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Sample records for ear fluid mef

  1. Oxidative metabolic products released from polymorphonuclear leukocytes in middle ear fluid during experimental pneumococcal otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Kawana, M; Kawana, C; Yokoo, T; Quie, P G; Giebink, G S

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether oxidative metabolic products of phagocytic cells are present in the middle ear during experimental pneumococcal otitis media, we measured the concentration of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in middle ear fluid (MEF) and the capacity of neutrophils isolated from MEF and peripheral blood to produce MPO and superoxide anion (O2-) after in vitro stimulation. Free MPO in MEF was significantly increased 24 and 48 h after either viable or nonviable pneumococci were inoculated into the middle ear. In vitro-stimulated production of MPO and O2- from middle ear neutrophils was significantly less than that from peripheral blood neutrophils 24 h after nonviable pneumococci were inoculated but similar to it after 48 h. Twenty-four hours after viable pneumococci were inoculated, middle ear neutrophils stimulated in vitro produced less MPO but the same amount of O2- as did blood neutrophils. Oxidative metabolic products, therefore, are released from phagocytic cells into the MEF during pneumococcal otitis media, and future studies will need to define the contribution of these products to acute and chronic middle ear tissue injury. PMID:1657782

  2. Middle Ear Fluid Cytokine and Inflammatory Cell Kinetics in the Chinchilla Otitis Media Model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Katsuro; Liebeler, Carol L.; Quartey, Moses K.; Le, Chap T.; Giebink, G. Scott

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microbe causing middle ear infection. The pathophysiology of pneumococcal otitis media has been characterized by measurement of local inflammatory mediators such as inflammatory cells, lysozyme, oxidative metabolic products, and inflammatory cytokines. The role of cytokines in bacterial infection has been elucidated with animal models, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) are recognized as being important local mediators in acute inflammation. We characterized middle ear inflammatory responses in the chinchilla otitis media model after injecting a very small number of viable pneumococci into the middle ear, similar to the natural course of infection. Middle ear fluid (MEF) concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α were measured by using anti-human cytokine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reagents. IL-1β showed the earliest peak, at 6 h after inoculation, whereas IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α concentrations were increasing 72 h after pneumococcal inoculation. IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α but not IL-1β concentrations correlated significantly with total inflammatory cell numbers in MEF, and all four cytokines correlated significantly with MEF neutrophil concentration. Several intercytokine correlations were significant. Cytokines, therefore, participate in the early middle ear inflammatory response to S. pneumoniae. PMID:10085040

  3. Evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic ODK-0901 test for detection of pneumococcal antigen in middle ear fluids and nasopharyngeal secretions.

    PubMed

    Hotomi, Muneki; Togawa, Akihisa; Takei, Shin; Sugita, Gen; Sugita, Rinya; Kono, Masamitsu; Fujimaki, Yutaka; Kamide, Yosuke; Uchizono, Akihiro; Kanesada, Keiko; Sawada, Shoichi; Okitsu, Naohiro; Tanaka, Yumi; Saijo, Yoko; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    Since the incidence of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae has been increasing at an astonishing rate throughout the world, the need for accurate and rapid identification of pneumococci has become increasingly important to determine the appropriate antimicrobial treatment. We have evaluated an immunochromatographic test (ODK-0901) that detects pneumococcal antigens using 264 middle ear fluids (MEFs) and 268 nasopharyngeal secretions (NPSs). A sample was defined to contain S. pneumoniae when optochin and bile sensitive alpha hemolytic streptococcal colonies were isolated by culture. The sensitivity and specificity of the ODK-0901 test were 81.4% and 80.5%, respectively, for MEFs from patients with acute otitis media (AOM). In addition, the sensitivity and specificity were 75.2% and 88.8%, respectively, for NPSs from patients with acute rhinosinusitis. The ODK-0901 test may provide a rapid and highly sensitive evaluation of the presence of S. pneumoniae and thus may be a promising method of identifying pneumococci in MEFs and NPSs.

  4. Combined Effect of Fluid and Pressure on Middle Ear Function

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Wood, Mark W.; Gan, Rong Z.

    2008-01-01

    In our previous studies, the effects of effusion and pressure on sound transmission were investigated separately. The aim of this study is to investigate the combined effect of fluid and pressure on middle ear function. An otitis media with effusion model was created by injecting saline solution and air pressure simultaneously into the middle ear of human temporal bones. Tympanic membrane displacement in response to 90 dB SPL sound input was measured by a laser vibrometer and the compliance of the middle ear was measured by a tympanometer. The movement of the tympanic membrane at the umbo was reduced up to 17 dB by the combination of fluid and pressure in the middle ear over the auditory frequency range. The fluid and pressure effects on the umbo movement in the fluid-pressure combination are not additive. The combined effect of fluid and pressure on the umbo movement is different compared with that of only fluid or pressure change in the middle ear. Negative pressure in fluid-pressure combination had more effect on middle ear function than positive pressure. Tympanometry can detect the middle ear pressure of the fluid-pressure combination. This study provides quantitative information for analysis of the combined effect of fluid and pressure on tympanic membrane movement. PMID:18162348

  5. Evaluation of a Rapid Immunochromatographic ODK-0901 Test for Detection of Pneumococcal Antigen in Middle Ear Fluids and Nasopharyngeal Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Hotomi, Muneki; Togawa, Akihisa; Takei, Shin; Sugita, Gen; Sugita, Rinya; Kono, Masamitsu; Fujimaki, Yutaka; Kamide, Yosuke; Uchizono, Akihiro; Kanesada, Keiko; Sawada, Shoichi; Okitsu, Naohiro; Tanaka, Yumi; Saijo, Yoko; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    Since the incidence of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae has been increasing at an astonishing rate throughout the world, the need for accurate and rapid identification of pneumococci has become increasingly important to determine the appropriate antimicrobial treatment. We have evaluated an immunochromatographic test (ODK-0901) that detects pneumococcal antigens using 264 middle ear fluids (MEFs) and 268 nasopharyngeal secretions (NPSs). A sample was defined to contain S. pneumoniae when optochin and bile sensitive alpha hemolytic streptococcal colonies were isolated by culture. The sensitivity and specificity of the ODK-0901 test were 81.4% and 80.5%, respectively, for MEFs from patients with acute otitis media (AOM). In addition, the sensitivity and specificity were 75.2% and 88.8%, respectively, for NPSs from patients with acute rhinosinusitis. The ODK-0901 test may provide a rapid and highly sensitive evaluation of the presence of S. pneumoniae and thus may be a promising method of identifying pneumococci in MEFs and NPSs. PMID:22448257

  6. An application of outer membrane protein p6-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of haemophilus influenzae in middle ear fluids and nasopharyngeal secretions.

    PubMed

    Hotomi, Muneki; Togawa, Akihisa; Kono, Masamitsu; Sugita, Gen; Sugita, Rinya; Fujimaki, Yutaka; Kamide, Yosuke; Uchizono, Akihiro; Kanesada, Keiko; Sawada, Shoichi; Okitsu, Naohiro; Masuda, Hisayo; Tanaka, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yumi; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific to outer membrane protein P6 (P6-ELISA) was applied for detecting Haemophilus influenzae in middle ear fluids (MEFs) from acute otitis media (AOM) patients and in nasopharyngeal secretions (NPSs) from acute rhinosinusitis patients. P6-ELISA had a sensitivity of 83.3% for MEFs and 71.5% for NPSs and a specificity of 85.6% for MEFs and 92.5% for NPSs, respectively. Real-time PCR exhibited significant differences in the number of ompP1 gene copies among samples determined by P6-ELISA to be positive and negative for H. influenzae. However, because the P6-ELISA test has the reactivity in Haemophilus species include two commensals H. haemolyticus and H. parainfluenzae, it is thus a weak method in order to detect only NTHi correctly. Consequently, diagnosis using the P6-ELISA should be based on an overall evaluation, including the results of other related examinations and clinical symptoms to prevent misleading conclusions in clinical setting.

  7. An Application of Outer Membrane Protein P6-Specific Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in Middle Ear Fluids and Nasopharyngeal Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Hotomi, Muneki; Togawa, Akihisa; Kono, Masamitsu; Sugita, Gen; Sugita, Rinya; Fujimaki, Yutaka; Kamide, Yosuke; Uchizono, Akihiro; Kanesada, Keiko; Sawada, Shoichi; Okitsu, Naohiro; Masuda, Hisayo; Tanaka, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yumi; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific to outer membrane protein P6 (P6-ELISA) was applied for detecting Haemophilus influenzae in middle ear fluids (MEFs) from acute otitis media (AOM) patients and in nasopharyngeal secretions (NPSs) from acute rhinosinusitis patients. P6-ELISA had a sensitivity of 83.3% for MEFs and 71.5% for NPSs and a specificity of 85.6% for MEFs and 92.5% for NPSs, respectively. Real-time PCR exhibited significant differences in the number of ompP1 gene copies among samples determined by P6-ELISA to be positive and negative for H. influenzae. However, because the P6-ELISA test has the reactivity in Haemophilus species include two commensals H. haemolyticus and H. parainfluenzae, it is thus a weak method in order to detect only NTHi correctly. Consequently, diagnosis using the P6-ELISA should be based on an overall evaluation, including the results of other related examinations and clinical symptoms to prevent misleading conclusions in clinical setting. PMID:24015192

  8. Molecular architecture underlying fluid absorption by the developing inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Keiji; Kim, Sung Huhn; Kelly, Michael C; Burns, Joseph C; Constance, Laura; Li, Xiangming; Zhou, Fei; Hoa, Michael; Kelley, Matthew W; Morell, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Mutations of SLC26A4 are a common cause of hearing loss associated with enlargement of the endolymphatic sac (EES). Slc26a4 expression in the developing mouse endolymphatic sac is required for acquisition of normal inner ear structure and function. Here, we show that the mouse endolymphatic sac absorbs fluid in an SLC26A4-dependent fashion. Fluid absorption was sensitive to ouabain and gadolinium but insensitive to benzamil, bafilomycin and S3226. Single-cell RNA-seq analysis of pre- and postnatal endolymphatic sacs demonstrates two types of differentiated cells. Early ribosome-rich cells (RRCs) have a transcriptomic signature suggesting expression and secretion of extracellular proteins, while mature RRCs express genes implicated in innate immunity. The transcriptomic signature of mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) indicates that they mediate vectorial ion transport. We propose a molecular mechanism for resorption of NaCl by MRCs during development, and conclude that disruption of this mechanism is the root cause of hearing loss associated with EES. PMID:28994389

  9. The fluid mechanics of the inner-ear disorder BPPV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Michael; Squires, Todd; Stone, Howard

    2001-11-01

    The inner ear of mammals contains fluid-filled semi-circular canals with a flexible sensory membrane (called a cupula) which detects rotational acceleration. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common disorders of this system diagnosed today, and is characterized by symptoms of dizziness and nausea brought on by sudden changes in head orientation. BPPV is believed to have a mechanical (rather than nervous) origin, in which dense particles called otoconia settle into the canals and trigger false sensations of rotational acceleration. Several qualitative mechanisms have been proposed by the medical community, which we examine from a fluid mechanical standpoint. Traditionally, the semicircular canal and the cupula are modeled as an over-damped torsional pendulum with a driving force provided by rotational acceleration. We extend this model to include the time-dependent mechanical response owing to sedimentation of the otoconia. We make qualitative and quantitative predictions associated with the proposed mechanisms, with an eye towards differentiating between them and perhaps towards more effective diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  10. Effect of middle ear fluid on sound transmission and auditory brainstem response in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiying; Gan, Rong Z

    2011-07-01

    Combined measurements of middle ear transfer function and auditory brainstem response (ABR) in live guinea pigs with middle ear effusion (MEE) are reported in this paper. The MEE model was created by injecting saline into the middle ear cavity. Vibrations of the tympanic membrane (TM), the tip of the incus, and the round window membrane (RWM) were measured with a laser vibrometer at frequencies of 0.2-40 kHz when the middle ear fluid increased from 0 to 0.2 ml (i.e., full fill of the cavity). The click and pure tone ABRs were recorded as the middle ear fluid increased. Fluid introduction reduced mobility of the TM, incus and RWM mainly at high frequencies (f > 1 kHz). The magnitude of this reduction was related to the volume of fluid. The displacement transmission ratio of the TM to incus varied with frequency and fluid level. The volume displacement ratio of the oval window to round window was approximately 1.0 over most frequencies. Elevation of ABR thresholds and prolongation of ABR latencies were observed as fluid level increased. Reduction of TM displacement correlated well with elevation of ABR threshold at 0.5-8 kHz. Alterations in the ratio of ossicular displacements before and after fluid induction are consistent with fluid-induced changes in complex ossicular motions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Penicillin treatment accelerates middle ear inflammation in experimental pneumococcal otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Kawana, M; Kawana, C; Giebink, G S

    1992-01-01

    Most Streptococcus pneumoniae strains are killed by very low concentrations of penicillin and other beta-lactam antibiotics, yet middle ear inflammation and effusion persist for days to weeks after treatment in most cases of pneumococcal otitis media. To study the effect of beta-lactam antibiotic treatment on pneumococci and the middle ear inflammatory response during pneumococcal otitis media, we measured concentrations of pneumococci, inflammatory cells, and lysozyme in middle ear fluid (MEF) by using the chinchilla model. Procaine penicillin G given intramuscularly 12 and 36 h after inoculation of pneumococci into the middle ear caused a significant acceleration in the MEF inflammatory cell concentration compared with that in untreated controls, with a significant peak in the inflammatory cell concentration 24 h after pneumococcal inoculation. The lysozyme concentration in MEF also increased more rapidly in treated than in control animals. Viable pneumococci were not detected in MEF after the second dose of penicillin, but the total pneumococcal cell concentration remained unchanged for at least 45 days. Therefore, penicillin treatment accelerated middle ear inflammation while killing pneumococci, but treatment did not accelerate clearance of the nonviable pneumococcal cells from MEF. Further studies will need to define the contribution of these responses to acute and chronic tissue injury. PMID:1563782

  12. Metabolomic profiling in inner ear fluid by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Irino, Yasuhiro; Kitamoto, Junko; Fukuda, Yuriko; Inokuchi, Go; Hasegawa, Shingo; Otsuki, Naoki; Yoshida, Masaru; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2015-10-08

    The composition and homeostasis of inner ear fluids are important in hearing function. The purpose of this study was to perform metabolomic analysis of the inner ear fluid in guinea pig cochlea, which has not been previously reported in literature, using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seventy-seven kinds of metabolites were detected in the inner ear fluid. Six metabolites, ascorbic acid, fructose, galactosamine, inositol, pyruvate+oxaloacetic acid, and meso-erythritol, were significantly more abundant, and nine metabolites, phosphate, valine, glycine, glycerol, ornithine, glucose, citric acid+isocitric acid, mannose, and trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline, were less abundant in the inner ear fluid than in plasma. The levels of ten metabolites, 3-hydroxy-butyrate, glycerol, fumaric acid, galactosamine, pyruvate+oxaloacetic acid, phosphate, meso-erythritol, citric acid+isocitric acid, mannose, and inositol, in the inner ear fluid significantly changed after loud noise exposure. These observations may help to elucidate various clinical conditions of sensorineural hearing loss, including noise-induced hearing loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Middle cranial fossa approach for the repair of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks to the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Altuna, Xabier; Navarro, Juan José; García, Leire; Ugarte, Ane; Thomas, Izaskun

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks to the middle ear due to tegmen tympani defects can result in hearing loss or hypoacusis and predispose to meningitis as well as other neurological complications. Surgical repair of the defect can be performed through a middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach or a transmastoid approach. We conducted a retrospective study of the patients in our Department due to a spontaneous CSF leak to the middle ear treated using a MCF approach during a 6-year period (2009-2014). Thirteen patients with spontaneous CSF leak to the middle ear were treated with this approach. The primary and first symptom in all of them was conductive hearing loss. In all cases, the defect or defects were closed in a multilayer manner using muscle, temporalis fascia and cortical bone. Minimum follow-up in this series was 14 months, with successful closure in all but one patient (who required reintervention). We found no intra- or postoperative complications due to the craniotomy, and the audiometry improved and normalised in all cases except for the failed case. The MCF approach with a multilayer closure of the defect is an effective technique for repairing spontaneous CSF leaks to the middle ear and for restoring hearing in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  14. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the ear drum or eustachian tube, Down Syndrome, cleft palate, and barotrauma (injury to the middle ear caused by a reduction of air pressure, ... specialist) may be warranted if you or your child has experienced repeated ... fluid in the middle ear, barotrauma, or have an anatomic abnormality that ...

  15. Flow behaviour in normal and Meniere’s disease of endolymphatic fluid inside the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisal, Muhammad Sufyan Amir; Azmi Wahab, Muhamad; Taib, Ishkrizat; Mat Isa, Norasikin; Ramli, Yahaya; Seri, Suzairin Md; Darlis, Nofrizalidris; Osman, Kahar; Khudzari, Ahmad Zahran Md; Nordin, Normayati

    2017-09-01

    Meniere’s disease is a rare disorder that affects the inner ear which might be more severe if not treated. This is due to fluctuating pressure of the fluid in the endolymphatic sac and dysfunction of cochlea which causing the stretching of vestibular membrane. However, the pattern of the flow recirculation in endolymphatic region is still not fully understood. Thus, this study aims to investigate the correlation between the increasing volume of endolymphatic fluid and flow characteristics such as velocity, pressure and wall shear stress. Three dimensional model of simplified endolymphatic region is modeled using computer aided design (CAD) software and simulated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software. There are three different models are investigated; normal (N) model, Meniere’s disease model with less severity (M1) and Meniere’s disease model with high severity (M2). From the observed, the pressure drop between inlet and outlet of inner ear becomes decreases as the outlet pressure along with endolymphatic volume increases. However, constant flow rate imposed at the inlet of endolymphatic showing the lowest velocity. Flow recirculation near to endolymphatic region is occurred as the volume in endolympathic increases. Overall, high velocity is monitored near to cochlear duct, ductus reuniens and endolymphatic duct. Hence, these areas show high distributions of wall shear stress (WSS) that indicating a high probability of endolymphatic wall membrane dilation. Thus, more severe conditions of Meniere’s disease, more complex of flow characteristic is occurred. This phenomenon presenting high probability of rupture is predicted at the certain area in the anatomy of vestibular system.

  16. Roles of autolysin and pneumolysin in middle ear inflammation caused by a type 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae strain in the chinchilla otitis media model.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, K; Quartey, M K; Liebeler, C L; Le, C T; Giebink, G S

    1996-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall and pneumolysin are important contributors to pneumococcal pathogenicity in some animal models. To further explore these factors in middle ear inflammation caused by pneumococci, penicillin-induced inflammatory acceleration was studied by using three closely related pneumococcal strains: a wild-type 3 strain (WT3), its pneumolysin-negative derivative (P-1), and into autolysin-negative derivative (A-1). Both middle ears of chinchillas were inoculated with one of the three pneumococcal strains. During the first 12 h, all three strains grew in vivo at the same rate, and all three strains induced similar inflammatory cell responses in middle ear fluid (MEF). Procaine penicillin G was given as 12 h to one-half of the animals in each group, and all treated chinchillas had sterile MEF at 24 h. Penicillin significantly accelerated MEF inflammatory cell influx into WT3-and P-1-infected ears at 18 and 24 h in comparison with the rate for penicillin-treated A-1-infected ears. Inflammatory cell influx was slightly, but not significantly, greater after treatment of WT3 infection than after treatment of P-1 infection. Interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6, but not IL-8, concentrations in MEF at 24 h reflected the penicillin effect on MEF inflammatory cells; however, differences between treatment groups were not significant. Results suggest that pneumococcal otitis media pathogenesis is triggered principally by the inflammatory effects of intact and lytic cell wall products in the middle ear, with at most a modes additional pneumolysin effect. Investigation strategies that limit the release of these products or neutralize them warrant further investigation. PMID:8606070

  17. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but they are less common. The infection usually affects the middle ear and is called otitis media. ... become clogged with fluid and mucus. This can affect hearing, because sound cannot get through all that ...

  18. Measurement of Cefaclor and Amoxicillin-Clavulanic Acid Levels in Middle-Ear Fluid in Patients with Acute Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, F.; Caronzolo, D.; Pintucci, J. P.; Fraschini, F.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of cefaclor (CFC) or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMX/CA) in middle-ear fluid collected preserving the stability and clearing the cell contents has been compared to those obtained using the traditional method. Sixty-seven children with effusive otitis media were treated orally with CFC (20 mg/kg of body weight) or AMX/CA (20 mg/kg) (4:1 ratio). The concentrations in cell-free fluid (C−) appear higher than those in the total fluid (C+) (as assayed traditionally). PMID:12937009

  19. Restoration of middle-ear input in fluid-filled middle ears by controlled introduction of air or a novel air-filled implant.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Chien, Wade W; Rosowski, John J

    2015-10-01

    The effect of small amounts of air on sound-induced umbo velocity in an otherwise saline-filled middle ear (ME) was investigated to examine the efficacy of a novel balloon-like air-filled ME implant suitable for patients with chronically non-aerated MEs. In this study, air bubbles or air-filled implants were introduced into saline-filled human cadaveric MEs. Umbo velocity, a convenient measure of ME response, served as an indicator of hearing sensitivity. Filling the ME with saline reduced umbo velocity by 25-30 dB at low frequencies and more at high frequencies, consistent with earlier work (Ravicz et al., Hear. Res. 195: 103-130 (2004)). Small amounts of air (∼30 μl) in the otherwise saline-filled ME increased umbo velocity substantially, to levels only 10-15 dB lower than in the dry ME, in a frequency- and location-dependent manner: air in contact with the tympanic membrane (TM) increased umbo velocity at all frequencies, while air located away from the TM increased umbo velocity only below about 500 Hz. The air-filled implant also affected umbo velocity in a manner similar to an air bubble of equivalent compliance. Inserting additional implants into the ME had the same effect as increasing air volume. These results suggest these middle-ear implants would significantly reduce conductive hearing loss in patients with chronically fluid-filled MEs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluid dynamics vascular theory of brain and inner-ear function in traumatic brain injury: a translational hypothesis for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Abraham; Strashun, Arnold M

    2009-01-01

    It is hypothesized that in all traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with a clinical history of closed or penetrating head injury, the initial head trauma is associated with a vibratory sensation and noise exposure, with resultant alteration in vascular supply to the structures and contents of the fluid compartments of brain and ear (i.e., the fluid dynamics vascular theory of brain-inner-ear function [FDVTBE]). The primary etiology-head trauma-results in an initial fluctuation, interference, or interaction in the normal fluid dynamics between brain and labyrinth of the inner ear, with a resultant clinical diversity of complaints varying in time of onset and severity. Normal function of the brain and ear is a reflection of a normal state of homeostasis between the fluid compartments in the brain of cerebrospinal fluid and perilymph-endolymph in the labyrinth of the ear. The normal homeostasis in the structures and contents between the two fluid compartment systems--intracerebral and intralabyrinthine--is controlled by mechanisms involved in the maintenance of normal pressures, water and electrolyte content, and neurotransmitter activities. The initial pathophysiology (a reflection of an alteration in the vascular supply to the brain-ear) is hypothesized to be an initial acute inflammatory response, persistence of which results in ischemia and an irreversible alteration in the involved neural substrates of brain-ear. Clinically, a chronic multisymptom complex becomes manifest. The multisymptom complex, individual for each TBI patient regardless of the diagnostic TBI category (i.e., mild, moderate, or severe), initially reflects processes of inflammation and ischemia which, in brain, result in brain volume loss identified as neurodegeneration and hydrocephalus ex vacuo or an alteration in cerebrospinal fluid production (i.e., pseudotumor cerebri) and, in ear, secondary endolymphatic hydrops with associated cochleovestibular complaints of hearing loss, tinnitus

  1. The physics of hearing: fluid mechanics and the active process of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Hudspeth, A J

    2014-07-01

    Most sounds of interest consist of complex, time-dependent admixtures of tones of diverse frequencies and variable amplitudes. To detect and process these signals, the ear employs a highly nonlinear, adaptive, real-time spectral analyzer: the cochlea. Sound excites vibration of the eardrum and the three miniscule bones of the middle ear, the last of which acts as a piston to initiate oscillatory pressure changes within the liquid-filled chambers of the cochlea. The basilar membrane, an elastic band spiraling along the cochlea between two of these chambers, responds to these pressures by conducting a largely independent traveling wave for each frequency component of the input. Because the basilar membrane is graded in mass and stiffness along its length, however, each traveling wave grows in magnitude and decreases in wavelength until it peaks at a specific, frequency-dependent position: low frequencies propagate to the cochlear apex, whereas high frequencies culminate at the base. The oscillations of the basilar membrane deflect hair bundles, the mechanically sensitive organelles of the ear's sensory receptors, the hair cells. As mechanically sensitive ion channels open and close, each hair cell responds with an electrical signal that is chemically transmitted to an afferent nerve fiber and thence into the brain. In addition to transducing mechanical inputs, hair cells amplify them by two means. Channel gating endows a hair bundle with negative stiffness, an instability that interacts with the motor protein myosin-1c to produce a mechanical amplifier and oscillator. Acting through the piezoelectric membrane protein prestin, electrical responses also cause outer hair cells to elongate and shorten, thus pumping energy into the basilar membrane's movements. The two forms of motility constitute an active process that amplifies mechanical inputs, sharpens frequency discrimination, and confers a compressive nonlinearity on responsiveness. These features arise because the

  2. The physics of hearing: fluid mechanics and the active process of the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2014-07-01

    Most sounds of interest consist of complex, time-dependent admixtures of tones of diverse frequencies and variable amplitudes. To detect and process these signals, the ear employs a highly nonlinear, adaptive, real-time spectral analyzer: the cochlea. Sound excites vibration of the eardrum and the three miniscule bones of the middle ear, the last of which acts as a piston to initiate oscillatory pressure changes within the liquid-filled chambers of the cochlea. The basilar membrane, an elastic band spiraling along the cochlea between two of these chambers, responds to these pressures by conducting a largely independent traveling wave for each frequency component of the input. Because the basilar membrane is graded in mass and stiffness along its length, however, each traveling wave grows in magnitude and decreases in wavelength until it peaks at a specific, frequency-dependent position: low frequencies propagate to the cochlear apex, whereas high frequencies culminate at the base. The oscillations of the basilar membrane deflect hair bundles, the mechanically sensitive organelles of the ear's sensory receptors, the hair cells. As mechanically sensitive ion channels open and close, each hair cell responds with an electrical signal that is chemically transmitted to an afferent nerve fiber and thence into the brain. In addition to transducing mechanical inputs, hair cells amplify them by two means. Channel gating endows a hair bundle with negative stiffness, an instability that interacts with the motor protein myosin-1c to produce a mechanical amplifier and oscillator. Acting through the piezoelectric membrane protein prestin, electrical responses also cause outer hair cells to elongate and shorten, thus pumping energy into the basilar membrane's movements. The two forms of motility constitute an active process that amplifies mechanical inputs, sharpens frequency discrimination, and confers a compressive nonlinearity on responsiveness. These features arise because the

  3. Increase in serotype 19A prevalence and amoxicillin non-susceptibility among paediatric Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from middle ear fluid in a passive laboratory-based surveillance in Spain, 1997-2009

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Conjugate vaccines, such as the 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV7), alter serotype nasopharyngeal carriage, potentially increasing cases of otitis media by non-vaccine serotypes. Methods All paediatric middle ear fluid (MEF) isolates received in the Spanish Reference Laboratory for Pneumococci through a passive, laboratory-based surveillance system from January 1997 to June 2009 were analysed. Data from 1997 to 2000 were pooled as pre-vaccination period. Trends over time were explored by linear regression analysis. Results A total of 2,077 isolates were analysed: 855 belonging to PCV7 serotypes, 466 to serotype 19A, 215 to serotype 3, 89 to serotype 6A and 452 to other serotypes (< 40 isolates each). Over time, there has been a decreasing trend for PCV7 serotypes (R2 = 0.944; p < 0.001, with significant decreasing trends for serotypes 19F, 14, 23F and 9V), and increasing trends for serotype 19A (R2 = 0.901; p < 0.001), serotype 3 (R2 = 0.463; p = 0.030) and other non-PCV7 serotypes (R2 = 0.877; p < 0.001), but not for serotype 6A (R2 = 0.311; p = 0.094). Considering all isolates, amoxicillin non-susceptibility showed an increasing trend (R2 = 0.528; p = 0.017). Regarding serotype 19A, increasing trends in non-susceptibility to penicillin (R2 = 0.726; p = 0.001), amoxicillin (R2 = 0.804; p < 0.001), cefotaxime (R2 = 0.546; p = 0.005) and erythromycin (R2 = 0.546; p = 0.009) were found, with amoxicillin non-susceptibility firstly detected in 2003 (7.4%) and increasing up to 38.0% in 2009. In PCV7 serotypes (which prevalence decreased from 70.7% during 1997-2000 to 10.6% in 2009) amoxicillin non-susceptibility rates showed an increasing trend (R2 = 0.702; p = 0.002). However, overall, amoxicillin non-susceptibility (≈25% in 2008-9) could be mainly attributed to serotype 19A (> 35% isolates) since PCV7 strains represented < 11% of total clinical isolates. Conclusions In contrast to reports on invasive pneumococcal strains, in MEF isolates the reduction in

  4. Ear Infection (Middle Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    ... secretions from the middle ear Swelling, inflammation and mucus in the eustachian tubes from an upper respiratory ... your baby for at least six months. Breast milk contains antibodies that may offer protection from ear ...

  5. Zebrafish Mef2ca and Mef2cb are essential for both first and second heart field cardiomyocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hinits, Yaniv; Pan, Luyuan; Walker, Charline; Dowd, John; Moens, Cecilia B.; Hughes, Simon M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mef2 transcription factors have been strongly linked with early heart development. D-mef2 is required for heart formation in Drosophila, but whether Mef2 is essential for vertebrate cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation is unclear. In mice, although Mef2c is expressed in all CMs, targeted deletion of Mef2c causes lethal loss of second heart field (SHF) derivatives and failure of cardiac looping, but first heart field CMs can differentiate. Here we examine Mef2 function in early heart development in zebrafish. Two Mef2c genes exist in zebrafish, mef2ca and mef2cb. Both are expressed similarly in the bilateral heart fields but mef2cb is strongly expressed in the heart poles at the primitive heart tube stage. By using fish mutants for mef2ca and mef2cb and antisense morpholinos to knock down either or both Mef2cs, we show that Mef2ca and Mef2cb have essential but redundant roles in myocardial differentiation. Loss of both Mef2ca and Mef2cb function does not interfere with early cardiogenic markers such as nkx2.5, gata4 and hand2 but results in a dramatic loss of expression of sarcomeric genes and myocardial markers such as bmp4, nppa, smyd1b and late nkx2.5 mRNA. Rare residual CMs observed in mef2ca;mef2cb double mutants are ablated by a morpholino capable of knocking down other Mef2s. Mef2cb over-expression activates bmp4 within the cardiogenic region, but no ectopic CMs are formed. Surprisingly, anterior mesoderm and other tissues become skeletal muscle. Mef2ca single mutants have delayed heart development, but form an apparently normal heart. Mef2cb single mutants have a functional heart and are viable adults. Our results show that the key role of Mef2c in myocardial differentiation is conserved throughout the vertebrate heart. PMID:22750409

  6. The expression and correlation of Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 in serous middle ear effusion fluids of pediatric patients-a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyun Jin; Choe, Ji Won; Chang, Moon Young; Kim, Kyung Soo; Lee, Sei Young; Mun, Seog-Kyun

    2017-10-01

    Several cytokines and innate immune-associated molecules are present in middle ear effusions, but damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in middle ear effusion have not been studied. Therefore, we evaluated the role of heat shock proteins (Hsps) in the development of otitis media with effusion (OME). Serous middle ear effusions from 22 pediatric patients who were diagnosed with OME and underwent ventilation tube insertion from June 2015 to March 2017 were evaluated in our study. The levels of Hsp 90, 70, 27, IL-8, and TNF-α in effusion fluids were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The associations between the levels of these molecules and the degree of tympanic membrane inflammation were statistically evaluated. Finally, the relationships among these molecules were also evaluated. Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 were detected in all middle ear effusions, but Hsp 90 was detected in only five effusion fluid samples. IL-8 was also detected in all middle ear effusions, but TNF-α was detected in only four effusion fluid samples. When we compared the degree of tympanic membrane inflammation with the levels of Hsp 70, Hsp 27, and IL-8, which were detected in all effusion fluids, we could not find statistical significance. However, Hsp 70, Hsp 27, and IL-8 were significantly associated with each other (p < 0.05). Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 were expressed in middle ear effusions. Furthermore, the levels of Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 were positively correlated with each other, and were also positively associated with the neutrophil chemoattractant, IL-8. Our findings suggested that Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 might be involved in the pathophysiology of pediatric OME. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Predominant Bacteria Detected from the Middle Ear Fluid of Children Experiencing Otitis Media: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Chinh C; Massa, Helen M; Thornton, Ruth B; Cripps, Allan W

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is amongst the most common childhood diseases and is associated with multiple microbial pathogens within the middle ear. Global and temporal monitoring of predominant bacterial pathogens is important to inform new treatment strategies, vaccine development and to monitor the impact of vaccine implementation to improve progress toward global OM prevention. A systematic review of published reports of microbiology of acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) from January, 1970 to August 2014, was performed using PubMed databases. This review confirmed that Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, remain the predominant bacterial pathogens, with S. pneumoniae the predominant bacterium in the majority reports from AOM patients. In contrast, H. influenzae was the predominant bacterium for patients experiencing chronic OME, recurrent AOM and AOM with treatment failure. This result was consistent, even where improved detection sensitivity from the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) rather than bacterial culture was conducted. On average, PCR analyses increased the frequency of detection of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae 3.2 fold compared to culture, whilst Moraxella catarrhalis was 4.5 times more frequently identified by PCR. Molecular methods can also improve monitoring of regional changes in the serotypes and identification frequency of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae over time or after vaccine implementation, such as after introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Globally, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae remain the predominant otopathogens associated with OM as identified through bacterial culture; however, molecular methods continue to improve the frequency and accuracy of detection of individual serotypes. Ongoing monitoring with appropriate detection methods for OM pathogens can support development of improved vaccines to provide protection from the complex combination of otopathogens within

  8. Predominant Bacteria Detected from the Middle Ear Fluid of Children Experiencing Otitis Media: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Chinh C.; Massa, Helen M.; Thornton, Ruth B.; Cripps, Allan W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Otitis media (OM) is amongst the most common childhood diseases and is associated with multiple microbial pathogens within the middle ear. Global and temporal monitoring of predominant bacterial pathogens is important to inform new treatment strategies, vaccine development and to monitor the impact of vaccine implementation to improve progress toward global OM prevention. Methods A systematic review of published reports of microbiology of acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) from January, 1970 to August 2014, was performed using PubMed databases. Results This review confirmed that Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, remain the predominant bacterial pathogens, with S. pneumoniae the predominant bacterium in the majority reports from AOM patients. In contrast, H. influenzae was the predominant bacterium for patients experiencing chronic OME, recurrent AOM and AOM with treatment failure. This result was consistent, even where improved detection sensitivity from the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) rather than bacterial culture was conducted. On average, PCR analyses increased the frequency of detection of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae 3.2 fold compared to culture, whilst Moraxella catarrhalis was 4.5 times more frequently identified by PCR. Molecular methods can also improve monitoring of regional changes in the serotypes and identification frequency of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae over time or after vaccine implementation, such as after introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Conclusions Globally, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae remain the predominant otopathogens associated with OM as identified through bacterial culture; however, molecular methods continue to improve the frequency and accuracy of detection of individual serotypes. Ongoing monitoring with appropriate detection methods for OM pathogens can support development of improved vaccines to provide protection from the

  9. Otopathogens Detected in Middle Ear Fluid Obtained during Tympanostomy Tube Insertion: Contrasting Purulent and Non-Purulent Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Robert C.; Kirse, Daniel J.; Evans, Adele K.; Whigham, Amy S.; Peters, Timothy R.; Poehling, Katherine A.; Swords, William E.; Reid, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    Otitis media is a prominent disease among children. Previous literature indicates that otitis media is a polymicrobial disease, with Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Alloiococcus otitidis and Moraxella catarrhalis being the most commonly associated bacterial pathogens. Recent literature suggests that introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines has had an effect on the etiology of otitis media. Using a multiplex PCR procedure, we sought to investigate the presence of the aforementioned bacterial pathogens in middle ear fluid collected from children undergoing routine tympanostomy tube placement at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center during the period between January 2011 and March 2014. In purulent effusions, one or more bacterial organisms were detected in ~90% of samples. Most often the presence of H. influenzae alone was detected in purulent effusions (32%; 10 of 31). In non-purulent effusions, the most prevalent organism detected was A. otitidis (26%; 63 of 245). Half of the non-purulent effusions had none of these otopathogens detected. In purulent and non-purulent effusions, the overall presence of S. pneumoniae was lower (19%; 6 of 31, and 4%; 9 of 245, respectively) than that of the other pathogens being identified. The ratio of the percentage of each otopathogen identified in purulent vs. non-purulent effusions was >1 for the classic otopathogens but not for A. otitidis. PMID:26039250

  10. Differences in innate immune response gene regulation in the middle ear of children who are otitis prone and in those not otitis prone

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Janet; Pichichero, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Acute otitis media (AOM) causes an inflammatory response in the middle ear. We assessed differences in innate immune responses involved in bacterial defense at onset of AOM in children who were stringently defined as otitis prone (sOP) and children not otitis prone (NOP). Study Design: Innate immune genes analysis from middle ear fluid (MEF) samples of children. Methods: Genes of toll-like receptors (TLR), nod-like and retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors, downstream effectors important for inflammation and apoptosis, including cytokines and chemokines, were studied from MEF samples by using a real-time polymerase chain reaction array. Protein levels of differentially regulated genes were measured by Luminex. Results: Gene expression in MEF among children who were sOP was significantly different in upregulation of interleukin 8, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3, and in downregulation of interferon regulatory factor 7 and its related signaling molecules interferon alpha, Toll-like receptor adaptor molecule 2, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5, and mitogen-activated protein kinase 8 compared with children who were NOP. Differences in innate gene regulation were similar when AOM was caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae or nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Conclusion: Innate-immune response genes are differentially regulated in children who were sOP compared with children with NOP. PMID:28124644

  11. Ear Infections and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Joanne E.; Zeisel, Susan A.

    Ear infections in infants and preschoolers can cause mild or moderate temporary hearing loss, which may in turn affect a child's ability to understand and learn language. Noting that providing children with proper medical treatment for ear infections or middle ear fluid is important in preventing possible problems with language development, this…

  12. Ear Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common illness in infants and young children. Tinnitus, a roaring in your ears, can be the ... problems in your inner ear; its symptoms include tinnitus and dizziness. Ear barotrauma is an injury to ...

  13. Swimmer's Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eardrum Taking Care of Your Ears Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Your Ears What's Earwax? How Do Pain Relievers Work? View more About Us Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice ...

  14. Ear wax

    MedlinePlus

    See your provider if your ears are blocked with wax and you are unable to remove the wax. Also call if you have an ear wax blockage and you develop new symptoms, such as: Drainage from the ear Ear pain Fever Hearing loss that continues after you clean the wax

  15. Ear Pieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students make fanciful connections between art and medicine. This project challenges students to interpret "ear idioms" (e.g. "blow it out your ear," "in one ear and out the other") by relying almost entirely on realistic ear drawings, the placement of them, marks, and values. In that…

  16. Ear discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... swabs or other small objects into the ear Middle ear infection Other causes of ear discharge include: Eczema ... tube surgery - what to ask your doctor Images Ear anatomy Eardrum repair - series References Bauer CA, Jenkins HA. Otologic symptoms and syndromes. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et ...

  17. First report of a Staphylococcus caprae isolated from middle ear fluid of an infant with recurrent acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Elżbieta; Żychowski, Piotr; Juda, Marek; Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Niedzielska, Grażyna; Malm, Anna; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2017-09-21

    Staphylococcus caprae was originally isolated from goat milk. This uncommon coagulase-negative staphylococcus, usually associated with animals, has only infrequently been detected in human clinical specimens. Its association with acute otitis media has not been demonstrated so far. The study reports the first isolation of S. caprae from the middle ear fluid of a 12-month-old infant with recurrent, bilateral acute otitis media. Biochemical traits and susceptibility pattern of the isolated strain are also presented.

  18. Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and ... loss. How does otitis media affect a child’s hearing? All children with middle ear infection or fluid ...

  19. Middle ear infection (otitis media) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media is an inflammation or infection of the middle ear. Acute otitis media (acute ear infection) occurs when there is ... which causes production of fluid or pus. Chronic otitis media occurs when the eustachian tube becomes blocked ...

  20. Airplane Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... to severe hearing loss Ringing in your ear (tinnitus) Spinning sensation (vertigo) Vomiting resulting from vertigo Bleeding ... complications may include: Permanent hearing loss Ongoing (chronic) tinnitus Prevention Follow these tips to avoid airplane ear: ...

  1. Ear examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear anatomy Otoscopic exam of the ear References King EF, Couch ME. History, physical examination, and the ... commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer ...

  2. Elephant ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002867.htm Elephant ear poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Elephant ear plants are indoor or outdoor plants with ...

  3. Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protect your hearing by wearing earplugs at loud music concerts and around noisy machinery, like in wood ... More on this topic for: Kids Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? What Is an Ear Infection? ...

  4. Ear Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have OTITIS MEDIA, an infection of the middle ear. Self CareSee your doctor. Many ear infections will ... half-alcohol, half-white vinegar solution in the ear before and after swimming or ... JOINT (TMJ) SYNDROME, a disorder that affects the jaw joint, may ...

  5. Ear wax

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Ear wax only becomes a problem if it causes a hearing impairment or other ear-related symptoms. Ear wax is more likely to accumulate and cause a hearing impairment when normal extrusion is prevented — for example, by the use of hearing aids, or by the use of cotton buds to clean the ears. Ear wax can visually obscure the ear drum, and may need to be removed for diagnostic purposes. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of methods to remove ear wax? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found nine systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: ear syringing; manual removal (other than ear syringing); and wax softeners (alone or prior to syringing). PMID:19450340

  6. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1/20th of an inch) that could allow water to enter the middle ear, research studies show no benefit in keeping the ears dry and current guidelines do not recommend routine water precautions. Therefore, you do not need to restrict ...

  7. Ear tag

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ear tag or pit are: An inherited tendency to have this facial feature A genetic syndrome ... Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2016:chap 19. Review Date 4/24/2017 Updated by: Liora C Adler, MD, ...

  8. Swimmer's ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... often gets better with the proper treatment. Possible Complications The infection may spread to other areas around the ear, including the skull bone. In older people or those who have diabetes, the infection may become severe. This condition is ...

  9. Pierced Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... weeks. Then you can start enjoying your pierced ears again! Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD Date reviewed: September ... All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, ...

  10. Ear emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... and ruptured eardrums can be caused by: Inserting cotton swabs, toothpicks, pins, pens, or other objects into ... The person will have severe pain. Place sterile cotton gently in the outer ear canal to keep ...

  11. Numerical analysis of ossicular chain lesion of human ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingxi; Li, Sheng; Sun, Xiuzhen

    2009-04-01

    Lesion of ossicular chain is a common ear disease impairing the sense of hearing. A comprehensive numerical model of human ear can provide better understanding of sound transmission. In this study, we propose a three-dimensional finite element model of human ear that incorporates the canal, tympanic membrane, ossicular bones, middle ear suspensory ligaments/muscles, middle ear cavity and inner ear fluid. Numerical analysis is conducted and employed to predict the effects of middle ear cavity, malleus handle defect, hypoplasia of the long process of incus, and stapedial crus defect on sound transmission. The present finite element model is shown to be reasonable in predicting the ossicular mechanics of human ear.

  12. 78 FR 10691 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for the MeF letter

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... MeF letter AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments... the MeF letter, Mondernized e-File--Non-compliance with Mandate for Large Corporations to file... Number: MeF letter. Abstract: Service will contact those taxpayers who file paper income tax returns to...

  13. MEF2 Transcription Factors Regulate Distinct Gene Programs in Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Nelsa L.; Desjardins, Cody A.; Nocco, Sarah E.; Clark, Amanda L.; Maksimenko, Yevgeniy; Naya, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation requires precisely coordinated transcriptional regulation of diverse gene programs that ultimately give rise to the specialized properties of this cell type. In Drosophila, this process is controlled, in part, by MEF2, the sole member of an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor family. By contrast, vertebrate MEF2 is encoded by four distinct genes, Mef2a, -b, -c, and -d, making it far more challenging to link this transcription factor to the regulation of specific muscle gene programs. Here, we have taken the first step in molecularly dissecting vertebrate MEF2 transcriptional function in skeletal muscle differentiation by depleting individual MEF2 proteins in myoblasts. Whereas MEF2A is absolutely required for proper myoblast differentiation, MEF2B, -C, and -D were found to be dispensable for this process. Furthermore, despite the extensive redundancy, we show that mammalian MEF2 proteins regulate a significant subset of nonoverlapping gene programs. These results suggest that individual MEF2 family members are able to recognize specific targets among the entire cohort of MEF2-regulated genes in the muscle genome. These findings provide opportunities to modulate the activity of MEF2 isoforms and their respective gene programs in skeletal muscle homeostasis and disease. PMID:25416778

  14. The co-existence of transcriptional activator and transcriptional repressor MEF2 complexes influences tumor aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Di Giorgio, Eros; Franforte, Elisa; Cefalù, Sebastiano; Rossi, Sabrina; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Polano, Maurizio; Maestro, Roberta; Paluvai, Harikrishnareddy

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of MEF2 TFs to the tumorigenic process is still mysterious. Here we clarify that MEF2 can support both pro-oncogenic or tumor suppressive activities depending on the interaction with co-activators or co-repressors partners. Through these interactions MEF2 supervise histone modifications associated with gene activation/repression, such as H3K4 methylation and H3K27 acetylation. Critical switches for the generation of a MEF2 repressive environment are class IIa HDACs. In leiomyosarcomas (LMS), this two-faced trait of MEF2 is relevant for tumor aggressiveness. Class IIa HDACs are overexpressed in 22% of LMS, where high levels of MEF2, HDAC4 and HDAC9 inversely correlate with overall survival. The knock out of HDAC9 suppresses the transformed phenotype of LMS cells, by restoring the transcriptional proficiency of some MEF2-target loci. HDAC9 coordinates also the demethylation of H3K4me3 at the promoters of MEF2-target genes. Moreover, we show that class IIa HDACs do not bind all the regulative elements bound by MEF2. Hence, in a cell MEF2-target genes actively transcribed and strongly repressed can coexist. However, these repressed MEF2-targets are poised in terms of chromatin signature. Overall our results candidate class IIa HDACs and HDAC9 in particular, as druggable targets for a therapeutic intervention in LMS. PMID:28419090

  15. Ultrasound characterization of middle ear effusion.

    PubMed

    Seth, Rahul; Discolo, Christopher M; Palczewska, Grazyna M; Lewandowski, Jan J; Krakovitz, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    To further enhance and assess the ability to characterize middle ear effusion (MEE) using non-invasive ultrasound technology. This is a prospective unblinded comparison study. Fifty-six children between the ages of 6 months and 17 years scheduled to undergo bilateral myringotomy with pressure equalization tube placement were enrolled. With the child anesthetized, the probe was placed into the external ear canal after sterile water was inserted. Ultrasound recordings of middle ear contents were analyzed by computer algorithm. Middle ear fluid was collected during myringotomy and analyzed for bacterial culture and viscosity. Ultrasound waveforms yielded a computer algorithm interpretation of middle ear contents in 66% of ears tested. When a result was obtained, the sensitivity and specificity for successfully characterizing middle ear fluid content as either void of fluid, thick fluid (mucoid), or thin fluid (serous or purulent) were at least 94%. Mucoid effusions had higher measured viscosity values (P=.002). Viscosity measures were compared to culture result, and those with low viscosity (thin consistency) had a higher likelihood of having a positive culture (P=.048). The device sensitivity and specificity for fluid detection were 94% or greater among interpretable waveforms (66% of those tested). Although this technology provides important information of the middle ear effusion presence and characteristic, further technological improvements are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound Characterization of Middle Ear Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Rahul; Discolo, Christopher M; Palczewska, Grazyna M; Lewandowski, Jan J; Krakovitz, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To further enhance and assess the ability to characterize middle ear effusion (MEE) using non-invasive ultrasound technology. Materials and Methods This is a prospective unblinded comparison study. Fifty-six children between the ages of 6 months and 17 years scheduled to undergo bilateral myringotomy with pressure equalization tube placement were enrolled. With the child anesthetized, the probe was placed into the external ear canal after sterile water was inserted. Ultrasound recordings of middle ear contents were analyzed by computer algorithm. Middle ear fluid was collected during myringotomy and analyzed for bacterial culture and viscosity. Results Ultrasound waveforms yielded a computer algorithm interpretation of middle ear contents in 66% of ears tested. When a result was obtained, the sensitivity and specificity for successfully characterizing middle ear fluid content as either void of fluid, thick fluid (mucoid), or thin fluid (serous or purulent) was at least 94%. Mucoid effusions had higher measured viscosity values (P=0.002). Viscosity measures were compared to culture result, and those with low viscosity (thin consistency) had a higher likelihood of having a positive culture (P=0.048). Conclusion The device sensitivity and specificity for fluid detection was 94% or greater among interpretable waveforms (66% of those tested). Although this technology provides important information of the middle ear effusion presence and characteristic, further technological improvements are needed. PMID:23084430

  17. Ultra-high-field (9.4 T) MRI Analysis of Contrast Agent Transport Across the Blood-Perilymph Barrier and Intrastrial Fluid-Blood Barrier in the Mouse Inner Ear.

    PubMed

    Counter, S Allen; Nikkhou-Aski, Sahar; Damberg, Peter; Berglin, Cecilia Engmér; Laurell, Göran

    2017-08-01

    Effective paramagnetic contrast agent for the penetration of the perilymphatic spaces of the scala tympani, scala vestibuli, and scala media of the mouse inner ear can be determined using intravenous injection of various gadolinium (Gd) complexes and ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 9.4 Tesla. A number of contrast agents have been explored in experimental high-field MRI to determine the most effective Gd complex for ideal signal-to-noise ratio and maximal visualization of the in vivo mammalian inner ear in analyzing the temporal and spatial parameters involved in drug penetration of the blood-perilymph barrier and intrastrial fluid-blood barrier in the mouse model using MRI. Gadoteric acid (Dotarem), Gadobutrol (Gadovist), Gadodiamide (Omniscan), Gadopent acid (Magnevist), and Mangafodipir (Teslascan) were administered intravenously using the tail vein of 60 Balb/C mice. High-resolution T1 images of drug penetration were acquired with a horizontal 9.4 T Agilent magnet after intravenously injection. Signal intensity was used as a metric of temporal and spatial parameters of drug delivery and penetration of the perilymphatic and endolymphatic spaces. ANOVA analysis of the area under the curve of intensity enhancement in perilymph revealed a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the scalae uptake using different contrast agents (F (3,25) = 3.54, p = 0.029). The Gadoteric acid complex Dotarem was found to be the most effective Gd compound in terms of rapid, morphological enhancement for analysis of the temporal, and spatial distribution in the perilymphatic space of the inner ear. Gadoteric acid (Dotarem) demonstrated efficacy as a contrast agent for enhanced visualization of the perilymphatic spaces of the inner ear labyrinthine in the mouse, including the scala tympani and scala vestibuli of the cochlea, and the semicircular canals of the vestibular apparatus. These findings may inform the clinical application of Gd compounds in

  18. Swimmer's Ear (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... scratching the ear canal, vigorous ear cleaning with cotton swabs, or putting foreign objects like bobby pins ... Also, never put objects into kids' ears, including cotton-tipped swabs. How Is Swimmer's Ear Treated? Treatment ...

  19. Foxp2 controls synaptic wiring of corticostriatal circuits and vocal communication by opposing Mef2c.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chuan; Kuo, Hsiao-Ying; Bornschein, Ulrich; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Chen, Shih-Yun; Lu, Kuan-Ming; Yang, Hao-Yu; Chen, Gui-May; Lin, Jing-Ruei; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chou, Yun-Chia; Cheng, Sin-Jhong; Chien, Cheng-Ting; Enard, Wolfgang; Hevers, Wulf; Pääbo, Svante; Graybiel, Ann M; Liu, Fu-Chin

    2016-11-01

    Cortico-basal ganglia circuits are critical for speech and language and are implicated in autism spectrum disorder, in which language function can be severely affected. We demonstrate that in the mouse striatum, the gene Foxp2 negatively interacts with the synapse suppressor gene Mef2c. We present causal evidence that Mef2c inhibition by Foxp2 in neonatal mouse striatum controls synaptogenesis of corticostriatal inputs and vocalization in neonates. Mef2c suppresses corticostriatal synapse formation and striatal spinogenesis, but can itself be repressed by Foxp2 through direct DNA binding. Foxp2 deletion de-represses Mef2c, and both intrastriatal and global decrease of Mef2c rescue vocalization and striatal spinogenesis defects of Foxp2-deletion mutants. These findings suggest that Foxp2-Mef2C signaling is critical to corticostriatal circuit formation. If found in humans, such signaling defects could contribute to a range of neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. Foxp2 Controls Synaptic Wiring of Corticostriatal Circuits and Vocal Communication by Opposing Mef2C

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Chuan; Kuo, Hsiao-Ying; Bornschein, Ulrich; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Chen, Shih-Yun; Lu, Kuan-Ming; Yang, Hao-Yu; Chen, Gui-May; Lin, Jing-Ruei; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chou, Yun-Chia; Cheng, Sin-Jhong; Chien, Cheng-Ting; Enard, Wolfgang; Hevers, Wulf; Pääbo, Svante; Graybiel, Ann M.; Liu, Fu-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Cortico-basal ganglia circuits are critical for speech and language and are implicated in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), in which language function can be severely affected. We demonstrate that in the striatum, the gene, Foxp2, negatively interacts with the synapse suppressor, Mef2C. We present causal evidence that Mef2C inhibition by Foxp2 in neonatal mouse striatum controls synaptogenesis of corticostriatal inputs and vocalization in neonates. Mef2C suppresses corticostriatal synapse formation and striatal spinogenesis, but can, itself, be repressed by Foxp2 through direct DNA binding. Foxp2 deletion de-represses Mef2C, and both intrastriatal and global decrease of Mef2C rescue vocalization and striatal spinogenesis defects of Foxp2-deletion mutants. These findings suggest that Foxp2-Mef2C signaling is critical to corticostriatal circuit formation. If found in humans, such signaling defects could contribute to a range of neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27595386

  1. Requirement of MEF2A, C, and D for skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning; Nelson, Benjamin R.; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of adult skeletal muscle following injury occurs through the activation of satellite cells, an injury-sensitive muscle stem cell population that proliferates, differentiates, and fuses with injured myofibers. Members of the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors play essential roles in muscle differentiation during embryogenesis, but their potential contributions to adult muscle regeneration have not been systematically explored. To investigate the potential involvement of MEF2 factors in muscle regeneration, we conditionally deleted the Mef2a, c, and d genes, singly and in combination, within satellite cells in mice, using tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase under control of the satellite cell-specific Pax7 promoter. We show that deletion of individual Mef2 genes has no effect on muscle regeneration in response to cardiotoxin injury. However, combined deletion of the Mef2a, c, and d genes results in a blockade to regeneration. Satellite cell-derived myoblasts lacking MEF2A, C, and D proliferate normally in culture, but cannot differentiate. The absence of MEF2A, C, and D in satellite cells is associated with aberrant expression of a broad collection of known and unique protein-coding and long noncoding RNA genes. These findings reveal essential and redundant roles of MEF2A, C, and D in satellite cell differentiation and identify a MEF2-dependent transcriptome associated with skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:24591619

  2. ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of MEF2D Promotes Neuronal Survival after DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shing Fai; Sances, Sam; Brill, Laurence M.; Okamoto, Shu-ichi; Zaidi, Rameez; McKercher, Scott R.; Akhtar, Mohd W.; Nakanishi, Nobuki

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, which encodes a kinase critical for the normal DNA damage response, cause the neurodegenerative disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). The substrates of ATM in the brain are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ATM phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), which plays a critical role in promoting survival of cerebellar granule cells. ATM associates with MEF2D after DNA damage and phosphorylates the transcription factor at four ATM consensus sites. Knockdown of endogenous MEF2D with a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) increases sensitivity to etoposide-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death. Interestingly, substitution of endogenous MEF2D with an shRNA-resistant phosphomimetic MEF2D mutant protects cerebellar granule cells from cell death after DNA damage, whereas an shRNA-resistant nonphosphorylatable MEF2D mutant does not. In vivo, cerebella in Mef2d knock-out mice manifest increased susceptibility to DNA damage. Together, our results show that MEF2D is a substrate for phosphorylation by ATM, thus promoting survival in response to DNA damage. Moreover, dysregulation of the ATM–MEF2D pathway may contribute to neurodegeneration in AT. PMID:24672010

  3. Primary Tumor and MEF Cell Isolation to Study Lung Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shengli; Maziveyi, Mazvita; Alahari, Suresh K

    2015-05-20

    In breast tumorigenesis, the metastatic stage of the disease poses the greatest threat to the affected individual. Normal breast cells with altered genotypes now possess the ability to invade and survive in other tissues. In this protocol, mouse mammary tumors are removed and primary cells are prepared from tumors. The cells isolated from this procedure are then available for gene profiling experiments. For successful metastasis, these cells must be able to intravasate, survive in circulation, extravasate to distant organs, and survive in that new organ system. The lungs are the typical target of breast cancer metastasis. A set of genes have been discovered that mediates the selectivity of metastasis to the lung. Here we describe a method of studying lung metastasis from a genetically engineered mouse model.. Furthermore, another protocol for analyzing mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from the mouse embryo is included. MEF cells from the same animal type provide a clue of non-cancer cell gene expression. Together, these techniques are useful in studying mouse mammary tumorigenesis, its associated signaling mechanisms and pathways of the abnormalities in embryos.

  4. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Debris removal, antibiotic ear drops, keeping water and cotton swabs out of the ear, and pain relievers ... Injuring the ear canal while cleaning it (using cotton swabs) or getting water or irritants, such as ...

  5. Ear Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inserting something into the ear. Things like a cotton swab, fingernail, or pencil can scratch the ear ... Never stick anything in their ears — not even cotton swabs or their fingers. Regular bathing should be ...

  6. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario

    2009-10-09

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-inducedmore » MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal {alpha}-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression.« less

  7. Galpha13 regulates MEF2-dependent gene transcription in endothelial cells: role in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoquan; Han, Jingyan; Profirovic, Jasmina; Strekalova, Elena; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A

    2009-01-01

    The alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G13 protein is required for the embryonic angiogenesis (Offermanns et al., Science 275:533-536, 1997). However, the molecular mechanism of Galpha13-dependent angiogenesis is not understood. Here, we show that myocyte-specific enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) mediates Galpha13-dependent angiogenesis. Our data showed that constitutively activated Galpha13Q226L stimulated MEF2-dependent gene transcription. In addition, downregulation of endogenous Galpha13 inhibited thrombin-stimulated MEF2-dependent gene transcription in endothelial cells. Both Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV) and histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) were involved in Galpha13-mediated MEF2-dependent gene transcription. Galpha13Q226L also increased Ca(2+)/calmodulin-independent CaMKIV activity, while dominant negative mutant of CaMKIV inhibited MEF2-dependent gene transcription induced by Galpha13Q226L. Furthermore, Galpha13Q226L was able to derepress HDAC5-mediated repression of gene transcription and induce the translocation of HDAC5 from nucleus to cytoplasm. Finally, downregulation of endogenous Galpha13 and MEF2 proteins in endothelial cells reduced cell proliferation and capillary tube formation. Decrease of endothelial cell proliferation that was caused by the Galpha13 downregulation was partially restored by the constitutively active MEF2-VP16. Our studies suggest that MEF2 proteins are an important component in Galpha13-mediated angiogenesis.

  8. Mef2d is essential for the maturation and integrity of retinal photoreceptor and bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yoshihiro; Kitamura, Tamiki; Yoshida, Satoyo; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Chaya, Taro; Irie, Shoichi; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2015-05-01

    Mef2 transcription factors play a crucial role in cardiac and skeletal muscle differentiation. We found that Mef2d is highly expressed in the mouse retina and its loss causes photoreceptor degeneration similar to that observed in human retinitis pigmentosa patients. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were severely impaired in Mef2d-/- mice. Immunohistochemistry showed that photoreceptor and bipolar cell synapse protein levels severely decreased in the Mef2d-/- retina. Expression profiling by microarray analysis showed that Mef2d is required for the expression of various genes in photoreceptor and bipolar cells, including cone arrestin, Guca1b, Pde6h and Cacna1s, which encode outer segment and synapse proteins. We also observed that Mef2d synergistically activates the cone arrestin (Arr3) promoter with Crx, suggesting that functional cooperation between Mef2d and Crx is important for photoreceptor cell gene regulation. Taken together, our results show that Mef2d is essential for photoreceptor and bipolar cell gene expression, either independently or cooperatively with Crx. © 2015 Institution for Protein Research. Genes to Cells published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and the Molecular Biology Society of Japan.

