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Sample records for ear hair cell

  1. Magnetic Nanoparticles as Mechanical Actuators of Inner Ear Hair Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0039 Magnetic nanoparticles as mechanical actuators of inner ear hair cells Dolores Bozovic UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Magnetic nanoparticles as mechanical actuators of inner ear hair cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N.A. 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The collaborative project was designed to edevelop the use of magnetic nanoparticles to manipulate auditory hair

  2. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  3. Functional recovery in the avian ear after hair cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Smolders, J W

    1999-01-01

    Trauma to the inner ear in birds, due to acoustic overstimulation or ototoxic aminoglycosides, can lead to hair cell loss which is followed by regeneration of new hair cells. These processes are paralleled by hearing loss followed by significant functional recovery. After acoustic trauma, functional recovery is rapid and nearly complete. The early and major part of functional recovery after sound trauma occurs before regenerated hair cells become functional. Even very intense sound trauma causes loss of only a proportion of the hair cell population, mainly so-called short hair cells residing on the abneural mobile part of the avian basilar membrane. Uncoupling of the tectorial membrane from the hair cells during sound overexposure may serve as a protection mechanism. The rapid functional recovery after sound trauma appears not to be associated with regeneration of the lost hair cells, but with repair processes involving the surviving hair cells. Small residual functional deficits after recovery are most likely associated with the missing upper fibrous layer of the tectorial membrane which fails to regenerate after sound trauma. After aminoglycoside trauma, functional recovery is slower and parallels the structural regeneration more closely. Aminoglycosides cause damage to both types of hair cells, starting at the basal (high frequency) part of the basilar papilla. However, functional hearing loss and recovery also occur at lower frequencies, associated with areas of the papilla where hair cells survive. Functional recovery in these low frequency areas is complete, whereas functional recovery in high frequency areas with complete hair cell loss is incomplete, despite regeneration of the hair cells. Permanent residual functional deficits remain. This indicates that in low frequency regions functional recovery after aminoglycosides involves repair of nonlethal injury to hair cells and/or hair cell-neural synapses. In the high frequency regions functional recovery

  4. BONE MARROW MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS ARE PROGENITORS IN VITRO FOR INNER EAR HAIR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sang-Jun; Oshima, Kazuo; Heller, Stefan; Edge, Albert S.B.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have been demonstrated in the inner ear but they do not spontaneously divide to replace damaged sensory cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow have been reported to differentiate into multiple lineages including neurons, and we therefore asked whether MSCs could generate sensory cells. Overexpression of the prosensory transcription factor, Math1, in sensory epithelial precursor cells induced expression of myosin VIIa, espin, Brn3c, p27Kip, and jagged2, indicating differentiation to inner ear sensory cells. Some of the cells displayed F-actin positive protrusions in the morphology characteristic of hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell markers were also induced by culture of mouse MSC-derived cells in contact with embryonic chick inner ear cells, and this induction was not due to a cell fusion event, because the chick hair cells could be identified with a chick-specific antibody and chick and mouse antigens were never found in the same cell. PMID:17113786

  5. A review of gene delivery and stem cell based therapies for regenerating inner ear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Keerthana; Staecker, Hinrich; Detamore, Michael S

    2011-09-13

    Sensory neural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction have become the most common forms of sensory defects, affecting millions of people worldwide. Developing effective therapies to restore hearing loss is challenging, owing to the limited regenerative capacity of the inner ear hair cells. With recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of mammalian and non-mammalian hair cells a variety of strategies have emerged to restore lost hair cells are being developed. Two predominant strategies have developed to restore hair cells: transfer of genes responsible for hair cell genesis and replacement of missing cells via transfer of stem cells. In this review article, we evaluate the use of several genes involved in hair cell regeneration, the advantages and disadvantages of the different viral vectors employed in inner ear gene delivery and the insights gained from the use of embryonic, adult and induced pluripotent stem cells in generating inner ear hair cells. Understanding the role of genes, vectors and stem cells in therapeutic strategies led us to explore potential solutions to overcome the limitations associated with their use in hair cell regeneration.

  6. Generation of inner ear organoids containing functional hair cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Karl R; Nie, Jing; Longworth-Mills, Emma; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lee, Jiyoon; Holt, Jeffrey R; Hashino, Eri

    2017-06-01

    The derivation of human inner ear tissue from pluripotent stem cells would enable in vitro screening of drug candidates for the treatment of hearing and balance dysfunction and may provide a source of cells for cell-based therapies of the inner ear. Here we report a method for differentiating human pluripotent stem cells to inner ear organoids that harbor functional hair cells. Using a three-dimensional culture system, we modulate TGF, BMP, FGF, and WNT signaling to generate multiple otic-vesicle-like structures from a single stem-cell aggregate. Over 2 months, the vesicles develop into inner ear organoids with sensory epithelia that are innervated by sensory neurons. Additionally, using CRISPR-Cas9, we generate an ATOH1-2A-eGFP cell line to detect hair cell induction and demonstrate that derived hair cells exhibit electrophysiological properties similar to those of native sensory hair cells. Our culture system should facilitate the study of human inner ear development and research on therapies for diseases of the inner ear.

  7. Cell proliferation and hair cell addition in the ear of the goldfish, Carassius auratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanford, P. J.; Presson, J. C.; Popper, A. N.

    1996-01-01

    Cell proliferation and hair cell addition have not been studied in the ears of otophysan fish, a group of species who have specialized hearing capabilities. In this study we used the mitotic S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to identify proliferating cells in the ear of one otophysan species, Carassius auratus (the goldfish). Animals were sacrificed at 3 h or 5 days postinjection with BrdU and processed for immunocytochemistry. The results of the study show that cell proliferation occurs in all of the otic endorgans and results in the addition of new hair cells. BrdU-labeled cells were distributed throughout all epithelia, including the primary auditory endorgan (saccule), where hair cell phenotypes vary considerably along the rostrocaudal axis. This study lays the groundwork for our transmission electron microscopy study of proliferative cells in the goldfish ear (Presson et al., Hearing Research 100 (1996) 10-20) as well as future studies of hair cell development in this species. The ability to predict, based on epithelial location, the future phenotype of developing hair cells in the saccule of the goldfish make that endorgan a particularly powerful model system for the investigation of early hair cell differentiation.

  8. Hair cell regeneration in the chick inner ear following acoustic trauma: ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, M; Sakagami, M; Fukazawa, K; Ashida, K; Kubo, T; Senda, T; Yoneda, Y

    1995-09-01

    The regeneration of hair cells in the chick inner ear following acoustic trauma was examined using transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the localization of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) was demonstrated immunohistochemically. The auditory sensory epithelium of the normal chick consists of short and tall hair cells and supporting cells. Immediately after noise exposure to a 1500-Hz pure tone at a sound pressure level of 120 decibels for 48 h, all the short hair cells disappeared in the middle region of the auditory epithelium. Twelve hours to 1 day after exposure, mitotic cells, binucleate cells and PCNA-positive supporting cells were observed, and b-FGF immunoreactivity was shown in the supporting cells and glial cells near the habenula perforata. Spindle-shaped hair cells with immature stereocilia and a kinocilium appeared 3 days after exposure; these cells had synaptic connections with the newly developed nerve endings. The spindle-shaped hair cell is considered to be a transitional cell in the lineage of the supporting cell to the mature short hair cell. These results indicate that, after acoustic trauma, the supporting cells divide and differentiate into new short hair cells via spindle-shaped hair cells. Furthermore, it is suggested that b-FGF is related to the proliferation of the supporting cells and the extension of the nerve fibers.

  9. Hair cell regeneration in sensory epithelia from the inner ear of a urodele amphibian.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ruth R; Forge, Andrew

    2005-03-28

    The capacity of urodele amphibians to regenerate a variety of body parts is providing insight into mechanisms of tissue regeneration in vertebrates. In this study the ability of the newt, Notophthalmus viridescens, to regenerate inner ear hair cells in vitro was examined. Intact otic capsules were maintained in organotypic culture. Incubation in 2 mM gentamicin for 48 hours resulted in ablation of all hair cells from the saccular maculae. Thus, any hair cell recovery was not due to repair of damaged hair cells. Immature hair cells were subsequently observed at approximately 12 days posttreatment. Their number increased over the following 7-14 days to reach approximately 30% of the normal number. Following incubation of damaged tissue with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), labeled nuclei were confined strictly within regions of hair cell loss, indicating that supporting cells entered S-phase. Double labeling of tissue with two different hair cell markers and three different antibodies to BrdU in various combinations, however, all showed that the nuclei of cells that labeled with hair cell markers did not label for BrdU. This suggested that the new hair cells were not derived from those cells that had undergone mitosis. When mitosis was blocked with aphidicolin, new hair cells were still generated. The results suggest that direct phenotypic conversion of supporting cells into hair cells without an intervening mitotic event is a major mechanism of hair cell regeneration in the newt. A similar mechanism has been proposed for the hair cell recovery phenomenon observed in the vestibular organs of mammals. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. The molecular basis of neurosensory cell formation in ear development: a blueprint for hair cell and sensory neuron regeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Beisel, Kirk W.; Hansen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Summary The inner ear of mammals uses neurosensory cells derived from the embryonic ear for mechanoelectric transduction of vestibular and auditory stimuli (the hair cells) and conducts this information to the brain via sensory neurons. As with most other neurons of mammals, lost hair cells and sensory neurons are not spontaneously replaced and result instead in age-dependent progressive hearing loss. We review the molecular basis of neurosensory development in the mouse ear to provide a blueprint for possible enhancement of therapeutically useful transformation of stem cells into lost neurosensory cells. We identify several readily available adult sources of stem cells that express, like the ectoderm-derived ear, genes known to be essential for ear development. Use of these stem cells combined with molecular insights into neurosensory cell specification and proliferation regulation of the ear, might allow for neurosensory regeneration of mammalian ears in the near future. PMID:17120192

  11. Gfi1-Cre knock-in mouse line: A tool for inner ear hair cell-specific gene deletion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Gan, Jean; Xie, Xiaoling; Deng, Min; Feng, Liang; Chen, Xiaowei; Gao, Zhiqiang; Gan, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Gfi1encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor essential for the development and maintenance of haematopoiesis and the inner ear. In mouse inner ear, Gfi1 expression is confined to hair cells during development and in adulthood. To construct a genetic tool for inner ear hair cell-specific gene deletion, we generated a Gfi1-Cre mouse line by knocking-in Cre coding sequences into the Gfi1 locus and inactivating the endogenous Gfi1. The specificity and efficiency of Gfi1-Cre recombinase-mediated recombination in the developing inner ear was revealed through the expression of the conditional R26R-lacZ reporter gene. The onset of lacZ expression in the Gfi1Cre/+ inner ear was first detected at E13.5 in the vestibule and at E15.5 in the cochlea, coinciding with the generation of hair cells. Throughout inner ear development, lacZ expression was detected only in hair cells. Thus, Gfi1-Cre knock-in mouse line provides a useful tool for gene manipulations specifically in inner ear hair cells. PMID:20533399

  12. The zinc finger transcription factor Gfi1, implicated in lymphomagenesis, is required for inner ear hair cell differentiation and survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Deeann; Hamblen, Melanie; Zhou, Yi; Venken, Koen J T.; Schumacher, Armin; Grimes, H. Leighton; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2003-01-01

    Gfi1 was first identified as causing interleukin 2-independent growth in T cells and lymphomagenesis in mice. Much work has shown that Gfi1 and Gfi1b, a second mouse homolog, play pivotal roles in blood cell lineage differentiation. However, neither Gfi1 nor Gfi1b has been implicated in nervous system development, even though their invertebrate homologues, senseless in Drosophila and pag-3 in C. elegans are expressed and required in the nervous system. We show that Gfi1 mRNA is expressed in many areas that give rise to neuronal cells during embryonic development in mouse, and that Gfi1 protein has a more restricted expression pattern. By E12.5 Gfi1 mRNA is expressed in both the CNS and PNS as well as in many sensory epithelia including the developing inner ear epithelia. At later developmental stages, Gfi1 expression in the ear is refined to the hair cells and neurons throughout the inner ear. Gfi1 protein is expressed in a more restricted pattern in specialized sensory cells of the PNS, including the eye, presumptive Merkel cells, the lung and hair cells of the inner ear. Gfi1 mutant mice display behavioral defects that are consistent with inner ear anomalies, as they are ataxic, circle, display head tilting behavior and do not respond to noise. They have a unique inner ear phenotype in that the vestibular and cochlear hair cells are differentially affected. Although Gfi1-deficient mice initially specify inner ear hair cells, these hair cells are disorganized in both the vestibule and cochlea. The outer hair cells of the cochlea are improperly innervated and express neuronal markers that are not normally expressed in these cells. Furthermore, Gfi1 mutant mice lose all cochlear hair cells just prior to and soon after birth through apoptosis. Finally, by five months of age there is also a dramatic reduction in the number of cochlear neurons. Hence, Gfi1 is expressed in the developing nervous system, is required for inner ear hair cell differentiation, and its loss

  13. Inner ear supporting cells protect hair cells by secreting HSP70

    PubMed Central

    May, Lindsey A.; Kramarenko, Inga I.; Brandon, Carlene S.; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Roy, Soumen; Truong, Kristy; Francis, Shimon P.; Monzack, Elyssa L.; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells are the receptor cells of hearing and balance. Hair cells are sensitive to death from exposure to therapeutic drugs with ototoxic side effects, including aminoglycoside antibiotics and cisplatin. We recently showed that the induction of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) inhibits ototoxic drug–induced hair cell death. Here, we examined the mechanisms underlying the protective effect of HSP70. In response to heat shock, HSP70 was induced in glia-like supporting cells but not in hair cells. Adenovirus-mediated infection of supporting cells with Hsp70 inhibited hair cell death. Coculture with heat-shocked utricles protected nonheat-shocked utricles against hair cell death. When heat-shocked utricles from Hsp70–/– mice were used in cocultures, protection was abolished in both the heat-shocked utricles and the nonheat-shocked utricles. HSP70 was detected by ELISA in the media surrounding heat-shocked utricles, and depletion of HSP70 from the media abolished the protective effect of heat shock, suggesting that HSP70 is secreted by supporting cells. Together our data indicate that supporting cells mediate the protective effect of HSP70 against hair cell death, and they suggest a major role for supporting cells in determining the fate of hair cells exposed to stress. PMID:23863716

  14. Ick Ciliary Kinase Is Essential for Planar Cell Polarity Formation in Inner Ear Hair Cells and Hearing Function.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shio; Chaya, Taro; Omori, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Kubo, Shun; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2017-02-22

    Cellular asymmetries play crucial roles in development and organ function. The planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway is involved in the establishment of cellular asymmetry within the plane of a cell sheet. Inner ear sensory hair cells (HCs), which have several rows of staircase-like stereocilia and one kinocilium located at the vertex of the stereocilia protruding from the apical surface of each HC, exhibit a typical form of PCP. Although connections between cilia and PCP signaling in vertebrate development have been reported, their precise nature is not well understood. During inner ear development, several ciliary proteins are known to play a role in PCP formation. In the current study, we investigated a functional role for intestinal cell kinase (Ick), which regulates intraflagellar transport (IFT) at the tip of cilia, in the mouse inner ear. A lack of Ick in the developing inner ear resulted in PCP defects in the cochlea, including misorientation or misshaping of stereocilia and aberrant localization of the kinocilium and basal body in the apical and middle turns, leading to auditory dysfunction. We also observed abnormal ciliary localization of Ift88 in both HCs and supporting cells. Together, our results show that Ick ciliary kinase is essential for PCP formation in inner ear HCs, suggesting that ciliary transport regulation is important for PCP signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The cochlea in the inner ear is the hearing organ. Planar cell polarity (PCP) in hair cells (HCs) in the cochlea is essential for mechanotransduction and refers to the asymmetric structure consisting of stereociliary bundles and the kinocilium on the apical surface of the cell body. We reported previously that a ciliary kinase, Ick, regulates intraflagellar transport (IFT). Here, we found that loss of Ick leads to abnormal localization of the IFT component in kinocilia, PCP defects in HCs, and hearing dysfunction. Our study defines the association of ciliary transport

  15. Continuous hair cell turnover in the inner ear vestibular organs of a mammal, the Daubenton's bat (Myotis daubentonii).

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, M; Jørgensen, J M

    2000-02-01

    In both humans and mice the number of hair cells in the inner ear sensory epithelia declines with age, indicating cell death (Park et al. 1987; Rosenhall 1973). However, recent reports demonstrate the ability of the vestibular sensory epithelia to regenerate after injury (Forge et al. 1993, 1998; Kuntz and Oesterle 1998; Li and Forge 1997; Rubel et al. 1995; Tanyeri et al. 1995). Still, a continuous hair cell turnover in the vestibular epithelia has not previously been demonstrated in mature mammals. Bats are the only flying mammals, and they are known to live to a higher age than animals of equal size. The maximum age of many species is 20 years, with average lifespans of 4-6 years (Schober and Grimmberger 1989). Further, the young are fully developed and able to fly at the age of 2 months, and thus the vestibular organs are thought to be differentiated at that age. Consequently, long-lived mammals such as bats might compensate for the loss of hair cells by producing new hair cells in their postembryonic life. Here we show that the utricular macula of adult Daubenton's bats (more than 6 months old) contains innervated immature hair cells as well as apoptotic hair cells, which strongly indicates a continuous turnover of hair cells, as previously demonstrated in birds.

  16. Continuous Hair Cell Turnover in the Inner Ear Vestibular Organs of a Mammal, the Daubenton's Bat (Myotis daubentonii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkegaard, M.; Jørgensen, J. M.

    In both humans and mice the number of hair cells in the inner ear sensory epithelia declines with age, indicating cell death (Park et al. 1987; Rosenhall 1973). However, recent reports demonstrate the ability of the vestibular sensory epithelia to regenerate after injury (Forge et al. 1993, 1998; Kuntz and Oesterle 1998; Li and Forge 1997; Rubel et al. 1995; Tanyeri et al. 1995). Still, a continuous hair cell turnover in the vestibular epithelia has not previously been demonstrated in mature mammals. Bats are the only flying mammals, and they are known to live to a higher age than animals of equal size. The maximum age of many species is 20years, with average lifespans of 4-6years (Schober and Grimmberger 1989). Further, the young are fully developed and able to fly at the age of 2months, and thus the vestibular organs are thought to be differentiated at that age. Consequently, long-lived mammals such as bats might compensate for the loss of hair cells by producing new hair cells in their postembryonic life. Here we show that the utricular macula of adult Daubenton's bats (more than 6months old) contains innervated immature hair cells as well as apoptotic hair cells, which strongly indicates a continuous turnover of hair cells, as previously demonstrated in birds.

  17. Evolution of vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells and inner ears: toward identifying stimuli that select mutation driven altered morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Straka, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Among the major distance senses of vertebrates, the ear is unique in its complex morphological changes during evolution. Conceivably, these changes enable the ear to adapt toward sensing various physically well-characterized stimuli. This review develops a scenario that integrates sensory cell with organ evolution. We propose that molecular and cellular evolution of the vertebrate hair cells occurred prior to the formation of the vertebrate ear. We previously proposed that the genes driving hair cell differentiation, were aggregated in the otic region through developmental re-patterning that generated a unique vertebrate embryonic structure, the otic placode. In agreement with the presence of graviceptive receptors in many vertebrate outgroups, it is likely that the vertebrate ear originally functioned as a simple gravity-sensing organ. Based on the rare occurrence of angular acceleration receptors in vertebrate outgroups, we further propose that the canal system evolved with a more sophisticated ear morphogenesis. This evolving morphogenesis obviously turned the initial otocyst into a complex set of canals and recesses, harboring multiple sensory epithelia each adapted to the acquisition of a specific aspect of a given physical stimulus. As support for this evolutionary progression, we provide several details of the molecular basis of ear development. PMID:24281353

  18. Hair cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Edge, Albert SB; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear largely lacks the capacity to regenerate hair cells, the sensory cells required for hearing and balance. Recent studies in both lower vertebrates and mammals have uncovered genes and pathways important in hair cell development and have suggested ways that the sensory epithelia could be manipulated to achieve hair cell regeneration. These approaches include the use of inner ear stem cells, transdifferentiation of nonsensory cells, and induction of a proliferative response in the cells that can become hair cells. PMID:18929656

  19. Wild-type cells rescue genotypically Math1-null hair cells in the inner ears of chimeric mice.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoping; Jensen, Patricia; Goldowitz, Daniel; Hamre, Kristin M

    2007-05-15

    The transcription factor Math1 has been shown to be critical in the formation of hair cells (HCs) in the inner ear. However, the influence of environmental factors in HC specification suggests that cell extrinsic factors are also crucial to their development. To test whether extrinsic factors impact development of Math1-null (Math1(beta-Gal/beta-Gal)) HCs, we examined neonatal (postnatal ages P0-P4.5) Math1-null chimeric mice in which genotypically mutant and wild-type cells intermingle to form the inner ear. We provide the first direct evidence that Math1-null HCs are able to be generated and survive in the conducive chimeric environment. beta-Galactosidase expression was used to identify genetically mutant cells while cells were phenotypically defined as HCs by morphological characteristics notably the expression of HC-specific markers. Genotypically mutant HCs were found in all sensory epithelia of the inner ear at all ages examined. Comparable results were obtained irrespective of the wild-type component of the chimeric mice. Thus, genotypically mutant cells retain the competence to differentiate into HCs. The implication is that the lack of the Math1 gene in HC precursors can be overcome by environmental influences, such as cell-cell interactions with wild-type cells, to ultimately result in the formation of HCs.

  20. The function and molecular identity of inward rectifier channels in vestibular hair cells of the mouse inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michaela E.

    2012-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells respond to mechanical stimuli with graded receptor potentials. These graded responses are modulated by a host of voltage-dependent currents that flow across the basolateral membrane. Here, we examine the molecular identity and the function of a class of voltage-dependent ion channels that carries the potassium-selective inward rectifier current known as IK1. IK1 has been identified in vestibular hair cells of various species, but its molecular composition and functional contributions remain obscure. We used quantitative RT-PCR to show that the inward rectifier gene, Kir2.1, is highly expressed in mouse utricle between embryonic day 15 and adulthood. We confirmed Kir2.1 protein expression in hair cells by immunolocalization. To examine the molecular composition of IK1, we recorded voltage-dependent currents from type II hair cells in response to 50-ms steps from −124 to −54 in 10-mV increments. Wild-type cells had rapidly activating inward currents with reversal potentials close to the K+ equilibrium potential and a whole-cell conductance of 4.8 ± 1.5 nS (n = 46). In utricle hair cells from Kir2.1-deficient (Kir2.1−/−) mice, IK1 was absent at all stages examined. To identify the functional contribution of Kir2.1, we recorded membrane responses in current-clamp mode. Hair cells from Kir2.1−/− mice had significantly (P < 0.001) more depolarized resting potentials and larger, slower membrane responses than those of wild-type cells. These data suggest that Kir2.1 is required for IK1 in type II utricle hair cells and contributes to hyperpolarized resting potentials and fast, small amplitude receptor potentials in response to current inputs, such as those evoked by hair bundle deflections. PMID:22496522

  1. Neurogenin 1 Null Mutant Ears Develop Fewer, Morphologically Normal Hair Cells in Smaller Sensory Epithelia Devoid of Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiufu; Anderson, David J.

    2000-01-01

    The proneuronal gene neurogenin 1 (ngn1) is essential for development of the inner-ear sensory neurons that are completely absent in ngn1 null mutants. Neither afferent, efferent, nor autonomic nerve fibers were detected in the ears of ngn1 null mutants. We suggest that efferent and autonomic fibers are lost secondarily to the absence of afferents. In this article we show that ngn1 null mutants develop smaller sensory epithelia with morphologically normal hair cells. In particular, the saccule is reduced dramatically and forms only a small recess with few hair cells along a duct connecting the utricle with the cochlea. Hair cells of newborn ngn1 null mutants show no structural abnormalities, suggesting that embryonic development of hair cells is independent of innervation. However, the less regular pattern of dispersal within sensory epithelia may be caused by some effects of afferents or to the stunted growth of the sensory epithelia. Tracing of facial and stato-acoustic nerves in control and ngn1 null mutants showed that only the distal, epibranchial, placode-derived sensory neurons of the geniculate ganglion exist in mutants. Tracing further showed that these geniculate ganglion neurons project exclusively to the solitary tract. In addition to the normal complement of facial branchial and visceral motoneurons, ngn1 null mutants have some trigeminal motoneurons and contralateral inner-ear efferents projecting, at least temporarily, through the facial nerve. These data suggest that some neurons in the brainstem (e.g., inner-ear efferents, trigeminal motoneurons) require afferents to grow along and redirect to ectopic cranial nerve roots in the absence of their corresponding sensory roots. PMID:11545141

  2. Daple coordinates organ-wide and cell-intrinsic polarity to pattern inner-ear hair bundles

    PubMed Central

    Siletti, Kimberly; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of planar polarization by mammalian cells necessitates the integration of diverse signaling pathways. In the inner ear, at least two systems regulate the planar polarity of sensory hair bundles. The core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins coordinate the orientations of hair cells across the epithelial plane. The cell-intrinsic patterning of hair bundles is implemented independently by the G protein complex classically known for orienting the mitotic spindle. Although the primary cilium also participates in each of these pathways, its role and the integration of the two systems are poorly understood. We show that Dishevelled-associating protein with a high frequency of leucine residues (Daple) interacts with PCP and cell-intrinsic signals. Regulated by the cell-intrinsic pathway, Daple is required to maintain the polarized distribution of the core PCP protein Dishevelled and to position the primary cilium at the abneural edge of the apical surface. Our results suggest that the primary cilium or an associated structure influences the domain of cell-intrinsic signals that shape the hair bundle. Daple is therefore essential to orient and pattern sensory hair bundles. PMID:29229865

  3. In vivo and in vitro biophysical properties of hair cells from the lateral line and inner ear of developing and adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Olt, Jennifer; Johnson, Stuart L; Marcotti, Walter

    2014-05-15

    Hair cells detect and process sound and movement information, and transmit this with remarkable precision and efficiency to afferent neurons via specialized ribbon synapses. The zebrafish is emerging as a powerful model for genetic analysis of hair cell development and function both in vitro and in vivo. However, the full exploitation of the zebrafish is currently limited by the difficulty in obtaining systematic electrophysiological recordings from hair cells under physiological recording conditions. Thus, the biophysical properties of developing and adult zebrafish hair cells are largely unknown. We investigated potassium and calcium currents, voltage responses and synaptic activity in hair cells from the lateral line and inner ear in vivo and using near-physiological in vitro recordings. We found that the basolateral current profile of hair cells from the lateral line becomes more segregated with age, and that cells positioned in the centre of the neuromast show more mature characteristics and those towards the edge retain a more immature phenotype. The proportion of mature-like hair cells within a given neuromast increased with zebrafish development. Hair cells from the inner ear showed a developmental change in current profile between the juvenile and adult stages. In lateral line hair cells from juvenile zebrafish, exocytosis also became more efficient and required less calcium for vesicle fusion. In hair cells from mature zebrafish, the biophysical characteristics of ion channels and exocytosis resembled those of hair cells from other lower vertebrates and, to some extent, those in the immature mammalian vestibular and auditory systems. We show that although the zebrafish provides a suitable animal model for studies on hair cell physiology, it is advisable to consider that the age at which the majority of hair cells acquire a mature-type configuration is reached only in the juvenile lateral line and in the inner ear from >2 months after hatching. © 2014 The

  4. Maintained expression of the planar cell polarity molecule Vangl2 and reformation of hair cell orientation in the regenerating inner ear.

    PubMed

    Warchol, Mark E; Montcouquiol, Mireille

    2010-09-01

    The avian inner ear possesses a remarkable ability to regenerate sensory hair cells after ototoxic injury. Regenerated hair cells possess phenotypes and innervation that are similar to those found in the undamaged ear, but little is known about the signaling pathways that guide hair cell differentiation during the regenerative process. The aim of the present study was to examine the factors that specify the orientation of hair cell stereocilia bundles during regeneration. Using organ cultures of the chick utricle, we show that hair cells are properly oriented after having regenerated entirely in vitro and that orientation is not affected by surgical removal of the striolar reversal zone. These results suggest that the orientation of regenerating stereocilia is not guided by the release of a diffusible morphogen from the striolar reversal zone but is specified locally within the regenerating sensory organ. In order to determine the nature of the reorientation cues, we examined the expression patterns of the core planar cell polarity molecule Vangl2 in the normal and regenerating utricle. We found that Vangl2 is asymmetrically expressed on cells within the sensory epithelium and that this expression pattern is maintained after ototoxic injury and throughout regeneration. Notably, treatment with a small molecule inhibitor of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase disrupted the orientation of regenerated hair cells. Both of these results are consistent with the hypothesis that noncanonical Wnt signaling guides hair cell orientation during regeneration.

  5. Transduction channels' gating can control friction on vibrating hair-cell bundles in the ear.

    PubMed

    Bormuth, Volker; Barral, Jérémie; Joanny, Jean-François; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2014-05-20

    Hearing starts when sound-evoked mechanical vibrations of the hair-cell bundle activate mechanosensitive ion channels, giving birth to an electrical signal. As for any mechanical system, friction impedes movements of the hair bundle and thus constrains the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of auditory transduction. Friction is generally thought to result mainly from viscous drag by the surrounding fluid. We demonstrate here that the opening and closing of the transduction channels produce internal frictional forces that can dominate viscous drag on the micrometer-sized hair bundle. We characterized friction by analyzing hysteresis in the force-displacement relation of single hair-cell bundles in response to periodic triangular stimuli. For bundle velocities high enough to outrun adaptation, we found that frictional forces were maximal within the narrow region of deflections that elicited significant channel gating, plummeted upon application of a channel blocker, and displayed a sublinear growth for increasing bundle velocity. At low velocity, the slope of the relation between the frictional force and velocity was nearly fivefold larger than the hydrodynamic friction coefficient that was measured when the transduction machinery was decoupled from bundle motion by severing tip links. A theoretical analysis reveals that channel friction arises from coupling the dynamics of the conformational change associated with channel gating to tip-link tension. Varying channel properties affects friction, with faster channels producing smaller friction. We propose that this intrinsic source of friction may contribute to the process that sets the hair cell's characteristic frequency of responsiveness.

  6. Transduction channels’ gating can control friction on vibrating hair-cell bundles in the ear

    PubMed Central

    Bormuth, Volker; Barral, Jérémie; Joanny, Jean-François; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Hearing starts when sound-evoked mechanical vibrations of the hair-cell bundle activate mechanosensitive ion channels, giving birth to an electrical signal. As for any mechanical system, friction impedes movements of the hair bundle and thus constrains the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of auditory transduction. Friction is generally thought to result mainly from viscous drag by the surrounding fluid. We demonstrate here that the opening and closing of the transduction channels produce internal frictional forces that can dominate viscous drag on the micrometer-sized hair bundle. We characterized friction by analyzing hysteresis in the force–displacement relation of single hair-cell bundles in response to periodic triangular stimuli. For bundle velocities high enough to outrun adaptation, we found that frictional forces were maximal within the narrow region of deflections that elicited significant channel gating, plummeted upon application of a channel blocker, and displayed a sublinear growth for increasing bundle velocity. At low velocity, the slope of the relation between the frictional force and velocity was nearly fivefold larger than the hydrodynamic friction coefficient that was measured when the transduction machinery was decoupled from bundle motion by severing tip links. A theoretical analysis reveals that channel friction arises from coupling the dynamics of the conformational change associated with channel gating to tip-link tension. Varying channel properties affects friction, with faster channels producing smaller friction. We propose that this intrinsic source of friction may contribute to the process that sets the hair cell’s characteristic frequency of responsiveness. PMID:24799674

  7. Coupling and Elastic Loading Affect the Active Response by the Inner Ear Hair Cell Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Strimbu, Clark Elliott; Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Bozovic, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Active hair bundle motility has been proposed to underlie the amplification mechanism in the auditory endorgans of non-mammals and in the vestibular systems of all vertebrates, and to constitute a crucial component of cochlear amplification in mammals. We used semi-intact in vitro preparations of the bullfrog sacculus to study the effects of elastic mechanical loading on both natively coupled and freely oscillating hair bundles. For the latter, we attached glass fibers of different stiffness to the stereocilia and observed the induced changes in the spontaneous bundle movement. When driven with sinusoidal deflections, hair bundles displayed phase-locked response indicative of an Arnold Tongue, with the frequency selectivity highest at low amplitudes and decreasing under stronger stimulation. A striking broadening of the mode-locked response was seen with increasing stiffness of the load, until approximate impedance matching, where the phase-locked response remained flat over the physiological range of frequencies. When the otolithic membrane was left intact atop the preparation, the natural loading of the bundles likewise decreased their frequency selectivity with respect to that observed in freely oscillating bundles. To probe for signatures of the active process under natural loading and coupling conditions, we applied transient mechanical stimuli to the otolithic membrane. Following the pulses, the underlying bundles displayed active movement in the opposite direction, analogous to the twitches observed in individual cells. Tracking features in the otolithic membrane indicated that it moved in phase with the bundles. Hence, synchronous active motility evoked in the system of coupled hair bundles by external input is sufficient to displace large overlying structures. PMID:22479461

  8. Hair cell ribbon synapses

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Andreas; Lysakowski, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Hearing and balance rely on the faithful synaptic coding of mechanical input by the auditory and vestibular hair cells of the inner ear. Mechanical deflection of their stereocilia causes the opening of mechanosensitive channels, resulting in hair cell depolarization, which controls the release of glutamate at ribbon-type synapses. Hair cells have a compact shape with strong polarity. Mechanoelectrical transduction and active membrane turnover associated with stereociliar renewal dominate the apical compartment. Transmitter release occurs at several active zones along the basolateral membrane. The astonishing capability of the hair cell ribbon synapse for temporally precise and reliable sensory coding has been the subject of intense investigation over the past few years. This research has been facilitated by the excellent experimental accessibility of the hair cell. For the same reason, the hair cell serves as an important model for studying presynaptic Ca2+ signaling and stimulus-secretion coupling. In addition to common principles, hair cell synapses differ in their anatomical and functional properties among species, among the auditory and vestibular organs, and among hair cell positions within the organ. Here, we briefly review synaptic morphology and connectivity and then focus on stimulus-secretion coupling at hair cell synapses. PMID:16944206

  9. Disruption of SorCS2 reveals differences in the regulation of stereociliary bundle formation between hair cell types in the inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ruth R.; Lovett, Michael; Jagger, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Behavioural anomalies suggesting an inner ear disorder were observed in a colony of transgenic mice. Affected animals were profoundly deaf. Severe hair bundle defects were identified in all outer and inner hair cells (OHC, IHC) in the cochlea and in hair cells of vestibular macular organs, but hair cells in cristae were essentially unaffected. Evidence suggested the disorder was likely due to gene disruption by a randomly inserted transgene construct. Whole-genome sequencing identified interruption of the SorCS2 (Sortilin-related VPS-10 domain containing protein) locus. Real-time-qPCR demonstrated disrupted expression of SorCS2 RNA in cochlear tissue from affected mice and this was confirmed by SorCS2 immuno-labelling. In all affected hair cells, stereocilia were shorter than normal, but abnormalities of bundle morphology and organisation differed between hair cell types. Bundles on OHC were grossly misshapen with significantly fewer stereocilia than normal. However, stereocilia were organised in rows of increasing height. Bundles on IHC contained significantly more stereocilia than normal with some longer stereocilia towards the centre, or with minimal height differentials. In early postnatal mice, kinocilia (primary cilia) of IHC and of OHC were initially located towards the lateral edge of the hair cell surface but often became surrounded by stereocilia as bundle shape and apical surface contour changed. In macular organs the kinocilium was positioned in the centre of the cell surface throughout maturation. There was disruption of the signalling pathway controlling intrinsic hair cell apical asymmetry. LGN and Gαi3 were largely absent, and atypical Protein Kinase C (aPKC) lost its asymmetric distribution. The results suggest that SorCS2 plays a role upstream of the intrinsic polarity pathway and that there are differences between hair cell types in the deployment of the machinery that generates a precisely organised hair bundle. PMID:28346477

  10. The deltaA gene of zebrafish mediates lateral inhibition of hair cells in the inner ear and is regulated by pax2.1.

    PubMed

    Riley, B B; Chiang, M; Farmer, L; Heck, R

    1999-12-01

    Recent studies of inner ear development suggest that hair cells and support cells arise within a common equivalence group by cell-cell interactions mediated by Delta and Notch proteins. We have extended these studies by analyzing the effects of a mutant allele of the zebrafish deltaA gene, deltaA(dx2), which encodes a dominant-negative protein. deltaA(dx2/dx2 )homozygous mutants develop with a 5- to 6-fold excess of hair cells and a severe deficiency of support cells. In addition, deltaA(dx2/dx2) mutants show an increased number of cells expressing pax2.1 in regions where hair cells are normally produced. Immunohistological analysis of wild-type and deltaA(dx2/dx2) mutant embryos confirmed that pax2.1 is expressed during the initial stages of hair cell differentiation and is later maintained at high levels in mature hair cells. In contrast, pax2.1 is not expressed in support cells. To address the function of pax2.1, we analyzed hair cell differentiation in no isthmus mutant embryos, which are deficient for pax2.1 function. no isthmus mutant embryos develop with approximately twice the normal number of hair cells. This neurogenic defect correlates with reduced levels of expression of deltaA and deltaD in the hair cells in no isthmus mutants. Analysis of deltaA(dx2/dx2); no isthmus double mutants showed that no isthmus suppresses the deltaA(dx2) phenotype, probably by reducing levels of the dominant-negative mutant protein. This interpretation was supported by analysis of T(msxB)(b220), a deletion that removes the deltaA locus. Reducing the dose of deltaA(dx2) by generating deltaA(dx2)/T(msxB)(b220 )trans-heterozygotes weakens the neurogenic effects of deltaA(dx2), whereas T(msxB)(b220) enhances the neurogenic defects of no isthmus. mind bomb, another strong neurogenic mutation that may disrupt reception of Delta signals, causes a 10-fold increase in hair cell production and is epistatic to both no isthmus and deltaA(dx2). These data indicate that deltaA expressed by

  11. Exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic fields emitted from mobile phones induced DNA damage in human ear canal hair follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Akdag, Mehmet; Dasdag, Suleyman; Canturk, Fazile; Akdag, Mehmet Zulkuf

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effect of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) emitted from mobile phones on DNA damage in follicle cells of hair in the ear canal. The study was carried out on 56 men (age range: 30-60 years old)in four treatment groups with n = 14 in each group. The groups were defined as follows: people who did not use a mobile phone (Control), people use mobile phones for 0-30 min/day (second group), people use mobile phones for 30-60 min/day (third group) and people use mobile phones for more than 60 min/day (fourth group). Ear canal hair follicle cells taken from the subjects were analyzed by the Comet Assay to determine DNA damages. The Comet Assay parameters measured were head length, tail length, comet length, percentage of head DNA, tail DNA percentage, tail moment, and Olive tail moment. Results of the study showed that DNA damage indicators were higher in the RFR exposure groups than in the control subjects. In addition, DNA damage increased with the daily duration of exposure. In conclusion, RFR emitted from mobile phones has a potential to produce DNA damage in follicle cells of hair in the ear canal. Therefore, mobile phone users have to pay more attention when using wireless phones.

  12. Stem Cell Therapy for the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, perception of sound, motion, and balance is mediated through mechanosensory hair cells located within the inner ear. In mammals, hair cells are only generated during a short period of embryonic development. As a result, loss of hair cells as a consequence of injury, disease, or genetic mutation, leads to permanent sensory deficits. At present, cochlear implantation is the only option for profound hearing loss. However, outcomes are still variable and even the best implant cannot provide the acuity of a biological ear. The recent emergence of stem cell technology has the potential to open new approaches for hair cell regeneration. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of inner ear stem cell research from a viewpoint of its clinical application for inner ear disorders to illustrate how complementary studies have the potential to promote and refine stem cell therapies for inner ear diseases. The review initially discusses our current understanding of the genetic pathways that regulate hair cell formation from inner ear progenitors during normal development. Subsequent sections discuss the possible use of endogenous inner ear stem cells to induce repair as well as the initial studies aimed at transplanting stem cells into the ear. PMID:22514095

  13. Making connections in the inner ear: recent insights into the development of spiral ganglion neurons and their connectivity with sensory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Coate, Thomas M.; Kelley, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, auditory information is processed by the hair cells (HCs) located in the cochlea and then rapidly transmitted to the CNS via a specialized cluster of bipolar afferent connections known as the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Although many anatomical aspects of SGNs are well described, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying their genesis, how they are precisely arranged along the cochlear duct, and the guidance mechanisms that promote the innervation of their hair cell targets are only now being understood. Building upon foundational studies of neurogenesis and neurotrophins, we review here new concepts and technologies that are helping to enrich our understanding of the development of the nervous system within the inner ear. PMID:23660234

  14. TMC1 and TMC2 are components of the mechanotransduction channel in hair cells of the mammalian inner ear.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bifeng; Géléoc, Gwenaelle S; Asai, Yukako; Horwitz, Geoffrey C; Kurima, Kiyoto; Ishikawa, Kotaro; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Griffith, Andrew J; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2013-08-07

    Sensory transduction in auditory and vestibular hair cells requires expression of transmembrane channel-like (Tmc) 1 and 2 genes, but the function of these genes is unknown. To investigate the hypothesis that TMC1 and TMC2 proteins are components of the mechanosensitive ion channels that convert mechanical information into electrical signals, we recorded whole-cell and single-channel currents from mouse hair cells that expressed Tmc1, Tmc2, or mutant Tmc1. Cells that expressed Tmc2 had high calcium permeability and large single-channel currents, while cells with mutant Tmc1 had reduced calcium permeability and reduced single-channel currents. Cells that expressed Tmc1 and Tmc2 had a broad range of single-channel currents, suggesting multiple heteromeric assemblies of TMC subunits. The data demonstrate TMC1 and TMC2 are components of hair cell transduction channels and contribute to permeation properties. Gradients in TMC channel composition may also contribute to variation in sensory transduction along the tonotopic axis of the mammalian cochlea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hair Cell Heterogeneity in the Goldfish Saccule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saidel, William M.; Lanford, Pamela J.; Yan, Hong Y.; Popper, Arthur N.

    1995-01-01

    A set of cytological studies performed in the utricle and saccule of Astronotus ocellatus (Teleostei, Percomorphi, Cichlidae) identified two basic types of hair cells and others with some intermediate characteristics. This paper reports on applying the same techniques to the saccule of Carassius auratus (Teleostei, Otophysi, Cyprinidae) and demonstrates similar types of hair cells to those found in Astronotus. Since Carassius and Astronous are species of extreme taxonomic distance within the Euteteostei, two classes of mechanoreceptive hair cells are likely to represent the primitive condition for sensory receptors in the euteleost inner ear and perhaps in all bony fish ears.

  16. Sensory Cells of the Fish Ear: A Hairy Enigma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, A. N.; Saidel, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the structure of the ears in teleost fishes has led to the tentative suggestion that otolithic endorgans may function differently, in different species. Recently, evidence has demonstrated different 'types' of sensory hair cells can be found in the ears of teleost fishes, and individual hair cell types are found in discrete regions of individual sensory, epithelia. The presence of multiple hair cell types in fishes provides strong support to the hypothesis of regional differences in the responses of individual otolithic sensory epithelia. The finding of hair cell types in fishes that closely resemble those found in amniote vestibular endorgans also suggests that hair cell heterogeneity arose earlier in the evolution of the vertebrate ear than previously thought.

  17. CNGA3 is expressed in inner ear hair cells and binds to an intracellular C-terminus domain of EMILIN1.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Dakshnamurthy; Drescher, Marian J; Dowdall, Jayme R; Khan, Khalid M; Hatfield, James S; Ramakrishnan, Neeliyath A; Drescher, Dennis G

    2012-04-15

    The molecular characteristics of CNG (cyclic nucleotide-gated) channels in auditory/vestibular hair cells are largely unknown, unlike those of CNG mediating sensory transduction in vision and olfaction. In the present study we report the full-length sequence for three CNGA3 variants in a hair cell preparation from the trout saccule with high identity to CNGA3 in olfactory receptor neurons/cone photoreceptors. A custom antibody targeting the N-terminal sequence immunolocalized CNGA3 to the stereocilia and subcuticular plate region of saccular hair cells. The cytoplasmic C-terminus of CNGA3 was found by yeast two-hybrid analysis to bind the C-terminus of EMILIN1 (elastin microfibril interface-located protein 1) in both the vestibular hair cell model and rat organ of Corti. Specific binding between CNGA3 and EMILIN1 was confirmed with surface plasmon resonance analysis, predicting dependence on Ca2+ with Kd=1.6×10-6 M for trout hair cell proteins and Kd=2.7×10-7 M for organ of Corti proteins at 68 μM Ca2+. Pull-down assays indicated that the binding to organ of Corti CNGA3 was attributable to the EMILIN1 intracellular sequence that follows a predicted transmembrane domain in the C-terminus. Saccular hair cells also express the transcript for PDE6C (phosphodiesterase 6C), which in cone photoreceptors regulates the degradation of cGMP used to gate CNGA3 in phototransduction. Taken together, the evidence supports the existence in saccular hair cells of a molecular pathway linking CNGA3, its binding partner EMILIN1 (and β1 integrin) and cGMP-specific PDE6C, which is potentially replicated in cochlear outer hair cells, given stereociliary immunolocalizations of CNGA3, EMILIN1 and PDE6C.

  18. sox2 and sox3 Play unique roles in development of hair cells and neurons in the zebrafish inner ear.

    PubMed

    Gou, Yunzi; Vemaraju, Shruti; Sweet, Elly M; Kwon, Hye-Joo; Riley, Bruce B

    2018-03-01

    Formation of neural and sensory progenitors in the inner ear requires Sox2 in mammals, and in other species is thought to rely on both Sox2 and Sox3. How Sox2 and/or Sox3 promote different fates is poorly understood. Our mutant analysis in zebrafish showed that sox2 is uniquely required for sensory development while sox3 is uniquely required for neurogenesis. Moderate misexpression of sox2 during placodal stages led to development of otic vesicles with expanded sensory and reduced neurogenic domains. However, high-level misexpression of sox2 or sox3 expanded both sensory and neurogenic domains to fill the medial and lateral halves of the otic vesicle, respectively. Disruption of medial factor pax2a eliminated the ability of sox2/3 misexpression to expand sensory but not neurogenic domains. Additionally, mild misexpression of fgf8 during placodal development was sufficient to specifically expand the zone of prosensory competence. Later, cross-repression between atoh1a and neurog1 helps maintain the sensory-neural boundary, but unlike mouse this does not require Notch activity. Together, these data show that sox2 and sox3 exhibit intrinsic differences in promoting sensory vs. neural competence, but at high levels these factors can mimic each other to enhance both states. Regional cofactors like pax2a and fgf8 also modify sox2/3 functions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Zebrafish hair cell mechanics and physiology through the lens of noise-induced hair cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, Allison B.; Xu, Jie; Uribe, Phillip M.

    2018-05-01

    Hair cells are exquisitely sensitive to auditory stimuli, but also to damage from a variety of sources including noise trauma and ototoxic drugs. Mammals cannot regenerate cochlear hair cells, while non-mammalian vertebrates exhibit robust regenerative capacity. Our research group uses the lateral line system of larval zebrafish to explore the mechanisms underlying hair cell damage, identify protective therapies, and determine molecular drivers of innate regeneration. The lateral line system contains externally located sensory organs called neuromasts, each composed of ˜8-20 hair cells. Lateral line hair cells are homologous to vertebrate inner ear hair cells and share similar susceptibility to ototoxic damage. In the last decade, the lateral line has emerged as a powerful model system for understanding hair cell death mechanisms and for identifying novel protective compounds. Here we demonstrate that the lateral line is a tractable model for noise-induced hair cell death. We have developed a novel noise damage system capable of inducing over 50% loss of lateral line hair cells, with hair cell death occurring in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell death is greatest 72 hours post-exposure. However, early signs of hair cell damage, including changes in membrane integrity and reduced mechanotransduction, are apparent within hours of noise exposure. These features, early signs of damage followed by delayed hair cell death, are consistent with mammalian data, suggesting that noise acts similarly on zebrafish and mammalian hair cells. In our future work we will use our new model system to investigate noise damage events in real time, and to develop protective therapies for future translational research.

  20. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog uticulus. 2: Sensitivity and response dynamics to hair bundle displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    The present study was motivated by an interest in seeing whether hair cell types in the bullfrog utriculus might differ in their voltage responses to hair bundle displacement. Particular interest was in assessing the contributions of two factors to the responses of utricular hair cells. First, interest in examining the effect of hair bundle morphology on the sensitivity of hair cells to natural stimulation was motivated by the observation that vestibular hair cells, unlike many auditory hair cells, are not free-standing but rather linked to an accessory cupular or otolithic membrane via the tip of their kinocilium. Interest also laid in examining the contribution, if any, of adaptation to the response properties of utricular hair cells. Hair cells in auditory and vibratory inner ear endorgans adapt to maintained displacements of their hair bundles, sharply limiting their low frequency sensitivity. This adaptation is mediated by a shift in the displacement-response curve (DRC) of the hair cell along the displacement axis. Observations suggest that the adaptation process occurs within the hair bundle and precedes mechanoelectric transduction. Recent observations of time-dependent changes in hair bundle stiffness are consistent with this conclusion. Adaptation would be expected to be most useful in inner ear endorgans in which hair cells are subject to large static displacements that could potentially saturate their instantaneous response and compromise their sensitivity to high frequency stimulation. The adaptation process also permits hair cells to maintain their sensory hair bundle in the most sensitive portion of their DRC. In vestibular otolith organs in which static sensitivity is desirable, any adaptation process in the hair cells may be undesirable. The rate and extent of the decline of the voltage responses was measured of utricular hair cells to step and sinusoidal hair bundle displacements. Then for similar resting potentials and response amplitudes, the

  1. Sensory hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Lush, Mark E; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2014-10-01

    Damage or destruction of sensory hair cells in the inner ear leads to hearing or balance deficits that can be debilitating, especially in older adults. Unfortunately, the damage is permanent, as regeneration of the inner ear sensory epithelia does not occur in mammals. Zebrafish and other non-mammalian vertebrates have the remarkable ability to regenerate sensory hair cells and understanding the molecular and cellular basis for this regenerative ability will hopefully aid us in designing therapies to induce regeneration in mammals. Zebrafish not only possess hair cells in the ear but also in the sensory lateral line system. Hair cells in both organs are functionally analogous to hair cells in the inner ear of mammals. The lateral line is a mechanosensory system found in most aquatic vertebrates that detects water motion and aids in predator avoidance, prey capture, schooling, and mating. Although hair cell regeneration occurs in both the ear and lateral line, most research to date has focused on the lateral line due to its relatively simple structure and accessibility. Here we review the recent discoveries made during the characterization of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. SENSORY HAIR CELL REGENERATION IN THE ZEBRAFISH LATERAL LINE

    PubMed Central

    Lush, Mark E.; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Damage or destruction of sensory hair cells in the inner ear leads to hearing or balance deficits that can be debilitating, especially in older adults. Unfortunately, the damage is permanent, as regeneration of the inner ear sensory epithelia does not occur in mammals. Zebrafish and other non-mammalian vertebrates have the remarkable ability to regenerate sensory hair cells and understanding the molecular and cellular basis for this regenerative ability will hopefully aid us in designing therapies to induce regeneration in mammals. Zebrafish not only possess hair cells in the ear but also in the sensory lateral line system. Hair cells in both organs are functionally analogous to hair cells in the inner ear of mammals. The lateral line is a mechanosensory system found in most aquatic vertebrates that detects water motion and aids in predator avoidance, prey capture, schooling and mating. Although hair cell regeneration occurs in both the ear and lateral line, most research to date has focused on the lateral line due to its relatively simple structure and accessibility. Here we review the recent discoveries made during the characterization of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish. PMID:25045019

  3. Hair cell regeneration: Look to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, Edwin W.

    2005-04-01

    Less than 2 decades ago it was discovered that birds can regenerate hair cells in the auditory and vestibular parts of the inner ear after the native hair cells are destroyed by exposure to excessive noise or by mechanical trauma of aminoglycoside antibiotics. This discovery issued in a new era of hearing research-it suggested that some day it may be possible to actually restore hearing in people with congenital or acquired hearing loss due to the degeneration of sensory cells or supporting cells in the inner ear. Fifteen years is a very short time in the history of science. Consider the fact that we have actively sought chemical treatments to prevent or cure cancers for well over a half century and the ``war on Cancer,'' resulted in enormous public and private support. Progress has been great, and some forms of cancer can be treated with great success, but the overall 5-year survival rates have only risen from about 50% to 63%. Progress will continue and many more forms of cancer will be cured and prevented during the next half century. Similarly, during the first 15 years of hair cell regeneration research enormous progress has been made, and we now know that postnatal mammalian ears have the capacity to produce new hair cells. We are indeed a long way from restoring hearing through hair cell regeneration, but the future is pretty clear. I will review the progress of this field with an eye toward the future and what it means for treatments of today. In particular, I will address the potential cost versus benefits of bilateral implantation when applied to babies and young children.

  4. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Jerry D.; Rajadinakaran, Gopinath; Smith, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980’s, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation vs. direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies. PMID:25954154

  5. Beyond generalized hair cells: Molecular cues for hair cell types

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Israt; Pan, Ning; Kersigo, Jennifer; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) are crucial for inner ear neurosensory development. The proneural TF Atoh1 regulates the differentiation of hair cells (HCs) whereas Neurog1 and Neurod1 regulate specification and differentiation of neurons, respectively, but also affect HC development. Expression of Delta and Jagged ligands in nascent HCs and Notch receptors in supporting cells induce supporting cell differentiation through the regulation of neurogenic bHLH TFs (such as Hes1, Hes5) and suppression of limited Atoh1 expression. In sensorineural hearing loss, HCs are lost followed by supporting cells and progressive degeneration of neurons, at least in rodents. Regaining complete hearing may require reconstituting the organ of Corti (OC) from scratch, including the two types of HCs, inner (IHC) and outer (OHC) hair cells with the precise sorting of two types of afferent (type I and II) and efferent (lateral, LOC and medial, MOC olivo-cochlear) innervation. We review effects of bHLH TF dosage and their cross-regulation to differentiate HC types in the OC. We categorize findings of specific gene expressions in HCs: 1. as markers without meaning for the regeneration task, 2. as stabilizers who are needed to maintain or complete differentiation, and 3. as decision making genes, expressed and acting early enough to be useful in this process. Only one TF has been characterized that fits the last aspect: Atoh1. We propose that temporal and intensity variations of Atoh1 are naturally modulated to differentiate specific types of HCs. Importantly, the molecular means to modify the Atoh1 expression are at least partially understood and can be readily implemented in the attempts to regenerate specific types of HCs. PMID:23201032

  6. A Myo6 mutation destroys coordination between the myosin heads, revealing new functions of myosin VI in the stereocilia of mammalian inner ear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Hertzano, Ronna; Shalit, Ella; Rzadzinska, Agnieszka K; Dror, Amiel A; Song, Lin; Ron, Uri; Tan, Joshua T; Shitrit, Alina Starovolsky; Fuchs, Helmut; Hasson, Tama; Ben-Tal, Nir; Sweeney, H Lee; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Steel, Karen P; Avraham, Karen B

    2008-10-03

    Myosin VI, found in organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans, is essential for auditory and vestibular function in mammals, since genetic mutations lead to hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction in both humans and mice. Here, we show that a missense mutation in this molecular motor in an ENU-generated mouse model, Tailchaser, disrupts myosin VI function. Structural changes in the Tailchaser hair bundles include mislocalization of the kinocilia and branching of stereocilia. Transfection of GFP-labeled myosin VI into epithelial cells and delivery of endocytic vesicles to the early endosome revealed that the mutant phenotype displays disrupted motor function. The actin-activated ATPase rates measured for the D179Y mutation are decreased, and indicate loss of coordination of the myosin VI heads or 'gating' in the dimer form. Proper coordination is required for walking processively along, or anchoring to, actin filaments, and is apparently destroyed by the proximity of the mutation to the nucleotide-binding pocket. This loss of myosin VI function may not allow myosin VI to transport its cargoes appropriately at the base and within the stereocilia, or to anchor the membrane of stereocilia to actin filaments via its cargos, both of which lead to structural changes in the stereocilia of myosin VI-impaired hair cells, and ultimately leading to deafness.

  7. Negative hair-bundle stiffness betrays a mechanism for mechanical amplification by the hair cell.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Mehta, A D; Hudspeth, A J

    2000-10-24

    Hearing and balance rely on the ability of hair cells in the inner ear to sense miniscule mechanical stimuli. In each cell, sound or acceleration deflects the mechanosensitive hair bundle, a tuft of rigid stereocilia protruding from the cell's apical surface. By altering the tension in gating springs linked to mechanically sensitive transduction channels, this deflection changes the channels' open probability and elicits an electrical response. To detect weak stimuli despite energy losses caused by viscous dissipation, a hair cell can use active hair-bundle movement to amplify its mechanical inputs. This amplificatory process also yields spontaneous bundle oscillations. Using a displacement-clamp system to measure the mechanical properties of individual hair bundles from the bullfrog's ear, we found that an oscillatory bundle displays negative slope stiffness at the heart of its region of mechanosensitivity. Offsetting the hair bundle's position activates an adaptation process that shifts the region of negative stiffness along the displacement axis. Modeling indicates that the interplay between negative bundle stiffness and the motor responsible for mechanical adaptation produces bundle oscillation similar to that observed. Just as the negative resistance of electrically excitable cells and of tunnel diodes can be embedded in a biasing circuit to amplify electrical signals, negative stiffness can be harnessed to amplify mechanical stimuli in the ear.

  8. Relationship Between Hair Cell Loss and Hearing Loss in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to intense sound or ototoxic chemicals can damage the auditory hair cells of vertebrates, resulting in hearing loss. Although the relationship between such hair cell damage and auditory function is fairly established for terrestrial vertebrates, there are limited data available to understand this relationship in fishes. Although investigators have measured either the morphological damage of the inner ear or the functional deficits in the hearing of fishes, very few have directly measured both in an attempt to find a relationship between the two. Those studies that have examined both auditory hair cell damage in the inner ear and the resulting hearing loss in fishes are reviewed here. In general, there is a significant linear relationship between the number of hair cells lost and the severity of hearing threshold shifts, although this varies between species and different hair cell-damaging stimuli. After trauma to the fish ear, auditory hair cells are able to regenerate to control level densities. With this regeneration also comes a restoration of hearing. Thus there is also a significant relationship between hair cell recovery and hearing recovery in fishes.

  9. Reprogramming of single-cell derived mesenchymal stem cells into hair cell-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhaoyu; Perez, Philip; Sun, Zhenyu; Liu, Jan-Jan; Shin, June Ho; Hyrc, Krzysztof L.; Samways, Damien; Egan, Terry; Holley, Matthew C.; Bao, Jianxin

    2012-01-01

    Hypothesis Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be converted into hair cell-like cells by transdetermination. Background Given the fundamental role sensory hair cells play in sound detection and the irreversibility of their loss in mammals, much research has focused on developing methods to generate new hair cells as a means of treating permanent hearing loss. Although MSCs can differentiate into multiple cell lineages, no efficient means of reprogramming them into sensory hair cells exists. Earlier work has shown that the transcription factor Atoh1 is necessary for early development of hair cells, but it is not clear whether Atoh1 can be used to convert MSCs into hair cells. Methods Clonal MSC cell lines were established and reprogrammed into hair cell-like cells by a combination of protein transfer, adenoviral based gene transfer and co-culture with neurons. During transdetermination, inner ear molecular markers were analyzed by RT-PCR, and cell structures were examined by immunocytochemistry. Results Atoh1 overexpression in MSCs failed to convert MSCs into hair cell-like cells, suggesting that the ability of Atoh1 to induce hair cell differentiation is context dependent. Because Atoh1 overexpression successfully transforms VOT-E36 cells into hair cell-like cells, we modified the cell context of MSCs by performing a total protein transfer from VOT-E36 cells prior to overexpressing Atoh1. The modified MSCs were transformed into hair cell-like cells and attracted contacts from spiral ganglion neurons in a co-culture model. Conclusion We established a new procedure, consisting of VOT-E36 protein transfer, Atoh1 overexpression, and co-culture with spiral ganglion neurons, which can transform MSCs into hair cell-like cells. PMID:23111404

  10. Development and regeneration of vestibular hair cells in mammals.

    PubMed

    Burns, Joseph C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular sensation is essential for gaze stabilization, balance, and perception of gravity. The vestibular receptors in mammals, Type I and Type II hair cells, are located in five small organs in the inner ear. Damage to hair cells and their innervating neurons can cause crippling symptoms such as vertigo, visual field oscillation, and imbalance. In adult rodents, some Type II hair cells are regenerated and become re-innervated after damage, presenting opportunities for restoring vestibular function after hair cell damage. This article reviews features of vestibular sensory cells in mammals, including their basic properties, how they develop, and how they are replaced after damage. We discuss molecules that control vestibular hair cell regeneration and highlight areas in which our understanding of development and regeneration needs to be deepened. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Generation of inner ear sensory cells from bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Durán Alonso, M Beatriz; Feijoo-Redondo, Ana; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Carnicero, Estela; García, Ana Sánchez; García-Sancho, Javier; Rivolta, Marcelo N; Giráldez, Fernando; Schimmang, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in humans, its main cause being the loss of cochlear hair cells. We studied the potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate towards hair cells and auditory neurons. hMSCs were first differentiated to neural progenitors and subsequently to hair cell- or auditory neuron-like cells using in vitro culture methods. Differentiation of hMSCs to an intermediate neural progenitor stage was critical for obtaining inner ear sensory lineages. hMSCs generated hair cell-like cells only when neural progenitors derived from nonadherent hMSC cultures grown in serum-free medium were exposed to EGF and retinoic acid. Auditory neuron-like cells were obtained when treated with retinoic acid, and in the presence of defined growth factor combinations containing Sonic Hedgehog. The results show the potential of hMSCs to give rise to inner ear sensory cells.

