditions. We identified two small molecules that significantly reduce age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass: ursolic acid (a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in apples) and tomatidine (a steroidal alkaloid derived from green tomatoes). Because small molecule inhibitors can sometimes provide mechanistic insight into disease processes, we used ursolic acid and tomatidine to investigate the pathogenesis of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that ursolic acid and tomatidine generate hundreds of small positive and negative changes in mRNA levels in aged skeletal muscle, and the mRNA expression signatures of the two compounds are remarkably similar. Interestingly, a subset of the mRNAs repressed by ursolic acid and tomatidine in aged muscle are positively regulated by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Based on this finding, we investigated ATF4 as a potential mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that a targeted reduction in skeletal muscle ATF4 expression reduces age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass, similar to ursolic acid and tomatidine. These results elucidate ATF4 as a critical mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. In addition, these results identify ursolic acid and tomatidine as potential agents and/or lead compounds for reducing ATF4 activity, weakness, and atrophy in aged skeletal muscle. PMID:26338703

  15. Identification and Small Molecule Inhibition of an Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4)-dependent Pathway to Age-related Skeletal Muscle Weakness and Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Scott M; Dyle, Michael C; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Murry, Daryl J; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Lira, Vitor A; Meyerholz, David K; Talley, John J; Adams, Christopher M

    2015-10-16

    Aging reduces skeletal muscle mass and strength, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we used mouse models to investigate molecular mechanisms of age-related skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy as well as new potential interventions for these conditions. We identified two small molecules that significantly reduce age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass: ursolic acid (a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in apples) and tomatidine (a steroidal alkaloid derived from green tomatoes). Because small molecule inhibitors can sometimes provide mechanistic insight into disease processes, we used ursolic acid and tomatidine to investigate the pathogenesis of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that ursolic acid and tomatidine generate hundreds of small positive and negative changes in mRNA levels in aged skeletal muscle, and the mRNA expression signatures of the two compounds are remarkably similar. Interestingly, a subset of the mRNAs repressed by ursolic acid and tomatidine in aged muscle are positively regulated by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Based on this finding, we investigated ATF4 as a potential mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that a targeted reduction in skeletal muscle ATF4 expression reduces age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass, similar to ursolic acid and tomatidine. These results elucidate ATF4 as a critical mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. In addition, these results identify ursolic acid and tomatidine as potential agents and/or lead compounds for reducing ATF4 activity, weakness, and atrophy in aged skeletal muscle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Systemic Administration of a Cyclic Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) Decoy Oligonucleotide Inhibits Tumor Growth without Inducing Toxicological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Malabika; Paul, Kathleen; Freilino, Maria L; Li, Hua; Li, Changyou; Johnson, Daniel E; Wang, Lin; Eiseman, Julie; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been linked to tumorigenesis in most malignancies, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Intravenous delivery of a chemically modified cyclic STAT3 decoy oligonucleotide with improved serum and thermal stability demonstrated antitumor efficacy in conjunction with downmodulation of STAT3 target gene expression such as cyclin D1 and Bcl-XL in a mouse model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The purpose of the present study was to determine the toxicity and dose-dependent antitumor efficacy of the cyclic STAT3 decoy after multiple intravenous doses in Foxn1 nu mice in anticipation of clinical translation. The two doses (5 and 10 mg/kg) of cyclic STAT3 decoy demonstrated a significant decrease in tumor volume compared with the control groups (mutant cyclic STAT3 decoy or saline) in conjunction with downmodulation of STAT3 target gene expression. There was no dose-dependent effect of cyclic STAT3 decoy on tumor volume or STAT3 target gene expression. There were no significant changes in body weights between the groups during the dosing period, after the dosing interval or on the day of euthanasia. No hematology or clinical chemistry parameters suggested toxicity of the cyclic STAT3 decoy compared with saline control. No gross or histological pathological abnormalities were noted at necropsy in any of the animals. These findings suggest a lack of toxicity of intravenous administration of a cyclic STAT3 decoy oligonucleotide. In addition, comparable antitumor effects indicate a lack of dose response at the two dose levels investigated. PMID:24395569

  17. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cinnamyl Alcohol, the Bioactive Component of Chestnut Flower Absolute, Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation in 3T3-L1 Cells by Downregulating Adipogenic Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dae Il; Won, Kyung-Jong; Kim, Do-Yoon; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Hwan Myung

    2017-01-01

    The extract of chestnut (Castanea crenata var. dulcis) flower (CCDF) has antioxidant and antimelanogenic properties, but its anti-obesity properties have not been previously examined. In this study, we tested the effect of CCDF absolute on adipocyte differentiation by using 3T3-L1 cells and determining the bioactive component of CCDF absolute in 3T3-L1 cell differentiation. CCDF absolute (0.1-100[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL) did not change 3T3-L1 cell viability. At 50[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL and 100[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL, the absolute significantly reduced the accumulation of lipid droplets in 3T3-L1 cells that were induced by culture in medium containing 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine/dexamethasone/insulin (MDI). GC/MS analysis showed that CCDF absolute contains 10 compounds. Among these compounds, cinnamyl alcohol (3-phenyl-2-propene-1-ol) dose-dependently inhibited the increased accumulation of lipid droplets in MDI-contained medium-cultured 3T3-L1 cells at a concentration range of 0.1[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL to 10[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL that did not cause cytotoxicity in 3T3-L1 cells. The inhibitory effect was significant at 5[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL ([Formula: see text] of response in MDI alone-treated state, [Formula: see text]) and 10[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL ([Formula: see text] of response in MDI alone-treated state, [Formula: see text]). Moreover, the enhanced expression of obesity-related proteins (PPAR[Formula: see text], C/EBP[Formula: see text], SREBP-1c, and FAS) in MDI medium-cultivated 3T3-L1 cells was significantly attenuated by the addition of cinnamyl alcohol at 5[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL and 10[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/mL. These findings demonstrate that cinnamyl alcohol suppresses 3T3-L1 cell differentiation by inhibiting anti-adipogenesis-related proteins, and it may be a main bioactive

  19. Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 inhibits transcription of IRF3 and IRF7 and suppresses induction of interferon-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Gretchen L.; Liu Renshui; Hahn, Angela M.

    Activation of interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) 3 and 7 is essential for the induction of Type I interferons (IFN) and innate antiviral responses, and herpesviruses have evolved mechanisms to evade such responses. We previously reported that Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1, an immediate-early (IE) protein, inhibits the function of IRF7, but the role of BRLF1, the other IE transactivator, in IRF regulation has not been examined. We now show that BRLF1 expression decreased induction of IFN-{beta}, and reduced expression of IRF3 and IRF7; effects were dependent on N- and C-terminal regions of BRLF1 and its nuclear localization signal. Endogenous IRF3 and IRF7more » RNA and protein levels were also decreased during cytolytic EBV infection. Finally, production of IFN-{beta} was decreased during lytic EBV infection and was associated with increased susceptibility to superinfection with Sendai virus. These data suggest a new role for BRLF1 with the ability to evade host innate immune responses.« less

  20. Combination therapy with an OX40L fusion protein and a vaccine targeting the transcription factor twist inhibits metastasis in a murine model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Malamas, Anthony S; Hammond, Scott A; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2017-10-31

    OX40 is a costimulatory receptor that potentiates proliferation, survival, memory formation, and effector function of CD4 + and CD8 + T-cells, while overcoming the suppressive activity of regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Here, we explored the combination of an OX40L fusion protein (OX40L-FP) with a poxvirus-based cancer vaccine (MVA-Twist-TRICOM) to inhibit tumor metastasis in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model. Contrary to the single agent treatments, the combination therapy significantly decreased the number of metastatic colonies per lung and prolonged survival. Depletion studies demonstrated that these effects were mediated by both CD4 + and CD8 + T-cells. The combination therapy a) increased the total number of T-cells in the CD4 + Foxp3 - population and the CD4 + central and effector memory subsets within the lung, spleen, and draining lymph node, b) enhanced infiltration of CD4 + T-cells into metastatic areas of the lung, and (c) increased the number of functional CD8 + T-cells that produced IFNγ and TNFα. The combination therapy also promoted the development of KLRG1 - CD127 + memory precursor CD8 + T-cells, while reducing those with a KLRG1 + terminally differentiated phenotype. Moreover, the combination of OX40L-FP and vaccine induced greater CD4 + and CD8 + Twist-specific responses. In addition, Tregs isolated from mice receiving the combination were also less immunosuppressive in ex-vivo proliferation assays than those from the OX40L-FP and MVA-Twist-TRICOM monotherapy groups. Such results provide the rationale to combine co-stimulatory agonists with cancer vaccines for the treatment of tumor metastasis.

  1. Combination therapy with an OX40L fusion protein and a vaccine targeting the transcription factor twist inhibits metastasis in a murine model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malamas, Anthony S.; Hammond, Scott A.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2017-01-01

    OX40 is a costimulatory receptor that potentiates proliferation, survival, memory formation, and effector function of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, while overcoming the suppressive activity of regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Here, we explored the combination of an OX40L fusion protein (OX40L-FP) with a poxvirus-based cancer vaccine (MVA-Twist-TRICOM) to inhibit tumor metastasis in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model. Contrary to the single agent treatments, the combination therapy significantly decreased the number of metastatic colonies per lung and prolonged survival. Depletion studies demonstrated that these effects were mediated by both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. The combination therapy a) increased the total number of T-cells in the CD4+Foxp3- population and the CD4+ central and effector memory subsets within the lung, spleen, and draining lymph node, b) enhanced infiltration of CD4+ T-cells into metastatic areas of the lung, and (c) increased the number of functional CD8+ T-cells that produced IFNγ and TNFα. The combination therapy also promoted the development of KLRG1-CD127+ memory precursor CD8+ T-cells, while reducing those with a KLRG1+ terminally differentiated phenotype. Moreover, the combination of OX40L-FP and vaccine induced greater CD4+ and CD8+ Twist-specific responses. In addition, Tregs isolated from mice receiving the combination were also less immunosuppressive in ex-vivo proliferation assays than those from the OX40L-FP and MVA-Twist-TRICOM monotherapy groups. Such results provide the rationale to combine co-stimulatory agonists with cancer vaccines for the treatment of tumor metastasis. PMID:29207606

  2. Isobutyrylshikonin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production in BV2 microglial cells by suppressing the PI3K/Akt-mediated nuclear transcription factor-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Jayasooriya, Rajapaksha Gedara Prasad Tharanga; Lee, Kyoung-Tae; Kang, Chang-Hee; Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Lee, Hak-Ju; Choi, Yung Hyun; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Gi-Young

    2014-12-01

    Microglia are important macrophages to defend against pathogens in the central nervous system (CNS); however, persistent or acute inflammation of microglia lead to CNS disorders via neuronal cell death. Therefore, we theorized that a good strategy for the treatment of CNS disorders would be to target inflammatory mediators from microglia in disease. Consequently, we investigated whether isobutyrylshikonin (IBS) attenuates the production of proinflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. Treatment with IBS inhibited the secretion of NO and prostaglandin E2 (as well as the expression of their key regulatory genes), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Isobutyrylshikonin also suppressed LPS-induced DNA-binding activity of nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB), by inhibiting the nuclear translocation of p50 and p65 in addition to blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a specific NF-κB inhibitor, showed the down-regulation of LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 messenger RNA by suppressing NF-κB activity. This indirectly suggests that IBS-mediated NF-κB inhibition is the main signaling pathway involved in the inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 expression. In addition, IBS attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt, which are upstream molecules of NF-κB, in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. The functional aspects of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway were analyzed with LY294002, which is a specific PI3K/Akt inhibitor that attenuated LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression by suppressing NF-κB activity. These data suggest that an IBS-mediated anti-inflammatory effect may be involved in suppressing the PI3K/Akt-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Wine polyphenols exert antineoplasic effect on androgen resistant PC-3 cell line through the inhibition of the transcriptional activity of COX-2 promoter mediated by NF-kβ.

    PubMed

    Ferruelo, A; de Las Heras, M M; Redondo, C; Ramón de Fata, F; Romero, I; Angulo, J C

    2014-09-01

    Mediterranean diet may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is associated with increased cellular proliferation, prevents apoptosis and favors tumor invasion. We intend to clarify whether resveratrol and other polyphenols effectively inhibit COX-2 activity and induce apoptosis in hormone-resistant PC-3 cell line. PC-3 cells were cultured and treated with different concentrations of gallic acid, tannic acid, quercetin, and resveratrol in presence of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA; 50 μg/ml) that induces COX-2 expression. Total RNA was extracted and COX-2 expression was analyzed by relative quantification real-time PCR (ΔΔCt method). COX-2 activity was determined by PGE-2 detection using ELISA. Caspase 3/7 luminescence assay was used to disclose apoptosis. Transitory transfection with short human COX-2 (phPES2 -327/+59) and p5xNF-kβ-Luc plasmids determined COX-2 promoter activity and specifically that dependant of NF-kβ. COX-2 expression was not modified in media devoid of PMA. However, under PMA induction tannic acid (2.08 ±.21), gallic acid (2.46 ±.16), quercetin (1.78 ±.14) and resveratrol (1.15 ±.16) significantly inhibited COX-2 mRNA with respect to control (3.14 ±.07), what means a 34%, 23%, 46% and 61% reduction, respectively. The inhibition in the levels of PGE-2 followed a similar pattern. All compounds studied induced apoptosis at 48 h, although at a different rate. PMA caused a rise in activity 7.4 ±.23 times phPES2 -327/+59 and 2.0 ±.1 times p5xNF-kβ-Luc at 6h compared to basal. Resveratrol suppressed these effects 17.1 ±.21 and 32.4 ±.18 times, respectively. Similarly, but to a lesser extent, the rest of evaluated polyphenols diminished PMA inductor effect on the activity of both promoters. Polyphenols inhibit transcriptional activity of COX-2 promoter mediated by NF-kβ. This effect could explain, at least in part, the induction of apoptosis in vitro by

  4. Inhibition of Gαs/cAMP Signaling Decreases TCR-Stimulated IL-2 transcription in CD4(+) T Helper Cells.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Thomas R; Yost, Evan A; Yost, Stacy M; Hartle, Cassandra M; Ott, Braden J; Berlot, Catherine H

    2015-07-06

    The role of cAMP in regulating T cell activation and function has been controversial. cAMP is generally known as an immunosuppressant, but it is also required for generating optimal immune responses. As the effect of cAMP is likely to depend on its cellular context, the current study investigated whether the mechanism of activation of Gαs and adenylyl cyclase influences their effect on T cell receptor (TCR)-stimulated interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA levels. The effect of blocking Gs-coupled receptor (GsPCR)-mediated Gs activation on TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels in CD4(+) T cells was compared with that of knocking down Gαs expression or inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity. The effect of knocking down Gαs expression on TCR-stimulated cAMP accumulation was compared with that of blocking GsPCR signaling. ZM-241385, an antagonist to the Gs-coupled A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR), enhanced TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels in primary human CD4(+) T helper cells and in Jurkat T cells. A dominant negative Gαs construct, GαsDN3, also enhanced TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. Similar to GsPCR antagonists, GαsDN3 blocked GsPCR-dependent activation of both Gαs and Gβγ. In contrast, Gαs siRNA and 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine (ddA), an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, decreased TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. Gαs siRNA, but not GαsDN3, decreased TCR-stimulated cAMP synthesis. Potentiation of IL-2 mRNA levels by ZM-241385 required at least two days of TCR stimulation, and addition of ddA after three days of TCR stimulation enhanced IL-2 mRNA levels. GsPCRs play an inhibitory role in the regulation of TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels whereas Gαs and cAMP can play a stimulatory one. Additionally, TCR-dependent activation of Gαs does not appear to involve GsPCRs. These results suggest that the context of Gαs/cAMP activation and the stage of T cell activation and differentiation determine the effect on TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels.

