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Sample records for early 19th-century revivalism

  1. Jean-Louis Brachet (1789-1858). A forgotten contributor to early 19th century neurology.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, O

    2015-10-01

    Specialists of the history of hysteria know the name of Jean-Louis Brachet (1789-1858), but few realise the influence of this physician and surgeon from Lyon, a city in the southeastern part of France. Not only a clinician, he was also a neurophysiology researcher in the early 19th century. Along with his descriptions of meningoencephalitis, including hydrocephalus and meningoencephalitis, he elucidated the functioning of the vegetative nervous system and described its activity during emotional states. He also helped describe the different forms of epilepsy and sought to understand their aetiologies, working at the same time as the better-known Louis-Florentin Calmeil (1798-1895). We present a biography of this forgotten physician, a prolific writer, keen clinical observer and staunch devotee of a rigorous scientific approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Upland Hardwood Forests and Related Communities of the Arkansas Ozarks in the Early 19th Century

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Foti

    2004-01-01

    Historic accounts of the 19 th Century Arkansas Ozarks mention such communities as oak forests, pine forests, barrens and prairies. I document the region-wide distribution of these types based on data from the first land survey conducted by the General Land Office (GLO). Structural classes used here include closed forest, open forest, woodland, savanna, open savanna...

  3. [Eventful life stories. Members of student fraternities persecuted in Silesia in the early 19th century].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Walter

    2003-01-01

    This study supplemented by three charts and a list of biographies, is, for the first time, encompassing their life-data, their resumés and even their professional careers as well as political commitments shown by more than 200 Silesian students. They, at the University of Breslau, but also at other German universities, had joined the student fraternities in the 20-ies and early 30-ies of the 19th century and, in consequence, were persecuted by state authorities, notably in Prussia and, in the majority of cases, had been sentenced to prison terms of varying degrees. The first demagogic persecution, which happened in the first half of the twenties, culminating in 1822 in the Breslau Arminen Trail and ending up with the staging of the Youth-Association-Trail in 1826, had implicated about 100 Silesians, with a smaller portion of them - apart from teh three Youth-Association Silesians who were sentenced to five years imprisonment in a fortress - getting away with a relatively short "political fortress imprisonment". Later a considerable part of them made a career in the prussian judicial authority, in the institutions of higher learning, as parish priests, physicians and scientists, whereas any political engagement remained a rare exception. Out of the 137 Silesian members of the student fraternities affected by the second wave of persecution, the overwhelming majority of them being Protestants and originating partly from the middle classes, mostly artisans, and from intellectual background, with about a hundred of them being given essentially higher sentences ranging from six years up to capital punishment and, in the event of reprieves, they had to serve their sentences between six months and four-to-six years in a fortress. The majority of them made a medium-level professional career, never exceeding the medium ranks, as judicial officers, lawyers in state or communal services, parish priests, teachers or physicians. However, from this group of persecuted persons, a

  4. Astrometry and early astrophysics at Kuffner Observatory in the late 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habison, Peter

    The astronomer and mathematician Norbert Herz encouraged Moriz von Kuffner, owner of the beer brewery in Ottakring, to finance a private scientific observatory in the western parts of Vienna. In the years 1884-87 the Kuffner Observatory was built at the Gallitzinberg in Wien-Ottakring. It was an example of enlighted patronage and noted at the time for its rapid acquisition of new instruments and by increasing international recognition. It contained the largest heliometer in the world and the largest meridian circle in the Austrian-Hungarian Empire. Of the many scientists who worked here we mention Leo de Ball, Gustav Eberhard, Johannes Hartmann and we should not forget Karl Schwarzschild. Here in Vienna he published papers on celestial mechanics, measuring techniques, optics and his fundamental papers concerning photographic photometry, in particular the quantitative determination of the departure of the reciprocity law. The telescope and the associated camera with which he carried out his measurements are still in existence at the observatory. The observatory houses important astronomical instruments from the 19th century. All telescopes were made by Repsold und Söhne in Hamburg, and Steinheil in Munich. These two German companies were best renowned for quality and precision in high standard astronomical instruments. The Great Refractor (270/3500 mm) is still the third largest refractor in Austria. It was installed at the observatory in 1886 and was used together with the Schwarzschild Refractor for early astrophysical work including photography. It is this double refractor, where Schwarzschild carried out his measurements on photographic photometry. The Meridian Circle (132/1500 mm) was the largest meridian passage instrument of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Today it is the largest meridian circle in Austria and still one of the largest in Europe. The telescope is equipped with one of the first impersonal micrometers of that time. First observations were carried

  5. Climate and history in the late 18th and early 19th centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Theodore S.

    As in many areas of human knowledge, the notion of climate acquired a deeper historical content around the turn of the 19th century. Natural philosophers, geographers, and others became increasingly aware of climate's own history and its relation to human, plant and animal, and Earth history. This article examines several aspects of this “historicization” of climate.The lively 18th century discussion of the influence of climate on society is well known. Montesquieu is its most famous representative, but Voltaire, Hume, Kant, and others also participated. Their debate was literary more than scientific, their goal the understanding of man, not climate. Partly for this reason and partly because of the lack of good information on climates, they made no attempt to gather substantial climatic data. In fact, the importance of systematically collecting reliable data was scarcely understood in any area of natural philosophy before the last decades of the century [Cf. Frängsmyr et al., 1990; Feldman, 1990]. Instead, participants in the debate repeated commonplaces dating from Aristotle and Hippocrates and based their conclusions on unreliable reports from travelers. As Glacken wrote of Montesquieu, “his dishes are from old and well-tested recipes” [Glacken, 1967, chapter 12]. This is not to say that the debate over climatic influence was not significant—only that its significance lay more in the history of man than in the atmospheric sciences.

  6. Evidence of Active Dune Sand on the Great Plains in the 19th Century from Accounts of Early Explorers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Holliday, Vance T.

    1995-03-01

    Eolian sand is extensive over the Great Plains of North America, but is at present mostly stabilized by vegetation. Accounts published by early explorers, however, indicate that at least parts of dune fields in Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, and Texas were active in the 19th century. Based on an index of dune mobility and a regional tree-ring record, the probable causes for these periods of greater eolian activity are droughts, accompanied by higher temperatures, which greatly lowered the precipitation-to-evapotranspiration ratio and diminished the cover of stabilizing vegetation. In addition, observations by several explorers, and previous historical studies, indicate that rivers upwind of Great Plains dune fields had shallow, braided, sandy channels, as well as intermittent flow in the 19th century. Wide, braided, sandy rivers that were frequently dry would have increased sand supplies to active dune fields. We conclude that dune fields in the Great Plains are extremely sensitive to climate change and that the potential for reactivation of stabilized dunes in the future is high, with or without greenhouse warming.

  7. Early meteorological records from Latin-America and the Caribbean during the 18th and 19th centuries

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Castro, Fernando; Vaquero, José Manuel; Gallego, María Cruz; Farrona, Ana María Marín; Antuña-Marrero, Juan Carlos; Cevallos, Erika Elizabeth; Herrera, Ricardo García; de la Guía, Cristina; Mejía, Raúl David; Naranjo, José Manuel; del Rosario Prieto, María; Ramos Guadalupe, Luis Enrique; Seiner, Lizardo; Trigo, Ricardo Machado; Villacís, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides early instrumental data recovered for 20 countries of Latin-America and the Caribbean (Argentina, Bahamas, Belize, Brazil, British Guiana, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, France (Martinique and Guadalupe), Guatemala, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador and Suriname) during the 18th and 19th centuries. The main meteorological variables retrieved were air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and precipitation, but other variables, such as humidity, wind direction, and state of the sky were retrieved when possible. In total, more than 300,000 early instrumental data were rescued (96% with daily resolution). Especial effort was made to document all the available metadata in order to allow further post-processing. The compilation is far from being exhaustive, but the dataset will contribute to a better understanding of climate variability in the region, and to enlarging the period of overlap between instrumental data and natural/documentary proxies. PMID:29135974

  8. Early meteorological records from Latin-America and the Caribbean during the 18th and 19th centuries.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Castro, Fernando; Vaquero, José Manuel; Gallego, María Cruz; Farrona, Ana María Marín; Antuña-Marrero, Juan Carlos; Cevallos, Erika Elizabeth; Herrera, Ricardo García; de la Guía, Cristina; Mejía, Raúl David; Naranjo, José Manuel; Del Rosario Prieto, María; Ramos Guadalupe, Luis Enrique; Seiner, Lizardo; Trigo, Ricardo Machado; Villacís, Marcos

    2017-11-14

    This paper provides early instrumental data recovered for 20 countries of Latin-America and the Caribbean (Argentina, Bahamas, Belize, Brazil, British Guiana, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, France (Martinique and Guadalupe), Guatemala, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador and Suriname) during the 18th and 19th centuries. The main meteorological variables retrieved were air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and precipitation, but other variables, such as humidity, wind direction, and state of the sky were retrieved when possible. In total, more than 300,000 early instrumental data were rescued (96% with daily resolution). Especial effort was made to document all the available metadata in order to allow further post-processing. The compilation is far from being exhaustive, but the dataset will contribute to a better understanding of climate variability in the region, and to enlarging the period of overlap between instrumental data and natural/documentary proxies.

  9. Early meteorological records from Latin-America and the Caribbean during the 18th and 19th centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Castro, Fernando; Vaquero, José Manuel; Gallego, María Cruz; Farrona, Ana María Marín; Antuña-Marrero, Juan Carlos; Cevallos, Erika Elizabeth; Herrera, Ricardo García; de La Guía, Cristina; Mejía, Raúl David; Naranjo, José Manuel; Del Rosario Prieto, María; Ramos Guadalupe, Luis Enrique; Seiner, Lizardo; Trigo, Ricardo Machado; Villacís, Marcos

    2017-11-01

    This paper provides early instrumental data recovered for 20 countries of Latin-America and the Caribbean (Argentina, Bahamas, Belize, Brazil, British Guiana, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, France (Martinique and Guadalupe), Guatemala, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador and Suriname) during the 18th and 19th centuries. The main meteorological variables retrieved were air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and precipitation, but other variables, such as humidity, wind direction, and state of the sky were retrieved when possible. In total, more than 300,000 early instrumental data were rescued (96% with daily resolution). Especial effort was made to document all the available metadata in order to allow further post-processing. The compilation is far from being exhaustive, but the dataset will contribute to a better understanding of climate variability in the region, and to enlarging the period of overlap between instrumental data and natural/documentary proxies.

  10. Evidence of active dune sand on the Great Plains in the 19th century from accounts of early explorers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Holliday, V.T.

    1995-01-01

    Dune fields are found in several areas of the Great Plains, and though mostly stabilised today, the accounts of early explorers show that they were more mobile in the last century. Using an index of dune mobility and tree ring data, it is found that these periods of mobility were related to temperature-induced drought, the high temperatures increasing evapotranspiration. Explorers also record that rivers upwind of these dune fields had shallow braided channels in the 19th century, and these would have supplied further aeolian sand. It is concluded that these dunes are extremely susceptible to climate change and that it may not need global warming to increase their mobility again. -K.Clayton

  11. New early instrumental series since the beginning of the 19th century in eastern Iberia (Valencia, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Barriendos, Mariano; Guinaldo, Elena; Lopez-Bustins, Joan A.

    2010-05-01

    Early instrumental series are the main source for climate information in the 18th and the first part of the 19th century, which is when systematic meteorological observations started in most national meteorological services. The first continuous series in Spain starts in 1780 in Barcelona due to meteorological observations made by the medical doctor Francisco Salvá Campillo. Moreover, only two other series have been recovered at the present in Spain: Madrid and Cádiz/San Fernando. Until present, in Spain the major part of the meteorological observations detected in early instrumental periods were made by medical doctors, who started to pay attention to the environmental factors influencing population health under the Hippocrates oath, although also there are military institutions and academic university staff (e.g. physicists, mathematicians, etc.). Due to the high spatial and temporal climate variability in the Iberian Peninsula, it is important to recover and digitize more climatic series, and this is one of the main goals of the Salvá-Sinobas project (http://salva-sinobas.uvigo.es/) funded by the Spanish Ministry of Environment, and Rural and Marine Affairs for the 2009-2011 period. The first new series with systematic observations was detected in the city of Valencia, in the eastern façade of the Iberian Peninsula. The meteorological observations were daily published in the newspapers Diario de Valencia (1804-1834) and Diario Mercantil de Valencia (1837-1863) until official meteorological observations started in 1858 at the University of Valencia. Each day 3-daily observations (morning, midday, afternoon) were published with five climatic variables: temperature, air pressure, humidity, wind direction and the sky state. Only during the 1804-1808 period daily rainfall data is available. We checked the observer comments published in the newspapers to obtain metadata about the instruments and meteorological station information. Unfortunately, temperature data

  12. An early 19th-century Canadian surgical practice: the casebook of John Mackieson of Charlottetown, 1795–1885

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, David A.E.; Grogono, Basil J.S.

    2002-01-01

    A casebook written by Dr. John Mackieson (1795–1885), of Charlottetown, contains the records of 49 surgical cases he managed between 1826 and 1857. In view of the rarity of first-hand accounts of surgical practice in Canada in the mid-19th century, Mackieson’s case records are a significant source of information. These cases are discussed in order to delineate Mackieson’s approach to the surgical problems he faced in his general practice. His case records also illustrate some of the general problems that beset surgeons in that era. PMID:11939660

  13. The early steps of chloroform anaesthesia in Turkey during the Ottoman Empire in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Ulman, Yesim Isil

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to research the pioneering steps for the employment of chloroform in Turkey in comparison with the developments in the West i.e. in the United States and in Europe. The development of anaesthesiology in the West started in the first half of the 19th century. As an anaesthetic substance, ether was first employed in a medical operation by R. Liston in December 1846. But taking into consideration of its bronchially irritant effect, British gynaecologist Dr. J.Y. Simpson preferred to utilize chloroform in obstetrical operations in 1847. The paper aims at shedding light on the earlier steps for modern anaesthesiology in Turkey in that sense. The survey used evaluation of archival documents, first hand-original sources such as the annual medical reports of the Medical School, books, official journals, and newspapers of the time, and also secondary sources concerned with the subject. In view of the findings of the survey, chloroform, as an anaesthetic material, began to be administered surgically in Turkey much earlier than it was already known. It was experienced and used in operations at the surgical clinic of the Imperial School of Medicine at the Capital city, Istanbul in 1848. The Crimean War (1853-1855) induced to the prevalent surgical use of chloroform in Istanbul on the soldiers back from the front. In other words, it was evidenced that surgeons started to make use of this anaesthetic substance in the Ottoman Empire, shortly after it was put into medical practice in Europe. This study deals with that phenomenal progress of chloroform anaesthesia in the medical history in Turkey during the second half of the 19th century.

  14. Astronomical dating in the 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgen, Frederik J.

    2010-01-01

    layering in Holocene peat bogs. He specifically linked the exceptionally wet Atlantic period to the prolonged precession minimum at 33,300 yr ago and further related basic stratigraphic alternations to precession induced climate change in general. Such a linkage was also proposed by Grove Karl Gilbert for cyclic alternations in the marine Cretaceous of North America. Extrapolating sedimentation rates, he arrived at an astronomical duration for part of the Cretaceous that was roughly as long as the final estimate of William Thomson for the age of the Earth. Assuming that orbital parameters directly affect sea level, Karl Mayer-Eymar and Blytt correlated the well known succession of Tertiary stages to precession and eccentricity, respectively. Remarkably, Blytt, like Croll before him, used very long-period cycles in eccentricity to establish and validate his tuning. Understandably these studies in the second half of the 19th century were largely deductive in nature and proved partly incorrect later. Nevertheless, this fascinating period marks a crucial phase in the development of the astronomical theory of the ice ages and climate, and in astronomical dating. It preceded the final inductive phase, which started with the recovery of deep-sea cores in 1947 and led to a spectacular revival of the astronomical theory, by a century. The first half of the 20th century can best be regarded as an intermediate phase, despite the significant progress made in both theoretical aspects and tuning.

  15. Teratology in Mexico. 19th Century.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, Frida

    2014-01-01

    It was not until the last third of the 19th century, the period in which, according to historiography, the country definitely inserted itself into modernity, that anomalies and monstrosities had a presence in Mexico. Therefore, what I present here are four moments of teratology in Mexico, four dates in which I try to recount how teratology, which still occupied a marginal place within the main themes of national science, not only reached to cover the realm of medical discussions at the time, but also laid the foundations for new disciplines like biology and anthropology.

  16. [Assisted birth in 19th century Bahia].

    PubMed

    Barreto, Maria Renilda Nery

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the traditions of assisted childbirth in the Brazilian state of Bahia in the 19th Century and develops the hypothesis that two obstetrical traditions coexisted in the capital, Salvador, namely the doctor-midwives--who used technical resources and knowledge acquired from obstetrics as a medical specialty--and the traditional midwives, whose know-how was purely of an empirical-sensorial nature. Despite all efforts employed by the doctors to win over the confidence of Bahian families, the midwives continued to be predominant in the art of 'delivering' children and treating female illnesses. The analysis focuses on the social and professional segments that were active in assisted birth; the role of the Bahian College of Medicine (Faculdade de Medicina da Bahia) in the training and certification of midwives and the use of newspapers as a way to legitimize the doctor-midwives; it also discusses the scant coverage of the midwives in these media.

  17. [Antônio Moniz de Souza, the 'Man of Brazilian Nature': science and medicinal plants in the early 19th century].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Laura Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    Early nineteenth century Brazil saw a vibrant movement to study nature, including a number of expeditions aimed at gathering a corpus of knowledge on Brazilian flora. One of the main goals of these expeditions was to map and identify plant species of economic and therapeutic value. The government undertook and sponsored various initiatives, and it was within this context that the Bahian voyager Antônio Moniz de Souza engaged in his activities. He traveled through areas of the Brazilian territory in the first decades of the nineteenth century, observing, cataloging, and collecting products from the three kingdoms, especially plants with medicinal powers. This study of Moniz de Souza pinpoints and analyzes important features in the exploration of nature and knowledge and the use of medicinal plants during this timeframe.

  18. Women in 19th Century Irish immigration.

    PubMed

    Jackson, P

    1984-01-01

    By the 1950s--100 years after the great famine of 1845-49-- 57% of emigrants from the 26 countries of Ireland were women. In the latter 1/2 of the 19th Century, increasing proportions of women emigrated, until they outnumbered men. For women it was more than a flight from poverty. It was also an escape from an increasingly patriarchal society, whose asymetrical development as a colony curtailed women's social space, even in their traditional role as wife and mother. The famine, which is the single greatest influence forcing emigration, undermined the social fabric of an agrarian society, hastening the process of agricultural transformation. The growth of a new class of Irish a British grazier landlords resulted in a situation of acute land scarcity, encouraging tendencies to cling to one's land holding without dividing it. This, combined with new inheritance practices, gave rise to widespread arranged marriages as a means of land consolidation, and the dowry system. The spontaneous marriage practices of famine days also were replaced by a postponement of marriage. These trends severely reduced the choices exerted by women. The absence of big industrialized cities, which might have absorbed displaced rural populations, removed available options, particularly for women. The system of land monopoly and inheritance revolving around male heads of households reinforced partriarchal relations, within a framework of rigid sexual norms, whose enforcement was easy because the church, which played an important role in the emergence of these values, was a major landowner in itself. The subordinated, invisible status of women in post-famine Ireland, and growing barriers to easy access to marriage partners, to waged employment and self-expression, all helped ensure the higher and higher emigration rates of women. The economic transformation of Irish agriculture accelerated the establishment of oppressive values and helped depreciate the position of women to a very low level. The

  19. [Changes of medico-pharmaceutical profession and private practice from the late 19th century to the early 20th century: ebb and flow of western pharmacies and clinics attached to pharmacy].

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung-Ki

    2010-12-31

    This article examined i) how traditional medico-pharmaceutical custom from the late 19th century influenced such changes, ii) how medical laws of Daehan Empire and early colonial period influenced the differentiation of medico-pharmaceutical profession, and iii) what the responses of medico-pharmaceutical professionals were like, and arrived at following conclusions. First, in late Chosun, there was a nationwide spread of pharmacies (medicine room, medicine store) as general medical institutions in charge of prescription and medication as well as diagnosis. Therefore, Koreans' perception of Western medicine was not very different from that of traditional pharmacy. Second, Western pharmacies were established by various entities including oriental doctors, Western doctors and drug manufacturers.Their business ranged from medical consultation, prescription, medication and drug manufacture. This was in a way the extension of traditional medico-pharmaceutical custom, which did not draw a sharp line between medical and pharmaceutical practices. Also, regulations on medical and pharmaceutical business of Daehan Empire did not distinguish oriental and Western medicine. Third, clinics attached to pharmacy began to emerge after 1908, as some Western pharmacies that had grown their business based on selling medicine began to hire doctors trained in Western medicine. This trend resulted from Government General's control over medico-pharmaceutical business that began in 1908, following a large-scale dismissal of army surgeons trained in medical schools in 1907. Fourth, as specialization increased within medico-pharmaceutical business following the colonial medical law in early 1910s, such comprehensive business practices as Western pharmacy disappeared and existing businesses were differentiated into dealers of medical ingredients, drug manufacturer, patent medicine businessmen and herbalists. And private practice gradually became the general trend by establishment of medical

  20. Technical improvements in 19th century Belgian window glass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauriks, Leen; Collette, Quentin; Wouters, Ine; Belis, Jan

    Glass was used since the Roman age in the building envelope, but it became widely applied together with iron since the 19th century. Belgium was a major producer of window glass during the nineteenth century and the majority of the produced window glass was exported all over the world. Investigating the literature on the development of 19th century Belgian window glass production is therefore internationally relevant. In the 17th century, wood was replaced as a fuel by coal. In the 19th century, the regenerative tank furnace applied gas as a fuel in a continuous glass production process. The advantages were a clean production, a more constant and higher temperature in the furnace and a fuel saving. The French chemist Nicolas Leblanc (1787-1793) and later the Belgian chemist Ernest Solvay (1863) invented processes to produce alkali out of common salt. The artificial soda ash improved the quality and aesthetics of the glass plates. During the 19th century, the glass production was industrialized, influencing the operation of furnaces, the improvement of raw materials as well as the applied energy sources. Although the production process was industrialized, glassblowing was still the work of an individual. By improving his work tools, he was able to create larger glass plates. The developments in the annealing process followed this evolution. The industry had to wait until the invention of the drawn glass in the beginning of the 20th century to fully industrialise the window glass manufacture process.

  1. Vocational Education in the 19th Century American Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Gordon F.

    The phrase "all things useful and all things ornamental," coined by Benjamin Franklin, describes the stated mission of most of the approximately 6,000 educational academies flourishing in America in the mid-19th century. Built upon the roots of Latin grammar schools, the academies evolved to include courses in many areas, from classical…

  2. Tuberculosis in the Ottoman harem in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Baris, Y Izzetin; Hillerdal, Gunnar

    2009-08-01

    At least four of the sultans who ruled during the 19th century suffered from tuberculosis (TB), and probably many of the women and children in the harem too. Life there was crowded with low standards of hygiene, resulting in high mortality, especially among children. Infectious diseases were the main killers and TB was one of the many factors behind the decline and fall of the empire.

  3. The psychologist as a poet: Kierkegaard and psychology in 19th-century Copenhagen.

    PubMed

    Pind, Jörgen L

    2016-11-01

    Psychology had an early start at the University of Copenhagen in the first half of the 19th century, where it was taught as the major part of a compulsory course required of all first-year students. Particularly important in the establishment of psychology at the university was Frederik Christian Sibbern, who was professor of philosophy from 1813 to 1870. Sibbern wrote numerous works on psychology throughout his career. In his first book on psychology, Sibbern expressed the view that the ideal psychologist should also be a poet. Søren Kierkegaard, Sibbern's student, was precisely such a poet-psychologist. Kierkegaard discussed psychology in many of his works, reflecting the gathering momentum of psychology in 19th-century Copenhagen, Denmark. The article brings out some aspects of Kierkegaard's poetic and literary-imaginative approach to psychology. In his opinion, psychology was primarily a playful subject and limited in the questions about human nature it could answer, especially when it came up against the "eternal" in man's nature. Kierkegaard had a positive view of psychology, which contrasts sharply with his negative views on the rise of statistics and the natural sciences. In the latter half of the 19th century, psychology turned positivistic at the University of Copenhagen. This left little room for Kierkegaard's kind of poetic psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Hay fever, a post industrial revolution epidemic: a history of its growth during the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, M B

    1988-05-01

    Although other forms of allergic disease were described in antiquity, hay fever is surprisingly modern. Very rare descriptions can be traced back to Islamic texts of the 9th century and European texts of the 16th century. It was only in the early 19th century that the disease was carefully described and at that time was regarded as most unusual. By the end of the 19th century it had become commonplace in both Europe and North America. This paper attempts to chart the growth of hay fever through the medical literature of the 19th century. It is hoped that an understanding of the increase in prevalence between 1820 and 1900 may provide an insight for modern researchers and give some clues into possible reasons for the epidemic nature of the disease today.

  5. Cast Iron in The 19th Century Building Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasek, Michał; Piwek, Aleksander

    2017-10-01

    Cast iron is a material, characteristics of which enable to receive extremely artistic elements. It maintains good strength properties at the same time. That combination of these seemingly contrary traits makes it a commodity that was widely used in the 19th century industry and architecture. These usages were not only as decorative elements, technical and structural ones. The production of new household utilities started, which made people’s lives more comfortable. Cast iron allowed for fast and cheap production while maintaining high aesthetic qualities. Useful elements, which often were ornamental parts of buildings were created. The aim of the article is to characterise elements of interior equipment of the 19th century building that are made of cast iron. As it appears from performed bibliography, archival and field studies, the ways of exploitation are very broad. Some were mounted into the building; the others were a mobile equipment. As it occurred they were most commonly used as functional items. Cast iron was used to produce the minor elements, which were only parts of the bigger wooden or stone items. Notwithstanding, there were also bigger ones casted as a whole, and frequently ones that were assembled from many elements. Nowadays, elements of an interior feature are one of the subjects of study during the restoration work of the buildings. They can provide important information about the building and the way people lived and are considered as the essential part of historical objects.

  6. Institutionalising senile dementia in 19th-century Britain.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Emily Stella

    2017-02-01

    This article explains how old, poor people living with dementia came to be institutionalised in 19th-century Britain (with a focus on London), and how they were responded to by the people who ran those institutions. The institutions in question are lunatic asylums, workhouses and charitable homes. Old people with dementia were admitted to lunatic asylums, workhouses and charitable homes, but were not welcome there. Using the records of Hanwell lunatic asylum, published texts of psychiatric theory, and the administrative records that all of these institutions generated at local and national levels, this article argues that 'the senile' were a perpetual classificatory residuum in the bureaucracy of 19th-century health and welfare. They were too weak and unresponsive to adhere to the norms of the asylum regime, yet too challenging in their behaviour to conform to that of the workhouse, or the charitable home. Across all of these institutions, old people with dementia were represented as an intractable burden, many decades before the 'ageing society' became a demographic reality. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  7. Music therapy in the 19th century America.

    PubMed

    Davis, W B

    1987-01-01

    The history of music therapy in the United States has not been thoroughly investigated and documented. The few sources containing information on the historical uses of music in medicine concentrate primarily on 20th century practices, while virtually omitting 19th century contributions to the field. The purpose of this study was to analyze elected music therapy literature that appeared in 19th century medical journals and dissertations. The articles found in these publications indicated interest during this time in advocating the use of music to provide the patient an alternate, more holistic approach to treatment. The dissemination of music therapy ideas occurred almost exclusively through these publications, which unfortunately resulted in very limited proliferation of the topic because of the nature of the audience (i.e.,primarily physicians). Nine articles were analyzed; the study was based on primary evidence located in medical journals and dissertations written between 1804 and 1899. The sources were located in a variety of bibliographies found in books, journals, dissertations, and theses.

  8. Cholera in Haiti and Other Caribbean Regions, 19th Century

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Medical journals and other sources do not show evidence that cholera occurred in Haiti before 2010, despite the devastating effect of this disease in the Caribbean region in the 19th century. Cholera occurred in Cuba in 1833–1834; in Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, St. Thomas, St. Lucia, St. Kitts, Nevis, Trinidad, the Bahamas, St. Vincent, Granada, Anguilla, St. John, Tortola, the Turks and Caicos, the Grenadines (Carriacou and Petite Martinique), and possibly Antigua in 1850–1856; and in Guadeloupe, Cuba, St. Thomas, the Dominican Republic, Dominica, Martinique, and Marie Galante in 1865–1872. Conditions associated with slavery and colonial military control were absent in independent Haiti. Clustered populations, regular influx of new persons, and close quarters of barracks living contributed to spread of cholera in other Caribbean locations. We provide historical accounts of the presence and spread of cholera epidemics in Caribbean islands. PMID:22099117

  9. Colombian approaches to psychology in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Gilberto Leonardo

    2012-11-01

    Colombian intellectuals of the 19th century widely consulted scientific psychology in regard to their political, religious, and educational interests. Colombian independence from Spain (1810) introduced the necessity of transforming the former subjects into illustrious citizens and members of a modern state. After independence, political liberals embraced Bentham's thesis of utilitarianism and the theories of sensibility, with a teaching style based in induction. Conservatives defended the Catholic tradition about the divine origin of the soul and used scholasticism as a model of teaching. A bipartisan coalition, the Regeneration, incorporated the ideas of modern psychology based on the principles of Thomistic thought (Neo-Thomism). The Neo-Thomists considered psychology as a science of the soul and debated physiological explanations of the mind. The conceptual advances of the period have been trivialized in historical accounts of psychology in Colombia, due to the emphasis on the institutionalization processes of the discipline in 1947. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Landmarks in Allergy during the 19th Century.

    PubMed

    Kay, A Barry

    2014-01-01

    There were remarkable achievements in the 19th century in our understanding of the cells of the allergic response, the clear descriptions of hay fever and asthma, as well as the role of pollen in seasonal rhinitis. Although allergy as a concept was not developed until well into the 20th century, the foundations of our present understanding of these diseases were laid in the 1800s. The outstanding physicians and scientists of this time included Paul Ehrlich (who described mast cells, eosinophils and basophils), John Bostock (who provided the first detailed account of hay fever), Charles Blackley (who showed that pollen was the cause of hay fever), Morrill Wyman (who demonstrated that autumnal catarrh was due to ragweed pollen), Henry Hide Salter (who made the first classic description of asthma) and Henri Laënnec (the inventor of the stethoscope). © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Critical analysis of documentary sources for Historical Climatology of Northern Portugal (17th-19th centuries)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Inês; Sousa Silva, Luís; Garcia, João Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Critical analysis of documentary sources for Historical Climatology of Northern Portugal (17th-19th centuries) Inês Amorim CITCEM, Department of History, Political and International Studies, U. of Porto, Portugal. Luís Sousa Silva CITCEM, PhD Fellowship - FCT. João Carlos Garcia CIUHCT, Geography Department, U. of Porto, Portugal. The first major national project on Historical Climatology in Portugal, called "KLIMHIST: Reconstruction and model simulations of past climate in Portugal using documentary and early instrumental sources (17th-19th centuries)", ended in September 2015, coordinated by Maria João Alcoforado. This project began in March 2012 and counted on an interdisciplinary team of researchers from four Portuguese institutions (Centre of Geographical Studies, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, University of Porto, and University of Évora), from different fields of knowledge (Geography, History, Biology, Climatology and Meteorology). The team networked and collaborated with other international research groups on Climate Change and Historical Climatology, resulting in several publications. This project aimed to reconstruct thermal and rainfall patterns in Portugal between the 17th and 19th centuries, as well as identify the main hydrometeorological extremes that occurred over that period. The basic methodology consisted in combining information from different types of anthropogenic sources (descriptive and instrumental) and natural sources (tree rings and geothermal holes), so as to develop climate change models of the past. The data collected were stored in a digital database, which can be searched by source, date, location and type of event. This database, which will be made publically available soon, contains about 3500 weather/climate-related records, which have begun to be studied, processed and published. Following this seminal project, other initiatives have taken place in Portugal in the area of Historical Climatology, namely a Ph

  12. [Asylum: the Huge Psychiatric Hospital in the 19th century U.S].

    PubMed

    Kazano, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    The large-scale state psychiatric hospitals, referred to as "asylums," were built in the USA in the 19th century and generally have a bad reputation in Japan as institutions with an unpleasant environment for the patients. Asylums were not built for institutionalizing mental patients. The original meaning of the word asylum is a "retreat" or "sanctuary," and these institutions were originally built to act as sanctuaries for the protection of mental patients. The field of psychiatric medicine in western countries in the 19th century began to embrace the concept of "moral treatment" for mental patients, including no restraint of the patients and treating them in a more open environment. With this background, asylums were built according to the efforts of social activist Dorothea Dix with financial assistance from the Quakers. The psychiatrist Dr. Thomas Kirkbride had a large influence on asylum architecture, and believed that the hospital building and environment as well as location have healing effects on the patients, which he called the "therapeutic landscape". Kirkbridelater proposed an architectural plan that became the basis for subsequent mental hospital architecture, and many asylums were built according to this plan. As the architecture was considered part of the treatment, many leading architects and landscape architects at the time became involved in building asylums. In the later half of the 19th century, over 150 asylums were built across the USA. However, moral treatment fell out of favor toward the end of the 19th century, and the concept of therapeutic landscape was also neglected. The hospitals had many uncured patients, and caregivers became pessimistic about the efficacy of the treatments. Abuse and neglect of the patients were also common. The environment at the asylums deteriorated, which created the image of asylums that, we hold today. Many asylums have been demolished or abandoned. These early attempts at asylum failed due to insufficient

  13. [Gymnastics and therapeutic gymnastics in 19th century Hungary].

    PubMed

    Kölnei, Lívia

    2009-01-01

    Gymnastics as a way of healing and of preserving health spread in Hungary--almost exclusively among higher classes--only in the first half of the 19th century. The movement was inspired by naturopathic theories of the time, first of all by Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland's macrobiotics, by Vinzenz Priessnitz's hydrotherapy and by his healing gymnastics. Gymnastics has been utilized from the 30ies by a new bough of medicine, orthopaedy. The so called Swedish Gymnastics invented by Per Henrik Ling and by his son Hjalmar Ling or the method of the German gymnast Adolf Spiess were well known in Hungary as well. The pediatrist Agost Schöp-Merei founded the first Institute for Gymnastics in Pest in 1835. As orthopaedy developed, gymnastics was more and more utilized in curing locomotor disorders. Gymnastics however stood in close connection with hydropathy as well. Several institutes for hydropathy and gymnastics were founded in the 50ies and 60ies throughout the country. The most popular of them were those of Károly Siklósy and Sámuel Batizfalvy. Preventive gymnastics gained popularity only in the second half of the 19th century, as 1830 the French gymnast Ignatius Clair moved to Pest and founded the "Pester gymnastische Schule" (Gymnastics School of Pest). This private school flourished till 1863. The Gymnastic Federation of Pest (later National Gymnastics Federation), the first Hungarian sport club was founded in 1866. Tivadar Bakody played an important role in its creation. Gymnastics and sport at the beginning were closely connected with fire-service, so gymnastics clubs often functioned also as fire-guard-bodies. In the 70ies and 80ies the social basis of sport movement was slowly broadened out. The end of the century saw already 44 gymnastics-clubs in Hungary united in a single union, the National Federation of Gymnasts, which organized the education of the profession as well. The trend of development didn't cease up to the Great War. This time the movement was

  14. Faces and Photography in 19th-Century Visual Science.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    Reading faces for identity, character, and expression is as old as humanity but representing these states is relatively recent. From the 16th century, physiognomists classified character in terms of both facial form and represented the types graphically. Darwin distinguished between physiognomy (which concerned static features reflecting character) and expression (which was dynamic and reflected emotions). Artists represented personality, pleasure, and pain in their paintings and drawings, but the scientific study of faces was revolutionized by photography in the 19th century. Rather than relying on artistic abstractions of fleeting facial expressions, scientists photographed what the eye could not discriminate. Photography was applied first to stereoscopic portraiture (by Wheatstone) then to the study of facial expressions (by Duchenne) and to identity (by Galton and Bertillon). Photography opened new methods for investigating face perception, most markedly with Galton's composites derived from combining aligned photographs of many sitters. In the same decade (1870s), Kühne took the process of photography as a model for the chemical action of light in the retina. These developments and their developers are described and fixed in time, but the ideas they initiated have proved impossible to stop. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Austrian Pharmacy in the 18th and 19th Century

    PubMed Central

    Kletter, Christa

    2010-01-01

    This overview reflects the extensive changes in the health care system which had significant effects on the apothecary’s profession and education. In the 18th century Maria Theresia assigned Gerard van Swieten to modernize the medical curriculum and to work out reforms for health care. The resulting sanitary bill released in 1770 and amended in 1773 became effective for the whole empire and influenced greatly the apothecary’s profession. The Viennese Medical Faculty continued to be the supervisory body for the apothecaries, a situation which prolonged the conflicts between the faculty and the apothecaries. The financial and social distress prevalent in the 19th century also affected the apothecary business and led to a crisis of the profession. Furthermore, the apothecaries’ missing influence over the sanitary authorities delayed the release of a badly needed new apothecary bill until 1906. The introduction of a specific pharmaceutical curriculum at the university in 1853 was a great step forward to improve the pharmaceutical education. Nevertheless, the secondary school exam was not compulsory for the studies until 1920 and, therefore, the graduates were not on a par with other university graduates before that date. Women, except nuns, were not allowed to work as pharmacists until 1900. PMID:21179353

  16. Austrian pharmacy in the 18 and 19th century.

    PubMed

    Kletter, Christa

    2010-01-01

    This overview reflects the extensive changes in the health care system which had significant effects on the apothecaryâs profession and education. In the 18(th) century Maria Theresia assigned Gerard van Swieten to modernize the medical curriculum and to work out reforms for health care. The resulting sanitary bill released in 1770 and amended in 1773 became effective for the whole empire and influenced greatly the apothecaryâs profession. The Viennese Medical Faculty continued to be the supervisory body for the apothecaries, a situation which prolonged the conflicts between the faculty and the apothecaries. The financial and social distress prevalent in the 19(th) century also affected the apothecary business and led to a crisis of the profession. Furthermore, the apothecariesâ missing influence over the sanitary authorities delayed the release of a badly needed new apothecary bill until 1906. The introduction of a specific pharmaceutical curriculum at the university in 1853 was a great step forward to improve the pharmaceutical education. Nevertheless, the secondary school exam was not compulsory for the studies until 1920 and, therefore, the graduates were not on a par with other university graduates before that date. Women, except nuns, were not allowed to work as pharmacists until 1900.

  17. Florence Nightingale: a 19th-century mystic.

    PubMed

    Dossey, Barbara M

    2010-03-01

    Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) received a clear and profoundly moving Call to serve God at the age of 16. Through a lifetime of hard work and discipline, she became a practicing mystic in the Western tradition, thereby becoming an instrument of God's love, which was the primarily source of her great energy and the fabled "Nightingale power." To understand the life and work of this legendary healer, who forever changed human consciousness, the role of women, and nursing and public health systems in the middle of the 19th century, it is necessary to understand her motivation and inspiration. This article will discuss her life and work in the context of her mystical practice and to show the parallels between her life and the lives of three recognized women mystics. In her epic Crimean war mission (1854-1856) of leading and directing women nurses in the army hospital at Scutari, Turkey, Florence Nightingale burst into world consciousness as a spiritual beacon of hope and compassion for all who suffered. Her historic breakthrough achievement--pioneering the modern administrative role of nurse superintendent with measurable outcomes supported by irrefutable data--in the face of incredible adversity was merely the cornerstone of her life work.

  18. [Origin of animal experimentation legislation in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Pocard, M

    1999-01-01

    The first legislation in the world, designed to protect animals used in research, was passed in England in 1876, and is still in force today. It is one of the strictest in Europe. At the same period, France had no such law, and was the country conducting the greatest amount of animal experimentation. Comparing, these two countries, in the middle of the 19th century, can account for this difference. The most important difference seems to be related to the theological question: are animals endowed with a soul? Saint Augustine, claimed, in the 4th century, perhaps because of an experiment with the centipede, that animals do not have a soul. In the 17th century, René Descartes, using a different philosophical system, reached a similar conclusion, in France. On the other hand, under the influence of Charles Darwin, England rejected the Roman Catholic conclusion, about the soul of animals. The industrial revolution, occurring earlier in England than in France, also changed the society, developing urban areas, where people were cut off from rural life and changing human relationships with animals. The industrial revolution enabled the development of the press, giving impetus to public opinion. These facts, combined with a caution of science, which was more developed in England than in France, brought about the first important "anti-doctor" campaign.

  19. Accounts from 19th-century Canadian Arctic explorers' logs reflect present climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overland, James E.; Wood, Kevin

    The widely perceived failure of 19th-century expeditions to find and transit the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic is often attributed to extraordinary cold climatic conditions associated with the “Little Ice Age” evident in proxy records. However, examination of 44 explorers' logs for the western Arctic from 1818 to 1910 reveals that climate indicators such as navigability, the distribution and thickness of annual sea ice, monthly surface air temperature, and the onset of melt and freeze were within the present range of variability.The quest for the Northwest Passage through the Canadian archipelago during the 19th century is frequently seen as a vain and tragic failure. Polar exploration during the Victorian era seems to us today to have been a costly exercise in heroic futility, which in many respects it was. This perspective has been reinforced since the 1970s, when paleoclimate reconstructions based on Arctic ice core stratigraphy appeared to confirm the existence of exceptionally cold conditions consistent with the period glaciologists had termed the “Little Ice Age” (Figure 1a), with temperatures more than one standard deviation colder relative to an early 20th-century mean [Koerner, 1977; Koerner and Fisher, 1990; Overpeck et al., 1998]. In recent years, the view of the Little Ice Age as a synchronous worldwide and prolonged cold epoch that ended with modern warming has been questioned [Bradley and Jones, 1993; Jones and Briffa, 2001 ;Ogilvie, 2001].

  20. Absinthism: a fictitious 19th century syndrome with present impact

    PubMed Central

    Padosch, Stephan A; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kröner, Lars U

    2006-01-01

    Absinthe, a bitter spirit containing wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.), was banned at the beginning of the 20th century as consequence of its supposed unique adverse effects. After nearly century-long prohibition, absinthe has seen a resurgence after recent de-restriction in many European countries. This review provides information on the history of absinthe and one of its constituent, thujone. Medical and toxicological aspects experienced and discovered before the prohibition of absinthe are discussed in detail, along with their impact on the current situation. The only consistent conclusion that can be drawn from those 19th century studies about absinthism is that wormwood oil but not absinthe is a potent agent to cause seizures. Neither can it be concluded that the beverage itself was epileptogenic nor that the so-called absinthism can exactly be distinguished as a distinct syndrome from chronic alcoholism. The theory of a previous gross overestimation of the thujone content of absinthe may have been verified by a number of independent studies. Based on the current available evidence, thujone concentrations of both pre-ban and modern absinthes may not have been able to cause detrimental health effects other than those encountered in common alcoholism. Today, a questionable tendency of absinthe manufacturers can be ascertained that use the ancient theories of absinthism as a targeted marketing strategy to bring absinthe into the spheres of a legal drug-of-abuse. Misleading advertisements of aphrodisiac or psychotropic effects of absinthe try to re-establish absinthe's former reputation. In distinction from commercially manufactured absinthes with limited thujone content, a health risk to consumers is the uncontrolled trade of potentially unsafe herbal products such as absinthe essences that are readily available over the internet. PMID:16722551

  1. Reading for Moral Progress: 19th Century Institutions Promoting Social Change. Occasional Papers No. 207.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Donald G., Jr.; And Others

    The three papers in this document examine the motives behind the collecting and loaning of publications in the 19th century. They describe the effects of three discrete movements designed to assist religious, military, and academic endeavors. The first paper, "Bread Upon the Waters: The Printed Word in Sunday Schools in 19th Century England…

  2. The power of the kashrut: older but shorter. The impact of religious nutritional and hygienic rules on stature and life expectancy of Jewish conscripts in the early 19th century.