  12. Interrelated striated elements in vestibular hair cells of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Bourne, C.

    1983-01-01

    A series of interrelated striated organelles in types I and II vestibular hair cells of the rat which appear to be less developed in cochlear hair cells have been revealed by unusual fixation procedures, suggesting that contractile elements may play a role in sensory transduction in the inner ear, especially in the vestibular system. Included in the series of interrelated striated elements are the cuticular plate and its basal attachments to the hair cell margins, the connections of the strut array of the kinociliary basal body to the cuticular plate, and striated organelles associated with the plasma membrane and extending below the apical junctional complexes.

  13. Notch Inhibition Induces Cochlear Hair Cell Regeneration and Recovery of Hearing after Acoustic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mizutari, Kunio; Fujioka, Masato; Hosoya, Makoto; Bramhall, Naomi; Okano, Hirotaka James; Okano, Hideyuki; Edge, Albert S.B.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hearing loss due to damage to auditory hair cells is normally irreversible because mammalian hair cells do not regenerate. Here, we show that new hair cells can be induced and can cause partial recovery of hearing in ears damaged by noise trauma, when Notch signaling is inhibited by a γ-secretase inhibitor selected for potency in stimulating hair cell differentiation from inner ear stem cells in vitro. Hair cell generation resulted from an increase in the level of bHLH transcription factor, Atoh1, in response to inhibition of Notch signaling. In vivo prospective labeling of Sox2-expressing cells with a Cre/lox system unambiguously demonstrated that hair cell generation resulted from transdifferentiation of supporting cells. Manipulating cell fate of cochlear sensory cells in vivo by pharmacological inhibition of Notch signaling is thus a potential therapeutic approach to the treatment of deafness. PMID:23312516

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 antagonizes hair cell regeneration in the avian auditory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Rebecca M; Keller, Jesse J; Wan, Liangcai; Stone, Jennifer S

    2018-07-01

    Permanent hearing loss is often a result of damage to cochlear hair cells, which mammals are unable to regenerate. Non-mammalian vertebrates such as birds replace damaged hair cells and restore hearing function, but mechanisms controlling regeneration are not understood. The secreted protein bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) regulates inner ear morphogenesis and hair cell development. To investigate mechanisms controlling hair cell regeneration in birds, we examined expression and function of BMP4 in the auditory epithelia (basilar papillae) of chickens of either sex after hair cell destruction by ototoxic antibiotics. In mature basilar papillae, BMP4 mRNA is highly expressed in hair cells, but not in hair cell progenitors (supporting cells). Supporting cells transcribe genes encoding receptors for BMP4 (BMPR1A, BMPR1B, and BMPR2) and effectors of BMP4 signaling (ID transcription factors). Following hair cell destruction, BMP4 transcripts are lost from the sensory epithelium. Using organotypic cultures, we demonstrate that treatments with BMP4 during hair cell destruction prevent supporting cells from upregulating expression of the pro-hair cell transcription factor ATOH1, entering the cell cycle, and fully transdifferentiating into hair cells, but they do not induce cell death. By contrast, noggin, a BMP4 inhibitor, increases numbers of regenerated hair cells. These findings demonstrate that BMP4 antagonizes hair cell regeneration in the chicken basilar papilla, at least in part by preventing accumulation of ATOH1 in hair cell precursors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of Notch Signaling during Spontaneous Regeneration of Cochlear Hair Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0475 TITLE: Investigation of Notch Signaling during Spontaneous Regeneration of Cochlear Hair Cells PRINCIPAL...Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Investigation of Notch Signaling during Spontaneous Regeneration of Cochlear Hair Cells 5b...inherent to military settings. These noise exposures damage and kill sensory hair cells (HCs) found in the cochlea of the inner ear, resulting in permanent

  16. Cell proliferation during hair cell regeneration induced by Math1 in vestibular epithelia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-bo; Ma, Rui; Yang, Juan-mei; Han, Zhao; Cong, Ning; Gao, Zhen; Ren, Dongdong; Wang, Jing; Chi, Fang-lu

    2018-01-01

    Hair cell regeneration is the fundamental method of correcting hearing loss and balance disorders caused by hair cell damage or loss. How to promote hair cell regeneration is a hot focus in current research. In mammals, cochlear hair cells cannot be regenerated and few vestibular hair cells can be renewed through spontaneous regeneration. However, Math1 gene transfer allows a few inner ear cells to be transformed into hair cells in vitro or in vivo. Hair cells can be renewed through two possible means in birds: supporting cell differentiation and transdifferentiation with or without cell division. Hair cell regeneration is strongly associated with cell proliferation. Therefore, this study explored the relationship between Math1-induced vestibular hair cell regeneration and cell division in mammals. The mouse vestibule was isolated to harvest vestibular epithelial cells. Ad-Math1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was used to track cell division during hair cell transformation. 5-Bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was added to track cell proliferation at various time points. Immunocytochemistry was utilized to determine cell differentiation and proliferation. Results demonstrated that when epithelial cells were in a higher proliferative stage, more of these cells differentiated into hair cells by Math1 gene transfer. However, in the low proliferation stage, no BrdU-positive cells were seen after Math1 gene transfer. Cell division always occurred before Math1 transfection but not during or after Math1 transfection, when cells were labeled with BrdU before and after Ad-Math1-EGFP transfection. These results confirm that vestibular epithelial cells with high proliferative potential can differentiate into new hair cells by Math1 gene transfer, but this process is independent of cell proliferation. PMID:29623936

  17. Isolation of sphere-forming stem cells from the mouse inner ear.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kazuo; Senn, Pascal; Heller, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear has very limited ability to regenerate lost sensory hair cells. This deficiency becomes apparent when hair cell loss leads to hearing loss as a result of either ototoxic insult or the aging process. Coincidently, with this inability to regenerate lost hair cells, the adult cochlea does not appear to harbor cells with a proliferative capacity that could serve as progenitor cells for lost cells. In contrast, adult mammalian vestibular sensory epithelia display a limited ability for hair cell regeneration, and sphere-forming cells with stem cell features can be isolated from the adult murine vestibular system. The neonatal inner ear, however, does harbor sphere-forming stem cells residing in cochlear and vestibular tissues. Here, we provide protocols to isolate sphere-forming stem cells from neonatal vestibular and cochlear sensory epithelia as well as from the spiral ganglion. We further describe procedures for sphere propagation, cell differentiation, and characterization of inner ear cell types derived from spheres. Sphere-forming stem cells from the mouse inner ear are an important tool for the development of cellular replacement strategies of damaged inner ears and are a bona fide progenitor cell source for transplantation studies.

  18. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  19. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Goo; Huang, Mingqian; Obholzer, Nikolaus D; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A; Megason, Sean G; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  20. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Obholzer, Nikolaus D.; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Megason, Sean G.; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:27351484

  1. Hair cell regeneration in the avian auditory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jennifer S; Cotanche, Douglas A

    2007-01-01

    Regeneration of sensory hair cells in the mature avian inner ear was first described just over 20 years ago. Since then, it has been shown that many other non-mammalian species either continually produce new hair cells or regenerate them in response to trauma. However, mammals exhibit limited hair cell regeneration, particularly in the auditory epithelium. In birds and other non-mammals, regenerated hair cells arise from adjacent non-sensory (supporting) cells. Hair cell regeneration was initially described as a proliferative response whereby supporting cells re-enter the mitotic cycle, forming daughter cells that differentiate into either hair cells or supporting cells and thereby restore cytoarchitecture and function in the sensory epithelium. However, further analyses of the avian auditory epithelium (and amphibian vestibular epithelium) revealed a second regenerative mechanism, direct transdifferentiation, during which supporting cells change their gene expression and convert into hair cells without dividing. In the chicken auditory epithelium, these two distinct mechanisms show unique spatial and temporal patterns, suggesting they are differentially regulated. Current efforts are aimed at identifying signals that maintain supporting cells in a quiescent state or direct them to undergo direct transdifferentiation or cell division. Here, we review current knowledge about supporting cell properties and discuss candidate signaling molecules for regulating supporting cell behavior, in quiescence and after damage. While significant advances have been made in understanding regeneration in non-mammals over the last 20 years, we have yet to determine why the mammalian auditory epithelium lacks the ability to regenerate hair cells spontaneously and whether it is even capable of significant regeneration under additional circumstances. The continued study of mechanisms controlling regeneration in the avian auditory epithelium may lead to strategies for inducing

  2. Steady-state stiffness of utricular hair cells depends on macular location and hair bundle structure

    PubMed Central

    Spoon, Corrie; Moravec, W. J.; Rowe, M. H.; Grant, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial and temporal properties of head movement are encoded by vestibular hair cells in the inner ear. One of the most striking features of these receptors is the orderly structural variation in their mechanoreceptive hair bundles, but the functional significance of this diversity is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that hair bundle structure is a significant contributor to hair bundle mechanics by comparing structure and steady-state stiffness of 73 hair bundles at varying locations on the utricular macula. Our first major finding is that stiffness of utricular hair bundles varies systematically with macular locus. Stiffness values are highest in the striola, near the line of hair bundle polarity reversal, and decline exponentially toward the medial extrastriola. Striolar bundles are significantly more stiff than those in medial (median: 8.9 μN/m) and lateral (2.0 μN/m) extrastriolae. Within the striola, bundle stiffness is greatest in zone 2 (106.4 μN/m), a band of type II hair cells, and significantly less in zone 3 (30.6 μN/m), which contains the only type I hair cells in the macula. Bathing bundles in media that break interciliary links produced changes in bundle stiffness with predictable time course and magnitude, suggesting that links were intact in our standard media and contributed normally to bundle stiffness during measurements. Our second major finding is that bundle structure is a significant predictor of steady-state stiffness: the heights of kinocilia and the tallest stereocilia are the most important determinants of bundle stiffness. Our results suggest 1) a functional interpretation of bundle height variability in vertebrate vestibular organs, 2) a role for the striola in detecting onset of head movement, and 3) the hypothesis that differences in bundle stiffness contribute to diversity in afferent response dynamics. PMID:21918003

  3. Steady-state stiffness of utricular hair cells depends on macular location and hair bundle structure.

    PubMed

    Spoon, Corrie; Moravec, W J; Rowe, M H; Grant, J W; Peterson, E H

    2011-12-01

    Spatial and temporal properties of head movement are encoded by vestibular hair cells in the inner ear. One of the most striking features of these receptors is the orderly structural variation in their mechanoreceptive hair bundles, but the functional significance of this diversity is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that hair bundle structure is a significant contributor to hair bundle mechanics by comparing structure and steady-state stiffness of 73 hair bundles at varying locations on the utricular macula. Our first major finding is that stiffness of utricular hair bundles varies systematically with macular locus. Stiffness values are highest in the striola, near the line of hair bundle polarity reversal, and decline exponentially toward the medial extrastriola. Striolar bundles are significantly more stiff than those in medial (median: 8.9 μN/m) and lateral (2.0 μN/m) extrastriolae. Within the striola, bundle stiffness is greatest in zone 2 (106.4 μN/m), a band of type II hair cells, and significantly less in zone 3 (30.6 μN/m), which contains the only type I hair cells in the macula. Bathing bundles in media that break interciliary links produced changes in bundle stiffness with predictable time course and magnitude, suggesting that links were intact in our standard media and contributed normally to bundle stiffness during measurements. Our second major finding is that bundle structure is a significant predictor of steady-state stiffness: the heights of kinocilia and the tallest stereocilia are the most important determinants of bundle stiffness. Our results suggest 1) a functional interpretation of bundle height variability in vertebrate vestibular organs, 2) a role for the striola in detecting onset of head movement, and 3) the hypothesis that differences in bundle stiffness contribute to diversity in afferent response dynamics.

  4. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  5. The genetics of hair-cell function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, Teresa

    2017-09-01

    Our ears are remarkable sensory organs, providing the important senses of balance and hearing. The complex structure of the inner ear, or 'labyrinth', along with the assorted neuroepithelia, have evolved to detect head movements and sounds with impressive sensitivity. The rub is that the inner ear is highly vulnerable to genetic lesions and environmental insults. According to National Institute of Health estimates, hearing loss is one of the most commonly inherited or acquired sensorineural diseases. To understand the causes of deafness and balance disorders, it is imperative to understand the underlying biology of the inner ear, especially the inner workings of the sensory receptors. These receptors, which are termed hair cells, are particularly susceptible to genetic mutations - more than two dozen genes are associated with defects in this cell type in humans. Over the past decade, a substantial amount of progress has been made in working out the molecular basis of hair-cell function using vertebrate animal models. Given the transparency of the inner ear and the genetic tools that are available, zebrafish have become an increasingly popular animal model for the study of deafness and vestibular dysfunction. Mutagenesis screens for larval defects in hearing and balance have been fruitful in finding key components, many of which have been implicated in human deafness. This review will focus on the genes that are required for hair-cell function in zebrafish, with a particular emphasis on mechanotransduction. In addition, the generation of new tools available for the characterization of zebrafish hair-cell mutants will be discussed.

  6. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Hailey, Dale W; Stawicki, Tamara M; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W; Simon, Julian A; Ou, Henry C

    2013-03-06

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analog of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line.

  7. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew J.; Hailey, Dale W.; Stawicki, Tamara M.; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.; Simon, Julian A.; Ou, Henry C.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anti-cancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analogue of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  8. Stimulation of hair cells with ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimzadeh, Julien B.; Fabella, Brian A.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    Hair bundles are specialized organelles that transduce mechanical inputs into electrical outputs. To activate hair cells, physiologists have resorted to mechanical methods of hair-bundle stimulation. Here we describe a new method of hair-bundle stimulation, irradiation with ultraviolet light. A hair bundle illuminated by ultraviolet light rapidly moves towards its tall edge, a motion typically associated with excitatory stimulation. The motion disappears upon tip-link rupture and is associated with the opening of mechanotransduction channels. Hair bundles can be induced to move sinusoidally with oscillatory modulation of the stimulation power. We discuss the implications of ultraviolet stimulation as a novel hair-bundle stimulus.

  9. Membrane Electromechanics at Hair-Cell Synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, W. E.; Farrell, B.; Raphael, R. M.

    2003-02-01

    Both outer hair cell electromotility and neurotransmission at the inner hair cell synapse are rapid mechanical events that are synchronized to the hair-cell receptor potential. We analyze whether the forces and potentials resulting from membrane flexoelectricity could affect synaptic vesicle fusion. The results suggest that the coupling of membrane curvature with membrane potential is of sufficient magnitude to influence neurotransmitter release.

  10. Concise review: Inner ear stem cells--an oxymoron, but why?

    PubMed

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Nasr, Marjan; Heller, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Hearing loss, caused by irreversible loss of cochlear sensory hair cells, affects millions of patients worldwide. In this concise review, we examine the conundrum of inner ear stem cells, which obviously are present in the inner ear sensory epithelia of nonmammalian vertebrates, giving these ears the ability to functionally recover even from repetitive ototoxic insults. Despite the inability of the mammalian inner ear to regenerate lost hair cells, there is evidence for cells with regenerative capacity because stem cells can be isolated from vestibular sensory epithelia and from the neonatal cochlea. Challenges and recent progress toward identification of the intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways that could be used to re-establish stemness in the mammalian organ of Corti are discussed. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  11. Supporting cells remove and replace sensory receptor hair cells in a balance organ of adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Bucks, Stephanie A; Cox, Brandon C; Vlosich, Brittany A; Manning, James P; Nguyen, Tot B; Stone, Jennifer S

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular hair cells in the inner ear encode head movements and mediate the sense of balance. These cells undergo cell death and replacement (turnover) throughout life in non-mammalian vertebrates. However, there is no definitive evidence that this process occurs in mammals. We used fate-mapping and other methods to demonstrate that utricular type II vestibular hair cells undergo turnover in adult mice under normal conditions. We found that supporting cells phagocytose both type I and II hair cells. Plp1-CreERT2-expressing supporting cells replace type II hair cells. Type I hair cells are not restored by Plp1-CreERT2-expressing supporting cells or by Atoh1-CreERTM-expressing type II hair cells. Destruction of hair cells causes supporting cells to generate 6 times as many type II hair cells compared to normal conditions. These findings expand our understanding of sensorineural plasticity in adult vestibular organs and further elucidate the roles that supporting cells serve during homeostasis and after injury. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18128.001 PMID:28263708

  12. Distinct capacity for differentiation to inner ear cell types by progenitor cells of the cochlea and vestibular organs

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Will J.; McLean, Dalton T.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of hearing and balance are most commonly associated with damage to cochlear and vestibular hair cells or neurons. Although these cells are not capable of spontaneous regeneration, progenitor cells in the hearing and balance organs of the neonatal mammalian inner ear have the capacity to generate new hair cells after damage. To investigate whether these cells are restricted in their differentiation capacity, we assessed the phenotypes of differentiated progenitor cells isolated from three compartments of the mouse inner ear – the vestibular and cochlear sensory epithelia and the spiral ganglion – by measuring electrophysiological properties and gene expression. Lgr5+ progenitor cells from the sensory epithelia gave rise to hair cell-like cells, but not neurons or glial cells. Newly created hair cell-like cells had hair bundle proteins, synaptic proteins and membrane proteins characteristic of the compartment of origin. PLP1+ glial cells from the spiral ganglion were identified as neural progenitors, which gave rise to neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, but not hair cells. Thus, distinct progenitor populations from the neonatal inner ear differentiate to cell types associated with their organ of origin. PMID:27789624

  13. Autonomous assembly of epithelial structures by subrenal implantation of dissociated embryonic inner-ear cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Kaiqing; Zhu, Helen He; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-05-27

    Microenvironment and cell-cell interactions play an important role during embryogenesis and are required for the stemness and differentiation of stem cells. The inner-ear sensory epithelium, containing hair cells and supporting cells, is derived from the stem cells within the otic vesicle at early embryonic stages. However, whether or not such microenvironment or cell-cell interactions within the embryonic otic tissue have the capacity to regulate the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells and to autonomously reassemble the cells into epithelial structures is unknown. Here, we report that on enzymatic digestion and dissociation to harvest all the single cells from 13.5-day-old rat embryonic (E13.5) inner-ear tissue as well as on implantation of these cells under renal capsules; the dissociated cells are able to reassemble themselves to form epithelial structures as early as 7 days after implantation. By 25 days after implantation, more mature epithelial structures are formed. Immunostaining with cell-type-specific markers reveals that hair cells and supporting cells are not only formed, but are also well aligned with the hair cells located in the apical layer surrounded by the supporting cells. These findings suggest that microenvironment and cell-cell interactions within the embryonic inner-ear tissue have the autonomous signals to induce the formation of sensory epithelial structures. This method may also provide a useful system to study the potential of stem cells to differentiate into hair cells in vivo.

  14. Artificial Induction of Sox21 Regulates Sensory Cell Formation in the Embryonic Chicken Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Stephen D.; Daudet, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    During embryonic development, hair cells and support cells in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear derive from progenitors that express Sox2, a member of the SoxB1 family of transcription factors. Sox2 is essential for sensory specification, but high levels of Sox2 expression appear to inhibit hair cell differentiation, suggesting that factors regulating Sox2 activity could be critical for both processes. Antagonistic interactions between SoxB1 and SoxB2 factors are known to regulate cell differentiation in neural tissue, which led us to investigate the potential roles of the SoxB2 member Sox21 during chicken inner ear development. Sox21 is normally expressed by sensory progenitors within vestibular and auditory regions of the early embryonic chicken inner ear. At later stages, Sox21 is differentially expressed in the vestibular and auditory organs. Sox21 is restricted to the support cell layer of the auditory epithelium, while it is enriched in the hair cell layer of the vestibular organs. To test Sox21 function, we used two temporally distinct gain-of-function approaches. Sustained over-expression of Sox21 from early developmental stages prevented prosensory specification, and abolished the formation of both hair cells and support cells. However, later induction of Sox21 expression at the time of hair cell formation in organotypic cultures of vestibular epithelia inhibited endogenous Sox2 expression and Notch activity, and biased progenitor cells towards a hair cell fate. Interestingly, Sox21 did not promote hair cell differentiation in the immature auditory epithelium, which fits with the expression of endogenous Sox21 within mature support cells in this tissue. These results suggest that interactions among endogenous SoxB family transcription factors may regulate sensory cell formation in the inner ear, but in a context-dependent manner. PMID:23071561

  15. Damage and Recovery of Hair Cells in Fish Canal (But Not Superficial) Neuromasts after Gentamicin Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Jiakun; Yan, Hong Young; Popper, Arthur N.

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrating the presence of two types of sensory hair cells in the ear of a telcost fish (Astronotus ocellatus, the oscar) indicates that hair cell heterogeneity may exist not only in amniotic vertebrates but also in anamniotes. Here we report that a similar heterogeneity between hair cell types may also occur in the other mechanosensory organ of the oscar, the lateral line. We exposed oscars to the aminoglycoside (ototoxic) antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and found damaged sensory hair cells in one class of the lateral line receptors, the canal neuromasts, but not in the other class, the superficial neuromasts. This effect was not due to the canal environment. Moreover, new ciliary bundles on hair cells of the canal neuromasts were found after, and during, gentamicin exposure. The pattern of hair cell destruction and recovery in canal neuromasts is similar to that of type 1-like hair cells found in the striolar region of the utricle and lagena of the oscar after gentamicin treatment. These results suggest that the hair cells in the canal and superficial neuromasts may be similar to type 1-like and type 2 hair cells, respectively, in the fish ear.

  16. Guided genetic screen to identify genes essential in the regeneration of hair cells and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Pei, Wuhong; Xu, Lisha; Huang, Sunny C; Pettie, Kade; Idol, Jennifer; Rissone, Alberto; Jimenez, Erin; Sinclair, Jason W; Slevin, Claire; Varshney, Gaurav K; Jones, MaryPat; Carrington, Blake; Bishop, Kevin; Huang, Haigen; Sood, Raman; Lin, Shuo; Burgess, Shawn M

    2018-01-01

    Regenerative medicine holds great promise for both degenerative diseases and traumatic tissue injury which represent significant challenges to the health care system. Hearing loss, which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, is caused primarily by a permanent loss of the mechanosensory receptors of the inner ear known as hair cells. This failure to regenerate hair cells after loss is limited to mammals, while all other non-mammalian vertebrates tested were able to completely regenerate these mechanosensory receptors after injury. To understand the mechanism of hair cell regeneration and its association with regeneration of other tissues, we performed a guided mutagenesis screen using zebrafish lateral line hair cells as a screening platform to identify genes that are essential for hair cell regeneration, and further investigated how genes essential for hair cell regeneration were involved in the regeneration of other tissues. We created genetic mutations either by retroviral insertion or CRISPR/Cas9 approaches, and developed a high-throughput screening pipeline for analyzing hair cell development and regeneration. We screened 254 gene mutations and identified 7 genes specifically affecting hair cell regeneration. These hair cell regeneration genes fell into distinct and somewhat surprising functional categories. By examining the regeneration of caudal fin and liver, we found these hair cell regeneration genes often also affected other types of tissue regeneration. Therefore, our results demonstrate guided screening is an effective approach to discover regeneration candidates, and hair cell regeneration is associated with other tissue regeneration.

  17. Feathers and fins: non-mammalian models for hair cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Brignull, Heather R; Raible, David W; Stone, Jennifer S

    2009-06-24

    Death of mechanosensory cells in the inner ear results in two profound disabilities: hearing loss and balance disorders. Although mammals lack the capacity to regenerate hair cells, recent studies in mice and other rodents have offered valuable insight into strategies for stimulating hair cell regeneration in mammals. Investigations of model organisms that retain the ability to form new hair cells after embryogenesis, such as fish and birds, are equally important and have provided clues as to the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may block hair cell regeneration in mammals. Here, we summarize studies on hair cell regeneration in the chicken and the zebrafish, discuss specific advantages of each model, and propose future directions for the use of non-mammalian models in understanding hair cell regeneration.

  18. Physiological Maturation of Regenerating Hair Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    The bullfrog saccule, a sensor of gravity and substrate-borne vibration, is a model system for hair cell transduction. Saccular hair cells also increase in number throughout adult life and rapidly recover after hair cell damage, making this organ an ideal system for studying hair cell development, repair, and regeneration. We have used of hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers to identify damaged hair cells and hair cell precursors in organotypic cultures of the bullfrog saccule. We then used an innovative combination of confocal, electron, and time-lapse microscopy to study the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of new hair cells after gentamicin ototoxicity in normal and mitotically blocked saccular cultures. These studies have shown that gentamicin ototoxicity produces both lethal and sublethal hair cell damage. They have also shown that hair cell recovery in this organ takes place by both the repair of sublethally damaged hair cells and by the replacement of lost hair cells by mitotic regeneration. In parallel studies, we have used biophysical and molecular biological techniques to study the differentiation and innervation of developing, repairing, and regenerating hair cells. More specifically, we have used RT-PCR to obtain the bullfrog homologues of L-type voltage- gated calcium (L-VGCC) and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channel genes. We have then obtained probes for these genes and, using in situ hybridization, begun to examine their expression in the bullfrog saccule and amphibian papilla. We have also used fluorescent-labeled channel toxins and channel toxin derivatives to determine the time of appearance of L-type voltage-gated calcium (L-VGCC) and Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels and to study dynamic changes in the number, distribution, and co-localization of these proteins in developing, repairing, and regenerating hair cells. Using time-lapse microscopy, we are also studying the dynamic relationship

  19. A missense mutation in myosin VIIA prevents aminoglycoside accumulation in early postnatal cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G P; Forge, A; Kros, C J; Marcotti, W; Becker, D; Williams, D S; Thorpe, J; Fleming, J; Brown, S D; Steel, K P

    1999-11-28

    Myosin VIIA is expressed by sensory hair cells in the inner ear and proximal tubule cells in the kidney, the two primary targets of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Using cochlear cultures prepared from early postnatal Myo7a6J mice with a missense mutation in the head region of the myosin VIIA molecule we show that this myosin is required for aminoglycoside accumulation in cochlear hair cells. Hair cells in homozygous mutant Myo7a6J cochlear cultures have disorganized hair bundles, but are otherwise morphologically normal and transduce. However, and in contrast to hair cells from heterozygous Myo7a6J cultures, the homozygous Myo7a6J hair cells do not accumulate [3H]gentamicin and do not exhibit an ototoxic response on exposure to aminoglycoside. Possible roles for myosin VIIA in the process of aminoglycoside accumulation are discussed.

  20. Limited hair cell induction from human induced pluripotent stem cells using a simple stepwise method.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Skerleva, Desislava; Kitajiri, Shin-ichiro; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Ito, Juichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2015-07-10

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) cells are expected to contribute to exploring useful tools for studying the pathophysiology of inner ear diseases and to drug discovery for treating inner ear diseases. For this purpose, stable induction methods for the differentiation of human iPS cells into inner ear hair cells are required. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of a simple induction method for inducing the differentiation of human iPS cells into hair cells. The induction of inner ear hair cell-like cells was performed using a stepwise method mimicking inner ear development. Human iPS cells were sequentially transformed into the preplacodal ectoderm, otic placode, and hair cell-like cells. As a first step, preplacodal ectoderm induction, human iPS cells were seeded on a Matrigel-coated plate and cultured in a serum free N2/B27 medium for 8 days according to a previous study that demonstrated spontaneous differentiation of human ES cells into the preplacodal ectoderm. As the second step, the cells after preplacodal ectoderm induction were treated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for induction of differentiation into otic-placode-like cells for 15 days. As the final step, cultured cells were incubated in a serum free medium containing Matrigel for 48 days. After preplacodal ectoderm induction, over 90% of cultured cells expressed the genes that express in preplacodal ectoderm. By culture with bFGF, otic placode marker-positive cells were obtained, although their number was limited. Further 48-day culture in serum free media resulted in the induction of hair cell-like cells, which expressed a hair cell marker and had stereocilia bundle-like constructions on their apical surface. Our results indicate that hair cell-like cells are induced from human iPS cells using a simple stepwise method with only bFGF, without the use of xenogeneic cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic actuation of hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state.

  2. Return of Function after Hair Cell Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ryals, Brenda M.; Dent, Micheal L.; Dooling, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of hair cell regeneration is to restore functional hearing. Because birds begin perceiving and producing song early in life, they provide a propitious model for studying not only whether regeneration of lost hair cells can return auditory sensitivity but also whether this regenerated periphery can restore complex auditory perception and production. They are the only animal where hair cell regeneration occurs naturally after hair cell loss and where the ability to correctly perceive and produce complex acoustic signals is critical to procreation and survival. The purpose of this review article is to survey the most recent literature on behavioral measures of auditory functional return in adult birds after hair cell regeneration. The first portion of the review summarizes the effect of ototoxic drug induced hair cell loss and regeneration on hearing loss and recovery for pure tones. The second portion reviews studies of complex, species-specific vocalization discrimination and recognition after hair cell regeneration. Finally, we discuss the relevance of temporary hearing loss and recovery through hair cell regeneration on complex call and song production. Hearing sensitivity is restored, except for the highest frequencies, after hair cell regeneration in birds, but there are enduring changes to complex auditory perception. These changes do not appear to provide any obstacle to future auditory or vocal learning. PMID:23202051

  3. Adenovirus Vectors Target Several Cell Subtypes of Mammalian Inner Ear In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Shen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian inner ear harbors diverse cell types that are essential for hearing and balance. Adenovirus is one of the major vectors to deliver genes into the inner ear for functional studies and hair cell regeneration. To identify adenovirus vectors that target specific cell subtypes in the inner ear, we studied three adenovirus vectors, carrying a reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) from two vendors or with a genome editing gene Cre recombinase (Cre), by injection into postnatal days 0 (P0) and 4 (P4) mouse cochlea through scala media by cochleostomy in vivo. We found three adenovirus vectors transduced mouse inner ear cells with different specificities and expression levels, depending on the type of adenoviral vectors and the age of mice. The most frequently targeted region was the cochlear sensory epithelium, including auditory hair cells and supporting cells. Adenovirus with GFP transduced utricular supporting cells as well. This study shows that adenovirus vectors are capable of efficiently and specifically transducing different cell types in the mammalian inner ear and provides useful tools to study inner ear gene function and to evaluate gene therapy to treat hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. PMID:28116172

  4. Melatonin mitigates neomycin-induced hair cell injury in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyoung Ho; Rah, Yoon Chan; Hwang, Kyu Ho; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kwon, Soon Young; Cha, Jae Hyung; Choi, June

    2017-10-01

    Ototoxicity due to medications, such as aminoglycosides, is irreversible, and free radicals in the inner ear are assumed to play a major role. Because melatonin has an antioxidant property, we hypothesize that it might mitigate hair cell injury by aminoglycosides. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether melatonin has an alleviative effect on neomycin-induced hair cell injury in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Various concentrations of melatonin were administered to 5-day post-fertilization zebrafish treated with 125 μM neomycin for 1 h. Surviving hair cells within four neuromasts were compared with that of a control group. Apoptosis was assessed via terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay. The changes of ultrastructure were confirmed using a scanning electron microscope. Melatonin alleviated neomycin-induced hair cell injury in neuromasts (neomycin + melatonin 100 μM: 13.88 ± 0.91 cells, neomycin only: 7.85 ± 0.90 cells; n = 10, p < 0.05) and reduced neomycin-induced apoptosis in the TUNEL assay. In ultrastructural analysis, hair cells within the neuromasts in zebrafish were preserved exposed to 125 μM neomycin and 100 μM melatonin for 1 h in SEM findings. Melatonin is effective in alleviating aminoglycoside-induced hair cell injury in zebrafish. The results of this study demonstrated that melatonin has the potential to reduce apoptosis induced by aminoglycosides in zebrafish.

  5. Hair cell transduction, tuning and synaptic transmission in the mammalian cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Fettiplace, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Sound pressure fluctuations striking the ear are conveyed to the cochlea, where they vibrate the basilar membrane on which sit hair cells, the mechanoreceptors of the inner ear. Recordings of hair cell electrical responses have shown that they transduce sound via sub-micrometer deflections of their hair bundles, which are arrays of interconnected stereocilia containing the mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) channels. MET channels are activated by tension in extracellular tip links bridging adjacent stereocilia, and they can respond within microseconds to nanometer displacements of the bundle, facilitated by multiple processes of Ca2+-dependent adaptation. Studies of mouse mutants have produced much detail about the molecular organization of the stereocilia, the tip links and their attachment sites, and the MET channels localized to the lower ends of each tip link. The mammalian cochlea contains two categories of hair cells. Inner hair cells relay acoustic information via multiple ribbon synapses that transmit rapidly without rundown. Outer hair cells are important for amplifying sound-evoked vibrations. The amplification mechanism primarily involves contractions of the outer hair cells, which are driven by changes in membrane potential and mediated by prestin, a motor protein in the outer hair cell lateral membrane. Different sound frequencies are separated along the cochlea, with each hair cell being tuned to a narrow frequency range; amplification sharpens the frequency resolution and augments sensitivity 100-fold around the cell’s characteristic frequency. Genetic mutations and environmental factors such as acoustic overstimulation cause hearing loss through irreversible damage to the hair cells or degeneration of inner hair cell synapses. PMID:28915323

  6. Retinoic Acid Signaling Mediates Hair Cell Regeneration by Repressing p27kip and sox2 in Supporting Cells.

    PubMed

    Rubbini, Davide; Robert-Moreno, Àlex; Hoijman, Esteban; Alsina, Berta

    2015-11-25

    During development, otic sensory progenitors give rise to hair cells and supporting cells. In mammalian adults, differentiated and quiescent sensory cells are unable to generate new hair cells when these are lost due to various insults, leading to irreversible hearing loss. Retinoic acid (RA) has strong regenerative capacity in several organs, but its role in hair cell regeneration is unknown. Here, we use genetic and pharmacological inhibition to show that the RA pathway is required for hair cell regeneration in zebrafish. When regeneration is induced by laser ablation in the inner ear or by neomycin treatment in the lateral line, we observe rapid activation of several components of the RA pathway, with dynamics that position RA signaling upstream of other signaling pathways. We demonstrate that blockade of the RA pathway impairs cell proliferation of supporting cells in the inner ear and lateral line. Moreover, in neuromast, RA pathway regulates the transcription of p27(kip) and sox2 in supporting cells but not fgf3. Finally, genetic cell-lineage tracing using Kaede photoconversion demonstrates that de novo hair cells derive from FGF-active supporting cells. Our findings reveal that RA has a pivotal role in zebrafish hair cell regeneration by inducing supporting cell proliferation, and shed light on the underlying transcriptional mechanisms involved. This signaling pathway might be a promising approach for hearing recovery. Hair cells are the specialized mechanosensory cells of the inner ear that capture auditory and balance sensory input. Hair cells die after acoustic trauma, ototoxic drugs or aging diseases, leading to progressive hearing loss. Mammals, in contrast to zebrafish, lack the ability to regenerate hair cells. Here, we find that retinoic acid (RA) pathway is required for hair cell regeneration in vivo in the zebrafish inner ear and lateral line. RA pathway is activated very early upon hair cell loss, promotes cell proliferation of progenitor cells

  7. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Niksch, Paul D.; Webber, Roxanna M.; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction. PMID:27196058

  8. Wnt Responsive Lgr5-Expressing Stem Cells Are Hair Cell Progenitors in the Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fuxin; Kempfle, Judith; Edge, Albert S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Auditory hair cells are surrounded on their basolateral aspects by supporting cells, and these two cell types together constitute the sensory epithelium of the organ of Corti, which is the hearing apparatus of the ear. We show here that Lgr5, a marker for adult stem cells, was expressed in a subset of supporting cells in the newborn and adult murine cochlea. Lgr5-expressing supporting cells, sorted by flow cytometry and cultured in a single cell suspension, as compared to unsorted cells, displayed an enhanced capacity for self-renewing neurosphere formation in response to Wnt and were converted to hair cells at a higher (>10-fold) rate. The greater differentiation of hair cell in the neurosphere assay showed that Lgr5-positive cells had the capacity to act as cochlear progenitor cells, and lineage tracing confirmed that Lgr5-expressing cells accounted for the cells that formed neurospheres and differentiated to hair cells. The responsiveness to Wnt of cells with a capacity for division and sensory cell formation suggests a potential route to new hair cell generation in the adult cochlea. PMID:22787049

  9. Defective calmodulin-dependent rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish sensory hair cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Seiler, C; Nicolson, T

    1999-11-15

    Vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells contain a narrow "pericuticular" zone which is densely populated with small vesicles between the cuticular plate and cellular junctions near the apical surface. The presence of many cytoplasmic vesicles suggests that the apical surface of hair cells has a high turnover rate. The significance of intense membrane trafficking at the apical surface is not known. Using a marker of endocytosis, the styryl dye FM1-43, this report shows that rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells is calcium and calmodulin dependent and is partially blocked by the presence of amiloride and dihydrostreptomycin, known inhibitors of mechanotransduction channels. As seen in lateral line hair cells, sensory hair cells within the larval otic capsule also exhibit rapid apical endocytosis. Defects in internalization of the dye in both lateral line and inner ear hair cells were found in five zebrafish auditory/vestibular mutants: sputnik, mariner, orbiter, mercury, and skylab. In addition, lateral line hair cells in these mutants were not sensitive to prolonged exposure to streptomycin, which is toxic to hair cells. The presence of endocytic defects in the majority of zebrafish mechanosensory mutants points to a important role of apical endocytosis in hair cell function. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. A simple method for purification of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells, and application for proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Herget, Meike; Scheibinger, Mirko; Guo, Zhaohua; Jan, Taha A; Adams, Christopher M; Cheng, Alan G; Heller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive hair cells and supporting cells comprise the sensory epithelia of the inner ear. The paucity of both cell types has hampered molecular and cell biological studies, which often require large quantities of purified cells. Here, we report a strategy allowing the enrichment of relatively pure populations of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells including supporting cells. We utilized specific uptake of fluorescent styryl dyes for labeling of hair cells. Enzymatic isolation and flow cytometry was used to generate pure populations of sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells. We applied mass spectrometry to perform a qualitative high-resolution analysis of the proteomic makeup of both the hair cell and non-sensory cell populations. Our conservative analysis identified more than 600 proteins with a false discovery rate of <3% at the protein level and <1% at the peptide level. Analysis of proteins exclusively detected in either population revealed 64 proteins that were specific to hair cells and 103 proteins that were only detectable in non-sensory cells. Statistical analyses extended these groups by 53 proteins that are strongly upregulated in hair cells versus non-sensory cells and vice versa by 68 proteins. Our results demonstrate that enzymatic dissociation of styryl dye-labeled sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells is a valid method to generate pure enough cell populations for flow cytometry and subsequent molecular analyses.

  11. Hair band retained prosthetic reconstruction of bilaterally missing ears: a case of congenital atresia of external auditory canals and pinna.

    PubMed

    Minati, C; Shanmuganathan, N; Jain, Bhakti S; Padmanabhan, T V

    2014-01-01

    Auricular defects present reconstructive challenges, especially if they are bilateral. Surgical reconstruction provides effective results for defects; however for some patients surgical intervention is contraindicated. This case report describes an easy clinical technique to rehabilitate a patient with auricular defects. The prime purpose of this treatment rendered was to restore the lost auricular structure to the patient's satisfaction in an elegant, comfortable and cost effective manner. A thirteen year old female patient, who had bilaterally missing ears, was referred with a chief complaint of discomfort caused due to her existing hair band prosthesis and unsatisfactory esthetics. There was constant formation of ulcers at the site where the prosthesis came in contact with the skin. Considering the patient's age, ease of use and economic status, hair band retained ear prosthesis was selected. Silicone ear prostheses were fabricated on acrylic substructure to ensure fit, esthetics. Beneath the acrylic plates, a thin layer of soft silicone material was attached. The ear prostheses of both sides were connected with a metal hair band to retain. The newly fabricated prosthesis overcame the limitations of the existing one. The patient and her parents were satisfied with the results. The hair band retained silicone ear prosthesis is esthetic, economical and easy to use as a facial prosthesis. The addition of soft liner provided a cushion-like effect, thus reducing the formation of any ulcers due to pressure. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Caspase inhibitors promote vestibular hair cell survival and function after aminoglycoside treatment in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Haque, Asim; Huss, David; Messana, Elizabeth P.; Alosi, Julie A.; Roberson, David W.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Dickman, J. David; Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The sensory hair cells of the inner ear undergo apoptosis after acoustic trauma or aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment, causing permanent auditory and vestibular deficits in humans. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for caspase activation in hair cell death and ototoxic injury that can be reduced by concurrent treatment with caspase inhibitors in vitro. In this study, we examined the protective effects of caspase inhibition on hair cell death in vivo after systemic injections of aminoglycosides. In one series of experiments, chickens were implanted with osmotic pumps that administrated the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(Ome)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD) into inner ear fluids. One day after the surgery, the animals received a 5 d course of treatment with streptomycin, a vestibulotoxic aminoglycoside. Direct infusion of zVAD into the vestibule significantly increased hair cell survival after streptomycin treatment. A second series of experiments determined whether rescued hair cells could function as sensory receptors. Animals treated with streptomycin displayed vestibular system impairment as measured by a greatly reduced vestibulo-ocular response (VOR). In contrast, animals that received concurrent systemic administration of zVAD with streptomycin had both significantly greater hair cell survival and significantly increased VOR responses, as compared with animals treated with streptomycin alone. These findings suggest that inhibiting the activation of caspases promotes the survival of hair cells and protects against vestibular function deficits after aminoglycoside treatment.

  13. Differential Expression of Unconventional Myosins in Apoptotic and Regenerating Chick Hair Cells Confirms Two Regeneration Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, LUKE J.; MANGIARDI, DOMINIC A.; MATSUI, JONATHAN I.; ANDERSON, JULIA K.; McLAUGHLIN-WILLIAMSON, KATE; COTANCHE, DOUGLAS A.

    2008-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are damaged by intense noise, aging, and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Gentamicin causes oxidative damage to hair cells, inducing apoptosis. In mammals, hair cell loss results in a permanent deficit in hearing and balance. In contrast, avians can regenerate lost hair cells to restore auditory and vestibular function. This study examined the changes of myosin VI and myosin VIIa, two unconventional myosins that are critical for normal hair cell formation and function, during hair cell death and regeneration. During the late stages of apoptosis, damaged hair cells are ejected from the sensory epithelium. There was a 4–5-fold increase in the labeling intensity of both myosins and a redistribution of myosin VI into the stereocilia bundle, concurrent with ejection. Two separate mechanisms were observed during hair cell regeneration. Proliferating supporting cells began DNA synthesis 60 hours after gentamicin treatment and peaked at 72 hours postgentamicin treatment. Some of these mitotically produced cells began to differentiate into hair cells at 108 hours after gentamicin (36 hours after bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) administration), as demonstrated by the colabeling of myosin VI and BrdU. Myosin VIIa was not expressed in the new hair cells until 120 hours after gentamicin. Moreover, a population of supporting cells expressed myosin VI at 78 hours after gentamicin treatment and myosin VIIa at 90 hours. These cells did not label for BrdU and differentiated far too early to be of mitotic origin, suggesting they arose by direct transdifferentiation of supporting cells into hair cells. PMID:17048225

  14. NOTCH SIGNALING ALTERS SENSORY OR NEURONAL CELL FATE SPECIFICATION OF INNER EAR STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sang-Jun; Fujioka, Masato; Kim, Shi-Chan; Edge, Albert S.B.

    2011-01-01

    Multipotent progenitor cells in the otic placode give rise to the specialized cell types of the inner ear, including neurons, supporting cells and hair cells. The mechanisms governing acquisition of specific fates by the cells that form the cochleovestibular organs remain poorly characterized. Here we show that whereas blocking Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor increased the conversion of inner ear stem cells to hair cells by a mechanism that involved the upregulation of bHLH transcription factor, Math1 (mouse Atoh1), differentiation to a neuronal lineage was increased by expression of the Notch intracellular domain. The shift to a neuronal lineage could be attributed in part to the continued cell proliferation in cells that did not undergo sensory cell differentiation due to the high Notch signaling, but also involved upregulation of Ngn1. The Notch intracellular domain influenced Ngn1 indirectly by upregulation of Sox2, a transcription factor expressed in many neural progenitor cells, and directly by an interaction with an RBP-J binding site in the Ngn1 promoter/enhancer. The induction of Ngn1 was blocked partially by mutation of the RBP-J site and nearly completely when the mutation was combined with inhibition of Sox2 expression. Thus Notch signaling had a significant role in the fate specification of neurons and hair cells from inner ear stem cells, and decisions about cell fate were mediated in part by a differential effect of combinatorial signaling by Notch and Sox2 on the expression of bHLH transcription factors. PMID:21653840

  15. Auditory hair cell innervational patterns in lizards.

    PubMed

    Miller, M R; Beck, J

    1988-05-22

    The pattern of afferent and efferent innervation of two to four unidirectional (UHC) and two to nine bidirectional (BHC) hair cells of five different types of lizard auditory papillae was determined by reconstruction of serial TEM sections. The species studies were Crotaphytus wislizeni (iguanid), Podarcis (Lacerta) sicula and P. muralis (lacertids), Ameiva ameiva (teiid), Coleonyx variegatus (gekkonid), and Mabuya multifasciata (scincid). The main object was to determine in which species and in which hair cell types the nerve fibers were innervating only one (exclusive innervation), or two or more hair cells (nonexclusive innervation); how many nerve fibers were supplying each hair cell; how many synapses were made by the innervating fibers; and the total number of synapses on each hair cell. In the species studies, efferent innervation was limited to the UHC, and except for the iguanid, C. wislizeni, it was nonexclusive, each fiber supplying two or more hair cells. Afferent innervation varied both with the species and the hair cell types. In Crotaphytus, both the UHC and the BHC were exclusively innervated. In Podarcis and Ameiva, the UHC were innervated exclusively by some fibers but nonexclusively by others (mixed pattern). In Coleonyx, the UHC were exclusively innervated but the BHC were nonexclusively innervated. In Mabuya, both the UHC and BHC were nonexclusively innervated. The number of afferent nerve fibers and the number of afferent synapses were always larger in the UHC than in the BHC. In Ameiva, Podarcis, and Mabuya, groups of bidirectionally oriented hair cells occur in regions of cytologically distinct UHC, and in Ameiva, unidirectionally oriented hair cells occur in cytologically distinct BHC regions.

  16. Analysis of the Proteome of Hair-Cell Stereocilia by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Krey, Jocelyn F.; Wilmarth, Philip A.; David, Larry L.; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of proteins that mediate mechanotransduction by hair cells, the sensory cells of the inner ear, is hampered by the scarcity of these cells and their sensory organelle, the hair bundle. Mass spectrometry, with its high sensitivity and identification precision, is the ideal method for determining which proteins are present in bundles and what proteins they interact with. We describe here the isolation of mouse hair bundles, as well as preparation of bundle-protein samples for mass spectrometry. We also describe protocols for data-dependent (shotgun) and parallel-reaction-monitoring (targeted) mass spectrometry that allow us to identify and quantify proteins of the hair bundle. These sensitive methods are particularly useful for comparing proteomes of wild-type and mice with deafness mutations affecting hair-bundle proteins. (120 words; maximum 250) PMID:28109437

  17. Mammalian cochlear supporting cells can divide and trans-differentiate into hair cells.

    PubMed

    White, Patricia M; Doetzlhofer, Angelika; Lee, Yun Shain; Groves, Andrew K; Segil, Neil

    2006-06-22

    Sensory hair cells of the mammalian organ of Corti in the inner ear do not regenerate when lost as a consequence of injury, disease, or age-related deafness. This contrasts with other vertebrates such as birds, where the death of hair cells causes surrounding supporting cells to re-enter the cell cycle and give rise to both new hair cells and supporting cells. It is not clear whether the lack of mammalian hair cell regeneration is due to an intrinsic inability of supporting cells to divide and differentiate or to an absence or blockade of regenerative signals. Here we show that post-mitotic supporting cells purified from the postnatal mouse cochlea retain the ability to divide and trans-differentiate into new hair cells in culture. Furthermore, we show that age-dependent changes in supporting cell proliferative capacity are due in part to changes in the ability to downregulate the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1) (also known as Cdkn1b). These results indicate that postnatal mammalian supporting cells are potential targets for therapeutic manipulation.

  18. Comparative Transduction Mechanisms of Vestibular Otolith Hair Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs regenerate following aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Hair cells in these organs are differentially sensitive to gentamicin, with saccular hair cells and hair cells in the utricular striola being damaged at lower gentamicin concentrations than hair cells in the utricular extrastriola. Regenerating hair cells in these organs have short hair bundles and can be classified into a number of phenotypes using the same morphological criteria used to identify their mature counterparts. Our studies suggest that some supporting cells can convert, or transdifferentiate,into hair cells without an intervening cell division. By stimulating these processes in humans, clinicians may be able to alleviate human deafness and peripheral vestibular disorders by regenerating and replacing lost hair cells. In vivo and in vitro studies were done on cell proliferation and hair cell regeneration.

  19. Changes in ribbon synapses and rough endoplasmic reticulum of rat utricular macular hair cells in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    This study combined ultrastructural and statistical methods to learn the effects of weightlessness on rat utricular maculae. A principle aim was to determine whether weightlessness chiefly affects ribbon synapses of type II cells, since the cells communicate predominantly with branches of primary vestibular afferent endings. Maculae were microdissected from flight and ground control rat inner ears collected on day 13 of a 14-day spaceflight (F13), landing day (R0) and day 14 postflight (R14) and were prepared for ultrastructural study. Ribbon synapses were counted in hair cells examined in a Zeiss 902 transmission electron microscope. Significance of synaptic mean differences was determined for all hair cells contained within 100 section series, and for a subset of complete hair cells, using SuperANOVA software. The synaptic mean for all type II hair cells of F13 flight rats increased by 100%, and that for complete cells by 200%. Type I cells were less affected, with synaptic mean differences statistically insignificant in complete cells. Synapse deletion began within 8 h upon return to Earth. Additionally, hair cell laminated rough endoplasmic reticulum of flight rats was reversibly disorganized on R0. Results support the thesis that synapses in type II hair cells are uniquely affected by altered gravity. Type II hair cells may be chiefly sensors of gravitational and type I cells of translational linear accelerations.

  20. Natural Bizbenzoquinoline Derivatives Protect Zebrafish Lateral Line Sensory Hair Cells from Aminoglycoside Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Matthew; Boney, Robert; Ordoobadi, Alexander J; Sommers, Thomas F; Trapani, Josef G; Coffin, Allison B

    2016-01-01

    Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20-30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment.

  1. Natural Bizbenzoquinoline Derivatives Protect Zebrafish Lateral Line Sensory Hair Cells from Aminoglycoside Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Matthew; Boney, Robert; Ordoobadi, Alexander J.; Sommers, Thomas F.; Trapani, Josef G.; Coffin, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20–30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment. PMID:27065807

  2. Induction of differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into functional hair-cell-like cells in the absence of stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Tang, Zihua; Chen, Jiarong; Shi, Haosong; Chen, Jianling; Wang, Cuicui; Zhang, Cui; Li, Liang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jinfu

    2016-12-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction have become the most common forms of sensory defects. Stem cell-based therapeutic strategies for curing hearing loss are being developed. Several attempts to develop hair cells by using chicken utricle stromal cells as feeder cells have resulted in phenotypic conversion of stem cells into inner ear hair-cell-like cells. Here, we induced the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into otic epithelial progenitors (OEPs), and further induced the differentiation of OEPs into hair-cell-like cells using different substrates. Our results showed that OEPs cultured on the chicken utricle stromal cells with the induction medium could differentiate into hair-cell-like cells with stereociliary bundles. Co-culture with stromal cells, however, may be problematic for subsequent examination of the induced hair-cell-like cells. In order to avoid the interference from stromal cells, we cultured OEPs on laminin with different induction media and examined the effects of the induction medium on the differentiation potentials of OEPs into hair-cell-like cells. The results revealed that the culture of OEPs on laminin with the conditioned medium from chicken utricle stromal cells supplemented with EGF and all-trans retinoic acid (RA) could promote the organization of cells into epithelial clusters displaying hair-cell-like cells with stereociliary bundles. These cells also displayed the expected electrophysiological properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hair-bundle proteomes of avian and mammalian inner-ear utricles

    PubMed Central

    Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Krey, Jocelyn F.; Shin, Jung-Bum; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Examination of multiple proteomics datasets within or between species increases the reliability of protein identification. We report here proteomes of inner-ear hair bundles from three species (chick, mouse, and rat), which were collected on LTQ or LTQ Velos ion-trap mass spectrometers; the constituent proteins were quantified using MS2 intensities, which are the summed intensities of all peptide fragmentation spectra matched to a protein. The data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD002410 (chick LTQ), PXD002414 (chick Velos), PXD002415 (mouse Velos), and PXD002416 (rat LTQ). The two chick bundle datasets compared favourably to a third, already-described chick bundle dataset, which was quantified using MS1 peak intensities, the summed intensities of peptides identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry (PXD000104; updated analysis in PXD002445). The mouse bundle dataset described here was comparable to a different mouse bundle dataset quantified using MS1 intensities (PXD002167). These six datasets will be useful for identifying the core proteome of vestibular hair bundles. PMID:26645194

  4. Hair bundles of cochlear outer hair cells are shaped to minimize their fluid-dynamic resistance.

    PubMed

    Ciganović, Nikola; Wolde-Kidan, Amanuel; Reichenbach, Tobias

    2017-06-15

    The mammalian sense of hearing relies on two types of sensory cells: inner hair cells transmit the auditory stimulus to the brain, while outer hair cells mechanically modulate the stimulus through active feedback. Stimulation of a hair cell is mediated by displacements of its mechanosensitive hair bundle which protrudes from the apical surface of the cell into a narrow fluid-filled space between reticular lamina and tectorial membrane. While hair bundles of inner hair cells are of linear shape, those of outer hair cells exhibit a distinctive V-shape. The biophysical rationale behind this morphology, however, remains unknown. Here we use analytical and computational methods to study the fluid flow across rows of differently shaped hair bundles. We find that rows of V-shaped hair bundles have a considerably reduced resistance to crossflow, and that the biologically observed shapes of hair bundles of outer hair cells are near-optimal in this regard. This observation accords with the function of outer hair cells and lends support to the recent hypothesis that inner hair cells are stimulated by a net flow, in addition to the well-established shear flow that arises from shearing between the reticular lamina and the tectorial membrane.

  5. A ‘calcium capacitor’ shapes cholinergic inhibition of cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Paul Albert

    2014-01-01

    Efferent cholinergic neurons project from the brainstem to inhibit sensory hair cells of the vertebrate inner ear. This inhibitory synapse combines the activity of an unusual class of ionotropic cholinergic receptor with that of nearby calcium-dependent potassium channels to shunt and hyperpolarize the hair cell. Postsynaptic calcium signalling is constrained by a thin near-membrane cistern that is co-extensive with the efferent terminal contacts. The postsynaptic cistern may play an essential role in calcium homeostasis, serving as sink or source, depending on ongoing activity and the degree of buffer saturation. Release of calcium from postsynaptic stores leads to a process of retrograde facilitation via the synthesis of nitric oxide in the hair cell. Activity-dependent synaptic modification may contribute to changes in hair cell innervation that occur during development, and in the aged or damaged cochlea. PMID:24566542

  6. A central to peripheral progression of cell cycle exit and hair cell differentiation in the developing mouse cristae.

    PubMed

    Slowik, Amber D; Bermingham-McDonogh, Olivia

    2016-03-01

    The inner ear contains six distinct sensory organs that each maintains some ability to regenerate hair cells into adulthood. In the postnatal cochlea, there appears to be a relationship between the developmental maturity of a region and its ability to regenerate as postnatal regeneration largely occurs in the apical turn, which is the last region to differentiate and mature during development. In the mature cristae there are also regional differences in regenerative ability, which led us to hypothesize that there may be a general relationship between the relative maturity of a region and the regenerative competence of that region in all of the inner ear sensory organs. By analyzing adult mouse cristae labeled embryonically with BrdU, we found that hair cell birth starts in the central region and progresses to the periphery with age. Since the peripheral region of the adult cristae also maintains active Notch signaling and some regenerative competence, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the last regions to develop retain some of their regenerative ability into adulthood. Further, by analyzing embryonic day 14.5 inner ears we provide evidence for a wave of hair cell birth along the longitudinal axis of the cristae from the central regions to the outer edges. Together with the data from the adult inner ears labeled with BrdU as embryos, these results suggest that hair cell differentiation closely follows cell cycle exit in the cristae, unlike in the cochlea where they are uncoupled. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A central to peripheral progression of cell cycle exit and hair cell differentiation in the developing mouse cristae

    PubMed Central

    Slowik, Amber D; Bermingham-McDonogh, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    The inner ear contains six distinct sensory organs that each maintains some ability to regenerate hair cells into adulthood. In the postnatal cochlea, there appears to be a relationship between the developmental maturity of a region and its ability to regenerate as postnatal regeneration largely occurs in the apical turn, which is the last region to differentiate and mature during development. In the mature cristae there are also regional differences in regenerative ability, which led us to hypothesize that there may be a general relationship between the relative maturity of a region and the regenerative competence of that region in all of the inner ear sensory organs. By analyzing adult mouse cristae labeled embryonically with BrdU, we found that hair cell birth starts in the central region and progresses to the periphery with age. Since the peripheral region of the adult cristae also maintains active Notch signaling and some regenerative competence, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the last regions to develop retain some of their regenerative ability into adulthood. Further, by analyzing embryonic day 14.5 inner ears we provide evidence for a wave of hair cell birth along the longitudinal axis of the cristae from the central regions to the outer edges. Together with the data from the adult inner ears labeled with BrdU as embryos, these results suggest that hair cell differentiation closely follows cell cycle exit in the cristae, unlike in the cochlea where they are uncoupled. PMID:26826497

  8. Spontaneous hair cell regeneration in the mouse utricle following gentamicin ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kohei; Izumikawa, Masahiko; Beyer, Lisa A; Atkin, Graham M; Raphael, Yehoash

    2009-01-01

    Whereas most epithelial tissues turn-over and regenerate after a traumatic lesion, this restorative ability is diminished in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear; it is absent in the cochlea and exists only in a limited capacity in the vestibular epithelium. The extent of regeneration in vestibular hair cells has been characterized for several mammalian species including guinea pig, rat, and chinchilla, but not yet in mouse. As the fundamental model species for investigating hereditary disease, the mouse can be studied using a wide variety of genetic and molecular tools. To design a mouse model for vestibular hair cell regeneration research, an aminoglycoside-induced method of complete hair cell elimination was developed in our lab and applied to the murine utricle. Loss of utricular hair cells was observed using scanning electron microscopy, and corroborated by a loss of fluorescent signal in utricles from transgenic mice with GFP-positive hair cells. Regenerative capability was characterized at several time points up to six months following insult. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed that as early as two weeks after insult, a few immature hair cells, demonstrating the characteristic immature morphology indicative of regeneration, could be seen in the utricle. As time progressed, larger numbers of immature hair cells could be seen along with some mature cells resembling surface morphology of type II hair cells. By six months post-lesion, numerous regenerated hair cells were present in the utricle, however, neither their number nor their appearance was normal. A BrdU assay suggested that at least some of the regeneration of mouse vestibular hair cells involved mitosis. Our results demonstrate that the vestibular sensory epithelium in mice can spontaneously regenerate, elucidate the time course of this process, and identify involvement of mitosis in some cases. These data establish a road map of the murine vestibular regenerative process, which can be

  9. Protecting Mammalian Hair Cells from Aminoglycoside-Toxicity: Assessing Phenoxybenzamine's Potential.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Paromita; Moore, Paulette A; Richardson, Guy P; Gale, Jonathan E

    2017-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are widely used antibiotics because of their low cost and high efficacy against gram-negative bacterial infection. However, AGs are ototoxic, causing the death of sensory hair cells in the inner ear. Strategies aimed at developing or discovering agents that protect against aminoglycoside ototoxicity have focused on inhibiting apoptosis or more recently, on preventing antibiotic uptake by the hair cells. Recent screens for ototoprotective compounds using the larval zebrafish lateral line identified phenoxybenzamine as a potential protectant for aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here we used live imaging of FM1-43 uptake as a proxy for aminoglycoside entry, combined with hair-cell death assays to evaluate whether phenoxybenzamine can protect mammalian cochlear hair cells from the deleterious effects of the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. We show that phenoxybenzamine can block FM1-43 entry into mammalian hair cells in a reversible and dose-dependent manner, but pre-incubation is required for maximal inhibition of entry. We observed differential effects of phenoxybenzamine on FM1-43 uptake in the two different types of cochlear hair cell in mammals, the outer hair cells (OHCs) and inner hair cells (IHCs). The requirement for pre-incubation and reversibility suggests an intracellular rather than an extracellular site of action for phenoxybenzamine. We also tested the efficacy of phenoxybenzamine as an otoprotective agent. In mouse cochlear explants the hair cell death resulting from 24 h exposure to neomycin was steeply dose-dependent, with 50% cell death occurring at ~230 μM for both IHC and OHC. We used 250 μM neomycin in subsequent hair-cell death assays. At 100 μM with 1 h pre-incubation, phenoxybenzamine conferred significant protection to both IHCs and OHCs, however at higher concentrations phenoxybenzamine itself showed clear signs of ototoxicity and an additive toxic effect when combined with neomycin. These data do not

  10. Hair follicle stem cell proliferation, Akt and Wnt signaling activation in TPA-induced hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weiming; Lei, Mingxing; Zhou, Ling; Bai, Xiufeng; Lai, Xiangdong; Yu, Yu; Yang, Tian; Lian, Xiaohua

    2017-06-01

    Regeneration of hair follicles relies on activation of hair follicle stem cells during telogen to anagen transition process in hair cycle. This process is rigorously controlled by intrinsic and environmental factors. 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a tumor promoter, accelerates reentry of hair follicles into anagen phase. However, it is unclear that how TPA promotes the hair regeneration. In the present study, we topically applied TPA onto the dorsal skin of 2-month-old C57BL/6 female mice to examine the activity of hair follicle stem cells and alteration of signaling pathways during hair regeneration. We found that refractory telogen hair follicles entered anagen prematurely after TPA treatment, with the enhanced proliferation of CD34-positive hair follicle stem cells. Meanwhile, we observed Akt signaling was activated in epidermis, hair infundibulum, bulge and hair bulb, and Wnt signaling was also activated after hair follicle stem cells proliferation. Importantly, after overexpression of DKK1, a specific Wnt signaling inhibitor, the accelerated reentry of hair follicles into anagen induced by TPA was abolished. Our data indicated that TPA-induced hair follicle regeneration is associated with activation of Akt and Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  11. PI3K and Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins Modulate Gentamicin- Induced Hair Cell Death in the Zebrafish Lateral Line

    PubMed Central

    Wiedenhoft, Heather; Hayashi, Lauren; Coffin, Allison B.