  5. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ agonist GW501516 inhibits IL-6-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation and insulin resistance in human liver cells.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Marco, L; Barroso, E; El Kochairi, I; Palomer, X; Michalik, L; Wahli, W; Vázquez-Carrera, M

    2012-03-01

    IL-6 induces insulin resistance by activating signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and upregulating the transcription of its target gene SOCS3. Here we examined whether the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)β/δ agonist GW501516 prevented activation of the IL-6-STAT3-suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) pathway and insulin resistance in human hepatic HepG2 cells. Studies were conducted with human HepG2 cells and livers from mice null for Pparβ/δ (also known as Ppard) and wild-type mice. GW501516 prevented IL-6-dependent reduction in insulin-stimulated v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 1 (AKT) phosphorylation and in IRS-1 and IRS-2 protein levels. In addition, treatment with this drug abolished IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation of Tyr⁷⁰⁵ and Ser⁷²⁷ and prevented the increase in SOCS3 caused by this cytokine. Moreover, GW501516 prevented IL-6-dependent induction of extracellular-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), a serine-threonine protein kinase involved in serine STAT3 phosphorylation; the livers of Pparβ/δ-null mice showed increased Tyr⁷⁰⁵- and Ser⁷²⁷-STAT3 as well as phospho-ERK1/2 levels. Furthermore, drug treatment prevented the IL-6-dependent reduction in phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a kinase reported to inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation on Tyr⁷⁰⁵. In agreement with the recovery in phospho-AMPK levels observed following GW501516 treatment, this drug increased the AMP/ATP ratio and decreased the ATP/ADP ratio. Overall, our findings show that the PPARβ/δ activator GW501516 prevents IL-6-induced STAT3 activation by inhibiting ERK1/2 phosphorylation and preventing the reduction in phospho-AMPK levels. These effects of GW501516 may contribute to the prevention of cytokine-induced insulin resistance in hepatic cells.

  6. Convection-enhanced delivery of sorafenib and suppression of tumor progression in a murine model of brain melanoma through the inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhaoxia; Yin, Yufang; Lin, Jenny; Hsu, Li-Chen J; Brandon, Vanessa L; Yang, Fan; Jove, Richard; Jandial, Rahul; Li, Gang; Chen, Mike Y

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Despite recent advances, metastatic melanoma remains a terminal disease, in which life-threatening brain metastasis occurs in approximately half of patients. Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that induces apoptosis of melanoma cells in vitro. However, systemic administration has been ineffective because adequate tissue concentrations cannot be achieved. This study investigated if convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of sorafenib would enhance tumor control and survival via inhibition of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) pathway in a murine model of metastatic brain melanoma. METHODS Melanoma cells treated with sorafenib in vitro were examined for signaling and survival changes. The effect of sorafenib given by CED was assessed by bioluminescent imaging and animal survival. RESULTS The results showed that sorafenib induced cell death in the 4 established melanoma cell lines and in 1 primary cultured melanoma cell line. Sorafenib inhibited Stat3 phosphorylation in HTB65, WYC1, and B16 cells. Accordingly, sorafenib treatment also decreased expression of Mcl-1 mRNA in melanoma cell lines. Because sorafenib targets multiple pathways, the present study demonstrated the contribution of the Stat3 pathway by showing that mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) Stat3 +/+ cells were significantly more sensitive to sorafenib than MEF Stat3 -/- cells. In the murine model of melanoma brain metastasis used in this study, CED of sorafenib increased survival by 150% in the treatment group compared with animals receiving the vehicle control (p < 0.01). CED of sorafenib also significantly abrogated tumor growth. CONCLUSIONS The data from this study indicate that local delivery of sorafenib effectively controls brain melanoma. These findings validate further investigation of the use of CED to distribute molecularly targeted agents.

  7. A Novel Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist, MGN1703, Enhances HIV-1 Transcription and NK Cell-Mediated Inhibition of HIV-1-Infected Autologous CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Offersen, Rasmus; Nissen, Sara Konstantin; Rasmussen, Thomas A; Østergaard, Lars; Denton, Paul W; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are potent enhancers of innate antiviral immunity and may also reverse HIV-1 latency. Therefore, TLR agonists have a potential role in the context of a "shock-and-kill" approach to eradicate HIV-1. Our extensive preclinical evaluation suggests that a novel TLR9 agonist, MGN1703, may indeed perform both functions in an HIV-1 eradication trial. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from aviremic HIV-1-infected donors on antiretroviral therapy (ART) that were incubated with MGN1703 ex vivo exhibited increased secretion of interferon alpha (IFN-α) (P= 0.005) and CXCL10 (P= 0.0005) in culture supernatants. Within the incubated PBMC pool, there were higher proportions of CD69-positive CD56(dim)CD16(+)NK cells (P= 0.001) as well as higher proportions of CD107a-positive (P= 0.002) and IFN-γ-producing (P= 0.038) NK cells. Incubation with MGN1703 also increased the proportions of CD69-expressing CD4(+)and CD8(+)T cells. Furthermore, CD4(+)T cells within the pool of MGN1703-incubated PBMCs showed enhanced levels of unspliced HIV-1 RNA (P= 0.036). Importantly, MGN1703 increased the capacity of NK cells to inhibit virus spread within a culture of autologous CD4(+)T cells assessed by using an HIV-1 p24 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (P= 0.03). In conclusion, we show that MGN1703 induced strong antiviral innate immune responses, enhanced HIV-1 transcription, and boosted NK cell-mediated suppression of HIV-1 infection in autologous CD4(+)T cells. These findings support clinical testing of MGN1703 in HIV-1 eradication trials. We demonstrate that MGN1703 (a TLR9 agonist currently undergoing phase 3 clinical testing for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer) induces potent antiviral responses in immune effector cells from HIV-1-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. The significantly improved safety and tolerability profiles of MGN1703 versus TLR9 agonists of the CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) family

  8. Inhibition of Vpx-Mediated SAMHD1 and Vpr-Mediated Host Helicase Transcription Factor Degradation by Selective Disruption of Viral CRL4 (DCAF1) E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Guo, Haoran; Su, Jiaming; Rui, Yajuan; Zheng, Wenwen; Gao, Wenying; Zhang, Wenyan; Li, Zhaolong; Liu, Guanchen; Markham, Richard B; Wei, Wei; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2017-05-01

    The lentiviral accessory proteins Vpx and Vpr are known to utilize CRL4 (DCAF1) E3 ligase to induce the degradation of the host restriction factor SAMHD1 or host helicase transcription factor (HLTF), respectively. Selective disruption of viral CRL4 (DCAF1) E3 ligase could be a promising antiviral strategy. Recently, we have determined that posttranslational modification (neddylation) of Cullin-4 is required for the activation of Vpx-CRL4 (DCAF1) E3 ligase. However, the mechanism of Vpx/Vpr-CRL4 (DCAF1) E3 ligase assembly is still poorly understood. Here, we report that zinc coordination is an important regulator of Vpx-CRL4 E3 ligase assembly. Residues in a conserved zinc-binding motif of Vpx were essential for the recruitment of the CRL4 (DCAF1) E3 complex and Vpx-induced SAMHD1 degradation. Importantly, altering the intracellular zinc concentration by treatment with the zinc chelator N , N , N '-tetrakis-(2'-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) potently blocked Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation and inhibited wild-type SIVmac (simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques) infection of myeloid cells, even in the presence of Vpx. TPEN selectively inhibited Vpx and DCAF1 binding but not the Vpx-SAMHD1 interaction or Vpx virion packaging. Moreover, we have shown that zinc coordination is also important for the assembly of the HIV-1 Vpr-CRL4 E3 ligase. In particular, Vpr zinc-binding motif mutation or TPEN treatment efficiently inhibited Vpr-CRL4 (DCAF1) E3 ligase assembly and Vpr-mediated HLTF degradation or Vpr-induced G 2 cell cycle arrest. Collectively, our study sheds light on a conserved strategy by the viral proteins Vpx and Vpr to recruit host CRL4 (DCAF1) E3 ligase, which represents a target for novel anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug development. IMPORTANCE The Vpr and its paralog Vpx are accessory proteins encoded by different human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) lentiviruses. To facilitate viral replication, Vpx has

  9. Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Retinoblastoma protein, E2F transcription factor, high throughput screen, drug discovery, x-ray crystallography 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...developed a method to perform fragment based screening by x-ray crystallography . 2.0 KEYWORDS Retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway, E2F transcription factor...cancer, cell-cycle inhibition, activation, modulation, inhibition, high throughput screening, fragment-based screening, x-ray crystallography

  10. Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-11-01

    SUBJECT TERMS cell cycle, Retinoblastoma protein, E2F transcription factor, high throughput screen, drug discovery, x-ray crystallography 16. SECURITY...screening by x-ray crystallography . 2.0 KEYWORDS Retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway, E2F transcription factor, cancer, cell-cycle inhibition, activation...modulation, inhibition, high throughput screening, fragment-based screening, x-ray crystallography . 3.0 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Summary: We

  11. Long non-coding RNA nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 inhibits the apoptosis of retina Müller cells after diabetic retinopathy through regulating miR-497/brain-derived neurotrophic factor axis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Juan

    2018-05-01

    The role of long non-coding RNA in diabetic retinopathy, a serious complication of diabetes mellitus, has attracted increasing attention in recent years. The purpose of this study was to explore whether long non-coding RNA nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 was involved in the context of diabetic retinopathy and its underlying mechanisms. Our results revealed that nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 was significantly downregulated in the retina of diabetes mellitus rats. Meanwhile, miR-497 was significantly increased in diabetes mellitus rats' retina and high glucose-treated Müller cells, but brain-derived neurotrophic factor was increased. We also found that high glucose-induced apoptosis of Müller cells was accompanied by the significant downregulation of nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 in vitro. Further study demonstrated that high glucose-promoted Müller cells apoptosis through downregulating nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 and downregulated nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 mediated this effect via negative regulating miR-497. Moreover, brain-derived neurotrophic factor was negatively regulated by miR-497 and associated with the apoptosis of Müller cells under high glucose. Our results suggested that under diabetic conditions, downregulated nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 decreased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor through elevating miR-497, thereby promoting Müller cells apoptosis and aggravating diabetic retinopathy.

  12. DNA cytosine methylation in the bovine leukemia virus promoter is associated with latency in a lymphoma-derived B-cell line: potential involvement of direct inhibition of cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-binding protein/CRE modulator/activation transcription factor binding.

    PubMed

    Pierard, Valérie; Guiguen, Allan; Colin, Laurence; Wijmeersch, Gaëlle; Vanhulle, Caroline; Van Driessche, Benoît; Dekoninck, Ann; Blazkova, Jana; Cardona, Christelle; Merimi, Makram; Vierendeel, Valérie; Calomme, Claire; Nguyên, Thi Liên-Anh; Nuttinck, Michèle; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Kettmann, Richard; Portetelle, Daniel; Burny, Arsène; Hirsch, Ivan; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2010-06-18

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral latency represents a viral strategy to escape the host immune system and allow tumor development. Besides the previously demonstrated role of histone deacetylation in the epigenetic repression of BLV expression, we showed here that BLV promoter activity was induced by several DNA methylation inhibitors (such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and that overexpressed DNMT1 and DNMT3A, but not DNMT3B, down-regulated BLV promoter activity. Importantly, cytosine hypermethylation in the 5'-long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 and R regions was associated with true latency in the lymphoma-derived B-cell line L267 but not with defective latency in YR2 cells. Moreover, the virus-encoded transactivator Tax(BLV) decreased DNA methyltransferase expression levels, which could explain the lower level of cytosine methylation observed in the L267(LTaxSN) 5'-LTR compared with the L267 5'-LTR. Interestingly, DNA methylation inhibitors and Tax(BLV) synergistically activated BLV promoter transcriptional activity in a cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-dependent manner. Mechanistically, methylation at the -154 or -129 CpG position (relative to the transcription start site) impaired in vitro binding of CRE-binding protein (CREB) transcription factors to their respective CRE sites. Methylation at -129 CpG alone was sufficient to decrease BLV promoter-driven reporter gene expression by 2-fold. We demonstrated in vivo the recruitment of CREB/CRE modulator (CREM) and to a lesser extent activating transcription factor-1 (ATF-1) to the hypomethylated CRE region of the YR2 5'-LTR, whereas we detected no CREB/CREM/ATF recruitment to the hypermethylated corresponding region in the L267 cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that site-specific DNA methylation of the BLV promoter represses viral transcription by directly inhibiting transcription factor binding, thereby contributing to true proviral latency.