    PubMed

    Tassenaar, V; Karel, E H

    2016-06-01

    We test the impact of several demographic, economic and social factors on stature in an early nineteenth century environment. We use a database of conscripts from the period 1818-1860 of a rural province in The Netherlands (Drenthe). This area had a rather high biological standard of living. This database of 413 conscripts contains information about family structure, family rank order, height, tax income, occupation and age of death. Conscripts came from two communities: one from a particular village (Oosterhesselen) and the other was Jewish conscripts that came from the countryside of the province. Our statistical analysis shows a positive significant relationship between family size and height, which confirms the resource dilution theory. Remarkably, the sign of the relation between family size and life expectancy is inverse. Other factors such as the potato crisis and income had the expected effect on conscript heights. The community effect was strong. Jewish conscripts were much shorter than their counterparts. Access to nutrition, the specific food laws and other factors can explain this difference. An increasing sibship size had a negative impact on body height but positive effects on life expectancy when adulthood was reached. Specifically for the Jewish community was the positive effect of the death of the father on conscript height. The mechanisms behind this phenomenon are unclear and open for further research.

  3. [Animal ethics in the 19th century and Swiss animal protection law].

    PubMed

    Bloch, I

    2018-01-01

    The development of animal ethics and animal rights from the antiquity up to modern times is described. The relationship of humans to animals was primarily based on fear and animal cult, developed by the domestication to a partnership. The philosophers of the early modern age denied the animals the reason, what was disadvantageous to the position of the animals in the society and the behavior of humans to the animals. By the end of the 19th century the animal protection concept developed with numerous postulates for legal regulations. With the Swiss animal protection law, which came into force in 1981, most of the postulates could be realised. It is shown, how animal protection has developed since that time.

  4. Heat and Kinetic Theory in 19th-Century Physics Textbooks: The Case of Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaquero, Jose M.; Santos, Andres

    2001-01-01

    Presents an analysis of the contents of 19th century Spanish textbooks. These textbooks are centered on imponderable fluids, the concept of energy, the mechanical theory of heat, and the kinetic theory of gases. (SAH)

  5. 41. VIEW WEST OF 19TH CENTURY RESERVOIR ALONG RIGHT SHOULDER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW WEST OF 19TH CENTURY RESERVOIR ALONG RIGHT SHOULDER OF DAMIEN ROAD, USED FOR KALAWAO SETTLEMENT. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  6. 4. LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARDS LOCKS. 19TH CENTURY GRAVITY LOCKS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARDS LOCKS. 19TH CENTURY GRAVITY LOCKS ON RIGHT. 20TH CENTURY ELECTRIC LIFT LOCKS ON LEFT. - New York State Barge Canal, Lockport Locks, Richmond Avenue, Lockport, Niagara County, NY

  7. Naming and Necessity: Sherborn’s Context in the 19th Century

    PubMed Central

    McOuat, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract By the late 19th Century, storms plaguing early Victorian systematics and nomenclature seemed to have abated. Vociferous disputes over radical renaming, the world-shaking clash of all-encompassing procrustean systems, struggles over centres of authority, and the issues of language and meaning had now been settled by the institution of a stable imperial museum and its catalogues, a set of rules for the naming of zoological objects, and a new professional class of zoologists. Yet, for all that tranquillity, the disputes simmered below the surface, re-emerging as bitter struggles over synonyms, trinomials, the subspecies category, the looming issues of the philosophy of scientific language, and the aggressive new American style of field biology – all pressed in upon the received practice of naming and classifying organisms and the threat of anarchy. In the midst rose an index. This paper will explore the context of CD Sherborn’s Index Animalium and those looming problems and issues which a laborious and comprehensive “index of nature” was meant to solve. PMID:26877652

  8. [Physicians in 19th century Mexico: between State control and professional autonomy].

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Ana María

    2002-01-01

    This article analyses the struggles of 19th century Mexican physicians to gain professional autonomy versus the state. Medical practitioners sought to resist the imposition of a series of state measures, including directives to attend all patients and provide free care to the poor, forced adherence to political ideologies, state control of medical education, penal action in cases of professional liability, violation of medical confidentiality, and challenges to professional freedom. The article shows the reach of political power over medical practice in the 19th century, and explains the range and limits of the power of the medical profession.

  9. Height, weight and body mass index values of mid-19th century New York legislative officers.

    PubMed

    Bodenhorn, Howard

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies of mid-19th century American heights and body mass index values have used potentially unrepresentative groups-students in military academies, prisoners, and African Americans. This paper uses an alternative source with heights and weights of ordinary people employed in a wide variety of occupations. The results reveal the operation of the antebellum paradox in that average heights declined between men born circa 1820 and those born circa 1840. Average weights also declined for adult males, suggesting a decline in mid-19th century nutritional status. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Whooping Cough: A Brief History to the 19th Century.

    PubMed

    Weston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the history of whooping cough (pertussis) from its first recorded mention in 1190 to the time when its microbial cause was identified. The historical records of the disease are complicated by the variation in the nomenclature employed and through using the same name for disorders with different symptoms. During the early-modern period it was considered to be a disease new to Europe-contagious, dangerous, and potentially epidemic. Believed to be confined to children, its significance was limited until the 18th century when its incidence increased markedly. This essay argues pertussis may have occurred in the late medieval period in individual, though not epidemical, cases.

  11. [Disease, experiment and psychology in mid-19th century France].

    PubMed

    Babini, Valeria P

    2002-01-01

    This article offers a contribution to the thesis that considers H. Taine and Th. Ribot the theorists of the "pathological method" in psychology, and thus the forefathers of French experimental psychology. At the same time it points out that the idea of equivalence between observation of the pathological and experimentation could already be found in th psychological medicine of the 1840s. The author examines the early years of the Annals médico-psychologiques (1843-1844), the constitution of the Société médico-psychologique (1852), and the work of J. Moreau de Tours (1843) on hashish and mental alienation, with the intention of demonstrating that in the 1850s French psychiatry was actively engaged in the debate on the Science des rapports du physique et du moral, and that consequently the organicistic paradigm, proclaimed in those years in Germany, had not yet spread to France.

  12. Seriously Popular: Rethinking 19th-Century American Literature through the Teaching of Popular Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatti, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Curious about the connections between the author's students' reading tastes and those of 19th-century readers, the author read Nina Baym's excellent text "Novels, Readers, and Reviewers: Responses to Fiction in Antebellum America" to gain a sense of how readers in the 1800s might have thought about the texts that they read. Nineteenth-century…

  13. 4. Photocopy of old 19th century photo showing a steam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of old 19th century photo showing a steam engine in active use. Original photo in files of Insurance Company of North America, Philadelphia, Pa. Exact date not known. - Philadelphia Hose Company No. 1, Seventh & Filbert Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. 3. Photocopy of old 19th century photo showing a nonsteam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of old 19th century photo showing a non-steam engine. Original photo in files of Insurance Company of North America, Philadelphia, Pa. Exact date not known. - Philadelphia Hose Company No. 1, Seventh & Filbert Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. 12. VIEW OF MERCHANTS' HOTEL IN MID 19th CENTURY, 'FOURTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF MERCHANTS' HOTEL IN MID- 19th CENTURY, 'FOURTH STREET, PHILA., WEST SIDE, FROM MARKET TO ARCH', as it appeared in The Baxter Panoramic Business Directory, Est. 1857 which is available for viewing at the Free Library of Philadelphia, in the Castner Collection, Philadelphia Vol. No. 12, 'Streets 1'. - Merchants' Hotel, 40-50 North Fourth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. [Rape and transgression. Forensic medicine and sexual morality in Spain in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Carpena, Amalio Lorente

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the importance of the contribution of the Spanish forensic medical discourse in the 19th century, and its application in cases of sexual harassment, to legitimize the sexual moral value of the time. For that reason we will analyse the main forensic medicine treaties edited in Spain during this century.

  17. The Romantic Rhetoric of 19th Century Obituaries: "She Gave a Few Faint Gasps and Died."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnew, Eleanor

    Scholars of writing, language, and culture will find a rich fund of research material in 19th-century obituaries which convey extensive details of the deceased's life through an elegant language reminiscent of an oral culture. In contrast to today's newspaper obituaries, which are business-like, tight-lipped, and entirely devoid of any details or…

  18. The Rise of Age Homogamy in 19th Century Western Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Putte, Bart; Van Poppel, Frans; Vanassche, Sofie; Sanchez, Maria; Jidkova, Svetlana; Eeckhaut, Mieke; Oris, Michel; Matthijs, Koen

    2009-01-01

    In many parts of Western Europe the age at first marriage and the level of celibacy declined in the second half of the 19th century. This weakening of the European marriage pattern (EMP) can be interpreted as a "classic" response to the increase of the standard of living, but a more far-reaching interpretation is that the erosion of the…

  19. Circumcision of the Female Intellect: 19th Century Women Who Opposed Scholarly Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Marbeth

    2009-01-01

    In 19th century America, some women decried the opportunity for scholarly education as rebellion against religion and predicted a grim decline in the quality of life, home, and hearth for American families and for American culture and politics. In particular, women who opposed scholarly education argued that God had not created men and women…

  20. Negative Numbers in the 18th and 19th Centuries: Phenomenology and Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maz-Machado, Alexander; Rico-Romero, Luis

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a categorization of the phenomena and representations used to introduce negative numbers in mathematics books published in Spain during the 18th and 19th centuries. Through a content analysis of fourteen texts which were selected for the study, we distinguished four phenomena typologies: physical, accounting, temporal and…

  1. Missionaries and Tonic Sol-fa Music Pedagogy in 19th-Century China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southcott, Jane E.; Lee, Angela Hao-Chun

    2008-01-01

    In the 19th century, Christian missionaries in China, as elsewhere, used the Tonic Sol-fa method of music instruction to aid their evangelizing. This system was designed to improve congregational singing in churches, Sunday schools and missions. The London Missionary Society and other evangelical groups employed the method. These missionaries took…

  2. Settlement Patterns and the Governing Structures of 19th Century School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John G.

    Examination of state school governance structures in the late 19th century reveals three regional models, each springing from particular patterns of settlement and political administration. Historical explanations for school system origins have drawn mainly on the histories of northeastern cities and states. They have underemphasized regional…

  3. 1. COPY OF A LATE 19TH CENTURY BUSINESS CARD FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. COPY OF A LATE 19TH CENTURY BUSINESS CARD FOR A. ALEXANDER & SON FLOURING MILLS. CARD OWNED BY THOMAS R. WILSON. Photographer: Berni Rich, Score Photographers, September 1986. - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. Public Education in the Russian Empire at the End of the 19th Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevchenko, Natal'ya A.; Kucherkov, Ivan A.; Shirev, Denis A.; Miku, Natal'ya V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper reviews primary education in the Russian Empire at the end of the 19th century. It focuses on describing the successes and shortcomings of the public education system, as well as identifying the causes of its poor efficiency. As a summary, the authors concluded that the government of the Russian Empire consolidated major efforts to…

  5. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume I: 15th-19th Centuries. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teten, Carol

    This VHS videotape recording is the first in a two-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It focuses on the 15th-19th centuries, including Renaissance nobility, Baroque extravagance, Regency refinement, and Victorian romanticism. Each era reflects the changing relationships between men and women through the…

  6. An Analysis of Environmental Issues in 19th Century England Using the Writings of Charles Dickens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Ann Haley

    2008-01-01

    Charles Dickens lived during the best and worst of times in 19th century England. His writings were greatly influenced by the ongoing industrial revolution. He described abhorrent environmental conditions, inadequate sanitary practices, child abuse, and other social maladies of the times. By bringing Charles Dickens into the biology classroom,…

  7. [The comparison of the two Ottoman books of anatomy (17-19th centuries) with regard to the circulatory system].

    PubMed

    Uluçam, E; Gökçe, N

    2000-01-01

    17th and 19th centuries were particularly important for the development of the Ottoman medicine. Westernization which had already started in the 17th century continued along the 19th and the early 20th centuries. Turkish physicians began to contact with their European colleagues and in this period Latin medical terminology began to appear in the Ottoman medical literature. Sirvanli Semseddin Itaki's work of the 17th century, the Teşrihü'l Ebdan ve Tercüman-i Kibale-i Feylesufan, is the first illustrated Turkish manuscript of anatomy. The illustrations are qualified as developed examples, compared with the medical literature and knowledge of the period. In the 19th century, Sanizade Mehmet Ataullah Efendi (1771-1826) wrote a modern book of anatomy for the Ottoman medical doctors. Miyarü'l Etibba was one of the earliest printed medical books in Turkish. The second volume of Sanizade's Hamse, Miratü'l Ebdan fi Teşrih-i Azai'l Insan is the first printed Ottoman book on anatomy. In Usulü't-Tabia, the third volume of Hamse, the circulatory system is discussed. In this article, we studied the circulatory system described in Semseddin Itaki's Teşrih-ül Ebdan ve Tercüman-i Kibale-i Feylesufan and in Sanizade's Usulü't-Tabia and compared them.

  8. [The comparison of the two Ottoman books of anatomy (17-19th centuries) with regard to the circulatory system].

    PubMed

    Ulucam, E; Gokce, N

    2000-01-01

    17th and 19th centuries were particularly important for the development of te Ottoman medicine. Westernization which had already started in the 17th century continued along the 19th and the early 20th centuries. Turkish physicians began to contact with their European colleagues and in this period Latin medical terminology began to appear in the Ottoman medical literature. Sirvanli Semseddin Itaki's work of the 17th century, the Teşrihü'l Ebdan ve Tercüman-i Kibale-i Feylesufan, is the first illustrated Turkish manuscript of anatomy. The illustrations are qualified as developed examples, compared with the medical literature and knowledge of the period. In the 19th century, Sanizade Mehmet Ataullah Efendi (1771-1826) wrote a modern book of anatomy for the Ottoman medical doctors. Miyarü'l Etibba was one of the earliest printed medical books in Turkish. The second volume of Sanizade's Hamse, Miratü'l Ebdan fi Tesrih-i-Azai'l Insan is the first printed Ottoman book on anatomy. In Usulü't-Tabia, the third volume of Hamse, the circulatory system is discussed. In this article, we studied the circulatory system described in Semseddin Itaki's Teşrih-ül Ebdan ve Tercüman-i-Kibale-i Feylesufan and in Sanizade's Usulü't-Tabia and compared them.

  9. 19th century London dust-yards: a case study in closed-loop resource efficiency.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas A; Wilson, David C; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2009-04-01

    The material recovery methods used by dust-yards in early 19th century London, England and the conditions that led to their development, success and decline are reported. The overall system developed in response to the market value of constituents of municipal waste, and particularly the high coal ash content of household 'dust'. The emergence of lucrative markets for 'soil' and 'breeze' products encouraged dust-contractors to recover effectively 100% of the residual wastes remaining after readily saleable items and materials had been removed by the thriving informal sector. Contracting dust collection to the private sector allowed parishes to keep the streets relatively clean, without the need to develop institutional capacity, and for a period this also generated useful income. The dust-yard system is, therefore, an early example of organised, municipal-wide solid waste management, and also of public-private sector participation. The dust-yard system had been working successfully for more than 50 years before the Public Health Acts of 1848 and 1875, and was thus important in facilitating a relatively smooth transition to an institutionalised, municipally-run solid waste management system in England. The dust-yards can be seen as early precursors of modern materials recycling facilities (MRFs) and mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plants; however, it must be emphasised that dust-yards operated without any of the environmental and occupational health considerations that are indispensable today. In addition, there are analogies between dust-yards and informal sector recycling systems currently operating in many developing countries.

  10. [Hybris and crisis. The 19th century and transition to modern medicine].

    PubMed

    Vatle, A

    1993-10-20

    Medicine declared itself to be a scientific discipline in the 19th century, and radically cut off its former links with the Hippocratic-Galenic tradition after the French Revolution in 1789. Owing to the great progress made in physics and chemistry, these disciplines came to be regarded as the only ones capable of solving medical problems. This is a reductionist view, in contrast to the vitalist view, which still believed in the existence of the Hippocratic physis or life force. Reductionist medicine led to great advances, though in the 19th century much of the wisdom of earlier times tended to be forgotten, to the detriment of medicine as a whole. It was believed that medicine and science could solve all the world's problems, a belief that, in modern times, has been abandoned as invalid. We now need a new medical anthropology, or rather medicine that is anthropological in its thinking.

  11. Max Sandreczky: a pediatric surgeon in 19th-century Jerusalem.

    PubMed

    Nissan, S; Martin, P

    1998-08-01

    Until the mid-19th century, there had not been a single resident physician in the Holy Land. However, by the first World War in 1914, 19 hospitals had been established in Jerusalem. The reasons for this unusual phenomenon were religious, political, and sectarian. This does not apply to The Marienstift Kinderhospital, which was unique in 19th century Jerusalem. The hospital was founded and operated by Dr Max Sandreczky, a German pediatric surgeon. The standards of medical and surgical practice in the hospital not only compared favorably with those in western Europe, but, in certain aspects, they were more advanced. The Marienstift Kinderhospital was an "implant" of a western institution in a society that was medieval in character. The response of this society was studied as well as the natural history of this unique institution and its medical director, the pediatric surgeon, Dr Max Sandreczky.

  12. [Criminology and superstition at the turn of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Bachhiesl, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Criminology, which institutionalised at university level at the turn of the 19th century, was intensively engaged in the exploration of superstition. Criminologists investigated the various phenomena of superstition and the criminal behaviour resulting from it. They discovered bizarre (real or imagined) worlds of thought and mentalities, which they subjected to a rationalistic regime of interpretation in order to arrive at a better understanding of offences and crimes related to superstition. However, they sometimes also considered the use of occultist practices such as telepathy and clairvoyance to solve criminal cases. As a motive for committing homicide superstition gradually became less relevant in the course of the 19th century. Around 1900, superstition was accepted as a plausible explanation in this context only if a psychopathic form of superstition was involved. In the 20th century, superstition was no longer regarded as an explanans but an explanandum.

  13. Physics education in the Greek community schools of Istanbul (19th century). The books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, Panayotis; Vlahakis, George N.

    2016-03-01

    During the 19th century a number of elementary and high schools were established for the need of the Greek community of Istanbul. Among the courses included in the curricula were those concerning the scientific study of Nature like Botany, Chemistry and Physics. In the present study we attempt to give a thorough description of the educational material used in these schools for the study of natural sciences with an emphasis in Physics. Especially we shall discuss the books used as course books as well as their probable sources. Furthermore we shall try to make a comparison with the relevant situation in the Greek state and the Ottoman Empire, where modern physics had been already introduced through textbooks based on Ganot's treatise on Physics. The results of our research will give for the first time a picture of the way Greek students in the 19th century Istanbul received their basic knowledge about Physics.

  14. [Hygiene, hygienism and public health policy in late 19th century France].

    PubMed

    Cavé, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In France the desire to expand public health developed mainly because of the hygienist movement which prevailed in the 19th century. This paper aims to show how medical doctors committed themselves deeply at the Chambre des députés and Sénat with the objective of creating the legislation to control sanitary standards which was written between 1870 and 1914.

  15. Brutal and negligent? 19th century factory mothers and child care.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Melanie

    2011-10-01

    This paper aims to highlight some working class women's childcare practices in northern industrial areas of Britain during the latter half of the 19th century. It aims to challenge the commonly held belief that 19th century northern working-class factory mothers were irresponsive and neglectful toward their infants, thereby fuelling the high northern infant mortality rate. It will do this by showing that factory mothers were responsible and responsive toward their infants despite being thwarted by the working patterns of industrialisation. It begins by outlining the arguments made by historians that northern working class women were neglectful toward their children. Then key areas such as the working patterns of waged factory mothers will be illustrated to show the agency and determination of 19th century working class women to provide their infants with good care. Reassessment of these historical childcare practices can provide a springboard by which today's health professionals can endeavour to maintain accurate and fair perspectives about the childcare practices of today's women of low socio-economic status.

  16. [From ancient pot collections to the modern medicines. Menier's pot collection-19th century].

    PubMed

    Demouy, Isabelle

    2012-02-01

    At the beginning of the 19th century in 1816, Jean Antoine Brutus Menier founded the "Maison Centrale de Droguerie Menier". It supplied most of the pharmacies in France with drugs of animal, plant and mineral origin for the pharmaceutical preparations recommended at that time. The company provided training for many chemists and pharmacists, and as such, had a collection of pots containing over seven hundred drugs that is currently held at the head office of the Council of the College of Pharmacists in Paris. After having described the pot collection, set it against the 19th century background which experienced a real revolution within this profession, and after retracing its history, a study was then carried out in order to compare the former uses with the modern uses for each of the drugs. Thanks to this detailed, comparative analysis it is now possible to evaluate the relevance of the therapeutic range of drugs in the first half of the 19th century, before the significant rise in chemistry. The Germinal Law changed the pharmacist's profession, and with the birth of chemistry, the art of the pharmacy was revolutionised. However, the drugs, and particularly those of plant origin, have managed to keep a dominant position in today's pharmaceutical domain and in the French or European Pharmacopoeia.

  17. The dentist's armamentarium: a collection of 19th century instruments in the Louisiana State University School of Dentistry Library.

    PubMed

    Cheramie, Toby J; Strother, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    A small collection of antique dental instruments located in the LSU School of Dentistry Library (LSUSD) provides a glimpse into the world of the 19th century dentist. The instruments in this collection, with handles carved from common and rare early materials such as bone, wood, ivory, ebony, cameo, shell and pearl, provide a striking contrast to all-steel instruments of the 20th century. An understanding of their development and function substantially increases appreciation of these instruments, which can be categorized as instruments for oral surgery, prophylaxis, restoration, and general use. In this article, the authors summarize the historical development of each type of instrument and describe the specific items in the LSUSD Library collection.

  18. [Epidemic Cholera and American Reform Movements in the 19th Century].

    PubMed

    Kim, Seohyung

    2015-12-01

    The 19th century was the age of great reform in American history. After constructing of the canal and railroads, the industrialization began and American society changed so rapidly. In this period, there were so many social crisis and American people tried to solve these problems within the several reform movements. These reform movements were the driving forces to control cholera during the 19th century. Cholera was the endemic disease in Bengal, India, but after the 19th century it had spread globally by the development of trade networks. The 1832 cholera in the United States was the first epidemic cholera in American history. The mortality of cholera was so high, but it was very hard to find out the cause of this fatal infectious disease. So, different social discourses happened to control epidemic cholera in the 19th century, these can be understood within the similar context of American reform movements during this period. Board of Health in New York States made a new public health act to control cholera in 1832, it was ineffective. Some people insisted that the cause of this infectious disease was the corruption of the United States. They emphasized unjust and immoral system in American society. Moral reform expanded to Nativism, because lots of Irish immigrants were the victims of cholera. So, epidemic cholera was the opportunity to spread the desire for moral reform. To control cholera in 1849, the sanitary reform in Britain had affected. The fact that it was so important to improve and maintain the water quality for the control and prevention of disease spread, the sanitary reform happened. There were two different sphere of the sanitary reform. The former was the private reform to improve sewer or privy, the latter was the public reform to build sewage facilities. The 1849 cholera had an important meaning, because the social discourse, which had emphasized the sanitation of people or home expanded to the public sphere. When cholera broke out in 1866 again

  19. Beginnings of Astigmatism Understanding and Management in the 19th Century.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Kanclerz, Piotr

    2017-11-14

    Within the last 200 years, the perception of astigmatism has evolved from that of an infrequent and peculiar defect of the eye to a distortion almost as common as spherical refractive errors. Most of the significant findings on this condition were made in the 19th century, including the first description by Thomas Young (1773-1829) and the introduction of the treatment methods used today. The purpose of this study was to investigate the milestones in the understanding and management of astigmatism that occurred up to the year 1900. This fascinating history illustrates how knowledge evolves across time, geographical areas, and interdisciplinary boundaries. The first article looking at the use of a cylindrical lens to correct astigmatism was written by George Airy (1801-1892) in 1825. The term "astigmatism" was introduced in by William Whewell (1794-1866) in 1846. Methods for subjective and objective evaluation were subsequently established, including the introduction of a cross cylinder, keratoscope, astigmatic dial, and the development of retinoscopy and ophthalmoscopy. In the last two decades of the 19th century, the first attempt to alter the refraction in astigmatic patients by changing the shape of the cornea was made. It must be noted that diverse challenges were encountered in this field on the way to the development of a treatment, including the technical manufacture of a lens, the precise measurement of the refractive error, and understanding the optical properties of the eye. The importance of the 19th century was that interdisciplinary cooperation, such as that seen in this study, between physicists and astronomers, and mathematicians and physicians, led to the development of comprehensive knowledge on astigmatism.

  20. [Lettuce, lactuca sp., as a medicinal plant in polish publications of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Trojanowska, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Mentions of lettuce Lactuca sp. that have appeared since antiquity contained similar information on its curative properties, but such properties were ascribed to different species or varieties. Apart from the wild and poisonous lettuce, also garden or common lettuce were identified as having curative action, and some publications lacked information enabling the precise identification of the lettuce in question. In the 19th century, attempts were made to put some order into the knowledge of lettuce as a medicinal plant. Information contained in Polish medical studies of the 19th century on lettuce points to the poisonous species, Lactuca virosa, and the common or garden lettuce, Lactuca sativa v. Lactuca hortensis, as being used as a medicinal plant. In that period, lettuce and especially the the desiccated lactescent juice obtained from it, lactucarium, were considered to be an intoxicant, and were used as a sedative and an analgesic. The action of the substance was weaker than that of opium but free of the side-effects, and medical practice showed that in some cases lactucarium produced better curative effects than opium. To corroborate those properties of lettuce and its lactescent juice, studies were undertaken to find the substance responsible for the curative effects of the juice. However, such studies failed to produce the expected results, and the component responsible for the curative properties of letuce was not identified. Medical practice thus had to restrict itself to the uses of the desiccated lactescent juice and extracts obtained from it. The possibility of obtaining lactucarium from plants cultivated in Poland caused Polish pharmacists and physicians to take an interest in the stuff and launch their own research of lettuce and the lactescent juice obtained from it. Results of research on lettuce were published in 19th-century journals by, among others, Jan Fryderyk Wolfgang, Florian Sawiczewski and Józef Orkisz.

  1. Glacier changes on South Georgia since the late-19th century documented in historical photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, John; Haynes, Valerie

    2014-05-01

    South Georgia is one of the few landmasses in the Southern Ocean. It provides a crucial geographical datapoint for glacier responses to climate change over different timescales. As part of an ongoing glacier inventory of the island, we are compiling a database of historical glacier photographs. Since the late 19th century, the island has been visited by numerous scientific and survey expeditions, as well as being the land-base for a major whaling industry. Historical photographs of the island are available from the late-19th century, beginning with the 1882-83 German International Polar Year Expedition. Many more exist from the 20th century, notably from the South Georgia Surveys in the 1950s. An assessment of the value of the photographs indicates that spatial coverage is variable, many lack reference features to pinpoint glacier positions and, in the case of smaller glaciers, the presence of snowcover makes it difficult to define the ice edge. Nevertheless, the photographs provide useful corroboration of more advanced glacier positions during the late-19th century and recession of smaller mountain and valley glaciers during the mid-20th century, while larger tidewater and sea-calving glaciers generally remained in relatively advanced positions until the 1980s. Since then, nearly all the glaciers have retreated; some of these retreats have been dramatic and a number of small mountain glaciers have fragmented or disappeared. The response of the glaciers can be related to synoptic-scale warming, particularly since the 1950s, moderated by individual glacier geometry and topography.

  2. [Refutation of traditional views of the disease and formation of the scientific basis of pathology (17-19th centuries)].

    PubMed

    Stochik, A M; Pal'tsev, M A; Zatravkin, S N; Stochik, A A

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the revision of disease concepts that prevailed during the Galenism era and the formation of the scientific basis of pathology at the time of two scientific revolutions of the 17-19th centuries.

  3. Preventive measures and treatments for cholera in the 19th century in Ottoman archive documents.

    PubMed

    Erer, Sezer; Erdemir, Aysegul Demirhan

    2010-06-01

    Cholera spread all over the world starting from India and made major outbreaks. Cholera, a highly effective disease, also had been a pioneer effect on taking health measures worldwide.The first international health organization and health conferences organized in different countries to determine preventive measures and treatments for cholera. In this article, preventive measures and treatments for cholera in the 19th century in the Ottoman period were analyzed according to Republic of Turkey Prime Ministry Ottoman Archives and compared with the current methods.

  4. [History of pediatric anesthesia: from the beginnings to the end of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Sabourdin, N

    2013-12-01

    The first intuitions and descriptions of anesthesia can be found in the antique civilizations. In the 19th century, the invention of anesthesia took place in Boston, and quickly spread to Europe. In France, regulations and structures were created before the beginning of the 20th century to organize this new profession, for children as well as for adults. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Considerations concerning medical knowledge inherited in Mexico from 19th century: the diabetes mellitus case].

    PubMed

    García de Alba-García, Javier Eduardo; Salcedo-Rocha, Ana Leticia; Milke-Najar, María Eugenia; Alonso-Reynoso, Carlos; García de Alba-Verduzco, Javier Eugenio

    2017-01-01

    In Mexico, as in the entire Western world, during the 19th century and the beginnings of the 20th century, medical knowledge developed in a remarkable way and the case of diabetes mellitus was not the exception. This situation, which arose on the basis of the antique paradigm, and which in turn was overthrown by the positivism as the emergent paradigm (with its clinical and anatomical, as well as physiopathological and etiopathological viewpoints), was reflected during the 19th the century through its actors and the communications that opened the access of Mexican medicine to the modernity.

  6. The treatment of scrofula in Ferrara (Italy) in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Chiara Beatrice; Altieri, Lorenzo; Guidi, Enrica; Contini, Carlo; Manfredini, Stefano

    2012-06-01

    The therapeutic approaches used against scrofula in the 19th Century in Ferrara are discussed. In the manuscripts and treatises of the time treasured in the town's libraries, hygienic and dietetic rules and treatment of this illness were described. In particular, baths and mineral water spas (sulphurous, ferruginous and other mineral waters, such as a bromo-iodine-salt water) and the sea-bathing establishment were recommended. The remedies reported in Campana's Pharmacopoeia ferrarese and the efficacious treatments employed in St Anna Hospital are discussed. The Committee and its President, Marquis Giovanni Manfredini, decided to cure the scrofulous in bathing establishments.

  7. Did some 18th and 19th century treatments for mental disorders act on the brain?

    PubMed

    Leonard, Edward C

    2004-01-01

    Review of 18th and 19th century psychiatric therapies raises the possibility that several may have altered the activity of vasopressin or Na-K-ATPase. Bleeding, whirling, nausea created by medicines, and vagus nerve stimulation by application of electricity through the skin all perturb the hypothalamic hormone, arginine vasopressin, while helleborus and digitalis inhibit the sodium pump enzyme, Na-K-ATPase. These approaches were used with reported benefit many years ago, acting on the brain in ways ongoing research suggests may play a role in affective disorders. Study of long-abandoned treatments may clarify their mechanisms of action and the characteristics of responsive patients.

  8. The relationship between 19th century BMIs and family size: Economies of scale and positive externalities.

    PubMed

    Carson, Scott Alan

    2015-04-01

    The use of body mass index values (BMI) to measure living standards is now a well-accepted method in economics. Nevertheless, a neglected area in historical studies is the relationship between 19th century BMI and family size, and this relationship is documented here to be positive. Material inequality and BMI are the subject of considerable debate, and there was a positive relationship between BMI and wealth and an inverse relationship with inequality. After controlling for family size and wealth, BMI values were related with occupations, and farmers and laborers had greater BMI values than workers in other occupations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. [The politics of the self: psychological science and bourgeois subjectivity in 19th century Spain.].

    PubMed

    Novella, Enric J

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers an analysis of the process of institutionalization of psychological knowledge in Spain following the educative reforms implemented during the second third of the 19th century, which prescribed its inclusion in the curricular program of the new secondary education. After a detailed examination of the theoretical orientation, the ideological assumptions and the socio-political connections of the contents transmitted to the students throughout the century, its militant spiritualism is interpreted as a highly significant attempt on the part of the liberal elites to articulate a pedagogy of subjectivity intended to counteract the trends toward reduction, naturalization and fragmentation of psychic life inherent to the development of modern science.

  10. Rising trends of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, A; Baron, J H

    2010-10-01

    The risk of dying from gastric cancer appears to have increased among consecutive generations born during the 19th century. To follow the time trends of hospitalization for gastric cancer and test whether they confirm such increase. Inpatient records of the last two centuries from four hospitals in Scotland and three US hospitals were analysed. Proportional rates of hospitalization for gastric cancer, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer were calculated during consecutive 5-year periods. The data from all seven cities revealed strikingly similar patterns. No hospital admissions for gastric cancer or peptic ulcer were recorded prior to 1800. Hospital admissions for gastric cancer increased in an exponential fashion throughout the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. In a majority of cities, the rise in hospitalization for gastric cancer preceded a similar rise in hospitalization for gastric ulcer. Hospitalization for these two latter diagnoses clearly preceded hospitalization for duodenal ulcer by 20-40 years. The occurrence of gastric cancer, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer markedly increased during the 19th century. Improvements in hygiene may have resulted in the decline of infections by other gastrointestinal organisms that had previously kept concomitant infection by Helicobacter pylori suppressed. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Pioneers of exfoliative cytology in the 19th century: the predecessors of George Papanicolaou.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, A; Magiorkinis, E

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to summarize the knowledge on exfoliative cytology during the 19th century and to track down Papanicolaou's predecessors. A thorough study of texts, medical books and reports, together with a review of the available literature in PubMed, was undertaken. The study of cytological preparations as a diagnostic procedure can be traced back to the work of the famous French microscopist Alfred François Donné. However, the systematic study and the criteria for the diagnosis of malignant cells should be attributed to Johannes Müller. The increasing interest in the cytological examination of various fluids of the human body can be confirmed by a plethora of studies published during this period. By the end of the 19th century, the invention of new techniques in pathology, such as the introduction of cell block techniques, tissue sections and new staining methods which provided the opportunity to study surgical specimens in three dimensions, led to a decrease in the interest in exfoliative cytology, which was re-discovered by George Papanicolaou almost three decades later. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Results of Russian geomagnetic observatories in the 19th century: magnetic activity, 1841-1862

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevanlinna, H.; Häkkinen, L.

    2010-04-01

    Hourly (spot readings) magnetic data (H- and D-components) were digitized from Russian yearbook tables for the years 1850-1862 from four observatories. The pdf pictures for digitization were taken by a normal digital camera. The database obtained consists of about 900 000 single data points. The time series of hourly magnetic values reveal slow secular variations (declination only) as well as transient and regular geomagnetic variations of external origin. The quality and homogeneity of the data is satisfactory. Daily Ak-indices were calculated using the index algorithm that has been earlier applied to 19th century data from Helsinki (Finland) as well as modern magnetic observatory recordings. The activity index series derived from the Russian data is consistent with earlier activity index series for 1850-1862. The digitized index data series derived in this study was extended back to 1841 by including magnetic C9 activity index data available from a Russian observatory (St. Petersburg). Magnetic data rescued here is well suitable for various reconstructions for studies of the long-term variation of the space weather in the 19th century.

  13. Human Genetic Variation and Yellow Fever Mortality during 19th Century U.S. Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We calculated the incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates for Caucasians and non-Caucasians during 19th century yellow fever (YF) epidemics in the United States and determined statistical significance for differences in the rates in different populations. We evaluated nongenetic host factors, including socioeconomic, environmental, cultural, demographic, and acquired immunity status that could have influenced these differences. While differences in incidence rates were not significant between Caucasians and non-Caucasians, differences in mortality and case fatality rates were statistically significant for all epidemics tested (P < 0.01). Caucasians diagnosed with YF were 6.8 times more likely to succumb than non-Caucasians with the disease. No other major causes of death during the 19th century demonstrated a similar mortality skew toward Caucasians. Nongenetic host factors were examined and could not explain these large differences. We propose that the remarkably lower case mortality rates for individuals of non-Caucasian ancestry is the result of human genetic variation in loci encoding innate immune mediators. PMID:24895309

  14. Human genetic variation and yellow fever mortality during 19th century U.S. epidemics.

    PubMed

    Blake, Lauren E; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2014-06-03

    We calculated the incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates for Caucasians and non-Caucasians during 19th century yellow fever (YF) epidemics in the United States and determined statistical significance for differences in the rates in different populations. We evaluated nongenetic host factors, including socioeconomic, environmental, cultural, demographic, and acquired immunity status that could have influenced these differences. While differences in incidence rates were not significant between Caucasians and non-Caucasians, differences in mortality and case fatality rates were statistically significant for all epidemics tested (P < 0.01). Caucasians diagnosed with YF were 6.8 times more likely to succumb than non-Caucasians with the disease. No other major causes of death during the 19th century demonstrated a similar mortality skew toward Caucasians. Nongenetic host factors were examined and could not explain these large differences. We propose that the remarkably lower case mortality rates for individuals of non-Caucasian ancestry is the result of human genetic variation in loci encoding innate immune mediators. Different degrees of severity of yellow fever have been observed across diverse populations, but this study is the first to demonstrate a statistically significant association between ancestry and the outcome of yellow fever (YF). With the global burden of mosquito-borne flaviviral infections, such as YF and dengue, on the rise, identifying and characterizing host factors could prove pivotal in the prevention of epidemics and the development of effective treatments. Copyright © 2014 Blake and Garcia-Blanco.

  15. [Medecine, Law, and Knowledge Production about the "Civilized" War in the Long 19th Century].

    PubMed

    Goltermann, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    The aim to 'civilize' warfare accompanied Medicine and International Law ever since the mid-19th century. However, the entanglement of Medicine and Law, crucial for such an endeavour, has not been taken into consideration so far; likewise, the huge importance of medical knowledge for the perception of wars and their ramifications did not garner much attention in historical research. Hence, by focusing on the 'long' 19th century, this paper shows, firstly, that the production of surgical knowledge during warfare aimed at measuring the effects of combat on human bodies in order to develop prognostic medical knowledge for future wars, as well as maintaining the combat strength of soldiers. Moreover, this knowledge production during warfare strived for the enhancement of medical competence in the diagnosis and treatment of wounds in general. Secondly, I show that this medical knowledge was not only relevant for warfare, but also crucial for the design of International Law: it served to nourish the debates among the so called 'civilized' nations about legitimate and illegitimate weaponry and warfare.

  16. [Biased objectivity--images of women in 19th century German neuroscience].

    PubMed

    Schröter, A; Riha, O; Steinberg, H

    2012-09-01

    At the beginning of the 19 (th) century German scholars wanted to differentiate men and women on the basis of anatomic brain or cerebrum particularities. With the help of scientific criteria such as the weight of the brain they aimed not only to prove pre-postulated intellectual differences, but also to find scientific justification for the inferiority of women in general and their inferior position and treatment in society. This paper presents insights into and excerpts from studies written by renowned scientists such as S. T. von Soemmerring, J. F. Ackermann, K. F. Burdach, F. Tiedemann, E. Huschke, H. Schaaffhausen, or P. J. Möbius. Covering the years from 1780 to 1900, these materials show how at the beginning the interest was primarily in comparative anatomic studies and results, but was soon mingled with sociological intentions. Hence this study gives insights into the history of modern gender studies of neurosciences. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Prospects for using sonar for underwater archeology on the Yenisei: surveying a 19th century shipwreck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. E.; Mednikov, D. M.; Karelin, N. M.; Nasyrov, I. R.

    2016-11-01

    Current progress in underwater archeology is based on a rich arsenal of high-tech appliances, among which sonar technology plays a key role; it enables scientists not only to detect submerged archeological objects, but to examine them in high definition without having to conduct diving operations or use expensive underwater unmanned vehicles. While the majority of sensational scientific discoveries using sonar have been made in saltwater environments, freshwater ones, rivers in particular, have seen limited activity. The river Yenisei in central Siberia contains an unrecorded number of shipwrecks that await being discovered and studied. In this article we focus on the peculiarities of using sonar for detecting archeological sites on the Yenisei. This article is based on the results of the 2016 expedition, which has determined the location of Thames, a 19th century British steam schooner which was wrecked on the Yenisei.

  18. The role of recovering physicians in 19th century addiction medicine: an organizational case study.

    PubMed

    White, W L

    2000-01-01

    An elaborate network of inebriate homes, inebriate asylums, nationally franchised private addiction treatment institutes, and proprietary home cures for addiction arose on the American landscape between 1850 and 1900. The pinnacle of the movement to professionalize America's first addiction treatment field was the founding of the American Association for the Cure of Inebriety in 1870 and its publication of the first issue of the Journal of Inebriety in 1876. One of the most contentious issues among the various branches of this new professional field was the question of the use of "reformed men" as physicians, managers and attendants within treatment institutions. This article describes the employment of recovering physicians within one 19th century addiction treatment franchise--the Keeley Institutes--and documents the nature of the professional debate stirred by what was then a controversial practice.

  19. Following rules in the intermontane west: 19th-century mormon settlement

    PubMed Central

    Norton, William

    2001-01-01

    The academic discipline of human geography is concerned with human activities, especially as these relate to physical landscapes and contribute to the modification of those landscapes. Although little attention has been paid to objectivist philosophies to inform human geography, behavior analysis might offer a useful explanatory model. As an example, a behavior analysis of selected aspects of 19th-century Mormon movement and settlement in the intermontane West is conducted. Mormons are a society of believers who practice cooperative effort and support for other members, and the Mormon church is governed by priesthood authority with members being called to perform tasks. This analysis employs the concepts of metacontingency, rule-governed behavior, and delayed reinforcement to analyze how Mormons settled the intermontane West. PMID:22478355

  20. [Crespi d'Adda: psychosocial risk factors in a late 19th century company town].

    PubMed

    Punzi, S

    2012-01-01

    Crespi d'Adda is a late 19th century company town established around a textile factory by Cristoforo Benigno Crespi and his son Silvio. It was an ideal model of company residency being a self-sufficient microcosm equipped with all the services needed by a community where the life of workers and their families was revolving around the factory and the working requirements. It was the expression of philanthropic and patronizing enlightened entrepreneurs at that time, committed in protecting workers' life inside and outside the factory, resulting into a more affectionate and productive manpower. Silvio Benigno Crespi developed an extensive activity to improve working conditions, with special reference to accident prevention and work-related diseases, as well as night work in factories, weekly day off, reduction of working hours: we can say that in some ways he was concerned also with psychosocial risks.