    2017-01-01

    Inner ear hair cell death leads to sensorineural hearing loss and can be a direct consequence of aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment. Aminoglycosides such as gentamicin are effective therapy for serious Gram-negative bacterial infections such as some forms of meningitis, pneumonia, and sepsis. Aminoglycosides enter hair cells through mechanotransduction channels at the apical end of hair bundles and initiate intrinsic cell death cascades, but the precise cell signaling that leads to hair cell death is incompletely understood. Here, we examine the cell death pathways involved in aminoglycoside damage using the zebrafish (Danio rerio). The zebrafish lateral line contains hair cell-bearing organs called neuromasts that are homologous to hair cells of the mammalian inner ear and represents an excellent model to study ototoxicity. Based on previous research demonstrating a role for p53, Bcl2 signaling, autophagy, and proteasomal degradation in aminoglycoside-damaged hair cells, we used the Cytoscape GeneMANIA Database to identify additional proteins that might play a role in neomycin or gentamicin ototoxicity. Our bioinformatics analysis identified the pro-survival proteins phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (Xiap) as potential mediators of gentamicin-induced hair cell damage. Pharmacological inhibition of PDK1 or its downstream mediator protein kinase C facilitated gentamicin toxicity, as did Xiap mutation, suggesting that both PI3K and endogenous Xiap confer protection. Surprisingly, aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death was highly attenuated in wild type Tupfel long-fin (TL fish; the background strain for the Xiap mutant line) compared to wild type ∗AB zebrafish. Pharmacologic manipulation of p53 suggested that the strain difference might result from decreased p53 in TL hair cells, allowing for increased hair cell survival. Overall, our studies identified additional steps in the cell death cascade triggered by

  12. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) exacerbates cisplatin-induced sensory hair cell death in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Uribe, Phillip M; Mueller, Melissa A; Gleichman, Julia S; Kramer, Matthew D; Wang, Qi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M; Steyger, Peter S; Cotanche, Douglas A; Matsui, Jonathan I

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear sensory hair cells die following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics or chemotherapeutics like cisplatin, leading to permanent auditory and/or balance deficits in humans. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are used to study drug-induced sensory hair cell death since their hair cells are similar in structure and function to those found in humans. We developed a cisplatin dose-response curve using a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein under the control of the Brn3c promoter/enhancer. Recently, several small molecule screens have been conducted using zebrafish to identify potential pharmacological agents that could be used to protect sensory hair cells in the presence of ototoxic drugs. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is typically used as a solvent for many pharmacological agents in sensory hair cell cytotoxicity assays. Serendipitously, we found that DMSO potentiated the effects of cisplatin and killed more sensory hair cells than treatment with cisplatin alone. Yet, DMSO alone did not kill hair cells. We did not observe the synergistic effects of DMSO with the ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. Cisplatin treatment with other commonly used organic solvents (i.e. ethanol, methanol, and polyethylene glycol 400) also did not result in increased cell death compared to cisplatin treatment alone. Thus, caution should be exercised when interpreting data generated from small molecule screens since many compounds are dissolved in DMSO.

  13. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) Exacerbates Cisplatin-induced Sensory Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Gleichman, Julia S.; Kramer, Matthew D.; Wang, Qi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M.; Steyger, Peter S.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Matsui, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear sensory hair cells die following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics or chemotherapeutics like cisplatin, leading to permanent auditory and/or balance deficits in humans. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are used to study drug-induced sensory hair cell death since their hair cells are similar in structure and function to those found in humans. We developed a cisplatin dose-response curve using a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein under the control of the Brn3c promoter/enhancer. Recently, several small molecule screens have been conducted using zebrafish to identify potential pharmacological agents that could be used to protect sensory hair cells in the presence of ototoxic drugs. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is typically used as a solvent for many pharmacological agents in sensory hair cell cytotoxicity assays. Serendipitously, we found that DMSO potentiated the effects of cisplatin and killed more sensory hair cells than treatment with cisplatin alone. Yet, DMSO alone did not kill hair cells. We did not observe the synergistic effects of DMSO with the ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. Cisplatin treatment with other commonly used organic solvents (i.e. ethanol, methanol, and polyethylene glycol 400) also did not result in increased cell death compared to cisplatin treatment alone. Thus, caution should be exercised when interpreting data generated from small molecule screens since many compounds are dissolved in DMSO. PMID:23383324

  14. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  15. Screen of FDA-approved drug library reveals compounds that protect hair cells from aminoglycosides and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Vlasits, Anna L.; Simon, Julian A.; Raible, David W.; Rubel, Edwin W; Owens, Kelly N.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of mechanosensory hair cells in the inner ear accounts for many hearing loss and balance disorders. Several beneficial pharmaceutical drugs cause hair cell death as a side effect. These include aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as neomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin, and several cancer chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin. Discovering new compounds that protect mammalian hair cells from toxic insults is experimentally difficult because of the inaccessibility of the inner ear. We used the zebrafish lateral line sensory system as an in vivo screening platform to survey a library of FDA-approved pharmaceuticals for compounds that protect hair cells from neomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin and cisplatin. Ten compounds were identified that provide protection from at least two of the four toxins. The resulting compounds fall into several drug classes, including serotonin and dopamine-modulating drugs, adrenergic receptor ligands, and estrogen receptor modulators. The protective compounds show different effects against the different toxins, supporting the idea that each toxin causes hair cell death by distinct, but partially overlapping, mechanisms. Furthermore, some compounds from the same drug classes had different protective properties, suggesting that they might not prevent hair cell death by their known target mechanisms. Some protective compounds blocked gentamicin uptake into hair cells, suggesting that they may block mechanotransduction or other routes of entry. The protective compounds identified in our screen will provide a starting point for studies in mammals as well as further research discovering the cellular signaling pathways that trigger hair cell death. PMID:22967486

  16. The stat3/socs3a pathway is a key regulator of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Liang, Jin; Wang, Dongmei; Renaud, Gabriel; Wolfsberg, Tyra G; Wilson, Alexander F; Burgess, Shawn M

    2012-08-01

    All nonmammalian vertebrates studied can regenerate inner ear mechanosensory receptors (i.e., hair cells) (Corwin and Cotanche, 1988; Lombarte et al., 1993; Baird et al., 1996), but mammals possess only a very limited capacity for regeneration after birth (Roberson and Rubel, 1994). As a result, mammals experience permanent deficiencies in hearing and balance once their inner ear hair cells are lost. The mechanisms of hair cell regeneration are poorly understood. Because the inner ear sensory epithelium is highly conserved in all vertebrates (Fritzsch et al., 2007), we chose to study hair cell regeneration mechanism in adult zebrafish, hoping the results would be transferrable to inducing hair cell regeneration in mammals. We defined the comprehensive network of genes involved in hair cell regeneration in the inner ear of adult zebrafish with the powerful transcriptional profiling technique digital gene expression, which leverages the power of next-generation sequencing ('t Hoen et al., 2008). We also identified a key pathway, stat3/socs3, and demonstrated its role in promoting hair cell regeneration through stem cell activation, cell division, and differentiation. In addition, transient pharmacological inhibition of stat3 signaling accelerated hair cell regeneration without overproducing cells. Taking other published datasets into account (Sano et al., 1999; Schebesta et al., 2006; Dierssen et al., 2008; Riehle et al., 2008; Zhu et al., 2008; Qin et al., 2009), we propose that the stat3/socs3 pathway is a key response in all tissue regeneration and thus an important therapeutic target for a broad application in tissue repair and injury healing.

  17. Identification of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors That Target Neonatal and Adult Mammalian Inner Ear Cell Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yilai; Tao, Yong; Wang, Zhengmin; Tang, Yong; Li, Huawei; Dai, Pu; Gao, Guangping; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear consists of diverse cell types with important functions. Gene mutations in these diverse cell types have been found to underlie different forms of genetic hearing loss. Targeting these mutations for gene therapy development represents a future therapeutic strategy to treat hearing loss. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have become the vector of choice for gene delivery in animal models in vivo. To identify AAV vectors that target inner ear cell subtypes, we systemically screened 12 AAV vectors with different serotypes (AAV1, 2, 5, 6, 6.2, 7, 8, 9, rh.8, rh.10, rh.39, and rh.43) that carry a reporter gene GFP in neonatal and adult mice by microinjection in vivo. We found that most AAVs infect both neonatal and adult inner ear, with different specificities and expression levels. The inner ear cochlear sensory epithelial region, which includes auditory hair cells and supporting cells, is most frequently targeted for gene delivery. Expression of the transgene is sustained, and neonatal inner ear delivery does not adversely affect hearing. Adult inner ear injection of AAV has a similar infection pattern as the younger inner ear, with the exception that outer hair cell death caused by the injection procedure can lead to hearing loss. In the adult, more so than in the neonatal mice, cell types infected and efficiency of infection are correlated with the site of injection. Most infected cells survive in neonatal and adult inner ears. The study adds to the list of AAV vectors that transduce the mammalian inner ear efficiently, providing the tools that are important to study inner ear gene function and for the development of gene therapy to treat hearing loss. PMID:27342665

  18. Cryopreservation of Hair-Follicle Associated Pluripotent (HAP) Stem Cells Maintains Differentiation and Hair-Growth Potential.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M; Kajiura, Satoshi; Cao, Wenluo; Liu, Fang; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicles contain nestin-expressing pluripotent stem cells which originate above the bulge area of the follicle, below the sebaceous gland. We have termed these cells hair follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. We have established efficient cryopreservation methods of the hair follicle that maintain the pluripotency of HAP stem cells as well as hair growth. We cryopreserved the whole hair follicle by slow-rate cooling in TC-Protector medium or in DMSO-containing medium and storage in liquid nitrogen or at -80 °C. After thawing and culture of the cryopreserved whisker follicles, growing HAP stem cells formed hair spheres. The hair spheres contained cells that differentiated to neurons, glial cells, and other cell types. The hair spheres derived from slow-cooling cryopreserved hair follicles were as pluripotent as hair spheres from fresh hair follicles. We have also previously demonstrated that cryopreserved mouse whisker hair follicles maintain their hair-growth potential. DMSO better cryopreserved mouse whisker follicles compared to glycerol. DMSO-cryopreserved hair follicles also maintained the HAP stem cells, evidenced by P75 ntr expression. Subcutaneous transplantation of DMSO-cryopreserved hair follicles in nude mice resulted in extensive hair fiber growth over 8 weeks, indicating the functional recovery of hair-shaft growth of cryopreserved hair follicles. HAP stem cells can be used for nerve and spinal-cord repair. This biobanking of hair follicles can allow each patient the potential for their own stem cell use for regenerative medicine or hair transplantation.

  19. Hair cell heterogeneity and ultrasonic hearing: recent advances in understanding fish hearing.

    PubMed Central

    Popper, A N

    2000-01-01

    The past decade has seen a wealth of new data on the auditory capabilities and mechanisms of fishes. We now have a significantly better appreciation of the structure and function of the auditory system in fishes with regard to their peripheral and central anatomy, physiology, behaviour, sound source localization and hearing capabilities. This paper deals with two of the newest of these findings, hair cell heterogeneity and the detection of ultrasound. As a result of this recent work, we now know that fishes have several different types of sensory hair cells in both the ear and lateral line and there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that these hair cell types arose very early in the evolution of the octavolateralis system. There is also some evidence to suggest that the differences in the hair cell types have functional implications for the way the ear and lateral line of fishes detect and process stimuli. Behavioural studies have shown that, whereas most fishes can only detect sound to 1-3 kHz, several species of the genus Alosa (Clupeiformes, i.e. herrings and their relatives) can detect sounds up to 180 kHz (or even higher). It is suggested that this capability evolved so that these fishes can detect one of their major predators, echolocating dolphins. The mechanism for ultrasound detection remains obscure, though it is hypothesized that the highly derived utricle of the inner ear in these species is involved. PMID:11079414

  20. Cell density and N-cadherin interactions regulate cell proliferation in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Warchol, Mark E

    2002-04-01

    Sensory hair cells in the inner ears of nonmammalian vertebrates can regenerate after injury. In many species, replacement hair cells are produced by the proliferation of epithelial supporting cells. Thus, the ability of supporting cells to undergo renewed proliferation is a key determinant of regenerative ability. The present study used cultures of isolated inner ear sensory epithelia to identify cellular signals that regulate supporting cell proliferation. Small pieces of sensory epithelia from the chicken utricle were cultured in glass microwells. Under those conditions, cell proliferation was inversely related to local cell density. The signaling molecules N-cadherin, beta-catenin, and focal adhesion kinase were immunolocalized in the cultured epithelial cells, and high levels of phosphotyrosine immunoreactivity were present at cell-cell junctions and focal contacts of proliferating cells. Binding of microbeads coated with a function-blocking antibody to N-cadherin inhibited ongoing proliferation. The growth of epithelial cells was also affected by the density of extracellular matrix molecules. The results suggest that cell density, cell-cell contact, and the composition of the extracellular matrix may be critical influences on the regulation of sensory regeneration in the inner ear.

  1. Gene-expression analysis of hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Linjia; Romero-Carvajal, Andres; Haug, Jeff S.; Seidel, Christopher W.; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Deafness caused by the terminal loss of inner ear hair cells is one of the most common sensory diseases. However, nonmammalian animals (e.g., birds, amphibians, and fish) regenerate damaged hair cells. To understand better the reasons underpinning such disparities in regeneration among vertebrates, we set out to define at high resolution the changes in gene expression associated with the regeneration of hair cells in the zebrafish lateral line. We performed RNA-Seq analyses on regenerating support cells purified by FACS. The resulting expression data were subjected to pathway enrichment analyses, and the differentially expressed genes were validated in vivo via whole-mount in situ hybridizations. We discovered that cell cycle regulators are expressed hours before the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling following hair cell death. We propose that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is not involved in regulating the onset of proliferation but governs proliferation at later stages of regeneration. In addition, and in marked contrast to mammals, our data clearly indicate that the Notch pathway is significantly down-regulated shortly after injury, thus uncovering a key difference between the zebrafish and mammalian responses to hair cell injury. Taken together, our findings lay the foundation for identifying differences in signaling pathway regulation that could be exploited as potential therapeutic targets to promote either sensory epithelium or hair cell regeneration in mammals. PMID:24706903

  2. Epigenetic regulation of Atoh1 guides hair cell development in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Stojanova, Zlatka P; Kwan, Tao; Segil, Neil

    2015-10-15

    In the developing cochlea, sensory hair cell differentiation depends on the regulated expression of the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. In mammals, if hair cells die they do not regenerate, leading to permanent deafness. By contrast, in non-mammalian vertebrates robust regeneration occurs through upregulation of Atoh1 in the surviving supporting cells that surround hair cells, leading to functional recovery. Investigation of crucial transcriptional events in the developing organ of Corti, including those involving Atoh1, has been hampered by limited accessibility to purified populations of the small number of cells present in the inner ear. We used µChIP and qPCR assays of FACS-purified cells to track changes in the epigenetic status of the Atoh1 locus during sensory epithelia development in the mouse. Dynamic changes in the histone modifications H3K4me3/H3K27me3, H3K9ac and H3K9me3 reveal a progression from poised, to active, to repressive marks, correlating with the onset of Atoh1 expression and its subsequent silencing during the perinatal (P1 to P6) period. Inhibition of acetylation blocked the increase in Atoh1 mRNA in nascent hair cells, as well as ongoing hair cell differentiation during embryonic organ of Corti development ex vivo. These results reveal an epigenetic mechanism of Atoh1 regulation underlying hair cell differentiation and subsequent maturation. Interestingly, the H3K4me3/H3K27me3 bivalent chromatin structure observed in progenitors persists at the Atoh1 locus in perinatal supporting cells, suggesting an explanation for the latent capacity of these cells to transdifferentiate into hair cells, and highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets in hair cell regeneration. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Evidence that protons act as neurotransmitters at vestibular hair cell-calyx afferent synapses.

    PubMed

    Highstein, Stephen M; Holstein, Gay R; Mann, Mary Anne; Rabbitt, Richard D

    2014-04-08

    Present data support the conclusion that protons serve as an important neurotransmitter to convey excitatory stimuli from inner ear type I vestibular hair cells to postsynaptic calyx nerve terminals. Time-resolved pH imaging revealed stimulus-evoked extrusion of protons from hair cells and a subsequent buildup of [H(+)] within the confined chalice-shaped synaptic cleft (ΔpH ∼ -0.2). Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings revealed a concomitant nonquantal excitatory postsynaptic current in the calyx terminal that was causally modulated by cleft acidification. The time course of [H(+)] buildup limits the speed of this intercellular signaling mechanism, but for tonic signals such as gravity, protonergic transmission offers a significant metabolic advantage over quantal excitatory postsynaptic currents--an advantage that may have driven the proliferation of postsynaptic calyx terminals in the inner ear vestibular organs of contemporary amniotes.

  4. Inhibition of Repulsive Guidance Molecule, RGMa, Increases Afferent Synapse Formation with Auditory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brugeaud, Aurore; Tong, Mingjie; Luo, Li; Edge, Albert S.B.

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral fibers that extend from auditory neurons to hair cells are sensitive to damage, and replacement of the fibers and their afferent synapse with hair cells would be of therapeutic interest. Here, we show that RGMa, a repulsive guidance molecule previously shown to play a role in the development of the chick visual system, is expressed in the developing, newborn, and mature mouse inner ear. The effect of RGMa on synaptogenesis between afferent neurons and hair cells, from which afferent connections had been removed, was assessed. Contact of neural processes with hair cells and elaboration of postsynaptic densities at sites of the ribbon synapse were increased by treatment with a blocking antibody to RGMa, and pruning of auditory fibers to achieve the mature branching pattern of afferent neurons was accelerated. Inhibition by RGMa could thus explain why auditory neurons have a low capacity to regenerate peripheral processes: postnatal spiral ganglion neurons retain the capacity to send out processes that respond to signals for synapse formation, but expression of RGMa postnatally appears to be detrimental to regeneration of afferent hair cell innervation and antagonizes synaptogenesis. Increased synaptogenesis after inhibition of RGMa suggests that manipulation of guidance or inhibitory factors may provide a route to increase formation of new synapses at deafferented hair cells. PMID:24123853

  5. Identification of ion-channel modulators that protect against aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Emma J.; Kirkwood, Nerissa K.; Kitcher, Siân R.; O’Reilly, Molly; Cantillon, Daire M.; Goodyear, Richard J.; Secker, Abigail; Baxendale, Sarah; Bull, James C.; Waddell, Simon J.; Whitfield, Tanya T.; Ward, Simon E.; Kros, Corné J.; Richardson, Guy P.

    2017-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections but can cause deafness due to hair cell death in the inner ear. Compounds have been described that protect zebrafish lateral line hair cells from aminoglycosides, but few are effective in the cochlea. As the aminoglycosides interact with several ion channels, including the mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) channels by which they can enter hair cells, we screened 160 ion-channel modulators, seeking compounds that protect cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) from aminoglycoside-induced death in vitro. Using zebrafish, 72 compounds were identified that either reduced loading of the MET-channel blocker FM 1-43FX, decreased Texas red–conjugated neomycin labeling, or reduced neomycin-induced hair cell death. After testing these 72 compounds, and 6 structurally similar compounds that failed in zebrafish, 13 were found that protected against gentamicin-induced death of OHCs in mouse cochlear cultures, 6 of which are permeant blockers of the hair cell MET channel. None of these compounds abrogated aminoglycoside antibacterial efficacy. By selecting those without adverse effects at high concentrations, 5 emerged as leads for developing pharmaceutical otoprotectants to alleviate an increasing clinical problem. PMID:29263311

  6. Identification of ion-channel modulators that protect against aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Emma J; Kirkwood, Nerissa K; Kitcher, Siân R; O'Reilly, Molly; Derudas, Marco; Cantillon, Daire M; Goodyear, Richard J; Secker, Abigail; Baxendale, Sarah; Bull, James C; Waddell, Simon J; Whitfield, Tanya T; Ward, Simon E; Kros, Corné J; Richardson, Guy P

    2017-12-21

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections but can cause deafness due to hair cell death in the inner ear. Compounds have been described that protect zebrafish lateral line hair cells from aminoglycosides, but few are effective in the cochlea. As the aminoglycosides interact with several ion channels, including the mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) channels by which they can enter hair cells, we screened 160 ion-channel modulators, seeking compounds that protect cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) from aminoglycoside-induced death in vitro. Using zebrafish, 72 compounds were identified that either reduced loading of the MET-channel blocker FM 1-43FX, decreased Texas red-conjugated neomycin labeling, or reduced neomycin-induced hair cell death. After testing these 72 compounds, and 6 structurally similar compounds that failed in zebrafish, 13 were found that protected against gentamicin-induced death of OHCs in mouse cochlear cultures, 6 of which are permeant blockers of the hair cell MET channel. None of these compounds abrogated aminoglycoside antibacterial efficacy. By selecting those without adverse effects at high concentrations, 5 emerged as leads for developing pharmaceutical otoprotectants to alleviate an increasing clinical problem.

  7. Zebrafish Models for the Mechanosensory Hair Cell Dysfunction in Usher Syndrome 3 Reveal That Clarin-1 Is an Essential Hair Bundle Protein.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Suhasini R; Chen, Daniel H-C; Chou, Shih-Wei; Zang, Jingjing; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Stepanyan, Ruben; McDermott, Brian M; Alagramam, Kumar N

    2015-07-15

    Usher syndrome type III (USH3) is characterized by progressive loss of hearing and vision, and varying degrees of vestibular dysfunction. It is caused by mutations that affect the human clarin-1 protein (hCLRN1), a member of the tetraspanin protein family. The missense mutation CLRN1(N48K), which affects a conserved N-glycosylation site in hCLRN1, is a common causative USH3 mutation among Ashkenazi Jews. The affected individuals hear at birth but lose that function over time. Here, we developed an animal model system using zebrafish transgenesis and gene targeting to provide an explanation for this phenotype. Immunolabeling demonstrated that Clrn1 localized to the hair cell bundles (hair bundles). The clrn1 mutants generated by zinc finger nucleases displayed aberrant hair bundle morphology with diminished function. Two transgenic zebrafish that express either hCLRN1 or hCLRN1(N48K) in hair cells were produced to examine the subcellular localization patterns of wild-type and mutant human proteins. hCLRN1 localized to the hair bundles similarly to zebrafish Clrn1; in contrast, hCLRN1(N48K) largely mislocalized to the cell body with a small amount reaching the hair bundle. We propose that this small amount of hCLRN1(N48K) in the hair bundle provides clarin-1-mediated function during the early stages of life; however, the presence of hCLRN1(N48K) in the hair bundle diminishes over time because of intracellular degradation of the mutant protein, leading to progressive loss of hair bundle integrity and hair cell function. These findings and genetic tools provide an understanding and path forward to identify therapies to mitigate hearing loss linked to the CLRN1 mutation. Mutations in the clarin-1 gene affect eye and ear function in humans. Individuals with the CLRN1(N48K) mutation are born able to hear but lose that function over time. Here, we develop an animal model system using zebrafish transgenesis and gene targeting to provide an explanation for this phenotype

  8. microRNA-183 is Essential for Hair Cell Regeneration after Neomycin Injury in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Woo; Han, Ji Hyuk; Wu, Ling; Choi, Jae Young

    2018-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs composed of 20 to 22 nucleotides that regulate development and differentiation in various organs by silencing specific RNAs and regulating gene expression. In the present study, we show that the microRNA (miR)-183 cluster is upregulated during hair cell regeneration and that its inhibition reduces hair cell regeneration following neomycin-induced ototoxicity in zebrafish. miRNA expression patterns after neomycin exposure were analyzed using microarray chips. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to validate miR-183 cluster expression patterns following neomycin exposure (500 μM for 2 h). After injection of an antisense morpholino (MO) to miR-183 (MO-183) immediately after fertilization, hair cell regeneration after neomycin exposure in neuromast cells was evaluated by fluorescent staining (YO-PRO1). The MO-183 effect also was assessed in transgenic zebrafish larvae expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in inner ear hair cells. Microarray analysis clearly showed that the miR-183 cluster (miR-96, miR-182, and miR-183) was upregulated after neomycin treatment. We also confirmed upregulated expression of the miR-183 cluster during hair cell regeneration after neomycin-induced ototoxicity. miR-183 inhibition using MO-183 reduced hair cell regeneration in both wild-type and GFP transgenic zebrafish larvae. Our work demonstrates that the miR-183 cluster is essential for the regeneration of hair cells following ototoxic injury in zebrafish larvae. Therefore, regulation of the miR-183 cluster can be a novel target for stimulation of hair cell regeneration. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2018

  9. P2X antagonists inhibit styryl dye entry into hair cells.

    PubMed

    Crumling, M A; Tong, M; Aschenbach, K L; Liu, L Qian; Pipitone, C M; Duncan, R K

    2009-07-21

    The styryl pyridinium dyes, FM1-43 and AM1-43, are fluorescent molecules that can permeate the mechanotransduction channels of hair cells, the sensory receptors of the inner ear. When these dyes are applied to hair cells, they enter the cytoplasm rapidly, resulting in a readily detectable intracellular fluorescence that is often used as a molecular indication of mechanotransduction channel activity. However, such dyes can also permeate the ATP receptor, P2X(2). Therefore, we explored the contribution of P2X receptors to the loading of hair cells with AM1-43. The chick inner ear was found to express P2X receptors and to release ATP, similar to the inner ear of mammals, allowing for the endogenous stimulation of P2X receptors. The involvement of these receptors was evaluated pharmacologically, by exposing the sensory epithelium of the chick inner ear to 5 microM AM1-43 under different experimental conditions and measuring the fluorescence in hair cells after fixation of the tissue. Pre-exposure of the tissue to 5 mM EGTA for 15 min, which should eliminate most of the gating "tip links" of the mechanotransduction channels, deceased fluorescence by only 44%. In contrast, P2X receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid [PPADS], suramin, 2',3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) ATP [TNP-ATP], and d-tubocurarine) had greater effects on dye loading. PPADS, suramin, and TNP-ATP all decreased intracellular AM1-43 fluorescence in hair cells by at least 69% when applied at a concentration of 100 microM. The difference between d-tubocurarine-treated and control fluorescence was statistically insignificant when d-tubocurarine was applied at a concentration that blocks the mechanotransduction channel (200 microM). At a concentration that also blocks P2X(2) receptors (2 mM), d-tubocurarine decreased dye loading by 72%. From these experiments, it appears that AM1-43 can enter hair cells through endogenously activated P2X receptors. Thus, the contribution of P2X

  10. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  11. LSD1 is Required for Hair Cell Regeneration in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    He, Yingzi; Tang, Dongmei; Cai, Chengfu; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-05-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A) plays an important role in complex cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. It has recently been demonstrated that during development, downregulation of LSD1 inhibits cell proliferation, modulates the expression of cell cycle regulators, and reduces hair cell formation in the zebrafish lateral line, which suggests that LSD1-mediated epigenetic regulation plays a key role in the development of hair cells. However, the role of LSD1 in hair cell regeneration after hair cell loss remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the effect of LSD1 on hair cell regeneration following neomycin-induced hair cell loss. We show that the LSD1 inhibitor trans-2-phenylcyclopropylamine (2-PCPA) significantly decreases the regeneration of hair cells in zebrafish after neomycin damage. In addition, immunofluorescent staining demonstrates that 2-PCPA administration suppresses supporting cell proliferation and alters cell cycle progression. Finally, in situ hybridization shows that 2-PCPA significantly downregulates the expression of genes related to Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf activation. Altogether, our data suggest that downregulation of LSD1 significantly decreases hair cell regeneration after neomycin-induced hair cell loss through inactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf signaling pathways. Thus, LSD1 plays a critical role in hair cell regeneration and might represent a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of hearing loss.

  12. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  13. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  14. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuates gentamicin-induced cochlear hair cell death in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhanwei; He, Qiang; Shan, Chunguang; Li, Fengyi

    2018-09-15

    Gentamycin is one of the most clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics which induce intrinsic apoptosis of hair cells. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is known as safe cell-protective agent in disorders associated with apoptosis. We aimed to investigate the protective effects of TUDCA against gentamicin-induced ototoxicity. House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1(HEI-OC1) cells and explanted cochlear tissue were treated with gentamicin and TUDCA, followed by serial analyses including cell viability assay, hair cell staining, qPCR, ELISA and western blotting to determine the cell damage by the parameters relevant to cell apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress. TUDCA significantly attenuated gentamicin-induced cell damage in cultured HEI-OC1 cells and explanted cochlear hair cells. TUDCA alleviated gentamicin-induced cell apoptosis, supported by the decreased Bax/Bcl2 ratio compared with that of gentamicin treated alone. TUDCA decreased gentamicin-induced nitric oxide production and protein nitration in both models. In addition, TUDCA suppressed gentamicin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as reflected by inversing the expression levels of Binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip), CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) and Caspase 3. TUDCA attenuated gentamicin-induced hair cell death by inhibiting protein nitration activation and ER stress, providing new insights into the new potential therapies for sensorineural deafness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Inner ear progenitor cells can be generated in vitro from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boddy, Sarah L; Chen, Wei; Romero-Guevara, Ricardo; Kottam, Lucksy; Bellantuono, Illaria; Rivolta, Marcelo N

    2012-11-01

    Mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate sensory neurons and produce inner ear hair cell-like cells. An equivalent source from humans is highly desirable, given their potential application in patient-specific regenerative therapies for deafness. In this study, we explored the ability of human MSCs (hMSCs) to differentiate into otic lineages. hMSCs were exposed to culture media conditioned by human fetal auditory stem cells. Conditioned media induced the expression of otic progenitor markers PAX8, PAX2, GATA3 and SOX2. After 4 weeks, cells coexpressed ATOH1, MYO7A and POU4F3 (indicators of hair cell lineage) or neuronal markers NEUROG1, POU4F1 and NEFH. Inhibition of WNT signaling prevented differentiation into otic progenitors, while WNT activation partially phenocopied results seen with the conditioned media. This study demonstrates that hMSCs can be driven to express key genes found in the otic lineages and thereby promotes their status as candidates for regenerative therapies for deafness.

  16. Sensory hair cell development and regeneration: similarities and differences

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Patrick J.; Huarcaya Najarro, Elvis; Sayyid, Zahra N.; Cheng, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are mechanoreceptors of the auditory and vestibular systems and are crucial for hearing and balance. In adult mammals, auditory hair cells are unable to regenerate, and damage to these cells results in permanent hearing loss. By contrast, hair cells in the chick cochlea and the zebrafish lateral line are able to regenerate, prompting studies into the signaling pathways, morphogen gradients and transcription factors that regulate hair cell development and regeneration in various species. Here, we review these findings and discuss how various signaling pathways and factors function to modulate sensory hair cell development and regeneration. By comparing and contrasting development and regeneration, we also highlight the utility and limitations of using defined developmental cues to drive mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:25922522

  17. Causes and Consequences of Sensory Hair Cell Damage and Recovery in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael E; Monroe, J David

    2016-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are the mechanotransductive receptors that detect gravity, sound, and vibration in all vertebrates. Damage to these sensitive receptors often results in deficits in vestibular function and hearing. There are currently two main reasons for studying the process of hair cell loss in fishes. First, fishes, like other non-mammalian vertebrates, have the ability to regenerate hair cells that have been damaged or lost via exposure to ototoxic chemicals or acoustic overstimulation. Thus, they are used as a biomedical model to understand the process of hair cell death and regeneration and find therapeutics that treat or prevent human hearing loss. Secondly, scientists and governmental natural resource managers are concerned about the potential effects of intense anthropogenic sounds on aquatic organisms, including fishes. Dr. Arthur N. Popper and his students, postdocs and research associates have performed pioneering experiments in both of these lines of fish hearing research. This review will discuss the current knowledge regarding the causes and consequences of both lateral line and inner ear hair cell damage in teleost fishes.

  18. Activating Hair Follicle Stem Cells via R-spondin2 to Stimulate Hair Growth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew A; Li, Jingtao; Liu, Bo; Hunter, Daniel; Pyles, Malcolm; Gillette, Martin; Dhamdhere, Girija R; Abo, Arie; Oro, Anthony; Helms, Jill A

    2016-08-01

    Wnt signaling is required for the development of the hair follicle, and for inciting the growth (anagen) phase of the hair cycle. Most strategies to enhance Wnt signaling for hair growth create a state of constitutive Wnt activation, which leads to neoplastic transformation of the epithelial hair matrix. Using Axin2(LacZ/+) and Axin2(Cre/+)R26R(mTmG/+) reporter mice and RNA analyses, we show that Wnt signaling is elevated during anagen, is reduced at the onset of catagen, and can be reamplified in the skin and surrounding hair follicles via intradermal injection of recombinant R-spondin2 protein. Using Lgr5(LacZ/+) reporter mice, we demonstrate that this amplified Wnt environment leads to activation of leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive stem cells in the hair follicle. The onset of catagen is repressed by R-spondin2 injection, and the anagen phase persists. As a consequence, hair shafts grow longer. We conclude that R-spondin2 treatment activates hair follicle stem cells and therefore may have therapeutic potential to promote hair growth. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Motility of vestibular hair cells in the chick.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Y; Sekitani, T

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies of the outer hair cells in cochlea have demonstrated active motilities. However, very little study has been done on the vestibular hair cells (VHCs). The present study shows the motile response of the VHCs induced by application of Ca2+/ATP promoting contraction. Reversible cell shape changes could be shown in 10 of 16 isolated type I hair cells and 9 of 15 isolated type II hair cells by applying the contraction solution. Furthermore, the sensory hair bundles in the utricular epithelium pivoted around the base and stood perpendicularly to the apical borderline of the epithelium in response to the application of the same solution. It is suggested that the contraction of the isolated VHCs may be transferred to tension which causes the sensory hair bundles to restrict their motion in normal tissue, instead of changing the cell shape.

  20. A historical to present-day account of efforts to answer the question, “What puts the brakes on mammalian hair cell regeneration?”

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Joseph C.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Hearing and balance deficits often affect humans and other mammals permanently, because their ears stop producing hair cells within a few days after birth. But production occurs throughout life in the ears of sharks, bony fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds allowing them to replace lost hair cells and quickly recover after temporarily experiencing the kinds of sensory deficits that are irreversible for mammals. Since the mid 1970's, researchers have been asking what puts the brakes on hair cell regeneration in mammals? Here we evaluate the headway that has been made and assess current evidence for various alternative mechanistic hypotheses that have been proposed to account for the limits to hair cell regeneration in mammals. PMID:23333259

  1. A historical to present-day account of efforts to answer the question: "what puts the brakes on mammalian hair cell regeneration?".

    PubMed

    Burns, Joseph C; Corwin, Jeffrey T

    2013-03-01

    Hearing and balance deficits often affect humans and other mammals permanently, because their ears stop producing hair cells within a few days after birth. But production occurs throughout life in the ears of sharks, bony fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds allowing them to replace lost hair cells and quickly recover after temporarily experiencing the kinds of sensory deficits that are irreversible for mammals. Since the mid 1970s, researchers have been asking what puts the brakes on hair cell regeneration in mammals. Here we evaluate the headway that has been made and assess current evidence for alternative mechanistic hypotheses that have been proposed to account for the limits to hair cell regeneration in mammals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. MEKK4 Signaling Regulates Sensory Cell Development and Function in the Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Khujista; Pandey, Atul K.; Zheng, Hong-Wei; Riazuddin, Saima; Sha, Su-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) residing in the inner ear are critical for hearing and balance. Precise coordination of proliferation, sensory specification, and differentiation during development is essential to ensure the correct patterning of HCs in the cochlear and vestibular epithelium. Recent studies have revealed that FGF20 signaling is vital for proper HC differentiation. However, the mechanisms by which FGF20 signaling promotes HC differentiation remain unknown. Here, we show that mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase 4 (MEKK4) expression is highly regulated during inner ear development and is critical to normal cytoarchitecture and function. Mice homozygous for a kinase-inactive MEKK4 mutation exhibit significant hearing loss. Lack of MEKK4 activity in vivo also leads to a significant reduction in the number of cochlear and vestibular HCs, suggesting that MEKK4 activity is essential for overall development of HCs within the inner ear. Furthermore, we show that loss of FGF20 signaling in vivo inhibits MEKK4 activity, whereas gain of Fgf20 function stimulates MEKK4 expression, suggesting that Fgf20 modulates MEKK4 activity to regulate cellular differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate, for the first time, that MEKK4 acts as a critical node to integrate FGF20-FGFR1 signaling responses to specifically influence HC development and that FGFR1 signaling through activation of MEKK4 is necessary for outer hair cell differentiation. Collectively, this study provides compelling evidence of an essential role for MEKK4 in inner ear morphogenesis and identifies the requirement of MEKK4 expression in regulating the specific response of FGFR1 during HC development and FGF20/FGFR1 signaling activated MEKK4 for normal sensory cell differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sensory hair cells (HCs) are the mechanoreceptors within the inner ear responsible for our sense of hearing. HCs are formed before birth, and mammals lack the ability to restore the sensory deficits associated

  3. Diphtheria Toxin-Induced Cell Death Triggers Wnt-Dependent Hair Cell Regeneration in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lingxiang; Lu, Jingrong; Chiang, Hao; Shi, Fuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells (HCs), the sensory cells that respond to sound, do not regenerate after damage in adult mammals, and their loss is a major cause of deafness. Here we show that HC regeneration in newborn mouse ears occurred spontaneously when the original cells were ablated by treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) in ears that had been engineered to overexpress the DT receptor, but was not detectable when HCs were ablated in vivo by the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. A variety of Wnts (Wnt1, Wnt2, Wnt2b, Wnt4, Wnt5a, Wnt7b, Wnt9a, Wnt9b, and Wnt11) and Wnt pathway component Krm2 were upregulated after DT damage. Nuclear β-catenin was upregulated in HCs and supporting cells of the DT-damaged cochlea. Pharmacological inhibition of Wnt decreased spontaneous regeneration, confirming a role of Wnt signaling in HC regeneration. Inhibition of Notch signaling further potentiated supporting cell proliferation and HC differentiation that occurred spontaneously. The absence of new HCs in the neomycin ears was correlated to less robust Wnt pathway activation, but the ears subjected to neomycin treatment nonetheless showed increased cell division and HC differentiation after subsequent forced upregulation of β-catenin. These studies suggest, first, that Wnt signaling plays a key role in regeneration, and, second, that the outcome of a regenerative response to damage in the newborn cochlea is determined by reaching a threshold level of Wnt signaling rather than its complete absence or presence. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sensory HCs of the inner ear do not regenerate in the adult, and their loss is a major cause of deafness. We found that HCs regenerated spontaneously in the newborn mouse after diphtheria toxin (DT)-induced, but not neomycin-induced, HC death. Regeneration depended on activation of Wnt signaling, and regeneration in DT-treated ears correlated to a higher level of Wnt activation than occurred in nonregenerating neomycin-treated ears. This is significant

  4. Diphtheria Toxin-Induced Cell Death Triggers Wnt-Dependent Hair Cell Regeneration in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingxiang; Lu, Jingrong; Chiang, Hao; Wu, Hao; Edge, Albert S B; Shi, Fuxin

    2016-09-07

    Cochlear hair cells (HCs), the sensory cells that respond to sound, do not regenerate after damage in adult mammals, and their loss is a major cause of deafness. Here we show that HC regeneration in newborn mouse ears occurred spontaneously when the original cells were ablated by treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) in ears that had been engineered to overexpress the DT receptor, but was not detectable when HCs were ablated in vivo by the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. A variety of Wnts (Wnt1, Wnt2, Wnt2b, Wnt4, Wnt5a, Wnt7b, Wnt9a, Wnt9b, and Wnt11) and Wnt pathway component Krm2 were upregulated after DT damage. Nuclear β-catenin was upregulated in HCs and supporting cells of the DT-damaged cochlea. Pharmacological inhibition of Wnt decreased spontaneous regeneration, confirming a role of Wnt signaling in HC regeneration. Inhibition of Notch signaling further potentiated supporting cell proliferation and HC differentiation that occurred spontaneously. The absence of new HCs in the neomycin ears was correlated to less robust Wnt pathway activation, but the ears subjected to neomycin treatment nonetheless showed increased cell division and HC differentiation after subsequent forced upregulation of β-catenin. These studies suggest, first, that Wnt signaling plays a key role in regeneration, and, second, that the outcome of a regenerative response to damage in the newborn cochlea is determined by reaching a threshold level of Wnt signaling rather than its complete absence or presence. Sensory HCs of the inner ear do not regenerate in the adult, and their loss is a major cause of deafness. We found that HCs regenerated spontaneously in the newborn mouse after diphtheria toxin (DT)-induced, but not neomycin-induced, HC death. Regeneration depended on activation of Wnt signaling, and regeneration in DT-treated ears correlated to a higher level of Wnt activation than occurred in nonregenerating neomycin-treated ears. This is significant because insufficient

  5. Energy output of a single outer hair cell: Effect of resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Kuni H.

    2018-05-01

    The ability of the mammalian ear in processing high frequency sounds, up to ˜100 kHz, is based on the capability of outer hair cells (OHCs) in responding to stimulation at high frequencies. These cells show a unique motility in their cell body coupled with charge movement. With this motile element, voltage changes generated by stimuli at their hair bundles drive the cell body and that, in turn, amplifies the signal. In vitro experiments show that the movement of these charges significantly increases the membrane capacitance, limiting the motile activity by an additional attenuation of voltage changes. It was found, however, that such an effect is due to the absence of mechanical load. In the presence of mechanical load, particularly inertial load, such as under in vivo conditions, the movement of motile charges should reduce the membrane capacitance, enhancing the mechanical power output.

  6. Artificial Hair Cells for Sensing Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present additional information about the flow-velocity sensors described briefly in the immediately preceding article. As noted therein, these sensors can be characterized as artificial hair cells that implement an approximation of the sensory principle of flow-sensing cilia of fish: A cilium is bent by an amount proportional to the flow to which it is exposed. A nerve cell at the base of the cilium senses the flow by sensing the bending of the cilium. In an artificial hair cell, the artificial cilium is a microscopic cantilever beam, and the bending of an artificial cilium is measured by means of a strain gauge at its base (see Figure 1). Figure 2 presents cross sections of a representative sensor of this type at two different stages of its fabrication process. The process consists of relatively- low-temperature metallization, polymer-deposition, microfabrication, and surface-micromachining subprocesses, including plastic-deformation magnetic assembly (PDMA), which is described below. These subprocesses are suitable for a variety of substrate materials, including silicon, some glasses, and some polymers. Moreover, because it incorporates a polymeric supporting structure, this sensor is more robust, relative to its silicon-based counterparts.

  7. Round window administration of gentamicin: a new method for the study of ototoxicity of cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Husmann, K R; Morgan, A S; Girod, D A; Durham, D

    1998-11-01

    Damage to inner ear sensory hair cells after systemic administration of ototoxic drugs has been documented in humans and animals. Birds have the ability to regenerate new hair cells to replace those damaged by drugs or noise. Unfortunately, the systemic administration of gentamicin damages both ears in a variable fashion with potentially confounding systemic drug effects. We developed a method of direct application of gentamicin to one cochlea of hatchling chickens, allowing the other ear to serve as a within-animal control. We tested variables including the vehicle for application, location of application, dosage, and duration of gentamicin exposure. After 5 or 28 days survival, the percent length damage to the cochlea and regeneration of hair cells was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Controls consisted of the opposite unexposed cochlea and additional animals which received saline instead of gentamicin. Excellent damage was achieved using gentamicin-soaked Gelfoam pledgets applied to the round window membrane. The percent length damage could be varied from 15 to 100% by changing the dosage of gentamicin, with exposures as short as 30 min. No damage was observed in control animals. Regeneration of hair cells was observed in both the base and apex by 28 days survival.

  8. Outer Hair Cell Electromotility in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of outer hair cell (OHC) electro-motility in vivo has been challenged by the expected low-pass filtering of the transmembrane potential due to the cell's own capacitance. The OHC electromotility is characterized here by an electromechanical ratio defined as the ratio of the OHC contraction to the transmembrane potential. This ratio has been measured in isolated cells to be approximately 26 nm/mV. We estimate the OHC electromechanical ratio in vivo from the recently measured displacements of the reticular lamina and the basilar membrane near the 19 kHz characteristic frequency in the basal region of guinea pig cochlea. Our analysis strongly suggests OHC electromotility process is effective for cochlear amplification in vivo at least around the characteristic frequency of the basal location in spite of the low-pass filtering.

  9. Hydrogen protects auditory hair cells from cisplatin-induced free radicals.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Yayoi S; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Mirei; Ito, Juichi

    2014-09-05

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various malignancies. However, its maximum dose is often limited by severe ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity may require the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the inner ear by activating enzymes specific to the cochlea. Molecular hydrogen was recently established as an antioxidant that selectively reduces ROS, and has been reported to protect the central nervous system, liver, kidney and cochlea from oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of molecular hydrogen to protect cochleae against cisplatin. We cultured mouse cochlear explants in medium containing various concentrations of cisplatin and examined the effects of hydrogen gas dissolved directly into the media. Following 48-h incubation, the presence of intact auditory hair cells was assayed by phalloidin staining. Cisplatin caused hair cell loss in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the addition of hydrogen gas significantly increased the numbers of remaining auditory hair cells. Additionally, hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF) staining of the spiral ganglion showed that formation of hydroxyl radicals was successfully reduced in hydrogen-treated cochleae. These data suggest that molecular hydrogen can protect auditory tissues against cisplatin toxicity, thus providing an additional strategy to protect against drug-induced inner ear damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Actions of Calcium on Hair Bundle Mechanics in Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beurg, Maryline; Nam, Jong-Hoon; Crawford, Andrew; Fettiplace, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Sound stimuli excite cochlear hair cells by vibration of each hair bundle, which opens mechanotransducer (MT) channels. We have measured hair-bundle mechanics in isolated rat cochleas by stimulation with flexible glass fibers and simultaneous recording of the MT current. Both inner and outer hair-cell bundles exhibited force-displacement relationships with a nonlinearity that reflects a time-dependent reduction in stiffness. The nonlinearity was abolished, and hair-bundle stiffness increased, by maneuvers that diminished calcium influx through the MT channels: lowering extracellular calcium, blocking the MT current with dihydrostreptomycin, or depolarizing to positive potentials. To simulate the effects of Ca2+, we constructed a finite-element model of the outer hair cell bundle that incorporates the gating-spring hypothesis for MT channel activation. Four calcium ions were assumed to bind to the MT channel, making it harder to open, and, in addition, Ca2+ was posited to cause either a channel release or a decrease in the gating-spring stiffness. Both mechanisms produced Ca2+ effects on adaptation and bundle mechanics comparable to those measured experimentally. We suggest that fast adaptation and force generation by the hair bundle may stem from the action of Ca2+ on the channel complex and do not necessarily require the direct involvement of a myosin motor. The significance of these results for cochlear transduction and amplification are discussed. PMID:18178649

  11. Lgr5-Positive Supporting Cells Generate New Hair Cells in the Postnatal Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, Naomi F.; Shi, Fuxin; Arnold, Katrin; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Edge, Albert S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The prevalence of hearing loss after damage to the mammalian cochlea has been thought to be due to a lack of spontaneous regeneration of hair cells, the primary receptor cells for sound. Here, we show that supporting cells, which surround hair cells in the normal cochlear epithelium, differentiate into new hair cells in the neonatal mouse following ototoxic damage. Using lineage tracing, we show that new hair cells, predominantly outer hair cells, arise from Lgr5-expressing inner pillar and third Deiters cells and that new hair cell generation is increased by pharmacological inhibition of Notch. These data suggest that the neonatal mammalian cochlea has some capacity for hair cell regeneration following damage alone and that Lgr5-positive cells act as hair cell progenitors in the cochlea. PMID:24672754

  12. Mechanosensory hair cells express two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Cunningham, Christopher; Harkins-Perry, Sarah; Coste, Bertrand; Ranade, Sanjeev; Zebarjadi, Navid; Beurg, Maryline; Fettiplace, Robert; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mueller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Auditory hair cells contain mechanotransduction channels that rapidly open in response to sound-induced vibrations. Surprisingly, we report here that auditory hair cells contain two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels. One ion channel is activated by sound and is responsible for sensory transduction. This sensory transduction channel is expressed in hair-cell stereocilia and previous studies show that its activity is affected by mutations in the genes encoding the transmembrane proteins TMHS/LHFPL5, TMIE and TMC1/2. We show here that the second ion channel is expressed at the apical surface of hair cells and contains the Piezo2 protein. The activity of the Piezo2-dependent channel is controlled by the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and can be recorded following disruption of the sensory transduction machinery or more generally by disruption of the sensory epithelium. We thus conclude that hair cells express two molecularly and functionally distinct mechanotransduction channels with different subcellular distribution. PMID:27893727

  13. Sensory Hair Cells: An Introduction to Structure and Physiology.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Duane R

    2018-06-18

    Sensory hair cells are specialized secondary sensory cells that mediate our senses of hearing, balance, linear acceleration, and angular acceleration (head rotation). In addition, hair cells in fish and amphibians mediate sensitivity to water movement through the lateral line system, and closely related electroreceptive cells mediate sensitivity to low-voltage electric fields in the aquatic environment of many fish species and several species of amphibian.Sensory hair cells share many structural and functional features across all vertebrate groups, while at the same time they are specialized for employment in a wide variety of sensory tasks. The complexity of hair cell structure is large, and the diversity of hair cell applications in sensory systems exceeds that seen for most, if not all, sensory cell types. The intent of this review is to summarize the more significant structural features and some of the more interesting and important physiological mechanisms that have been elucidated thus far. Outside vertebrates, hair cells are only known to exist in the coronal organ of tunicates. Electrical resonance, electromotility, and their exquisite mechanical sensitivity all contribute to the attractiveness of hair cells as a research subject.

  14. Concise Review: Regeneration in Mammalian Cochlea Hair Cells: Help from Supporting Cells Transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Franco, Bénédicte; Malgrange, Brigitte

    2017-03-01

    It is commonly assumed that mammalian cochlear cells do not regenerate. Therefore, if hair cells are lost following an injury, no recovery could occur. However, during the first postnatal week, mice harbor some progenitor cells that retain the ability to give rise to new hair cells. These progenitor cells are in fact supporting cells. Upon hair cells loss, those cells are able to generate new hair cells both by direct transdifferentiation or following cell cycle re-entry and differentiation. However, this property of supporting cells is progressively lost after birth. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that are involved in mammalian hair cell development and regeneration. Manipulating pathways used during development constitute good candidates for inducing hair cell regeneration after injury. Despite these promising studies, there is still no evidence for a recovery following hair cells loss in adult mammals. Stem Cells 2017;35:551-556. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Hair cell recovery in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Burton, M. D.; Fashena, D. S.; Naeger, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hair cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates are regenerated by the mitotic division of supporting cell progenitors and the differentiation of the resulting progeny into new hair cells and supporting cells. Recent studies have shown that nonmitotic hair cell recovery after aminoglycoside-induced damage can also occur in the vestibular organs. Using hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers, we have used confocal and electron microscopy to examine the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of immature hair cells after gentamicin treatment in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule. Extruding and fragmenting hair cells, which undergo apoptotic cell death, are replaced by scar formations. After losing their bundles, sublethally damaged hair cells remain in the sensory epithelium for prolonged periods, acquiring supporting cell-like morphology and immunoreactivity. These modes of damage appear to be mutually exclusive, implying that sublethally damaged hair cells repair their bundles. Transitional cells, coexpressing hair cell and supporting cell markers, are seen near scar formations created by the expansion of neighboring supporting cells. Most of these cells have morphology and immunoreactivity similar to that of sublethally damaged hair cells. Ultrastructural analysis also reveals that most immature hair cells had autophagic vacuoles, implying that they originated from damaged hair cells rather than supporting cells. Some transitional cells are supporting cells participating in scar formations. Supporting cells also decrease in number during hair cell recovery, supporting the conclusion that some supporting cells undergo phenotypic conversion into hair cells without an intervening mitotic event.

  16. Hair cell recovery in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Richard A.; Burton, Miriam D.; Fashena, David S.; Naeger, Rebecca A.

    2000-01-01

    Hair cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates are regenerated by the mitotic division of supporting cell progenitors and the differentiation of the resulting progeny into new hair cells and supporting cells. Recent studies have shown that nonmitotic hair cell recovery after aminoglycoside-induced damage can also occur in the vestibular organs. Using hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers, we have used confocal and electron microscopy to examine the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of immature hair cells after gentamicin treatment in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule. Extruding and fragmenting hair cells, which undergo apoptotic cell death, are replaced by scar formations. After losing their bundles, sublethally damaged hair cells remain in the sensory epithelium for prolonged periods, acquiring supporting cell-like morphology and immunoreactivity. These modes of damage appear to be mutually exclusive, implying that sublethally damaged hair cells repair their bundles. Transitional cells, coexpressing hair cell and supporting cell markers, are seen near scar formations created by the expansion of neighboring supporting cells. Most of these cells have morphology and immunoreactivity similar to that of sublethally damaged hair cells. Ultrastructural analysis also reveals that most immature hair cells had autophagic vacuoles, implying that they originated from damaged hair cells rather than supporting cells. Some transitional cells are supporting cells participating in scar formations. Supporting cells also decrease in number during hair cell recovery, supporting the conclusion that some supporting cells undergo phenotypic conversion into hair cells without an intervening mitotic event. PMID:11050201

  17. Hair cell recovery in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule.

    PubMed

    Baird, R A; Burton, M D; Lysakowski, A; Fashena, D S; Naeger, R A

    2000-10-24

    Hair cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates are regenerated by the mitotic division of supporting cell progenitors and the differentiation of the resulting progeny into new hair cells and supporting cells. Recent studies have shown that nonmitotic hair cell recovery after aminoglycoside-induced damage can also occur in the vestibular organs. Using hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers, we have used confocal and electron microscopy to examine the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of immature hair cells after gentamicin treatment in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule. Extruding and fragmenting hair cells, which undergo apoptotic cell death, are replaced by scar formations. After losing their bundles, sublethally damaged hair cells remain in the sensory epithelium for prolonged periods, acquiring supporting cell-like morphology and immunoreactivity. These modes of damage appear to be mutually exclusive, implying that sublethally damaged hair cells repair their bundles. Transitional cells, coexpressing hair cell and supporting cell markers, are seen near scar formations created by the expansion of neighboring supporting cells. Most of these cells have morphology and immunoreactivity similar to that of sublethally damaged hair cells. Ultrastructural analysis also reveals that most immature hair cells had autophagic vacuoles, implying that they originated from damaged hair cells rather than supporting cells. Some transitional cells are supporting cells participating in scar formations. Supporting cells also decrease in number during hair cell recovery, supporting the conclusion that some supporting cells undergo phenotypic conversion into hair cells without an intervening mitotic event.

  18. The mechanosensory structure of the hair cell requires clarin-1, a protein encoded by Usher syndrome III causative gene.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ruishuang; Melki, Sami; Chen, Daniel H-C; Tian, Guilian; Furness, David N; Oshima-Takago, Tomoko; Neef, Jakob; Moser, Tobias; Askew, Charles; Horwitz, Geoff; Holt, Jeffrey R; Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Alagramam, Kumar N

    2012-07-11

    Mutation in the clarin-1 gene (Clrn1) results in loss of hearing and vision in humans (Usher syndrome III), but the role of clarin-1 in the sensory hair cells is unknown. Clarin-1 is predicted to be a four transmembrane domain protein similar to members of the tetraspanin family. Mice carrying null mutation in the clarin-1 gene (Clrn1(-/-)) show loss of hair cell function and a possible defect in ribbon synapse. We investigated the role of clarin-1 using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. We show by immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp recordings of Ca(2+) currents and membrane capacitance from inner hair cells that clarin-1 is not essential for formation or function of ribbon synapse. However, reduced cochlear microphonic potentials, FM1-43 [N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(4-(dibutylamino)styryl) pyridinium dibromide] loading, and transduction currents pointed to diminished cochlear hair bundle function in Clrn1(-/-) mice. Electron microscopy of cochlear hair cells revealed loss of some tall stereocilia and gaps in the v-shaped bundle, although tip links and staircase arrangement of stereocilia were not primarily affected by Clrn1(-/-) mutation. Human clarin-1 protein expressed in transfected mouse cochlear hair cells localized to the bundle; however, the pathogenic variant p.N48K failed to localize to the bundle. The mouse model generated to study the in vivo consequence of p.N48K in clarin-1 (Clrn1(N48K)) supports our in vitro and Clrn1(-/-) mouse data and the conclusion that CLRN1 is an essential hair bundle protein. Furthermore, the ear phenotype in the Clrn1(N48K) mouse suggests that it is a valuable model for ear disease in CLRN1(N48K), the most prevalent Usher syndrome III mutation in North America.

  19. The tip-link antigen, a protein associated with the transduction complex of sensory hair cells, is protocadherin-15.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zubair M; Goodyear, Richard; Riazuddin, Saima; Lagziel, Ayala; Legan, P Kevin; Behra, Martine; Burgess, Shawn M; Lilley, Kathryn S; Wilcox, Edward R; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Griffith, Andrew J; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Belyantseva, Inna A; Richardson, Guy P; Friedman, Thomas B

    2006-06-28

    Sound and acceleration are detected by hair bundles, mechanosensory structures located at the apical pole of hair cells in the inner ear. The different elements of the hair bundle, the stereocilia and a kinocilium, are interconnected by a variety of link types. One of these links, the tip link, connects the top of a shorter stereocilium with the lateral membrane of an adjacent taller stereocilium and may gate the mechanotransducer channel of the hair cell. Mass spectrometric and Western blot analyses identify the tip-link antigen, a hitherto unidentified antigen specifically associated with the tip and kinocilial links of sensory hair bundles in the inner ear and the ciliary calyx of photoreceptors in the eye, as an avian ortholog of human protocadherin-15, a product of the gene for the deaf/blindness Usher syndrome type 1F/DFNB23 locus. Multiple protocadherin-15 transcripts are shown to be expressed in the mouse inner ear, and these define four major isoform classes, two with entirely novel, previously unidentified cytoplasmic domains. Antibodies to the three cytoplasmic domain-containing isoform classes reveal that each has a different spatiotemporal expression pattern in the developing and mature inner ear. Two isoforms are distributed in a manner compatible for association with the tip-link complex. An isoform located at the tips of stereocilia is sensitive to calcium chelation and proteolysis with subtilisin and reappears at the tips of stereocilia as transduction recovers after the removal of calcium chelators. Protocadherin-15 is therefore associated with the tip-link complex and may be an integral component of this structure and/or required for its formation.