  13. Pervasive Targeting of Nascent Transcripts by Hfq.

    PubMed

    Kambara, Tracy K; Ramsey, Kathryn M; Dove, Simon L

    2018-05-01

    Hfq is an RNA chaperone and an important post-transcriptional regulator in bacteria. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq), we show that Hfq associates with hundreds of different regions of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. These associations are abolished when transcription is inhibited, indicating that they reflect Hfq binding to transcripts during their synthesis. Analogous ChIP-seq analyses with the post-transcriptional regulator Crc reveal that it associates with many of the same nascent transcripts as Hfq, an activity we show is Hfq dependent. Our findings indicate that Hfq binds many transcripts co-transcriptionally in P. aeruginosa, often in concert with Crc, and uncover direct regulatory targets of these proteins. They also highlight a general approach for studying the interactions of RNA-binding proteins with nascent transcripts in bacteria. The binding of post-transcriptional regulators to nascent mRNAs may represent a prevalent means of controlling translation in bacteria where transcription and translation are coupled. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chromatin potentiates transcription

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Shigeki; Davis, Ralph E.; Mattei, Pierre Jean; Eagen, Kyle Patrick; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin isolated from the chromosomal locus of the PHO5 gene of yeast in a transcriptionally repressed state was transcribed with 12 pure proteins (80 polypeptides): RNA polymerase II, six general transcription factors, TFIIS, the Pho4 gene activator protein, and the SAGA, SWI/SNF, and Mediator complexes. Contrary to expectation, a nucleosome occluding the TATA box and transcription start sites did not impede transcription but rather, enhanced it: the level of chromatin transcription was at least sevenfold greater than that of naked DNA, and chromatin gave patterns of transcription start sites closely similar to those occurring in vivo, whereas naked DNA gave many aberrant transcripts. Both histone acetylation and trimethylation of H3K4 (H3K4me3) were important for chromatin transcription. The nucleosome, long known to serve as a general gene repressor, thus also performs an important positive role in transcription. PMID:28137832

  15. The In Vivo Activity of Ime1, the Key Transcriptional Activator of Meiosis-Specific Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Is Inhibited by the Cyclic AMP/Protein Kinase A Signal Pathway through the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3-β Homolog Rim11

    PubMed Central

    Rubin-Bejerano, Ifat; Sagee, Shira; Friedman, Osnat; Pnueli, Lilach; Kassir, Yona

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the main mode by which signals are transmitted to key regulators of developmental pathways. The glycogen synthase kinase 3 family plays pivotal roles in the development and well-being of all eukaryotic organisms. Similarly, the budding yeast homolog Rim11 is essential for the exit of diploid cells from the cell cycle and for entry into the meiotic developmental pathway. In this report we show that in vivo, in cells grown in a medium promoting vegetative growth with acetate as the sole carbon source (SA medium), Rim11 phosphorylates Ime1, the master transcriptional activator required for entry into the meiotic cycle and for the transcription of early meiosis-specific genes. We demonstrate that in the presence of glucose, the kinase activity of Rim11 is inhibited. This inhibition could be due to phosphorylation on Ser-5, Ser-8, and/or Ser-12 because in the rim11S5AS8AS12A mutant, Ime1 is incorrectly phosphorylated in the presence of glucose and cells undergo sporulation. We further show that this nutrient signal is transmitted to Rim11 and consequently to Ime1 by the cyclic AMP/protein kinase A signal transduction pathway. Ime1 is phosphorylated in SA medium on at least two residues, Tyr-359 and Ser-302 and/or Ser-306. Ser-302 and Ser-306 are part of a consensus site for the mammalian homolog of Rim11, glycogen synthase kinase 3-β. Phosphorylation on Tyr-359 but not Ser-302 or Ser-306 is essential for the transcription of early meiosis-specific genes and sporulation. We show that Tyr-359 is phosphorylated by Rim11. PMID:15282298

  16. R-loops in bacterial transcription: their causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Gowrishankar, J; Leela, J Krishna; Anupama, K

    2013-01-01

    Nascent untranslated transcripts in bacteria are prone to generating RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops); Rho-dependent transcription termination acts to reduce their prevalence. Here we discuss the mechanisms of R-loop formation and growth inhibition in bacteria.

  17. Two-level inhibition of galK expression by Spot 42: Degradation of mRNA mK2 and enhanced transcription termination before the galK gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xun; Ji, Sang Chun; Jeon, Heung Jin; Lee, Yonho; Lim, Heon M.

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gal operon has the structure Pgal-galE-galT-galK-galM. During early log growth, a gradient in gene expression, named type 2 polarity, is established, as follows: galE > galT > galK > galM. However, during late-log growth, type 1 polarity is established in which galK is greater than galT, as follows: galE > galK > galT > galM. We found that type 2 polarity occurs as a result of the down-regulation of galK, which is caused by two different molecular mechanisms: Spot 42-mediated degradation of the galK-specific mRNA, mK2, and Spot 42-mediated Rho-dependent transcription termination at the end of galT. Because the concentration of Spot 42 drops during the transition period of the polarity type switch, these results demonstrate that type 1 polarity is the result of alleviation of Spot 42-mediated galK down-regulation. Because the Spot 42-binding site overlaps with a putative Rho-binding site, a molecular mechanism is proposed to explain how Spot 42, possibly with Hfq, enhances Rho-mediated transcription termination at the end of galT. PMID:26045496

  18. Biosynthesis of the acetyl‐CoA carboxylase‐inhibiting antibiotic, andrimid in Serratia is regulated by Hfq and the LysR‐type transcriptional regulator, AdmX

    PubMed Central

    Nogellova, Veronika; Morel, Bertrand; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Summary Infections due to multidrug‐resistant bacteria represent a major global health challenge. To combat this problem, new antibiotics are urgently needed and some plant‐associated bacteria are a promising source. The rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica A153 produces several bioactive secondary metabolites, including the anti‐oomycete and antifungal haterumalide, oocydin A and the broad spectrum polyamine antibiotic, zeamine. In this study, we show that A153 produces a second broad spectrum antibiotic, andrimid. Using genome sequencing, comparative genomics and mutagenesis, we defined new genes involved in andrimid (adm) biosynthesis. Both the expression of the adm gene cluster and regulation of andrimid synthesis were investigated. The biosynthetic cluster is operonic and its expression is modulated by various environmental cues, including temperature and carbon source. Analysis of the genome context of the adm operon revealed a gene encoding a predicted LysR‐type regulator, AdmX, apparently unique to Serratia strains. Mutagenesis and gene expression assays demonstrated that AdmX is a transcriptional activator of the adm gene cluster. At the post‐transcriptional level, the expression of the adm cluster is positively regulated by the RNA chaperone, Hfq, in an RpoS‐independent manner. Our results highlight the complexity of andrimid biosynthesis – an antibiotic with potential clinical and agricultural utility. PMID:26914969

  19. Reverse genetic generation of recombinant Zaire Ebola viruses containing disrupted IRF-3 inhibitory domains results in attenuated virus growth in vitro and higher levels of IRF-3 activation without inhibiting viral transcription or replication.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Amy L; Dover, Jason E; Towner, Jonathan S; Nichol, Stuart T

    2006-07-01

    The VP35 protein of Zaire Ebola virus is an essential component of the viral RNA polymerase complex and also functions to antagonize the cellular type I interferon (IFN) response by blocking activation of the transcription factor IRF-3. We previously mapped the IRF-3 inhibitory domain within the C terminus of VP35. In the present study, we show that mutations that disrupt the IRF-3 inhibitory function of VP35 do not disrupt viral transcription/replication, suggesting that the two functions of VP35 are separable. Second, using reverse genetics, we successfully recovered recombinant Ebola viruses containing mutations within the IRF-3 inhibitory domain. Importantly, we show that the recombinant viruses were attenuated for growth in cell culture and that they activated IRF-3 and IRF-3-inducible gene expression at levels higher than that for Ebola virus containing wild-type VP35. In the context of Ebola virus pathogenesis, VP35 may function to limit early IFN-beta production and other antiviral signals generated from cells at the primary site of infection, thereby slowing down the host's ability to curb virus replication and induce adaptive immunity.

  20. WRKY transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Paul J; Somssich, Imre E; Ringler, Patricia; Shen, Qingxi J

    2010-05-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants and form integral parts of signalling webs that modulate many plant processes. Here, we review recent significant progress in WRKY transcription factor research. New findings illustrate that WRKY proteins often act as repressors as well as activators, and that members of the family play roles in both the repression and de-repression of important plant processes. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that a single WRKY transcription factor might be involved in regulating several seemingly disparate processes. Mechanisms of signalling and transcriptional regulation are being dissected, uncovering WRKY protein functions via interactions with a diverse array of protein partners, including MAP kinases, MAP kinase kinases, 14-3-3 proteins, calmodulin, histone deacetylases, resistance proteins and other WRKY transcription factors. WRKY genes exhibit extensive autoregulation and cross-regulation that facilitates transcriptional reprogramming in a dynamic web with built-in redundancy. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Interactive effects of inflammatory cytokine and abundant low-molecular-weight PAHs on inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication, disruption of cell proliferation control, and the AhR-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Kabátková, Markéta; Svobodová, Jana; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Mohatad, Dilshad Shaik; Šmerdová, Lenka; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav; Vondráček, Jan

    2015-01-05

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with lower molecular weight exhibit lesser genotoxicity and carcinogenicity than highly carcinogenic PAHs with a higher number of benzene rings. Nevertheless, they elicit specific effects linked with tumor promotion, such as acute inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Although inflammatory reaction may alter bioactivation and toxicity of carcinogenic PAHs, little is known about the impact of pro-inflammatory cytokines on toxic effects of the low-molecular-weight PAHs. Here, we investigated the impact of a pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), on the effects associated with tumor promotion and with induction of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent gene expression in rat liver epithelial cells. We found that a prolonged incubation with TNF-α induced a down-regulation of GJIC, associated with reduced expression of connexin 43 (Cx43), a major connexin isoform found in liver epithelial cells. The Cx43 down-regulation was partly mediated by the activity of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) p38 kinase. Independently of GJIC modulation, or p38 activation, TNF-α potentiated the AhR-dependent proliferative effect of a model low-molecular-weight PAH, fluoranthene, on contact-inhibited cells. In contrast, this pro-inflammatory cytokine repressed the fluoranthene-induced expression of a majority of model AhR gene targets, such as Cyp1a1, Ahrr or Tiparp. The results of the present study indicate that inflammatory reaction may differentially modulate various toxic effects of low-molecular-weight PAHs; the exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines may both strengthen (inhibition of GJIC, disruption of contact inhibition) and repress (expression of a majority of AhR-dependent genes) their impact on toxic endpoints associated with carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design. PMID:26764017

  3. The Smad3 linker region contains a transcriptional activation domain

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smads regulate a wide variety of biological responses through transcriptional regulation of target genes. Smad3 plays a key role in TGF-β/Smad-mediated transcriptional responses. Here, we show that the proline-rich linker region of Smad3 contains a transcriptional activation domain. When the linker region is fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, it activates transcription. We show that the linker region physically interacts with p300. The adenovirus E1a protein, which binds to p300, inhibits the transcriptional activity of the linker region, and overexpression of p300 can rescue the linker-mediated transcriptional activation. In contrast, an adenovirus E1a mutant, which cannot bind to p300, does not inhibit the linker-mediated transcription. The native Smad3 protein lacking the linker region is unable to mediate TGF-β transcriptional activation responses, although it can be phosphorylated by the TGF-β receptor at the C-terminal tail and has a significantly increased ability to form a heteromeric complex with Smad4. We show further that the linker region and the C-terminal domain of Smad3 synergize for transcriptional activation in the presence of TGF-β. Thus our findings uncover an important function of the Smad3 linker region in Smad-mediated transcriptional control. PMID:15588252

  4. The Smad3 linker region contains a transcriptional activation domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Long, Jianyin; Matsuura, Isao; He, Dongming; Liu, Fang

    2005-02-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)/Smads regulate a wide variety of biological responses through transcriptional regulation of target genes. Smad3 plays a key role in TGF-beta/Smad-mediated transcriptional responses. Here, we show that the proline-rich linker region of Smad3 contains a transcriptional activation domain. When the linker region is fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, it activates transcription. We show that the linker region physically interacts with p300. The adenovirus E1a protein, which binds to p300, inhibits the transcriptional activity of the linker region, and overexpression of p300 can rescue the linker-mediated transcriptional activation. In contrast, an adenovirus E1a mutant, which cannot bind to p300, does not inhibit the linker-mediated transcription. The native Smad3 protein lacking the linker region is unable to mediate TGF-beta transcriptional activation responses, although it can be phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptor at the C-terminal tail and has a significantly increased ability to form a heteromeric complex with Smad4. We show further that the linker region and the C-terminal domain of Smad3 synergize for transcriptional activation in the presence of TGF-beta. Thus our findings uncover an important function of the Smad3 linker region in Smad-mediated transcriptional control.