  9. Postnatal Loss of Mef2c Results in Dissociation of Effects on Synapse Number and Learning and Memory.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Megumi; Lin, Pei-Yi; Pranav, Heena; Monteggia, Lisa M

    2016-07-15

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors play critical roles in diverse cellular processes during central nervous system development. Studies attempting to address the role of MEF2 in brain have largely relied on overexpression of a constitutive MEF2 construct that impairs memory formation or knockdown of MEF2 function that increases spine numbers and enhances memory formation. Genetic deletion of individual MEF2 isoforms in brain during embryogenesis demonstrated that Mef2c loss negatively regulates spine numbers resulting in learning and memory deficits, possibly as a result of its essential role in development. To investigate MEF2C function in brain further, we genetically deleted Mef2c during postnatal development in mice. We characterized these conditional Mef2c knockout mice in an array of behavioral paradigms and examined the impact of postnatal loss of Mef2c on long-term potentiation. We observed increased spine numbers in hippocampus of the conditional Mef2c knockout mice. However, the postnatal loss of Mef2c did not impact learning and memory, long-term potentiation, or social and repetitive behaviors. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for MEF2C in the regulation of spine numbers with a dissociation of learning and memory, synaptic plasticity, and measures of autism-related behaviors in postnatal brain. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Could ionizing radiation forestall cauliflower ear?

    PubMed

    Hwang, K; Kim, C W; Lee, S I; Park, I S; Kim, W C; Loh, J J

    2001-02-01

    Repeated trauma to the ear very often results in "cauliflower ear." Many methods have been suggested to prevent an injured ear from demonstrating a cauliflowerlike deformity. The principles of treatment are evacuation of the hematoma, control of the reaccumulation of fluid, and maintenance of the cartilage contour. The authors studied the effect of ionizing radiation on deformed rabbit ears induced by repeated trauma. Twenty ears (10 rabbits) were used in the experiment. The animals were divided into four groups (control, preradiation, low dose, and high dose). Hematoma was produced by pounding the lateral side of the auricle 10 times with a 50-g weight at a height of 15 cm. The thickness of the injured and uninjured sites was measured, and histological analysis was performed for each group. The thickness of the ears of the irradiated groups was significantly less than the control group. The authors think that radiation treatment of repeatedly injured ears could prevent ear deformity, and could possibly be an adjunctive form of management of cauliflower ear in addition to hematoma evacuation and compression therapy.

  11. Genomic analyses identify recurrent MEF2D fusions in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhaohui; Churchman, Michelle; Roberts, Kathryn; Li, Yongjin; Liu, Yu; Harvey, Richard C.; McCastlain, Kelly; Reshmi, Shalini C.; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Shao, Ying; Chen, I-Ming; Valentine, Marcus; Pei, Deqing; Mungall, Karen L.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Ma, Yussanne; Moore, Richard; Marra, Marco; Stonerock, Eileen; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Dai, Yunfeng; Wood, Brent; Borowitz, Michael; Larsen, Eric E.; Maloney, Kelly; Mattano Jr, Leonard A.; Angiolillo, Anne; Salzer, Wanda L.; Burke, Michael J.; Gianni, Francesca; Spinelli, Orietta; Radich, Jerald P.; Minden, Mark D.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Patel, Bella; Fielding, Adele K.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Luger, Selina M.; Bhatia, Ravi; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Forman, Stephen J.; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Stock, Wendy; Kornblau, Steven; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Konopleva, Marina; Paietta, Elisabeth; Willman, Cheryl L.; L. Loh, Mignon; P. Hunger, Stephen; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are initiating events in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Here using RNA sequencing of 560 ALL cases, we identify rearrangements between MEF2D (myocyte enhancer factor 2D) and five genes (BCL9, CSF1R, DAZAP1, HNRNPUL1 and SS18) in 22 B progenitor ALL (B-ALL) cases with a distinct gene expression profile, the most common of which is MEF2D-BCL9. Examination of an extended cohort of 1,164 B-ALL cases identified 30 cases with MEF2D rearrangements, which include an additional fusion partner, FOXJ2; thus, MEF2D-rearranged cases comprise 5.3% of cases lacking recurring alterations. MEF2D-rearranged ALL is characterized by a distinct immunophenotype, DNA copy number alterations at the rearrangement sites, older diagnosis age and poor outcome. The rearrangements result in enhanced MEF2D transcriptional activity, lymphoid transformation, activation of HDAC9 expression and sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment. Thus, MEF2D-rearranged ALL represents a distinct form of high-risk leukaemia, for which new therapeutic approaches should be considered. PMID:27824051

  12. Serogroup 19 pneumococci containing both mef and erm macrolide resistance determinants in an American city.

    PubMed

    Toltzis, Philip; Dul, Michael; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Jacobs, Michael R; Blumer, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Asia has experienced a striking incidence of infection by highly resistant pneumococi containing both principal macrolide resistance determinants, namely, the mef efflux pump and the erm ribosomal methylase. mef/erm-containing pneumococci have not been identified in significant numbers in North America. Pneumococci were isolated as part of a larger study in Cleveland, OH examining colonization patterns among children randomized to 1 of 4 outpatient antibiotics for acute otitis media. Azithromycin-resistant organisms were tested for the presence of mef and erm sequences by polymerase chain reaction. The clonal relationship of pneumococci containing both genes was determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence testing. Selected characteristics of children harboring mef/erm-containing organisms were compared with other participants of the larger study. Of 221 children colonized by pneumococci, 17 (7.7%) were colonized with an organism containing both determinants. All mef/erm-positive organisms demonstrated azithromycin minimum inhibitory concentrations > or =256 microg/mL and were coresistant to all other agents tested. The mef/erm-containing organisms were serotype 19A and 19F, all but 1 of which manifested similar pulsed field gel electrophoresis patterns. Multilocus sequence testing analysis indicated a relationship to the Taiwan-14 macrolide-resistant strain that has spread throughout Eastern Asia. More than one-third of children colonized by a mef/erm-containing organism had received > or =1 dose of conjugate pneumococcal vaccine, a significantly higher proportion than children carrying less resistant organisms (P< 0.01). No other characteristics distinguished children harboring a mef/erm-containing pneumococcus from other children enrolled in the larger study. Clonally related mef/erm-containing serogroup 19 pneumococci were prominent among otherwise healthy children in a North American metropolitan area. Our findings suggest that spread

  13. Predominant role of msr(D) over mef(A) in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okada, Ryo; Hata, Nanako; Matsumoto, Masakado; Isaka, Masanori; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the number of patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is reported to be increasing. mef(A) gene-positive macrolide-resistant emm1 strains are thought to possibly contribute to the rise in the frequency of STSS. Although analyses of macrolide-resistant mechanisms, including mef(A) resistance, have been performed mainly in Streptococcus pneumoniae, the role of this gene in Streptococcus pyogenes has not been completely investigated. Therefore, to the best of our knowledge, we established the first mef(A)-knockout strain using an emm1-type S. pyogenes strain, and tested its susceptibility to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin. We found that the antimicrobial susceptibilities were almost identical to those of the parental strain. Hence, we established a knockout strain for another gene, msr(D), that is located immediately downstream of mef(A). The macrolide resistances of the resulting strain significantly decreased, and were further altered when both mef(A) and msr(D) were knocked out. The introduction of the msr(D) gene into a macrolide-sensitive strain conferred more resistance than the introduction of the mef(A) gene. The erythromycin susceptibilities of knockout strains were further dissected using two additional emm4- and emm75-type S. pyogenes strains. We found almost identical results for both strains except for the mef(A) knockout emm4 type, whose susceptibility was altered, although the change was less than that for the msr(D) knockout. These results suggest that both mef(A) and msr(D) are involved in macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes, and that the msr(D) gene plays a more predominant role in macrolide resistance than mef(A).

  14. Pokemon promotes the invasiveness of hepatocellular carcinoma by enhancing MEF2D transcription.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Li, Xiangqian; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2016-05-01

    Pokemon, a master oncogene crucial for the tumorigenicity and progression of a variety of cancers, has been demonstrated to enhance the proliferation and survival of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the contribution of Pokemon to the invasiveness of HCC has not yet been studied. In this study, we employed HCC cells to investigate the role of Pokemon in the invasion of HCC with multidisciplinary approaches. Pokemon overexpression was found to be closely associated with invasion and intrahepatic metastasis of HCC in clinical specimens. Suppression of Pokemon attenuated the invasion of HCC cells by in vitro transwell and wound-healing assays. Myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), an oncogene that can promote the invasiveness of HCC, was found to be underexpressed during Pokemon silencing in HCC cells. Restoration of MEF2D abolished the effect of Pokemon downregulation on the migration of HCC cells. Further experiments verified that Pokemon binds two putative recognition sites located within the upstream region of the MEF2D promoter and enhances its transcription. The association between Pokemon and MEF2D was further confirmed in HCC specimens. Animal experiments further confirmed that Pokemon downregulation attenuated the metastasis of HCC cells in mice. Collectively, Pokemon was found to enhance the migration and invasion of HCC by increasing MEF2D expression. Thus, targeting Pokemon and MEF2D may be an effective strategy to suppress the metastasis of HCC.

  15. Next-Generation Sequencing Combined with Specific PCR Assays To Determine the Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene Profiles of Middle Ear Fluid Collected from Children with Acute Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Kramna, Lenka; Oikarinen, Sami; Sipilä, Markku; Rautiainen, Markus; Aittoniemi, Janne; Laranne, Jussi; Hyöty, Heikki; Cinek, Ondrej

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of the study was to analyze the bacteriome of acute otitis media with a novel modification of next-generation sequencing techniques. Outpatient children with acute otitis media were enrolled in the study, and middle ear fluids were collected during 90 episodes from 79 subjects aged 5 to 42 months (median age, 19 months). The bacteriome profiles of middle ear fluid samples were determined by a nested-PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene (V4 region), followed by mass sequencing. The profiling results were compared to the results of specific PCR assays targeting selected prevalent pathogens. Bacteriome profiling using nested amplification of low-volume samples was aided by a bioinformatic subtraction of signal contaminants from the recombinant polymerase, achieving a sensitivity slightly lower than that of specific PCR detection. Streptococcus pneumoniae was detected in 28 (31%) samples, Haemophilus influenzae in 24 (27%), Moraxella catarrhalis in 18 (20%), Staphylococcus spp. in 21 (23%), Turicella otitidis in 5 (5.6%), Alloiococcus otitidis in 3 (3.3%), and other bacteria in 14 (16%) using bacteriome profiling. S. pneumoniae was the dominant pathogen in 14 (16%) samples, H. influenzae in 15 (17%), M. catarrhalis in 5 (5.6%), T. otitidis in 2, and Staphylococcus auricularis in 2. Weaker signals of Prevotella melaninogenica, Veillonella dispar, and Veillonella montpellierensis were noted in several samples. Fourteen samples (16%) were not explainable by bacterial pathogens; novel causative agents were not detected. In conclusion, unbiased bacteriome profiling helped in depicting the true mutual quantitative ratios of ear bacteria, but at present, its complicated protocol impedes its routine clinical use. IMPORTANCE Although S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and M. catarrhalis have been long established as the most important pathogens in acute otitis media using culture and specific PCR assays, the knowledge of their mutual quantitative relations

  16. IGF-1 deficiency causes atrophic changes associated with upregulation of VGluT1 and downregulation of MEF2 transcription factors in the mouse cochlear nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Santamaría, V; Alvarado, J C; Rodríguez-de la Rosa, L; Murillo-Cuesta, S; Contreras, J; Juiz, J M; Varela-Nieto, I

    2016-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a neurotrophic protein that plays a crucial role in modulating neuronal function and synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. Mice lacking the Igf1 gene exhibit profound deafness and multiple anomalies in the inner ear and spiral ganglion. An issue that remains unknown is whether, in addition to these peripheral abnormalities, IGF-1 deficiency also results in structural changes along the central auditory pathway that may contribute to an imbalance between excitation and inhibition, which might be reflected in abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABR). To assess such a possibility, we evaluated the morphological and physiological alterations in the cochlear nucleus complex of the adult mouse. The expression and distribution of the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1) and the vesicular inhibitory transporter (VGAT), which were used as specific markers for labeling excitatory and inhibitory terminals, and the involvement of the activity-dependent myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors in regulating excitatory synapses were assessed in a 4-month-old mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency and neurosensorial deafness (Igf1 (-/-) homozygous null mice). The results demonstrate decreases in the cochlear nucleus area and cell size along with cell loss in the cochlear nuclei of the deficient mouse. Additionally, our results demonstrate that there is upregulation of VGluT1, but not VGAT, immunostaining and downregulation of MEF2 transcription factors together with increased wave II amplitude in the ABR recording. Our observations provide evidence of an abnormal neuronal cytoarchitecture in the cochlear nuclei of Igf1 (-/-) null mice and suggest that the increased efficacy of glutamatergic synapses might be mediated by MEF2 transcription factors.

  17. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... Chole RA. Chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, and petrositis. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  18. Ear drainage culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed. Your health care provider will use a cotton swab to collect the sample from inside the ... Using a cotton swab to take a sample of drainage from the outer ear is not painful. However, ear pain may ...

  19. Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... t help, your doctor might prescribe a stronger pain reliever. You'll use this only for a short time — until the ear drops and antibiotics begin to work. To protect your ear while it heals, your ...

  20. Taking Care of Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Audiologist Perforated Eardrum What's Hearing Loss? Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? What Is an Ear Infection? Swimmer's Ear Your Ears What's Earwax? View more About Us Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice ...

  1. Pokemon and MEF2D co-operationally promote invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Hong, Xing-Yu; Li, Tao; He, Cheng-Yan

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human malignancy, and frequent invasion and metastasis is closely associated with its poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion is still not completely elucidated. Pokemon is a well-established oncogene for HCC growth, but its contribution to HCC invasion has not been studied yet. In this paper, Pokemon was found to be overexpressed in MHCC-97H HCC cell line, which possesses higher invasiveness. Downregulation of Pokemon abolished the invasion of MHCC-97H HCC cell lines. Pokemon overexpression was able to enhance the invasion of MHCC-97L cells with lower invasiveness. MEF2D, an oncogene promoting the invasion of HCC cells, was further detected to be upregulated and downregulated when Pokemon was overexpressed and silenced, respectively. Online database analysis indicated that one Pokemon recognition site was located within the promoter of MEF2D. Chromatin co-precipitation, luciferase, and qPCR assays all proved that Pokemon can promote the expression of MEF2D in HCC cells. Restoration of MEF2D expression can prevent the impaired invasion of HCC cells with Pokemon silencing, while suppression of MEF2D abolished the effect of Pokemon overexpression on HCC invasion. More interestingly, MEF2D was also found to increase the transcription of Pokemon by binding myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) sites within its promoter region, implying an auto-regulatory circuit consisting of these two oncogenes that can promote HCC invasion. Our findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion, and provided evidence that targeting this molecular loop may be a promising strategy for anti-invasion therapy.

  2. Preventing Cauliflower Ear with a Modified Tie-Through Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimeff, Robert J.; Hough, David O.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a quick, simple tie-through suture technique (in which a collodion packing is secured to the auricle with two buttons) for preventing cauliflower ear following external ear trauma in wrestlers and boxers. The technique ensures constant compression; multiple treatments for fluid reaccumulation are rarely necessary. (SM)

  3. Analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae isolated from middle ear fluid before and after the introduction of government subsidies for pneumococcal and H. influenzae type b vaccines in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Noriko; Fukasawa, Chie; Hirose, Shoko; Okui, Hideyuki; Sato, Hiroko; Sato, Mari; Arimoto, Yukiko; Nakano, Atsuko; Ishiwada, Naruhiko

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to identify trends in frequency, serotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae isolated from middle ear fluid specimens of children aged≤15 years (mean, 2 years), before and after the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and the H. influenzae type b vaccine, at a pediatric facility in Japan. Sixty-six S. pneumoniae and 88 H. influenzae strains were isolated from 820 middle ear fluid samples. Serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed. The study time-frame was divided into period 1 (2007-2010) and period 2 (2011-2014), according to the availability of vaccine public funding. The S. pneumoniae detection rate decreased from 9.6% in period 1-6.1% in period 2 (p = 0.042). PCV7 serotypes decreased from 56.8% to 9.1% (p = 0.0002). No significant change was observed for the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) serotypes: 72.7% in period 1 and 59.1% in period 2. Penicillin-resistant strains (penicillin G-MIC ≥2 μg/mL) decreased from 25% to 4.5% (p = 0.038). Detection rates for H. influenzae did not change significantly: 10.3% in period 1 and 11.3% in period 2. Serotypes were mostly non-typeable: 97.9% in period 1 and 90.2% in period 2, and only one serotype b strain was isolated in each period. The frequency of ampicillin-resistant strains (MIC ≥4 μg/mL) did not change. These results show a preventative effect of PCV7 on otitis media due to S. pneumoniae. PCV7 was replaced with PCV13 in 2013 in Japan; therefore, a further decrease in pneumococcal otitis media is anticipated in the future. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cauliflower ear dissection.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masao; Suzuki, Ayano; Nagata, Takeshi; Fukamizu, Hidekazu

    2011-11-01

    Cauliflower ear (CE) is caused by repeated direct trauma to the external ear. Surgical correction of an established CE is one of the most challenging problems in ear reconstruction. However, no reports have clarified the dissection of an established CE in detail. In this report, the dissection of a CE is described based on macroscopic, microscopic and imaging features. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inner ear contribution to bone conduction hearing in the human.

    PubMed

    Stenfelt, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Bone conduction (BC) hearing relies on sound vibration transmission in the skull bone. Several clinical findings indicate that in the human, the skull vibration of the inner ear dominates the response for BC sound. Two phenomena transform the vibrations of the skull surrounding the inner ear to an excitation of the basilar membrane, (1) inertia of the inner ear fluid and (2) compression and expansion of the inner ear space. The relative importance of these two contributors were investigated using an impedance lumped element model. By dividing the motion of the inner ear boundary in common and differential motion it was found that the common motion dominated at frequencies below 7 kHz but above this frequency differential motion was greatest. When these motions were used to excite the model it was found that for the normal ear, the fluid inertia response was up to 20 dB greater than the compression response. This changed in the pathological ear where, for example, otosclerosis of the stapes depressed the fluid inertia response and improved the compression response so that inner ear compression dominated BC hearing at frequencies above 400 Hz. The model was also able to predict experimental and clinical findings of BC sensitivity in the literature, for example the so called Carhart notch in otosclerosis, increased BC sensitivity in superior semicircular canal dehiscence, and altered BC sensitivity following a vestibular fenestration and RW atresia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlation between genetic features of the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Luca Agostino; Di Luca, Maria Chiara; Prenna, Manuela; Petrelli, Dezemona

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the genetic variation within mef(A)-msr(D) determinants of efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes and the level of erythromycin resistance. Twenty-eight mef(A)-positive strains were selected according to erythromycin MIC (4-32 μg/mL), and their mef(A)-msr(D) regions were sequenced. Strains were classified according to the bacteriophage carrying mef(A)-msr(D). A new Φm46.1 genetic variant was found in 8 strains out of 28 and named VP_00501.1. Degree of allelic variation was higher in mef(A) than in msr(D). Hotspots for recombination were mapped within the locus that could have shaped the apparent mosaic structure of the region. There was a general correlation between mef(A)-msr(D) sequence and erythromycin resistance level. However, lysogenic conversion of susceptible strains by mef(A)-msr(D)-carrying Φm46.1 indicated that key determinants may not all reside within the mef(A)-msr(D) locus and that horizontal gene transfer could contribute to changes in the level of antibiotic resistance in S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MEF2 Cooperates With Forskolin/cAMP and GATA4 to Regulate Star Gene Expression in Mouse MA-10 Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Daems, Caroline; Di-Luoffo, Mickaël; Paradis, Élise; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2015-07-01

    In Leydig cells, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) participates in cholesterol shuttling from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. Steroid hormone biosynthesis and steroidogenic gene expression are regulated by LH, which activates various signaling pathways and transcription factors, including cAMP/Ca(2+)/CAMK (Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase)-myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2). The 4 MEF2 transcription factors are essential regulators of cell differentiation and organogenesis in numerous tissues. Recently, MEF2 was identified in Sertoli and Leydig cells of the testis. Here, we report that MEF2 regulates steroidogenesis in mouse MA-10 Leydig cells by acting on the Star gene. In MA-10 cells depleted of MEF2 using siRNAs (small interfering RNAs), STAR protein levels, Star mRNA levels, and promoter activity were significantly decreased. On its own, MEF2 did not activate the mouse Star promoter but was found to cooperate with forskolin/cAMP. By chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA precipitation assays, we confirmed MEF2 binding to a consensus element located at -232 bp of the Star promoter. Mutation or deletion of the MEF2 element reduced but did not abrogate the MEF2/cAMP cooperation, indicating that MEF2 cooperates with other DNA-bound transcription factor(s). We identified GATA4 (GATA binding protein 4) as a partner for MEF2 in Leydig cells, because mutation of the GATA element abrogated the MEF2/cAMP cooperation on a reporter lacking a MEF2 element. MEF2 and GATA4 interact as revealed by coimmunoprecipitation, and MEF2 and GATA4 transcriptionally cooperate on the Star promoter. Altogether, our results define MEF2 as a novel regulator of steroidogenesis and Star transcription in Leydig cells and identify GATA4 as a key partner for MEF2-mediated action.

  8. The role of MEF2 transcription factors in dehydration and anoxia survival in Rana sylvatica skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hoyeck, Myriam P.; Hadj-Moussa, Hanane

    2017-01-01

    The wood frog (Rana sylvatica) can endure freezing of up to 65% of total body water during winter. When frozen, wood frogs enter a dormant state characterized by a cessation of vital functions (i.e., no heartbeat, blood circulation, breathing, brain activity, or movement). Wood frogs utilize various behavioural and biochemical adaptations to survive extreme freezing and component anoxia and dehydration stresses, including a global suppression of metabolic functions and gene expression. The stress-responsive myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) transcription factor family regulates the selective expression of genes involved in glucose transport, protein quality control, and phosphagen homeostasis. This study examined the role of MEF2A and MEF2C proteins as well as select downstream targets (glucose transporter-4, calreticulin, and muscle and brain creatine kinase isozymes) in 40% dehydration and 24 h anoxia exposure at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels using qRT-PCR, immunoblotting, and subcellular localization. Mef2a/c transcript levels remained constant during dehydration and anoxia. Total, cytoplasmic, and nuclear MEF2A/C and phospho-MEF2A/C protein levels remained constant during dehydration, whereas a decrease in total MEF2C levels was observed during rehydration. Total and phospho-MEF2A levels remained constant during anoxia, whereas total MEF2C levels decreased during 24 h anoxia and P-MEF2C levels increased during 4 h anoxia. In contrast, cytoplasmic MEF2A levels and nuclear phospho-MEF2A/C levels were upregulated during anoxia. MEF2 downstream targets remained constant during dehydration and anoxia, with the exception of glut4 which was upregulated during anoxia. These results suggest that the upregulated MEF2 response reported in wood frogs during freezing may in part stem from their cellular responses to surviving prolonged anoxia, rather than dehydration, leading to an increase in GLUT4 expression which may have an important

  9. Preventing Cauliflower Ear With a Modified Tie-Through Technique.

    PubMed

    Dimeff, R J; Hough, D O

    1989-03-01

    In brief: Hematoma following trauma to the external ear is a common problem among wrestlers and boxers. If the hematoma is not treated promptly, infection, fibrosis, scarring, and calcification may develop, leading to the gross deformity known as cauliflower ear or wrestler's ear. Evacuation of the hematoma followed by compression of the auricle is commonly regarded as the treatment of choice. However, fluid frequently reaccumulates after this procedure. The authors describe a tie-through suture technique in which a collodion packing is secured to the auricle with two buttons. Multiple treatments for fluid reaccumulation are rarely necessary when this technique is used.

  10. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... eardrum may cause some hearing loss. But most children do not have long-term damage to their hearing or speech, even when the ... not go away with treatment, or if a child has many ear infections ... or that damages nearby nerves Injury to the ear after sudden ...

  11. Inner ear disorders.

    PubMed

    Smouha, Eric

    2013-01-01

    To present a framework for the diagnosis and treatment of inner ear disorders, with an emphasis on problems common to neuro-rehabilitation. Disorders of the inner ear can cause hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and imbalance. Hearing loss can be conductive, sensorineural, or mixed; conductive hearing loss arises from the ear canal or middle ear, while sensorineural hearing loss arises from the inner ear or auditory nerve. Vertigo is a hallucination of motion, and is the cardinal symptom of vestibular system disease. It should be differentiated from other causes of dizziness: gait imbalance, disequilibrium, lightheadedness (pre-syncope). Vertigo can be caused by problems in the inner ear or central nervous system. The diagnosis of inner ear disorders begins with a targeted physical examination. The initial work-up of hearing loss is made by audiometry, and vertigo by electronystagmography (ENG). Supplemental tests and MRI are obtained when clinically indicated. The clinical pattern and duration of vertigo are the most important clinical features in the diagnosis. Common inner ear causes of vertigo include: vestibular neuritis (sudden, unilateral vestibular loss), Meniere's disease (episodic vertigo), benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and bilateral vestibular loss. Common central nervous system causes of vertigo include: post concussion syndrome, cervical vertigo, vestibular migraine, cerebrovascular disease, and acoustic neuroma. A basic knowledge of vestibular physiology, coupled with a understanding of common vestibular syndromes, will lead to correct diagnosis and treatment in most cases.

  12. Computational Modeling of Blast Wave Transmission Through Human Ear.

    PubMed

    Leckness, Kegan; Nakmali, Don; Gan, Rong Z

    2018-03-01

    Hearing loss has become the most common disability among veterans. Understanding how blast waves propagate through the human ear is a necessary step in the development of effective hearing protection devices (HPDs). This article presents the first 3D finite element (FE) model of the human ear to simulate blast wave transmission through the ear. The 3D FE model of the human ear consisting of the ear canal, tympanic membrane, ossicular chain, and middle ear cavity was imported into ANSYS Workbench for coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis in the time domain. Blast pressure waveforms recorded external to the ear in human cadaver temporal bone tests were applied at the entrance of the ear canal in the model. The pressure waveforms near the tympanic membrane (TM) in the canal (P1) and behind the TM in the middle ear cavity (P2) were calculated. The model-predicted results were then compared with measured P1 and P2 waveforms recorded in human cadaver ears during blast tests. Results show that the model-derived P1 waveforms were in an agreement with the experimentally recorded waveforms with statistic Kurtosis analysis. The FE model will be used for the evaluation of HPDs in future studies.

  13. The microRNA miR-1 regulates a MEF-2 dependent retrograde signal at neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Simon, David J.; Madison, Jon M.; Conery, Annie L.; Thompson-Peer, Katherine L.; Soskis, Michael; Ruvkun, Gary B.; Kaplan, Joshua M.; Kim, John K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We show that miR-1, a conserved muscle specific microRNA, regulates aspects of both pre- and post-synaptic function at C. elegans neuromuscular junctions. miR-1 regulates the expression level of two nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits (UNC-29 and UNC-63), thereby altering muscle sensitivity to acetylcholine (ACh). miR-1 also regulates the muscle transcription factor MEF-2, which results in altered pre-synaptic ACh secretion, suggesting that MEF-2 activity in muscles controls a retrograde signal. The effect of the MEF-2-dependent retrograde signal on secretion is mediated by the synaptic vesicle protein RAB-3. Finally, acute activation of levamisole-sensitive nAChRs stimulates MEF-2-dependent transcriptional responses, and induces the MEF-2-dependent retrograde signal. We propose that miR-1 refines synaptic function by coupling changes in muscle activity to changes in pre-synaptic function. PMID:18510933

  14. Effectiveness of Ear Splint Therapy for Ear Deformities

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To present our experience with ear splint therapy for babies with ear deformities, and thereby demonstrate that this therapy is an effective and safe intervention without significant complications. Methods This was a retrospective study of 54 babies (35 boys and 19 girls; 80 ears; age ≤3 months) with ear deformities who had received ear splint therapy at the Center for Torticollis, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ajou University Hospital between December 2014 and February 2016. Before the initiation of ear splint therapy, ear deformities were classified with reference to the standard terminology. We compared the severity of ear deformity before and after ear splint therapy by using the physician's ratings. We also compared the physician's ratings and the caregiver's ratings on completion of ear splint therapy. Results Among these 54 babies, 41 children (58 ears, 72.5%) completed the ear splint therapy. The mean age at initiation of therapy was 52.91±18.26 days and the treatment duration was 44.27±32.06 days. Satyr ear, forward-facing ear lobe, Darwinian notch, overfolded ear, and cupped ear were the five most common ear deformities. At the completion of therapy, the final physician's ratings of ear deformities were significantly improved compared to the initial ratings (8.28±1.44 vs. 2.51±0.92; p<0.001). There was no significant difference between the physician's ratings and the caregiver's ratings at the completion of ear splint therapy (8.28±1.44 vs. 8.0±1.61; p=0.297). Conclusion We demonstrated that ear splint therapy significantly improved ear deformities in babies, as measured by quantitative rating scales. Ear splint therapy is an effective and safe intervention for babies with ear deformities. PMID:28289646

  15. Histone deacetylase degradation andMEF2 activation promote the formation of slow-twitch myofibers

    PubMed Central

    Potthoff, Matthew J.; Wu, Hai; Arnold, Michael A.; Shelton, John M.; Backs, Johannes; McAnally, John; Richardson, James A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2007-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of heterogeneous myofibers with distinctive rates of contraction, metabolic properties, and susceptibility to fatigue. We show that class II histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins, which function as transcriptional repressors of the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factor, fail to accumulate in the soleus, a slow muscle, compared with fast muscles (e.g., white vastus lateralis). Accordingly, pharmacological blockade of proteasome function specifically increases expression of class II HDAC proteins in the soleus in vivo. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches in mice, we discovered that class II HDAC proteins suppress the formation of slow twitch, oxidative myofibers through the repression of MEF2 activity. Conversely, expression of a hyperactive form of MEF2 in skeletal muscle of transgenic mice promotes the formation of slow fibers and enhances running endurance, enabling mice to run almost twice the distance of WT littermates. Thus, the selective degradation of class II HDACs in slow skeletal muscle provides a mechanism for enhancing physical performance and resistance to fatigue by augmenting the transcriptional activity of MEF2. These findings provide what we believe are new insights into the molecular basis of skeletal muscle function and have important implications for possible therapeutic interventions into muscular diseases. PMID:17786239

  16. Cooperative activation of cardiac transcription through myocardin bridging of paired MEF2 sites

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Courtney M.; Hu, Jianxin; Thomas, Reuben

    2017-03-28

    Enhancers frequently contain multiple binding sites for the same transcription factor. These homotypic binding sites often exhibit synergy, whereby the transcriptional output from two or more binding sites is greater than the sum of the contributions of the individual binding sites alone. Although this phenomenon is frequently observed, the mechanistic basis for homotypic binding site synergy is poorly understood. Here in this paper, we identify a bona fide cardiac-specific Prkaa2 enhancer that is synergistically activated by homotypic MEF2 binding sites. We show that two MEF2 sites in the enhancer function cooperatively due to bridging of the MEF2C-bound sites by themore » SAP domain-containing co-activator protein myocardin, and we show that paired sites buffer the enhancer from integration site-dependent effects on transcription in vivo. Paired MEF2 sites are prevalent in cardiac enhancers, suggesting that this might be a common mechanism underlying synergy in the control of cardiac gene expression in vivo.« less

  17. The constricted ear.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Alfredo A; Williams, J Kerwin; Elsahy, Nabil I

    2002-04-01

    The constricted ear may be described best as a pursestring closure of the ear. The deformity may include lidding of the upper pole with downward folding, protrusion of the concha, decreased vertical height, and low ear position relative to the face. The goals of surgical correction should include obtaining symmetry and correcting the intra-auricular anatomy. The degree of intervention is based on the severity of the deformity and may range from simple repositioning, soft tissue rearrangement, or manipulation of the cartilage. Multiple surgical techniques are described.

  18. Red ear syndrome.

    PubMed

    Purdy, R Allan; Dodick, David W

    2007-08-01

    The red ear syndrome is a rare syndrome originally described by Lance in 1994. It involves pain in and around the ear and associated autonomic phenomena, the most significant of which is cutaneous erythema of the ear ipsilateral to the pain and obvious to the patient and examiner during the attack. It may well represent an auriculo-autonomic cephalgia and/or be part of the group of disorders recognized as trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. As a syndrome, it still lacks specificity in regard to etiology, mechanisms, and treatment but is important to recognize clinically because of its associations.

  19. Promoter Variant-Dependent mRNA Expression of the MEF2A in Longissimus Dorsi Muscle in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Starzyński, Rafał Radosław; Wicińska, Krystyna; Flisikowski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) gene encodes a member of the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) protein family that is involved in vertebrate skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle development and differentiation during myogenesis. According to recent studies, MEF2 genes might be major regulators of postnatal skeletal muscle growth; thus, they are considered to be important, novel candidates for muscle development and body growth in farm animals. The aim of the present study was to search for polymorphisms in the bovine MEF2A gene and analyze their effect on the MEF2A mRNA expression level in the longissimus dorsi muscle of Polish Holstein-Fresian cattle. In total, 4094 bp of the whole coding sequence and the promoter region of MEF2A were re-sequenced in 30 animals, resulting in the detection of 6 novel variants as well as one previously reported SNP. Three linked mutations in the promoter region (-780T/G, g.-768T/G, and g.-222A/G) and only two genotypes were identified in two Polish breeds (TTA/TTA and TTA/GGG). Three SNPs in the coding region [g.1599G/A (421aa), g.1626G/A (429aa), and g.1641G/A (434aa)] appeared to be silent substitutions and segregated as two intragene haplotypes: GGG and AAA. Expression analysis showed that the mutations in the promoter region are highly associated with the MEF2A mRNA level in the longissimus dorsi muscle of bulls carrying two different genotypes. The higher MEF2A mRNA level was estimated in the muscle of bulls carrying the TTA/TTA (p<0.01) genotype as compared with those with TTA/GGG. The results obtained suggest that the nucleotide sequence mutation in MEF2A might be useful marker for body growth traits in cattle. PMID:22320864

  20. Disruption of chaperone-mediated autophagy-dependent degradation of MEF2A by oxidative stress-induced lysosome destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Sun, Yang; Fei, Mingjian; Tan, Cheng; Wu, Jing; Zheng, Jie; Tang, Jiqing; Sun, Wei; Lv, Zhaoliang; Bao, Jiandong; Xu, Qiang; Yu, Huixin

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in both normal aging and various neurodegenerative disorders and it may be a major cause of neuronal death. Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) targets selective cytoplasmic proteins for degradation by lysosomes and protects neurons against various extracellular stimuli including oxidative stress. MEF2A (myocyte enhancer factor 2A), a key transcription factor, protects primary neurons from oxidative stress-induced cell damage. However, the precise mechanisms of how the protein stability and the transcriptional activity of MEF2A are regulated under oxidative stress remain unknown. In this study, we report that MEF2A is physiologically degraded through the CMA pathway. In pathological conditions, mild oxidative stress (200 μM H2O2) enhances the degradation of MEF2A as well as its activity, whereas excessive oxidative stress (> 400 μM H2O2) disrupts its degradation process and leads to the accumulation of nonfunctional MEF2A. Under excessive oxidative stress, an N-terminal HDAC4 (histone deacetylase 4) cleavage product (HDAC4-NT), is significantly induced by lysosomal serine proteases released from ruptured lysosomes in a PRKACA (protein kinase, cAMP-dependent, catalytic, α)-independent manner. The production of HDAC4-NT, as a MEF2 repressor, may account for the reduced DNA-binding and transcriptional activity of MEF2A. Our work provides reliable evidence for the first time that MEF2A is targeted to lysosomes for CMA degradation; oxidative stress-induced lysosome destabilization leads to the disruption of MEF2A degradation as well as the dysregulation of its function. These findings may shed light on the underlying mechanisms of pathogenic processes of neuronal damage in various neurodegenerative-related diseases. PMID:24879151

  1. Cosmetic ear surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear reduction. In: Rubin JP, Neligan PC, eds. Plastic Surgery: Volume 2: Aesthetic Surgery . 4th ed. Philadelphia, ... Tang Ho, MD, Assistant Professor, Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology – Head and ...

  2. Complications of ear rings.

    PubMed

    Lane, Jennifer C E; O'Toole, Gregory

    2012-06-01

    In this paper the complications of ear piercing are considered and the treatment of resultant deformities is described. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 children) Changes in altitude or climate Cold climate Exposure to smoke Family history of ear infections ... Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Internal review and update ...

  4. EAR Program Research Results

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-01-01

    The Exploratory Advanced Research (EAR) Program addresses the need for longer term, higher risk research with the potential for longterm improvements to transportation systems-improvements in planning, building, renewing, and operating safe, congesti...

  5. Middle Ear Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Middle Ear Infections KidsHealth / For Parents / Middle Ear Infections What's ... en español Infecciones del oído medio What Are Middle Ear Infections? Ear infections happen when viruses or bacteria ...

  6. Modeling Analysis of Biomechanical Changes of Middle Ear and Cochlea in Otitis Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Rong Z.; Zhang, Xiangming; Guan, Xiying

    2011-11-01

    A comprehensive finite element (FE) model of the human ear including the ear canal, middle ear, and spiral cochlea was developed using histological sections of human temporal bone. The cochlea was modeled with three chambers separated by the basilar membrane and Reissner's membrane and filled with perilymphatic fluid. The viscoelastic material behavior was applied to middle ear soft tissues based on dynamic measurements of tissues in our lab. The model was validated using the experimental data obtained in human temporal bones and then used to simulate various stages of otitis media (OM) including the changes of morphology, mechanical properties, pressure, and fluid level in the middle ear. Function alterations of the middle ear and cochlea in OM were derived from the model and compared with the measurements from temporal bones. This study indicates that OM can be simulated in the FE model to predict the hearing loss induced by biomechanical changes of the middle ear and cochlea.

  7. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) assay using metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Keegan, Gemma L.; Stranik, Ondrej; Brennan-Fournet, Margaret E.; McDonagh, Colette

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescence has been extensively employed in the area of diagnostic immunoassays. A significant enhancement of fluorescence can be achieved when noble metal nanoparticles are placed in close proximity to fluorophores. This effect, referred to as metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF), has the potential to produce immunoassays with a high sensitivity and a low limit of detection (LOD). In this study, we investigate the fluorescence enhancement effect of two different nanoparticle systems, large spherical silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold edge-coated triangular silver nanoplates, and both systems were evaluated for MEF. The extinction properties and electric field enhancement of both systems were modeled, and the optimum system, spherical AgNPs, was used in a sandwich immunoassay for human C-reactive protein with a red fluorescent dye label. A significant enhancement in the fluorescence was observed, which corresponded to an LOD improvement of 19-fold compared to a control assay without AgNPs.

  8. MEF2C loss-of-function mutation contributes to congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Xian-Ling; Huang, Ri-Tai; Xue, Song; Wang, Juan; Qiu, Xing-Biao; Liu, Xing-Yuan; Yang, Yi-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of developmental abnormality in humans, and is a leading cause for substantially increased morbidity and mortality in affected individuals. Increasing studies demonstrates a pivotal role of genetic defects in the pathogenesis of CHD, and presently mutations in more than 60 genes have been associated with CHD. Nevertheless, CHD is of pronounced genetic heterogeneity, and the genetic basis underpinning CHD in a large proportion of patients remains unclear. In the present study, the whole coding exons and splicing donors/acceptors of the MEF2C gene, which codes for a transcription factor essential for normal cardiovascular development, were sequenced in 200 unrelated patients affected with CHD, and a novel heterozygous missense mutation, p.L38P, was identified in an index patient with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and ventricular septal defect (VSD). Genetic scan of the mutation carrier's family members available showed that the mutation was present in all affected family members but absent in unaffected family members. Analysis of the proband's pedigree revealed that the mutation co-segregated with PDA, which was transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance. The mutation changed the amino acid that was completely conserved evolutionarily, and did not exist in 300 unrelated, ethnically-matched healthy individuals used as controls. Functional deciphers by using a dual-luciferase reporter assay system unveiled that the mutant MEF2C protein had a significantly reduced transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the mutation significantly diminished the synergistic activation between MEF2C and GATA4, another cardiac core transcription factor that has been causally linked to CHD. In conclusion, this is the first report on the association of a MEF2C loss-of-function mutation with an increased vulnerability to CHD in humans, which provides novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying CHD

  9. MEF2C loss-of-function mutation contributes to congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Xian-Ling; Huang, Ri-Tai; Xue, Song; Wang, Juan; Qiu, Xing-Biao; Liu, Xing-Yuan; Yang, Yi-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of developmental abnormality in humans, and is a leading cause for substantially increased morbidity and mortality in affected individuals. Increasing studies demonstrates a pivotal role of genetic defects in the pathogenesis of CHD, and presently mutations in more than 60 genes have been associated with CHD. Nevertheless, CHD is of pronounced genetic heterogeneity, and the genetic basis underpinning CHD in a large proportion of patients remains unclear. In the present study, the whole coding exons and splicing donors/acceptors of the MEF2C gene, which codes for a transcription factor essential for normal cardiovascular development, were sequenced in 200 unrelated patients affected with CHD, and a novel heterozygous missense mutation, p.L38P, was identified in an index patient with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and ventricular septal defect (VSD). Genetic scan of the mutation carrier's family members available showed that the mutation was present in all affected family members but absent in unaffected family members. Analysis of the proband's pedigree revealed that the mutation co-segregated with PDA, which was transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance. The mutation changed the amino acid that was completely conserved evolutionarily, and did not exist in 300 unrelated, ethnically-matched healthy individuals used as controls. Functional deciphers by using a dual-luciferase reporter assay system unveiled that the mutant MEF2C protein had a significantly reduced transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the mutation significantly diminished the synergistic activation between MEF2C and GATA4, another cardiac core transcription factor that has been causally linked to CHD. In conclusion, this is the first report on the association of a MEF2C loss-of-function mutation with an increased vulnerability to CHD in humans, which provides novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying CHD

  10. Histologic characterization of the cat middle ear: in sickness and in health.

    PubMed

    Sula, M M; Njaa, B L; Payton, M E

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish microscopic normal in the middle ear of the cat while concurrently characterizing gross and microscopic lesions reflecting spontaneous otitis media. Both ears from 50 cats were examined grossly and processed for histologic examination of the external, middle, and internal ear on a single slide. Gross lesions of the middle ear were present in 14 of 100 (14%) and included turbid fluid, frank pus, hemorrhage, and fibrous thickening of the auricular mucoperiosteum. Histologically, 48 of 100 (48%) ears had evidence of ongoing or previous inflammatory middle ear disease, including proteinaceous fluid; vascular ectasia; expansion of the auricular mucoperiosteum by neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages; cholesterol clefts; hemorrhage; fibrin; granulation tissue; membranous pseudo-glands; fibrosis; proliferation and/or osteolysis of the tympanic and septum bullae. Histologic lesions were identified in 34 of 100 ears (34%) lacking gross evidence of disease. Ears were classified histologically as either normal (52/100 [52%]) or diseased (48/100 [48%]). Diseased ears were further classified as mild to moderate (37/100 [37%]) or severely (11/100 [11%]) affected. Internal ear involvement was present in 11 of 100 (11%) ears. Histologic evidence of middle ear disease in cats is far greater than gross lesions or clinical literature suggests; further investigation and correlation of clinical and histologic disease are warranted. With minimal additional preparation, diagnostic specimens may be readily prepared and evaluated for this integral sensing organ. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Communication routes between intracranial spaces and inner ear: function, pathophysiologic importance and relations with inner ear diseases.

    PubMed

    Ciuman, Raphael R

    2009-01-01

    There exist 3 communication routes between the intracranial space and the inner ear, the vestibular aqueduct, the cochlear aqueduct, and the internal auditory canal. They possess a key role in inner ear pressure regulation and fluid homeostasis and are related to inner ear diseases. Relevant literature was reviewed, and the current knowledge of the anatomy, physiologic importance, and relations to inner ear diseases were described. Pathologic communication routes such as semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome were highlighted as well. Abnormalities in all 3 communication routes may predispose or be the cause of distinct inner ear pathologic condition and involved in other cochlear and vestibular syndromes, in which their role is not completely clear. The increasing knowledge of the underlying mechanisms encourages promising approaches for possible intervention in the future.

  12. Passage of albumin from the middle ear to the inner ear in otitis media in the chinchilla

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, B.; Goycoolea, M.V.; Schleivert, P.M.

    1981-08-01

    A study of the permeability of the middle ear-inner ear interface for macromolecules was carried out in chinchillas with open and obstructed eustachian tubes utilizing tritiated human serum albumin and immunoelectrophoresis. Tritiated albumin was placed in the round window niche area or normal animals and animals in which the eustachian tubes had been obstructed for 24 hours or 14 days. The tritiated albumin was allowed to remain in the middle ear cavity for 24 hours, Samples of middle ear effusion, perilymph, blood and cerebrospinal fluid were collected and measured for radioactivity. Radioactivity was demonstrated in the perilymph. Samples of middlemore » ear effusions and perilymph were also studied by immunoelectrophoresis with goat antihuman albumin. Albumin placed in the round window niche of an experimental animal could be recovered unchanged in the perilymph. The results suggest a pathophysiologic explanation for the association of otitis media and sensorineural hearing loss or endolymphatic hydrops.« less

  13. Mef2c Regulates Transcription of the Extracellular Matrix Protein Cartilage Link Protein 1 in the Developing Murine Heart

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Aimee L.; Ghatnekar, Angela V.; Barth, Jeremy L.; Norris, Russell A.; Wessels, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage Link Protein 1 (Crtl1) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that stabilizes the interaction between hyaluronan and versican and is expressed in endocardial and endocardially-derived cells in the developing heart, including cells in the atrioventricular (AV) and outflow tract (OFT) cushions. Previous investigations into the transcriptional regulation of the Crtl1 gene have shown that Sox9 regulates Crtl1 expression in both cartilage and the AV valves. The cardiac transcription factor Mef2c is involved in the regulation of gene expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle cell lineages. In this study we have investigated the potential role of Mef2c in the regulation of ECM production in the endocardial and mesenchymal cell lineages of the developing heart. We demonstrate that the Crtl1 5′ flanking region contains two highly conserved Mef2 binding sites and that Mef2c is able to bind to these sites in vivo during cardiovascular development. Additionally, we show that Crtl1 transcription is dependent on Mef2c expression in fetal mitral valve interstitial cells (VICs). Combined, these findings highlight a new role for Mef2c in cardiac development and the regulation of cardiac extracellular matrix protein expression. PMID:23468913

  14. Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection? Swimmer's Ear Perforated Eardrum Hearing Impairment Swimmer's Ear (External ... All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, ...

  15. Listening to the ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics-termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models-that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  16. Listening to the Ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher Alan

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics--termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models--that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus -frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  17. [Basics of Ear Surgery].

    PubMed

    Lailach, S; Zahnert, T

    2016-12-01

    The present article about the basics of ear surgery is a short overview of current indications, the required diagnostics and surgical procedures of common otologic diseases. In addition to plastic and reconstructive surgery of the auricle, principles of surgery of the external auditory canal, basics of middle ear surgery and the tumor surgery of the temporal bone are shown. Additionally, aspects of the surgical hearing rehabilitation (excluding implantable hearing systems) are presented considering current study results. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... to the eardrum) and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  19. What Is an Ear Infection?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hearing Loss? Taking Care of Your Ears Swimmer's Ear Perforated Eardrum What's Earwax? View ... All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, ...

  20. From Ear to Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Doreen Kimura gives a personal history of the "right-ear effect" in dichotic listening. The focus is on the early ground-breaking papers, describing how she did the first dichotic listening studies relating the effects to brain asymmetry. The paper also gives a description of the visual half-field technique for lateralized stimulus…

  1. Ear-protector ratings.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1973-12-01

    Twenty-one brands of ear protectors, including custom-molded, wearer-molded, and pre-molded types, were evaluated according to American-standard procedures. Earplugs are described and are listed in the order of their low-frequency (below 1000 Hz) att...

  2. Ear surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ear Disorders ...

  3. Ear Scaffold Reconstruction Using Ultrasonic Aspirator for Cauliflower Ear.

    PubMed

    Hao, Scarlett; Angster, Kristen; Hubbard, Fleesie; Greywoode, Jewel; Vakharia, Kalpesh T

    2018-04-01

    Untreated auricular hematomas from ear trauma can result in an ear deformation known as cauliflower ear, secondary to fibrosis and new cartilage overgrowth. Cauliflower ear reconstruction has traditionally utilized tools such as a drill or a scalpel in order to improve auricular cosmesis. We present a case report utilizing an ultrasonic aspirator to recontour the fibrosed cartilage of a cauliflower ear. The ultrasonic aspirator has advantages over traditional tools in its ability to provide finely controlled bone removal without damage to surrounding soft tissue. The patient in this case report underwent multistage reconstruction using the ultrasonic aspirator with excellent cosmetic result and patient satisfaction.

  4. Expression of the prospective mesoderm genes twist, snail, and mef2 in penaeid shrimp.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiankai; Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot; Sellars, Melony J; Xiang, Jianhai; Hertzler, Philip L

    2016-07-01

    In penaeid shrimp, mesoderm forms from two sources: naupliar mesoderm founder cells, which invaginate during gastrulation, and posterior mesodermal stem cells called mesoteloblasts, which undergo characteristic teloblastic divisions. The primordial mesoteloblast descends from the ventral mesendoblast, which arrests in cell division at the 32-cell stage and ingresses with its sister dorsal mesendoblast prior to naupliar mesoderm invagination. The naupliar mesoderm forms the muscles of the naupliar appendages (first and second antennae and mandibles), while the mesoteloblasts form the mesoderm, including the muscles, of subsequently formed posterior segments. To better understand the mechanism of mesoderm and muscle formation in penaeid shrimp, twist, snail, and mef2 cDNAs were identified from transcriptomes of Penaeus vannamei, P. japonicus, P. chinensis, and P. monodon. A single Twist ortholog was found, with strong inferred amino acid conservation across all three species. Multiple Snail protein variants were detected, which clustered in a phylogenetic tree with other decapod crustacean Snail sequences. Two closely-related mef2 variants were found in P. vannamei. The developmental mRNA expression of these genes was studied by qPCR in P. vannamei embryos, larvae, and postlarvae. Expression of Pv-twist and Pv-snail began during the limb bud stage and continued through larval stages to the postlarva. Surprisingly, Pv-mef2 expression was found in all stages from the zygote to the postlarva, with the highest expression in the limb bud and protozoeal stages. The results add comparative data on the development of anterior and posterior mesoderm in malacostracan crustaceans, and should stimulate further studies on mesoderm and muscle development in penaeid shrimp.

  5. Immortalization of MEF is characterized by the deregulation of specific miRNAs with potential tumor suppressor activity

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Milena; Evangelista, Monica; Simili, Marcella; Mariani, Laura; Pitto, Letizia; Rainaldi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The life span (Hayflick limit) of primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) in culture is variable but it is still unclear if the escape of the Hayflick limit is also variable. To address this point MEF were expanded every fifteen days (6T15) instead of every three days (6T3) until they became immortal. With this protocol MEF lifespan was extended and immortalization accordingly delayed. By testing a panel of genes (p19ARF, p16, p21) and miRNAs (miR-20a, miR-21, miR-28, miR-290) related to primary MEF senescence, a switch of p21 from up to down regulation, the down regulation of specific miRNAs as well as a massive shift from diploidy to hyperdiploidy were observed in coincidence with the resumption of cell proliferation. Collectively, these data indicate that the inactivation of genes and miRNAs, important in controlling cell proliferation, might be determinant for the escape from the Hayflick limit. In support of this hypothesis was the finding that some of the down regulated miRNAs transfected in immortalized MEF inhibited cell proliferation thus displaying a tumor suppressor-like activity. PMID:21765199

  6. Immortalization of MEF is characterized by the deregulation of specific miRNAs with potential tumor suppressor activity.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Milena; Evangelista, Monica; Simili, Marcella; Mariani, Laura; Pitto, Letizia; Rainaldi, Giuseppe

    2011-07-01

    The life span (Hayflick limit) of primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) in culture is variable but it is still unclear if the escape of the Hayflick limit is also variable. To address this point MEF were expanded every fifteen days (6T15) instead of every three days (6T3) until they became immortal. With this protocol MEF lifespan was extended and immortalization accordingly delayed. By testing a panel of genes (p19ARF, p16, p21) and miRNAs (miR-20a, miR-21, miR-28, miR-290) related to primary MEF senescence, a switch of p21 from up to down regulation, the down regulation of specific miRNAs as well as a massive shift from diploidy to hyperdiploidy were observed in coincidence with the resumption of cell proliferation. Collectively, these data indicate that the inactivation of genes and miRNAs, important in controlling cell proliferation, might be determinant for the escape from the Hayflick limit. In support of this hypothesis was the finding that some of the down regulated miRNAs transfected in immortalized MEF inhibited cell proliferation thus displaying a tumor suppressor-like activity.

  7. SERS+MEF of the anti-tumoral drug emodin adsorbed on silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla, Paz; De Llanos, Raquel; Domingo, Concepción; Sánchez-Cortés, Santiago; García-Ramos, José V.

    2010-02-01

    Metal nanostructures are known to amplify the spontaneous emission of fluorescent molecules by resonant coupling to external electromagnetic fields. We have used spectroscopy to characterize the structural properties of emodin molecules, a natural anthraquinone dye, and bovine serum albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, in the presence of silver nanoparticles. Aggregation of emodin at pH=10 and pH=6 gives rise to SERS and MEF effects in silver colloid. We have obtained MEF spectra at acidic pH=2.9 using two different silver nanostructures. We have also studied the change in the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin adsorbed on metal nanoparticles surface. Circular dichroism, fluorescence emission and fluorescence lifetime measurements indicate an increase in the alfa-helical content of the protein and a change in the environment of the tryptophan residues that bury in the interior of the biomolecule. This variation on the secondary structure could have further influence in the binding of the drug to form transport and regulatory complexes.

  8. Evolutionary genetic analyses of MEF2C gene: implications for learning and memory in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Kalmady, Sunil V; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Arasappa, Rashmi; Rao, Naren P

    2013-02-01

    MEF2C facilitates context-dependent fear conditioning (CFC) which is a salient aspect of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. CFC might have played a crucial role in human evolution because of its advantageous influence on survival of species. In this study, we analyzed 23 orthologous mammalian gene sequences of MEF2C gene to examine the evidence for positive selection on this gene in Homo sapiens using Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) and HyPhy software. Both PAML Bayes Empirical Bayes (BEB) and HyPhy Fixed Effects Likelihood (FEL) analyses supported significant positive selection on 4 codon sites in H. sapiens. Also, haplotter analysis revealed significant ongoing positive selection on this gene in Central European population. The study findings suggest that adaptive selective pressure on this gene might have influenced human evolution. Further research on this gene might unravel the potential role of this gene in learning and memory as well as its pathogenetic effect in certain hippocampal disorders with evolutionary basis like schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Severe myopathy in mice lacking the MEF2/SRF-dependent gene leiomodin-3

    PubMed Central

    Cenik, Bercin K.; Garg, Ankit; McAnally, John R.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Liu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of skeletal muscle structure and function requires a precise stoichiometry of sarcomeric proteins for proper assembly of the contractile apparatus. Absence of components of the sarcomeric thin filaments causes nemaline myopathy, a lethal congenital muscle disorder associated with aberrant myofiber structure and contractility. Previously, we reported that deficiency of the kelch-like family member 40 (KLHL40) in mice results in nemaline myopathy and destabilization of leiomodin-3 (LMOD3). LMOD3 belongs to a family of tropomodulin-related proteins that promote actin nucleation. Here, we show that deficiency of LMOD3 in mice causes nemaline myopathy. In skeletal muscle, transcription of Lmod3 was controlled by the transcription factors SRF and MEF2. Myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs), which function as SRF coactivators, serve as sensors of actin polymerization and are sequestered in the cytoplasm by actin monomers. Conversely, conditions that favor actin polymerization de-repress MRTFs and activate SRF-dependent genes. We demonstrated that the actin nucleator LMOD3, together with its stabilizing partner KLHL40, enhances MRTF-SRF activity. In turn, SRF cooperated with MEF2 to sustain the expression of LMOD3 and other components of the contractile apparatus, thereby establishing a regulatory circuit to maintain skeletal muscle function. These findings provide insight into the molecular basis of the sarcomere assembly and muscle dysfunction associated with nemaline myopathy. PMID:25774500

  10. Ear Infections - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Nepali (नेपाली) Russian (Русский) ... हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Japanese (日本語) Expand Section Middle Ear Infection - 日本語 (Japanese) ...

  11. A short-wave infrared otoscope for middle ear disease diagnostics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Jessica A.; Valdez, Tulio; Bruns, Oliver; Bawendi, Moungi

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media, a range of inflammatory conditions of the middle ear, is the second most common illness diagnosed in children. However, the diagnosis can be challenging, particularly in pediatric patients. Otitis media is commonly over-diagnosed and over-treated and has been identified as one of the primary factors in increased antibiotic resistance. We describe the development of a short-wave infrared (SWIR) otoscope for objective middle ear effusion diagnosis. The SWIR otoscope can unambiguously detect the presence of middle ear fluid based on its strong light absorption in the SWIR. This absorption causes a stark, visual contrast between the presence and absence of fluid behind the tympanic membrane. Additionally, when there is no middle ear fluid, the deeper tissue penetration of SWIR light allows the SWIR otoscope to better visualize middle ear anatomy through the tympanic membrane than is possible with visible light. We demonstrate that in healthy, adult human ears, SWIR otoscopy can image a range of middle ear anatomy, including landmarks of the entire ossicular chain, the promontory, the round window niche, and the chorda tympani. We suggest that SWIR otoscopy can provide valuable diagnostic information complementary to that provided by visible pneumotoscopy in the diagnosis of middle ear effusions, otitis media, and other maladies of the middle ear.

  12. Cilia and Ear.

    PubMed

    Piatti, Gioia; De Santi, Maria Margherita; Torretta, Sara; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Soi, Daniela; Ambrosetti, Umberto

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of otological complications derived from primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) in adulthood. Twenty-three patients with diagnosed PCD underwent medical history aimed at recording the presence of ear, nose, and throat manifestations (ENT) and any surgical treatments. The ENT objectivity was annotated, and then patients were subjected to audiometric test, tympanometry, registration of otoacoustic emission, and vestibular evaluation. Otitis media with chronic middle ear effusion (OME) during childhood was reported in 52% of the subjects, no patient had undergone ear surgery, and only 2 patients had an episode of otitis in the last year. Eleven of 23 patients showed normal hearing, 11 had a conductive hearing impairment, and 1 showed a severe sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to the syndrome. The bilateral stapedial reflex was only found in all cases of normoacusia and type A tympanogram, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) were present in 8 patients, and no patient had vestibular alterations. Our study confirms a very frequent prevalence of OME in PCD during childhood. Careful monitoring of otological complications of the syndrome is always desirable, also given the high presence in adults of other manifestations in the upper airways, such as chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis.

  13. 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3 INDUCES MONOCYTIC DIFFERENTIATION OF HUMAN MYELOID LEUKEMIA CELLS BY REGULATING C/EBPβ EXPRESSION THROUGH MEF2C

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ruifang; Wang, Xuening; Studzinski, George P.

    2015-01-01

    Myogenic enhancer factor2 (Mef2) consists of a family of transcription factors involved in morphogenesis of skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle cells. Among the four isoforms (Mef2A, 2B, 2C, and 2D), Mef2C was also found to play important roles in hematopoiesis. At myeloid progenitor level, Mef2C expression favors monocytic differentiation. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that ERK5 was activated in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D)-induced monocytic differentiation in AML cells and ERK5 activation was accompanied by increased Mef2C phosphorylation. We therefore examined the role of Mef2C in 1,25D-induced monocytic differentiation in AML cell lines (HL60, U937 and THP1) and found that knockdown of Mef2C with small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the expression of the monocytic marker, CD14, without affecting the expression of the general myeloid marker, CD11b. CCAAT/Enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) β, which can bind to CD14 promoter and increase its transcription, has been shown to be the downstream effector of 1,25D-induced monocytic differentiation in AML cells. When Mef2C was knocked down, expression of C/EBPβ was reduced at both mRNA and protein levels. The protein expression levels of cell cycle regulators, p27Kip1 and cyclin D1, were not affected by Mef2C knockdown, nor the monopoiesis related transcription factor, ATF2 (Activating Transcription Factor 2). Thus, we conclude that 1,25D-induced monocytic differentiation, and CD14 expression in particular, is mediated through activation of ERK5-Mef2C-C/EBPβ signaling pathway, and that Mef2C does not seem to modulate cell cycle progression. PMID:25448741

  14. PPARγ suppresses the proliferation of cardiac myxoma cells through downregulation of MEF2D in a miR-122-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Youzhu; Yang, Jie; Bian, Shizhu

    2016-06-03

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a multiple functional transcription factor, has been reported to have anti-tumor effects through inhibition of cells proliferation. However, its effects on cardiac myxoma (CM) cells and the underlying signaling mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that the level of PPARγ is inversely correlated with that of myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), a biomarker of CM. We found that activation of PPARγ inhibit MEF2D expression via upregulation of miR-122, which can target the 3′-UTR of MEF2D and inhibit MEF2D expression, by directly binding to the PPRE in the miR-122 promoter region. Functional experimentsmore » further showed that miR-122-dependent downregulation of MEF2D by PPARγ suppress the proliferation of CM cells. These results suggest that PPARγ may exert its antiproliferative effects by negatively regulating the MEF2D in CM cells, which through upregulation of miR-122, and PPARγ/miR-122/MEF2D signaling pathway may be a novel target for treatment of CM. -- Highlights: •PPARγ expression is inversely correlated with MEF2D expression in CM tissues. •PPARγ downregulates MEF2D expression in CM cells. •PPARγ inhibits MEF2D expression via upregulation of miR-122. •miR-122-dependent downregulation of MEF2D by PPARγ suppresses the proliferation of CM cells.« less

  15. The ear: Diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vignaud, J.; Jardin, C.; Rosen, L.

    1986-01-01

    This is an English translation of volume 17-1 of Traite de radiodiagnostic and represents a reasonably complete documentation of the diseases of the temporal bone that have imaging manifestations. The book begins with chapters on embryology, anatomy and radiography anatomy; it continues with blood supply and an overview of temporal bone pathology. Subsequent chapters cover malformations, trauma, infections, tumors, postoperative changes, glomus tumors, vertebasilar insufficiency, and facial nerve canal lesions. A final chapter demonstrates and discusses magnetic resonance images of the ear and cerebellopontine angle.