  20. DNA damage signaling regulates age-dependent proliferative capacity of quiescent inner ear supporting cells

    PubMed Central

    Laos, Maarja; Anttonen, Tommi; Kirjavainen, Anna; Hällström, Taija af; Laiho, Marikki; Pirvola, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Supporting cells (SCs) of the cochlear (auditory) and vestibular (balance) organs hold promise as a platform for therapeutic regeneration of the sensory hair cells. Prior data have shown proliferative restrictions of adult SCs forced to re-enter the cell cycle. By comparing juvenile and adult SCs in explant cultures, we have here studied how proliferative restrictions are linked with DNA damage signaling. Cyclin D1 overexpression, used to stimulate cell cycle re-entry, triggered higher proliferative activity of juvenile SCs. Phosphorylated form of histone H2AX (γH2AX) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) were induced in a foci-like pattern in SCs of both ages as an indication of DNA double-strand break formation and activated DNA damage response. Compared to juvenile SCs, γH2AX and the repair protein Rad51 were resolved with slower kinetics in adult SCs, accompanied by increased apoptosis. Consistent with the in vitro data, in a Rb mutant mouse model in vivo, cell cycle re-entry of SCs was associated with γH2AX foci induction. In contrast to cell cycle reactivation, pharmacological stimulation of SC-to-hair-cell transdifferentiation in vitro did not trigger γH2AX. Thus, DNA damage and its prolonged resolution are critical barriers in the efforts to stimulate proliferation of the adult inner ear SCs. PMID:25063730

  1. Innervation regulates synaptic ribbons in lateral line mechanosensory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Remy; Cunningham, Dale E.; Hailey, Dale W.; Prendergast, Andrew; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Failure to form proper synapses in mechanosensory hair cells, the sensory cells responsible for hearing and balance, leads to deafness and balance disorders. Ribbons are electron-dense structures that tether synaptic vesicles to the presynaptic zone of mechanosensory hair cells where they are juxtaposed with the post-synaptic endings of afferent fibers. They are initially formed throughout the cytoplasm, and, as cells mature, ribbons translocate to the basolateral membrane of hair cells to form functional synapses. We have examined the effect of post-synaptic elements on ribbon formation and maintenance in the zebrafish lateral line system by observing mutants that lack hair cell innervation, wild-type larvae whose nerves have been transected and ribbons in regenerating hair cells. Our results demonstrate that innervation is not required for initial ribbon formation but suggest that it is crucial for regulating the number, size and localization of ribbons in maturing hair cells, and for ribbon maintenance at the mature synapse. PMID:27103160

  2. Innervation regulates synaptic ribbons in lateral line mechanosensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Suli, Arminda; Pujol, Remy; Cunningham, Dale E; Hailey, Dale W; Prendergast, Andrew; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-06-01

    Failure to form proper synapses in mechanosensory hair cells, the sensory cells responsible for hearing and balance, leads to deafness and balance disorders. Ribbons are electron-dense structures that tether synaptic vesicles to the presynaptic zone of mechanosensory hair cells where they are juxtaposed with the post-synaptic endings of afferent fibers. They are initially formed throughout the cytoplasm, and, as cells mature, ribbons translocate to the basolateral membrane of hair cells to form functional synapses. We have examined the effect of post-synaptic elements on ribbon formation and maintenance in the zebrafish lateral line system by observing mutants that lack hair cell innervation, wild-type larvae whose nerves have been transected and ribbons in regenerating hair cells. Our results demonstrate that innervation is not required for initial ribbon formation but suggest that it is crucial for regulating the number, size and localization of ribbons in maturing hair cells, and for ribbon maintenance at the mature synapse. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Stem cell dynamics in the hair follicle niche

    PubMed Central

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Greco, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Hair follicles are skin appendages of the mammalian skin that have the ability to periodically and stereotypically regenerate in order to continuously produce new hair over our lifetime. The ability of the hair follicle to regenerate is due to the presence of stem cells that along with other cell populations and non-cellular components, including molecular signals and extracellular material, make up a niche microenvironment. Mounting evidence suggests that the niche is critical for regulating stem cell behavior and thus the process of regeneration. Here we review the literature concerning past and current studies that have utilized mouse genetic models, combined with other approaches to dissect the molecular and cellular composition of the hair follicle niche. We also discuss our current understanding of how stem cells operate within the niche during the process of tissue regeneration and the factors that regulate their behavior. PMID:24361866

  4. Falsification of the ionic channel theory of hair cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Michelangelo

    2013-11-01

    The hair cell provides the transduction of mechanical vibrations in the balance and acoustic sense of all vertebrates that swim, walk, or fly. The current theory places hair cell transduction in a mechanically controlled ion channel. Although the theory of a mechanical input modulating the flow of ions through an ion pore has been a useful tool, it is falsified by experimental data in the literature and can be definitively falsified by a proposed experiment.

  5. Falsification of the ionic channel theory of hair cell transduction

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Michelangelo

    2013-01-01

    The hair cell provides the transduction of mechanical vibrations in the balance and acoustic sense of all vertebrates that swim, walk, or fly. The current theory places hair cell transduction in a mechanically controlled ion channel. Although the theory of a mechanical input modulating the flow of ions through an ion pore has been a useful tool, it is falsified by experimental data in the literature and can be definitively falsified by a proposed experiment. PMID:24563711

  6. Mechanotransduction current is essential for stability of the transducing stereocilia in mammalian auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Vélez-Ortega, A Catalina; Freeman, Mary J; Indzhykulian, Artur A; Grossheim, Jonathan M; Frolenkov, Gregory I

    2017-01-01

    Mechanotransducer channels at the tips of sensory stereocilia of inner ear hair cells are gated by the tension of 'tip links' interconnecting stereocilia. To ensure maximal sensitivity, tip links are tensioned at rest, resulting in a continuous influx of Ca2+ into the cell. Here, we show that this constitutive Ca2+ influx, usually considered as potentially deleterious for hair cells, is in fact essential for stereocilia stability. In the auditory hair cells of young postnatal mice and rats, a reduction in mechanotransducer current, via pharmacological channel blockers or disruption of tip links, leads to stereocilia shape changes and shortening. These effects occur only in stereocilia that harbor mechanotransducer channels, recover upon blocker washout or tip link regeneration and can be replicated by manipulations of extracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ buffering. Thus, our data provide the first experimental evidence for the dynamic control of stereocilia morphology by the mechanotransduction current. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24661.001 PMID:28350294

  7. Cytodifferentiation of hair cells during the development of a basal chordate.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Fabio; Caicci, Federico; Rigon, Francesca; Zaniolo, Giovanna; Burighel, Paolo; Manni, Lucia

    2013-10-01

    Tunicates are unique animals for studying the origin and evolution of vertebrates because they are considered vertebrates' closest living relatives and share the vertebrate body plan and many specific features. Both possess neural placodes, transient thickenings of the cranial ectoderm that give rise to various types of sensory cells, including axonless secondary mechanoreceptors. In vertebrates, these are represented by the hair cells of the inner ear and the lateral line, which have an apical apparatus typically bearing cilia and stereovilli. In tunicates, they are found in the coronal organ, which is a mechanoreceptor located at the base of the oral siphon along the border of the velum and tentacles and is formed of cells bearing a row of cilia and short microvilli. The coronal organ represents the best candidate homolog for the vertebrate lateral line. To further understand the evolution of secondary sensory cells, we analysed the development and cytodifferentiation of coronal cells in the tunicate ascidian Ciona intestinalis for the first time. Here, coronal sensory cells can be identified as early as larval metamorphosis, before tentacles form, as cells with short cilia and microvilli. Sensory cells gradually differentiate, acquiring hair cell features with microvilli containing actin and myosin VIIa; in the meantime, the associated supporting cells develop. The coronal organ grows throughout the animal's lifespan, accompanying the growth of the tentacle crown. Anti-phospho Histone H3 immunostaining indicates that both hair cells and supporting cells can proliferate. This finding contributes to the understanding of the evolution of secondary sensory cells, suggesting that both ancestral cell types were able to proliferate and that this property was progressively restricted to supporting cells in vertebrates and definitively lost in mammals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Mechanosensory Structure of the Hair Cell Requires Clarin-1, a Protein Encoded by Usher Syndrome III Causative Gene

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ruishuang; Melki, Sami; Chen, Daniel H.-C.; Tian, Guilian; Furness, David; Oshima-Takago, Tomoko; Neef, Jakob; Moser, Tobias; Askew, Charles; Horwitz, Geoff; Holt, Jeffrey; Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Alagramam, Kumar N.

    2012-01-01

    Mutation in the clarin-1 gene results in loss of hearing and vision in humans (Usher syndrome III), but the role of clarin-1 in the sensory hair cells is unknown. Clarin-1 is predicted to be a four transmembrane domain protein similar to members of the tetraspanin family. Mice carrying null mutation in the clarin-1 (Clrn1−/−) gene show loss of hair cell function and a possible defect in ribbon synapse. We investigated the role of clarin-1 using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. We show by immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp recordings of Ca2+ currents and membrane capacitance from IHCs that clarin-1 is not essential for formation or function of ribbon synapse. However, reduced cochlear microphonic potentials, FM1-43 loading and transduction currents pointed to diminished cochlear hair bundle function in Clrn1−/− mice. Electron microscopy of cochlear hair cells revealed loss of some tall stereocilia and gaps in the v-shaped bundle, although tip-links and staircase arrangement of stereocilia were not primarily affected by Clrn1−/− mutation. Human clarin-1 protein expressed in transfected mouse cochlear hair cells localized to the bundle; however, the pathogenic variant, p.N48K, failed to localize to the bundle. The mouse model generated to study the in vivo consequence of p. N48K in clarin-1 (Clrn1N48K) supports our in vitro and Clrn1−/− mouse data and the conclusion that CLRN1 is an essential hair bundle protein. Further, the ear phenotype in the Clrn1N48K mouse suggests that it is a valuable model for ear disease in CLRN1N48K, the most prevalent Usher III mutation in North America. PMID:22787034

  9. Therapeutic strategy for hair regeneration: Hair cycle activation, niche environment modulation, wound-induced follicle neogenesis and stem cell engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, Shan-Chang; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Chih-Chiang; Lei, Mingxing; Wang, Ling Mei; Widelitz, Randall B.; Hughes, Michael W.; Jiang, Ting-Xing; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are major new advancements in the fields of stem cell biology, developmental biology, regenerative hair cycling, and tissue engineering. The time is ripe to integrate, translate and apply these findings to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Readers will learn about new progress in cellular and molecular aspects of hair follicle development, regeneration and potential therapeutic opportunities these advances may offer. Areas covered Here we use hair follicle formation to illustrate this progress and to identify targets for potential strategies in therapeutics. Hair regeneration is discussed in four different categories. (1) Intra-follicle regeneration (or renewal) is the basic production of hair fibers from hair stem cells and dermal papillae in existing follicles. (2) Chimeric follicles via epithelial-mesenchymal recombination to identify stem cells and signaling centers. (3) Extra-follicular factors including local dermal and systemic factors can modulate the regenerative behavior of hair follicles, and may be relatively easy therapeutic targets. (4) Follicular neogenesis means the de novo formation of new follicles. In addition, scientists are working to engineer hair follicles, which require hair forming competent epidermal cells and hair inducing dermal cells. Expert opinion Ideally self-organizing processes similar to those occurring during embryonic development should be elicited with some help from biomaterials. PMID:23289545

  10. Bone Marrow Stem Cells and Ear Framework Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hamid; Emami, Seyed-Abolhassan; Olad-Gubad, Mohammad-Kazem

    2016-11-01

    Repair of total human ear loss or congenital lack of ears is one of the challenging issues in plastic and reconstructive surgery. The aim of the present study was 3D reconstruction of the human ear with cadaveric ear cartilages seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells. We used cadaveric ear cartilages with preserved perichondrium. The samples were divided into 2 groups: group A (cartilage alone) and group B (cartilage seeded with a mixture of fibrin powder and mesenchymal stem cell [1,000,000 cells/cm] used and implanted in back of 10 athymic rats). After 12 weeks, the cartilages were removed and shape, size, weight, flexibility, and chondrocyte viability were evaluated. P value <0.05 was considered significant. In group A, size and weight of cartilages clearly reduced (P < 0.05) and then shape and flexibility (torsion of cartilages in clockwise and counterclockwise directions) were evaluated, which were found to be significantly reduced (P > 0.05). After staining with hematoxylin and eosin and performing microscopic examination, very few live chondrocytes were found in group A. In group B, size and weight of samples were not changed (P < 0.05); the shape and flexibility of samples were well maintained (P < 0.05) and on performing microscopic examination of cartilage samples, many live chondrocytes were found in cartilage (15-20 chondrocytes in each microscopic field). In samples with human stem cell, all variables (size, shape, weight, and flexibility) were significantly maintained and abundant live chondrocytes were found on performing microscopic examination. This method may be used for reconstruction of full defect of auricles in humans.

  11. Intercellular junctions between palisade nerve endings and outer root sheath cells of rat vellus hairs.

    PubMed

    Kaidoh, T; Inoué, T

    2000-05-15

    Hair follicles have a longitudinal set of sensory nerve endings called palisade nerve endings (PN). We examined the junctional structures between the PN and outer root sheath (ORS) cells of hair follicles in the rat external ear. Transmission electron microscopy of serial thin sections showed that the processes of the ORS cells penetrated the basal lamina of the hair follicle, forming intercellular junctions with the PN (PN-ORS junctions). Two types of junctions were found: junctions between nerve endings and ORS cells (N-ORS junctions) and those between Schwann cell processes and ORS cells (S-ORS junctions). The N-ORS junctions had two subtypes: 1) a short process or small eminence of the ORS cell was attached to the nerve ending (type I); or 2) a process of the ORS cell was invaginated into the nerve ending (type II). The S-ORS junctions also had two subtypes: 1) a short process or small eminence of the ORS cell was abutted on the Schwann cell process (type I); or 2) a process of the ORS cell was invaginated into the Schwann cell process (type II). Vesicles, coated pits, coated vesicles, and endosomes were sometimes seen in nerve endings, Schwann cells, and ORS cells near the junctions. Computer-aided reconstruction of the serial thin sections displayed the three-dimensional structure of these junctions. These results suggested that the PN-ORS junctions provided direct relationships between the PN and ORS in at least four different patterns. The discovery of these junctions shows the PN-ORS relationship to be closer than previously realized. We speculate that these junctions may have roles in attachment of the PN to the ORS, contributing to increases in the sensitivity of the PN, and in chemical signaling between the PN and ORS.

  12. Lactate dehydrogenase activity drives hair follicle stem cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Aimee, Flores; John, Schell; Abby, Krall; David, Jelinek; Matilde, Miranda; Melina, Grigorian; Daniel, Braas; White Andrew, C; Jessica, Zhou; Nick, Graham; Thomas, Graeber; Pankaj, Seth; Denis, Evseenko; Hilary, Coller; Jared, Rutter; Heather, Christofk; Lowry William, E

    2017-01-01

    Summary While normally dormant, Hair Follicle Stem Cells (HFSCs) quickly become activated to divide during a new hair cycle. The quiescence of HFSCs is known to be regulated by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Here we provide several lines of evidence to demonstrate that HFSCs utilize glycolytic metabolism and produce significantly more lactate than other cells in the epidermis. Furthermore, lactate generation appears to be critical for the activation of HFSCs as deletion of lactate dehydrogenase (Ldha) prevented their activation. Conversely, genetically promoting lactate production in HFSCs through mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (Mpc1) deletion accelerated their activation and the hair cycle. Finally, we identify small molecules that increase lactate production by stimulating Myc levels or inhibiting Mpc1 carrier activity and can topically induce the hair cycle. These data suggest that HFSCs maintain a metabolic state that allow them to remain dormant and yet quickly respond to appropriate proliferative stimuli. PMID:28812580

  13. Mechanisms underlying the temporal precision of sound coding at the inner hair cell ribbon synapse

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Tobias; Neef, Andreas; Khimich, Darina

    2006-01-01

    Our auditory system is capable of perceiving the azimuthal location of a low frequency sound source with a precision of a few degrees. This requires the auditory system to detect time differences in sound arrival between the two ears down to tens of microseconds. The detection of these interaural time differences relies on network computation by auditory brainstem neurons sharpening the temporal precision of the afferent signals. Nevertheless, the system requires the hair cell synapse to encode sound with the highest possible temporal acuity. In mammals, each auditory nerve fibre receives input from only one inner hair cell (IHC) synapse. Hence, this single synapse determines the temporal precision of the fibre. As if this was not enough of a challenge, the auditory system is also capable of maintaining such high temporal fidelity with acoustic signals that vary greatly in their intensity. Recent research has started to uncover the cellular basis of sound coding. Functional and structural descriptions of synaptic vesicle pools and estimates for the number of Ca2+ channels at the ribbon synapse have been obtained, as have insights into how the receptor potential couples to the release of synaptic vesicles. Here, we review current concepts about the mechanisms that control the timing of transmitter release in inner hair cells of the cochlea. PMID:16901948

  14. Prestin and the cholinergic receptor of hair cells: positively-selected proteins in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Franchini, Lucía F.

    2010-01-01

    The hair cells of the vertebrate inner ear posses active mechanical processes to amplify their inputs. The stereocilia bundle of various vertebrate animals can produce active movements. Though standard stereocilia-based mechanisms to promote amplification persist in mammals, an additional radically different mechanism evolved: the so called somatic electromotility which refers to the elongation/contraction of the outer hair cells’ (OHC) cylindrical cell body in response to membrane voltage changes. Somatic electromotility in OHCs, as the basis for cochlear amplification, is a mammalian novelty and it is largely dependent upon the properties of the unique motor protein prestin. We review recent literature which has demonstrated that although the gene encoding prestin is present in all vertebrate species, mammalian prestin has been under positive selective pressure to acquire motor properties, probably rendering it fit to serve somatic motility in outer hair cells. Moreover, we discuss data which indicates that a modified α10 nicotinic cholinergic receptor subunit has coevolved in mammals, most likely to give the auditory feedback system the capability to control somatic electromotility. PMID:20056140

  15. Sox2 and Jagged1 Expression in Normal and Drug-Damaged Adult Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sean; Taylor, Ruth R.; Forge, Andrew; Hume, Clifford R.

    2007-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells detect environmental signals associated with hearing, balance, and body orientation. In humans and other mammals, significant hair cell loss leads to irreversible hearing and balance deficits, whereas hair cell loss in nonmammalian vertebrates is repaired by the spontaneous generation of replacement hair cells. Research in mammalian hair cell regeneration is hampered by the lack of in vivo damage models for the adult mouse inner ear and the paucity of cell-type-specific markers for non-sensory cells within the sensory receptor epithelia. The present study delineates a protocol to drug damage the adult mouse auditory epithelium (organ of Corti) in situ and uses this protocol to investigate Sox2 and Jagged1 expression in damaged inner ear sensory epithelia. In other tissues, the transcription factor Sox2 and a ligand member of the Notch signaling pathway, Jagged1, are involved in regenerative processes. Both are involved in early inner ear development and are expressed in developing support cells, but little is known about their expressions in the adult. We describe a nonsurgical technique for inducing hair cell damage in adult mouse organ of Corti by a single high-dose injection of the aminoglycoside kanamycin followed by a single injection of the loop diuretic furosemide. This drug combination causes the rapid death of outer hair cells throughout the cochlea. Using immunocytochemical techniques, Sox2 is shown to be expressed specifically in support cells in normal adult mouse inner ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 is absent from auditory hair cells, but is expressed in a subset of vestibular hair cells. Double-labeling experiments with Sox2 and calbindin suggest Sox2-positive hair cells are Type II. Jagged1 is also expressed in support cells in the adult ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 and Jagged1 may be involved in the maintenance of support cells in adult mouse inner ear. PMID:18157569

  16. Effect of sinapic acid on hair growth promoting in human hair follicle dermal papilla cells via Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hyunju; Lee, Seungjun; Kim, Seungbeom; Park, Deokhoon; Jung, Eunsun

    2017-07-01

    Hair loss known as alopecia is caused by abnormal hair follicle cycling including shortening of the anagen (growth) phase and changing of hair follicle morphology with miniaturization. In accordance with the life extension, the quality of life is considered to be a most important thing. The yearning for healthy and beautiful hair and low self esteem due to hair loss had negative influence on the quality of life with psychosocial maladjustment. The objective of this research was to identify new compound that can be used as a drug to promote hair growth. We investigated whether the function of sinapic acid (SA) is able to promote hair growth in human hair follicle dermal papilla cells (hHFDPC). We showed that treatment of SA in hHFDPC could induce proliferation and the activation of Akt signaling in HFDPC. In addition, SA could stimulate the expressions of the several growth factors, insulin-like growth factor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor for hair growth. We showed that SA led to an increased level of phospho-GSK-3β and β-catenin accumulation in HFDPC. Finally, the promoting effect of SA in hHFDPC cell growth occurred by the induction of cell cycle progression. These results suggest that SA could be one of the potential candidate compounds for the treatment of alopecia by inducing hair growth through triggering the expressions of growth factors via activation of Akt and subsequent inactivation of GSK-3β /β-catenin pathway.

  17. Structure and Function of the Hair Cell Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Nouvian, R.; Beutner, D.; Parsons, T.D.

    2006-01-01

    Faithful information transfer at the hair cell afferent synapse requires synaptic transmission to be both reliable and temporally precise. The release of neurotransmitter must exhibit both rapid on and off kinetics to accurately follow acoustic stimuli with a periodicity of 1 ms or less. To ensure such remarkable temporal fidelity, the cochlear hair cell afferent synapse undoubtedly relies on unique cellular and molecular specializations. While the electron microscopy hallmark of the hair cell afferent synapse — the electron-dense synaptic ribbon or synaptic body — has been recognized for decades, dissection of the synapse’s molecular make-up has only just begun. Recent cell physiology studies have added important insights into the synaptic mechanisms underlying fidelity and reliability of sound coding. The presence of the synaptic ribbon links afferent synapses of cochlear and vestibular hair cells to photoreceptors and bipolar neurons of the retina. This review focuses on major advances in understanding the hair cell afferent synapse molecular anatomy and function that have been achieved during the past years. PMID:16773499

  18. A hydrodynamic model of an outer hair cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.

    1982-01-01

    On the model it is possible to measure the force and the force direction for each individual hair as a function of the flow direction and velocity. Measurements were made at the man flow velocity .01 m/s, which is equivalent to a flow velocity in the real ear of about 1 micrometer/s. The kinematic viscosity of the liquid used in the model was 10,000 times higher than the viscosity of perilymph to attain hydrodynamic equality. Two different geometries for the sterocilia pattern were tested. First the force distribution for a W-shaped sterocilia pattern was recorded. This is the sterocilia pattern found in all real ears. It is found that the forces acting on the hairs are very regular and perpendicular to the legs of the W when the flow is directed from the outside of the W. When the flow is reversed, the forces are not reversed, but are much more irregular. This can eventually explain the half wave rectification of the nerve signals. As a second experiment, the force distribution for a V-shaped sterocilia pattern was recorded. Here the forces were irregular both when the flow was directed into the V and when it was directed against the edge of the V.

  19. Lgr5+ Cells Regenerate Hair Cells via Proliferation and Direct Transdifferentiation in Damaged Neonatal Mouse Utricle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Chai, Renjie; Kim, Grace S.; Pham, Nicole; Jansson, Lina; Nguyen, Duc-Huy; Kuo, Bryan; May, Lindsey; Zuo, Jian; Cunningham, Lisa L.; Cheng, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    Recruitment of endogenous progenitors is critical during tissue repair. The inner ear utricle requires mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) to detect linear acceleration. After damage, non-mammalian utricles regenerate HCs via both proliferation and direct transdifferentiation. In adult mammals, limited transdifferentiation from unidentified progenitors occurs to regenerate extrastriolar Type II HCs. Here, we show that HC damage in neonatal mouse utricle activates the Wnt target gene Lgr5 in striolar supporting cells. Lineage tracing and time-lapse microscopy reveal that Lgr5+ cells transdifferentiate into HC-like cells in vitro. In contrast to adults, HC ablation in neonatal utricles in vivo recruits Lgr5+ cells to regenerate striolar HCs through mitotic and transdifferentiation pathways. Both Type I and II HCs are regenerated, and regenerated HCs display stereocilia and synapses. Lastly, stabilized β-catenin in Lgr5+ cells enhances mitotic activity and HC regeneration. Thus Lgr5 marks Wnt-regulated, damage-activated HC progenitors and may help uncover factors driving mammalian HC regeneration. PMID:25849379

  20. Actin polymerization drives polar growth in Arabidopsis root hair cells.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Luis Alfredo Bañuelos; Sanchez, Rosana; Hernandez-Barrera, Alejandra; Zepeda-Jazo, Isaac; Sánchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen; Torres, Luis Cárdenas

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the actin cytoskeleton is a prime regulator of cell polarity, growth, and cytoplasmic streaming. Tip growth, as observed in root hairs, caulonema, and pollen tubes, is governed by many factors, including calcium gradients, exocytosis and endocytosis, reactive oxygen species, and the cytoskeleton. Several studies indicate that the polymerization of G-actin into F-actin also contributes to tip growth. The structure and function of F-actin within the apical dome is variable, ranging from a dense meshwork to sparse single filaments. The presence of multiple F-actin structures in the elongating apices of tip-growing cells suggests that this cytoskeletal array is tightly regulated. We recently reported that sublethal concentrations of fluorescently labeled cytochalasin could be used to visualize the distribution of microfilament plus ends using fluorescence microscopy, and found that the tip region of the growing root hair cells of a legume plant exhibits a clear response to the nodulation factors secreted by Rhizobium. (1) In this current work, we expanded our analysis using confocal microscopy and demonstrated the existence of highly dynamic fluorescent foci along Arabidopsis root hair cells. Furthermore, we show that the strongest fluorescence signal accumulates in the tip dome of the growing root hair and seems to be in close proximity to the apical plasma membrane. Based on these findings, we propose that actin polymerization within the dome of growing root hair cells regulates polar growth.

  1. Transfer characteristics of the hair cell's afferent synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Erica C.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2006-04-01

    The sense of hearing depends on fast, finely graded neurotransmission at the ribbon synapses connecting hair cells to afferent nerve fibers. The processing that occurs at this first chemical synapse in the auditory pathway determines the quality and extent of the information conveyed to the central nervous system. Knowledge of the synapse's input-output function is therefore essential for understanding how auditory stimuli are encoded. To investigate the transfer function at the hair cell's synapse, we developed a preparation of the bullfrog's amphibian papilla. In the portion of this receptor organ representing stimuli of 400-800 Hz, each afferent nerve fiber forms several synaptic terminals onto one to three hair cells. By performing simultaneous voltage-clamp recordings from presynaptic hair cells and postsynaptic afferent fibers, we established that the rate of evoked vesicle release, as determined from the average postsynaptic current, depends linearly on the amplitude of the presynaptic Ca2+ current. This result implies that, for receptor potentials in the physiological range, the hair cell's synapse transmits information with high fidelity. auditory system | exocytosis | glutamate | ribbon synapse | synaptic vesicle

  2. Isolating LacZ-expressing cells from mouse inner ear tissues using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Jan, Taha A; Chai, Renjie; Sayyid, Zahra N; Cheng, Alan G

    2011-12-23

    Isolation of specific cell types allows one to analyze rare cell populations such as stem/progenitor cells. Such an approach to studying inner ear tissues presents a unique challenge because of the paucity of cells of interest and few transgenic reporter mouse models. Here, we describe a protocol using fluorescence-conjugated probes to selectively label LacZ-positive cells from the neonatal cochleae. The most common underlying pathology of sensorineural hearing loss is the irreversible damage and loss of cochlear sensory hair cells, which are required to transduce sound waves to neural impulses. Recent evidence suggests that the murine auditory and vestibular organs harbor stem/progenitor cells that may have regenerative potential. These findings warrant further investigation, including identifying specific cell types with stem/progenitor cell characteristics. The Wnt signaling pathway has been demonstrated to play a critical role in maintaining stem/progenitor cell populations in several organ systems. We have recently identified Wnt-responsive Axin2-expressing cells in the neonatal cochlea, but their function is largely unknown. To better understand the behavior of these Wnt-responsive cells in vitro, we have developed a method of isolating Axin2-expressing cells from cochleae of Axin2-LacZ reporter mice. Using flow cytometry to isolate Axin2-LacZ positive cells from the neonatal cochleae, we could in turn execute a variety of experiments on live cells to interrogate their behavior as stem/progenitor cells. Here, we describe in detail the steps for the microdissection of neonatal cochlea, dissociation of these tissues, labeling of the LacZ-positive cells using a fluorogenic substrate, and cell sorting. Techniques for dissociating cochleae into single cells and isolating cochlear cells via flow cytometry have been described. We have made modifications to these techniques to establish a novel protocol to isolate LacZ-expressing cells from the neonatal cochlea.

  3. Protective effect of hexane and ethanol extract of piper longum L. On gentamicin-induced hair cell loss in neonatal cultures.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Choi, June; Song, Jae-Jun

    2014-03-01

    Gentamicin (GM) is a commonly used aminoglycoside antibiotic that generates free oxygen radicals within the inner ear, which can cause vestibulo-cochlear toxicity and permanent damage to the sensory hair cells and neurons. Piper longum L. (PL) is a well-known spice and traditional medicine in Asia and Pacific islands, which has been reported to exhibit a wide spectrum of activity, including antioxidant activity. In this study, we evaluated the effect of hexane:ethanol (2:8) PL extract (subfraction of PL [SPL] extract) on GM-induced hair cell loss in basal, middle and apical regions in a neonatal cochlea cultures. The protective effects of SPL extract were measured by phalloidin staining of cultures from postnatal day 2-3 mice with GM-induced hair cell loss. The anti-apoptosis activity of SPL extract was measured using double labeling by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and myosin-7a staining. The radical-scavenging activity of SPL extract was assessed using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. SPL extract at a concentration of 1 µg/mL significantly inhibited GM-induced hair cell loss at basal and middle region of cochlea, while 5 µg/mL was effective against apical region hair cell loss. The protective effect of SPL extract was concentration dependent and hair cells retained their stereocilia in explants treated with SPL extract prior to treatment with 0.3 mM GM. SPL extract decreased GM-induced apoptosis of hair cells as assessed by TUNEL staining. The outer hair and inner hair counts were not decreased in SPL extract treated groups in compare to GM treated explants. Additionally, SPL extract showed concentration dependent radical scavenging activity in a DPPH assay. An anti-apoptosis effect and potent radical scavenger activity of SPL extract protects from GM-induced hair cell loss at basal, middle and apical regions in neonatal cochlea cultures.

  4. Ecabet sodium alleviates neomycin-induced hair cell damage.

    PubMed

    Rah, Yoon Chan; Choi, June; Yoo, Myung Hoon; Yum, Gunhwee; Park, Saemi; Oh, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kwon, Soon Young; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Suhyun; Park, Hae-Chul

    2015-12-01

    Ecabet sodium (ES) is currently applied to some clinical gastrointestinal disease primarily by the inhibition of the ROS production. In this study, the protective role of ES was evaluated against the neomycin-induced hair cell loss using zebrafish experimental animal model. Zebrafish larvae (5-7 dpf), were treated with each of the following concentrations of ES: 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL for 1 h, followed by 125 μM neomycin for 1h. The positive control group was established by 125 μM neomycin-only treatment (1h) and the negative control group with no additional chemicals was also established. Hair cells inside four neuromasts ( SO1, SO2, O1, OC1) were assessed using fluorescence microscopy (n = 10). Hair cell survival was calculated as the mean number of viable hair cells for each group. Apoptosis and mitochondrial damage were investigated using special staining (TUNEL and DASPEI assay, respectively), and compared among groups. Ultrastructural changes were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Pre-treatment group with ES increased the mean number of viable hair cells as a dose-dependent manner achieving almost same number of viable hair cells with 40 μM/ml ES treatment (12.98 ± 2.59 cells) comparing to that of the negative control group (14.15 ± 1.39 cells, p = 0.72) and significantly more number of viable hair cells than that of the positive control group (7.45 ± 0.91 cells, p < 0.01). The production of reactive oxygen species significantly increased by 183% with 125 μM neomycin treatment than the negative control group and significantly decreased down to 105% with the pre-treatment with 40 μM/ml ES (n = 40, p = 0.04). A significantly less number of TUNEL-positive cells (reflecting apoptosis, p < 0.01) and a significantly increased DASPEI reactivity (reflecting viable mitochondria, p < 0.01) were observed in 40 μM/ml ES pre-treatment group. Our data suggest that ES could protect against neomycin-induced hair cell loss possibly by reducing

  5. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brichta, Alan M.; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J.; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C.; Poppi, Lauren A.; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT. An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in <3 ms and decaying with a time constant of ∼24 ms. The inhibitory component dominated whole cell currents in 50% of hair cells at −68 mV and in 67% of hair cells at −60 mV. Responses were quantified and described on the basis of first principles of thermodynamics. Results identify key molecular targets underlying heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  6. Structural Diversity in the Inner Ear of Teleost Fishes: Implications for Connections to the Mauthner Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, Arthur N.; Edds-Walton, Peggy L.

    1995-01-01

    A body of literature suggests that the Mauthner cell startle response can be elicited by stimulation of the ear. While we know that there are projections to the M-cell from the ear, the specific endorgan(s) of the ear projecting to the M-cell are not known. Moreover, there are many reasons to question whether there is one pattern of inner ear to M-cell connection or whether the endorgan(s) projection to the M-cell varies in species that have different hearing capabilities of hearing structures. In this paper, we briefly review the structure of fish ears, with an emphasis on structural regionalization within the ear. We also review the central projections of the ear, along with a discussion of the limited data on projections to the M-cell.

  7. Semicircular Canals Circumvent Brownian Motion Overload of Mechanoreceptor Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Muller, Mees; Heeck, Kier; Elemans, Coen P H

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate semicircular canals (SCC) first appeared in the vertebrates (i.e. ancestral fish) over 600 million years ago. In SCC the principal mechanoreceptors are hair cells, which as compared to cochlear hair cells are distinctly longer (70 vs. 7 μm), 10 times more compliant to bending (44 vs. 500 nN/m), and have a 100-fold higher tip displacement threshold (< 10 μm vs. <400 nm). We have developed biomechanical models of vertebrate hair cells where the bundle is approximated as a stiff, cylindrical elastic rod subject to friction and thermal agitation. Our models suggest that the above differences aid SCC hair cells in circumventing the masking effects of Brownian motion noise of about 70 nm, and thereby permit transduction of very low frequency (<10 Hz) signals. We observe that very low frequency mechanoreception requires increased stimulus amplitude, and argue that this is adaptive to circumvent Brownian motion overload at the hair bundles. We suggest that the selective advantage of detecting such low frequency stimuli may have favoured the evolution of large guiding structures such as semicircular canals and otoliths to overcome Brownian Motion noise at the level of the mechanoreceptors of the SCC.

  8. Semicircular Canals Circumvent Brownian Motion Overload of Mechanoreceptor Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Mees; Heeck, Kier

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate semicircular canals (SCC) first appeared in the vertebrates (i.e. ancestral fish) over 600 million years ago. In SCC the principal mechanoreceptors are hair cells, which as compared to cochlear hair cells are distinctly longer (70 vs. 7 μm), 10 times more compliant to bending (44 vs. 500 nN/m), and have a 100-fold higher tip displacement threshold (< 10 μm vs. <400 nm). We have developed biomechanical models of vertebrate hair cells where the bundle is approximated as a stiff, cylindrical elastic rod subject to friction and thermal agitation. Our models suggest that the above differences aid SCC hair cells in circumventing the masking effects of Brownian motion noise of about 70 nm, and thereby permit transduction of very low frequency (<10 Hz) signals. We observe that very low frequency mechanoreception requires increased stimulus amplitude, and argue that this is adaptive to circumvent Brownian motion overload at the hair bundles. We suggest that the selective advantage of detecting such low frequency stimuli may have favoured the evolution of large guiding structures such as semicircular canals and otoliths to overcome Brownian Motion noise at the level of the mechanoreceptors of the SCC. PMID:27448330

  9. Advances in translational inner ear stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Warnecke, Athanasia; Mellott, Adam J; Römer, Ariane; Lenarz, Thomas; Staecker, Hinrich

    2017-09-01

    Stem cell research is expanding our understanding of developmental biology as well as promising the development of new therapies for a range of different diseases. Within hearing research, the use of stem cells has focused mainly on cell replacement. Stem cells however have a broad range of other potential applications that are just beginning to be explored in the ear. Mesenchymal stem cells are an adult derived stem cell population that have been shown to produce growth factors, modulate the immune system and can differentiate into a wide variety of tissue types. Potential advantages of mesenchymal/adult stem cells are that they have no ethical constraints on their use. However, appropriate regulatory oversight seems necessary in order to protect patients from side effects. Disadvantages may be the lack of efficacy in many preclinical studies. But if proven safe and efficacious, they are easily translatable to clinical trials. The current review will focus on the potential application on mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of inner ear disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Usher protein functions in hair cells and photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Dominic; Zallocchi, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    The 10 different genes associated with the deaf/blind disorder, Usher syndrome, encode a number of structurally and functionally distinct proteins, most expressed as multiple isoforms/protein variants. Functional characterization of these proteins suggests a role in stereocilia development in cochlear hair cells, likely owing to adhesive interactions in hair bundles. In mature hair cells, homodimers of the Usher cadherins, cadherin 23 and protocadherin 15, interact to form a structural fiber, the tip link, and the linkages that anchor the taller stereocilia's actin cytoskeleton core to the shorter adjacent stereocilia and the elusive mechanotransduction channels, explaining the deafness phenotype when these molecular interactions are perturbed. The conundrum is that photoreceptors lack a synonymous mechanotransduction apparatus, and so a common theory for Usher protein function in the two neurosensory cell types affected in Usher syndrome is lacking. Recent evidence linking photoreceptor cell dysfunction in the shaker 1 mouse model for Usher syndrome to light-induced protein translocation defects, combined with localization of an Usher protein interactome at the periciliary region of the photoreceptors suggests Usher proteins might regulate protein trafficking between the inner and outer segments of photoreceptors. A distinct Usher protein complex is trafficked to the ribbon synapses of hair cells, and synaptic defects have been reported in Usher mutants in both hair cells and photoreceptors. This review aims to clarify what is known about Usher protein function at the synaptic and apical poles of hair cells and photoreceptors and the prospects for identifying a unifying pathobiological mechanism to explain deaf/blindness in Usher syndrome. PMID:24239741

  11. Usher protein functions in hair cells and photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Dominic; Zallocchi, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    The 10 different genes associated with the deaf/blind disorder, Usher syndrome, encode a number of structurally and functionally distinct proteins, most expressed as multiple isoforms/protein variants. Functional characterization of these proteins suggests a role in stereocilia development in cochlear hair cells, likely owing to adhesive interactions in hair bundles. In mature hair cells, homodimers of the Usher cadherins, cadherin 23 and protocadherin 15, interact to form a structural fiber, the tip link, and the linkages that anchor the taller stereocilia's actin cytoskeleton core to the shorter adjacent stereocilia and the elusive mechanotransduction channels, explaining the deafness phenotype when these molecular interactions are perturbed. The conundrum is that photoreceptors lack a synonymous mechanotransduction apparatus, and so a common theory for Usher protein function in the two neurosensory cell types affected in Usher syndrome is lacking. Recent evidence linking photoreceptor cell dysfunction in the shaker 1 mouse model for Usher syndrome to light-induced protein translocation defects, combined with localization of an Usher protein interactome at the periciliary region of the photoreceptors suggests Usher proteins might regulate protein trafficking between the inner and outer segments of photoreceptors. A distinct Usher protein complex is trafficked to the ribbon synapses of hair cells, and synaptic defects have been reported in Usher mutants in both hair cells and photoreceptors. This review aims to clarify what is known about Usher protein function at the synaptic and apical poles of hair cells and photoreceptors and the prospects for identifying a unifying pathobiological mechanism to explain deaf/blindness in Usher syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic Bead Actuation of Saccular Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, David; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    When decoupled from the overlying membrane, hair bundles of the amphibian sacculus exhibit spontaneous oscillation. To explore the dynamics of this innate motility without an imposed external load, we recorded their oscillations with a high-speed CMOS camera, and applied mechanical manipulation that minimally alters the geometry of an individual hair bundle. We present a technique that utilizes micron-sized magnetic particles to actuate the stereociliary bundle with a magnetized probe. Quasi-steady-state displacements were imposed on freely oscillating bundles. Our data indicate that deflection of the bundle affects both the frequency and the amplitude of the oscillations, with a crossing of the bifurcation that is dependent on the direction and speed of the applied offset.

  13. Effects of Mechanical Loading on the Dynamics of Hair-Cell Stereociliary Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, Lea

    Hearing is remarkably sensitive and still not entirely understood. Hair cells of the inner ear are the mechano-electrical transducers of sound and understanding how they function is essential to the understanding of hearing in general. Spontaneous oscillations exhibited by stereociliary bundles of the bullfrog sacculus provide a useful probe for the study of the hair cells' internal dynamic state. In this work we study the effects of mechanical loading on these hair-cell bundles in order to study their dynamics. When applying stiffness loads, we find that the spontaneous oscillation profile changes from multimode to single mode with light loading, and decreases in amplitude and increases in frequency with stiffer loads. We also find that tuning decreases with increasing load such that at loads comparable to in vivo conditions the tuning is flat. We further explore loading via deflections to hair cell bundles, both in the form of steady-state offsets and slow ramps. We find that steady state offsets lead to significant modulation of the characteristic frequency of response, decreasing the frequency in the channels closed direction (negative) and increasing it in the channels open direction (positive). Attachment to the overlying membrane was found, in vitro, to affect bundle offset position in hair cells of the bullfrog sacculus. Application of similar offsets on free-standing, spontaneously oscillating hair bundles shows modulation of their dynamic state, i.e. oscillation profile, characteristic frequency, and response to stimulus. Large offsets are found to arrest spontaneous oscillations, which recover upon reversal of the stimulus. The dynamical state of the hair bundle is dependent on both the history and direction of the offset stimulus. Oscillation suppression occurs much more readily in the negative direction and the bundle behavior approaching quiescence is distinct from that in the positive direction. With the change in spontaneous oscillation frequency

  14. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus. 1: Responses to intracellular current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus are specifically adapted to sense small-amplitude, high-frequency linear accelerations. These hair cells display many properties that are undesirable or inappropriate for hair cells that must provide static gravity sensitivity. This study resulted in part due to an interest in seeing how the transduction mechanisms of hair cells in a gravity-sensing otolith endorgan would differ from those in the bullfrog sacculus. The bullfrog utriculus is an appropriate model for these studies, because its structure is representative of higher vertebrates in general and its function as a sensor of static gravity and dynamic linear acceleration is well known. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus, classifiable as Type 2 by cell body and synapse morphology, differ markedly in hair bundle morphology from those in the bullfrog sacculus. Moreover, the hair bundle morphologies of utricular hair cells, unlike those in the sacculus, differ in different membrane regions.

  15. Localization and expression of clarin-1, the Clrn1 gene product, in auditory hair cells and photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Meehan, Daniel T.; Delimont, Duane; Askew, Charles; Garrige, Suneetha; Gratton, Michael Anne; Rothermund-Franklin, Christie A.; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2009-01-01

    The Usher syndrome 3A (CLRN1) gene encodes clarin-1, which is a member of the tetraspanin family of transmembrane proteins. Although identified more than 6 years ago, little is known about its localization or function in the eye and ear. We developed a polyclonal antibody that react with all clarin-1 isoforms and used it to characterize protein expression in cochlea and retina. In the cochlea, we observe clarin-1expression in the stereocilia of P0 mice, and in synaptic terminals present at the base of the auditory hair cells from E18 to P6. In the retina, clarin-1 localizes to the connecting cilia, inner segment of photoreceptors and to the ribbon synapses. RT-PCR from P0 cochlea and P28 retina show mRNAs encoding only isoforms 2 and 3. Western-blots show that only isoform 2 is present in protein extracts from these same tissues. We examined clarin-1 expression in the immortomouse-derived hair cell line UB/OC-1. Only isoform 2 is expressed in UB/OC-1 at both mRNA and protein levels, suggesting this isoform is biologically relevant to hair cell function. The protein co-localizes with microtubules and post-transgolgi vesicles. The sub-cellular localization of clarin-1 in hair cells and photoreceptors suggests it functions at both the basal and apical poles of neurosensoriepithelia. PMID:19539019

  16. Hair cell specific NTPDase6 immunolocalisation in vestibular end organs: potential role of purinergic signaling in vestibular sensory transduction.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Mary G; Thorne, Peter R; Housley, Gary D; Robson, Simon C; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2012-01-01

    A complex extracellular nucleotide signalling system acting on P2 receptors is involved in regulation of cochlear function in the mammalian inner ear. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) are ectonucleotidases that regulate P2 receptor signalling pathways in mammalian tissues by hydrolysing extracellular nucleotides to the respective nucleosides. All enzymes from the CD39/ENTPD family (NTPDase1-8) are expressed in the adult rat cochlea, but their expression and distribution in the vestibular end organ is unknown. This report demonstrates selective expression of NTPDase6 by rat vestibular hair cells. Hair cells transducing both angular acceleration (crista ampullaris) and static head position (maculae of the utricle and saccule) exhibited strong immunolabelling with a bias towards the sensory pole and in particular, the hair cell bundle. NTPDase6 is an intracellular enzyme that can be released in a soluble form from cell cultures and shows an enzymatic preference for nucleoside 5'-diphosphates, such as guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) and uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP). The main function of NTPDase6 may be the regulation of nucleotide levels in cellular organelles by regulating the conversion of nucleotides to nucleosides. NTPDase6 immunolocalisation in the vestibular end organ could be linked to the regulation of P2 receptor signalling and sensory transduction, including maintenance of vestibular hair bundles.

  17. Stimulus dependent properties of mammalian cochlear hair cell mechanoelectrical transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharr, A. L.; Ricci, Anthony

    2018-05-01

    Cochlear hair cell stereocilia move semi-independently, shaping the force transfer to mechanoelectrical transduction (MET) channels, as indicated by the MET current response. Semi-independent movement of stereocilia was evoked by stimulating inner hair cell (IHC) bundles from acutely dissected rat cochlea with stiff probes ranging in size from 1 to 10 µm. MET current responses were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Small probes directly displaced stereocilia they contacted, and recruited adjacent stereocilia depending on stimulus magnitude. We inferred that the recruitment of stereocilia resulted in less uniform and less synchronous movement. Step displacements using smaller probes resulted in smaller current responses (from 1 nA for large probes to 0.3 nA for small, p <.0001), slower rate of current activation, as measured from the linear portion (from 4 nA/ms to 1 nA/ms, p <.0001), slower time constants of adaptation, as measured from double exponential fits from peak to steady state current (fast component: from 0.6 to 1.2 ms, p =.004; slow component: from 8 ms to 12 ms, p =.001) and less complete adaptation (from 95% to 30%, p <.0001). These results indicate that the mechanical properties of less coherent bundles greatly affect force transfer to MET channels as indicated by the electrical response of the cell. Thus, outer hair cells (OHCs), with their bundles embedded in the tectorial membrane, may exhibit synchronous MET activation and therefore time-dependent adaptation where fast adaptation provides a high pass filter. Hair cells with free standing bundles, like inner hair cells (IHC), may exhibit more asynchronous MET activation and adaptation, in which case adaptation would not provide this additional filter.

  18. Proanthocyanidins from grape seeds promote proliferation of mouse hair follicle cells in vitro and convert hair cycle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Kamiya, T; Yokoo, Y

    1998-11-01

    For the purpose of discovering natural products which possess hair growing activity, we examined about 1000 kinds of plant extracts concerning growth-promoting activity with respect to hair follicle cells. After an extensive search, we discovered that proanthocyanidins extracted from grape seeds promote proliferation of hair follicle cells isolated from mice by about 230% relative to controls (100%); and that proanthocyanidins possess remarkable hair-cycle-converting activity from the telogen phase to the anagen phase in C3H mice in vivo test systems. The profile of the active fraction of the proanthocyanidins was elucidated by thiolytic degradation and tannase hydrolysis. We found that the constitutive monomers were epicatechin and catechin; and that the degree of polymerization was 3.5. We demonstrated the possibility of using the proanthocyanidins extracted from grape seeds as agents inducing hair growth.

  19. Large basolateral processes on type II hair cells are novel processing units in mammalian vestibular organs.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Rémy; Pickett, Sarah B; Nguyen, Tot Bui; Stone, Jennifer S

    2014-10-01

    Sensory receptors in the vestibular system (hair cells) encode head movements and drive central motor reflexes that control gaze, body movements, and body orientation. In mammals, type I and II vestibular hair cells are defined by their shape, contacts with vestibular afferent nerves, and membrane conductance. Here we describe unique morphological features of type II vestibular hair cells in mature rodents (mice and gerbils) and bats. These features are cytoplasmic processes that extend laterally from the hair cell base and project under type I hair cells. Closer analysis of adult mouse utricles demonstrated that the basolateral processes of type II hair cells vary in shape, size, and branching, with the longest processes extending three to four hair cell widths. The hair cell basolateral processes synapse upon vestibular afferent nerves and receive inputs from vestibular efferent nerves. Furthermore, some basolateral processes make physical contacts with the processes of other type II hair cells, forming some sort of network among type II hair cells. Basolateral processes are rare in perinatal mice and do not attain their mature form until 3-6 weeks of age. These observations demonstrate that basolateral processes are significant signaling regions of type II vestibular hair cells and suggest that type II hair cells may directly communicate with each other, which has not been described in vertebrates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. l-N-acetylcysteine protects outer hair cells against TNFα initiated ototoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tillinger, Joshua A; Gupta, Chhavi; Ila, Kadri; Ahmed, Jamal; Mittal, Jeenu; Van De Water, Thomas R; Eshraghi, Adrien A

    2018-08-01

    The present study is aimed at determining the efficacy and exploring the mechanisms by which l-N-acetylcysteine (l-NAC) provides protection against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα)-induced oxidative stress damage and hair cell loss in 3-day-old rat organ of Corti (OC) explants. Previous work has demonstrated a high level of oxidative stress in TNFα-challenged OC explants. TNFα can potentially play a significant role in hair cell loss following an insult to the inner ear. l-NAC has shown to provide effective protection against noise-induced hearing loss in laboratory animals but mechanisms of this otoprotective effect are not well-defined. Rat OC explants were exposed to either: (1) saline control (N = 12); (2) TNFα (2 μg/ml, N = 12); (3) TNFα+l-NAC (5 mM, N = 12); (4) TNFα+l-NAC (10 mM, N = 12); or (5) l-NAC (10 mM, N = 12). Outer hair cell (OHC) density, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation of cell membranes, gluthathione activity, and mitochondrial viability were assayed. l-NAC (5 and 10 mM) provided protection for OHCs from ototoxic level of TNFα in OC explants. Groups treated with TNFα+l-NAC (5 mM) showed a highly significant reduction of both ROS (p < 0.01) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal immunostaining (p < 0.001) compared to TNFα-challenged explants. Total glutathione levels were low in TNFα-challenged explants compared to control and TNFα+l-NAC (5 mM) treated explants (p < 0.001). l-NAC is a promising treatment for protecting auditory HCs from TNFα-induced oxidative stress and subsequent loss via programmed cell death.

  1. Mechanisms of Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiardi, Dominic A.; Cotanche, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are commonly used because of their ability to treat bacterial infections, yet they also are a major cause of deafness. Aminoglycosides selectively damage the cochlea's sensory hair cells, the receptors that respond to the fluid movement in the cochlea to produce neural signals that are relayed to the brain. Sensory hair…

  2. Stem cell plasticity enables hair regeneration following Lgr5+ cell loss.

    PubMed

    Hoeck, Joerg D; Biehs, Brian; Kurtova, Antonina V; Kljavin, Noelyn M; de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Alicke, Bruno; Koeppen, Hartmut; Modrusan, Zora; Piskol, Robert; de Sauvage, Frederic J

    2017-06-01

    Under injury conditions, dedicated stem cell populations govern tissue regeneration. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce stem cell regeneration and enable plasticity are poorly understood. Here, we investigate stem cell recovery in the context of the hair follicle to understand how two molecularly distinct stem cell populations are integrated. Utilizing diphtheria-toxin-mediated cell ablation of Lgr5 + (leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5) stem cells, we show that killing of Lgr5 + cells in mice abrogates hair regeneration but this is reversible. During recovery, CD34 + (CD34 antigen) stem cells activate inflammatory response programs and start dividing. Pharmacological attenuation of inflammation inhibits CD34 + cell proliferation. Subsequently, the Wnt pathway controls the recovery of Lgr5 + cells and inhibition of Wnt signalling prevents Lgr5 + cell and hair germ recovery. Thus, our study uncovers a compensatory relationship between two stem cell populations and the underlying molecular mechanisms that enable hair follicle regeneration.

  3. Generation of sensory hair cells by genetic programming with a combination of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Costa, Aida; Sanchez-Guardado, Luis; Juniat, Stephanie; Gale, Jonathan E; Daudet, Nicolas; Henrique, Domingos

    2015-06-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) are the primary receptors of our senses of hearing and balance. Elucidation of the transcriptional networks regulating HC fate determination and differentiation is crucial not only to understand inner ear development but also to improve cell replacement therapies for hearing disorders. Here, we show that combined expression of the transcription factors Gfi1, Pou4f3 and Atoh1 can induce direct programming towards HC fate, both during in vitro mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation and following ectopic expression in chick embryonic otic epithelium. Induced HCs (iHCs) express numerous HC-specific markers and exhibit polarized membrane protrusions reminiscent of stereociliary bundles. Transcriptome profiling confirms the progressive establishment of a HC-specific gene signature during in vitro iHC programming. Overall, this work provides a novel approach to achieve robust and highly efficient HC production in vitro, which could be used as a model to study HC development and to drive inner ear HC regeneration. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Hair cell regeneration in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs following aminoglycoside toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Torres, M. A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    Adult bullfrog were given single intraotic injections of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and sacrificed at postinjection times ranging from 0.5 to 9 days. The saccular and utricular maculae of normal and injected animals were examined in wholemount and cross-section. Intraotic 200 microM gentamicin concentrations resulted in the uniform destruction of the hair bundles and, at later times, the cell bodies of saccular hair cells. In the utriculus, striolar hair cells were selectively damaged while extrastriolar hair cells were relatively unaffected. Regenerating hair cells, identified in sectioned material by their small cell bodies and short, well-formed hair bundles, were seen in the saccular and utricular maculae as early as 24-48 h postinjection. Immature versions of mature hair cell types in both otolith organs were recognized by the presence or absence of a bulbed kinocilia and the relative lengths of their kinocilia and longest stereocilia. Utricular hair cell types with kinocilia longer than their longest stereocilia were observed at earlier than hair cell types with shorter kinocilia. In the sacculus, the hair bundles of gentamicin-treated animals, even at 9 days postinjection, were significantly smaller than those of normal animals. The hair bundles of utricular hair cells, on the other hand, reached full maturity within the same time period.

  5. Hair cell regeneration in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs following aminoglycoside toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Torres, M. A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Adult bullfrogs were given single intraotic injections of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and sacrificed at postinjection times ranging from 0.5 to 9 days. The saccular and utricular maculae of normal and injected animals were examined in wholemount and cross-section. Intraotic 200 (mu) M gentamicin concentrations resulted in the uniform destruction of the hair bundles and, at later times, the cell bodies of saccular hair cells. In the utriculus, striolar hair cells were selectively damaged while extrastriolar hair cells were relatively unaffected. Regenerating hair cells, identified in sectioned material by their small cell bodies and short, well-formed hair bundles, were seen in the saccular and utricular maculae as early as 24-48 h postinjection. Immature versions of mature hair cell types in both otolith organs were recognized by the presence of absence of a bulbed kinocilia and the relative lengths of their kinocilia and longest sterocilia. Utricular hair cell types with kinocilia longer than their longest stereocilia were observed at earlier times than hair cell types with shorter kinocilia. In the same sacculus, the hair bundles of gentamicin-treated animals, even at 9 days postinjection, were significantly smaller than those of normal animals. The hair bundles of utricular hair cells, on the other hand, reached full maturity within the same time period.

  6. d-Tubocurarine and Berbamine: Alkaloids That Are Permeant Blockers of the Hair Cell's Mechano-Electrical Transducer Channel and Protect from Aminoglycoside Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, Nerissa K.; O'Reilly, Molly; Derudas, Marco; Kenyon, Emma J.; Huckvale, Rosemary; van Netten, Sietse M.; Ward, Simon E.; Richardson, Guy P.; Kros, Corné J.