  5. Orphan Nuclear Receptor Small Heterodimer Partner Negatively Regulates Growth Hormone-mediated Induction of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis through Inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5) Transactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Deuk; Li, Tiangang; Ahn, Seung-Won; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, In-Kyu; Chiang, John Y. L.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a key metabolic regulator mediating glucose and lipid metabolism. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase superfamily and regulates cell cycle progression. The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP: NR0B2) plays a pivotal role in regulating metabolic processes. Here, we studied the role of ATM on GH-dependent regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis in the liver. GH induced phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose 6-phosphatase gene expression in primary hepatocytes. GH treatment and adenovirus-mediated STAT5 overexpression in hepatocytes increased glucose production, which was blocked by a JAK2 inhibitor, AG490, dominant negative STAT5, and STAT5 knockdown. We identified a STAT5 binding site on the PEPCK gene promoter using reporter assays and point mutation analysis. Up-regulation of SHP by metformin-mediated activation of the ATM-AMP-activated protein kinase pathway led to inhibition of GH-mediated induction of hepatic gluconeogenesis, which was abolished by an ATM inhibitor, KU-55933. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that SHP physically interacted with STAT5 and inhibited STAT5 recruitment on the PEPCK gene promoter. GH-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis was decreased by either metformin or Ad-SHP, whereas the inhibition by metformin was abolished by SHP knockdown. Finally, the increase of hepatic gluconeogenesis following GH treatment was significantly higher in the liver of SHP null mice compared with that of wild-type mice. Overall, our results suggest that the ATM-AMP-activated protein kinase-SHP network, as a novel mechanism for regulating hepatic glucose homeostasis via a GH-dependent pathway, may be a potential therapeutic target for insulin resistance. PMID:22977252

  6. DNA residence time is a regulatory factor of transcription repression

    PubMed Central

    Clauß, Karen; Popp, Achim P.; Schulze, Lena; Hettich, Johannes; Reisser, Matthias; Escoter Torres, Laura; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Transcription comprises a highly regulated sequence of intrinsically stochastic processes, resulting in bursts of transcription intermitted by quiescence. In transcription activation or repression, a transcription factor binds dynamically to DNA, with a residence time unique to each factor. Whether the DNA residence time is important in the transcription process is unclear. Here, we designed a series of transcription repressors differing in their DNA residence time by utilizing the modular DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and varying the number of nucleotide-recognizing repeat domains. We characterized the DNA residence times of our repressors in living cells using single molecule tracking. The residence times depended non-linearly on the number of repeat domains and differed by more than a factor of six. The factors provoked a residence time-dependent decrease in transcript level of the glucocorticoid receptor-activated gene SGK1. Down regulation of transcription was due to a lower burst frequency in the presence of long binding repressors and is in accordance with a model of competitive inhibition of endogenous activator binding. Our single molecule experiments reveal transcription factor DNA residence time as a regulatory factor controlling transcription repression and establish TALE-DNA binding domains as tools for the temporal dissection of transcription regulation. PMID:28977492

  7. Transcription Regulation in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Alexandra M.; Walker, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    The known diversity of metabolic strategies and physiological adaptations of archaeal species to extreme environments is extraordinary. Accurate and responsive mechanisms to ensure that gene expression patterns match the needs of the cell necessitate regulatory strategies that control the activities and output of the archaeal transcription apparatus. Archaea are reliant on a single RNA polymerase for all transcription, and many of the known regulatory mechanisms employed for archaeal transcription mimic strategies also employed for eukaryotic and bacterial species. Novel mechanisms of transcription regulation have become apparent by increasingly sophisticated in vivo and in vitro investigations of archaeal species. This review emphasizes recent progress in understanding archaeal transcription regulatory mechanisms and highlights insights gained from studies of the influence of archaeal chromatin on transcription. PMID:27137495

  8. WRKY transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  9. Nucleosome displacement in transcription.

    PubMed

    Workman, Jerry L

    2006-08-01

    Recent reports reinforce the notion that nucleosomes are highly dynamic in response to the process of transcription. Nucleosomes are displaced at promoters during gene activation in a process that involves histone modification, ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling complexes, histone chaperones and perhaps histone variants. During transcription elongation nucleosomes are acetylated and transferred behind RNA polymerase II where they are required to suppress spurious transcription initiation within the body of the gene. It is becoming increasingly clear that the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery is adapted to exploit the presence of nucleosomes in very sophisticated ways.

  10. Novel kinase fusion transcripts found in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryo; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Yamawaki, Kaoru; Suda, Kazuaki; Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Adachi, Sosuke; Okuda, Shujiro; Inoue, Ituro; Verhaak, Roel G. W.; Enomoto, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA-sequencing technology have enabled the discovery of gene fusion transcripts in the transcriptome of cancer cells. However, it remains difficult to differentiate the therapeutically targetable fusions from passenger events. We have analyzed RNA-sequencing data and DNA copy number data from 25 endometrial cancer cell lines to identify potential therapeutically targetable fusion transcripts, and have identified 124 high-confidence fusion transcripts, of which 69% are associated with gene amplifications. As targetable fusion candidates, we focused on three in-frame kinase fusion transcripts that retain a kinase domain (CPQ-PRKDC, CAPZA2-MET, and VGLL4-PRKG1). We detected only CPQ-PRKDC fusion transcript in three of 122 primary endometrial cancer tissues. Cell proliferation of the fusion-positive cell line was inhibited by knocking down the expression of wild-type PRKDC but not by blocking the CPQ-PRKDC fusion transcript expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that the expression of the CPQ-PRKDC fusion transcript was significantly lower than that of wild-type PRKDC, corresponding to a low transcript allele fraction of this fusion, based on RNA-sequencing read counts. In endometrial cancers, the CPQ-PRKDC fusion transcript may be a passenger aberration related to gene amplification. Our findings suggest that transcript allele fraction is a useful predictor to find bona-fide therapeutic-targetable fusion transcripts. PMID:26689674

  11. Novel kinase fusion transcripts found in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ryo; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Yamawaki, Kaoru; Suda, Kazuaki; Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Adachi, Sosuke; Okuda, Shujiro; Inoue, Ituro; Verhaak, Roel G W; Enomoto, Takayuki

    2015-12-22

    Recent advances in RNA-sequencing technology have enabled the discovery of gene fusion transcripts in the transcriptome of cancer cells. However, it remains difficult to differentiate the therapeutically targetable fusions from passenger events. We have analyzed RNA-sequencing data and DNA copy number data from 25 endometrial cancer cell lines to identify potential therapeutically targetable fusion transcripts, and have identified 124 high-confidence fusion transcripts, of which 69% are associated with gene amplifications. As targetable fusion candidates, we focused on three in-frame kinase fusion transcripts that retain a kinase domain (CPQ-PRKDC, CAPZA2-MET, and VGLL4-PRKG1). We detected only CPQ-PRKDC fusion transcript in three of 122 primary endometrial cancer tissues. Cell proliferation of the fusion-positive cell line was inhibited by knocking down the expression of wild-type PRKDC but not by blocking the CPQ-PRKDC fusion transcript expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that the expression of the CPQ-PRKDC fusion transcript was significantly lower than that of wild-type PRKDC, corresponding to a low transcript allele fraction of this fusion, based on RNA-sequencing read counts. In endometrial cancers, the CPQ-PRKDC fusion transcript may be a passenger aberration related to gene amplification. Our findings suggest that transcript allele fraction is a useful predictor to find bona-fide therapeutic-targetable fusion transcripts.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevier, Stuart A.; Levine, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical properties of transcription have recently been shown to play a central role in gene expression. However, a full physical characterization of this central biological process is lacking. In this Letter, we introduce a simple description of the basic physical elements of transcription where RNA elongation, RNA polymerase rotation, and DNA supercoiling are coupled. The resulting framework describes the relative amount of RNA polymerase rotation and DNA supercoiling that occurs during RNA elongation. Asymptotic behavior is derived and can be used to experimentally extract unknown mechanical parameters of transcription. Mechanical limits to transcription are incorporated through the addition of a DNA supercoiling-dependent RNA polymerase velocity. This addition can lead to transcriptional stalling and resulting implications for gene expression, chromatin structure and genome organization are discussed.

  13. Dolastatin 15, a mollusk linear peptide, and Celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, prevent preneoplastic colonic lesions and induce apoptosis through inhibition of the regulatory transcription factor NF-κB and an inflammatory protein, iNOS.

    PubMed

    Piplani, Honit; Vaish, Vivek; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2012-11-01

    The marine ecosystem is a unique and enormously rich source of natural products with potential chemopreventive applications in cancer. In the present study, we explored the chemopreventive role and the molecular mechanism of Dolastatin, a linear peptide from an Indian Ocean mollusk, and Celecoxib, a well-established cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor in an individual as well as in a combination regimen in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis in a rat model. After a 6-week treatment with DMH, morphological analysis revealed a marked occurrence of preneoplastic features in the colonic mucosa, whereas histologically well-characterized dysplasia and hyperplasia were observed in DMH-treated animals. Simultaneous administration of Celecoxib and Dolastatin reduced these features significantly. DMH treatment affected the number of apoptotic cells in colonic enterocytes, which reverted to the normal level with the use of Celecoxib and Dolastatin. Inflammation remains the dominant molecular mechanism in the development of multiple plaque lesions, the carcinogenic lesions in a DMH-induced process that may be mediated by COX-2. Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis revealed a higher expression of COX-2 and nuclear factor-κB, the transcription factors responsible for proinflammatory proteins such as TNFα, and also the inducible nitric oxide synthase in the DMH group, which was further recovered significantly with the use of Celecoxib and Dolastatin. In-silico molecular docking analysis of Dolastatin as a ligand with various regulatory proteins suggests that although the peptide failed to dock to COX-2, it successfully did so with inducible nitric oxide synthase, thereby indicating the potential of this inflammatory protein as a molecular anticancer target in colon carcinogenesis.

  14. Oxymatrine attenuates hepatic steatosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease rats fed with high fructose diet through inhibition of sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (Srebf1) and activation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (Pparα).

    PubMed

    Shi, Li-juan; Shi, Lei; Song, Guang-yao; Zhang, He-fang; Hu, Zhi-juan; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Dong-hui

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the therapeutic effect of oxymatrine, a monomer isolated from the medicinal plant Sophora flavescens Ait, on the hepatic lipid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) rats and to explore the potential mechanism. Rats were fed with high fructose diet for 8 weeks to establish the NAFLD model, then were given oxymatrine treatment (40, 80, and 160 mg/kg, respectively) for another 8 weeks. Body weight gain, liver index, serum and liver lipids, and histopathological evaluation were measured. Enzymatic activity and gene expression of the key enzymes involved in the lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation were assayed. The results showed that oxymatrine treatment reduced body weight gain, liver weight, liver index, dyslipidemia, and liver triglyceride level in a dose dependant manner. Importantly, the histopathological examination of liver confirmed that oxymatrine could decrease the liver lipid accumulation. The treatment also decreased the fatty acid synthase (FAS) enzymatic activity and increased the carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) enzymatic activity. Besides, oxymatrine treatment decreased the mRNA expression of sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1(Srebf1), fatty acid synthase (Fasn), and acetyl CoA carboxylase (Acc), and increased the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (Pparα), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (Cpt1a), and acyl CoA oxidase (Acox1) in high fructose diet induced NAFLD rats. These results suggested that the therapeutic effect of oxymatrine on the hepatic steatosis in high fructose diet induced fatty liver rats is partly due to down-regulating Srebf1 and up-regulating Pparα mediated metabolic pathways simultaneously. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hey bHLH transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Weber, David; Wiese, Cornelia; Gessler, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Hey bHLH transcription factors are direct targets of canonical Notch signaling. The three mammalian Hey proteins are closely related to Hes proteins and they primarily repress target genes by either directly binding to core promoters or by inhibiting other transcriptional activators. Individual candidate gene approaches and systematic screens identified a number of Hey target genes, which often encode other transcription factors involved in various developmental processes. Here, we review data on interaction partners and target genes and conclude with a model for Hey target gene regulation. Furthermore, we discuss how expression of Hey proteins affects processes like cell fate decisions and differentiation, e.g., in cardiovascular, skeletal, and neural development or oncogenesis and how this relates to the observed developmental defects and phenotypes observed in various knockout mice. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. HIV-1 transcription and latency: an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy, despite being potent and life-prolonging, is not curative and does not eradicate HIV-1 infection since interruption of treatment inevitably results in a rapid rebound of viremia. Reactivation of latently infected cells harboring transcriptionally silent but replication-competent proviruses is a potential source of persistent residual viremia in cART-treated patients. Although multiple reservoirs may exist, the persistence of resting CD4+ T cells carrying a latent infection represents a major barrier to eradication. In this review, we will discuss the latest reports on the molecular mechanisms that may regulate HIV-1 latency at the transcriptional level, including transcriptional interference, the role of cellular factors, chromatin organization and epigenetic modifications, the viral Tat trans-activator and its cellular cofactors. Since latency mechanisms may also operate at the post-transcriptional level, we will consider inhibition of nuclear RNA export and inhibition of translation by microRNAs as potential barriers to HIV-1 gene expression. Finally, we will review the therapeutic approaches and clinical studies aimed at achieving either a sterilizing cure or a functional cure of HIV-1 infection, with a special emphasis on the most recent pharmacological strategies to reactivate the latent viruses and decrease the pool of viral reservoirs. PMID:23803414

  17. Mangiferin ameliorates Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced experimental periodontitis by inhibiting phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB and Janus kinase 1-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Wang, Q; Ding, Y; Bao, C; Li, W

    2017-02-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol compound with anti-inflammatory properties. However, there have been few reports on the effect of mangiferin on periodontitis. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of this compound on experimental periodontitis and the underlying mechanisms. Mice were inoculated with Porphyromonas gingivalis to induce periodontitis, and treated with mangiferin orally (50 mg/kg bodyweight, once a day) for 8 wk. Then, the alveolar bone loss was examined using a scanning electronic microscope. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and the phosphorylation levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase 1-signal transducer and activator of adhesion (JAK1-STAT) pathways in the gingival epithelium were detected using western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining. The results showed that mice with periodontitis exhibited greater alveolar bone loss, stronger expression of TNF-α and higher phosphorylation levels of NF-κB and JAK1-STAT1/3 pathways in gingival epithelia, compared with control mice with no periodontitis. Moreover, treatment with mangiferin could significantly inhibit alveolar bone loss, TNF-α production and phosphorylation of NF-κB and JAK1-STAT1/3 pathways in gingival epithelia. Mangiferin has anti-inflammatory effects on periodontitis, which is associated with its ability to down-regulate the phosphorylation of NF-κB and JAK1-STAT1/3 pathways in gingival epithelia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. ASTP Onboard Voice Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The transcription is presented of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project voice communications as recorded on the command module data storage equipment. Data from this recorder are telemetered (dumped) to Space Tracking and Data Network sites for retransmission to the Johnson Space Center. The transcript is divided into three columns -- time, speaker, and text. The Greenwich mean time column consists of three two-digit numbers representing hours, minutes, and seconds (e.g., 22 34 14) for the Julian dates shown at the top of the page on which a new day begins. The speaker column indicates the source of a transmission; the text column contains the verbatim transcript of the communications.