  1. George Beard and Lydia Pinkham: gender, class, and nerves in late 19th century America.

    PubMed

    Davis, D L

    1989-01-01

    A historical comparison of the careers of George Beard, medical doctor, and Lydia Pinkham, feminist and patent medicine maker, demonstrates the complex social nature of the experience of nerves among late 19th century women. Special attention is paid to the roles played by changing gender and class ideologies in Pinkham's and Beard's theories of nerves during the period from the 1870s to World War I. A comparison of contemporary anthropological and historical studies of gender and nerves leads to the conclusion that nerves, as a female complaint, takes hold of the popular and medical imagination during periods of dramatic social change which threaten women's traditional family roles and challenge their sense of self-identity.

  2. Mechanisms and microevolutionary consequences of social homogamy in a 19th-century Italian community.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Matteo

    2009-02-01

    Abstract Choosing a spouse has always been an event subjected to strong social control. Consideration of socioprofessional elements is therefore necessary for an in-depth understanding of the microevolutionary consequences of marriage. Thus in this paper I explore the extent and causes of reproduction isolation between different socioprofessional groups of a 19th-century Italian community, Casalguidi. Various features of mate choice pattern were investigated by means of individual-level data. The results show that Casalguidi was a community with strong socioeconomic internal boundaries, in which social belonging mattered much more than geographic provenience. The bourgeoisie showed such a high degree of social homogamy that it was almost reproductively isolated. Much more openness and less isolation was found between the two categories of farm laborers and sharecroppers, and day laborers.

  3. [Healthcare in times of epidemics in Rio de Janeiro in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Tânia Salgado

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to examine the provision of healthcare for the population of Rio de Janeiro in the mid-19th century and describe its reorganization during the crisis caused by outbreaks of yellow fever and cholera. In this context, it is essential to consider the significant changes taking place in healthcare during this period, also affecting the spaces in which hospital care was offered. Therefore, we focussed our investigation on Santa Casa da Misericórdia Hospital, the most important hospital in the capital of the Brazilian Empire. The sources used are the correspondence between the government and the hospital, the hospital annual reports, archives of the Central Board of Public Hygiene, and wide-circulation medical journals.

  4. Electrical treatment of spinal cord injuries in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    PubMed

    Silver, John R; Weiner, M-F

    2013-05-01

    Two centuries ago, electricity was being used for the treatment of paraplegia and trials were taking place in France. This study aims to identify cases of traumatic paraplegia treated with electricity in the 19th century in order to assess the therapeutic benefit. Only four such cases were identified, none with a complete transection of the spinal cord since these patients would have died from pressure sores and urinary tract infections. The personalities involved, William Gull, William Erb, Guillaume Duchenne and Cyril Henry Golding Bird are portrayed and contemporaneous views on electrotherapy analysed. While the four patients apparently benefited from the treatment, the lack of follow-up and the incomplete data prevented a definitive conclusion on the therapeutic value of electrical treatment in traumatic paraplegia.

  5. [Our medicinal preparations in the mid-19th century. Part I--Introduction and chemical preparations].

    PubMed

    Drábek, Pavel

    2012-08-01

    The paper deals with the development of the first editions of the Austrian Pharmacopoeia, Pharmacopoea Austriaca, since its origin in the year 1812. It demonstrates its gradual retardation in the period when nearly all medicinal substances had to be prepared only in pharmacies. The conception was changed as late as 1855 in the Fifth Edition, when it was allowed to buy many medicinal substances from producers or wholesalers. At the same time, requirements for organoleptic properties and chemical purity began to be introduced. The present communication also deals with the chemical drugs used in the mid-19th century and is based on a comparison of the pharmacopoeias of 1836 and 1855. It presents some typical examples, such as alkaloids and metal compounds.

  6. Passionate men, emotional women: psychology constructs gender difference in the late 19th century.

    PubMed

    Shields, Stephanie A

    2007-05-01

    The author examines British and American scientific psychology's portrayal of natural and ideal masculinity and femininity in the late 19th century to show how purported differences in emotion and reason were critical to explaining the evolutionary foundation of existing social hierarchies. Strong emotion was identified with heterosexual manliness and men's purportedly better capacity to harness the power of emotion in the service of reason. "Feminine" emotion was portrayed as a comparatively ineffectual emotionality, a by-product of female reproductive physiology and evolutionary need to be attractive to men. The author argues that constructions of emotion by psychology served an important power maintenance function. A concluding section addresses the relevance of this history to the politics of emotion in everyday life, especially assertions of emotional legitimacy.

  7. Paths to and from poverty in late 19th century novels

    PubMed Central

    Howden‐Chapman, Philippa; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    Late 19th century novels provide graphic descriptions of working and living conditions and their impact on population health, in particular the detrimental effects of hunger, poor housing, environmental conditions, hazardous work and poor pay, smoking and alcohol and crime, but also the transformative possibilities of social and political action. The popularity of these novels helped raise the collective conscience of citizens and illuminated the direction for 20th century welfare reforms. Yet many of these problems remain and the pathways to and from poverty are still recognisable today. Although novels are now less central in conveying social information, re‐reading these novels enables us to understand how social and economic circumstances were understood at the time and what led to social and political change. PMID:16415257

  8. Apothecary activity in Dubrovnik Dominican Monastery from 17th to the beginning 19th century.

    PubMed

    Krasic, Stjepan

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the Dominican monastery pharmacy is not clear, but sources suggest that it had operated from the eve of the great earthquake in Dubrovnik in 1667 to the beginning of the 19th century. Its last pharmacist, praised for his competence, passed away in 1803, leaving no one behind The prior travelled all the way to Naples to find a competent pharmacist in his stead, but never returned. Story has it that on the way back, the abbot and the pharmacist lost their lives in a shipwreck. The French army occupied the town in 1806, and the monastery was turned into a military camp. Following the retreat of the French army in 1814, the monastery was returned to the Dominicans, but the pharmacy was never restored.

  9. Evidence for tuberculosis in 18th/19th century slaves in Anse Sainte-Marguerite (Guadeloupe - French Western Indies).

    PubMed

    Lösch, Sandra; Kim, Mi-Ra; Dutour, Olivier; Courtaud, Patrice; Maixner, Frank; Romon, Thomas; Sola, Christophe; Zink, Albert

    2015-06-01

    During the American colonization in the 18th and 19th century, Africans were captured and shipped to America. Harsh living and working conditions often led to chronic diseases and high mortality rates. Slaves in the Caribbean were forced to work mainly on sugar plantations. They were buried in cemeteries like Anse Sainte-Marguerite on the isle of Grande-Terre (Guadeloupe) which was examined by archaeologists and physical anthropologists. Morphological studies on osseous remains of 148 individuals revealed 15 cases with signs for bone tuberculosis and a high frequency of periosteal reactions which indicates early stages of the disease. 11 bone samples from these cemeteries were analysed for ancient DNA. The samples were extracted with established procedures and examined for the cytoplasmic multicopy β-actin gene and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA (IS 6110) by PCR. An amplification product for M. tuberculosis with the size of 123 bp was obtained. Sequencing confirmed the result. This study shows evidence of M. tuberculosis complex DNA in a Caribbean slave population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Medical and Social Aspects of Syphilis in the Balkans from the mid-19th Century to the Interwar.

    PubMed

    Tsiamis, Costas; Vrioni, Georgia; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Gennimata, Vasiliki; Murdjeva, Mariana А; Tsakris, Athanasios

    2016-03-01

    The current study presents some aspects of syphilis in the Balkan Peninsula from the 19th century until the Interwar. Ever since the birth of modern Balkan States (Greece, Bulgaria, Turkey and Serbia), urbanization, poverty and the frequent wars have been considered the major factors conducive to the spread of syphilis. The measures against sex work and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were taken in two aspects, one medical and the other legislative. In this period, numerous hospitals for venereal diseases were established in the Balkan countries. In line with the international diagnostic approach and therapeutic standards, laboratory examinations in these Balkan hospitals included spirochete examination, Wassermann reaction, precipitation reaction and cerebrospinal fluid examination. Despite the strict legislation and the adoption of relevant laws against illegal sex work, public health services were unable to curb the spread of syphilis. Medical and social factors such as poverty, citizen's ignorance of STDs, misguided medical perceptions, lack of sanitary control of prostitution and epidemiological studies, are highlighted in this study. These factors were the major causes that helped syphilis spread in the Balkan countries during the 19th and early 20th century. The value of these aspects as a historic paradigm is diachronic. Failure to comply with the laws and the dysfunction of public services during periods of war or socioeconomic crises are both factors facilitating the spread of STDs.

  11. An exploration of the word 'palliative' in the 19th century: searching the BMJ archives for clues.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Mark; Fielding, Helen; Mathews, Emma; Frazer, Ricky

    2013-03-01

    Palliative care went through a significant evolution in the 20th century, but the 19th century has been seen my some scholars as the real turning point toward the more modern concept of hospices and palliative care. To investigate some examples of earlier uses of the word 'palliative', a literature search was conducted within the earliest available BMJ archive sections, the years 1840 to 1842. This provided a glimpse into how the word was used in the medical literature in Victorian times, mid-nineteenth century. Search results brought up a number of case reports, and the word was employed to describe medicines ('use of palliatives') as well as passive, non-active treatment approaches, probably best described as a watch-and-wait strategy. Of note is that the first recorded use of the word in the archives is by a surgeon. Some doctors associated the word palliative with there not being any prospect for cure and only for the relief of symptoms and greater comfort of the patient. There were, however, early reflections on whether palliative treatments may in some cases increase the length of patients' lives.

  12. How to compare the faces of the Earth? Walachia in mid-19th century and nowadays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos-Elekes, Zsombor; Magyari-Sáska, Zsolt; Timár, Gábor; Imecs, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    In 1864 a detailed map was made about Walachia, its title is Charta României Meridionale (Map of Southern Romania), it has 112 map sheets, it is often called after his draughtsman: Szathmári's map. The map has an outstanding position in the history of Romanian cartography, because it indicates a turning-point. Before the map, foreigners (Austrians and Russians) had made topographic maps about this vassal principality of the Ottoman Empire. The Austrian topographic survey (1855-1859) - which served as a basis for this map - was the last one and the most detailed of these surveys. The map was made between the personal-union (1859) and independence (1878) of the Danubian Principalities. This map was the first (to a certain extent) own map of the forming country. In consequence of this survey and map, the Romanian mapping institute was founded, which one - based on this survey and map - began the topographic mapping of the country. In the Romanian scientific literature imperfect and contradictory information has been published about this map. Only a dozen copies of the map were kept in few map collections; the researchers could have reached them with difficulties. During our research we processed the circumstances of the survey and mapmaking discovering its documentation in the archives of Vienna, as well as using the Romanian, Hungarian and German scientific literature. We found the copies in map collections from Vienna to Bucharest. We digitized all the map sheets from different collections. We calculated the parameters of the used geodetic datum and map projection. We published on the web, such we made the map reachable for everybody. The map can be viewed in different zoom levels; can be downloaded; settlements can be found using the place name index; areas can be exported in modern projection, so the conditions of that time could be compared with today's reality. Our poster presents on the one hand the survey and the map realized in mid-19th century and our

  13. The Struggle To Survive: Work for Racial Ethnic Women in the 18th- and 19th-Century United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higginbotham, Elizabeth

    The work situations of Black, Mexican American, and Chinese immigrant women in 18th- and 19th-century United States are explored. Generally, when engaged in agricultural work, all ethnic people were considered units of labor. However, because the slave owner needed to perpetuate his property, Black women were allowed lower rates of production when…

  14. How To Dance through Time. Volume VI: A 19th Century Ball--The Charm of Group Dances. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teten, Carol

    This 48-minute VHS videotape is the sixth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It shows the festivity of the 19th century group dances, enabling the viewer to plan and participate in the elegant opening to the ball, a refined square dance, and flirtatious Cotillion dancing games. Professional dancers demonstrate the…

  15. Physics education in the Greek community schools of Istanbul (19th century). Scientific instruments and experiments in electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, Panagiotis; Vlahakis, George N.

    2016-03-01

    The Greek schools operating in Istanbul date back to the 19th century. These schools have noteworthy collections of old scientific instruments that were used in teaching experimental physics. Amongst them, more outstanding are the scientific instruments used in demonstrating electrostatics. This paper briefly presents the equipment, focuses on exceptional scientific instruments and attempts to illuminate certain aspects in teaching the natural sciences.

  16. American Pestalozzianism Revisited: Alfred Holbrook and the Origins of Object-Based Pedagogy in 19th Century America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nathan R.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the significance of 19th century American educator Alfred Holbrook through his writings and administration of the Lebanon, Ohio based National Normal University. Through a case study of Alfred Holbrook, the historical understanding of important issues relating to the history of pedagogy and normal schools…

  17. The Case for Consolidation: Our 19th-Century Model of Governance Is a Formula for Mediocrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amdursky, Saul

    2004-01-01

    We need fewer public libraries with greater dependence. Here at the beginning of the 21st century, public libraries are still saddled with a 19th-century model of government. They are far too beholden to governing authorities, usually municipal or county governments, for their financial sustenance. This is a formula for mediocrity. "Local control"…

  18. The use of Congreve-type war Rockets by the Spanish in the 19th century: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancho, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    A yearly account of military uses, by the Spanish, of Congreve war rockets is given, from the year 1810 until 1895. Events prior to the 19th century are also recorded which include the use of rockets against the Moors of Valencia and documentation, from literature of that period, relating to rocket applications.

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a historical perspective leading up to the end of the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Ekmektzoglou, Konstantinos A; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Syros, Periklis; Chalkias, Athanasios; Kalambalikis, Lazaros; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    Social laws and religious beliefs throughout history underscore the leaps and bounds that the science of resuscitation has achieved from ancient times until today. The effort to resuscitate victims goes back to ancient history, where death was considered a special form of sleep or an act of God. Biblical accounts of resuscitation attempts are numerous. Resuscitation in the Middle Ages was forbidden, but later during Renaissance, any prohibition against performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was challenged, which finally led to the Enlightenment, where scholars attempted to scientifically solve the problem of sudden death. It was then that the various components of CPR (ventilation, circulation, electricity, and organization of emergency medical services) began to take shape. The 19th century gave way to hallmarks both in the ventilatory support (intubation innovations and the artificial respirator) and the open-and closed chest circulatory support. Meanwhile, novel defibrillation techniques had been employed and ventricular fibrillation described. The groundbreaking discoveries of the 20th century finally led to the scientific framework of CPR. In 1960, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation was eventually combined with chest compression and defibrillation to become CPR as we now know it. This review presents the scientific milestones behind one of medicine's most widely used fields.

  20. The impact of childhood sickness on adult socioeconomic outcomes: Evidence from late 19th century America

    PubMed Central

    Warren, John Robert; Knies, Laurie; Haas, Steven; Hernandez, Elaine M.

    2013-01-01

    We use family fixed-effects models to estimate the impact of childhood health on adult literacy, labor force outcomes, and marital status among pairs of white brothers observed as children in the 1880 U.S. Census and then as adults in the 1900–1930 Censuses. Given our focus on the 19th century, we observed a wider array of infectious, chronic, and traumatic health problems than is observed using data that are more recent; our results thus provide some insights into circumstances in modern developing countries where similar health problems are more frequently observed. Compared to their healthy siblings, sick brothers were less likely to be located (and thus more likely to be dead) 20–50 years after their 1880 enumeration. Sick brothers were also less likely to be literate, to have ever been married, and to have reported an occupation. However, among those with occupations, sick and healthy brothers tended to do similar kinds of work. We discuss the implications of our results for research on the impact of childhood health on socioeconomic outcomes in developed and developing countries. PMID:22809795

  1. Shark tooth weapons from the 19th Century reflect shifting baselines in Central Pacific predator assemblies.

    PubMed

    Drew, Joshua; Philipp, Christopher; Westneat, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    The reefs surrounding the Gilbert Islands (Republic of Kiribati, Central Pacific), like many throughout the world, have undergone a period of rapid and intensive environmental perturbation over the past 100 years. A byproduct of this perturbation has been a reduction of the number of shark species present in their waters, even though sharks play an important in the economy and culture of the Gilbertese. Here we examine how shark communities changed over time periods that predate the written record in order to understand the magnitude of ecosystem changes in the Central Pacific. Using a novel data source, the shark tooth weapons of the Gilbertese Islanders housed in natural history museums, we show that two species of shark, the Spot-tail (Carcharhinus sorrah) and the Dusky (C. obscurus), were present in the islands during the last half of the 19(th) century but not reported in any historical literature or contemporary ichthyological surveys of the region. Given the importance of these species to the ecology of the Gilbert Island reefs and to the culture of the Gilbertese people, documenting these shifts in baseline fauna represents an important step toward restoring the vivid splendor of both ecological and cultural diversity.

  2. Shark Tooth Weapons from the 19th Century Reflect Shifting Baselines in Central Pacific Predator Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Joshua; Philipp, Christopher; Westneat, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    The reefs surrounding the Gilbert Islands (Republic of Kiribati, Central Pacific), like many throughout the world, have undergone a period of rapid and intensive environmental perturbation over the past 100 years. A byproduct of this perturbation has been a reduction of the number of shark species present in their waters, even though sharks play an important in the economy and culture of the Gilbertese. Here we examine how shark communities changed over time periods that predate the written record in order to understand the magnitude of ecosystem changes in the Central Pacific. Using a novel data source, the shark tooth weapons of the Gilbertese Islanders housed in natural history museums, we show that two species of shark, the Spot-tail (Carcharhinus sorrah) and the Dusky (C. obscurus), were present in the islands during the last half of the 19th century but not reported in any historical literature or contemporary ichthyological surveys of the region. Given the importance of these species to the ecology of the Gilbert Island reefs and to the culture of the Gilbertese people, documenting these shifts in baseline fauna represents an important step toward restoring the vivid splendor of both ecological and cultural diversity. PMID:23573214

  3. Pietro Loreta and his contribution to surgery in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Aldini, Nicolò Nicoli; Fini, Milena; Giardino, Roberto

    2011-03-01

    Pietro Loreta (1831 to 1889), head of surgery at the University of Bologna, Italy, is at present a little-known name. However, in the field of surgery in the second half of the 19th century, his contributions to various areas, especially that of bladder stone treatment and gastric surgery, aroused great interest also at the international level. This survey focuses on both of these subjects that are particularly indicative of Loreta's activity. While he was trying to improve the operation of perineal cystotomy, which was about to be abandoned, he was faced with the new frontier of gastrointestinal tract surgery. Surgery was in rapid transformation, and the practice of a general surgeon still encompassed the domains of different surgical specialties, which would develop individually afterward. Loreta was a pupil of the outstanding surgeon Francesco Rizzoli and some of his pupils such as Alessandro Codivilla and Bartolo Nigrisoli became heads of surgery. His attitude of caution, that he recommended in his writings, is more remarkable considering his problematic nature and might be the most significant and original trait of Loreta's personality.

  4. Placebos in 19th century medicine: a quantitative analysis of the BMJ.

    PubMed

    Raicek, Jacqueline E; Stone, Bradley H; Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2012-12-18

    To provide the first quantitative data on the use of the term "placebo" in the 19th century. Computer search of BMJ's archival database from January 1840 (the first issue) through December 1899 for uses of the words "placebo(s)." Grounded theory was used to categorise the implications of uses of the term. 71 citations contained the term "placebo(s)." Of these, 22 (31%) used the term to mean "no effect" or as a general pejorative term, 18 (25%) portrayed placebo treatment as permitting the unfolding of the natural history (the normal waxing and waning of illness), 14 (20%) described placebo as important to satisfy patients, 7 (10%) described it as fulfilling a physician's performance role, 3 (4%) described its use to buy time, 3 (4%) described its use for financial gain, 2 (3%) used it in a manner similar to a placebo control, and only one implied that placebo could have a clinical effect. Only one citation mentioned telling the patient about his placebo treatment. Nineteenth century physicians had diverse a priori assumptions about placebos. These findings remind us that contemporary medicine needs to use rigorous science to separate fact from its own beliefs concerning the "provision of care." As in previous generations, ethical issues concerning placebos continue to challenge medicine.

  5. Elizabeth Brown and the Classification of Sunspots in the 19th Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2014-06-01

    British amateur astronomers collected solar observation data as members of organizations such as the British Astronomical Association (BAA) and Liverpool Astronomical Society (LAS) in the late 1800s. Amateur astronomer Elizabeth Brown (1830-99) served as Solar Section Director of both groups, and not only aggregated solar observations (including hand-drawn illustrations) from observers from around the globe, but worked closely with solar astronomer Edward Maunder and other professionals in an attempt to garner specific types of observations from BAA members in order to answer a number of astronomical questions of the day. For example, she encouraged the monitoring of the growth and decay of sunspot groups and published a number of her own observations of particular groups, urging observers to note whether faculae were seen before the birth of sunspots in a given region, a topic of controversy at that time. She also developed a system for classifying sunspots and sunspot groups based on their appearance, dividing then into 11 types: normal, compound, pairs, clusters, trains, streams, zigzags, elliptical, vertical, nebulous, and dots. This poster will summarize Brown’s important contributions to solar observing in the late 19th century and situate her classification scheme relative to those of A.L. Cortie (1901), M. Waldmeier (1938; 1947) and the modified Zurich system of McIntosh (1966; 1969; 1989).

  6. Modelling the dynamics of scarlet fever epidemics in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Duncan, S R; Scott, S; Duncan, C J

    2000-01-01

    Annual deaths from scarlet fever in Liverpool, UK during 1848-1900 have been used as a model system for studying the historical dynamics of the epidemics. Mathematical models are developed which include the growth of the population and the death rate from scarlet fever. Time-series analysis of the results shows that there were two distinct phases to the disease (i) 1848-1880: regular epidemics (wavelength = 3.7 years) consistent with the system being driven by an oscillation in the transmission coefficient (deltabeta) at its resonant frequency, probably associated with dry conditions in winter (ii) 1880-1900: an undriven SEIR system with a falling endemic level and decaying epidemics. This period was associated with improved nutritive levels. There is also evidence from time-series analysis that raised wheat prices in pregnancy caused increased susceptibility in the subsequent children. The pattern of epidemics and the demographic characteristics of the population can be replicated in the modelling which provides insights into the detailed epidemiology of scarlet fever in this community in the 19th century.

  7. Solar rotational cycle in lightning activity in Japan during the 18-19th centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Hiroko; Kataoka, Ryuho; Mikami, Takehiko; Zaiki, Masumi; Hirano, Junpei; Yoshimura, Minoru; Aono, Yasuyuki; Iwahashi, Kiyomi

    2018-04-01

    Thunderstorm and cloud activities sometimes show a 27-day period, and this has long been studied to uncover a possible important link to solar rotation. Because the 27-day variations in the solar forcing parameters such as solar ultraviolet and galactic cosmic rays become more prominent when the solar activity is high, it is expected that the signal of the 27-day period in meteorological phenomena may wax and wane according to the changes in the solar activity level. In this study, we examine in detail the intensity variations in the signal of the 27-day solar rotational period in thunder and lightning activity from the 18th to the 19th centuries based on 150-year-long records found in old diaries kept in Japan and discuss their relation with the solar activity levels. Such long records enable us to examine the signals of solar rotation at both high and low solar activity levels. We found that the signal of the solar rotational period in the thunder and lightning activity increases as the solar activity increases. In this study, we also discuss the possibility of the impact of the long-term climatological conditions on the signals of the 27-day period in thunder/lightning activities.

  8. Landscape change and sediment yield of rivers in the northeastern US during 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanova, T.; Wreschnig, A. J.; Ruffing, C. M.; McCormack, S. M.; Bain, D. J.; Hermans, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    During the 19th century, population growth, dam construction, and large scale forest clearing, particularly for agriculture, was followed by a massive migration to urban and industrialized centers. This led to the high degree of rural land abandonment in many parts of northeastern US. Such significant changes in land use and demography impacted sediment loading and delivery to receiving waters. The objective of this study is to assess the historical changes in sediment loading to waters as a result of land use change and related change in soil erosion, dam dynamics and sediment trapping. Various methods for assessing soil erosion, sediment yield and dam influence will be used and compared (RUSLE, BQART model, dam trapping efficiency). We expect to see 1) an accelerated erosion rates and sediment yield following forest clearing and intensification of agriculture and 2) decreased sediment delivery to estuaries with an increasing number of dams. While sediment management often focuses on fluvial corridors, our understanding of historic upland dynamics remains rudimentary. This study aims to highlight and explain the interconnectedness of the landscape-hydro system; with a particular emphasis on anthropogenic forcing and influences.

  9. ["Fabulous things". Drug narratives about coca and cocaine in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Wahrig, Bettina

    2009-12-01

    This contribution focuses on the history of Coca leaves and Cocaine in the second half of 19th century Europe. Even though, to date, no direct link has been established between the activities of the Milano physician Paolo Mantegazza, and the Göttingen chemist Friedrich Wöhler, it is not a mere coincidence that both published their findings in the same year, namely, 1859. Mantegazza authored the first treatise claiming that Coca had psychoactive qualities and touted its broad therapeutic faculties; he claimed that it should be introduced into European pharmacotherapy. In Wöhler's laboratory, cocaine was isolated from leaves by his pupil Alfred Niemann; later, Wilhelm Lossen refined and corrected Niemann's results. Narratives about medicinal drugs often streamline history into a story that starts with multiple meanings and impure matters and ends with well-defined substances, directed at clear-cut diseases and symptoms. In the case of Coca, however, the pure substance triggered no such process well into the 1880s, whereas the leaves continued to circulate as an exotic, pluripotent drug whose effects where miraculous and yet difficult to establish.

  10. Science Policy at the Wrong Scale and Without Adequate Political Institutions: Parallels between the U.S. 19th Century and the 21st Century Global Contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    national and state levels), and there is only weak international confederation provided in the United Nations and multilateral treaties used to restrain multinational corporations. Again, there is tension between unregulated economic development based on local control and strong centralized decision making, but the 21st century has inadequate international political institutions. National corporations did not fit into the institutional context of the 19th century. Multinational corporations do not fit the political institutions extant in the early 21st century. Hutton's insight about geologic time can be applied to politics. Time scale is important in understanding political as well as geologic processes. Policy trends begin with electoral surges and are sustained with subsequent incremental election results and consensus. Geoscientists of the 21st century may be able to look to their 19th century colleagues to recognize the level of political energy needed to convincingly explain the policy consequences of their data to elected officials. Geoscience influence in the policy process is critical to building a lasting political consensus for sustainable policy choices.

  11. Hydrometeorological extremes reconstructed from documentary evidence for the Jihlava region in the 17th-19th centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolak, Lukas; Brazdil, Rudolf; Chroma, Katerina; Valasek, Hubert; Belinova, Monika; Reznickova, Ladislava

    2016-04-01

    Different documentary evidence (taxation records, chronicles, insurance reports etc.) is used for reconstruction of hydrometeorological extremes (HMEs) in the Jihlava region (central part of the recent Czech Republic) in the 17th-19th centuries. The aim of the study is description of the system of tax alleviation in Moravia, presentation of utilization of early fire and hail damage insurance claims and application of the new methodological approaches for the analysis of HMEs impacts. During the period studied more than 400 HMEs were analysed for the 16 estates (past basic economic units). Late frost on 16 May 1662 on the Nove Mesto na Morave estate, which destroyed whole cereals and caused damage in the forests, is the first recorded extreme event. Downpours causing flash floods and hailstorms are the most frequently recorded natural disasters. Moreover, floods, droughts, windstorms, blizzards, late frosts and lightning strikes starting fires caused enormous damage as well. The impacts of HMEs are classified into three categories: impacts on agricultural production, material property and the socio-economic impacts. Natural disasters became the reasons of losses of human lives, property, supplies and farming equipment. HMEs caused damage to fields and meadows, depletion of livestock and triggered the secondary consequences as lack of seeds and finance, high prices, indebtedness, poverty and deterioration in field fertility. The results are discussed with respect to uncertainties associated with documentary evidences and their spatiotemporal distribution. Archival records, preserved in the Moravian Land Archives in Brno and other district archives, create a unique source of data contributing to the better understanding of extreme events and their impacts.

  12. Azañón's disease. A 19th century epidemic of neurolathyrism in Spain.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Roldán, S; Spencer, P S

    2016-12-01

    The cultivation and consumption of grasspea (Lathyrus sativus) in Spain probably dates back centuries, especially during times of famine when the neurotoxic potential of this legume was expressed in the form of a spastic paraparesis known as neurolathyrism. Little known outside the country, the epidemic of neurolathyrism in the years following the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) came to affect more than a thousand people. In late 1872, during the Six Years Revolutionary Term, young Alejandro San Martín Satrústegui (1847-1908), then editor of the popular weekly El Siglo Médico, travelled to Azañón, a remote village in the province of Guadalajara, to clarify a so-far unknown disease. We analysed the original article published in 1873 by San Martin, as well as communications sent by El Siglo Médico readers reporting similar cases in many other Castilian provinces. San Martín's neurological findings in seven personally examined cases were astonishingly accurate; he concluded the subjects' neurological deficits resulted from injury to the lateral columns in the lower portion of the spinal cord. Description of the clinical findings provided both by San Martín, and by the readers of El Siglo Médico, leave no doubt as to the diagnosis of neurolathyrism. However, none suspected the patient's staple food was the determinant cause of the disease. San Martín proposed the eponym Azañón's disease for lack of a better name the same year (1873) in which Cantani in Italy introduced the term lathyrism. The epidemic of neurolathyrism that affected many Castilian towns represents one of the best-documented in Europe during the last third of the 19th century. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Forgotten research from 19th century: science should not follow fashion.

    PubMed

    Galler, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    The fine structure of cross-striated muscle and its changes during contraction were known already in considerable detail in the 19th century. This knowledge was the result of studying birefringence properties of muscle fibres under the polarization microscope, a method mainly established by Brücke (Denk Kais Akad Wiss Math Naturwiss Cl 15:69-84, 1858) in Vienna, Austria. The knowledge was seemingly forgotten in the first half of the 20th century before it was rediscovered in 1954. This rediscovery was essential for the formulation of the sliding filament theory which represents the commonly accepted concept of muscle contraction (A.F. Huxley and Niedergerke, Nature 173:971-973, 1954; H.E. Huxley and Hanson, Nature 173:973-976, 1954). The loss of knowledge was the result of prevailing views within the scientific community which could be attributed to "fashion": it was thought that the changes of cross-striations, which were observed under the microscope, were inconsequential for contraction since other types of movements like cell crawling and smooth muscle contraction were not associated with similar changes of the fine structure. The basis for this assumption was the view that all types of movements associated with life must be caused by the same mechanisms. Furthermore, it was assumed that the light microscopy was of little use, because the individual molecules that carry out life functions cannot be seen under the light microscope. This unfortunate episode of science history teaches us that the progress of science can severely be retarded by fashion.

  14. The puzzle of human emotions: some historical considerations from the 17th to the 19th centuries.

    PubMed

    Albano, Caterina

    2008-07-01

    Emotions are both central to life experience itself and highly pertinent to various disciplines, including neuroscience, psychology, social studies, philosophy, and the arts. The definition of emotion lies at the interface of nature and culture reflecting an understanding of the components that shape emotional states and experiences across time and cultures. This review describes how the concept of emotion developed in Western thought, from the Renaissance notion of the passions to the 19th century idea of 'emotion'.

  15. [Nerve impulse in the 19th century: it's nature and the method of research].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Risa; Sugiyama, Shigeo

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate in this paper how scientists in the 19th century did researches on the nervous system; some scientists tried to make the nature of "nerve impulse" clear only to fail, while others chose to investigate how the nervous system works, leaving the nature of the impulse unknown. A. Mosso and H. D. Rolleston, for example, attempted to detect heat produced in nerves with a view to elucidating the nature of the impulse. The heat, they believed, would suggest that "nerve impulse" was nothing but "a wave of chemical reaction" or "a wave of molecular vibration." On the other hand, C. S. Sherrington who introduced the term synapsis in 1897 to refer to the special connection between nerve cells--special in the sense it offers an opportunity for "nerve impulse" to change in its nature--refrained from examining the nature of the impulse. He believed that it was impossible for science at the time to elucidate the nature. He, therefore, focused his attention to reactions of muscles in an animal caused when various stimulations were applied on animal's skin in a remote area from the muscles. He did not probe into the working of the nerves running between the part where stimulation was given and the part where corresponding reaction occurred. He pursued his studies by using phenomenalistic approach. We call his approach "phenomenalistic" because his research focused only on contradictions of muscles easily seen without probing into minute arrangement in a body. Gotch and Horsley, like Sherrington, did not argue about the nature of "nerve impulse." But unlike Sherrington, they made experiments with electrical changes produced in nerves or a spinal cord, based on the idea that "nerve impulse" should accompany certain electrical changes. Making use of their electrical method effectively, they obtained a series of quantitative data as to the electrical changes. The data they collected allowed them to explore distribution of nerves deep in a body and even led them to

  16. Instrumental evidence of an unusually strong West African Monsoon in the 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, David; Ordoñez, Paulina; Ribera, Pedro; Peña-Ortiz, Cristina; Garcia-Herrera, Ricardo; Vega, Inmaculada; Gomez, Francisco de Paula

    2016-04-01

    The precipitation in the Sahel -which is mainly controlled by the dynamics of the West African Monsoon-, has been in the spot of the climate community for the last three decades due to the persistence of the drought period that started in the 1970s. Unfortunately, reliable meteorological series in this area are only available since the beginning of the 20th Century, thus limiting our understanding of the significance of this period from a long term perspective. Currently, our knowledge of what happened in times previous to the 20th Century essentially relies in documentary or proxy sources. In this work, we present the first instrumental evidence of a 50 year-long period characterised by an unusually strong West African monsoon in the19th Century. Following the recent advances in the generation of climatic indices based on data from ship's logbooks, we used historical wind observations to compute a new index (the so-called ASWI) for characterising the strength of the West African Monsoon. The ASWI is based in the persistence of the southwesterly winds in the [29°W-17°W;7°N-13°N] area and it has been possible to compute it since 1790 for July and since 1839 for August and September. We show that the ASWI is a reliable measure of the monsoon's strength and the Sahelian rainfall. Our new series clearly shows the well-known drought period starting in the 1970s. During this dry period, the West African Monsoon was particularly weak and interestingly, we found that since then, the correlations with different climatic patterns such as the Pacific and Atlantic "El Niño" changed significantly in relation to those of the previous century. Remarkably, our results also show that the period 1839-1890 was characterised by an unusually strong and persistent monsoon. Notwithstanding, two of the few dry years within this period were concurrent with large volcanic eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere. This latter result supports the recently suggested relationship between major

  17. Theoretical astrophysics in the 19th century (Homage to Radó von Kövesligethy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs, Lajos G.

    The nature of astronomical information is determined mostly by the incoming light. Theoretical astrophysics means basically the theory of light emission and its relation to the physical constitution of the emitting celestial bodies. The necessary physical disciplines include theory of gravitation, theory of radiation, thermodynamics, matter--radiation interaction. The most significant theoretical achievement in the 17th - 18th century was the axiomatic foundation of mechanics and the law of gravitation. In the context of the nature of light, there were two conceptions: Newton contra Huygens, i.e. particle versus wave phenomenon. Using the theory of gravitation, first speculations appeared on black holes (Michell, Laplace), cosmogony (Kant-Laplace theory), the structure of the Milky Way (Kant), and the explanation of motion of the celestial bodies. The Olbers Paradox, formulated in the 19th century, is still one of the most significant constraints on observational cosmology. The development of thermodynamics, matter-radiation interaction, development of the theory of electromagnetism became important milestones. Maxwell's theory was the classical framework of the interaction between matter and radiation. Kirchhoff and Bunsen's revolutionary discovery of spectral analysis (1859) showed that observation of spectra makes it possible to study the chemical composition of emitting bodies. Thermodynamics predicted the existence of the black body radiation. It did not succeed, however, to determine the functional form of the wavelength dependence. A combination of the thermodynamic equation of state with the equation of hydrostatics resulted in the first stellar models (Lane, Ritter, Schuster). The first successful spectral equation of black body radiation was the theory of continuous spectra of celestial bodies by Radó von Kövesligethy (published 1885 in Hungarian, 1890 in German). Kövesligethy made several assumptions on the matter-radiation interaction: radiating

  18. [Mortality in Nuremberg in the 19th century (about 1800 to 1913)].

    PubMed

    Vasold, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    Before the middle of the 19th century urban life was hazardous, life expectancy in big cities was shorter than in the countryside, it was half as high as it is today. Cities used to be called "the graves of mankind"; they were unhygienic, since their inhabitants lived under crowded, unhealthy conditions. In German cities infant mortality was extremely high, one out of three new-born children died within its first year. In most big cities more people died in any given year than were born. In 1806, when the Imperial City of Nuremberg was absorbed by the Kingdom of Bavaria, it had 25 000 inhabitants, fewer than around the year 1600. In the following decades Nuremberg grew quickly, up to 50000 in 1846 and 100000 in 1881, 330000 in 1910. Its population was living extremely crowded within the medieval city-walls, up to 58 000 (1885) in the old parts of the city, more than twice as many as in 1806. Mortality was bound to increase, as more and more people moved to Nuremberg. Mortality rose from 25.5 per thousand in the 1820's to 29.4 in the 1850's and 32.8 in the 1860's. This increase of population was mainly due to migration from outside, from the countryside. New industries settled down in Nuremberg and provided new jobs, the new factories produced lots of smoke and dangerous dust. The general living conditions of the workers were poor, people were much smaller than nowadays. During the industrialisation labor was backbreaking, working hours were extremely long, and annual working hours were more than twice as long as today. New and better legislation was written by the Northern German Confederation, founded in 1867. Now the magistrate of Nuremberg recognised that something had to be done. In the following years physicians began to collect information as to morbidity and mortality in various parts of Nuremberg. Very many people still died of infectious diseases, esp. of tubercolosis, typhoid fever, diphtheria, pertussis, scarlet fever and other infectious diseases. There

  19. A 19th century climate chronology for the Kalahari region of central southern Africa derived from missionary correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, David J.; Endfield, Georgina H.

    2002-06-01

    patterns of climatic variability are unclear, but 19th century drought periods in the Kalahari show a close coincidence with the timing of moderate to strong El Niño-southern oscillation events

  20. Italian horticultural and culinary records of summer squash (Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbitaceae) and emergence of the zucchini in 19th-century Milan

    PubMed Central

    Lust, Teresa A.; Paris, Harry S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Summer squash, the young fruits of Cucurbita pepo, are a common, high-value fruit vegetable. Of the summer squash, the zucchini, C. pepo subsp. pepo Zucchini Group, is by far the most cosmopolitan. The zucchini is easily distinguished from other summer squash by its uniformly cylindrical shape and intense colour. The zucchini is a relatively new cultivar-group of C. pepo, the earliest known evidence for its existence having been a description in a book on horticulture published in Milan in 1901. For this study, Italian-language books on agriculture and cookery dating from the 16th to 19th centuries have been collected and searched in an effort to follow the horticultural development and culinary use of young Cucurbita fruits in Italy. Findings The results indicate that Cucurbita fruits, both young and mature, entered Italian kitchens by the mid-16th century. A half-century later, round and elongate young fruits of C. pepo were addressed as separate cookery items and the latter had largely replaced the centuries-old culinary use of young, elongate bottle gourds, Lagenaria siceraria. Allusion to a particular, extant cultivar of the longest fruited C. pepo, the Cocozelle Group, dates to 1811 and derives from the environs of Naples. The Italian diminutive word zucchini arose by the beginning of the 19th century in Tuscany and referred to small, mature, desiccated bottle gourds used as containers to store tobacco. By the 1840s, the Tuscan word zucchini was appropriated to young, primarily elongate fruits of C. pepo. The Zucchini Group traces its origins to the environs of Milan, perhaps as early as 1850. The word zucchini and the horticultural product zucchini arose contemporaneously but independently. The results confirm that the Zucchini Group is the youngest of the four cultivar-groups of C. pepo subsp. pepo but it emerged approximately a half-century earlier than previously known. PMID:27343231

  1. Polynesia and polygenism: the scientific use of travel literature in the early 19th century.

    PubMed

    Carhart, Michael C

    2009-04-01

    Christoph Meiners (1747-1810) was one of 18th-century Europe's most important readers of global travel literature, and he has been credited as a founder of the disciplines of ethnology and anthropology. This article examines a part of his final work, "Untersuchungen über die Verschiedenheiten der Menschennaturen" [Inquiries on the differences of human natures], published posthumously in the 1810s. Here Meiners developed an elaborate argument, based on empirical evidence, that the different races of men emerged indigenously at different times and in different places in natural history. Specifically this article shows how a sedentary scholar who never left Europe constructed a narrative of human origins and migrations on the basis of (1) French theory from the 1750s (Charles de Brosses and Simon Pelloutier) and (2) data gathered by explorers as reported in travel literature (J.R. Forster, Pérouse, Cook, Marsden).

  2. Goethe's Ottilie: an early 19th century description of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bhanji, S; Jolles, F E; Jolles, R A

    1990-01-01

    The view that the prevalence of anorexia nervosa is influenced by social attitudes and customs is a popular one. Unfortunately the scarcity of medical accounts prior to the later decades of the last century make it difficult if not impossible to estimate the prevalence of anorexia nervosa at various periods in history. The authors present the history of one of Goethe's literary heroines and suggest that similar studies could throw some light on the epidemiology of anorexia nervosa in the past. PMID:2213809

  3. [A bloody boldness: amputations of the neck of the womb in France at the beginning of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Carol, Anne

    2008-01-01

    During the 1820s and 1830s the number of uterus cervix amputations increases in France, becoming a speciality for some famous surgeons such as Jacques Lisfranc. Since the end of the 1820s, however, the operation is known as useless and dangerous by specialists, and censured in medical papers. Why did Lisfranc carry on operating? This paper tries to clear up the intricate reasons of this success and this passion, by exploring the scientific and technical context, but also the social and professional struggles in the rising art of 19th-century surgery. Thus, it attempts to understand how therapeutic choices or medical practices can be constructed.

  4. D Representation of the 19TH Century Balkan Architecture Using Scaled Museum-Maquette and Photogrammetry Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, E.; Karachaliou, E.; Stylianidis, E.

    2017-08-01

    Characteristic example of the Balkan architecture of the 19th century, consists the "Tower house" which is found in the region of Epirus and Western Macedonia, Greece. Nowadays, the only information about these heritage buildings could be abstracted by the architectural designs on hand and the model - Tower that is being displayed in the Folklore Museum of the Municipality of Kozani, Greece, as a maquette. The current work generates a scaled 3D digital model of the "Tower house", by using photogrammetry techniques applied on the model-maquette that is being displayed in the Museum exhibits.

  5. An archival exploration of homicide--suicide and mass murder in the context of 19th-century American parricides.

    PubMed

    Shon, Phillip Chong Ho; Roberts, Michael A

    2010-02-01

    There has been little attempt to integrate contemporary studies of suicide and mass murder to homicide-suicides. The current research attempts to do so in the context of 19th-century parricides in America. This project uses archival records from The New York Times and the Chicago Tribune, 1851-1899, resulting in a total of 231 incidents. Our results indicate that parricides, mass murders, and suicides tended to originate as spontaneous acts, usually during the course of an argument, gathering momentum as the interaction unfolded. We contend that suicide is one way of alleviating threats to offender's loss of self-identity.

  6. [JAN JĘDRZEJEWICZ AND EUROPEAN ASTRONOMY OF THE 2ND HALF OF THE 19TH CENTURY].