    2017-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used for the treatment of life-threatening bacterial infections, but cause permanent hearing loss in a substantial proportion of treated patients. The sensory hair cells of the inner ear are damaged following entry of these antibiotics via the mechano-electrical transducer (MET) channels located at the tips of the hair cell's stereocilia. d-Tubocurarine (dTC) is a MET channel blocker that reduces the loading of gentamicin-Texas Red (GTTR) into rat cochlear hair cells and protects them from gentamicin treatment. Berbamine is a structurally related alkaloid that reduces GTTR labeling of zebrafish lateral-line hair cells and protects them from aminoglycoside-induced cell death. Both compounds are thought to reduce aminoglycoside entry into hair cells through the MET channels. Here we show that dTC (≥6.25 μM) or berbamine (≥1.55 μM) protect zebrafish hair cells in vivo from neomycin (6.25 μM, 1 h). Protection of zebrafish hair cells against gentamicin (10 μM, 6 h) was provided by ≥25 μM dTC or ≥12.5 μM berbamine. Hair cells in mouse cochlear cultures are protected from longer-term exposure to gentamicin (5 μM, 48 h) by 20 μM berbamine or 25 μM dTC. Berbamine is, however, highly toxic to mouse cochlear hair cells at higher concentrations (≥30 μM) whilst dTC is not. The absence of toxicity in the zebrafish assays prompts caution in extrapolating results from zebrafish neuromasts to mammalian cochlear hair cells. MET current recordings from mouse outer hair cells (OHCs) show that both compounds are permeant open-channel blockers, rapidly and reversibly blocking the MET channel with half-blocking concentrations of 2.2 μM (dTC) and 2.8 μM (berbamine) in the presence of 1.3 mM Ca2+ at −104 mV. Berbamine, but not dTC, also blocks the hair cell's basolateral K+ current, IK,neo, and modeling studies indicate that berbamine permeates the MET channel more readily than dTC. These studies reveal key properties of MET

  7. Vezatin, an integral membrane protein of adherens junctions, is required for the sound resilience of cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Bahloul, Amel; Simmler, Marie-Christine; Michel, Vincent; Leibovici, Michel; Perfettini, Isabelle; Roux, Isabelle; Weil, Dominique; Nouaille, Sylvie; Zuo, Jian; Zadro, Cristina; Licastro, Danilo; Gasparini, Paolo; Avan, Paul; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Petit, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Loud sound exposure is a significant cause of hearing loss worldwide. We asked whether a lack of vezatin, an ubiquitous adherens junction protein, could result in noise-induced hearing loss. Conditional mutant mice bearing non-functional vezatin alleles only in the sensory cells of the inner ear (hair cells) indeed exhibited irreversible hearing loss after only one minute exposure to a 105 dB broadband sound. In addition, mutant mice spontaneously underwent late onset progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction related to substantial hair cell death. We establish that vezatin is an integral membrane protein with two adjacent transmembrane domains, and cytoplasmic N- and C-terminal regions. Late recruitment of vezatin at junctions between MDCKII cells indicates that the protein does not play a role in the formation of junctions, but rather participates in their stability. Moreover, we show that vezatin directly interacts with radixin in its actin-binding conformation. Accordingly, we provide evidence that vezatin associates with actin filaments at cell–cell junctions. Our results emphasize the overlooked role of the junctions between hair cells and their supporting cells in the auditory epithelium resilience to sound trauma. PMID:20049712

  8. Foxi3 deficiency compromises hair follicle stem cell specification and activation

    PubMed Central

    Shirokova, Vera; Biggs, Leah C.; Jussila, Maria; Ohyama, Takahiro; Groves, Andrew K.; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2017-01-01

    The hair follicle is an ideal system to study stem cell specification and homeostasis due to its well characterized morphogenesis and stereotypic cycles of stem cell activation upon each hair cycle to produce a new hair shaft. The adult hair follicle stem cell niche consists of two distinct populations, the bulge and the more activation-prone secondary hair germ. Hair follicle stem cells are set aside during early stages of morphogenesis. This process is known to depend on the Sox9 transcription factor, but otherwise the establishment of the hair follicle stem cell niche is poorly understood. Here we show that that mutation of Foxi3, a Forkhead family transcription factor mutated in several hairless dog breeds, compromises stem cell specification. Further, loss of Foxi3 impedes hair follicle downgrowth and progression of the hair cycle. Genome-wide profiling revealed a number of downstream effectors of Foxi3 including transcription factors with a recognized function in hair follicle stem cells such as Lhx2, Runx1, and Nfatc1, suggesting that the Foxi3 mutant phenotype results from simultaneous downregulation of several stem cell signature genes. We show that Foxi3 displays a highly dynamic expression pattern during hair morphogenesis and cycling, and identify Foxi3 as a novel secondary hair germ marker. Absence of Foxi3 results in poor hair regeneration upon hair plucking, and a sparse fur phenotype in unperturbed mice that exacerbates with age, caused by impaired secondary hair germ activation leading to progressive depletion of stem cells. Thus, Foxi3 regulates multiple aspects of hair follicle development and homeostasis. PMID:26992132

  9. Stochastic resonance in the synaptic transmission between hair cells and vestibular primary afferents in development.

    PubMed

    Flores, A; Manilla, S; Huidobro, N; De la Torre-Valdovinos, B; Kristeva, R; Mendez-Balbuena, I; Galindo, F; Treviño, M; Manjarrez, E

    2016-05-13

    The stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon of nonlinear systems in which the addition of an intermediate level of noise improves the response of such system. Although SR has been studied in isolated hair cells and in the bullfrog sacculus, the occurrence of this phenomenon in the vestibular system in development is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore for the existence of SR via natural mechanical-stimulation in the hair cell-vestibular primary afferent transmission. In vitro experiments were performed on the posterior semicircular canal of the chicken inner ear during development. Our experiments showed that the signal-to-noise ratio of the afferent multiunit activity from E15 to P5 stages of development exhibited the SR phenomenon, which was characterized by an inverted U-like response as a function of the input noise level. The inverted U-like graphs of SR acquired their higher amplitude after the post-hatching stage of development. Blockage of the synaptic transmission with selective antagonists of the NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors abolished the SR of the afferent multiunit activity. Furthermore, computer simulations on a model of the hair cell - primary afferent synapse qualitatively reproduced this SR behavior and provided a possible explanation of how and where the SR could occur. These results demonstrate that a particular level of mechanical noise on the semicircular canals can improve the performance of the vestibular system in their peripheral sensory processing even during embryonic stages of development. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Seasonal plasticity of auditory hair cell frequency sensitivity correlates with plasma steroid levels in vocal fish

    PubMed Central

    Rohmann, Kevin N.; Bass, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrates displaying seasonal shifts in reproductive behavior provide the opportunity to investigate bidirectional plasticity in sensory function. The midshipman teleost fish exhibits steroid-dependent plasticity in frequency encoding by eighth nerve auditory afferents. In this study, evoked potentials were recorded in vivo from the saccule, the main auditory division of the inner ear of most teleosts, to test the hypothesis that males and females exhibit seasonal changes in hair cell physiology in relation to seasonal changes in plasma levels of steroids. Thresholds across the predominant frequency range of natural vocalizations were significantly less in both sexes in reproductive compared with non-reproductive conditions, with differences greatest at frequencies corresponding to call upper harmonics. A subset of non-reproductive males exhibiting an intermediate saccular phenotype had elevated testosterone levels, supporting the hypothesis that rising steroid levels induce non-reproductive to reproductive transitions in saccular physiology. We propose that elevated levels of steroids act via long-term (days to weeks) signaling pathways to upregulate ion channel expression generating higher resonant frequencies characteristic of non-mammalian auditory hair cells, thereby lowering acoustic thresholds. PMID:21562181

  11. Middle ear application of a sodium hyaluronate gel loaded with neomycin in a Guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Saber, Amanj; Laurell, Göran; Bramer, Tobias; Edsman, Katarina; Engmér, Cecilia; Ulfendahl, Mats

    2009-02-01

    Establishing methods for topical administration of drugs to the inner ear have great clinical relevance and potential even in a relatively short perspective. To evaluate the efficacy of sodium hyaluronate (HYA) as a vehicle for drugs that could be used for treatment of inner ear disorders. The cochlear hair cell loss and round window membrane (RWM) morphology were investigated after topical application of neomycin and HYA into the middle ear. Sixty-five albino guinea pigs were used and divided into groups depending on the type of the treatment. Neomycin was chosen as tracer for drug release and pharmacodynamic effect. HYA loaded with 3 different concentrations of neomycin was injected to the middle ear cavity of guinea pigs. Phalloidin stained surface preparations of the organ of Corti were used to estimate hair cell loss induced by neomycin. The thickness of the midportion of the RWM was measured and compared with that of controls using light and electron microscopy. All animal procedures were pe rformed in accordance with the ethical standards of Karolinska Institutet. Neomycin induced a considerable hair cell loss in guinea pigs receiving a middle ear injection of HYA loaded with the drug, demonstrating that neomycin was released from the gel and delivered to the inner ear. The resulting hair cell loss showed a clear dose-dependence. Only small differences in hair cell loss were noted between animals receiving neomycin solution and animals exposed to neomycin in HYA suggesting that the vehicle neither facilitated nor hindered drug transport between the middle ear cavity and the inner ear. One week after topical application, the thickness of the RWM had increased and was dependent upon the concentration of neomycin administered to the middle ear. At 4 weeks the thickness of the RWM had returned to normal. HYA is a safe vehicle for drugs aimed to pass into the inner ear through the RWM. Neomycin was released from HYA and transported into the inner ear as evidenced

  12. Synaptic hyperpolarization and inhibition of turtle cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Art, J J; Fettiplace, R; Fuchs, P A

    1984-11-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from turtle cochlear hair cells in order to examine the properties of the post-synaptic potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the efferent axons. Single shocks to the efferents generated a hair cell membrane hyperpolarization with an average amplitude generally less than 1 mV and lasting for about 100 ms. With short trains of shocks, the size of the post-synaptic potential grew markedly to a maximum of 20-30 mV. The interaction between pairs of shocks separated by a varying interval was studied. For an interval of 4 ms, the response to the second shock was increased on average by a factor of 3 and the conditioning effect of the first shock decayed with a time constant of about 100 ms. We suggest the augmentation in response to trains of shocks may be partly due to facilitation of efferent transmitter release. The efferent post-synaptic potentials could be reversibly abolished by perfusion with perilymphs containing 3 microM-curare or atropine, and infusion of acetylcholine gave a transient membrane hyperpolarization. These observations are consistent with efferent action being mediated via a cholinergic synapse onto the hair cells. The post-synaptic potentials could be reversed in polarity by injection of hyperpolarizing currents through the recording electrode. The reversal potential was estimated as about -80 mV, 30 mV negative to the resting potential. Near reversal, a small brief depolarization was evident and may constitute a minor component of the synaptic response. The value of the reversal potential was unaffected by substitution of the perilymphatic chloride, but was altered in a predictable manner by changes in extracellular potassium concentration indicating that the post-synaptic potentials arise mainly by an increase in the permeability of the hair cell membrane to potassium ions. Throughout the post-synaptic hyperpolarization there was a reduction in the sensitivity of the hair cell to tones at its

  13. Static length changes of cochlear outer hair cells can tune low-frequency hearing

    PubMed Central

    Ciganović, Nikola; Warren, Rebecca L.; Keçeli, Batu; Jacob, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    The cochlea not only transduces sound-induced vibration into neural spikes, it also amplifies weak sound to boost its detection. Actuators of this active process are sensory outer hair cells in the organ of Corti, whereas the inner hair cells transduce the resulting motion into electric signals that propagate via the auditory nerve to the brain. However, how the outer hair cells modulate the stimulus to the inner hair cells remains unclear. Here, we combine theoretical modeling and experimental measurements near the cochlear apex to study the way in which length changes of the outer hair cells deform the organ of Corti. We develop a geometry-based kinematic model of the apical organ of Corti that reproduces salient, yet counter-intuitive features of the organ’s motion. Our analysis further uncovers a mechanism by which a static length change of the outer hair cells can sensitively tune the signal transmitted to the sensory inner hair cells. When the outer hair cells are in an elongated state, stimulation of inner hair cells is largely inhibited, whereas outer hair cell contraction leads to a substantial enhancement of sound-evoked motion near the hair bundles. This novel mechanism for regulating the sensitivity of the hearing organ applies to the low frequencies that are most important for the perception of speech and music. We suggest that the proposed mechanism might underlie frequency discrimination at low auditory frequencies, as well as our ability to selectively attend auditory signals in noisy surroundings. PMID:29351276

  14. The Coupling between Ca2+ Channels and the Exocytotic Ca2+ Sensor at Hair Cell Ribbon Synapses Varies Tonotopically along the Mature Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soyoun

    2017-01-01

    The cochlea processes auditory signals over a wide range of frequencies and intensities. However, the transfer characteristics at hair cell ribbon synapses are still poorly understood at different frequency locations along the cochlea. Using recordings from mature gerbils, we report here a surprisingly strong block of exocytosis by the slow Ca2+ buffer EGTA (10 mM) in basal hair cells tuned to high frequencies (∼30 kHz). In addition, using recordings from gerbil, mouse, and bullfrog auditory organs, we find that the spatial coupling between Ca2+ influx and exocytosis changes from nanodomain in low-frequency tuned hair cells (∼<2 kHz) to progressively more microdomain in high-frequency cells (∼>2 kHz). Hair cell synapses have thus developed remarkable frequency-dependent tuning of exocytosis: accurate low-latency encoding of onset and offset of sound intensity in the cochlea's base and submillisecond encoding of membrane receptor potential fluctuations in the apex for precise phase-locking to sound signals. We also found that synaptic vesicle pool recovery from depletion was sensitive to high concentrations of EGTA, suggesting that intracellular Ca2+ buffers play an important role in vesicle recruitment in both low- and high-frequency hair cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that microdomain coupling is important for exocytosis in high-frequency hair cells, suggesting a novel hypothesis for why these cells are more susceptible to sound-induced damage than low-frequency cells; high-frequency inner hair cells must have a low Ca2+ buffer capacity to sustain exocytosis, thus making them more prone to Ca2+-induced cytotoxicity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the inner ear, sensory hair cells signal reception of sound. They do this by converting the sound-induced movement of their hair bundles present at the top of these cells, into an electrical current. This current depolarizes the hair cell and triggers the calcium-induced release of the neurotransmitter

  15. Molecular evolution of the vertebrate mechanosensory cell and ear.

    PubMed

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Beisel, Kirk W; Pauley, Sarah; Soukup, Garrett

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of mechanosensation, mechanosensory cell development and mechanosensory organ development is reviewed with an emphasis on its evolution. In contrast to eye evolution and development, which apparently modified a genetic program through intercalation of genes between the master control genes on the top (Pax6, Eya1, Six1) of the hierarchy and the structural genes (rhodopsin) at the bottom, the as yet molecularly unknown mechanosensory channel precludes such a firm conclusion for mechanosensors. However, recent years have seen the identification of several structural genes which are involved in mechanosensory tethering and several transcription factors controlling mechanosensory cell and organ development; these warrant the interpretation of available data in very much the same fashion as for eye evolution: molecular homology combined with potential morphological parallelism. This assertion of molecular homology is strongly supported by recent findings of a highly conserved set of microRNAs that appear to be associated with mechanosensory cell development across phyla. The conservation of transcription factors and their regulators fits very well to the known or presumed mechanosensory specializations which can be mostly grouped as variations of a common cellular theme. Given the widespread distribution of the molecular ability to form mechanosensory cells, it comes as no surprise that structurally different mechanosensory organs evolved in different phyla, presenting a variation of a common theme specified by a conserved set of transcription factors in their cellular development. Within vertebrates and arthropods, some mechanosensory organs evolved into auditory organs, greatly increasing sensitivity to sound through modifications of accessory structures to direct sound to the specific sensory epithelia. However, while great attention has been paid to the evolution of these accessory structures in vertebrate fossils, comparatively less attention has

  16. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus. II. Sensitivity and response dynamics to hair bundle displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    1. Hair cells in whole-mount in vitro preparations of the utricular macula of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) were selected according to their macular location and hair bundle morphology. The sensitivity and response dynamics of selected hair cells to natural stimulation were examined by recording their voltage responses to step and sinusoidal hair bundle displacements applied to their longest stereocilia. 2. The voltage responses of 31 hair cells to sinusoidal hair bundle displacements were characterized by their gains and phases, taken with respect to peak hair bundle displacement. The gains of Type B and Type C cells at both 0.5 and 5.0 Hz were markedly lower than those of Type F and Type E cells. Phases, with the exception of Type C cells, lagged hair bundle displacement at 0.5 Hz. Type C cells had phase leads of 25-40 degrees. At 5.0 Hz, response phases in all cells were phase lagged with respect to those at 0.5 Hz. Type C cells had larger gains and smaller phase leads at 5.0 Hz than at 0.5 Hz, suggesting the presence of low-frequency adaptation. 3. Displacement-response curves, derived from the voltage responses to 5.0-Hz sinusoids, were sigmoidal in shape and asymmetrical, with the depolarizing response having a greater magnitude and saturating less abruptly than the hyperpolarizing response. When normalized to their largest displacement the linear ranges of these curves varied from < 0.5 to 1.25 microns and were largest in Type B and smallest in Type F and Type E cells. Sensitivity, defined as the slope of the normalized displacement-response curve, was inversely correlated with linear range. 4. The contribution of geometric factors associated with the hair bundle to linear range and sensitivity were predicted from realistic models of utricular hair bundles created using morphological data obtained from light and electron microscopy. Three factors, including 1) the inverse ratio of the lengths of the kinocilium and longest stereocilia, representing the

  17. Modeling high-frequency electromotility of cochlear outer hair cell in microchamber experiment.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhijie; Popel, Aleksander S; Brownell, William E; Spector, Alexander A

    2005-04-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) are critically important for the amplification and sharp frequency selectivity of the mammalian ear. The microchamber experiment has been an effective tool to analyze the OHC high-frequency performance. In this study, the OHC electrical stimulation in the microchamber is simulated. The model takes into account the inertial and viscous properties of fluids inside and outside the cell as well as the viscoelastic and piezoelectric properties of the cell composite membrane (wall). The closed ends of the cylindrical cell were considered as oscillatory rigid plates. The final solution was obtained in terms of Fourier series, and it was checked against the available results of the microchamber experiment. The conditions of the interaction between the cell and pipette was analyzed, and it was found that the amount of slip along the contact surface has a significant effect on the cell electromotile response. The cell's length changes were computed as a function of frequency, and their dependence on the viscosities of both fluids and the cell wall was analyzed. The distribution of the viscous losses inside the fluids was also estimated. The proposed approach can help in a better understanding of the high-frequency OHC electromotility under experimental and physiological conditions.

  18. Developing an active artificial hair cell using nonlinear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2015-09-01

    The hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. These cells have inspired a variety of artificial hair cells (AHCs) to serve as biologically inspired sound, fluid flow, and acceleration sensors and could one day replace damaged hair cells in humans. Most of these AHCs rely on passive transduction of stimulus while it is known that the biological cochlea employs active processes to amplify sound-induced vibrations and improve sound detection. In this work, an active AHC mimics the active, nonlinear behavior of the cochlea. The AHC consists of a piezoelectric bimorph beam subjected to a base excitation. A feedback control law is used to reduce the linear damping of the beam and introduce a cubic damping term which gives the AHC the desired nonlinear behavior. Model and experimental results show the AHC amplifies the response due to small base accelerations, has a higher frequency sensitivity than the passive system, and exhibits a compressive nonlinearity like that of the mammalian cochlea. This bio-inspired accelerometer could lead to new sensors with lower thresholds of detection, improved frequency sensitivities, and wider dynamic ranges.

  19. Spaceflight-induced synaptic modifications within hair cells of the mammalian utricle.

    PubMed

    Sultemeier, David R; Choy, Kristel R; Schweizer, Felix E; Hoffman, Larry F

    2017-06-01

    Exposure to the microgravity conditions of spaceflight alleviates the load normally imposed by the Earth's gravitational field on the inner ear utricular epithelia. Previous ultrastructural investigations have shown that spaceflight induces an increase in synapse density within hair cells of the rat utricle. However, the utricle exhibits broad physiological heterogeneity across different epithelial regions, and it is unknown whether capabilities for synaptic plasticity generalize to hair cells across its topography. To achieve systematic and broader sampling of the epithelium than was previously conducted, we used immunohistochemistry and volumetric image analyses to quantify synapse distributions across representative utricular regions in specimens from mice exposed to spaceflight (a 15-day mission of the space shuttle Discovery). These measures were compared with similarly sampled Earth-bound controls. Following paraformaldehyde fixation and microdissection, immunohistochemistry was performed on intact specimens to label presynaptic ribbons (anti-CtBP2) and postsynaptic receptor complexes (anti-Shank1A). Synapses were identified as closely apposed pre- and postsynaptic puncta. Epithelia from horizontal semicircular canal cristae served as "within-specimen" controls, whereas utricles and cristae from Earth-bound cohorts served as experimental controls. We found that synapse densities decreased in the medial extrastriolae of microgravity specimens compared with experimental controls, whereas they were unchanged in the striolae and horizontal cristae from the two conditions. These data demonstrate that structural plasticity was topographically localized to the utricular region that encodes very low frequency and static changes in linear acceleration, and illuminates the remarkable capabilities of utricular hair cells for synaptic plasticity in adapting to novel gravitational environments. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Spaceflight imposes a radically different sensory environment

  20. Recovery of vestibular function following hair cell destruction by streptomycin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Nelson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Can the vestibular periphery of warm-blooded vertebrates recover functionally from severe sensory hair cell loss? Recent findings in birds suggest a mechanism for recovery but in fact no direct functional evidence has been reported. We produced vestibular hair cell lesions using the ototoxic agent streptomycin sulfate (600 mg/kg/day, 8 days, chicks, Gallus domesticus). Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were used as a direct measure of peripheral vestibular function. Vestibular thresholds, neural activation latencies and amplitudes were documented. Eight days of drug treatment elevated thresholds significantly (P < 0.001) and eliminated all but remnants of vestibular activity. Virtually complete physiological recovery occurred in all animals studied over a period of 70 days following treatment. Thresholds recovered within two weeks of drug treatment whereas the return of response morphologies including activation latencies and amplitudes required an additional 6-8 weeks.

  1. Repair of traumatized mammalian hair cells via sea anemone repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Smith, Karen Müller; Watson, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian hair cells possess only a limited ability to repair damage after trauma. In contrast, sea anemones show a marked capability to repair damaged hair bundles by means of secreted repair proteins (RPs). Previously, it was found that recovery of traumatized hair cells in blind cavefish was enhanced by anemone-derived RPs; therefore, the ability of anemone RPs to assist recovery of damaged hair cells in mammals was tested here. After a 1 h incubation in RP-enriched culture media, uptake of FM1-43 by experimentally traumatized murine cochlear hair cells was restored to levels comparable to those exhibited by healthy controls. In addition, RP-treated explants had significantly more normally structured hair bundles than time-matched traumatized control explants. Collectively, these results indicate that anemone-derived RPs assist in restoring normal function and structure of experimentally traumatized hair cells of the mouse cochlea. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. The electrical properties of auditory hair cells in the frog amphibian papilla.

    PubMed

    Smotherman, M S; Narins, P M

    1999-07-01

    The amphibian papilla (AP) is the principal auditory organ of the frog. Anatomical and neurophysiological evidence suggests that this hearing organ utilizes both mechanical and electrical (hair cell-based) frequency tuning mechanisms, yet relatively little is known about the electrophysiology of AP hair cells. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we have investigated the electrical properties and ionic currents of isolated hair cells along the rostrocaudal axis of the AP. Electrical resonances were observed in the voltage response of hair cells harvested from the rostral and medial, but not caudal, regions of the AP. Two ionic currents, ICa and IK(Ca), were observed in every hair cell; however, their amplitudes varied substantially along the epithelium. Only rostral hair cells exhibited an inactivating potassium current (IA), whereas an inwardly rectifying potassium current (IK1) was identified only in caudal AP hair cells. Electrically tuned hair cells exhibited resonant frequencies from 50 to 375 Hz, which correlated well with hair cell position and the tonotopic organization of the papilla. Variations in the kinetics of the outward current contribute substantially to the determination of resonant frequency. ICa and IK(Ca) amplitudes increased with resonant frequency, reducing the membrane time constant with increasing resonant frequency. We conclude that a tonotopically organized hair cell substrate exists to support electrical tuning in the rostromedial region of the frog amphibian papilla and that the cellular mechanisms for frequency determination are very similar to those reported for another electrically tuned auditory organ, the turtle basilar papilla.

  3. Magnetic stem cell targeting to the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. N.; Straatman, L.; Yanai, A.; Rahmanian, R.; Garnis, C.; Häfeli, U. O.; Poblete, T.; Westerberg, B. D.; Gregory-Evans, K.

    2017-12-01

    Severe sensorineural deafness is often accompanied by a loss of auditory neurons in addition to injury of the cochlear epithelium and hair cell loss. Cochlear implant function however depends on a healthy complement of neurons and their preservation is vital in achieving optimal results. We have developed a technique to target mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to a deafened rat cochlea. We then assessed the neuroprotective effect of systematically delivered MSCs on the survival and function of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). MSCs were labeled with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, injected via the systemic circulation, and targeted using a magnetized cochlea implant and external magnet. Neurotrophic factor concentrations, survival of SGNs, and auditory function were assessed at 1 week and 4 weeks after treatments and compared against multiple control groups. Significant numbers of magnetically targeted MSCs (>30 MSCs/section) were present in the cochlea with accompanied elevation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor levels (p < 0.001). In addition we saw improved survival of SGNs (approximately 80% survival at 4 weeks). Hearing threshold levels in magnetically targeted rats were found to be significantly better than those of control rats (p < 0.05). These results indicate that magnetic targeting of MSCs to the cochlea can be accomplished with a magnetized cochlear permalloy implant and an external magnet. The targeted stem cells release neurotrophic factors which results in improved SGN survival and hearing recovery. Combining magnetic cell-based therapy and cochlear implantation may improve cochlear implant function in treating deafness.

  4. Pejvakin, a Candidate Stereociliary Rootlet Protein, Regulates Hair Cell Function in a Cell-Autonomous Manner

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Piotr; Harris, Suzan L.; Shah, Prahar; Puel, Jean-Luc; Lenoir, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the Pejvakin (PJVK) gene are thought to cause auditory neuropathy and hearing loss of cochlear origin by affecting noise-induced peroxisome proliferation in auditory hair cells and neurons. Here we demonstrate that loss of pejvakin in hair cells, but not in neurons, causes profound hearing loss and outer hair cell degeneration in mice. Pejvakin binds to and colocalizes with the rootlet component TRIOBP at the base of stereocilia in injectoporated hair cells, a pattern that is disrupted by deafness-associated PJVK mutations. Hair cells of pejvakin-deficient mice develop normal rootlets, but hair bundle morphology and mechanotransduction are affected before the onset of hearing. Some mechanotransducing shorter row stereocilia are missing, whereas the remaining ones exhibit overextended tips and a greater variability in height and width. Unlike previous studies of Pjvk alleles with neuronal dysfunction, our findings reveal a cell-autonomous role of pejvakin in maintaining stereocilia architecture that is critical for hair cell function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Two missense mutations in the Pejvakin (PJVK or DFNB59) gene were first identified in patients with audiological hallmarks of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, whereas all other PJVK alleles cause hearing loss of cochlear origin. These findings suggest that complex pathogenetic mechanisms underlie human deafness DFNB59. In contrast to recent studies, we demonstrate that pejvakin in auditory neurons is not essential for normal hearing in mice. Moreover, pejvakin localizes to stereociliary rootlets in hair cells and is required for stereocilia maintenance and mechanosensory function of the hair bundle. Delineating the site of the lesion and the mechanisms underlying DFNB59 will allow clinicians to predict the efficacy of different therapeutic approaches, such as determining compatibility for cochlear implants. PMID:28209736

  5. Streptomycin ototoxicity and hair cell regeneration in the adult pigeon utricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, T. C.; Dye, B. J.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to develop a technique to investigate the regeneration of utricular hair cells in the adult pigeon (Columba livia) following complete hair cell loss through administration of streptomycin. STUDY DESIGN: Experimental animal study. METHODS: Animals were divided into four groups. Group 1 received 10 to 15 days of systemic streptomycin injections. Animals in Groups 2 and 3 received a single direct placement of a 1-, 2-, 4-, or 8-mg streptomycin dose into the perilymphatic space. Animals in Groups 1 and 2 were analyzed within 1 week from injection to investigate hair cell destruction, whereas Group 3 was investigated at later dates to study hair cell recovery. Group 4 animals received a control injection of saline into the perilymphatic space. Damage and recovery were quantified by counting hair cells in isolated utricles using scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Although systemic injections failed to reliably achieve complete utricular hair cell destruction, a single direct placement of a 2-, 4-, or 8-mg streptomycin dose caused complete destruction within the first week. Incomplete hair cell loss was observed with the 1-mg dose. Over the long term, regeneration of the hair cells was seen with the 2-mg dose but not the 8-mg dose. Control injections of saline into the perilymphatic space caused no measurable hair cell loss. CONCLUSIONS: Direct placement of streptomycin into the perilymph is an effective, reliable method for complete destruction of utricular hair cells while preserving the regenerative potential of the neuroepithelium.

  6. Paraquat initially damages cochlear support cells leading to anoikis-like hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhui; Sun, Hong; Salvi, Richard; Ding, Dalian

    2018-07-01

    Paraquat (PQ), one of the most widely used herbicides, is extremely dangerous because it generates the highly toxic superoxide radical. When paraquat was applied to cochlear organotypic cultures, it not only damaged the outer hair cells (OHCs) and inner hair cells (IHCs), but also caused dislocation of the hair cell rows. We hypothesized that the dislocation arose from damage to the support cells (SCs) that anchors hair cells within the epithelium. To test this hypothesis, rat postnatal cochlear cultures were treated with PQ. Shortly after PQ treatment, the rows of OHCs separated from one another and migrated radially away from IHCs suggesting loss of cell-cell adhesion that hold the hair cells in proper alignment. Hair cells dislocation was associated with extensive loss of SCs in the organ of Corti, loss of tympanic border cells (TBCs) beneath the basilar membrane, the early appearance of superoxide staining and caspase-8 labeling in SCs below the OHCs and disintegration of E-cadherin and β-catenin in the organ of Corti. Damage to the TBCs and SCs occurred prior to loss of OHC or IHC loss suggesting a form of detachment-induced apoptosis referred to as anoikis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Regeneration and replacement in the vertebrate inner ear.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Jonathan I; Parker, Mark A; Ryals, Brenda M; Cotanche, Douglas A

    2005-10-01

    Deafness affects more than 40 million people in the UK and the USA, and many more world-wide. The primary cause of hearing loss is damage to or death of the sensory receptor cells in the inner ear, the hair cells. Birds can readily regenerate their cochlear hair cells but the mammalian cochlea has shown no ability to regenerate after damage. Current research efforts are focusing on gene manipulation, gene therapy and stem cell transplantation for repairing or replacing damaged mammalian cochlear hair cells, which could lead to therapies for treating deafness in humans.

  8. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor of the middle ear: A case report.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Yao, Mengwei; Yang, Xinxin; Liu, Tao; Wang, Shaohua; Ma, Dengdian; Li, Xiaoyu

    2018-04-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare, aggressive and malignant tumor. This report describes a case involving DSRCT of the middle ear which no case has been reported in the literature till date. A 59-year-old Chinese man with a 40-year history of repeated suppuration of his right ear and 1-year history of drooping of the angle of mouth. The CT of the middle ear and brain scan and enhanced MRI showed space occupying lesion in the right middle ear. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor of the middle ear. After relevant examinations, radical mastoidectomy and subtotal temporal bone resection were performed on the right ear under general anesthesia. The patient underwent postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. The patient was counterchecked regularly,there was norecurrence of DSRCT of the middle ear. Four years after surgery, the CT and MRI of the middle ear mastoid showed right middle ear soft tissue shadow,but postoperative pathological results showed proliferative fibrous and vascular tissues with chronic inflammatory cell infiltration and necrosis. DSRCT is a relatively aggressive, malignant mesenchymal tumor, with a very poor prognosis.The diagnosis of DSRCT relies on immunohistological data. Early diagnosis, radical surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy are considered a reasonable way to prolong survival.

  9. Dermal papilla cell number specifies hair size, shape and cycling and its reduction causes follicular decline

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Woo; Wu, Eleanor; Morgan, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Although the hair shaft is derived from the progeny of keratinocyte stem cells in the follicular epithelium, the growth and differentiation of follicular keratinocytes is guided by a specialized mesenchymal population, the dermal papilla (DP), that is embedded in the hair bulb. Here we show that the number of DP cells in the follicle correlates with the size and shape of the hair produced in the mouse pelage. The same stem cell pool gives rise to hairs of different sizes or types in successive hair cycles, and this shift is accompanied by a corresponding change in DP cell number. Using a mouse model that allows selective ablation of DP cells in vivo, we show that DP cell number dictates the size and shape of the hair. Furthermore, we confirm the hypothesis that the DP plays a crucial role in activating stem cells to initiate the formation of a new hair shaft. When DP cell number falls below a critical threshold, hair follicles with a normal keratinocyte compartment fail to generate new hairs. However, neighbouring follicles with a few more DP cells can re-enter the growth phase, and those that do exploit an intrinsic mechanism to restore both DP cell number and normal hair growth. These results demonstrate that the mesenchymal niche directs stem and progenitor cell behaviour to initiate regeneration and specify hair morphology. Degeneration of the DP population in mice leads to the types of hair thinning and loss observed during human aging, and the results reported here suggest novel approaches to reversing hair loss. PMID:23487317

  10. Calbindin and parvalbumin are early markers of non-mitotically regenerating hair cells in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyger, P. S.; Burton, M.; Hawkins, J. R.; Schuff, N. R.; Baird, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated hair cell regeneration in the absence of cell proliferation, and suggested that supporting cells could phenotypically convert into hair cells following hair cell loss. Because calcium-binding proteins are involved in gene up-regulation, cell growth, and cell differentiation, we wished to determine if these proteins were up-regulated in scar formations and regenerating hair cells following gentamicin treatment. Calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeling was examined in control or gentamicin-treated (GT) bullfrog saccular and utricular explants cultured for 3 days in amphibian culture medium or amphibian culture medium supplemented with aphidicolin, a blocker of nuclear DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. In control cultures, calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeled the hair bundles and, less intensely, the cell bodies of mature hair cells. In GT or mitotically-blocked GT (MBGT) cultures, calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeling was also seen in the hair bundles, cuticular plates, and cell bodies of hair cells with immature hair bundles. Thus, these antigens were useful markers for both normal and regenerating hair cells. Supporting cell immunolabeling was not seen in control cultures nor in the majority of supporting cells in GT cultures. In MBGT cultures, calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeling was up-regulated in the cytosol of single supporting cells participating in scar formations and in supporting cells with hair cell-like characteristics. These data provide further evidence that non-mitotic hair cell regeneration in cultures can be accomplished by the conversion of supporting cells into hair cells.

  11. A review of adipocyte lineage cells and dermal papilla cells in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peipei; Kling, Russell E; Ravuri, Sudheer K; Kokai, Lauren E; Rubin, J Peter; Chai, Jia-ke

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is an exceedingly prevalent problem effecting men and women of all ages. The standard of care for alopecia involves either transplanting existing hair follicles to bald areas or attempting to stimulate existing follicles with topical and/or oral medication. Yet, these treatment options are fraught with problems of cost, side effects, and, most importantly, inadequate long-term hair coverage. Innovative cell-based therapies have focused on the dermal papilla cell as a way to grow new hair in previously bald areas. However, despite this attention, many obstacles exist, including retention of dermal papilla inducing ability and maintenance of dermal papilla productivity after several passages of culture. The use of adipocyte lineage cells, including adipose-derived stem cells, has shown promise as a cell-based solution to regulate hair regeneration and may help in maintaining or increasing dermal papilla cells inducing hair ability. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of the cellular contribution and regulation of dermal papilla cells and summarize adipocyte lineage cells in hair regeneration. PMID:25383178

  12. Counter-rotational cell flows drive morphological and cell fate asymmetries in mammalian hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Cetera, Maureen; Leybova, Liliya; Joyce, Bradley; Devenport, Danelle

    2018-05-01

    Organ morphogenesis is a complex process coordinated by cell specification, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and tissue polarity. A striking example is the pattern of regularly spaced, globally aligned mammalian hair follicles, which emerges through epidermal-dermal signaling and planar polarized morphogenesis. Here, using live-imaging, we discover that developing hair follicles polarize through dramatic cell rearrangements organized in a counter-rotational pattern of cell flows. Upon hair placode induction, Shh signaling specifies a radial pattern of progenitor fates that, together with planar cell polarity, induce counter-rotational rearrangements through myosin and ROCK-dependent polarized neighbour exchanges. Importantly, these cell rearrangements also establish cell fate asymmetry by repositioning radial progenitors along the anterior-posterior axis. These movements concurrently displace associated mesenchymal cells, which then signal asymmetrically to maintain polarized cell fates. Our results demonstrate how spatial patterning and tissue polarity generate an unexpected collective cell behaviour that in turn, establishes both morphological and cell fate asymmetry.

  13. Isolation of Mouse Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells and Their Functional Analysis in a Reconstitution Assay.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Hsieh, Jen-Chih; Escandon, Julia; Cotsarelis, George

    2016-01-01

    The hair follicle (HF) is a dynamic structure readily accessible within the skin, and contains various pools of stem cells that have a broad regenerative potential during normal homeostasis and in response to injury. Recent discoveries demonstrating the multipotent capabilities of hair follicle stem cells and the easy access to skin tissue make the HF an attractive source for isolating stem cells and their subsequent application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, we describe the isolation and purification of hair follicle bulge stem cells from mouse skin, and hair reconstitution assays that allows the functional analysis of multipotent stem cells.

  14. Gradient-dependent release of the model drug TRITC-dextran from FITC-labeled BSA hydrogel nanocarriers in the hair follicles of porcine ear skin.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngo Bich Nga Nathalie; Knorr, Fanny; Mak, Wing Cheung; Cheung, Kwan Yee; Richter, Heike; Meinke, Martina; Lademann, Jürgen; Patzelt, Alexa

    2017-07-01

    Hair follicle research is currently focused on the development of drug-loaded nanocarriers for the targeting of follicular structures in the treatment of skin and hair follicle-related disorders. In the present study, a dual-label nanocarrier system was implemented in which FITC-labeled BSA hydrogel nanocarriers loaded with the model drug and dye TRITC-dextran were applied topically to porcine ear skin. Follicular penetration and the distribution of both dyes corresponding to the nanocarriers and the model drug in the follicular ducts subsequent to administration to the skin were investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The release of TRITC-dextran from the particles was induced by washing of the nanocarriers, which were kept in a buffer containing TRITC-labeled dextran to balance out the diffusion of the dextran during storage, thereby changing the concentration gradient. The results showed a slightly but statistically significantly deeper follicular penetration of fluorescent signals corresponding to TRITC-dextran as opposed to fluorescence corresponding to the FITC-labeled particles. The different localizations of the dyes in the cross-sections of the skin samples evidenced the release of the model drug from the labeled nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimization of gene delivery methods in Xenopus laevis kidney (A6) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines for heterologous expression of Xenopus inner ear genes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Gordillo, Daniel; Trujillo-Provencio, Casilda; Knight, V. Bleu; Serrano, Elba E.

    2014-01-01

    The Xenopus inner ear provides a useful model for studies of hearing and balance because it shares features with the mammalian inner ear, and because amphibians are capable of regenerating damaged mechanosensory hair cells. The structure and function of many proteins necessary for inner ear function have yet to be elucidated and require methods for analysis. To this end, we seek to characterize Xenopus inner ear genes outside of the animal model through heterologous expression in cell lines. As part of this effort, we aimed to optimize physical (electroporation), chemical (lipid-mediated; Lipofectamine™ 2000, Metafectene® Pro), and biological (viral-mediated; BacMam virus Cellular Lights™ Tubulin-RFP) gene delivery methods in amphibian (Xenopus; A6) cells and mammalian (Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)) cells. We successfully introduced the commercially available pEGFP-N3, pmCherry-N1, pEYFP-Tubulin, and Cellular Lights™ Tubulin-RFP fluorescent constructs to cells and evaluated their transfection or transduction efficiencies using the three gene delivery methods. In addition, we analyzed the transfection efficiency of a novel construct synthesized in our laboratory by cloning the Xenopus inner ear calcium-activated potassium channel β1 subunit, then subcloning the subunit into the pmCherry-N1 vector. Every gene delivery method was significantly more effective in CHO cells. Although results for the A6 cell line were not statistically significant, both cell lines illustrate a trend towards more efficient gene delivery using viral-mediated methods; however the cost of viral transduction is also much higher. Our findings demonstrate the need to improve gene delivery methods for amphibian cells and underscore the necessity for a greater understanding of amphibian cell biology. PMID:21959846

  16. The hair follicle bulge: a niche for adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pasolli, Hilda Amalia

    2011-08-01

    Adult stem cells (SCs) are essential for tissue homeostasis and wound repair. They have the ability to both self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell types. They often reside in specialized microenvironments or niches that preserve their proliferative and tissue regenerative capacity. The murine hair follicle (HF) has a specialized and permanent compartment--the bulge, which safely lodges SCs and provides the necessary molecular cues to regulate their function. The HF undergoes cyclic periods of destruction, regeneration, and rest, making it an excellent system to study SC biology.

  17. Sonic hedgehog initiates cochlear hair cell regeneration through downregulation of retinoblastoma protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Na; Department of Otolaryngology and Program in Neuroscience, Harvard Medical School and Eaton Peabody Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA 02114; Chen, Yan

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh activation in neonatal cochleae enhances sensory cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating supporting cells can transdifferentiate into hair cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh promotes proliferation by transiently modulating pRb activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh inhibits pRb by inhibiting transcription and increasing phosphorylation of pRb. -- Abstract: Cell cycle re-entry by cochlear supporting cells and/or hair cells is considered one of the best approaches for restoring hearing loss as a result of hair cell damage. To identify mechanisms that can be modulated to initiate cell cycle re-entry and hair cell regeneration, we studied the effect of activating the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. We showmore » that Shh signaling in postnatal rat cochleae damaged by neomycin leads to renewed proliferation of supporting cells and hair cells. Further, proliferating supporting cells are likely to transdifferentiate into hair cells. Shh treatment leads to inhibition of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) by increasing phosphorylated pRb and reducing retinoblastoma gene transcription. This results in upregulation of cyclins B1, D2, and D3, and CDK1. These results suggest that Shh signaling induces cell cycle re-entry in cochlear sensory epithelium and the production of new hair cells, in part by attenuating pRb function. This study provides an additional route to modulate pRb function with important implications in mammalian hair cell regeneration.« less

  18. Bmi1 regulates auditory hair cell survival by maintaining redox balance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Li, L; Ni, W; Zhang, Y; Sun, S; Miao, D; Chai, R; Li, H

    2015-01-22

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation are involved in noise- and ototoxic drug-induced hair cell loss, which is the major cause of hearing loss. Bmi1 is a member of the Polycomb protein family and has been reported to regulate mitochondrial function and ROS level in thymocytes and neurons. In this study, we reported the expression of Bmi1 in mouse cochlea and investigated the role of Bmi1 in hair cell survival. Bmi1 expressed in hair cells and supporting cells in mouse cochlea. Bmi1(-/-) mice displayed severe hearing loss and patched outer hair cell loss from postnatal day 22. Ototoxic drug-induced hair cells loss dramatically increased in Bmi1(-/-) mice compared with that in wild-type controls both in vivo and in vitro, indicating Bmi1(-/-) hair cells were significantly more sensitive to ototoxic drug-induced damage. Cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL staining demonstrated that apoptosis was involved in the increased hair cell loss of Bmi1(-/-) mice. Aminophenyl fluorescein and MitoSOX Red staining showed the level of free radicals and mitochondrial ROS increased in Bmi1(-/-) hair cells due to the aggravated disequilibrium of antioxidant-prooxidant balance. Furthermore, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine rescued Bmi1(-/-) hair cells from neomycin injury both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that ROS accumulation was mainly responsible for the increased aminoglycosides sensitivity in Bmi1(-/-) hair cells. Our findings demonstrate that Bmi1 has an important role in hair cell survival by controlling redox balance and ROS level, thus suggesting that Bmi1 may work as a new therapeutic target for the prevention of hair cell death.

  19. Cooperative functions of Hes/Hey genes in auditory hair cell and supporting cell development.

    PubMed

    Tateya, Tomoko; Imayoshi, Itaru; Tateya, Ichiro; Ito, Juichi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro

    2011-04-15

    Notch-mediated lateral inhibition has been reported to regulate auditory hair cell and supporting cell development from common precursors. While the Notch effector genes Hes1, Hes5 and Hey1 are expressed in the developing cochlea, inactivation of either of them causes only mild abnormality, suggesting their functional redundancy. To explore the roles of Hes/Hey genes in cochlear development, we examined compound heterozygous or homozygous mutant mice that lacked Hes1, Hes5 and Hey1 alleles. We found that a reduction in Hes/Hey gene dosage led to graded increase of hair cell formation. However, if at least one allele of Hes1, Hes5 or Hey1 was intact, excessive hair cells were accompanied by overproduction of supporting cells, suggesting that the hair cell increase does not occur at the expense of supporting cells, and that each Hes/Hey gene functions to induce supporting cells. By contrast, when all alleles of Hes1, Hes5 and Hey1 were inactivated, the number of hair cells increased more drastically, whereas that of supporting cells was unchanged compared with control, suggesting that supporting cell formation was balanced by their overproduction and fate conversion into hair cells. The increase of the cell numbers seemed to occur after the prosensory domain formation in the mutants because the proliferation state and the size of the prosensory domain were not affected. Thus, Hes1, Hes5 and Hey1 cooperatively inhibit hair cell formation, and one allele of Hes1, Hes5 or Hey1 is sufficient for supporting cell production probably by lateral inhibition in the sensory epithelium. Strikingly, Hes/Hey mutations lead to disorganized cell alignment and polarity and to hearing loss despite hair cell overproduction. These results suggest that Hes/Hey gene dosage is essential not only for generation of appropriate numbers of hair cells and supporting cells by controlling cell proliferation and lateral inhibition but also for the hearing ability by regulating the cell alignment

  20. Cisplatin ototoxicity blocks sensory regeneration in the avian inner ear.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Eric L; Warchol, Mark E

    2010-03-03

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent that is widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. Ototoxicity is a common side effect of cisplatin therapy and often leads to permanent hearing loss. The sensory organs of the avian ear are able to regenerate hair cells after aminoglycoside ototoxicity. This regenerative response is mediated by supporting cells, which serve as precursors to replacement hair cells. Given the antimitotic properties of cisplatin, we examined whether the avian ear was also capable of regeneration after cisplatin ototoxicity. Using cell and organ cultures of the chick cochlea and utricle, we found that cisplatin treatment caused apoptosis of both auditory and vestibular hair cells. Hair cell death in the cochlea occurred in a unique pattern, progressing from the low-frequency (distal) region toward the high-frequency (proximal) region. We also found that cisplatin caused a dose-dependent reduction in the proliferation of cultured supporting cells as well as increased apoptosis in those cells. As a result, we observed no recovery of hair cells after ototoxic injury caused by cisplatin. Finally, we explored the potential for nonmitotic hair cell recovery via activation of Notch pathway signaling. Treatment with the gamma-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester failed to promote the direct transdifferentiation of supporting cells into hair cells in cisplatin-treated utricles. Taken together, our data show that cisplatin treatment causes maintained changes to inner ear supporting cells and severely impairs the ability of the avian ear to regenerate either via proliferation or by direct transdifferentiation.

  1. Vitamin D receptor deficiency impairs inner ear development in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hye-Joo; Biology Department, Princess Nourah University, Riyadh 11671

    The biological actions of vitamin D are largely mediated through binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, which regulates gene expression in a wide variety of tissues and cells. Mutations in VDR gene have been implicated in ear disorders (hearing loss and balance disorder) but the mechanisms are not well established. In this study, to investigate the role of VDR in inner ear development, morpholino-mediated gene knockdown approaches were used in zebrafish model system. Two paralogs for VDR, vdra and vdrb, have been identified in zebrafish. Knockdown of vdra had no effectmore » on ear development, whereas knockdown of vdrb displayed morphological ear defects including smaller otic vesicles with malformed semicircular canals and abnormal otoliths. Loss-of-vdrb resulted in down-regulation of pre-otic markers, pax8 and pax2a, indicating impairment of otic induction. Furthermore, zebrafish embryos lacking vdrb produced fewer sensory hair cells in the ears and showed disruption of balance and motor coordination. These data reveal that VDR signaling plays an important role in ear development. - Highlights: • VDR signaling is involved in ear development. • Knockdown of vdrb causes inner ear malformations during embryogenesis. • Knockdown of vdrb affects otic placode induction. • Knockdown of vdrb reduces the number of sensory hair cells in the inner ear. • Knockdown of vdrb disrupts balance and motor coordination.« less

  2. Fractalkine Signaling Regulates Macrophage Recruitment into the Cochlea and Promotes the Survival of Spiral Ganglion Neurons after Selective Hair Cell Lesion.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Tejbeer; Zamani, Darius; Tong, Ling; Rubel, Edwin W; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Hirose, Keiko; Warchol, Mark E

    2015-11-11

    Macrophages are recruited into the cochlea in response to injury caused by acoustic trauma or ototoxicity, but the nature of the interaction between macrophages and the sensory structures of the inner ear remains unclear. The present study examined the role of fractalkine signaling in regulating the injury-evoked behavior of macrophages following the selective ablation of cochlear hair cells. We used a novel transgenic mouse model in which the human diphtheria toxin receptor (huDTR) is selectively expressed under the control of Pou4f3, a hair cell-specific transcription factor. Administration of diphtheria toxin (DT) to these mice resulted in nearly complete ablation of cochlear hair cells, with no evident pathology among supporting cells, spiral ganglion neurons, or cells of the cochlear lateral wall. Hair cell death led to an increase in macrophages associated with the sensory epithelium of the cochlea. Their numbers peaked at 14 days after DT and then declined at later survival times. Increased macrophages were also observed within the spiral ganglion, but their numbers remained elevated for (at least) 56 d after DT. To investigate the role of fractalkine signaling in macrophage recruitment, we crossed huDTR mice to a mouse line that lacks expression of the fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1). Disruption of fractalkine signaling reduced macrophage recruitment into both the sensory epithelium and spiral ganglion and also resulted in diminished survival of spiral ganglion neurons after hair cell death. Our results suggest a fractalkine-mediated interaction between macrophages and the neurons of the cochlea. It is known that damage to the inner ear leads to recruitment of inflammatory cells (macrophages), but the chemical signals that initiate this recruitment and the functions of macrophages in the damaged ear are unclear. Here we show that fractalkine signaling regulates macrophage recruitment into the cochlea and also promotes the survival of cochlear afferents after

  3. A study in motion sickness - Saccular hair cells in the adult bullfrog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, G. M.; Reschke, M.; Homick, J.

    1982-01-01

    The bullfrog's saccule were examined using light and scanning electron microscopy. No evidence of a striola was found. Type A hair cells were not only distributed peripherally, but also throughout the central macula, though far less frequently than the dominant type D. Two primary hair cell types were distinguished, which corresponded to the ciliary patterns: type A cilia are associated with short, conical hair cells, and type D cilia are associated with long, cylindrical hair cells. Each displays at least one subtype, which may represent developmental precursors. The otolithic membrane is crisscrossed with tunnels and topped with statoconia.

  4. Screening for chemicals that affect hair cell death and survival in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Ou, Henry; Simon, Julian A; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2012-06-01

    The zebrafish lateral line is an efficient model system for the evaluation of chemicals that protect and damage hair cells. Located on the surface of the body, lateral line hair cells are accessible for manipulation and visualization. The zebrafish lateral line system allows rapid screens of large chemical libraries, as well as subsequent thorough evaluation of interesting compounds. In this review, we focus on the results of our previous screens and the evolving methodology of our screens for chemicals that protect hair cells, and chemicals that damage hair cells using the zebrafish lateral line. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Regeneration of Sensory Hair Cells Requires Localized Interactions between the Notch and Wnt Pathways.

    PubMed

    Romero-Carvajal, Andrés; Navajas Acedo, Joaquín; Jiang, Linjia; Kozlovskaja-Gumbrienė, Agnė; Alexander, Richard; Li, Hua; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2015-08-10

    In vertebrates, mechano-electrical transduction of sound is accomplished by sensory hair cells. Whereas mammalian hair cells are not replaced when lost, in fish they constantly renew and regenerate after injury. In vivo tracking and cell fate analyses of all dividing cells during lateral line hair cell regeneration revealed that support and hair cell progenitors localize to distinct tissue compartments. Importantly, we find that the balance between self-renewal and differentiation in these compartments is controlled by spatially restricted Notch signaling and its inhibition of Wnt-induced proliferation. The ability to simultaneously study and manipulate individual cell behaviors and multiple pathways in vivo transforms the lateral line into a powerful paradigm to mechanistically dissect sensory organ regeneration. The striking similarities to other vertebrate stem cell compartments uniquely place zebrafish to help elucidate why mammals possess such low capacity to regenerate hair cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Postnatal development, maturation and aging in the mouse cochlea and their effects on hair cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brad; Zuo, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The organ of Corti in the mammalian inner ear is comprised of mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) and nonsensory supporting cells (SCs), both of which are believed to be terminally postmitotic beyond late embryonic ages. Consequently, regeneration of HCs and SCs does not occur naturally in the adult mammalian cochlea, though recent evidence suggests that these cells may not be completely or irreversibly quiescent in at earlier postnatal ages. Furthermore, regenerative processes can be induced by genetic and pharmacological manipulations, but, more and more reports suggest that regenerative potential declines as the organ of Corti continues to age. In numerous mammalian systems, such effects of aging on regenerative potential are well established. However, in the cochlea, the problem of regeneration has not been traditionally viewed as one of aging. This is an important consideration as current models are unable to elicit widespread regeneration or full recovery of function at adult ages yet regenerative therapies will need to be developed specifically for adult populations. Still, the advent of gene targeting and other genetic manipulations has established mice as critically important models for the study of cochlear development and HC regeneration and suggests that auditory HC regeneration in adult mammals may indeed be possible. Thus, this review will focus on the pursuit of regeneration in the postnatal and adult mouse cochlea and highlight processes that occur during postnatal development, maturation, and aging that could contribute to an age-related decline in regenerative potential. Second, we will draw upon the wealth of knowledge pertaining to age related senescence in tissues outside of the ear to synthesize new insights and potentially guide future research aimed at promoting HC regeneration in the adult cochlea. PMID:23164734

  7. Clear cell hidradenocarcinoma of the ear helix: report of primary ear helix adnexal carcinoma with regional lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bae, Tae Hui; Kang, Shin Hyuk; Kim, Han Koo; Kim, Woo Seob; Kim, Mi Kyung

    2014-07-01

    Clear cell hidradenocarcinoma is a rare tumor of eccrine sweat gland origin that has a predilection for the head and neck. It has an indolent growth pattern and a higher incidence of regional and distant metastases. Metastasizing adnexal carcinomas are rare; thus, currently there is no uniform treatment guideline. We report a case of an 89-year-old female patient with clear cell hidradenocarcinoma manifesting in the right ear helix that metastasized to the right parotid gland who was treated by wide local excision and radiation therapy.

  8. RNA analysis of inner ear cells from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) archival human temporal bone section using laser microdissection--a technical report.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yurika; Kubo, Sachiho; Koda, Hiroko; Shigemoto, Kazuhiro; Sawabe, Motoji; Kitamura, Ken

    2013-08-01

    Molecular analysis using archival human inner ear specimens is challenging because of the anatomical complexity, long-term fixation, and decalcification. However, this method may provide great benefit for elucidation of otological diseases. Here, we extracted mRNA for RT-PCR from tissues dissected from archival FFPE human inner ears by laser microdissection. Three human temporal bones obtained at autopsy were fixed in formalin, decalcified by EDTA, and embedded in paraffin. The samples were isolated into spiral ligaments, outer hair cells, spiral ganglion cells, and stria vascularis by laser microdissection. RNA was extracted and heat-treated in 10 mM citrate buffer to remove the formalin-derived modification. To identify the sites where COCH and SLC26A5 mRNA were expressed, semi-nested RT-PCR was performed. We also examined how long COCH mRNA could be amplified by semi-nested RT-PCR in archival temporal bone. COCH was expressed in the spiral ligament and stria vascularis. However, SLC26A5 was expressed only in outer hair cells. The maximum base length of COCH mRNA amplified by RT-PCR was 98 bp in 1 case and 123 bp in 2 cases. We detected COCH and SLC26A5 mRNA in specific structures and cells of the inner ear from archival human temporal bone. Our innovative method using laser microdissection and semi-nested RT-PCR should advance future RNA study of human inner ear diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evolution of Gravity Receptors in the Ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, Arthur N. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The general status of a grant to investigate the origins and evolution of two hair cell types in the ears of a teleost fish, Astronotus ocellatus (the oscar), is presented. First, it was demonstrated that the cells in the rostral end of the saccule of the , Carassius auratus, are type 1-like, while those at the caudal end are type 2 cells. It was demonstrated that the dichotomy of hair cell types found in the utricle of the oscar is also found in the goldfish. Second, the lateral line system of the oscar was examined using gentamicin sulphate, an ototocix drug that destroys type 1- like hair cells but does not appear to damage type 2 hair cells. It was demonstrated that the hair cells found in neuromasts of lateral line canal organs were totally destroyed within 1 day of treatment, while the hair cells in free neuromasts were undamaged after 12 days of treatment. Third, it was demonstrated that the calyx, the specialized nerve ending, is not unique to amniotes and that it is present at least in the cristae of semicirular canals in goldfish. These results have demonstrated that: (1) there are multiple hair cell types in the vestibular endorgans of the ear of fishes, (2) these hair cell types are very similar to those found in the mammalian vestibular endorgans, (3) the nerve calyx is also present in fishes, and (4) multiple hair cell types and the calyx have evolved far earlier in the course of vertebrate evolution than heretofore thought. Understanding the structure of the vestibular endorgans has important implications for being able to understand how these organs respond to gravistatic, acceleration and acoustic input. The vestibular endorgans of fishes may provide an ideal system in which to analyze functional differences in hair cells. Not only are the two hair cell types similar to those found in mammals, they are located in very discrete regions in each endorgan. Thus, it is relatively easy to gain access to cells of one or the other type. The presence of two

  10. Deletion of Brg1 causes abnormal hair cell planer polarity, hair cell anchorage, and scar formation in mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yecheng; Ren, Naixia; Li, Shiwei; Fu, Xiaolong; Sun, Xiaoyang; Men, Yuqin; Xu, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Yue; Xia, Ming; Gao, Jiangang

    2016-06-03

    Hair cells (HCs) are mechanosensors that play crucial roles in perceiving sound, acceleration, and fluid motion. The precise architecture of the auditory epithelium and its repair after HC loss is indispensable to the function of organ of Corti (OC). In this study, we showed that Brg1 was highly expressed in auditory HCs. Specific deletion of Brg1 in postnatal HCs resulted in rapid HC degeneration and profound deafness in mice. Further experiments showed that cell-intrinsic polarity of HCs was abolished, docking of outer hair cells (OHCs) by Deiter's cells (DCs) failed, and scar formation in the reticular lamina was deficient. We demonstrated that Brg1 ablation disrupted the Gαi/Insc/LGN and aPKC asymmetric distributions, without overt effects on the core planer cell polarity (PCP) pathway. We also demonstrated that Brg1-deficient HCs underwent apoptosis, and that leakage in the reticular lamina caused by deficient scar formation shifted the mode of OHC death from apoptosis to necrosis. Together, these data demonstrated a requirement for Brg1 activity in HC development and suggested a role for Brg1 in the proper cellular structure formation of HCs.

  11. Inhibition of mTOR by Rapamycin Results in Auditory Hair Cell Damage and Decreased Spiral Ganglion Neuron Outgrowth and Neurite Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Leitmeyer, Katharina; Glutz, Andrea; Radojevic, Vesna; Setz, Cristian; Huerzeler, Nathan; Bumann, Helen; Bodmer, Daniel; Brand, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is an antifungal agent with immunosuppressive properties. Rapamycin inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) by blocking the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). mTOR is an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, which controls cell growth, cell proliferation, and cell metabolism. However, less is known about the mTOR pathway in the inner ear. First, we evaluated whether or not the two mTOR complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2, resp.) are present in the mammalian cochlea. Next, tissue explants of 5-day-old rats were treated with increasing concentrations of rapamycin to explore the effects of rapamycin on auditory hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. Auditory hair cell survival, spiral ganglion neuron number, length of neurites, and neuronal survival were analyzed in vitro. Our data indicates that both mTOR complexes are expressed in the mammalian cochlea. We observed that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin results in a dose dependent damage of auditory hair cells. Moreover, spiral ganglion neurite number and length of neurites were significantly decreased in all concentrations used compared to control in a dose dependent manner. Our data indicate that the mTOR may play a role in the survival of hair cells and modulates spiral ganglion neuronal outgrowth and neurite formation. PMID:25918725

  12. Inhibition of mTOR by Rapamycin Results in Auditory Hair Cell Damage and Decreased Spiral Ganglion Neuron Outgrowth and Neurite Formation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Leitmeyer, Katharina; Glutz, Andrea; Radojevic, Vesna; Setz, Cristian; Huerzeler, Nathan; Bumann, Helen; Bodmer, Daniel; Brand, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is an antifungal agent with immunosuppressive properties. Rapamycin inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) by blocking the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). mTOR is an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, which controls cell growth, cell proliferation, and cell metabolism. However, less is known about the mTOR pathway in the inner ear. First, we evaluated whether or not the two mTOR complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2, resp.) are present in the mammalian cochlea. Next, tissue explants of 5-day-old rats were treated with increasing concentrations of rapamycin to explore the effects of rapamycin on auditory hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. Auditory hair cell survival, spiral ganglion neuron number, length of neurites, and neuronal survival were analyzed in vitro. Our data indicates that both mTOR complexes are expressed in the mammalian cochlea. We observed that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin results in a dose dependent damage of auditory hair cells. Moreover, spiral ganglion neurite number and length of neurites were significantly decreased in all concentrations used compared to control in a dose dependent manner. Our data indicate that the mTOR may play a role in the survival of hair cells and modulates spiral ganglion neuronal outgrowth and neurite formation.

  13. Gene expression underlying enhanced, steroid-dependent auditory sensitivity of hair cell epithelium in a vocal fish.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Daniel J; Feng, Ni Y; Bass, Andrew H

    2015-10-14

    Successful animal communication depends on a receiver's ability to detect a sender's signal. Exemplars of adaptive sender-receiver coupling include acoustic communication, often important in the context of seasonal reproduction. During the reproductive summer season, both male and female midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) exhibit similar increases in the steroid-dependent frequency sensitivity of the saccule, the main auditory division of the inner ear. This form of auditory plasticity enhances detection of the higher frequency components of the multi-harmonic, long-duration advertisement calls produced repetitively by males during summer nights of peak vocal and spawning activity. The molecular basis of this seasonal auditory plasticity has not been fully resolved. Here, we utilize an unbiased transcriptomic RNA sequencing approach to identify differentially expressed transcripts within the saccule's hair cell epithelium of reproductive summer and non-reproductive winter fish. We assembled 74,027 unique transcripts from our saccular epithelial sequence reads. Of these, 6.4 % and 3.0 % were upregulated in the reproductive and non-reproductive saccular epithelium, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analyses of the differentially expressed transcripts showed that the reproductive saccular epithelium was transcriptionally, translationally, and metabolically more active than the non-reproductive epithelium. Furthermore, the expression of a specific suite of candidate genes, including ion channels and components of steroid-signaling pathways, was upregulated in the reproductive compared to the non-reproductive saccular epithelium. We found reported auditory functions for 14 candidate genes upregulated in the reproductive midshipman saccular epithelium, 8 of which are enriched in mouse hair cells, validating their hair cell-specific functions across vertebrates. We identified a suite of differentially expressed genes belonging to neurotransmission and

  14. Artificial hair cell integrated with an artificial neuron: Interplay between criticality and excitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo Seok; Jeong, Wonhee; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2014-12-01

    We provide a simple dynamical model of a hair cell with an afferent neuron where the spectral and the temporal responses are controlled by the hair bundle's criticality and the neuron's excitability. To demonstrate that these parameters, indeed, specify the resolution of the sound encoding, we fabricate a neuromorphic device that models the hair cell bundle and its afferent neuron. Then, we show that the neural response of the biomimetic system encodes sounds with either high temporal or spectral resolution or with a combination of both resolutions. Our results suggest that the hair cells may easily specialize to fulfil various roles in spite of their similar physiological structures.

  15. Genetically induced cell death in bulge stem cells reveals their redundancy for hair and epidermal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Iwona; Oeztuerk-Winder, Feride; Humphreys, Peter; Frye, Michaela

    2015-03-01

    Adult mammalian epidermis contains multiple stem cell populations in which quiescent and more proliferative stem and progenitor populations coexist. However, the precise interrelation of these populations in homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we blocked the contribution of quiescent keratin 19 (K19)-expressing bulge stem cells to hair follicle formation through genetic ablation of the essential histone methyltransferase Setd8 that is required for the maintenance of adult skin. Deletion of Setd8 eliminated the contribution of bulge cells to hair follicle regeneration through inhibition of cell division and induction of cell death, but the growth and morphology of hair follicles were unaffected. Furthermore, ablation of Setd8 in the hair follicle bulge blocked the contribution of K19-postive stem cells to wounded epidermis, but the wound healing process was unaltered. Our data indicate that quiescent bulge stem cells are dispensable for hair follicle regeneration and epidermal injury in the short term and support the hypothesis that quiescent and cycling stem cell populations are equipotent. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  16. Hair cells in motion: Imaging the organ of Corti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, David C.; Karavitaki, K. Domenica

    2003-10-01

    The mammalian cochlea contains two types of sensory cells, inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs). The IHCs provide the vast majority of the synaptic input to the auditory nerve while the OHCs express a unique motor protein, prestin, and appear to participate in an electromechanical feedback loop that amplifies the motion of the organ of Corti (OC). To study this amplification process we have employed stroboscopic video microscopy to quantify the motion of various elements of the OC. Extracellular electrical stimulation was used to excite OHC motility and a computer-controlled high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) is used to illuminate the organ OC in an excised cochlear preparation. Motion is measured by extracting small regions of interest (ROIs) from the images and cross-correlating the ROIs taken during electrical stimulation with a reference image from the same ROIs taken with no stimulation. The observed motion is quite complex with several vibration modes observed. One of the major findings is that there appears to be oscillatory fluid flow within the tunnel of Corti suggesting that the OHC contractions are pumping fluid longitudinally within the organ. [Work funded by NIDCD.

  17. Drive mechanisms to the inner and outer hair cell stereocilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maftoon, Nima; Motallebzadeh, Hamid; Guinan, John J.; Puria, Sunil

    2018-05-01

    It has been long believed that inner hair cell (IHC) stimulation can be gleaned from the classic ter-Kuile shear motion between the reticular lamina (RL) and tectorial membrane (TM). The present study explores this and other IHC stimulation mechanisms using a finite-element-model representation of an organ of Corti (OoC) cross section with fluid-structure interaction. A 3-D model of a cross section of the OoC including soft tissue and the fluid in the sub-tectorial space, tunnel of Corti and above the TM was formulated based on anatomical measurements from the gerbil apical turn. The outer hair cells (OHCs), Deiter's cells and their phalangeal processes are represented as Y-shaped building-block elements. Each of the IHC and OHC bundles is represented by a single sterocilium. Linearized Navier-Stokes equations coupled with linear-elastic equations discretized with tetrahedral elements are solved in the frequency domain. We evaluated the dynamic changes in the OoC motion including sub-tectorial gap dimensions for 0.1 to 10 kHz input frequencies. Calculations show the classic ter-Kuile motion but more importantly they show that the gap-height changes which produce oscillatory radial flow in the subtectorial space. Phase changes in the stereocilia across OHC rows and the IHC are also observed.