  16. Mutations in the Nucleolar Phosphoprotein, Nucleophosmin, Promote the Expression of the Oncogenic Transcription Factor MEF/ELF4 in Leukemia Cells and Potentiates Transformation*

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Koji; Tsushima, Hideki; Matsuo, Emi; Horio, Kensuke; Tominaga-Sato, Shinya; Imanishi, Daisuke; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Iwanaga, Masako; Itonaga, Hidehiro; Yoshida, Shinichiro; Hata, Tomoko; Moriuchi, Ryozo; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Nimer, Stephen; Mano, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Tomoki; Tomonaga, Masao; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid ELF1-like factor (MEF/ELF4), a member of the ETS transcription factors, can function as an oncogene in murine cancer models and is overexpressed in various human cancers. Here, we report a mechanism by which MEF/ELF4 may be activated by a common leukemia-associated mutation in the nucleophosmin gene. By using a tandem affinity purification assay, we found that MEF/ELF4 interacts with multifactorial protein nucleophosmin (NPM1). Coimmunoprecipitation and GST pull-down experiments demonstrated that MEF/ELF4 directly forms a complex with NPM1 and also identified the region of NPM1 that is responsible for this interaction. Functional analyses showed that wild-type NPM1 inhibited the DNA binding and transcriptional activity of MEF/ELF4 on the HDM2 promoter, whereas NPM1 mutant protein (Mt-NPM1) enhanced these activities of MEF/ELF4. Induction of Mt-NPM1 into MEF/ELF4-overexpressing NIH3T3 cells facilitated malignant transformation. In addition, clinical leukemia samples with NPM1 mutations had higher human MDM2 (HDM2) mRNA expression. Our data suggest that enhanced HDM2 expression induced by mutant NPM1 may have a role in MEF/ELF4-dependent leukemogenesis. PMID:23393136

  17. Mutations in the nucleolar phosphoprotein, nucleophosmin, promote the expression of the oncogenic transcription factor MEF/ELF4 in leukemia cells and potentiates transformation.

    PubMed

    Ando, Koji; Tsushima, Hideki; Matsuo, Emi; Horio, Kensuke; Tominaga-Sato, Shinya; Imanishi, Daisuke; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Iwanaga, Masako; Itonaga, Hidehiro; Yoshida, Shinichiro; Hata, Tomoko; Moriuchi, Ryozo; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Nimer, Stephen; Mano, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Tomoki; Tomonaga, Masao; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2013-03-29

    Myeloid ELF1-like factor (MEF/ELF4), a member of the ETS transcription factors, can function as an oncogene in murine cancer models and is overexpressed in various human cancers. Here, we report a mechanism by which MEF/ELF4 may be activated by a common leukemia-associated mutation in the nucleophosmin gene. By using a tandem affinity purification assay, we found that MEF/ELF4 interacts with multifactorial protein nucleophosmin (NPM1). Coimmunoprecipitation and GST pull-down experiments demonstrated that MEF/ELF4 directly forms a complex with NPM1 and also identified the region of NPM1 that is responsible for this interaction. Functional analyses showed that wild-type NPM1 inhibited the DNA binding and transcriptional activity of MEF/ELF4 on the HDM2 promoter, whereas NPM1 mutant protein (Mt-NPM1) enhanced these activities of MEF/ELF4. Induction of Mt-NPM1 into MEF/ELF4-overexpressing NIH3T3 cells facilitated malignant transformation. In addition, clinical leukemia samples with NPM1 mutations had higher human MDM2 (HDM2) mRNA expression. Our data suggest that enhanced HDM2 expression induced by mutant NPM1 may have a role in MEF/ELF4-dependent leukemogenesis.

  18. Inefficient reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes using Gata4, Mef2c, Tbx5

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.X.; Krane, M.; Deutsch, M. A.; Wang, L.; Rav-Acha, M.; Gregoire, S.; Engels, M. C.; Rajarajan, K.; Karra, R.; Abel, E. D.; Wu, J. C.; Milan, D.; Wu, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes is a novel strategy for cardiac regeneration. However, the key determinants involved in this process are unknown. Objective To assess the efficiency of direct fibroblast reprogramming via viral overexpression of GATA4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT). Methods and Results We induced GMT overexpression in murine tail tip fibroblasts (TTFs) and cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) from multiple lines of transgenic mice carrying different cardiomyocyte lineage reporters. We found that the induction of GMT overexpression in TTFs and CFs is inefficient at inducing molecular and electrophysiological phenotypes of mature cardiomyocytes. In addition, transplantation of GMT infected CFs into injured mouse hearts resulted in decreased cell survival with minimal induction of cardiomyocyte genes. Conclusions Significant challenges remain in our ability to convert fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells and a greater understanding of cardiovascular epigenetics is needed to increase the translational potential of this strategy. PMID:22581928

  19. ICESpy009, a Conjugative Genetic Element Carrying mef(E) in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Del Grosso, Maria; Camilli, Romina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Pietrelli, Alessandro; De Bellis, Gianluca; Pantosti, Annalisa

    2016-07-01

    Efflux-mediated macrolide resistance due to mef(E) and mel, carried by the mega element, is common in Streptococcus pneumoniae, for which it was originally characterized, but it is rare in Streptococcus pyogenes In S. pyogenes, mega was previously found to be enclosed in Tn2009, a composite genetic element of the Tn916 family containing tet(M) and conferring erythromycin and tetracycline resistance. In this study, S. pyogenes isolates containing mef(E), apparently not associated with other resistance determinants, were examined to characterize the genetic context of mega. By whole-genome sequencing of one isolate, MB56Spyo009, we identified a novel composite integrative and conjugative element (ICE) carrying mega, designated ICESpy009, belonging to the ICESa2603 family. ICESpy009 was 55 kb long, contained 61 putative open reading frames (ORFs), and was found to be integrated into hylA, a novel integration site for the ICESa2603 family. The modular organization of the ICE was similar to that of members of the ICESa2603 family carried by different streptococcal species. In addition, a novel cluster of accessory resistance genes was found inside a region that encloses mega. PCR mapping targeting ICESpy009 revealed the presence of a similar ICE in five other isolates under study. While in three isolates the integration site was the same as that of ICESpy009, in two isolates the ICE was integrated into rplL, the typical integration site of the ICESa2603 family. ICESpy009 was able to transfer macrolide resistance by conjugation to both S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae, showing the first evidence of the transferability of mega from S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. ICESpy009, a Conjugative Genetic Element Carrying mef(E) in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Camilli, Romina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Pietrelli, Alessandro; De Bellis, Gianluca; Pantosti, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Efflux-mediated macrolide resistance due to mef(E) and mel, carried by the mega element, is common in Streptococcus pneumoniae, for which it was originally characterized, but it is rare in Streptococcus pyogenes. In S. pyogenes, mega was previously found to be enclosed in Tn2009, a composite genetic element of the Tn916 family containing tet(M) and conferring erythromycin and tetracycline resistance. In this study, S. pyogenes isolates containing mef(E), apparently not associated with other resistance determinants, were examined to characterize the genetic context of mega. By whole-genome sequencing of one isolate, MB56Spyo009, we identified a novel composite integrative and conjugative element (ICE) carrying mega, designated ICESpy009, belonging to the ICESa2603 family. ICESpy009 was 55 kb long, contained 61 putative open reading frames (ORFs), and was found to be integrated into hylA, a novel integration site for the ICESa2603 family. The modular organization of the ICE was similar to that of members of the ICESa2603 family carried by different streptococcal species. In addition, a novel cluster of accessory resistance genes was found inside a region that encloses mega. PCR mapping targeting ICESpy009 revealed the presence of a similar ICE in five other isolates under study. While in three isolates the integration site was the same as that of ICESpy009, in two isolates the ICE was integrated into rplL, the typical integration site of the ICESa2603 family. ICESpy009 was able to transfer macrolide resistance by conjugation to both S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae, showing the first evidence of the transferability of mega from S. pyogenes. PMID:27067338

  1. Sound pressure gain produced by the human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, H; Goode, R L

    1995-10-01

    The acoustic function of the middle ear is to match sound passing from the low impedance of air to the high impedance of cochlear fluid. Little information is available on the actual middle ear pressure gain in human beings. This article describes experiments on middle ear pressure gain in six fresh human temporal bones. Stapes footplate displacement and phase were measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer before and after removal of the tympanic membrane, malleus, and incus. Acoustic insulation of the round window with clay was performed. Umbo displacement was also measured before tympanic membrane removal to assess baseline tympanic membrane function. The middle ear has its major gain in the lower frequencies, with a peak near 0.9 kHz. The mean gain was 23.0 dB below 1.0 kHz, the resonant frequency of the middle ear; the mean peak gain was 26.6 dB. Above 1.0 kHz, the second pressure gain decreased at a rate of -8.6 dB/octave, with a mean gain of 6.5 dB at 4.0 kHz. Only a small amount of gain was present above 7.0 kHz. Significant individual differences in pressure gain were found between ears that appeared related to variations in tympanic membrane function and not to variations in cochlear impedance.

  2. TWEAK promotes migration and invasion in MEFs through a mechanism dependent on ERKs activation and Fibulin 3 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Sequera, Celia; Vázquez-Carballo, Ana; Arechederra, María; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Porras, Almudena

    2018-02-01

    TWEAK regulates multiple physio-pathological processes in fibroblasts such as fibrosis. It also induces migration and invasion in tumors and it can activate p38 MAPK in various cell types. Moreover, p38α MAPK promotes migration and invasion in several cancer cells types and in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). However, it remains unknown if TWEAK could promote migration in fibroblasts and whether p38α MAPK might play a role. Our results reveal that TWEAK activates ERKs, Akt, and p38α/β MAPKs and reduces secreted Fibulin 3 in MEFs. TWEAK also increases migration and invasion in wt and p38α deficient MEFs, which indicates that p38α MAPK is not required to mediate these effects. In contrast, ERKs inhibition significantly decreases TWEAK-induced migration and Fibulin 3 knock-down mimics TWEAK effect. These results indicate that both ERKs activation and Fibulin 3 down-regulation would contribute to mediate TWEAK pro-migratory effect. In fact, the additional regulation of ERKs and/or p38β as a consequence of Fibulin 3 decrease might be also involved in the pro-migratory effect of TWEAK in MEFs. In conclusion, our studies uncover novel mechanisms by which TWEAK would favor tissue repair by promoting fibroblasts migration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. CaM kinase signaling induces cardiac hypertrophy and activates the MEF2 transcription factor in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Passier, Robert; Zeng, Hong; Frey, Norbert; Naya, Francisco J.; Nicol, Rebekka L.; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Overbeek, Paul; Richardson, James A.; Grant, Stephen R.; Olson, Eric N.

    2000-01-01

    Hypertrophic growth is an adaptive response of the heart to diverse pathological stimuli and is characterized by cardiomyocyte enlargement, sarcomere assembly, and activation of a fetal program of cardiac gene expression. A variety of Ca2+-dependent signal transduction pathways have been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy, but whether these pathways are independent or interdependent and whether there is specificity among them are unclear. Previously, we showed that activation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin or its target transcription factor NFAT3 was sufficient to evoke myocardial hypertrophy in vivo. Here, we show that activated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases-I and -IV (CaMKI and CaMKIV) also induce hypertrophic responses in cardiomyocytes in vitro and that CaMKIV overexpressing mice develop cardiac hypertrophy with increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter and decreased fractional shortening. Crossing this transgenic line with mice expressing a constitutively activated form of NFAT3 revealed synergy between these signaling pathways. We further show that CaMKIV activates the transcription factor MEF2 through a posttranslational mechanism in the hypertrophic heart in vivo. Activated calcineurin is a less efficient activator of MEF2-dependent transcription, suggesting that the calcineurin/NFAT and CaMK/MEF2 pathways act in parallel. These findings identify MEF2 as a downstream target for CaMK signaling in the hypertrophic heart and suggest that the CaMK and calcineurin pathways preferentially target different transcription factors to induce cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:10811847

  4. The Role of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in Activity-Dependent Neuronal Plasticity in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Wandilson dos Santos; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factors CREB (cAMP response element binding factor), SRF (serum response factor), and MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2) play critical roles in the mechanisms underlying neuronal plasticity. However, the role of the activation of these transcription factors in the different components of plasticity in vivo is not well known. In this study, we tested the role of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in ocular dominance plasticity (ODP), a paradigm of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity in the visual cortex. These three proteins bind to the synaptic activity response element (SARE), an enhancer sequence found upstream of many plasticity-related genes (Kawashima et al., 2009; Rodríguez-Tornos et al., 2013), and can act cooperatively to express Arc, a gene required for ODP (McCurry et al., 2010). We used viral-mediated gene transfer to block the transcription function of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in the visual cortex, and measured visually evoked potentials in awake male and female mice before and after a 7 d monocular deprivation, which allowed us to examine both the depression component (Dc-ODP) and potentiation component (Pc-ODP) of plasticity independently. We found that CREB, SRF, and MEF2 are all required for ODP, but have differential effects on Dc-ODP and Pc-ODP. CREB is necessary for both Dc-ODP and Pc-ODP, whereas SRF and MEF2 are only needed for Dc-ODP. This finding supports previous reports implicating SRF and MEF2 in long-term depression (required for Dc-ODP), and CREB in long-term potentiation (required for Pc-ODP). SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Activity-dependent neuronal plasticity is the cellular basis for learning and memory, and it is crucial for the refinement of neuronal circuits during development. Identifying the mechanisms of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity is crucial to finding therapeutic interventions in the myriad of disorders where it is disrupted, such as Fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, epilepsy, major depressive disorder, and autism

  5. The Role of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in Activity-Dependent Neuronal Plasticity in the Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Pulimood, Nisha S; Rodrigues, Wandilson Dos Santos; Atkinson, Devon A; Mooney, Sandra M; Medina, Alexandre E

    2017-07-12

    The transcription factors CREB (cAMP response element binding factor), SRF (serum response factor), and MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2) play critical roles in the mechanisms underlying neuronal plasticity. However, the role of the activation of these transcription factors in the different components of plasticity in vivo is not well known. In this study, we tested the role of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in ocular dominance plasticity (ODP), a paradigm of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity in the visual cortex. These three proteins bind to the synaptic activity response element (SARE), an enhancer sequence found upstream of many plasticity-related genes (Kawashima et al., 2009; Rodríguez-Tornos et al., 2013), and can act cooperatively to express Arc , a gene required for ODP (McCurry et al., 2010). We used viral-mediated gene transfer to block the transcription function of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in the visual cortex, and measured visually evoked potentials in awake male and female mice before and after a 7 d monocular deprivation, which allowed us to examine both the depression component (Dc-ODP) and potentiation component (Pc-ODP) of plasticity independently. We found that CREB, SRF, and MEF2 are all required for ODP, but have differential effects on Dc-ODP and Pc-ODP. CREB is necessary for both Dc-ODP and Pc-ODP, whereas SRF and MEF2 are only needed for Dc-ODP. This finding supports previous reports implicating SRF and MEF2 in long-term depression (required for Dc-ODP), and CREB in long-term potentiation (required for Pc-ODP). SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Activity-dependent neuronal plasticity is the cellular basis for learning and memory, and it is crucial for the refinement of neuronal circuits during development. Identifying the mechanisms of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity is crucial to finding therapeutic interventions in the myriad of disorders where it is disrupted, such as Fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, epilepsy, major depressive disorder, and autism

  6. Myocyte enhancer factor (MEF)-2 plays essential roles in T-cell transformation associated with HTLV-1 infection by stabilizing complex between Tax and CREB.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pooja; Lavorgna, Alfonso; Sehgal, Mohit; Gao, Linlin; Ginwala, Rashida; Sagar, Divya; Harhaj, Edward W; Khan, Zafar K

    2015-02-27

    The exact molecular mechanisms regarding HTLV-1 Tax-mediated viral gene expression and CD4 T-cell transformation have yet to be fully delineated. Herein, utilizing virus-infected primary CD4+ T cells and the virus-producing cell line, MT-2, we describe the involvement and regulation of Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (specifically MEF-2A) during the course of HTLV-1 infection and associated disease syndrome. Inhibition of MEF-2 expression by shRNA and its activity by HDAC9 led to reduced viral replication and T-cell transformation in correlation with a heightened expression of MEF-2 in ATL patients. Mechanistically, MEF-2 was recruited to the viral promoter (LTR, long terminal repeat) in the context of chromatin, and constituted Tax/CREB transcriptional complex via direct binding to the HTLV-1 LTR. Furthermore, an increase in MEF-2 expression was observed upon infection in an extent similar to CREB (known Tax-interacting transcription factor), and HATs (p300, CBP, and p/CAF). Confocal imaging confirmed MEF-2 co-localization with Tax and these proteins were also shown to interact by co-immunoprecipitation. MEF-2 stabilization of Tax/CREB complex was confirmed by a novel promoter-binding assay that highlighted the involvement of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) in this process via Tax-mediated activation of calcineurin (a calcium-dependent serine-threonine phosphatase). MEF-2-integrated signaling pathways (PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, MAPK, JAK/STAT, and TGF-β) were also activated during HTLV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T cells, possibly regulating MEF-2 activity. We demonstrate the involvement of MEF-2 in Tax-mediated LTR activation, viral replication, and T-cell transformation in correlation with its heightened expression in ATL patients through direct binding to DNA within the HTLV-1 LTR.

  7. [Transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions and distortion product emissions in disorders of middle ear ventilation].

    PubMed

    Schmuziger, N; Hauser, R; Probst, R

    1996-06-01

    Both the amplitude and power spectra of otoacoustic emissions are affected by the transfer properties of the middle ear. This prospective study examined the influence of eustachian tube dysfunction on transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). In all, 18 ears were studied that exhibited negative middle ear pressures with or without middle ear fluid. Measurements were performed at the time of diagnosis during the recovery stage, and after the middle ear became normally ventilated. Findings showed that TEOAE and DPOAE levels increased while airbone gaps were reduced by an average of 8 dB after negative middle ear pressures returned from -400 daPa to a normal state. There was a tendency for negative middle ear pressure to affect DPOAEs more in the 1-kHz region than in higher frequencies. By contrast, TEOAEs and airbone gaps were more uniformly affected across the entire frequency range. These results for ears with eustachian tube dysfunction were somewhat different from those results of studies obtained in healthy ears tested during experimental changes in middle ear pressure.

  8. Surgical correction of cauliflower ear.

    PubMed

    Yotsuyanagi, T; Yamashita, K; Urushidate, S; Yokoi, K; Sawada, Y; Miyazaki, S

    2002-07-01

    We have classified the cauliflower ear into different types according to the zone and the degree of deformity. One major group is deformity without change in the outline of the ear, and this is divided into four subgroups according to the zone. All of these subgroups can be treated by shaving the deformed cartilage through suitable incision lines. For deformities accompanied by a skin deficit, a postauricular skin flap should be used. The other major group is deformity accompanied by a change in the outline of the ear, which is divided into two subgroups. If the ear is rigid, a conchal cartilage graft is used. If the structural integrity of the ear is poor, costal cartilage is used to provide rigidity.

  9. Pinna abnormalities and low-set ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect - pinna; Congenital defect - pinna Images Ear abnormalities Pinna of the newborn ear References Haddad J, Keesecker S. Congenital malformations. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, ...

  10. Anomalies of the middle and inner ear.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Kimsey; Shah, Rahul K; Kenna, Margaret

    2007-02-01

    The development of the middle and inner ear highlights the intricacy of embryology. As early as 3 weeks after fertilization, the inner ear begins taking form. This process, along with development of the middle ear, continues throughout gestation. At birth, the middle ear, inner ear, and associated structures are almost adult size. An understanding of the embryologic development of the ear serves as a foundation for evaluating and managing congenital malformations of these structures. The focus of this article is the normal, abnormal, and arrested development of the middle and inner ear, with a clinical emphasis on malformed middle and inner ear structures and a discussion of associated syndromes.

  11. Roles and regulations of the ETS transcription factor ELF4/MEF

    PubMed Central

    Suico, Mary Ann; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Kai, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Most E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of cancer. This is in part due to the roles of ETS transcription factors in basic biological processes such as growth, proliferation, and differentiation, and also because of their regulatory functions that have physiological relevance in tumorigenesis, immunity, and basal cellular homoeostasis. A member of the E74-like factor (ELF) subfamily of the ETS transcription factor family—myeloid elf-1-like factor (MEF), designated as ELF4—has been shown to be critically involved in immune response and signalling, osteogenesis, adipogenesis, cancer, and stem cell quiescence. ELF4 carries out these functions as a transcriptional activator or through interactions with its partner proteins. Mutations in ELF4 cause aberrant interactions and induce downstream processes that may lead to diseased cells. Knowing how ELF4 impinges on certain cellular processes and how it is regulated in the cells can lead to a better understanding of the physiological and pathological consequences of modulated ELF4 activity. PMID:27932483

  12. Classification of Newborn Ear Malformations and their Treatment with the EarWell Infant Ear Correction System.

    PubMed

    Daniali, Lily N; Rezzadeh, Kameron; Shell, Cheryl; Trovato, Matthew; Ha, Richard; Byrd, H Steve

    2017-03-01

    A single practice's treatment protocol and outcomes following molding therapy on newborn ear deformations and malformations with the EarWell Infant Ear Correction System were reviewed. A classification system for grading the severity of constricted ear malformations was created on the basis of anatomical findings. A retrospective chart/photograph review of a consecutive series of infants treated with the EarWell System from 2011 to 2014 was undertaken. The infants were placed in either deformation or malformation groups. Three classes of malformation were identified. Data regarding treatment induction, duration of treatment, and quality of outcome were collected for all study patients. One hundred seventy-five infant ear malformations and 303 infant ear deformities were treated with the EarWell System. The average age at initiation of treatment was 12 days; the mean duration of treatment was 37 days. An average of six office visits was required. Treated malformations included constricted ears [172 ears (98 percent)] and cryptotia [three ears (2 percent)]. Cup ear (34 ears) was considered a constricted malformation, in contrast to the prominent ear deformity. Constricted ears were assigned to one of three classes, with each subsequent class indicating increasing severity: class I, 77 ears (45 percent); class II, 81 ears (47 percent); and class III, 14 ears (8 percent). Molding therapy with the EarWell System reduced the severity by an average of 1.2 points (p < 0.01). Complications included minor superficial excoriations and abrasions. The EarWell System was shown to be effective in eliminating or reducing the need for surgery in all but the most severe malformations. Therapeutic, IV.

  13. Ototoxicity (Ear Poisoning) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... never change the dose or stop giving your child a medicine without talking to your doctor first. Reviewed by: Robert C. ... Hearing Loss? Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Going to the Audiologist Hearing ...

  14. Principles of endoscopic ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Tarabichi, Muaaz; Kapadia, Mustafa

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this review is to study the rationale, limitations, techniques, and long-term outcomes of endoscopic ear surgery. The article discusses the advantages of endoscopic ear surgery in treating cholesteatoma and how the hidden sites like facial recess, sinus tympani, and anterior epitympanum are easily accessed using the endoscope. Transcanal endoscopic approach allows minimally invasive removal of cholesteatoma with results that compare well to traditional postauricular tympanomastoidectomy.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of Drug Entry into Cochlear Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.

    2005-01-01

    The inner ear is exposed to aminoglycosides or other drugs either intentionally or as a side effect of clinical treatments directed at other regions of the body. An understanding of the effects of drugs on the inner ear requires knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug once it reaches the cochlear fluids, specifically how much of it reaches…

  16. Using the shortwave infrared to image middle ear pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Tulio A.; Bruns, Oliver T.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2016-01-01

    Visualizing structures deep inside opaque biological tissues is one of the central challenges in biomedical imaging. Optical imaging with visible light provides high resolution and sensitivity; however, scattering and absorption of light by tissue limits the imaging depth to superficial features. Imaging with shortwave infrared light (SWIR, 1–2 μm) shares many advantages of visible imaging, but light scattering in tissue is reduced, providing sufficient optical penetration depth to noninvasively interrogate subsurface tissue features. However, the clinical potential of this approach has been largely unexplored because suitable detectors, until recently, have been either unavailable or cost prohibitive. Here, taking advantage of newly available detector technology, we demonstrate the potential of SWIR light to improve diagnostics through the development of a medical otoscope for determining middle ear pathologies. We show that SWIR otoscopy has the potential to provide valuable diagnostic information complementary to that provided by visible pneumotoscopy. We show that in healthy adult human ears, deeper tissue penetration of SWIR light allows better visualization of middle ear structures through the tympanic membrane, including the ossicular chain, promontory, round window niche, and chorda tympani. In addition, we investigate the potential for detection of middle ear fluid, which has significant implications for diagnosing otitis media, the overdiagnosis of which is a primary factor in increased antibiotic resistance. Middle ear fluid shows strong light absorption between 1,400 and 1,550 nm, enabling straightforward fluid detection in a model using the SWIR otoscope. Moreover, our device is easily translatable to the clinic, as the ergonomics, visual output, and operation are similar to a conventional otoscope. PMID:27551085

  17. Surgical correction of constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ye; Lin, Lin; Yang, Qinhua; Pan, Bo; Zhao, Yanyong; He, Leren; Jiang, Haiyue

    2015-07-01

    Constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear is a rare ear deformity, which is a kind of complex congenital auricular deformity. From 1 January 2007 to 1 January 2014, 19 patients with constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear (Spock ear) were enrolled in this study, most of which were unilaterally deformed. To correct the deformity, a double Z-shaped skin incision was made on the posterior side of the auricle, with the entire layer of cartilage cut parallel to the helix traversing the third crus to form a fan-shaped cartilage flap. The superior crura of the antihelix were shaped by the folding cartilage rim. The cartilage of the abnormal third crus was made part of the new superior crura of antihelix, and the third crus was eliminated. The postoperative aesthetic assessment of the reshaped auricle was graded by both doctors and patients (or their parents). Out of the 19 patients, the number of satisfying cases of the symmetry, helix stretch, elimination of the third crus, the cranioauricular angle, and the substructure of the reshaped ears was 14 (nine excellent and five good), 16 (six excellent and 10 good), 17 (eight excellent and nine good), 15 (five excellent and 10 good), and 13 (two excellent and 11 good), respectively. With a maximum of a 90-month follow-up, no complication was observed. The results of the study suggested that this rare deformity could be corrected by appropriate surgical treatment, with a satisfied postoperative appearance. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Visualization of Middle Ear Ossicles in Elder Subjects with Ultra-short Echo Time MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Shinji; Nakane, Toshiki; Kawai, Hisashi; Taoka, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Kojiro; Iwano, Shingo; Satake, Hiroko; Grodzki, David

    2017-04-10

    To evaluate the visualization of middle ear ossicles by ultra-short echo time magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3T in subjects over 50 years old. Sixty ears from 30 elder patients that underwent surgical or interventional treatment for neurovascular diseases were included (ages: 50-82, median age: 65; 10 men, 20 women). Patients received follow-up MR imaging including routine T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images, time-of-flight MR angiography, and ultra-short echo time imaging (PETRA, pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition). All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) angiography before treatment. Thin-section source CT images were correlated with PETRA images. Scan parameters for PETRA were: TR 3.13, TE 0.07, flip angle 6 degrees, 0.83 × 0.83 × 0.83 mm resolution, 3 min 43 s scan time. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated the visibility of each ossicular structure as positive or negative using PETRA images. The structures evaluated included the head of the malleus, manubrium of the malleus, body of the incus, long process of the incus, and the stapes. Signal intensity of the ossicles was classified as: between labyrinthine fluid and air, similar to labyrinthine fluid, between labyrinthine fluid and cerebellar parenchyma, or higher than cerebellar parenchyma. In all ears, the body of the incus was visible. The head of the malleus was visualized in 36/60 ears. The manubrium of the malleus and long process of the incus was visualized in 1/60 and 4/60 ears, respectively. The stapes were not visualized in any ear. Signal intensity of the visible structures was between labyrinthine fluid and air in all ears. The body of the incus was consistently visualized with intensity between air and labyrinthine fluid on PETRA images in aged subjects. Poor visualization of the manubrium of the malleus, long process of the incus, and the stapes limits clinical significance of middle ear imaging with current PETRA methods.

  19. MEF2 responds to multiple calcium-regulated signals in the control of skeletal muscle fiber type

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hai; Naya, Francisco J.; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Mercer, Brian; Shelton, John M.; Chin, Eva R.; Simard, Alain R.; Michel, Robin N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Williams, R. Sanders

    2000-01-01

    Different patterns of motor nerve activity drive distinctive programs of gene transcription in skeletal muscles, thereby establishing a high degree of metabolic and physiological specialization among myofiber subtypes. Recently, we proposed that the influence of motor nerve activity on skeletal muscle fiber type is transduced to the relevant genes by calcineurin, which controls the functional activity of NFAT (nuclear family of activated T cell) proteins. Here we demonstrate that calcineurin-dependent gene regulation in skeletal myocytes is mediated also by MEF2 transcription factors, and is integrated with additional calcium-regulated signaling inputs, specifically calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity. In skeletal muscles of transgenic mice, both NFAT and MEF2 binding sites are necessary for properly regulated function of a slow fiber-specific enhancer, and either forced expression of activated calcineurin or motor nerve stimulation up-regulates a MEF2-dependent reporter gene. These results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which specialized characteristics of skeletal myofiber subtypes are established and maintained. PMID:10790363

  20. The MEF2 gene is essential for yeast longevity, with a dual role in cell respiration and maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Sylvie; McKinnon, Ross A; Andrews, Stuart; de Barros Lopes, Miguel A

    2011-04-20

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MEF2 gene is a mitochondrial protein translation factor. Formerly believed to catalyze peptide elongation, evidence now suggests its involvement in ribosome recycling. This study confirms the role of the MEF2 gene for cell respiration and further uncovers a slow growth phenotype and reduced chronological lifespan. Furthermore, in comparison with cytoplasmic ρ(0) strains, mef2Δ strains have a marked reduction of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondria show a tendency to aggregate, suggesting an additional role for the MEF2 gene in maintenance of mitochondrial health, a role that may also be shared by other mitochondrial protein synthesis factors. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Hydrodynamic Model of Transport in the Wheat Ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stieber, Joseph; Stieber, Joli; Bubenheim, David L.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The vascular arrangement in the main axis (rachis) of the wheat ear, studied and reported in a previous paper by the same, described a circuit-cascade system consisting of capacitance and resistance passages (so-called RC-circuits). Some hydromechanic aspects (e.g., resonance, impulse control) of this asymmetric transport system and their possible role and importance in the fluid supply are discussed. A theoretical analysis of how this system works, as well as samples of practical application are presented.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear in Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, Ilmari; Zou, Jing; Poe, Dennis; Nakashima, Tsutomu; Naganawa, Shinji

    2010-10-01

    Recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have made it possible to examine the compartments of the cochlea using gadolidium-chelate (GdC) as a contrast agent. As GdC loads into the perilymph space without entering the endolymph in healthy inner ears, the technique provides possibilities to visualize the different cochlear compartments and evaluate the integrity of the inner ear barriers. This critical review presents the recent advancements in the inner ear MRI technology, contrast agent application and the correlated ototoxicity study, and the uptake dynamics of GdC in the inner ear. GdC causes inflammation of the mucosa of the middle ear, but there are no reports or evidence of toxicity-related changes in vivo either in animals or in humans. Intravenously administered GdC reached the guinea pig cochlea about 10 minutes after administration and loaded the scala tympani and scala vestibuli with the peak at 60 minutes. However, the perilymphatic loading peak was 80 to 100 minutes in mice after intravenous administration of GdC. In healthy animals the scala media did not load GdC. In mice in which GdC was administered topically onto the round window, loading of the cochlea peaked at 4 hours, at which time it reached the apex. The initial portions of the organ to be filled were the basal turn of the cochlea and vestibule. In animal models with endolymphatic hydrops (EH), bulging of the Reissner's membrane was observed as deficit of GdC in the scala vestibuli. Histologically the degree of bulging correlated with the MR images. In animals with immune reaction-induced EH, MRI showed that EH could be limited to restricted regions of the inner ear, and in the same inner ear both EH and leakage of GdC into the scala media were visualized. More than 100 inner ear MRI scans have been performed to date in humans. Loading of GdC followed the pattern seen in animals, but the time frame was different. In intravenous delivery of double-dose GdC, the inner ear compartments

  3. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  4. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  5. Lamellar projections in the endolymphatic sac act as a relief valve to regulate inner ear pressure

    PubMed Central

    Swinburne, Ian A; Mosaliganti, Kishore R; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Liu, Tsung-Li; Hildebrand, David G C; Tsai, Tony Y -C; Chen, Anzhi; Al-Obeidi, Ebaa; Fass, Anna K; Malhotra, Samir; Engert, Florian; Lichtman, Jeff W; Kirchausen, Tomas; Betzig, Eric

    2018-01-01

    The inner ear is a fluid-filled closed-epithelial structure whose function requires maintenance of an internal hydrostatic pressure and fluid composition. The endolymphatic sac (ES) is a dead-end epithelial tube connected to the inner ear whose function is unclear. ES defects can cause distended ear tissue, a pathology often seen in hearing and balance disorders. Using live imaging of zebrafish larvae, we reveal that the ES undergoes cycles of slow pressure-driven inflation followed by rapid deflation. Absence of these cycles in lmx1bb mutants leads to distended ear tissue. Using serial-section electron microscopy and adaptive optics lattice light-sheet microscopy, we find a pressure relief valve in the ES comprised of partially separated apical junctions and dynamic overlapping basal lamellae that separate under pressure to release fluid. We propose that this lmx1-dependent pressure relief valve is required to maintain fluid homeostasis in the inner ear and other fluid-filled cavities. PMID:29916365

  6. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z.

    2016-01-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa - a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis. PMID:26785845

  7. Unclassified congenital deformities of the external ear.

    PubMed

    Vathulya, Madhubari

    2018-01-01

    Congenital ear deformities are a common entity. They are found in isolation or as a part of syndrome in patients. They may involve the external, middle or inner ear or in any of these combinations. Three patients of different ages presented with deformities including mirror image duplication of the superior auricle, unclassified deformities of ear lobule (wavy lobule) and deformity of superior auricle with unclassified variety of lateral ear pit. This article highlights that there are further cases of ear deformities that are noticed in the general population who come for cosmetic correction, and hence, there is a need for further modifying the classification of ear deformities.

  8. Learning to perform ear reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Gordon H

    2009-08-01

    Learning how to perform ear reconstruction is very difficult. There are no standardized teaching methods. This has resulted in many ear reconstructions being suboptimal. Learning requires a major commitment by the surgeon. Factors to be seriously considered by those considering performing this surgery are (1) commitment, (2) aptitude, (3) training methods available, (4) surgical skills and experience, and (5) additional equipment needs. Unless all these factors are addressed in a surgeon's decision to perform this form of reconstruction, the end result will be compromised, and patient care will not be optimized. It is hoped that considering these factors and following this approach will result in a higher quality of aesthetic result. The future of ear reconstruction lies in the use of advanced digital technologies and tissue engineering. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  9. Human middle-ear model with compound eardrum and airway branching in mastoid air cells

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustical/mechanical model of normal adult human middle-ear function is described for forward and reverse transmission. The eardrum model included one component bound along the manubrium and another bound by the tympanic cleft. Eardrum components were coupled by a time-delayed impedance. The acoustics of the middle-ear cleft was represented by an acoustical transmission-line model for the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and mastoid air cell system with variable amounts of excess viscothermal loss. Model parameters were fitted to published measurements of energy reflectance (0.25–13 kHz), equivalent input impedance at the eardrum (0.25–11 kHz), temporal-bone pressure in scala vestibuli and scala tympani (0.1–11 kHz), and reverse middle-ear impedance (0.25–8 kHz). Inner-ear fluid motion included cochlear and physiological third-window pathways. The two-component eardrum with time delay helped fit intracochlear pressure responses. A multi-modal representation of the eardrum and high-frequency modeling of the middle-ear cleft helped fit ear-canal responses. Input reactance at the eardrum was small at high frequencies due to multiple modal resonances. The model predicted the middle-ear efficiency between ear canal and cochlea, and the cochlear pressures at threshold. PMID:25994701

  10. Human middle-ear model with compound eardrum and airway branching in mastoid air cells.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Douglas H

    2015-05-01

    An acoustical/mechanical model of normal adult human middle-ear function is described for forward and reverse transmission. The eardrum model included one component bound along the manubrium and another bound by the tympanic cleft. Eardrum components were coupled by a time-delayed impedance. The acoustics of the middle-ear cleft was represented by an acoustical transmission-line model for the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and mastoid air cell system with variable amounts of excess viscothermal loss. Model parameters were fitted to published measurements of energy reflectance (0.25-13 kHz), equivalent input impedance at the eardrum (0.25-11 kHz), temporal-bone pressure in scala vestibuli and scala tympani (0.1-11 kHz), and reverse middle-ear impedance (0.25-8 kHz). Inner-ear fluid motion included cochlear and physiological third-window pathways. The two-component eardrum with time delay helped fit intracochlear pressure responses. A multi-modal representation of the eardrum and high-frequency modeling of the middle-ear cleft helped fit ear-canal responses. Input reactance at the eardrum was small at high frequencies due to multiple modal resonances. The model predicted the middle-ear efficiency between ear canal and cochlea, and the cochlear pressures at threshold.

  11. Prevalence of ear disease in dogs undergoing multidetector thin-slice computed tomography of the head.

    PubMed

    Foster, Allison; Morandi, Federica; May, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports describing the prevalence of ear diseases in dogs have primarily been based on dogs presenting with clinical signs of disease. The prevalence of subclinical ear disease remains unknown. The purpose of this cross-sectional retrospective study was to describe the prevalence of lesions consistent with middle and external ear disease in dogs presented for multidetector computed tomography (CT) of the head and/or cranial cervical spine at our hospital during the period of July 2011 and August 2013. For each included dog, data recorded were signalment, CT findings, diagnosis, and treatment. A total of 199 dogs met inclusion criteria. Nineteen dogs (9.5%) were referred for evaluation of suspected ear disease and 27 dogs (13.5%) had histories or physical examination findings consistent with otitis externa. A total of 163 dogs (81.9%) had CT lesions consistent with external ear disease (i.e. ear canal mineralization, external canal thickening, and/or narrowing of the external canal). Thirty-nine dogs (19.5%) had CT lesions consistent with middle ear disease (i.e. soft tissue attenuating/fluid material in the tympanic bullae, bulla wall thickening or lysis, and/or periosteal proliferation of the temporal bone). Findings from this study indicated that the prevalence of external and middle ear disease in dogs could be higher than that previously reported. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  12. β-asarone increases MEF2D and TH levels and reduces α-synuclein level in 6-OHDA-induced rats via regulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway: Chaperone-mediated autophagy activation, macroautophagy inhibition and HSP70 up-expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Liu, Shu; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-10-15

    Inactive myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) and alpha-synuclein (α-syn) aggregation will cause neuronal death. MEF2D or α-syn degradation is also associated with macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70). We found that β-asarone had positive effects on treating 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rats, but mechanisms of β-asarone affecting on MEF2D and α-syn via regulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway remain unclear. Unilateral 6-OHDA injection into the medial forebrain bundle was used to create PD rats, which were divided into four groups and administered for 30days: 6-OHDA model group, MEF2D inhibitor-treated group (SB203580, 0.5mg/kg, i.p.), MEF2D activator-treated group (LiCl, 100mg/kg, i.p.), β-asarone-treated group (15mg/kg, p.o.). Expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), α-syn, heat-shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A), MEF2D, HSP70, Beclin-1, light chain 3B (LC3B) and p62 in the mesencephalon were measured after 30-day administration. α-syn, Beclin-1 and LC3B levels were higher in the 6-OHDA model group, while TH, MEF2D, HSC70, LAMP-2A, p62 levels were lower compared to the sham-operated group. Our results also showed thatβ-asarone treatment reduced protein and mRNA levels of α-syn, Beclin-1 and LC3B, but increased HSP70, TH, MEF2D, HSC70, LAMP-2A and p62 levels compared to the 6-OHDA model group. Additionally, certain correlations among α-syn, TH, Beclin-1, LC3B, p62, HSP70, LAMP-2A and MEF2D were also discovered in this study. These findings suggested that β-asarone treatment could increase MEF2D and TH as well as reduce α-syn to protect against 6-OHDA induced damage in PD rat mesencephalon via modulating the HSP70/MAPK/MEF2D/Beclin-1 pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. MEF2C-MYOCD and Leiomodin1 Suppression by miRNA-214 Promotes Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype Switching in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Sanghamitra; Meijles, Daniel N.; Al Ghouleh, Imad; Tandon, Manuj; Cifuentes-Pagano, Eugenia; Sembrat, John; Rojas, Mauricio; Goncharova, Elena; Pagano, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular hyperproliferative disorders are characterized by excessive smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation leading to vessel remodeling and occlusion. In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), SMC phenotype switching from a terminally differentiated contractile to synthetic state is gaining traction as our understanding of the disease progression improves. While maintenance of SMC contractile phenotype is reportedly orchestrated by a MEF2C-myocardin (MYOCD) interplay, little is known regarding molecular control at this nexus. Moreover, the burgeoning interest in microRNAs (miRs) provides the basis for exploring their modulation of MEF2C-MYOCD signaling, and in turn, a pro-proliferative, synthetic SMC phenotype. We hypothesized that suppression of SMC contractile phenotype in pulmonary hypertension is mediated by miR-214 via repression of the MEF2C-MYOCD-leiomodin1 (LMOD1) signaling axis. Methods and Results In SMCs isolated from a PAH patient cohort and commercially obtained hPASMCs exposed to hypoxia, miR-214 expression was monitored by qRT-PCR. miR-214 was upregulated in PAH- vs. control subject hPASMCs as well as in commercially obtained hPASMCs exposed to hypoxia. These increases in miR-214 were paralleled by MEF2C, MYOCD and SMC contractile protein downregulation. Of these, LMOD1 and MEF2C were directly targeted by the miR. Mir-214 overexpression mimicked the PAH profile, downregulating MEF2C and LMOD1. AntagomiR-214 abrogated hypoxia-induced suppression of the contractile phenotype and its attendant proliferation. Anti-miR-214 also restored PAH-PASMCs to a contractile phenotype seen during vascular homeostasis. Conclusions Our findings illustrate a key role for miR-214 in modulation of MEF2C-MYOCD-LMOD1 signaling and suggest that an antagonist of miR-214 could mitigate SMC phenotype changes and proliferation in vascular hyperproliferative disorders including PAH. PMID:27144530

  14. Inner Ear Drug Delivery for Auditory Applications

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Erin E. Leary; Mescher, Mark J.; Sewell, William F.; Tao, Sarah L.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2008-01-01

    Many inner ear disorders cannot be adequately treated by systemic drug delivery. A blood-cochlear barrier exists, similar physiologically to the blood-brain barrier, which limits the concentration and size of molecules able to leave the circulation and gain access to the cells of the inner ear. However, research in novel therapeutics and delivery systems has led to significant progress in the development of local methods of drug delivery to the inner ear. Intratympanic approaches, which deliver therapeutics to the middle ear, rely on permeation through tissue for access to the structures of the inner ear, whereas intracochlear methods are able to directly insert drugs into the inner ear. Innovative drug delivery systems to treat various inner ear ailments such as ototoxicity, sudden sensorineural hearing loss, autoimmune inner ear disease, and for preserving neurons and regenerating sensory cells are being explored. PMID:18848590

  15. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  16. The novel conjugative transposon tn1207.3 carries the macrolide efflux gene mef(A) in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Santagati, Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Cascone, Carmela; Campanile, Floriana; Oggioni, Marco R; Stefani, Stefania; Pozzi, Gianni

    2003-01-01

    The macrolide efflux gene mef(A) of the Streptococcus pyogenes clinical strain 2812A was found to be carried by a 52-kb chromosomal genetic element that could be transferred by conjugation to the chromosome of other streptococcal species. The characteristics of this genetic element are typical of conjugative transposons and was named Tn1207.3. The size of Tn1207.3 was established by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and DNA sequencing analysis showed that the 7,244 bp at the left end of Tn1207.3 were identical to those of the pneumococcal Tn1207.1 element. Tn1207.3-like genetic elements were found to be inserted at a single specific chromosomal site in 12 different clinical isolates S. pyogenes exhibiting the M phenotype of resistance to macrolides and carrying the mef(A) gene. Tn1207.3 was transferred from S. pyogenes 2812A to Streptococcus pneumoniae, and sequence analysis carried out on six independent transconjugants showed that insertion of Tn1207.3 in the pneumococcal genome always occurred at a single specific site as in Tn1207.1. Using MF2, a representative S. pneumoniae transconjugant, as a donor, Tn1207.3 was transferred again by conjugation to S. pyogenes and Streptococcus gordonii. The previously described nonconjugative element Tn1207.1 of S. pneumoniae appears to be a defective element, part of a longer conjugative transposon that carries mef(A) and is found in clinical isolates of S. pyogenes.

  17. Immunolocalization of aquaporin CHIP in the guinea pig inner ear.

    PubMed

    Stanković, K M; Adams, J C; Brown, D

    1995-12-01

    Aquaporin CHIP (AQP-CHIP) is a water channel protein previously identified in red blood cells and water transporting epithelia. The inner ear is an organ of hearing and balance whose normal function depends critically on maintenance of fluid homeostasis. In this study, AQP-CHIP, or a close homologue, was found in specific cells of the inner ear, as assessed by immunocytochemistry with the use of affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against AQP-CHIP.AQP-CHIP was predominantly found in fibrocytes in close association with bone, including most of the cells lining the bony labyrinth and in fibrocytes lining the endolymphatic duct and sac. AQP-CHIP-positive cells not directly apposing bone include cells under the basilar membrane, some type III fibrocytes of the spiral ligament, fibrocytes of the spiral limbus, and the trabecular perilymphatic tissue extending from the membranous to the bony labyrinth. AQP-CHIP was also found in the periosteum of the middle ear and cranial bones, as well as in chondrocytes of the oval window and stapes. The distribution of AQP-CHIP in the inner ear suggests that AQP-CHIP may have special significance for maintenance of bone and the basilar membrane, and for function of the spiral ligament.

  18. THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION THERAPY ON THE EAR WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO RADIATION OTITIS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Borsanyi, S.J.

    Between l957 and 1961 over l00 patients who were treated by a Co/sup 60/ teletherapy unit for malignant tumors of the head and neck were observed. The ears were included in the field of irradiation (4000 to 6000 r to the region of the inner ear). Between 50 and 60% of the patients developed ear symptoms during or shortly after completion of treatment. The most common symptoms were a sensation of fullness in the ear, some loss of hearing, earache, and tinnitus. Examination of ears revealed mild to moderate hyperemia of ear drums, with slight retraction in eariy stages andmore » bulging at iater stages. There was a moderate conductive hearing loss also. This disease entity is termed radiation otitis media and its pathophysiologic mechanism is similar to that of serous otitis media. Sterile fluid fills the middle ear, containing also some desquamated epithelial cells. Radiation otitis media usually clears up in a few weeks after the completion of treatment. In the management of this condition, vasoconstrictors, mild analgesics, and gentie politzeration were sufficient. However, in a few cases bacterial invasion of the sterile fluid occurred, resulting in purulent otitis media which required the use of antibiotics. Hearing of 20 patients was tested at weekly intervals during and after the completion of radiation. Cut of the 40 ears, 16 showed a conductive hearing loss, averaging 20 db. Six ears showed a worsening of the original loss of preceptive hearing. However, this was also primarily due to the development of a conductive component. There were no microscopicaiiy detectable immediate changes in the cochlea or labyrinth exposed to radiation in cancerocidal doses. (H.H.D.)« less

  19. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear...

  20. Immunologic Disorders of the Inner Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, William C.; Hughes, Gordon B.

    1997-01-01

    Immune inner ear disease represents a series of immune system mediated problems that can present with hearing loss, dizziness, or both. The etiology, presentation, testing, and treatment of primary immune inner ear disease is discussed. A review of secondary immune inner ear disease is presented for comparison. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  1. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear...

  2. Treating "cauliflower ear" with silicone mold.

    PubMed

    Gross, C G

    1978-01-01

    Acute hematoma of the ear (cauliflower ear) can be satisfactorily treated with aspiration and the use of the silicone mold to prevent reaccumulation of the blood or serum in the ear. Advantages of the silicone mold over other dressings appears to be ease of application, patient acceptance, and prevention of reoccurrence of reaccumulation of the hematoma.

  3. Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? KidsHealth / For Kids / Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Print en español La música ... up? Oh! You want to know if loud music can hurt your ears . Are you asking because ...

  4. Use of Clindamycin Disks To Detect Macrolide Resistance Mediated by ermB and mefE in Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken; Johnson, Crystal; Gray, Barry; Edwards, Kathryn; Crain, Marilyn; Benjamin, William

    2000-01-01

    We studied 198 macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates obtained from adults and children to evaluate whether 2-μg clindamycin disks can distinguish between isolates manifesting ermB- versus mefE-mediated resistance to clarithromycin and to determine the relative frequency with which each resistance mechanism occurred in these populations. The mefE gene was predominant among 109 isolates from children, occurring in 73.4% versus 50.6% of 89 isolates from adults. Three isolates (1.5%) did not amplify either gene. Among 125 mefE+ isolates, the MIC of clarithromycin at which 90% of the isolates tested were inhibited, determined by Etest, was 32 μg/ml versus >256 μg/ml in 70 ermB+ isolates. All ermB+ isolates were highly resistant to clindamycin (MICs >256 μg/ml), whereas all mefE+ isolates were susceptible to clindamycin using the 2-μg disk. Testing S. pneumoniae from the respiratory tract for susceptibility to clindamycin by agar disk diffusion is an easy and inexpensive method to estimate the frequency of resistance mediated by ermB in specific patient populations. Macrolide resistance mediated by ermB is usually of greater magnitude than that due to mefE. Clinical studies are needed to determine the significance of high- versus low-level macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. PMID:10790089

  5. Cytotoxicity due to corrosion of ear piercing studs.

    PubMed

    Rogero, S O; Higa, O Z; Saiki, M; Correa, O V; Costa, I

    2000-12-01

    It is well known that allergic and/or inflammatory reactions can be elicited from the use of gold-coated studs, particularly the type used for piercing ears, since they are left in contact with body fluids until the puncture heals. Inasmuch as gold is known as a non-toxic element, other elements of the substrate material may be responsible for some allergies. Therefore, characteristics of the coating, such as defects that expose the substrate to the human skin or body fluids, play an important role in the development of skin sensitization. In this study, the cytotoxicity of commercial studs used for ear piercing and laboratory-made studs was determined in a culture of mammalian cells. The corrosion performance of the studs was investigated by means of weight loss measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The elements that leached out into the medium were also analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Further, the surfaces of the studs were examined by scanning electron microscopy and analysed by energy dispersive spectroscopy to identify defects and reaction products on the surface, both before and after their exposure to the culture medium. The stud which showed lower corrosion performance resulted in higher cytotoxicity. Ti showed no cytotoxicity and high corrosion resistance, proving to be a potential material for the manufacture of ear piercing studs.

  6. The NOTCH1/SNAIL1/MEF2C Pathway Regulates Growth and Self-Renewal in Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ignatius, Myron S; Hayes, Madeline N; Lobbardi, Riadh; Chen, Eleanor Y; McCarthy, Karin M; Sreenivas, Prethish; Motala, Zainab; Durbin, Adam D; Molodtsov, Aleksey; Reeder, Sophia; Jin, Alexander; Sindiri, Sivasish; Beleyea, Brian C; Bhere, Deepak; Alexander, Matthew S; Shah, Khalid; Keller, Charles; Linardic, Corinne M; Nielsen, Petur G; Malkin, David; Khan, Javed; Langenau, David M

    2017-06-13

    Tumor-propagating cells (TPCs) share self-renewal properties with normal stem cells and drive continued tumor growth. However, mechanisms regulating TPC self-renewal are largely unknown, especially in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS)-a common pediatric cancer of muscle. Here, we used a zebrafish transgenic model of ERMS to identify a role for intracellular NOTCH1 (ICN1) in increasing TPCs by 23-fold. ICN1 expanded TPCs by enabling the de-differentiation of zebrafish ERMS cells into self-renewing myf5+ TPCs, breaking the rigid differentiation hierarchies reported in normal muscle. ICN1 also had conserved roles in regulating human ERMS self-renewal and growth. Mechanistically, ICN1 upregulated expression of SNAIL1, a transcriptional repressor, to increase TPC number in human ERMS and to block muscle differentiation through suppressing MEF2C, a myogenic differentiation transcription factor. Our data implicate the NOTCH1/SNAI1/MEF2C signaling axis as a major determinant of TPC self-renewal and differentiation in ERMS, raising hope of therapeutically targeting this pathway in the future. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-invasive biophysical measurement of travelling waves in the insect inner ear

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Frequency analysis in the mammalian cochlea depends on the propagation of frequency information in the form of a travelling wave (TW) across tonotopically arranged auditory sensilla. TWs have been directly observed in the basilar papilla of birds and the ears of bush-crickets (Insecta: Orthoptera) and have also been indirectly inferred in the hearing organs of some reptiles and frogs. Existing experimental approaches to measure TW function in tetrapods and bush-crickets are inherently invasive, compromising the fine-scale mechanics of each system. Located in the forelegs, the bush-cricket ear exhibits outer, middle and inner components; the inner ear containing tonotopically arranged auditory sensilla within a fluid-filled cavity, and externally protected by the leg cuticle. Here, we report bush-crickets with transparent ear cuticles as potential model species for direct, non-invasive measuring of TWs and tonotopy. Using laser Doppler vibrometry and spectroscopy, we show that increased transmittance of light through the ear cuticle allows for effective non-invasive measurements of TWs and frequency mapping. More transparent cuticles allow several properties of TWs to be precisely recovered and measured in vivo from intact specimens. Our approach provides an innovative, non-invasive alternative to measure the natural motion of the sensilla-bearing surface embedded in the intact inner ear fluid. PMID:28573026

  8. Bacterial invasion of the inner ear in association with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2014-06-01

    To examine the pathways of bacterial invasion and subsequent spreading in the inner ear during pneumococcal meningitis. A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was used. Thirty rats were inoculated intrathecally with S. pneumoniae serotype 1, 3 or 9 V and received no additional treatment. The rats were sacrificed when reaching terminal illness or on Day 7 and then prepared for serial sectioning and PAS-Alcian blue staining for light microscopy. During the first few days after inoculation, bacteria invade the inner ear through the cochlear aqueduct, into the scala tympani of the cochlea (perilymphatic space). From here, bacteria spreads apically toward the helicotrema and subsequently basally through the scala vestibuli, toward the vestibule and the vestibular system. When the bacteria after 5 to 6 days had reached scala vestibuli of the basal turn of the cochlea, hematogenous spreading occurred to the spiral ligament and into the cochlear endolymph, subsequently to the vestibular endolymph. We found no evidence of alternative routes for bacterial invasion in the inner ear. Several internal barriers to bacterial spreading were found within the inner ear. Bacterial elimination was evidenced by engulfment by macrophages within the inner ear. From the meninges, pneumococci invade the inner ear through the cochlear aqueduct during the first days of infection, whereas hematogenous invasion via the spiral ligament capillary bed occur at later stages. Although internal barriers exist within the inner ear, the spreading of bacteria occurs via the natural pathways of the fluid compartments. Bacterial elimination occurs by local macrophage engulfment.

  9. Ionizing Radiation and the Ear

    SciTech Connect

    Borsanyi, Steven J.

    The effects of ionizing radiation on the ears of 100 patients were studied in the course of treatment of malignant head and neck tumors by teleradiation using Co 60. Early changes consisted of radiation otitis media and a transient vasculitis of the vessels of the inner ear, resulting in hearing loss, tinnitus, and temporary recruitment. While no permanent changes were detected microscopically shortly after the completion of radiation in the cochlea or labyrinth, late changes sometimes occurred in the temporal bone as a result of an obliterating endarteritis. The late changes were separate entities caused primarily by obliterating endarteritis andmore » alterations in the collagen. Radiation affected the hearing of individuals selectively. When hearing threshold shift did occur, the shift was not great. The 4000 cps frequency showed a greater deficit in hearing capacity during the tests, while the area least affected appeared to be in the region of 2000 cps. The shift in speech reception was not significant and it was correlated with the over-all change in response to pure tones. Discrimination did not appear to be affected. Proper shielding of the ear with lead during radiation, when possible, eliminated most complications. (H.R.D.)« less

  10. Pathogenesis of Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto-Fukuda, Tomomi; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Yasuaki; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Takahashi, Haruo; Koji, Takehiko

    2010-01-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma is characterized by enhanced proliferation of epithelial cells with aberrant morphological characteristics. To investigate the origin of the cholesteatoma cells, we analyzed spontaneously occurring cholesteatomas associated with a new transplantation model in Mongolian gerbils (gerbils). Cholesteatomas were induced in gerbils with a transplanted tympanic membrane by using the external auditory canal (EAC) ligation method. After the pars flaccida of the tympanic membranes were completely removed from male gerbils, corresponding portions of tympanic membranes of female gerbils were transplanted to the area of defect, and then we ligated the EAC (hybrid-model group). As a control group, the EAC of normal male and female gerbils was ligated without myringoplasty. In all ears of each group, the induced cholesteatomas were seen. In situ PCR was then performed to detect the mouse X chromosome-linked phosphoglycerate kinase-1 (pgk-1) gene on the paraffin sections. One pgk-1 spot in the epithelial nuclei was detected in male cholesteatoma, and two pgk-1 spots were detected in female cholesteatoma, respectively. On the other hand, in the hybrid-model group, we detected not only one but also two pgk-1 spots in the epithelial nuclei of cholesteatoma. These results strengthened the evidence that the origin of epithelial cells in cholesteatoma is the tympanic membrane in this model, but not the residential middle ear epithelial cells or the skin of the EAC. PMID:20413684

  11. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  12. A morphometric study of the human ear.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K Skaria; Stott, David J; Sivakumar, Branavan; Kang, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    We examined variations in the shape of the human ear according to age, sex and ethnic group with particular attention to ear prominence. 420 volunteers were recruited. Measurements included; head height and length, ear height and axis, antihelix taken off angle, earlobe length and width, ear width at the helical root and tragus. Prominence was measured at the helical root and tragus (conchomastoid angle, conchal bowl depth and helical-mastoid distance). Good symmetry was shown for all measurements. Ethnically Indian volunteers had the largest ears (both length and width), followed by Caucasians, and Afro-Caribbeans. This trend was significant in males (p<0.001), but not significant in females (p=0.087). Ears increased in size throughout life. Subjectively, only 2% of volunteers felt their ears were prominent compared to 10% in the opinion of the principal investigator. No objective measurements were identified that accurately predicted subjective perceptions of prominence. We found consistent trends in ear morphology depending on ethnic group, age and sex. Our study was unable to define an objective method for assessing ear prominence. Decisions about what constitutes a prominent ear should be left to personal and aesthetic choice. Copyright © 2010 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ear canal dynamic motion as a source of power for in-ear devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delnavaz, Aidin; Voix, Jérémie

    2013-02-01

    Ear canal deformation caused by temporomandibular joint (jaw joint) activity, also known as "ear canal dynamic motion," is introduced in this paper as a candidate source of power to possibly recharge hearing aid batteries. The geometrical deformation of the ear canal is quantified in 3D by laser scanning of different custom ear moulds. An experimental setup is proposed to measure the amount of power potentially available from this source. The results show that 9 mW of power is available from a 15 mm3 dynamic change in the ear canal volume. Finally, the dynamic motion and power capability of the ear canal are investigated in a group of 12 subjects.