  19. Repression of TFIIH Transcriptional Activity and TFIIH-Associated cdk7 Kinase Activity at Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Long, John J.; Leresche, Anne; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear transcription is repressed when eukaryotic cells enter mitosis. Mitotic repression of transcription of various cellular and viral gene promoters by RNA polymerase II can be reproduced in vitro either with extracts prepared from cells arrested at mitosis with the microtubule polymerization inhibitor nocodazole or with nuclear extracts prepared from asynchronous cells and the mitotic protein kinase cdc2/cyclin B. Purified cdc2/cyclin B kinase is also sufficient to inhibit transcription in reconstituted transcription reactions with biochemically purified and recombinant basal transcription factors and RNA polymerase II. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1 can reverse the effect of cdc2/cyclin B kinase, indicating that repression of transcription is due to protein phosphorylation. Transcription rescue and inhibition experiments with each of the basal factors and the polymerase suggest that multiple components of the transcription machinery are inactivated by cdc2/cyclin B kinase. For an activated promoter, targets of repression are TFIID and TFIIH, while for a basal promoter, TFIIH is the major target for mitotic inactivation of transcription. Protein labeling experiments indicate that the p62 and p36 subunits of TFIIH are in vitro substrates for mitotic phosphorylation. Using the carboxy-terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II as a test substrate for phosphorylation, the TFIIH-associated kinase, cdk7/cyclin H, is inhibited concomitant with inhibition of transcription activity. Our results suggest that there exist multiple phosphorylation targets for the global shutdown of transcription at mitosis. PMID:9488463

  20. Cutting medical transcription costs.

    PubMed

    Forsman, John A

    2003-07-01

    Home-based, production-based medical transcription represents a substantial cost-saving opportunity. Fewer employees are required. Office space is not needed. Outsourcing costs are eliminated. Turnaround time is reduced.

  1. Flexible Transcription Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr-Smith, Norma

    1976-01-01

    Flexible structure in a San Francisco State University shorthand course is described as a way to provide motivation for students. Topics discussed are transcription testing plan, method of evaluation, practice tests, increasing difficulty of tests, and classroom results. (TA)

  2. High mobility group box 1 induces the activation of the Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK2/STAT3) signaling pathway in pancreatic acinar cells in rats, while AG490 and rapamycin inhibit their activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoliang; Zhang, Jingchao; Dui, Danhua; Ren, Haoyuan; Liu, Jin

    2016-11-10

    The pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) remains unclear. The Janus kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway is important for various cytokines and growth factors. This study investigated the effect of the late inflammatory factor high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) on the activation of JAK2/STAT3 in pancreatic acinar cells and the inhibitory effects of AG490 (a JAK2 inhibitor) and rapamycin (a STAT3 inhibitor) on this pathway. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were randomly divided into the control, HMGB1, AG490, and rapamycin groups. The mRNA levels of JAK2 and STAT3 at 10, 30, 60, and 120 minutes were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The protein levels of JAK2 and STAT3 at 60 and 120 minutes were observed using Western blotting. Compared with the control group, the HMGB1 group exhibited significantly increased levels of JAK2 mRNA at each time point; STAT3 mRNA at 30, 60, and 120 minutes; and JAK2 and STAT3 proteins at 60 and 120 minutes (p < 0.01). Compared with the HMGB1 group, the AG490 and rapamycin groups both exhibited significantly decreased levels of JAK2 mRNA at each time point (p < 0.05); STAT3 mRNA at 30, 60, and 120 minutes (p < 0.01); and JAK2 and STAT3 proteins at 60 and 120 minutes (p < 0.01). HMGB1 induces the activation of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in rat pancreatic acinar cells, and this activation can be inhibited by AG490 and rapamycin. The results of this study may provide new insights for the treatment of SAP.

  3. Transcription through enhancers suppresses their activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enhancer elements determine the level of target gene transcription in a tissue-specific manner, providing for individual patterns of gene expression in different cells. Knowledge of the mechanisms controlling enhancer action is crucial for understanding global regulation of transcription. In particular, enhancers are often localized within transcribed regions of the genome. A number of experiments suggest that transcription can have both positive and negative effects on regulatory elements. In this study, we performed direct tests for the effect of transcription on enhancer activity. Results Using a transgenic reporter system, we investigated the relationship between the presence of pass-through transcription and the activity of Drosophila enhancers controlling the expression of the white and yellow genes. The results show that transcription from different promoters affects the activity of enhancers, counteracting their ability to activate the target genes. As expected, the presence of a transcriptional terminator between the inhibiting promoter and the affected enhancer strongly reduces the suppression. Moreover, transcription leads to dislodging of the Zeste protein that is responsible for the enhancer-dependent regulation of the white gene, suggesting a 'transcription interference’ mechanism for this regulation. Conclusions Our findings suggest a role for pass-through transcription in negative regulation of enhancer activity. PMID:24279291

  4. Episodic Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racsmany, Mihaly; Conway, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    Six experiments examined the proposal that an item of long-term knowledge can be simultaneously inhibited and activated. In 2 directed forgetting experiments items to-be-forgotten were found to be inhibited in list-cued recall but activated in lexical decision tasks. In 3 retrieval practice experiments, unpracticed items from practiced categories…

  5. Identification of the gene transcription repressor domain of Gli3.

    PubMed

    Tsanev, Robert; Tiigimägi, Piret; Michelson, Piret; Metsis, Madis; Østerlund, Torben; Kogerman, Priit

    2009-01-05

    Gli transcription factors are downstream targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Two of the three Gli proteins harbor gene transcription repressor function in the N-terminal half. We have analyzed the sequences and identified a potential repressor domain in Gli2 and Gli3 and have tested this experimentally. Overexpression studies confirm that the N-terminal parts harbor gene repression activity and we mapped the minimal repressor to residues 106 till 236 in Gli3. Unlike other mechanisms that inhibit Gli induced gene transcription, the repressor domain identified here does not utilize Histone deacetylases (HDACs) to achieve repression, as confirmed by HDAC inhibition studies and pull-down assays. This distinguishes the identified domain from other regulatory parts with negative influence on transcription.

  6. 7SK-BAF axis controls pervasive transcription at enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan A.; Do, Brian T.; Rubin, Adam J.; Calo, Eliezer; Lee, Byron; Kuchelmeister, Hannes; Rale, Michael; Chu, Ci; Kool, Eric T.; Wysocka, Joanna; Khavari, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    RNA functions at enhancers remain mysterious. Here we show that the 7SK small nuclear RNA (snRNA) inhibits enhancer transcription by modulating nucleosome position. 7SK occupies enhancers and super enhancers genome-wide in mouse and human cells, and 7SK is required to limit eRNA initiation and synthesis in a manner distinct from promoter pausing. Clustered elements at super enhancers uniquely require 7SK to prevent convergent transcription and DNA damage signaling. 7SK physically interacts with the BAF chromatin remodeling complex, recruit BAF to enhancers, and inhibits enhancer transcription by modulating chromatin structure. In turn, 7SK occupancy at enhancers coincides with Brd4 and is exquisitely sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. Thus, 7SK employs distinct mechanisms to counteract diverse consequences of pervasive transcription that distinguish super enhancers, enhancers, and promoters. PMID:26878240

  7. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on the transcriptional landscape.

    PubMed

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O'Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-04-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA cofactors short interfering RNAs are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) that are antisense to germline transcripts. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here we used genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts and found that the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway promoted sense-oriented RNA polymerase II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway helps maintain the directionality of active transcription, thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions.

  8. Transcription upregulation via force-induced direct stretching of chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Arash; Zhang, Yuejin; Wei, Fuxiang; Sun, Jian; Jia, Qiong; Zhou, Wenwen; Singh, Rishi; Khanna, Nimish; Belmont, Andrew S.; Wang, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical forces play critical roles in the function of living cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of how forces influence nuclear events remain elusive. Here, we show that chromatin deformation as well as force-induced transcription of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bacterial-chromosome dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) transgene can be visualized in a living cell by using three-dimensional magnetic twisting cytometry to apply local stresses on the cell surface via an Arg-Gly-Asp-coated magnetic bead. Chromatin stretching depended on loading direction. DHFR transcription upregulation was sensitive to load direction and proportional to the magnitude of chromatin stretching. Disrupting filamentous actin or inhibiting actomyosin contraction abrogated or attenuated force-induced DHFR transcription, whereas activating endogenous contraction upregulated force-induced DHFR transcription. Our findings suggest that local stresses applied to integrins propagate from the tensed actin cytoskeleton to the LINC complex and then through lamina-chromatin interactions to directly stretch chromatin and upregulate transcription.

  9. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  10. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  11. Modulation of transcription factors by curcumin.

    PubMed

    Shishodia, Shishir; Singh, Tulika; Chaturvedi, Madan M

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient of turmeric that has been consumed as a dietary spice for ages. Turmeric is widely used in traditional Indian medicine to cure biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. Extensive investigation over the last five decades has indicated that curcumin reduces blood cholesterol, prevents low-density lipoprotein oxidation, inhibits platelet aggregation, suppresses thrombosis and myocardial infarction, suppresses symptoms associated with type II diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease, inhibits HIV replication, enhances wound healing, protects from liver injury, increases bile secretion, protects from cataract formation, and protects from pulmonary toxicity and fibrosis. Evidence indicates that the divergent effects of curcumin are dependent on its pleiotropic molecular effects. These include the regulation of signal transduction pathways and direct modulation of several enzymatic activities. Most of these signaling cascades lead to the activation of transcription factors. Curcumin has been found to modulate the activity of several key transcription factors and, in turn, the cellular expression profiles. Curcumin has been shown to elicit vital cellular responses such as cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation by activating a cascade of molecular events. In this chapter, we briefly review the effects of curcumin on transcription factors NF-KB, AP-1, Egr-1, STATs, PPAR-gamma, beta-catenin, nrf2, EpRE, p53, CBP, and androgen receptor (AR) and AR-related cofactors giving major emphasis to the molecular mechanisms of its action.

  12. Machine Dictation and Transcription.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Evelyn; And Others

    This instructional package contains both an instructor's manual and a student's manual for a course in machine dictation and transcription. The instructor's manual contains an overview with tips on teaching the course, letters for dictation, and a key to the letters. The student's manual contains an overview of the course and of the skills needed…

  13. Transcriptional Networks in Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Venkov, Christo; Plieth, David; Ni, Terri; Karmaker, Amitava; Bian, Aihua; George, Alfred L.; Neilson, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    Backround Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) changes polarized epithelial cells into migratory phenotypes associated with loss of cell-cell adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal rearrangements. This form of plasticity is seen in mesodermal development, fibroblast formation, and cancer metastasis. Methods and Findings Here we identify prominent transcriptional networks active during three time points of this transitional process, as epithelial cells become fibroblasts. DNA microarray in cultured epithelia undergoing EMT, validated in vivo, were used to detect various patterns of gene expression. In particular, the promoter sequences of differentially expressed genes and their transcription factors were analyzed to identify potential binding sites and partners. The four most frequent cis-regulatory elements (CREs) in up-regulated genes were SRY, FTS-1, Evi-1, and GC-Box, and RNA inhibition of the four transcription factors, Atf2, Klf10, Sox11, and SP1, most frequently binding these CREs, establish their importance in the initiation and propagation of EMT. Oligonucleotides that block the most frequent CREs restrain EMT at early and intermediate stages through apoptosis of the cells. Conclusions Our results identify new transcriptional interactions with high frequency CREs that modulate the stability of cellular plasticity, and may serve as targets for modulating these transitional states in fibroblasts. PMID:21980432

  14. Specific Inhibition of HER-2/neu Transcription Initiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    normoxia due to posttranslational processing involving proline hy- droxylation and the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) protein, a multifunctional adapter...inducible factor 1 alpha; VHL, Von Hippel Lindau; HRE, hypoxia response element; VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor; PI3K, phosphatidyl inositol...Biol. 13, 167-171. 3. Zhong, H., De Marzo, A. M., Laughner, E., Lim, M., Hilton , D. A., Zagzag, D., Buechler, P ., Isaacs, W. B., Semenza, G. L., and

  15. Targeting the Warburg effect with a novel glucose transporter inhibitor to overcome gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, I-Lu; Chou, Chih-Chien; Lai, Po-Ting; Fang, Chun-Sheng; Shirley, Lawrence A.; Yan, Ribai; Mo, Xiaokui; Bloomston, Mark; Kulp, Samuel K.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Gemcitabine resistance remains a significant clinical challenge. Here, we used a novel glucose transporter (Glut) inhibitor, CG-5, as a proof-of-concept compound to investigate the therapeutic utility of targeting the Warburg effect to overcome gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer. The effects of gemcitabine and/or CG-5 on viability, survival, glucose uptake and DNA damage were evaluated in gemcitabine-sensitive and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis of gemcitabine resistance and the mechanism of CG-5-induced sensitization to gemcitabine. The effects of CG-5 on gemcitabine sensitivity were investigated in a xenograft tumor model of gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer. In contrast to gemcitabine-sensitive pancreatic cancer cells, the resistant Panc-1 and Panc-1GemR cells responded to gemcitabine by increasing the expression of ribonucleotide reductase M2 catalytic subunit (RRM2) through E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation. Acting as a pan-Glut inhibitor, CG-5 abrogated this gemcitabine-induced upregulation of RRM2 through decreased E2F1 expression, thereby enhancing gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and inhibition of cell survival. This CG-5-induced inhibition of E2F1 expression was mediated by the induction of a previously unreported E2F1-targeted microRNA, miR-520f. The addition of oral CG-5 to gemcitabine therapy caused greater suppression of Panc-1GemR xenograft tumor growth in vivo than either drug alone. Glut inhibition may be an effective strategy to enhance gemcitabine activity for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24879635

  16. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  17. Intrinsic disorder in transcription factors†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangang; Perumal, Narayanan B.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Su, Eric W.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) is highly abundant in eukaryotes, which reflect the greater need for disorder-associated signaling and transcriptional regulation in nucleated cells. Although several well-characterized examples of intrinsically disordered proteins in transcriptional regulation have been reported, no systematic analysis has been reported so far. To test for a general prevalence of intrinsic disorder in transcriptional regulation, we used the Predictor Of Natural Disorder Regions (PONDR) to analyze the abundance of intrinsic disorder in three transcription factor datasets and two control sets. This analysis revealed that from 94.13% to 82.63% of transcription factors posses extended regions of intrinsic disorder, relative to 54.51% and 18.64% of the proteins in two control datasets, which indicates the significant prevalence of intrinsic disorder in transcription factors. This propensity of transcription factors for intrinsic disorder was confirmed by cumulative distribution function analysis and charge-hydropathy plots. The amino acid composition analysis showed that all three transcription factor datasets were substantially depleted in order-promoting residues, and significantly enriched in disorder-promoting residues. Our analysis of the distribution of disorder within the transcription factor datasets revealed that: (a) The AT-hooks and basic regions of transcription factor DNA-binding domains are highly disordered; (b) The degree of disorder in transcription factor activation regions is much higher than that in DNA-binding domains; (c) The degree of disorder is significantly higher in eukaryotic transcription factors than in prokaryotic transcription factors; (d) The level of α-MoRFs (molecular recognition feature) prediction is much higher in transcription factors. Overall, our data reflected the fact that the eukaryotes with well-developed gene transcription machinery require transcription factor flexibility to be more efficient. PMID:16734424

  18. Interaction between FMDV Lpro and transcription factor ADNP is required for viral replication

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) leader protease (Lpro) inhibits host translation and transcription affecting the expression of several factors involved in innate immunity. In this study, we have identified the host transcription factor ADNP (activity dependent neuroprotective protein) as an ...