  18. Regional analysis of whole cell currents from hair cells of the turtle posterior crista.

    PubMed

    Brichta, Alan M; Aubert, Anne; Eatock, Ruth Anne; Goldberg, Jay M

    2002-12-01

    The turtle posterior crista is made up of two hemicristae, each consisting of a central zone containing type I and type II hair cells and a surrounding peripheral zone containing only type II hair cells and extending from the planum semilunatum to the nonsensory torus. Afferents from various regions of a hemicrista differ in their discharge properties. To see if afferent diversity is related to the basolateral currents of the hair cells innervated, we selectively harvested type I and II hair cells from the central zone and type II hair cells from two parts of the peripheral zone, one near the planum and the other near the torus. Voltage-dependent currents were studied with the whole cell, ruptured-patch method and characterized in voltage-clamp mode. We found regional differences in both outwardly and inwardly rectifying voltage-sensitive currents. As in birds and mammals, type I hair cells have a distinctive outwardly rectifying current (I(K,L)), which begins activating at more hyperpolarized voltages than do the outward currents of type II hair cells. Activation of I(K,L) is slow and sigmoidal. Maximal outward conductances are large. Outward currents in type II cells vary in their activation kinetics. Cells with fast kinetics are associated with small conductances and with partial inactivation during 200-ms depolarizing voltage steps. Almost all type II cells in the peripheral zone and many in the central zone have fast kinetics. Some type II cells in the central zone have large outward currents with slow kinetics and little inactivation. Although these currents resemble I(K,L), they can be distinguished from the latter both electrophysiologically and pharmacologically. There are two varieties of inwardly rectifying currents in type II hair cells: activation of I(K1) is rapid and monoexponential, whereas that of I(h) is slow and sigmoidal. Many type II cells either have both inward currents or only have I(K1); very few cells only have I(h). Inward currents are

  19. Caprin-1 is a target of the deafness gene Pou4f3 and is recruited to stress granules in cochlear hair cells in response to ototoxic damage

    PubMed Central

    Towers, Emily R.; Kelly, John J.; Sud, Richa; Gale, Jonathan E.; Dawson, Sally J.

    2011-01-01

    The POU4 family of transcription factors are required for survival of specific cell types in different sensory systems. Pou4f3 is essential for the survival of auditory sensory hair cells and several mutations in human POU4F3 cause hearing loss. Thus, genes regulated by Pou4f3 are likely to be essential for hair cell survival. We performed a subtractive hybridisation screen in an inner-ear-derived cell line to find genes with differential expression in response to changes in Pou4f3 levels. The screen identified the stress-granule-associated protein Caprin-1 as being downregulated by Pou4f3. We demonstrated that this regulation occurs through the direct interaction of Pou4f3 with binding sites in the Caprin-1 5′ flanking sequence, and describe the expression pattern of Caprin-1 mRNA and protein in the cochlea. Moreover, we found Caprin-1-containing stress granules are induced in cochlear hair cells following aminoglycoside-induced damage. This is the first report of stress granule formation in mammalian hair cells and suggests that the formation of Caprin-1-containing stress granules is a key damage response to a clinically relevant ototoxic agent. Our results have implications for the understanding of aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss and provide further evidence that stress granule formation is a fundamental cellular stress response. PMID:21402877

  20. Intracellular studies of hair cells in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, I J; Sellick, P M

    1978-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from inner hair cells in the first turn of the guinea-pig cochlea, the recording sites being confirmed by the injection of Procion yellow dye and subsequent histology. 2. The receptor potential, in response to a pure tone burst, consisted of an AC response which followed the wave form of the stimulus and was analogous to the extracellularly recorded cochlear microphonic and a depolarizating DC response which followed the envelope of the tone burst and was analogous to the extracellularly recorded summating potential. 3. The DC response was broadly tuned at high sound pressure having a maximal amplitude of 27 mV at a sound pressure level of ca. 100 db; however the bandwidth of the response was reduced at lower sound pressure level. Isoamplitude curves for the DC response were indistinguishable from the threshold curves for auditory nerve fibres. 4. The AC response was tuned in a similar fashion to the DC response except that it was attenuated at 6-9 db/octave with respect to the DC response. It is suggested that this difference was due to the effect of membrane capacitance and resistance on the AC response. In contrast the extracellularly recorded AC component was not subject to this attenuation. 5. The total resistance and capacitance in three cells were found to be 46-61 Momega and 7.8-15.8 muF respectively. 6. Intracellular resistance changes were measured during sound stimulation, the resistance change being proportional to the DC receptor potential, indicating constant current flow through the hair cell. The current varied between 0.37 and 0.81 nA between cells. The time constant for seven cells was found to lie between 0.31 and 0.76 msec. 7. A map of the basilar membrane showing position of hair cells against characteristic frequency corresponded to the cut-off frequencies of the basilar membrane mechanical measurements and the innervation sites of spiral ganglion cells. PMID:731538

  1. Brief report: reconstruction of joint hyaline cartilage by autologous progenitor cells derived from ear elastic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Shinji; Takebe, Takanori; Kan, Hiroomi; Yabuki, Yuichiro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Ik, Lee Jeong; Maegawa, Jiro; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    In healthy joints, hyaline cartilage covering the joint surfaces of bones provides cushioning due to its unique mechanical properties. However, because of its limited regenerative capacity, age- and sports-related injuries to this tissue may lead to degenerative arthropathies, prompting researchers to investigate a variety of cell sources. We recently succeeded in isolating human cartilage progenitor cells from ear elastic cartilage. Human cartilage progenitor cells have high chondrogenic and proliferative potential to form elastic cartilage with long-term tissue maintenance. However, it is unknown whether ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells can be used to reconstruct hyaline cartilage, which has different mechanical and histological properties from elastic cartilage. In our efforts to develop foundational technologies for joint hyaline cartilage repair and reconstruction, we conducted this study to obtain an answer to this question. We created an experimental canine model of knee joint cartilage damage, transplanted ear-derived autologous cartilage progenitor cells. The reconstructed cartilage was rich in proteoglycans and showed unique histological characteristics similar to joint hyaline cartilage. In addition, mechanical properties of the reconstructed tissues were higher than those of ear cartilage and equal to those of joint hyaline cartilage. This study suggested that joint hyaline cartilage was reconstructed from ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells. It also demonstrated that ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells, which can be harvested by a minimally invasive method, would be useful for reconstructing joint hyaline cartilage in patients with degenerative arthropathies. © AlphaMed Press.

  2. Evolution and development of the vertebrate ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Beisel, K. W.

    2001-01-01

    This review outlines major aspects of development and evolution of the ear, specifically addressing issues of cell fate commitment and the emerging molecular governance of these decisions. Available data support the notion of homology of subsets of mechanosensors across phyla (proprioreceptive mechanosensory neurons in insects, hair cells in vertebrates). It is argued that this conservation is primarily related to the specific transducing environment needed to achieve mechanosensation. Achieving this requires highly conserved transcription factors that regulate the expression of the relevant structural genes for mechanosensory transduction. While conserved at the level of some cell fate assignment genes (atonal and its mammalian homologue), the ear has also radically reorganized its development by implementing genes used for cell fate assignment in other parts of the developing nervous systems (e.g., neurogenin 1) and by evolving novel sets of genes specifically associated with the novel formation of sensory neurons that contact hair cells (neurotrophins and their receptors). Numerous genes have been identified that regulate morphogenesis, but there is only one common feature that emerges at the moment: the ear appears to have co-opted genes from a large variety of other parts of the developing body (forebrain, limbs, kidneys) and establishes, in combination with existing transcription factors, an environment in which those genes govern novel, ear-related morphogenetic aspects. The ear thus represents a unique mix of highly conserved developmental elements combined with co-opted and newly evolved developmental elements.

  3. Human middle-ear model with compound eardrum and airway branching in mastoid air cells

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustical/mechanical model of normal adult human middle-ear function is described for forward and reverse transmission. The eardrum model included one component bound along the manubrium and another bound by the tympanic cleft. Eardrum components were coupled by a time-delayed impedance. The acoustics of the middle-ear cleft was represented by an acoustical transmission-line model for the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and mastoid air cell system with variable amounts of excess viscothermal loss. Model parameters were fitted to published measurements of energy reflectance (0.25–13 kHz), equivalent input impedance at the eardrum (0.25–11 kHz), temporal-bone pressure in scala vestibuli and scala tympani (0.1–11 kHz), and reverse middle-ear impedance (0.25–8 kHz). Inner-ear fluid motion included cochlear and physiological third-window pathways. The two-component eardrum with time delay helped fit intracochlear pressure responses. A multi-modal representation of the eardrum and high-frequency modeling of the middle-ear cleft helped fit ear-canal responses. Input reactance at the eardrum was small at high frequencies due to multiple modal resonances. The model predicted the middle-ear efficiency between ear canal and cochlea, and the cochlear pressures at threshold. PMID:25994701

  4. Human middle-ear model with compound eardrum and airway branching in mastoid air cells.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Douglas H

    2015-05-01

    An acoustical/mechanical model of normal adult human middle-ear function is described for forward and reverse transmission. The eardrum model included one component bound along the manubrium and another bound by the tympanic cleft. Eardrum components were coupled by a time-delayed impedance. The acoustics of the middle-ear cleft was represented by an acoustical transmission-line model for the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and mastoid air cell system with variable amounts of excess viscothermal loss. Model parameters were fitted to published measurements of energy reflectance (0.25-13 kHz), equivalent input impedance at the eardrum (0.25-11 kHz), temporal-bone pressure in scala vestibuli and scala tympani (0.1-11 kHz), and reverse middle-ear impedance (0.25-8 kHz). Inner-ear fluid motion included cochlear and physiological third-window pathways. The two-component eardrum with time delay helped fit intracochlear pressure responses. A multi-modal representation of the eardrum and high-frequency modeling of the middle-ear cleft helped fit ear-canal responses. Input reactance at the eardrum was small at high frequencies due to multiple modal resonances. The model predicted the middle-ear efficiency between ear canal and cochlea, and the cochlear pressures at threshold.

  5. Effect of JNK inhibitor SP600125 on hair cell regeneration in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shaoyang; Wang, Xu; Li, Wenyan; Li, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    The c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) proteins are a subgroup of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family. They play a complex role in cell proliferation, survival, and apoptosis. Here, we report a novel role of JNK signalling in hair cell regeneration. We eliminated hair cells of 5-day post-fertilization zebrafish larvae using neomycin followed by JNK inhibition with SP600125. JNK inhibition strongly decreased the number of regenerated hair cells in response to neomycin damage. These changes were associated with reduced proliferation. JNK inhibition also increased cleaved caspase-3 activity and induced apoptosis in regenerating neuromasts. Finally, JNK inhibition with SP600125 decreased the expression of genes related to Wnt. Over-activation of the Wnt signalling pathway partly rescued the hair cell regeneration defects induced by JNK inhibition. Together, our findings provide novel insights into the function of JNK and show that JNK inhibition blocks hair cell regeneration by controlling the Wnt signalling pathway. PMID:27438150

  6. Auditory Brainstem Response Altered in Humans With Noise Exposure Despite Normal Outer Hair Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, Naomi F.; Konrad-Martin, Dawn; McMillan, Garnett P.; Griest, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Recent animal studies demonstrated that cochlear synaptopathy, a partial loss of inner hair cell-auditory nerve fiber synapses, can occur in response to noise exposure without any permanent auditory threshold shift. In animal models, this synaptopathy is associated with a reduction in the amplitude of wave I of the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The goal of this study was to determine whether higher lifetime noise exposure histories in young people with clinically normal pure-tone thresholds are associated with lower ABR wave I amplitudes. Design Twenty-nine young military Veterans and 35 non Veterans (19 to 35 years of age) with normal pure-tone thresholds were assigned to 1 of 4 groups based on their self-reported lifetime noise exposure history and Veteran status. Suprathreshold ABR measurements in response to alternating polarity tone bursts were obtained at 1, 3, 4, and 6 kHz with gold foil tiptrode electrodes placed in the ear canal. Wave I amplitude was calculated from the difference in voltage at the positive peak and the voltage at the following negative trough. Distortion product otoacoustic emission input/output functions were collected in each participant at the same four frequencies to assess outer hair cell function. Results After controlling for individual differences in sex and distortion product otoacoustic emission amplitude, the groups containing participants with higher reported histories of noise exposure had smaller ABR wave I amplitudes at suprathreshold levels across all four frequencies compared with the groups with less history of noise exposure. Conclusions Suprathreshold ABR wave I amplitudes were reduced in Veterans reporting high levels of military noise exposure and in non Veterans reporting any history of firearm use as compared with Veterans and non Veterans with lower levels of reported noise exposure history. The reduction in ABR wave I amplitude in the groups with higher levels of noise exposure cannot be accounted

  7. Characterization of the Transcriptomes of Lgr5+ Hair Cell Progenitors and Lgr5- Supporting Cells in the Mouse Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Guo, Luo; Lu, Ling; Xu, Xiaochen; Zhang, ShaSha; Gao, Junyan; Waqas, Muhammad; Zhu, Chengwen; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xuan, Chuanying; Gao, Xia; Tang, Mingliang; Chen, Fangyi; Shi, Haibo; Li, Huawei; Chai, Renjie

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear supporting cells (SCs) have been shown to be a promising resource for hair cell (HC) regeneration in the neonatal mouse cochlea. Previous studies have reported that Lgr5+ SCs can regenerate HCs both in vitro and in vivo and thus are considered to be inner ear progenitor cells. Lgr5+ progenitors are able to regenerate more HCs than Lgr5- SCs, and it is important to understand the mechanism behind the proliferation and HC regeneration of these progenitors. Here, we isolated Lgr5+ progenitors and Lgr5- SCs from Lgr5-EGFP-CreERT2/Sox2-CreERT2/Rosa26-tdTomato mice via flow cytometry. As expected, we found that Lgr5+ progenitors had significantly higher proliferation and HC regeneration ability than Lgr5- SCs. Next, we performed RNA-Seq to determine the gene expression profiles of Lgr5+ progenitors and Lgr5- SCs. We analyzed the genes that were enriched and differentially expressed in Lgr5+ progenitors and Lgr5- SCs, and we found 8 cell cycle genes, 9 transcription factors, and 24 cell signaling pathway genes that were uniquely expressed in one population but not the other. Last, we made a protein-protein interaction network to further analyze the role of these differentially expressed genes. In conclusion, we present a set of genes that might regulate the proliferation and HC regeneration ability of Lgr5+ progenitors, and these might serve as potential new therapeutic targets for HC regeneration.

  8. Characterization of the Transcriptomes of Lgr5+ Hair Cell Progenitors and Lgr5- Supporting Cells in the Mouse Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; Guo, Luo; Lu, Ling; Xu, Xiaochen; Zhang, ShaSha; Gao, Junyan; Waqas, Muhammad; Zhu, Chengwen; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xuan, Chuanying; Gao, Xia; Tang, Mingliang; Chen, Fangyi; Shi, Haibo; Li, Huawei; Chai, Renjie

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear supporting cells (SCs) have been shown to be a promising resource for hair cell (HC) regeneration in the neonatal mouse cochlea. Previous studies have reported that Lgr5+ SCs can regenerate HCs both in vitro and in vivo and thus are considered to be inner ear progenitor cells. Lgr5+ progenitors are able to regenerate more HCs than Lgr5- SCs, and it is important to understand the mechanism behind the proliferation and HC regeneration of these progenitors. Here, we isolated Lgr5+ progenitors and Lgr5- SCs from Lgr5-EGFP-CreERT2/Sox2-CreERT2/Rosa26-tdTomato mice via flow cytometry. As expected, we found that Lgr5+ progenitors had significantly higher proliferation and HC regeneration ability than Lgr5- SCs. Next, we performed RNA-Seq to determine the gene expression profiles of Lgr5+ progenitors and Lgr5- SCs. We analyzed the genes that were enriched and differentially expressed in Lgr5+ progenitors and Lgr5- SCs, and we found 8 cell cycle genes, 9 transcription factors, and 24 cell signaling pathway genes that were uniquely expressed in one population but not the other. Last, we made a protein–protein interaction network to further analyze the role of these differentially expressed genes. In conclusion, we present a set of genes that might regulate the proliferation and HC regeneration ability of Lgr5+ progenitors, and these might serve as potential new therapeutic targets for HC regeneration. PMID:28491023

  9. Sonic Hedgehog Initiates Cochlear Hair Cell Regeneration through Downregulation of Retinoblastoma Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Na; Chen, Yan; Wang, Zhengmin; Chen, Guoling; Lin, Qin; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Li, Huawei

    2013-01-01

    Cell cycle re-entry by cochlear supporting cells and/or hair cells is considered one of the best approaches for restoring hearing loss as a result of hair cell damage. To identify mechanisms that can be modulated to initiate cell cycle re-entry and hair cell regeneration, we studied the effect of activating the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. We show that Shh signaling in postnatal rat cochleae damaged by neomycin leads to renewed proliferation of supporting cells and hair cells. Further, proliferating supporting cells are likely to transdifferentiate into hair cells. Shh treatment leads to inhibition of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) by increasing phosphorylated pRb and reducing retinoblastoma gene transcription. This results in upregulation of cyclins B1, D2, and D3, and CDK1. These results suggest that Shh signaling induces cell cycle re-entry in cochlear sensory epithelium and the production of new hair cells, in part by attenuating pRb function. This study provides an additional route to modulate pRb function with important implications in mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:23211596

  10. Biotechnology in the Treatment of Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Foundations and Future of Hair Cell Regeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the methodologies involved in the field of hair cell regeneration. First, the author provides a tutorial on the biotechnological foundations of this field to assist the reader in the comprehension and interpretation of the research involved in hair cell regeneration. Next, the author presents a review of stem…

  11. Discussion: Changes in Vocal Production and Auditory Perception after Hair Cell Regeneration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryals, Brenda M.; Dooling, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    A bird study found that with sufficient time and training after hair cell and hearing loss and hair cell regeneration, the mature avian auditory system can accommodate input from a newly regenerated periphery sufficiently to allow for recognition of previously familiar vocalizations and the learning of new complex acoustic classifications.…

  12. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E.; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Nature’s fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5’s active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  13. Cochlear hair cell regeneration after noise-induced hearing loss: does regeneration follow development?

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fei; Zuo, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) affects a large number of military personnel and civilians. Regenerating inner-ear cochlear hair cells (HCs) is a promising strategy to restore hearing after NIHL. In this review, we first summarize recent transcriptome profile analysis of zebrafish lateral lines and chick utricles where spontaneous HC regeneration occurs after HC damage. We then discuss recent studies in other mammalian regenerative systems such as pancreas, heart and central nervous system. Both spontaneous and forced HC regeneration occurs in mammalian cochleae in vivo involving proliferation and direct lineage conversion. However, both processes are inefficient and incomplete, and decline with age. For direct lineage conversion in vivo in cochleae and in other systems, further improvement requires multiple factors, including transcription, epigenetic and trophic factors, with appropriate stoichiometry in appropriate architectural niche. Increasing evidence from other systems indicates that the molecular paths of direct lineage conversion may be different from those of normal developmental lineages. We therefore hypothesize that HC regeneration does not have to follow HC development and that epigenetic memory of supporting cells influences the HC regeneration, which may be a key to successful cochlear HC regeneration. Finally, we discuss recent efforts in viral gene therapy and drug discovery for HC regeneration. We hope that combination therapy targeting multiple factors and epigenetic signaling pathways will provide promising avenues for HC regeneration in humans with NIHL and other types of hearing loss. PMID:28034617

  14. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  15. Activating β-catenin signaling in CD133-positive dermal papilla cells increases hair inductivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linli; Yang, Kun; Xu, Mingang; Andl, Thomas; Millar, Sarah; Boyce, Steven; Zhang, Yuhang

    2016-01-01

    Bioengineering hair follicles using cells isolated from human tissue remains as a difficult task. Dermal papilla (DP) cells are known to guide the growth and cycling activities of hair follicles by interacting with keratinocytes. However, DP cells quickly lose their inductivity during in vitro passaging. Rodent DP cell cultures need external addition of chemical factors, including WNT and BMP molecules, to maintain the hair inductive property. CD133 is expressed by a small subpopulation of DP cells that are capable of inducing hair follicle formation in vivo. We report here that expression of a stabilized form of β-catenin promoted clonal growth of CD133-positive (CD133+) DP cells in in vitro three-dimensional hydrogel culture while maintaining expression of DP markers, including alkaline phosphatase (AP), CD133, and Integrin α8. After a two-week in vitro culture, cultured CD133+ DP cells with up-regulated β-catenin activity led to an accelerated in vivo hair growth in reconstituted skin than control cells. Further analysis showed that matrix cell proliferation and differentiation were significantly promoted in hair follicles when β-catenin signaling was upregulated in CD133+ DP cells. Our data highlight an important role for β-catenin signaling in promoting the inductive capability of CD133+ DP cells for in vitro expansion and in vivo hair follicle regeneration, which could potentially be applied to cultured human DP cells. PMID:27312243

  16. Shape deformation of the organ of Corti associated with length changes of outer hair cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, U.; Fermin, C.

    1996-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) are commonly assumed to function as mechanical effectors as well as sensory receptors in the organ of Corti (OC) of the inner ear. OHC in vitro and in organ explants exhibit mechanical responses to electrical, chemical or mechanical stimulation which may represent an aspect of their effector process that is expected in vivo. A detailed description, however, of an OHC effector operation in situ is still missing. Specifically, little is known as to how OHC movements influence the geometry of the OC in situ. Previous work has demonstrated that the motility of isolated OHCs in response to electrical stimulation and to K(+)-gluconate is probably under voltage control and causes depolarisation (shortening) and hyperpolarization (elongation). This work was undertaken to investigate if the movements that were observed in isolated OHC, and which are induced by ionic stimulation, could change the geometry of the OC. A synchronized depolarization of OHC was induced in guinea pig cochleae by exposing the entire OC to artificial endolymph (K+). Subsequent morphometry of mid-modiolar sections from these cochleae revealed that the distance between the basilar membrane (BM) and the reticular lamina (RL) had decreased considerably. Furthermore, in the three upper turns OHC had significantly shortened in all rows. The results suggest that OHC can change their length in the organ of Corti (OC) thus deforming the geometry of the OC. The experiments reveal a tonic force generation within the OC that may change the position of RL and/or BM, contribute to damping, modulate the BM-RL-distance and control the operating points of RL and sensory hair bundles. Thus, the results suggest active self-adjustments of cochlear mechanics by slow OHC length changes. Such mechanical adjustments have recently been postulated to correspond to timing elements of animal communication, speech or music.

  17. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells. PMID:27974743

  18. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-12-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells.

  19. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  20. Stem Cell-Associated Marker Expression in Canine Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Gerhards, Nora M.; Sayar, Beyza S.; Origgi, Francesco C.; Galichet, Arnaud; Müller, Eliane J.; Welle, Monika M.; Wiener, Dominique J.

    2016-01-01

    Functional hair follicle (HF) stem cells (SCs) are crucial to maintain the constant recurring growth of hair. In mice and humans, SC subpopulations with different biomarker expression profiles have been identified in discrete anatomic compartments of the HF. The rare studies investigating canine HF SCs have shown similarities in biomarker expression profiles to that of mouse and human SCs. The aim of our study was to broaden the current repertoire of SC-associated markers and their expression patterns in the dog. We combined analyses on the expression levels of CD34, K15, Sox9, CD200, Nestin, LGR5 and LGR6 in canine skin using RT-qPCR, the corresponding proteins in dog skin lysates, and their expression patterns in canine HFs using immunohistochemistry. Using validated antibodies, we were able to define the location of CD34, Sox9, Keratin15, LGR5 and Nestin in canine HFs and confirm that all tested biomarkers are expressed in canine skin. Our results show similarities between the expression profile of canine, human and mouse HF SC markers. This repertoire of biomarkers will allow us to conduct functional studies and investigate alterations in the canine SC compartment of different diseases, like alopecia or skin cancer with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. PMID:26739040

  1. Stem Cell-Associated Marker Expression in Canine Hair Follicles.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, Nora M; Sayar, Beyza S; Origgi, Francesco C; Galichet, Arnaud; Müller, Eliane J; Welle, Monika M; Wiener, Dominique J

    2016-03-01

    Functional hair follicle (HF) stem cells (SCs) are crucial to maintain the constant recurring growth of hair. In mice and humans, SC subpopulations with different biomarker expression profiles have been identified in discrete anatomic compartments of the HF. The rare studies investigating canine HF SCs have shown similarities in biomarker expression profiles to that of mouse and human SCs. The aim of our study was to broaden the current repertoire of SC-associated markers and their expression patterns in the dog. We combined analyses on the expression levels of CD34, K15, Sox9, CD200, Nestin, LGR5 and LGR6 in canine skin using RT-qPCR, the corresponding proteins in dog skin lysates, and their expression patterns in canine HFs using immunohistochemistry. Using validated antibodies, we were able to define the location of CD34, Sox9, Keratin15, LGR5 and Nestin in canine HFs and confirm that all tested biomarkers are expressed in canine skin. Our results show similarities between the expression profile of canine, human and mouse HF SC markers. This repertoire of biomarkers will allow us to conduct functional studies and investigate alterations in the canine SC compartment of different diseases, like alopecia or skin cancer with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  2. β-Catenin activation regulates tissue growth non-cell autonomously in the hair stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Deschene, Elizabeth R; Myung, Peggy; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Zito, Giovanni; Sun, Thomas Yang; Taketo, Makoto M; Saotome, Ichiko; Greco, Valentina

    2014-03-21

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical for tissue regeneration. However, it is unclear how β-catenin controls stem cell behaviors to coordinate organized growth. Using live imaging, we show that activation of β-catenin specifically within mouse hair follicle stem cells generates new hair growth through oriented cell divisions and cellular displacement. β-Catenin activation is sufficient to induce hair growth independently of mesenchymal dermal papilla niche signals normally required for hair regeneration. Wild-type cells are co-opted into new hair growths by β-catenin mutant cells, which non-cell autonomously activate Wnt signaling within the neighboring wild-type cells via Wnt ligands. This study demonstrates a mechanism by which Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls stem cell-dependent tissue growth non-cell autonomously and advances our understanding of the mechanisms that drive coordinated regeneration.

  3. TGF-beta is specifically expressed in human dermal papilla cells and modulates hair folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keita; Aoi, Noriyuki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Sato, Takahiro; Suga, Hirotaka; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2009-01-01

    Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in the mammalian hair follicle have been shown to develop hair follicles through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. A cell therapy to regenerate human hair is theoretically possible by expanding autologous human DPCs (hDPCs) and transplanting them into bald skin, though much remains to be overcome before clinical success. In this study, we compared gene signatures of hDPCs at different passages and human dermal fibroblasts, and found transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta(2) to be highly expressed in cultured hDPCs. Keratinocyte conditioned medium, which is known to help preserve the hair-inducing capacity of hDPCs, up-regulated TGF-beta(2) expression of hDPCs and also enhanced their alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a known index for hair-inductive capacity. Through screening of components secreted from keratinocytes, the vitamin D(3) analogue was found to promote TGF-beta(2) expression and ALP activity of hDPCs. In animal hair folliculogenesis models using rat epidermis and expanded hDPCs, inhibition of TGF-beta(2) signalling at the ligand or receptor level significantly impaired hair folliculogenesis and maturation. These results suggest an important role for TGF-beta(2) in hair follicle morphogenesis and provide insights into the establishment of future cell therapies for hair regrowth by transplanting expanded DPCs.

  4. Large basolateral processes on type II hair cells comprise a novel processing unit in mammalian vestibular organs

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Rémy; Pickett, Sarah B.; Nguyen, Tot Bui; Stone, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory receptors in the vestibular system (hair cells) encode head movements and drive central motor reflexes that control gaze, body movements, and body orientation. In mammals, type I and II vestibular hair cells are defined by their shape, contacts with vestibular afferent nerves, and membrane conductance. Here, we describe unique morphological features of type II vestibular hair cells in mature rodents (mice and gerbils) and bats. These features are cytoplasmic processes that extend laterally from the hair cell’s base and project under type I hair cells. Closer analysis of adult mouse utricles demonstrated that the basolateral processes of type II hair cells range in shape, size, and branching, with the longest processes extending 3–4 hair cell widths. The hair cell basolateral processes synapse upon vestibular afferent nerves and receive inputs from vestibular efferent nerves. Further, some basolateral processes make physical contacts with the processes of other type II hair cells, forming some sort of network amongst type II hair cells. Basolateral processes are rare in perinatal mice and do not attain their mature form until 3–6 weeks of age. These observations demonstrate that basolateral processes are significant signaling regions of type II vestibular hair cells, and they suggest type II hair cells may directly communicate with each other, which has not been described in vertebrates. PMID:24825750

  5. Actuation of flexoelectric membranes in viscoelastic fluids with applications to outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Valencia, E. E.; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid crystal flexoelectric actuation uses an imposed electric field to create membrane bending, and it is used by the outer hair cells (OHCs) located in the inner ear, whose role is to amplify sound through generation of mechanical power. Oscillations in the OHC membranes create periodic viscoelastic flows in the contacting fluid media. A key objective of this work on flexoelectric actuation relevant to OHCs is to find the relations and impact of the electromechanical properties of the membrane, the rheological properties of the viscoelastic media, and the frequency response of the generated mechanical power output. The model developed and used in this work is based on the integration of: (i) the flexoelectric membrane shape equation applied to a circular membrane attached to the inner surface of a circular capillary and (ii) the coupled capillary flow of contacting viscoelastic phases, such that the membrane flexoelectric oscillations drive periodic viscoelastic capillary flows, as in OHCs. By applying the Fourier transform formalism to the governing equation, analytical expressions for the transfer function associated with the curvature and electrical field and for the power dissipation of elastic storage energy were found. PMID:25332388

  6. Age-related changes in auditory nerve-inner hair cell connections, hair cell numbers, auditory brain stem response and gap detection in UM-HET4 mice.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, R A; Dolan, D F; Halsey, K; Kanicki, A; Deng, N; Martin, C; Eberle, J; Kohrman, D C; Miller, R A; Schacht, J

    2015-04-30

    This study compared the timing of appearance of three components of age-related hearing loss that determine the pattern and severity of presbycusis: the functional and structural pathologies of sensory cells and neurons and changes in gap detection (GD), the latter as an indicator of auditory temporal processing. Using UM-HET4 mice, genetically heterogeneous mice derived from four inbred strains, we studied the integrity of inner and outer hair cells by position along the cochlear spiral, inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections, spiral ganglion neurons (SGN), and determined auditory thresholds, as well as pre-pulse and gap inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR). Comparisons were made between mice of 5-7, 22-24 and 27-29 months of age. There was individual variability among mice in the onset and extent of age-related auditory pathology. At 22-24 months of age a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was restricted to the apical third of the cochlea and threshold shifts in the auditory brain stem response were minimal. There was also a large and significant loss of inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections and a significant reduction in GD. The expression of Ntf3 in the cochlea was significantly reduced. At 27-29 months of age there was no further change in the mean number of synaptic connections per inner hair cell or in GD, but a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was found across all cochlear turns as well as significantly increased ABR threshold shifts at 4, 12, 24 and 48 kHz. A statistical analysis of correlations on an individual animal basis revealed that neither the hair cell loss nor the ABR threshold shifts correlated with loss of GD or with the loss of connections, consistent with independent pathological mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. miR-124 promotes the neuronal differentiation of mouse inner ear neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Di; Du, Jintao; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhou, Wei; Zong, Lin; Dong, Chang; Chen, Kaitian; Chen, Yu; Chen, Xihui; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) act as key regulators in neuronal development, synaptic morphogenesis and plasticity. However, their role in the neuronal differentiation of inner ear neural stem cells (NSCs) remains unclear. In this study, 6 miRNAs were selected and their expression patterns during the neuronal differentiation of inner ear NSCs were examined by RT-qPCR. We demonstrated that the culture of spiral ganglion stem cells present in the inner ears of newborn mice gave rise to neurons in vitro. The expression patterns of miR-124, miR-132, miR-134, miR-20a, miR-17-5p and miR-30a-5p were examined during a 14-day neuronal differentiation period. We found that miR-124 promoted the neuronal differentiation of and neurite outgrowth in mouse inner ear NSCs, and that the changes in the expression of tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) and cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) during inner ear NSC differentiation were associated with miR-124 expression. Our findings indicate that miR-124 plays a role in the neuronal differentiation of inner ear NSCs. This finding may lead to the development of novel strategies for restoring hearing in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28025992

  8. Neuromast hair cells retain the capacity of regeneration during heavy metal exposure.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, G; Capillo, G; Laurà, R; Abbate, F; Levanti, M; Guerrera, M C; Ciriaco, E; Germanà, A

    2018-07-01

    The neuromast is the morphological unit of the lateral line of fishes and is composed of a cluster of central sensory cells (hair cells) surrounded by support and mantle cells. Heavy metals exposure leads to disruption of hair cells within the neuromast. It is well known that the zebrafish has the ability to regenerate the hair cells after damage caused by toxicants. The process of regeneration depends on proliferation, differentiation and cellular migration of sensory and non-sensory progenitor cells. Therefore, our study was made in order to identify which cellular types are involved in the complex process of regeneration during heavy metals exposure. For this purpose, adult zebrafish were exposed to various heavy metals (Arsenic, cadmium and zinc) for 72h. After acute (24h) exposure, immunohistochemical localization of S100 (a specific marker for hair cells) in the neuromasts highlighted the hair cells loss. The immunoreaction for Sox2 (a specific marker for stem cells), at the same time, was observed in the support and mantle cells, after exposure to arsenic and cadmium, while only in the support cells after exposure to zinc. After chronic (72h) exposure the hair cells were regenerated, showing an immunoreaction for S100 protein. At the same exposure time to the three metals, a Sox2 immunoreaction was expressed in support and mantle cells. Our results showed for the first time the regenerative capacity of hair cells, not only after, but also during exposure to heavy metals, demonstrated by the presence of different stem cells that can diversify in hair cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of Th2 cells on hair cycle/growth after repeated cutaneous application of hapten.

    PubMed

    Sugita, K; Nomura, T; Ikenouchi-Sugita, A; Ito, T; Nakamura, M; Miyachi, Y; Tokura, Y; Kabashima, K

    2014-03-01

    Exposure to contact allergens in order to produce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) seems to induce hair cycle/growth, but the mechanism of this remains unclear. In the current study, we investigated this mechanism and found that repeated application of hapten induced production of interleukin (IL)-4 in lymph-node immune cells. In addition, hair growth was induced in mice after the adoptive transfer of T-helper (Th)2 cells that had been purified from mice exposed to repeated cutaneous application of hapten. These findings lead us to speculate that Th2 cells that are repeatedly hapten-sensitized are recruited to hapten-challenged skin areas, and thus stimulate the production of IL-4 in the vicinity of the hair follicles, which influences hair cycle/growth. Our results may provide fundamental insights into the mechanism of contact hypersensitivity-induced hair cycle/growth. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Establishment of human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells with overexpressed human hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Cheng, Hongjing; Liu, Jinyu; Zhang, Lei

    2017-06-01

    Chronic liver disease has become a major health problem that causes serious damage to human health. Since the existing treatment effect was not ideal, we need to seek new treatment methods. We utilized the gene recombination technology to obtain the human hair mesenchymal stem cells which overexpression of human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF). Furthermore, we verified the property of transfected cells through detecting surface marker by flow cytometry. We show here establishment of the hHGF-overexpressing lentivirus vector, and successfully transfection to human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells. The verified experiments could demonstrate the human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells which have been transfected still have the properties of stem cells. We successfully constructed human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells which overexpression hHGF, and maintain the same properties compared with pro-transfected cells.

  11. Creatine supports propagation and promotes neuronal differentiation of inner ear progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Di Santo, Stefano; Mina, Amir; Ducray, Angélique; Widmer, Hans R; Senn, Pascal

    2014-05-07

    Long-term propagation of inner ear-derived progenitor/stem cells beyond the third generation and differentiation into inner ear cell types has been shown to be feasible, but challenging. We investigated whether the known neuroprotective guanidine compound creatine (Cr) promotes propagation of inner ear progenitor/stem cells as mitogen-expanded neurosphere cultures judged from the formation of spheres over passages. In addition, we studied whether Cr alone or in combination with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes neuronal differentiation of inner ear progenitors. For this purpose, early postnatal rat spiral ganglia, utricle, and organ of Corti-derived progenitors were grown as floating spheres in the absence (controls) or presence of Cr (5 mM) from passage 3 onward. Similarly, dissociated sphere-derived cultures were differentiated for 14 days in the presence or absence of Cr (5 mM) and spiral ganglia sphere-derived cultures in a combination of Cr with the neurotrophin BDNF (50 ng/ml). We found that the cumulative total number of spheres over all passages was significantly higher after Cr supplementation as compared with controls in all the three inner ear cultures. In contrast, sphere sizes were not affected by the administration of Cr. Administration of Cr during differentiation of spiral ganglia cells resulted in a significantly higher density of β-III-tubulin-positive cells compared with controls, whereas densities of myosin VIIa-positive cells in cultures of utricle and organ of Corti were not affected by the treatment. Importantly, a combination of Cr with the neurotrophin BDNF resulted in further significantly increased densities of β-III-tubulin-positive cells in cultures of spiral ganglia cells as compared with single treatments. In sum, Cr promoted continuing propagation of rat inner ear-derived progenitor cells and supported specifically in combination with BDNF the differentiation of neuronal cell types from spiral ganglion

  12. THE POTENTIAL ROLE OF ENDOGENOUS STEM CELLS IN REGENERATION OF THE INNER EAR

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Monedero, Rodrigo; Oshima, Kazuo; Heller, Stefan; Edge, Albert S.B.

    2007-01-01

    Stem cells in various mammalian tissues retain the capacity to renew themselves and may be able to restore damaged tissue. Their existence has been proven by genetic tracer studies that demonstrate their differentiation into multiple tissue types and by their ability to self-renew through proliferation. Stem cells from the adult nervous system proliferate to form clonal floating colonies called spheres in vitro, and recent studies have demonstrated sphere formation by cells in the cochlea in addition to the vestibular system and the auditory ganglia, indicating that these tissues contain cells with stem cell properties. The presence of stem cells in the inner ear raises the hope of regeneration of mammalian inner ear cells but is difficult to correlate with the lack spontaneous regeneration seen in the inner ear after tissue damage. Loss of stem cells postnatally in the cochlea may correlate with the loss of regenerative capacity and may limit our ability to stimulate regeneration. Retention of sphere forming capacity in adult vestibular tissues suggests that the limited capacity for repair may be attributed to the continued presence of progenitor cells. Future strategies for regeneration must consider the distribution of endogenous stem cells in the inner ear and whether cells with the capacity for regeneration are retained. PMID:17321086

  13. Cell membrane organization is important for inner hair cell MET-channel gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effertz, Thomas; Scharr, Alexandra L.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2018-05-01

    Specialized sensory cells, hair cells, translate mechanical stimuli into electro/chemical responses. This process, termed mechano-electrical transduction (MET), is localized to the hair cell's sensory organelle, the hair bundle. The mature hair bundle comprises three rows of actin filled stereocilia, arranged in a staircase pattern. Deflections towards the tallest row of stereocilia activate MET channels, residing at the top of stereocilia. While other MET channels can be activated or modulated by changes to their lipid environment, this remains unknown for the mammalian auditory MET channel. We show here that the effect of lipid and cholesterol depletion from the cell membrane affect the MET current as well. We used γ-cyclodextrin to extract lipids form the membrane, reversibly reducing the peak MET current, current adaptation, and decreasing the channels resting open probability. The recovery after γ-cyclodextrin treatment was slower than the initial peak current reduction, suggesting that a specific lipid organization is required for normal MET channel function, which requires time reestablish. Extraction of cholesterol, using Mβ-cyclodextrin, irreversibly reduces the peak MET current and reversibly increases the channel resting open probability, suggesting that cholesterol restricts MET channel opening. This restriction could be useful to increase the channel's signal to noise ratio. Together this data suggests that the cell membrane is part of the force relay machinery to the MET channel and could possibly restrict gating associated conformational changes of the MET channel.

  14. Genetic analysis of vertebrate sensory hair cell mechanosensation: the zebrafish circler mutants.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, T; Rüsch, A; Friedrich, R W; Granato, M; Ruppersberg, J P; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1998-02-01

    The molecular basis of sensory hair cell mechanotransduction is largely unknown. In order to identify genes that are essential for mechanosensory hair cell function, we characterized a group of recently isolated zebrafish motility mutants. These mutants are defective in balance and swim in circles but have no obvious morphological defects. We examined the mutants using calcium imaging of acoustic-vibrational and tactile escape responses, high resolution microscopy of sensory neuroepithelia in live larvae, and recordings of extracellular hair cell potentials (microphonics). Based on the analyses, we have identified several classes of genes. Mutations in sputnik and mariner affect hair bundle integrity. Mutant astronaut and cosmonaut hair cells have relatively normal microphonics and thus appear to affect events downstream of mechanotransduction. Mutant orbiter, mercury, and gemini larvae have normal hair cell morphology and yet do not respond to acoustic-vibrational stimuli. The microphonics of lateral line hair cells of orbiter, mercury, and gemini larvae are absent or strongly reduced. Therefore, these genes may encode components of the transduction apparatus.

  15. Hedgehog Signaling Promotes the Proliferation and Subsequent Hair Cell Formation of Progenitor Cells in the Neonatal Mouse Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Lu, Xiaoling; Guo, Luo; Ni, Wenli; Zhang, Yanping; Zhao, Liping; Wu, Lingjie; Sun, Shan; Zhang, Shasha; Tang, Mingliang; Li, Wenyan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2017-01-01

    Hair cell (HC) loss is the major cause of permanent sensorineural hearing loss in mammals. Unlike lower vertebrates, mammalian cochlear HCs cannot regenerate spontaneously after damage, although the vestibular system does maintain limited HC regeneration capacity. Thus HC regeneration from the damaged sensory epithelium has been one of the main areas of research in the field of hearing restoration. Hedgehog signaling plays important roles during the embryonic development of the inner ear, and it is involved in progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the cell fate decision. In this study, we show that recombinant Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) protein effectively promotes sphere formation, proliferation, and differentiation of Lgr5+ progenitor cells isolated from the neonatal mouse cochlea. To further explore this, we determined the effect of Hedgehog signaling on cell proliferation and HC regeneration in cultured cochlear explant from transgenic R26-SmoM2 mice that constitutively activate Hedgehog signaling in the supporting cells of the cochlea. Without neomycin treatment, up-regulation of Hedgehog signaling did not significantly promote cell proliferation or new HC formation. However, after injury to the sensory epithelium by neomycin treatment, the over-activation of Hedgehog signaling led to significant supporting cell proliferation and HC regeneration in the cochlear epithelium explants. RNA sequencing and real-time PCR were used to compare the transcripts of the cochleae from control mice and R26-SmoM2 mice, and multiple genes involved in the proliferation and differentiation processes were identified. This study has important implications for the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss by manipulating the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:29311816

  16. Patterns of light interference produced by damaged cuticle cells in human hair.

    PubMed

    Gamez-Garcia, Manuel; Lu, Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Colorful patterns of light interference have been observed to occur in human hair cuticle cells. The light interference phenomenon has been analyzed by optical microscopy. The strong patterns of light interference appeared only in cuticle cells that had been damaged either mechanically or by thermal stresses. Cuticle cells that were not damaged did not produce this phenomenon. The zones of light interference on the hair surface were seen to extend to cuticle sheath areas whose damage was not apparent when analyzed under the Scanning Electron Microscope. The presence of oils and other hydrophobic materials in the hair had a strong effect in the appearance or disappearance of the interference patterns.

  17. ACh-induced hyperpolarization and decreased resistance in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Poppi, Lauren A; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Drury, Hannah R; Jobling, Phillip; Callister, Robert J; Migliaccio, Americo A; Jordan, Paivi M; Holt, Joseph C; Rabbitt, Richard D; Lim, Rebecca; Brichta, Alan M

    2018-01-01

    In the mammalian vestibular periphery, electrical activation of the efferent vestibular system (EVS) has two effects on afferent activity: 1) it increases background afferent discharge and 2) decreases afferent sensitivity to rotational stimuli. Although the cellular mechanisms underlying these two contrasting afferent responses remain obscure, we postulated that the reduction in afferent sensitivity was attributed, in part, to the activation of α9- containing nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (α9*nAChRs) and small-conductance potassium channels (SK) in vestibular type II hair cells, as demonstrated in the peripheral vestibular system of other vertebrates. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of the predominant EVS neurotransmitter ACh on vestibular type II hair cells from wild-type (wt) and α9-subunit nAChR knockout (α9 -/- ) mice. Immunostaining for choline acetyltransferase revealed there were no obvious gross morphological differences in the peripheral EVS innervation among any of these strains. ACh application onto wt type II hair cells, at resting potentials, produced a fast inward current followed by a slower outward current, resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and decreased membrane resistance. Hyperpolarization and decreased resistance were due to gating of SK channels. Consistent with activation of α9*nAChRs and SK channels, these ACh-sensitive currents were antagonized by the α9*nAChR blocker strychnine and SK blockers apamin and tamapin. Type II hair cells from α9 -/- mice, however, failed to respond to ACh at all. These results confirm the critical importance of α9nAChRs in efferent modulation of mammalian type II vestibular hair cells. Application of exogenous ACh reduces electrical impedance, thereby decreasing type II hair cell sensitivity. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Expression of α9 nicotinic subunit was crucial for fast cholinergic modulation of mammalian vestibular type II hair cells. These findings show a multifaceted

  18. AN ADENYLYL CYCLASE SIGNALING PATHWAY PREDICTS DIRECT DOPAMINERGIC INPUT TO VESTIBULAR HAIR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    DRESCHER, M. J.; CHO, W. J.; FOLBE, A. J.; SELVAKUMAR, D.; KEWSON, D. T.; ABU-HAMDAN, M. D.; OH, C. K.; RAMAKRISHNAN, N. A.; HATFIELD, J. S.; KHAN, K. M.; ANNE, S.; HARPOOL, E. C.; DRESCHER, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase signaling pathways have been identified in a model hair cell preparation from the trout saccule, for which the hair cell is the only intact cell type. The use of degenerate primers targeting cDNA sequence conserved across adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms, and RT-PCR, coupled with cloning of amplification products, indicated expression of AC9, AC7 and AC5/6, with cloning efficiencies of 11:5:2. AC9 and AC5/6 are inhibited by Ca2+, the former in conjunction with calcineurin, and message for calcineurin has also been identified in the trout saccular hair cell layer. AC7 is independent of Ca2+. Given the lack of detection of calcium/calmodulin-activated isoforms previously suggested to mediate adenylyl cyclase activation in the absence of Gαs in mammalian cochlear hair cells, the issue of hair-cell Gαs mRNA expression was re-examined in the teleost vestibular hair cell model. Two full-length coding sequences were obtained for Gαs/olf in the vestibular type II-like hair cells of the trout saccule. Two messages for Gαi have also been detected in the hair cell layer, one with homology to Gαi1 and the second with homology to Gαi3 of higher vertebrates. Both Gαs/olf protein and Gαi1/Gαi3 protein were immunolocalized to stereocilia and to the base of the hair cell, the latter consistent with sites of efferent input. While a signaling event coupling to Gαs/olf and Gαi1/Gαi3 in the stereocilia is currently unknown, signaling with Gαs/olf, Gαi3, and AC5/6 at the base of the hair cell would be consistent with transduction pathways activated by dopaminergic efferent input. mRNA for dopamine receptors D1A4 and five forms of dopamine D2 were found to be expressed in the teleost saccular hair cell layer, representing information on vestibular hair cell expression not directly available for higher vertebrates. Dopamine D1A receptor would couple to Gαolf and activation of AC5/6. Co-expression with dopamine D2 receptor, which itself couples to Gαi3 and AC

  19. An adenylyl cyclase signaling pathway predicts direct dopaminergic input to vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Drescher, M J; Cho, W J; Folbe, A J; Selvakumar, D; Kewson, D T; Abu-Hamdan, M D; Oh, C K; Ramakrishnan, N A; Hatfield, J S; Khan, K M; Anne, S; Harpool, E C; Drescher, D G

    2010-12-29

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) signaling pathways have been identified in a model hair cell preparation from the trout saccule, for which the hair cell is the only intact cell type. The use of degenerate primers targeting cDNA sequence conserved across AC isoforms, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with cloning of amplification products, indicated expression of AC9, AC7 and AC5/6, with cloning efficiencies of 11:5:2. AC9 and AC5/6 are inhibited by Ca(2+), the former in conjunction with calcineurin, and message for calcineurin has also been identified in the trout saccular hair cell layer. AC7 is independent of Ca(2+). Given the lack of detection of calcium/calmodulin-activated isoforms previously suggested to mediate AC activation in the absence of Gαs in mammalian cochlear hair cells, the issue of hair-cell Gαs mRNA expression was re-examined in the teleost vestibular hair cell model. Two full-length coding sequences were obtained for Gαs/olf in the vestibular type II-like hair cells of the trout saccule. Two messages for Gαi have also been detected in the hair cell layer, one with homology to Gαi1 and the second with homology to Gαi3 of higher vertebrates. Both Gαs/olf protein and Gαi1/Gαi3 protein were immunolocalized to stereocilia and to the base of the hair cell, the latter consistent with sites of efferent input. Although a signaling event coupling to Gαs/olf and Gαi1/Gαi3 in the stereocilia is currently unknown, signaling with Gαs/olf, Gαi3, and AC5/6 at the base of the hair cell would be consistent with transduction pathways activated by dopaminergic efferent input. mRNA for dopamine receptors D1A4 and five forms of dopamine D2 were found to be expressed in the teleost saccular hair cell layer, representing information on vestibular hair cell expression not directly available for higher vertebrates. Dopamine D1A receptor would couple to Gαolf and activation of AC5/6. Co-expression with dopamine D2 receptor, which

  20. β-Catenin Is Required for Hair-Cell Differentiation in the Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lingxiang; Jacques, Bonnie E.; Mulvaney, Joanna F.; Dabdoub, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The development of hair cells in the auditory system can be separated into steps; first, the establishment of progenitors for the sensory epithelium, and second, the differentiation of hair cells. Although the differentiation of hair cells is known to require the expression of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Atoh1, the control of cell proliferation in the region of the developing cochlea that will ultimately become the sensory epithelium and the cues that initiate Atoh1 expression remain obscure. We assessed the role of Wnt/β-catenin in both steps in gain- and loss-of-function models in mice. The canonical Wnt pathway mediator, β-catenin, controls the expression of Atoh1. Knock-out of β-catenin inhibited hair-cell, as well as pillar-cell, differentiation from sensory progenitors but was not required to maintain a hair-cell fate once specified. Constitutive activation of β-catenin expanded sensory progenitors by inducing additional cell division and resulted in the differentiation of extra hair cells. Our data demonstrate that β-catenin plays a role in cell division and differentiation in the cochlear sensory epithelium. PMID:24806673

  1. Biotechnology in the Treatment of Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Foundations and Future of Hair Cell Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To provide an overview of the methodologies involved in the field of hair cell regeneration. First, a tutorial on the biotechnological foundations of this field will be provided in order to assist the reader in the comprehension and interpretation of the research involved in hair cell regeneration. Next, a review of stem cell and gene therapy will be presented and a critical appraisal of their application to hair cell regeneration will be provided. The methodologies used in these approaches will be highlighted. Method Narrative review of the fields of cellular, molecular, and developmental biology, tissue engineering, and stem cell and gene therapy using the PubMed database. Results The use of biotechnological approaches to the treatment of hearing loss, such as stem cell and gene therapy, has led to new methods of regenerating cochlear hair cells in mammals. Conclusions There have been incredible strides made in assembling important pieces of the puzzle that comprise hair cell regeneration. However, mammalian hair cell regeneration using stem cell and gene therapy are years if not decades away from being clinically feasible. If the goals of the biological approaches are met, these therapies may represent the future treatments for hearing loss. PMID:21386039

  2. Characteristics of MIC-1 antlerogenic stem cells and their effect on hair growth in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cegielski, Marek; Izykowska, Ilona; Chmielewska, Magdalena; Dziewiszek, Wojciech; Bochnia, Marek; Calkosinski, Ireneusz; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    We characterized growth factors produced by MIC-1 antlerogenic stem cells and attempted to apply those cells to stimulate hair growth in rabbits. We evaluated the gene and protein expression of growth factors by immunocytochemical and molecular biology techniques in MIC-1 cells. An animal model was used to assess the effects of xenogenous stem cells on hair growth. In the experimental group, rabbits were intradermally injected with MIC-1 stem cells, whereas the control group rabbits were given vehicle-only. After 1, 2 and 4 weeks, skin specimen were collected for histological and immunohistochemical tests. MIC-1 antlerogenic stem cells express growth factors, as confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated an increase in the number of hair follicles, as well as the amount of secondary hair in the follicles, without an immune response in animals injected intradermally with MIC-1 cells, compared to animals receiving vehicle-alone. MIC-1 cells accelerated hair growth in rabbits due to the activation of cells responsible for the regulation of the hair growth cycle through growth factors. Additionally, the xenogenous cell implant did not induce immune response.

  3. Spontaneous activity of cochlear hair cells triggered by fluid secretion mechanism in adjacent support cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han Chin; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Cheung, Rocky; Zhang-Hooks, YingXin; Agarwal, Amit; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Rock, Jason; Bergles, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Spontaneous electrical activity of neurons in developing sensory systems promotes their maturation and proper connectivity. In the auditory system, spontaneous activity of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) is initiated by the release of ATP from glia-like inner supporting cells (ISCs), facilitating maturation of central pathways before hearing onset. Here, we find that ATP stimulates purinergic autoreceptors in ISCs, triggering Cl− efflux and osmotic cell shrinkage by opening TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels. Release of Cl− from ISCs also forces K+ efflux, causing transient depolarization of IHCs near ATP release sites. Genetic deletion of TMEM16A markedly reduces the spontaneous activity of IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons in the developing cochlea, and prevents ATP-dependent shrinkage of supporting cells. These results indicate that support cells in the developing cochlea have adapted a pathway used for fluid secretion in other organs to induce periodic excitation of hair cells. PMID:26627734

  4. Role of the array geometry in multi-bilayer hair cell sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddoni, Nima J.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, a bio-inspired, synthetic membrane-based hair cell sensor was fabricated and characterized. This sensor generates current in response to mechanical stimuli, such as airflow or free vibration, which perturb the sensor's hair. Vibration transferred from the hair to a lipid membrane (lipid bilayer) causes a voltage-dependent time rate of change in electrical capacitance of the membrane, which produces measurable current. Studies to date have been performed on systems containing only two droplets and a single bilayer, even though an array of multiple bilayers can be formed with more than 2 droplets. Thus, it is yet to be determined how multiple lipid bilayers affect the sensing response of a membrane-based hair cell sensor. In this work, we assemble serial droplet arrays with more than 1 bilayer to experimentally study the current generated by each membrane in response to perturbation of a single hair element. Two serial array configurations are studied: The first consists of a serial array of 3 bilayers formed using 4 droplets with the hair positioned in an end droplet. The second configuration consists of 3 droplets and 2 bilayers in series with the hair positioned in the central droplet. In serial arrays of up to four droplets, we observe that mechanotransduction of the hair's motion into a capacitive current occurs at every membrane, with bilayers positioned adjacent to the droplet containing the hair generating the largest sensing current. The measured currents suggest the total current generated by all bilayers in a 4-droplet, 3-bilaye array is greater than the current produced by a single-membrane sensor and similar in magnitude to the sum of currents output by 3, single-bilayer sensors operated independently. Moreover, we learned that bilayers positioned on the same side of the hair produce sensing currents that are in-phase, whereas bilayers positioned on opposite sides of the droplet containing the hair generate out-of-phase responses.