    PubMed

    Siuda-Bochenek, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Jan Jędrzejewicz was an amateur astronomer who in the 2nd half of the 19th century created an observation centre, which considering the level of research was comparable to the European ones. Jędrzejewicz settled down in Plonsk in 1862 and worked as a doctor ever since but his greatest passion was astronomy, to which he dedicated all his free time. In 1875 Jędrzejewicz finished the construction of his observatory. He equipped it with basic astronomical and meteorological instruments, then began his observations and with time he became quite skilled in it. Jędrzejewicz focused mainly on binary stars but he also pointed his telescopes at the planets of the solar system, the comets, the Sun, as well as all the phenomena appearing in the sky at that time. Thanks to the variety of the objects observed and the number of observations he stood out from other observers in Poland and took a very good position in the mainstream of the 19th-century astronomy in Europe. Micrometer observations of binary stars made in Płońsk gained recognition in the West and were included in the catalogues of binary stars. Interest in Jędrzejewicz and his observatory was confirmed by numerous references in the English "Nature" magazine.

  7. A light on medical practice in 19th-century Canada: the medical manuscripts of Dr. John Mackieson of Charlottetown

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, D A

    1998-01-01

    During his long career as a physician in Charlottetown, Dr. John Mackieson (1795-1885) compiled 4 medical manuscripts: 2 sets of case records, a synopsis of the medical conditions that were common in his day and a formulary. As primary sources, these documents provide information about medicine in 19th-century Canada and augment our knowledge of the problems of medical practice in that era. They illustrate aspects of the work of Dr. Mackieson, a generalist with interests in surgery and obstetrics, and they facilitate an understanding of the rationale underlying the treatments that he and his contemporaries used. Although 150 years old, the case records can be appreciated for their relevance to the art of medicine. Two excerpts from the case records, presented in this article, provide a sense of Dr. Mackieson's writings and introduce a discussion on the significance of these manuscripts in relation to the ideas on disease and treatment that governed medical practice, both in Prince Edward Island and elsewhere in Canada, in the 19th century. PMID:9724982

  8. The evil of the unknown--risk-benefit evaluation of new synthetic drugs in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A; Helmstädter, A

    2015-01-01

    In the 19th century, synthetic chemistry discovered completely new chemical entities for medicinal use, which dramatically enriched the therapeutic armamentarium. However, no information was available regarding the safety of these new drugs, which were unrelated to most of the medicinal agents formerly known. Therefore, the question arises, if and how far, considerations regarding the relationship between benefit and risks were made. In this study, chloroform, phenazone (antipyrine) and sulfonal, were investigated as examples for drugs newly introduced in the 19th century. The results revealed that these drugs were provided by the manufacturer, tested by the physicians in a multicentre pattern and side effects were published in the medical literature soon after. Within a few years, several hundred cases were reported but the data were rarely summarized statistically. Therefore, physicians needed to stay updated with the medical literature because neither systematic industrial research nor regulatory authorities existed. The number of case reports within the first years were sufficient to detect common (> 1/100 to < 1/10) side effects but rare events were also reported. An extraordinary example is the drug-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis, which is commonly known as the Lyell syndrome or its less severe form, the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. This reaction has been clearly described by Baruch Spitz (1854-1932) as a side effect of antipyrine in 1887, several decades before Stevens, Johnson and particularly Lyell.

  9. [From Paris to Strasbourgh: the development of orthopedic and gymnastic clinics (first half of the 19th century)].

    PubMed

    Quin, Gregory; Monet, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution, we try to outline a history of the rise of orthopaedic and gymnastic clinics from 1820 to 1860 in France, and particularly in Paris. These clinics are located at the crossroads of several social processes of the 19th century: the structuring of a medical field (observed through specialization, professionalization, etc.), physical exercises legitimating process or the development of a medical interest for the female body. Several types of interests and issues--epistemological, educational, social, professional or symbolic--cross around those clinics and place them as major elements in the constitution of a history of medical engagement in the production of physical education during the nineteenth century. Divided in two parts, our presentation will try to highlight various elements of a history of those clinics' rise: their directors, a geography of the implantation in Paris and a description of their customers, looking at the various educational and rehabilitative methodologies implemented in the different clinics.

  10. Mid 19th century minimum of galactic cosmic ray flux inferred from 44Ti in Allegan meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taricco, C.; Bhandari, N.; Colombetti, P.; Verma, N.

    Measurements of 44Ti activity in meteorites show that the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity has been declining in the interplanetary space during the past three centuries and has a component of cyclic variation, with periodicity of about 87 years [Taricco, C., Bhandari, N., Cane, D., et al. Galactic cosmic ray flux decline and periodicities in the interplanetary space during the last 3 centuries revealed by 44Ti in meteorites. J. Geophys. Res. 111, A08102, 2006.]. In order to verify these results, we have measured 44Ti activity in Allegan meteorite which fell in 1899 and in some other meteorites with better precision. The measurements confirm low cosmic ray flux and consequently high solar activity near the middle of 19th century.

  11. The treatment of syphilis in Ferrara (Italy) in the 19th century: the example of the Ferrarese pharmacopoeia.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Enrica; Angelini, Lauretta; Mares, Donatella; Contini, Carlo; Vicentini, Chiara Beatrice

    2010-03-01

    The authors have taken the Italian city of Ferrara as an example of the remedies against syphilis, commonly used worldwide in the 1800s. After having identified the terminologies used to diagnose syphilis, they evidence the legislative behaviours of the government authorities in 19th century in Italy and, in particular, the social and sanitary measures taken in Ferrara to limit the spread of the syphilis epidemic. Historical sources permitted description of the remedies employed in Ferrara from the beginning to the end of that century, not only to treat conditions linked directly to the malady itself, but also its complications and secondary pathologies. The pharmacopoeia written for the apothecaries of Ferrara by Antonio Campana, a famous Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Botany, won a great reputation and distribution in the international medical world not only of the first half of the 1800s. His authoritative work was much appreciated in Italy and abroad.

  12. Causes of mortality due to rheumatic diseases in Jerez de los Caballeros (Badajoz) during the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Peral Pacheco, Diego; Suárez-Guzmán, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    A total of 26,203 of the deaths in Jerez de los Caballeros (Badajoz) during the 19th century were collected and grouped according to the Bertillon's Classification, in order to study the causes of death from rheumatic diseases. An analysis was made using the Death Registers, those located in the Parish Archives, and files of the Municipal Archives. There were a total of 31 deaths due to rheumatic diseases, with the 65-74 years age group being most frequent. The lack of records may be due to the inaccuracy of the diagnoses. September was the month of increased mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  13. The black cholera comes to the central valley of America in the 19th century - 1832, 1849, and later.

    PubMed

    Daly, Walter J

    2008-01-01

    In mid-19th Century, cholera was epidemic throughout the world. Small towns of the American Midwest were not spared. The disease was blamed on miasmas arising from local causes, so flight from affected localities were logical and common. Flight, added to mortality, caused virtual depopulation of many small towns. Drinking water was drawn from rivers or shallow wells, often near seeping cesspools. Local merchants tried unsuccessfully to calm panic by suppressing information. Cholera was not good for business. Business was depressed. Organized religion thrived. National and state days of prayer were appointed to appease an angry God. During these frightening times, the people learned nothing about the infectiousness of cholera or about its prevention through sanitation. Their experiences tended to reinforce their belief in miasmas or divine retribution. The great epidemics of mankind describe human behavior in times of unavoidable and incurable crisis. Nineteenth Century cholera experiences illustrate a people's reaction to catastrophic disease, which they believed was incurable and unpreventable.

  14. The biological standard of living and mortality in Central Italy at the beginning of the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Michela

    2013-12-01

    The biological standard of living in Central Italy at the beginning of the 19th century is analyzed using newly collected data on the height of recruits in the army of the Papal States. The results reveal a decline in height for the cohorts born under French rule (1796-1815). Although this trend was common to many parts of Europe, the estimated magnitude of the decline suggests a worsening of the biological standard of living of the working classes in the Papal States even relative to that of other countries. Despite the differences in the economic systems within the Papal States, no significant geographical variation in height has been found: even the most dynamic and advanced regions experienced a dramatic height decline. Mortality also increased during the period under consideration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The politics of midwifery education and training in New South Wales during the last decades of the 19th Century.

    PubMed

    Purcal, Nita K

    2008-03-01

    This paper focuses on the introduction and development of midwifery education and training in Sydney during the last decades of the 19th century. The aim of the training, it is argued, was to displace the lay midwives by trained midwifery nurses who would work under medical control. The lay midwives were one of the largest occupational groups among women and two-thirds of births in NSW were being delivered by them in the late 19th century. It was a period of professionalisation of medicine and medical men laid claim to midwifery as a legitimate sphere of their practice and saw it as the gateway for establishing a family practice. The lay midwife stood in the way of their claim. The training programs were established purportedly to control maternal mortality. From the beginning in 1887 medical men were in control of midwifery nurse training. In addition to training at the Benevolent Society Asylum, three more women's hospitals were established in the 1890s in Sydney making it possible to train a stream of midwifery nurses. The midwifery nurses were charged exorbitant fees for their training; the fees contributed substantially towards running the new hospitals that delivered birth services to the poor and destitute women mostly in their homes. The midwifery nurses worked hard in miserable conditions under the guise of clinical experience required for training. When a critical mass of poorly trained midwifery nurses were in the offing, a Bill was introduced into the Parliament in 1895, restricting registration to midwifery nurses and this would have eliminated the lay midwife if passed. It took more than two decades to get a Registration Bill passed in the NSW Parliament.

  16. Human impacts of hydrometeorological extremes in the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands derived from documentary sources in the 18th-19th centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolák, Lukáš; Brázdil, Rudolf; Valášek, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    The extent of damage caused by hydrometeorological events or extremes (HME) has risen up in the entire world in the last few years. Especially the floods, flash floods, torrential rains and hailstorms are the most typical and one of the most frequent kind of natural disasters in the central Europe. Catastrophes are a part of human history and people were forced to cope with their consequences (e. g. material damage, economical losses, impacts on agriculture and society or losses of human lives). This paper analyses the human impacts of HME in the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands (central part of the Czech Republic) on the basis of documentary sources from the 18th-19th centuries. The paper presents various negative impacts of natural disasters on lives and property and subsequent inconveniences of Czech peasants. The preserved archival documents of estates or domains became the primary sources of data (e. g. taxation reliefs, damaged records, reports of afflicted farmers, administrative correspondence etc.). Particularly taxation reliefs relate to taxation system in the Czech lands during the 17th-19th centuries allowing to farmers to ask for tax alleviation when their crops were significantly damaged by any HME. These archival documents are a highly valuable source for the study of human impacts of natural disasters. Devastating consequences of these extremes affected individual farmers much more than the aristocracy. Floods caused inundations of farmer's fields, meadows, houses and farm buildings, washed away the arable land with crops, caused losses of cattle, clogged the land with gravel and mud and destroyed roads, bridges or agricultural equipment. Afflicted fields became worthless and it took them many years to become became fertile again. Crop was also damaged by hailstorms, droughts or late/early frosts. All these events led to lack of food and seeds in the following year and it meant the decrease of living standard, misery and poverty of farmers. Acquired

  17. Italian horticultural and culinary records of summer squash (Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbitaceae) and emergence of the zucchini in 19th-century Milan.

    PubMed

    Lust, Teresa A; Paris, Harry S

    2016-07-01

    Summer squash, the young fruits of Cucurbita pepo, are a common, high-value fruit vegetable. Of the summer squash, the zucchini, C. pepo subsp. pepo Zucchini Group, is by far the most cosmopolitan. The zucchini is easily distinguished from other summer squash by its uniformly cylindrical shape and intense colour. The zucchini is a relatively new cultivar-group of C. pepo, the earliest known evidence for its existence having been a description in a book on horticulture published in Milan in 1901. For this study, Italian-language books on agriculture and cookery dating from the 16th to 19th centuries have been collected and searched in an effort to follow the horticultural development and culinary use of young Cucurbita fruits in Italy. The results indicate that Cucurbita fruits, both young and mature, entered Italian kitchens by the mid-16th century. A half-century later, round and elongate young fruits of C. pepo were addressed as separate cookery items and the latter had largely replaced the centuries-old culinary use of young, elongate bottle gourds, Lagenaria siceraria Allusion to a particular, extant cultivar of the longest fruited C. pepo, the Cocozelle Group, dates to 1811 and derives from the environs of Naples. The Italian diminutive word zucchini arose by the beginning of the 19th century in Tuscany and referred to small, mature, desiccated bottle gourds used as containers to store tobacco. By the 1840s, the Tuscan word zucchini was appropriated to young, primarily elongate fruits of C. pepo The Zucchini Group traces its origins to the environs of Milan, perhaps as early as 1850. The word zucchini and the horticultural product zucchini arose contemporaneously but independently. The results confirm that the Zucchini Group is the youngest of the four cultivar-groups of C. pepo subsp. pepo but it emerged approximately a half-century earlier than previously known. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany

  18. Patterns of long bone growth in a mid-19th century documented sample of the urban poor from Bethnal Green, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Ives, Rachel; Humphrey, Louise

    2017-05-01

    Studies of male and female long bone growth in past populations are limited and usually constrained by the lack of personal identification. This article aimed to evaluate long bone growth in a series of mid-19 th century documented burials associated with the urban poor from Bethnal Green, London, UK. Maximum diaphyseal lengths from 74 males and 70 females (2 months to 12 years) were compared to modern reference data from North America. Diaphyseal lengths were expressed as a percentage of expected length and an average percentage value was calculated across all available long bones. An index of growth progression was introduced to explore differences in the progress of males and females towards their projected adult size. Deviation from the expected growth attainment was evident in both sexes in the archaeological series by 2-4 months of age. Only 19.4% (28/144) of the children had attained an average long bone length >90% of the predicted mean in the reference series. The percentage of expected growth attainment decreased steadily in both sexes during infancy and early childhood. Overall, females deviated further from their expected growth progression than males. Growth faltering in both males and females was established during infancy (<1 year) with no evidence for recovery in older age groups. Early weaning and inadequate artificial feeding, together with impoverished living conditions and limited sanitary provision, most likely impacted on childhood growth. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Medical history of the representation of rosacea in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Cribier, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    Throughout the 1800s, clinical illustrations helped to formalize what was then the recently developed field of dermatology. Knowledge of skin diseases was given new dimension as artists and clinicians alike strove to accurately document the physical characteristics of numerous dermatoses. Introduction of novel processes and refined techniques advanced the clinical use of disease images. The increasingly superior quality of these images aided in the early distinction between rosacea and acne. This article highlights these illustrative contributions in dermatology, and includes key images that serve as a road map to early clinical understanding of skin diseases. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Disease of the Italian Poet Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837): A Case of Juvenile Ankylosing Spondylitis in the 19th Century?

    PubMed

    Sganzerla, Erik Pietro; Riva, Michele Augusto

    2017-06-01

    Some authors sustained that the pessimistic thought of the Italian writer and philosopher Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837) may be attributed to his unhappy life, characterized by several health problems. His philosophical theories appear as the result of depressive and melancholic state, related to his precarious health conditions, so limiting their intrinsic values. Several authors formulated various hypotheses on the diseases that Leopardi suffered from and postulated different theories on the cause of his early death. This article assumed that Leopardi may have been affected by juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, conditioning spinal deformities, relapsing-remitting uveitis, urinary tract and bowel tract problems, and acute arthritis. Chest deformity, as a complication of juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, may have caused progressive cardiorespiratory failure, worsened by recurrent bronchial and pulmonary complications, until his death caused by acute right ventricular heart failure. The acknowledgment of a physical cause of Leopardi's disease contributes to reevaluate his "cosmic pessimism" as an original expression of his thought, so leading a general revaluation of the figure of one of the most important European thinkers of the 19th century.

  1. Nimble Fingers. From 19th Century New England Mills to 20th Century Global Assembly Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Lyn

    1988-01-01

    Covers women's labor history in the United States and in industrialized nations from the early 1800s to the present. Provides primary source documents from New England workers in the 1830s and 1840s and from women workers on global assembly lines in the 1980s. Includes discussion questions. (LS)

  2. Survival in 19th Century Cities: The Larger the City, the Smaller Your Chances

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Louis; Hong, Sok Chul

    2009-01-01

    Using Union Army veterans’ lifetime socioeconomic and health records, this essay finds a consistent and persistent hierarchy in survival rates and hazard ratios by urban size at and across three stages of life: birth, late adolescence, and death. This urban mortality penalty remains after controlling for variables associated with each individual veteran. The results of our geographical mobility analyses suggest that, with respect to these veterans, the search for an explanation should focus on late adolescence and adulthood as much as on early life. A complete explanation of the penalty requires a project of greater scope. PMID:20161075

  3. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a 19th century children's book.

    PubMed

    Thome, Johannes; Jacobs, Kerrin A

    2004-08-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a major mental disorder in children. Presently, its pathogenesis and treatment as well as its role in adult psychiatry are subjects of heated debate. As early as 1846, the typical symptoms of ADHD were described by Heinrich Hoffmann, a physician who later founded the first mental hospital in Frankfurt. Interestingly, his description was published in a children's book entitled "Struwwelpeter" which he had designed for his 3-year-old son Carl Philipp. The symptomatology is impressively depicted in the colourfully illustrated story of "Zappel-Philipp" ("Fidgety Philip"), probably the first written mention of ADHD by a medical professional. This clearly shows that the diagnosis of ADHD is not an "invention" of modern times.

  4. The treatment of tuberculosis in Ferrara (Italy) in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Chiara Beatrice; Mares, Donatella; Guidi, Enrica; Angelini, Lauretta; Contini, Carlo; Manfredini, Stefano

    2010-12-01

    The present work is a review of the remedies in use in Ferrara against tuberculosis in the 1800s. The work started from the discovery of accounts describing methods and remedies. These remedies were also in use world wide. Of particular interest is the work by Antonio Campana, a famous professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Botany in Ferrara, who wrote a pharmacopoeia which had several editions between 1797 and 1841. The Farmacopea Ferrarese was addressed to the apothecaries of Ferrara. Nevertheless, due to its great reputation it had an international distribution. It provided us with an exhaustive view about the medical field in Ferrara in the early 1800s. The remedies adopted in the city in the second half of the century were in line with those present abroad. The work was also supported by the discovery of statistical accounts of the Sant'Anna hospital from 1871. The manuscript written by Alessandro Bennati enabled elucidation of the methods used to treat tuberculosis in the second half of the century. Bennati's work is an historical document completed by the work of the physician Cesare Minerbi.

  5. Relevance of 19th century continuous tone photomechanical printing techniques to digitally generated imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, Stephen; Thirkell, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Collotype and Woodburytype are late 19th early 20th century continuous tone methods of reproducing photography in print, which do not have an underlying dot structure. The aesthetic and tactile qualities produced by these methods at their best, have never been surpassed. Woodburytype is the only photomechanical print process using a printing matrix and ink, that is capable of rendering true continuous tone; it also has the characteristic of rendering a photographic image by mapping a three-dimensional surface topography. Collotype"s absence of an underlying dot structure enables an image to be printed in as many colours as desired without creating any form of interference structure. Research at the Centre for Fine Print Research, UWE Bristol aims to recreate these processes for artists and photographers and assess their potential to create a digitally generated image printed in full colour and continuous tone that will not fade or deteriorate. Through this research the Centre seeks to provide a context in which the development of current four-colour CMYK printing may be viewed as an expedient rather than a logical route for the development of colour printing within the framework of digitally generated hard copy paper output.

  6. Fish and fishery historical data since the 19th century in the Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    Fortibuoni, Tomaso; Libralato, Simone; Arneri, Enrico; Giovanardi, Otello; Solidoro, Cosimo; Raicevich, Saša

    2017-01-01

    Historic data on biodiversity provide the context for present observations and allow studying long-term changes in marine populations. Here we present multiple datasets on fish and fisheries of the Adriatic Sea covering the last two centuries encompassing from qualitative observations to standardised scientific monitoring. The datasets consist of three groups: (1) early naturalists’ descriptions of fish fauna, including information (e.g., presence, perceived abundance, size) on 255 fish species for the period 1818–1936; (2) historical landings from major Northern Adriatic fish markets (Venice, Trieste, Rijeka) for the period 1902–1968, Italian official landings for the Northern and Central Adriatic (1953–2012) and landings from the Lagoon of Venice (1945–2001); (3) trawl-survey data from seven surveys spanning the period 1948–1991 and including Catch per Unit of Effort data (kgh−1 and/or nh−1) for 956 hauls performed at 301 stations. The integration of these datasets has already demonstrated to be useful to analyse historical marine community changes over time, and its availability through open-source data portal will facilitate analyses in the framework of marine historical ecology. PMID:28895949

  7. Fish and fishery historical data since the 19th century in the Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Fortibuoni, Tomaso; Libralato, Simone; Arneri, Enrico; Giovanardi, Otello; Solidoro, Cosimo; Raicevich, Saša

    2017-09-12

    Historic data on biodiversity provide the context for present observations and allow studying long-term changes in marine populations. Here we present multiple datasets on fish and fisheries of the Adriatic Sea covering the last two centuries encompassing from qualitative observations to standardised scientific monitoring. The datasets consist of three groups: (1) early naturalists' descriptions of fish fauna, including information (e.g., presence, perceived abundance, size) on 255 fish species for the period 1818-1936; (2) historical landings from major Northern Adriatic fish markets (Venice, Trieste, Rijeka) for the period 1902-1968, Italian official landings for the Northern and Central Adriatic (1953-2012) and landings from the Lagoon of Venice (1945-2001); (3) trawl-survey data from seven surveys spanning the period 1948-1991 and including Catch per Unit of Effort data (kgh -1 and/or nh -1 ) for 956 hauls performed at 301 stations. The integration of these datasets has already demonstrated to be useful to analyse historical marine community changes over time, and its availability through open-source data portal will facilitate analyses in the framework of marine historical ecology.

  8. Fish and fishery historical data since the 19th century in the Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortibuoni, Tomaso; Libralato, Simone; Arneri, Enrico; Giovanardi, Otello; Solidoro, Cosimo; Raicevich, Saša

    2017-09-01

    Historic data on biodiversity provide the context for present observations and allow studying long-term changes in marine populations. Here we present multiple datasets on fish and fisheries of the Adriatic Sea covering the last two centuries encompassing from qualitative observations to standardised scientific monitoring. The datasets consist of three groups: (1) early naturalists' descriptions of fish fauna, including information (e.g., presence, perceived abundance, size) on 255 fish species for the period 1818-1936 (2) historical landings from major Northern Adriatic fish markets (Venice, Trieste, Rijeka) for the period 1902-1968, Italian official landings for the Northern and Central Adriatic (1953-2012) and landings from the Lagoon of Venice (1945-2001) (3) trawl-survey data from seven surveys spanning the period 1948-1991 and including Catch per Unit of Effort data (kgh-1 and/or nh-1) for 956 hauls performed at 301 stations. The integration of these datasets has already demonstrated to be useful to analyse historical marine community changes over time, and its availability through open-source data portal will facilitate analyses in the framework of marine historical ecology.

  9. The Diary of Frances Jacobs: Astronomical Observations by a 19th-century Oregon Woman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGown, R. D.

    2002-12-01

    This abstract summarizes my research, transcription and editing of Francis Jacob's 170-page handwritten astronomical diary. This diary is a unique example of a time in early Portland history, illustrating the mind of a young woman who was interested in science and astronomy. Reflected in her diary are the discoveries and mention of leading astronomers of the day like Emerson Bernard and Edward Pickering. Francis Jacobs lived in an era of the great refractors For example, ``The Leviathan," built by Lord Rosse in Ireland was completed in 1847. In this 72-inch telescope, stars of 18th magnitude could be seen. The first spiral nebulae to be revealed was M51 - known today as the Whirlpool Galaxy. The Earl was the first to suggest that these spirals could actually be rotating masses of stars. At the turn of the century, study of observational astronomy was rooted in naked eye observing, study of binary stars and nebula. This was a time when women were becoming interested in the sciences and had begun to play an important role in science and astronomy. It was an incredible inspiration for other women across the country to hear what was happening on the astronomical frontiers at Harvard. Some constellation asterisms used in Francis Jacob's diary were different than they are today. One asterism in particular, the Egyptian Cross, is relatively unknown now. The summer triangle and winter circle asterisms were used in her notes and obviously popular in her era, as today. Her written comments included some Messier catalogue numbers and in some case written on her sketches and diagrams nicknames, such as the 'Dumbbell' nebula. She also referred to M99 as `St. Katherine's Wheel', a nickname that is not in common use today.

  10. Geomagnetic research in the 19th century: a case study of the German contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, W.; Wiederkehr, K.-H.

    2001-10-01

    Even before the discovery of electromagnetism by Oersted, and before the work of Ampère, who attributed all magnetism to the flux of electrical currents, A.v. Humboldt and Hansteen had turned to geomagnetism. Through the ``Göttinger Magnetischer Verein'', a worldwide cooperation under the leadership of Gauss came into existence. Even today, Gauss's theory of geomagnetism is one of the pillars of geomagnetic research. Thereafter, J.v. Lamont, in Munich, took over the leadership in Germany. In England, the Magnetic Crusade was started by the initiative of John Herschel and E. Sabine. At the beginning of the 1840s, James Clarke Ross advanced to the vicinity of the southern magnetic pole on the Antarctic Continent, which was then quite unknown. Ten years later, Sabine was able to demonstrate solar-terrestrial relations from the data of the colonial observatories. In the 1980s, Arthur Schuster, following Balfour Stewart's ideas, succeeded in interpreting the daily variations of the electrical process in the high atmosphere. Geomagnetic research work in Germany was given a fresh impetus by the programme of the First Polar Year 1882-1883. Georg Neumayer, director of the ``Deutsche Seewarte'' in Hamburg, was one of the initiators of the Polar Year. He forged a close cooperation with the newly founded ``Kaiserliches Marineobservatorium'' in Wilhelmshaven, and also managed to gain the collaboration of the ``Gauss-Observatorium für Erdmagnetismus'' in Göttingen under E. Schering. In the Polar Year, the first automatic recording magnetometers (Kew-Model) were used in the German observatory at Wilhelmshaven. Here, M. Eschenhagen, who later became director of the geomagnetic section in the new Meteorological Magnetic Observatory in Potsdam, deserves special credit. Early hypotheses of geomagnetism and pioneering palaeomagnetic experiments are briefly reviewed. The essential seismological investigations at the turn of the 19th to the 20th century are also briefly described as

  11. The Essence of Language Is History: A Theoretical Introduction to the Connection between Social Relations and Language Relations in 19th Century Brussels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Metsenaere, Machteld

    An examination of language use in 19th century Brussels seeks to explain how and why a link between language and social class came into operation. Hypotheses relating the social characteristics (material circumstances and consciousness) of social classes and segments of social classes to various resulting language patterns are proposed. This…

  12. (Re)Constructions of Etymology of the Term "Electricity" in French German and Modern Greek Textbooks of Physics of 18th-19th Centuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patsopoulos, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    The different and contrasting versions of the etymology of the term "electricity" in Modern Greek textbooks of Physics of the 18th and 19th century, which are influenced by French and German textbooks, are not mere (re)constructions that serve the didactic purposes and objectives of their authors. They are (in)directly related to the social and…

  13. American Journalism Historians Association Annual Convention (London, Ontario, Canada, October 3-5, 1996). Part I: Selected Papers Covering the Colonial Period through the 19th Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journalism Historians' Association.

    The 16 papers presented in this collection all deal with journalism and journalists from colonial America through the 19th century. The papers and their authors are: "Fighting for a Continent: Newspaper Coverage of the English and French War for Control of North America, 1754-1760" (David A. Copeland); "A Romance with 'Local'…

  14. The "Abyssal Society". François-Alphonse Forel and the Case of Deep Fauna in Late 19th Century.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Ichthyological investigations and technological advancements, such as the laying of submarine telegraph cables, promoted new dredging methods in the second half of the 19th century. In contrast to the idea of a lifeless deep ocean (Edward Forbes' azoic hypothesis), the discovery of deep water fauna and the challenge of defining its systematics opened up new theoretical perspectives. In this frame, which was already marked by the impact of Darwin's theory, naturalistic surveys in freshwater environments in western Switzerland intertwined with those of oceanographic expeditions. The study of the fauna in the depths of subalpine lakes by the Swiss savant François-Alphonse Forel was one of the most striking examples of this turning point, because the relatively recently evolution of its freshwater fauna allowed him to investigate: (a) the role of isolation, (b) the progressive differentiation of species from a common ancestor, and (c) the constitution of a species-specific category in form transition, from a genealogical viewpoint to an ecological one.

  15. [The midwives of Guadalajara (México) in the 19th century, the plundering of their art].

    PubMed

    Díaz Robles, Laura Catalina; Oropeza Sandoval, Luciano

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the social devaluation of the knowledge and practice used by midwives in their work. The research is limited to historical events that took place during the 19th century in the city of Guadalajara, capital of the state of Jalisco in Mexico. The study shows how the displacement and subordination of these women were associated with the higher social status of physicians. Supported by advances in medicine and by the authority derived from the knowledge acquired through formal educational institutions, doctors started to undermine the value of empirical knowledge and subordinate it to the knowledge that came from these advances. It is shown how doctors detract from and subordinated the midwife to the scientific-employment field of medicine by using a discourse that degraded empirical knowledge and by institutionalizing training courses that tended to ignore the practical know-how of these women and replace it with knowledge derived from scientific medicine. The study is based on information from archives and scientific journals of the time: Archiva Fondos Especiales de la Biblioteca Pública de Jalisco, Archivo Histórico de Jalisco, Archivo Histórico de la Universidad de Guadalajara, Archivo Municipal de Guadalajara and Revista Médica.

  16. [Psychophysical parallelism. On a discursive figure in the field of scientific changes in the late 19th century].

    PubMed

    Wegener, Mai

    2009-01-01

    The article traces the rise and fall of "psychophysical parallelism" - which was the most advanced scientific formulation of the mind / body relationship in the second half of the 19th century - through an interdisciplinary and broad geographical spectrum. It sheds light on the extremely different positions that rallied round this discursive figure, ranging from Fechner, Hering, Mach, Wundt, Bain, Hughlings Jackson, and Taine to Freud and Saussure. The article develops the thesis that the psychophysical parallelism functioned as a 'hot zone' within and a symptom of the changes in the order of sciences at that time. Against that background, the criticism of the psychophysical parallelism which became prominent around 1900 (Stumpf, Busse, Bergson, Mauthner et. al.) indicates the cooling of this 'hot zone' and the establishment of a new order within the scientific disciplines. The article pays particular attention to the position of this figure in contemporaneous language theories. Its basic assumption is that the relationship between the body and the psyche is itself constituted by language.

  17. Digital radiography and historical contextualisation of the 19th century modified human skeletal remains from the Worcester Royal Infirmary, England.

    PubMed

    Western, A G; Bekvalac, J

    2015-09-01

    Recent excavations at the Worcester Royal Infirmary revealed a large assemblage of modified skeletal remains dating to the late 19th century. The assemblage included a sample of 134 long bones, 76 of which were transected and 58 of which displayed evidence of gross pathology without transection. Transection may have been undertaken for the purposes of amputation, anatomical or morbid dissection, for surgical training or specimen preparation. In order to elucidate the motives for such modification, Direct Digital Radiography (DDR) was undertaken on the proximal and distal elements present to confirm the true prevalence of disease. The radiographic evidence revealed that some transected elements exhibited previously unobserved pathological changes. The ratios of proximal to distal elements varied between samples of pathological and non-pathological transected elements, suggesting different motives for modification. There was also a significant difference between the composition of the skeletal sample and that expected from historical records of amputation. Aggressive or acute/subacute as well as chronic stages of disease were observed, some lesions possibly relating to ascending infection following gangrenous limb ischaemia or haematogenous spread. Other rare conditions were detected using DDR, proving it to be a critical tool in the assessment of skeletal disease in the past. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Black Cholera Comes to the Central Valley of America in the 19th Century - 1832, 1849, and Later

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    In mid-19th Century, cholera was epidemic throughout the world. Small towns of the American Midwest were not spared. The disease was blamed on miasmas arising from local causes, so flight from affected localities were logical and common. Flight, added to mortality, caused virtual depopulation of many small towns. Drinking water was drawn from rivers or shallow wells, often near seeping cesspools. Local merchants tried unsuccessfully to calm panic by suppressing information. Cholera was not good for business. Business was depressed. Organized religion thrived. National and state days of prayer were appointed to appease an angry God. During these frightening times, the people learned nothing about the infectiousness of cholera or about its prevention through sanitation. Their experiences tended to reinforce their belief in miasmas or divine retribution. The great epidemics of mankind describe human behavior in times of unavoidable and incurable crisis. Nineteenth Century cholera experiences illustrate a people's reaction to catastrophic disease, which they believed was incurable and unpreventable. PMID:18596846

  19. Contribution of physiologists to the identification of the humoral component of immunity in the 19th century

    PubMed Central

    Lahaie, Yves-Marie

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The history of antimicrobial humoral immunity usually focuses on the works of the German school at the end of the 19th century, born in the tradition of chemistry and disinfection. Starting from an old quarrel of priority about serotherapy between Emil von Behring (1854–1917) and the French physiologists Charles Richet (1850–1935) and Jules Héricourt (1850–1938), we first confirm that the latter stated the principle of serotherapy in 1888 and put it into practice before the seminal Behring's article in 1890, observing several adverse effects of this new immunotherapy. We also find that researchers who can be considered heirs of the French school of Physiology founded by Claude Bernard (1813–1878) also investigated the field of humoral immunity in the 1870–1880s. Maurice Raynaud (1834–1881), Auguste Chauveau (1827–1917), and eventually Charles Richet applied the experimental method of Claude Bernard to the young field of microbiology, illustrating a movement called by Jacques Léonard “physiologization of the pasteurism.” However, the contribution of physiologists in this field started before Louis Pasteur, leading to the conclusion that physiologists and chemists synergistically contributed to the birth of bacteriology and immunology. PMID:28557665

  20. Geomagnetic field intensity variations in Northwestern-Central Russia between the 12th and 19th century AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnaia, N.; Gallet, Y.; Genevey, A.; Antipov, I.; Elshin, D.

    2017-12-01

    We will present a synthesis of the archeointensity data spanning the past millennium that we recently acquired in the European part of Russia. These data were principally obtained from groups of architectural brick fragments sampled in the Novgorod, Moscow and Yaroslavl areas that are precisely dated between the 12th and the 19th century thanks to archives and archeological constraints. All intensity measurements were carried out using the experimental protocol developed for the Triaxe magnetometer. The reliability of the data is attested through the use of stringent selection criteria on the Triaxe data, rock magnetic experiments and by the use of two different cooling rates for laboratory thermoremanent magnetization acquisition. Altogether the new data show a progressive decrease of the geomagnetic field intensities in Northwestern-Central Russia over the past millennium. They do not exhibit large and rapid fluctuations, as those previously reported from the Balkan archeointensity dataset. They further allow us to constrain the dipole moment evolution over the past four centuries. Finally, we will discuss the consistency of the geomagnetic field intensity variations during the second millennium AD at the entire European scale. The research was supported by RSF (project No. 16-17-10097)

  1. The role of political and welfare state characteristics in infant mortality: a comparative study in wealthy countries since the late 19th century.

    PubMed

    Regidor, Enrique; Pascual, Cruz; Martínez, David; Calle, María E; Ortega, Paloma; Astasio, Paloma

    2011-10-01

    A close examination of the literature suggests that the consistent relation between political and welfare state characteristics and infant mortality in the second half of the 20th century in wealthy countries may not be causal. The evolution of infant mortality since the late 19th century was studied in 17 wealthy countries classified according to political traditions, family policy model and period of infant mortality transition. The relation of public health expenditure and income inequality to infant mortality from 1980 to 2005 was also evaluated. The Social Democratic and Scandinavian countries, and those with the earliest transition in infant mortality, had the lowest infant mortality rates until the early 21st century, whereas the late democracies, the Southern European countries, and those in which the transition in infant mortality took place later, had the highest rates until the late 20th century. By the early 21st century, the differences in infant mortality were negligible. Three of the four Scandinavian countries were the first to achieve infant mortality transition, whereas the Southern European countries were the last. The relation between public health expenditure and infant mortality varied depending on the time period in which the analysis was made, and increased income inequality was associated with higher infant mortality. The relation between political and welfare state characteristics and infant mortality in previous studies probably reflects the historical moment in which the transition in infant mortality took place in each country. Methodological limitations do not allow inference of causality in the associations found between welfare state characteristics and infant mortality.

  2. [The new hospital model established at the end of 19th Century and the professional nursing schools].

    PubMed

    Bargoni, A

    2008-04-01

    The historical research in hospitals organisation began in Europe only after the II World War. In particular, studies regarding the nursing in Italy are very scarce and heavily influenced by the fragmented political and organisational management due to the historical divisions within Italy. All the same, the social and working conditions, at least in the north of Italy, were similar in this respect. The workforce up to the beginning of the 20th Century was equally divided between males and females. The female recruitment took place exclusively from the foundlings left in front of the hospital and raised within the hospital walls. The work was very hard with long working hours, under a total subordination to the religious administrators with miserable wage. These conditions remained unchanged until the second half of the 19th Century when, in central Europe, a change in the reorganisation of hospital management occurred, together with a cultural improvement in the nursing profession. This process of reforms had started in England some decades earlier from the reorganisation of nursing made by Florence Nightingale. After Italian post-unification the healthcare field was involved in the tentative to homologate the vast differences in the hospital organisation within the Italian states which also generated tension, bitterness and many political debates. The particular conditions created in the main hospital of Turin in the second half of the 19th Century, together with the political and social climate at the time and the reopening of debates between Socialist, Liberals and Catholics favoured the reorganizational improvement of the San Giovanni Battista hospital. Under this prospective, the foundation of the nursing school came into being, preceded by the intense control of a behavioral and ethical cleaning of the nurses, in particular the males. The availability of the hospital administrations in carrying out the recommendations of the medical staff in the

  3. Two Intense Decades of 19th Century Whaling Precipitated Rapid Decline of Right Whales around New Zealand and East Australia

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Emma L.; Jackson, Jennifer A.; Paton, David; Smith, Tim D.

    2014-01-01

    Right whales (Eubalaena spp.) were the focus of worldwide whaling activities from the 16th to the 20th century. During the first part of the 19th century, the southern right whale (E. australis) was heavily exploited on whaling grounds around New Zealand (NZ) and east Australia (EA). Here we build upon previous estimates of the total catch of NZ and EA right whales by improving and combining estimates from four different fisheries. Two fisheries have previously been considered: shore-based whaling in bays and ship-based whaling offshore. These were both improved by comparison with primary sources and the American offshore whaling catch record was improved by using a sample of logbooks to produce a more accurate catch record in terms of location and species composition. Two fisheries had not been previously integrated into the NZ and EA catch series: ship-based whaling in bays and whaling in the 20th century. To investigate the previously unaddressed problem of offshore whalers operating in bays, we identified a subset of vessels likely to be operating in bays and read available extant logbooks. This allowed us to estimate the total likely catch from bay-whaling by offshore whalers from the number of vessels seasons and whales killed per season: it ranged from 2,989 to 4,652 whales. The revised total estimate of 53,000 to 58,000 southern right whales killed is a considerable increase on the previous estimate of 26,000, partly because it applies fishery-specific estimates of struck and loss rates. Over 80% of kills were taken between 1830 and 1849, indicating a brief and intensive fishery that resulted in the commercial extinction of southern right whales in NZ and EA in just two decades. This conforms to the global trend of increasingly intense and destructive southern right whale fisheries over time. PMID:24690918

  4. James Craufurd Gregory, 19th century Scottish physicians, and the link between occupation as a coal miner and lung disease.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, K; Wallace, W A; Elliot, T A; Henry, C

    2017-09-01

    By the mid-19th century about 200,000 miners were employed in a UK coal mining industry still growing with the advances of the Industrial Revolution. Coal miners were long known to suffer poor health but the link to inhaling dust in the mines had not been made. In 1813 George Pearson was the first to suggest that darkening of lungs seen in normal individuals as they aged was caused by inhaled soot from burning oil, candles and coal, which were the common domestic sources of heat and light. In 1831 Dr James Craufurd Gregory first described black pigmentation and disease in the lungs of a deceased coal miner and linked this to pulmonary accumulation of coal mine dust. Gregory hypothesised that the black material seen at autopsy in the collier's lungs was inhaled coal dust and this was confirmed by chemical analysis carried out by Professor Sir Robert Christison. Gregory suggested that coal dust was the cause of the disease and warned physicians in mining areas to be vigilant for the disease. This first description of what came to be known as 'coal worker's pneumoconiosis' sparked a remarkable intellectual effort by physicians in Scotland, culminating in a large body of published work that led to the first understandings of this disease and its link to coalblackened lungs. This paper sets out the history of the role of Scottish physicians in gaining this understanding of coal worker's pneumoconiosis. It describes Gregory's case and the lung - recently discovered in the pathology collection of the Surgeons' Hall Museums, Edinburgh, where it has lain unnoticed for over 180 years - on which Gregory based his landmark paper.

  5. A chaotic model for the plague epidemic that has occurred in Bombay at the end of the 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiarotti, Sylvain

    2015-04-01

    The plague epidemic that has occurred in Bombay at the end of the 19th century was detected in 1896. One year before, an Advisory Committee had been appointed by the Secretary of State for India, the Royal Society, and the Lister Institute. This Committee made numerous investigations and gathered a large panel of data including the number of people attacked and died from the plague, records of rat and flea populations, as well as meteorological records of temperature and humidity [1]. The global modeling technique [2] aims to obtain low dimensional models able to simulate the observed cycles from time series. As far as we know, this technique has been tried only to one case of epidemiological analysis (the whooping cough infection) based on a discrete formulation [3]. In the present work, the continuous time formulation of this technique is used to analyze the time evolution of the plague epidemic from this data set. One low dimensional model (three variables) is obtained exhibiting a limit cycle of period-5. A chaotic behavior could be derived from this model by tuning the model parameters. It provides a strong argument for a dynamical behavior that can be approximated by low dimensional deterministic equations. This model also provides an empirical argument for chaos in epidemics. [1] Verjbitski D. T., Bannerman W. B. & Kápadiâ R. T., 1908. Reports on Plague Investigations in India (May,1908), The Journal of Hygiene, 8(2), 161 -308. [2] Mangiarotti S., Coudret R., Drapeau L. & Jarlan L., 2012. Polynomial search and Global modelling: two algorithms for modeling chaos. Physical Review E, 86(4), 046205. [3] Boudjema G. & Cazelles B., 2003. Extraction of nonlinear dynamics from short and noisy time series. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals, 12, 2051-2069.

  6. Two intense decades of 19th century whaling precipitated rapid decline of right whales around New Zealand and East Australia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Emma L; Jackson, Jennifer A; Paton, David; Smith, Tim D

    2014-01-01

    Right whales (Eubalaena spp.) were the focus of worldwide whaling activities from the 16th to the 20th century. During the first part of the 19th century, the southern right whale (E. australis) was heavily exploited on whaling grounds around New Zealand (NZ) and east Australia (EA). Here we build upon previous estimates of the total catch of NZ and EA right whales by improving and combining estimates from four different fisheries. Two fisheries have previously been considered: shore-based whaling in bays and ship-based whaling offshore. These were both improved by comparison with primary sources and the American offshore whaling catch record was improved by using a sample of logbooks to produce a more accurate catch record in terms of location and species composition. Two fisheries had not been previously integrated into the NZ and EA catch series: ship-based whaling in bays and whaling in the 20th century. To investigate the previously unaddressed problem of offshore whalers operating in bays, we identified a subset of vessels likely to be operating in bays and read available extant logbooks. This allowed us to estimate the total likely catch from bay-whaling by offshore whalers from the number of vessels seasons and whales killed per season: it ranged from 2,989 to 4,652 whales. The revised total estimate of 53,000 to 58,000 southern right whales killed is a considerable increase on the previous estimate of 26,000, partly because it applies fishery-specific estimates of struck and loss rates. Over 80% of kills were taken between 1830 and 1849, indicating a brief and intensive fishery that resulted in the commercial extinction of southern right whales in NZ and EA in just two decades. This conforms to the global trend of increasingly intense and destructive southern right whale fisheries over time.