  14. Detection of MEF-1 laboratory reference strain of poliovirus type 2 in children with poliomyelitis in India in 2002 & 2003.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, J M; Nadkarni, S S; Siddiqui, Z A

    2003-12-01

    Significant progress has been made towards eradication of poliomyelitis in India. Surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) has reached high standards. Among the 3 types of polioviruses, type 2 had been eliminated in India and eradicated globally as of October 1999. However, we isolated wild poliovirus type 2 from a small number of polio cases in northern India in 2000 and again during December 2002 to February 2003. Using molecular tools the origin, of the wild type 2 poliovirus was investigated. Polioviruses isolated from stool samples collected from patients with AFP were differentiated as wild virus or Sabin vaccine-like by ELISA and probe hybridization assays. Complete VP1 gene nucleotide sequences of the wild type 2 poliovirus isolates were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), followed by cycle sequencing. VP1 nucleotide sequences were compared with those of wild type 2 polioviruses that were indigenous in India in the past as well as prototype/laboratory strains and the GenBank database. Wild poliovirus type 2 was detected in stool samples from 6 patients with AFP in western Uttar Pradesh and 1 in Gujarat. In addition, the virus was isolated from one healthy contact child and from environmental sewage sample in Moradabad where three of these patients were reported. These isolates were identified as genetically closely related to laboratory reference strain MEF-1. Molecular characterization of the isolates confirmed that there was no evidence of extensive person-to-person transmission of the virus in the community. Laboratory reference strain (MEF-1) of poliovirus type 2 caused paralytic poliomyelitis in 10 patients in September 2000 and November 2002 to February 2003. The origin of the virus was some laboratory as yet not identified. This episode highlights the urgent need for stringent containment of wild poliovirus containing materials in the laboratories across the country in order to prevent recurrence of such

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Inner Ear Development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Doris K.; Kelley, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    The inner ear is a structurally complex vertebrate organ built to encode sound, motion, and orientation in space. Given its complexity, it is not surprising that inner ear dysfunction is a relatively common consequence of human genetic mutation. Studies in model organisms suggest that many genes currently known to be associated with human hearing impairment are active during embryogenesis. Hence, the study of inner ear development provides a rich context for understanding the functions of genes implicated in hearing loss. This chapter focuses on molecular mechanisms of inner ear development derived from studies of model organisms. PMID:22855724

  16. Molecular mechanisms of inner ear development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Doris K; Kelley, Matthew W

    2012-08-01

    The inner ear is a structurally complex vertebrate organ built to encode sound, motion, and orientation in space. Given its complexity, it is not surprising that inner ear dysfunction is a relatively common consequence of human genetic mutation. Studies in model organisms suggest that many genes currently known to be associated with human hearing impairment are active during embryogenesis. Hence, the study of inner ear development provides a rich context for understanding the functions of genes implicated in hearing loss. This chapter focuses on molecular mechanisms of inner ear development derived from studies of model organisms.

  17. Listening to Nature's orchestra with peculiar ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, David D.

    2003-04-01

    Insects use hearing for the crucial tasks of communicating with conspecifics and avoiding predators. Although all are based on the same acoustic principles, the diversity of insect ears is staggering and instructive. For instance, a South African grasshopper demonstrates that hearing conspecific calls is possible over distances 1 km with ears that do not have tympana. Actually, these creatures have six pairs of ears that play different roles in behavior. In numerical contrast, praying mantises have just a single ear in the ventral midline. The ear is very effective at detecting ultrasonic bat cries. However, the bioacoustics of sound transduction by two tympana facing each other in a deep, narrow slit is a puzzle. Tachinid flies demonstrate that directional hearing at 5 kHz is possible with a pair of ears fused together to give a total size of 1 mm. The ears are under the fly's chin. Hawk moths have their ears built into their mouthparts and the tympanum is more like a hollow ball than the usual membrane. As an apt last example, cicada ears are actually part of the orchestra: their tympana function both in sound reception and sound production.

  18. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition. PMID:26061553

  19. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition.

  20. CT of the ear in Pendred syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goldfeld, Moshe; Glaser, Benjamin; Nassir, Elias; Gomori, John Moshe; Hazani, Elitsur; Bishara, Nassir

    2005-05-01

    To prospectively determine the structural anomalies of the inner ear by using thin-section computed tomography (CT) in an extended family with Pendred syndrome. Ethics committee approved the study, and informed consent was obtained from every patient or from parents of patients under legal age. Twelve patients (three females and nine males aged 7-47 years) with Pendred syndrome (all from the same ethnic isolate and with the same mutation in the PDS gene) were evaluated for inner-ear malformation at thin-section CT. Both ears were evaluated. Presence or absence of interscalar septum between upper and middle turns of the cochlea was evaluated, and vestibule and vestibular aqueduct were examined for enlargement. Modiolus was determined to be present or absent (modiolar deficiency). CT scans were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists (M.G., J.M.G.). All patients had inner ear malformation on both sides. Modiolus was absent and vestibule was enlarged on both sides in all 12 patients. Interscalar septum was absent in 18 (75%) of 24 ears. In eight patients, interscalar septum was absent in both ears, whereas in two patients, it was absent on only one side. Aqueduct was enlarged in 20 (80%) of 24 ears. In nine patients, both ears had enlarged aqueducts, while in two patients, only one side was abnormal. Inner ear malformation is an invariable finding in Pendred syndrome. Modiolus deficiency and vestibular enlargement were the most consistent anomalies in this population with Pendred syndrome. (c) RSNA, 2005.

  1. Protective Effects of LSGYGP from Fish Skin Gelatin Hydrolysates on UVB-Induced MEFs by Regulation of Oxidative Stress and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingyu; Liu, Qiuming; Yuan, Ling; Zhuang, Yongliang

    2018-03-28

    A previous study has shown that tilapia fish skin gelatin hydrolysates inhibited photoaging in vivo, and that, Leu-Ser-Gly-Tyr-Gly-Pro (LSGYGP) identified in the hydrolysate had a high hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. In this study, activities of LSGYGP were further evaluated using ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). UVB irradiation significantly increased the intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activities and decreased the content of collagen in MEFs. LSGYGP reduced the intercellular ROS generation in UVB-induced MEFs. Meanwhile, the decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and the increase of malondiaidehyde (MDA) content were inhibited by LSGYGP. LSGYGP reduced MMP-1 and MMP-9 activities in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking simulation indicated that LSGYGP inhibited MMPs activities by docking the active sites of MMP-1 and MMP-9. Furthermore, LSGYGP also affected the intercellular phosphorylation of UVB-induced the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. LSGYGP could protect collagen synthesis in MEFs under UVB irradiation by inhibiting oxidative stress and regulating MMPs activities.

  2. Protective Effects of LSGYGP from Fish Skin Gelatin Hydrolysates on UVB-Induced MEFs by Regulation of Oxidative Stress and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qingyu; Liu, Qiuming; Yuan, Ling; Zhuang, Yongliang

    2018-01-01

    A previous study has shown that tilapia fish skin gelatin hydrolysates inhibited photoaging in vivo, and that, Leu-Ser-Gly-Tyr-Gly-Pro (LSGYGP) identified in the hydrolysate had a high hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. In this study, activities of LSGYGP were further evaluated using ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). UVB irradiation significantly increased the intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activities and decreased the content of collagen in MEFs. LSGYGP reduced the intercellular ROS generation in UVB-induced MEFs. Meanwhile, the decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and the increase of malondiaidehyde (MDA) content were inhibited by LSGYGP. LSGYGP reduced MMP-1 and MMP-9 activities in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking simulation indicated that LSGYGP inhibited MMPs activities by docking the active sites of MMP-1 and MMP-9. Furthermore, LSGYGP also affected the intercellular phosphorylation of UVB-induced the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. LSGYGP could protect collagen synthesis in MEFs under UVB irradiation by inhibiting oxidative stress and regulating MMPs activities. PMID:29597313

  3. Notch3 and Mef2c Proteins Are Mutually Antagonistic via Mkp1 Protein and miR-1/206 MicroRNAs in Differentiating Myoblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Gagan, Jeffrey; Dey, Bijan K.; Layer, Ryan; Yan, Zhen; Dutta, Anindya

    2012-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a well known regulator of skeletal muscle stem cells known as satellite cells. Loss of Notch1 signaling leads to spontaneous myogenic differentiation. Notch1, normally expressed in satellite cells, is targeted for proteasomal degradation by Numb during differentiation. A homolog of Notch1, Notch3, is also expressed in these cells but is not inhibited by Numb. We find that Notch3 is paradoxically up-regulated during the early stages of differentiation by an enhancer that requires both MyoD and activated Notch1. Notch3 itself strongly inhibits the myogenic transcription factor Mef2c, most likely by increasing the p38 phosphatase Mkp1, which inhibits the Mef2c activator p38 MAP kinase. Active Notch3 decreases differentiation. Mef2c, however, induces microRNAs miR-1 and miR-206, which directly down-regulate Notch3 and allow differentiation to proceed. Thus, the myogenic differentiation-induced microRNAs miR-1 and -206 are important for differentiation at least partly because they turn off Notch3. We suggest that the transient expression of Notch3 early in differentiation generates a temporal lag between myoblast activation by MyoD and terminal differentiation into myotubes directed by Mef2c. PMID:23055528

  4. Classification and Current Management of Inner Ear Malformations.

    PubMed

    Sennaroğlu, Levent; Bajin, Münir Demir

    2017-09-29

    Morphologically congenital sensorineural hearing loss can be investigated under two categories. The majority of congenital hearing loss causes (80%) are membranous malformations. Here, the pathology involves inner ear hair cells. There is no gross bony abnormality and, therefore, in these cases high-resolution computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the temporal bone reveal normal findings. The remaining 20% have various malformations involving the bony labyrinth and, therefore, can be radiologically demonstrated by computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The latter group involves surgical challenges as well as problems in decision-making. Some cases may be managed by a hearing aid, others need cochlear implantation, and some cases are candidates for an auditory brainstem implantation (ABI). During cochlear implantation, there may be facial nerve abnormalities, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, electrode misplacement or difficulty in finding the cochlea itself. During surgery for inner ear malformations, the surgeon must be ready to modify the surgical approach or choose special electrodes for surgery. In the present review article, inner ear malformations are classified according to the differences observed in the cochlea. Hearing and language outcomes after various implantation methods are closely related to the status of the cochlear nerve, and a practical classification of the cochlear nerve deficiency is also provided.

  5. Inner ear decompression sickness in compressed-air diving.

    PubMed

    Klingmann, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Inner ear decompression sickness (IEDCS) has become more frequently reported in recreational diving. We examined 34 divers after IEDCS and analyzed their dive profiles, pattern of symptoms, time of symptom onset and the association with a right-to left shunt (r/l shunt). Four divers used mixed gas and were excluded from the analysis. Of the remaining 30 divers, 25 presented with isolated IEDCS alone, while five divers had additional skin and neurological symptoms. All divers presented with vertigo (100%), and 12 divers reported additional hearing loss (40%). All symptoms occurred within 120 minutes (median 30 minutes) of ascent. Twenty-two of 30 divers (73.3%) showed a r/l shunt. A possible explanation for the frequent association of a r/l shunt and the dominance of vestibular rather than cochlear symptoms could be attributed to the different blood supply of the inner ear structures and the different size of the labyrinthine compartments. The cochlea has a blood supply up to four times higher than the vestibular part of the inner ear, whereas the vestibular fluid space is 30% larger. The higher prevalence of symptoms referrable to the less well-perfused vestibular organ provides further evidence that persistent local inert gas supersaturation may cause growth of incoming arterial bubbles and may therefore be an important pathophysiological factor in IEDCS.

  6. Inner Ear Barotrauma After Underwater Pool Competency Training Without the Use of Compressed Air Case and Review.

    PubMed

    McIntire, Sean; Boujie, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear barotrauma can occur when the gas-filled chambers of the ear have difficulty equalizing pressure with the outside environment after changes in ambient pressure. This can transpire even with small pressure changes. Hypobaric or hyperbaric environments can place significant stress on the structures of the middle and inner ear. If methods to equalize pressure between the middle ear and other connected gas-filled spaces (i.e., Valsalva maneuver) are unsuccessful, middle ear overpressurization can occur. This force can be transmitted to the fluid-filled inner ear, making it susceptible to injury. Damage specifically to the structures of the vestibulocochlear system can lead to symptoms of vertigo, hearing loss, and tinnitus. This article discusses the case of a 23-year-old male Marine who presented with symptoms of nausea and gait instability after performing underwater pool competency exercises to a maximum depth of 13 feet, without breathing compressed air. Diagnosis and management of inner ear barotrauma are reviewed, as is differentiation from inner ear decompression sickness. 2016.

  7. Non-invasive optical assessment of viscosity of middle ear effusions in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Guillermo L; Pande, Paritosh; Shelton, Ryan L; Nolan, Ryan M; Spillman, Darold R; Porter, Ryan G; Novak, Michael A; Boppart, Stephen A

    2017-03-01

    Eustachian tube dysfunction can cause fluid to collect within the middle ear cavity and form a middle ear effusion (MEE). MEEs can persist for weeks or months and cause hearing loss as well as speech and learning delays in young children. The ability of a physician to accurately identify and characterize the middle ear for signs of fluid and/or infection is crucial to provide the most appropriate treatment for the patient. Currently, middle ear infections are assessed with otoscopy, which provides limited and only qualitative diagnostic information. In this study, we propose a method utilizing cross-sectional depth-resolved optical coherence tomography to noninvasively measure the diffusion coefficient and viscosity of colloid suspensions, such as a MEE. Experimental validation of the proposed technique on simulated MEE phantoms with varying viscosity and particulate characteristics is presented, along with some preliminary results from in vivo and ex vivo samples of human MEEs. In vivo Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) image of a human tympanic membrane and Middle Ear Effusion (MEE) (top), with a CCD image of the tympanic membrane surface (inset). Below is the corresponding time-lapse M-mode OCT data acquired along the white dotted line over time, which can be analyzed to determine the Stokes-Einstein diffusion coefficient of the effusion. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Playing by Ear: Foundation or Frill?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Many people divide musicians into two types: those who can read music and those who play by ear. Formal music education tends to place great emphasis on producing musically literate performers but devotes much less attention to teaching students to make music without notation. Some would suggest that playing by ear is a specialized skill that is…

  9. The ideal ear position in Caucasian females.

    PubMed

    Broer, P Niclas; Thiha, Aung; Ehrl, Denis; Sinno, Sammy; Juran, Sabrina; Szpalski, Caroline; Ng, Reuben; Ninkovic, Milomir; Prantl, Lukas; Heidekrueger, Paul I

    2018-03-01

    Ear position contributes significantly to facial appearance. However, while objective measurements remain the foundation for esthetic evaluations, little is known about how an ear should ideally be positioned regarding its rotational axis. This study aimed to further evaluate whether there exists a universally applicable ideal ear axis, and how sociodemographic factors impact such preferences. An interactive online survey was designed, enabling participants to change the axis of a female model's ear in terms of its forward and backward rotation. The questionnaire was sent out internationally to plastic surgeons and the general public. Demographic data were collected and analysis of variance was used to investigate respective preferences. A total of 1016 responses from 35 different countries (response rate: 18.5%) were gathered. Overall, 60% of survey takers chose the minus 10 or 5° angles to be most attractive. Significant differences were found regarding sex, ethnicity, country of residence, profession and respective ear axis preferences. Across multiple countries and ethnicities, an ear position in slight reclination of minus 5-10° is considered most pleasing in Caucasian females. However, sociodemographic factors significantly impact individual ear axis preferences and should be taken into consideration when performing reconstructive ear surgery. Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stem Cell Therapy for the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, perception of sound, motion, and balance is mediated through mechanosensory hair cells located within the inner ear. In mammals, hair cells are only generated during a short period of embryonic development. As a result, loss of hair cells as a consequence of injury, disease, or genetic mutation, leads to permanent sensory deficits. At present, cochlear implantation is the only option for profound hearing loss. However, outcomes are still variable and even the best implant cannot provide the acuity of a biological ear. The recent emergence of stem cell technology has the potential to open new approaches for hair cell regeneration. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of inner ear stem cell research from a viewpoint of its clinical application for inner ear disorders to illustrate how complementary studies have the potential to promote and refine stem cell therapies for inner ear diseases. The review initially discusses our current understanding of the genetic pathways that regulate hair cell formation from inner ear progenitors during normal development. Subsequent sections discuss the possible use of endogenous inner ear stem cells to induce repair as well as the initial studies aimed at transplanting stem cells into the ear. PMID:22514095

  11. Is Attention Shared Between the Ears?1

    PubMed Central

    Shiffrin, Richard M.; Pisoni, David B.; Castaneda-Mendez, Kicab

    2012-01-01

    This study tests the locus of attention during selective listening for speech-like stimuli. Can processing be differentially allocated to the two ears? Two conditions were used. The simultaneous condition involved one of four randomly chosen stop-consonants being presented to one of the ears chosen at random. The sequential condition involved two intervals; in the first S listened to the right ear; in the second S listened to the left ear. One of the four consonants was presented to an attended ear during one of these intervals. Experiment I used no distracting stimuli. Experiment II utilized a distracting consonant not confusable with any of the four target consonants. This distractor was always presented to any ear not containing a target. In both experiments, simultaneous and sequential performance were essentially identical, despite the need for attention sharing between the two ears during the simultaneous condition. We conclude that selective attention does not occur during perceptual processing of speech sounds presented to the two ears. We suggest that attentive effects arise in short-term memory following processing. PMID:23226838

  12. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An...

  13. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An...

  14. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An...

  15. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An...

  16. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An...

  17. INNER EAR EMBRYOGENESIS: GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The anatomy and developmental molecular genetics of the inner ear from establishment of the otic placode to formation of the definitive cochlea and vestibular apparatus will be reviewed and the complex 3-D structural changes that shape the developing inner ear will be illustrated...

  18. Ear asymmetries in middle-ear, cochlear, and brainstem responses in human infants

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.; Gorga, Michael P.; Jesteadt, Walt; Smith, Lynette M.

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, Sininger and Cone-Wesson examined asymmetries in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of otoacoustic emissions (OAE) in infants, reporting that distortion-product (DP)OAE SNR was larger in the left ear, whereas transient-evoked (TE)OAE SNR was larger in the right. They proposed that cochlear and brainstem asymmetries facilitate development of brain-hemispheric specialization for sound processing. Similarly, in 2006 Sininger and Cone-Wesson described ear asymmetries mainly favoring the right ear in infant auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). The present study analyzed 2640 infant responses to further explore these effects. Ear differences in OAE SNR, signal, and noise were evaluated separately and across frequencies (1.5, 2, 3, and 4 kHz), and ABR asymmetries were compared with cochlear asymmetries. Analyses of ear-canal reflectance and admittance showed that asymmetries in middle-ear functioning did not explain cochlear and brainstem asymmetries. Current results are consistent with earlier studies showing right-ear dominance for TEOAE and ABR. Noise levels were higher in the right ear for OAEs and ABRs, causing ear asymmetries in SNR to differ from those in signal level. No left-ear dominance for DPOAE signal was observed. These results do not support a theory that ear asymmetries in cochlear processing mimic hemispheric brain specialization for auditory processing. PMID:18345839

  19. Biometric recognition using 3D ear shape.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Bowyer, Kevin W

    2007-08-01

    Previous works have shown that the ear is a promising candidate for biometric identification. However, in prior work, the preprocessing of ear images has had manual steps and algorithms have not necessarily handled problems caused by hair and earrings. We present a complete system for ear biometrics, including automated segmentation of the ear in a profile view image and 3D shape matching for recognition. We evaluated this system with the largest experimental study to date in ear biometrics, achieving a rank-one recognition rate of 97.8 percent for an identification scenario and an equal error rate of 1.2 percent for a verification scenario on a database of 415 subjects and 1,386 total probes.

  20. Etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of middle ear fluid pathogens in Costa Rican children with otitis media before and after the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the National Immunization Program: acute otitis media microbiology in Costa Rican children.

    PubMed

    Abdelnour, Arturo; Arguedas, Adriano; Dagan, Ron; Soley, Carolina; Porat, Nurith; Castrejon, Maria Mercedes; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo; Colindres, Romulo; Pirçon, Jean-Yves; DeAntonio, Rodrigo; Van Dyke, Melissa K

    2015-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) microbiology was evaluated in children after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction in Costa Rica (private sector, 2004; National Immunization Program, 2009). This was a combined prospective and retrospective study conducted in a routine clinical setting in San José, Costa Rica. In the prospective part of the study, which was conducted post-PCV7 introduction (2010-2012), standard bacteriological procedures were used to evaluate the etiology and serotype distribution of middle ear fluid samples collected by tympanocentesis or otorrhea from children aged 3-59 months diagnosed with AOM. E-tests were used to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility in culture-positive samples. Retrospective data recorded between 1999 and 2004 were used for comparison of bacterial etiology and serotype distribution before and after PCV7 introduction. Statistical significance was evaluated in bivariate analyses at the P-value < 0.05 level (without multiplicity correction). Post-PCV7 introduction, Haemophilus influenzae was detected in 118/456 and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 87/456 AOM episodes. Most H. influenzae isolates (113/118) were non-typeable. H. influenzae was more (27.4% vs 20.8%) and S. pneumoniae less (17.1% vs 25.5%) frequently observed in vaccinated (≥ 2 PCV7 doses or ≥ 1 PCV7 dose at >1 year of age) versus unvaccinated children. S. pneumoniae non-susceptibility rates were 1.1%, 34.5%, 31.7%, and 50.6% for penicillin, erythromycin, azithromycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), respectively. H. influenzae non-susceptibility rate was 66.9% for TMP-SMX. Between pre- and post-PCV7 introduction, H. influenzae became more (20.5% vs 25.9%; P-value < 0.001) and S. pneumoniae less (27.7% vs 19.1%; P-value = 0.002) prevalent, and PCV7 serotype proportions decreased among pneumococcal isolates (65.8% vs 43.7%; P-value = 0.0005). Frequently identified pneumococcal serotypes were 19F (34.2%), 3 (9.7%), 6B (9.7%), and 14 (9

  1. Flying and Your Child's Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... cry during those last few minutes of the flight, when the air pressure in the cabin increases ... of decaffeinated fluids (water is best) throughout the flight. Drinking a lot is very important, not only ...

  2. Microbiomes of the normal middle ear and ears with chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Minami, Shujiro B; Mutai, Hideki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Horii, Arata; Oishi, Naoki; Wasano, Koichiro; Katsura, Motoyasu; Tanaka, Fujinobu; Takiguchi, Tetsuya; Fujii, Masato; Kaga, Kimitaka

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to profile and compare the middle ear microbiomes of human subjects with and without chronic otitis media. Prospective multicenter cohort study. All consecutive patients undergoing tympanoplasty surgery for chronic otitis media or ear surgery for conditions other than otitis media were recruited. Sterile swab samples were collected from the middle ear mucosa during surgery. The variable region 4 of the 16S rRNA gene in each sample were amplified using region-specific primers adapted for the Illumina MiSeq sequencer (Illumina, CA, USA)). The sequences were subjected to local blast and classified using Metagenome@KIN (World Fusion, Tokyo, Japan). In total, 155 participants were recruited from seven medical centers. Of these, 88 and 67 had chronic otitis media and normal middle ears, respectively. The most abundant bacterial phyla on the mucosal surfaces of the normal middle ears were Proteobacteria, followed by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The children and adults with normal middle ears differed significantly in terms of middle ear microbiomes. Subjects with chronic otitis media without active inflammation (dry ear) had similar middle ear microbiomes as the normal middle ears group. Subjects with chronic otitis media with active inflammation (wet ear) had a lower prevalence of Proteobacteria and a higher prevalence of Firmicutes than the normal middle ears. The human middle ear is inhabited by more diverse microbial communities than was previously thought. Alteration of the middle ear microbiome may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media with active inflammation. 2b. Laryngoscope, 127:E371-E377, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Middle ear tuberculosis: diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Jesić, Snezana; Stosić, Svetlana; Milenković, Branislava; Nesić, Vladimir; Dudvarski, Zoran; Jotić, Ana; Slijepcević, Nikola

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous otitis is a diagnostic problem due to the difficulty to obtain microbiological, histomorphological and cytological confirmation of the disease. Our objective was to compare clinical and radiological characteristic and development of otogenic complications in patients with tuberculous otitis and otitis with cholesteatoma as the most destructive form of chronic nonspecific otitis in the purpose of establishing the diagnostic criteria for tuberculous otitis. Medical records of 12 patients with tuberculous otitis and 163 patients with cholesteatoma treated at the Institute of Otorhinolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery in Belgrade during the eight-year period were analyzed. All of the patients underwent otomicroscopic, audiological and radiological examination of the thorax and temporal bone, microbiological examination of the secretion and histomorphological examination of the tissue taken during middle ear surgery. Statistical analysis was done using chi2 test with Yates correction. Otogenic complication as facial palsy and sensorineural hearing loss were more frequent in tuberculous otitis patients, than in cholesteatoma. Also, fistulas of the labyrinth and facial canal bone destruction were also more frequent in tuberculous otitis than in cholesteatoma. A larger extent of temporal bone destruction was noticed on CT scans of the temporal bone in half of the patents with tuberculous otitis. Coexistence with miliary pulmonary tuberculosis was detected in one third of the patients. There were no microbiological or histomorphological confirmations of the disease, except in one case with positive ZiehI-Neelsen staining. Tuberculous otitis media should be considered in patients with serious otogenic complications and with shorter duration of ear discharge, and in association with diagnosed miliary pulmonary tuberculosis and extensive temporal bone destruction. Polymerase chain reaction still is not reliable for diagnosis.

  4. Genotypes of macrolide-resistant pneumococci from children in southwestern Japan: raised incidence of strains that have both erm(B) and mef(A) with serotype 6B clones.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Masaaki; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Gotoh, Kenji; Hidaka, Hidenobu; Koga, Hiroyasu; Masunaga, Kenji; Nagai, Kensuke; Tsumura, Naoki; Appelbaum, Peter C; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2008-09-01

    MICs of penicillin G, erythromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin, azithromycin, and telithromycin were tested for 189 clinical isolates collected during 2002 to 2005 from children in southwestern Japan. Serotyping and polymerase chain reaction for presence of erm(B) and mef(A) were performed. All strains with erm(B) + mef(A) were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and compared to 3 global clones: Spain(23F)-1; Spain(9V)-3 and its variant -14; a South Korean strain same as Taiwan (19F)-14 clone and 5 strains with erm(B) + mef(A) from other countries. Of the 173 macrolide-resistant (erythromycin MIC > or =0.5 microg/mL) strains, 104 (60.1%) had erm(B), 47 (27.2%) had mef(A), and 22 (12.7%) had erm(B) + mef(A). Strains expressing erm(B) or both erm(B) and mef(A) had high macrolide MIC(90)s (>64 microg/mL), except telithromycin (MIC(90), 0.25 microg/mL). Of the 22 erm(B) + mef(A) strains, 10 had 4 distinct PFGE patterns and were mainly serotype 6B clones, which differed from those described in previous reports; 5 other strains had unique profiles.

  5. Acceleration induced water removal from ear canals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hosung; Averett, Katelee; Jung, Sunghwan

    2017-11-01

    Children and adults commonly experience having water trapped in the ear canals after swimming. To remove the water, individuals will shake their head sideways. Since a child's ear canal has a smaller diameter, it requires more acceleration of the head to remove the trapped water. In this study, we theoretically and experimentally investigated the acceleration required to break the surface meniscus of the water in artificial ear canals and hydrophobic-coated glass tubes. In experiments, ear canal models were 3D-printed from a CT-scanned human head. Also, glass tubes were coated with silane to match the hydrophobicity in ear canals. Then, using a linear stage, we measured the acceleration values required to forcefully eject the water from the artificial ear canals and glass tubes. A theoretical model was developed to predict the critical acceleration at a given tube diameter and water volume by using a modified Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Furthermore, this research can shed light on the potential of long-term brain injury and damage by shaking the head to push the water out of the ear canal. This research was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CBET-1604424.

  6. Facial Asymmetry: Brow and Ear Position.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Balaji; Meyer, Dale R

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to analyze brow and ear position, and examine the relationship between these structures in patients presenting for blepharoplasty evaluation. A retrospective chart review was performed, which included all patients presenting to one oculoplastic physician for a blepharoplasty evaluation from November, 2012 to March, 2014. The prevalence of brow ptosis and brow and ear asymmetry was calculated; the proportional distribution was determined, and chi-square analysis and the z-test of proportions were used to calculate the significance. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for this study. A total of 133 patients met the inclusion criteria. Some degree of brow ptosis was noted in 83% of patients. Brow asymmetry was found in 88% of patients, and ear asymmetry in 77%. Of those patients who had asymmetry, 61% had the right brow lower and 75% had the right ear lower; 73% of all patients had the brow and ear lower on the same side ( p  < 0.001). In this study, brow ptosis and asymmetry were quite common. In addition, the side of the lower brow correlated strongly with the side of the lower ear, and the right side structures were lower more often than the left. Patients presenting for blepharoplasty evaluation may have an element of generalized facial asymmetry which includes the brows and ears. These observations can be important for preoperative planning and patient counseling. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Middle ear impedance measurements in large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Cem; Kirkim, Günay; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2009-06-01

    To assess the effect of inner ear pressure on middle ear impedance in patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS). Data from admittance tympanometry and multifrequency tympanometry on 8 LVAS patients and control subjects were studied. Static acoustic compliance (SAC) values for the ears with stable sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) were within the limits of the mean values of control groups except for two ears. The resonance frequency (RF) values of the ears with stable SNHL were lower than the mean values of control groups except for three ears. SAC values for the two ears with fluctuating SNHL were lower and the RF values were higher than the mean values of control groups. Decreased SAC values and increased RF values found in the ears with fluctuating SNHL might be an indirect indicator of increased inner ear pressure, while low RF values in the ears with stable SNHL might reflect the decreased inner ear impedance.

  8. EARS: Electronic Access to Reference Service.

    PubMed Central

    Weise, F O; Borgendale, M

    1986-01-01

    Electronic Access to Reference Service (EARS) is a front end to the Health Sciences Library's electronic mail system, with links to the online public catalog. EARS, which became operational in September 1984, is accessed by users at remote sites with either a terminal or microcomputer. It is menu-driven, allowing users to request: a computerized literature search, reference information, a photocopy of a journal article, or a book. This paper traces the history of EARS and discusses its use, its impact on library staff and services, and factors that influence the diffusion of new technology. PMID:3779167

  9. EARS: Electronic Access to Reference Service.

    PubMed

    Weise, F O; Borgendale, M

    1986-10-01

    Electronic Access to Reference Service (EARS) is a front end to the Health Sciences Library's electronic mail system, with links to the online public catalog. EARS, which became operational in September 1984, is accessed by users at remote sites with either a terminal or microcomputer. It is menu-driven, allowing users to request: a computerized literature search, reference information, a photocopy of a journal article, or a book. This paper traces the history of EARS and discusses its use, its impact on library staff and services, and factors that influence the diffusion of new technology.

  10. Localization of soluble guanylate cyclase activity in the guinea pig inner ear.

    PubMed

    Takumida, M; Anniko, M; Popa, R; Zhang, D M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the nitric oxide (NO) receptor soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), to determine the cells targeted by NO and to elucidate the function of the NO/cGMP pathway in the inner ear. sGC activity in the inner ear was localized by immunohistochemical detection of NO-stimulated cGMP. Soluble guanylate cyclase activity in the cochlea was detected in the nerve endings underneath the outer and inner hair cells, supporting cells, stria vascularis and vessels. In the vestibular organs, sGC activity was detected in the cytoplasm of sensory cells, nerve fibres, dark cells and transitional cells and vessels. These findings suggest that the NO/cGMP pathway may be involved in regulatory processes in neurotransmission, blood flow and inner ear fluid homeostasis.

  11. Theoretical studies of the mechanism of the action of the neurohypophyseal hormones. I. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and molecular electrostatic field (MEF) maps of some vasopressin analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liwo, Adam; Tempczyk, Anna; Grzonka, Zbigniew

    1989-09-01

    Continuing our theoretical studies of the oxytocin and vasopressin analogues, we have analysed the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and the norm of the molecular electrostatic field (MEF) of [1- β-mercaptopropionic acid]-arginine-vasopressin ([Mpa1]-AVP), [1-( β-mercapto- β,β-cyclopentamethylene)propionic acid]-arginine-vasopressin ([Cpp']-AVP), and [1-thiosalicylic acid]-arginine-vasopressin ([Ths']-AVP) whose low-energy conformations were calculated in our previous work. These compounds are known from experiment to exhibit different biological activity. The scalar fields mentioned determine the energy of interaction with either charged (MEP) or polar (MEF) species, the energy being in the second case either optimal or Boltzmann-averaged over all the possible orientations of the dipole moment versus the electrostatic field. The electrostatic interactions slowly vanish with distance and can therefore be considered to be the factor determining the molecular shape at greater distances, which can help in both predicting the interactions with the receptor at the stage of remote recognition and in finding the preferred directions of solvation by a polar solvent. In the analysis of the fields three techniques have been used: (i) the construction of maps in certain planes; (ii) the construction of maps on spheres centered in the charge center of the molecule under study and of poles chosen according to the main axes of the quadrupole moment; and (iii) the construction of surfaces corresponding to a given value of potential. The results obtained show that the shapes of both MEP and MEF are similar in the case of [Mpa1]-AVP and [Cpp1-AVP (biologically active), while some differences emerge when comparing these compounds with [Ths1]-AVP (inactive). It has also been found that both MEP and MEF depend even more strongly on conformation.

  12. Numerical evaluation of implantable hearing devices using a finite element model of human ear considering viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Tian, Jiabin; Ta, Na; Huang, Xinsheng; Rao, Zhushi

    2016-08-01

    Finite element method was employed in this study to analyze the change in performance of implantable hearing devices due to the consideration of soft tissues' viscoelasticity. An integrated finite element model of human ear including the external ear, middle ear and inner ear was first developed via reverse engineering and analyzed by acoustic-structure-fluid coupling. Viscoelastic properties of soft tissues in the middle ear were taken into consideration in this model. The model-derived dynamic responses including middle ear and cochlea functions showed a better agreement with experimental data at high frequencies above 3000 Hz than the Rayleigh-type damping. On this basis, a coupled finite element model consisting of the human ear and a piezoelectric actuator attached to the long process of incus was further constructed. Based on the electromechanical coupling analysis, equivalent sound pressure and power consumption of the actuator corresponding to viscoelasticity and Rayleigh damping were calculated using this model. The analytical results showed that the implant performance of the actuator evaluated using a finite element model considering viscoelastic properties gives a lower output above about 3 kHz than does Rayleigh damping model. Finite element model considering viscoelastic properties was more accurate to numerically evaluate implantable hearing devices. © IMechE 2016.

  13. Neonatal Ear Molding: Timing and Technique.

    PubMed

    Anstadt, Erin Elizabeth; Johns, Dana Nicole; Kwok, Alvin Chi-Ming; Siddiqi, Faizi; Gociman, Barbu

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of auricular deformities is believed to be ∼11.5 per 10,000 births, excluding children with microtia. Although not life-threatening, auricular deformities can cause undue distress for patients and their families. Although surgical procedures have traditionally been used to reconstruct congenital auricular deformities, ear molding has been gaining acceptance as an efficacious, noninvasive alternative for the treatment of newborns with ear deformations. We present the successful correction of bilateral Stahl's ear deformity in a newborn through a straightforward, nonsurgical method implemented on the first day of life. The aim of this report is to make pediatric practitioners aware of an effective and simple molding technique appropriate for correction of congenital auricular anomalies. In addition, it stresses the importance of very early initiation of ear cartilage molding for achieving the desired outcome. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Animal models of middle ear cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Fukuda, Tomomi; Takahashi, Haruo; Koji, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Middle ear acquired cholesteatoma is a pathological condition associated with otitis media, which may be associated with temporal bone resorption, otorrhea and hearing loss, and occasionally various other complications. Cholesteatoma is characterized by the enhanced proliferation of epithelial cells with aberrant morphologic characteristics. Unfortunately, our understanding of the mechanism underlying its pathogenesis is limited. To investigate its pathogenesis, different animal models have been used. This paper provides a brief overview of the current status of research in the field of pathogenesis of middle ear acquired cholesteatoma, four types of animal models previously reported on, up-to-date cholesteatoma research using these animal models, our current studies of the local hybrid ear model, and the future prospect of new animal models of middle ear cholesteatoma.

  15. Animal Models of Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto-Fukuda, Tomomi; Takahashi, Haruo; Koji, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Middle ear acquired cholesteatoma is a pathological condition associated with otitis media, which may be associated with temporal bone resorption, otorrhea and hearing loss, and occasionally various other complications. Cholesteatoma is characterized by the enhanced proliferation of epithelial cells with aberrant morphologic characteristics. Unfortunately, our understanding of the mechanism underlying its pathogenesis is limited. To investigate its pathogenesis, different animal models have been used. This paper provides a brief overview of the current status of research in the field of pathogenesis of middle ear acquired cholesteatoma, four types of animal models previously reported on, up-to-date cholesteatoma research using these animal models, our current studies of the local hybrid ear model, and the future prospect of new animal models of middle ear cholesteatoma. PMID:21541229

  16. Milestones in the History of Ear Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Berghaus, Alexander; Nicoló, Marion San

    2015-12-01

    The reconstruction of ear deformities has been challenging plastic surgeons since centuries. However, it is only in the 19th century that reports on partial and total ear reconstruction start increasing. In the quest for an aesthetically pleasing and natural-looking result, surgeons worked on the perfect framework and skin coverage. Different materials and flap techniques have evolved. Some were abandoned out of frustration, while others kept evolving over the years. In this article, we discuss the milestones in ear reconstruction-from ancient times to early attempts in Western civilization to the key chapters of ear reconstruction in the 20th century leading to the current techniques. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. EAR Program Research Results : Updated through 2013

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-12-31

    The Exploratory Advanced Research (EAR) Program addresses the need for longer term, higher risk research with the potential for long-term improvements to transportation systemsimprovements in planning, building, renewing, and operating safe, conge...

  18. EAR Program Research Results: Updated through 2014

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-12-31

    The Exploratory Advanced Research (EAR) Program addresses the need for longer term, higher risk research with the potential for long-term improvements to transportation systemsimprovements in planning, building, renewing, and operating safe, conge...

  19. Diode Laser Ear Piercing: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Suseela, Bibilash Babu; Babu, Preethitha; Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Earlobe piercing is a common office room procedure done by a plastic surgeon. Various methods of ear piercing have been described. In this article, we describe a novel method of laser ear piercing using the diode laser. An 18-year-old female patient underwent an ear piercing using a diode laser with a power of 2.0 W in continuous mode after topical local anaesthetic and pre-cooling. The diode laser was fast, safe, easy to use and highly effective way of ear piercing. The advantages we noticed while using the diode laser over conventional methods were more precision, minimal trauma with less chances of hypertrophy and keloids, no bleeding with coagulation effect of laser, less time taken compared to conventional method and less chance of infection due to thermal heat effect of laser.

  20. Torsion of partial cleft of ear lobule.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, M; Waiker, Veena P

    2014-02-01

    Torsion is a well-known phenomenon involving organs with long mesentery. Torsion in the ear lobule is rare. Ear lobule is very well vascularized. In cases of partial cleft ear lobule, there is a small segment of lobule inferior to the cleft which is vascularized through the pedicles on either side of the cleft. A lady aged 89 years presented with discoloration of the ear lobule. She was diagnosed as having gangrene of the central part of lobule. The segment of the lobule had undergone more than 360° torsion. She underwent debridement of gangrenous part and lobuloplasty. In our case laxity of the stretched lobule caused the torsion of the segment followed by gangrene. This rare complication indicates the need for correction of the cleft lobule not only for esthetic purpose, but also for the prevention of torsion. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. EAR Program Research Results: Updated through 2016

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-12-31

    The Exploratory Advanced Research (EAR) Program addresses the need for longer term, higher risk research with the potential for long-term improvements to transportation systemsimprovements in planning, building, renewing, and operating safe, conge...

  2. Middle ear abnormalities in Van Maldergem syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verheij, Emmy; Thomeer, Henricus G X M; Pameijer, Frank A; Topsakal, Vedat

    2017-01-01

    Van Maldergem syndrome (VMS) is a very rare syndrome that was first described in 1992. The main features of this syndrome comprise intellectual disability, blepharo-naso-facial malformation, and hand anomalies. Almost all nine described patients have been shown to be affected by conductive hearing impairment attributed to microtia, and atresia of the outer ear canal. Here, we present a VMS patient with congenital malformations of the middle ear as the main reason for severe conductive bilateral hearing impairment. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe middle ear abnormalities in VMS. These malformations were seen on high resolution Computed Tomography scanning and during an exploratory tympanotomy. Due to the severity of the middle ear abnormalities and the risk for facial nerve damage, the patient was not offered an ossicular chain reconstruction but a bone conduction device after this exploratory tympanotomy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Verrucous carcinoma of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Woodson, G E; Jurco, S; Alford, B R; McGavran, M H

    1981-01-01

    A case of a highly destructive, cytologically nondysplastic squamous epithelial lesion of the middle ear is presented. The cranial nerve involvement and bone destruction are more extensive than has been seen in cholesteatoma. Cultures are negative for Pseudomonas, and the patient does not have the reported diathesis for malignant otitis externa. The gross and microscopic features are those of verrucous carcinoma. To our knowledge, the middle ear has not been previously reported as a site of involvement by verrucous carcinoma.

  4. Use of beta-methylphenylalanine (beta MeF) residues to probe the nature of the interaction of substance P with its receptor: effects of beta MeF-containing substance P analogs on rabbit iris smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Birney, D M; Cole, D C; Crosson, C E; Kahl, B F; Neff, B W; Reid, T W; Ren, K; Walkup, R D

    1995-06-23

    The effects of substituting (2S,3S)-beta-methylphenylalanine (S-beta MeF) or (2S,3R)-beta-methylphenylalanine (R-beta MeF) for the Phe7 and/or Phe8 residues of the tachykinin substance P (SP, RPKPQQFFGLM-NH2) upon the ability of SP to stimulate contraction of the rabbit iris smooth muscle were investigated. The eight beta MeF-containing SP analogs (four monosubstituted analogs, four disubstituted analogs) 1-8 were synthesized and found to be agonsts of SP in the smooth muscle contraction assay, having EC50 values ranging from 0.15 to 10.0 nM. Three analogs are significantly more active than SP [8R-(beta MeF)SP (4), 7S,8S-(beta MeF)2SP (5), and 7R,8S-(beta MeF)2SP (6)], three analogs are approximately equipotent with SP [7S-(beta MeF)SP (1), 7R-(beta MeF)SP (2), and 7S,8R-(beta MeF)2SP (8)], and two analogs are significantly less active than SP [8S-(beta MeF)SP (3) and 7R,8R-(beta MeF)2SP (7)]. The effects of the beta MeF substitutions upon the activity of SP are not additive and cannot be explained using simple conformational models which focus only on the side chain conformations of the beta MeF residues. It is postulated that the beta MeF residues induce minor distortions in the peptide backbone with resultant consequences upon peptide-receptor binding which are not dictated soley by the side chain conformations. This idea is consistent with 1H-NMR data for the monosubstituted analogs 1-4, which imply that the beta MeF substitutions cause slight distortions in the peptide backbone and that the beta MeF side chains are assuming trans or gauche(-) conformations.

  5. Houttuynia cordata Thunb Promotes Activation of HIF-1A-FOXO3 and MEF2A Pathways to Induce Apoptosis in Human HepG2 Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Min; Hwang, In-Hu; Jang, Ik-Soon; Kim, Min; Bang, In Seok; Park, Soo Jung; Chung, Yun-Jo; Joo, Jong-Cheon; Lee, Min-Goo

    2017-09-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb ( H cordata), a medicinal plant, has anticancer activity, as it inhibits cell growth and induces cell apoptosis in cancer. However, the potential anti-cancer activity and mechanism of H cordata for human liver cancer cells is not well understood. Recently, we identified hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1A, Forkhead box (FOX)O3, and MEF2A as proapoptotic factors induced by H cordata, suggesting that HIF-1A, FOXO3, and MEF2A contribute to the apoptosis of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. FOXO3 transcription factors regulate target genes involved in apoptosis. H cordata significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1A and FOXO3 and stimulated MEF2A expression in addition to increased apoptosis in HepG2 cells within 24 hours. Therefore, we determined the potential role of FOXO3 on apoptosis and on H cordata-induced MEF2A in HepG2 cells. HIF-1A silencing by siRNA attenuated MEF2A and H cordata-mediated FOXO3 upregulation in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, H cordata-mediated MEF2A expression enhanced caspase-3 and caspase-7, which were abolished on silencing FOXO3 with siRNA. In addition, H cordata inhibited growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that H cordata enhances HIF-1A/FOXO3 signaling, leading to MEF2A upregulation in HepG2 cells, and in parallel, it disturbs the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins (Bax, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL), which results in apoptosis. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that H cordata promotes the activation of HIF-1A-FOXO3 and MEF2A pathways to induce apoptosis in human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells and is, therefore, a promising candidate for antitumor drug development.

  6. Houttuynia cordata Thunb Promotes Activation of HIF-1A–FOXO3 and MEF2A Pathways to Induce Apoptosis in Human HepG2 Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Min; Hwang, In-Hu; Jang, Ik-Soon; Kim, Min; Bang, In Seok; Park, Soo Jung; Chung, Yun-Jo; Joo, Jong-Cheon; Lee, Min-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb (H cordata), a medicinal plant, has anticancer activity, as it inhibits cell growth and induces cell apoptosis in cancer. However, the potential anti-cancer activity and mechanism of H cordata for human liver cancer cells is not well understood. Recently, we identified hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1A, Forkhead box (FOX)O3, and MEF2A as proapoptotic factors induced by H cordata, suggesting that HIF-1A, FOXO3, and MEF2A contribute to the apoptosis of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. FOXO3 transcription factors regulate target genes involved in apoptosis. H cordata significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1A and FOXO3 and stimulated MEF2A expression in addition to increased apoptosis in HepG2 cells within 24 hours. Therefore, we determined the potential role of FOXO3 on apoptosis and on H cordata–induced MEF2A in HepG2 cells. HIF-1A silencing by siRNA attenuated MEF2A and H cordata–mediated FOXO3 upregulation in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, H cordata–mediated MEF2A expression enhanced caspase-3 and caspase-7, which were abolished on silencing FOXO3 with siRNA. In addition, H cordata inhibited growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that H cordata enhances HIF-1A/FOXO3 signaling, leading to MEF2A upregulation in HepG2 cells, and in parallel, it disturbs the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins (Bax, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL), which results in apoptosis. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that H cordata promotes the activation of HIF-1A–FOXO3 and MEF2A pathways to induce apoptosis in human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells and is, therefore, a promising candidate for antitumor drug development. PMID:27698266

  7. A ChIP-seq-defined genome-wide map of MEF2C binding reveals inflammatory pathways associated with its role in bone density determination.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew E; Deliard, Sandra; Zhu, Fengchang; Xia, Qianghua; Wells, Andrew D; Hankenson, Kurt D; Grant, Struan F A

    2014-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have demonstrated that genetic variation at the MADS box transcription enhancer factor 2, polypeptide C (MEF2C) locus is robustly associated with bone mineral density, primarily at the femoral neck. MEF2C is a transcription factor known to operate via the Wnt signaling pathway. Our hypothesis was that MEF2C regulates the expression of a set of molecular pathways critical to skeletal function. Drawing on our laboratory and bioinformatic experience with ChIP-seq, we analyzed ChIP-seq data for MEF2C available via the ENCODE project to gain insight in to its global genomic binding pattern. We aligned the ChIP-seq data generated for GM12878 (an established lymphoblastoid cell line) and, using the analysis package HOMER, a total of 17,611 binding sites corresponding to 8,118 known genes were observed. We then performed a pathway analysis of the gene list using Ingenuity. At 5 kb, the gene list yielded 'EIF2 Signaling' as the most significant annotation, with a P value of 5.01 × 10(-26). Moving further out, this category remained the top pathway at 50 and 100 kb, then dropped to just second place at 500 kb and beyond by 'Molecular Mechanisms of Cancer'. In addition, at 50 kb and beyond 'RANK Signaling in Osteoclasts' was a consistent feature and resonates with the main general finding from GWAS of bone density. We also observed that MEF2C binding sites were significantly enriched primarily near inflammation associated genes identified from GWAS; indeed, a similar enrichment for inflammation genes has been reported previously using a similar approach for the vitamin D receptor, an established key regulator of bone turnover. Our analyses point to known connective tissue and skeletal processes but also provide novel insights in to networks involved in skeletal regulation. The fact that a specific GWAS category is enriched points to a possible role of inflammation through which it impacts bone mineral density.

  8. [Constricted ear therapy with free auricular composite grafts].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tun; Zhang, Lian-sheng; Zhuang, Hong-xing; Zhang, Ke-yuan

    2004-03-01

    A simple and effective therapy for single side constricted ear. Transplanting normal side free composite auricular grafts to constricted ear (15 patients and 15 sides), then lengthening the helix, exposing the scapha, correcting deformity. The 15 patients composite grafts all survived. The helix has been lengthened, the scapha exposed, the normal ear reduced, the constricted ear augmented and two sides ear have become symmetry. This method is simple and results are satisfied.

  9. [Atypical inflammation of the middle ear].

    PubMed

    Garov, E V; Kryukov, A I; Zelenkova, V N; Sidorina, N G; Kaloshina, A S

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the patients presenting with atypical inflammation of the middle ear and consider the currently available methods for their examination. A total of 20 patients at the age from 16 to 66 years were admitted to the Department of Ear Microsurgery during the period from 2008 and 2016 for the treatment of atypical inflammation of the middle ear. Eleven of them (18 ears) were found to have tuberculous lesions (TL) of the middle ear while the remaining 9 patients (11 ears) suffered giant cell vasculitis (GCV). All the patients underwent the general clinical and otorhinolaryngological examination, computed tomography of the temporal bones and the thoracic cavity organs, cytological, bacteriological, pathomorphological, and molecular-genetic studies including PCR diagnostics, rheumatological tests, as well as counseling by a phthisiotherapist and rheumatologist. The primary localization of TL in the middle ear was documented in 6 patients including its association with lung lesions in 5 cases. The clinical picture of the disease in 5 patients was that of smoldering exudative pathology and in 6 ones was accompanied by suppurative perforative otitis media. According to the laboratory analyses, bacteriological diagnostics proved efficient in 9% of the patients, pathomorphological and cytological diagnostics in 18% and 27.3% of the cases respectively while the effectiveness of PCR diagnostics was estimated at 55%. The diagnosis in individual patients was established within the period from 1 month to 1.5 years after they first sought medical advice in connection with complaints of the ear disease. Tuberculosis of the middle ear began to develop as exudative middle otitis that acquired the form of bilateral pathology in 4 patients. Three patients had a concomitant pulmonary disease. In 4 patuents, the diagnois of middle ear tuberculosis was established based on the presence of the specific antibodies and in 5 ones based on the

  10. Not All Inner Ears are the Same: Otolith Matrix Proteins in the Inner Ear of Sub-Adult Cichlid Fish, Oreochromis Mossambicus, Reveal Insights Into the Biomineralization Process.

    PubMed

    Weigele, Jochen; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2016-02-01

    The fish ear stones (otoliths) consist mainly of calcium carbonate and have lower amounts of a proteinous matrix. This matrix consists of macromolecules, which directly control the biomineralization process. We analyzed the composition of this proteinous matrix by mass spectrometry in a shotgun approach. For this purpose, an enhanced protein purification technique was developed that excludes any potential contamination of proteins from body fluids. Using this method we identified eight proteins in the inner ear of Oreochromis mossambicus. These include the common otolith matrix proteins (OMP-1, otolin-1, neuroserpin, SPARC and otoconin), and three proteins (alpha tectorin, otogelin and transferrin) not previously localized to the otoliths. Moreover, we were able to exclude the occurrence of two matrix proteins (starmaker and pre-cerebellin-like protein) known from other fish species. In further analyses, we show that the absence of the OMP starmaker corresponds to calcitic otoliths and that pre-cerebellin-like protein is not present at any stage during the development of the otoliths of the inner ear. This study shows O. mossambicus does not have all of the known otolith proteins indicating that the matrix proteins in the inner ear of fish are not the same across species. Further functional studies of the novel proteins we identified during otolith development are required. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea due to cochlear dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2005-07-01

    Cochlear dysplasia associated with defect in stapes footplate can be a cause of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak in these cases is usually done by packing the vestibule with muscle or fascia. This traditional method of repair has 30-60% failure rate. Cerebrospinal fluid leak in four such patients was successfully repaired using multiple layer packing of vestibule, reinforced by pedicle temporalis muscle graft. Intraoperatively continuous lumbar drain was done. Magnetic resonance imaging of inner ear using 3D FSE T2WI and 3D FIESTA sequences was found helpful noninvasive investigation to localize site and route of cerebrospinal fluid leak.

  12. Middle Ear Pressures in Wind Instrument Musicians.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Max Sallis; Morris, Simon; Clark, Matthew P; Begg, Philip

    2018-05-22

    This study aimed to assess if playing wind instruments leads to a measurable increase in middle ear pressure during note generation and to provide evidence to clinicians to advise musicians undergoing middle ear surgery. An observational cohort study of 40 volunteers in 7 different wind instrument categories underwent tympanometry at rest and during note production. Community. Recreational musicians aged over 18 years recruited from the student body attending Birmingham University, UK. None. Tympanometry is used as a noninvasive measure of middle ear pressure. The pressure at which peak compliance occurred was taken as an indirect measure of middle ear pressure. The data produced at rest and during note production was statistically analysed with paired t testing and significance set at a p value less than 0.01. Overall a statistically significant increase in middle ear pressure change of 0.63 mm Hg (p = 0.0001) during note production was identified. Musicians playing the oboe and trumpet demonstrate the largest increase in middle ear pressure of 1.46 mm Hg (p = 0.0053) and 0.78 mm Hg (p = 0.0005) respectively. The data provided by this study gives evidence for the first time that playing wind instruments does increase middle ear pressure. Although the clinical significance of this is yet to be determined the authors would advise that musicians who undergo otological procedures should refrain from playing their instruments until full recovery has been achieved as advised by their clinician following direct microscopic review.

  13. Structure and function of the mammalian middle ear. I: Large middle ears in small desert mammals.

    PubMed

    Mason, Matthew J

    2016-02-01

    Many species of small desert mammals are known to have expanded auditory bullae. The ears of gerbils and heteromyids have been well described, but much less is known about the middle ear anatomy of other desert mammals. In this study, the middle ears of three gerbils (Meriones, Desmodillus and Gerbillurus), two jerboas (Jaculus) and two sengis (elephant-shrews: Macroscelides and Elephantulus) were examined and compared, using micro-computed tomography and light microscopy. Middle ear cavity expansion has occurred in members of all three groups, apparently in association with an essentially 'freely mobile' ossicular morphology and the development of bony tubes for the middle ear arteries. Cavity expansion can occur in different ways, resulting in different subcavity patterns even between different species of gerbils. Having enlarged middle ear cavities aids low-frequency audition, and several adaptive advantages of low-frequency hearing to small desert mammals have been proposed. However, while Macroscelides was found here to have middle ear cavities so large that together they exceed brain volume, the bullae of Elephantulus are considerably smaller. Why middle ear cavities are enlarged in some desert species but not others remains unclear, but it may relate to microhabitat. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  14. Prenatal evaluation of the middle ear and diagnosis of middle ear hypoplasia using MRI.

    PubMed

    Katorza, Eldad; Nahama-Allouche, Catherine; Castaigne, Vanina; Gonzales, Marie; Galliani, Eva; Marlin, Sandrine; Jouannic, Jean-Marie; Rosenblatt, Jonathan; le Pointe, Hubert Ducou; Garel, Catherine

    2011-05-01

    Analysis of the middle ear with fetal MRI has not been previously reported. To show the contribution of fetal MRI to middle ear imaging. The tympanic cavity was evaluated in 108 fetal cerebral MRI examinations (facial and/or cerebral malformation excluded) and in two cases, one of Treacher Collins syndrome (case 1) and the other of oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OUV) spectrum (case 2) with middle ear hypoplasia identified by MRI at 27 and 36 weeks' gestation, respectively. In all 108 fetuses (mean gestational age 32.5 weeks), the tympanic cavity and T2 hypointensity related to the ossicles were well visualised on both sides. Case 1 had micro/retrognathia and bilateral external ear deformity and case 2 had retrognathism with a left low-set and deformed ear. MRI made it possible to recognize the marked hypoplasia of the tympanic cavity, which was bilateral in case 1 and unilateral in case 2. Both syndromes are characterized by craniofacial abnormalities including middle ear hypoplasia, which cannot be diagnosed with US. The middle ear cavity can be visualized with fetal MRI. We emphasize the use of this imaging modality in the diagnosis of middle ear hypoplasia.

  15. [Effect size on resonance of the outer ear canal by simulation of middle ear lesions using a temporal bone preparation].

    PubMed

    Scheinpflug, L; Vorwerk, U; Begall, K

    1995-01-01

    By means of a model of the external and the middle ear it is possible to simulate various, exactly defined pathological conditions of the middle ear and to describe their influence on ear canal resonance. Starting point of the investigations are fresh postmortem preparations of 8 human temporal bones with an intact ear drum and a retained skin of the ear canal. The compliance of the middle ear does not significantly differ from the clinical data of probands with healthy ears. After antrotomy it is possible to simulate pathological conditions of the middle ear one after the other at the same temporal bone. The influence of the changed middle ear conditions on ear drum compliance, ear canal volume and on the resonance curve of the external ear canal was investigated. For example, the middle ear was filled with water to create approximately the same conditions as in acute serous otitis media. In this middle ear condition a significant increase of the sound pressure amplification was found, on an average by 4 decibels compared to the unchanged temporal bone model. A small increase in resonance frequency was also measured. The advantages of this model are the approximately physiological conditions and the constant dimensions of the external and middle ear.

  16. An Electroacoustic Hearing Protector Simulator That Accurately Predicts Pressure Levels in the Ear Based on Standard Performance Metrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    earplug and earmuff showing HPD simulator elements for energy flow paths...unprotected or protected ear traditionally start with analysis of energy flow through schematic diagrams based on electroacoustic (EA) analogies between...Schröter, 1983; Schröter and Pösselt, 1986; Shaw and Thiessen, 1958, 1962; Zwislocki, 1957). The analysis method tracks energy flow through fluid and

  17. Case presentation: a novel way of treating acute cauliflower ear in a professional rugby player.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, D J M; Calder, N; Perrett, G; McGuiness, R G

    2005-06-01

    Acute auricular haematoma is a common problem in rugby players and can be difficult to treat due to re-accumulation of the fluid and can subsequently cause the unsightly cauliflower ear. We present a case of auricular haematoma affecting the central part of the pinna in a professional rugby player. This was treated successfully by aspiration and the use of silicone splints which allowed the player to continue training and competing.

  18. Skin, ear and testis--unusual sites of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ene, Cătălina Elena; Toma, Claudia; Belaconi, Ionela; Dumitrache-Rujinski, Stefan; Jipa, Daniela; Tudor, Adrian; Leonte, Diana; Bogdan, Miron Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary localization is the most common site of tuberculosis (TB)and the most contagious form. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis with the rarest and most unexpected localizations represents a significant proportion of all cases of tuberculosis and remains an important public health problem. We report three unusual TB locations: skin, ear and testis occurred in three immunocompetent patients. In the case of skin and testicular lesions, diagnosis was based on pathological confirmation of granulomas with caseous necrosis. In the third case the diagnosis was made possible by identification of positive Acid-Fast Bacilli smear and positive culture from othic drainage fluid. The outcome at all three patients was good with antituberculous treatment. These unusual localization of tuberculosis also highlight the possibility of extrapulmonary tuberculosis as a differential diagnosis in many common diseases.

  19. Maintaining ear aesthetics in helical rim reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James M; Rajan, Ruchika; Dickson, John K; Mahajan, Ajay L

    2014-03-01

    Wedge resections of the helical rim may result in a significant deformity of the ear with the ear not only smaller but cupped and prominent too. Our technique involves resection of the wedge in the scaphal area without extending into the concha followed by advancement of the helical rim into the defect. This technique is most suitable for peripheral defects of the helical rim, in the middle third. Our modified surgical technique was applied to reconstruction of the pinna after resection of the tumor in 12 patients. Free cartilaginous helical rim, length of helical rim to be resected, and projection of the ear from the mastoid was measured. This was then compared with measurements after the operation, and the patient satisfaction assessed with a visual analog scale. The free cartilaginous rim was 91.67 ± 5.61 mm. Of this, 21.92 ± 3.78 mm was resected, which amounted to 23.84% ± 3.35% of the rim. Although this resulted in a mean increase in ear projection of 6.42 ± 1.68 mm, the aesthetic outcome was good (visual analog scale, 9.08 ± 0.9). This technique reduces cupping and does not make the ear as prominent as it may do after a conventional wedge resection and results in high patient satisfaction.

  20. Evolution and development of the vertebrate ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Beisel, K. W.

    2001-01-01

    This review outlines major aspects of development and evolution of the ear, specifically addressing issues of cell fate commitment and the emerging molecular governance of these decisions. Available data support the notion of homology of subsets of mechanosensors across phyla (proprioreceptive mechanosensory neurons in insects, hair cells in vertebrates). It is argued that this conservation is primarily related to the specific transducing environment needed to achieve mechanosensation. Achieving this requires highly conserved transcription factors that regulate the expression of the relevant structural genes for mechanosensory transduction. While conserved at the level of some cell fate assignment genes (atonal and its mammalian homologue), the ear has also radically reorganized its development by implementing genes used for cell fate assignment in other parts of the developing nervous systems (e.g., neurogenin 1) and by evolving novel sets of genes specifically associated with the novel formation of sensory neurons that contact hair cells (neurotrophins and their receptors). Numerous genes have been identified that regulate morphogenesis, but there is only one common feature that emerges at the moment: the ear appears to have co-opted genes from a large variety of other parts of the developing body (forebrain, limbs, kidneys) and establishes, in combination with existing transcription factors, an environment in which those genes govern novel, ear-related morphogenetic aspects. The ear thus represents a unique mix of highly conserved developmental elements combined with co-opted and newly evolved developmental elements.