  19. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Testori, Alessandro

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  20. Effect Of Simulated Microgravity On Activated T Cell Gene Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocytes under the shear stress environment of clinorotation have demonstrated an inhibition of activation in response to TCR mediated signaling. These results mimic those observed during space flight. This work investigates the molecular signaling events of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation. Purified human T lymphocytes and the T cell clone Jurkat exhibit an uncoupling of signaling as mediated through the TCR. Activation of the transcription factor AP-1 is inhibited while activation of NFAT occurs. NFAT dephosphorylation and activation is dependent on sustained Ca(++) influx. Alternatively, AP-1, which consists of two transcription factors, jun and fos, is activated by PKC and Ras mediated pathways. TCR signaling is known to be dependent on cytoskeletal rearrangements, in particular, raft aggregation is critical. Raft aggregation, as mediated through GM, crosslinking, overcomes the inhibition of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation, indicating that the block is occurring upstream of raft aggregation. Clinorotation is shown to have an effect similar to a weak TCR signal.

  1. Transcription Factors in Long-Term Memory and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Alberini, Cristina M.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription is a molecular requisite for long-term synaptic plasticity and long-term memory formation. Thus, in the last several years, one main interest of molecular neuroscience has been the identification of families of transcription factors that are involved in both of these processes. Transcription is a highly regulated process that involves the combined interaction and function of chromatin and many other proteins, some of which are essential for the basal process of transcription, while others control the selective activation or repression of specific genes. These regulated interactions ultimately allow a sophisticated response to multiple environmental conditions, as well as control of spatial and temporal differences in gene expression. Evidence based on correlative changes in expression, genetic mutations, and targeted molecular inhibition of gene expression have shed light on the function of transcription in both synaptic plasticity and memory formation. This review provides a brief overview of experimental work showing that several families of transcription factors, including CREB, C/EBP, Egr, AP-1, and Rel have essential functions in both processes. The results of this work suggest that patterns of transcription regulation represent the molecular signatures of long-term synaptic changes and memory formation. PMID:19126756

  2. Profilin is associated with transcriptionally active genes

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, Emilia; Hessle, Viktoria; von Euler, Anne; Visa, Neus

    2012-01-01

    We have raised antibodies against the profilin of Chironomus tentans to study the location of profilin relative to chromatin and to active genes in salivary gland polytene chromosomes. We show that a fraction of profilin is located in the nucleus, where profilin is highly concentrated in the nucleoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Moreover, profilin is associated with multiple bands in the polytene chromosomes. By staining salivary glands with propidium iodide, we show that profilin does not co-localize with dense chromatin. Profilin associates instead with protein-coding genes that are transcriptionally active, as revealed by co-localization with hnRNP and snRNP proteins. We have performed experiments of transcription inhibition with actinomycin D and we show that the association of profilin with the chromosomes requires ongoing transcription. However, the interaction of profilin with the gene loci does not depend on RNA. Our results are compatible with profilin regulating actin polymerization in the cell nucleus. However, the association of actin with the polytene chromosomes of C. tentans is sensitive to RNase, whereas the association of profilin is not, and we propose therefore that the chromosomal location of profilin is independent of actin. PMID:22572953

  3. c-MYC inhibition impairs hypoxia response in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Falchetti, Maria Laura; Illi, Barbara; Bozzo, Francesca; Valle, Cristiana; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Nasi, Sergio; Levi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The c-MYC oncoprotein is a DNA binding transcription factor that enhances the expression of many active genes. c-MYC transcriptional signatures vary according to the transcriptional program defined in each cell type during differentiation. Little is known on the involvement of c-MYC in regulation of gene expression programs that are induced by extracellular cues such as a changing microenvironment. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of c-MYC in glioblastoma multiforme cells blunts hypoxia-dependent glycolytic reprogramming and mitochondria fragmentation in hypoxia. This happens because c-MYC inhibition alters the cell transcriptional response to hypoxia and finely tunes the expression of a subset of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1-regulated genes. We also show that genes whose expression in hypoxia is affected by c-MYC inhibition are able to distinguish the Proneural subtype of glioblastoma multiforme, thus potentially providing a molecular signature for this class of tumors that are the least tractable among glioblastomas. PMID:27119353

  4. Lost in transcription: p21 repression, mechanisms, and consequences.

    PubMed

    Gartel, Andrei L; Radhakrishnan, Senthil K

    2005-05-15

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 is a major player in cell cycle control and it is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Whereas induction of p21 predominantly leads to cell cycle arrest, repression of p21 may have a variety of outcomes depending on the context. In this review, we concentrate on transcriptional repression of p21 by cellular and viral factors, and delve in detail into its possible biological implications and its role in cancer. It seems that the major mode of p21 transcriptional repression by negative regulators is the interference with positive transcription factors without direct binding to the p21 promoter. Specifically, the negative factors may either inhibit binding of positive regulators to the promoter or hinder their transcriptional activity. The ability of p21 to inhibit proliferation may contribute to its tumor suppressor function. Because of this, it is not surprising that a number of oncogenes repress p21 to promote cell growth and tumorigenesis. However, p21 is also an inhibitor of apoptosis and p21 repression may also have an anticancer effect. For example, c-Myc and chemical p21 inhibitors, which repress p21, sensitize tumor cells to apoptosis by anticancer drugs. Further identification of factors that repress p21 is likely to contribute to the better understanding of its role in cancer.

  5. Ubiquitin and Proteasomes in Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Fuqiang; Wenzel, Sabine; Tansey, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is vitally important for the maintenance of normal cellular homeostasis. Failure to correctly regulate gene expression, or to deal with problems that arise during the transcription process, can lead to cellular catastrophe and disease. One of the ways cells cope with the challenges of transcription is by making extensive use of the proteolytic and nonproteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Here, we review recent evidence showing deep mechanistic connections between the transcription and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Our goal is to leave the reader with a sense that just about every step in transcription—from transcription initiation through to export of mRNA from the nucleus—is influenced by the UPS and that all major arms of the system—from the first step in ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation through to the proteasome—are recruited into transcriptional processes to provide regulation, directionality, and deconstructive power. PMID:22404630

  6. DNA topology and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  7. Euglena Transcript Processing.

    PubMed

    McWatters, David C; Russell, Anthony G

    2017-01-01

    RNA transcript processing is an important stage in the gene expression pathway of all organisms and is subject to various mechanisms of control that influence the final levels of gene products. RNA processing involves events such as nuclease-mediated cleavage, removal of intervening sequences referred to as introns and modifications to RNA structure (nucleoside modification and editing). In Euglena, RNA transcript processing was initially examined in chloroplasts because of historical interest in the secondary endosymbiotic origin of this organelle in this organism. More recent efforts to examine mitochondrial genome structure and RNA maturation have been stimulated by the discovery of unusual processing pathways in other Euglenozoans such as kinetoplastids and diplonemids. Eukaryotes containing large genomes are now known to typically contain large collections of introns and regulatory RNAs involved in RNA processing events, and Euglena gracilis in particular has a relatively large genome for a protist. Studies examining the structure of nuclear genes and the mechanisms involved in nuclear RNA processing have revealed that indeed Euglena contains large numbers of introns in the limited set of genes so far examined and also possesses large numbers of specific classes of regulatory and processing RNAs, such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). Most interestingly, these studies have also revealed that Euglena possesses novel processing pathways generating highly fragmented cytosolic ribosomal RNAs and subunits and non-conventional intron classes removed by unknown splicing mechanisms. This unexpected diversity in RNA processing pathways emphasizes the importance of identifying the components involved in these processing mechanisms and their evolutionary emergence in Euglena species.

  8. Dexamethasone Enhances 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Effects by Increasing Vitamin D Receptor Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Deeb, Kristin K.; Pike, J. Wesley; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) has been shown to increase the antitumor effects of calcitriol in squamous cell carcinoma. In this study we found that pretreatment with Dex potentiates calcitriol effects by inhibiting cell growth and increasing vitamin D receptor (VDR) and VDR-mediated transcription. Treatment with actinomycin D inhibits Vdr mRNA synthesis, indicating that Dex regulates VDR expression at transcriptional level. Real time PCR shows that treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time- and a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Dex directly regulates expression of Vdr. RU486, an inhibitor of glucocorticoids, inhibits Dex-induced Vdr expression. In addition, the silencing of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) abolishes the induction of Vdr by Dex, indicating that Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a GR-dependent manner. A fragment located 5.2 kb upstream of Vdr transcription start site containing two putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) was evaluated using a luciferase-based reporter assay. Treatment with 100 nm Dex induces transcription of luciferase driven by the fragment. Deletion of the GRE distal to transcription start site was sufficient to abolish Dex induction of luciferase. Also, chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals recruitment of GR to distal GRE with Dex treatment. We conclude that Dex increases VDR and vitamin D effects by increasing Vdr de novo transcription in a GR-dependent manner. PMID:21868377

  9. The effect of myotonic dystrophy transcript levels and location on muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastroyiannopoulos, Nikolaos P.; Chrysanthou, Elina; Kyriakides, Tassos C.

    2008-12-12

    In myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), nuclear retention of mutant DMPK transcripts compromises muscle cell differentiation. Although several reports have identified molecular defects in myogenesis, it remains still unclear how exactly the retention of the mutant transcripts induces this defect. We have recently created a novel cellular model in which the mutant DMPK 3' UTR transcripts were released to the cytoplasm of myoblasts by using the WPRE genetic element. As a result, muscle cell differentiation was repaired. In this paper, this cellular model was further exploited to investigate the effect of the levels and location of the mutant transcripts onmore » muscle differentiation. Results show that the levels of these transcripts were proportional to the inhibition of both the initial fusion of myoblasts and the maturity of myotubes. Moreover, the cytoplasmic export of the mutant RNAs to the cytoplasm caused less inhibition only in the initial fusion of myoblasts.« less

  10. Binding of transcription termination protein nun to nascent RNA and template DNA.

    PubMed

    Watnick, R S; Gottesman, M E

    1999-12-17

    The amino-terminal arginine-rich motif of coliphage HK022 Nun binds phage lambda nascent transcript, whereas the carboxyl-terminal domain interacts with RNA polymerase (RNAP) and blocks transcription elongation. RNA binding is inhibited by zinc (Zn2+) and stimulated by Escherichia coli NusA. To study these interactions, the Nun carboxyl terminus was extended by a cysteine residue conjugated to a photochemical cross-linker. The carboxyl terminus contacted NusA and made Zn2+-dependent intramolecular contacts. When Nun was added to a paused transcription elongation complex, it cross-linked to the DNA template. Nun may arrest transcription by anchoring RNAP to DNA.

  11. Profilin Is Required for Optimal Actin-Dependent Transcription of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genome RNA

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Emily; Mahoney, Nicole M.; Almo, Steven C.; Barik, Sailen

    2000-01-01

    Transcription of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) genome RNA exhibited an obligatory need for the host cytoskeletal protein actin. Optimal transcription, however, required the participation of another cellular protein that was characterized as profilin by a number of criteria. The amino acid sequence of the protein, purified on the basis of its transcription-optimizing activity in vitro, exactly matched that of profilin. RSV transcription was inhibited 60 to 80% by antiprofilin antibody or poly-l-proline, molecules that specifically bind profilin. Native profilin, purified from extracts of lung epithelial cells by affinity binding to a poly-l-proline matrix, stimulated the actin-saturated RSV transcription by 2.5- to 3-fold. Recombinant profilin, expressed in bacteria, stimulated viral transcription as effectively as the native protein and was also inhibited by poly-l-proline. Profilin alone, in the absence of actin, did not activate viral transcription. It is estimated that at optimal levels of transcription, every molecule of viral genomic RNA associates with approximately the following number of protein molecules: 30 molecules of L, 120 molecules of phosphoprotein P, and 60 molecules each of actin and profilin. Together, these results demonstrated for the first time a cardinal role for profilin, an actin-modulatory protein, in the transcription of a paramyxovirus RNA genome. PMID:10623728

  12. Suppression of Factor-Dependent Transcription Termination by Antiterminator RNA

    PubMed Central

    King, Rodney A.; Weisberg, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Nascent transcripts of the phage HK022 put sites modify the transcription elongation complex so that it terminates less efficiently at intrinsic transcription terminators and accelerates through pause sites. We show here that the modification also suppresses termination in vivo at two factor-dependent terminators, one that depends on the bacterial Rho protein and a second that depends on the HK022-encoded Nun protein. Suppression was efficient when the termination factors were present at physiological levels, but an increase in the intracellular concentration of Nun increased termination both in the presence and absence of put. put-mediated antitermination thus shows no apparent terminator specificity, suggesting that put inhibits a step that is common to termination at the different types of terminator. PMID:14645267

  13. Identifying transcription factor functions and targets by phenotypic activation

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Gordon; Morris, Quaid D.; Sopko, Richelle; Robinson, Mark D.; Ryan, Owen; Chan, Esther T.; Frey, Brendan J.; Andrews, Brenda J.; Boone, Charles; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2006-01-01

    Mapping transcriptional regulatory networks is difficult because many transcription factors (TFs) are activated only under specific conditions. We describe a generic strategy for identifying genes and pathways induced by individual TFs that does not require knowledge of their normal activation cues. Microarray analysis of 55 yeast TFs that caused a growth phenotype when overexpressed showed that the majority caused increased transcript levels of genes in specific physiological categories, suggesting a mechanism for growth inhibition. Induced genes typically included established targets and genes with consensus promoter motifs, if known, indicating that these data are useful for identifying potential new target genes and binding sites. We identified the sequence 5′-TCACGCAA as a binding sequence for Hms1p, a TF that positively regulates pseudohyphal growth and previously had no known motif. The general strategy outlined here presents a straightforward approach to discovery of TF activities and mapping targets that could be adapted to any organism with transgenic technology. PMID:16880382

  14. Centromere Transcription: Means and Motive.

    PubMed

    Duda, Zachary; Trusiak, Sarah; O'Neill, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The chromosome biology field at large has benefited from studies of the cell cycle components, protein cascades and genomic landscape that are required for centromere identity, assembly and stable transgenerational inheritance. Research over the past 20 years has challenged the classical descriptions of a centromere as a stable, unmutable, and transcriptionally silent chromosome component. Instead, based on studies from a broad range of eukaryotic species, including yeast, fungi, plants, and animals, the centromere has been redefined as one of the more dynamic areas of the eukaryotic genome, requiring coordination of protein complex assembly, chromatin assembly, and transcriptional activity in a cell cycle specific manner. What has emerged from more recent studies is the realization that the transcription of specific types of nucleic acids is a key process in defining centromere integrity and function. To illustrate the transcriptional landscape of centromeres across eukaryotes, we focus this review on how transcripts interact with centromere proteins, when in the cell cycle centromeric transcription occurs, and what types of sequences are being transcribed. Utilizing data from broadly different organisms, a picture emerges that places centromeric transcription as an integral component of centromere function.