  7. Climate of migration? How climate triggered migration from southwest Germany to North America during the 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Rüdiger; Himmelsbach, Iso; Bösmeier, Annette

    2017-11-01

    This paper contributes to the ongoing debate on the extent to which climate and climatic change can have a negative impact on societies by triggering migration, or even contribute to conflict. It summarizes results from the transdisciplinary project Climate of migration (funded 2010-2014), whose innovative title was created by Franz Mauelshagen and Uwe Lübken. The overall goal of this project was to analyze the relation between climatic and socioeconomic parameters and major migration waves from southwest Germany to North America during the 19th century. The article assesses the extent to which climatic conditions triggered these migration waves. The century investigated was in general characterized by the Little Ice Age with three distinct cooling periods, causing major glacier advances in the alpine regions and numerous climatic extremes such as major floods, droughts and severe winter. Societal changes were tremendous, marked by the warfare during the Napoleonic era (until 1815), the abolition of serfdom (1817), the bourgeois revolution (1847/48), economic freedom (1862), the beginning of industrialization accompanied by large-scale rural-urban migration resulting in urban poverty, and finally by the foundation of the German Empire in 1871.

    The presented study is based on quantitative data and a qualitative, information-based discourse analysis. It considers climatic conditions as well as socioeconomic and political issues, leading to the hypothesis of a chain of effects ranging from unfavorable climatic conditions to a decrease in crop yields to rising cereal prices and finally to emigration. These circumstances were investigated extensively for the peak emigration years identified with each migration wave. Furthermore, the long-term relations between emigration and the prevailing climatic conditions, crop yields and cereal prices were statistically evaluated with a sequence of linear models which were significant with explanatory power

  8. Paleontology and Darwin's Theory of Evolution: The Subversive Role of Statistics at the End of the 19th Century.

    PubMed

    Tamborini, Marco

    2015-11-01

    This paper examines the subversive role of statistics paleontology at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries. In particular, I will focus on German paleontology and its relationship with statistics. I argue that in paleontology, the quantitative method was questioned and strongly limited by the first decade of the 20th century because, as its opponents noted, when the fossil record is treated statistically, it was found to generate results openly in conflict with the Darwinian theory of evolution. Essentially, statistics questions the gradual mode of evolution and the role of natural selection. The main objections to statistics were addressed during the meetings at the Kaiserlich-Königliche Geologische Reichsanstalt in Vienna in the 1880s. After having introduced the statistical treatment of the fossil record, I will use the works of Charles Léo Lesquereux (1806-1889), Joachim Barrande (1799-1833), and Henry Shaler Williams (1847-1918) to compare the objections raised in Vienna with how the statistical treatment of the data worked in practice. Furthermore, I will discuss the criticisms of Melchior Neumayr (1845-1890), one of the leading German opponents of statistical paleontology, to show why, and to what extent, statistics were questioned in Vienna. The final part of this paper considers what paleontologists can derive from a statistical notion of data: the necessity of opening a discussion about the completeness and nature of the paleontological data. The Vienna discussion about which method paleontologists should follow offers an interesting case study in order to understand the epistemic tensions within paleontology surrounding Darwin's theory as well as the variety of non-Darwinian alternatives that emerged from the statistical treatment of the fossil record at the end of the 19th century.

  9. Girl in the Looking Glass: A Historical Study of the Life of a Deaf Teacher in 19th-Century Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Noel

    2017-01-01

    The author explicates the life story of Anne Smyth, a deaf teacher in 19th-century Ireland. The story was written and published in 1858 by another deaf teacher, Charlotte Mary Kelly, who traced Anne Smyth's life trajectory from her birth to the day she began life in a deaf school until her untimely death at the age of 18 years. The study examines…

  10. Policy Commercializing Nonprofits in Health: The History of a Paradox From the 19th Century to the ACA

    PubMed Central

    FOX, DANIEL M

    2015-01-01

    growth and commercialization of nonprofits in the health sector since the late 19th century remains influential in health policy, especially for the allocation of resources. However, aspects of the implementation of the ACA may constrain some of the effects of the paradox. PMID:25752354

  11. Policy commercializing nonprofits in health: the history of a paradox from the 19th century to the ACA.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel M

    2015-03-01

    the health sector since the late 19th century remains influential in health policy, especially for the allocation of resources. However, aspects of the implementation of the ACA may constrain some of the effects of the paradox. © 2015 Milbank Memorial Fund.

  12. [The Changing Value of Mother's Milk. Feeding Premature and Sick Newborns Since the Late 19th Century].

    PubMed

    Sunder-Plaßmann, A

    2016-12-01

    In the 1960s/early 70s there was a widespread conviction in West Germany that mother's milk was no longer essential even for premature infants given the availability of improved industrial milk products. But today the superiority of human milk is again undisputed, and progress in neonatology has created a growing target group of extremely premature infants who show clear benefits from being fed with human milk, particularly regarding improved outcomes. Currently there is a revival of donor milk banks (FMB). Globally there are around 500, 15 in Germany. Until the 1960s, mother's milk was the preferred means of German pediatricians to counter infant mortality. During the German Empire and the Weimar Republic doctors widely recommended nursing and engaged wet nurses to meet the demand for human milk and the first donor milk banks were set up; during the Nazi regime there were dozens. The GDR continued using donor milk, while FRG milk banks were shut down in the 70s. The history of milk banks has been shaped not only by science, but also by culture, politics and economics. In the German Empire and the Weimar Republic, social, national and eugenic considerations became intertwined in the struggle against infant mortality. In Nazi Germany human milk was used to strengthen the "German Volksgemeinschaft" ("community of the German people"), particularly individuals who were considered as "erbgesund" ("hereditarily healthy"). Massive advertising of the baby food industry in the West and public debate about pollutants and HIV/AIDS increased doubts about the advantages of natural feeding. In East Germany the planned economy, state health system and censored media significantly contributed to the survival of milk banks. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. The evolution of anatomical illustration and wax modelling in Italy from the 16th to early 19th centuries

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Alessandro; Conti, Gabriele; Solinas, Paola; Loy, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Although the contribution to anatomical illustration by Vesalius and his followers has received much attention, less credit has been given to Veslingius and particularly Fabricius. By 1600, Fabricius had amassed more than 300 paintings that together made the Tabulae Pictae, a great atlas of anatomy that was highly admired by his contemporaries. Many of his new observations were incorporated into subsequent books, including those by Casserius, Spighelius, Harvey and Veslingius. Also of importance were the Tabulae by Eustachius (1552), which, although only published in 1714, greatly influenced anatomical wax modelling. In 1742, Pope Benedict XIV established a Museum of Anatomy in Bologna, entrusting to Ercole Lelli the creation of several anatomical preparations in wax. Felice Fontana realised that the production of a large number of models by the casting method would make cadaveric specimens superfluous for anatomical teaching and in 1771 he asked the Grand Duke to fund a wax-modelling workshop in Florence as part of the Natural History Museum, later known as La Specola. Fontana engaged Giuseppe Ferrini as his first modeller and then the 19-year-old Clemente Susini who, by his death in 1814, had superintended the production of, or personally made, more than 2000 models. In 1780, the Austrian Emperor Joseph II visited La Specola and ordered a great number of models for his Josephinum museum; these were made by Fontana with the help of Clemente Susini and supervised by the anatomist Paolo Mascagni. It is, however, in Cagliari that some of Susini’s greatest waxes are to be found. These were made when he was free of Fontana’s influence and were based on dissections made by Francesco Antonio Boi (University of Cagliari). Their distinctive anatomical features include the emphasis given to nerves and the absence of lymphatics in the brain, a mistake made on earlier waxes. The refined technical perfection of the anatomical details demonstrates the closeness of the cooperation between Susini and Boi, whereas the expressiveness of the faces and the harmony of colours make the models of Cagliari masterpieces of figurative art. PMID:19900181

  14. [Cathedrals to sciences or temples of knowledge? The museums of natural sciences of Cordoba, Argentina, by the end of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Tognetti, L

    2001-01-01

    The museums of Botany, Mineralogy and Zoology of the Facultad de Ciencias Físico-Matemáticas were created along with a world wide phenomenon, defined by some authors as the "museum movement," in a time the basics of this movement were being restructured. Thus, this work intends to go over the building stage of the natural history museums in a peripheral domain --- Cordoba by the end of the 19th century --- in order to partially understand this transition process. The strategy is to analyze the collections and find out how and why they were gathered. Two other aspects are also relevant: the human resources and the funds these institutions were granted.

  15. Dilemmas of 19th-century Liberalism among German Academic Chemists: Shaping a National Science Policy from Hofmann to Fischer, 1865-1919.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeffrey Allan

    2015-04-01

    This paper's primary goal is to compare the personalities, values, and influence of August Wilhelm Hofmann and Emil Fischer as exemplars and acknowledged leaders of successive generations of the German chemical profession and as scientists sharing a 19th-century liberal, internationalist outlook from the German wars of unification in the 1860s to Fischer's death in 1919 in the aftermath of German defeat in World War I. The paper will consider the influence of Hofmann and Fischer on the shaping of national scientific institutions in Germany, from founding of the German Chemical Society in 1867 to the first institutes of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society founded in 1911, their academic leadership in other areas including the shaping of a successful academic-industrial symbiosis in organic chemistry, and finally their response to war as a force disruptive of scientific internationalism. All of these developments posed serious dilemmas, exacerbated by emerging strains of nationalism and anti-Semitism in German society. Whereas Hofmann's lifework came to a relatively successful end in 1892, Fischer was not so fortunate, as the war brought him heavy responsibilities and terrible personal losses, but with no German victory and no peace of reconciliation--a bleak end for Fischer and the 19th-century liberal ideals that had inspired him.

  16. Finnish wallpaper pigments in the 18th-19th century: Presence of KFe3(CrO4)2(OH)6 and odd pigment mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Kepa; Knuutinen, Ulla; Vallejuelo, Silvia Fdez-Ortiz de; Irazola, Mireia; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Several Finish wallpapers from the 18th and 19th century were analysed by using Raman spectroscopy assisted with EDXRF instrumentation, in an attempt of determine the pigments used in their manufacture process as well as of trying to date some of the samples through pigment composition. All pigments present in samples were determined and surprisingly the unusual and strange iron (III) chromate yellow pigment was found. Besides, unusual mixtures were found to obtain fashionable colours, especially in blue and green areas, where more than one blue pigments were mixed with green and yellow pigments. Blue verditer, ultramarine blue, Prussian blue, chrome yellow, calcite, lead white, red and yellow iron oxide, gypsum and carbon black were identified. The presence of the risky and poisonous emerald green must be highlighted. The results were compared with those found in other wallpapers from Spain and France.

  17. J. M. Despréaux' lichens from the Canary Islands and West Africa: an account of a 19th century collection found in an English archive.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Hudson, Begoña; Whitworth, Isabella; Spooner, Brian M

    2011-01-01

    This is an historical and descriptive account of 28 herbarium specimens, 27 lichens and an alga, found in the archives of Charles Chalcraft, a descendant of the Bedford family, who were dye manufacturers in Leeds, England, in the 19th century. The lichens comprise 13 different morphotypes collected in the Canary Islands and West Africa by the French botanist J. M. Despréaux between 1833 and 1839. The collections include samples of "Roccella fuciformis", "R. phycopsis" and "R. tinctoria" (including the fertile morphotype "R. canariensis"), "Ramalina crispatula" and "R. cupularis", two distinct morphotypes of "Sticta", "S. canariensis" and "S. dufouri", "Physconia enteroxantha", "Pseudevernia furfuracea var. ceratea" and "Pseudocyphellaria argyracea". The herbarium also includes authentic material of "Parmotrema tinctorum" and a probable syntype of "Seirophora scorigena". Most of these species are known as a source of the purple dye orchil, which was used to dye silk and wool.

  18. Recovery of Degraded-Beyond-Recognition 19th Century Daguerreotypes with Rapid High Dynamic Range Elemental X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Mercury L Emission.

    PubMed

    Kozachuk, Madalena S; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Martin, Ronald R; Nelson, Andrew J; Coulthard, Ian; McElhone, John P

    2018-06-22

    A daguerreotype image, the first commercialized photographic process, is composed of silver-mercury, and often silver-mercury-gold amalgam particles on the surface of a silver-coated copper plate. Specular and diffuse reflectance of light from these image particles produces the range of gray tones that typify these 19 th century images. By mapping the mercury distribution with rapid-scanning, synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) imaging, full portraits, which to the naked eye are obscured entirely by extensive corrosion, can be retrieved in a non-invasive, non-contact, and non-destructive manner. This work furthers the chemical understanding regarding the production of these images and suggests that mercury is retained in the image particles despite surface degradation. Most importantly, μ-XRF imaging provides curators with an image recovery method for degraded daguerreotypes, even if the artifact's condition is beyond traditional conservation treatments.

  19. Roots of Physical Medicine, Physical Therapy, and Mechanotherapy in the Netherlands in the 19th Century: A Disputed Area within the Healthcare Domain

    PubMed Central

    Terlouw, Thomas J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Physical medicine, which in the context of this article includes mechanotherapy, hydrotherapy, balneotherapy, electrotherapy, light therapy, air therapy, and thermotherapy, became a new field of labor in the healthcare domain in the Netherlands around 1900. This article gives an account of the introduction and development of mechanotherapy as a professional activity in the Netherlands in the 19th century. Mechanotherapy, which historically included exercises, manipulations, and massage, was introduced in this country around 1840 and became one of the core elements of physical medicine towards the end of that century. In contrast to what one might expect, mostly physical education teachers, referred to as “heilgymnasts,” dedicated themselves to this kind of treatment, whereas only a few physicians were active in this field until the 1880s. When, in the last quarter of the 19th century, differentiation and specialization within the medical profession took place, physicians specializing in physical medicine and orthopaedics began to claim the field of mechanotherapy exclusively for themselves. This led to tensions between them and the group of heilgymnasts that had already been active in this field for decades. The focus of attention in this article is on interprofessional relationships, on the roles played by the different professional organizations in the fields of physical education and medicine, the local and national governments, and the judicial system, and on the social, political, and cultural circumstances under which developments in the field of mechanotherapy took place. The article concludes with the hypothesis that the intra- and inter-occupational rivalries discussed have had a negative impact on the academic development of physical medicine, orthopaedics, and heilgymnastics/physical therapy in the Netherlands in the first half of the 20th century. PMID:19066646

  20. [Records of the invisible: Visa reperta in 18th- and 19th-century forensic medicine and their role as promoters of pathological-anatomical knowledge].

    PubMed

    Müller, Irmgard; Fangerau, Heiner

    2010-01-01

    Case reports in medicine serve as a tool to collect and to transfer knowledge. A special kind of case report in forensic medicine during the 18th and 19th centuries was the so-called Visum repertum. This format of note-taking and of rendering an expert opinion without presuppositions has rarely investigated in the history of medicine. Analyzing Visa reperta the authors argue that due to their special structure and mode of representation Visa reperta not only shaped the practice of forensic medicine but also the standardized examination and documentation in pathological anatomy. Based on previous studies on medical case reports, medical expert witnesses in court and traditions in pathological anatomy the authors examine two examples from the 18th and 19th centuries in order to show how semiological, classifying methods of presenting forensic examinations were replaced by the material aspect of the observation of examination results itself. The examples are a forensic case report by Michael Alberti (1682-1757) from 1728 and a Visum repertum by Joseph Bernt (1770-1842) from 1827. The authors argue that Visa reperta transcended their original forensic purpose and served as a guideline for pathology leading to an understanding of the origin of diseases in organs. They served as a promoter of scientific medicine, and their persuasiveness was backed by factors such as (a) the extreme conditions of forensic practice, (b) the claim to act as a tool for the sound and precise recording of facts and c) the awareness that they documented objects that were destroyed during the process of documentation.

  1. Genetic structure of Flores island (Azores, Portugal) in the 19th century and in the present day: evidence from surname analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cristina; Abade, Augusto; Cantons, Jordi; Mayer, Francine M; Aluja, M Pilar; Lima, Manuela

    2005-06-01

    The island of Flores is the most westerly of the Azores archipelago (Portugal). Despite its marked geographic isolation and reduced population size, biodemographic and genetic studies conducted so far do not support the idea that its population constitutes a genetic isolate. In this study we conducted a surname analysis of the Flores population for two time periods: the second half of the 19th century and the present day. Our main purposes were (1) to biodemographically and genetically characterize the island, taking into account the strong reduction in population observed from the middle of the 19th century to the present day; and (2) to analyze the influence that the effective population size and geographic distance have on the genetic structure of populations. For both periods analyzed, all indicators of diversity revealed a high level of surname diversity. Our results are in accordance with the diversity estimates obtained from both monoparental genetic markers located in the Y chromosome and frequencies of mtDNA haplogroups. Contrary to what could be expected, considering the strong reduction of population in the last 150 years, we observed that diversity was maintained and that microdifferentiation decreased. Both observations support a higher openness of parishes as a consequence of the increase in communication routes. From the first to the second period analyzed, a change in surname composition is evident, although the more frequent surnames in Flores are almost the same for both periods and some of them are reported to be surnames present in the first settlers of Flores. This result testifies to the impact of founders on the present-day gene pool of Flores island and allows us to infer that the genetic characterization of the present-day population of Flores could provide reliable information about the history of the peopling of the Azores.

  2. Changes in the utilization of wild green vegetables in Poland since the 19th century: a comparison of four ethnobotanical surveys.

    PubMed

    Luczaj, Lukasz

    2010-03-24

    The aim of this paper is to compare the presence of wild green vegetables in four ethnobotanical questionnaires. This range of surveys offers a rich diachronic perspective, possibly unique in ethnobotany. Four archival questionnaires (by other researchers), whose results have been only partly published, were analyzed. They are Rostafiński's questionnaire of 1883-1909, the Gajek team's questionnaires of 1948-1949 and 1964-1969, and Stolicná and Kłodnicki's questionnaire of 2000-2003. Green shoots or leaves of least 58 species (belonging to 43 genera) of wild plants have been used as green vegetables or culinary herbs for nutritional purposes since the 19th century. The disappearance of wild green vegetables from the Polish diet was a gradual process, in which the sequence of disappearance of the species from diet was as follows: (1) Aegopodium & Heracleum, (2) Cirsium, Sinapis & Raphanus, (3) Urtica, (4) Chenopodium, (5) Oxalis, (6) Rumex. In Poland, within the studied time scale, there was no tradition of incorporating more than a few species of wild greens in one dish. Local people usually utilized a small number of taxa, but in large quantities, resorting to some other available species only in times of famine. The relatively low number of wild green vegetables utilized has gradually decreased to practically none, mainly due to replacement by a few cultivated vegetables. This process must have started well before the 19th century, but became most dramatic throughout the 20th century. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Traces of blood. The significance of blood in criminology at the turn of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Bachhiesl, Christian

    2010-03-01

    In late 19th and early 20th century, criminology became institutionalized as an independent branch of science. Methodologically it focused on the 'exact' methods of the natural sciences, but also it tried to integrate the methods of the humanities. This mix of methods becomes visible in the treatment of blood, which on the one hand was an object of then brand new methods of scientific analysis (identification of human blood by the biological or precipitin method), and on the other hand was analyzed as a product of the magic and superstitious mentalities of criminals. The methodical tension resulting from this epistemological crossbreeding did not disturb the criminologists, for whom the reconciliation of opposite ways of thinking and researching seemed to be possible. In this encyclopaedic analysis of blood early criminology tried to combine the anthropological exploration of vampirism with the chemical and microscopic detection of antibodies and haemoglobin, thus mirroring the positivistic optimism that was then prevalent.

  4. Mapping the Elephants of the 19th Century East African Ivory Trade with a Multi-Isotope Approach.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Ashley N; Lee-Thorp, Julia; Collins, Matthew J; Lane, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    East African elephants have been hunted for their ivory for millennia but the nineteenth century witnessed strongly escalating demand from Europe and North America. It has been suggested that one consequence was that by the 1880s elephant herds along the coast had become scarce, and to meet demand, trade caravans trekked farther into interior regions of East Africa, extending the extraction frontier. The steady decimation of elephant populations coupled with the extension of trade networks have also been claimed to have triggered significant ecological and socio-economic changes that left lasting legacies across the region. To explore the feasibility of using an isotopic approach to uncover a 'moving frontier' of elephant extraction, we constructed a baseline isotope data set (δ13C, δ15N, δ18O and 87Sr/86Sr) for historic East African elephants known to have come from three distinct regions (coastal, Rift Valley, and inland Lakes). Using the isotope results with other climate data and geographical mapping tools, it was possible to characterise elephants from different habitats across the region. This baseline data set was then used to provenance elephant ivory of unknown geographical provenance that was exported from East Africa during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to determine its likely origin. This produced a better understanding of historic elephant geography in the region, and the data have the potential to be used to provenance older archaeological ivories, and to inform contemporary elephant conservation strategies.

  5. Mapping the Elephants of the 19th Century East African Ivory Trade with a Multi-Isotope Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Thorp, Julia; Collins, Matthew J.; Lane, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    East African elephants have been hunted for their ivory for millennia but the nineteenth century witnessed strongly escalating demand from Europe and North America. It has been suggested that one consequence was that by the 1880s elephant herds along the coast had become scarce, and to meet demand, trade caravans trekked farther into interior regions of East Africa, extending the extraction frontier. The steady decimation of elephant populations coupled with the extension of trade networks have also been claimed to have triggered significant ecological and socio-economic changes that left lasting legacies across the region. To explore the feasibility of using an isotopic approach to uncover a ‘moving frontier’ of elephant extraction, we constructed a baseline isotope data set (δ13C, δ15N, δ18O and 87Sr/86Sr) for historic East African elephants known to have come from three distinct regions (coastal, Rift Valley, and inland Lakes). Using the isotope results with other climate data and geographical mapping tools, it was possible to characterise elephants from different habitats across the region. This baseline data set was then used to provenance elephant ivory of unknown geographical provenance that was exported from East Africa during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to determine its likely origin. This produced a better understanding of historic elephant geography in the region, and the data have the potential to be used to provenance older archaeological ivories, and to inform contemporary elephant conservation strategies. PMID:27760152

  6. From the Island of the Blue Dolphins: A unique 19th century cache feature from San Nicolas Island, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erlandson, Jon M.; Thomas-Barnett, Lisa; Vellanoweth, René L.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Muhs, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    A cache feature salvaged from an eroding sea cliff on San Nicolas Island produced two redwood boxes containing more than 200 artifacts of Nicoleño, Native Alaskan, and Euro-American origin. Outside the boxes were four asphaltum-coated baskets, abalone shells, a sandstone dish, and a hafted stone knife. The boxes, made from split redwood planks, contained a variety of artifacts and numerous unmodified bones and teeth from marine mammals, fish, birds, and large land mammals. Nicoleño-style artifacts include 11 knives with redwood handles and stone blades, stone projectile points, steatite ornaments and effigies, a carved stone pipe, abraders and burnishing stones, bird bone whistles, bone and shell pendants, abalone shell dishes, and two unusual barbed shell fishhooks. Artifacts of Native Alaskan style include four bone toggling harpoons, two unilaterally barbed bone harpoon heads, bone harpoon fore-shafts, a ground slate blade, and an adze blade. Objects of Euro-American origin or materials include a brass button, metal harpoon blades, and ten flaked glass bifaces. The contents of the cache feature, dating to the early-to-mid nineteenth century, provide an extraordinary window on a time of European expansion and global economic development that created unique cultural interactions and social transformations.

  7. From sermons in stone to studies in science: The transformation of 19th-century juvenile natural history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, Jon-Paul Charles

    This dissertation seeks to explain the social, cultural, and economic factors that transformed the ways nineteenth-century American children learned about, encountered, and understood the natural world. It highlights the interests, tastes, and fears of the middle-class as key factors in the transformation of children's relationship to nature. Developments such as the quest for gentility and refinement, the evolution of religious practices and beliefs, the print revolution, the popularity of Romanticism, the marginalization of women, the rise of professionalization, the impact of industrialization, and the growth of cities all helped shape nineteenth-century children's relationship to nature. For much of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries adults had taught children to see nature as a world of wonders in which God acted out his Providential design. During the early republic, however, Americans, especially women, increasingly valued more refined and genteel interpretations of nature that invoked discrete segments of nature for their ability to cultivate morals, evidence the existence of God, and mold children's behavior. The print revolution that swept America during this period abetted this process. During the second quarter of the nineteenth century, increasing numbers of adults began to use religious publications, schoolbooks, literature, and domestic amusements to involve children with the natural world in ways that were variously religious or Romantic. As a result nature became an accepted and valued segment of middle-class life. Ironically, however, these efforts also helped separate religious from secular interpretations of nature, and changes in fashions, literary techniques, and parenting techniques allowed children more autonomy to interpret nature as they wished. In the last half of the nineteenth century, adults continued to rely on nature as a means of training up children in the ways they should go. Writers, teachers, and reformers increasingly

  8. The hydroclimatology of UK droughts: evidence from newly recovered and reconstructed datasets from the late 19th century to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. A.; Hannaford, J.; Bloomfield, J.; McCarthy, M.; Parry, S.; Barker, L. J.; Svensson, C.; Tanguy, M.; Marchant, B.; McKenzie, A.; Legg, T.; Prudhomme, C.

    2017-12-01

    While the UK is regarded as a wet country, it has periodically suffered from major droughts which have caused serious environmental and societal impacts. Parts of the UK are water stressed and, in a warming world, changes to supply/demand balances could have major implications. There is a pressing need for improved tools for drought risk assessment, which is contingent on a proper understanding of past occurrence of droughts. However, our understanding of hydrological drought occurrence is grounded in the post-1960 period when most UK river flow and groundwater records commenced. As such, water resources planners would benefit from a more thorough assessment of historical drought characteristics and their variability. The multi-disciplinary `Historic Droughts' project thus aims to rigorously characterise droughts in the UK back to the 1890s to inform improved drought management. The foundation of this is a comprehensive characterisation of the hydroclimatology of UK droughts. Here, we present the results of this initiative, based on a hydrological reconstruction campaign of unparalleled scope and detail. Driven by rainfall and potential evapotranspiration data, extended in time using newly recovered observational records, hydro(geo)logical models are used to reconstruct, back to 1890, river flows for >300 catchments across the UK, and groundwater levels from >50 boreholes. The reconstructions are derived within a state-of-the-art modelling framework which allows a comprehensive assessment of uncertainty. A suite of indicators are then applied to these datasets to identify and characterise drought events, integrating precipitation, evapotranspiration, streamflow and groundwater. The work provides new insights into the spatial and temporal dynamics of hitherto poorly quantified late 19th and early 20th century droughts. Similarly, the assessment of temporal variability of drought characteristics benefits from the long timescale of the reconstructions, in turn

  9. The role of vertical land movements on late 19th century sea level rise at Cuxhaven, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehüser, Sebastian; Jensen, Jürgen; Wahl, Thomas; Dangendorf, Sönke; Hofstede, Jacobus

    2015-04-01

    Tide gauges, located along the world's coastlines, represent one of the most important data sources with information about sea level change back into the 17th century, bridging the gap between paleo proxies and modern remote sensing data sources. While the worldwide coverage of tide gauges has increased considerably since the mid-20th century, there are only a few gauges available providing information about regional sea level changes before 1900. Furthermore, these tide gauge measurements are often contaminated by local vertical land movements (VLM) resulting from tectonic processes or local anthropogenic interventions. Such non-climatic effects need to be removed from the raw data to uncover climate signals, which are important, for instance, for answering the question whether and when sea level started to accelerate from the nearly constant rates over the past 2000 years. Here we focus on one of these long tide gauge records: Cuxhaven, which is located in the German Bight and provides uninterrupted digital time series of tidal high and low water levels since 1843. The record has been extensively studied during the past decades with respect to regional and global sea level rise. However, a question that still remains is the role of local subsidence before 1900 at the lighthouse of Cuxhaven, located close to the tide gauge. In 1855 Lentz installed a granite height mark at the lighthouse, which was later used as a proxy for VLMs of the tide gauge itself. The height of the control mark was derived by a levelling between Hamburg and Cuxhaven. These levellings were repeated five times between 1855 and 1900 and later evaluated by Siefert and Lassen (1985) with respect to the role of local subsidence. Based on a linear regression of individual levellings Siefert and Lassen (1985) concluded that the lighthouse subsided by an average rate of 2.8 mm/yr (1855-1875: 4.2 mm/yr; 1876-1890: 2 mm/yr; 1890-1900: 1.2 mm/yr). However, due to the massive uncertainties of these early

  10. "Do Not Turn a Deaf Ear or a Blind Eye on Me, as I Am Your Son": New Conceptions of Childhood and Parenthood in 18th- and 19th-Century Jewish Letter-Writing Manuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogman, Tal

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the cultural functions of Hebrew letter-writing manuals published in German-speaking countries in the 18th and 19th centuries, aimed at young people. I argue that these books, which were used frequently as textbooks for studying Hebrew writing, conveyed modern ideological values and at the same time corresponded to the…

  11. Stable C and N isotope analysis of hair suggest undernourishment as a factor in the death of a mummified girl from late 19th century San Francisco, CA.

    PubMed

    Eerkens, Jelmer W; Hull, Bryna; Goodman, Jena; Evoy, Angela; Kapp, Joshua D; Hussain, Sidra; Green, Richard E

    2017-01-01

    The chance discovery of a 1.5-3.5 years old mummified girl presents a unique opportunity to further our understanding of health and disease among children in 19th Century San Francisco. This study focuses on carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures in serial samples of hair that cover the last 14 months of her life. Results suggest an initial omnivorous diet with little input from marine resources or C4 plants. Around six months before death δ15N starts a steady increase, with a noticeable acceleration just two months before she died. The magnitude of δ15N change, +1.5‰ in total, is consistent with severe undernourishment or starvation. Cemetery records from this time period in San Francisco indicate high rates of infant and child mortality, mainly due to bacterial-borne infectious diseases, about two orders of magnitude higher than today. Taken together, we hypothesize that the girl died after a prolonged battle with such an illness. Results highlight the tremendous impacts that modern sanitation and medicine have had since the 1800s on human health and lifespan in the United States.

  12. [An anatomical wax of the deep structures of the pelvic limb (by Tramond, 19th century): observation of the tridimensional photographic rotation].

    PubMed

    Cazenoves, A; Le Floch-Prigent, P

    2011-06-01

    Anatomical wax modelling was widely used during the 19(th) century, especially in France and Italy. In Paris, The Tramond house was specialized in the realization of this kind of samples. The sample was placed on two large horizontal marble disks, rotating every 5°. We could then describe the sample, verify its anatomical accuracy and also perform a virtual reconstruction with Quick Time Reality QTVR(®) software. The muscular, nervous and arterial elements were represented. We divided the description in three parts: (1) lumbar, pelvic and femoral; (2) femoro-tibial; and (3) tibio-tarsian. We focused the anatomical description on the sciatic nerve; on the organization of the muscles of the gluteal region and the neurovascular organization; and on arterial segmentation. This sample was getting damaged with time, noticeably the representation of the nerves, which are very thin and so, very fragile. Nowadays, 3D representation of the dissected human body is more common, with new techniques such as plastination (Von Hagen's type), which allows one to preserve all the anatomical elements of the subject. This paper and the realization of the virtual museum also aim to participate in a work memory, which recognize the knowledge of the anatomist of wax makers, their teaching quality remained unequalled as their obvious artistical value. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of 19th century ceramic fragments excavated from Pirenópolis (Goiás, Brazil) using FT-IR, Raman, XRF and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Renato P.; Coelho, Filipe A.; Felix, Valter S.; Pereira, Marcelo O.; de Souza, Marcos André Torres; Anjos, Marcelino J.

    2018-03-01

    This study used Raman, FT-IR and XRF spectroscopy and SEM to analyze ceramic fragments dating from the 19th century, excavated from an old farm in the municipality of Pirenópolis, Goiás, Brazil. The results show that the samples were produced in an open oven at a firing temperature below 500 °C, using raw materials including kaolinite, hematite, magnetite, quartz, microcline, albite, anhydrite, calcite, illite, orthoclase and MnO2. Although the analyses showed similarities in the manufacturing process and the presence of many minerals was common in all samples, multivariate statistical methods (PCA) allowed a more detailed assessment of similarities and differences in the mineral composition of the samples. The results of the PCA showed that the samples excavated in one of the slave quarters (senzalas) group with those excavated at the farmhouse, where the landowner lived, which indicates a paternalistic attitude towards captives, including the sharing of ceramic materials of everyday use.

  14. A demographic transition altered the strength of selection for fitness and age-specific survival and fertility in a 19th century American population

    PubMed Central

    Moorad, Jacob A.

    2012-01-01

    Modernization has increased longevity and decreased fertility in many human populations, but it is not well understood how or to what extent these demographic transitions have altered patterns of natural selection. I integrate individual-based multivariate phenotypic selection approaches with evolutionary demographic methods to demonstrate how a demographic transition in 19th century female populations of Utah altered relationships between fitness and age-specific survival and fertility. Coincident with this demographic transition, natural selection for fitness, as measured by the opportunity for selection, increased by 13–20% over 65 years. Proportional contributions of age-specific survival to total selection (the complement to age-specific fertility) diminished from approximately 1/3 to 1/7 following a marked increase in infant survival. Despite dramatic reductions in age-specific fertility variance at all ages, the absolute magnitude of selection for fitness explained by age-specific fertility increased by approximately 45%. I show that increases in the adaptive potential of fertility traits followed directly from decreased population growth rates. These results suggest that this demographic transition has increased the adaptive potential of the Utah population, intensified selection on reproductive traits, and de-emphasized selection on survival-related traits. PMID:23730757

  15. Understanding Edward Muybridge: historical review of behavioral alterations after a 19th-century head injury and their multifactorial influence on human life and culture.

    PubMed

    Manjila, Sunil; Singh, Gagandeep; Alkhachroum, Ayham M; Ramos-Estebanez, Ciro

    2015-07-01

    Edward Muybridge was an Anglo-American photographer, well known for his pioneering contributions in photography and his invention of the "zoopraxiscope," a forerunner of motion pictures. However, this 19th-century genius, with two original patents in photographic technology, made outstanding contributions in art and neurology alike, the latter being seldom acknowledged. A head injury that he sustained changed his behavior and artistic expression. The shift of his interests from animal motion photography to human locomotion and gait remains a pivotal milestone in our understanding of patterns in biomechanics and clinical neurology, while his own behavioral patterns, owing to an injury to the orbitofrontal cortex, remain a mystery even for cognitive neurologists. The behavioral changes he exhibited and the legal conundrum that followed, including a murder of which he was acquitted, all depict the complexities of his personality and impact of frontal lobe injuries. This article highlights the life journey of Muybridge, drawing parallels with Phineas Gage, whose penetrating head injury has been studied widely. The wide sojourn of Muybridge also illustrates the strong connections that he maintained with Stanford and Pennsylvania universities, which were later considered pinnacles of higher education on the two coasts of the United States.

  16. English Translations Of The First Clinical Reports On Narcolepsy And Cataplexy By Westphal And Gélineau In The Late 19th Century, With Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Carlos H.; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: To publish the first English translations, with commentary, of the original reports describing narcolepsy and cataplexy by Westphal in German (1877) and by Gélineau in French (1880). Methods: A professional translation service translated the 2 reports from either German or French to English, with each translation then being slightly edited by one of the authors. All authors then provided commentary. Results: Both Westphal and Gélineau correctly identified and described the new clinical entities of cataplexy and narcolepsy, with recurrent, self-limited sleep attacks and/or cataplectic attacks affecting 2 otherwise healthy people. Narcolepsy was named by Gélineau (and cataplexy was named by Henneberg in 1916). The evidence in both cases is sufficiently convincing to conclude that they were likely each HLA-DQB1*0602 positive and hypocretin deficient. Conclusions: The original descriptions of narcolepsy and cataplexy are now available in English, allowing for extensive clinical and historical commentary. Citations: Schenck CH; Bassetti CL; Arnulf I et al. English translations of the first clinical reports on narcolepsy and cataplexy by Westphal and Gélineau in the late 19th century, with commentary. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(3):301–311 PMID:17561602

  17. By their words ye shall know them: Evidence of genetic selection against general intelligence and concurrent environmental enrichment in vocabulary usage since the mid 19th century

    PubMed Central

    Menie, Michael A. Woodley of; Fernandes, Heitor B. F.; José Figueredo, Aurelio; Meisenberg, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    It has been theorized that declines in general intelligence (g) due to genetic selection stemming from the inverse association between completed fertility and IQ and the Flynn effect co-occur, with the effects of the latter being concentrated on less heritable non-g sources of intelligence variance. Evidence for this comes from the observation that 19th century populations were more intellectually productive, and also exhibited faster simple reaction times than modern ones, suggesting greater information-processing ability and therefore higher g. This co-occurrence model is tested via examination of historical changes in the utilization frequencies of words from the highly g-loaded WORDSUM test across 5.9 million texts spanning the period 1850–2005. Consistent with predictions, words with higher difficulties (δ parameters from Item Response Theory) and stronger negative correlations between pass rates and completed fertility declined in use over time whereas less difficult and less strongly selected words, increased in use over time, consistent with a Flynn effect stemming in part from the vocabulary enriching effects of increases in population literacy. These findings persisted when explicitly controlled for word age, changing literacy rates and temporal autocorrelation. These trends constitute compelling evidence for the co-occurrence model. PMID:25954211

  18. Examining the ground layer of St. Anthony from Padua 19th century oil painting by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vančo, Ľubomír; Kadlečíková, Magdaléna; Breza, Juraj; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Gregor, Miloš

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we studied the material composition of the ground layer of a neoclassical painting. We used Raman spectroscopy (RS) as a prime method. Thereafter scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were employed as complementary techniques. The painting inspected was of the side altar in King St. Stephen's Church in Galanta (Slovakia), signed and dated by Jos. Chr. Mayer 1870. Analysis was carried out on both covered and uncovered ground layers. Four principal compounds (barite, lead white, calcite, dolomite) and two minor compounds (sphalerite, quartz) were identified. This ground composition is consistent with the 19th century painting technique used in Central Europe consisting of white pigments and white fillers. Transformation of lead white occurred under laser irradiation. Subdominant Raman peaks of the components were measured. The observed results elucidate useful partnership of RS and SEM-EDS measurements supported by X-ray powder diffraction as well as possibilities and limitations of non-destructive analysis of covered lower layers by RS.

  19. [Historical sketch of modern pharmaceutical science and technology (Part 3). From the second half of the 19th century to World War II].

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, K

    1995-01-01

    The history of modern pharmaceutical science and technology, from the second half of the 19th century to the end of World War II, is divided into nine sections for the purpose of discussion. 1. The European medical and pharmaceutical science and technology at the end of the 19th century is reviewed. Pharmacology, bacteriology and biochemistry were built in this period. 2. The Meiji Government accepted Western medicine and medical law and regulations in 1883. Consequently, the Japanese physician changed from Eastern (Kanpooi) to Western (Seiyooi). 3. Modern scientific and engineering education had been accepted in America, England, Germany, and France etc. Foreign scientists and engineers (Oyatoi-gai-kokujin) were educated by practice and theory. The Faculty of Engineering was established in the universities in Japan. This fact is one of the differences in the history of universities in Europe and America. 4. Pharmaceutical education in the Meiji period (1873-1911). Twenty-nine schools of pharmacy were built in this period. However, 20 schools of pharmacy had been closed. Pharmacy and pharmaceutical industry was not established in the Meiji era. 5. The profession of pharmacist in 1873-1944. The policy of medicine was changed by the Meiji Government in 1889, when Western physicians were allowed to prepare medicines for patients, and this practice continues today. Political and technological power of Japanese pharmacists was weak, so their role was not estimated. 6. Consequences of world War I, and the establishment of the pharmaceutical industry. The Sino-Japanese War (1894-95) and Russo-Japanese War (1904-05) were won fortunately. The first pharmaceutical company was established in 1885. At this times, many pharmaceutical manufacturing companies, which were converted from whole sale merchants, were built. Then started the manufacturing of commercial drugs. 7. Hygienic chemistry and some problems of public hygiene. The causes of diseses unique to Japan, such as

  20. Georg Büchner, Sigmund Freud and the "Schädelnerven" (cranial nerves) - research on the brain and soul in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Ruppert, Christina; Stienen, Martin N; Surbeck, Werner

    2014-10-01

    One of the authors' encounter with one of Sigmund Freud's original works about the anatomy of the human brain stem and his interest in the scientist, anatomist, philosopher, writer and revolutionary Georg Büchner led to re-examination and review of the original writings of two major 19th century protagonists of brain anatomy research. The aim of the authors is to highlight the achievements of both Freud and Büchner in the field of comparative brain morphology. The medical and philosophical publications of Georg Büchner were reviewed with reference to the historical-critical edition of his complete works and writings (the so-called Marburg edition). Evaluation of the neuroanatomical achievements of Sigmund Freud was based on a summary of his publications and also partially on his autobiographical writings. After careful review of their publications both Freud and Büchner should be acknowledged as brain scientists focusing particularly on comparative morphology. Both chose fish as the subject of their macroscopic (Büchner) and microscopic (Freud) neuroanatomical studies, and both cut across their own language and cultural space by continuing their work in France. In interpreting their findings both were influenced by their respective contemporary methodological schools of thought. Büchner became a soul scientist/psychologist by turning to the writing of literary texts, heralding the end of his idealistic and metaphysical interpretation of life. Likewise, Freud increasingly devoted himself to the destiny of man and his "conditio humana," eventually turning away from anatomical brain research. Review of the biographies and medical-scientific, as well as philosophical publications, of Georg Büchner and Sigmund Freud reveal striking parallels between the two researchers in addition to common insights that have generally been ignored or only marginally addressed in the past. Both should be appreciated and remembered as forerunners of today's neuroscientific

  1. The Sommersdorf mummies—An interdisciplinary investigation on human remains from a 17th-19th century aristocratic crypt in southern Germany

    PubMed Central

    Kellinghaus, Manuel; Jackowski, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Rühli, Frank; Maixner, Frank; Zink, Albert; Rosendahl, Wilfried; Lösch, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Sommersdorf Castle (Bavaria, Germany) is a medieval castle complex which has been inhabited by the aristocratic family von Crailsheim. The deceased were entombed in a crypt located in the parapets underneath the castle’s church, resulting in mummification of the bodies. Based on the family chronicle and oral history, identities have been ascribed to the mummies. The aim of the study is therefore to test the accuracy of the historical records in comparison to archaeological, anthropological and genetic data. Today, the crypt houses eleven wooden coffins from the 17th to 19th century AD. In ten of these, mummified and scattered human remains were found. Archive records were studied in order to identify names, ancestry, titles, occupation, date of birth and death, and place of interment of the individuals. The coffins were visually inspected and dated by typo-chronology, and the mummified and scattered skeletal remains were subjected to a physical anthropological examination. In total, the crypt contains the remains of a minimum number of nine individuals, among them three adult males, five adult females and one infant. A detailed scientific examination, including prior conservation, ancient DNA analyses, and computed tomography (CT), was performed on five mummies. By means of the CT data age at death, sex, body height, pathologies, and anatomical variants were investigated. CT analysis further showed that the bodies were naturally mummified. Mitochondrial DNA analyses revealed that the tested individuals are not maternally related. In addition, health, living conditions and circumstances of death of the entombed individuals could be highlighted. Being confronted with the strengths, weaknesses and limitations of each methodological approach, probable identification was achieved in two cases. PMID:28859116

  2. Spatial-temporal analysis of climate variations in mid-17th through 19th centuries in East China and the possible relationships with Monsoon climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K. H. E.; Wang, P. K.; Liao, Y. C.; Lee, S. Y.; Tan, P.