  5. Concise Review: Inner Ear Stem Cells—An Oxymoron, But Why?

    PubMed Central

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Nasr, Marjan; Heller, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Hearing loss, caused by irreversible loss of cochlear sensory hair cells, affects millions of patients worldwide. In this concise review, we examine the conundrum of inner ear stem cells, which obviously are present in the inner ear sensory epithelia of nonmammalian vertebrates, giving these ears the ability to functionally recover even from repetitive ototoxic insults. Despite the inability of the mammalian inner ear to regenerate lost hair cells, there is evidence for cells with regenerative capacity because stem cells can be isolated from vestibular sensory epithelia and from the neonatal cochlea. Challenges and recent progress toward identification of the intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways that could be used to re-establish stemness in the mammalian organ of Corti are discussed. PMID:22102534

  6. Why do hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea die during aging?

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Philip; Bao, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    Age-related decline of cochlear function is mainly due to the loss of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Recent findings clearly indicate that survival of these two cell types during aging depends on genetic and environmental interactions, and this relationship is seen at the systemic, tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. At cellular and molecular levels, age-related loss of hair cells and SGNs can occur independently, suggesting distinct mechanisms for the death of each during aging. This mechanistic independence is also observed in the loss of medial olivocochlear efferent innervation and outer hair cells during aging, pointing to a universal independent cellular mechanism for age-related neuronal death in the peripheral auditory system. While several molecular signaling pathways are implicated in the age-related loss of hair cells and SGNs, studies with the ability to locally modify gene expression in these cell types are needed to address whether these signaling pathways have direct effects on hair cells and SGNs during aging. Finally, the issue of whether age-related loss of these cells occurs via typical apoptotic pathways requires further examination. As new studies in the field of aging reshape the framework for exploring these underpinnings, understanding of the loss of hair cells and SGNs associated with age and the interventions that can treat and prevent these changes will result in dramatic benefits for an aging population. PMID:22396875

  7. Clonal Expansion of Lgr5-Positive Cells from Mammalian Cochlea and High-Purity Generation of Sensory Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    McLean, Will J; Yin, Xiaolei; Lu, Lin; Lenz, Danielle R; McLean, Dalton; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M; Edge, Albert S B

    2017-02-21

    Death of cochlear hair cells, which do not regenerate, is a cause of hearing loss in a high percentage of the population. Currently, no approach exists to obtain large numbers of cochlear hair cells. Here, using a small-molecule approach, we show significant expansion (>2,000-fold) of cochlear supporting cells expressing and maintaining Lgr5, an epithelial stem cell marker, in response to stimulation of Wnt signaling by a GSK3β inhibitor and transcriptional activation by a histone deacetylase inhibitor. The Lgr5-expressing cells differentiate into hair cells in high yield. From a single mouse cochlea, we obtained over 11,500 hair cells, compared to less than 200 in the absence of induction. The newly generated hair cells have bundles and molecular machinery for transduction, synapse formation, and specialized hair cell activity. Targeting supporting cells capable of proliferation and cochlear hair cell replacement could lead to the discovery of hearing loss treatments. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Foxp1 Regulates the Proliferation of Hair Follicle Stem Cells in Response to Oxidative Stress during Hair Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianzhi; Li, Hanjun; Zhou, Rujiang; Ma, Gang; Dekker, Joseph D.; Tucker, Haley O.; Yao, Zhengju; Guo, Xizhi

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) in the bugle circularly generate outer root sheath (ORS) through linear proliferation within limited cycles during anagen phases. However, the mechanisms controlling the pace of HFSC proliferation remain unclear. Here we revealed that Foxp1, a transcriptional factor, was dynamically relocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of HFSCs in phase transitions from anagen to catagen, coupled with the rise of oxidative stress. Mass spectrum analyses revealed that the S468 phosphorylation of Foxp1 protein was responsive to oxidative stress and affected its nucleocytoplasmic translocation. Foxp1 deficiency in hair follicles led to compromised ROS accrual and increased HFSC proliferation. And more, NAC treatment profoundly elongated the anagen duration and HFSC proliferation in Foxp1-deficient background. Molecularly, Foxp1 augmented ROS levels through suppression of Trx1-mediated reductive function, thereafter imposing the cell cycle arrest by modulating the activity of p19/p53 pathway. Our findings identify a novel role for Foxp1 in controlling HFSC proliferation with cellular dynamic location in response to oxidative stress during hair cycling. PMID:26171970

  9. The BEACH protein LRBA is required for hair bundle maintenance in cochlear hair cells and for hearing.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Christian; Butola, Tanvi; Haag, Natja; Hausrat, Torben J; Leitner, Michael G; Moutschen, Michel; Lefèbvre, Philippe P; Speckmann, Carsten; Garrett, Lillian; Becker, Lore; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Nietzsche, Sandor; Kessels, Michael M; Oliver, Dominik; Kneussel, Matthias; Kilimann, Manfred W; Strenzke, Nicola

    2017-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) belongs to the enigmatic class of BEACH domain-containing proteins, which have been attributed various cellular functions, typically involving intracellular protein and membrane transport processes. Here, we show that LRBA deficiency in mice leads to progressive sensorineural hearing loss. In LRBA knockout mice, inner and outer hair cell stereociliary bundles initially develop normally, but then partially degenerate during the second postnatal week. LRBA deficiency is associated with a reduced abundance of radixin and Nherf2, two adaptor proteins, which are important for the mechanical stability of the basal taper region of stereocilia. Our data suggest that due to the loss of structural integrity of the central parts of the hair bundle, the hair cell receptor potential is reduced, resulting in a loss of cochlear sensitivity and functional loss of the fraction of spiral ganglion neurons with low spontaneous firing rates. Clinical data obtained from two human patients with protein-truncating nonsense or frameshift mutations suggest that LRBA deficiency may likewise cause syndromic sensorineural hearing impairment in humans, albeit less severe than in our mouse model. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. ELMOD1 Stimulates ARF6-GTP Hydrolysis to Stabilize Apical Structures in Developing Vestibular Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Krey, Jocelyn F; Dumont, Rachel A; Wilmarth, Philip A; David, Larry L; Johnson, Kenneth R; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G

    2018-01-24

    Sensory hair cells require control of physical properties of their apical plasma membranes for normal development and function. Members of the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) small GTPase family regulate membrane trafficking and cytoskeletal assembly in many cells. We identified ELMO domain-containing protein 1 (ELMOD1), a guanine nucleoside triphosphatase activating protein (GAP) for ARF6, as the most highly enriched ARF regulator in hair cells. To characterize ELMOD1 control of trafficking, we analyzed mice of both sexes from a strain lacking functional ELMOD1 [roundabout ( rda )]. In rda/rda mice, cuticular plates of utricle hair cells initially formed normally, then degenerated after postnatal day 5; large numbers of vesicles invaded the compromised cuticular plate. Hair bundles initially developed normally, but the cell's apical membrane lifted away from the cuticular plate, and stereocilia elongated and fused. Membrane trafficking in type I hair cells, measured by FM1-43 dye labeling, was altered in rda/rda mice. Consistent with the proposed GAP role for ELMOD1, the ARF6 GTP/GDP ratio was significantly elevated in rda/rda utricles compared with controls, and the level of ARF6-GTP was correlated with the severity of the rda/rda phenotype. These results suggest that conversion of ARF6 to its GDP-bound form is necessary for final stabilization of the hair bundle. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Assembly of the mechanically sensitive hair bundle of sensory hair cells requires growth and reorganization of apical actin and membrane structures. Hair bundles and apical membranes in mice with mutations in the Elmod1 gene degenerate after formation, suggesting that the ELMOD1 protein stabilizes these structures. We show that ELMOD1 is a GTPase-activating protein in hair cells for the small GTP-binding protein ARF6, known to participate in actin assembly and membrane trafficking. We propose that conversion of ARF6 into the GDP-bound form in the apical domain of hair cells is

  11. Effect of histone deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A and valproic acid on hair cell regeneration in zebrafish lateral line neuromasts

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingzi; Cai, Chengfu; Tang, Dongmei; Sun, Shan; Li, Huawei

    2014-01-01

    In humans, auditory hair cells are not replaced when injured. Thus, cochlear hair cell loss causes progressive and permanent hearing loss. Conversely, non-mammalian vertebrates are capable of regenerating lost sensory hair cells. The zebrafish lateral line has numerous qualities that make it well-suited for studying hair cell development and regeneration. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity has been shown to have an important role in regenerative processes in vertebrates, but its function in hair cell regeneration in vivo is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the role of HDAC activity in hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line. We eliminated lateral line hair cells of 5-day post-fertilization larvae using neomycin and then treated the larvae with HDAC inhibitors. To assess hair cell regeneration, we used 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation in zebrafish larvae to label mitotic cells after hair cell loss. We found that pharmacological inhibition of HDACs using trichostatin A (TSA) or valproic acid (VPA) increased histone acetylation in the regenerated neuromasts following neomycin-induced damage. We also showed that treatment with TSA or VPA decreased the number of supporting cells and regenerated hair cells in response to hair cell damage. Additionally, BrdU immunostaining and western blot analysis showed that TSA or VPA treatment caused a significant decrease in the percentage of S-phase cells and induced p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 expression, both of which are likely to explain the decrease in the amount of newly regenerated hair cells in treated embryos. Finally, we showed that HDAC inhibitors induced no observable cell death in neuromasts as measured by cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HDAC activity has an important role in the regeneration of hair cells in the lateral line. PMID:25431550

  12. Ion flow in cochlear hair cells and the regulation of hearing sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Patuzzi, Robert

    2011-10-01

    This paper discusses how ion transport proteins in the hair cells of the mammalian cochlea work to produce a sensitive but stable hearing organ. The transport proteins in the inner and outer hair cells are summarized (including their current voltage characteristics), and the roles of these proteins in determining intracellular Ca(2+), membrane potential, and ultimately cochlear sensitivity are discussed. The paper also discusses the role of the Ca(2+) sequestration sacs in outer hair cells in the autoregulation of hair cell membrane potential and cochlear gain, and how the underdamped control of Ca(2+) within these sacs may produce the observed slow oscillations in cochlear sensitivity and otoacoustic emissions after cochlear perturbations, including perilymphatic perfusions and prolonged low-frequency tones. The relative insensitivity of cochlear gain to short-term changes in the endocochlear potential is also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  14. Activation of miR-34a/SIRT1/p53 signaling contributes to cochlear hair cell apoptosis: implications for age-related hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hao; Pang, Jiaqi; Yang, Haidi; Dai, Min; Liu, Yimin; Ou, Yongkang; Huang, Qiuhong; Chen, Suijun; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Yaodong; Lai, Lan; Zheng, Yiqing

    2015-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying age-related hearing loss are not fully understood, and currently, there is no treatment for this disorder. MicroRNAs have recently been reported to be increasingly associated with age-related diseases and are emerging as promising therapeutic targets. In this study, miR-34a/Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)/p53 signaling was examined in cochlear hair cells during aging. MiR-34a, p53 acetylation, and apoptosis increased in the cochlea of C57BL/6 mice with aging, whereas an age-related decrease in SIRT1 was observed. In the inner ear HEI-OC1 cell line, miR-34a overexpression inhibited SIRT1, leading to an increase in p53 acetylation and apoptosis. Moreover, miR-34a knockdown increased SIRT1 expression and diminished p53 acetylation, and apoptosis. Additionally, resveratrol, an activator of SIRT1, significantly rescued miR-34a overexpression-induced HEI-OC1 cell death and significantly reduced hearing threshold shifts and hair cell loss in C57BL/6 mice after a 2-month administration. Our results support a link between age-related cochlear hair cell apoptosis and miR-34a/SIRT1/p53 signaling, which may serve as a potential target for age-related hearing loss treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. BMP signaling in dermal papilla cells is required for their hair follicle-inductive properties

    PubMed Central

    Rendl, Michael; Polak, Lisa; Fuchs, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Hair follicle (HF) formation is initiated when epithelial stem cells receive cues from specialized mesenchymal dermal papilla (DP) cells. In culture, DP cells lose their HF-inducing properties, but during hair growth in vivo, they reside within the HF bulb and instruct surrounding epithelial progenitors to orchestrate the complex hair differentiation program. To gain insights into the molecular program that maintains DP cell fate, we previously purified DP cells and four neighboring populations and defined their cell-type-specific molecular signatures. Here, we exploit this information to show that the bulb microenvironment is rich in bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) that act on DP cells to maintain key signature features in vitro and hair-inducing activity in vivo. By employing a novel in vitro/in vivo hybrid knockout assay, we ablate BMP receptor 1a in purified DP cells. When DPs cannot receive BMP signals, they lose signature characteristics in vitro and fail to generate HFs when engrafted with epithelial stem cells in vivo. These results reveal that BMP signaling, in addition to its key role in epithelial stem cell maintenance and progenitor cell differentiation, is essential for DP cell function, and suggest that it is a critical feature of the complex epithelial–mesenchymal cross-talk necessary to make hair. PMID:18281466

  16. Ionic mechanisms subserving mechanosensory transduction and neural integration in statocyst hair cells of Hermissenda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    The neural processing of gravitational-produced sensory stimulation of statocyst hair cells in the nudibranch mollusk Hermissenda was studied. The goal in these studies was to understand how: gravireceptor neurons sense or transduce gravitational forces, gravitational stimulation is integrated so as to produce a graded receptor potential, and ultimately the generation of an action potential, and various neural adaptation phenomena which hair cells exhibit arise. The approach to these problems was primarily electrophysical.

  17. Natural Compounds as Occult Ototoxins? Ginkgo biloba Flavonoids Moderately Damage Lateral Line Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Neveux, Sarah; Smith, Nicole K; Roche, Anna; Blough, Bruce E; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Coffin, Allison B

    2017-04-01

    Several drugs, including aminoglycosides and platinum-based chemotherapy agents, are well known for their ototoxic properties. However, FDA-approved drugs are not routinely tested for ototoxicity, so their potential to affect hearing often goes unrecognized. This issue is further compounded for natural products, where there is a lack of FDA oversight and the manufacturer is solely responsible for ensuring the safety of their products. Natural products such as herbal supplements are easily accessible and commonly used in the practice of traditional eastern and alternative medicine. Using the zebrafish lateral line, we screened a natural products library to identify potential ototoxins. We found that the flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol, both from the Gingko biloba plant, demonstrated significant ototoxicity, killing up to 30 % of lateral line hair cells. We then examined a third Ginkgo flavonoid, isorhamnetin, and found similar levels of ototoxicity. After flavonoid treatment, surviving hair cells demonstrated reduced uptake of the vital dye FM 1-43FX, suggesting that the health of the remaining hair cells was compromised. We then asked if these flavonoids enter hair cells through the mechanotransduction channel, which is the site of entry for many known ototoxins. High extracellular calcium or the quinoline derivative E6 berbamine significantly protected hair cells from flavonoid damage, implicating the transduction channel as a site of flavonoid uptake. Since known ototoxins activate cellular stress responses, we asked if reactive oxygen species were necessary for flavonoid ototoxicity. Co-treatment with the antioxidant D-methionine significantly protected hair cells from each flavonoid, suggesting that antioxidant therapy could prevent hair cell loss. How these products affect mammalian hair cells is still an open question and will be the target of future experiments. However, this research demonstrates the potential for ototoxic damage caused by unregulated

  18. Fgf9 from dermal γδ T cells induces hair follicle neogenesis after wounding

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Denise; Kwon, Ohsang; Zhang, Zhikun; Spata, Michelle; Plikus, Maksim V; Holler, Phillip D; Ito, Mayumi; Yang, Zaixin; Treffeisen, Elsa; Kim, Chang D; Nace, Arben; Zhang, Xiaohong; Baratono, Sheena; Wang, Fen; Ornitz, David M; Millar, Sarah E; Cotsarelis, George

    2014-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms for regeneration of hair follicles provides new opportunities for developing treatments for hair loss and other skin disorders. Here we show that fibroblast growth factor 9 (Fgf9), initially secreted by γδ T cells, modulates hair follicle regeneration after wounding the skin of adult mice. Reducing Fgf9 expression decreases this wound-induced hair neogenesis (WIHN). Conversely, overexpression of Fgf9 results in a two- to threefold increase in the number of neogenic hair follicles. We found that Fgf9 from γδ T cells triggers Wnt expression and subsequent Wnt activation in wound fibroblasts. Through a unique feedback mechanism, activated fibroblasts then express Fgf9, thus amplifying Wnt activity throughout the wound dermis during a crucial phase of skin regeneration. Notably, humans lack a robust population of resident dermal γδ T cells, potentially explaining their inability to regenerate hair after wounding. These findings highlight the essential relationship between the immune system and tissue regeneration. The importance of Fgf9 in hair follicle regeneration suggests that it could be used therapeutically in humans. PMID:23727932

  19. Middle Ear Fluid Cytokine and Inflammatory Cell Kinetics in the Chinchilla Otitis Media Model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Katsuro; Liebeler, Carol L.; Quartey, Moses K.; Le, Chap T.; Giebink, G. Scott

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microbe causing middle ear infection. The pathophysiology of pneumococcal otitis media has been characterized by measurement of local inflammatory mediators such as inflammatory cells, lysozyme, oxidative metabolic products, and inflammatory cytokines. The role of cytokines in bacterial infection has been elucidated with animal models, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) are recognized as being important local mediators in acute inflammation. We characterized middle ear inflammatory responses in the chinchilla otitis media model after injecting a very small number of viable pneumococci into the middle ear, similar to the natural course of infection. Middle ear fluid (MEF) concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α were measured by using anti-human cytokine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reagents. IL-1β showed the earliest peak, at 6 h after inoculation, whereas IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α concentrations were increasing 72 h after pneumococcal inoculation. IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α but not IL-1β concentrations correlated significantly with total inflammatory cell numbers in MEF, and all four cytokines correlated significantly with MEF neutrophil concentration. Several intercytokine correlations were significant. Cytokines, therefore, participate in the early middle ear inflammatory response to S. pneumoniae. PMID:10085040

  20. Hair Follicle Generation by Injections of Adult Human Follicular Epithelial and Dermal Papilla Cells into Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammadali; Rahimi Jameh, Elham; Jaffary, Fariba; Abolhasani, Ehsan; Keshtmand, Gelavizh; Zarkob, Hajar; Mohammadi, Parvaneh; Aghdami, Nasser

    2017-01-01

    Objective Dermal papilla and hair epithelial stem cells regulate hair formation and the growth cycle. Damage to or loss of these cells can cause hair loss. Although several studies claim to reconstitute hairs using rodent cells in an animal model, additional research is needed to develop a stable human hair follicle reconstitution protocol. In this study, we have evaluated hair induction by injecting adult cultured human dermal papilla cells and a mixture of hair epithelial and dermal papilla cells in a mouse model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, discarded human scalp skins were used to obtain dermal papilla and hair epithelial cells. After separation, cells were cultured and assessed for their characteristics. We randomly allocated 15 C57BL/6 nude mice into three groups that received injections in their dorsal skin. The first group received cultured dermal papilla cells, the second group received a mixture of cultured epithelial and dermal papilla cells, and the third group (control) received a placebo [phosphate-buffered saline (PBS-)]. Results Histopathologic examination of the injection sites showed evidence of hair growth in samples that received cells compared with the control group. However, the group that received epithelial and dermal papilla cells had visible evidence of hair growth. PKH tracing confirmed the presence of transplanted cells in the new hair. Conclusion Our data showed that injection of a combination of adult human cultured dermal papilla and epithelial cells could induce hair growth in nude mice. This study emphasized that the combination of human adult cultured dermal papilla and epithelial cells could induce new hair in nude mice. PMID:28670518

  1. Distribution and time course of hair cell regeneration in the pigeon utricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, B. J.; Frank, T. C.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular and cochlear regeneration following ototoxic insult from aminoglycoside antibiotics has been well documented, particularly in birds. In the present study, intraotic application of a 2 mg streptomycin paste was used to achieve complete vestibular hair cell destruction in pigeons (Columba livia) while preserving regenerative ability. Scanning electron microscopy was used to quantify hair cell density longitudinally during regeneration in three different utricular macula locations, including the striola, central and peripheral regions. The utricular epithelium was void of stereocilia (indicating hair cell loss) at 4 days after intraotic treatment with streptomycin. At 2 weeks the stereocilia began to appear randomly and mostly in an immature form. However, when present most kinocilia were polarized toward the developing striola. Initially, regeneration occurred more rapidly in the central and peripheral regions of the utricle as compared to the striola. As regeneration proceeded from 2 to 12 weeks, hair cell density in the striola region equaled the density noted in the central and peripheral regions. At 24 weeks, hair cell density of the central and peripheral regions was equal to normal values, however the striola region had a slightly greater hair cell density than that observed for normal animals.

  2. Heterotopic synaptic bodies in the auditory hair cells of adult lizards.

    PubMed

    Miller, M R; Beck, J

    1987-07-01

    The auditory hair cells of adults of eight species of lizards (three gekkonids: Coleonyx variegatus, Gekko gecko, and Cosymbotus platyurus; two teiids: Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus tigris; one anguid: Celestus costatus; one lacertid: Podarcis (Lacerta) sicula; and one iguanid: Crotaphytus wislizeni) were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Heterotopic synaptic bodies were found in some of the auditory hair cells of all of the above species, occurring frequently in the gekkonids but infrequently in other species. The groups of heterotopic synaptic bodies occurred mainly in the infranuclear cytoplasm between the hair cell nucleus and the hair cell plasma membrane. The groups of synaptic bodies that were close to the hair cell nucleus were usually associated with specialized arrays of rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The numbers of heterotopic synaptic bodies were greatest in the gekkonid species and were especially large in Coleonyx variegatus, where an average of 36.8 synaptic bodies occur in one group. The functional significance of the presence of heterotopic synaptic bodies in the auditory hair cells of adults animals is not known.

  3. Squamous cell carcinoma and consequent otitis in a Long-eared Hedgehog (Hemiechinus auritus)--case report.

    PubMed

    Gál, Janos; Landauer, Krisztina; Palade, Elena Alina; Ivaskevics, Katalin; Rusvai, Miklós; Demeter, Zoltán

    2009-03-01

    The authors describe a squamous cell carcinoma arising from the ear canal of a Long-eared Hedgehog (Hemiechinus auritus). No metastasis could be identified elsewhere in the animal. Due to the irritation caused by the tumorous proliferation the animal constantly scratched the affected area, which led to secondary bacterial infection of the middle ear accompanied by the stagnation of an increased volume of local secretions. Using routine haematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining techniques, the tumour was identified as a squamous cell carcinoma. This work constitutes the first description of such a tumour in a Long-eared Hedgehog.

  4. Ear Infection (Middle Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    ... secretions from the middle ear Swelling, inflammation and mucus in the eustachian tubes from an upper respiratory ... your baby for at least six months. Breast milk contains antibodies that may offer protection from ear ...

  5. Coping with cancer - hair loss

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer treatment - alopecia; Chemotherapy - hair loss; Radiation - hair loss ... Many chemotherapy drugs attack fast-growing cells. This is because cancer cells divide rapidly. Since the cells in hair ...

  6. Auditory Hair Cell Centrioles Undergo Confined Brownian Motion Throughout the Developmental Migration of the Kinocilium

    PubMed Central

    Lepelletier, Léa; de Monvel, Jacques Boutet; Buisson, Johanna; Desdouets, Chantal; Petit, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Planar polarization of the forming hair bundle, the mechanosensory antenna of auditory hair cells, depends on the poorly characterized center-to-edge displacement of a primary cilium, the kinocilium, at their apical surface. Taking advantage of the gradient of hair cell differentiation along the cochlea, we reconstituted a map of the kinocilia displacements in the mouse embryonic cochlea. We then developed a cochlear organotypic culture and video-microscopy approach to monitor the movements of the kinocilium basal body (mother centriole) and its daughter centriole, which we analyzed using particle tracking and modeling. We found that both hair cell centrioles undergo confined Brownian movements around their equilibrium positions, under the apparent constraint of a radial restoring force of ∼0.1 pN. This magnitude depended little on centriole position, suggesting nonlinear interactions with constraining, presumably cytoskeletal elements. The only dynamic change observed during the period of kinocilium migration was a doubling of the centrioles’ confinement area taking place early in the process. It emerges from these static and dynamic observations that kinocilia migrate gradually in parallel with the organization of hair cells into rows during cochlear neuroepithelium extension. Analysis of the confined motion of hair cell centrioles under normal and pathological conditions should help determine which structures contribute to the restoring force exerting on them. PMID:23823223

  7. Auditory hair cell centrioles undergo confined Brownian motion throughout the developmental migration of the kinocilium.

    PubMed

    Lepelletier, Léa; de Monvel, Jacques Boutet; Buisson, Johanna; Desdouets, Chantal; Petit, Christine

    2013-07-02

    Planar polarization of the forming hair bundle, the mechanosensory antenna of auditory hair cells, depends on the poorly characterized center-to-edge displacement of a primary cilium, the kinocilium, at their apical surface. Taking advantage of the gradient of hair cell differentiation along the cochlea, we reconstituted a map of the kinocilia displacements in the mouse embryonic cochlea. We then developed a cochlear organotypic culture and video-microscopy approach to monitor the movements of the kinocilium basal body (mother centriole) and its daughter centriole, which we analyzed using particle tracking and modeling. We found that both hair cell centrioles undergo confined Brownian movements around their equilibrium positions, under the apparent constraint of a radial restoring force of ∼0.1 pN. This magnitude depended little on centriole position, suggesting nonlinear interactions with constraining, presumably cytoskeletal elements. The only dynamic change observed during the period of kinocilium migration was a doubling of the centrioles' confinement area taking place early in the process. It emerges from these static and dynamic observations that kinocilia migrate gradually in parallel with the organization of hair cells into rows during cochlear neuroepithelium extension. Analysis of the confined motion of hair cell centrioles under normal and pathological conditions should help determine which structures contribute to the restoring force exerting on them. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HYPOTONIC SWELLING OF SALICYLATE-TREATED COCHLEAR OUTER HAIR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Man; Ratnanather, J. Tilak; Ceyhan, Elvan; Popel, Aleksander S.; Brownell, William E.

    2007-01-01

    The outer hair cell (OHC) is a hydrostat with a low hydraulic conductivity of Pf = 3×10−4 cm/s across the plasma membrane (PM) and subsurface cisterna (SSC) that make up the OHC's lateral wall. The SSC is structurally and functionally a transport barrier in normal cells that is known to be disrupted by salicylate. The effect of sodium salicylate on Pf is determined from osmotic experiments in which isolated, control and salicylate-treated OHCs were exposed to hypotonic solutions in a constant flow chamber. The value of Pf = 3.5±0.5 ×10−4 cm/s (mean ± s.e.m, n = 34) for salicylate-treated OHCs was not significantly different from Pf = 2.4±0.3 ×10−4 cm/s (mean ± s.e.m, n = 31) for untreated OHCs (p=.3302). Thus Pf is determined by the PM and is unaffected by salicylate treatment. The ratio of longitudinal strain to radial strain εz/εc = −0.76 for salicylate-treated OHCs was significantly smaller (p = .0143) from −0.72 for untreated OHCs, and is also independent of the magnitude of the applied osmotic challenge. Salicylate-treated OHCs took longer to attain a steady-state volume which is larger than that for untreated OHCs and increased in volume by 8-15% prior to hypotonic perfusion unlike sodium α-ketoglutarate treated OHCs. It is suggested that depolymerization of cytoskeletal proteins and/or glycogen maybe responsible for the large volume increase in salicylate-treated OHCs as well as the different responses to different modes of application of the hypotonic solution. PMID:17400411

  9. A two-step mechanism for stem cell activation during hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greco, Valentina; Chen, Ting; Rendl, Michael; Schober, Markus; Pasolli, H Amalia; Stokes, Nicole; Dela Cruz-Racelis, June; Fuchs, Elaine

    2009-02-06

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cyclic bouts of degeneration, rest, and regeneration. During rest (telogen), the hair germ (HG) appears as a small cell cluster between the slow-cycling bulge and dermal papilla (DP). Here we show that HG cells are derived from bulge stem cells (SCs) but become responsive quicker to DP-promoting signals. In vitro, HG cells also proliferate sooner but display shorter-lived potential than bulge cells. Molecularly, they more closely resemble activated bulge rather than transit-amplifying (matrix) cells. Transcriptional profiling reveals precocious activity of both HG and DP in late telogen, accompanied by Wnt signaling in HG and elevated FGFs and BMP inhibitors in DP. FGFs and BMP inhibitors participate with Wnts in exerting selective and potent stimuli to the HG both in vivo and in vitro. Our findings suggest a model where HG cells fuel initial steps in hair regeneration, while the bulge is the engine maintaining the process.

  10. Cytoplasm localization of aminopeptidase M1 and its functional activity in root hair cells and BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ok Ran; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2012-12-01

    Aminopeptidase M1 (APM1) was the first M1 metallopeptidase family member identified in Arabidopsis, isolated by its affinity for the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). A loss-of-function mutation showed various developmental defects in cell division and auxin transport. APM1 was shown to be localized in endomembrane structures, the cytoplasm, and the plasma membrane. These previous results suggested that APM1 has diverse functional roles in different cell and tissue types. Here we report that APM1 localized to the cytoplasm, and its over-expression in the root hair cell caused longer root hair phenotypes. Treatment of aminopeptidase inhibitors caused internalization of auxin efflux PIN-FORMED proteins in root hair cells and suppressed short root hair phenotype of PIN3 overexpression line (PIN3ox). APM1 also localized to the cytoplasm in tobacco BY-2 cells, its over-expression had little effect on auxin transport in these cells.

  11. Bulge Region as a Putative Hair Follicle Stem Cells Niche: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    JOULAI VEIJOUYE, Sanaz; YARI, Abazar; HEIDARI, Fatemeh; SAJEDI, Nayereh; GHOROGHI MOGHANI, Fatemeh; NOBAKHT, Maliheh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hair follicle stem cells exist in different sites. Most of the hair follicle stem cells are reside in niche called bulge. Bulge region is located between the opening of sebaceous gland and the attachment site of the arrector pili muscle. Methods: Data were collected using databases and resources of PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, Scopus, MEDLINE and their references from the earliest available published to identify English observational studies on hair follicle bulge region. Results: Bulge stem cells are pluripotent with high proliferative capacity. Specific markers allow the bulge cells to be isolated from mouse or human hair follicle. Stem cells isolated from bulge region are label retaining and slow cycling hence these cells are defined as label-retaining cells. Bulge cell populations, due to their plasticity nature are able to differentiate into distinct linage and could contribute in tissue regeneration. Conclusion: The current review discuss about bulge stem cells characteristics and biology including their cycle, location, plasticity, specific markers and regenerative nature. Also the differences between mouse and human hair follicles are investigated. PMID:29026781

  12. Generation of iPS-derived model cells for analyses of hair shaft differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kido, Takumi; Horigome, Tomoatsu; Uda, Minori; Adachi, Naoki; Hirai, Yohei

    2017-09-01

    Biological evaluation of hair growth/differentiation activity in vitro has been a formidable challenge, primarily due to the lack of relevant model cell systems. To solve this problem, we generated a stable model cell line in which successive differentiation via epidermal progenitors to hair components is easily inducible and traceable. Mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells were selected to stably express a tetracycline (Tet)-inducible bone morphogenic protein-4 (BMP4) expression cassette and a luciferase reporter driven by a hair-specific keratin 31 gene (krt31) promoter (Tet-BMP4-KRT31-Luc iPS). While Tet- BMP4-KRT31-Luc iPS cells could be maintained as stable iPS cells, the cells differentiated to produce luciferase luminescence in the presence of all-trans retinoic acid (RA) and doxycycline (Dox), and addition of a hair differentiation factor significantly increased luciferase fluorescence. Thus, this cell line may provide a reliable cell-based screening system to evaluate drug candidates for hair differentiation activity.

  13. CD34 Expression by Hair Follicle Stem Cells Is Required for Skin Tumor Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trempus, Carol S.; Morris, Rebecca J.; Ehinger, Matthew; Elmore, Amy; Bortner, Carl D.; Ito, Mayumi; Cotsarelis, George; Nijhof, Joanne G.W.; Peckham, John; Flagler, Norris; Kissling, Grace; Humble, Margaret M.; King, Leon C.; Adams, Linda D.; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Tennant, Raymond W.

    2007-01-01

    The cell surface marker CD34 marks mouse hair follicle bulge cells, which have attributes of stem cells, including quiescence and multipotency. Using a CD34 knockout (KO) mouse, we tested the hypothesis that CD34 may participate in tumor development in mice because hair follicle stem cells are thought to be a major target of carcinogens in the two-stage model of mouse skin carcinogenesis. Following initiation with 200 nmol 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), mice were promoted with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for 20 weeks. Under these conditions, CD34KO mice failed to develop papillomas. Increasing the initiating dose of DMBA to 400 nmol resulted in tumor development in the CD34KO mice, albeit with an increased latency and lower tumor yield compared with the wild-type (WT) strain. DNA adduct analysis of keratinocytes from DMBA-initiated CD34KO mice revealed that DMBA was metabolically activated into carcinogenic diol epoxides at both 200 and 400 nmol. Chronic exposure to TPA revealed that CD34KO skin developed and sustained epidermal hyperplasia. However, CD34KO hair follicles typically remained in telogen rather than transitioning into anagen growth, confirmed by retention of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled bulge stem cells within the hair follicle. Unique localization of the hair follicle progenitor cell marker MTS24 was found in interfollicular basal cells in TPA-treated WT mice, whereas staining remained restricted to the hair follicles of CD34KO mice, suggesting that progenitor cells migrate into epidermis differently between strains. These data show that CD34 is required for TPA-induced hair follicle stem cell activation and tumor formation in mice. PMID:17483328

  14. Ethanol affects the development of sensory hair cells in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Uribe, Phillip M; Asuncion, James D; Matsui, Jonathan I

    2013-01-01

    Children born to mothers with substantial alcohol consumption during pregnancy can present a number of morphological, cognitive, and sensory abnormalities, including hearing deficits, collectively known as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The goal of this study was to determine if the zebrafish lateral line could be used to study sensory hair cell abnormalities caused by exposure to ethanol during embryogenesis. Some lateral line sensory hair cells are present at 2 days post-fertilization (dpf) and are functional by 5 dpf. Zebrafish embryos were raised in fish water supplemented with varying concentrations of ethanol (0.75%-1.75% by volume) from 2 dpf through 5 dpf. Ethanol treatment during development resulted in many physical abnormalities characteristic of FAS in humans. Also, the number of sensory hair cells decreased as the concentration of ethanol increased in a dose-dependent manner. The dye FM 1-43FX was used to detect the presence of functional mechanotransduction channels. The percentage of FM 1-43-labeled hair cells decreased as the concentration of ethanol increased. Methanol treatment did not affect the development of hair cells. The cell cycle markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) demonstrated that ethanol reduced the number of sensory hair cells, as a consequence of decreased cellular proliferation. There was also a significant increase in the rate of apoptosis, as determined by TUNEL-labeling, in neuromasts following ethanol treatment during larval development. Therefore, zebrafish are a useful animal model to study the effects of hair cell developmental disorders associated with FAS.

  15. Minoxidil Promotes Hair Growth through Stimulation of Growth Factor Release from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nahyun; Shin, Soyoung; Song, Sun U; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2018-02-28

    Minoxidil directly promotes hair growth via the stimulation of dermal papilla (DP) and epithelial cells. Alternatively, there is little evidence for indirect promotion of hair growth via stimulation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). We investigated whether minoxidil stimulates ASCs and if increased growth factor secretion by ASCs facilitates minoxidil-induced hair growth. Telogen-to-anagen induction was examined in mice. Cultured DP cells and vibrissae hair follicle organ cultures were used to further examine the underlying mechanisms. Subcutaneous injection of minoxidil-treated ASCs accelerated telogen-to-anagen transition in mice, and increased hair weight at day 14 post-injection. Minoxidil did not alter ASC proliferation, but increased migration and tube formation. Minoxidil also increased the secretion of growth factors from ASCs, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF), and platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C). Minoxidil increased extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, and concomitant upregulation of PD-ECGF and PDGF-C mRNA levels were attenuated by an ERK inhibitor. Subcutaneous injection of CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C enhanced anagen induction in mice, and both CXCL1 and PDGF-C increased hair length in ex vivo organ culture. Treatment with CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C also increased the proliferation index in DP cells. Finally, topical application of CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C with 2% minoxidil enhanced anagen induction when compared to minoxidil alone. Minoxidil stimulates ASC motility and increases paracrine growth factor signaling. Minoxidil-stimulated secretion of growth factors by ASCs may enhance hair growth by promoting DP proliferation. Therefore, minoxidil can be used as an ASC preconditioning agent for hair regeneration.

  16. Minoxidil Promotes Hair Growth through Stimulation of Growth Factor Release from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nahyun; Shin, Soyoung; Song, Sun U.; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2018-01-01

    Minoxidil directly promotes hair growth via the stimulation of dermal papilla (DP) and epithelial cells. Alternatively, there is little evidence for indirect promotion of hair growth via stimulation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). We investigated whether minoxidil stimulates ASCs and if increased growth factor secretion by ASCs facilitates minoxidil-induced hair growth. Telogen-to-anagen induction was examined in mice. Cultured DP cells and vibrissae hair follicle organ cultures were used to further examine the underlying mechanisms. Subcutaneous injection of minoxidil-treated ASCs accelerated telogen-to-anagen transition in mice, and increased hair weight at day 14 post-injection. Minoxidil did not alter ASC proliferation, but increased migration and tube formation. Minoxidil also increased the secretion of growth factors from ASCs, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF), and platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C). Minoxidil increased extracellular signal–regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, and concomitant upregulation of PD-ECGF and PDGF-C mRNA levels were attenuated by an ERK inhibitor. Subcutaneous injection of CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C enhanced anagen induction in mice, and both CXCL1 and PDGF-C increased hair length in ex vivo organ culture. Treatment with CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C also increased the proliferation index in DP cells. Finally, topical application of CXCL1, PD-ECGF, or PDGF-C with 2% minoxidil enhanced anagen induction when compared to minoxidil alone. Minoxidil stimulates ASC motility and increases paracrine growth factor signaling. Minoxidil-stimulated secretion of growth factors by ASCs may enhance hair growth by promoting DP proliferation. Therefore, minoxidil can be used as an ASC preconditioning agent for hair regeneration. PMID:29495622

  17. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on vestibular hair cells in the guinea pig: importance of cell membrane impairment preceding cell death.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Tohru; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Hayashi, Ken; Nakayama, Meiho; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Banno, Shinya; Takumida, Masaya; Brodie, Hirally; Inafuku, Shigeru

    2008-11-01

    Our findings indicate that oxidative stress induces morphological changes in vestibular hair cells and subsequently leads to cell death after 2.5 h. The aim of this study was to confirm the direct effects of oxidative stress on vestibular hair cells. Vestibular hair cells isolated from guinea pigs were loaded with 1 or 10 mM H2O2, and morphological changes were observed. In addition, in a viability/cytotoxicity assay system, the numbers of dead cells in isolated cristae ampullares were counted 1, 3, and 5 h after loading with H2O2 or artificial perilymph (control). Reactive oxygen, in the form of H2O2, directly affects the cell membrane of isolated vestibular hair cells and causes swelling of the cell body, bleb formation, and shortening of the neck region. Morphological changes occur within 30 min after loading with H2O2, but a significant increase in the number of dead cells is noted only after 3 h.

  18. Hair cell counts in a rat model of sound damage: Effects of tissue preparation & identification of regions of hair cell loss.

    PubMed

    Neal, Christopher; Kennon-McGill, Stefanie; Freemyer, Andrea; Shum, Axel; Staecker, Hinrich; Durham, Dianne

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to intense sound can damage or kill cochlear hair cells (HC). This loss of input typically manifests as noise induced hearing loss, but it can also be involved in the initiation of other auditory disorders such as tinnitus or hyperacusis. In this study we quantify changes in HC number following exposure to one of four sound damage paradigms. We exposed adult, anesthetized Long-Evans rats to a unilateral 16 kHz pure tone that varied in intensity (114 dB or 118 dB) and duration (1, 2, or 4 h) and sacrificed animals 2-4 weeks later. We compared two different methods of tissue preparation, plastic embedding/sectioning and whole mount dissection, for quantifying hair cell loss as a function of frequency. We found that the two methods of tissue preparation produced largely comparable cochleograms, with whole mount dissections allowing a more rapid evaluation of hair cell number. Both inner and outer hair cell loss was observed throughout the length of the cochlea irrespective of sound damage paradigm. Inner HC loss was either equal to or greater than outer HC loss. Increasing the duration of sound exposures resulted in more severe HC loss, which included all HC lesions observed in an analogous shorter duration exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. How do the medial olivocochlear efferents influence the biomechanics of the outer hair cells and thereby the cochlear amplifier? Simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Amin; Stenfelt, Stefan; Verhulst, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The bottom-up signal pathway, which starts from the outer ear and leads to the brain cortices, gives the classic image of the human sound perception. However, there have been growing evidences in the last six decades for existence of a functional descending network whereby the central auditory system can modulate the early auditory processing, in a top-down manner. The medial olivocochlear efferent fibers project from the superior olivary complex at the brainstem into the inner ear. They are linked to the basal poles of the hair cells by forming synaptic cisterns. This descending network can activate nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR) that increase the membrane conductance of the outer hair cells and thereby modify the magnitude of the active force generated inside the cochlea. The aim of the presented work is to quantitatively investigate how the changes in the biomechanics of the outer hair cells, caused by the efferent activation, manipulate the cochlear responses. This is done by means of a frequency-domain biophysical model of the cochlea [12] where the parameters of the model convey physiological interpretations of the human cochlear structures. The simulations manifest that a doubling of the outer hair cell conductance, due to efferent activation, leads to a frequency-dependent gain reduction along the cochlear duct with its highest effect at frequencies between 1 kHz and 3.5 kHz and a maximum of approximately 10 dB gain reduction at 2 kHz. This amount of the gain inhibition and its frequency dependence reasonably agrees with the experimental data recorded from guinea pig, cat and human cochleae where the medial olivococlear efferents had been elicited by broad-band stimuli. The simulations also indicate that the efferent-induced increase of the outer hair cell conductance increases the best frequency of the cochlear responses, in the basal region. The presented simulations quantitatively confirm that activation of the medial olivocochlear efferents can

  20. [Investigation of neural stem cell-derived donor contribution in the inner ear following blastocyst injection].

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, S; Brors, D; Hansen, S; Mlynski, R; Dinger, T C; Müller, A M; Dazert, S

    2008-03-01

    Utilising the enormous proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation potentials of somatic stem cells represents a possible therapeutical strategy for diseases of non-regenerative tissues like the inner ear. In the current study, the possibility of murine neural stem cells to contribute to the developing inner ear following blastocyst injection was investigated. Fetal brain-derived neural stem cells from the embryonic day 14 cortex of male mice were isolated and expanded for four weeks in neurobasal media supplemented with bFGF and EGF. Neural stem cells of male animals were harvested, injected into blastocysts and the blastocysts were transferred into pseudo-pregnant foster animals. Each blastocyst was injected with 5-15 microspheres growing from single cell suspension from neurospheres dissociated the day before. The resulting mice were investigated six months POST PARTUM for the presence of donor cells. Brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA) was performed in six animals. To visualize donor cells Lac-Z staining was performed on sliced cochleas of two animals. In addition, the cochleas of four female animals were isolated and genomic DNA of the entire cochlea was analyzed for donor contribution by Y-chromosome-specific PCR. All animals had normal thresholds in brainstem evoked response audiometry. The male-specific PCR product indicating the presence of male donor cells were detected in the cochleas of three of the four female animals investigated. In two animals, male donor cells were detected unilateral, in one animal bilateral. The results suggest that descendants of neural stem cells are detectable in the inner ear after injection into blastocysts and possess the ability to integrate into the developing inner ear without obvious loss in hearing function.

  1. Effect of Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kanehira Leaf Aqueous Extract on Dermal Papilla Cell Proliferation and Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Tung-Chou; Li, Yuan-Sheng; Rajamani, Karthyayani; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we explored the effect of the water extract of Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kanehira (COK) leaves on hair growth by in vitro and in vivo assays. Using an in vitro 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, it was found that the proliferation of rat vibrissae and human hair dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) was significantly enhanced by the COK leaf extract treatment. As determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of some hair growth–related factors including vascular endothelial growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and transforming growth factor-β2 were found to be higher in the cultured hDPCs exposed to COK leaf extract than those in the untreated control group. In the hair-depilated C57BL/6 mouse model, the stimulation of hair growth was demonstrated in the group of COK leaf extract treatment. Both photographical and histological observations revealed the promotion of the anagen phase in the hair growth cycle by the COK leaf extract in the C57BL/6 mice. Finally, the ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) showed that the COK extract contained mostly cinnamic aldehyde and a small amount of cinnamic acid. The results suggest that the COK leaf extract may find use for the treatment of hair loss. PMID:29637818

  2. Progressive hearing loss and degeneration of hair cell stereocilia in taperin gene knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mo; Wang, Qin; Zhu, Gang-Hua

    The TPRN gene encodes taperin, which is prominently present at the taper region of hair cell stereocilia. Mutations in TPRN have been reported to cause autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness 79(DFNB 79). To investigate the role of taperin in pathogenesis of hearing loss, we generated TPRN knockout mice using TALEN technique. Sanger sequencing confirmed an 11 bp deletion at nucleotide 177–187 in exon 1 of TPRN, which results in a truncated form of taperin protein. Heterozygous TPRN{sup +/−} mice showed apparently normal auditory phenotypes to their wide-type (WT) littermates. Homozygous TPRN{sup −/−} mice exhibited progressive sensorineural hearing loss as reflected bymore » auditory brainstem response to both click and tone burst stimuli at postnatal days 15 (P15), 30 (P30), and 60 (P60). Alex Fluor-594 phalloidin labeling showed no obvious difference in hair cell numbers in the cochlea between TPRN{sup −/−} mice and WT mice under light microscope. However, scanning electronic microscopy revealed progressive degeneration of inner hair cell stereocilia, from apparently normal at postnatal days 3 (P3) to scattered absence at P15 and further to substantial loss at P30. The outer hair cell stereocilia also showed progressive degeneration, though much less severe, Collectively, we conclude that taperin plays an important role in maintenance of hair cell stereocilia. Establishment of TPRN knockout mice enables further investigation into the function of this gene. - Highlights: • TPRN{sup −/−} mice were generated using TALEN technique. • TPRN{sup −/−} mice presented progressive hearing loss. • WT and TPRN{sup −/−} mice showed no difference in hair cell numbers. • TPRN{sup −/−} mice showed progressive degeneration of hair cell stereocilia.« less

  3. Mutations in cadherin 23 affect tip links in zebrafish sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Christian; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Siemens, Jan; Geisler, Robert; Schuster, Stephan C; Müller, Ulrich; Nicolson, Teresa

    2004-04-29

    Hair cells have highly organized bundles of apical projections, or stereocilia, that are deflected by sound and movement. Displacement of stereocilia stretches linkages at the tips of stereocilia that are thought to gate mechanosensory channels. To identify the molecular machinery that mediates mechanotransduction in hair cells, zebrafish mutants were identified with defects in balance and hearing. In sputnik mutants, stereociliary bundles are splayed to various degrees, with individuals displaying reduced or absent mechanotransduction. Here we show that the defects in sputnik mutants are caused by mutations in cadherin 23 (cdh23). Mutations in Cdh23 also cause deafness and vestibular defects in mice and humans, and the protein is present in hair bundles. We show that zebrafish Cdh23 protein is concentrated near the tips of hair bundles, and that tip links are absent in homozygous sputnik(tc317e) larvae. Moreover, tip links are absent in larvae carrying weak alleles of cdh23 that affect mechanotransduction but not hair bundle integrity. We conclude that Cdh23 is an essential tip link component required for hair-cell mechanotransduction.

  4. Cell Growth Characteristics, Differentiation Frequency, and Immunophenotype of Adult Ear Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Staszkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Frazier, Trivia P.; Rowan, Brian G.; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Chiu, Ernest S.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Ear mesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs) represent a readily accessible population of stem-like cells that are adherent, clonogenic, and have the ability to self-renew. Previously, we have demonstrated that they can be induced to differentiate into adipocyte, osteocyte, chondrocyte, and myocyte lineages. The purpose of the current study was to characterize the growth kinetics of the cells and to determine their ability to form colonies of fibroblasts, adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. In addition, the immunophenotypes of freshly isolated and culture-expanded cells were evaluated. From 1 g of tissue, we were able to isolate an average of 7.8 × 106 cells exhibiting a cell cycle length of ∼2–3 days. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays indicated high proliferation potential, and confirmed previously observed multipotentiality of the cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) showed that EMSCs were negative for hematopoietic markers (CD4, CD45), proving that they did not derive from circulating hematopoietic cells. The FACS analyses also showed high expression of stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) with only a minor population of cells expressing CD117, thus identifying Sca-1 as the more robust stem cell biomarker. Additionally, flow cytometry data revealed that the expression patterns of hematopoietic, stromal, and stem cell markers were maintained in the passaged EMSCs, consistent with the persistence of an undifferentiated state. This study indicates that EMSCs provide an alternative model for in vitro analyses of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Further studies will be necessary to determine their utility for tissue engineering and regenerative medical applications. PMID:19400629

  5. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype expression in avian vestibular hair cells, nerve terminals and ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Li, G Q; Kevetter, G A; Leonard, R B; Prusak, D J; Wood, T G; Correia, M J

    2007-04-25

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are widely expressed in the CNS and peripheral nervous system and play an important role in modulating the cell activity and function. We have shown that the cholinergic agonist carbachol reduces the pigeon's inwardly rectifying potassium channel (pKir2.1) ionic currents in native vestibular hair cells. We have cloned and sequenced pigeon mAChR subtypes M2-M5 and we have studied the expression of all five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) in the pigeon vestibular end organs (semicircular canal ampullary cristae and utricular maculae), vestibular nerve fibers and the vestibular (Scarpa's) ganglion using tissue immunohistochemistry (IH), dissociated single cell immunocytochemistry (IC) and Western blotting (WB). We found that vestibular hair cells, nerve fibers and ganglion cells each expressed all five (M1-M5) mAChR subtypes. Two of the three odd-numbered mAChRs (M1, M5) were present on the hair cell cilia, supporting cells and nerve terminals. And all three odd numbered mAChRs (M1, M3 and M5) were expressed on cuticular plates, myelin sheaths and Schwann cells. Even-numbered mAChRs were seen on the nerve terminals. M2 was also shown on the cuticular plates and supporting cells. Vestibular efferent fibers and terminals were not identified in our studies. Results from WB of the dissociated vestibular epithelia, nerve fibers and vestibular ganglia were consistent with the results from IH and IC. Our findings suggest that there is considerable co-expression of the subtypes on the neural elements of the labyrinth. Further electrophysiological and pharmacological studies should delineate the mechanisms of action of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on structures in the labyrinth.

  6. Junctional E-cadherin/p120-catenin Is Correlated with the Absence of Supporting Cells to Hair Cells Conversion in Postnatal Mice Cochleae.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen-Wei; Wang, Xin-Wei; Ma, Rui; Chi, Fang-Lu; Chen, Ping; Cong, Ning; Gu, Yu-Yan; Ren, Dong-Dong; Yang, Juan-Mei

    2018-01-01

    Notch inhibition is known to generate supernumerary hair cells (HCs) at the expense of supporting cells (SCs) in the mammalian inner ear. However, inhibition of Notch activity becomes progressively less effective at inducing SC-to-HC conversion in the postnatal cochlea and balance organs as the animal ages. It has been suggested that the SC-to-HC conversion capacity is inversely correlated with E-cadherin accumulation in postnatal mammalian utricles. However, whether E-cadherin localization is linked to the SC-to-HC conversion capacity in the mammalian inner ear is poorly understood. In the present study, we treated cochleae from postnatal day 0 (P0) with the Notch signaling inhibitor DAPT and observed apparent SC-to-HC conversion along with E-cadherin/p120ctn disruption in the sensory region. In addition, the SC-to-HC conversion capacity and E-cadherin/p120ctn disorganization were robust in the apex but decreased toward the base. We further demonstrated that the ability to regenerate HCs and the disruption of E-cadherin/p120ctn concomitantly decreased with age and ceased at P7, even after extended DAPT treatments. This timing is consistent with E-cadherin/p120ctn accumulation in the postnatal cochleae. These results suggest that the decreasing capacity of SCs to transdifferentiate into HCs correlates with E-cadherin/p120ctn localization in the postnatal cochleae, which might account for the absence of SC-to-HC conversion in the mammalian cochlea.

  7. Fully functional hair follicle regeneration through the rearrangement of stem cells and their niches

    PubMed Central

    Toyoshima, Koh-ei; Asakawa, Kyosuke; Ishibashi, Naoko; Toki, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Miho; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Irié, Tarou; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Sato, Akio; Takeda, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Organ replacement regenerative therapy is purported to enable the replacement of organs damaged by disease, injury or aging in the foreseeable future. Here we demonstrate fully functional hair organ regeneration via the intracutaneous transplantation of a bioengineered pelage and vibrissa follicle germ. The pelage and vibrissae are reconstituted with embryonic skin-derived cells and adult vibrissa stem cell region-derived cells, respectively. The bioengineered hair follicle develops the correct structures and forms proper connections with surrounding host tissues such as the epidermis, arrector pili muscle and nerve fibres. The bioengineered follicles also show restored hair cycles and piloerection through the rearrangement of follicular stem cells and their niches. This study thus reveals the potential applications of adult tissue-derived follicular stem cells as a bioengineered organ replacement therapy. PMID:22510689

  8. Divergent cytosine DNA methylation patterns in single-cell, soybean root hairs.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Shakhawat; Kawakatsu, Taiji; Kim, Kyung Do; Zhang, Ning; Nguyen, Cuong T; Khan, Saad M; Batek, Josef M; Joshi, Trupti; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Schmitz, Robert J; Xu, Dong; Jackson, Scott A; Ecker, Joseph R; Stacey, Gary

    2017-04-01

    Chromatin modifications, such as cytosine methylation of DNA, play a significant role in mediating gene expression in plants, which affects growth, development, and cell differentiation. As root hairs are single-cell extensions of the root epidermis and the primary organs for water uptake and nutrients, we sought to use root hairs as a single-cell model system to measure the impact of environmental stress. We measured changes in cytosine DNA methylation in single-cell root hairs as compared with multicellular stripped roots, as well as in response to heat stress. Differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in each methylation context showed very distinct methylation patterns between cell types and in response to heat stress. Intriguingly, at normal temperature, root hairs were more hypermethylated than were stripped roots. However, in response to heat stress, both root hairs and stripped roots showed hypomethylation in each context, especially in the CHH context. Moreover, expression analysis of mRNA from similar tissues and treatments identified some associations between DMRs, genes and transposons. Taken together, the data indicate that changes in DNA methylation are directly or indirectly associated with expression of genes and transposons within the context of either specific tissues/cells or stress (heat). © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. FGF signalling controls the specification of hair placode-derived SOX9 positive progenitors to Merkel cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Binh; Cohen, Idan; Kumar, Vinod; Xu, Zijian; Bar, Carmit; Dauber-Decker, Katherine L; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Marangoni, Pauline; Klein, Ophir D; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Chen, Ting; Mikkola, Marja L; Ezhkova, Elena

    2018-06-13

    Merkel cells are innervated mechanosensory cells responsible for light-touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are located in touch domes and found in the epidermis around primary hairs. While it has been shown that Merkel cells are skin epithelial cells, the progenitor cell population that gives rise to these cells is unknown. Here, we show that during embryogenesis, SOX9-positive (+) cells inside hair follicles, which were previously known to give rise to hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) and cells of the hair follicle lineage, can also give rise to Merkel Cells. Interestingly, while SOX9 is critical for HFSC specification, it is dispensable for Merkel cell formation. Conversely, FGFR2 is required for Merkel cell formation but is dispensable for HFSCs. Together, our studies uncover SOX9(+) cells as precursors of Merkel cells and show the requirement for FGFR2-mediated epithelial signalling in Merkel cell specification.

  10. Mature middle and inner ears express Chd7 and exhibit distinctive pathologies in a mouse model of CHARGE syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Elizabeth A.; Adams, Meredith E.; Layman, Wanda S.; Swiderski, Donald L.; Beyer, Lisa A.; Halsey, Karin E.; Benson, Jennifer M.; Gong, Tzy-Wen; Dolan, David F.; Raphael, Yehoash; Martin, Donna M.

    2011-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain-DNA-binding-protein 7 (CHD7) cause CHARGE syndrome, a multiple anomaly condition which includes vestibular dysfunction and hearing loss. Mice with heterozygous Chd7 mutations exhibit semicircular canal dysgenesis and abnormal inner ear neurogenesis, and are an excellent model of CHARGE syndrome. Here we characterized Chd7 expression in mature middle and inner ears, analyzed morphological features of mutant ears and tested whether Chd7 mutant mice have altered responses to noise exposure and correlated those responses to inner and middle ear structure. We found that Chd7 is highly expressed in mature inner and outer hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons, vestibular sensory epithelia and middle ear ossicles. There were no obvious defects in individual hair cell morphology by Prestin immunostaining or scanning electron microscopy, and cochlear innervation appeared normal in Chd7Gt/+ mice. Hearing thresholds by auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing were elevated at 4 and 16 kHz in Chd7Gt/+ mice, and there were reduced distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Exposure of Chd7Gt/+ mice to broadband noise resulted in variable degrees of hair cell loss which inversely correlated with severity of stapedial defects. The degrees of hair cell loss and threshold shifts after noise exposure were more severe in wild type mice than in mutants. Together, these data indicate that Chd7Gt/+ mice have combined conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, correlating with changes in both middle and inner ears. PMID:21875659

  11. Generation of hair cells in neonatal mice by β-catenin overexpression in Lgr5-positive cochlear progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fuxin; Hu, Lingxiang; Edge, Albert S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian hair cells do not regenerate, and their loss is a major cause of deafness. We recently identified leucine-rich repeat containing, G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5)-expressing cochlear supporting cells with the capacity for self-renewal and hair cell differentiation in vitro. We found that these cells, a subset of cochlear supporting cells, were responsive to Wnt signaling. Here we asked whether these Lgr5-positive cells, despite their lack of contribution to hair cell replacement after degenerative loss, could be driven by forced expression of β-catenin to act as hair cell progenitors in vivo. We showed that forced stabilization of β-catenin in supporting cells in neonatal animals resulted in proliferation of supporting cells and generation of hair cells. Although β-catenin expression was increased by genetic means in all supporting cells, entry to the cell cycle and differentiation to hair cells of the normally postmitotic cells was restricted to the Lgr5-positive population. Our finding suggests that Wnt/β-catenin can drive Lgr5-positive cells to act as hair cell progenitors, even after their exit from the cell cycle and apparent establishment of cell fate. PMID:23918377

  12. Segregating neural and mechanosensory fates in the developing ear: patterning, signaling, and transcriptional control

    PubMed Central

    Raft, Steven; Groves, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate inner ear is composed of multiple sensory receptor epithelia, each of which is specialized for detection of sound, gravity or angular acceleration. Each receptor epithelium contains mechanosensitive hair cells, which are connected to the brainstem by bipolar sensory neurons. Hair cells and their associated neurons are derived from the embryonic rudiment of the inner ear epithelium, but the precise spatial and temporal patterns of their generation, as well as the signals that coordinate these events, have only recently begun to be understood. Gene expression, lineage tracing, and mutant analyses suggest that both neurons and hair cells are generated from a common domain of neural and sensory competence in the embryonic inner ear rudiment. Members of the Shh, Wnt and FGF families, together with retinoic acid signals, regulate transcription factor genes within the inner ear rudiment to establish the axial identity of the ear and regionalize neurogenic activity. Close-range signaling, such as that of the Notch pathway, specifies the fate of sensory regions and individual cell types. We also describe positive and negative interactions between basic helix-loop-helix and SoxB family transcription factors that specify either neuronal or sensory fates in a context-dependent manner. Finally, we review recent work on inner ear development in zebrafish, which demonstrates that the relative timing of neurogenesis and sensory epithelial formation is not phylogenetically constrained. PMID:24902666

  13. Protective effects of edaravone against cisplatin-induced hair cell damage in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seok Jin; Im, Gi Jung; Chang, Jiwon; Chae, Sung Won; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kwon, Soon Young; Jung, Hak Hyun; Chung, Ah Young; Park, Hae Chul; Choi, June

    2013-06-01

    Edaravone is known to have a potent free radical scavenging effect. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of edaravone on cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in transgenic zebrafish (Brn3C: EGFP). Five day post-fertilization zebrafish larvae were exposed to 1000 μM cisplatin and 50 μM, 100 μM, 250 μM, 500 μM, 750 μM, and 1000 μM concentrations of edaravone for 4h. Hair cells within neuromasts of the supraorbital (SO1 and SO2), otic (O1), and occipital (OC1) lateral lines were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy (n=10). Hair cell survival was calculated as a percentage of the hair cells in the control group that were not exposed to cisplatin. Ultrastructural changes were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Edaravone protected cisplatin-induced hair cell loss of neuromasts (edaravone 750 μM: 8.7 ± 1.5 cells, cisplatin 1000 μM only: 3.7 ± 0.9 cells; n=10, p<0.0001) and decreased the Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) reaction. Structures of mitochondria and hair cell within neuromasts in ultrastructural analysis were preserved in zebrafish exposed to 1000 μM cisplatin and 750 μM edaravone for 4h. Edaravone attenuated cisplatin-induced hair cell damage in zebrafish. The results of the current study suggest that cisplatin induces apoptosis, and the apoptotic cell death can be prevented by treatment with edaravone in zebrafish. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The acquisition of mechano-electrical transducer current adaptation in auditory hair cells requires myosin VI.

    PubMed

    Marcotti, Walter; Corns, Laura F; Goodyear, Richard J; Rzadzinska, Agnieszka K; Avraham, Karen B; Steel, Karen P; Richardson, Guy P; Kros, Corné J

    2016-07-01

    The transduction of sound into electrical signals occurs at the hair bundles atop sensory hair cells in the cochlea, by means of mechanosensitive ion channels, the mechano-electrical transducer (MET) channels. The MET currents decline during steady stimuli; this is termed adaptation and ensures they always work within the most sensitive part of their operating range, responding best to rapidly changing (sound) stimuli. In this study we used a mouse model (Snell's waltzer) for hereditary deafness in humans that has a mutation in the gene encoding an unconventional myosin, myosin VI, which is present in the hair bundles. We found that in the absence of myosin VI the MET current fails to acquire its characteristic adaptation as the hair bundles develop. We propose that myosin VI supports the acquisition of adaptation by removing key molecules from the hair bundle that serve a temporary, developmental role. Mutations in Myo6, the gene encoding the (F-actin) minus end-directed unconventional myosin, myosin VI, cause hereditary deafness in mice (Snell's waltzer) and humans. In the sensory hair cells of the cochlea, myosin VI is expressed in the cell bodies and along the stereocilia that project from the cells' apical surface. It is required for maintaining the structural integrity of the mechanosensitive hair bundles formed by the stereocilia. In this study we investigate whether myosin VI contributes to mechano-electrical transduction. We report that Ca(2+) -dependent adaptation of the mechano-electrical transducer (MET) current, which serves to keep the transduction apparatus operating within its most sensitive range, is absent in outer and inner hair cells from homozygous Snell's waltzer mutant mice, which fail to express myosin VI. The operating range of the MET channels is also abnormal in the mutants, resulting in the absence of a resting MET current. We found that cadherin 23, a component of the hair bundle's transient lateral links, fails to be downregulated

  15. A nonlinear cochlear model with the outer hair cell piezoelectric activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoai; Grosh, Karl

    2003-10-01

    In this paper we present a simple cochlear model which captures the most important aspect of nonlinearity in the cochlea-the nonlinearity caused by the piezoelectric-like activity of outer hair cells and the variable conductance of the outer hair cell stereocilia. A one-dimensional long-wave model is built to simulate the dynamic response of the fluid-loaded basilar membrane. The basilar membrane is simulated as isolated linear oscillators along the cochlear length, and its motion is coupled with the fluid pressure and the nonlinear force produced by the outer hair cells. As the basilar membrane moves, the fluid shears stereocilia, and the resulting ion flow changes the transmembrane potential of the outer hair cells and subsequently their length, leading to further movement of the basilar membrane. The piezoelectric-like activity of the outer hair cell is simulated by a current source, and stereocilia motion is modeled as a varying conductance that changes as the basilar membrane moves. A solution in the time domain will be presented. [Work supported by NIH.