  1. Kinetics of reciprocating drug delivery to the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Pararas, Erin E Leary; Chen, Zhiqiang; Fiering, Jason; Mescher, Mark J; Kim, Ernest S; McKenna, Michael J; Kujawa, Sharon G; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Sewell, William F

    2011-06-10

    Reciprocating drug delivery is a means of delivering soluble drugs directly to closed fluid spaces in the body via a single cannula without an accompanying fluid volume change. It is ideally suited for drug delivery into small, sensitive and unique fluid spaces such as the cochlea. We characterized the pharmacokinetics of reciprocating drug delivery to the scala tympani within the cochlea by measuring the effects of changes in flow parameters on the distribution of drug throughout the length of the cochlea. Distribution was assessed by monitoring the effects of DNQX, a reversible glutamate receptor blocker, delivered directly to the inner ear of guinea pigs using reciprocating flow profiles. We then modeled the effects of those parameters on distribution using both an iterative curve-fitting approach and a computational fluid dynamic model. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that reciprocating delivery distributes the drug into a volume in the base of the cochlea, and suggest that the primary determinant of distribution throughout more distal regions of the cochlea is diffusion. Increases in flow rate distributed the drug into a larger volume that extended more apically. Over short time courses (less than 2h), the apical extension, though small, significantly enhanced apically directed delivery of drug. Over longer time courses (>5h) or greater distances (>3mm), maintenance of drug concentration in the basal scala tympani may prove more advantageous for extending apical delivery than increases in flow rate. These observations demonstrate that this reciprocating technology is capable of providing controlled delivery kinetics to the closed fluid space in the cochlea, and may be suitable for other applications such as localized brain and retinal delivery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetics of Reciprocating Drug Delivery to the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Leary Pararas, Erin E.; Chen, Zhiqiang; Fiering, Jason; Mescher, Mark J.; Kim, Ernest S.; McKenna, Michael J.; Kujawa, Sharon G.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Sewell, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Reciprocating drug delivery is a means of delivering soluble drugs directly to closed fluid spaces in the body via a single cannula without an accompanying fluid volume change. It is ideally suited for drug delivery into small, sensitive and unique fluid spaces such as the cochlea. We characterized the pharmacokinetics of reciprocating drug delivery to the scala tympani within the cochlea by measuring the effects of changes in flow parameters on the distribution of drug throughout the length of the cochlea. Distribution was assessed by monitoring the effects of DNQX, a reversible glutamate receptor blocker, delivered directly to the inner ear of guinea pigs using reciprocating flow profiles. We then modeled the effects of those parameters on distribution using both an iterative curve-fitting approach and a computational fluid dynamic model. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that reciprocating delivery distributes the drug into a volume in the base of the cochlea, and suggest that the primary determinant of distribution throughout more distal regions of the cochlea is diffusion. Increases in flow rate distributed the drug into a larger volume that extended more apically. Over short time courses (less than 2 h), the apical extension, though small, significantly enhanced apically directed delivery of drug. Over longer time courses (>5 h) or greater distances (>3 mm), maintenance of drug concentration in the basal scala tympani may prove more advantageous for extending apical delivery than increases in flow rate. These observations demonstrate that this reciprocating technology is capable of providing controlled delivery kinetics to the closed fluid space in the cochlea, and may be suitable for other applications such as localized brain and retinal delivery. PMID:21385596

  3. Computational modeling of the generation and propagation of distortion products in the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, Thomas; Wen, Haiqi; Meaud, Julien

    2018-05-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emissions are used in both clinical and research settings to assess cochlear function although there are still questions for how the distortion products propagate in the cochlea from their generation location to the middle ear. Here, a physiologically based computational model of the gerbil ear is used to investigate distortion product propagation. The fluid is modeled in three dimensions and includes two ducts. Simulations of the distortion products in the cochlear fluid pressure and basilar membrane are compared with published experimental data. Model results are consistent with measurements from Ren and colleagues which indicated that the intracochlear distortion product is dominated by a forward traveling wave at a low primary frequency ratio, although backward traveling waves become apparent when other ratios are considered. The magnitude and phase of both basilar membrane and spatial variations of the distortion product fluid pressure are qualitatively similar to the expected response of a slowly propagating backward traveling wave. These results combined suggest that distortion products propagate primarily as a slow wave both when the cochlea is driven by intracochlear sources and an acoustic stimulus in the ear canal.

  4. Ear molding in newborn infants with auricular deformities.

    PubMed

    Byrd, H Steve; Langevin, Claude-Jean; Ghidoni, Lorraine A

    2010-10-01

    A review of a single physician's experience in managing over 831 infant ear deformities (488 patients) is presented. The authors' methods of molding have advanced from the use of various tapes, glues, and stents, to a comprehensive yet simple system that shapes the antihelix, the triangular fossa, the helical rim, and the overly prominent conchal-mastoid angle (EarWell Infant Ear Correction System). The types of deformities managed, and their relative occurrence, are as follows: (1) prominent/cup ear, 373 ears (45 percent); (2) lidding/lop ear, 224 ears (27 percent); (3) mixed ear deformities, 83 ears (10 percent) (all had associated conchal crus); (4) Stahl's ear, 66 ears (8 percent); (5) helical rim abnormalities, 58 ears (7 percent); (6) conchal crus, 25 ears (3 percent); and (7) cryptotia, two ears (0.2 percent). Bilateral deformities were present in 340 patients (70 percent), with unilateral deformities in 148 patients (30 percent). Fifty-eight infant ears (34 patients) were treated using the final version of the EarWell Infant Ear Correction System with a success rate exceeding 90 percent (good to excellent results). The system was found to be most successful when begun in the first week of the infant's life. When molding was initiated after 3 weeks from birth, only approximately half of the infants had a good response. Congenital ear deformities are common and only approximately 30 percent self-correct. These deformities can be corrected by initiating appropriate molding in the first week of life. Neonatal molding reduces the need for surgical correction with results that often exceed what can be achieved with the surgical alternative.

  5. Precise individualized armature for ear reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenhouse, Raymond J.; Chen, Xiaoming

    1991-04-01

    The cosmetic result of an ear restored surgically or via prosthetics is dependent on the surgeon''s ability to carve a precise cartilage armature at the time of surgery or the prosthetist''s ability to sculpt in wax an exact duplicate of the patient''s " missing" ear. Introducing CAD/CAM technology into the process benefits the esthetic outcome of these procedures. By utilizing serial section information derived from CAT MRI or moulage techniques a mirrorimage of the patient''s " donor" ear is generated. The resulting earform data is then used for the design of a cartilage armature produced by multi-axis milling or to produce by stereolithography a model which serves as the basis for a prosthesis.

  6. Building an endoscopic ear surgery program.

    PubMed

    Golub, Justin S

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses background, operative details, and outcomes of endoscopic ear surgery. This information will be helpful for those establishing a new program. Endoscopic ear surgery is growing in popularity. The ideal benefit is in totally transcanal access that would otherwise require a larger incision. The endoscope carries a number of advantages over the microscope, as well as some disadvantages. Several key maneuvers can minimize disadvantages. There is a paucity of studies directly comparing outcomes between endoscopic and microscopic approaches for the same procedure. The endoscope is gaining acceptance as a tool for treating otologic diseases. For interested surgeons, this article can help bridge the transition from microscopic to totally transcanal endoscopic ear surgery for appropriate disease.

  7. Finite element modelling of sound transmission from outer to inner ear.

    PubMed

    Areias, Bruno; Santos, Carla; Natal Jorge, Renato M; Gentil, Fernanda; Parente, Marco Pl

    2016-11-01

    The ear is one of the most complex organs in the human body. Sound is a sequence of pressure waves, which propagates through a compressible media such as air. The pinna concentrates the sound waves into the external auditory meatus. In this canal, the sound is conducted to the tympanic membrane. The tympanic membrane transforms the pressure variations into mechanical displacements, which are then transmitted to the ossicles. The vibration of the stapes footplate creates pressure waves in the fluid inside the cochlea; these pressure waves stimulate the hair cells, generating electrical signals which are sent to the brain through the cochlear nerve, where they are decoded. In this work, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human ear is developed. The model incorporates the tympanic membrane, ossicular bones, part of temporal bone (external auditory meatus and tympanic cavity), middle ear ligaments and tendons, cochlear fluid, skin, ear cartilage, jaw and the air in external auditory meatus and tympanic cavity. Using the finite element method, the magnitude and the phase angle of the umbo and stapes footplate displacement are calculated. Two slightly different models are used: one model takes into consideration the presence of air in the external auditory meatus while the other does not. The middle ear sound transfer function is determined for a stimulus of 60 dB SPL, applied to the outer surface of the air in the external auditory meatus. The obtained results are compared with previously published data in the literature. This study highlights the importance of external auditory meatus in the sound transmission. The pressure gain is calculated for the external auditory meatus.

  8. Expansion method in secondary total ear reconstruction for undesirable reconstructed ear.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tun; Hu, Jintian; Zhou, Xu; Zhang, Qingguo

    2014-09-01

    Ear reconstruction by autologous costal cartilage grafting is the most widely applied technique with fewer complications. However, undesirable ear reconstruction brings more problems to plastic surgeons. Some authors resort to free flap or osseointegration technique with prosthetic ear. In this article, we introduce a secondary total ear reconstruction with expanded skin flap method. From July 2010 to April 2012, 7 cases of undesirable ear reconstruction were repaired by tissue expansion method. Procedures including removal of previous cartilage framework, soft tissue expander insertion, and second stage of cartilage framework insertion were performed to each case regarding their local conditions. The follow-up time ranged from 6 months to 2.5 years. All of the cases recovered well with good 3-dimensional forms, symmetrical auriculocephalic angle, and stable fixation. All these evidence showed that this novel expansion method is safe, stable, and less traumatic for secondary total ear reconstruction. With sufficient expanded skin flap and refabricated cartilage framework, lifelike appearance of reconstructed ear could be acquired without causing additional injury.

  9. Active middle ear implant after lateral petrosectomy and radiotherapy for ear cancer.

    PubMed

    Cristalli, Giovanni; Sprinzl, Georg M; Wolf-Magele, Astrid; Marchesi, Paolo; Mercante, Giuseppe; Spriano, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    Tumor of the temporal bone is a rare disease with a very poor prognosis. Surgery and postoperative radiotherapy are usually the recommended treatments for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external and middle ear, which may cause conductive hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the audiologic results and compliance of active middle ear implant (AMEI) and establish the feasibility of the procedure in a patient treated for middle ear cancer. A 73-year-old patient treated with lateral petrosectomy, neck dissection, reconstruction/obliteration by pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, and postoperative full dose radiotherapy for external and middle ear SCC was selected for AMEI. Preoperative audiometric and speech audiometry tests were performed on both ears before and after the activation. Pure tone free field audiometry. Binaural free field speech audiogram. Aided pure tone free field audiometry AMEI results show an increase in air conduction. Speech audiogram showed better discrimination scores in AMEI-aided situations. No complications were observed. AMEI after surgery followed by radiotherapy for middle ear cancer is feasible. Acoustic results in obliterated ear are satisfactory.

  10. Gustatory otalgia and wet ear syndrome: a possible cross-innervation after ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Saito, H

    1999-04-01

    The chorda tympani and Arnold's nerves have close approximation to each other and their cross-innervation is possible after ear surgery. A retrospective study was performed with a temporal bone pathology case and two clinical cases as representatives of such a possibility. Patients had severe otalgia and wet ear during gustatory stimulation. A temporal bone pathology case was studied under a light microscope. Earache and/or wet ear were provoked during gustatory stimulation. Wet ear was tested with iodine-starch reaction after the subject tasted lemon juice. The temporal bone specimen has clusters of regenerated fibers in the tympanic cavity in the area of the chorda tympani and Arnold's nerves, suggesting a possibility of mixing. There are regenerated fibers in the iter chordae anterius, showing successful bridging of the chorda tympani nerves across a long gap. Detachment of the skin over the operated mastoid bowl obscured signs in one clinical case. Another clinical case of gustatory wet ear showed objective evidence of cross-innervation with iodine-starch reaction. The detachment procedure and iodine-starch reaction were the proofs that the signs were related to regenerated fibers. This is the first report of gustatory otalgia and wet ear after ear surgery.

  11. A new mosaic integrative and conjugative element from Streptococcus agalactiae carrying resistance genes for chloramphenicol (catQ) and macrolides [mef(I) and erm(TR)].

    PubMed

    Morici, Eleonora; Simoni, Serena; Brenciani, Andrea; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Varaldo, Pietro E; Mingoia, Marina

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis of catQ-mediated chloramphenicol resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae. Two clinical strains of catQ-positive chloramphenicol-resistant S. agalactiae (Sag236 and Sag403) were recently isolated, typed (MLST, PFGE pulsotypes, capsular types) and their antibiotic resistances investigated by phenotypic and genotypic approaches. Several molecular methods (PCR mapping, restriction assays, Southern blotting, sequencing and sequence analysis, conjugal transfer assays) were used to determine the genetic context of catQ and characterize a genetic element detected in the isolates. Sag236 and Sag403 shared the same ST (ST19), but exhibited a different capsular type (III and V, respectively) and pulsotype. Both harboured the macrolide resistance genes mef(I) and erm(TR) and the tetracycline resistance gene tet(M). Accordingly, they were resistant to chloramphenicol, erythromycin and tetracycline. catQ and mef(I) were associated in an IQ module that was indistinguishable in Sag236 and Sag403. In mating assays, chloramphenicol and erythromycin resistance proved transferable, at low frequency, only from Sag236. Transconjugants carried not only catQ and mef(I), but also erm(TR), suggesting a linkage of the three resistance genes in a mobile element, which, though seemingly non-mobile, was also detected in Sag403. The new element (designated ICESag236, ∼110 kb) results from recombination of two integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) originally described in different streptococcal species: S. agalactiae ICESagTR7, carrying erm(TR); and Streptococcus pneumoniae ICESpn529IQ, carrying the prototype IQ module. These findings strengthen the notion that widespread streptococcal ICEs may form mosaics that enhance their diversity and spread, broaden their host range and carry new cargo genes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  12. Dysmorphism of the middle ear: case report

    PubMed Central

    Solero, P; Ferrara, M; Musto, R; Pira, A; Di Lisi, D

    2005-01-01

    Summary Although there are numerous publications in the literature describing the wide range of diagnosis, classifications and treatment of malformations of the hearing apparatus, even more variations can be found in clinical practice. Indeed, each individual case is unique as far as concerns pathogenesis, clinical course and treatment. The case reported herein describes a 12-year-old boy affected by cranio-facial dysmorphism and monolateral conductive hearing loss in the right ear: followed from radiological diagnosis – carried out to study a malformation of the ear pinna – to surgical treatment. PMID:16602328

  13. Correcting prominent ears with the island technique.

    PubMed

    DeMoura, L F

    1977-01-01

    A surgical procedure is described which corrects the ansiform ear by repositioning and reconstructing the anthelix and the anterior crus with the formation of the triangular fossa. This corrects the scaphoconchal angle and improves the cephaloauricular angle, overcoming the problem of prominent ears. Correction in early childhood is recommended in order to avoid personality problems that may result from the deformity, particularly in boys. The technique employed yields important advantages: (1) prolonged use of the helmet-type of surgical dressing is unnecessary; (2) scars are less conspicuous; (3) the outcome is attractive and normal; (4) bleeding and inflammatory complications are avoided; and (5) recurrence of the malformation is unlikely.

  14. Are two ears not better than one?

    PubMed

    McArdle, Rachel A; Killion, Mead; Mennite, Monica A; Chisolm, Theresa H

    2012-03-01

    The decision to fit one or two hearing aids in individuals with binaural hearing loss has been debated for years. Although some 78% of U.S. hearing aid fittings are binaural (Kochkin , 2010), Walden and Walden (2005) presented data showing that 82% (23 of 28 patients) of their sample obtained significantly better speech recognition in noise scores when wearing one hearing aid as opposed to two. To conduct two new experiments to fuel the monaural/binaural debate. The first experiment was a replication of Walden and Walden (2005), whereas the second experiment examined the use of binaural cues to improve speech recognition in noise. A repeated measures experimental design. Twenty veterans (aged 59-85 yr), with mild to moderately severe binaurally symmetrical hearing loss who wore binaural hearing aids were recruited from the Audiology Department at the Bay Pines VA Healthcare System. Experiment 1 followed the procedures of the Walden and Walden study, where signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss was measured using the Quick Speech-in-Noise (QuickSIN) test on participants who were aided with their current hearing aids. Signal and noise were presented in the sound booth at 0° azimuth under five test conditions: (1) right ear aided, (2) left ear aided, (3) both ears aided, (4) right ear aided, left ear plugged, and (5) unaided. The opposite ear in (1) and (2) was left open. In Experiment 2, binaural Knowles Electronics Manikin for Acoustic Research (KEMAR) manikin recordings made in Lou Malnati's pizza restaurant during a busy period provided a typical real-world noise, while prerecorded target sentences were presented through a small loudspeaker located in front of the KEMAR manikin. Subjects listened to the resulting binaural recordings through insert earphones under the following four conditions: (1) binaural, (2) diotic, (3) monaural left, and (4) monaural right. Results of repeated measures ANOVAs demonstrated that the best speech recognition in noise performance was

  15. A different type of 'glue ear': report of an unusual case of prominent ears.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Elizabeth M; O'Neill, Ann C; Regan, Padraic J

    2003-09-01

    Prominent ears is a condition that can cause extreme psychological distress in young people. This cosmetic deformity can be corrected by otoplasty, an outpatient surgical procedure that is associated with a high rate of patient satisfaction. We report the unusual case of a teenage boy who had repeatedly applied cyanoacrylate adhesive ("superglue") to his postauricular skin in an attempt to pin back his prominent ears. This case of "glue ear" was ultimately resolved by successful otoplasty, although the residual effects of the glue resulted in delayed healing of the surgical wound.

  16. [An ear thermometer based on infrared thermopiles sensor].

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyuan; Qian, Mingli

    2013-09-01

    According to the development of body temperature measurement mode, an ear thermometer with infrared thermopiles sensor is designed for body thermometry Compared with oral thermometer, the accuracy of ear thermometer is acceptable.

  17. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Pediatric Obesity ... self-esteem, and isolation from their peers. Pediatric obesity and otolaryngic problems Otolaryngologists, or ear, nose, and ...

  18. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Although there is no proven medical link between middle ear infections and pediatric obesity there may be a behavioral association between the two conditions. Some studies have found that when a child is rubbing or massaging the infected ear the ...

  19. Transmission matrix analysis of the chinchilla middle ear

    PubMed Central

    Songer, Jocelyn E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the common use of the chinchilla as an animal model in auditory research, a complete characterization of the chinchilla middle ear using transmission matrix analysis has not been performed. In this paper we describe measurements of middle-ear input admittance and stapes velocity in ears with the middle-ear cavity opened under three conditions: intact tympano-ossicular system and cochlea, after the cochlea has been drained, and after the stapes has been fixed. These measurements, made with stimulus frequencies of 100–8000 Hz, are used to define the transmission matrix parameters of the middle ear and to calculate the cochlear input impedance as well as the middle-ear output impedance. This transmission characterization of the chinchilla middle ear will be useful for modeling auditory sensitivity in the normal and pathological chinchilla ear. PMID:17672642

  20. Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about ear tube surgery; Tympanostomy - what to ask your doctor; Myringotomy - what to ask your doctor ... need ear tubes? Can we try other treatments? What are the risks of the surgery? Is it ...

  1. Some Remarks on Imaging of the Inner Ear: Options and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Giesemann, A; Hofmann, E

    2015-10-01

    The temporal bone has a highly complex anatomical structure, in which the sensory organs of the cochlea and the vestibular system are contained within a small space together with the sound-conducting system of the middle ear. Detailed imaging is thus required in this anatomical area. There are a great many clinical aims for which the highest-possible spatial resolution is required. These include the localization of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas, the detection of malformations of the middle and inner ear and the vestibulocochlear nerve, an aberrant course of the facial nerve and anomalies of the arterial and venous structures, the confirmation of dehiscence of the semicircular canals and finally, the verification of endolymphatic hydrops in cases of Ménière's disease. However, the term 'high resolution' is very time dependent. Two milestones in this respect have been (in 1991) the 3D visualization of the inner ear by means of maximum-intensity projection (MIP) of a T2-weighted constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequence of a 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner (Tanioka et al., Radiology 178:141-144, 1991) and (in 1997) imaging of the vestibulocochlear nerve for the diagnosis of hypoplasia inside the internal auditory canal using the same sequence (Casselman et al., Radiology 202:773-781, 1997).The objective of this article is to highlight the options for, and the challenges of, contemporary imaging with regard to some clinical issues relating to the inner ear.

  2. Getting Teens to Read with Their Ears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fues, Marianne Cole

    2009-01-01

    Audiobooks have been around for years in various formats, like cassette tapes and CDs. This article describes a new type of audiobook on the market which is generating an interest in "reading." The device, called Playaway, is the size of a MP3 player and comes with a lanyard and ear buds. Buttons on the back of the player control the…

  3. Congenital tuberculosis localised to the ear.

    PubMed Central

    Naranbhai, R C; Mathiassen, W; Malan, A F

    1989-01-01

    We report two infants who had localised congenital tuberculous otitis. In both cases the infants presented with an ear discharge and both mothers had been diagnosed as having miliary tuberculosis. Infection is thought to have occurred in utero or during birth. Images Figure PMID:2786383

  4. A systematic review on external ear melanoma.

    PubMed

    Toia, Francesca; Garbo, Giuseppe; Tripoli, Massimiliano; Rinaldi, Gaetana; Moschella, Francesco; Cordova, Adriana

    2015-07-01

    External ear melanoma accounts for only 1% of all cutaneous melanomas, and data on its optimal management and prognosis are limited. We aim to review the literature on external ear melanoma to guide surgeons in the treatment of this uncommon and peculiar pathology. A systematic review of English language studies on ear melanoma published from 1993 to 2013 was performed using the PubMed electronic database. Data on epidemiology, oncological treatment (tumor resection and regional lymph nodes management), and reconstruction were extrapolated from selected papers. The total number of patients was 858 (30 studies). The helix was the most common location (57%); superficial spreading melanoma was the most common histopathological subtype (41%). The mean Breslow thickness was 2.01 mm, with 88% of stage I-II patients. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed in 45% of patients, with 8% of positive nodes. Available data on its prognosis are fragmentary and contrasting, but the Breslow thickness appears to be the main prognostic factor. There is a tendency towards reduced resection margins and preservation of the underlying perichondrium and cartilage. Local flaps are the most popular reconstructive option. To the best of our knowledge, this systematic review presents the largest data series on external ear melanoma. There is no general agreement on its surgical management, but a favorable prognosis seems to justify the tendency towards conservative treatments. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Surgical correction of the cauliflower ear.

    PubMed

    Vogelin, E; Grobbelaar, A O; Chana, J S; Gault, D T

    1998-07-01

    The cauliflower ear presents a challenge to the surgeon. Patients complain of discomfort and appearance. Three patients were treated surgically via a posterior approach to remove the hardened segment and re-sculpture a leaf of cartilage left in place. An acceptable cosmetic result was achieved and all patients are currently pain free.

  6. Interaction Between Allergy and Middle Ear Infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Woo Jin

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have attempted to identify interactions among the causes of otitis media with effusion (OME). This review discusses the interaction between allergy and infection with regard to host and environmental factors in terms of the development of OME. Protection of the upper airway against microbial invasion requires active interaction between the defense mechanisms of the respiratory epithelium, including innate and adaptive immunity, and mechanical factors. The impairment of these defenses due to allergy and/or increased bacterial resistance may lead to increased susceptibility to infectious organisms in the respiratory tract and middle ear mucosa. Recent genetic studies have provided valuable information about the association of Toll-like receptor signaling variations with clinical phenotypes and the risk of infection in the middle ear. Among the causal factors of OME, allergy not only induces an inflammatory reaction in the middle ear cavity but also facilitates the invasion of infectious pathogens. There is also evidence that allergy can affect the susceptibility of patients to infection of the upper respiratory tract, including the middle ear cavity.

  7. A review of microvascular ear replantation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Won; Lee, Junsang; Oh, Suk Joon; Koh, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chul Hoon; Lee, Jong Wook

    2013-03-01

    Microvascular ear replantation is a significant challenge because of the small size of the vessels and the fact that traumatic amputations are frequently avulsed. The zone of trauma is therefore extended and the primary repair of the injured vessel is rendered unlikely. The purpose of this study is to review the literature of ear replantation. A review of the relevant literature that has been published since 1980 revealed 47 cases reported in 37 publications. We present 5 cases from our own experience and analyze a total 52 cases of microvascular ear replantation. The patient's age, sex, degree of amputation, cause of injury, ischemic time, method of arterial and venous anastomosis, complications, any additional outflow used, postoperative medications, the requirement for transfusions, and the number of hospital admission days are described. Successful microvascular ear replantations require anastomosis of the vessels if possible. Rather than a vein graft, primary repair of the vessels, or at least pedicled repair of the artery, should be considered to ensure flap survival. In addition, vein repair should be considered if possible to ensure the secure drainage of blood from the replant. With secure circulation, the replant can survive, resulting in a very satisfactory outcome. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Keep Your Ear-Lids Open.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrington, Gary

    1994-01-01

    This article suggests that the development of listening skills should extend to the "soundscape" of nonspeech acoustical information. It presents a model for effective aural processing, identifies categories of information obtained from nonverbal sound, and explores "ear-tuning" or listening exercises that use sound to glean…

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear by using a hybrid radiofrequency coil at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Heo, Phil; Kim, Young-Bo; Han, Gyu-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of the membranous structures of the inner ear has been limited to the detection of the normal fluid signal intensity within the bony labyrinth by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipped with a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnet. High-field (HF) MRI has been available for more than a decade, and numerous studies have documented its significant advantages over conventional MRI with regards to its use in basic scientific research and routine clinical assessments. No previous studies of the inner ear by using HF MRI have been reported, in part because high-quality resolution of mastoid pneumatization is challenging due to artifacts generated in the HF environment and insufficient performance of radiofrequency (RF) coils. Therefore, a hybrid RF coil with integrated circuitry was developed at 7 T and was targeted for anatomical imaging to achieve a high resolution image of the structure of the human inner ear, excluding the bony portion. The inner-ear's structure is composed of soft tissues containing hydrogen ions and includes the membranous labyrinth, endolymphatic space, perilymphatic space, and cochlear-vestibular nerves. Visualization of the inner-ear's anatomy was performed in-vivo with a custom-designed hybrid RF coil and a specific imaging protocol based on an interpolated breath-held examination sequence. The comparative signal intensity value at 30-mm away from the phantom side was 88% higher for the hybrid RF coil and 24% higher for the 8-channel transmit/receive (Tx/Rx) coil than for the commercial birdcage coil. The optimized MRI protocol employed a hybrid RF coil because it enabled high-resolution imaging of the inner-ear's anatomy and accurate mapping of structures including the cochlea and the semicircular canals. These results indicate that 7 T MRI achieves high spatial resolution visualization of the inner-ear's anatomy. Therefore, MRI imaging using a hybrid RF coil at 7 T could provide a powerful tool for clinical investigations of petrous

  10. [The effect of OSAHS on middle ear and inner ear vestibule function advances].

    PubMed

    Li, K L; Li, J R

    2016-05-20

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome(OSAHS) as a common frequentlyoccurring disease, it can cause repeated episodes of hypoxaemia and hypercapnia during sleep. With long period of hypoxaemia, obvious pathological changes and dysfunction emerged in heart,brain and lung then all kinds of clinical symptoms appear. Because of the middle ear and inner ear themselves anatomical characteristics and blood supply of regulating mechanism, they often has been damaged before the other important organ damage. As scholars have indepth study of the auditory system complications in patients with OSAHS, various influence of OSAHS on the middle ear,inner ear also gradually be known.This paper will review the effect of OSAHS on middle ear, inner ear and vestibule function, hope to have some application value for clinical work. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

  11. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation of...

  12. The middle ear mass: a rare but important diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pankhania, Miran; Rourke, Thomas; Draper, Mark R

    2011-12-02

    The authors report a rare case of primary intracranial meningioma presenting as a middle ear mass with conductive hearing loss. The authors aim to highlight the importance of diagnosing a middle ear mass, which although rare, may have a substantial impact on ongoing patient management. A discussion of other middle ear pathologies is made in order to demonstrate the subtle differences in presentation.

  13. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation of...

  14. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation of...

  15. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation of...

  16. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation of...

  17. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... technology and software not subject to the EAR are described in §§ 734.7 through 734.11 and supplement no. 1... of items subject to the EAR out of the United States, or release of technology or software subject to... source code and object code software subject to the EAR. (2) Export of technology or software. (See...

  18. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... technology and software not subject to the EAR are described in §§ 734.7 through 734.11 and supplement no. 1... of items subject to the EAR out of the United States, or release of technology or software subject to... source code and object code software subject to the EAR. (2) Export of technology or software. (See...

  19. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... technology and software not subject to the EAR are described in §§ 734.7 through 734.11 and supplement no. 1... of items subject to the EAR out of the United States, or release of technology or software subject to... source code and object code software subject to the EAR. (2) Export of technology or software. (See...

  20. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... technology and software not subject to the EAR are described in §§ 734.7 through 734.11 and supplement no. 1... of items subject to the EAR out of the United States, or release of technology or software subject to... source code and object code software subject to the EAR. (2) Export of technology or software. (See...

  1. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... technology and software not subject to the EAR are described in §§ 734.7 through 734.11 and supplement no. 1... of items subject to the EAR out of the United States, or release of technology or software subject to... source code and object code software subject to the EAR. (2) Export of technology or software. (See...

  2. Role of skeletal muscle in ear development.

    PubMed

    Rot, Irena; Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; Costain, Willard J; Hong, Paul; Tafra, Robert; Mardesic-Brakus, Snjezana; Mrduljas-Djujic, Natasa; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Kablar, Boris

    2017-10-01

    The current paper is a continuation of our work described in Rot and Kablar, 2010. Here, we show lists of 10 up- and 87 down-regulated genes obtained by a cDNA microarray analysis that compared developing Myf5-/-:Myod-/- (and Mrf4-/-) petrous part of the temporal bone, containing middle and inner ear, to the control, at embryonic day 18.5. Myf5-/-:Myod-/- fetuses entirely lack skeletal myoblasts and muscles. They are unable to move their head, which interferes with the perception of angular acceleration. Previously, we showed that the inner ear areas most affected in Myf5-/-:Myod-/- fetuses were the vestibular cristae ampullaris, sensitive to angular acceleration. Our finding that the type I hair cells were absent in the mutants' cristae was further used here to identify a profile of genes specific to the lacking cell type. Microarrays followed by a detailed consultation of web-accessible mouse databases allowed us to identify 6 candidate genes with a possible role in the development of the inner ear sensory organs: Actc1, Pgam2, Ldb3, Eno3, Hspb7 and Smpx. Additionally, we searched for human homologues of the candidate genes since a number of syndromes in humans have associated inner ear abnormalities. Mutations in one of our candidate genes, Smpx, have been reported as the cause of X-linked deafness in humans. Our current study suggests an epigenetic role that mechanical, and potentially other, stimuli originating from muscle, play in organogenesis, and offers an approach to finding novel genes responsible for altered inner ear phenotypes.

  3. [European Portuguese EARS test battery adaptation].

    PubMed

    Alves, Marisa; Ramos, Daniela; Oliveira, Graça; Alves, Helena; Anderson, Ilona; Magalhães, Isabel; Martins, Jorge H; Simões, Margarida; Ferreira, Raquel; Fonseca, Rita; Andrade, Susana; Silva, Luís; Ribeiro, Carlos; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes

    2014-01-01

    The use of adequate assessment tools in health care is crucial for the management of care. The lack of specific tools in Portugal for assessing the performance of children who use cochlear implants motivated the translation and adaptation of the EARS (Evaluation of Auditory Responses to Speech) test battery into European Portuguese. This test battery is today one of the most commonly used by (re)habilitation teams of deaf children who use cochlear implants worldwide. The goal to be achieved with the validation of EARS was to provide (re)habilitation teams an instrument that enables: (i) monitoring the progress of individual (re)habilitation, (ii) managing a (re)habilitation program according to objective results, comparable between different (re)habilitation teams, (iii) obtaining data that can be compared with the results of international teams, and (iv) improving engagement and motivation of the family and other professionals from local teams. For the test battery translation and adaptation process, the adopted procedures were the following: (i) translation of the English version into European Portuguese by a professional translator, (ii) revision of the translation performed by an expert panel, including doctors, speech-language pathologists and audiologists, (iii) adaptation of the test stimuli by the team's speechlanguage pathologist, and (iv) further review by the expert panel. For each of the tests that belong to the EARS battery, the introduced adaptations and adjustments are presented, combining the characteristics and objectives of the original tests with the linguistic and cultural specificities of the Portuguese population. The difficulties that have been encountered during the translation and adaptation process and the adopted solutions are discussed. Comparisons are made with other versions of the EARS battery. We defend that the translation and the adaptation process followed for the EARS test battery into European Portuguese was correctly conducted

  4. Defective heat shock factor 1 inhibits the growth of fibrosarcoma derived from simian virus 40/T antigen-transformed MEF cells

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, QIYING; ZHANG, ZHI; LI, SHULIAN; WANG, ZHAOYANG; MA, YUANFANG; HU, YANZHONG

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1) serves an important role in regulating the proliferation of human tumor cell lines in vitro and tissue specific tumorigenesis in certain mouse models. However, its role in viral-oncogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, the role of Hsf1 in fibroblastoma derived from simian virus 40/T antigen (SV40/TAG)-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines was investigated. Knockout of Hsf1 inhibited MEF cell proliferation in vitro and fibroblastoma growth and metastasis to the lungs in vivo in nude mice. Knockout of Hsf1 increased the protein expression levels of p53 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (pRb), however reduced the expression of heat shock protein 25 (Hsp25) in addition to the expression of the angiogenesis markers vascular endothelial growth factor, cluster of differentiation 34 and factor VIII related antigen. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation indicated that knockout of Hsf1 inhibited the association between SV40/TAG and p53 or pRb. These data suggest that Hsf1 is involved in the regulation of SV40/TAG-derived fibroblastoma growth and metastasis by modulating the association between SV40/TAG and tumor suppressor p53 and pRb. The current study provides further evidence that Hsf1 may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26352782

  5. Multifunction of Chrysin in Parkinson's Model: Anti-Neuronal Apoptosis, Neuroprotection via Activation of MEF2D, and Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase-B.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baojian; Zheng, Chengyou; Cai, Wei; Cheng, Jiehong; Wang, Hongyu; Li, Haitao; Sun, Yewei; Cui, Wei; Wang, Yuqiang; Han, Yifan; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Zhang, Zaijun

    2016-07-06

    Chrysin, a flavonoid compound existing in several plants, is applied as a dietary supplement because of its beneficial effects on general human health and alleviation of neurological disorders. However, mechanisms underlying neuroprotection of chrysin has not been fully elucidated, and the effects of chrysin on the Parkinson's disease (PD) model in vivo have not been investigated. It is here shown that chrysin protects primary granular neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion insult via antiapoptosis by reversing the dysregulated expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase 3. The mechanisms also involved activating transcriptional factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) via regulation of AKT-GSK3β signaling. In this in vivo model of PD, chrysin rescued the dopaminergic neurons loss and alleviated the decrease in dopamine level induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine in mice. Moreover, chrysin markedly inhibited monoamine oxidase-B activity in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, chrysin exerts beneficial effects to PD, possibly through multitarget mechanisms including antineuronal apoptosis, activation of the AKT-GSK3β/MEF2D pathway, and inhibition of the MAO-B activity.

  6. Naturopathic treatment for ear pain in children.

    PubMed

    Sarrell, E Michael; Cohen, Herman Avner; Kahan, Ernesto

    2003-05-01

    Otitis media is 1 of the most frequent diseases of early infancy and childhood and 1 of the most common reasons for children to visit a physician. In the past 2 decades, there has been a substantial increase in the diagnosis of otitis media worldwide. In the United States, 93% of all children have had at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by 7 years of age. Otalgia is the hallmark of AOM. Most affected children either complain of earache or manifest behavior that the parents interpret as indicating ear pain. Treatment of the ear pain early in the course of AOM decreases both parental anxiety and the child's discomfort and accelerates the healing process. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of naturopathic versus traditional treatment for the management of otalgia commonly associated with AOM in children. The study was designed as a double-blind trial in an outpatient community clinic. A total of 171 children who were aged 5 to 18 years and had otalgia and clinical findings associated with middle-ear infection were studied. The children were randomly assigned to receive treatment with Naturopathic Herbal Extract Ear Drops (NHED) or anesthetic ear drops, with or without amoxicillin. On enrollment, the children were assigned by computer-numbered randomization to receive NHED (contents: allium sativum, verbascum thapsus, calendula flores, hypericum perfoliatum, lavender, and vitamin E in olive oil) 5 drops 3 times daily, alone (group A) or together with a topical anesthetic (amethocaine and phenazone in glycerin) 5 drops 3 times daily (group B), or oral amoxicillin 80 mg/kg/d (maximum 500 mg/dose) divided into 3 doses with either NHED 5 drops 3 times daily (group C) or topical anesthetic 5 drops 3 times daily (group D). A double-blind design was used, and all ear drops were placed in identical bottles. Treatment was initiated by the nurse in all cases. A single physician (M.S.) evaluated and treated all of the patients

  7. Chinchilla middle ear transmission matrix model and middle-ear flexibilitya)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2017-01-01

    The function of the middle ear (ME) in transforming ME acoustic inputs and outputs (sound pressures and volume velocities) can be described with an acoustic two-port transmission matrix. This description is independent of the load on the ME (cochlea or ear canal) and holds in either direction: forward (from ear canal to cochlea) or reverse (from cochlea to ear canal). A transmission matrix describing ME function in chinchilla, an animal commonly used in auditory research, is presented, computed from measurements of forward ME function: input admittance YTM, ME pressure gain GMEP, ME velocity transfer function HV, and cochlear input admittance YC, in the same set of ears [Ravicz and Rosowski (2012b). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2437–2454; (2013a). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2208–2223; (2013b). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 2852–2865]. Unlike previous estimates, these computations require no assumptions about the state of the inner ear, effectiveness of ME manipulations, or measurements of sound transmission in the reverse direction. These element values are generally consistent with physical constraints and the anatomical ME “transformer ratio.” Differences from a previous estimate in chinchilla [Songer and Rosowski (2007). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 932–942] may be due to a difference in ME flexibility between the two subject groups. PMID:28599566

  8. Chinchilla middle ear transmission matrix model and middle-ear flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Rosowski, John J

    2017-05-01

    The function of the middle ear (ME) in transforming ME acoustic inputs and outputs (sound pressures and volume velocities) can be described with an acoustic two-port transmission matrix. This description is independent of the load on the ME (cochlea or ear canal) and holds in either direction: forward (from ear canal to cochlea) or reverse (from cochlea to ear canal). A transmission matrix describing ME function in chinchilla, an animal commonly used in auditory research, is presented, computed from measurements of forward ME function: input admittance Y TM , ME pressure gain G MEP , ME velocity transfer function H V , and cochlear input admittance Y C , in the same set of ears [Ravicz and Rosowski (2012b). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2437-2454; (2013a). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2208-2223; (2013b). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 2852-2865]. Unlike previous estimates, these computations require no assumptions about the state of the inner ear, effectiveness of ME manipulations, or measurements of sound transmission in the reverse direction. These element values are generally consistent with physical constraints and the anatomical ME "transformer ratio." Differences from a previous estimate in chinchilla [Songer and Rosowski (2007). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 932-942] may be due to a difference in ME flexibility between the two subject groups.

  9. Investigation of a broadband duct noise control system inspired by the middle ear mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunqi; Huang, Lixi

    2012-08-01

    A new duct noise control device is introduced based on the mechanism of human middle ear which functions as a compact, broadband impedance transformer between the air motion in the outer ear and the liquid motion in the inner ear. The system consists of two rigid endplates, simulating the tympanic membrane and the stapes footplate, and they are connected by a single rigid rod, simulating the overall action of the ossicular chain. These three pieces are placed in a side-branch cavity, and the whole device is called an ossicular silencer. A specific configuration is investigated numerically with a two-dimensional finite element model. Results show that broadband noise attenuation can be achieved in the very low frequency regime. Typically, two or more resonance peaks are found and the transmission loss between two neighbouring peaks is maintained at a high level. The cavity length is found to be the most crucial parameter that determines the effective frequency range of the ossicular silencer. The total cavity volume, which is a major controlling factor in most existing noise control devices, becomes less influential. The fluid medium in the enclosed cavity mainly acts like an added mass, while its stiffness effect is negligible. Simplified plane wave analysis is also conducted to reveal the mechanisms of the system resonances. The first resonance is identified as of the mass-spring system with mass contributions from both fluid and the plates, while the second one is of the Herschel-Quincke (HQ) tube resonance.

  10. Anthropometric growth study of the ear in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shichun; Li, Dianguo; Liu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Yibiao; Liu, Lei; Jiang, Duyin; Pan, Bo

    2018-04-01

    A large number of anthropometric studies of the auricle have been reported in different nations, but little data were available in the Chinese population. The aim of this study was to analyze growth changes in the ear by measuring the width and length of ears in a Chinese population. A total of 480 participants were enrolled and classified into 1-, 3-, 5-, 7-, 9-, 12-, 14-, and 18-year groups (half were boys and half were girls in each group). Ear length, ear width, body weight, and body length were measured and recorded; ear index was calculated according to ear length and ear width. The growth of auricle and differences between genders were analyzed. Growth of ear in relation to body height and weight and the degree of emphasis on the length and width of the auricle were also analyzed. Ear length and width increased with age. Ear length achieved its mature size in both 14-year-old males and females. Ear width reached its mature size in males at 7 years and in females at 5 years. Different trends of ear index were shown between males and females. People in this population paid more attention to the length than the width of the auricle. The data indicated that ear development followed increase in age. There were gender and ethnic difference in the development of ear. These results may have potential implications for the diagnosis of congenital malformations, syndromes, and planning of ear reconstruction surgery. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Ear Care in Coastal Karnataka.

    PubMed

    Dosemane, Deviprasad; Ganapathi, Keerthan; Kanthila, Jayashree

    2015-12-01

    Ear as an organ is necessary for the perception of sound and body balance. Ear infection, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and excessive use of mobile phone for listening to music at high volume all can reduce hearing. No earlier study was available in the costal Karnataka population, regarding the practice of ear care. The study objective was to ascertain the level of knowledge of the community regarding ear care, to find out whether some of the common conditions affecting hearing are known and to find out the common practices involved in maintaining ear hygiene. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 500 subjects in two tertiary care hospitals by convenient sampling, using self-administered questionnaire. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice across the age groups, religion & education background were studied. Across different education groups, 66.7%-90% did not know that 'cold' can cause ear infection and 46.7%-75.0% did not know that diabetes and hypertension can reduce hearing. When there is ear pain or discharge, people put ear drops available at home in 48.3%-75.0% across 3 age groups; 58.5%-61.5% across 3 religions and 44.8%-67.9% across 5 education groups. No statistically significant difference was found in the practice of pouring oil into ears across religions. A total of 58.6%-100% daily clean inside the ear and 70-100% use cotton buds. General perception of the people is that ear is necessary only for hearing. Majority did not know that nasal infection can affect the ear and that DM and hypertension can cause hearing loss. When there is ear pain and discharge, most of the adults put drops that are available at home. Pouring oil into the ears and cleaning inside the ear canals is routinely practiced in costal Karnataka.

  12. MEF2C haploinsufficiency caused by either microdeletion of the 5q14.3 region or mutation is responsible for severe mental retardation with stereotypic movements, epilepsy and/or cerebral malformations

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Nathalie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jaillard, Sylvie; Goldenberg, Alice; Joriot, Sylvie; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Guichet, Agnès; Barth, Magalie; Charollais, Aude; Journel, Hubert; Auvin, Stéphane; Boucher, Cécile; Kerckaert, Jean-Pierre; David, Véronique; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Frébourg, Thierry; Dubourg, Christèle; Andrieux, Joris; Bonneau, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years, array-CGH has remarkably improved the ability to detect cryptic unbalanced rearrangements in patients presenting with syndromic mental retardation. Using whole genome oligonucleotide array-CGH, we detected 5q14.3 microdeletions ranging from 216 kb to 8.8 Mb in 5 unrelated patients showing phenotypic similarities, namely severe mental retardation with absent speech, hypotonia and stereotypic movements. Most of the patients presented also with facial dysmorphic features, epilepsy and/or cerebral malformations. The minimal common deleted region of these 5q14 microdeletions encompassed only MEF2C, known to act in brain as a neurogenesis effector which regulates excitatory synapse number. In a patient presenting a similar phenotype, we subsequently identified a MEF2C nonsense mutation. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that haploinsufficiency of MEF2C is responsible for severe mental retardation with stereotypic movements, seizures and/or cerebral malformations. PMID:19592390

  13. Correction of Lying Ears by Augmentation of the Conchoscaphal Angle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Yeo, Chi-Ho; Kim, Taegon; Kim, Yong-Ha; Lee, Jun Ho; Chung, Kyu-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Lying ears are defined as ears that protrude less from the head, and in frontal view, are characterized by lateral positioning of antihelical contour relative to the helical rim. These aesthetically displeasing ears require correction in accord with the goals of otoplasty stated by McDowell. The authors present a case of lying ears treated by correcting the conchomastoid angle using Z-plasty, resection of posterior auricular muscle, and correction of the conchoscaphal angle by releasing cartilage using 2 full-thickness incisions and grafting of a conchal cartilage spacer. By combining these techniques, the authors efficiently corrected lying ears and produced aesthetically pleasing results.

  14. Management of auricular hematoma and the cauliflower ear.

    PubMed

    Greywoode, Jewel D; Pribitkin, Edmund A; Krein, Howard

    2010-12-01

    Acute auricular hematoma is common after blunt trauma to the side of the head. A network of vessels provides a rich blood supply to the ear, and the ear cartilage receives its nutrients from the overlying perichondrium. Prompt management of hematoma includes drainage and prevention of reaccumulation. If left untreated, an auricular hematoma can result in complications such as perichondritis, infection, and necrosis. Cauliflower ear may result from long-standing loss of blood supply to the ear cartilage and formation of neocartilage from disrupted perichondrium. Management of cauliflower ear involves excision of deformed cartilage and reshaping of the auricle. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  15. MEF2‑activated long non‑coding RNA PCGEM1 promotes cell proliferation in hormone‑refractory prostate cancer through downregulation of miR‑148a.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shibao; Li, Zongwu; Zhang, Longyang; Xu, Zhonghua

    2018-05-04

    Prostate cancer gene expression marker 1 (PCGEM1) is a prostate‑specific gene overexpressed in prostate cancer cells that promotes cell proliferation. To study the molecular mechanism of PCGEM1 function in hormone‑refractory prostate cancer, the interaction between myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) and PCGEM1 was assessed by a luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. In addition, the underlying mechanism of PCGEM1 regulating expression of microRNA (miR)‑148a in PC3 prostate cancer cells was evaluated. Relative expression levels were measured by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and early apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. PCGEM1 was demonstrated to be overexpressed in prostate cancer tissues compared with noncancerous tissues. Expression levels of PCGEM1 in PC3 cancer cells were demonstrated to be regulated by MEF2, as PCGME1 mRNA was increased by MEF2 overexpression but decreased by MEF2 silencing. MEF2 was also demonstrated to enhance the activity of PCGEM1 promoter and thus promote PCGEM1 transcription. In addition, downregulation of PCGEM1 expression in PC3 cells increased expression of miR‑148a. By contrast, overexpression of PCGEM1 decreased miR‑148a expression. Finally, PCGME1 silencing by small interfering RNA significantly induced early cell apoptosis but this effect was reduced by a miR‑148a inhibitor. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated a positive regulatory association between MEF2 and PCGEM1, and a reciprocal negative regulatory association between PCGEM1 and miR‑148a that controls cell apoptosis. The present study, therefore, provides new insights into the mechanism of PCGEM1 function in prostate cancer development.

  16. Estimation of outer-middle ear transmission using DPOAEs and fractional-order modeling of human middle ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghibolhosseini, Maryam

    Our ability to hear depends primarily on sound waves traveling through the outer and middle ear toward the inner ear. Hence, the characteristics of the outer and middle ear affect sound transmission to/from the inner ear. The role of the middle and outer ear in sound transmission is particularly important for otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), which are sound signals generated in a healthy cochlea, and recorded by a sensitive microphone placed in the ear canal. OAEs are used to evaluate the health and function of the cochlea; however, they are also affected by outer and middle ear characteristics. To better assess cochlear health using OAEs, it is critical to quantify the impact of the outer and middle ear on sound transmission. The reported research introduces a noninvasive approach to estimate outer-middle ear transmission using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). In addition, the role of the outer and middle ear on sound transmission was investigated by developing a physical/mathematical model, which employed fractional-order lumped elements to include the viscoelastic characteristics of biological tissues. Impedance estimations from wideband refectance measurements were used for parameter fitting of the model. The model was validated comparing its estimates of the outer-middle ear sound transmission with those given by DPOAEs. The outer-middle ear transmission by the model was defined as the sum of forward and reverse outer-middle ear transmissions. To estimate the reverse transmission by the model, the probe-microphone impedance was calculated through estimating the Thevenin-equivalent circuit of the probe-microphone. The Thevenin-equivalent circuit was calculated using measurements in a number of test cavities. Such modeling enhances our understanding of the roles of different parts of the outer and middle ear and how they work together to determine their function. In addition, the model would be potentially helpful in diagnosing pathologies of

  17. Structures that Contribute to Middle-Ear Admittance in Chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Rosowski, John J.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Songer, Jocelyn E.

    2009-01-01

    We describe measurements of middle-ear input admittance in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) before and after various manipulations that define the contributions of different middle-ear components to function. The chinchilla’s middle-ear air spaces have a large effect on the low-frequency compliance of the middle ear, and removing the influences of these spaces reveals a highly admittant tympanic membrane and ossicular chain. Measurements of the admittance of the air spaces reveal that the high-degree of segmentation of these spaces has only a small effect on the admittance. Draining the cochlea further increases the middle-ear admittance at low frequencies and removes a low-frequency (less than 300 Hz) level dependence in the admittance. Spontaneous or sound-driven contractions of the middle-ear muscles in deeply anesthetized animals were associated with significant changes in middle-ear admittance. PMID:16944166

  18. Pneumatic low-coherence interferometry otoscope to quantify tympanic membrane mobility and middle ear pressure.

    PubMed

    Won, Jungeun; Monroy, Guillermo L; Huang, Pin-Chieh; Dsouza, Roshan; Hill, Malcolm C; Novak, Michael A; Porter, Ryan G; Chaney, Eric; Barkalifa, Ronit; Boppart, Stephen A

    2018-02-01

    Pneumatic otoscopy to assess the mobility of the tympanic membrane (TM) is a highly recommended diagnostic method of otitis media (OM), a widespread middle ear infection characterized by the fluid accumulation in the middle ear. Nonetheless, limited depth perception and subjective interpretation of small TM displacements have challenged the appropriate and efficient examination of TM dynamics experienced during OM. In this paper, a pneumatic otoscope integrated with low coherence interferometry (LCI) was adapted with a controlled pressure-generating system to record the pneumatic response of the TM and to estimate middle ear pressure (MEP). Forty-two ears diagnosed as normal (n = 25), with OM (n = 10), or associated with an upper respiratory infection (URI) (n = 7) were imaged with a pneumatic LCI otoscope with an axial, transverse, and temporal resolution of 6 µm, 20 µm, and 1 msec, respectively. The TM displacement under pneumatic pressure transients (a duration of 0.5 sec with an intensity of ± 150 daPa) was measured to compute two metrics (compliance and amplitude ratio). These metrics were correlated with peak acoustic admittance and MEP from tympanometry and statistically compared via Welch's t- test. As a result, the compliance represents pneumatic TM mobility, and the amplitude ratio estimates MEP. The presence of a middle ear effusion (MEE) significantly decreased compliance (p<0.001). The amplitude ratio of the OM group was statistically less than that of the normal group (p<0.01), indicating positive MEP. Unlike tympanometry, pneumatic LCI otoscopy quantifies TM mobility as well as MEP regardless of MEE presence. With combined benefits of pneumatic otoscopy and tympanometry, pneumatic LCI otoscopy may provide new quantitative metrics for understanding TM dynamics and diagnosing OM.

  19. Pneumatic low-coherence interferometry otoscope to quantify tympanic membrane mobility and middle ear pressure

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jungeun; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Huang, Pin-Chieh; Dsouza, Roshan; Hill, Malcolm C.; Novak, Michael A.; Porter, Ryan G.; Chaney, Eric; Barkalifa, Ronit; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2018-01-01

    Pneumatic otoscopy to assess the mobility of the tympanic membrane (TM) is a highly recommended diagnostic method of otitis media (OM), a widespread middle ear infection characterized by the fluid accumulation in the middle ear. Nonetheless, limited depth perception and subjective interpretation of small TM displacements have challenged the appropriate and efficient examination of TM dynamics experienced during OM. In this paper, a pneumatic otoscope integrated with low coherence interferometry (LCI) was adapted with a controlled pressure-generating system to record the pneumatic response of the TM and to estimate middle ear pressure (MEP). Forty-two ears diagnosed as normal (n = 25), with OM (n = 10), or associated with an upper respiratory infection (URI) (n = 7) were imaged with a pneumatic LCI otoscope with an axial, transverse, and temporal resolution of 6 µm, 20 µm, and 1 msec, respectively. The TM displacement under pneumatic pressure transients (a duration of 0.5 sec with an intensity of ± 150 daPa) was measured to compute two metrics (compliance and amplitude ratio). These metrics were correlated with peak acoustic admittance and MEP from tympanometry and statistically compared via Welch’s t-test. As a result, the compliance represents pneumatic TM mobility, and the amplitude ratio estimates MEP. The presence of a middle ear effusion (MEE) significantly decreased compliance (p<0.001). The amplitude ratio of the OM group was statistically less than that of the normal group (p<0.01), indicating positive MEP. Unlike tympanometry, pneumatic LCI otoscopy quantifies TM mobility as well as MEP regardless of MEE presence. With combined benefits of pneumatic otoscopy and tympanometry, pneumatic LCI otoscopy may provide new quantitative metrics for understanding TM dynamics and diagnosing OM. PMID:29552381

  20. Impact of Staphylococcus epidermidis lysates on middle ear epithelial proinflammatory and mucogenic response.

    PubMed

    Val, Stéphanie; Mubeen, Humaira; Tomney, Amarel; Chen, Saisai; Preciado, Diego

    2015-02-01

    Chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) develops after sustained inflammation and is characterized by secretory middle ear epithelial metaplasia and effusion, most frequently mucoid. Staphylococcus epidermidis, typically considered a commensal organism, is very frequently recovered in chronic middle ear fluid and in middle ear biofilms. Although it has been shown to drive inflammation in sinonasal epithelium, the impact of S. epidermidis on COME is markedly understudied. The goal of this study was to examine the in vitro effects of S. epidermidis lysates on murine and human middle ear epithelial cells. Staphylococcus epidermidis lysates were generated and used to stimulate submerged and differentiated human and murine epithelial cells (MEECs) for 24 to 48 hours. Quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunocytochemistry techniques were performed to interrogate the mucin gene MUC5AC and MUC5B expression and protein production, chemokine response, as well as NF-κB activation. Luciferase reporter assays were performed to further evaluate nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation and query specific promoter responses after S. epidermidis exposure. Staphylococcus epidermidis induced a time- and dose-dependent MUC5AC and MUC5B overexpression along with a parallel overexpression of Cxcl2 in mouse MEEC and IL-8 in human MEEC. Further investigations in mMEEC showed a 1.3 to 1.5 induction of the MUC5AC and MUC5B promoters. As potential mechanisms for these responses, induction of an oxidative stress marker, along with early nuclear translocation and activation of NF-κB, was found. Finally, chronic exposure induced marked epithelial thickening of cells differentiated at the air liquid interface. Staphylococcus epidermidis lysates activate a proinflammatory response in MEEC, including mucin gene expression and protein production. Although typically considered a nonpathogenic commensal organism in the ear, these

  1. Management of prominent ears: personal approach.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Macias, José Manuel

    2008-03-01

    Various methods for correcting prominent ears have been reported. Although anterior cartilage antihelix abrasion combined with posterior retention sutures is a conventional procedure, it does not include anterior conchal cartilage abrasion and thus allows easier reduction of the condromastoid angle. A simple and effective technique is described that involves using a rasp to score the whole anterior surface of the auricular cartilage, including the concha, in combination with Mustarde-type conchal-antihelical and conchal-mastoid retention sutures. This method was applied to 342 patients (675 ears) over 23 years, who were followed up for periods varying from 18 to 24 months. Good results were obtained for all patients with minimal complications.

  2. A rare case of petrified ear.

    PubMed

    Buikema, Kathryn E; Adams, Erin G

    2012-01-01

    Calcification or ossification of the auricle, also referred to as petrified ear, is a rare diagnosis in dermatology. In medical literature, it has most often been attributed to trauma, hypothermia and frostbite, or hypercalcemia secondary to a metabolic or endocrine disorder, such as Addison's disease. Here, we report the clinical and radiologic findings of a 79-year-old African American male whose unilateral petrified auricle was an incidental finding. He had a preceding history of hyperparathyroidism and subsequent hypercalcemia treated with a subtotal parathyroidectomy three years prior to presentation. In addition to laboratory analysis, a history and physical examination was performed which revealed no other signs of hypercalcemia. Radiologic studies demonstrated partial ossification of the external auricular cartilage on the left side. The patient was diagnosed with the rare occurrence of a petrified ear. In light of this case, we provide a discussion concerning the possible etiologies of this diagnosis including appropriate patient evaluation and possible treatment recommendations.

  3. A Rare Case of Petrified Ear

    PubMed Central

    Buikema, Kathryn E.; Adams, Erin G.

    2012-01-01

    Calcification or ossification of the auricle, also referred to as petrified ear, is a rare diagnosis in dermatology. In medical literature, it has most often been attributed to trauma, hypothermia and frostbite, or hypercalcemia secondary to a metabolic or endocrine disorder, such as Addison's disease. Here, we report the clinical and radiologic findings of a 79-year-old African American male whose unilateral petrified auricle was an incidental finding. He had a preceding history of hyperparathyroidism and subsequent hypercalcemia treated with a subtotal parathyroidectomy three years prior to presentation. In addition to laboratory analysis, a history and physical examination was performed which revealed no other signs of hypercalcemia. Radiologic studies demonstrated partial ossification of the external auricular cartilage on the left side. The patient was diagnosed with the rare occurrence of a petrified ear. In light of this case, we provide a discussion concerning the possible etiologies of this diagnosis including appropriate patient evaluation and possible treatment recommendations. PMID:23259082

  4. Ewing Sarcoma of the External Ear Canal

    PubMed Central

    Kecelioglu Binnetoglu, Kiymet; Gerin, Fatma; Sari, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ewing sarcoma (ES) is a high-grade malignant tumor that has skeletal and extraskeletal forms and consists of small round cells. In the head and neck region, reported localization of extraskeletal ES includes the larynx, thyroid gland, submandibular gland, nasal fossa, pharynx, skin, and parotid gland, but not the external ear canal. Methods. We present the unique case of a 2-year-old boy with extraskeletal ES arising from the external ear canal, mimicking auricular hematoma. Results. Surgery was performed and a VAC/IE (vincristine, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide alternating with ifosfamide, and etoposide) regimen was used for adjuvant chemotherapy for 12 months. Conclusion. The clinician should consider extraskeletal ES when diagnosing tumors localized in the head and neck region because it may be manifested by a nonspecific clinical picture mimicking common otorhinolaryngologic disorders. PMID:27313930

  5. Long-term evaluation of the effect of middle ear effusion on the vestibular system in children.

    PubMed

    Pazdro-Zastawny, Katarzyna; Pośpiech, Lucyna; Zatoński, Tomasz

    2018-06-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is one of the most common clinical conditions in childhood. Fluid accumulation in the middle ear may impact inner ear. The purpose of this random sample cohort study was to investigate whether the past history of middle ear effusion has a long-term negative impact on the vestibular system in children. The study was carried out on 22 children aged 7-15 years who had undergone drainage of the middle ear 5 years before evaluation. The control group consisted of 29 healthy children aged 4-17 years. Vestibular function was examined using sway posturography and electronystagmography (ENG). The stabilogram parameters of the study group and the control group were compared. The field of developed area (FDA) and the average body sway velocity (ASV) were analyzed. Elevated stabilogram parameters of FDA and ASV, both with eyes open and eyes closed, were found in the study group. Statistically significant values (p < 0.05) were present for ASV with eyes open and with eyes closed. The ENG recordings were analyzed in both groups. In the study group, spontaneous nystagmus was observed in 40.9% of the children and positional nystagmus occurred in 63.6% of the children. According to tests, eye tracking test was impaired in 27.3% of cases. Rotatory chair testing revealed asymmetry in 18.2% of the children. The presence of effusion in the middle ear in the past has a negative impact on the vestibular part of the inner ear. Clinicians should be aware of the possible negative impact of middle ear effusion on the vestibular function in children with a history of otitis media with effusion. With seeimingly asymptomatic children clinicians should inquire parents about symptoms of dysequlibrium and imbalance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Preoperative CT Scan in middle ear cholesteatoma].