    2016-12-01

    IPCC AR5 has revealed more frequent extreme climate events and higher climate variability in the near future. Regardless of all the improvements, East Asia monsoon climate is still less understood and/or poorly projected due partly to insufficient records. Most areas of the Asian region lack sufficient observational records to draw conclusions about trends in annual precipitation over the past century (i.e. WGIAR5 Chapter 2). Precipitation trends, including extremes, are characterized by strong variability, with both increasing and decreasing observed in different parts and seasons of Asia. Understanding the variations of the monsoon climate in historical time may bring significant insights to reveal its spatial and temporal patterns embedded in the atmospheric dynamics at different decadal or centennial scales. This study presents some preliminary research results of high resolution climate reconstruction, in both time and space coverage, in east China, by using RCEC historical climate dataset that is developed under interdisciplinary collaboration led by Research Center for Environmental Changes at Academia Sinica, Taiwan. The present research results are derived from chronological meteorological records in the RCEC dataset in Qing dynasty labeling mid-17th to 19th centuries. In total, the dataset comprises more than 1,300 cities/counties in China that has had more than sixty thousands meteorological records in the period. The analysis comprises three parts. Firstly, the frequency of extreme temperature, precipitation, drought, and flood in every recorded cities/counties were computed to depicting climate variabilities in northeast, central-east and southeast China. Secondly, the multivariate regression model was conducted to estimate the coefficients among the climatic index (temperature, precipitation, and drought). It is found that the temperature and wet-dry characteristics have great seasonal and yearly variations; northeast China compared with central

  3. [Modern medicine environment and adaptation of Korean trader for medicinal herbs from the late 19th century to the early 20th century].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jeongpil

    2006-12-01

    Since the late 18th century, the Korean traditional medicine trade witnessed a steady growth. There were lots of stores which sold Korean medicinal herbs in Seoul and every major towns had at least one or more stores in Korea, which led to a subsequent growth of people involved in the trade. However, Korean medicine merchants encountered a new environment with the influx of western medicines after the Opening of Ports and the execution of modern medicine policies. Such change of atmosphere led the merchants to seek new breakthroughs. Some of the merchants found the answer in producing and selling patent medicine. The people in the industry had little knowledge of western medicine, so that they had little choice but to combine their experience of Korean medicine with whatever information they had about western counterpart. Such resolution generated a new kind of medicine known as patent medicine. Patent medicine businessmen observed the new medicine policies of the Korean Empire. Some visionary ones even sought to eagerly utilize the trademark system to secure the selling route. The Japanese colonial government strengthened the medicine policies. It revised the legislature and mobilized administrative powers to manage and control the industry. However, such colonial policies in the 1910s implicated certain limits due to its lack of understanding of Korean medicine industry. Also, the colonial government showed poor efforts in introducing modern medicine facilities and systems, so that the ground was set for the patent medicine business to flourish. Patent medicine enjoyed a high turnover. So, the entrepreneurs endeavored to promote the sales in whatever means necessary. The most basic form of advertisement was through the newspaper. Indirect promotion through newspaper articles, issuing medicine flyers, free gift draw, reputation of an influential expert were widely used for its sales. Consequently, patent medicine industry in the 1910s saw a healthy prosperity. One example of such golden days was the case of Hwuapyungdangyakbabg (one of the biggest patent medicine companies), which won a third place along with Kyungsungbangjik, which was the top Korean company at that time, in the advertisement design contest hosted by the classified department of Dong-a Daily in 1926. But actually, a few Japanese medicine merchants led the industry. So prosperity of Korean medicine merchant had its limits.

  4. A comparison between the 19th century early proposals and the 20th-21st centuries realized projects intended to contact other planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin Cerceau, Florence; Bilodeau, Bénédicte

    2012-09-01

    Methods dealing with how to contact other planets that are supposed to be inhabited by “intelligent” civilizations have begun more than one century and a half ago. The historical question has been already treated in several studies and the aim of this paper is not to provide details on that aspect. On the other hand, it could be interesting to make a comparison between the different approaches to contact planets, formulated at different epochs (even if obviously techniques were not in the same state of advancement). The most important characteristics of the earliest messages, remained only on a theoretical form, will be presented. The main features of modern messages, which have been concretely realized, will also be emphasized. Drawing a parallel between these two series of projects could demonstrate what has been considered as unavoidable by both pioneer and modern messages creators, while it has not been proved that the first ones have had any influence on the second ones. The common points emerging from this comparison could then (perhaps) help to select adequate models for an intelligible message intended to ETs, particularly concerning the language forms. Besides this, the differences could illustrate the human cultural advances in the field of METI and underline the tendencies that have been chosen in that field since the last decades.

  5. A comparison of high-resolution pollen-inferred climate data from central Minnesota, USA, to 19th century US military fort climate data and tree-ring inferred climate reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Jacques, J.; Cumming, B. F.; Sauchyn, D.; Vanstone, J. R.; Dickenson, J.; Smol, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    -settlement calibration set give much more credible reconstructions. We then compare the temperature reconstructions based upon the two calibration sets for AD 1116-2002. Significant signal flattening and bias exist when using the conventional modern pollen-climate calibration set rather than the pre-settlement pollen-climate calibration set, resulting in an overestimation of Little Ice Age monthly mean temperatures of 0.5-1.5 oC. Therefore, regional warming from anthropogenic global warming is significantly underestimated when using the conventional method of building pollen-climate calibration sets. We also compare the Lake Mina pollen-inferred effective moisture record to early 19th century climate data and to a four-century tree-ring inferred moisture reconstruction based upon sites in Minnesota and the Dakotas. This comparison shows that regional tree-ring reconstructions are biased towards dry conditions and record wet periods poorly relative to high-resolution pollen reconstructions, giving a false impression of regional aridity. It also suggests that varve chronologies should be based upon cross-dating to ensure a more accurate chronology.

  6. The Impacts of Advancing Glaciers and Jökulhlaups on the 19th Century Farming Community in the Suðursveit District South of Vatnajökull Glacier, Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurmundsson, F. S.; Gísladóttir, G.; Erlendsson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Few areas in Iceland were as vulnerable to climate changes during the 19th century as the region south of Vatnajökull glacier. The region was repeatedly affected by glacier advance and jökulhlaups (glacier outburst floods) during the Little Ice Age AD 1300-1900 (LIA). The land area between the glacier and the coast was occupied by farming community. The aim of this research is to quantify and map the size of lost vegetated area in the 19th century during the glacial advance in the climax of the LIA and the impact these events had on the community, land-use, ownership, value of estates and livelihood. This research employs historical written sources to investigate changes in the cultural and natural landscape. Historical data and field observations will be collected and stored in a GIS database designed for the research, allowing data to be analyzed and presented on maps. The first recorded impact on the settlement is from 1794 when the Breiðármerkurjökull outlet glacier advanced and devastated pastures and crofts belonging in west of the district. Seventy five years later, in 1868, the largest estate was completely destroyed by a jökulhlaup. In 1829 a farm site in the middle of the district was moved due to repeated jökulhlaup. The outlet glacier Brókarjökull initiated annual jökulhlaups during 1820 -1870, devastating pastures and hayfields and woodlands of a total of 3 prominent estates in the area (by 1200 ha), causing devaluation of 33-66% on these estates. In the eastern part extensive jökulhlaups changed the glacial river channel causing the river to flow over vast area devastating 80 % of the eastern most estate causing its abandonment in 1892. The climate change and accompanied hazards during the 19th century changed the landscape of the Suðursveit district significantly. By the turn of the 20thcentury the vegetated land in the district had been reduced by 35% and areas of sediments increased by 25% and glaciated area increased by 10%. These

  7. [Is medicine an art or a science?--considerations in the light of Polish school of medicine philosophy and views of other European doctors from the beginning of 19th century till outbreak of the Second World War"].

    PubMed

    Gryglewski, Ryszard W

    2006-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of real nature of medicine, as it was seen in Polish school of the philosophy of the medicine. Is medicine more (or only) science, or is it an art was the crucial point of discussion, which was held in European philosophy of the medicine for the first time in late 19th century. The important voice in it was given by Polish scientists such as Zygmunt Kramsztyk, Henryk Nusbaum, Władysław Biegański, Edmund Biernacki, Władyslaw Szumowski and Ludwik Zembrzuski. How they understood place and meaning of medicine in the realm of human activities, in which points they found the same grounds and in which they differed, should be seen as the main topic for this article.

  8. Sociology and positivism in 19th-century France: the vicissitudes of the Société de sociologie (1872-4).

    PubMed

    Heilbron, Johan

    2009-10-01

    Little is known about the world's first sociological society, Emile Littré's Société de Sociologie (1872-4). This article, based on prosopographic research, offers an interpretation of the foundation, political-intellectual orientation and early demise of the society. As indicated by recruitment and texts by its founding members, the Société de Sociologie was in fact conceived more as a political club than a learned society. Guided in this by Littré's heterodox positivism and the redefinition of sociology he proposed around 1870, the Société de Sociologie was intended first and foremost to accompany intellectually the political changes that Littré considered imperative in the early years of the Third Republic (1870-1940). This expectation found little echo among the members of the society, and it seems possible that Littré himself and his closest associates were the ones to interrupt the society's meetings. Some of its members' general studies on the status of the social sciences and their main divisions were continued in the framework of the journal "La Philosophie positive" (1867-83), but the authors most committed to those studies were on the margins of the Littré network. Neither the dominant positivist republicanism, centered around Littré and Dubost, nor the general sociology of the more peripheral members of the network (Mesmer, Roberty, Vitry) represented an important intellectual contribution to the formation of academic sociology in France. Given that the Société de Sociologie did contribute to diffuse the project of a sociological science and developed forms of sociology coherent enough to be rejected by the pioneers of university sociology, the group constitutes a significant case of failure in the history of the discipline.

  9. Characterisation of the rare cadmium chromate pigment in a 19th century tube colour by Raman, FTIR, X-ray and EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Marie Bitsch; Sørensen, Mikkel Agerbæk; Sanyova, Jana; Bendix, Jesper; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær

    2017-03-01

    In an investigation of the artists' materials used by P. S. Krøyer the contents of the tube colours found in Krøyer's painting cabinet were examined. In most cases, the results of the pigment analyses were as expected based on our knowledge of artists' colours used in the late 1800s and early 1900s. However, in one of the tube colours labelled "Jaune de Cadmium Citron" (cadmium lemon yellow) an extremely rare cadmium chromate pigment was found. The pigment was analysed and characterised by Raman microscopy (MRS), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Cadmium chromate was synthesised by precipitation from an aqueous solution of cadmium nitrate and potassium chromate, and the resulting yellow crystals proved identical to the pigment found in the tube colour "Jaune de Cadmium Citron". The structure determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction identified the pigment as 2CdCrO4·KOH·H2O or more accurately as KCd2(CrO4)2(H3O2) illustrating the μ-H3O2- species. The yellow colour of the paint sample taken from the tube had a greenish hue, which became even more prominent upon storage and drying. EPR analysis of the sample showed the presence of paramagnetic degradation products containing Cr(III) and Cr(V).

  10. Characterisation of the rare cadmium chromate pigment in a 19th century tube colour by Raman, FTIR, X-ray and EPR.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Marie Bitsch; Sørensen, Mikkel Agerbæk; Sanyova, Jana; Bendix, Jesper; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær

    2017-03-15

    In an investigation of the artists' materials used by P. S. Krøyer the contents of the tube colours found in Krøyer's painting cabinet were examined. In most cases, the results of the pigment analyses were as expected based on our knowledge of artists' colours used in the late 1800s and early 1900s. However, in one of the tube colours labelled "Jaune de Cadmium Citron" (cadmium lemon yellow) an extremely rare cadmium chromate pigment was found. The pigment was analysed and characterised by Raman microscopy (MRS), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Cadmium chromate was synthesised by precipitation from an aqueous solution of cadmium nitrate and potassium chromate, and the resulting yellow crystals proved identical to the pigment found in the tube colour "Jaune de Cadmium Citron". The structure determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction identified the pigment as 2CdCrO 4 ·KOH·H 2 O or more accurately as KCd 2 (CrO 4 ) 2 (H 3 O 2 ) illustrating the μ-H 3 O 2 - species. The yellow colour of the paint sample taken from the tube had a greenish hue, which became even more prominent upon storage and drying. EPR analysis of the sample showed the presence of paramagnetic degradation products containing Cr(III) and Cr(V). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The restart of meteorological observations in the 19th century in Lisbon: the contribution of Marino Miguel FRANZINI (1779-1861)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcoforado, Maria-Joao; Nunes, Fatima

    2013-04-01

    After the early meteorological observations of the 1770s to the 1790s in continental Portugal (including a 5 year daily series by J. Velho), there were hardly any until 1815. In December 1815, a meteorological station was set up in Lisbon by Marino Miguel Franzini (1779-1861), an engineer who was also actively involved in Politics (liberal party). Following the tradition of the 18th century enlightenment movement, he took a keen interest in Nature and Sciences, particularly in the "influence" of weather and climate on health and agriculture. Franzini started his observations by request of a physician who sought to understand the reasons why the maximum mortality occurred on the summer months, unlike in northern countries of Europe where maximum mortality occurred in winter (as it happens nowadays in Portugal). The deterministic background of the two scientists is clear. Franzini was a member of the Lisbon Academy of Sciences (founded in 1799) and had contact with foreign Academies and foreign scientists. His instruments were carefully constructed and described, including graduation scales, and stations' location was indicated. Data from two years observations (several meteorological variables) was published in the Academy of Sciences Memoirs. From 1818 until 1826 and from 1835 until 1856 data was divulged in journals and newspapers, such as the "Journal of Medical Sciences", together with data on necrology in some of Lisbon parishes (illustrating the interest of physicians on weather); meteorological data and information about agriculture was also published in the "Lisbon Gazette". Unfortunately, there are hardly any daily data, as Franzini grouped his records according to weather types, as will be explained. Franzini's series will be presented in our talk. The gap between 1826 and 1835 was due to the political activities in which Franzini was involved: the civil war (liberals against absolutist) disruptedscientific research in Portugal. Official meteorological

  12. The number of missing teeth in people of the Edo period in Japan in the 17th to 19th centuries.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hisashi

    2012-06-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the number of missing teeth in the people of the Edo period (or number of remaining teeth) and to contribute to the 8020 movement proposed in Japan to help people retain 20 or more of their own teeth until the age of 80. The study of dentition in ancient skeletal remains of our ancestors from multiple perspectives can yield information that can contribute to the study of physical anthropology and the leading edge of modern dental research. The materials were 82 excavated individuals (52 males and 30 females) from 1603 to 1868 whose maxillas and mandibles were both examinable. The age and sex were estimated by anthropological methods, and the individuals were divided into five groups. The status of missing teeth was compared between groups, and a chi-square test was used to test significant differences between groups. The rates of tooth loss were examined in the maxillas and mandibles. In the people of the Edo period, many teeth remained in good condition until early to late middle age. There were more remaining teeth in these individuals than in modern-day individuals. However, the Edo people clearly showed increased tooth loss with age. There were no differences in tooth loss by sex. The tooth type with a high rate of tooth loss was posterior teeth, but incisor loss also occurred with ageing. Mandibular canines were most likely to be remaining. The Edo people had more remaining teeth than modern-day society. This finding was unexpected. The notion that "people of long past ages lost more teeth more quickly" does not seem to apply to people in the Edo period in Japan. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Fine particles and carbon monoxide from wood burning in 17th-19th century Danish kitchens: Measurements at two reconstructed farm houses at the Lejre Historical-Archaeological Experimental Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryhl-Svendsen, Morten; Clausen, Geo; Chowdhury, Zohir; Smith, Kirk R.

    2010-02-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM 2.5) were measured in two reconstructed Danish farmhouses (17-19th century) during two weeks of summer. During the first week intensive measurements were performed while test cooking fires were burned, during the second week the houses were monitored while occupied by guest families. A masonry hearth was located in the middle of each house for open cooking fires and with heating stoves. One house had a chimney leading to the outside over the hearth; in the other, a brickwork hood led the smoke into an attic and through holes in the roof. During the first week the concentration of PM 2.5 averaged daily between 138 and 1650 μg m -3 inside the hearths and 21-160 μg m -3 in adjacent living rooms. CO averaged daily between 0.21 and 1.9 ppm in living areas, and up to 12 ppm in the hearths. Highest concentrations were measured when two fires were lit at the same time, which would cause high personal exposure for someone working in the kitchens. 15 min averages of up to 25 400 μg m -3 (PM 2.5) and 260 ppm CO were recorded. WHO air quality guidelines were occasionally exceeded for CO and constantly for PM 2.5. However, air exchange and air distribution measurements revealed a large draw in the chimney, which ensured a fast removal of wood smoke from the hearth area. The guest families were in average exposed to no more than 0.21 ppm CO during 48 h. Based on a hypothetical time-activity pattern, however, a woman living in this type of house during the 17-19th century would be exposed to daily averages of 1.1 ppm CO and 196 μg m -3 PM 2.5, which exceeds WHO guideline for PM 2.5, and is comparable to what is today observed for women in rural areas of developing countries.

  14. Combined Survey Format (CSF) Archaeogeophysical (Metal Detecting, Radiometrics and Resistivity) and Archaeochemical (XRF) Investigations of the 19th Century La Hacienda Y Presidio of Babocomari Military Site in Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, R. J.; Aydin, N.; Brackett, C.

    2007-05-01

    Recent archaeological investigations of Historic Era Mexican and Anglo-American and Prehistoric and Protohistoric Hohokam and Sobaipuri culture sites on the Babacomari Land Grant near Sierra Vista Arizona by Carothers Environmental, LLC (CE), Wondjina Research Institute (WRI) and DMG Four Corners Research (FCR) led to the discovery of two major 19th Century military sites that were known from the literature but had not been scientifically investigated. It was decided by WRI and BABACOMARI RANCH that this project was ideal for an experimental cooperative training program for archaeologists and geologists from the anthropology and geology departments of UA, ASU, NAU, PC, and members of AAS, AAHS, AAC, THS and USFS personnel in the use of the new CSF archaeogeophysical, archaeochemical and airbourne remote sensing technologies and field techniques that have just been recently introduced in the US. WRI, CE and Statistical Research Inc. (SRI) conducted CSF VLF Metal Detecting, Radiometrics and Resistivity studies and portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) archaeochemical studies. The results will be presented along with suggestions as to use of these technologies in CSF studies.

  15. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopy as a Forensic Method to Determine the Composition of Inks Used to Print the United States One-cent Blue Benjamin Franklin Postage Stamps of the 19th Century.

    PubMed

    Brittain, Harry G

    2016-01-01

    Through the combined use of infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) sampling, the composition of inks used to print the many different types of one-cent Benjamin Franklin stamps of the 19th century has been established. This information permits a historical evaluation of the formulations used at various times, and also facilitates the differentiation of the various stamps from each other. In two instances, the ink composition permits the unambiguous identification of stamps whose appearance is identical, and which (until now) have only been differentiated through estimates of the degree of hardness or softness of the stamp paper, or through the presence or absence of a watermark in the paper. In these instances, the use of ATR Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectroscopy effectively renders irrelevant two 100-year-old practices of stamp identification. Furthermore, since the use of ATR sampling makes it possible to obtain the spectrum of a stamp still attached to its cover, it is no longer necessary to identify these blue Franklin stamps using their cancellation dates. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. [Industrial social diseases in 19th century].

    PubMed

    Leoni, F

    1991-01-01

    The author illustrates the relations in Italy between industry and the medical-hygienic situation in the XIX century. Italy started industrial processes rather late, about 1840, and between 1840 and 1870, for the first time, a remarkable quantity of publications about working class life conditions appeared. Special attention was given to spinning-mill workers, who - as Tonini, Ripa and Bonomi describe in their treatises - suffered a very hard life and working conditions, cold, damp, a very poor diet based on stale bread; furthermore, women had dangerous pregnancies and their babies were extremely undernourished, because of bottle-feeding caused by the impossibility of mothers to take their infants with them. These conditions produced numerous gastric, rheumatic and respiratory diseases. At the end of the XIX century, Mantegazzaa defined, for the first time, professional diseases from a clinical and social point of view. Investigations acquired a more rigorous and scientific character by dividing into a series of subjects such as, for instance, the study of "unhealthy industries." Legislation was adapted quite late, and produced in 1888 the "Crispi act".

  17. [Observational medicine in 19th century Iran].

    PubMed

    Ebrahimnejad, H

    1998-01-01

    The ravages wrought by epidemics in Iran as of 1821 acted as a stimulus to medical thought while the awakening of political consciousness mobilized efforts to fight contagious diseases. The combination "epidemics-politics-medicine" made nineteenth-century Persia turn to European science for help. Thus western medicine was introduced into Persia. If this introduction has been perceived by political means and epidemiological justification, the theoretical and epistemological process involved has been almost completely overlooked or misinterpreted. It is generally considered that the imported medicine swept away the local one, but this is not altogether true. It was the internal evolution of traditional medicine which paved the way for anatomoclinical medicine. This evolution comes accross clearly in the works of Shirâzi and Sâveji between 1831 and 1862, years in which epidemics struck frequently and violently. While Europeans in Iran such as Dr. Polak qualified heyzeh (a kind of severe diarrhea) a "sporadic cholera" or "autumn cholera", Shirâzi wrote three treatises to show that heyzeh was not cholera but an ordinary kind of diarrhea caused by generalized malnourishment. Shirâzi was also an innovator in the theoretical and terminological fields, doing away with the notion of vabâ which meant a putrid atmosphere. Vabâ became a physiological anomaly which took on epidemic proportions in an impure atmosphere. The modern definition of vabâ meaning cholera was therefore elaborated thanks to Shirâzi.

  18. Clear cutting (10-13th century) and deep stable economy (18-19th century) as responsible interventions for sand drifting and plaggic deposition in cultural landscapes on aeolian sands (SE-Netherlands).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Jan; Vera, Hein; Wallinga, Jakob

    2013-04-01

    landscapes, characterized by deflation plains (gleyic arenosols) and complexes of inland dunes (haplic arenosols). Clear cutting was responsible for the mediaeval first large scale expansion of drift sand landscapes. In such driftsand landscapes, the majority of the podzolic soils in coversand has been truncated by aeolian erosion. Only on scattered sheltered sites in the landscape, palaeopodzols were buried under mono or polycyclic driftsand deposits. They are now the valuable soil archives for palaeoecological research. During the 18th century, the population growth and regional economic activity stimulated the agricultural productivity. Farmers introduced the innovative 'deep stable' technique to increase the production of fertilizers. Farmers started sod digging, including the top of the Ah horizon of the humus forms. This consequently promoted heath degradation and sand drifting, resulting in the extension of driftsand landscapes. Deep stable economy and sod digging was responsible for the 18th century second large scale expansion of drift sand landscapes. During the 19th century, farmers tried to find alternative fertilizers and authorities initiated reforestation projects. The invention of chemical fertilizers at the end of the 19th century marked the end of the period of heath management and plaggic agriculture. The heath was no longer used for the harvesting of plaggic matter and new land management practices were introduced. Heath was reclaimed to new arable land or reforested with Scotch pine. Geomorphological features as inland dunes and plaggic covers survived in the landscape and are now included in the geological inheritance.

  19. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    In the 19th Century, experiments in America, Europe, and elsewhere attempted to build postal rockets to deliver mail from one location to another. The idea was more novel than successful. Many stamps used in these early postal rockets have become collector's items.

  20. A three-variable chaotic system for the epidemic of bubonic plague in Bombay by the end of the 19th century and its coupling to the epizootics of the two main species of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiarotti, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    A plague epidemic broke out in Bombay by the end of the 19th century. A committee was first appointed by the Bombay City [1] in order to stop the epidemic before the rain season started. Unfortunately, the disease could not be stopped and the epidemic became endemic. After several years, another Advisory Committee [2] was appointed that tried to investigate the causes of plague in all possible directions. An impressing quantity of information was gathered during the period 1907-1911 and published. In particular, it was noticed that the epidemic was systematically preceded by epizootics of rats. For this reason, the populations of the main species of rodents were systematically monitored. This data set is revisited here by using a multivariate version of the global modeling technique [3]. The aim of this technique is to obtain a set of Ordinary Differential Equations directly from time series. Three observational time series are considered: the number of person died of bubonic plague per half month (1), and the number of captured infected black rats Mus rattus (2) and brown rats Mus decumanus (3). Several models are obtained, all based on the same algebraic basic structure. These models are, either directly chaotic, or close to chaos (chaos could easily be obtained by tuning one model parameter). The algebraic structure of the simplest model obtained is analyzed in more details. Surprisingly, it is found that the interpretation of the coupling between the three variables can be done term by term. This interpretation is in quite good coherence with the conclusions of the Advisory Committee published one hundred years ago. This structure also shows that the human action to slow down the disease during this period was obviously effective, although insufficient to stop the epidemic drastically. This result suggests that the global modeling technique can be a powerful tool to detect causal couplings in epidemiology, and, more generally, among observational variables from

  1. Astronomy Teaching in Argentina in the 19th Century. (Spanish Title: La Enseñanza de la Astronomía en la Argentina del Siglo XIX.) O Ensino de Astronomia na Argentina no Século XIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberto Cornejo, Jorge; Santilli, Haydée

    2010-12-01

    Sarmiento believed that Copernican astronomy was one of the critical scientific disciplines to the formation of a "modern" citizen. In this work, we shall study astronomical science from two points of view: from the scientific knowledge and the educational presentation of such knowledge. Our study will address in Argentina in 19th century, starting from the initiative of Bernardino Rivadavia in 1821, who founded an astronomic observatory at Buenos Aires, until the first activities of the observatories at Córdoba and La Plata. On both lines, scientific and educative, we shall analyze the influence of positivist ideas. We shall highlight epistemological differences between both observatories, Córdoba's based on French positivism and La Plata's based on German positivism. We shall also show the different attitude of both observatories towards education. We shall see the way in which positivist ideas had great relevance in the training of elementary school teachers. We shall also establish the relevant influence of the socio-historical context over the astronomical development, and show that astronomy was a fundamental social factor at Argentina history. Domingo F. Sarmiento consideraba que la astronomía copernicana era una de las disciplinas científicas fundamentales para la conformación de un ciudadano "moderno". En este trabajo estudiaremos la ciencia astronómica desde dos vertientes: la referida específicamente al conocimiento científico y aquella vinculada con la presentación educativa de dicho conocimiento. Nuestro estudio se desarrollará en Argentina durante el siglo XIX, desde la iniciativa de Bernardino Rivadavia en 1821, de establecer en Buenos Aires un observatorio astronómico, hasta las primeras actividades de los observatorios de Córdoba y de La Plata. En ambas vertientes, científica y educativa, analizaremos la influencia de las ideas positivistas. Resaltaremos las diferencias epistemológicas entre los dos observatorios, orientado el primero

  2. Reviving Rage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Isaac

    2012-01-01

    As people commemorate ACT UP and examine its memory in public cultures, the 2011 revival of "The Normal Heart" (TNH) and the rhetorical labor undertaken to evoke political emotionalities inside and outside of the theater provides one site for analyzing how direct action politics, both past and present, are imagined as a kairotic response to…

  3. Analysis of Factors that have Influenced Outcomes of Battles and Wars: A Data Base of Battles and Engagements. Volume 2. Wars from 1600 through 1800. Part 1. Wars of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    of Christian’s force and capturing all of the Danish artillery and baggage. Christian fled to his stronghold of Holstein with the reumnts of his army...events that led to Yorktow began. Sources: C.) C. 13. 184 TIE NERICAN REV IONARY WAR Cow , 17 J _m,,,y 1781 Early in the morning of 17 Jumzy, Prigadier

  4. Regionalism and Development in Early Nineteenth Century Spanish America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Douglas

    An understanding of regionalism in early 19th century Spanish America is crucial to any understanding of this region's economic development. Regionalism became the barrier to the kind of integrated national economy that some writers claim could have been implemented had it not been for the imposition of dependency by external forces. This…

  5. [Earth magnetism research in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Schröder, W; Wiederkehr, K H

    2000-01-01

    Even before the discovery of the electromagnetism by Oersted, and before Ampère, who attributed all magnetism to the flux of electrical currents, A. v. Humboldt and Hansteen had turned to geomagnetism. With the help of the "Göttinger Magnetische Verein", a worldwide cooperation under the leadership of Gauss game into existence. Even today, Gauss' theory of the geomagnetism is one of the pillars for geomagnetical research work. Thereafter, J. v. Lamont, Prof. in Munich, took over the leadership in Germany. In England, the Magnetic Crusade was started by the initiative of John Herschel and E. Sabine. At the beginning of the forties, James Clarke Ross advanced to the Antarctic Continent, which was then quite unknown. Ten years later, Sabine was able to gather solar-terrestrial relations from the data of the colonical observatories. In the eighties, Arthur Schuster, following Balfour Stewart's ideas, succeeded in interpreting the daily variations of the electrical process in the high atmosphere. The geomagnetic research work in Germany was given a fresh impetus by the First Polar Year 1882-1883. Georg Neumayer, director of the "Deutsche Seewarte" in Hamburg, had been one of the initiators of the Polar Year. He had a close cooperation with the newly founded "Kaiserliches Marineobservatorium" in Wilhelmshaven, and he also managed to gain the collaboration of the "Gauss-Observatorium für Erdmagnetismus" in Göttingen under E. Schering. In the Polar Year, the first automatic recording magnetometers (Kew-Model) were used in a German observatory in Wilhelmshaven. Here M. Eschenhagen, who later became director of the geomagnetic section in the new Meterological-Magnetic Observatory in Potsdam, gained special merit. The treatise considers preceding hypotheses of geomagnetism as well as the palaeomagnetic studies. The essential seismological investigations at the turn of the 19th to the 20th century are briefly treated. They represent one of the keystones for the modern theory of the Earthdynamo.n

  6. Why Read the Great 19th-Century Historians?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clive, John

    1978-01-01

    Clive comments on the literary power of Karl Marx (The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon), Alexis de Tocqueville (The Old Regime and the Revolution), Thomas Carlyle (French Revolution), and Jakob Burkhardt (The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy); and notes Macaulay's sensitivity to the "public mind" (History of England). (SJL)

  7. American medical students in 19th-century Europe.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jeremy Hugh

    2005-07-01

    Many Americans studied medicine in Britain in the 18th century, but the major influx to Europe began after 1815, when the French Revolution's reforms of health care and medical teaching had reached their zenith. Americans were well trained in France (and later in Germany) in medicine, surgery, pathology and clinical science, and brought these skills back to the US. Their training had been in countries with government-run, relatively egalitarian health care systems. On their return, they did not seek to transplant such a system to the US, but they did introduce European medical science and medical techniques, and something of the European medical education system.

  8. 19th Century American Journals of Natural History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dexter, Ralph W.

    1976-01-01

    This article presents a brief list of journals containing information for historians and naturalists. The journals are presented in two lists from 1810-1875 and from 1876-1900. Each list is further classified into general natural history, microscopy, botany, entomology, conchology, ornithology, and geology and paleontology. (MR)

  9. [Movement and tranquility in 19th century Aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, S

    1993-01-01

    The nineteenth century sees the rise of the bourgeoisie to social and political power. The values of this class increased the attention paid to certain branches of the medical sciences, such as for example hygiene. A set of rules and methods to achieve better health and, at the same time, to come closer to the perfect image of man described by writers of aesthetics, often taking classical Greece as a point of reference, are believed to be found in these branches. In these strategies physical exercise plays a role which is positively valued as much by hygienists as by philosophers, some of whose works are studied in this article.

  10. 19th Century Christian Benevolence and the Unwritten Constitution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labour to subvert these great Pillars of human happiness...Brought on by disestablishment and buoyed by the energy from the Second Great Awakening, ecumenical Protestantism jettisoned the artificial barriers of the...highest to the lowest, as coworkers in the same labour of love.’’ 23 Efficiency in distribution, however, required accurate communication between the

  11. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    During the 19th century, rocket enthusiasts and inventors began to appear in almost every country. Some people thought these early rocket pioneers were geniuses, and others thought they were crazy. Claude Ruggieri, an Italian living in Paris, apparently rocketed small animals into space as early as 1806. The payloads were recovered by parachute. As depicted here by artist Larry Toschik, French authorities were not always impressed with rocket research. They halted Ruggieri's plans to launch a small boy using a rocket cluster. (Reproduced from a drawing by Larry Toschik and presented here courtesy of the artist and Motorola Inc.)

  12. Public health and social supervision issues within public administration of ukrainian territories in the late 8th- early 9th centuries.

    PubMed

    Hrynzovskyi, Anatolii M; Holovanova, Irina A; Omelchuk, Sergei T; Kuzminska, Olena V; Hrynzovska, Anastasia A; Karlova, Olena O; Kondratiuk, Vitalii Ye

    Introduction: The public health system modernization history is based upon the progress in state country administration and administration of healthcare within the sectorwide approach. The WHO European Bureau pays much attention to the National Health Service systems development while implementing their basic policies. The Ukrainian state health service management was founded basing on the regulatory field of the Russian Empire, using the European healthcare promotion experience. Aim: of the article is the analysis of the regulatory field of police and amenity authorities of the Russian Empire and Ukraine within the medical and social service in the 18th-19th centuries. Materials and methods: The structure of the article corresponds to the problem city and chronology principles, using the following methods and techniques of scientific learning: the systemic, historic, regulatory comparative, logical and structural-functional analysis of the studied medical-legal phenomena. The study sources are the scientific publications, collections of laws and executive orders of the Russian Empire and Ukraine in the 18th-19th centuries. Review: As a result of the performed work it can be determined were the main directions of the police competence in late 18th- early 19th centuries. Conclusion: Preserving health, treatment of the ill and injured, management of medical and social service of those in need, holding various preventive activities and supporting safe environment and regulating the safety of food were the main directions of the police competence in late 18th- early 19th centuries.

  13. On the early history of the Finnish Meteorological Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevanlinna, H.

    2014-03-01

    This article is a review of the foundation (in 1838) and later developments of the Helsinki (Finland) magnetic and meteorological observatory, today the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The main focus of the study is in the early history of the FMI up to the beginning of the 20th century. The first director of the observatory was Physics Professor Johan Jakob Nervander (1805-1848). He was a famous person of the Finnish scientific, academic and cultural community in the early decades of the 19th century. Finland was an autonomously part of the Russian Empire from 1809 to 1917, but the observatory remained organizationally under the University of Helsinki, independent of Russian scientific institutions, and funded by the Finnish Government. Throughout the late-19th century the Meteorological Institute was responsible of nationwide meteorological, hydrological and marine observations and research. The observatory was transferred to the Finnish Society of Sciences and Letters under the name the Central Meteorological Institute in 1881. The focus of the work carried out in the Institute was changed gradually towards meteorology. Magnetic measurements were still continued but in a lower level of importance. The culmination of Finnish geophysical achievements in the 19th century was the participation to the International Polar Year programme in 1882-1883 by setting up a full-scale meteorological and magnetic observatory in Sodankylä, Lapland.

  14. The seed of abundance and misery Peruvian living standards from the early republican period to the end of the guano era (1820-1880).

    PubMed

    Twrdek, Linda; Manzel, Kerstin

    2010-07-01

    This paper examines 19th-century Peruvian heights from the early republican period to the end of the guano era (1820-1880). Analyzing male and female prisoner heights from the Lima penitentiary, we find that the physical stature of the lower classes stagnated throughout the period. In spite of the substantial profits generated by Peru's chief export product, guano, these revenues apparently did not filter down to benefit ordinary laborers. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Early colonial health developments in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Parahoo, K A

    1986-01-01

    The historical development of Mauritius and in particular the early developments in health care are crucial to an understanding of the contemporary health system. The introduction of major epidemic diseases through the movements of French soldiers to and from India and the immigration of indentured laborers from India account for the high mortality and morbidity rates in the 18th and 19th centuries and later. The colonial economy created and fortified the dependence on a single cash crop and on imported food. It also contributed toward the impoverization of large sections of the Mauritian population. The colonial era is also responsible for initiating a three tier system of health care.

  16. New Early Cycladic Figurine At Nea Styra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosma, M.

    The existence of an Early Bronze Age coastal site in the district of Nea Styra has been known since the end of the 19th century when three marble figurines of early Cycladic type had been found in the area. During the 20th century survey investigations conducted by Greek and foreign archaeologists offered new evidence which demonstrated the significance of the site during the Early and Middle Helladic periods. A new figurine of early Cycladic type, which recently came to light at Nea Styra due to the control of building permits by the 11th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities, reaffirms the identification of the area as one of the three most important sites on Euboea during the Early Helladic II period. This paper focuses on a newly discovered figurine and its typological character. The new find is compared to the figurines that had been found in the 19th century at Nea Styra. We hope that the scheduled excavations on the private land plot where the new figurine was found will offer new data leading to a better understanding of the character of the Early Helladic settlement in this part of southern Euboea.

  17. Landscape designers, doctors, and the making of healthy urban spaces in 19th century America

    Treesearch

    Robert Martensen

    2009-01-01

    One of 18 articles inspired by the Meristem 2007 Forum, "Restorative Commons for Community Health." The articles include interviews, case studies, thought pieces, and interdisciplinary theoretical works that explore the relationship between human health and the urban...

  18. Cultural patterns of trauma among 19th-century-born males in cadaver collections.

    PubMed

    De La Cova, Carlina

    2010-01-01

    Comprehending violence among bioarchaeological and historical groups is a topic of recent interest among biological anthropologists. This research examines trauma among African American and Euro-American males of low socioeconomic status born between 1825 and 1877. A total of 651 male skeletons from the Cobb, Terry, and Hamann-Todd anatomical collections were macroscopically evaluated for skeletal trauma, based on the presence of fractures and weapon-related wounds, and statistically analyzed according to ancestry, birth (Antebellum, Civil War, Reconstruction), combined ancestry - birth, and collection cohorts. Results indicated that African Americans and Euro-Americans expressed ethnic differences in regard to interpersonal violence. To interpret these disparities, documentary data were used to reconstruct the socioeconomic and cultural environment of these individuals. This research emphasizes the importance of evaluating skeletal data within the context of class, culture, and environment so that behavioral patterns observed in the skeleton can be better understood.

  19. Moral Education and Public Schools: Evolution in 19th Century Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Thomas C.

    As evidenced by official documents of state superintendents, Protestantism and Bible-reading ceased to comprise the foundation for moral education in the public schools of Wisconsin by 1890. Although the 1848 Wisconsin Constitution mandated against sectarian instruction in public schools, the "Annual Reports" and "Decision…

  20. [Epidemiological, social and public health aspects of tuberculosis in Ferrara in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Guidi, E; Angelini, L; Lupi, S; Vicentini, C B; Mares, D; Manfredini, S; Contini, C

    2011-12-01

    Our first study of tuberculosis in Ferrara during the nineteenth century, whose results have been recently published, focused on disease treatment. Here we present the descriptive analysis of mortality, with the following results being attained: two behavioural patterns are detected with regard to the onset of disease, before and after 1850; TB is a specific disease that affects all parts of the body in all age groups: childhood, and active and passive populations; there are no significant differences with regard to gender; as regards the occupations performed by the deceased, those related to industry and agriculture and to various other activities and services are those with the highest mortality; tuberculosis has a seasonal pattern; summer and autumn are the periods of greatest prevalence (hot weather and humidity are factors that affect the respiratory system); among the forms of tuberculosis it can be observed that up to the year 1850 people died in Ferrara either of pulmonary tuberculosis or TB localised in other areas; from 1851 onward there appears to have been a dramatic change, with a decrease in unspecific diagnosis but the appearance of disease manifestations in its various clinical forms.

  1. 19th Century Canals and the Growth of New York and New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This publication opens with a statement by the 2001-2002 National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) President Adrian Davis on the horrific events of September 11, 2001. Davis said that social studies educators need to reinforce the ideals of tolerance, equity, and social justice against a backlash of antidemocratic sentiments and hostile…

  2. Diffusion of Ideas by 19th Century Feminists: The Growth of Women's Magazines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    The communications of suffragist Lucy Stone illustrate the changes that the growth of women's magazines brought to nineteenth century feminists. As indicated in letters to friends and family, Lucy Stone became an active proponent of women's rights at a time when public speaking tours were the best means of reaching a wide audience. As the printing…

  3. Linking buildings, archives and museums of the 19th century Turin's Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborrino, R.; Rinaudo, F.

    2015-08-01

    The documentation of Cultural Heritage asset is the basis for all the interventions and policies on Cultural heritage conservation and management. The documentation is mainly based on historic knowledge and metric survey. As far as historic knowledge is concerned many information are still recorded and preserved inside written documents that are usually not easy to reach and correctly understandable by all the experts that have specific responsibilities on Cultural Heritage. The digitalization of documents (hardly faced in the last years) is not sufficient to guarantee the effective access to the historical information useful inside a documentation process. The documentation always needs an historical interpretation based on a critical reading produced by linking heterogeneous materials. Iconography also is an important source when it is correctly interpreted and linked to other sources. IT development and digital technology diffusion allowed offering new way to record, organize and share historical information: GIS and 3D modeling can be used as standard approaches to transfer the historical knowledge in a proper way to specialists involved in Cultural Heritage conservation and management. They have been generally used as tool to represent information for different targets, the ones mostly for specialized users, the others for edutainment. GIS are largely diffused yet in the Cultural Heritage management, and 3D modeling is wide spread used in museums communication. Nevertheless, both of them have more potential. They could be integrated in order to manage different data set related with the same matter. They could be used to make new research by surveying and improving interpretation in a way ready to transmit the outcomes. To produce a new generation of affordable digital historical products is necessary that the GIS and 3D modeling design and realization would be developed in a multidisciplinary approach that must be explained and demonstrated to the people that in the future will offer to the community this expertise. The paper describes a teaching and research training experience started two years ago at the Politecnico di Torino in the master course on Architecture (Conservation).