  16. ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE4 (RSL4) promotes root hair elongation by transcriptionally regulating the expression of genes required for cell growth.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Priya; Datta, Sourav; Dolan, Liam

    2016-12-01

    ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE4 (RSL4) is necessary and sufficient for root hair elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Root hair length is determined by the duration for which RSL4 protein is present in the developing root hair. The aim of this research was to identify genes regulated by RSL4 that affect root hair growth. To identify genes regulated by RSL4, we identified genes whose expression was elevated by induction of RSL4 activity in the presence of an inhibitor of translation. Thirty-four genes were identified as putative targets of RSL transcriptional regulation, and the results suggest that the activities of SUPPRESSOR OF ACTIN (SAC1), EXOCSYT SUBUNIT 70A1 (EXO70A1), PEROXIDASE7 (PRX7) and CALCIUM-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE11 (CPK11) are required for root hair elongation. These data indicate that RSL4 controls cell growth by controlling the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in cell signalling, cell wall modification and secretion. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Biomechanics of hair cell kinocilia: experimental measurement of kinocilium shaft stiffness and base rotational stiffness with Euler–Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam analysis

    PubMed Central

    Spoon, Corrie; Grant, Wally

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular hair cell bundles in the inner ear contain a single kinocilium composed of a 9+2 microtubule structure. Kinocilia play a crucial role in transmitting movement of the overlying mass, otoconial membrane or cupula to the mechanotransducing portion of the hair cell bundle. Little is known regarding the mechanical deformation properties of the kinocilium. Using a force-deflection technique, we measured two important mechanical properties of kinocilia in the utricle of a turtle, Trachemys (Pseudemys) scripta elegans. First, we measured the stiffness of kinocilia with different heights. These kinocilia were assumed to be homogenous cylindrical rods and were modeled as both isotropic Euler–Bernoulli beams and transversely isotropic Timoshenko beams. Two mechanical properties of the kinocilia were derived from the beam analysis: flexural rigidity (EI) and shear rigidity (kGA). The Timoshenko model produced a better fit to the experimental data, predicting EI=10,400 pN μm2 and kGA=247 pN. Assuming a homogenous rod, the shear modulus (G=1.9 kPa) was four orders of magnitude less than Young's modulus (E=14.1 MPa), indicating that significant shear deformation occurs within deflected kinocilia. When analyzed as an Euler–Bernoulli beam, which neglects translational shear, EI increased linearly with kinocilium height, giving underestimates of EI for shorter kinocilia. Second, we measured the rotational stiffness of the kinocilium insertion (κ) into the hair cell's apical surface. Following BAPTA treatment to break the kinocilial links, the kinocilia remained upright, and κ was measured as 177±47 pN μm rad–1. The mechanical parameters we quantified are important for understanding how forces arising from head movement are transduced and encoded by hair cells. PMID:21307074

  18. 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 modulates the hair-inductive capacity of dermal papilla cells: therapeutic potential for hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Noriyuki; Inoue, Keita; Chikanishi, Toshihiro; Fujiki, Ryoji; Yamamoto, Hanako; Kato, Harunosuke; Eto, Hitomi; Doi, Kentaro; Itami, Satoshi; Kato, Shigeaki; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2012-08-01

    Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) have the potential to induce differentiation of epithelial stem cells into hair, and Wnt signaling is deeply involved in the initiation process. The functional limitation of expanded adult DPCs has been a difficult challenge for cell-based hair regrowth therapy. We previously reported that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD(3)) upregulates expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, both features of hair-inducing human DPCs (hDPCs). In this study, we further examined the effects and signaling pathways associated with VD(3) actions on DPCs. VD(3) suppressed hDPC proliferation in a dose-dependent, noncytotoxic manner. Among the Wnt-related genes investigated, Wnt10b expression was significantly upregulated by VD(3) in hDPCs. Wnt10b upregulation, as well as upregulation of ALPL (ALP, liver/bone/kidney) and TGF-β2, by VD(3) was specific in hDPCs and not detected in human dermal fibroblasts. Screening of paracrine or endocrine factors in the skin indicated that all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) upregulated Wnt10b gene expression, although synergistic upregulation (combined atRA and VD(3)) was not seen. RNA interference with vitamin D receptor (VDR) revealed that VD(3) upregulation of Wnt10b, ALPL, and TGF-β2 was mediated through the genomic VDR pathway. In a rat model of de novo hair regeneration by murine DPC transplantation, pretreatment with VD(3) significantly enhanced hair folliculogenesis. Specifically, a greater number of outgrowing hair shafts and higher maturation of regenerated follicles were observed. Together, these data suggest that VD(3) may promote functional differentiation of DPCs and be useful in preserving the hair follicle-inductive capacity of cultured DPCs for hair regeneration therapies.

  19. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Modulates the Hair-Inductive Capacity of Dermal Papilla Cells: Therapeutic Potential for Hair Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Aoi, Noriyuki; Inoue, Keita; Chikanishi, Toshihiro; Fujiki, Ryoji; Yamamoto, Hanako; Kato, Harunosuke; Eto, Hitomi; Doi, Kentaro; Itami, Satoshi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2012-01-01

    Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) have the potential to induce differentiation of epithelial stem cells into hair, and Wnt signaling is deeply involved in the initiation process. The functional limitation of expanded adult DPCs has been a difficult challenge for cell-based hair regrowth therapy. We previously reported that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3) upregulates expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, both features of hair-inducing human DPCs (hDPCs). In this study, we further examined the effects and signaling pathways associated with VD3 actions on DPCs. VD3 suppressed hDPC proliferation in a dose-dependent, noncytotoxic manner. Among the Wnt-related genes investigated, Wnt10b expression was significantly upregulated by VD3 in hDPCs. Wnt10b upregulation, as well as upregulation of ALPL (ALP, liver/bone/kidney) and TGF-β2, by VD3 was specific in hDPCs and not detected in human dermal fibroblasts. Screening of paracrine or endocrine factors in the skin indicated that all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) upregulated Wnt10b gene expression, although synergistic upregulation (combined atRA and VD3) was not seen. RNA interference with vitamin D receptor (VDR) revealed that VD3 upregulation of Wnt10b, ALPL, and TGF-β2 was mediated through the genomic VDR pathway. In a rat model of de novo hair regeneration by murine DPC transplantation, pretreatment with VD3 significantly enhanced hair folliculogenesis. Specifically, a greater number of outgrowing hair shafts and higher maturation of regenerated follicles were observed. Together, these data suggest that VD3 may promote functional differentiation of DPCs and be useful in preserving the hair follicle-inductive capacity of cultured DPCs for hair regeneration therapies. PMID:23197867

  20. Three-Dimensional Cell Printing of Large-Volume Tissues: Application to Ear Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Seob; Kim, Byoung Soo; Seo, Donghwan; Park, Jeong Hun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-03-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) printing of large-volume cells, printed in a clinically relevant size, is one of the most important challenges in the field of tissue engineering. However, few studies have reported the fabrication of large-volume cell-printed constructs (LCCs). To create LCCs, appropriate fabrication conditions should be established: Factors involved include fabrication time, residence time, and temperature control of the cell-laden hydrogel in the syringe to ensure high cell viability and functionality. The prolonged time required for 3D printing of LCCs can reduce cell viability and result in insufficient functionality of the construct, because the cells are exposed to a harsh environment during the printing process. In this regard, we present an advanced 3D cell-printing system composed of a clean air workstation, a humidifier, and a Peltier system, which provides a suitable printing environment for the production of LCCs with high cell viability. We confirmed that the advanced 3D cell-printing system was capable of providing enhanced printability of hydrogels and fabricating an ear-shaped LCC with high cell viability. In vivo results for the ear-shaped LCC also showed that printed chondrocytes proliferated sufficiently and differentiated into cartilage tissue. Thus, we conclude that the advanced 3D cell-printing system is a versatile tool to create cell-printed constructs for the generation of large-volume tissues.

  1. Acoustical transmission-line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cells.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Douglas H

    2015-04-01

    An acoustical transmission line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cell system (MACS) was constructed for the adult human middle ear with normal function. The air-filled cavities comprised the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and MACS. A binary symmetrical airway branching model of the MACS was constructed using an optimization procedure to match the average total volume and surface area of human temporal bones. The acoustical input impedance of the MACS was calculated using a recursive procedure, and used to predict the input impedance of the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The model also calculated the ratio of the acoustical pressure in the antrum to the pressure in the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The predicted responses were sensitive to the magnitude of the viscothermal losses within the MACS. These predicted input impedance and pressure ratio functions explained the presence of multiple resonances reported in published data, which were not explained by existing MACS models.

  2. The final stage of cholinergic differentiation occurs below inner hair cells during development of the rodent cochlea.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Adam L; Schrader, Angela; Yang, Dan; Osman, Abdullah A; Simmons, Dwayne D

    2005-12-01

    To gain further insights into the cholinergic differentiation of presynaptic efferent terminals in the inner ear, we investigated the expression of the high-affinity choline transporter (ChT1) in comparison to other presynaptic and cholinergic markers. In the adult mammalian cochlea, cholinergic axons from medial olivocochlear (OC) neurons form axosomatic synapses with outer hair cells (OHCs), whereas axons from lateral OC neurons form axodendritic synapses on afferent fibers below inner hair cells (IHCs). Mouse brain and cochlea homogenates reveal at least two ChT1 isoforms: a nonglycosylated approximately 73 kDa protein and a glycosylated approximately 45 kDa protein. In mouse brain, ChT1 is preferentially expressed by neurons in periolivary regions of the superior olive consistent with the location of medial OC neurons. In the adult mouse cochlea, ChT1-positive terminals are located almost exclusively below OHCs consistent with a medial OC innervation. Between postnatal day 2 (P2) and P4, ChT1-positive terminals are below IHCs and occur after the expression of growth-associated protein 43, synapsin, and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter. By P15, ChT1-positive terminals are mostly on OHCs. Accounting for differences in gestational age, the developmental expression of ChT1 in the rat cochlea is similar to the mouse. However, in older rats ChT1-positive terminals are below IHCs and OHCs. In both rat and mouse, our observations indicate that the onset of ChT1 expression occurs after efferent terminals are below IHCs and express other presynaptic and cholinergic markers. In the mouse, but not in the rat, ChT1 may preferentially identify medial OC neurons.

  3. Functional evaluation of a cell replacement therapy in the inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhengqing; Ulfendahl, Mats; Prieskorn, Diane M.; Olivius, N. Petri; Miller, Josef M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Cell replacement therapy in the inner ear will contribute to the functional recovery of hearing loss. Background Cell replacement therapy is a potentially powerful approach to replace degenerated or severely damaged spiral ganglion neurons. This study aimed at stimulating the neurite outgrowth of the implanted neurons and enhancing the potential therapeutic of inner ear cell implants. Methods Chronic electrical stimulation (CES) and exogenous neurotrophic growth factor (NGF) were applied to 46 guinea pigs transplanted with embryonic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons four days post deafening. The animals were evaluated with the electrically-evoked auditory brain stem responses (EABRs) at experimental day 7, 11, 17, 24, 31. The animals were euthanized at day 31 and the inner ears were dissected out for immunohistochemistry investigation. Results Implanted DRG cells, identified by EGFP fluorescence and a neuronal marker, were found close to Rosenthal's canal in the adult inner ear for up to four weeks following transplantation. Extensive neurite projections clearly, greater than in non-treated animals, were observed to penetrate the bony modiolus and reach the spiral ganglion region in animals supplied with CES and/or NGF. There was, however, no significant difference in the thresholds of EABRs between DRG-transplanted-animals supplied with CES and/or NGF and DRG-transplanted animals without CES or NGF supplement. Conclusions The results suggest that CES and/or NGF can stimulate neurite outgrowth from implanted neurons, although based on EABR measurement these interventions did not induce functional connections to the central auditory pathway. Additional time or novel approaches may enhance functional responsiveness of implanted cells in the adult cochlea. PMID:19395986

  4. Reciprocal synapses between outer hair cells and their afferent terminals: evidence for a local neural network in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Thiers, Fabio A; Nadol, Joseph B; Liberman, M Charles

    2008-12-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) serve both as sensory receptors and biological motors. Their sensory function is poorly understood because their afferent innervation, the type-II spiral ganglion cell, has small unmyelinated axons and constitutes only 5% of the cochlear nerve. Reciprocal synapses between OHCs and their type-II terminals, consisting of paired afferent and efferent specialization, have been described in the primate cochlea. Here, we use serial and semi-serial-section transmission electron microscopy to quantify the nature and number of synaptic interactions in the OHC area of adult cats. Reciprocal synapses were found in all OHC rows and all cochlear frequency regions. They were more common among third-row OHCs and in the apical half of the cochlea, where 86% of synapses were reciprocal. The relative frequency of reciprocal synapses was unchanged following surgical transection of the olivocochlear bundle in one cat, confirming that reciprocal synapses were not formed by efferent fibers. In the normal ear, axo-dendritic synapses between olivocochlear terminals and type-II terminals and/or dendrites were as common as synapses between olivocochlear terminals and OHCs, especially in the first row, where, on average, almost 30 such synapses were seen in the region under a single OHC. The results suggest that a complex local neuronal circuitry in the OHC area, formed by the dendrites of type-II neurons and modulated by the olivocochlear system, may be a fundamental property of the mammalian cochlea, rather than a curiosity of the primate ear. This network may mediate local feedback control of, and bidirectional communication among, OHCs throughout the cochlear spiral.

  5. Stria vascularis and cochlear hair cell changes in syphilis: A human temporal bone study.

    PubMed

    Hızlı, Ömer; Kaya, Serdar; Hızlı, Pelin; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2016-12-01

    To observe any changes in stria vascularis and cochlear hair cells in patients with syphilis. We examined 13 human temporal bone samples from 8 patients with syphilis (our syphilis group), as well as 12 histopathologically normal samples from 9 age-matched patients without syphilis (our control group). We compared, between the two groups, the mean area of the stria vascularis (measured with conventional light microscopy connected to a personal computer) and the mean percentage of cochlear hair cell loss (obtained from cytocochleograms). In our syphilis group, only 1 (7.7%) of the 13 samples had precipitate in the endolymphatic or perilymphatic spaces; 8 (61.5%) of the samples revealed the presence of endolymphatic hydrops (4 cochlear, 4 saccular). The mean area of the stria vascularis did not significantly differ, in any turn of the cochlea, between the 2 groups (P>0.1). However, we did find significant differences between the 2 groups in the mean percentage of outer hair cells in the apical turn (P<0.026) and in the mean percentage of inner hair cells in the basal (P=0.001), middle (P=0.004), and apical (P=0.018) turns. In 7 samples in our syphilis group, we observed either complete loss of the organ of Corti or a flattened organ of Corti without any cells in addition to the absence of both outer and inner hair cells. In this study, syphilis led either to complete loss of the organ of Corti or to significant loss of cochlear hair cells, in addition to cochleosaccular hydrops. But the area of the stria vascularis did not change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stria Vascularis and Cochlear Hair Cell Changes in Syphilis: A Human Temporal Bone Study

    PubMed Central

    Hızlı, Ömer; Kaya, Serdar; Hızlı, Pelin; Paparella, Michael M.; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe any changes in stria vascularis and cochlear hair cells in patients with syphilis Materials and Methods We examined 13 human temporal bone samples from 8 patients with syphilis (our syphilis group), as well as 12 histopathologically normal samples from 9 age-matched patients without syphilis (our control group). We compared, between the 2 groups, the mean area of the stria vascularis (measured with conventional light microscopy connected to a personal computer) and the mean percentage of cochlear hair cell loss (obtained from cytocochleograms). Results In our syphilis group, only 1 (7.7%) of the 13 samples had precipitate in the endolymphatic or perilymphatic spaces; 8 (61.5%) of the samples revealed the presence of endolymphatic hydrops (4 cochlear, 4 saccular). The mean area of the stria vascularis area did not significantly differ, in any turn of the cochlea, between the 2 groups (P > 0.1). However, we did find significant differences between the 2 groups in the mean percentage of outer hair cells in the apical turn (P < 0.026) and in the mean percentage of inner hair cells in the basal (P = 0.001), middle (P = 0.004), and apical (P = 0.018) turns. In 7 samples in our syphilis group, we observed either complete loss of the organ of Corti or a flattened organ of Corti without any cells in addition to the absence of both outer and inner hair cells. Conclusion In this study, syphilis led either to complete loss of the organ of Corti or to significant loss of cochlear hair cells, in addition to cochleosaccular hydrops. But the area of the stria vascularis did not change. PMID:26860231

  7. Dermal Papilla Cells Improve the Wound Healing Process and Generate Hair Bud-Like Structures in Grafted Skin Substitutes Using Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leirós, Gustavo José; Kusinsky, Ana Gabriela; Drago, Hugo; Bossi, Silvia; Sturla, Flavio; Castellanos, María Lía; Stella, Inés Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered skin represents a useful strategy for the treatment of deep skin injuries and might contribute to the understanding of skin regeneration. The use of dermal papilla cells (DPCs) as a dermal component in a permanent composite skin with human hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) was evaluated by studying the tissue-engineered skin architecture, stem cell persistence, hair regeneration, and graft-take in nude mice. A porcine acellular dermal matrix was seeded with HFSCs alone and with HFSCs plus human DPCs or dermal fibroblasts (DFs). In vitro, the presence of DPCs induced a more regular and multilayered stratified epidermis with more basal p63-positive cells and invaginations. The DPC-containing constructs more accurately mimicked the skin architecture by properly stratifying the differentiating HFSCs and developing a well-ordered epithelia that contributed to more closely recapitulate an artificial human skin. This acellular dermal matrix previously repopulated in vitro with HFSCs and DFs or DPCs as the dermal component was grafted in nude mice. The presence of DPCs in the composite substitute not only favored early neovascularization, good assimilation and remodeling after grafting but also contributed to the neovascular network maturation, which might reduce the inflammation process, resulting in a better healing process, with less scarring and wound contraction. Interestingly, only DPC-containing constructs showed embryonic hair bud-like structures with cells of human origin, presence of precursor epithelial cells, and expression of a hair differentiation marker. Although preliminary, these findings have demonstrated the importance of the presence of DPCs for proper skin repair. PMID:25161315

  8. Noninvasive method for assessing the human circadian clock using hair follicle cells

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Makoto; Soma, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Takuro; Tsugitomi, Asuka; Yamashita, Shiko; Yamamoto, Takuya; Nishida, Eisuke; Yasuda, Akio; Liao, James K.; Node, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the circadian clock requires qualitative evaluation of circadian clock gene expression. Thus far, no simple and effective method for detecting human clock gene expression has become available. This limitation has greatly hampered our understanding of human circadian rhythm. Here we report a convenient, reliable, and less invasive method for detecting human clock gene expression using biopsy samples of hair follicle cells from the head or chin. We show that the circadian phase of clock gene expression in hair follicle cells accurately reflects that of individual behavioral rhythms, demonstrating that this strategy is appropriate for evaluating the human peripheral circadian clock. Furthermore, using this method, we indicate that rotating shift workers suffer from a serious time lag between circadian gene expression rhythms and lifestyle. Qualitative evaluation of clock gene expression in hair follicle cells, therefore, may be an effective approach for studying the human circadian clock in the clinical setting. PMID:20798039

  9. Bio-inspired piezoelectric artificial hair cell sensor fabricated by powder injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun Sae; Oh, Keun Ha; Moon, Won Kyu; Kim, Kyungseop; Joh, Cheeyoung; Seo, Hee Seon; Bollina, Ravi; Park, Seong Jin

    2015-12-01

    A piezoelectric artificial hair cell sensor was fabricated by the powder injection molding process in order to make an acoustic vector hydrophone. The entire process of powder injection molding was developed and optimized for PMN-PZT ceramic powder. The artificial hair cell sensor, which consists of high aspect ratio hair cell and three rectangular mechanoreceptors, was precisely fabricated through the developed powder injection molding process. The density and the dielectric property of the fabricated sensor shows 98% of the theoretical density and 85% of reference dielectric property of PMN-PZT ceramic powder. With regard to homogeneity, three rectangular mechanoreceptors have the same dimensions, with 3 μm of tolerance with 8% of deviation of dielectric property. Packaged vector hydrophones measure the underwater acoustic signals from 500 to 800 Hz with -212 dB of sensitivity. Directivity of vector hydrophone was acquired at 600 Hz as analyzing phase differences of electric signals.

  10. The potential use of low-frequency tones to locate regions of outer hair cell loss.

    PubMed

    Kamerer, Aryn M; Diaz, Francisco J; Peppi, Marcello; Chertoff, Mark E

    2016-12-01

    Current methods used to diagnose cochlear hearing loss are limited in their ability to determine the location and extent of anatomical damage to various cochlear structures. In previous experiments, we have used the electrical potential recorded at the round window -the cochlear response (CR) -to predict the location of damage to outer hair cells in the gerbil. In a follow-up experiment, we applied 10 mM ouabain to the round window niche to reduce neural activity in order to quantify the neural contribution to the CR. We concluded that a significant proportion of the CR to a 762 Hz tone originated from phase-locking activity of basal auditory nerve fibers, which could have contaminated our conclusions regarding outer hair cell health. However, at such high concentrations, ouabain may have also affected the responses from outer hair cells, exaggerating the effect we attributed to the auditory nerve. In this study, we lowered the concentration of ouabain to 1 mM and determined the physiologic effects on outer hair cells using distortion-product otoacoustic emissions. As well as quantifying the effects of 1 mM ouabain on the auditory nerve and outer hair cells, we attempted to reduce the neural contribution to the CR by using near-infrasonic stimulus frequencies of 45 and 85 Hz, and hypothesized that these low-frequency stimuli would generate a cumulative amplitude function (CAF) that could reflect damage to hair cells in the apex more accurately than the 762 stimuli. One hour after application of 1 mM ouabain, CR amplitudes significantly increased, but remained unchanged in the presence of high-pass filtered noise conditions, suggesting that basal auditory nerve fibers have a limited contribution to the CR at such low frequencies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Minoxidil upregulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in human hair dermal papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Lachgar, S; Charveron, M; Gall, Y; Bonafe, J L

    1998-03-01

    The hair follicle dermal papilla which controls hair growth, is characterized in the anagen phase by a highly developed vascular network. We have demonstrated in a previous study that the expression of an angiogenic growth factor called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA varied during the hair cycle. VEGF mRNA is strongly expressed in dermal papilla cells (DPC) in the anagen phase, but during the catagen and telogen phases. VEGF mRNA is less strongly expressed. This involvement of VEGF during the hair cycle allowed us to determine whether VEGF mRNA expression by DPC was regulated by minoxidil. In addition, the effect of minoxidil on VEGF protein synthesis in both cell extracts and DPC-conditioned medium, was investigated immunoenzymatically. Both VEGF mRNA and protein were significantly elevated in treated DPC compared with controls. DPC incubated with increasing minoxidil concentrations (0.2, 2, 6, 12 and 24 mumol/L) induced a dose-dependent expression of VEGF mRNA. Quantification of transcripts showed that DPC stimulated with 24 mumol/L minoxidil express six times more VEGF mRNA than controls. Similarly, VEGF protein production increases in cell extracts and conditioned media following minoxidil stimulation. These studies strongly support the likely involvement of minoxidil in the development of dermal papilla vascularization via a stimulation of VEGF expression, and support the hypothesis that minoxidil has a physiological role in maintaining a good vascularization of hair follicles in androgenetic alopecia.

  12. No effect of prolonged pulsed high frequency ultrasound imaging of the basilar membrane on cochlear function or hair cell survival found in an initial study.

    PubMed

    Landry, Thomas G; Bance, Manohar L; Adamson, Robert B; Brown, Jeremy A

    2018-06-01

    Miniature high frequency ultrasound devices show promise as tools for clinical middle ear and basal cochlea imaging and vibrometry. However, before clinical use it is important to verify that the ultrasound exposure does not damage the cochlea. In this initial study, electrophysiological responses of the cochlea were measured for a range of stimulus frequencies in both ears of anesthetized chinchillas, before and after exposing the organ of Corti region of one ear to pulsed focused ultrasound for 30 min. Measurements were again taken after an 11 day survival period. Cochlear tissue was examined with a confocal microscope for signs of damage to the cochlear hair cells. No significant change in response thresholds due to exposure was found, and no signs of ultrasound-induced tissue damage were observed, although one animal (out of ten) did have a region of extensive tissue damage in the exposed cochlea. However, after further analysis this was concluded to be not likely a result of the ultrasound exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Morphological changes on cochlear hair cells of rats in simulated weightlessness and inboard noise].

    PubMed

    2017-06-18

    To observe the morphological changes on cochlear hair cells of rats in simulated weightlessness and inboard noise and to investigate the different changes in three turns of hair cells. Thirty-two healthy SD rats, all males, were randomly divided into four groups: control group, weightlessness group, noise group and weightlessness+noise groups (n=8). Then rats were exposed to -30° head down tilt as simulated weightlessness and inboard noise including steady-state noise which was (72±2) dB SPL and impulse noise up to 160 dB SPL in spaceship environment. The control group was kept in normal condition for 8 weeks. Bilateral auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds were tested before and after exposure respectively, and immunofluorescence staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEMs) of basilar membrane were applied after exposure. ABR threshold shifts of each group were higher after exposure. There was difference between ABRs of the experiment groups before and after exposure (P<0.05). IF showed that the inner hair cells (IHCs) missing was the main damage in the basal turn of weightlessness group, the hair cells in the middle turn were swell and in the top turn, the hair cells were not clear. In noise group, the main loss happened in the outer hair cells (OHCs) of the outermost layer. In weightlessness+noise group, the nuclear missing in the basal turn was apparent, and mainly happened at the outermost layer. Meanwhile, the missing of hair cells in the middle turn and top turn was seen at the innermost layer. SEM showed that the cilia in the basal turn of weightlessness group were serious lodging, and occasional absence. Furthermore, the basal cilia in noise group became lodged and absent, and the other two turns were seriously missing. And in weightlessness+noise group, the cilia missing in the basal turn was apparently seen. The damage degree of the four groups: weightlessness+noise group>noise group>weightlessness group>control group and the damage degree

  14. [Hair and their environment].

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    2015-02-01

    Hair is influenced by the effects of the daily environment. Some toxic xenobiotics slow down or block the cell renewal of the hair matrix, thus inhibiting hair growth. The ultraviolet light obviously influences the physical structure and physiology of the hair follicle. Tobacco is similarly responsible for negative influences on the evolution of various alopecias. Several cosmetic procedures for maintaining and making hair more attractive are not always harmless, and they occasionally represent a possible origin for alopecia.

  15. Increased symplasmic permeability in barley root epidermal cells correlates with defects in root hair development

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, M; Muszynska, A; Melzer, M; Sas-Nowosielska, H; Kurczynska, E U; Wick, S

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the process of plant cell differentiation depends on the symplasmic isolation of cells. Before starting the differentiation programme, the individual cell or group of cells should restrict symplasmic communication with neighbouring cells. We tested the symplasmic communication between epidermal cells in the different root zones of parental barley plants Hordeum vulgare L., cv. ‘Karat’ with normal root hair development, and two root hairless mutants (rhl1.a and rhl1.b). The results clearly show that symplasmic communication was limited during root hair differentiation in the parental variety, whereas in both root hairless mutants epidermal cells were still symplasmically connected in the corresponding root zone. This paper is the first report on the role of symplasmic isolation in barley root cell differentiation, and additionally shows that a disturbance in the restriction of symplasmic communication is present in root hairless mutants. PMID:23927737

  16. Tissue-engineered skin preserving the potential of epithelial cells to differentiate into hair after grafting.

    PubMed

    Larouche, Danielle; Cuffley, Kristine; Paquet, Claudie; Germain, Lucie

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether tissue-engineered skin produced in vitro was able to sustain growth of hair follicles in vitro and after grafting. Different tissues were designed. Dissociated newborn mouse keratinocytes or newborn mouse hair buds (HBs) were added onto dermal constructs consisting of a tissue-engineered cell-derived matrix elaborated from either newborn mouse or adult human fibroblasts cultured with ascorbic acid. After 7-21 days of maturation at the air-liquid interface, no hair was noticed in vitro. Epidermal differentiation was observed in all tissue-engineered skin. However, human fibroblast-derived tissue-engineered dermis (hD) promoted a thicker epidermis than mouse fibroblast-derived tissue-engineered dermis (mD). In association with mD, HBs developed epithelial cyst-like inclusions presenting outer root sheath-like attributes. In contrast, epidermoid cyst-like inclusions lined by a stratified squamous epithelium were present in tissues composed of HBs and hD. After grafting, pilo-sebaceous units formed and hair grew in skin elaborated from HBs cultured 10-26 days submerged in culture medium in association with mD. However, the number of normal hair follicles decreased with longer culture time. This hair-forming capacity after grafting was not observed in tissues composed of hD overlaid with HBs. These results demonstrate that epithelial stem cells can be kept in vitro in a permissive tissue-engineered dermal environment without losing their potential to induce hair growth after grafting.

  17. Chemical Ototoxicity of the Fish Inner Ear and Lateral Line.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Allison B; Ramcharitar, John

    2016-01-01

    Hair cell-driven mechanosensory systems are crucial for successful execution of a number of behaviors in fishes, and have emerged as good models for exploring questions relevant to human hearing. This review focuses on ototoxic effects in the inner ear and lateral line system of fishes. We specifically examine studies where chemical ototoxins such as aminoglycoside antibiotics have been employed as tools to disable the lateral line. Lateral line ablation results in alterations to feeding behavior and orientation to water current in a variety of species. However, neither behavior is abolished in the presence of additional sensory cues, supporting the hypothesis that many fish behaviors are driven by multisensory integration. Within biomedical research, the larval zebrafish lateral line has become an important model system for understanding signaling mechanisms that contribute to hair cell death and for developing novel pharmacological therapies that protect hair cells from ototoxic damage. Furthermore, given that fishes robustly regenerate damaged hair cells, ototoxin studies in fishes have broadened our understanding of the molecular and genetic events in an innately regenerative system, offering potential targets for mammalian hair cell regeneration. Collectively, studies of fish mechanosensory systems have yielded insight into fish behavior and in mechanisms of hair cell death, protection, and regeneration.

  18. The goya mouse mutant reveals distinct newly identified roles for MAP3K1 in the development and survival of cochlear sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew; Cross, Sally H; Jackson, Ian J; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel; Morse, Susan; Nicholson, George; Coghill, Emma; Bowl, Michael R; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAP3K1, plays an important role in a number of cellular processes, including epithelial migration during eye organogenesis. In addition, studies in keratinocytes indicate that MAP3K1 signalling through JNK is important for actin stress fibre formation and cell migration. However, MAP3K1 can also act independently of JNK in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. We have identified a mouse mutant, goya, which exhibits the eyes-open-at-birth and microphthalmia phenotypes. In addition, these mice also have hearing loss. The goya mice carry a splice site mutation in the Map3k1 gene. We show that goya and kinase-deficient Map3k1 homozygotes initially develop supernumerary cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) that subsequently degenerate, and a progressive profound hearing loss is observed by 9 weeks of age. Heterozygote mice also develop supernumerary OHCs, but no cellular degeneration or hearing loss is observed. MAP3K1 is expressed in a number of inner-ear cell types, including outer and inner hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. Investigation of targets downstream of MAP3K1 identified an increase in p38 phosphorylation (Thr180/Tyr182) in multiple cochlear tissues. We also show that the extra OHCs do not arise from aberrant control of proliferation via p27KIP1. The identification of the goya mutant reveals a signalling molecule involved with hair-cell development and survival. Mammalian hair cells do not have the ability to regenerate after damage, which can lead to irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. Given the observed goya phenotype, and the many diverse cellular processes that MAP3K1 is known to act upon, further investigation of this model might help to elaborate upon the mechanisms underlying sensory hair cell specification, and pathways important for their survival. In addition, MAP3K1 is revealed as a new candidate gene for human sensorineural hearing loss. © 2015. Published by The Company of

  19. DAPT mediates atoh1 expression to induce hair cell-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongmiao; Guo, Weiwei; Liu, Wei; Gao, Weiqiang; Xie, Dinghua; Yin, Tuanfang; Yang, Shiming; Ren, Jihao

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is currently an incurable degenerative disease characterized by a paucity of hair cells (HCs), which cannot be spontaneously replaced in mammals. Recent technological advancements in gene therapy and local drug delivery have shed new light for hearing loss. Atoh1, also known as Math1, Hath1, and Cath1, is a proneural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that is essential for HC differentiation. At various stages in development, Atoh1 activity is sufficient to drive HC differentiation in the cochlea. Thus, Atoh1 related gene therapy is the most promising option for HC induction. DAPT, an inhibitor of Notch signaling, enhances the expression of Atoh1 indirectly, which in turn promotes the induction of a HC fate. Here, we show that DAPT cooperates with Atoh1 to synergistically promote HC fate in ependymal cells in vitro and promote hair cell regeneration in the cultured basilar membrane (BM) which mimics the microenvironment in vivo. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that DAPT is sufficient to induce HC-like cells via enhancing of the expression of Atoh1 to inhibit the progression of HC apoptosis and to induce new HC formation.

  20. Direct mechanical stimulation of tip links in hair cells through DNA tethers

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Aakash; Lagier, Samuel; Vologodskaia, Maria; Fabella, Brian A; Hudspeth, AJ

    2016-01-01

    Mechanoelectrical transduction by hair cells commences with hair-bundle deflection, which is postulated to tense filamentous tip links connected to transduction channels. Because direct mechanical stimulation of tip links has not been experimentally possible, this hypothesis has not been tested. We have engineered DNA tethers that link superparamagnetic beads to tip links and exert mechanical forces on the links when exposed to a magnetic-field gradient. By pulling directly on tip links of the bullfrog's sacculus we have evoked transduction currents from hair cells, confirming the hypothesis that tension in the tip links opens transduction channels. This demonstration of direct mechanical access to tip links additionally lays a foundation for experiments probing the mechanics of individual channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16041.001 PMID:27331611

  1. The delayed rectifier, IKI, is the major conductance in type I vestibular hair cells across vestibular end organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, A. J.; Rennie, K. J.; Correia, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Hair cells were dissociated from the semicircular canal, utricle, lagena and saccule of white king pigeons. Type I hair cells were identified morphologically based on the ratios of neck width to cuticular plate width (NPR < 0.72) as well as neck width to cell body width (NBR < 0.64). The perforated patch variant of the whole-cell recording technique was used to measure electrical properties from type I hair cells. In voltage-clamp, the membrane properties of all identified type I cells were dominated by a predominantly outward potassium current, previously characterized in semicircular canal as IKI. Zero-current potential, activation, deactivation, slope conductance, pharmacologic and steady-state properties of the complex currents were not statistically different between type I hair cells of different vestibular end organs. The voltage dependence causes a significant proportion of this conductance to be active about the cell's zero-current potential. The first report of the whole-cell activation kinetics of the conductance is presented, showing a voltage dependence that could be best fit by an equation for a single exponential. Results presented here are the first data from pigeon dissociated type I hair cells from utricle, saccule and lagena suggesting that the basolateral conductances of a morphologically identified population of type I hair cells are conserved between functionally different vestibular end organs; the major conductance being a delayed rectifier characterized previously in semicircular canal hair cells as IKI.

  2. Hopx expression defines a subset of multipotent hair follicle stem cells and a progenitor population primed to give rise to K6+ niche cells

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Norifumi; Jain, Rajan; LeBoeuf, Matthew R.; Padmanabhan, Arun; Wang, Qiaohong; Li, Li; Lu, Min Min; Millar, Sarah E.; Epstein, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian hair follicle relies on adult resident stem cells and their progeny to fuel and maintain hair growth throughout the life of an organism. The cyclical and initially synchronous nature of hair growth makes the hair follicle an ideal system with which to define homeostatic mechanisms of an adult stem cell population. Recently, we demonstrated that Hopx is a specific marker of intestinal stem cells. Here, we show that Hopx specifically labels long-lived hair follicle stem cells residing in the telogen basal bulge. Hopx+ cells contribute to all lineages of the mature hair follicle and to the interfollicular epidermis upon epidermal wounding. Unexpectedly, our analysis identifies a previously unappreciated progenitor population that resides in the lower hair bulb of anagen-phase follicles and expresses Hopx. These cells co-express Lgr5, do not express Shh and escape catagen-induced apoptosis. They ultimately differentiate into the cytokeratin 6-positive (K6) inner bulge cells in telogen, which regulate the quiescence of adjacent hair follicle stem cells. Although previous studies have suggested that K6+ cells arise from Lgr5-expressing lower outer root sheath cells in anagen, our studies indicate an alternative origin, and a novel role for Hopx-expressing lower hair bulb progenitor cells in contributing to stem cell homeostasis. PMID:23487314

  3. Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells Appear Dispensable for the Acute Phase of Wound Re-epithelialization.

    PubMed

    Garcin, Clare L; Ansell, David M; Headon, Denis J; Paus, Ralf; Hardman, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous healing response has evolved to occur rapidly, in order to minimize infection and to re-establish epithelial homeostasis. Rapid healing is achieved through complex coordination of multiple cell types, which importantly includes specific cell populations within the hair follicle (HF). Under physiological conditions, the epithelial compartments of HF and interfollicular epidermis remain discrete, with K15(+ve) bulge stem cells contributing progeny for HF reconstruction during the hair cycle and as a basis for hair shaft production during anagen. Only upon wounding do HF cells migrate from the follicle to contribute to the neo-epidermis. However, the identity of the first-responding cells, and in particular whether this process involves a direct contribution of K15(+ve) bulge cells to the early stage of epidermal wound repair remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that epidermal injury in murine skin does not induce bulge activation during early epidermal wound repair. Specifically, bulge cells of uninjured HFs neither proliferate nor appear to migrate out of the bulge niche upon epidermal wounding. In support of these observations, Diphtheria toxin-mediated partial ablation of K15(+ve) bulge cells fails to delay wound healing. Our data suggest that bulge cells only respond to epidermal wounding during later stages of repair. We discuss that this response may have evolved as a protective safeguarding mechanism against bulge stem cell exhaust and tumorigenesis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1377-1385. © 2016 The Authors. Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  4. Ablation of Coactivator Med1 Switches the Cell Fate of Dental Epithelia to That Generating Hair

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thai; Sakai, Kiyoshi; He, Bing; Fong, Chak; Oda, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Cell fates are determined by specific transcriptional programs. Here we provide evidence that the transcriptional coactivator, Mediator 1 (Med1), is essential for the cell fate determination of ectodermal epithelia. Conditional deletion of Med1 in vivo converted dental epithelia into epidermal epithelia, causing defects in enamel organ development while promoting hair formation in the incisors. We identified multiple processes by which hairs are generated in Med1 deficient incisors: 1) dental epithelial stem cells lacking Med 1 fail to commit to the dental lineage, 2) Sox2-expressing stem cells extend into the differentiation zone and remain multi-potent due to reduced Notch1 signaling, and 3) epidermal fate is induced by calcium as demonstrated in dental epithelial cell cultures. These results demonstrate that Med1 is a master regulator in adult stem cells to govern epithelial cell fate. PMID:24949995

  5. Enlargement of Ribbons in Zebrafish Hair Cells Increases Calcium Currents But Disrupts Afferent Spontaneous Activity and Timing of Stimulus Onset

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Mary; Petralia, Ronald S.; Wang, Ya-Xian; Zhang, Qiuxiang

    2017-01-01

    In sensory hair cells of auditory and vestibular organs, the ribbon synapse is required for the precise encoding of a wide range of complex stimuli. Hair cells have a unique presynaptic structure, the synaptic ribbon, which organizes both synaptic vesicles and calcium channels at the active zone. Previous work has shown that hair-cell ribbon size is correlated with differences in postsynaptic activity. However, additional variability in postsynapse size presents a challenge to determining the specific role of ribbon size in sensory encoding. To selectively assess the impact of ribbon size on synapse function, we examined hair cells in transgenic zebrafish that have enlarged ribbons, without postsynaptic alterations. Morphologically, we found that enlarged ribbons had more associated vesicles and reduced presynaptic calcium-channel clustering. Functionally, hair cells with enlarged ribbons had larger global and ribbon-localized calcium currents. Afferent neuron recordings revealed that hair cells with enlarged ribbons resulted in reduced spontaneous spike rates. Additionally, despite larger presynaptic calcium signals, we observed fewer evoked spikes with longer latencies from stimulus onset. Together, our work indicates that hair-cell ribbon size influences the spontaneous spiking and the precise encoding of stimulus onset in afferent neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Numerous studies support that hair-cell ribbon size corresponds with functional sensitivity differences in afferent neurons and, in the case of inner hair cells of the cochlea, vulnerability to damage from noise trauma. Yet it is unclear whether ribbon size directly influences sensory encoding. Our study reveals that ribbon enlargement results in increased ribbon-localized calcium signals, yet reduces afferent spontaneous activity and disrupts the timing of stimulus onset, a distinct aspect of auditory and vestibular encoding. These observations suggest that varying ribbon size alone can influence

  6. Noise-Induced Loss of Hair Cells and Cochlear Synaptopathy Are Mediated by the Activation of AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kayla; Yuan, Hu; Wang, Xianren

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major unresolved public health problem. Here, we investigate pathomechanisms of sensory hair cell death and suggest a novel target for protective intervention. Cellular survival depends upon maintenance of energy homeostasis, largely by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In response to a noise exposure in CBA/J mice, the levels of phosphorylated AMPKα increased in hair cells in a noise intensity-dependent manner. Inhibition of AMPK via siRNA or the pharmacological inhibitor compound C attenuated noise-induced loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) and synaptic ribbons, and preserved auditory function. Additionally, noise exposure increased the activity of the upstream AMPK kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in cochlear tissues. The inhibition of LKB1 by siRNA attenuated the noise-increased phosphorylation of AMPKα in OHCs, reduced the loss of inner hair cell synaptic ribbons and OHCs, and protected against NIHL. These results indicate that noise exposure induces hair cell death and synaptopathy by activating AMPK via LKB1-mediated pathways. Targeting these pathways may provide a novel route to prevent NIHL. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our results demonstrate for the first time that the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α in sensory hair cells is noise intensity dependent and contributes to noise-induced hearing loss by mediating the loss of inner hair cell synaptic ribbons and outer hair cells. Noise induces the phosphorylation of AMPKα1 by liver kinase B1 (LKB1), triggered by changes in intracellular ATP levels. The inhibition of AMPK activation by silencing AMPK or LKB1, or with the pharmacological inhibitor compound C, reduced outer hair cell and synaptic ribbon loss as well as noise-induced hearing loss. This study provides new insights into mechanisms of noise-induced hearing loss and suggests novel interventions for the prevention of the loss of sensory hair cells and cochlear synaptopathy. PMID:27413159

  7. Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells Appear Dispensable for the Acute Phase of Wound Re‐epithelialization

    PubMed Central

    Garcin, Clare L.; Ansell, David M.; Headon, Denis J.; Paus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cutaneous healing response has evolved to occur rapidly, in order to minimize infection and to re‐establish epithelial homeostasis. Rapid healing is achieved through complex coordination of multiple cell types, which importantly includes specific cell populations within the hair follicle (HF). Under physiological conditions, the epithelial compartments of HF and interfollicular epidermis remain discrete, with K15+ve bulge stem cells contributing progeny for HF reconstruction during the hair cycle and as a basis for hair shaft production during anagen. Only upon wounding do HF cells migrate from the follicle to contribute to the neo‐epidermis. However, the identity of the first‐responding cells, and in particular whether this process involves a direct contribution of K15+ve bulge cells to the early stage of epidermal wound repair remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that epidermal injury in murine skin does not induce bulge activation during early epidermal wound repair. Specifically, bulge cells of uninjured HFs neither proliferate nor appear to migrate out of the bulge niche upon epidermal wounding. In support of these observations, Diphtheria toxin‐mediated partial ablation of K15+ve bulge cells fails to delay wound healing. Our data suggest that bulge cells only respond to epidermal wounding during later stages of repair. We discuss that this response may have evolved as a protective safeguarding mechanism against bulge stem cell exhaust and tumorigenesis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1377–1385 PMID:26756547

  8. Hair regrowth in alopecia areata patients following Stem Cell Educator therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjia; Yan, Baoyong; Wang, Hepeng; Li, Heng; Li, Quanhai; Zhao, Dong; Chen, Yana; Zhang, Ye; Li, Wenxia; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Shanfeng; Shen, Jie; Li, Yunxiang; Guindi, Edward; Zhao, Yong

    2015-04-20

    Alopecia areata (AA) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases and targets the hair follicles, with high impact on the quality of life and self-esteem of patients due to hair loss. Clinical management and outcomes are challenged by current limited immunosuppressive and immunomodulating regimens. We have developed a Stem Cell Educator therapy in which a patient's blood is circulated through a closed-loop system that separates mononuclear cells from the whole blood, allows the cells to briefly interact with adherent human cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SC), and returns the "educated" autologous cells to the patient's circulation. In an open-label, phase 1/phase 2 study, patients (N = 9) with severe AA received one treatment with the Stem Cell Educator therapy. The median age was 20 years (median alopecic duration, 5 years). Clinical data demonstrated that patients with severe AA achieved improved hair regrowth and quality of life after receiving Stem Cell Educator therapy. Flow cytometry revealed the up-regulation of Th2 cytokines and restoration of balancing Th1/Th2/Th3 cytokine production in the peripheral blood of AA subjects. Immunohistochemistry indicated the formation of a "ring of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1)" around the hair follicles, leading to the restoration of immune privilege of hair follicles and the protection of newly generated hair follicles against autoimmune destruction. Mechanistic studies revealed that co-culture with CB-SC may up-regulate the expression of coinhibitory molecules B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and programmed death-1 receptor (PD-1) on CD8β(+)NKG2D(+) effector T cells and suppress their proliferation via herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) ligands and programmed death-1 ligand (PD-L1) on CB-SCs. Current clinical data demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the Stem Cell Educator therapy for the treatment of AA. This innovative approach produced lasting improvement in hair regrowth in

  9. Expression of S100 beta in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Martin, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated anti-S100 beta expression in the chick (Gallus domesticus) inner ear and determined that: 1) the monomer anti-S100 beta is expressed differentially in the vestibular and auditory perikarya; 2) expression of S100 beta in the afferent nerve terminals is time-related to synapse and myelin formation; 3) the expression of the dimer anti-S100 alpha alpha beta beta and monomer anti-S100 beta overlaps in most inner ear cell types. Most S100 alpha alpha beta beta positive cells express S100 beta, but S100 beta positive cells do not always express S100 alpha alpha beta beta. 4) the expression of S100 beta is diffused over the perikaryal cytoplasm and nuclei of the acoustic ganglia but is concentrated over the nuclei of the vestibular perikarya. 6) S100 beta is expressed in secretory cells, and it is co-localized with GABA in sensory cells. 7) Color thresholding objective quantitation indicates that the amount of S100 beta was higher (mean 22, SD +/- 4) at E19 than at E9 (mean 34, SD +/- 3) in afferent axons. 8) Moreover, S100 beta was unchanged between E11-E19 in the perikaryal cytoplasm, but did change over the nuclei. At E9, 74%, and at E21, 5% of vestibular perikarya were positive. The data suggest that S100 beta may be physically associated with neuronal and ionic controlling cells of the vertebrate inner ear, where it could provide a dual ionic and neurotrophic modulatory function.

  10. ATP-gamma-S shifts the operating point of outer hair cell transduction towards scala tympani.

    PubMed

    Bobbin, Richard P; Salt, Alec N

    2005-07-01

    ATP receptor agonists and antagonists alter cochlear mechanics as measured by changes in distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Some of the effects on DPOAEs are consistent with the hypothesis that ATP affects mechano-electrical transduction and the operating point of the outer hair cells (OHCs). This hypothesis was tested by monitoring the effect of ATP-gamma-S on the operating point of the OHCs. Guinea pigs anesthetized with urethane and with sectioned middle ear muscles were used. The cochlear microphonic (CM) was recorded differentially (scala vestibuli referenced to scala tympani) across the basal turn before and after perfusion (20 min) of the perilymph compartment with artificial perilymph (AP) and ATP-gamma-S dissolved in AP. The operating point was derived from the cochlear microphonics (CM) recorded in response low frequency (200 Hz) tones at high level (106, 112 and 118 dB SPL). The analysis procedure used a Boltzmann function to simulate the CM waveform and the Boltzmann parameters were adjusted to best-fit the calculated waveform to the CM. Compared to the initial perfusion with AP, ATP-gamma-S (333 microM) enhanced peak clipping of the positive peak of the CM (that occurs during organ of Corti displacements towards scala tympani), which was in keeping with ATP-induced displacement of the transducer towards scala tympani. CM waveform analysis quantified the degree of displacement and showed that the changes were consistent with the stimulus being centered on a different region of the transducer curve. The change of operating point meant that the stimulus was applied to a region of the transducer curve where there was greater saturation of the output on excursions towards scala tympani and less saturation towards scala vestibuli. A significant degree of recovery of the operating point was observed after washing with AP. Dose response curves generated by perfusing ATP-gamma-S (333 microM) in a cumulative manner yielded an EC(50) of 19.8 micro

  11. Probing the Xenopus laevis inner ear transcriptome for biological function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The senses of hearing and balance depend upon mechanoreception, a process that originates in the inner ear and shares features across species. Amphibians have been widely used for physiological studies of mechanotransduction by sensory hair cells. In contrast, much less is known of the genetic basis of auditory and vestibular function in this class of animals. Among amphibians, the genus Xenopus is a well-characterized genetic and developmental model that offers unique opportunities for inner ear research because of the amphibian capacity for tissue and organ regeneration. For these reasons, we implemented a functional genomics approach as a means to undertake a large-scale analysis of the Xenopus laevis inner ear transcriptome through microarray analysis. Results Microarray analysis uncovered genes within the X. laevis inner ear transcriptome associated with inner ear function and impairment in other organisms, thereby supporting the inclusion of Xenopus in cross-species genetic studies of the inner ear. The use of gene categories (inner ear tissue; deafness; ion channels; ion transporters; transcription factors) facilitated the assignment of functional significance to probe set identifiers. We enhanced the biological relevance of our microarray data by using a variety of curation approaches to increase the annotation of the Affymetrix GeneChip® Xenopus laevis Genome array. In addition, annotation analysis revealed the prevalence of inner ear transcripts represented by probe set identifiers that lack functional characterization. Conclusions We identified an abundance of targets for genetic analysis of auditory and vestibular function. The orthologues to human genes with known inner ear function and the highly expressed transcripts that lack annotation are particularly interesting candidates for future analyses. We used informatics approaches to impart biologically relevant information to the Xenopus inner ear transcriptome, thereby addressing the

  12. Role for a Novel Usher Protein Complex in Hair Cell Synaptic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Meehan, Daniel T.; Delimont, Duane; Rutledge, Joseph; Gratton, Michael Anne; Flannery, John; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying hair cell synaptic maturation are not well understood. Cadherin-23 (CDH23), protocadherin-15 (PCDH15) and the very large G-protein coupled receptor 1 (VLGR1) have been implicated in the development of cochlear hair cell stereocilia, while clarin-1 has been suggested to also play a role in synaptogenesis. Mutations in CDH23, PCDH15, VLGR1 and clarin-1 cause Usher syndrome, characterized by congenital deafness, vestibular dysfunction and retinitis pigmentosa. Here we show developmental expression of these Usher proteins in afferent spiral ganglion neurons and hair cell synapses. We identify a novel synaptic Usher complex comprised of clarin-1 and specific isoforms of CDH23, PCDH15 and VLGR1. To establish the in vivo relevance of this complex, we performed morphological and quantitative analysis of the neuronal fibers and their synapses in the Clrn1−/− mouse, which was generated by incomplete deletion of the gene. These mice showed a delay in neuronal/synaptic maturation by both immunostaining and electron microscopy. Analysis of the ribbon synapses in Ames waltzerav3J mice also suggests a delay in hair cell synaptogenesis. Collectively, these results show that, in addition to the well documented role for Usher proteins in stereocilia development, Usher protein complexes comprised of specific protein isoforms likely function in synaptic maturation as well. PMID:22363448

  13. Functional support of glutamate as a vestibular hair cell transmitter in an amniote

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, S. L.; Correia, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Although hair cells in the cochlea and in the vestibular endorgans of anamniotes are thought to release glutamate or a similar compound as their transmitter, there is little evidence in amniotes (which, unlike anamniotes, possess both type I and II hair cells) as to the nature of the hair cell transmitters in the vestibular labyrinth. We have recorded extracellularly from single semicircular canal afferents in the turtle labyrinth maintained in vitro and have bath-applied a number of transmitter agonists and antagonists to relate the effects of these substances to the actions of the endogenous transmitter substances. Both glutamate and aspartate strongly excite the afferents while GABA and carbachol have negligible or weak effects. In contrast to its lack of effect on afferent activity in some anamniotes, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) was also found to excite these afferents. Kynurenic acid reversibly reduced the resting firing rates of the afferents and the increases in firing due to the application of glutamate and aspartate. These findings provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that glutamate (or a related compound) is also a vestibular hair cell transmitter in amniotes.

  14. Hair cell tufts and afferent innervation of the bullfrog crista ampullaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1990-01-01

    Within the bullfrog semicircular canal crista, hair cell tuft types were defined and mapped with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. Dye-filled planar afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.6-4.9 microns, highly branched arbors, and contacted 11-24 hair cells. Dye-filled isthmus afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.8-7.9 microns, with either small or large field arbors contacting 4-9 or 25-31 hair cells. The estimated mean number of contacts per innervated hair cell was 2.2 for planar and 1.3 for isthmus afferent neurons. Data on evoked afferent responses were available only for isthmus units that were observed to respond to our microrotational stimuli. Of 21 such afferent neurons, eight were successfully dye-filled. Within this sample, high-gain units had large field arbors and lower-gain units had small field arbors. The sensitivity of each afferent neuron was analyzed in terms of noise equivalent input (NEI), the stimulus amplitude for which the afferent response amplitude is just equivalent to the rms deviation of the instantaneous spike rate. NEI for isthmus units varied from 0.63 to 8.2 deg/s; the mean was 3.2 deg/s.

  15. An Analogue VLSI Implementation of the Meddis Inner Hair Cell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwan, Alistair; van Schaik, André

    2003-12-01

    The Meddis inner hair cell model is a widely accepted, but computationally intensive computer model of mammalian inner hair cell function. We have produced an analogue VLSI implementation of this model that operates in real time in the current domain by using translinear and log-domain circuits. The circuit has been fabricated on a chip and tested against the Meddis model for (a) rate level functions for onset and steady-state response, (b) recovery after masking, (c) additivity, (d) two-component adaptation, (e) phase locking, (f) recovery of spontaneous activity, and (g) computational efficiency. The advantage of this circuit, over other electronic inner hair cell models, is its nearly exact implementation of the Meddis model which can be tuned to behave similarly to the biological inner hair cell. This has important implications on our ability to simulate the auditory system in real time. Furthermore, the technique of mapping a mathematical model of first-order differential equations to a circuit of log-domain filters allows us to implement real-time neuromorphic signal processors for a host of models using the same approach.

  16. Insights into inner ear-specific gene regulation: epigenetics and non-coding RNAs in inner ear development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Karen B.

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate inner ear houses highly specialized sensory organs, tuned to detect and encode sound, head motion and gravity. Gene expression programs under the control of transcription factors orchestrate the formation and specialization of the non-sensory inner ear labyrinth and its sensory constituents. More recently, epigenetic factors and non-coding RNAs emerged as an additional layer of gene regulation, both in inner ear development and disease. In this review, we provide an overview on how epigenetic modifications and non-coding RNAs, in particular microRNAs (miRNAs), influence gene expression and summarize recent discoveries that highlight their critical role in the proper formation of the inner ear labyrinth and its sensory organs. In contrast to non-mammalian vertebrates, adult mammals lack the ability to regenerate inner ear mechano-sensory hair cells. Finally, we discuss recent insights into how epigenetic factors and miRNAs may facilitate, or in the case of mammals, restrict sensory hair cell regeneration. PMID:27836639

  17. Organ-level quorum sensing directs regeneration in hair stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Lei; Plikus, Maksim V.; Jiang, Ting Xin; Murray, Philip J.; Ramos, Raul; Guerrero-Juarez, Christian F.; Hughes, Michael W; Lee, Oscar K.; Shi, Songtao; Widelitz, Randall B.; Lander, Arthur D.; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Coordinated organ behavior is crucial for an effective response to environmental stimuli. By studying regeneration of hair follicles in response to patterned hair removal, we demonstrate that organ-level quorum sensing allows coordinated responses to skin injury. Removing hair at different densities leads to a regeneration of up to 5 times more neighboring, unplucked resting hairs, indicating activation of a collective decision-making process. Through data modeling, the range of the quorum signal was estimated to be on the order of 1 mm, greater than expected for a diffusible molecular cue. Molecular and genetic analysis uncovered a two-step mechanism, where release of CCL2 from injured hairs leads to recruitment of TNF-α secreting macrophages, which accumulate and signal to both plucked and unplucked follicles. By coupling immune response with regeneration, this mechanism allows skin to respond predictively to distress, disregarding mild injury, while meeting stronger injury with full-scale cooperative activation of stem cells. PMID:25860610

  18. Acute effects of gentamicin on the ionic currents of semicircular canal hair cells in the frog.

    PubMed

    Martini, Marta; Canella, Rita; Prigioni, Ivo; Russo, Giancarlo; Tavazzani, Elisa; Fesce, Riccardo; Rossi, Maria Lisa

    2011-12-01

    The effects of acute gentamicin application on hair cells isolated from the frog semicircular canals have been tested by using the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. Extracellular gentamicin (1 mM) mostly affected the Ca(2+) macrocurrent, I(Ca), and the Ca-dependent K(+) current, I(KCa). The drug, applied to the hair cell basolateral membrane through a fast perfusion system, produced a rapid and relevant decrease (∼34%) of I(Ca) amplitude, without apparently affecting its activation-deactivation kinetics. The I(KCa) component of the delayed I(KD) was similarly affected: peak and steady-state mean amplitudes were significantly reduced, by about 47 and 54%, respectively, whereas the time constant of the mono-exponential current rising phase did not change. The Ca(2+) independent fraction of I(KD), I(KV), and the fast IA current were unaffected. Transduction channels (permeable to and blocked by gentamicin) are not available in the isolated hair cell, so the effect of intracellular gentamicin was tested by applying the drug through the patch pipette (1 mM in the pipette): again, it significantly reduced both I(Ca) and I(KD) amplitude, without affecting currents kinetics. IA properties were also unaffected. The drug did not affect the onset and removal of I(KD) inactivation, although the changes were scaled to the reduced I(KD) amplitude. From these observations, it is expected that hair cells exposed to gentamicin 'in vivo' become unresponsive to physiological stimulation (block of the transduction channels) and transmitter release at the cytoneural junction be drastically depressed due to reduced Ca(2+) inflow. In particular, functional impairment ensues much earlier than biochemical events that lead to hair cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Niche induced cell death and epithelial phagocytosis regulate hair follicle stem cell pool

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Kailin R.; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Zito, Giovanni; Myung, Peggy; Sun, Thomas Yang; Brown, Samara; Gonzalez, David; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Haberman, Ann M.; Greco, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tissue homeostasis is achieved through a balance of cell production (growth) and elimination (regression)1,2. Contrary to tissue growth, the cells and molecular signals required for tissue regression remain unknown. To investigate physiological tissue regression, we use the mouse hair follicle, which cycles stereotypically between phases of growth and regression while maintaining a pool of stem cells to perpetuate tissue regeneration3. Here we show by intravital microscopy in live mice4–6 that the regression phase eliminates the majority of the epithelial cells by two distinct mechanisms: terminal differentiation of suprabasal cells and a spatial gradient of apoptosis of basal cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that basal epithelial cells collectively act as phagocytes to clear dying epithelial neighbors. Through cellular and genetic ablation we show that epithelial cell death is extrinsically induced through TGFβ activation and mesenchymal crosstalk. Strikingly, our data show that regression acts to reduce the stem cell pool as inhibition of regression results in excess basal epithelial cells with regenerative abilities. This study identifies the cellular behaviors and molecular mechanisms of regression that counterbalance growth to maintain tissue homeostasis. PMID:25849774

  20. Niche-induced cell death and epithelial phagocytosis regulate hair follicle stem cell pool.

    PubMed

    Mesa, Kailin R; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Zito, Giovanni; Myung, Peggy; Sun, Thomas Y; Brown, Samara; Gonzalez, David G; Blagoev, Krastan B; Haberman, Ann M; Greco, Valentina

    2015-06-04

    Tissue homeostasis is achieved through a balance of cell production (growth) and elimination (regression). In contrast to tissue growth, the cells and molecular signals required for tissue regression remain unknown. To investigate physiological tissue regression, we use the mouse hair follicle, which cycles stereotypically between phases of growth and regression while maintaining a pool of stem cells to perpetuate tissue regeneration. Here we show by intravital microscopy in live mice that the regression phase eliminates the majority of the epithelial cells by two distinct mechanisms: terminal differentiation of suprabasal cells and a spatial gradient of apoptosis of basal cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that basal epithelial cells collectively act as phagocytes to clear dying epithelial neighbours. Through cellular and genetic ablation we show that epithelial cell death is extrinsically induced through transforming growth factor (TGF)-β activation and mesenchymal crosstalk. Strikingly, our data show that regression acts to reduce the stem cell pool, as inhibition of regression results in excess basal epithelial cells with regenerative abilities. This study identifies the cellular behaviours and molecular mechanisms of regression that counterbalance growth to maintain tissue homeostasis.

  1. Effects of NSAIDs on the Inner Ear: Possible Involvement in Cochlear Protection

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Tomofumi; Tabuchi, Keiji; Hara, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase, two important enzymes involved in arachidonic acid metabolism, are major targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Recent investigations suggest that arachidonic cascades and their metabolites may be involved in maintaining inner ear functions. The excessive use of aspirin may cause tinnitus in humans and impairment of the outer hair cell functions in experimental animals. On the other hand, NSAIDs reportedly exhibit protective effects against various kinds of inner ear disorder. The present review summarizes the effects of NSAIDs on cochlear pathophysiology. NSAIDs are a useful ameliorative adjunct in the management of inner ear disorders. PMID:27713301

  2. Isolation of hair follicle bulge stem cells from YFP-expressing reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Irvine, Timothy S; Dagnino, Lina

    2013-01-01

    In this article we provide a method to isolate hair follicle stem cells that have undergone targeted gene inactivation. The mice from which these cells are isolated are bred into a Rosa26-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter background, which results in YFP expression in the targeted stem cell population. These cells are isolated and purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, using epidermal stem cell-specific markers in conjunction with YFP fluorescence. The purified cells can be used for gene expression studies, clonogenic experiments, and biological assays, such as viability and capacity for directional migration.

  3. Effectiveness, active energy produced by molecular motors, and nonlinear capacitance of the cochlear outer hair cell.

    PubMed

    Spector, Alexander A

    2005-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells are crucial for active hearing. These cells have a unique form of motility, named electromotility, whose main features are the cell's length changes, active force production, and nonlinear capacitance. The molecular motor, prestin, that drives outer hair cell electromotility has recently been identified. We reveal relationships between the active energy produced by the outer hair cell molecular motors, motor effectiveness, and the capacitive properties of the cell membrane. We quantitatively characterize these relationships by introducing three characteristics: effective capacitance, zero-strain capacitance, and zero-resultant capacitance. We show that zero-strain capacitance is smaller than zero-resultant capacitance, and that the effective capacitance is between the two. It was also found that the differences between the introduced capacitive characteristics can be expressed in terms of the active energy produced by the cell's molecular motors. The effectiveness of the cell and its molecular motors is introduced as the ratio of the motors'active energy to the energy of the externally applied elect