    PubMed

    Sethom, Anissa; Akkari, Khemaies; Dridi, Inès; Tmimi, S; Mardassi, Ali; Benzarti, Sonia; Miled, Imed; Chebbi, Mohamed Kamel

    2011-03-01

    To compare preoperative CT scan finding and per-operative lesions in patients operated for middle ear cholesteatoma, A retrospective study including 60 patients with cholesteatoma otitis diagnosed and treated within a period of 5 years, from 2001 to 2005, at ENT department of Military Hospital of Tunis. All patients had computed tomography of the middle and inner ear. High resolution CT scan imaging was performed using millimetric incidences (3 to 5 millimetres). All patients had surgical removal of their cholesteatoma using down wall technic. We evaluated sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of CT-scan comparing otitic damages and CT finding, in order to examine the real contribution of computed tomography in cholesteatoma otitis. CT scan analysis of middle ear bone structures shows satisfaction (with 83% of sensibility). The rate of sensibility decrease (63%) for the tympanic raff. Predictive value of CT scan for the diagnosis of cholesteatoma was low. However, we have noticed an excellent sensibility in the analysis of ossicular damages (90%). Comparative frontal incidence seems to be less sensible for the detection of facial nerve lesions (42%). But when evident on CT scan findings, lesions of facial nerve were usually observed preoperatively (spécificity 78%). Predictive value of computed tomography for the diagnosis of perilymphatic fistulae (FL) was low. In fact, CT scan imaging have showed FL only for four patients among eight. Best results can be obtained if using inframillimetric incidences with performed high resolution computed tomography. Preoperative computed tomography is necessary for the diagnosis and the evaluation of chronic middle ear cholesteatoma in order to show extending lesion and to detect complications. This CT analysis and surgical correlation have showed that sensibility, specificity and predictive value of CT-scan depend on the anatomic structure implicated in cholesteatoma damages.

  7. Structural Metadata Research in the Ears Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    detecting structural information in the word stream (the so-called “structural MDE” portion of the EARS program); other MDE efforts on speaker ... diarization are overviewed in [13]. The rest of this paper is organized as follows. We describe the structural MDE tasks, performance measurement, and corpora...tems have only recently been introduced, with NIST reporting re- sults with the Wilcoxon signed rank test for speaker -level average score differences

  8. Theory of forward and reverse middle-ear transmission applied to otoacoustic emissions in infant and adult ears

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.; Abdala, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand why otoacoustic emission (OAE) levels are higher in normal-hearing human infants relative to adults. In a previous study, distortion product (DP) OAE input/output (I/O) functions were shown to differ at f2=6 kHz in adults compared to infants through 6 months of age. These DPOAE I/O functions were used to noninvasively assess immaturities in forward/reverse transmission through the ear canal and middle ear [Abdala, C., and Keefe, D. H., (2006). J. Acoust Soc. Am. 120, 3832–3842]. In the present study, ear-canal reflectance and DPOAEs measured in the same ears were analyzed using a scattering-matrix model of forward and reverse transmission in the ear canal, middle ear, and cochlea. Reflectance measurements were sensitive to frequency-dependent effects of ear-canal and middle-ear transmission that differed across OAE type and subject age. Results indicated that DPOAE levels were larger in infants mainly because the reverse middle-ear transmittance level varied with ear-canal area, which differed by more than a factor of 7 between term infants and adults. The forward middle-ear transmittance level was −16 dB less in infants, so that the conductive efficiency was poorer in infants than adults. PMID:17348521

  9. Ear recognition from one sample per person.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Mu, Zhichun; Zhang, Baoqing; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Biometrics has the advantages of efficiency and convenience in identity authentication. As one of the most promising biometric-based methods, ear recognition has received broad attention and research. Previous studies have achieved remarkable performance with multiple samples per person (MSPP) in the gallery. However, most conventional methods are insufficient when there is only one sample per person (OSPP) available in the gallery. To solve the OSPP problem by maximizing the use of a single sample, this paper proposes a hybrid multi-keypoint descriptor sparse representation-based classification (MKD-SRC) ear recognition approach based on 2D and 3D information. Because most 3D sensors capture 3D data accessorizing the corresponding 2D data, it is sensible to use both types of information. First, the ear region is extracted from the profile. Second, keypoints are detected and described for both the 2D texture image and 3D range image. Then, the hybrid MKD-SRC algorithm is used to complete the recognition with only OSPP in the gallery. Experimental results on a benchmark dataset have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method in resolving the OSPP problem. A Rank-one recognition rate of 96.4% is achieved for a gallery of 415 subjects, and the time involved in the computation is satisfactory compared to conventional methods.

  10. Why Do Elephants Flap Their Ears?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Moise; Jiji, Latif; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2009-11-01

    It is estimated that a 4200 kg elephant generates as much as 5.12 kW of heat. How the elephant dissipates its metabolic heat and regulates its body temperature has been investigated during the past seven decades. Findings and conclusions differ sharply. The high rate of metabolic heat coupled with low surface area to volume ratio and the absence of sweat glands eliminate surface convection as the primary mechanism for heat removal. Noting that the elephant ears have high surface area to volume ratio and an extensive vascular network, ear flapping is thought to be the principal thermoregulatory mechanism. A computational and experimental program is carried out to examine flow and heat transfer characteristics. The ear is modeled as a uniformly heated oscillating rectangular plate. Our computational work involves a three-dimensional time dependent CFD code with heat transfer capabilities to obtain predictions of the flow field and surface temperature distributions. This information was used to design an experimental setup with a uniformly heated plate of size 0.2m x 0.3m oscillating at 1.6 cycles per second. Results show that surface temperature increases and reaches a steady periodic oscillation after a period of transient oscillation. The role of the vortices shed off the plate in heat transfer enhancement will be discussed.

  11. Pathology of ear hematomas in swine.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Richard; Hélie, Pierre; D'Allaire, Sylvie

    2016-05-01

    The objectives of our study were to describe the pathology of ear hematomas in swine and to add to the comprehension of the pathogenesis of this condition. The pathogenesis of aural hematomas has been studied mainly in dogs; however, disagreements exist about the precise anatomic location of the hemorrhage. Sixteen pigs with ear hematoma at various stages of development were included in this study. The pigs were submitted for routine autopsy for various and unrelated reasons over a period of several years. Based on gross examination, the 16 cases of aural hematomas were subjectively classified as acute (n = 6), subacute (n = 3), and chronic (n = 7). The age of the animals at the time of autopsy ranged from 2 weeks to adulthood, with all acute cases being <7 weeks of age. Morphologic examination of all acute cases revealed that the hematoma developed predominantly in a subperichondral location on both sides of the cartilaginous plate simultaneously. Within these same cases, there were also some areas in which blood-filled clefts had formed within the cartilage itself. Besides fibroplasia, neoformation of cartilage was found to represent a significant part of the repair process. All chronic cases were characterized on cross-section of the ear by the presence of at least 2 distinct, wavy, focally folded, and roughly parallel plates of cartilage separated from each other by fibrous tissue. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. An investigation of ear necrosis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeonghwa; Friendship, Robert M; Poljak, Zvonimir; DeLay, Josepha; Slavic, Durda; Dewey, Catherine E

    2013-05-01

    Porcine ear necrosis was investigated in 23 conveniently chosen farms, consisting of 14 case farms and 9 control farms. Biopsies of lesions and oral swabs from pigs on 11 case farms were examined by histology and bacterial culture. All farms were visited for observations and a survey on management, housing, and the presence of other clinical signs or behavioral vices. Histological examination revealed that the lesions began on the surface and progressed to deeper layers, and that vascular damage did not appear to be the initiating cause. Spirochetes were only rarely observed in histological examination and were not cultured from biopsies and oral swabs. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus hyicus were cultured from 91% and 66% of samples, respectively. Ear biting and a humid environment were associated with ear necrosis. On some farms large numbers of pigs were affected and lesions were sometimes extensive. The condition appears to be an infectious disease beginning on the surface of the skin; contributing environmental and management factors are likely.

  13. An investigation of ear necrosis in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeonghwa; Friendship, Robert M.; Poljak, Zvonimir; DeLay, Josepha; Slavic, Durda; Dewey, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    Porcine ear necrosis was investigated in 23 conveniently chosen farms, consisting of 14 case farms and 9 control farms. Biopsies of lesions and oral swabs from pigs on 11 case farms were examined by histology and bacterial culture. All farms were visited for observations and a survey on management, housing, and the presence of other clinical signs or behavioral vices. Histological examination revealed that the lesions began on the surface and progressed to deeper layers, and that vascular damage did not appear to be the initiating cause. Spirochetes were only rarely observed in histological examination and were not cultured from biopsies and oral swabs. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus hyicus were cultured from 91% and 66% of samples, respectively. Ear biting and a humid environment were associated with ear necrosis. On some farms large numbers of pigs were affected and lesions were sometimes extensive. The condition appears to be an infectious disease beginning on the surface of the skin; contributing environmental and management factors are likely. PMID:24155434

  14. Pressure equilibration in the penguin middle ear.

    PubMed

    Sadé, Jacob; Handrich, Yves; Bernheim, Joelle; Cohen, David

    2008-01-01

    King penguins have a venous structure in the form of a corpus cavernosum (CC) in their middle ear (ME) submucosa. The CC may be viewed as a special organelle that can change ME volume for pressure equilibration during deep-sea diving it is a pressure regulating organelle (PRO). A similar CC and muscles also surround the external ear (EE) and may constrict it, isolating the tympanic membrane from the outside. A CC was previously found also in the ME of marine diving mammals and can be expected to exist in other deep diving animals, such as marine turtles. Marine animals require equalization of middle ear (ME) pressure when diving hundreds or thousands of meters to catch prey. We investigated what mechanism enables king penguins to protect their ME when they dive to great depths. Biopsies and serial sections of the ME and the EE of the deep diving king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) were examined microscopically. It was demonstrated that the penguin ME has an extensive network of small and large submucosal venous sinuses. This venous formation, a corpus cavernosum, can expand and potentially 'flood' the ME almost completely on diving, thus elevating ME pressure and reducing the ME space. The EE has a similar protective mechanism.

  15. Predicting skin deficits through surface area measurements in ear reconstruction and adult ear surface area norms.

    PubMed

    Yazar, Memet; Sevim, Kamuran Zeynep; Irmak, Fatih; Yazar, Sevgi Kurt; Yeşilada, Ayşin Karasoy; Karşidağğ, Semra Hacikerim; Tatlidede, Hamit Soner

    2013-07-01

    Ear reconstruction is one of the most challenging procedures in plastic surgery practice. Many studies and techniques have been described in the literature for carving a well-pronounced framework. However, just as important as the cartilage framework is the ample amount of delicate skin coverage of the framework. In this report, we introduce an innovative method of measuring the skin surface area of the auricle from a three-dimensional template created from the healthy ear.The study group consisted of 60 adult Turkish individuals who were randomly selected (30 men and 30 women). The participant ages ranged from 18 to 45 years (mean, 31.5 years), and they had no history of trauma or congenital anomalies. The template is created by dividing the ear into aesthetic subunits and using ImageJ software to estimate the necessary amount of total skin surface area required.Reconstruction of the auricle is a complicated process that requires experience and patience to provide the auricular details. We believe this estimate will shorten the learning curve for residents and surgeons interested in ear reconstruction and will help surgeons obtain adequate skin to drape over the well-sculpted cartilage frameworks by providing a reference list of total ear skin surface area measurements for Turkish men and women.

  16. Middle-ear velocity transfer function, cochlear input immittance, and middle-ear efficiency in chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The transfer function HV between stapes velocity VS and sound pressure near the tympanic membrane PTM is a descriptor of sound transmission through the middle ear (ME). The ME power transmission efficiency (MEE), the ratio of sound power entering the cochlea to power entering the middle ear, was computed from HV measured in seven chinchilla ears and previously reported measurements of ME input admittance YTM and ME pressure gain GMEP [Ravicz and Rosowski, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2437–2454 (2012); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2208–2223 (2013)] in the same ears. The ME was open, and a pressure sensor was inserted into the cochlear vestibule for most measurements. The cochlear input admittance YC computed from HV and GMEP is controlled by a combination of mass and resistance and is consistent with a minimum-phase system up to 27 kHz. The real part Re{YC}, which relates cochlear sound power to inner-ear sound pressure, decreased gradually with frequency up to 25 kHz and more rapidly above that. MEE was about 0.5 between 0.1 and 8 kHz, higher than previous estimates in this species, and decreased sharply at higher frequencies. PMID:24116422

  17. Middle-ear velocity transfer function, cochlear input immittance, and middle-ear efficiency in chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Rosowski, John J

    2013-10-01

    The transfer function H(V) between stapes velocity V(S) and sound pressure near the tympanic membrane P(TM) is a descriptor of sound transmission through the middle ear (ME). The ME power transmission efficiency (MEE), the ratio of sound power entering the cochlea to power entering the middle ear, was computed from H(V) measured in seven chinchilla ears and previously reported measurements of ME input admittance Y(TM) and ME pressure gain G(MEP) [Ravicz and Rosowski, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2437-2454 (2012); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2208-2223 (2013)] in the same ears. The ME was open, and a pressure sensor was inserted into the cochlear vestibule for most measurements. The cochlear input admittance Y(C) computed from H(V) and G(MEP) is controlled by a combination of mass and resistance and is consistent with a minimum-phase system up to 27 kHz. The real part Re{Y(C)}, which relates cochlear sound power to inner-ear sound pressure, decreased gradually with frequency up to 25 kHz and more rapidly above that. MEE was about 0.5 between 0.1 and 8 kHz, higher than previous estimates in this species, and decreased sharply at higher frequencies.

  18. Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Salt, Alec N; Hullar, Timothy E

    2010-09-01

    Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence the function of the ear. The inner ear has elaborate mechanisms to attenuate low frequency sound components before they are transmitted to the brain. The auditory portion of the ear, the cochlea, has two types of sensory cells, inner hair cells (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC), of which the IHC are coupled to the afferent fibers that transmit "hearing" to the brain. The sensory stereocilia ("hairs") on the IHC are "fluid coupled" to mechanical stimuli, so their responses depend on stimulus velocity and their sensitivity decreases as sound frequency is lowered. In contrast, the OHC are directly coupled to mechanical stimuli, so their input remains greater than for IHC at low frequencies. At very low frequencies the OHC are stimulated by sounds at levels below those that are heard. Although the hair cells in other sensory structures such as the saccule may be tuned to infrasonic frequencies, auditory stimulus coupling to these structures is inefficient so that they are unlikely to be influenced by airborne infrasound. Structures that are involved in endolymph volume regulation are also known to be influenced by infrasound, but their sensitivity is also thought to be low. There are, however, abnormal states in which the ear becomes hypersensitive to infrasound. In most cases, the inner ear's responses to infrasound can be considered normal, but they could be associated with unfamiliar sensations or subtle changes in physiology. This raises the possibility that exposure to the

  19. Inner ear problems of Thai priest at Priest Hospital.

    PubMed

    Karnchanakas, Taweporn; Tantanavat, Are; Sinsakontavat, Jamjan

    2008-01-01

    The inner ear problems of Thai priest at Priest Hospital had never been reported previously, so Department of Ear Nose Throat try to correlate the metebotic disorder with inner ear problems. 1) To study the fasting blood sugar (FBS), total cholesterol (T. Chol), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglyceride (TG), the factors expected to involve in inner ear problems of priests at Priest Hospital. 2) To compare the FBS, T. Chol, HDL, LDL, and TG of priests with inner ear problems at Priest Hospital. 3) To find the percentage of abnormal from FBS, T. Chol, LDL, and TG. The study using 83 sampling of priests with inner ear problems and 107 priests as a controlled group. The research instruments used to collect data was the questionnaire which composed of general information, physical, ear-nose-throat and neurological examination, pure tone audiometry, brainstem evoke response audiometry (BERA) and the blood tests:FBS, T. Chol, TG, and LDL. The inner ear problems were composed of: 1) Dizziness 2) Hearing Loss 3) Tinnitus Aurium. The descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data from questionnaires and utilized frequency, percentage, standard deviation (S.D.) and t-test to achieve desired results. Priest at middle age and elderly with inner ear problems had greater FBS and TG than expected values of the control group. The middle age and elderly priests who had greater FBS and TG than expected values were sick with inner ear problems that causing dizziness, hearing loss and tinnitus aurium.

  20. Rhesus Cochlear and Vestibular Functions Are Preserved After Inner Ear Injection of Saline Volume Sufficient for Gene Therapy Delivery.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chenkai; Lehar, Mohamed; Sun, Daniel Q; Rvt, Lani Swarthout; Carey, John P; MacLachlan, Tim; Brough, Doug; Staecker, Hinrich; Della Santina, Alexandra M; Hullar, Timothy E; Della Santina, Charles C

    2017-08-01

    Sensorineural losses of hearing and vestibular sensation due to hair cell dysfunction are among the most common disabilities. Recent preclinical research demonstrates that treatment of the inner ear with a variety of compounds, including gene therapy agents, may elicit regeneration and/or repair of hair cells in animals exposed to ototoxic medications or other insults to the inner ear. Delivery of gene therapy may also offer a means for treatment of hereditary hearing loss. However, injection of a fluid volume sufficient to deliver an adequate dose of a pharmacologic agent could, in theory, cause inner ear trauma that compromises functional outcome. The primary goal of the present study was to assess that risk in rhesus monkeys, which closely approximates humans with regard to middle and inner ear anatomy. Secondary goals were to identify the best delivery route into the primate ear from among two common surgical approaches (i.e., via an oval window stapedotomy and via the round window) and to determine the relative volumes of rhesus, rodent, and human labyrinths for extrapolation of results to other species. We measured hearing and vestibular functions before and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after unilateral injection of phosphate-buffered saline vehicle (PBSV) into the perilymphatic space of normal rhesus monkeys at volumes sufficient to deliver an atoh1 gene therapy vector. To isolate effects of injection, PBSV without vector was used. Assays included behavioral observation, auditory brainstem responses, distortion product otoacoustic emissions, and scleral coil measurement of vestibulo-ocular reflexes during whole-body rotation in darkness. Three groups (N = 3 each) were studied. Group A received a 10 μL transmastoid/trans-stapes injection via a laser stapedotomy. Group B received a 10 μL transmastoid/trans-round window injection. Group C received a 30 μL transmastoid/trans-round window injection. We also measured inner ear fluid space volume via 3D

  1. Tn5253 family integrative and conjugative elements carrying mef(I) and catQ determinants in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Mingoia, Marina; Morici, Eleonora; Morroni, Gianluca; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Del Grosso, Maria; Pantosti, Annalisa; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2014-10-01

    The linkage between the macrolide efflux gene mef(I) and the chloramphenicol inactivation gene catQ was first described in Streptococcus pneumoniae (strain Spn529), where the two genes are located in a module designated IQ element. Subsequently, two different defective IQ elements were detected in Streptococcus pyogenes (strains Spy029 and Spy005). The genetic elements carrying the three IQ elements were characterized, and all were found to be Tn5253 family integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). The ICE from S. pneumoniae (ICESpn529IQ) was sequenced, whereas the ICEs from S. pyogenes (ICESpy029IQ and ICESpy005IQ, the first Tn5253-like ICEs reported in this species) were characterized by PCR mapping, partial sequencing, and restriction analysis. ICESpn529IQ and ICESpy029IQ were found to share the intSp 23FST81 integrase gene and an identical Tn916 fragment, whereas ICESpy005IQ has int5252 and lacks Tn916. All three ICEs were found to lack the linearized pC194 plasmid that is usually associated with Tn5253-like ICEs, and all displayed a single copy of a toxin-antitoxin operon that is typically contained in the direct repeats flanking the excisable pC194 region when this region is present. Two different insertion sites of the IQ elements were detected, one in ICESpn529IQ and ICESpy029IQ, and another in ICESpy005IQ. The chromosomal integration of the three ICEs was site specific, depending on the integrase (intSp 23FST81 or int5252). Only ICESpy005IQ was excised in circular form and transferred by conjugation. By transformation, mef(I) and catQ were cotransferred at a high frequency from S. pyogenes Spy005 and at very low frequencies from S. pneumoniae Spn529 and S. pyogenes Spy029. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Sheep as a large animal ear model: Middle-ear ossicular velocities and intracochlear sound pressure.

    PubMed

    Péus, Dominik; Dobrev, Ivo; Prochazka, Lukas; Thoele, Konrad; Dalbert, Adrian; Boss, Andreas; Newcomb, Nicolas; Probst, Rudolf; Röösli, Christof; Sim, Jae Hoon; Huber, Alexander; Pfiffner, Flurin

    2017-08-01

    Animals are frequently used for the development and testing of new hearing devices. Dimensions of the middle ear and cochlea differ significantly between humans and commonly used animals, such as rodents or cats. The sheep cochlea is anatomically more like the human cochlea in size and number of turns. This study investigated the middle-ear ossicular velocities and intracochlear sound pressure (ICSP) in sheep temporal bones, with the aim of characterizing the sheep as an experimental model for implantable hearing devices. Measurements were made on fresh sheep temporal bones. Velocity responses of the middle ear ossicles at the umbo, long process of the incus and stapes footplate were measured in the frequency range of 0.25-8 kHz using a laser Doppler vibrometer system. Results were normalized by the corresponding sound pressure level in the external ear canal (P EC ). Sequentially, ICSPs at the scala vestibuli and tympani were then recorded with custom MEMS-based hydrophones, while presenting identical acoustic stimuli. The sheep middle ear transmitted most effectively around 4.8 kHz, with a maximum stapes velocity of 0.2 mm/s/Pa. At the same frequency, the ICSP measurements in the scala vestibuli and tympani showed the maximum gain relative to the P EC (24 dB and 5 dB, respectively). The greatest pressure difference across the cochlear partition occurred between 4 and 6 kHz. A comparison between the results of this study and human reference data showed middle-ear resonance and best cochlear sensitivity at higher frequencies in sheep. In summary, sheep can be an appropriate large animal model for research and development of implantable hearing devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  4. Fluid Physics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-12

    These are video microscope images of magnetorheological (MR) fluids, illuminated with a green light. Those on Earth, left, show the MR fluid forming columns or spikes structures. On the right, the fluids in microgravity aboard the International Space Station (ISS), formed broader columns.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT FOR TREATMENT OF WASTEWATER GENERATED DURING DECONTAMINATION ACTIVITIES - ULTRASTRIP SYSTEMS, INC., MOBILE EMERGENCY FILTRATION SYSTEM (MEFS) - 04/14/WQPC-HS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Performance verification testing of the UltraStrip Systems, Inc., Mobile Emergency Filtration System (MEFS) was conducted under EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program at the EPA Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, during November, 2003, thr...

  6. Chinchilla middle-ear admittance and sound power: High-frequency estimates and effects of inner-ear modifications

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2012-01-01

    The middle-ear input admittance relates sound power into the middle ear (ME) and sound pressure at the tympanic membrane (TM). ME input admittance was measured in the chinchilla ear canal as part of a larger study of sound power transmission through the ME into the inner ear. The middle ear was open, and the inner ear was intact or modified with small sensors inserted into the vestibule near the cochlear base. A simple model of the chinchilla ear canal, based on ear canal sound pressure measurements at two points along the canal and an assumption of plane-wave propagation, enables reliable estimates of YTM, the ME input admittance at the TM, from the admittance measured relatively far from the TM. YTM appears valid at frequencies as high as 17 kHz, a much higher frequency than previously reported. The real part of YTM decreases with frequency above 2 kHz. Effects of the inner-ear sensors (necessary for inner ear power computation) were small and generally limited to frequencies below 3 kHz. Computed power reflectance was ∼0.1 below 3.5 kHz, lower than with an intact ME below 2.5 kHz, and nearly 1 above 16 kHz. PMID:23039439

  7. Substantial protection against MPTP-associated Parkinson's neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo by anti-cancer agent SU4312 via activation of MEF2D and inhibition of MAO-B.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baojian; Hu, Shengquan; Zheng, Chengyou; Wang, Hongyu; Luo, Fangcheng; Li, Haitao; Cui, Wei; Yang, Xifei; Cui, Guozhen; Mak, Shinghung; Choi, Tony Chung-Lit; Ma, Edmond Dik-Lung; Wang, Yuqiang; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen; Zhang, Zaijun; Han, Yifan

    2017-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated the unexpected neuroprotection of the anti-cancer agent SU4312 in cellular models associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the precise mechanisms underlying its neuroprotection are still unknown, and the effects of SU4312 on rodent models of PD have not been characterized. In the current study, we found that the protection of SU4312 against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP + )-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells was achieved through the activation of transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), as evidenced by the fact that SU4312 stimulated myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcriptional activity and prevented the inhibition of MEF2D protein expression caused by MPP + , and that short hairpin RNA (ShRNA)-mediated knockdown of MEF2D significantly abolished the neuroprotection of SU4312. Additionally, Western blotting analysis revealed that SU4312 potentiated pro-survival PI3-K/Akt pathway to down-regulate MEF2D inhibitor glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3β). Furthermore, using the in vivo PD model of C57BL/6 mice insulted with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), we found that intragastrical administration of SU4312 (0.2 and 1 mg/kg) greatly ameliorated Parkinsonian motor defects, and restored protein levels of MEF2D, phosphorylated-Ser473-Akt and phosphorylated-Ser9-GSK3β. Meanwhile, SU4312 effectively reversed the decrease in protein expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons, inhibited oxidative stress, maintained mitochondrial biogenesis and partially prevented the depletion of dopamine and its metabolites. Very encouragingly, SU4312 was able to selectively inhibit monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) activity both in vitro and in vivo, with an IC 50 value of 0.2 μM. These findings suggest that SU4312 provides therapeutic benefits in cellular and animal models of PD, possibly through multiple mechanisms including enhancement of MEF2D

  8. Analysis of SOST expression using large minigenes reveals the MEF2C binding site in the evolutionarily conserved region (ECR5) enhancer mediates forskolin, but not 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 or TGFβ1 responsiveness.

    PubMed

    St John, Hillary C; Hansen, Sydney J; Pike, J Wesley

    2016-11-01

    Transcribed from the SOST gene, sclerostin is an osteocyte-derived negative regulator of bone formation that inhibits osteoblastogenesis via antagonism of the Wnt pathway. Sclerostin is a promising therapeutic target for low bone mass diseases and neutralizing antibody therapies that target sclerostin are in development. Diverse stimuli regulate SOST including the vitamin D hormone, forskolin (Fsk), bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2), oncostatin M (OSM), dexamethasone (Dex), and transforming growth factor (TGFβ 1 ). To explore the mechanisms by which these compounds regulate SOST expression, we examined their ability to regulate a SOST reporter minigene containing the entire SOST locus including the downstream regionor mutant minigenes containing a deletion of the -1kb to -2kb promoter proximal region (-1kb), ECR2, ECR5, or two point mutations in the MEF2 binding site of ECR5 (ECR5/MEF2). Previous reports suggest that both the PTH and TGFβ 1 effects on SOST are mediated through ECR5 and that the action of PTH is mediated specifically via the MEF2 binding site at ECR5. Consistent with these reports, the suppressive effects of Fsk were abrogated following both ECR5 deletion and ECR5/MEF2 mutation. In contrast, we found that TGFβ 1 negatively regulated SOST and that neither ECR5 nor ECR5/MEF2 was involved. Surprisingly, none of these four deletions/mutations abrogated the suppressive effects of the vitamin D hormone, OSM, Dex, or TGFβ 1 , or the positive effects of BMP-2. These data suggest that we need to move beyond ECR5 to understand SOST regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optoacoustic induced vibrations within the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K Y; Wenzel, G I; Balster, S; Lim, H H; Lubatschowski, H; Lenarz, T; Ertmer, W; Reuter, G

    2009-12-07

    An acoustic transient can be generated inside an absorbing tissue as a result of laser-tissue interaction after pulsed laser irradiation. Herein we report a novel application of this physical process, the optoacoustic wave generation in the inner ear and subsequently the induction of basilar membrane vibrations. These laser induced vibrations show a direct correlation to the laser energy and an indirect correlation to the distance from the irradiation focus. Through these characteristics they may be used, in a new generation of cochlear implants, to improve the frequency specific cochlear activation and consequently improve speech perception in hearing impaired patients with residual hearing.

  10. The velocity field of growing ear cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R W; Peacock, M A

    1978-01-01

    The velocity vector field of the growing rabbit ear cartilage has been investigated between 12 and 299 days. Empirical curves have been computed for path lines and for velocities between 12 and 87 days. The tissue movement has been found to behave as an irrotational flow of material. Stream lines and velocity equipotential lines have been calculated and provide akinematic description of the changes during growth. The importance of a knowledge of the velocity vector in physical descriptions of growth and morphological differentiation at the tissue and cellular levels is emphasized. PMID:689993

  11. Vitamin D receptor deficiency impairs inner ear development in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hye-Joo; Biology Department, Princess Nourah University, Riyadh 11671

    The biological actions of vitamin D are largely mediated through binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, which regulates gene expression in a wide variety of tissues and cells. Mutations in VDR gene have been implicated in ear disorders (hearing loss and balance disorder) but the mechanisms are not well established. In this study, to investigate the role of VDR in inner ear development, morpholino-mediated gene knockdown approaches were used in zebrafish model system. Two paralogs for VDR, vdra and vdrb, have been identified in zebrafish. Knockdown of vdra had no effectmore » on ear development, whereas knockdown of vdrb displayed morphological ear defects including smaller otic vesicles with malformed semicircular canals and abnormal otoliths. Loss-of-vdrb resulted in down-regulation of pre-otic markers, pax8 and pax2a, indicating impairment of otic induction. Furthermore, zebrafish embryos lacking vdrb produced fewer sensory hair cells in the ears and showed disruption of balance and motor coordination. These data reveal that VDR signaling plays an important role in ear development. - Highlights: • VDR signaling is involved in ear development. • Knockdown of vdrb causes inner ear malformations during embryogenesis. • Knockdown of vdrb affects otic placode induction. • Knockdown of vdrb reduces the number of sensory hair cells in the inner ear. • Knockdown of vdrb disrupts balance and motor coordination.« less

  12. Piercing the upper ear: a simple infection, a difficult reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cicchetti, S; Skillman, J; Gault, D T

    2002-04-01

    Piercing the upper ear to retain jewellery is now commonplace. When infection ensues, devastating chondritis leads to collapse of the ear. To our knowledge, the surgical reconstruction of post-piercing deformities has not been documented in the literature. We present five such cases referred for autogenous-tissue ear reconstruction. In four of these, the destroyed segments of ear cartilage were replaced with a carved costal-cartilage framework. One patient declined surgery. The importance of preventing infection is stressed. Copyright 2002 The British Association of Plastic Surgeons.

  13. Fly-ear inspired acoustic sensors for gunshot localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haijun; Currano, Luke; Gee, Danny; Yang, Benjamin; Yu, Miao

    2009-05-01

    The supersensitive ears of the parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea have inspired researchers to develop bio-inspired directional microphone for sound localization. Although the fly ear is optimized for localizing the narrow-band calling song of crickets at 5 kHz, experiments and simulation have shown that it can amplify directional cues for a wide frequency range. In this article, a theoretical investigation is presented to study the use of fly-ear inspired directional microphones for gunshot localization. Using an equivalent 2-DOF model of the fly ear, the time responses of the fly ear structure to a typical shock wave are obtained and the associated time delay is estimated by using cross-correlation. Both near-field and far-field scenarios are considered. The simulation shows that the fly ear can greatly amplify the time delay by ~20 times, which indicates that with an interaural distance of only 1.2 mm the fly ear is able to generate a time delay comparable to that obtained by a conventional microphone pair with a separation as large as 24 mm. Since the parameters of the fly ear structure can also be tuned for muzzle blast and other impulse stimulus, fly-ear inspired acoustic sensors offers great potential for developing portable gunshot localization systems.

  14. Correction of Stahl ear deformity using a suture technique.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Adil Abbas; Jose, Rajive M; Ali, Syed Nadir; Yap, Lok Huei

    2010-09-01

    Correction of partial ear deformities can be a challenging task for the plastic surgeon. There are no standard techniques for correcting many of these deformities, and several different techniques are described in literature. Stahl ear is one such anomaly, characterized by an accessory third crus in the ear cartilage, giving rise to an irregular helical rim. The conventional techniques of correcting this deformity include either excision of the cartilage, repositioning of the cartilage, or scoring techniques. We recently encountered a case of Stahl ear deformity and undertook correction using internal sutures with very good results. The technical details of the surgery are described along with a review of literature on correcting similar anomalies.

  15. Incorporating anthropometry into design of ear-related products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bor-Shong

    2008-01-01

    To achieve mass customization and collaborative product design, human factors and ergonomics should play a key development role. The purpose of this study was to provide product designers with the anthropometic dimensions of outer ears for different demographic data, including gender and age. The second purpose was to compare the dimensions of various ear-related products (i.e., earphone, bluetooth earphone and ear-cup earphone) with the anthropometic database and recommend appropriate solutions for design. Two hundred subjects aged 20-59 was selected for this study and divided into four age stratifications. Further, three different dimensions of the outer ear (i.e., the earhole length, the ear connection length and the length of the pinna) were measured by superimposed grid photographic technique. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to investigate the effects of gender, and age on ear dimensions. The results showed that all ear dimensions had significant gender effects. A comparison between the anthropometric dimensions and those of current products revealed that most current ear-related products need to be redesigned using anthropometric data. The shapes of earhole and pinna are not circular. Consequently, ear products need to be elongated so that users may feel more comfortably and not have the product slip off easily.

  16. Magnetically driven middle ear ossicles for optical measurement of vibrations in an ear with opened eardrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, John; Von Unge, Magnus; Dirckx, Joris

    2012-06-01

    Vibrations of the middle ear ossicles are easily measured by means of laser vibrometry. However, exposing the ossicles requires the removal of the eardrum, with the result that the ossicles can no longer be stimulated acoustically. To overcome this we devised a new set up in which the ossicles can be driven magnetically. After measuring the response of the eardrum to an acoustic signal, we then remove the eardrum and attach a small magnet to the exposed manubrium (the part of the first auditory ossicle, the malleus, which is normally attached to the eardrum). An electromagnetic excitation coil is then used to drive the magnet, and the output to the coil adjusted until the vibration of the manubrium, as measured by the vibrometer, matches that measured in response to the acoustic signal. Such a set-up has uses in research on middle ear mechanics, such as the measurement of non-linearities in their response, as well as applications in the diagnosis of middle ear conditions such as the fixation of the ossicles by otosclerosis, or in chronic otitis media. We describe our set up in which the vibrometer unit is attached to a surgical microscope, offering accurate positioning of the laser beam. We discuss the viability of our method and its future potential by presenting some measurements on artificially fixated ears.

  17. A new cochlear implant electrode with a "cork"-type stopper for inner ear malformations.

    PubMed

    Sennaroğlu, Levent; Atay, Gamze; Bajin, Münir Demir

    2014-08-01

    Gusher in inner ear malformations is common in patients with incomplete partition type I and type III. It is also common in less severe form as oozing in incomplete partition type II and large vestibular aqueduct. It is important to prevent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) escape around the electrode to prevent meningitis. The custom-made device was produced by Med-El Company. It has a "cork"-like stopper instead of the usual silicon ring to prevent gusher. There are two types of electrodes of different lengths. The standard one is 25mm (contact space 1.7mm) and the short one is 20mm (contact space 1.3mm). It was used in 50 patients with different inner ear malformations. Thirteen patients had gusher, and 11 patients oozing during cochleostomy. One patient with initial prototype of the cork electrode had to be revised because of persistent oozing around the electrode. Another patient had slow extrusion of the electrode most probably due to CSF pulsation and had to be revised. Both patients had no more CSF fistula. CSF fistula in inner ear malformations is a serious situation which may lead to recurrent meningitis. The new electrode with "cork" stopper looks promising in preventing the postoperative CSF leak around the electrode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Innate immune defense in the inner ear - mucines are expressed by the human endolymphatic sac.

    PubMed

    Møller, Martin N; Kirkeby, Svend; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2017-02-01

    The human endolymphatic sac has been shown recently to have immunological capacities and has thus been proposed as the main entity protecting the inner ear from pathogen invasion, equivalent to mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Although the sac expresses molecules of the innate immune system, the potential expression of members of the important mucin family has not been detailed. Thus, this paper explores endolymphatic sac expression of a number of mucins and mucin precursors. Twelve fresh tissue samples from the human endolymphatic sac were obtained during translabyrinthine surgery. The expression of Mucin 1, 2, 5B/AC and 16, as well as the core structure elements (mucin precursors) T-antigen, Tn-antigen and Sialyl-Tn-antigen was investigated by immunohistochemistry. The endolymphatic sac epithelium expressed MUC1 (both apically towards the endolymphatic sac (ES) lumen and basally towards the capillary network), MUC 16 and Tn-antigen. There was no labeling after incubation with antibodies against T-antigen, sialyl-Tn-antigen, MUC2 and MUC5B/AC. We conclude that the human endolymphatic sac epithelium expresses a number of mucin molecules, which supports the hypothesis of the sac as the primary immunological tissue structure of the inner ear, equivalent to MALT in other organs. The mucins may also play a role in the formation and continuous homeostasis of the inner ear fluids, as well as the pathogenesis of Meniere's disease. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  19. Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines

    PubMed Central

    Salt, Alec N.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence the function of the ear. The inner ear has elaborate mechanisms to attenuate low frequency sound components before they are transmitted to the brain. The auditory portion of the ear, the cochlea, has two types of sensory cells, inner hair cells (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC), of which the IHC are coupled to the afferent fibers that transmit “hearing” to the brain. The sensory stereocilia (“hairs”) on the IHC are “fluid coupled” to mechanical stimuli, so their responses depend on stimulus velocity and their sensitivity decreases as sound frequency is lowered. In contrast, the OHC are directly coupled to mechanical stimuli, so their input remains greater than for IHC at low frequencies. At very low frequencies the OHC are stimulated by sounds at levels below those that are heard. Although the hair cells in other sensory structures such as the saccule may be tuned to infrasonic frequencies, auditory stimulus coupling to these structures is inefficient so that they are unlikely to be influenced by airborne infrasound. Structures that are involved in endolymph volume regulation are also known to be influenced by infrasound, but their sensitivity is also thought to be low. There are, however, abnormal states in which the ear becomes hypersensitive to infrasound. In most cases, the inner ear’s responses to infrasound can be considered normal, but they could be associated with unfamiliar sensations or subtle changes in physiology. This raises the possibility that

  20. Wearable ear EEG for brain interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Eric D.; Walker, Nicholas; Danko, Amanda S.

    2017-02-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) measuring electrical activity via electroencephalogram (EEG) have evolved beyond clinical applications to become wireless consumer products. Typically marketed for meditation and neu- rotherapy, these devices are limited in scope and currently too obtrusive to be a ubiquitous wearable. Stemming from recent advancements made in hearing aid technology, wearables have been shrinking to the point that the necessary sensors, circuitry, and batteries can be fit into a small in-ear wearable device. In this work, an ear-EEG device is created with a novel system for artifact removal and signal interpretation. The small, compact, cost-effective, and discreet device is demonstrated against existing consumer electronics in this space for its signal quality, comfort, and usability. A custom mobile application is developed to process raw EEG from each device and display interpreted data to the user. Artifact removal and signal classification is accomplished via a combination of support matrix machines (SMMs) and soft thresholding of relevant statistical properties.

  1. Enhanced visualization of inner ear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Kucharski, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Bruzgielewicz, Antoni

    2004-07-01

    Recently surgery requires extensive support from imaging technologies in order to increase effectiveness and safety of operations. One of important tasks is to enhance visualisation of quasi-phase (transparent) 3d structures. Those structures are characterized by very low contrast. It makes differentiation of tissues in field of view very difficult. For that reason the surgeon may be extremly uncertain during operation. This problem is connected with supporting operations of inner ear during which physician has to perform cuts at specific places of quasi-transparent velums. Conventionally during such operations medical doctor views the operating field through stereoscopic microscope. In the paper we propose a 3D visualisation system based on Helmet Mounted Display. Two CCD cameras placed at the output of microscope perform acquisition of stereo pairs of images. The images are processed in real-time with the goal of enhancement of quasi-phased structures. The main task is to create algorithm that is not sensitive to changes in intensity distribution. The disadvantages of existing algorithms is their lack of adaptation to occuring reflexes and shadows in field of view. The processed images from both left and right channels are overlaid on the actual images exported and displayed at LCD's of Helmet Mounted Display. A physician observes by HMD (Helmet Mounted Display) a stereoscopic operating scene with indication of the places of special interest. The authors present the hardware ,procedures applied and initial results of inner ear structure visualisation. Several problems connected with processing of stereo-pair images are discussed.

  2. Probing the Xenopus laevis inner ear transcriptome for biological function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The senses of hearing and balance depend upon mechanoreception, a process that originates in the inner ear and shares features across species. Amphibians have been widely used for physiological studies of mechanotransduction by sensory hair cells. In contrast, much less is known of the genetic basis of auditory and vestibular function in this class of animals. Among amphibians, the genus Xenopus is a well-characterized genetic and developmental model that offers unique opportunities for inner ear research because of the amphibian capacity for tissue and organ regeneration. For these reasons, we implemented a functional genomics approach as a means to undertake a large-scale analysis of the Xenopus laevis inner ear transcriptome through microarray analysis. Results Microarray analysis uncovered genes within the X. laevis inner ear transcriptome associated with inner ear function and impairment in other organisms, thereby supporting the inclusion of Xenopus in cross-species genetic studies of the inner ear. The use of gene categories (inner ear tissue; deafness; ion channels; ion transporters; transcription factors) facilitated the assignment of functional significance to probe set identifiers. We enhanced the biological relevance of our microarray data by using a variety of curation approaches to increase the annotation of the Affymetrix GeneChip® Xenopus laevis Genome array. In addition, annotation analysis revealed the prevalence of inner ear transcripts represented by probe set identifiers that lack functional characterization. Conclusions We identified an abundance of targets for genetic analysis of auditory and vestibular function. The orthologues to human genes with known inner ear function and the highly expressed transcripts that lack annotation are particularly interesting candidates for future analyses. We used informatics approaches to impart biologically relevant information to the Xenopus inner ear transcriptome, thereby addressing the

  3. Cauliflower Ear and Skin Infections among Wrestlers in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Kordi, Ramin; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Nourian, Roh Allah; Wallace, W Angus

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the magnitude of the selected sports medicine problems (i.e. cauliflower ear and skin infections) among wrestlers in Tehran. A number of 411 wrestlers were randomly selected from wrestling clubs in Tehran employing cluster sample setting method. The participants were interviewed using a specially designed and validated questionnaire. Nearly half of the participants (44%) had "cauliflower ears". Only 23% of these participants had received any kind of treatment for their acute ear haematomas that are known to result in "cauliflower ears". The prevalence of reported hearing loss among participants with cauliflower ears (11.5%, 95%CI: 6.9 to 16.2) was significantly more than this prevalence among those participants without cauliflower ears (1.8%, 95%CI: 0.1 to 3.5) (p < 0.05). More than half of the participants (52%) had skin infection diagnosed by a physician during the previous year. This study has identified evidence of an increase in hearing loss as a possible side effect of either cauliflower ear or ear injury in wrestling in Iran. There has been an outbreak of ringworm and there is a significant potential for an outbreak of impetigo among wrestlers in Tehran. Key pointsSkin infections are prevalent among wrestlers in Tehran.Commonly wrestlers in Tehran continue to carry out wrestling training while affected by skin infections.Cauliflower ear "is common among wrestlers in Tehran.More research is needed to investigate hearing loss as a possible side effect of either cauliflower ear or ear injury in wrestling in Iran.

  4. Measurements of Human Middle- and Inner-Ear Mechanics With Dehiscence of the Superior Semicircular Canal

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wade; Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.; Merchant, Saumil N.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives (1) To develop a cadaveric temporal-bone preparation to study the mechanism of hearing loss resulting from superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) and (2) to assess the potential usefulness of clinical measurements of umbo velocity for the diagnosis of SCD. Background The syndrome of dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal is a clinical condition encompassing a variety of vestibular and auditory symptoms, including an air-bone gap at low frequencies. It has been hypothesized that the dehiscence acts as a “third window” into the inner ear that shunts acoustic energy away from the cochlea at low frequencies, causing hearing loss. Methods Sound-induced stapes, umbo, and round-window velocities were measured in prepared temporal bones (n = 8) using laser-Doppler vibrometry (1) with the superior semicircular canal intact, (2) after creation of a dehiscence in the superior canal, and (3) with the dehiscence patched. Clinical measurements of umbo velocity in live SCD ears (n = 29) were compared with similar data from our cadaveric temporal-bone preparations. Results An SCD caused a significant reduction in sound-induced round-window velocity at low frequencies, small but significant increases in sound-induced stapes and umbo velocities, and a measurable fluid velocity inside the dehiscence. The increase in sound-induced umbo velocity in temporal bones was also found to be similar to that measured in the 29 live ears with SCD. Conclusion Findings from the cadaveric temporal-bone preparation were consistent with the third-window hypothesis. In addition, measurement of umbo velocity in live ears is helpful in distinguishing SCD from other otologic pathologies presenting with an air-bone gap (e.g., otosclerosis). PMID:17255894

  5. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL OTIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients § 344.12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of isopropyl...

  6. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL OTIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients § 344.12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of isopropyl...

  7. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL OTIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients § 344.12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of isopropyl...

  8. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL OTIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients § 344.12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of isopropyl...

  9. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section...) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL OTIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients § 344.12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of isopropyl...

  10. The maize rachis affects Aspergillus flavus movement during ear development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aspergillus flavus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to follow infection in ears of maize hybrids resistant and susceptible to the fungus. Developing ears were needle-inoculated with GFP-transformed A. flavus 20 days after silk emergence, and GFP fluorescence in the pith was evalu...

  11. Single-stage autologous ear reconstruction for microtia.

    PubMed

    Kasrai, Leila; Snyder-Warwick, Alison K; Fisher, David M

    2014-03-01

    The authors have been using the Nagata technique since 2002. In this review of 100 consecutive ear reconstructions, the authors present technique modifications that have evolved over this period that have contributed to improved auricular contour and that now allow for auricular reconstruction in a single stage. This study is a retrospective review of a prospectively acquired database. The series is restricted to primary reconstructions performed for congenital microtia. Photographs of 10 consecutive patients are presented to demonstrate the results of the technique. Surgical complication rates are discussed. One hundred ear reconstructions were performed in 96 patients. There were 75 primary cases of congenital microtia. Twenty-four ears underwent a two-stage reconstruction, and 51 ears were reconstructed with a Nagata stage I procedure or a single-stage reconstruction. There was a gradual shift in technique, with a trend to perform fewer Nagata stage II outsetting procedures and more single-stage reconstructions. In patients who underwent an ear reconstruction in two stages, the surgical complication rate was 22 percent. In the last 40 consecutive ear reconstructions since abandoning the two-stage approach, the surgical complication rate is now 15 percent. A modification of Nagata's technique of autologous ear reconstruction for microtia is described. Modifications of the three-dimensional framework address the contour of the inferior crus and control tragal projection and position. Inclusion of a projection block and recruitment of retroauricular skin allow for symmetric projection of the ear in a single stage. Therapeutic, IV.

  12. Surgical correction of the expanded earlobe after ear gauging.

    PubMed

    Henderson, James; Malata, Charles M

    2010-10-01

    Expansion of the earlobe by ear gauging or plugging is an increasingly fashionable practice. As patients get older, some seek to have their ears restored to normal. This report presents a simple local flap technique that has been successful in achieving uneventful healing with acceptable cosmetic results.

  13. [Adaptability of sweet corn ears to a frozen process].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Matheus, Alejandra O; Martínez, Norelkys Maribel; de Bertorelli, Ligia O; De Venanzi, Frank

    2004-12-01

    The effects of frozen condition on the quality of three sweet corn ears (2038, 2010, 2004) and the pattern (Bonanza), were evaluated. Biometrics characteristics like ear size, ear diameter, row and kernel deep were measured as well as chemical and physical measurement in fresh and frozen states. The corn ears were frozen at -95 degrees C by 7 minutes. The yield and stability of the frozen ears were evaluated at 45 and 90 days of frozen storage (-18 degrees C). The average commercial yield as frozen corn ear for all the hybrids was 54.2%. The industry has a similar value range of 48% to 54%. The ear size average was 21.57 cm, row number was 15, ear diameter 45.54 mm and the kernel corn deep was 8.57 mm. All these measurements were found not different from commercial values found for the industry. All corn samples evaluated showed good stability despites the frozen processing and storage. Hybrid 2038 ranked higher in quality.

  14. Long-eared owls nesting in Badlands National Park

    Treesearch

    Deborah D. Paulson; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    1985-01-01

    Long-eared Owls nest at high densities locally over the Great Plains where suitable habitat is limited (Bent 1938), yet , according to Whitney et al. (1978), this species is rare to uncommon in South Dakota. Especially west of the Missouri River, few nesting records have been reported. This paper reports the occurrence of Long-eared Owls in the Badlands National Park...

  15. Redefinition of the helical rim in cauliflower-ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Schonauer, F; La Rusca, I; Pereira, J A; Molea, G

    2002-01-01

    Cauliflower ear is a serious deformity of the auricle induced by single or repeated injury to the external ear. Few papers deal with surgical techniques for correcting this deformity. We describe the use of ipsilateral excess cartilage to restore the helical rim. Copyright 2002 The British Association of Plastic Surgeons.

  16. Replantation of an avulsed ear, using a single arterial anastamosis.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, G; Bhatti, K; Masood, S

    2008-01-01

    Avulsion of the ear is relatively uncommon and replantation a technical challenge. A case in which an avulsed ear was successfully replanted using a single arterial anastamosis is described. The surgical difficulties encountered, the pharmaceutical approach to postoperative care and the problems which resulted from the lack of venous drainage are discussed.

  17. Gain affected by the interior shape of the ear canal.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Chen, Yen-Sheng; Cheng, Wei-De

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated the correlation of gain distribution and the interior shape of the human external ear canal. Cross-sectional study of gain measurement at the first bend and second bend. Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University. There were 15 ears in patients aged between 20 and 30 years (8 men/7 women) with normal hearing and middle ears. Stimulus frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz were based on the standard clinical hearing test. Measurements closer to the tympanic membrane and the positions at the first and second bends were confirmed by using otoscope. Real ear measurement to analyze the canal resonance in human external ears was adopted. This study found that gain at stimulus frequencies of 4000 Hz was affected by the interior shape of the ear canal (P < .005), particularly at the first and second bends, whereas gain was only affected by the length of the ear canal for stimulus frequencies of 2000 Hz (P < .005). This study found that gain was affected not only by the length of the external auditory canal (EAC) but also by the interior shape of the EAC significantly. The findings of this study may have potential clinical applications in canalplasty and congenital aural atresia surgery and may be used to guide surgeries that attempt to reshape the ear canal to achieve more desirable hearing outcomes.

  18. Identifying position, visibility, dimensions, and angulation of the ear.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Kasim; Christian, Jayanth; Jeyapalan, Karthigeyan; Natarajan, Shanmuganathan; Banu, Fathima; Veeravalli, Padmanabhan T

    2014-01-01

    We selected 254 subjects between the ages of 18 and 30 yr to assess the ear position, angulations of the ear in relation to the nose, visibility from the frontal view, and dimensions of the ear by using various anthropometric points of the face. Subjects were divided into four groups based on facial form. A reference plane indicator, facial topographical measurements, metal ruler, and digital photography were used. While considering the position of the ear, in all facial forms except square tapering, the most samples showed a tendency for the subaurale being in line with subnasale. Regression analysis showed a tendency to gnathion distance is the most dependent variable with length of the ear kept as a constant predictor, while both interalar distance and exocanthion to endocanthion distance correlate highly significantly to the width of the ear. In all subjects, the visibility of the ear when viewed from the front was an average of 1.5 mm. Regardless of facial form, ear angulation was generally less than nose angulation.

  19. Can you hear me now? Understanding vertebrate middle ear development

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Susan Caroline

    2010-01-01

    The middle ear is a composite organ formed from all three germ layers and the neural crest. It provides the link between the outside world and the inner ear, where sound is transduced and routed to the brain for processing. Extensive classical and modern studies have described the complex morphology and origin of the middle ear. Non-mammalian vertebrates have a single ossicle, the columella. Mammals have three functionally equivalent ossicles, designated the malleus, incus and stapes. In this review, I focus on the role of genes known to function in the middle ear. Genetic studies are beginning to unravel the induction and patterning of the multiple middle ear elements including the tympanum, skeletal elements, the air-filled cavity, and the insertion point into the inner ear oval window. Future studies that elucidate the integrated spatio-temporal signaling mechanisms required to pattern the middle ear organ system are needed. The longer-term translational benefits of understanding normal and abnormal ear development will have a direct impact on human health outcomes. PMID:21196256

  20. Klippel-Feil syndrome and associated ear anomalies.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Nadir; Arslanoğlu, Atilla; Mahiroğullari, Mahir; Sahan, Murat; Ozkan, Hüseyin

    2008-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a congenital segmentation anomaly of the cervical vertebrae that manifests as short neck, low hair line, and limited neck mobility. Various systemic malformations may also accompany the syndrome including wide variety of otopathologies affecting all 3 compartments of the ear (external, middle, and inner ear) as well as internal acoustic canal and vestibular aqueduct. We aimed to investigate these involvements and their clinical correlates in a group of patients with KFS. We present 20 KFS cases, of which 12 (% 60) displayed most of the reported ear abnormalities such as microtia, external ear canal stenosis, chronic ear inflammations and their sequels, anomalies of the tympanic cavity and ossicles, inner ear dysplasies, deformed internal acoustic canal, and wide vestibular aqueduct, which are demonstrated using the methods of otoscopy, audiologic testing, and temporal bone computed tomography. This series represents one of the highest reported rate of ear involvement in KFS. We found no correlation between the identified ear pathologies and the skeletal and extraskeletal malformations. The genetic nature of the syndrome was supported by the existence of affected family members in 4 (20%) of the cases.

  1. Major evolutionary transitions and innovations: the tympanic middle ear

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    One of the most amazing transitions and innovations during the evolution of mammals was the formation of a novel jaw joint and the incorporation of the original jaw joint into the middle ear to create the unique mammalian three bone/ossicle ear. In this review, we look at the key steps that led to this change and other unusual features of the middle ear and how developmental biology has been providing an understanding of the mechanisms involved. This starts with an overview of the tympanic (air-filled) middle ear, and how the ear drum (tympanic membrane) and the cavity itself form during development in amniotes. This is followed by an investigation of how the ear is connected to the pharynx and the relationship of the ear to the bony bulla in which it sits. Finally, the novel mammalian jaw joint and versatile dentary bone will be discussed with respect to evolution of the mammalian middle ear. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological diversity’. PMID:27994124

  2. Comparison of Microbiological Flora in the External Auditory Canal of Normal Ear and an Ear with Acute Otitis Externa.

    PubMed

    Ghanpur, Asheesh Dora; Nayak, Dipak Ranjan; Chawla, Kiran; Shashidhar, V; Singh, Rohit

    2017-09-01

    Acute Otitis Externa (AOE) is also known as swimmer's ear. Investigations initiated during World War II firmly established the role of bacteria in the aetiology of Acute Otitis Externa. To culture the microbiological flora of the normal ear and compare it with the flora causing AOE and to know the role of normal ear canal flora and anaerobes in the aetiology. A prospective observational study was conducted on 64 patients clinically diagnosed with unilateral AOE. Ear swabs were taken from both the ears. Microbiological flora was studied considering diseased ear as test ear and the normal ear as the control. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were done. Severity of the disease was assessed by subjective and objective scores. Effect of topical treatment with ichthammol glycerine pack was assessed after 48 hours and scores were calculated again. Patients with scores < 4 after pack removal were started on systemic antibiotics and were assessed after seven days of antibiotics course. Data was analysed using Paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Chi-square test. A p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (33%) was the most common bacteria cultured from the ear followed by Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (18%). Patients with anaerobic organism in the test ear had severe symptoms and needed systemic antibiotic therapy. Most of the cases may respond to empirical antibiotic therapy. In cases with severe symptoms and the ones refractory to empirical treatment, a culture from the ear canal will not be a tax on the patient. This helps in giving a better understanding about the disease, causative organisms and helps in avoiding the use of inappropriate antibiotics that usually result in developing resistant strains of bacteria.

  3. Can I Prevent Ear Infections When My Child Swims? (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear Your Ears Perforated Eardrum What's Earwax? Swimmer's Ear (External ... All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, ...

  4. Bilateral external ear canal osteomas - discussion on a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, D C; Stanciu, A E; Ulici, A; Zamfir-Chiru-Anton, A

    2016-01-01

    Osteomas of the external ear are uncommon benign tumors that need to be differentiated from the external ear canal exostoses, bony proliferations that are linked mainly to cold-water exposure. Clinical manifestations vary from no symptoms to recurrent local infections and external ear cholesteatoma. Objective: presenting a rare case that we did not find described in the published literature. A patient with multiple long-term asymptomatic osteomas of both external ear canals presented to our department. Material: Data recorded from the patient's medical record was reviewed and analyzed. Surgery was performed and histology confirmed the presumptive diagnosis. Results: There was a discrepancy between the local severity of the disease, with a complete obstruction of his ear canals, and the long-term disease-free status of the patient. Conclusion: We hypothesized about the etiology of these multiple bilateral osteomas of the EAC, in light of the clinical and surgical findings.

  5. Audiometric Predictions Using SFOAE and Middle-Ear Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, John C.; Keefe, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective The goals of the study are to determine how well stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) identify hearing loss, classify hearing loss as mild or moderate-severe, and correlate with pure-tone thresholds in a population of adults with normal middle-ear function. Other goals are to determine if middle-ear function as assessed by wideband acoustic transfer function (ATF) measurements in the ear canal account for the variability in normal thresholds, and if the inclusion of ATFs improves the ability of SFOAEs to identify hearing loss and predict pure-tone thresholds. Design The total suppressed SFOAE signal and its corresponding noise were recorded in 85 ears (22 normal ears and 63 ears with sensorineural hearing loss) at octave frequencies from 0.5 – 8 kHz using a nonlinear residual method. SFOAEs were recorded a second time in three impaired ears to assess repeatability. Ambient-pressure ATFs were obtained in all but one of these 85 ears, and were also obtained from an additional 31 normal-hearing subjects in whom SFOAE data were not obtained. Pure-tone air-and bone-conduction thresholds and 226-Hz tympanograms were obtained on all subjects. Normal tympanometry and the absence of air-bone gaps were used to screen subjects for normal middle-ear function. Clinical decision theory was used to assess the performance of SFOAE and ATF predictors in classifying ears as normal or impaired, and linear regression analysis was used to test the ability of SFOAE and ATF variables to predict the air-conduction audiogram. Results The ability of SFOAEs to classify ears as normal or hearing impaired was significant at all test frequencies. The ability of SFOAEs to classify impaired ears as either mild or moderate-severe was significant at test frequencies from 0.5 to 4 kHz. SFOAEs were present in cases of severe hearing loss. SFOAEs were also significantly correlated with air-conduction thresholds from 0.5 to 8 kHz. The best performance occurred using the SFOAE

  6. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions upon ear canal pressurization.

    PubMed

    Zebian, Makram; Schirkonyer, Volker; Hensel, Johannes; Vollbort, Sven; Fedtke, Thomas; Janssen, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the change in distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) level upon ear canal pressurization. DPOAEs were measured on 12 normal-hearing human subjects for ear canal static pressures between -200 and +200 daPa in (50 ± 5) daPa steps. A clear dependence of DPOAE levels on the pressure was observed, with levels being highest at the maximum compliance of the middle ear, and decreasing on average by 2.3 dB per 50 daPa for lower and higher pressures. Ear canal pressurization can serve as a tool for improving the detectability of DPOAEs in the case of middle-ear dysfunction.

  7. Inner ear symptoms and disease: Pathophysiological understanding and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Ciuman, Raphael R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, huge advances have taken place in understanding of inner ear pathophysiology causing sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. Advances in understanding comprise biochemical and physiological research of stimulus perception and conduction, inner ear homeostasis, and hereditary diseases with underlying genetics. This review describes and tabulates the various causes of inner ear disease and defines inner ear and non-inner ear causes of hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. The aim of this review was to comprehensively breakdown this field of otorhinolaryngology for specialists and non-specialists and to discuss current therapeutic options in distinct diseases and promising research for future therapies, especially pharmaceutic, genetic, or stem cell therapy. PMID:24362017

  8. Direct cost comparison of totally endoscopic versus open ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Patel, N; Mohammadi, A; Jufas, N

    2018-02-01

    Totally endoscopic ear surgery is a relatively new method for managing chronic ear disease. This study aimed to test the null hypothesis that open and endoscopic approaches have similar direct costs for the management of attic cholesteatoma, from an Australian private hospital setting. A retrospective direct cost comparison of totally endoscopic ear surgery and traditional canal wall up mastoidectomy for the management of attic cholesteatoma in a private tertiary setting was undertaken. Indirect and future costs were excluded. A direct cost comparison of anaesthetic setup and resources, operative setup and resources, and surgical time was performed between the two techniques. Totally endoscopic ear surgery has a mean direct cost reduction of AUD$2978.89 per operation from the hospital perspective, when compared to canal wall up mastoidectomy. Totally endoscopic ear surgery is more cost-effective, from an Australian private hospital perspective, than canal wall up mastoidectomy for attic cholesteatoma.

  9. Inner ear abnormalities in patients with Goldenhar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Lenarz, Minoo; Lenarz, Thomas; Becker, Hartmut

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the inner ear malformations in patients with Goldenhar syndrome and to hypothesize the potential embryopathogenesis of these malformations. Retrospective case review. Tertiary referral center. Fourteen patients with Goldenhar syndrome. Each patient underwent hearing tests and high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone. In six patients, magnetic resonance imaging of the temporal bone also was performed. Among the 14 patients with Goldenhar syndrome, 13 had outer and middle ear anomalies and 5 (36%) had inner ear malformations, including one case of common cavity. Our observations regarding inner ear anomalies in Goldenhar syndrome correlate with the reported cases in the literature and may help to hypothesize the embryological origin of these malformations, which can caused by an early developmental arrest in the fourth gestational week. Specialists evaluating patients with Goldenhar syndrome should be aware of the possibility of inner ear malformations, which could be diagnosed earlier with appropriate imaging studies.