  4. Marine 14C reservoir ages for 19th century whales and molluscs from the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangerud, Jan; Bondevik, Stein; Gulliksen, Steinar; Karin Hufthammer, Anne; Høisæter, Tore

    2006-12-01

    In order to compare radiocarbon dates on marine and terrestrial samples the former have to be corrected for a reservoir age. We present reservoir ages from dating 21 whales collected 1860-1901 and recalculating dates of 23 molluscs collected 1857-1926. Most of the whales were caught along the coast of Norway, but one is from France and one from Iceland. We assume the former mainly lived in the North and equatorial Atlantic and in the Norwegian Sea. Whales feed only on pelagic organisms and will provide the reservoir age for the open ocean surface water. However, they travel long distances and will integrate the reservoir ages of the different water masses along their way. Molluscs (dated from Norway, Spitsbergen and Arctic Canada) are stationary and monitor the sea water passing their dwelling site, but some also take up carbon from particulate food or sediment pore water. Coastal water also often contains some continental carbon. We present two different views on how to analyze and interpret the data. Mangerud recommends to use reservoir ages based on a combination of the whale and mollusc dates, i.e. 380±30 and 360±30 yr relative to Intcal04 and British oak, respectively, and a Δ R value of 20±30 for the surface water in the N-Atlantic and Norwegian Sea. Bondevik and Gulliksen maintain that the reservoir age—and Δ R—along the Norwegian coast is latitude dependant, with Δ R-values increasing from -3±22 in the South to 105±24 at Spitsbergen. Whales, reflecting North Atlantic open ocean surface water have lower Δ R (7±11) than most molluscs.

  5. Lithographic image simulation for the 21st century with 19th-century tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Ronald L.; Rosenbluth, Alan E.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of lithographic processes in semiconductor manufacturing has gone from a crude learning tool 20 years ago to a critical part of yield enhancement strategy today. Although many disparate models, championed by equally disparate communities, exist to describe various photoresist development phenomena, these communities would all agree that the one piece of the simulation picture that can, and must, be computed accurately is the image intensity in the photoresist. The imaging of a photomask onto a thin-film stack is one of the only phenomena in the lithographic process that is described fully by well-known, definitive physical laws. Although many approximations are made in the derivation of the Fourier transform relations between the mask object, the pupil, and the image, these and their impacts are well-understood and need little further investigation. The imaging process in optical lithography is modeled as a partially-coherent, Kohler illumination system. As Hopkins has shown, we can separate the computation into 2 pieces: one that takes information about the illumination source, the projection lens pupil, the resist stack, and the mask size or pitch, and the other that only needs the details of the mask structure. As the latter piece of the calculation can be expressed as a fast Fourier transform, it is the first piece that dominates. This piece involves computation of a potentially large number of numbers called Transmission Cross-Coefficients (TCCs), which are correlations of the pupil function weighted with the illumination intensity distribution. The advantage of performing the image calculations this way is that the computation of these TCCs represents an up-front cost, not to be repeated if one is only interested in changing the mask features, which is the case in Model-Based Optical Proximity Correction (MBOPC). The down side, however, is that the number of these expensive double integrals that must be performed increases as the square of the mask unit cell area; this number can cause even the fastest computers to balk if one needs to study medium- or long-range effects. One can reduce this computational burden by approximating with a smaller area, but accuracy is usually a concern, especially when building a model that will purportedly represent a manufacturing process. This work will review the current methodologies used to simulate the intensity distribution in air above the resist and address the above problems. More to the point, a methodology has been developed to eliminate the expensive numerical integrations in the TCC calculations, as the resulting integrals in many cases of interest can be either evaluated analytically, or replaced by analytical functions accurate to within machine precision. With the burden of computing these numbers lightened, more accurate representations of the image field can be realized, and better overall models are then possible.

  6. [A novel treatment of cholera by a Mexican physician in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-de-Romo, A C

    1995-01-01

    Doctor Felipe Castillo, head of the Hospital de San Pablo during the cholera epidemic of 1850, used "Salty water" as treatment for the patients who attended the hospital. The etiology and pathogenesis of this sickness were unknown in those days, so Castillo's conduct was surprising. This study is based on an unpublished report, classified as anonymous, that Castillo gave to the Governor of Mexico City during the cholera epidemic.

  7. Causes of irregularities in trends of global mean surface temperature since the late 19th century

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    The time series of monthly global mean surface temperature (GST) since 1891 is successfully reconstructed from known natural and anthropogenic forcing factors, including internal climate variability, using a multiple regression technique. Comparisons are made with the performance of 40 CMIP5 models in predicting GST. The relative contributions of the various forcing factors to GST changes vary in time, but most of the warming since 1891 is found to be attributable to the net influence of increasing greenhouse gases and anthropogenic aerosols. Separate statistically independent analyses are also carried out for three periods of GST slowdown (1896–1910, 1941–1975, and 1998–2013 and subperiods); two periods of strong warming (1911–1940 and 1976–1997) are also analyzed. A reduction in total incident solar radiation forcing played a significant cooling role over 2001–2010. The only serious disagreements between the reconstructions and observations occur during the Second World War, especially in the period 1944–1945, when observed near-worldwide sea surface temperatures (SSTs) may be significantly warm-biased. In contrast, reconstructions of near-worldwide SSTs were rather warmer than those observed between about 1907 and 1910. However, the generally high reconstruction accuracy shows that known external and internal forcing factors explain all the main variations in GST between 1891 and 2015, allowing for our current understanding of their uncertainties. Accordingly, no important additional factors are needed to explain the two main warming and three main slowdown periods during this epoch. PMID:29881771

  8. George William Hill, the Great but Unknown 19th Century Celestial Mechanician

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Brenda G.

    2012-01-01

    George William Hill (1838-1914) has long been considered one of the most famous and talented celestial mechanicians of the past century and a half. However, many people have never heard of him and his work. Simon Newcomb said he "will easily rank as the greatest master of mathematical astronomy during the last quarter of the nineteenth century.” After receiving a B.A. at Rutgers in 1859, Hill began work in 1861 at the office of the American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac in Cambridge, MA. He moved to Washington with the group in 1882 which then became part of the U. S. Naval Observatory. Newcomb, beginning his work on planetary motion, assigned the theory of Jupiter and Saturn to him, calling it about the most difficult topic. Hill's work was published by the USNO in 1890 as A New Theory of Jupiter and Saturn. From 1898 to 1901, Hill lectured on the subject of celestial mechanics at Columbia University in a position created just for him. After 1892 and until his death, he lived at the family homestead in West Nyack, NY. He never married, was something of a recluse, and spent most of his time with his books and research. Hill was an amateur botanist and enjoyed exploring on long walks in the countryside. Many honors and awards came to him during his lifetime, both from the U.S. and abroad, including serving as president of the American Mathematical Society. All of Hill's mathematical and astronomical research was incorporated in The Collected Mathematical Works of George William Hill. This work, containing a preface in French by Poincare, was published in 4 large volumes by the Carnegie Institution of Washington in 1905.

  9. Edison and the pure science ideal in 19th-century america.

    PubMed

    Hounshell, D A

    1980-02-08

    Between 1878 and 1882, key members of the American scientific community played an important role in Thomas A. Edison's work on electric lighting. Impressed by his abilities, these scientists came to regard Edison as a peer and led him to see himself as a scientific man. But Edison's high standing among scientists and the American public and his professed self-image as a scientist provoked America's noted experimental physicist, Henry A. Rowland, to make a "Plea for pure science" before the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1883.

  10. Present-day central African forest is a legacy of the 19th century human history

    PubMed Central

    Morin-Rivat, Julie; Fayolle, Adeline; Favier, Charly; Bremond, Laurent; Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Bayol, Nicolas; Lejeune, Philippe; Beeckman, Hans; Doucet, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    The populations of light-demanding trees that dominate the canopy of central African forests are now aging. Here, we show that the lack of regeneration of these populations began ca. 165 ya (around 1850) after major anthropogenic disturbances ceased. Since 1885, less itinerancy and disturbance in the forest has occurred because the colonial administrations concentrated people and villages along the primary communication axes. Local populations formerly gardened the forest by creating scattered openings, which were sufficiently large for the establishment of light-demanding trees. Currently, common logging operations do not create suitable openings for the regeneration of these species, whereas deforestation degrades landscapes. Using an interdisciplinary approach, which included paleoecological, archaeological, historical, and dendrological data, we highlight the long-term history of human activities across central African forests and assess the contribution of these activities to present-day forest structure and composition. The conclusions of this sobering analysis present challenges to current silvicultural practices and to those of the future. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20343.001 PMID:28093097

  11. Fresnel's original interpretation of complex numbers in 19th century optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Ricardo

    2018-04-01

    In 1823, Fresnel published an original (physical) interpretation of complex numbers in his investigations of refraction and reflection of polarized light. This is arguably the first time that complex numbers were given a physical interpretation, which led to a better understanding of elliptical and circular polarizations. This rather unknown episode of the history of physics is described in this work, and some of the pedagogical lessons that can be extracted from it are discussed.

  12. [Images of nursing mothers in France, 18th and 19th centuries].

    PubMed

    Morel, Marie-France

    2010-01-01

    As they became more widely adopted in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century France, wet-nursing and wet-nurses appeared prominently in the iconography of the time. Such images turned negative as criticism against “mercenary breast-feeding” mounted. Over the nineteenth century in particular, wet-nurses were heavily featured in press caricatures: they were being mocked while described as simple-minded, dumb, greedy creatures, with proclivities ranging from a taste for garish attire, to sexual appetites fuelling trysts in public gardens with soldiers on leave. A representative sample of such images will be selected to highlight the codes and values underpinning this mockery.

  13. Occult Genres and the Certification of Madness in a 19th-Century Lunatic Asylum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkenkotter, Carol; Hanganu-Bresch, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Using archival admissions records and case histories of patients at a British asylum from the 1860s to the 1870s, the authors examine the medical certification process leading to the asylum confinement of individuals judged to be "of unsound mind." These institutional texts are, the authors suggest, "occult genres" that…

  14. Fluid Mechanics and Complex Variable Theory: Getting Past the 19th Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Paul K.

    2017-01-01

    The subject of fluid mechanics is a rich, vibrant, and rapidly developing branch of applied mathematics. Historically, it has developed hand-in-hand with the elegant subject of complex variable theory. The Westmont College NSF-sponsored workshop on the revitalization of complex variable theory in the undergraduate curriculum focused partly on…

  15. Astronomy in "Serbskij Narodnij List" / "Serbian National Weekly" / (first half of the 19th century)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, B. D.

    2003-10-01

    The Editor in Chief of the cited weekly was our famous writer and journalist Teodor Pavlovic (1804-1854), founder of the Gallery of Matica Srpska, and the Editor in chief of the oldest monthly in Europe - "Letopis Matice Srpske" / "Annals of Matica Srpska"/. Reviewed, in this paper, are 21+2 articles dealing with Astronomy. The majority of them had no author undersigned, so that one may suspect them having been written by Pavlovic himself. Starting by explaining the appearance of comets and their characteristics, on the occasion of Halley's comet return, the eclipses of the Sun and the Moon, they included also the discussion of the origins of the Universe and the formation of stars and nebulae. It is interesting that the Serbs, of those times, had the opportunity to read such articles. Certainly the editor was asked to answer questions addressed by the subcribers. It is a great pity and a loss that his correspondence has not been saved.

  16. Reconstruction of climate in China during 17th-19th centuries using Chinese chronological records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pao; Lin, Kuan-Hui; Liao, Yi-Chun; Lee, Shih-Yu; Liao, Hsiung-Ming; Pai, Pi-Ling; Fan, I.-Chun

    2017-04-01

    Chinese historical documents are an extremely useful source from which much climate information can be retrieved if treated carefully. This is especially relevant to the reconstruction of climate in East Asia in the last 2000 years as the Chinese has kept official chronicles since 500BC and China also represents a large portion of East Asia's land. In addition, there are also local records in many cities and counties. When available, such documentary sources are often superior to environmental proxy data, especially in the time resolution as they usually provide at least annual resolution and even as high as daily records in some cases. This research will report on our recent advances on using a new REACHS dataset that collects primarily documented meteorological records from thousands of imperial and local chronicles in the Chinese history for more than 2000 years. The meteorological records were digitized and coded in the relational database management system in which accurate time (from yearly to daily), space (from province to city/county) and event (from meteorological to phonological and social) information is carefully reserved for analysis. We then formed digital climate series and performed time series and spatial analysis on them to obtain their temporal and spatial characteristics. Our present research results on the annual and seasonal temperature reconstruction during 17th-19th indicates lower temperature in the 17th century. There were also strangely high occurrence frequency of summer snowfall records in the lower reaches of Yangtze River during the Maunder Minimum. Reconstructed precipitation series fluctuated with strong regional character in the Northeast, Central-east and Southeast China. Spectral analysis shows that precipitation series have significant periodicity of 3-5 and 8-12 years during the period, suggesting strong interannual variability and different regional signatures. Flood happened frequently but long lasting drought was more frequently occurred in the 17th than in the following century. Furthermore drought is highly correlated with locust records, especially in the 17th century. The temporal and spatial variability of the climate reconstruction implies hierarchical and multi-scaled climate variability and a likely changing regime of monsoon: its spatial distribution, pattern and intensity. More detailed spatial-temporal analysis will be applied to analyze the dynamism.

  17. [Medical and pharmaceutical association in Spain in the second half of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Arroyo Medina, P

    1997-01-01

    It was happened a increase of the medical and pharmaceutical association, in the middle of XIX Century. This policy was not new, but now it has an different significance. The new sanitary corporation will be developed around a bourgeoisie. Dea: the professional attitude of its members. And its aim will be articulate the affairs of these class. They become one off the elements of the Liberal State. They are identified with theirs internal aims, that speak about the professional and scientific problems of these class.

  18. Cooking up a culinary identity for Belgium. Gastrolinguistics in two Belgian cookbooks (19th century).

    PubMed

    Parys, Nathalie

    2013-12-01

    The notion of cookbooks as socio-historic markers in a society is generally accepted within food studies. As both representations and prescriptions of food practices, perceived habits and attitudes towards food, they represent a certain identity for their readers. This paper investigates the nature of the identity that Belgian cookbooks constructed through their rhetoric. An important part of this study is to explore how and to what extent explicit reference to Belgium was made. To this end recipe titles/labels and recipe comments used in two leading bourgeois cookbooks from nineteenth-century Belgium were subjected to a quantitative and qualitative content analysis. The analysis showed that clear attention was paid to national culinary preferences. In terms of a domestic culinary corpus, it became apparent that both the Dutch and French editions of these cookbooks promoted dishes that were ascribed a Belgian origin. Internationality, however, was also an important building block of Belgian culinary identity. It was part of the desire of Belgian bourgeoisie to connect with an international elite. It fit into the 'search for sophistication', which was also expressed through the high representation of the more costly meats and sweet dishes. In addition, other references associated with bourgeois norms and values, such as family, convenience and frugality, were additional building blocks of Belgian culinary identity. Other issues such as tradition, innovation and health, were also matters of concerns to these Belgian cookbooks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Present-day central African forest is a legacy of the 19th century human history.

    PubMed

    Morin-Rivat, Julie; Fayolle, Adeline; Favier, Charly; Bremond, Laurent; Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Bayol, Nicolas; Lejeune, Philippe; Beeckman, Hans; Doucet, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-17

    The populations of light-demanding trees that dominate the canopy of central African forests are now aging. Here, we show that the lack of regeneration of these populations began ca. 165 ya (around 1850) after major anthropogenic disturbances ceased. Since 1885, less itinerancy and disturbance in the forest has occurred because the colonial administrations concentrated people and villages along the primary communication axes. Local populations formerly gardened the forest by creating scattered openings, which were sufficiently large for the establishment of light-demanding trees. Currently, common logging operations do not create suitable openings for the regeneration of these species, whereas deforestation degrades landscapes. Using an interdisciplinary approach, which included paleoecological, archaeological, historical, and dendrological data, we highlight the long-term history of human activities across central African forests and assess the contribution of these activities to present-day forest structure and composition. The conclusions of this sobering analysis present challenges to current silvicultural practices and to those of the future.

  20. The worldwide impact of Donati's comet on art and society in the mid-19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, Antonella; Galli, Daniele; Nenzi, Laura

    2011-06-01

    Donati's comet was one of the most spectacular astronomical events of the nineteenth century. Its extended sword-like tail was a spectacular sight that inspired several literary and artistic representations. Traces of Donati's comet are found in popular magazines, children's books, collection cards, and household objects through the beginning of the twentieth century.

  1. [Experimental testing of Pflüger's reflex hypothesis of menstruation in late 19th century].

    PubMed

    Simmer, H H

    1980-07-01

    Pflüger's hypothesis of a nerve reflex as the cause of menstruation published in 1865 and accepted by many, nonetheless did not lead to experimental investigations for 25 years. According to this hypothesis the nerve reflex starts in the ovary by an increase of the intraovarian pressure by the growing follicles. In 1884 Adolph Kehrer proposed a program to test the nerve reflex, but only in 1890, Cohnstein artificially increased the intraovarian pressure in women by bimanual compression from the outside and the vagina. His results were not convincing. Six years later, Strassmann injected fluids into ovaries of animals and obtained changes in the uterus resembling those of oestrus. His results seemed to verify a prognosis derived from Pflüger's hypothesis. Thus, after a long interval, that hypothesis had become a paradigma. Though reasons can be given for the delay, it is little understood, why experimental testing started so late.

  2. Eta Carina: What was the Great Eruption in the 19th Century?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore; Eta Carina Bunch

    2018-01-01

    In the 1840’s, Eta Carina brightened to rival Sirius in apparent magnitude only to fade to naked-eye visibility for 5 decades, brightened somewhat in the 1890s and faded again until the 1940’s when it began a progressive brightening that continues. Today Eta Carina is a massive binary (100 Mo and 30 Mo) with a 5.54-year period, immersed in a massive (>40Mo) dusty, bipolar nebula. The radiation and kinetic energy of the 1840s event rivals that of a supernova, but the binary survived. While Eta Carina is suggested to be a supernova imposter, most imposters, seen in nearby galaxies, lead to actual supernova events months to years afterwards, yet the binary, Eta Carina, is still with us 170 years after the outburst.With modern observatories we are gaining much insight on the massive binary--followed by many ground-based telescopes, the fossil wind structures--mapped with HST/STIS, the Little Homunculus--discovered with HST/STIS and Homunculus--now being studied with ALMA. 3D models are able to explain much of the structures, but potentially much material remains hidden in the form of molecules on the far side of the Homunculus in the equatorial skirt region, where Herschel observations indicate the bulk of dust-emitting continuum resides.Was there a third star that became a supernova? Did one of the two stars go through a near supernova experience?This poster will summarize observations and modeling of the current system in hopes that theorists will become interested in providing scenarios and models that led to the ejecta and binary we observe today.

  3. The dynamics of scarlet fever epidemics in England and Wales in the 19th century.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, C. J.; Duncan, S. R.; Scott, S.

    1996-01-01

    There was a marked rise in scarlet fever mortality in England and Wales in the mid-nineteenth century and spectral analysis of the registration details, 1847-80, shows that the interepidemic interval was 5-6 years, but after 1880 the endemic level fell and the fatal epidemics disappeared. The dynamics of the scarlet fever epidemics can be represented by a linearized mathematical model and because the system is lightly damped, it could be driven by an oscillation in susceptibility. Epidemics were significantly correlated with dry conditions in spring/summer (P < 0.001), suggesting that these produced a low amplitude oscillation in susceptibility which drove the system. Epidemics also correlated (P < 0.001) with an oscillation in wheat prices but at a lag of 3 years, suggesting that malnutrition during pregnancy caused increased susceptibility in the subsequent children which interacted synergistically with seasonal dry conditions. Scarlet fever mortality was sharply reduced after 1880 in parallel with falling wheat prices suggesting that the remarkable period of high scarlet fever mortality (1840-80) was dependent on poor nutritive levels during that time. PMID:8972674

  4. The dynamics of scarlet fever epidemics in England and Wales in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Duncan, C J; Duncan, S R; Scott, S

    1996-12-01

    There was a marked rise in scarlet fever mortality in England and Wales in the mid-nineteenth century and spectral analysis of the registration details, 1847-80, shows that the interepidemic interval was 5-6 years, but after 1880 the endemic level fell and the fatal epidemics disappeared. The dynamics of the scarlet fever epidemics can be represented by a linearized mathematical model and because the system is lightly damped, it could be driven by an oscillation in susceptibility. Epidemics were significantly correlated with dry conditions in spring/summer (P < 0.001), suggesting that these produced a low amplitude oscillation in susceptibility which drove the system. Epidemics also correlated (P < 0.001) with an oscillation in wheat prices but at a lag of 3 years, suggesting that malnutrition during pregnancy caused increased susceptibility in the subsequent children which interacted synergistically with seasonal dry conditions. Scarlet fever mortality was sharply reduced after 1880 in parallel with falling wheat prices suggesting that the remarkable period of high scarlet fever mortality (1840-80) was dependent on poor nutritive levels during that time.

  5. Jean-Martin Charcot's Role in the 19th Century Study of Music Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Julene K.; Lorch, Marjorie; Nicolas, Serge; Graziano, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-93) was a well-known French neurologist. Although he is widely recognized for his discovery of several neurological disorders and his research into aphasia, Charcot's ideas about how the brain processes music are less well known. Charcot discussed the music abilities of several patients in the context of his "Friday…

  6. Two Web-GIS Projects on Russian Historical Sources of the 15-19th Centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Aleksei A.; Golubinskiy, Aleksei A.

    2018-05-01

    The paper describes an experience of online-publication of Russian archival materials by means of two web-GIS projects. The first project is devoted to publication of the collection of the earliest Russian cartographic drawings (mainly 2nd half of the 17th century), which cover a significant part of Russian territory, mainly the European part (http://rgada.info/geos2). Most of them have never been published and were not easily accessible for scholars and users due to poor physical condition. We tried to combine opportunities of geocoding of the picture with capacity to use an authentic image. The second project offers the results of localization of toponyms and land parcels from various documents (15-19th cc.) connected with one region of the Russian State called Bezhetsk Upland (http://rgada.info/bezheck/popup.html). These results were arranged in the set of layers which may be combined by the user.

  7. Teaching of History of 19th Century Russia in the Visegrád Group Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kmet, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    The study focuses on the content and extent of teaching of Russian history, or history of Russian culture and civilization, in the teaching of history in the states of the Visegrád Group (i.e. in Hungary, the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia). In each of these states, the subject of history (sometimes in different names) has a different status,…

  8. Long 19th Century? Long 20th? Retooling that Last Chunk of World History Periodization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stearns, Peter N.

    2009-01-01

    As in any historical endeavor, periodization is an attempt to manage change, and present it coherently, by noting points where key breaks in framework occur. In world history, periodization has come to convey, particularly, shifts in the pattern of interactions and contacts among many, though not always all, major societies. In this article, the…

  9. Gestural Enthymemes: Delivering Movement in 18th- and 19th-Century Medical Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sara

    2009-01-01

    This article contributes to recent efforts to add life and movement to rhetorical studies by focusing on the representation of movement in medical texts. More specifically, this study examines medical texts, illustrations, and photographs involving movement by Johann Casper Lavater, G. B. Duchenne de Bologne, Charles Darwin, and Etienne-Jules…

  10. The second missing link: Bible nursing in 19th century London.

    PubMed

    Denny, E

    1997-12-01

    The London Bible and Domestic Female Mission was founded in 1857 by Ellen Ranyard. A nursing mission was added in 1868. The structure and work of the mission can be used to exemplify three strategies utilized in Victorian philanthropy. First, the use of working class women in the maintenance of social order, secondly the utilization of the middle class household to exemplify relations between the social classes, and thirdly the creation of districts in an attempt to recreate a 'golden age' of rural communities. Ranyard created a women's mission to women. As such it did not display the gender division of labour apparent in much health and caring work, but a hierarchical division of labour based on social class is evident.

  11. Properties of sunspot cycles and hemispheric wings since the 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leussu, Raisa; Usoskin, Ilya G.; Arlt, Rainer; Mursula, Kalevi

    2016-08-01

    Aims: The latitudinal evolution of sunspot emergence over the course of the solar cycle, the so-called butterfly diagram, is a fundamental property of the solar dynamo. Here we present a study of the butterfly diagram of sunspot group occurrence for cycles 7-10 and 11-23 using data from a recently digitized sunspot drawings by Samuel Heinrich Schwabe in 1825-1867, and from RGO/USAF/NOAA(SOON) compilation of sunspot groups in 1874-2015. Methods: We developed a new, robust method of hemispheric wing separation based on an analysis of long gaps in sunspot group occurrence in different latitude bands. The method makes it possible to ascribe each sunspot group to a certain wing (solar cycle and hemisphere), and separate the old and new cycle during their overlap. This allows for an improved study of solar cycles compared to the common way of separating the cycles. Results: We separated each hemispheric wing of the butterfly diagram and analysed them with respect to the number of groups appearing in each wing, their lengths, hemispheric differences, and overlaps. Conclusions: The overlaps of successive wings were found to be systematically longer in the northern hemisphere for cycles 7-10, but in the southern hemisphere for cycles 16-22. The occurrence of sunspot groups depicts a systematic long-term variation between the two hemispheres. During Schwabe time, the hemispheric asymmetry was north-dominated during cycle 9 and south-dominated during cycle 10.

  12. Spatial relationships between tropical cyclone frequencies and population densities in Haiti since the 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    The second edition of the United Nations Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction in 2011 outlined that the worldwide physical exposure to tropical cyclones increased by 192 per cent between 1970 and 2010. For the past 160 years, the Republic of Haiti has experienced numerous tropical storms and hurricanes which may have directly effected the country's development path. However, statistical data regarding storm frequencies and population densities in space and time show that the population's exposure in Haiti may have more negatively influenced its development than the actual number of storms and hurricanes. Haitians, in particular, those living in urban areas have been exposed to much higher tropical cyclone hazards than rural areas since the second half of the 20th century. Specifically, more storms made landfall in regions of accelerated migration/urbanization, such as, in departments Ouest, Artibonite, Nord, and Nord-Ouest with Haiti's four largest cities Port-au-Prince, Gonaives, Cap-Haitien and Port-de-Paix.

  13. Shaping the Values of Youth: Sunday School Books in 19th Century America

    Science.gov Websites

    develop accessible digital/electronic collections, unfortunately, not all are. The MSU Libraries are able to provide remediated, accessible versions of digital/electronic library documents to library users

  14. Then and Now: Fundraising during a Fiscal Crisis--Lessons from the 19th Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscatelli, Anton; Mackay, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    A housing and municipal construction bubble popped and generated a lending crisis in which interbank lending rates became impossibly high. The banking crisis, which spread across Europe and the United States, eventually impacted other industries, leading to a stock market crash and an economic contraction lasting several years. This was not in…

  15. Relationship between Spain and the United States during the 18th and 19th Centuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-21

    buiena correspandencis pars lo sucesivo; y si esta se difiriese a quando hubiese salida dle sus aprielas, ni sot voluntad estaria tan bien dispuesta, ni...ndidndase a voluntad . se podrdn internar hacia nuestres posesiones par [a espalda de Is Luisisna. H-ay que tcner presente quc el rio San Larenzo por el...serd en su mano on poderoso ynstrumento. pars menearlo a so voluntad contra dichas naciones: y que Wse no quedara sin exercicia, por mocha tiempo nadie

  16. 19th century pioneers of intensive therapy in North America. Part 2: Joseph O'Dwyer.

    PubMed

    Trubuhovich, Ronald V

    2008-06-01

    Dr Joseph O'Dwyer's principal distinction lies in his dedication and achievements in battling laryngeal diphtheria among children at the New York Foundling Asylum, where he was a physician from 1872. He was also active at the Presbyterian Hospital of New York and in private practice. Some of his pioneering work anticipated methods of intensive care medicine. His achievements included: * Introduction of a practical system of intralaryngeal intubation, including designs of tubes and a technique for inserting them, after many years of careful study and experimentation - always "without borrowed inspiration". * Use of his tubes in children with diphtheritic pseudomembranes in the larynx, to substantially increase their survival chances at a time when tracheotomy for this problem still had a high failure rate. The first intubated patient recovered, November 1882, only after change to prolonged wearing of a tracheotomy tube, so O'Dwyer did not date his first intubation success until 21 May 1884. * Introduction of his tubes into the Fell method of forced respiration, with the resultant Fell-O'Dwyer apparatus supplying practical instrumentation for intermittent positive pressure ventilation. * Demonstration that this apparatus, primarily used for saving lives after acute opiate poisoning, was also useful with some intracranial disasters, 1894. * Provision of a system, which others then applied, enabling surgeons to overcome the great "pneumothorax problem" of intrathoracic operations, and thereby conduct safe surgery inside the chest, 1898. * Development of an intubating method using successive short-term dilatations for treating chronic laryngeal stenosis, usually syphilitic, in adults, 1885. Throughout his medical lifetime, O'Dwyer was held in the highest regard as an altruistic, compassionate person of "sincere simplicity and frank goodness of character".

  17. Women Physicians, Coeducation and the Struggle for Professional Standards in 19th Century Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morantz, Regina Markell

    Orthodox medical education for women in the nineteenth century is examined to determine to what extent women's actual experience reflected their stated goals. It is contended that although women successfully founded some medical schools providing creditable, and in some cases outstanding, training to females, women physicians' ambivalence about…

  18. [The opiate pharmacopeia in France from its origins to the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Warolin, Christian

    2010-04-01

    For thousands of years, opium was the main remedy against pain. Its analgesic properties have been known since antiquity, as well as its stupefacient, narcotic and addictive effects. A countless number of opiate galenical preparations had already been formulated by the beginning of our era. The best-known were electuaries, complex drugs combining multiple active substances, essentially plant-based, used to obtain beneficial effects for different aliments. These universal remedies were panaceas. Sonne opium--or opiate--based electuaries were recommended as antidotes to poison or snake venom. The best-known, Mithridate and Theriac Andromache (Venice Treacle), the latter also containing viper flesh, combined up to a hundred or so ingredients. However, this polypharmacy was criticized and it was an English doctor, Thomas Sydenham, to whom we owe the preparation of a liquid laudanum which was easier to administer than an electuary. Sydenham's laudanum (1683) was adopted by ail the pharmacopeias. Later, based on a traditional research approach, pharmacists attempted to isolate the active principles of opium. Seguin, but above ail the German pharmacist Sertürner (in 1805 and 1817) isolated morphine. Organic chemists took over from the analysts, and morphine derivatives were obtained by hemi-synthesis (heroin), and then central analgesics, or opioids, by total synthesis. Opium is no longer seen as the only supreme remedy for painful disorders, and its galenic forms have gradually disappeared from pharmacopeias.

  19. Large numbers of vertebrates began rapid population decline in the late 19th century

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haipeng; Xiang-Yu, Jinggong; Dai, Guangyi; Gu, Zhili; Ming, Chen; Yang, Zongfeng; Ryder, Oliver A.; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Fu, Yun-Xin; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated losses of biodiversity are a hallmark of the current era. Large declines of population size have been widely observed and currently 22,176 species are threatened by extinction. The time at which a threatened species began rapid population decline (RPD) and the rate of RPD provide important clues about the driving forces of population decline and anticipated extinction time. However, these parameters remain unknown for the vast majority of threatened species. Here we analyzed the genetic diversity data of nuclear and mitochondrial loci of 2,764 vertebrate species and found that the mean genetic diversity is lower in threatened species than in related nonthreatened species. Our coalescence-based modeling suggests that in many threatened species the RPD began ∼123 y ago (a 95% confidence interval of 20–260 y). This estimated date coincides with widespread industrialization and a profound change in global living ecosystems over the past two centuries. On average the population size declined by ∼25% every 10 y in a threatened species, and the population size was reduced to ∼5% of its ancestral size. Moreover, the ancestral size of threatened species was, on average, ∼22% smaller than that of nonthreatened species. Because the time period of RPD is short, the cumulative effect of RPD on genetic diversity is still not strong, so that the smaller ancestral size of threatened species may be the major cause of their reduced genetic diversity; RPD explains 24.1–37.5% of the difference in genetic diversity between threatened and nonthreatened species. PMID:27872315

  20. Canoe Journeys and Cultural Revival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansen, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    For the state of Washington's one-hundredth birthday, in 1989, Native peoples there decided to revive a distinctive mode of transportation--long-distance journeys by canoe--along with an entire culture associated with it. Born as the "Paddle to Seattle," during the past two decades these canoe journeys have become a summertime staple for…

  1. A graph with fractional revival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Pierre-Antoine; Chan, Ada; Loranger, Érika; Tamon, Christino; Vinet, Luc

    2018-02-01

    An example of a graph that admits balanced fractional revival between antipodes is presented. It is obtained by establishing the correspondence between the quantum walk on a hypercube where the opposite vertices across the diagonals of each face are connected and, the coherent transport of single excitations in the extension of the Krawtchouk spin chain with next-to-nearest neighbour interactions.

  2. WHAT IS BEING REVIVED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CORBETT, EDWARD P.J.

    THIS BRIEF HISTORICAL SURVEY OF THE RHETORICAL TRADITION FROM ARISTOTLE TO KENNETH BURKE EMPHASIZES THE CHANGES IN THE DEFINITION OF RHETORIC AND IN THE SCOPE OF THE DISCIPLINE. TO REVEAL WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO RHETORICAL TRAINING IN THE NINETEENTH AND EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURIES, THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF THE BOYLSTON PROFESSORSHIP OF RHETORIC AT…

  3. Multiple oil pay revives interest

    SciTech Connect

    Stremel, K.

    1984-03-01

    Good, relatively shallow multiple pay oil potential is reviving interest in the flanks of the prolific Big Horn Basin. Operators say that although the areal extent of the basin's fields may not be that large, potential pay zones can exceed 250 feet. Several companies have stepped up geophysical work and activity. A discussion of trapping systems, test wells and stratigraphy studies are included from various petroleum companies. The interest was sparked by lower acreage costs and poor economic conditions elsewhere.

  4. Death and revival of chaos.

    PubMed

    Kaszás, Bálint; Feudel, Ulrike; Tél, Tamás

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the death and revival of chaos under the impact of a monotonous time-dependent forcing that changes its strength with a non-negligible rate. Starting on a chaotic attractor it is found that the complexity of the dynamics remains very pronounced even when the driving amplitude has decayed to rather small values. When after the death of chaos the strength of the forcing is increased again with the same rate of change, chaos is found to revive but with a different history. This leads to the appearance of a hysteresis in the complexity of the dynamics. To characterize these dynamics, the concept of snapshot attractors is used, and the corresponding ensemble approach proves to be superior to a single trajectory description, that turns out to be nonrepresentative. The death (revival) of chaos is manifested in a drop (jump) of the standard deviation of one of the phase-space coordinates of the ensemble; the details of this chaos-nonchaos transition depend on the ratio of the characteristic times of the amplitude change and of the internal dynamics. It is demonstrated that chaos cannot die out as long as underlying transient chaos is present in the parameter space. As a condition for a "quasistatically slow" switch-off, we derive an inequality which cannot be fulfilled in practice over extended parameter ranges where transient chaos is present. These observations need to be taken into account when discussing the implications of "climate change scenarios" in any nonlinear dynamical system.

  5. Hashish revival in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Chouvy, Pierre-Arnaud; Afsahi, Kenza

    2014-05-01

    In less than a decade, Morocco reportedly saw cannabis cultivation decrease by 65%, and hashish production is widely believed to have followed the same trend. Yet large anomalies exist between the alleged fall of hashish production in Morocco and international seizure data. While no explanation for such a discrepancy existed, the main hypothesis was that cannabis cultivation and hashish production had not declined to the extent suggested by the available information. Based on existing data, on interviews with various actors, from European police sources to Moroccan cannabis cultivators, and on field research in Morocco, this article reviews contradictory available data and confronts it with observations made in the field. In the past decade cannabis cultivation underwent radical changes that could explain the discrepancy between official Moroccan cultivation and production data on the one hand, and international seizures on the other hand. The "traditional" kif cannabis variety is being rapidly replaced by hybrids with much larger resin yields and much higher potency. This unnoticed phenomenon, which slowly started in the early 2000s, explains how a two-third decline in cannabis cultivation was at least partially compensated for by three to five-fold yield increases. The fact that the massive ongoing switch to hybrid cultivation is largely unknown or unaccounted for is actually a serious issue, for it directly questions the economic strategies that are being implemented in part to reduce and suppress cannabis cultivation in the Rif. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. From classicism and idealism to scientific naturalism: Titchener's Oxford years and their impact upon his early intellectual development.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Saulo de Freitas; Marcellos, Cintia Fernandes

    2017-05-01

    Edward Titchener (1867-1927) is one of the most prominent figures in the history of American psychology from the early 20th century. Accordingly, his psychological system-structuralism-has received due attention in the secondary literature. However, a closer look at traditional interpretations of the development of Titchener's ideas reveals a series of missing elements, such as his early studies before going to Leipzig. The central goal of this article is to present the main elements of Titchener's intellectual education in Oxford, thereby showing the influence of the British tradition of the 19th century upon his early intellectual development. On the basis of hitherto unexplored primary sources, we discuss Titchener's relationship with British idealism and scientific naturalism, two movements that shaped a significant part of British psychological thinking in the 19th century. We conclude that Titchener's Oxford years are much more relevant to understanding his intellectual development than the literature has so far assumed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Early use of simulation in medical education.

    PubMed

    Owen, Harry

    2012-04-01

    An oft-cited belief that, until recently, simulators used in education of health care professionals were simple models is wrong. Hundreds of years ago and, in one instance, thousands of years ago, intricate models were used to help teach anatomy and physiology and in training in obstetrics and many surgical disciplines. Simulators were used to learn skills before performing them on patients and in high-stakes assessment.The newest technologies were often used in simulators to improve fidelity. In the 18th century, obstetric simulators could leak amniotic fluid, and blood were used to train midwives and obstetricians to recognize and manage complications of childbirth. Italy was the major source of simulators early in the 18th century, but in the 19th century, dominance in clinical simulation moved to France, Britain, and then Germany. In comparison, much of the 20th century was a "dark age" for simulation.

  8. A brief history of early neuroanesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chivukula, Srinivas; Grandhi, Ramesh; Friedlander, Robert M

    2014-04-01

    Two key discoveries in the 19th century--infection control and the development of general anesthesia--provided an impetus for the rapid advancement of surgery, especially within the field of neurosurgery. Improvements in anesthesia and perioperative care, in particular, fostered the development of meticulous surgical technique conducive to the refinement of neuroanatomical understanding and optimization of neurosurgical procedures and outcomes. Yet, even dating back to the earliest times, some form of anesthesia or perioperative pain management was used during neurosurgical procedures. Despite a few reports on anesthesia published around the time of William Morton's now-famous public demonstration of ether anesthesia in 1846, relatively little is known or written of early anesthetics in neurosurgery. In the present article the authors discuss the history of anesthesia pertaining to neurosurgical procedures and draw parallels between the refinements and developments in anesthesia care over time with some of the concomitant advances in neurosurgery.

  9. 37 CFR 2.66 - Revival of abandoned applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Applicants § 2.66 Revival of abandoned applications. (a) The applicant may file a petition to revive an... for filing a petition to revive an application abandoned because the applicant did not timely respond... proposed response. (c) The requirements for filing a petition to revive an application abandoned because...

  10. The Sephardic Revival in the United States: A Case of Ethnic Revival in a Minority Within a Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Abraham D.

    1975-01-01

    Gives a brief background of the group, reviews some recent events which suggest a revival in several areas of concern to the group, examines some sociological reasons for this revival, suggests the importance of this revival and suggests that the total Jewish community can gain from the revival. (Author/AM)

  11. The turning point from an archaic Arab medical system to an early modern European system in Jerusalem according to the Swiss physician Titus Tobler (1806-77).

    PubMed

    Lev, Efraim; Amar, Zohar

    2004-01-01

    Until the end of the Ottoman period the Hippocratic-Galenic doctrine, which had been improved by medieval Muslim medicine, was the pre-dominant medicine in the Holy Land. The penetration of modern medicine into the region was a slow process, advancing step by step over the years until it was established around the end of the 19th century.Dr. Titus Tobler, a Swiss physician of many talents, first visited Jerusalem in 1835, then again in 1845, 1857, and 1865. He reported his experiences and impressions in several books and articles. His publications portray the condition of medicine in the city before the advent of European physicians, their arrival, and the establishment of the first hospitals in the city. Thanks to his endeavours, a professional description of the medical conditions prevailing in Jerusalem in the mid-19th century is available to the public. Tobler's writings include descriptions of the healers, blood-letters, quacks, medicinal substances and their market, and the diseases and illnesses from which the inhabitants suffered. In addition, Tobler produced a detailed report of the different hospitals, pharmacies, European physicians, and their experiences. A digest of Tobler's information, its fresh systematic arrangement, and its comparison with other historical sources, early as well as recent, produces a better picture than ever previously available of the medical conditions of the city in the final years of the ascendancy of Arab medical systems and in the early stages of early modern European medicine in Jerusalem and the Holy Land.

  12. The Modern Value of Early Writings in Medicine and Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Peck, Sheldon

    2016-01-01

    This article illustrates three examples supporting the modern value of early writings in dentistry and medicine. First, by studying cases described in works published long before the era of genetic science, we are able to develop new hypotheses about familial conditions and their genetic roots. Tooth transposition is presented as an example. Second, old writings may lead us to valuable historical insights and perspectives in medicine that can be revealed only in retrospective analysis. An example of this kind of historical analysis uncovers why dentistry became unnaturally separated from mainstream medicine in the 19th century. Third, early writings become keys to unlocking forgotten knowledge that enriches our understanding of historically significant people and events. The discovery of Norman Kingsley's long forgotten pyrographic paintings after Rembrandt portraits is used as an example. Libraries, the traditional custodians of these valued old texts, must continue to be supported, and not undermined by the paperless digital revolution. Copyright American Academy of the History of Dentistry.

  13. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    By the end of the 19th century, soldiers, sailors, and practical and not-so practical inventors, had developed a stake in rocketry. Skillful theorists, like Konstantian Tsiolkovsky in Russia, were examining the fundamental scientific theories behind rocketry. They were begirning to consider the possibility of space travel

  14. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    By the end of the 19th Century, a Russian theorist, Konstantian Tsiolkovsky, was examining the fundamental scientific theories behind rocketry. He made some pioneering studies in liquid chemical rocket concepts and recommended liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen as the optimum propellants. In the 1920's, Tsiolkovsky analyzed and mathematically formulated the technique for staged vehicles to reach escape velocities from Earth.

  15. The Spanish royal philanthropic expedition to bring smallpox vaccination to the New World and Asia in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Lammoglia, Lorena; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio

    2005-11-01

    The New World was ravaged by smallpox for several centuries after the Spanish conquest. Jenner's discovery of the smallpox vaccine made possible the prevention and control of smallpox epidemics. In response to a large outbreak of smallpox in the Spanish colonies, King Charles IV appointed Francisco Xavier de Balmis to lead an expedition that would introduce Jenner's vaccine to these colonies. During the journey, the vaccine was kept viable by passing it from arm to arm in orphaned children, who were brought along expressly for that purpose and remained under the care of the orphanage's director. This expedition was the first large scale mass vaccination of its kind. The historic legacy of this pioneering event in international health should be revisited in the current era of persistent inequalities in global health.

  16. [Statistics of the activities of a veterinarian from the Canton of Neuchâtel from the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Rutti, A

    2017-01-01

    Abraham Buehler wrote a statistical sketch of his activity as a practitioner during the years 1855 to 1861 in "Les Verrières" in the Swiss Canton of Neuchâtel. He included charts relating to diseases observed in different species such as horses, cows, goats, sheep, pigs and dogs. He described the evolution of the foot and mouth epidemic in the region during the years 1855 and 1856. Abraham Buehler stated that with this work he aimed to encourage his colleagues to also collect data.