  15. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A.; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A.; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Scicchitano, David A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER. PMID:26559971

  16. Illegitimate transcription: transcription of any gene in any cell type.

    PubMed Central

    Chelly, J; Concordet, J P; Kaplan, J C; Kahn, A

    1989-01-01

    Using in vitro amplification of cDNA by the polymerase chain reaction, we have detected spliced transcripts of various tissue-specific genes (genes for anti-Müllerian hormone, beta-globin, aldolase A, and factor VIIIc) in human nonspecific cells, such as fibroblasts, hepatoma cells, and lymphoblasts. In rats, erythroid- and liver-type pyruvate kinase transcripts were also detected in brain, lung, and muscle. The abundance of these "illegitimate" transcripts is very low; yet, their existence and the possibility of amplifying them by the cDNA polymerase chain reaction provide a powerful tool to analyze pathological transcripts of any tissue-specific gene by using any accessible cell. Images PMID:2495532

  17. Gene Transcription Profile of the Detached Retina (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, David N.

    2009-01-01

    chip was confirmed by qRT-PCR for all 51 genes. Western blot analysis showed that the p42/p44 family of MAPK was phosphorylated within 2 hours of retinal-RPE separation. This phosphorylation was detachment-induced and could be inhibited by specific inhibitors of MAPK phosphorylation. Conclusions: Separation of the retina from the RPE induces significant alteration in the gene transcription profile within the retina. These profiles are not static, but change as a function of time after detachment. These gene transcription changes are preceded by the activation of the p42/p44 family of MAPK. This altered transcription may serve as the basis for many of the morphologic, biochemical, and functional changes seen within the detached retina. PMID:20126507

  18. Transcriptional Mechanisms Underlying Hemoglobin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Katsumura, Koichi R.; DeVilbiss, Andrew W.; Pope, Nathaniel J.; Johnson, Kirby D.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2013-01-01

    The physiological switch in expression of the embryonic, fetal, and adult β-like globin genes has garnered enormous attention from investigators interested in transcriptional mechanisms and the molecular basis of hemoglobinopathies. These efforts have led to the discovery of cell type-specific transcription factors, unprecedented mechanisms of transcriptional coregulator function, genome biology principles, unique contributions of nuclear organization to transcription and cell function, and promising therapeutic targets. Given the vast literature accrued on this topic, this article will focus on the master regulator of erythroid cell development and function GATA-1, its associated proteins, and its frontline role in controlling hemoglobin synthesis. GATA-1 is a crucial regulator of genes encoding hemoglobin subunits and heme biosynthetic enzymes. GATA-1-dependent mechanisms constitute an essential regulatory core that nucleates additional mechanisms to achieve the physiological control of hemoglobin synthesis. PMID:23838521

  19. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  20. Transcription regulation by distal enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Stadhouders, Ralph; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Jorna, Ruud; Leslie, Kris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide chromatin profiling efforts have shown that enhancers are often located at large distances from gene promoters within the noncoding genome. Whereas enhancers can stimulate transcription initiation by communicating with promoters via chromatin looping mechanisms, we propose that enhancers may also stimulate transcription elongation by physical interactions with intronic elements. We review here recent findings derived from the study of the hematopoietic system. PMID:22771987

  1. Transcriptional and electrophysiological maturation of neocortical fastspiking GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Okaty, Benjamin W; Miller, Mark N; Sugino, Ken; Hempel, Chris M; Nelson, Sacha B

    2009-01-01

    Fast-spiking (FS) interneurons are important elements of neocortical circuitry that constitute the primary source of synaptic inhibition in adult cortex and impart temporal organization on ongoing cortical activity. The highly specialized intrinsic membrane and firing properties that allow cortical FS interneurons to perform these functions are due to equally specialized gene expression, which is ultimately coordinated by cell-type-specific transcriptional regulation. While embryonic transcriptional events govern the initial steps of cell-type specification in most cortical interneurons, including FS cells, the electrophysiological properties that distinguish adult cortical cell types emerge relatively late in postnatal development, and the transcriptional events that drive this maturational process are not known. To address this, we used mouse whole-genome microarrays and whole-cell patch clamp to characterize the transcriptional and electrophysiological maturation of cortical FS interneurons between postnatal day 7 (P7) and P40. We found that the intrinsic and synaptic physiology of FS cells undergoes profound regulation over the first four postnatal weeks, and that these changes are correlated with largely monotonic but bidirectional transcriptional regulation of thousands of genes belonging to multiple functional classes. Using our microarray screen as a guide, we discovered that upregulation of 2-pore K+ leak channels between P10 and P25 contributes to one of the major differences between the intrinsic membrane properties of immature and adult FS cells, and found a number of other candidate genes that likely confer cell-type specificity on mature FS cells. PMID:19474331

  2. Transcription and DNA Damage: Holding Hands or Crossing Swords?

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-10-27

    Transcription has classically been considered a potential threat to genome integrity. Collision between transcription and DNA replication machinery, and retention of DNA:RNA hybrids, may result in genome instability. On the other hand, it has been proposed that active genes repair faster and preferentially via homologous recombination. Moreover, while canonical transcription is inhibited in the proximity of DNA double-strand breaks, a growing body of evidence supports active non-canonical transcription at DNA damage sites. Small non-coding RNAs accumulate at DNA double-strand break sites in mammals and other organisms, and are involved in DNA damage signaling and repair. Furthermore, RNA binding proteins are recruited to DNA damage sites and participate in the DNA damage response. Here, we discuss the impact of transcription on genome stability, the role of RNA binding proteins at DNA damage sites, and the function of small non-coding RNAs generated upon damage in the signaling and repair of DNA lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. STAT3 inhibition as a therapeutic strategy for leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kanna, Rubashruti; Choudhary, Gaurav; Ramachandra, Nandini; Steidl, Ulrich; Verma, Amit; Shastri, Aditi

    2017-11-22

    Leukemia is characterized by selective overgrowth of malignant hematopoietic stem cells (HSC's) that interfere with HSC differentiation. Cytoreductive chemotherapy can kill rapidly dividing cancerous cells but cannot eradicate the malignant HSC pool leading to relapses. Leukemic stem cells have several dysregulated pathways and the Janus kinases (JAKs) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway are prominent among them. STAT3 is an important transcription factor that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and inhibits apoptosis. High STAT3 expression in leukemia has been associated with an increased risk for relapse and decreased overall survival. Multiple strategies for interfering with STAT3 activity in leukemic cells include inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation, interfering with STAT3 interactions, preventing nuclear transfer, inhibiting transcription and causing interference in STAT: DNA binding. A better understanding of key interactions and upstream mediators of STAT3 activity will help facilitate the development of effective cancer therapies and may result in durable remissions.

  4. Transcriptional response to petiole heat girdling in cassava.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Zehong; Ma, Fangfang; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Allen, Doug K; Brutnell, Thomas P; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming; Li, Pinghua

    2015-02-12

    To examine the interactions of starch and sugar metabolism on photosynthesis in cassava, a heat-girdling treatment was applied to petioles of cassava leaves at the end of the light cycle to inhibit starch remobilization during the night. The inhibition of starch remobilization caused significant starch accumulation at the beginning of the light cycle, inhibited photosynthesis, and affected intracellular sugar levels. RNA-seq analysis of heat-treated and control plants revealed significantly decreased expression of genes related to photosynthesis, as well as N-metabolism and chlorophyll biosynthesis. However, expression of genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondria electron transport components, and flavonoid biosynthetic pathway enzymes were induced. These studies reveal a dynamic transcriptional response to perturbation of sink demand in a single leaf, and provide useful information for understanding the regulations of cassava under sink or source limitation.

  5. Transcriptional response to petiole heat girdling in cassava

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Zehong; Ma, Fangfang; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Allen, Doug K.; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming; Li, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    To examine the interactions of starch and sugar metabolism on photosynthesis in cassava, a heat-girdling treatment was applied to petioles of cassava leaves at the end of the light cycle to inhibit starch remobilization during the night. The inhibition of starch remobilization caused significant starch accumulation at the beginning of the light cycle, inhibited photosynthesis, and affected intracellular sugar levels. RNA-seq analysis of heat-treated and control plants revealed significantly decreased expression of genes related to photosynthesis, as well as N-metabolism and chlorophyll biosynthesis. However, expression of genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondria electron transport components, and flavonoid biosynthetic pathway enzymes were induced. These studies reveal a dynamic transcriptional response to perturbation of sink demand in a single leaf, and provide useful information for understanding the regulations of cassava under sink or source limitation. PMID:25672661

  6. Reversible stalling of transcription elongation complexes by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Erijman, L; Clegg, R M

    1998-07-01

    We have investigated the effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the stability of RNA polymerase molecules during transcription. RNA polymerase molecules participating in stalled or active ternary transcribing complexes do not dissociate from the template DNA and nascent RNA at pressures up to 180 MPa. A lower limit for the free energy of stabilization of an elongating ternary complex relative to the quaternary structure of the free RNAP molecules is estimated to be 20 kcal/mol. The rate of elongation decreases at high pressure; transcription completely halts at sufficiently high pressure. The overall rate of elongation has an apparent activation volume (DeltaVdouble dagger) of 55-65 ml . mol-1 (at 35 degrees C). The pressure-stalled transcripts are stable and resume elongation at the prepressure rate upon decompression. The efficiency of termination decreases at the rho-independent terminator tR2 after the transcription reaction has been exposed to high pressure. This suggests that high pressure modifies the ternary complex such that termination is affected in a manner different from that of elongation. The solvent and temperature dependence of the pressure-induced inhibition show evidence for major conformational changes in the core polymerase enzyme during RNA synthesis. It is proposed that the inhibition of the elongation phase of the transcription reaction at elevated pressures is related to a reduction of the partial specific volume of the RNA polymerase molecule; under high pressure, the RNA polymerase molecule does not have the necessary structural flexibility required for the protein to translocate.

  7. Transcriptional control of Sost in bone [Transcriptional control of Sclerostin

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, Aimy; Loots, Gabriela G.

    Sclerostin is an osteocyte derived negative regulator of bone formation. A highly specific expression pattern and the exclusive bone phenotype have made Sclerostin an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in treating metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis and in facilitating fracture repair. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate Sclerostin transcription is of great interest as it may unveil new avenues for therapeutic approaches. Such studies may also elucidate how various signaling pathways intersect to modulate bone metabolism. Furthermore we review the current understanding of the upstream molecular mechanisms that regulate Sost/SOST transcription, in bone.

  8. Transcriptional control of Sost in bone [Transcriptional control of Sclerostin

    DOE PAGES

    Sebastian, Aimy; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2016-10-19

    Sclerostin is an osteocyte derived negative regulator of bone formation. A highly specific expression pattern and the exclusive bone phenotype have made Sclerostin an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in treating metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis and in facilitating fracture repair. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate Sclerostin transcription is of great interest as it may unveil new avenues for therapeutic approaches. Such studies may also elucidate how various signaling pathways intersect to modulate bone metabolism. Furthermore we review the current understanding of the upstream molecular mechanisms that regulate Sost/SOST transcription, in bone.

  9. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between that...

  10. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between that...