  10. Middle Ear Effusion in Children: A Report of Treatment in 500 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Forquer, Brian D.; Linthicum, Fred H.

    1982-01-01

    Records were studied of 500 children younger than 9 years of age with middle ear effusion who had received one of three treatment strategies: (1) administration of medication, including decongestants, antihistamines or antibiotics (or a combination), (2) administration of medication for a limited time and then surgical therapy if effusion did not resolve or (3) myringotomy done immediately with insertion of ventilation tubes and, in some cases, removal of adenoids. Early surgical intervention resulted in significantly shorter delay in hearing restoration. It did not result in a lower recurrence rate and it did not reduce the number of occasions when thick fluid, as compared with thin fluid, was found at operation. Four children for whom medical and surgical treatment failed were considered candidates for mild gain, low maximum-power-output hearing aids. All other children had normal hearing after treatment. Medication was successful in achieving this goal in 48 percent of the cases. PMID:6184891

  11. Physiological artifacts in scalp EEG and ear-EEG.

    PubMed

    Kappel, Simon L; Looney, David; Mandic, Danilo P; Kidmose, Preben

    2017-08-11

    A problem inherent to recording EEG is the interference arising from noise and artifacts. While in a laboratory environment, artifacts and interference can, to a large extent, be avoided or controlled, in real-life scenarios this is a challenge. Ear-EEG is a concept where EEG is acquired from electrodes in the ear. We present a characterization of physiological artifacts generated in a controlled environment for nine subjects. The influence of the artifacts was quantified in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deterioration of the auditory steady-state response. Alpha band modulation was also studied in an open/closed eyes paradigm. Artifacts related to jaw muscle contractions were present all over the scalp and in the ear, with the highest SNR deteriorations in the gamma band. The SNR deterioration for jaw artifacts were in general higher in the ear compared to the scalp. Whereas eye-blinking did not influence the SNR in the ear, it was significant for all groups of scalps electrodes in the delta and theta bands. Eye movements resulted in statistical significant SNR deterioration in both frontal, temporal and ear electrodes. Recordings of alpha band modulation showed increased power and coherence of the EEG for ear and scalp electrodes in the closed-eyes periods. Ear-EEG is a method developed for unobtrusive and discreet recording over long periods of time and in real-life environments. This study investigated the influence of the most important types of physiological artifacts, and demonstrated that spontaneous activity, in terms of alpha band oscillations, could be recorded from the ear-EEG platform. In its present form ear-EEG was more prone to jaw related artifacts and less prone to eye-blinking artifacts compared to state-of-the-art scalp based systems.

  12. Pinnaplasty: reshaping ears to improve hearing aid retention.

    PubMed

    Gault, David; Grob, Marion; Odili, Joy

    2007-01-01

    The hearing aid is extremely important to the deaf. A small number have difficulty in retaining the device because the ear is prominent or cup-shaped. This report describes 11 children whose ear shape was modified to improve hearing aid retention and one adult in whom an over set back ear was released to allow fitment of a postaural device. In eight of the 11 children treated, conservative measures such as double-sided tape and retention bands (Huggies) had been tried previously without success. The creation of an antihelical fold in a misshapen ear lacking such a fold provides a reinforcing strut which is useful to support a hearing aid. In patients whose ear had been excessively tethered by previous surgery, projection was restored by inserting a cartilage block behind the ear. In one child with ears tethered by previous surgery, costal cartilage was used not only to release both ears, but also to reconstruct a new helical rim on one side. Surgery enabled a normal postaural hearing aid to be worn in 17 of the 19 ears treated. The two failures deserve special mention. In one patient with a unilateral deformity and severe mental retardation, the dressings were pulled off immediately after surgery. In another patient with a bilateral problem, the appearance and hearing aid retention was improved, but there was not enough room in the postauricular sulcus on one side for the battery component to fit comfortably and an in-the-ear device is now used on that side. Pinnaplasty is a helpful strategy to improve hearing aid retention. Care must be taken not to overdo the set back so that enough room is left to retain the hearing device.

  13. Ear Infection in Isolated Cleft Lip: Etiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Ruegg, Teresa A.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Ford, Matthew D.; Wehby, George L.; Deleyiannis, Frederic W.B.; Czeizel, Andrew E.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Marazita, Mary L.; Weinberg, Seth M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Hypothesis Chronic ear infections are a common occurrence in children with orofacial clefts involving the secondary palate. Less is known about the middle ear status of individuals with isolated clefts of the lip, although several studies have reported elevated rates of ear infection in this group. The purpose of this retrospective study was to test the hypothesis that chronic ear infections occur more frequently in isolated cleft lip cases (n=94) compared with controls (n=183). Methods A questionnaire was used to obtain information on history of chronic ear infection. The association between ear infection status (present/absent) and cleft lip status (cleft lip case/control) was tested using both chi-square and logistic regression. Results and Conclusions The reported occurrence of chronic ear infection was significantly greater in cleft lipcases (31%) compared to unaffected controls (11%). After adjusting for age and sex, having a cleft lip increased the odds of being positive for ear infection by a factor greater than three (OR=3.698; 95%CI=1.91–7.14). Within cleft lipcases, there was no difference in the occurrence of ear infection by defect laterality or by the type of clefting present in the family history. Although velopharyngeal insufficiency was present in 18.4% of our cleft lip sample, there was no statistical association between ear infection and abnormal speech patterns. These results may have potential implications both for the clinical management of isolated cleft lip cases and for understanding the etiology of orofacial clefting. PMID:26153759

  14. Ear Infection in Isolated Cleft Lip: Etiological Implications.

    PubMed

    Ruegg, Teresa A; Cooper, Margaret E; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Ford, Matthew D; Wehby, George L; Deleyiannis, Frederic W B; Czeizel, Andrew E; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2017-03-01

      Chronic ear infections are a common occurrence in children with orofacial clefts involving the secondary palate. Less is known about the middle ear status of individuals with isolated clefts of the lip, although several studies have reported elevated rates of ear infection in this group. The purpose of this retrospective study was to test the hypothesis that chronic ear infections occur more frequently in isolated cleft lip cases (n = 94) compared with controls (n = 183).   A questionnaire was used to obtain information on history of chronic ear infection. The association between ear infection status (present/absent) and cleft lip status (cleft lip case/control) was tested using both chi-square and logistic regression.   The reported occurrence of chronic ear infection was significantly greater in cleft lip cases (31%) compared with unaffected controls (11%). After adjusting for age and sex, having a cleft lip increased the odds of being positive for ear infection by a factor greater than 3 (odds ratio = 3.698; 95% confidence interval = 1.91 to 7.14). Within cleft lip cases, there was no difference in the occurrence of ear infection by defect laterality or by the type of clefting present in the family history. Although velopharyngeal insufficiency was present in 18.4% of our cleft lip sample, there was no statistical association between ear infection and abnormal speech patterns. These results may have potential implications both for the clinical management of isolated cleft lip cases and for understanding the etiology of orofacial clefting.

  15. Rugby injury-associated pseudocyst of the auricle: report and review of sports-associated dermatoses of the ear.

    PubMed

    Kallini, Joseph R; Cohen, Philip R

    2013-02-15

    To describe a man with pseudocyst of the auricle, summarize the salient features of this condition, and review other sports-associated dermatoses of the ear. Pseudocyst of the auricle is an intracartilaginous collection of viscous straw-colored fluid typically located in the triangular fossa of the upper half of the auricle. It is usually asymptomatic. It can result in a permanent auricular deformity. A 63-year-old man developed a pseudocyst of the auricle following a traumatic rugby-related injury to his left ear. The lesion has persisted for many years; chronic massage has slightly decreased its size. The etiology of pseudocyst of the auricle has been described as either traumatic or developmental. Our patient developed his pseudocyst after a rugby-related injury. This condition is usually unilateral. Aspirate of the content is usually sterile. Histology shows an intracartilaginous cyst devoid of an epithelial lining. Treatment involves either partial removal of the cartilage or chemical irritation to enhance adhesiveness. Subsequent compression (via button bolsters) minimizes recurrence. Pseudocyst of the auricle is a benign cystic dilatation, which is intracartilaginous, devoid of an epithelial lining, and may be traumatic or non-traumatic in origin. A man with rugby-associated trauma to his left ear developed this condition. Auricular pseudocyst can be added to the list of sports-associated dermatoses of the ear.

  16. Mozart Ear Deformity: a Rare Diagnosis in the Ear Reconstruction Clinic.

    PubMed

    Telich-Tarriba, Jose E; Victor-Baldin, Andre; Apellaniz-Campo, Armando

    2017-07-01

    Mozart ear is a rare auricular deformity; clinically the auricle is characterized by the bulging appearance of the anterosuperior portion of the auricle due to fusion of the crura of the antihelix, an inversion in the normal form of the cavum conchae resulting in its convexity and a slit-like narrowing of the orifice of the external auditory meatus.A retrospective review of clinical and photographic records of patients attended at the ear reconstruction clinic of our hospital between June of 2010 and May 2016 was performed; out of 576 consecutive patients only 3 fulfilled the inclusion criteria, with a prevalence of 0.5%. The authors present these patients.Surgical interventions mainly focus on the correction of the convex concha; however, the procedure should be tailored to the severity of the deformity and the wishes of the patient.

  17. Recurrent syncope and chronic ear pain

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, Andrew; Daverede, Luis; Wong, Winson; Loney, Elizabeth; Young, John

    2010-01-01

    An elderly gentleman presented to hospital with recurrent blackout episodes consistent with syncope and a 3-month history of right ear pain. Significant postural hypotension was recorded. White cell count and C reactive protein were elevated. MRI of the head and neck revealed a soft tissue abnormality in the right nasopharynx and base of skull. Tissue biopsies were obtained and microbiology specimens revealed a mixed growth of pseudomonas and diphtheroids. There was no histological evidence of malignancy. A diagnosis of skull base infection was made. Infective involvement of the carotid sinus was considered to be the cause of the recurrent syncope and postural hypotension. The patient responded well to a 12-week course of intravenous meropenem. Inflammatory markers returned to normal and a repeat MRI after 3 months of treatment showed significant resolution of infection. The syncopal episodes and orthostatic hypotension resolved in parallel with treatment of infection. PMID:22791782

  18. Tuberculosis of the ear, a professional disease?

    PubMed

    Sens, Patrícia Maria; Almeida, Clemente I R; Valle, Lupércio O do; Costa, Luís H C; Angeli, Miguel L S

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a rare cause of chronic suppurative otitis media and mastoiditis; the predisposing factors of this association, however, are not commonly described. There has been an alarming increase in the incidence of tuberculosis in Brazil, including tuberculous otitis media. These patients typically present multiple perforations of the tympanic membrane, an ear discharge, and progressive hearing loss. This diagnosis should be taken into account in patients that do not respond to routine therapy for fungal external otitis or bacterial otitis media. In this retrospective study, the authors describe four cases of patients with tuberculous otitis media. This sample consisted of two physicians, a chemical engineer and an underage child in whose family there were cases of active tuberculosis. Predisposing factors for tuberculous otitis were contact with family members that had tuberculosis, professional contact with patients and exposure to pathogenic microorganisms in airways.

  19. The comparative anatomy of the pig middle ear cavity: a model for middle ear inflammation in the human?

    PubMed Central

    PRACY, J. P.; WHITE, A.; MUSTAFA, Y.; SMITH, D.; PERRY, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a functional model of otitis media with effusion (OME) in the pig (Sus scrofa), with the purpose of investigating the origin of lymphocytes populating the middle ear during the course of an inflammatory process. The relevance of the model to the human condition of OME is to a large extent dependent on the anatomical and physiological similarities between the middle ear cavity and the pharyngeal lymphoid tissue of the pig and man. Anatomical specimens were collected from 7 young Large White pigs to determine the gross anatomy of the middle ear cavity and the histological characteristics of the middle ear mucosa. It was found that the anatomy of the 3 parts of the middle ear cavity in man and in the pig is broadly similar, although some minor differences were observed. The porcine eustachian tube was seen to be cartilaginous throughout its length in contrast to the part osseous, part cartilaginous structure found in man; the porcine ossicles were slightly different in shape to those of man and the air cell system was situated inferior to the tympanic cavity in the pig as opposed to posteriorly in man. This paper describes the structure and morphology of the pig middle ear cavity and compares and contrasts it with that of man. The minor differences observed are of anatomical importance but do not diminish the usefulness of the pig middle ear cleft as a potential model for human middle ear disorders. PMID:9688502

  20. Improved Generation of Induced Cardiomyocytes Using a Polycistronic Construct Expressing Optimal Ratio of Gata4, Mef2c and Tbx5.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Ziqing; Yin, Chaoying; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Jiandong; Qian, Li

    2015-11-13

    Direct conversion of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) into induced cardiomyocytes (iCMs) holds great potential for regenerative medicine by offering alternative strategies for treatment of heart disease. This conversion has been achieved by forced expression of defined factors such as Gata4 (G), Mef2c (M) and Tbx5 (T). Traditionally, iCMs are generated by a cocktail of viruses expressing these individual factors. However, reprogramming efficiency is relatively low and most of the in vitro G,M,T-transduced fibroblasts do not become fully reprogrammed, making it difficult to study the reprogramming mechanisms. We recently have shown that the stoichiometry of G,M,T is crucial for efficient iCM reprogramming. An optimal stoichiometry of G,M,T with relative high level of M and low levels of G and T achieved by using our polycistronic MGT vector (hereafter referred to as MGT) significantly increased reprogramming efficiency and improved iCM quality in vitro. Here we provide a detailed description of the methodology used to generate iCMs with MGT construct from cardiac fibroblasts. Isolation of cardiac fibroblasts, generation of virus for reprogramming and evaluation of the reprogramming process are also included to provide a platform for efficient and reproducible generation of iCMs.

  1. CaMKII Signaling Stimulates Mef2c Activity In Vitro but Only Minimally Affects Murine Long Bone Development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Chandra S.; Fabritius, Christine; Houben, Astrid; Wolff, Lena I.; Hartmann, Christine

    2017-01-01

    The long bones of vertebrate limbs form by endochondral ossification, whereby mesenchymal cells differentiate into chondrogenic progenitors, which then differentiate into chondrocytes. Chondrocytes undergo further differentiation from proliferating to prehypertrophic, and finally to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Several signaling pathways and transcription factors regulate this process. Previously, we and others have shown in chicken that overexpression of an activated form of Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) results in ectopic chondrocyte maturation. Here, we show that this is not the case in the mouse. Although, in vitro Mef2c activity was upregulated by about 55-fold in response to expression of an activated form of CaMKII (DACaMKII), transgenic mice that expressed a dominant-active form of CaMKII under the control of the Col2a1 regulatory elements display only a very transient and mild phenotype. Here, only the onset of chondrocyte hypertrophy at E12.5 is accelerated. It is also this early step in chondrocyte differentiation that is temporarily delayed around E13.5 in transgenic mice expressing the peptide inhibitor CaM-KIIN from rat (rKIIN) under the control of the Col2a1 regulatory elements. Yet, ultimately DACaMKII, as well as rKIIN transgenic mice are born with completely normal skeletal elements with regard to their length and growth plate organization. Hence, our in vivo analysis suggests that CaMKII signaling plays a minor role in chondrocyte maturation in mice. PMID:28361052

  2. Transcription Factors MYOCD, SRF, Mesp1 and SMARCD3 Enhance the Cardio-Inducing Effect of GATA4, TBX5, and MEF2C during Direct Cellular Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Christoforou, Nicolas; Chellappan, Malathi; Adler, Andrew F.; Kirkton, Robert D.; Wu, Tianyi; Addis, Russell C.; Bursac, Nenad; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-01-01

    Transient overexpression of defined combinations of master regulator genes can effectively induce cellular reprogramming: the acquisition of an alternative predicted phenotype from a differentiated cell lineage. This can be of particular importance in cardiac regenerative medicine wherein the heart lacks the capacity to heal itself, but simultaneously contains a large pool of fibroblasts. In this study we determined the cardio-inducing capacity of ten transcription factors to actuate cellular reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells. Overexpression of transcription factors MYOCD and SRF alone or in conjunction with Mesp1 and SMARCD3 enhanced the basal but necessary cardio-inducing effect of the previously reported GATA4, TBX5, and MEF2C. In particular, combinations of five or seven transcription factors enhanced the activation of cardiac reporter vectors, and induced an upregulation of cardiac-specific genes. Global gene expression analysis also demonstrated a significantly greater cardio-inducing effect when the transcription factors MYOCD and SRF were used. Detection of cross-striated cells was highly dependent on the cell culture conditions and was enhanced by the addition of valproic acid and JAK inhibitor. Although we detected Ca2+ transient oscillations in the reprogrammed cells, we did not detect significant changes in resting membrane potential or spontaneously contracting cells. This study further elucidates the cardio-inducing effect of the transcriptional networks involved in cardiac cellular reprogramming, contributing to the ongoing rational design of a robust protocol required for cardiac regenerative therapies. PMID:23704920

  3. Vestibular sensory functional status of cochlear implanted ears versus non-implanted ears in bilateral profound deaf adults.

    PubMed

    Cozma, Romică Sebastian; Dima-Cozma, Lucia Corina; Rădulescu, Luminiţa Mihaela; Hera, Maria Cristina; Mârţu, Cristian; Olariu, Raluca; Cobzeanu, Bogdan Mihail; Bitere, Oana Roxana; Cobzeanu, Mihail Dan

    2018-01-01

    Patients with hearing loss who underwent cochlear implantation can present symptomatic or asymptomatic vestibular damages earlier or later after the surgery. The vestibular permanent lesions could be acute, produced by surgical trauma or could be progressive due to local morphological changes made by the presence of the portelectrode in the inner ear (fibrosis related, ossification, basilar membrane distortion, endolymphatic hydrops). Besides histopathological findings in inner ear of cochlear implanted patients, the vestibular permanent damages could be found by assessment of clinical vestibular status. This study reports the sensorial vestibular functional findings for adults in cochlear implanted ears related to the electrode insertion type (cochleostomy or round window approach) and comparing to non-implanted deaf ears. A total of 20 adult patients with 32 cochlear implanted ears (12 patients with binaural cochlear implant and eight with monoaural) were selected for postoperatory vestibular examination by cervical and ocular vestibular myogenic potentials and vestibular caloric tests. The same tests were made for a control group of 22 non-implanted deaf ears. Functional testing results were reported related to the electrode insertion approach. For the cochleostomy group, we found different deficits: in 40% for saccular function, 44% for utricular function, and 12% horizontal canal dysfunction. In round window group, the deficit was present in 14.29% for saccular function, 28.57% for utricular function, and 28.58% for horizontal canal. In 46.88% of implanted ears, the vestibular function was completely preserved on all tested sensors. In conclusion, the vestibular functional status after inner ear surgery presents sensorial damages in 53.12% ears compare with the vestibular dysfunction existing in 50% of deaf non-operated ears. Round window insertion allows for better conservation of the vestibular function.

  4. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  5. Surgical and Technical Modalities for Hearing Restoration in Ear Malformations.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Stefan; Thomas, Jan Peter; Volkenstein, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Malformations of the external and middle ear often go along with an aesthetic and functional handicap. Independent of additional aesthetic procedures, a successful functional hearing restoration leads to a tremendous gain in quality of life for affected patients. The introduction of implantable hearing systems (bone conduction and middle ear devices) offers new therapeutic options in this field. We focus on functional rehabilitation of patients with malformations, either by surgical reconstruction or the use of different implantable hearing devices, depending on the disease itself and the severity of malformation as well as hearing impairment. Patients with an open ear canal and minor malformations are good candidates for surgical hearing restoration of middle ear structures with passive titanium or autologous implants. In cases with complete fibrous or bony atresia of the ear canal, the most promising functional outcome and gain in quality of life can be expected with an active middle ear implant or a bone conduction device combined with a surgical aesthetic rehabilitation in a single or multi-step procedure. Although the surgical procedure for bone conduction devices is straightforward and safe, more sophisticated operations for active middle ear implants (e.g., Vibrant Soundbridge, MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) provide an improved speech discrimination in noise and the ability of sound localization compared with bone conduction devices where the stimulation reaches both cochleae. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Comparison of Middle Ear Visualization With Endoscopy and Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Marc L; Zhang, Dongqing; Labadie, Robert F; Noble, Jack H

    2016-04-01

    The primary goal of chronic ear surgery is the creation of a safe, clean dry ear. For cholesteatomas, complete removal of disease is dependent on visualization. Conventional microscopy is adequate for most dissection, but various subregions of the middle ear are better visualized with endoscopy. The purpose of the present study was to quantitatively assess the improved visualization that endoscopes afford as compared with operating microscopes. Microscopic and endoscopic views were simulated using a three-dimensional model developed from temporal bone scans. Surface renderings of the ear canal and middle ear subsegments were defined and the percentage of visualization of each middle ear subsegment, both with and without ossicles, was then determined for the microscope as well as for 0-, 30-, and 45-degree endoscopes. Using this information, we analyzed which mode of visualization is best suited for dissection within a particular anatomical region. Using a 0-degree scope provides significantly more visualization of every subregion, except the antrum, compared with a microscope. In addition, angled scopes permit visualizing significantly more surface area of every subregion of the middle ear than straight scopes or microscopes. Endoscopes offer advantages for cholesteatoma dissection in difficult-to-visualize areas including the sinus tympani and epitympanum.

  7. Inverse solution of ear-canal area function from reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M.; Neely, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    A number of acoustical applications require the transformation of acoustical quantities, such as impedance and pressure that are measured at the entrance of the ear canal, to quantities at the eardrum. This transformation often requires knowledge of the shape of the ear canal. Previous attempts to measure ear-canal area functions were either invasive, non-reproducible, or could only measure the area function up to a point mid-way along the canal. A method to determine the area function of the ear canal from measurements of acoustic impedance at the entrance of the ear canal is described. The method is based on a solution to the inverse problem in which measurements of impedance are used to calculate reflectance, which is then used to determine the area function of the canal. The mean ear-canal area function determined using this method is similar to mean ear-canal area functions measured by other researchers using different techniques. The advantage of the proposed method over previous methods is that it is non- invasive, fast, and reproducible. PMID:22225043

  8. An in vitro model of murine middle ear epithelium.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Apoorva; Akram, Khondoker M; Williams, Debbie; Armes, Hannah; Russell, Catherine; Hood, Derek; Armstrong, Stuart; Stewart, James P; Brown, Steve D M; Bingle, Lynne; Bingle, Colin D

    2016-11-01

    Otitis media (OM), or middle ear inflammation, is the most common paediatric disease and leads to significant morbidity. Although understanding of underlying disease mechanisms is hampered by complex pathophysiology it is clear that epithelial abnormalities underpin the disease. There is currently a lack of a well-characterised in vitro model of the middle ear (ME) epithelium that replicates the complex cellular composition of the middle ear. Here, we report the development of a novel in vitro model of mouse middle ear epithelial cells (mMECs) at an air-liquid interface (ALI) that recapitulates the characteristics of the native murine ME epithelium. We demonstrate that mMECs undergo differentiation into the varied cell populations seen within the native middle ear. Proteomic analysis confirmed that the cultures secrete a multitude of innate defence proteins from their apical surface. We showed that the mMECs supported the growth of the otopathogen, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), suggesting that the model can be successfully utilised to study host-pathogen interactions in the middle ear. Overall, our mMEC culture system can help to better understand the cell biology of the middle ear and improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of OM. The model also has the potential to serve as a platform for validation of treatments designed to reverse aspects of epithelial remodelling that underpin OM development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Effects of obstructive sleep apnea surgery on middle ear function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Ching; Friedman, Michael; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Shao, Chi-Hsin; Pulver, Tanya M; Chen, Yung-Che

    2011-04-01

    To study the effect of Z-palatopharyngoplasty plus radiofrequency of the base of the tongue on middle ear function. A retrospective review of a prospective data set at a tertiary care center. University-affiliated medical center. The study population included 47 patients (42 men and 5 women; mean age, 40.8 years) who underwent Z-palatopharyngoplasty plus radiofrequency of the base of the tongue for obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. All patients had healthy eardrums and no previous history of chronic ear disease. Pure-tone audiometric and tympanometric assessments were performed preoperatively and at 3 days, 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Levels of baseline and postoperative middle ear pressure were compared. Twelve patients (26%) reported otologic concerns, such as ear pressure and/or otalgia, within 1 week postoperatively. No permanent otologic discomfort occurred. A trend toward reduced middle ear pressure was noted in this study. The decrease in middle ear pressure became apparent on day 3. However, mean pressure changes were no longer significantly different than preoperative values by 1 week after surgery. We found that Z-palatopharyngoplasty plus radiofrequency of the base of the tongue for obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome induces changes in middle ear function. However, the changes were temporary and not significant after 3 months of follow-up.

  10. Musical ear syndrome in adult cochlear implant patients.

    PubMed

    Low, W-K; Tham, C A; D'Souza, V-D; Teng, S-W

    2013-09-01

    Except for a single case report, musical ear syndrome in cochlear implantees has not been studied. We aimed to study the prevalence and nature of musical ear syndrome among adult cochlear implant patients, as well as the effect on their emotional well-being. STUDY DESIGN, PATIENTS AND INTERVENTION: A cross-sectional survey of patients aged 18 years and above who had received cochlear implants for profound hearing loss between 1997 and 2010. Of the 82 patients studied, 18 (22 per cent) were found to have experienced musical ear syndrome. Seven and 11 patients had musical ear syndrome prior to and after cochlear implantation, respectively. The character of musical ear syndrome symptoms was described as instrumental music (n = 2), singing (6) or both (10). Fourteen patients reported an adverse emotional effect, with three expressing ‘intolerance’. In this study, 22 per cent of cochlear implantees experienced musical ear syndrome. These symptoms affected patients’ emotional state, but most coped well. Musical ear syndrome can occur prior to and after cochlear implantation.

  11. Cauliflower Ear and Skin Infections among Wrestlers in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Kordi, Ramin; Mansournai, Mohammad Ali; Nourian, Roh Allah; Wallace, W. Angus

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the magnitude of the selected sports medicine problems (i.e. cauliflower ear and skin infections) among wrestlers in Tehran. A number of 411 wrestlers were randomly selected from wrestling clubs in Tehran employing cluster sample setting method. The participants were interviewed using a specially designed and validated questionnaire. Nearly half of the participants (44%) had “cauliflower ears”. Only 23% of these participants had received any kind of treatment for their acute ear haematomas that are known to result in “cauliflower ears”. The prevalence of reported hearing loss among participants with cauliflower ears (11.5%, 95%CI: 6.9 to 16.2) was significantly more than this prevalence among those participants without cauliflower ears (1.8%, 95%CI: 0.1 to 3.5) (p < 0.05). More than half of the participants (52%) had skin infection diagnosed by a physician during the previous year. This study has identified evidence of an increase in hearing loss as a possible side effect of either cauliflower ear or ear injury in wrestling in Iran. There has been an outbreak of ringworm and there is a significant potential for an outbreak of impetigo among wrestlers in Tehran. Key points Skin infections are prevalent among wrestlers in Tehran. Commonly wrestlers in Tehran continue to carry out wrestling training while affected by skin infections. Cauliflower ear ”is common among wrestlers in Tehran. More research is needed to investigate hearing loss as a possible side effect of either cauliflower ear or ear injury in wrestling in Iran. PMID:24198702

  12. 3D visualization of middle ear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Uwe; Schmitt, Thomas

    1998-06-01

    The achievement of volume geometry data from middle ear structures and surrounding components performs a necessary supposition for the finite element simulation of the vibrational and transfer characteristics of the ossicular chain. So far those models base on generalized figures and size data from anatomy textbooks or particular manual and one- or two-dimensional distance measurements of single ossicles, mostly obtained by light microscopy, respectively. Therefore the goal of this study is to create a procedure for complete three-dimensional imaging of real middle ear structures (tympanic membrane, ossicles, ligaments) in vitro or even in vivo. The main problems are their microscopic size with relevant structures from 10 micrometer to 5 mm, representing various tissue properties (bone, soft tissue). Additionally, these structures are surrounded by the temporal bone, the most solid bone of the human body. Generally there exist several established diagnostic tools for medical imaging that could be used for geometry data acquisition, e.g., X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Basically they image different tissue parameters, either bony structures (ossicles), or soft tissue (tympanic membrane, ligaments). But considering this application those standard techniques allow low spatial resolution only, usually in the 0.5 - 1mm range, at least in one spatial direction. Thus particular structures of the middle ear region could even be missed completely because of their spatial location. In vitro there is a way out by collecting three complete data sets, each distinguished by 90 degree rotation of a cube-shaped temporal bone specimen. That allows high-resolution imaging in three orthogonal planes, which essentially supports the three-dimensional interpolation of the unknown elements, starting from the regularly set elements of the cubic grid with an edge extension given by the original two-dimensional matrix. A different approach represents the

  13. MEF2C haploinsufficiency caused by either microdeletion of the 5q14.3 region or mutation is responsible for severe mental retardation with stereotypic movements, epilepsy and/or cerebral malformations.

    PubMed

    Le Meur, N; Holder-Espinasse, M; Jaillard, S; Goldenberg, A; Joriot, S; Amati-Bonneau, P; Guichet, A; Barth, M; Charollais, A; Journel, H; Auvin, S; Boucher, C; Kerckaert, J-P; David, V; Manouvrier-Hanu, S; Saugier-Veber, P; Frébourg, T; Dubourg, C; Andrieux, J; Bonneau, D

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years, array-comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) has considerably improved our ability to detect cryptic unbalanced rearrangements in patients with syndromic mental retardation. Molecular karyotyping of six patients with syndromic mental retardation was carried out using whole-genome oligonucleotide array-CGH. 5q14.3 microdeletions ranging from 216 kb to 8.8 Mb were detected in five unrelated patients with the following phenotypic similarities: severe mental retardation with absent speech, hypotonia and stereotypic movements. Facial dysmorphic features, epilepsy and/or cerebral malformations were also present in most of these patients. The minimal common deleted region of these 5q14 microdeletions encompassed only MEF2C, the gene for a protein known to act in brain as a neurogenesis effector, which regulates excitatory synapse number. In a patient with a similar phenotype, an MEF2C nonsense mutation was subsequently identified. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that haploinsufficiency of MEF2C is responsible for severe mental retardation with stereotypic movements, seizures and/or cerebral malformations.

  14. Relationship Between Audio-Vestibular Functional Tests and Inner Ear MRI in Meniere's Disease.

    PubMed

    Quatre, Raphaële; Attyé, Arnaud; Karkas, Alexandre; Job, Agnès; Dumas, Georges; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2018-04-25

    Meniere's disease is an inner ear disorder generally attributed to an endolymphatic hydrops. Different electrophysiological tests and imaging techniques have been developed to improve endolymphatic hydrops diagnosis. The goal of our study was to compare the sensitivity and the specificity of delayed inner ear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after intravenous injection of gadolinium with extratympanic clicks electrocochleography (EcochG), phase shift of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (shift-DPOAEs), and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP) for the diagnosis of Meniere's disease. Forty-one patients, with a total of 50 affected ears, were included prospectively from April 2015 to April 2016 in our institution. Patients included had definite or possible Meniere's disease based on the latest American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery guidelines revised in 2015. All patients went through delayed inner ear MRI after intravenous injection of gadolinium (three dimension-fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences), pure-tone audiometry, extratympanic clicks EcochG, shift-DPOAEs, and cVEMP on the same day. Endolymphatic hydrops was graded on MRI using the saccule to utricle ratio inversion defined as when the saccule appeared equal or larger than the utricle. Abnormal EcochG and shift-DPOAEs in patients with definite Meniere's disease (DMD) were found in 68 and 64.5%, respectively. The two methods were significantly associated in DMD group. In DMD group, 25.7% had a positive MRI. The correlation between MRI versus EcochG and MRI versus shift-DPOAEs was not significant. MRI hydrops detection was correlated with hearing loss. Finally, 22.9% of DMD group had positive cVEMP. EcochG and shift-DPOAEs were both well correlated with clinical criteria of Meniere's disease. Inner ear MRI showed hydrops when hearing loss was higher than 35 dB. The shift-DPOAEs presented the advantage of a rapid and easy measurement if DPOAEs could be

  15. Shaping sound in space: the regulation of inner ear patterning.

    PubMed

    Groves, Andrew K; Fekete, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    The inner ear is one of the most morphologically elaborate tissues in vertebrates, containing a group of mechanosensitive sensory organs that mediate hearing and balance. These organs are arranged precisely in space and contain intricately patterned sensory epithelia. Here, we review recent studies of inner ear development and patterning which reveal that multiple stages of ear development - ranging from its early induction from the embryonic ectoderm to the establishment of the three cardinal axes and the fine-grained arrangement of sensory cells - are orchestrated by gradients of signaling molecules.

  16. Shaping sound in space: the regulation of inner ear patterning

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Andrew K.; Fekete, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    The inner ear is one of the most morphologically elaborate tissues in vertebrates, containing a group of mechanosensitive sensory organs that mediate hearing and balance. These organs are arranged precisely in space and contain intricately patterned sensory epithelia. Here, we review recent studies of inner ear development and patterning which reveal that multiple stages of ear development – ranging from its early induction from the embryonic ectoderm to the establishment of the three cardinal axes and the fine-grained arrangement of sensory cells – are orchestrated by gradients of signaling molecules. PMID:22186725

  17. Neonatal Hairy Ear Pinnae and Gestational Diabetes: Just a Coincidence?

    PubMed

    Valerio, Enrico; Riello, Laura; Chirico, Michela; Semenzato, Rossella; Cutrone, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A newborn girl of 36 weeks gestation was noted to have several anomalies, including bilateral low ear attachment with ear pinnae hypertrichosis, left preauricular pit, micrognathia, short lingual frenulum, and short neck. Pregnancy history revealed poorly controlled maternal gestational diabetes (GD). Localized hypertrichosis of the ear pinnae may represent a potential marker of GD and thereby alert physicians to suspect other potentially GD-associated conditions such as macrosomia, asphyxia, respiratory distress, hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, hyperbilirubinemia, polycythemia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and congenital anomalies, particularly those involving the central nervous system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Lop ear - knife, tape, or nothing at all?].

    PubMed

    Klockars, Tuomas

    2013-01-01

    More than 200 different surgical techniques of correction of lop ear have been published. The operation is usually recommended to be performed at the age of six years or after. In addition, lop ear surgery involves risks, the most common complications being bleeding, infections, sensory alterations and scarring problems. Surgical preference and decision should always be based on realistic expectations of the patient or the parents, and prior to the decision they should have adequate information about the nature of the procedure and potential complications. Splint therapy of lop ear is possible for infants.

  19. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; hide

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  20. CSF otorhinorrhea in a child with inner ear dysplasia: diagnosis with T2-weighted and intrathecal contrast-enhanced MR cisternography.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Elnur; Alkan, Alpay; Yetis, Huseyin; Aralasmak, Ayse; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-07-01

    During the follow-up of recurrent pneumonia in a 9-month-old girl, rhinorrhea with discharge of a positional and intermittent nature was discovered. Radiological assessment was requested to detect any skull base openings and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. T2-weighted MR cisternography showed bilateral inner ear dysplasia, communication of the internal auditory canal with the vestibule, and effusion in the right middle ear. Intrathecal contrast-enhanced MR cisternography revealed a CSF fistula from the right internal auditory canal to the Eustachian tube. The patient was operated upon on the right side, and the presence of a CSF leak near the oval window was confirmed. No adverse effects were seen during the short-term and long-term follow-up. Diagnosing this case required special attention, careful examination, and relevant investigations to find the site of CSF leakage in this patient with bilateral inner ear dysplasia.

  1. Evolution of Gravity Receptors in the Ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, Arthur N. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The general status of a grant to investigate the origins and evolution of two hair cell types in the ears of a teleost fish, Astronotus ocellatus (the oscar), is presented. First, it was demonstrated that the cells in the rostral end of the saccule of the , Carassius auratus, are type 1-like, while those at the caudal end are type 2 cells. It was demonstrated that the dichotomy of hair cell types found in the utricle of the oscar is also found in the goldfish. Second, the lateral line system of the oscar was examined using gentamicin sulphate, an ototocix drug that destroys type 1- like hair cells but does not appear to damage type 2 hair cells. It was demonstrated that the hair cells found in neuromasts of lateral line canal organs were totally destroyed within 1 day of treatment, while the hair cells in free neuromasts were undamaged after 12 days of treatment. Third, it was demonstrated that the calyx, the specialized nerve ending, is not unique to amniotes and that it is present at least in the cristae of semicirular canals in goldfish. These results have demonstrated that: (1) there are multiple hair cell types in the vestibular endorgans of the ear of fishes, (2) these hair cell types are very similar to those found in the mammalian vestibular endorgans, (3) the nerve calyx is also present in fishes, and (4) multiple hair cell types and the calyx have evolved far earlier in the course of vertebrate evolution than heretofore thought. Understanding the structure of the vestibular endorgans has important implications for being able to understand how these organs respond to gravistatic, acceleration and acoustic input. The vestibular endorgans of fishes may provide an ideal system in which to analyze functional differences in hair cells. Not only are the two hair cell types similar to those found in mammals, they are located in very discrete regions in each endorgan. Thus, it is relatively easy to gain access to cells of one or the other type. The presence of two

  2. EARS : Repositioning data management near data acquisition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinquin, Jean-Marc; Sorribas, Jordi; Diviacco, Paolo; Vandenberghe, Thomas; Munoz, Raquel; Garcia, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    The EU FP7 Projects Eurofleets and Eurofleets2 are an European wide alliance of marine research centers that aim to share their research vessels, to improve information sharing on planned, current and completed cruises, on details of ocean-going research vessels and specialized equipment, and to durably improve cost-effectiveness of cruises. Within this context logging of information on how, when and where anything happens on board of the vessel is crucial information for data users in a later stage. This forms a primordial step in the process of data quality control as it could assist in the understanding of anomalies and unexpected trends recorded in the acquired data sets. In this way completeness of the metadata is improved as it is recorded accurately at the origin of the measurement. The collection of this crucial information has been done in very different ways, using different procedures, formats and pieces of software in the context of the European Research Fleet. At the time that the Eurofleets project started, every institution and country had adopted different strategies and approaches, which complicated the task of users that need to log general purpose information and events on-board whenever they access a different platform loosing the opportunity to produce this valuable metadata on-board. Among the many goals the Eurofleets project has, a very important task is the development of an "event log software" called EARS (Eurofleets Automatic Reporting System) that enables scientists and operators to record what happens during a survey. EARS will allow users to fill, in a standardized way, the gap existing at the moment in metadata description that only very seldom links data with its history. Events generated automatically by acquisition instruments will also be handled, enhancing the granularity and precision of the event annotation. The adoption of a common procedure to log survey events and a common terminology to describe them is crucial to provide

  3. Hearing with an atympanic ear: good vibration and poor sound-pressure detection in the royal python, Python regius.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Christian Bech; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Brandt, Christian; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2012-01-15

    Snakes lack both an outer ear and a tympanic middle ear, which in most tetrapods provide impedance matching between the air and inner ear fluids and hence improve pressure hearing in air. Snakes would therefore be expected to have very poor pressure hearing and generally be insensitive to airborne sound, whereas the connection of the middle ear bone to the jaw bones in snakes should confer acute sensitivity to substrate vibrations. Some studies have nevertheless claimed that snakes are quite sensitive to both vibration and sound pressure. Here we test the two hypotheses that: (1) snakes are sensitive to sound pressure and (2) snakes are sensitive to vibrations, but cannot hear the sound pressure per se. Vibration and sound-pressure sensitivities were quantified by measuring brainstem evoked potentials in 11 royal pythons, Python regius. Vibrograms and audiograms showed greatest sensitivity at low frequencies of 80-160 Hz, with sensitivities of -54 dB re. 1 m s(-2) and 78 dB re. 20 μPa, respectively. To investigate whether pythons detect sound pressure or sound-induced head vibrations, we measured the sound-induced head vibrations in three dimensions when snakes were exposed to sound pressure at threshold levels. In general, head vibrations induced by threshold-level sound pressure were equal to or greater than those induced by threshold-level vibrations, and therefore sound-pressure sensitivity can be explained by sound-induced head vibration. From this we conclude that pythons, and possibly all snakes, lost effective pressure hearing with the complete reduction of a functional outer and middle ear, but have an acute vibration sensitivity that may be used for communication and detection of predators and prey.

  4. Self-ear cleaning practices and the associated risk of ear injuries and ear-related symptoms in a group of university students.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nasim Banu; Thaver, Sivashnee; Govender, Samantha Marlene

    2017-12-31

    Self-ear cleaning is the insertion of objects into the ear canal to clean it, a widespread practice that has the potential to compromise its integrity as a natural, selfcleansing mechanism, and a risk factor for possible injuries. The practice is common among young adults and highest in university than any other graduates. This study aimed to determine the self-ear cleaning practices and associated risk of injury and related symptoms in undergraduate students at KwaZulu-Natal University. The descriptive survey utilized a self-administered questionnaire. Of the 206 participants that responded, 98% engaged in self-ear cleaning, with 75% indicating that it was beneficial. The commonest method (79.6%) being the use of cotton buds, with an associated injury rate of 2.4%. There was no statistically significant associations between those who used or did not use cotton buds and the symptoms experienced. The complications indicate that self-ear cleaning does pose a risk for injury, necessitating more community information and education.

  5. Mechanics and materials in middle ear reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lesser, T H; Williams, K R; Blayney, A W

    1991-02-01

    The normal anatomy and physiology of the middle ear is not reproduced in ossiculoplasty and an artificial mechanism for the transmission of sound results. This is true for all types of graft, be they of natural or man-made material. There are, therefore, 2 areas for consideration when looking at the problems encountered in such reconstructions: first, the materials' biocompatability and, secondly, the mechanical effects of the positioning of the graft in the reconstructed ossicular chain. The present work examines these mechanical effects using the finite element method to determine stress and displacement levels in the reconstructed ossicular chain. It is found that the stress levels at the implant-stapedial joint increases as the implant is gradually moved down the malleus. In contrast there is thought to be an increase in sound transmission as the implant is moved down the malleus. Changes in rigidity and hardness of the implant appear to make only modest stress attenuations at the implant-stapes interface.

  6. Laser vibrometer measurements and middle ear prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Stephen T.; Dornhoffer, John; Ferguson, Scott

    1997-05-01

    One of us has developed an improved partial ossicular replacement prosthesis that is easier to implant and, based on pilot clinical measurements, results in better high-frequency hearing as compared to patients receiving one of the alternative prostheses. It is hypothesized that the primary reason for this is because of the relatively light weight (about 25 mg) and low compliance of the prosthesis, which could conceivably result in better high frequency vibrational characteristics. The purpose of our initial work was to develop an instrument suitable for objectively testing the vibrational characteristics of prostheses. We have developed a laser based device suitable for measuring the vibrational characteristics of the oval window or other structures of the middle ear. We have tested this device using a piezoelectric transducer excited at audio frequencies, as well as on the oval window in human temporal bones harvested from cadavers. The results illustrate that it is possible to non-invasively monitor the vibrational characteristics of anatomic structures with a very inexpensive photonic device.

  7. Gentamicin pharmacokinetics in the chicken inner ear.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Eric C; Park, Debra L; Durham, Dianne; Girod, Douglas A

    2004-06-01

    Avians have the unique ability to regenerate cochlear hair cells that are lost due to ototoxins or excessive noise. Many methodological techniques are available to damage the hair cells for subsequent scientific study. A recent method utilizes topical application of an ototoxic drug to the round window membrane. The current study examines the pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in the inner ear of chickens following topical application to the round window membrane or a single systemic high dose given intraperitoneally. Chickens were given gentamicin topically or systemically and survived for 1, 4, 12, 24, or 120 h (controls at 4 and 120 h). Serum and perilymph samples were obtained prior to sacrifice and measured for gentamicin levels. Results revealed higher levels of gentamicin in the perilymph of topically treated chickens than systemically treated chickens, with significant amounts of gentamicin still present in both at the latest survival time of 5 days. As expected, systemically treated chickens had much higher levels of gentamicin in the serum than topically treated chickens. Advantages and disadvantages to each method of drug administration are discussed.

  8. Why Internally Coupled Ears (ICE) Work Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2014-03-01

    Many vertebrates, such as frogs and lizards, have an air-filled cavity between left and right eardrum, i.e., internally coupled ears (ICE). Depending on source direction, internal time (iTD) and level (iLD) difference as experienced by the animal's auditory system may greatly exceed [C. Vossen et al., JASA 128 (2010) 909-918] the external, or interaural, time and level difference (ITD and ILD). Sensory processing only encodes iTD and iLD. We present an extension of ICE theory so as to elucidate the underlying physics. First, the membrane properties of the eardrum explain why for low frequencies iTD dominates whereas iLD does so for higher frequencies. Second, the plateau of iTD = γ ITD for constant 1 < γ < 5 and variable input frequency <ν∘ follows; e.g., for the Tockay gecko ν∘ ~ 1 . 5 kHz. Third, we use a sectorial instead of circular membrane to quantify the effect of the extracolumella embedded in the tympanum and connecting with the cochlea. The main parameters can be adjusted so that the model is species independent. Work done in collaboration with A.P. Vedurmudi and J. Goulet; partially supported by BCCN-Munich.

  9. Blackbody for metrological control of ear thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-García, D.; Méndez-Lango, E.

    2013-09-01

    Body temperature is an important parameter in medical practice, and most of health diagnoses are made based upon measured temperature values. Non-contact measurements are attractive to both patients and physicians, and ear thermometers (ET) are part of the set of infrared thermometers for medical applications. ETs sense the tympanic membrane temperature which best represents body temperature. They take advantage of the natural high effective emissivity cavity that is formed as radiation source. To calibrate or to check the performance of ETs, we designed a high-emissivity spherical cavity as a blackbody source which can be placed in a dry block oven. Although the blackbody cavity can have any shape, we decided to build it spherical because its effective emissivity can be easily calculated in a closed form. The cavity is made of Aluminum to take advantage of its high thermal conductivity while its inner side is covered with a black paint to increase the cavity effective emissivity. Based on paint emissivity measurements and the geometrical shape, we calculated that the cavity has an effective emissivity higher than 0.999. Blackbody temperature is measured with a calibrated contact thermometer placed inside the bottom wall of the cavity. We present the design of the cavity, the experimental setup, and results of three commercial ETs compared with this cavity.

  10. Green laser light activates the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Balster, Sven; Zhang, Kaiyin; Lim, Hubert H.; Reich, Uta; Massow, Ole; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Guenter

    2009-07-01

    The hearing performance with conventional hearing aids and cochlear implants is dramatically reduced in noisy environments and for sounds more complex than speech (e. g. music), partially due to the lack of localized sensorineural activation across different frequency regions with these devices. Laser light can be focused in a controlled manner and may provide more localized activation of the inner ear, the cochlea. We sought to assess whether visible light with parameters that could induce an optoacoustic effect (532 nm, 10-ns pulses) would activate the cochlea. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded preoperatively in anesthetized guinea pigs to confirm normal hearing. After opening the bulla, a 50-μm core-diameter optical fiber was positioned in the round window niche and directed toward the basilar membrane. Optically induced ABRs (OABRs), similar in shape to those of acoustic stimulation, were elicited with single pulses. The OABR peaks increased with energy level (0.6 to 23 μJ/pulse) and remained consistent even after 30 minutes of continuous stimulation at 13 μJ, indicating minimal or no stimulation-induced damage within the cochlea. Our findings demonstrate that visible light can effectively and reliably activate the cochlea without any apparent damage. Further studies are in progress to investigate the frequency-specific nature and mechanism of green light cochlear activation.

  11. Physiological and behavioral effects of tilt-induced body fluid shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Tjernstrom, O.; Ivarsson, A.; Gulledge, W. L.; Poston, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper addresses the 'fluid shift theory' of space motion sickness. The primary purpose of the research was the development of procedures to assess individual differences in response to rostral body fluid shifts on earth. Experiment I examined inner ear fluid pressure changes during head-down tilt in intact human beings. Tilt produced reliable changes. Differences among subjects and between ears within the same subject were observed. Experiment II examined auditory threshold changes during tilt. Tilt elicited increased auditory thresholds, suggesting that sensory depression may result from increased inner ear fluid pressure. Additional observations on rotation magnitude estimation during head-down tilt, which indicate that rostral fluid shifts may depress semicircular canal activity, are briefly described. The results of this research suggest that the inner ear pressure and auditory threshold shift procedures could be used to assess individual differences among astronauts prior to space flight. Results from the terrestrial observations could be related to reported incidence/severity of motion sickness in space and used to evaluate the fluid shift theory of space motion sickness.

  12. Ensemble training to improve recognition using 2D ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middendorff, Christopher; Bowyer, Kevin W.

    2009-05-01

    The ear has gained popularity as a biometric feature due to the robustness of the shape over time and across emotional expression. Popular methods of ear biometrics analyze the ear as a whole, leaving these methods vulnerable to error due to occlusion. Many researchers explore ear recognition using an ensemble, but none present a method for designing the individual parts that comprise the ensemble. In this work, we introduce a method of modifying the ensemble shapes to improve performance. We determine how different properties of an ensemble training system can affect overall performance. We show that ensembles built from small parts will outperform ensembles built with larger parts, and that incorporating a large number of parts improves the performance of the ensemble.

  13. Tympanostomy Tubes: A Rational Clinical Treatment for Middle Ear Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roland, Peter S.; Brown, Orval

    1990-01-01

    The use of tympanostomy tubes to treat middle ear disease including otitis media is discussed with sections on the eustachian tube; acute otitis media; persistent effusion; changes in the tympanic membrane; special populations; and complications. (DB)

  14. Statistics about Hearing, Balance, Ear Infections and Deafness

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home » Health Info Statistics about Hearing, Balance, Ear Infections, and Deafness Quick Statistics Charts ... What the Numbers Mean: An Epidemiological Perspective on Hearing References on Hearing Epidemiology Last Updated Date: October ...

  15. [Reconstruction of the ear in the burns patient].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Córdova, Jorge Raúl; Jiménez Murat, Yusef; Apellaniz-Campo, Armando; Bracho-Olvera, Hazel; Carrillo Esper, Raúl

    Face burns are a singular pathology with great functional and psychological impact in the patients suffering them. The ears play a fundamental role in personal interactions and damage to this organ results in physical and emotional distress. The reconstructive treatment of the burned ear is a challenge. Multiple procedures have been described to achieve success in the reconstruction of the burned ear; immediate reconstruction with autologous rib cartilage, secondary reconstruction, alloplastic material reconstruction, tissue expansion, skin grafts and also microvascular flaps are some of the most common procedures used in this patients. All these techniques focus on giving a natural appearance to the patient. Burns to the ears affect 30% of the patients with facial burns, they require an excellent treatment given by a multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2017 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. [The endoscopic anatomy of the middle ear (a dissection study)].

    PubMed

    Rzaev, R M; Rzaev, R R

    The objective of the present work was to study the specific endoscopic anatomical features of the middle ear using the dissected temporal bones with the intact tympanic membrane. The 18 cm long endoscopes 4 mm in diameter with a visual angle from 0 to 45 degrees in the combination with some other microinstruments, such as ear pincers, needles, curettes, elevators, and suction tubes, were used during the examination. It was shown that endomeato-transtympanic endosopy provides a panoramic view of almost all structures of the middle ear. After the resection of the posterior bone edge of 'annulus tympanicus', the use of the 45o endoscope ensured the panoramic view not only of certain structures of the middle ear (e.g. the tympanic chord, the stapedius muscle tendon, the entire pyramidal process) but also of the structures of the retrotympanic and anterior epitympanic spaces.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: scalp-ear-nipple syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear nipple syndrome Sources for This Page Marneros AG, Beck AE, Turner EH, McMillin MJ, Edwards MJ, ... qualified healthcare professional . About Selection Criteria for Links Data Files & API Site Map Subscribe Customer Support USA. ...

  18. Multi-resolution analysis for ear recognition using wavelet features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoaib, M.; Basit, A.; Faye, I.

    2016-11-01

    Security is very important and in order to avoid any physical contact, identification of human when they are moving is necessary. Ear biometric is one of the methods by which a person can be identified using surveillance cameras. Various techniques have been proposed to increase the ear based recognition systems. In this work, a feature extraction method for human ear recognition based on wavelet transforms is proposed. The proposed features are approximation coefficients and specific details of level two after applying various types of wavelet transforms. Different wavelet transforms are applied to find the suitable wavelet. Minimum Euclidean distance is used as a matching criterion. Results achieved by the proposed method are promising and can be used in real time ear recognition system.

  19. Ear Infection Treatment Shouldn't Be Shortened

    MedlinePlus

    ... no benefit in terms of adverse events or antibiotic resistance,” says study lead Dr. Alejandro Hoberman of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings confirm that standard antibiotics prescribed for an ear infection should be taken ...

  20. How minute sooglossid frogs hear without a middle ear.

    PubMed

    Boistel, Renaud; Aubin, Thierry; Cloetens, Peter; Peyrin, Françoise; Scotti, Thierry; Herzog, Philippe; Gerlach, Justin; Pollet, Nicolas; Aubry, Jean-François

    2013-09-17

    Acoustic communication is widespread in animals. According to the sensory drive hypothesis [Endler JA (1993) Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 340(1292):215-225], communication signals and perceptual systems have coevolved. A clear illustration of this is the evolution of the tetrapod middle ear, adapted to life on land. Here we report the discovery of a bone conduction-mediated stimulation of the ear by wave propagation in Sechellophryne gardineri, one of the world's smallest terrestrial tetrapods, which lacks a middle ear yet produces acoustic signals. Based on X-ray synchrotron holotomography, we measured the biomechanical properties of the otic tissues and modeled the acoustic propagation. Our models show how bone conduction enhanced by the resonating role of the mouth allows these seemingly deaf frogs to communicate effectively without a middle ear.

  1. Forgotten T-tube in the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Trinidade, Aaron; Khan, Imran; Ah-See, Kim Wong

    2012-05-01

    Retention within the middle ear cleft is an unusual complication of T-tube insertion. A 40-year-old woman with Kartagener's Syndrome presented with hearing impairment in the right ear. She was found to have a previously inserted Goode T-tube lying within the middle ear behind an intact drum. She underwent successful removal of the T-tube via a myringotomy, and a new tube was re-inserted. Migration of a T-tube into the middle ear cleft should always be kept in mind in patients who present with otological symptoms and have a history of T-tube insertion, even in the presence of an intact drum.

  2. Sonographic Measurement of Fetal Ear Length in Turkish Women with a Normal Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Mucize Eriç; Uzun, Işıl; Karahasanoğlu, Ayşe; Aygün, Mehmet; Akın, Hale; Yazıcıoğlu, Fehmi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abnormal fetal ear length is a feature of chromosomal disorders. Fetal ear length measurement is a simple measurement that can be obtained during ultrasonographic examinations. Aims: To develop a nomogram for fetal ear length measurements in our population and investigate the correlation between fetal ear length, gestational age, and other standard fetal biometric measurements. Study Design: Cohort study. Methods: Ear lengths of the fetuses were measured in normal singleton pregnancies. The relationship between gestational age and fetal ear length in millimetres was analysed by simple linear regression. In addition, the correlation of fetal ear length measurements with biparietal diameter, head circumference, abdominal circumference, and femur length were evaluated.Ear length measurements were obtained from fetuses in 389 normal singleton pregnancies ranging between 16 and 28 weeks of gestation. Results: A nomogram was developed by linear regression analysis of the parameters ear length and gestational age. Fetal ear length (mm) = y = (1.348 X gestational age)−12.265), where gestational ages is in weeks. A high correlation was found between fetal ear length and gestational age, and a significant correlation was also found between fetal ear length and the biparietal diameter (r=0.962; p<0.001). Similar correlations were found between fetal ear length and head circumference, and fetal ear length and femur length. Conclusion: The results of this study provide a nomogram for fetal ear length. The study also demonstrates the relationship between ear length and other biometric measurements. PMID:25667783

  3. "Triplet" polycistronic vectors encoding Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 enhances postinfarct ventricular functional improvement compared with singlet vectors.

    PubMed

    Mathison, Megumi; Singh, Vivek P; Gersch, Robert P; Ramirez, Maricela O; Cooney, Austin; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Nasser, Ahmed; Yang, Jianchang; Crystal, Ronald G; Rosengart, Todd K

    2014-10-01

    The in situ reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocytes by the administration of gene transfer vectors encoding Gata4 (G), Mef2c (M), and Tbx5 (T) has been shown to improve ventricular function in myocardial infarction models. The efficacy of this strategy could, however, be limited by the need for fibroblast targets to be infected 3 times--once by each of the 3 transgene vectors. We hypothesized that a polycistronic "triplet" vector encoding all 3 transgenes would enhance postinfarct ventricular function compared with use of "singlet" vectors. After validation of the polycistronic vector expression in vitro, adult male Fischer 344 rats (n=6) underwent coronary ligation with or without intramyocardial administration of an adenovirus encoding all 3 major vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) isoforms (AdVEGF-All6A positive), followed 3 weeks later by the administration to AdVEGF-All6A-positive treated rats of singlet lentivirus encoding G, M, or T (1×10(5) transducing units each) or the same total dose of a GMT "triplet" lentivirus vector. Western blots demonstrated that triplet and singlet vectors yielded equivalent GMT transgene expression, and fluorescence activated cell sorting demonstrated that triplet vectors were nearly twice as potent as singlet vectors in generating induced cardiomyocytes from cardiac fibroblasts. Echocardiography demonstrated that GMT triplet vectors were more effective than the 3 combined singlet vectors in enhancing ventricular function from postinfarct baselines (triplet, 37%±10%; singlet, 13%±7%; negative control, 9%±5%; P<.05). These data have confirmed that the in situ administration of G, M, and T induces postinfarct ventricular functional improvement and that GMT polycistronic vectors enhance the efficacy of this strategy. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Induction of cardiomyocyte-like cells in infarct hearts by gene transfer of Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5.

    PubMed

    Inagawa, Kohei; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Muraoka, Naoto; Sadahiro, Taketaro; Umei, Tomohiko; Wada, Rie; Katsumata, Yoshinori; Kaneda, Ruri; Nakade, Koji; Kurihara, Chitose; Obata, Yuichi; Miyake, Koichi; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ieda, Masaki

    2012-10-12

    After myocardial infarction (MI), massive cell death in the myocardium initiates fibrosis and scar formation, leading to heart failure. We recently found that a combination of 3 cardiac transcription factors, Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT), reprograms fibroblasts directly into functional cardiomyocytes in vitro. To investigate whether viral gene transfer of GMT into infarcted hearts induces cardiomyocyte generation. Coronary artery ligation was used to generate MI in the mouse. In vitro transduction of GMT retrovirus converted cardiac fibroblasts from the infarct region into cardiomyocyte-like cells with cardiac-specific gene expression and sarcomeric structures. Injection of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) retrovirus into mouse hearts, immediately after MI, infected only proliferating noncardiomyocytes, mainly fibroblasts, in the infarct region. The GFP expression diminished after 2 weeks in immunocompetent mice but remained stable for 3 months in immunosuppressed mice, in which cardiac induction did not occur. In contrast, injection of GMT retrovirus into α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC)-GFP transgenic mouse hearts induced the expression of αMHC-GFP, a marker of cardiomyocytes, in 3% of virus-infected cells after 1 week. A pooled GMT injection into the immunosuppressed mouse hearts induced cardiac marker expression in retrovirus-infected cells within 2 weeks, although few cells showed striated muscle structures. To transduce GMT efficiently in vivo, we generated a polycistronic retrovirus expressing GMT separated by 2A "self-cleaving" peptides (3F2A). The 3F2A-induced cardiomyocyte-like cells in fibrotic tissue expressed sarcomeric α-actinin and cardiac troponin T and had clear cross striations. Quantitative RT-PCR also demonstrated that FACS-sorted 3F2A-transduced cells expressed cardiac-specific genes. GMT gene transfer induced cardiomyocyte-like cells in infarcted hearts.

  5. Targeting the MEF2-Like Transcription Factor Smp1 by the Stress-Activated Hog1 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Eulàlia de; Casadomé, Laura; Posas, Francesc

    2003-01-01

    Exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to increases in extracellular osmolarity activates the stress-activated Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is essential for cell survival upon osmotic stress. Yeast cells respond to osmotic stress by inducing the expression of a very large number of genes, and the Hog1 MAPK plays a critical role in gene transcription upon stress. To understand how Hog1 controls gene expression, we designed a genetic screen to isolate new transcription factors under the control of the MAPK and identified the MEF2-like transcription factor, Smp1, as a target for Hog1. Overexpression of SMP1 induced Hog1-dependent expression of osmoresponsive genes such as STL1, whereas smp1Δ cells were defective in their expression. Consistently, smp1Δ cells displayed reduced viability upon osmotic shock. In vivo coprecipitation and phosphorylation studies showed that Smp1 and Hog1 interact and that Smp1 is phosphorylated upon osmotic stress in a Hog1-dependent manner. Hog1 phosphorylated Smp1 in vitro at the C-terminal region. Phosphorylation of Smp1 by the MAPK is essential for its function, since a mutant allele unable to be phosphorylated by the MAPK displays impaired stress responses. Thus, our data indicate that Smp1 acts downstream of Hog1, controlling a subset of the responses induced by the MAPK. Moreover, Smp1 concentrates in the nucleus during the stationary phase, and the lack of SMP1 results in cells that lose viability in the stationary phase. Localization of Smp1 depends on HOG1, and consistently, hog1Δ cells also lose viability during this growth phase. These data suggest that Smp1 could be mediating a role for the Hog1 MAPK during the stationary phase. PMID:12482976

  6. Prevalence of external ear disorders in Belgian stray cats.

    PubMed

    Bollez, Anouck; de Rooster, Hilde; Furcas, Alessandra; Vandenabeele, Sophie

    2018-02-01

    Objectives Feline otitis externa is a multifactorial dermatological disorder about which very little is known. The objective of this study was to map the prevalence of external ear canal disorders and the pathogens causing otitis externa in stray cats roaming around the region of Ghent, Belgium. Methods One hundred and thirty stray cats were randomly selected during a local trap-neuter-return programme. All cats were European Shorthairs. This study included clinical, otoscopic and cytological evaluation of both external ears of each cat. Prospective data used as parameters in this study included the sex, age and body condition score of each cat, as well as the presence of nasal and/or ocular discharge, and the results of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) Snap tests. Results Remarkably, very few (sub)clinical problems of the external ear canal were found in the stray cat population. Malassezia species was by far the most common organism found in the external ear canals of the 130 stray cats. A total of 96/130 (74%) cats were found to have Malassezia species organisms present in one or both ears based on the cytological examination. No correlation was found between the parameters of sex, age, body condition score, the presence of nasal and/or ocular discharge and FIV and FeLV status, and the presence of parasites, bacteria or yeasts. Conclusions and relevance This study provides more information about the normal state of the external ear canal of stray cats. The ears of most stray cats are relatively healthy. The presence of Malassezia species organisms in the external ear canal is not rare among stray cats.