  11. Mitochondrial transcription in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Shokolenko, Inna N.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of recent discoveries of intimate involvement of mitochondria with key cellular processes, there has been a resurgence of interest in all aspects of mitochondrial biology, including the intricate mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA maintenance and expression. Despite four decades of research, there remains a lot to be learned about the processes that enable transcription of genetic information from mitochondrial DNA to RNA, as well as their regulation. These processes are vitally important, as evidenced by the lethality of inactivating the central components of mitochondrial transcription machinery. Here, we review the current understanding of mitochondrial transcription and its regulation in mammalian cells. We also discuss key theories in the field and highlight controversial subjects and future directions as we see them. PMID:27814650

  12. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  13. mRNA Cap Methyltransferase, RNMT-RAM, Promotes RNA Pol II-Dependent Transcription.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Dhaval; Lombardi, Olivia; Schweikert, Gabriele; Dunn, Sianadh; Suska, Olga; Cowling, Victoria H

    2018-05-01

    mRNA cap addition occurs early during RNA Pol II-dependent transcription, facilitating pre-mRNA processing and translation. We report that the mammalian mRNA cap methyltransferase, RNMT-RAM, promotes RNA Pol II transcription independent of mRNA capping and translation. In cells, sublethal suppression of RNMT-RAM reduces RNA Pol II occupancy, net mRNA synthesis, and pre-mRNA levels. Conversely, expression of RNMT-RAM increases transcription independent of cap methyltransferase activity. In isolated nuclei, recombinant RNMT-RAM stimulates transcriptional output; this requires the RAM RNA binding domain. RNMT-RAM interacts with nascent transcripts along their entire length and with transcription-associated factors including the RNA Pol II subunits SPT4, SPT6, and PAFc. Suppression of RNMT-RAM inhibits transcriptional markers including histone H2BK120 ubiquitination, H3K4 and H3K36 methylation, RNA Pol II CTD S5 and S2 phosphorylation, and PAFc recruitment. These findings suggest that multiple interactions among RNMT-RAM, RNA Pol II factors, and RNA along the transcription unit stimulate transcription. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on transcriptional landscape

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O’Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-01-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA co-factors short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) antisense to germline transcripts and associates with chromatin in a siRNA-dependent manner. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here, we used a genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts to demonstrate that the CSR-1 RNAi pathway promotes sense-oriented Pol II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. Based on these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway has a role in maintaining the directionality of active transcription thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions. PMID:24681887

  15. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophoric antibiotic, inhibits adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Szkudlarek-Mikho, Maria; Saunders, Rudel A.; Yap, Sook Fan

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salinomycin inhibits preadipocyte differentiation into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salinomycin inhibits transcriptional regulation of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmacological effects of salinomycin suggest toxicity in cancer therapy. -- Abstract: The polyether ionophoric antibiotics including monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, are widely used in veterinary medicine and as food additives and growth promoters in animal husbandry including poultry farming. Their effects on human health, however, are not fully understood. Recent studies showed that salinomycin is a cancer stem cell inhibitor. Since poultry consumption has risen sharply in the last three decades, we asked whether the consumption of meat tainted with growth promoting antibiotics mightmore » have effects on adipose cells. We showed in this report that the ionophoric antibiotics inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. The block of differentiation is not due to the induction of apoptosis nor the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, salinomycin also suppresses the transcriptional activity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}. These results suggest that the ionophoric antibiotics can be exploited as novel anti-obesity therapeutics and as pharmacological probes for the study of adipose biology. Further, the pharmacological effects of salinomycin could be a harbinger of its toxicity on the adipose tissue and other susceptible target cells in cancer therapy.« less

  16. Redox-dependent transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjun; Colavitti, Renata; Rovira, Ilsa I; Finkel, Toren

    2005-11-11

    Reactive oxygen species contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of disparate disorders including tissue inflammation, heart failure, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. In response to oxidative stress, cells activate expression of a number of genes, including those required for the detoxification of reactive molecules as well as for the repair and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. In many cases, these induced genes are regulated by transcription factors whose structure, subcellular localization, or affinity for DNA is directly or indirectly regulated by the level of oxidative stress. This review summarizes the recent progress on how cellular redox status can regulate transcription-factor activity and the implications of this regulation for cardiovascular disease.

  17. Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Oliver J.; Winston, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which chromatin structure controls eukaryotic transcription has been an intense area of investigation for the past 25 years. Many of the key discoveries that created the foundation for this field came from studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the discovery of the role of chromatin in transcriptional silencing, as well as the discovery of chromatin-remodeling factors and histone modification activities. Since that time, studies in yeast have continued to contribute in leading ways. This review article summarizes the large body of yeast studies in this field. PMID:22345607

  18. Tyrosine phosphorylation of histone H2A by CK2 regulates transcriptional elongation

    PubMed Central

    Basnet, Harihar; Bessie Su, Xue; Tan, Yuliang; Meisenhelder, Jill; Merkurjev, Daria; Ohgi, Kenneth A.; Hunter, Tony; Pillus, Lorraine; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational histone modifications play critical roles in regulating transcription, the cell cycle, DNA replication and DNA damage repair1. The identification of new histone modifications critical for transcriptional regulation at initiation, elongation, or termination is of particular interest. Here, we report a new layer of regulation in transcriptional elongation that is conserved from yeast to mammals, based on a phosphorylation of a highly-conserved tyrosine residue, Y57, in histone H2A that is mediated by an unsuspected tyrosine kinase activity of casein kinase 2 (CK2). Mutation of H2A-Y57 in yeast or inhibition of CK2 activity impairs transcriptional elongation in yeast as well as in mammalian cells. Genome-wide binding analysis reveals that CK2α, the catalytic subunit of CK2, binds across RNA polymerase II-transcribed coding genes and active enhancers. Mutation of Y57 causes a loss of H2B mono-ubiquitylation as well as H3K4me3 and H3K79me3, histone marks associated with active transcription. Mechanistically, both CK2 inhibition and H2A-Y57F mutation enhance the H2B deubiquitylation activity of the SAGA complex, suggesting a critical role of this phosphorylation in coordinating the activity of the SAGA during transcription. Together, these results identify a new component of regulation in transcriptional elongation based on CK2-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the globular domain of H2A. PMID:25252977

  19. BLM helicase facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated ribosomal RNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Patrick M.; Lillard, Kate; Behbehani, Gregory K.; Combs, Kelly A.; Bhattacharyya, Saumitri; Acharya, Samir; Groden, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is invariably characterized by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. The Bloom's syndrome helicase (BLM), mutations of which lead to BS, localizes to promyelocytic leukemia protein bodies and to the nucleolus of the cell, the site of RNA polymerase I-mediated ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. rRNA transcription is fundamental for ribosome biogenesis and therefore protein synthesis, cellular growth and proliferation; its inhibition limits cellular growth and proliferation as well as bodily growth. We report that nucleolar BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrate the dependance of BLM nucleolar localization upon ongoing RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription. In vivo protein co-immunoprecipitation demonstrates that BLM interacts with RPA194, a subunit of RNA polymerase I. 3H-uridine pulse-chase assays demonstrate that BLM expression is required for efficient rRNA transcription. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that BLM unwinds GC-rich rDNA-like substrates that form in the nucleolus and normally inhibit progression of the RNA polymerase I transcription complex. These studies suggest that nucleolar BLM modulates rDNA structures in association with RNA polymerase I to facilitate RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription. Given the intricate relationship between rDNA metabolism and growth, our data may help in understanding the etiology of proportional dwarfism in BS. PMID:22106380

  20. BLM helicase facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated ribosomal RNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Grierson, Patrick M; Lillard, Kate; Behbehani, Gregory K; Combs, Kelly A; Bhattacharyya, Saumitri; Acharya, Samir; Groden, Joanna

    2012-03-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is invariably characterized by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. The Bloom's syndrome helicase (BLM), mutations of which lead to BS, localizes to promyelocytic leukemia protein bodies and to the nucleolus of the cell, the site of RNA polymerase I-mediated ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. rRNA transcription is fundamental for ribosome biogenesis and therefore protein synthesis, cellular growth and proliferation; its inhibition limits cellular growth and proliferation as well as bodily growth. We report that nucleolar BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrate the dependance of BLM nucleolar localization upon ongoing RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription. In vivo protein co-immunoprecipitation demonstrates that BLM interacts with RPA194, a subunit of RNA polymerase I. (3)H-uridine pulse-chase assays demonstrate that BLM expression is required for efficient rRNA transcription. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that BLM unwinds GC-rich rDNA-like substrates that form in the nucleolus and normally inhibit progression of the RNA polymerase I transcription complex. These studies suggest that nucleolar BLM modulates rDNA structures in association with RNA polymerase I to facilitate RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription. Given the intricate relationship between rDNA metabolism and growth, our data may help in understanding the etiology of proportional dwarfism in BS.

  1. Obligate intracellular bacterium Ehrlichia inhibiting mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhikai; Jiang, Yongquan; Zhang, Lihong; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Zhang, Jianzhi; Walker, David H.; Yu, Xue-jie

    2010-01-01

    Ehrlichia are obligately intracellular bacteria that reside in a vacuole in the cytoplasm of phagocytes. We determined by confocal microscopy the interaction between Ehrlichia and mitochondria in DH82 cells to investigate the mechanism of Ehrlichia survival inside the phagocyte. The most remarkable finding of our study was that Ehrlichia morulae interacted with mitochondria and inhibited mitochondrial metabolism,. We showed that in E. chaffeensis-infected DH82 cells, mitochondria did not incorporate BrdU and transcriptional level of the mitochondrial gene NADPH2 was significantly reduced, indicating the inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism. This study demonstrates that Ehrlichia are able to inhibit mitochondrial activities, and it opens up a new avenue for the study of Ehrlichia pathogenesis. PMID:21070861

  2. Inhibition of melanogenesis by Xanthium strumarium L.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailan; Min, Young Sil; Park, Kyoung-Chan; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Xanthium strumarium L. (Asteraceae) is traditionally used in Korea to treat skin diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of a X. strumarium stem extract on melanin synthesis. It inhibited melanin synthesis in a concentration-dependent manner, but it did not directly inhibit tyrosinase, the rate-limiting melanogenic enzyme, and instead downregulated microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase expression. MITF, the master regulator of pigmentation, is a target of the Wnt signaling pathway, which includes glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and β-catenin. Hence, the influence of X. strumarium stem extract on GSK3β and β-catenin was further investigated. X. strumarium induced GSK3β phosphorylation (inactivation), but the level of β-catenin did not change. Moreover, a specific GSK3β inhibitor restored X. strumarium-induced melanin reduction. Hence, we suggest that X. strumarium inhibits melanin synthesis through downregulation of tyrosinase via GSK3β phosphorylation.

  3. Transcription boundaries of U1 small nuclear RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, G R; Pederson, T

    1985-01-01

    Transcription-proximal stages of U1 small nuclear RNA biosynthesis were studied by 32P labeling of nascent chains in isolated HeLa cell nuclei. Labeled RNA was hybridized to nitrocellulose-immobilized, single-stranded M13 DNA clones corresponding to regions within or flanking a human U1 RNA gene. Transcription of U1 RNA was inhibited by greater than 95% by alpha-amanitin at 1 microgram/ml, consistent with previous evidence that it is synthesized by RNA polymerase II. No hybridization to DNA immediately adjacent to the 5' end of mature U1 RNA (-6 to -105 nucleotides) was detected, indicating that, like all studied polymerase II initiation, transcription of U1 RNA starts at or very near the cap site. However, in contrast to previously described transcription units for mRNA, in which equimolar transcription occurs for hundreds or thousands of nucleotides beyond the mature 3' end of the mRNA, labeled U1 RNA hybridization dropped off sharply within a very short region (approximately 60 nucleotides) immediately downstream from the 3' end of mature U1 RNA. Also in contrast to pre-mRNA, which is assembled into ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles while still nascent RNA chains, the U1 RNA transcribed in isolated nuclei did not form RNP complexes by the criterion of reaction with a monoclonal antibody for the small nuclear RNP Sm proteins. This suggests that, unlike pre-mRNA-RNP particle formation, U1 small nuclear RNP assembly does not occur until after the completion of transcription. These results show that, despite their common synthesis by RNA polymerase II, mRNA and U1 small nuclear RNA differ markedly both in their extents of 3' processing and their temporal patterns of RNP assembly. Images PMID:2942763

  4. Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB transcription factor AtMYB60 functions as a transcriptional repressor of anthocyanin biosynthesis in lettuce (Lactuca sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Sug; Kim, Jung-Bong; Cho, Kang-Jin; Cheon, Choong-Ill; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2008-01-01

    The MYB transcription factors play important roles in the regulation of many secondary metabolites at the transcriptional level. We evaluated the possible roles of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB transcription factors in flavonoid biosynthesis because they are induced by UV-B irradiation but their associated phenotypes are largely unexplored. We isolated their genes by RACE-PCR, and performed transgenic approach and metabolite analyses in lettuce (Lactuca sativa). We found that one member of this protein family, AtMYB60, inhibits anthocyanin biosynthesis in the lettuce plant. Wild-type lettuce normally accumulates anthocyanin, predominantly cyanidin and traces of delphinidin, and develops a red pigmentation. However, the production and accumulation of anthocyanin pigments in AtMYB60-overexpressing lettuce was inhibited. Using RT-PCR analysis, we also identified the complete absence or reduction of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) transcripts in AtMYB60- overexpressing lettuce (AtMYB60-117 and AtMYB60-112 lines). The correlation between the overexpression of AtMYB60 and the inhibition of anthocyanin accumulation suggests that the transcription factorAtMYB60 controls anthocyanin biosynthesis in the lettuce leaf. Clarification of the roles of the AtMYB60 transcription factor will facilitate further studies and provide genetic tools to better understand the regulation in plants of the genes controlled by the MYB-type transcription factors. Furthermore, the characterization of AtMYB60 has implications for the development of new varieties of lettuce and other commercially important plants with metabolic engineering approaches. PMID:18317777

  5. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  6. Transcriptional networks in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Kenichi; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-05-01

    Next to numerous abiotic stresses, plants are constantly exposed to a variety of pathogens within their environment. Thus, their ability to survive and prosper during the course of evolution was strongly dependent on adapting efficient strategies to perceive and to respond to such potential threats. It is therefore not surprising that modern plants have a highly sophisticated immune repertoire consisting of diverse signal perception and intracellular signaling pathways. This signaling network is intricate and deeply interconnected, probably reflecting the diverse lifestyles and infection strategies used by the multitude of invading phytopathogens. Moreover it allows signal communication between developmental and defense programs thereby ensuring that plant growth and fitness are not significantly retarded. How plants integrate and prioritize the incoming signals and how this information is transduced to enable appropriate immune responses is currently a major research area. An important finding has been that pathogen-triggered cellular responses involve massive transcriptional reprogramming within the host. Additional key observations emerging from such studies are that transcription factors (TFs) are often sites of signal convergence and that signal-regulated TFs act in concert with other context-specific TFs and transcriptional co-regulators to establish sensory transcription regulatory networks required for plant immunity. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Medical transcription outsourcing greased lightning?

    PubMed

    Bikman, Jeremy; Whiting, Stacilee

    2007-06-01

    As medical transcription volume grows, providers need to decide whether to outsource the work, and if so, whether to retain offshore or onshore firms. There are benefits and drawbacks to both. To avoid problems, providers need to make sure the details are spelled out in the contract and that their expectations are understood and met by the outsource firm.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of hepatic lipogenesis.