  7. Magnetic Nanoparticles as Mechanical Actuators of Inner Ear Hair Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0039 Magnetic nanoparticles as mechanical actuators of inner ear hair cells Dolores Bozovic UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Magnetic nanoparticles as mechanical actuators of inner ear hair cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N.A. 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The collaborative project was designed to edevelop the use of magnetic nanoparticles to manipulate auditory hair

  8. Prominent ears and their correction: a forty-year experience.

    PubMed

    Georgiade, G S; Riefkohl, R; Georgiade, N G

    1995-01-01

    The technique described in this article correcting the protruding ear deformity has evolved over 40 years. The original procedures and our subsequent modifications are described, including 20-year followup results. The possible pitfalls in carrying out this procedure and how to avoid them are also described. A relatively standardized short procedure with minimal morbidity and maximum long-term results yields an aesthetically satisfactory looking ear.

  9. A break-even analysis of major ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Wasson, J D; Phillips, J S

    2015-10-01

    To determine variables which affect cost and profit for major ear surgery and perform a break-even analysis. Retrospective financial analysis. UK teaching hospital. Patients who underwent major ear surgery under general anaesthesia performed by the senior author in main theatre over a 2-year period between dates of 07 September 2010 and 07 September 2012. Income, cost and profit for each major ear patient spell. Variables that affect major ear surgery profitability. Seventy-six patients met inclusion criteria. Wide variation in earnings, with a median net loss of £-1345.50 was observed. Income was relatively uniform across all patient spells; however, theatre time of major ear surgery at a cost of £953.24 per hour varied between patients and was the main determinant of cost and profit for the patient spell. Bivariate linear regression of earnings on theatre time identified 94% of variation in earnings was due to variation in theatre time (r = -0.969; P < 0.0001) and derived a break-even time for major ear surgery of 110.6 min. Theatre time was dependent on complexity of procedure and number of OPCS4 procedures performed, with a significant increase in theatre time when three or more procedures were performed during major ear surgery (P = 0.015). For major ear surgery to either break-even or return a profit, total theatre time should not exceed 110 min and 36 s. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Lumped parametric model of the human ear for sound transmission.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; Gan, Rong Z

    2004-09-01

    A lumped parametric model of the human auditoria peripherals consisting of six masses suspended with six springs and ten dashpots was proposed. This model will provide the quantitative basis for the construction of a physical model of the human middle ear. The lumped model parameters were first identified using published anatomical data, and then determined through a parameter optimization process. The transfer function of the middle ear obtained from human temporal bone experiments with laser Doppler interferometers was used for creating the target function during the optimization process. It was found that, among 14 spring and dashpot parameters, there were five parameters which had pronounced effects on the dynamic behaviors of the model. The detailed discussion on the sensitivity of those parameters was provided with appropriate applications for sound transmission in the ear. We expect that the methods for characterizing the lumped model of the human ear and the model parameters will be useful for theoretical modeling of the ear function and construction of the ear physical model.

  11. KGFR as a possible therapeutic target in middle ear cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Fukuda, Tomomi; Akiyama, Naotaro; Shibata, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Haruo; Ikeda, Tohru; Kohno, Michiaki; Koji, Takehiko

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrated that repression of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) receptor (KGFR) could be a potentially useful strategy in the conservative treatment of middle ear cholesteatoma. Recently, the use of a selective inhibitor of the KGFR, SU5402, in an in vitro experiment resulted in the inhibition of the differentiation and proliferation of epithelial cells through KGF secretion by fibroblasts isolated from the cholesteatoma. In this study, we investigated the effects of the KGFR inhibitor during middle ear cholesteatoma formation in vivo. Based on the role of KGF in the development of cholesteatoma, Flag-hKGF cDNA driven by CMV14 promoter was transfected through electroporation into the external auditory canal of rats five times on every fourth day. Ears transfected with empty vector were used as controls. KGFR selective inhibitor (SU5402) or MEK inhibitor (PD0325901) was administered in the right ear of five rats after vector transfection. In the control, 2% DMSO in PBS was administered in the other ears after vector transfection. The use of a selective KGFR inhibitor, SU5402, completely prevented middle ear cholesteatoma formation in the rats.

  12. Development of a finite element model of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Williams, K R; Blayney, A W; Rice, H J

    1996-01-01

    A representative finite element model of the healthy ear is developed commencing with a description of the decoupled isotropic tympanic membrane. This model was shown to vibrate in a manner similar to that found both numerically (1, 2) and experimentally (8). The introduction of a fibre system into the membrane matrix significantly altered the modes of vibration. The first mode "remains as a piston like movement as for the isotropic membrane. However, higher modes show a simpler vibration pattern similar to the second mode but with a varying axis of movement and lower amplitudes. The introduction of a malleus and incus does not change the natural frequencies or mode shapes of the membrane for certain support conditions. When constraints are imposed along the ossicular chain by simulation of a cochlear impedance term then significantly altered modes can occur. More recently a revised model of the ear has been developed by the inclusion of the outer ear canal. This discretisation uses geometries extracted from a Nuclear Magnetic resonance scan of a healthy subject and a crude inner ear model using stiffness parameters ultimately fixed through a parameter tuning process. The subsequently tuned model showed behaviour consistent with previous findings and should provide a good basis for subsequent modelling of diseased ears and assessment of the performance of middle ear prostheses.

  13. Continuous 24-hour measurement of middle ear pressure.

    PubMed

    Tideholm, B; Jönsson, S; Carlborg, B; Welinder, R; Grenner, J

    1996-07-01

    A new method was developed for continuous measurement of the middle ear pressure during a 24-h period. The equipment consisted of a piezo-electric pressure device and a digital memory. To allow continuous pressure recordings during normal every-day activities the equipment was made light and portable. The measurement accuracy of the equipment as well as the base-line and temperature stability were tested and found to meet to our requirements satisfactorily. In 4 volunteers with different middle ear conditions, a small perforation was made through the tympanic membrane. A rubber stopper containing a small polyethylene tube was fitted into the external ear canal. Tubal function tests were made to establish the equipment's ability to monitor fast pressure changes. The tests were well in accordance with other methods of direct pressure measurements. The equipment was carried by the volunteers for 24 h to monitor any slow or rapid dynamic pressure changes in the middle ear. Four continuous 24-h measurements are presented. The method was found to be suitable for valid measurements of dynamic pressure changes in the middle ear during normal every-day activities. It may become a useful instrument in the search for a better understanding of the development of chronic middle ear disease.

  14. Vitamin D receptor deficiency impairs inner ear development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hye-Joo

    2016-09-16

    The biological actions of vitamin D are largely mediated through binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, which regulates gene expression in a wide variety of tissues and cells. Mutations in VDR gene have been implicated in ear disorders (hearing loss and balance disorder) but the mechanisms are not well established. In this study, to investigate the role of VDR in inner ear development, morpholino-mediated gene knockdown approaches were used in zebrafish model system. Two paralogs for VDR, vdra and vdrb, have been identified in zebrafish. Knockdown of vdra had no effect on ear development, whereas knockdown of vdrb displayed morphological ear defects including smaller otic vesicles with malformed semicircular canals and abnormal otoliths. Loss-of-vdrb resulted in down-regulation of pre-otic markers, pax8 and pax2a, indicating impairment of otic induction. Furthermore, zebrafish embryos lacking vdrb produced fewer sensory hair cells in the ears and showed disruption of balance and motor coordination. These data reveal that VDR signaling plays an important role in ear development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Revisiting gender, race, and ear differences in peripheral auditory function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothalingam, Sriram; Klyn, Niall A. M.; Stiepan, Samantha M.; Wilson, Uzma S.; Lee, Jungwha; Siegel, Jonathan H.; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2018-05-01

    Various measures of auditory function are reported to be superior in females as compared to males, in African American compared to Caucasian individuals, and in right compared to left ears. We re-examined the influence of these subject variables on hearing thresholds and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) in a sample of 887 human participants between 10 and 68 years of age. Even though the variables of interest here have been examined before, previous attempts have largely been limited to frequencies up to 8 kHz. We used state-of-the-art signal delivery and recording techniques that compensated for individual differences in ear canal acoustics, allowing us to measure hearing thresholds and OAEs up to 20 kHz. The use of these modern calibration and recording techniques provided the motivation for re-examining these commonly studied variables. While controlling for age, noise exposure history, and general health history, we attempted to isolate the effects of gender, race, and ear (left versus right) on hearing thresholds and OAEs. Our results challenge the notion of a right ear advantage and question the existence of a significant gender and race differences in both hearing thresholds and OAE levels. These results suggest that ear canal anatomy and acoustics should be important considerations when evaluating the influence of gender, race, and ear on peripheral auditory function.

  16. Alternative splicing of inner-ear-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Liu, Yueyue; Nie, Hongyun; Ma, Xin; Xu, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Alternative splicing plays a fundamental role in the development and physiological function of the inner ear. Inner-ear-specific gene splicing is necessary to establish the identity and maintain the function of the inner ear. For example, exon 68 of Cadherin 23 (Cdh23) gene is subject to inner-ear-specific alternative splicing, and as a result, Cdh23(+ 68) is only expressed in inner ear hair cells. Alternative splicing along the tonotopic axis of the cochlea contributes to frequency tuning, particularly in lower vertebrates, such as chickens and turtles. Differential splicing of Kcnma1, which encodes for the α subunit of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK channel), has been suggested to affect the channel gating properties and is important for frequency tuning. Consequently, deficits in alternative splicing have been shown to cause hearing loss, as we can observe in Bronx Waltzer (bv) mice and Sfswap mutant mice. Despite the advances in this field, the regulation of alternative splicing in the inner ear remains elusive. Further investigation is also needed to clarify the mechanism of hearing loss caused by alternative splicing deficits.

  17. Inner ear test battery in guinea pig models - a review.

    PubMed

    Young, Yi-Ho

    2018-06-01

    This study reviewed the development of the inner ear test battery comprising auditory brainstem response (ABR), and caloric, ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP), and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) tests in guinea pig models at our laboratory over the last 20 years. Detailed description of the methodology for testing the small animals is also included. Inner ear disorders, i.e. ototoxicity, noise exposure, or perilymph fistula were established in guinea pig models first. One to four weeks after operation, each animal underwent ABR, oVEMP, cVEMP, and caloric tests. Then, animals were sacrificed for morphological study in the temporal bones. Inner ear endorgans can be comprehensively evaluated in guinea pig models via an inner ear test battery, which provides thorough information on the cochlea, saccule, utricle, and semicircular canal function of guinea pigs. Coupled with morphological study in the temporal bones of the animals may help elucidate the mechanism of inner ear disorders in humans. The inner ear test battery in guinea pig models may encourage young researchers to perform basic study in animals and stimulate the progress of experimental otology which is in evolution.

  18. Auditory Brainstem Circuits That Mediate the Middle Ear Muscle Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Sudeep; Windsor, Alanna Marie; Lee, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    The middle ear muscle (MEM) reflex is one of two major descending systems to the auditory periphery. There are two middle ear muscles (MEMs): the stapedius and the tensor tympani. In man, the stapedius contracts in response to intense low frequency acoustic stimuli, exerting forces perpendicular to the stapes superstructure, increasing middle ear impedance and attenuating the intensity of sound energy reaching the inner ear (cochlea). The tensor tympani is believed to contract in response to self-generated noise (chewing, swallowing) and nonauditory stimuli. The MEM reflex pathways begin with sound presented to the ear. Transduction of sound occurs in the cochlea, resulting in an action potential that is transmitted along the auditory nerve to the cochlear nucleus in the brainstem (the first relay station for all ascending sound information originating in the ear). Unknown interneurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus project either directly or indirectly to MEM motoneurons located elsewhere in the brainstem. Motoneurons provide efferent innervation to the MEMs. Although the ascending and descending limbs of these reflex pathways have been well characterized, the identity of the reflex interneurons is not known, as are the source of modulatory inputs to these pathways. The aim of this article is to (a) provide an overview of MEM reflex anatomy and physiology, (b) present new data on MEM reflex anatomy and physiology from our laboratory and others, and (c) describe the clinical implications of our research. PMID:20870664

  19. Minnesota wolf ear lengths as possible indicators of taxonomic differences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David

    2011-01-01

    Genetic findings suggest that 2 types of wolves, Canis lupus (Gray Wolf) and C. lycaon (Eastern Wolf), and/or their hybrids occupy Minnesota (MN), and this study examines adult wolf ear lengths as a possible distinguisher between these two. Photographic evidence suggested that the Eastern Wolf possesses proportionately longer ears than Gray Wolves. Ear lengths from 22 northwestern MN wolves from the early 1970s and 22 Alaskan wolves were used to represent Gray Wolves, and the greatest length of the sample (12.8 cm) was used as the least length to demarcate Eastern Wolf from Gray Wolf influence in the samples. Twenty-three percent of 112 adult wolves from Algonquin Park in eastern Ontario and 30% of 106 recent adult wolves in northeastern MN possessed ears >12.8 cm. The northeastern MN sample differed significantly from that of current and past northwestern MN wolves. Ear-lengths of wolves in the eastern half of the northeastern MN wolf population were significantly longer than those in the western half of that study area, even though the mean distance between the 2 areas was only 40 km, and the mean length of my 2004–2009 sample was significantly longer than that of 1999–2003. These findings support the hypothesis that Eastern Wolves tend to possess longer ears than do Gray Wolves and suggest a dynamic hybridization process is still underway in MN.

  20. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  1. Leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate 'LTBL' caused by EARS2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Steenweg, Marjan E; Ghezzi, Daniele; Haack, Tobias; Abbink, Truus E M; Martinelli, Diego; van Berkel, Carola G M; Bley, Annette; Diogo, Luisa; Grillo, Eugenio; Te Water Naudé, Johann; Strom, Tim M; Bertini, Enrico; Prokisch, Holger; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Zeviani, Massimo

    2012-05-01

    In the large group of genetically undetermined infantile-onset mitochondrial encephalopathies, multiple defects of mitochondrial DNA-related respiratory-chain complexes constitute a frequent biochemical signature. In order to identify responsible genes, we used exome-next-generation sequencing in a selected cohort of patients with this biochemical signature. In an isolated patient, we found two mutant alleles for EARS2, the gene encoding mitochondrial glutamyl-tRNA synthetase. The brain magnetic resonance imaging of this patient was hallmarked by extensive symmetrical cerebral white matter abnormalities sparing the periventricular rim and symmetrical signal abnormalities of the thalami, midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata and cerebellar white matter. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed increased lactate. We matched this magnetic resonance imaging pattern with that of a cohort of 11 previously selected unrelated cases. We found mutations in the EARS2 gene in all. Subsequent detailed clinical and magnetic resonance imaging based phenotyping revealed two distinct groups: mild and severe. All 12 patients shared an infantile onset and rapidly progressive disease with severe magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and increased lactate in body fluids and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Patients in the 'mild' group partially recovered and regained milestones in the following years with striking magnetic resonance imaging improvement and declining lactate levels, whereas those of the 'severe' group were characterized by clinical stagnation, brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging and persistent lactate increases. This new neurological disease, early-onset leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate, is hallmarked by unique magnetic resonance imaging features, defined by a peculiar biphasic clinical course and caused by mutations in a single gene, EARS2, expanding the list of medically relevant defects of mitochondrial

  2. Repair of Tympanic Membrane Perforations with Customized Bioprinted Ear Grafts Using Chinchilla Models.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Che-Ying; Wilson, Emmanuel; Fuson, Andrew; Gandhi, Nidhi; Monfaredi, Reza; Jenkins, Audrey; Romero, Maria; Santoro, Marco; Fisher, John P; Cleary, Kevin; Reilly, Brian

    2018-03-01

    The goal of this work is to develop an innovative method that combines bioprinting and endoscopic imaging to repair tympanic membrane perforations (TMPs). TMPs are a serious health issue because they can lead to both conductive hearing loss and repeated otitis media. TMPs occur in 3-5% of cases after ear tube placement, as well as in cases of acute otitis media (the second most common infection in pediatrics), chronic otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, or as a result of barotrauma to the ear. About 55,000 tympanoplasties, the surgery performed to reconstruct TMPs, are performed every year, and the commonly used cartilage grafting technique has a success rate between 43% and 100%. This wide variability in successful tympanoplasty indicates that the current approach relies heavily on the skill of the surgeon to carve the shield graft into the shape of the TMP, which can be extremely difficult because of the perforation's irregular shape. To this end, we hypothesized that patient specific acellular grafts can be bioprinted to repair TMPs. In vitro data demonstrated that our approach resulted in excellent wound healing responses (e.g., cell invasion and proliferations) using our bioprinted gelatin methacrylate constructs. Based on these results, we then bioprinted customized acellular grafts to treat TMP based on endoscopic imaging of the perforation and demonstrated improved TMP healing in a chinchilla study. These ear graft techniques could transform clinical practice by eliminating the need for hand-carved grafts. To our knowledge, this is the first proof of concept of using bioprinting and endoscopic imaging to fabricate customized grafts to treat tissue perforations. This technology could be transferred to other medical pathologies and be used to rapidly scan internal organs such as intestines for microperforations, brain covering (Dura mater) for determination of sites of potential cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and vascular systems to determine arterial

  3. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  4. Donor site reconstitution for ear reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fattah, Adel; Sebire, Neil J; Bulstrode, Neil W

    2010-09-01

    Current techniques of autologous ear reconstruction involve the soft tissue coverage of a carved costal cartilage framework. However, assessment of the morbidity associated with this donor site has been little documented. This study describes a method to reconstruct the defect and analyses the outcomes with or without donor site reconstitution. The donor site was reconstituted by wrapping morcelised cartilage in a vicryl mesh. Twenty-one patients with reconstitution and nine without were recruited to the study. Scar quality and length, dimensions of donor defect and visible deformity were recorded according to a modified Vancouver scar scale. Patients were also assessed by the SF36 questionnaire, a well-validated health survey. In a subset of our study group, we assessed the fate of the donor site reconstitution by direct visualisation in situ and histological analysis. Fifteen donor sites of patients without donor site reconstitution were compared to 23 reconstructed donor sites. In those without, all had a palpable defect with nearly half exhibiting visible chest deformity. In contrast, those that had rib reconstitution did not demonstrate significant chest wall deformity. Intraoperative examination demonstrated formation of a neo-rib, histologically proven to comprise hyaline cartilage admixed with fibrous tissue. Analysis of SF36 results showed a higher satisfaction in the reconstituted group, but in both groups, the donor site was of little overall morbidity. Although there is little difference between the groups in terms of subjectively perceived benefit, rib reconstitution is objectively associated with better costal margin contour and less chest wall deformity. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Finite-Element Modelling of the Acoustic Input Admittance of the Newborn Ear Canal and Middle Ear.

    PubMed

    Motallebzadeh, Hamid; Maftoon, Nima; Pitaro, Jacob; Funnell, W Robert J; Daniel, Sam J

    2017-02-01

    Admittance measurement is a promising tool for evaluating the status of the middle ear in newborns. However, the newborn ear is anatomically very different from the adult one, and the acoustic input admittance is different than in adults. To aid in understanding the differences, a finite-element model of the newborn ear canal and middle ear was developed and its behaviour was studied for frequencies up to 2000 Hz. Material properties were taken from previous measurements and estimates. The simulation results were within the range of clinical admittance measurements made in newborns. Sensitivity analyses of the material properties show that in the canal model, the maximum admittance and the frequency at which that maximum admittance occurs are affected mainly by the stiffness parameter; in the middle-ear model, the damping is as important as the stiffness in influencing the maximum admittance magnitude but its effect on the corresponding frequency is negligible. Scaling up the geometries increases the admittance magnitude and shifts the resonances to lower frequencies. The results suggest that admittance measurements can provide more information about the condition of the middle ear when made at multiple frequencies around its resonance.

  6. Fumonisin B(1)-nonproducing strains of Fusarium verticillioides cause maize (Zea mays) ear infection and ear rot.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, A E; Plattner, R D

    2000-11-01

    Fumonisins are polyketide mycotoxins produced by Fusarium verticillioides (synonym F. moniliforme), a major pathogen of maize (Zea mays) worldwide. Most field strains produce high levels of fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) and low levels of the less-oxygenated homologues FB(2) and FB(3), but fumonisin B(1)-nonproducing field strains have been obtained by natural variation. To test the role of various fumonisins in pathogenesis on maize under field conditions, one strain producing FB(1), FB(2), and FB(3), one strain producing only FB(2), one strain producing only FB(3), and one fumonisin-nonproducing strain were applied to ears via the silk channel and on seeds at planting. Disease severity on the harvested ears was evaluated by visible symptoms and by weight percent symptomatic kernels. Fumonisin levels in kernels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The presence of the applied FB(1)-nonproducing strains in kernels was determined by analysis of recovered strains for fumonisin production and other traits. All three FB(1)-nonproducing strains were able to infect ears following either silk-channel application or seed application at planting and were as effective as the FB(1)-producing strain in causing ear rot following silk-channel application. These results indicate that production of FB(1), FB(2), or FB(3) is not required for F. verticillioides to cause maize ear infection and ear rot.

  7. Tail Docking and Ear Cropping Dogs: Public Awareness and Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Katelyn E.; Robbins, Jesse; von Keyserlingk, Marina A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Tail docking and ear cropping are two surgical procedures commonly performed on many dog breeds. These procedures are classified as medically unnecessary surgeries whose purpose is primarily cosmetic. Available attitude research surrounding these controversial practices has been limited to surveys of veterinarians and dog breeders familiar with both practices. The aim of this project was to: 1) assess public awareness of tail docking and ear cropping, 2) determine whether physical alteration of a dog affects how the dog, and 3) owner are perceived. In Experiment 1 awareness was measured using a combination of both explicit and implicit measures. We found that 42% of participants (n = 810) were unable to correctly explain the reason why tail docked and ear cropped dogs had short ears and tails. Similarly, an implicit measure of awareness (‘nature vs nurture task’), found that the majority of participants believed short tails and erect ears were a consequence of genetics rather than something the owner or breeder had done. The results obtained in Experiment 2 (n = 392) provide evidence that ear cropped and tail docked dogs are perceived differently than an identical dog in its ‘natural’ state. Modified dogs were perceived as being more aggressive, more dominant, less playful and less attractive than natural dogs. Experiment 3 (n = 410) is the first evidence that owners of modified dogs are perceived as being more aggressive, more narcissistic, less playful, less talkative and less warm compared to owners of natural dogs. Taken together, these results suggest that although a significant proportion of subjects appear unaware of the practices of tail docking and ear cropping in dogs, these procedures have significant impacts on how modified dogs and their owners are perceived by others. PMID:27348817

  8. Retroauricular skin: a flaps bank for ear reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cordova, A; D'Arpa, S; Pirrello, R; Giambona, C; Moschella, F

    2008-01-01

    The retroauricular skin has always been given much attention by the reconstructive surgeon for ear and face reconstruction because it is richly vascularised, as many anatomical investigations show, it is hidden behind the ear, its skin is very similar to that of ear and face. All these reasons make it an ideal donor site for ear reconstruction. The authors propose their own algorithm for reconstruction of every kind of anterior defects of the auricle with different Retroauricular Island Flaps (RIFs) based on the location and size of the defect developed over a 16 years single institution's experience with a series of 216 consecutive cases. 216 patients have undergone ear reconstruction with RIFs from 1999 to 2006. In 52 a Superior Pedicle RIF (SP-RIF) was used for defects of the upper half of the auricle. In 68 cases a Perforator RIF (P-RIF) was used for conchal reconstruction. In 96 cases an Inferior Pedicle RIF (IP-RIF) was used for reconstruction of nonmarginal and superficial marginal defects of the auricle. No flap failure was recorded. Excellent morphological reconstruction was obtained with these flaps with no sequealae at the donor site in terms of form and function. Only in the case of P-RIFs the sulcus becomes flat in its central part, but this has never affected the possibility of wearing spectacles. The SP-RIFs may sometimes show some signs of venous stasis that invariably resolve in the first two postoperative days. The retroauricular skin may be considered a flaps bank for ear reconstruction. It offers in fact a great variety of island flaps that are suitable for every kind of loss of substance of the ear, have a safe vascularisation, skin of similar colour and texture, are easy to harvest under local anaesthesia on an outpatient basis and cause no relevant morbidity at the donor site. Location and size of the defects lead the choice between the different types of RIFs.

  9. Tail Docking and Ear Cropping Dogs: Public Awareness and Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Mills, Katelyn E; Robbins, Jesse; von Keyserlingk, Marina A G

    2016-01-01

    Tail docking and ear cropping are two surgical procedures commonly performed on many dog breeds. These procedures are classified as medically unnecessary surgeries whose purpose is primarily cosmetic. Available attitude research surrounding these controversial practices has been limited to surveys of veterinarians and dog breeders familiar with both practices. The aim of this project was to: 1) assess public awareness of tail docking and ear cropping, 2) determine whether physical alteration of a dog affects how the dog, and 3) owner are perceived. In Experiment 1 awareness was measured using a combination of both explicit and implicit measures. We found that 42% of participants (n = 810) were unable to correctly explain the reason why tail docked and ear cropped dogs had short ears and tails. Similarly, an implicit measure of awareness ('nature vs nurture task'), found that the majority of participants believed short tails and erect ears were a consequence of genetics rather than something the owner or breeder had done. The results obtained in Experiment 2 (n = 392) provide evidence that ear cropped and tail docked dogs are perceived differently than an identical dog in its 'natural' state. Modified dogs were perceived as being more aggressive, more dominant, less playful and less attractive than natural dogs. Experiment 3 (n = 410) is the first evidence that owners of modified dogs are perceived as being more aggressive, more narcissistic, less playful, less talkative and less warm compared to owners of natural dogs. Taken together, these results suggest that although a significant proportion of subjects appear unaware of the practices of tail docking and ear cropping in dogs, these procedures have significant impacts on how modified dogs and their owners are perceived by others.

  10. Two stage ear/microtia reconstruction using costal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S M

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of Grade III microtia is a challenging entity in maxillofacial esthetic rehabilitation. Several advocacies and philosophies exist in this field. The aim of the manuscript is to present a single South Indian Experience with Ear reconstruction among South Indian Population. Retrospective analysis of unilateral Grade III microtia reconstruction was performed. Using a set of predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, the population was selected. Outcome measures in terms of the ear size, auriculocephalic angle, and the conchal depth were measured in the reconstructed and normal side. Descriptive statistics is presented. Twenty-four patients formed the study group and had undergone the classical two-stage reconstruction in a similar fashion. The mean ear size in normal side was 65.8 ± 2.8 mm whereas on the reconstructed side, it was 61.3 ± 5.8 mm. The center's technique achieved above 75% similarity as that of the other normal ear. The mean auriculocephalic angle was 44.6 ± 5.2° whereas for the surgically reconstructed ear, it was 41.9 ± 2.6°. Overall, in these patients, we achieved a 79.94% similarity of auriculocephalic angle in the reconstructed ear as compared to the normal auricle. The conchal depth was 19.2 ± 2.1 mm and 16.6 ± 1.9 mm for normal and reconstructed ear, respectively. In terms of conchal depth, the present study group showed an achievement of 82.88% of accuracy even after a prolonged follow-up. The center employs a classic two stage reconstruction with a customized prosthesis that helps to avoid the loss of projection geometry and minimizes adhesion, infection, and early loss of structural stability.

  11. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Ear Morphology.

    PubMed

    Modabber, Ali; Galster, Helmut; Peters, Florian; Möhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Kniha, Kristian; Knobe, Matthias; Hölzle, Frank; Ghassemi, Alireza

    2018-06-01

    For surgical treatment of the face, detailed surgical planning is necessary to avoid later unaesthetic results. Most of the studies in the literature concentrate on the ears' anatomy during childhood and adolescence. Nearly no study evaluates the anatomy of ears of people aged 50 or older. It was our aim to measure and evaluate the ear's anatomy in Caucasians between the ages of 21 and 65. Three-dimensional scans of 240 volunteers were taken. The subjects were divided into groups of males and females and each of them into three groups by age (21-35, 36-50, 51-65). Landmarks were placed in these scans. Distances, relations and angles between them were recorded. The distance between the subaurale and superaurale significantly increases (p < 0.001) during the aging process in males and females. Also, the width of the ear, measured between the preaurale and postaurale, significantly increased (p = 0.007) with advancing age. When the length of the ear is divided into four parts by anatomical landmarks, it extended the most in the lower quadrant with increasing subject age. The ear of Caucasians does not stop changing its shape during adulthood. Even after the body has stopped growing, the ear still does. With the measured values in this study, it should be possible for the surgeon to plan the operation in advance and achieve satisfactory aesthetic outcomes. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  12. Severe capillary leak syndrome after inner ear decompression sickness in a recreational scuba diver.

    PubMed

    Gempp, Emmanuel; Lacroix, Guillaume; Cournac, Jean-Marie; Louge, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Post-decompression shock with plasma volume deficit is a very rare event that has been observed under extreme conditions of hypobaric and hyperbaric exposure in aviators and professional divers. We report a case of severe hypovolemic shock due to extravasation of plasma in a recreational scuba diver presenting with inner ear decompression sickness. Impaired endothelial function can lead to capillary leak with hemoconcentration and hypotension in severe cases. This report suggests that decompression-induced circulating bubbles may have triggered the endothelial damage, activating the classic inflammatory pathway of increased vascular permeability. This observation highlights the need for an accurate diagnosis of this potentially life-threatening condition at the initial presentation in the Emergency Department after a diving-related injury. An elevated hematocrit in a diver should raise the suspicion for the potential development of capillary leak syndrome requiring specific treatment using albumin infusion as primary fluid replacement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PREFACE: Ionic fluids Ionic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Yan; Kornyshev, Alexei; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2009-10-01

    In spite of its apparent simplicity Coulomb law, when applied to many body systems, leads to an amazingly rich mathematical structure. The simple idea that two similarly charged objects always repel, is not necessarily true in a colloidal suspension or a dusty plasma. Neither can one simply predict the direction of the electrophoretic motion of a polyion from only knowing its chemical charge. Strong Coulomb correlations in ionic fluids result in instabilities very similar to the gas--liquid phase separation observed in atomic fluids. It is fair to say that bulk behavior of simple aqueous monovalent electrolytes is now very well understood. Unfortunately this is not the case for multivalent electrolytes or molten salts. In these systems cation-anion association leads to strong non-linear effects which manifest themselves in formations of tightly bound ionic clusters. In spite of the tremendous effort invested over the years, our understanding of these systems remains qualitative. In this special issue we have collected articles from some of the biggest experts working on ionic fluids. The papers are both experimental and theoretical. They range from simple electrolytes in the bulk and near interfaces, to polyelectrolytes, colloids, and molten salts. The special issue, covers a wide spectrum of the ongoing research on ionic fluids. All readers should find something of interest here.

  14. Human ear detection in the thermal infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaza, Ayman; Bourlai, Thirimachos

    2012-06-01

    In this paper the problem of human ear detection in the thermal infrared (IR) spectrum is studied in order to illustrate the advantages and limitations of the most important steps of ear-based biometrics that can operate in day and night time environments. The main contributions of this work are two-fold: First, a dual-band database is assembled that consists of visible and thermal profile face images. The thermal data was collected using a high definition middle-wave infrared (3-5 microns) camera that is capable of acquiring thermal imprints of human skin. Second, a fully automated, thermal imaging based ear detection method is developed for real-time segmentation of human ears in either day or night time environments. The proposed method is based on Haar features forming a cascaded AdaBoost classifier (our modified version of the original Viola-Jones approach1 that was designed to be applied mainly in visible band images). The main advantage of the proposed method, applied on our profile face image data set collected in the thermal-band, is that it is designed to reduce the learning time required by the original Viola-Jones method from several weeks to several hours. Unlike other approaches reported in the literature, which have been tested but not designed to operate in the thermal band, our method yields a high detection accuracy that reaches ~ 91.5%. Further analysis on our data set yielded that: (a) photometric normalization techniques do not directly improve ear detection performance. However, when using a certain photometric normalization technique (CLAHE) on falsely detected images, the detection rate improved by ~ 4%; (b) the high detection accuracy of our method did not degrade when we lowered down the original spatial resolution of thermal ear images. For example, even after using one third of the original spatial resolution (i.e. ~ 20% of the original computational time) of the thermal profile face images, the high ear detection accuracy of our method

  15. A miniaturized laser-Doppler-system in the ear canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; Gerhardt, U.; Kupper, C.; Manske, E.; Witte, H.

    2013-03-01

    Gathering vibrational data from the human middle ear is quite difficult. To this date the well-known acoustic probe is used to estimate audiometric parameters, e.g. otoacoustic emissions, wideband reflectance and the measurement of the stapedius reflex. An acoustic probe contains at least one microphone and one loudspeaker. The acoustic parameter determination of the ear canal is essential for the comparability of test-retest measurement situations. Compared to acoustic tubes, the ear canal wall cannot be described as a sound hard boundary. Sound energy is partly absorbed by the ear canal wall. In addition the ear canal features a complex geometric shape (Stinson and Lawton1). Those conditions are one reason for the inter individual variability in input impedance measurement data of the tympanic membrane. The method of Laser-Doppler-Vibrometry is well described in literature. Using this method, the surface velocity of vibrating bodies can be determined contact-free. Conventional Laser-Doppler-Systems (LDS) for auditory research are mounted on a surgical microscope. Assuming a free line of view to the ear drum, the handling of those laser-systems is complicated. We introduce the concept of a miniaturized vibrometer which is supposed to be applied directly in the ear canal for contact-free measurement of the tympanic membrane surface vibration. The proposed interferometer is based on a Fabry-Perot etalon with a DFB laser diode as light source. The fiber-based Fabry-Perot-interferometer is characterized by a reduced size, compared to e.g. Michelson-, or Mach-Zehnder-Systems. For the determination of the phase difference in the interferometer, a phase generated carrier was used. To fit the sensor head in the ear canal, the required shape of the probe was generated by means of the geometrical data of 70 ear molds. The suggested prototype is built up by a singlemode optical fiber with a GRIN-lens, acting as a fiber collimator. The probe has a diameter of 1.8 mm and a

  16. A new method for correcting type I and type II constricted (cup and lop) ears.

    PubMed

    Xiaogeng, Hu; Hongxing, Zhuang; Qinghua, Yang; Haiyue, Jiang; Yanyong, Zhao

    2006-01-01

    Tanzer suggested the term "constricted ear," denoting a spectrum of deformities limited to the superior third of the ear. Tanzer classified the constricted ear into three types. Type I ears have involvement of the helix, which usually is flattened. Type II ears show involvement of both the helix and the scapha. With type III ears, the auricle is rolled into a nearly tubular form that some authors regard as a form of microtia. The authors' new method for correcting the constricted ear varies in accordance with the diverse degree of deformity. The new method was used to correct constricted ears through a one-stage operation in eight type I cases. For the remaining six type 2 cases, the methods were combined with composite grafting. Most of the patients were satisfied with the final results. Therefore, the authors conclude that their approach is suitable for the treatment of type I and type II constricted ears.

  17. Reconstruction following traumatic partial amputation of the ear.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Robert A; Sabbagh, Walid

    2011-02-01

    Reconstruction following traumatic amputation of the external ear remains a unique challenge to the plastic surgeon. The authors report a series of ear reconstructions with autologous costal cartilage in patients following traumatic partial amputation of the ear. Technical points regarding the carving of the cartilage framework and methods of skin coverage are discussed. Fifty partial ear reconstructions with autologous costal cartilage were performed over a 4-year period. All patients had suffered previous traumatic amputation of part of the external auricle due to bite injuries (n = 36), road traffic accidents (n = 6), burns (n = 5), or torture (n = 3). A two-stage technique of reconstruction with autologous cartilage graft was used based on Nagata's adaptations of Brent's original technique. In nine cases, skin shortage or extensive scarring required preoperative tissue expansion (n = 4) or a temporoparietal fascial flap (n = 5) to provide adequate coverage of the cartilage framework. Forty-seven patients had a successful surgical outcome without complication. Two patients developed small areas of skin necrosis resulting in exposure of the cartilage framework. These healed with conservative management with minor loss of definition. One case of wound infection resulted in significant loss of definition of the construct, which required a further surgical procedure with additional costal cartilage graft. Reconstruction of the external ear with autologous costal cartilage following traumatic amputation can produce high-quality auricles consistently and is becoming the treatment of choice for such injuries, given access to a specialist center with exposure to a high volume of cases.

  18. [Keloid scars of the external ear: a non solved problem].

    PubMed

    Bejarano Serrano, M; Parri Ferrandis, F J; García Smith, N I; Martínez-Herrada, S; Manzanares Quintela, A; Albert Cazalla, A

    2014-01-01

    The external ear is a location with high risk of keloid scar formation. Its incidence is growing since general use of piercings and performance of plastic surgery of the external ear. The external ear keloid can be a devasting process for adolescent population which is worried about their appearance. Our aim is to attract attention about the risk of keloid scars of the external ear, reviewing our experience. After dismissing radiotherapy, corticoid infiltration and surgical removal are the most used options, with a high recurrence risk. We have reviewed traumatic, surgical and piercing wounds of the external ear, with a subsequent keloid formation treated in our outpatient clinic, collecting data about wound etiology, treatment and results. During the last 10 years we have found 11 keloid scars, 2 of them improved with topical corticosteroid. Treatment has been surgical in 9 cases, 4 of them with skin graft: 5 recovered and 4 recurred; 2 of them were reoperated. 2 of them were treated with intralesional corticosteroid solely, one recovered and the other one had improved. Treatment management of keloid scars is complex and there isn't a procedure with superior results than the others. Risk of complication must be explained within adolescent population.

  19. The pathogenesis of cauliflower ear. An experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ohlsén, L; Skoog, T; Sohn, S A

    1975-01-01

    Appreciating an imcomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of cauliflower ear, an experimental study was designed to demonstrate the pathophysiology of this deformity. The investigation was conducted in 2-month-old rabbits. In one ear a collection of blood was placed under the raised perichondrium which was then sutured back in place and the skin closed. In the other ear an equal amount of blood was deposited between the intact perichondrium and skin. In the first study new cartilage developed under the perichondrium, but in the ear in which the blood was left above the surface of the perichondrium-covered cartilage, complete resorption of the clot occurred. The cauliflower ear was thus shown to be generating cartilage, arising from a layer of raised perichondrium which was further stimulated by a sero-sanguinous medium. The subperichondrial hematoma was extensively invaded by chondroblasts within 2 weeks, and over a period of 4 weeks the new tissue gradually changed into more mature cartilage. It was a consistent finding that the separated perichondrium retracted, thus causing the original cartilage to rise and buckle over the hamatoma, similar to the picture observed in the human pathology.

  20. Anisotropic yield function capable of predicting eight ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J. H.; Cazacu, O.

    2011-08-01

    Deep drawing of a cylindrical cup from a rolled sheet is one of the typical forming operations where the effect of this anisotropy is most evident. Indeed, it is well documented in the literature that the number of ears and the shape of the earing pattern correlate with the r-values profile. For the strongly textured aluminum alloy AA 5042 (Numisheet Benchmark 2011), the experimental r-value distribution has two minima between the rolling and transverse direction data provided for this show that the r-value along the transverse direction (TD) is five times larger than the value corresponding to the rolling direction. Therefore, it is expected that there are more that the earing profile has more than four ears. The main objective of this paper is to assess whether a new form of CPB06ex2 yield function (Plunkett et al. (2008)) tailored for metals with no tension-compression asymmetry is capable of predicting more than four ears for this material.

  1. Extracellular and intracellular melanin in inflammatory middle ear disease.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Mark A; Roehm, Pamela C; Bannan, Michael A; Lalwani, Anil K

    2014-06-01

    Melanin is a pigmented polymer with a known role in dermal solar protection. In vertebrates, melanogenesis has been reported in leukocyte populations, suggesting a potential role in innate immunity. In this study, we report the novel finding of melanin associated with chronic inflammation and speculate on its potential role in the middle ear and mastoid. Retrospective review of case series. Medical records of six patients who demonstrated melanin in the ear were reviewed. Six patients from 1 to 63 years of age were identified with extracellular melanin and melanin-laden histiocytes within the middle ear and/or mastoid air cells at time of surgery. Concurrent intraoperative findings included cholesteatoma (n = 3), chronic suppurative otitis media (n = 2), and coalescent mastoiditis (n = 1). Histologically, extracellular melanin and melanin-laden histiocytes were identified by Fontana-Masson stain; absence of melanocytes was confirmed by the absence of Melan-A staining. One patient had a positive stain for CD163 (a marker for macrophages). This case series is the first demonstration of melanin within middle ear mucosa without melanocytes in immediate proximity or metastatic melanocytic lesions. Melanin's presence in the setting of inflammation suggests that there may be a heretofore unreported link between the pigmentary and immune systems in the middle ear. 4.

  2. An abbreviated history of the ear: from Renaissance to present.

    PubMed Central

    Hachmeister, Jorge E.

    2003-01-01

    In this article we discuss important discoveries in relation to the anatomy and physiology of the ear from Renaissance to present. Before the Renaissance, there was a paucity of knowledge of the anatomy of the ear, because of the relative inaccessibility of the temporal bone and the general perception that human dissections should not be conducted. It was not until the sixteenth century that the middle ear was described with detail. Further progress would be made between the sixteenth and eighteenth century in describing the inner ear. In the nineteenth century, technological advancement permitted a description of the cells and structures that constitute the cochlea. Von Helmholtz made further progress in hearing physiology when he postulated his resonance theory and later von Békésy when he observed a traveling wave in human cadavers within the cochlea. Brownell later made a major advance when he discovered that the ear has a mechanism for sound amplification, via outer hair cell electromotility. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15369636

  3. Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnueli, David; Gutfinger, Chaim

    1997-01-01

    This text is intended for the study of fluid mechanics at an intermediate level. The presentation starts with basic concepts, in order to form a sound conceptual structure that can support engineering applications and encourage further learning. The presentation is exact, incorporating both the mathematics involved and the physics needed to understand the various phenomena in fluid mechanics. Where a didactical choice must be made between the two, the physics prevails. Throughout the book the authors have tried to reach a balance between exact presentation, intuitive grasp of new ideas, and creative applications of concepts. This approach is reflected in the examples presented in the text and in the exercises given at the end of each chapter. Subjects treated are hydrostatics, viscous flow, similitude and order of magnitude, creeping flow, potential flow, boundary layer flow, turbulent flow, compressible flow, and non-Newtonian flows. This book is ideal for advanced undergraduate students in mechanical, chemical, aerospace, and civil engineering. Solutions manual available.

  4. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  5. Cochlear pharmacokinetics with local inner ear drug delivery using a three-dimensional finite-element computer model.

    PubMed

    Plontke, Stefan K; Siedow, Norbert; Wegener, Raimund; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Salt, Alec N

    2007-01-01

    Cochlear fluid pharmacokinetics can be better represented by three-dimensional (3D) finite-element simulations of drug dispersal. Local drug deliveries to the round window membrane are increasingly being used to treat inner ear disorders. Crucial to the development of safe therapies is knowledge of drug distribution in the inner ear with different delivery methods. Computer simulations allow application protocols and drug delivery systems to be evaluated, and may permit animal studies to be extrapolated to the larger cochlea of the human. A finite-element 3D model of the cochlea was constructed based on geometric dimensions of the guinea pig cochlea. Drug propagation along and between compartments was described by passive diffusion. To demonstrate the potential value of the model, methylprednisolone distribution in the cochlea was calculated for two clinically relevant application protocols using pharmacokinetic parameters derived from a prior one-dimensional (1D) model. In addition, a simplified geometry was used to compare results from 3D with 1D simulations. For the simplified geometry, calculated concentration profiles with distance were in excellent agreement between the 1D and the 3D models. Different drug delivery strategies produce very different concentration time courses, peak concentrations and basal-apical concentration gradients of drug. In addition, 3D computations demonstrate the existence of substantial gradients across the scalae in the basal turn. The 3D model clearly shows the presence of drug gradients across the basal scalae of guinea pigs, demonstrating the necessity of a 3D approach to predict drug movements across and between scalae with larger cross-sectional areas, such as the human, with accuracy. This is the first model to incorporate the volume of the spiral ligament and to calculate diffusion through this structure. Further development of the 3D model will have to incorporate a more accurate geometry of the entire inner ear and

  6. Cochlear Pharmacokinetics with Local Inner Ear Drug Delivery Using a Three-Dimensional Finite-Element Computer Model

    PubMed Central

    Plontke, Stefan K.; Siedow, Norbert; Wegener, Raimund; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Salt, Alec N.

    2006-01-01

    Hypothesis: Cochlear fluid pharmacokinetics can be better represented by three-dimensional (3D) finite-element simulations of drug dispersal. Background: Local drug deliveries to the round window membrane are increasingly being used to treat inner ear disorders. Crucial to the development of safe therapies is knowledge of drug distribution in the inner ear with different delivery methods. Computer simulations allow application protocols and drug delivery systems to be evaluated, and may permit animal studies to be extrapolated to the larger cochlea of the human. Methods: A finite-element 3D model of the cochlea was constructed based on geometric dimensions of the guinea pig cochlea. Drug propagation along and between compartments was described by passive diffusion. To demonstrate the potential value of the model, methylprednisolone distribution in the cochlea was calculated for two clinically relevant application protocols using pharmacokinetic parameters derived from a prior one-dimensional (1D) model. In addition, a simplified geometry was used to compare results from 3D with 1D simulations. Results: For the simplified geometry, calculated concentration profiles with distance were in excellent agreement between the 1D and the 3D models. Different drug delivery strategies produce very different concentration time courses, peak concentrations and basal-apical concentration gradients of drug. In addition, 3D computations demonstrate the existence of substantial gradients across the scalae in the basal turn. Conclusion: The 3D model clearly shows the presence of drug gradients across the basal scalae of guinea pigs, demonstrating the necessity of a 3D approach to predict drug movements across and between scalae with larger cross-sectional areas, such as the human, with accuracy. This is the first model to incorporate the volume of the spiral ligament and to calculate diffusion through this structure. Further development of the 3D model will have to incorporate a more

  7. Two flaps and Z-plasty technique for correction of longitudinal ear lobe cleft.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paik-Kwon; Ju, Hong-Sil; Rhie, Jong-Won; Ahn, Sang-Tae

    2005-06-01

    Various surgical techniques have been reported for the correction of congenital ear lobe deformities. Our method, the two-flaps-and-Z-plasty technique, for correcting the longitudinal ear lobe cleft is presented. This technique is simple and easy to perform. It enables us to keep the bulkiness of the ear lobe with minimal tissue sacrifice, and to make a shorter operation scar. The small Z-plasty at the free ear lobe margin avoids notching deformity and makes the shape of the ear lobe smoother. The result is satisfactory in terms of matching the contralateral normal ear lobe in shape and symmetry.

  8. Expression of membrane-bound and cytosolic guanylyl cyclases in the rat inner ear.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, T; Beitz, E; Kumagami, H; Wild, K; Ruppersberg, J P; Schultz, J E

    1999-01-01

    Membrane-bound guanylyl cyclases (GCs) are peptide hormone receptors whereas the cytosolic isoforms are receptors for nitric oxide. In the inner ear, the membrane-bound GCs may be involved in the regulation of fluid homeostasis and the cytosolic forms possibly play a role in signal processing and regulation of local blood flow. In this comprehensive study, we examined, qualitatively and quantitatively, the transcription pattern of all known GC isoforms in the inner ear from rat by RT-PCR. The tissues used were endolymphatic sac, stria vascularis, organ of Corti, organ of Corti outer hair cells, cochlear nerve, Reissner's membrane, vestibular dark cells, and vestibular sensory cells. We show that multiple particulate (GC-A, GC-B, GC-D, GC-E, GC-F and GC-G) and several subunits of the heterodimeric cytosolic GCs (alpha1, alpha2, beta1 and beta2) are expressed, albeit at highly different levels. GC-C was not found. GC-A and the soluble subunits alpha1 and beta1 were transcribed ubiquitously. GC-B was present in all tissues except stria vascularis, which contained GC-A and traces of GC-E and GC-G. GC-B was by far the predominant membrane-bound isoform in the organ of Corti (86%), Reissner's membrane (75%) and the vestibulum (80%). Surprisingly, GC-E, a retinal isoform, was detected in significant amounts in the cochlear nerve (8%) and in the organ of Corti (4%). Although the cytosolic GC is a heterodimer composed of an alpha and a beta subunit, the mRNA transcription of these subunits was not stoichiometric. Particularly in the vestibulum, the transcription of the beta1 subunits was at least four-fold higher than of the alpha1 subunit. The data are compatible with earlier suggestions that membrane receptor GCs may be involved in the control of inner ear electrolyte and fluid composition whereas NO-stimulated GC isoforms mainly participate in the regulation of blood flow and supporting cell physiology.

  9. Sensory Cells of the Fish Ear: A Hairy Enigma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, A. N.; Saidel, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the structure of the ears in teleost fishes has led to the tentative suggestion that otolithic endorgans may function differently, in different species. Recently, evidence has demonstrated different 'types' of sensory hair cells can be found in the ears of teleost fishes, and individual hair cell types are found in discrete regions of individual sensory, epithelia. The presence of multiple hair cell types in fishes provides strong support to the hypothesis of regional differences in the responses of individual otolithic sensory epithelia. The finding of hair cell types in fishes that closely resemble those found in amniote vestibular endorgans also suggests that hair cell heterogeneity arose earlier in the evolution of the vertebrate ear than previously thought.

  10. [Plastic surgery to correct deformities of the ear].

    PubMed

    Naumann, A

    2005-08-18

    For the plastic-surgical correction of mild deformities of the ears, well-proven incisional and suturing techniques are available. Only in exceptional cases is skin grafting or the use of cartilage ersatz material required. In the plastic surgical treatment of moderate to severe ear deformities, in contrast, not only incisional and suturing techniques, but also free skin grafts and ersatz materials are needed. At the ENT Department of the Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich, plastic reconstruction of moderate to severe deformities of the external ear using porous polyethylene implants instead of rib cartilage grafts has been practiced with success for the past two years or so. Porous polyethylene implants provide good results and may help to avoid pre- and postoperative morbidity at donor site defects.

  11. Human Action Recognition Using Wireless Wearable In-Ear Microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Jun; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    To realize the ubiquitous eating habits monitoring, we proposed the use of sounds sensed by an in-ear placed wireless wearable microphone. A prototype of wireless wearable in-ear microphone was developed by utilizing a common Bluetooth headset. We proposed a robust chewing action recognition algorithm which consists of two recognition stages: “chew-like” signal detection and chewing sound verification stages. We also provide empirical results on other action recognition using in-ear sound including swallowing, cough, belch, and etc. The average chewing number counting error rate of 1.93% is achieved. Lastly, chewing sound mapping is proposed as a new prototypical approach to provide an additional intuitive feedback on food groups to be able to infer the eating habits in their daily life context.

  12. A Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Sensor Worn at the Ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Junichi; Uenishi, Yuji; Tochikubo, Osamu

    2009-12-01

    Blood pressure (BP) measurement and BP control are important for the prevention of lifestyle diseases, especially hypertension, which can lead to more serious conditions, such as cardiac infarction and cerebral apoplexy. The purpose of our study is to develop a ubiquitous blood pressure sensor that is more comfortable and less disruptive of users' daily activities than conventional blood pressure sensors. Our developed sensor is worn at an ear orifice and measures blood pressure at the tragus. This paper describes the concept, configuration, and the optical and electronic details of the developed ear-worn blood pressure sensor and presents preliminary evaluation results. The developed sensor causes almost no discomfort and produces signals whose quality is high enough for detecting BP at an ear, making it suitable for ubiquitous usage.

  13. Magnetically driven middle ear ossicles for optical measurement of vibrations in an ear with opened tympanic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J.; von Unge, M.; Dirckx, J.

    2013-12-01

    Vibrations of the middle ear ossicles are easily measured by means of laser vibrometry. However, laser vibrometry requires free visual access to the object under investigation, and acquiring free visual access to the ossicles through the ear canal requires the removal of the tympanic membrane (TM), with the result that the ossicles can no longer be stimulated acoustically. To overcome this, we devised a new setup in which the ossicles can be driven magnetically. After measuring the response of the TM to an acoustic signal, we then remove it and attach a small magnet to the exposed manubrium (a part of the most lateral auditory ossicle, the malleus, which is normally attached to the TM). An electromagnetic excitation coil is then used to drive the magnet, and the output to the coil adjusted until the vibration of the manubrium, as measured by the vibrometer, matches that measured in response to the acoustic signal. Such a setup may have uses in research on middle ear mechanics, such as the measurement of nonlinearities in their response, as well as applications in the diagnosis of middle ear conditions such as the fixation of the ossicles by otosclerosis or in chronic otitis media. We describe our setup and discuss the viability of our method and its future clinical potential by presenting some measurements on an artificially fixated ear.

  14. Insights into inner ear-specific gene regulation: epigenetics and non-coding RNAs in inner ear development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Karen B.

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate inner ear houses highly specialized sensory organs, tuned to detect and encode sound, head motion and gravity. Gene expression programs under the control of transcription factors orchestrate the formation and specialization of the non-sensory inner ear labyrinth and its sensory constituents. More recently, epigenetic factors and non-coding RNAs emerged as an additional layer of gene regulation, both in inner ear development and disease. In this review, we provide an overview on how epigenetic modifications and non-coding RNAs, in particular microRNAs (miRNAs), influence gene expression and summarize recent discoveries that highlight their critical role in the proper formation of the inner ear labyrinth and its sensory organs. In contrast to non-mammalian vertebrates, adult mammals lack the ability to regenerate inner ear mechano-sensory hair cells. Finally, we discuss recent insights into how epigenetic factors and miRNAs may facilitate, or in the case of mammals, restrict sensory hair cell regeneration. PMID:27836639

  15. High-throughput method for ear phenotyping and kernel weight estimation in maize using ear digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Makanza, R; Zaman-Allah, M; Cairns, J E; Eyre, J; Burgueño, J; Pacheco, Ángela; Diepenbrock, C; Magorokosho, C; Tarekegne, A; Olsen, M; Prasanna, B M

    2018-01-01

    Grain yield, ear and kernel attributes can assist to understand the performance of maize plant under different environmental conditions and can be used in the variety development process to address farmer's preferences. These parameters are however still laborious and expensive to measure. A low-cost ear digital imaging method was developed that provides estimates of ear and kernel attributes i.e., ear number and size, kernel number and size as well as kernel weight from photos of ears harvested from field trial plots. The image processing method uses a script that runs in a batch mode on ImageJ; an open source software. Kernel weight was estimated using the total kernel number derived from the number of kernels visible on the image and the average kernel size. Data showed a good agreement in terms of accuracy and precision between ground truth measurements and data generated through image processing. Broad-sense heritability of the estimated parameters was in the range or higher than that for measured grain weight. Limitation of the method for kernel weight estimation is discussed. The method developed in this work provides an opportunity to significantly reduce the cost of selection in the breeding process, especially for resource constrained crop improvement programs and can be used to learn more about the genetic bases of grain yield determinants.

  16. External ear anomalies and hearing impairment in Noonan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Trier, Dorothée C; van Nierop, Josephine; Draaisma, Jos M Th; van der Burgt, Ineke; Kunst, Henricus; Croonen, Ellen A; Admiraal, Ronald J C

    2015-06-01

    This is the first cohort in which hearing impairment and external ear anomalies in Noonan Syndrome are described extensively. Retrospective analysis of the otorhinolaryngological and clinical genetic data from 97 Noonan Syndrome (NS) patients. Forty-four NS patients were seen by an otorhinolaryngologist for the analysis of hearing impairment. In our cohort 80 of the 97 patients were genetically tested. In 71 of these mutations were found: in 48 patients a mutation in PTPN11, in 10 patients in SOS1, in 5 patients in SHOC2, in 5 patients in RAF1, in 1 patient in MAP2K2, in 1 patient in KRAS and in 1 patient in A2ML1. External ear anomalies were reported in 75 NS patients (77%). In 69 patients the ears were low-set, 28 patients had posteriorly rotated ears, 14 patients showed protruding ears and 18 had thickened helices. Hearing impairment was detected in 34 NS patients. Nine patients had sensorineural hearing impairment, two a permanent conductive hearing impairment, two other patients had mixed hearing impairment and 20 patients had conductive hearing impairment in the past, caused by otitis media with effusion. Their temporary conductive hearing impairment resolved between the ages of 2 and 18 years. Sensorineural hearing impairment varied between mild high-frequency hearing impairment and profound (uni- and bilateral) hearing impairment and was progressive in three patients. Four NS patients received cochlear implants for their severe sensorineural hearing impairment. The cohort is small for genotype-phenotype correlations, but sensorineural hearing impairment, especially the bilateral severe hearing impairment, was only seen in patients with a PTPN11 mutation. NS is characterized by dysmorphic external ear anomalies and both sensorineural and conductive hearing impairment. Audiological examinations are recommended in all patients with Noonan Syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Energy localization and frequency analysis in the locust ear.

    PubMed

    Malkin, Robert; McDonagh, Thomas R; Mhatre, Natasha; Scott, Thomas S; Robert, Daniel

    2014-01-06

    Animal ears are exquisitely adapted to capture sound energy and perform signal analysis. Studying the ear of the locust, we show how frequency signal analysis can be performed solely by using the structural features of the tympanum. Incident sound waves generate mechanical vibrational waves that travel across the tympanum. These waves shoal in a tsunami-like fashion, resulting in energy localization that focuses vibrations onto the mechanosensory neurons in a frequency-dependent manner. Using finite element analysis, we demonstrate that two mechanical properties of the locust tympanum, distributed thickness and tension, are necessary and sufficient to generate frequency-dependent energy localization.

  18. Spectacle fitting with ear, nose and face deformities or abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Eng, Helen; Chiu, Roger Sin Fai

    2002-11-01

    Spectacle frame selection and dispensing remain significant components of optometry. Occasionally, we encounter patients who are unable to wear conventional spectacles due to abnormalities or deformities following injury and/or surgery to their nose, ears or head. In these cases, spectacle frame fitting may be more complex and customized frame adjustments may be required to account for the anatomical variations. A patient with a microtia (hypoplastic pinna) was fitted with a tailored spectacle frame. The details are presented together with a summary of different frames and modifications available for ears, nose and face abnormalities.

  19. An assessment of individualized technical ear training for audio production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungyoung

    2015-07-01

    An individualized technical ear training method is compared to a non-individualized method. The efficacy of the individualized method is assessed using a standardized test conducted before and after the training period. Participants who received individualized training improved better than the control group on the test. Results indicate the importance of individualized training for acquisition of spectrum-identification and spectrum-matching skills. Individualized training, therefore, should be implemented by default into technical ear training programs used in audio production industry and education.

  20. Nonsurgical correction of congenital ear abnormalities in the newborn: Case series.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wg; Toye, Jw; Reid, A; Smith, Rw

    2005-07-01

    To determine whether a simple, nonsurgical treatment for congenital ear abnormalities (lop-ear, Stahl's ear, protruding ear, cryptotia) improved the appearance of ear abnormalities in newborns at six weeks of age. This is a descriptive case series. All newborns with identified abnormalities were referred by their family physician to one paediatrician (WGS) in a small level 2 perinatal centre. The ears were waxed and taped in a standard manner within 10 days of birth. Pictures were taken before taping and at the end of taping (one month). All patients and pictures were assessed by one plastic surgeon (JWT) at six weeks of age and scored using a standard scoring system. A telephone survey of the nontreatment group was conducted. The total number of ears assessed was 90. Of this total, 69 ears were taped and fully evaluated in the study (77%). The refusal rate was 23%. In the treatment group, 59% had lop-ear, 19% had Stahl's ear, 17% had protruding ear and 3% had cryptotia. Overall correction (excellent/improved) for the treatment group was 90% (100% for lop-ear, 100% for Stahl's ear, 67% for protruding ear and 0% for cryptotia). In the nontreatment (refusal) group, 67% of the ears failed to correct spontaneously. No complications were recognized by the authors or parents by six weeks. The percentage of newborns in one year in the perinatal centre with recognized ear abnormalities was 6% (90 of 1600). A simple, nonsurgical treatment in a Caucasian population appeared to be very effective in correcting congenital ear abnormalities with no complications and high patient/parent satisfaction.