  17. The "Unsavory Researches" of Helen Campbell: A 19th-Century Journalist's Investigation of Urban Women's Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Susan

    In 1886, the New York "Tribune" ran a series of articles by Helen Campbell, "The Prisoners of Poverty," which investigated the sufferings of working women in New York's slums. Initially a fiction and housekeeping writer, Helen Campbell's home economics orientation first pointed her toward the problems of the poor. In the late…

  18. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at an Exhibit of 19th Century Photography at the Getty Museum

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Naomi J.; Druzik, Jim

    This document is a report of observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The program supports demonstrations of high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products in order to develop empirical data and experience with in-the-field applications of this advanced lighting technology. The DOE GATEWAY Demonstration Program focuses on providing a source of independent, third-party data for use in decision-making by lighting users and professionals; this data should be considered in combination with other information relevant to the particular site and application under examination. Each GATEWAY Demonstration compares SSL productsmore » against the incumbent technologies used in that location. Depending on available information and circumstances, the SSL product may also be compared to alternate lighting technologies. Though products demonstrated in the GATEWAY program may have been prescreened for performance, DOE does not endorse any commercial product or in any way guarantee that users will achieve the same results through use of these products. This report reviews the installation and use of LED PAR38 lamps to light a collection of toned albument photographic prints at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, California. Research results provided by the Getty Conservation Institute are incorporated and discussed.« less

  19. Digital recovery of 19th century surveys in Tampa Bay, Florida: Topographic charts and Public Land Surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Roy, Laura C.; McIvor, Carole C.; Gleim, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Recovery of historic data to a digital setting adresses the need for data integration through time, bridging technical gaps and differences. The goal of this study was to evaluate a marsh-to-mangrove conversion spanning 125 years and the implications for present coastal-resource management (Yates and others, 2011; Raabe and others, 2012). The U.S. Geological Survey in St. Petersburg, Fla., georectified and digitized 1870s T-sheets at four Tampa Bay locations that still supported coastal wetlands in 2000 (table 1). Nineteenth century Public Land Surveys of Township and Range lines were also digitized for each site, as a secondary data source to verify historic landscape features (table 2).

  20. Patterns of trauma and violence in 19th-century-born African American and Euro-American females.

    PubMed

    de la Cova, Carlina

    Trauma and violence has been a topic of interest to biological anthropologists. This study examined the presence of trauma, including interpersonal violence, in a sample (n=256) of African American and Euro-American females of low socioeconomic status, born from 1800 to 1877, from the Terry Collection. Individuals were statistically analyzed according to ancestry (African American and Euro-American), birth (Antebellum, Civil War, Reconstruction), and birth status (Enslaved Black, Pre-Reconstruction White, Liberated Black, Reconstruction White) cohorts to determine if differences in trauma and fracture patterning existed between African Americans and Euro-Americans. Results indicated that there were significant differences. African American females had higher rates of cranial, nasal, and hand phalanx trauma and Euro-Americans had larger frequencies of hip and radial fractures. This variation in fracture patterning could have been the result of intimate partner violence, interpersonal violence, osteoporosis, or accidental injury. Historical research revealed that many of these women were inmates in mental hospitals, further suggesting that the observed trauma may have been the result of interpersonal and structural violence induced by institutionalization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Victims and survivors: stable isotopes used to identify migrants from the Great Irish Famine to 19th century London.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Julia; Geber, Jonny; Powers, Natasha; Wilson, Andrew; Lee-Thorp, Julia; Montgomery, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Historical evidence documents mass migration from Ireland to London during the period of the Great Irish Famine of 1845-52. The rural Irish were reliant on a restricted diet based on potatoes but maize, a C(4) plant, was imported from the United States of America in 1846-47 to mitigate against Famine. In London, Irish migrants joined a population with a more varied diet. To investigate and characterize their diet, carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were obtained from bone collagen of 119 and hair keratin of six individuals from Lukin Street cemetery, Tower Hamlets (1843-54), and bone collagen of 20 individuals from the cemetery at Kilkenny Union Workhouse in Ireland (1847-51). A comparison of the results with other contemporaneous English populations suggests that Londoners may have elevated δ(15) N compared with their contemporaries in other cities. In comparison, the Irish group have lower δ(15) N. Hair analysis combined with bone collagen allows the reconstruction of perimortem dietary changes. Three children aged 5-15 years from Kilkenny have bone collagen δ(13) C values that indicate consumption of maize (C(4)). As maize was only imported into Ireland in quantity from late 1846 and 1847, these results demonstrate relatively rapid bone collagen turnover in children and highlight the importance of age-related bone turnover rates, and the impact the age of the individual can have on studies of short-term dietary change or recent migration. Stable light isotope data in this study are consistent with the epigraphic and documentary evidence for the presence of migrants within the London cemetery. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Scurvy in the Great Irish Famine: Evidence of Vitamin C Deficiency From a Mid-19th Century Skeletal Population

    PubMed Central

    Geber, Jonny; Murphy, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    Scurvy has increasingly been recognized in archaeological populations since the 1980s but this study represents the first examination of the paleopathological findings of scurvy in a known famine population. The Great Famine (1845–1852) was a watershed in Irish history and resulted in the death of one million people and the mass emigration of just as many. It was initiated by a blight which completely wiped out the potato—virtually the only source of food for the poor of Ireland. This led to mass starvation and a widespread occurrence of infectious and metabolic diseases. A recent discovery of 970 human skeletons from mass burials dating to the height of the famine in Kilkenny City (1847–1851) provided an opportunity to study the skeletal manifestations of scurvy—a disease that became widespread at this time due to the sudden lack of Vitamin C which had previously almost exclusively been provided by the potato. A three-scale diagnostic reliance approach has been employed as a statistical aid for diagnosing the disease in the population. A biocultural approach was adopted to enable the findings to be contextualized and the etiology and impact of the disease explored. The results indicate that scurvy indirectly influenced famine-induced mortality. A sex and stature bias is evident among adults in which males and taller individuals displayed statistically significantly higher levels of scorbutic lesions. The findings have also suggested that new bone formation at the foramen rotundum is a diagnostic criterion for the paleopathological identification of scurvy, particularly among juveniles. Am J Phys Anthropol, 148:512–524, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22460661

  3. Scurvy in the Great Irish Famine: evidence of vitamin C deficiency from a mid-19th century skeletal population.

    PubMed

    Geber, Jonny; Murphy, Eileen

    2012-08-01

    Scurvy has increasingly been recognized in archaeological populations since the 1980s but this study represents the first examination of the paleopathological findings of scurvy in a known famine population. The Great Famine (1845-1852) was a watershed in Irish history and resulted in the death of one million people and the mass emigration of just as many. It was initiated by a blight which completely wiped out the potato-virtually the only source of food for the poor of Ireland. This led to mass starvation and a widespread occurrence of infectious and metabolic diseases. A recent discovery of 970 human skeletons from mass burials dating to the height of the famine in Kilkenny City (1847-1851) provided an opportunity to study the skeletal manifestations of scurvy-a disease that became widespread at this time due to the sudden lack of Vitamin C which had previously almost exclusively been provided by the potato. A three-scale diagnostic reliance approach has been employed as a statistical aid for diagnosing the disease in the population. A biocultural approach was adopted to enable the findings to be contextualized and the etiology and impact of the disease explored. The results indicate that scurvy indirectly influenced famine-induced mortality. A sex and stature bias is evident among adults in which males and taller individuals displayed statistically significantly higher levels of scorbutic lesions. The findings have also suggested that new bone formation at the foramen rotundum is a diagnostic criterion for the paleopathological identification of scurvy, particularly among juveniles. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effects of English admixture and geographic distance on anthropometric variation and genetic structure in 19th-century Ireland.

    PubMed

    Relethford, J H

    1988-05-01

    The analysis of anthropometric data often allows investigation of patterns of genetic structure in historical populations. This paper focuses on interpopulational anthropometric variation in seven populations in Ireland using data collected in the 1890s. The seven populations were located within a 120-km range along the west coast of Ireland and include islands and mainland isolates. Two of the populations (the Aran Islands and Inishbofin) have a known history of English admixture in earlier centuries. Ten anthropometric measures (head length, breadth, and height; nose length and breadth; bizygomatic and bigonial breadth; stature; hand length; and forearm length) on 259 adult Irish males were analyzed following age adjustment. Discriminant and canonical variates analysis were used to determine the degree and pattern of among-group variation. Mahalanobis' distance measure, D2, was computed between each pair of populations and compared to distance measures based on geographic distance and English admixture (a binary measure indicating whether either of a pair of populations had historical indications of admixture). In addition, surname frequencies were used to construct distance measures based on random isonymy. Correlations were computed between distance measures, and their probabilities were derived using the Mantel matrix permutation method. English admixture has the greatest effect on anthropometric variation among these populations, followed by geographic distance. The correlation between anthropometric distance and geographic distance is not significant (r = -0.081, P = .590), but the correlation of admixture and anthropometric distance is significant (r = 0.829, P = .047). When the two admixed populations are removed from the analysis the correlation between geographic and anthropometric distance becomes significant (r = 0.718, P = .025). Isonymy distance shows a significant correlation with geographic distance (r = 0.425, P = .046) but not with admixture distance (r = -0.052, P = .524). The fact that anthropometrics show past patterns of gene flow and surnames do not reflects the greater impact of stochastic processes on surnames, along with the continued extinction of surnames. This study shows that 1) anthropometrics can be extremely useful in assessing population structure and history, 2) differential gene flow into populations can have a major impact on local genetic structure, and 3) microevolutionary processes can have different effects on biological characters and surnames.

  5. Reflections on 19th-Century Experience with Knowledge Diffusion: The Sixth Annual Howard Davis Memorial Lecture, April 11, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Carol H.

    1991-01-01

    Provides the text of the Howard Davis Memorial Lecture, which was presented to the Knowledge Utilization Society in 1991. The lecture describes the work of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, which was active in Great Britain the nineteenth century and compares it with current practices in the field of knowledge utilization. (12…

  6. Vegetation changes and human impact inferred from an oxbow lake in southwestern Amazonia, Brazil since the 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Zorro, Paula A.; Enters, Dirk; Hermanowski, Barbara; da Costa, Marcondes Lima; Behling, Hermann

    2015-10-01

    Pollen and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) analyses from a 272 cm-long sediment core of Lago Amapá, an oxbow lake in western Amazonia, reveal the first palaeoecological investigation of late Holocene sediments in Acre state, Brazil. Radiocarbon dating of older sediments failed due to re-deposition of organic material but a historical map suggests that lacustrine deposition started at 1900 AD. We detected two periods of changes in sediment and vegetation, dominated by pioneer taxa especially Cecropia. The first period around 1900 AD is documenting an initial oxbow lake, with regular fluvial input (high Ti) and low accumulation of organic matter (low inc/coh ratio). During that period Andean pollen taxa originating from Peruvian Andean headwaters were deposited. A fully lacustrine phase started about 1950 AD and is characterized by prolonged periods of stagnant water (low Fe/Mn ratio). The increase of pioneer taxa, sedimentation rates and a reduction of most of the XRF element counts point to a period during which Lago Amapá was a more isolated lake which was flooded only during exceptional severe flood events and is catching mainly anthropogenic disturbances. The extensive human influence during this period was assumed by 1) the high occurrence of pioneer taxa and the absence of charcoal which could indicate changes in vegetation possibly as a result of logging, 2) the Ca and Ti/K ratio which reflect changes to a local sediment source, and 3) comparison of Landsat images from the last 30 years which shows broad changes in vegetation cover and land transformation in the peripheral areas of the oxbow lake.

  7. Educational Actions of some Greek Scholars in Romania: end of 16th-beginning of 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovithis, Petros; Rovithis-Livaniou, Eleni

    2008-09-01

    The scientific work of some outstanding personalities like Chrysanthos Notaras (1668-1732), Nikiforos Theotokis (1731-1800) and Benjamin Lesvios (1759-1824), who acted and worked in Greece and Romania and contributed in the Cultural Heritage of both countries are presented and discussed. Their important role in the development and spreading of their times' sciences, mainly in Mathematics, Physics, Geography and Astronomy are referred, too.

  8. An Intensive Cultural Resource Survey for the Bank Stabilization Project: A Late 19th Century Stoneware Manufacturing Site, Bonaparte, Iowa.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    in New England where this type of mass production got underway to any extent was Bennington , Vermont . The famous works there was the brain child of...4 2 Landform Regions of Iowa ...................... 7 3 Schematic of Van Buren County Geology ................. 7 4 Soils Within...Changes. In "Pleistocene and Recent Environments of the Central Great Plains," edited by W. Dort and J. Jones, University of Kansas, Department of Geology

  9. Peter Mark Roget: physician, scientist, systematist; his thesaurus and his impact on 19th-century neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Lawrence; Finger, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Peter Mark Roget (1779-1869) is best known for his Thesaurus, a project completed late in his long life. He trained as a physician, practiced medicine, and was interested in many branches of science. Much of his life was dedicated to the systematization of knowledge and identifying relationships. Although not an experimentalist in the modern sense of the word, he contributed to "neuroscience" in journal and encyclopaedia articles, as well as in books and lectures. He wrote extensively on comparative physiology, sensory systems, phrenology, optics, and various disorders affecting the nervous system. He viewed his two-volume Bridgewater Treatise of 1834 as his most significant achievement, turning to physiology and comparative anatomy to argue that God's existence can be seen in how living forms and their components are designed. Roget was active in many scholarly organizations, most notably the Royal Society of London, where he served for more than two decades as its secretary before "retiring" to pursue his Thesaurus. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sounding Sacred: The Adoption of Biblical Archaisms in the Book of Mormon and Other 19th Century Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    The Book of Mormon is a text published in 1830 and considered a sacred work of scripture by adherents of the Latter-day Saint movement. Although written 200 years later, it exhibits many linguistic features of the King James translation of the Bible. Such stylistic imitation has been little studied, though a notable exception is Sigelman &…

  11. From Undernutrition to Overnutrition: The Evolution of Overweight and Obesity among Young Men in Switzerland since the 19th Century

    PubMed Central

    Staub, Kaspar; Bender, Nicole; Floris, Joël; Pfister, Christian; Rühli, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The global obesity epidemic continues, new approaches are needed to understand the causes. We analyzed data from an evolutionary perspective, stressing developmental plasticity. Methods We present diachronical height, weight, and BMI data for 702,902 Swiss male conscripts aged 18-20 years, a representative, standardized and unchanged data source. Results From 1875 to 1879, the height distribution was slightly left-skewed; 12.1% of the conscripts were underweight, overweight and obesity were rare. The BMI-to-height relationship was positive but not linear, and very short conscripts were particularly slim. Since the 1870s, Swiss conscripts became taller, a trend that markedly slowed in the 1990s. In contrast, weight increased in two distinct steps at the end of the 1980s and again after 2002. Since 2010, BMI did not increase but stabilized at a high level. Conclusions The body of young men adapted differently to varying living conditions over time: First, less investment in height and weight under conditions of undernutrition and food uncertainty; second, more investment in height under more stable nutritional conditions; third, development of obesity during conditions of plateaued height growth, overnutrition, and decreasing physical activity. This example contributes to the evaluation of hypotheses on human developmental plasticity. PMID:27544200

  12. Quantifying pollen-vegetation relationships to reconstruct ancient forests using 19th-century forest composition and pollen data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Andria; Paciorek, Christopher J.; McLachlan, Jason S.; Goring, Simon; Williams, John W.; Jackson, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    Mitigation of climate change and adaptation to its effects relies partly on how effectively land-atmosphere interactions can be quantified. Quantifying composition of past forest ecosystems can help understand processes governing forest dynamics in a changing world. Fossil pollen data provide information about past forest composition, but rigorous interpretation requires development of pollen-vegetation models (PVMs) that account for interspecific differences in pollen production and dispersal. Widespread and intensified land-use over the 19th and 20th centuries may have altered pollen-vegetation relationships. Here we use STEPPS, a Bayesian hierarchical spatial PVM, to estimate key process parameters and associated uncertainties in the pollen-vegetation relationship. We apply alternate dispersal kernels, and calibrate STEPPS using a newly developed Euro-American settlement-era calibration data set constructed from Public Land Survey data and fossil pollen samples matched to the settlement-era using expert elicitation. Models based on the inverse power-law dispersal kernel outperformed those based on the Gaussian dispersal kernel, indicating that pollen dispersal kernels are fat tailed. Pine and birch have the highest pollen productivities. Pollen productivity and dispersal estimates are generally consistent with previous understanding from modern data sets, although source area estimates are larger. Tests of model predictions demonstrate the ability of STEPPS to predict regional compositional patterns.

  13. Agricultural illustrations of 19th century Korea: 'Imwon gyeongjeji' (Treatises on Management of Forest and Garden) by Seo Yugu.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyung-Min

    2011-01-01

    The generative relationship between text and image has long been established. Its structure evolved historically as a result of varying understandings of the functions of art and technology. Agriculture illustration, which emerged in China during the Song dynasty, is a prime example of this creative dialogue in which aspects of both disciplines were combined. Political, technological, and aesthetic concerns informed the reformulations of this new genre. This paper will address agricultural illustrations on nineteenth-century Korea, when notable changes occurred in the visualization of agricultural texts. It will explore changes in the understanding of the roles of agriculture, technology, and labor through an analysis of shifts in modes of illustration and the texts selected. The relationship between technology and visual representations during late Joseon Korea will be contextualized through an exploration of the evolution of technical drawing in East Asia. This paper will suggest that the recognition of imagery's ability to convey textual and technical information provided an important alternative paradigm for the presentation and use of knowledge.

  14. Quantifying pollen-vegetation relationships to reconstruct ancient forests using 19th-century forest composition and pollen data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Andria; Paciorek, Christopher J.; McLachlan, Jason S.; Goring, Simon; Williams, John W.; Jackson, Stephen T.

    2016-04-01

    Mitigation of climate change and adaptation to its effects relies partly on how effectively land-atmosphere interactions can be quantified. Quantifying composition of past forest ecosystems can help understand processes governing forest dynamics in a changing world. Fossil pollen data provide information about past forest composition, but rigorous interpretation requires development of pollen-vegetation models (PVMs) that account for interspecific differences in pollen production and dispersal. Widespread and intensified land-use over the 19th and 20th centuries may have altered pollen-vegetation relationships. Here we use STEPPS, a Bayesian hierarchical spatial PVM, to estimate key process parameters and associated uncertainties in the pollen-vegetation relationship. We apply alternate dispersal kernels, and calibrate STEPPS using a newly developed Euro-American settlement-era calibration data set constructed from Public Land Survey data and fossil pollen samples matched to the settlement-era using expert elicitation. Models based on the inverse power-law dispersal kernel outperformed those based on the Gaussian dispersal kernel, indicating that pollen dispersal kernels are fat tailed. Pine and birch have the highest pollen productivities. Pollen productivity and dispersal estimates are generally consistent with previous understanding from modern data sets, although source area estimates are larger. Tests of model predictions demonstrate the ability of STEPPS to predict regional compositional patterns.

  15. The medicinal use of chocolate in early North America.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Deanna L; Grivetti, Louis E

    2008-10-01

    The medicinal use of chocolate has a long history in North America dating back to the 16th century. From Mesoamerican Codices and European Treatises scholars have determined that for hundreds of years the beverage called chocolate was administered to the sick and prescribed homeopathically to prevent illness. Yet, little scholarship exists that focuses on medicinal chocolate usage in early North America (18th-19th century). This paper examines medical practices during this era and associated medicinal norms with special attention given to chocolate/cocoa usage. Given the current scientific attention on the relationship between dark chocolate consumption and heart disease attenuation it is timely to investigate and chronicle America's medical forebears' understanding of, and practices related to, the medicinal use of chocolate. Indeed, there is a significant amount of literature to suggest that chocolate was used for wellness and to treat illness.

  16. Viking and Early Middle Ages Northern Scandinavian Textiles Proven to be made with Hemp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoglund, G.; Nockert, M.; Holst, B.

    2013-10-01

    Nowadays most plant textiles used for clothing and household are made of cotton and viscose. Before the 19th century however, plant textiles were mainly made from locally available raw materials, in Scandinavia these were: nettle, hemp and flax. It is generally believed that in Viking and early Middle Ages Scandinavia hemp was used only for coarse textiles (i.e. rope and sailcloth). Here we present an investigation of 10 Scandinavian plant fibre textiles from the Viking and Early Middle Ages, believed to be locally produced. Up till now they were all believed to be made of flax. We show that 4 textiles, including two pieces of the famous Överhogdal Viking wall-hanging are in fact made with hemp (in three cases hemp and flax are mixed). This indicates that hemp was important, not only for coarse but also for fine textile production in Viking and Early Middle Ages in Scandinavia.

  17. Viking and early Middle Ages northern Scandinavian textiles proven to be made with hemp.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, G; Nockert, M; Holst, B

    2013-10-18

    Nowadays most plant textiles used for clothing and household are made of cotton and viscose. Before the 19th century however, plant textiles were mainly made from locally available raw materials, in Scandinavia these were: nettle, hemp and flax. It is generally believed that in Viking and early Middle Ages Scandinavia hemp was used only for coarse textiles (i.e. rope and sailcloth). Here we present an investigation of 10 Scandinavian plant fibre textiles from the Viking and Early Middle Ages, believed to be locally produced. Up till now they were all believed to be made of flax. We show that 4 textiles, including two pieces of the famous Överhogdal Viking wall-hanging are in fact made with hemp (in three cases hemp and flax are mixed). This indicates that hemp was important, not only for coarse but also for fine textile production in Viking and Early Middle Ages in Scandinavia.

  18. Wavepacket revivals in monolayer and bilayer graphene rings.

    PubMed

    García, Trinidad; Rodríguez-Bolívar, Salvador; Cordero, Nicolás A; Romera, Elvira

    2013-06-12

    We have studied the existence of quantum revivals in graphene quantum rings within a simplified model. The time evolution of a Gaussian-populated wavepacket shows revivals in monolayer and bilayer graphene rings. We have also studied this behavior for quantum rings in a perpendicular magnetic field. We have found that revival time is an observable that shows different values for monolayer and bilayer graphene quantum rings. In addition, the revival time shows valley degeneracy breaking.

  19. Achieving Energy Independence by Reviving America's Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Neil; Winterer, Amey

    1982-01-01

    Discusses how it is in our nation's energy interest that cities and city living prosper and that movement of people out of cities and into nonurban areas be reversed. However, national energy policy itself favors suburban sprawl-type development and works against city revival. (AM)

  20. Debate Revives Old Arguments on HPV Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2011-01-01

    The author reports on a Republican presidential debate which revives the contention over requiring middle school girls to be vaccinated against the virus that causes cervical cancer. At the September 12 debate, U.S. Representative Michele Bachmann, of Minnesota, and Rick Santorum, a former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania, attacked Texas Governor…

  1. The Folk Music Revival on Record.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swisher, Christopher C.

    1983-01-01

    This description of the folk music "industry" as it exists in America and the British Isles focuses on the output of many small record labels which have evolved out of the folk revival. Addresses and descriptions of 16 major producers of folk music are included. Eleven references are cited. (EJS)

  2. Leagues Revive Debate in City Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Bess

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how the National Association for Urban Debate Leagues is reviving debate competitions among high school students in city schools. Starting in Atlanta in 1985 and boosted by seed money from the billionaire George Soros' Open Society Institute, urban educators and their supporters in 2002 formed the National Association for…

  3. Hospitals of Rome in the Early Nineteenth Century: The Apostolic Visit of 1825.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Jacalyn

    2016-01-01

    Pope Leo XII marked the 1825 Jubilee by visiting the hospitals of Rome. Italy was recovering from the French invasion that had disrupted social and religious structures. The Visitors investigated conditions, and recommended changes. By 1826, eight large hospitals were ordered to unite, but, three years later, the order was rescinded. Based on the Visit's mostly unexamined records in the Vatican Secret Archives, hospital registers, and minutes of the governing council held in the Archivio di Stato di Roma, this paper reconstructs the network of Rome's hospitals in the early 19 th century. It also compares Roman hospitals to its Parisian counterparts, especially with respect to governance and education. Finally, it examines the merger as an early example of a practice that remains vibrant (if controversial) today.

  4. The ethics of reviving long extinct species.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Ronald

    2014-04-01

    There now appears to be a plausible pathway for reviving species that have been extinct for several decades, centuries, or even millennia. I conducted an ethical analysis of de-extinction of long extinct species. I assessed several possible ethical considerations in favor of pursuing de-extinction: that it is a matter of justice; that it would reestablish lost value; that it would create new value; and that society needs it as a conservation last resort. I also assessed several possible ethical arguments against pursuing de-extinction: that it is unnatural; that it could cause animal suffering; that it could be ecologically problematic or detrimental to human health; and that it is hubristic. There are reasons in favor of reviving long extinct species, and it can be ethically acceptable to do so. However, the reasons in favor of pursuing de-extinction do not have to do with its usefulness in species conservation; rather, they concern the status of revived species as scientific and technological achievements, and it would be ethically problematic to promote de-extinction as a significant conservation strategy, because it does not prevent species extinctions, does not address the causes of extinction, and could be detrimental to some species conservation efforts. Moreover, humanity does not have a responsibility or obligation to pursue de-extinction of long extinct species, and reviving them does not address any urgent problem. Therefore, legitimate ecological, political, animal welfare, legal, or human health concerns associated with a de-extinction (and reintroduction) must be thoroughly addressed for it to be ethically acceptable. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. James Lawrence Cabell, one of the most influential of America's early surgeons.

    PubMed

    DuBose, Joseph; Tribble, Curt

    2015-04-01

    Dr. James Lawrence Cabell was one of the most important, farsighted, and influential surgical educators and leaders in the United States in the 19th century. He was appointed as Chair of Surgery and Physiology at the University of Virginia by Thomas Jefferson's successor as Rector of the University, James Madison, and held that Chair for over 50 years, the longest tenure of any American medical academician. He was a founding member of the American Medical Association, the American Surgical Association, and the National Board of Health. He is best remembered as an articulate, incessant, and early proponent of public health and the delivery of quality health care in the United States. His legacy and that of his protégés has continued to influence health care in this country, especially in the realm of the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases, even into the present time.

  6. The Lowland Rivers of The Netherlands - Geodiversity and Cultural Heritage on 19th and early 20th century Landscape Paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; van den Ancker, Hanneke; Moes, Constance

    2015-04-01

    One of the major Dutch landscapes is formed by lowland rivers. They divide the country in a southern and a northern part, both physically and culturally. We screened the freely available database of 19th and early 20th century paintings of Simonis & Buunk, www.simonis-buunk.com, looking for lowland river landscapes depicting geodiversity and cultural heritage relationships (See References for other landscapes). Emperor Napoleon declared The Netherlands as naturally belonging to his empire as its lands originated from muds originating in France and transported there by the big rivers. A description that may have given rise to the idea of the Netherlands as a delta, but from a geomorphological perspective The Netherlands consists of series of river plains of terrestrial origin, of which the north-western part are subsiding and invaded by the sea. Now, the rivers Meuse and Rhine (including its branches Waal and IJssel) meander through ever larger river plains before reaching the North Sea. They end in estuaries, something one would not expect of rivers with catchments discharging a large part of Western Europe. Apart from the geological subsidence, the estuaries might be due to human interference, the exploitation of peat and building of dikes since the 11th century, heavy storms and the strong tidal currents. Archaeological finds show Vikings and Romans already used the river Rhine system for trading and transporting goods. During the Roman Empire the Rhine was part of The Limes, the northern defence line of the empire. Romans already influenced the distribution of water over the different river branches. Since the middle of the 19th century groins and canalization drastically changed the character of the rivers. The 19th and early 20th century landscape paintings illustrate this change as well as changes in land use. Examples of geodiversity and cultural heritage relationships shown: - meanders and irregular banks disappear as river management increases, i.a. bends

  7. The 2010-2011 Revival of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt: Perturbations of Temperatures, Clouds and Composition from Infrared Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, G.; Fletcher, L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Baines, K.; de Pater, I.; Wong, M.; Goetz, R.; Valkov, S.; hide

    2011-01-01

    On 2010 November 9, a perturbation appeared in Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt (SEB), which began a classical "revival" of the SEB, returning the entire axisymmetric region to its normal dark color from its anomalous, light, "faded" state. The early revival is marked by strong upwelling gas at the outbreak location, to the west of which appear alternating clear and cloudy regions. Clear regions are correlated with dark clouds near the outbreak and in a southern retrograding branch but less so in a northern prograding branch. A 5-micrometer image from 2010 March 1 shows much of the SEB closer to a pre-faded state.

  8. Secularization versus religious revival in Eastern Europe: Church institutional resilience, state repression and divergent paths.

    PubMed

    Northmore-Ball, Ksenia; Evans, Geoffrey

    2016-05-01

    Despite continuing for over two decades, the debate about the nature of the trends in religiosity in post-Communist Eastern Europe remains unresolved: some arguing that these countries are undergoing the same process of secularization as the West, while others insist that the entire region is experiencing a religious revival. Using national sample surveys from the early 1990s to 2007 to examine the change in demographic predictors of religiosity, we show that Catholic and Orthodox countries are experiencing different trends, the first group displaying evidence of secularization and the second of revival, and that these two different trends are likely to derive from the legacies of state repression and the differing abilities of the churches to resist such repression. We argue that the current literature has thus taken a mistakenly general approach, and that the post-Communist region consists of at least two distinct groups of societies with different trends in religiosity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Reviving oscillations in coupled nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Senthilkumar, D V; Zhan, Meng; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-07-05

    By introducing a processing delay in the coupling, we find that it can effectively annihilate the quenching of oscillation, amplitude death (AD), in a network of coupled oscillators by switching the stability of AD. It revives the oscillation in the AD regime to retain sustained rhythmic functioning of the networks, which is in sharp contrast to the propagation delay with the tendency to induce AD. This processing delay-induced phenomenon occurs both with and without the propagation delay. Further this effect is rather general from two coupled to networks of oscillators in all known scenarios that can exhibit AD, and it has a wide range of applications where sustained oscillations should be retained for proper functioning of the systems.

  10. The early eugenics movement and emerging professional psychiatry: conceptual transfers and personal relationships between Germany and North America, 1880s to 1930s.

    PubMed

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2014-01-01

    French-Austrian psychiatrist Bénédict Augustin Morel's (1809-1873) Traits des dégénérescences physiques, intellectuelles et morales de l'espèce humaine (1857) was fully dedicated to the social problem of "degeneration" and it became very attractive to German-speaking psychiatrists during the latter half of the 19th century. Auguste Forel (1848-1931) and Constantin von Monakow (1853-1930) in Zurich integrated Morel's approach and searched for the somatic and morphological alterations in the human brain; a perspective of research that Ernst Ruedin (1874-1952) at Munich further prolonged into a thorough analysis of hereditary influences on mental health. This paper investigates the continuities and major differences within some early eugenic traditions of the emerging field of psychiatry in the German-speaking countries and North America.

  11. Thermalization and revivals after a quantum quench in conformal field theory.

    PubMed

    Cardy, John

    2014-06-06

    We consider a quantum quench in a finite system of length L described by a 1+1-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT), of central charge c, from a state with finite energy density corresponding to an inverse temperature β≪L. For times t such that ℓ/2revivals at which F is O(1), leading to an eventual complete revival with F=1. There is also interesting structure at all rational values of t/L, related to properties of the CFT under modular transformations. At early times t≪(Lβ)^{1/2} there is a universal decay F∼exp(-(πc/3)Lt^{2}/β(β^{2}+4t^{2})). The effect of an irrelevant nonintegrable perturbation of the CFT is to progressively broaden each revival at t=nL/2 by an amount O(n^{1/2}).

  12. Medical revivalism and the national movement in british India.

    PubMed

    Bala, P

    1990-07-01

    The author discusses here the efforts made to revive Ayurveda in the twentieth century by the protagonists of Ayurveda during the national movement and appraises how far political support and State patronage did good for the recrudescence of Ayurveda.

  13. 14. Credit JTL: Detail, oblique view of Egyptian Revival decorative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Credit JTL: Detail, oblique view of Egyptian Revival decorative motifs used typically at midpoints of diagonals - Reading-Halls Station Bridge, U.S. Route 220, spanning railroad near Halls Station, Muncy, Lycoming County, PA

  14. 396. MIRACLE REVIVAL TEAM PENTECOSTAL CHURCH AT 2031 WEST JEFFERSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    396. MIRACLE REVIVAL TEAM PENTECOSTAL CHURCH AT 2031 WEST JEFFERSON STREET, WEST SIDE - Russell Neighborhood, Bounded by Congress & Esquire Alley, Fifteenth & Twenty-first Streets, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  15. 178. MIRACLE REVIVAL TEAM PENTECOSTAL CHURCH AT 2031 AND 2029, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    178. MIRACLE REVIVAL TEAM PENTECOSTAL CHURCH AT 2031 AND 2029, 2027 AND 2025, SOUTH FRONTS - Russell Neighborhood, Bounded by Congress & Esquire Alley, Fifteenth & Twenty-first Streets, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  16. If You Planet, They Will Come: Reviving the CCNY Planetarium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Ellianna; DiTomasso, Victoria; Hedberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The planetarium at CUNY-City College of New York (CCNY), located in the Harlem neighborhood of NYC, has reopened its doors. Originally installed in 1973, the CCNY Planetarium had previously hosted bi-weekly shows for its own student body and for neighboring public schools throughout the 1970s, 80s and 90s. In the early 2000s, planetarium programming declined to a few shows every several years, closing its doors in late 2013. Since its revival in Spring 2016, students have run planetarium shows on the local night sky, dark energy, cosmic inflation and habitable exoplanets along with rooftop astronomy events, allowing many CCNY students to view Saturn, Jupiter and the surface of the moon through a telescope for the first time. Each of these events has been attended to capacity (75+ attendees per event), resulting in higher astronomy interest and engagement on campus. Over 80% of CCNY’s student body is composed of underrepresented populations in STEM, and the CCNY Planetarium provides an access point for current undergraduate students along with visiting elementary/high school students to gain an interest in STEM and learn about career paths in astronomy and physics. We share statistics on current engagement along with plans to incorporate cross-discipline collaborations with local public schools.

  17. The Revival of Kaon Flavour Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.

    2016-11-01

    After years of silence we should witness in the rest of this decade and in the next decade the revival of kaon flavour physics. This is not only because of the crucial measurements of the branching ratios for the rare decays K+ → π+vv¯ and KL → π0vv¯ by NA62 and KOTO that being theoretically clean and very sensitive to new physics (NP) could hint for new phenomena even beyond the reach of the LHC without any significant theoretical uncertainties. Indeed simultaneously the advances in the calculations of perturbative and in particular non-perturbative QCD effects in ɛ'/ɛ, ɛK, ΔMK, KL → μ+μ- and KL → π0ℓ+ℓ- will increase the role of these observables in searching for NP. In fact the hints for NP contributing to ɛ'/ɛ have been already signalled last year through improved estimates of hadronic matrix elements of QCD and electroweak penguin operators Q6 and Q8 by lattice QCD and large N dual QCD approach. This talk summarizes in addition to this new flavour anomaly the present highlights of this field including some results from concrete NP scenarios.

  18. Early German plans for southern observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, G.

    2002-07-01

    As early as the 18th and 19th centuries, French and English observers were active in South Africa. Around the beginning of the 20th century, Heidelberg and Potsdam astronomers proposed a southern observatory. Then Göttingen astronomers suggested building an observatory in Windhoek for photographing the sky and measuring the solar constant. In 1910 Karl Schwarzschild (1873-1916), after a visit to observatories in the United States, pointed out the usefulness of an observatory in South West Africa, in a climate superior to that in Germany, giving German astronomers access to the southern sky. Seeing tests were begun in 1910 by Potsdam astronomers, but WW I stopped the plans. In 1928 Erwin Finlay-Freundlich (1885-1964), inspired by the Hamburg astronomer Walter Baade (1893-1960), worked out a detailed plan for a southern observatory with a reflecting telescope, spectrographs and an astrograph with an objective prism. Paul Guthnick (1879-1947), director of the Berlin observatory, in cooperation with APO Potsdam and Hamburg, made a site survey to Africa in 1929 and found the conditions in Windhoek to be ideal. Observations were started in the 1930s by Berlin and Breslau astronomers, but were stopped by WW II. In the 1950s, astronomers from Hamburg and The Netherlands renewed the discussion in the framework of European cooperation, and this led to the founding of ESO in 1963.

  19. Tropical mathematics and the financial catastrophe of the 17th century. Thermoeconomics of Russia in the early 20th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. P.

    2010-03-01

    In the paper, an example is presented concerning relationships (which cannot be neglected) between mathematics and other sciences. In particular, the relationship between the tropical mathematics and the humanitarian-economic catastrophe of 17th century (related to slavery of Africans) is considered. The notion of critical state of economy of the 19th century is introduced by using the refined Fisher equation. A correspondence principle for thermodynamics of fluids and economics of the 19th century is presented.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of REVIVE SE Thrombectomy Device for Acute Ischemic Stroke: River JAPAN (Reperfuse Ischemic Vessels with Endovascular Recanalization Device in Japan).

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nobuyuki; Ota, Shinzo; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Kondo, Rei; Satow, Tetsu; Kubo, Michiya; Tsumoto, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Yukiko; Kataoka, Taketo; Imamura, Hirotoshi; Todo, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Mikito; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Toyoda, Kazunori; Ito, Yasushi; Sugiu, Kenji; Matsumaru, Yuji; Yoshimura, Shinichi

    2018-04-15

    REVIVE SE (REVIVE) is a closed-ended, self-expanding stent retriever used in the RIVER JAPAN study. We present our early experience with REVIVE for revascularization of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) in patients who have failed or are ineligible for intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment. This prospective, single-arm, non-randomized, multicenter registry study followed up patients undergoing mechanical thrombectomy with REVIVE for 90 days. The primary endpoint was a post-procedure Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score ≥2a. Secondary endpoints were clot migration/embolization; recanalization without symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) at 24 h; symptomatic ICH; good neurological outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ≤2 National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score decrease ≥10) at day 90; device- or procedure-related serious adverse events (SAEs) and mortality at day 90. To confirm non-inferiority of REVIVE, results were compared with historical data of the Merci Retriever. About 49 patients were enrolled (median age 73 years; males 46.9%; middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion 83.7%; median NIHSS score 17). A post-procedure TICI score ≥2a was observed in 73.5% (36/49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 58.9-85.1) of patients. No post-procedural clot migration/embolization events occurred. Successful recanalization without symptomatic ICH was observed in 62.5% (30/48, 95% CI 47.4-76.0). The good neurological outcome was achieved in 66.7% (32/48) patients. Symptomatic ICH and device- or procedure-related SAEs were reported in 6.3% and 12.2% of patients, respectively. Two deaths were reported. REVIVE demonstrated equivalent efficacy and safety as the Merci Retriever. Results suggest that REVIVE is effective and safe in recanalizing occluded intracranial arteries in AIS.

  1. Efficacy and Safety of REVIVE SE Thrombectomy Device for Acute Ischemic Stroke: River JAPAN (Reperfuse Ischemic Vessels with Endovascular Recanalization Device in Japan)

    PubMed Central

    SAKAI, Nobuyuki; OTA, Shinzo; MATSUMOTO, Yasushi; KONDO, Rei; SATOW, Tetsu; KUBO, Michiya; TSUMOTO, Tomoyuki; ENOMOTO, Yukiko; KATAOKA, Taketo; IMAMURA, Hirotoshi; TODO, Kenichi; HAYAKAWA, Mikito; YAMAGAMI, Hiroshi; TOYODA, Kazunori; ITO, Yasushi; SUGIU, Kenji; MATSUMARU, Yuji; YOSHIMURA, Shinichi

    2018-01-01

    REVIVE SE (REVIVE) is a closed-ended, self-expanding stent retriever used in the RIVER JAPAN study. We present our early experience with REVIVE for revascularization of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) in patients who have failed or are ineligible for intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment. This prospective, single-arm, non-randomized, multicenter registry study followed up patients undergoing mechanical thrombectomy with REVIVE for 90 days. The primary endpoint was a post-procedure Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score ≥2a. Secondary endpoints were clot migration/embolization; recanalization without symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) at 24 h; symptomatic ICH; good neurological outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ≤2 National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score decrease ≥10) at day 90; device- or procedure-related serious adverse events (SAEs) and mortality at day 90. To confirm non-inferiority of REVIVE, results were compared with historical data of the Merci Retriever. About 49 patients were enrolled (median age 73 years; males 46.9%; middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion 83.7%; median NIHSS score 17). A post-procedure TICI score ≥2a was observed in 73.5% (36/49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 58.9–85.1) of patients. No post-procedural clot migration/embolization events occurred. Successful recanalization without symptomatic ICH was observed in 62.5% (30/48, 95% CI 47.4–76.0). The good neurological outcome was achieved in 66.7% (32/48) patients. Symptomatic ICH and device- or procedure-related SAEs were reported in 6.3% and 12.2% of patients, respectively. Two deaths were reported. REVIVE demonstrated equivalent efficacy and safety as the Merci Retriever. Results suggest that REVIVE is effective and safe in recanalizing occluded intracranial arteries in AIS. PMID:29526881

  2. Can U.S. Forces Lean from Mistakes Made by British during First and Second Anglo-Afghan Wars in the 19th Century?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-29

    INDIVIDUAL STUDENT AUTHOR AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF EITHER THE MARINE COPS COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE OR · ANY OTHER GOVERNMENTAL...entered Afghanistan in April1842. This army destroyed small towns, slaughtered livestock, burned crops and chased villagers into the countryside as

  3. [The British Surgeon William Wittman's impression of Istanbul and its neighborhood's health problems surrounding at the beginning of 19th century].

    PubMed

    Görkey, S

    1993-01-01

    British surgeon William Wittman visited the Ottoman Empire between the years 1799 and 1802 as a member of the British Military Mission. The British Military Mission came to the Ottoman Territory in accordance with the alliance which was enacted between the Ottoman and British Empires after Napoleons' invasion of Egypt. William Wittman spent a year in Istanbul. Later on he went to Jaffa with the British Military Mission to join the Ottoman army. They traveled through El-Arish and Belbeis to Cairo with the army. During this time Wittman recorded the health problems and the diseases which were prevalent both in the Ottoman army and the British Military Mission. He also recorded the cases which he tried to cure. William Wittman appended three medical reports to his travel report. This article is on William Wittman's biography and his impressions of the Levant Chiflick in Istanbul; health problems, and diseases prevalent in Istanbul and its neighborhood during the period.

  4. Bites, nibbles, sips and puffs: new exotic goods in Norway in the 18th and the first half of the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Ragnhild

    2011-01-01

    The slow but significant changes in the material culture of European households that took place in the pre-industrial period are visible in several ways, such as in the changing patterns of housing, furnishing and clothing which have been illustrated in several studies. However, most of these studies focus on the pre-industrial economic leaders, often ignoring the changes taking place on the margins of the economic growth centres. This article seeks to rectify this by looking at changes in the material culture in one such 'marginal' country, namely Norway. The goods focused upon in this case are sugar, tobacco and coffee, which are often termed as exotic goods. These were new commodities in the 18th century and precisely because of their novelty and foreign origin, it is in many cases possible to trace how they spread in rural society, as well as how they impacted it. The emphasis has been put on rural areas for the simple reason that this was where the overall majority of Norwegians lived at the time.

  5. The Coming of Age of the Academic Career: Differentiation and Professionalization of German Academic Positions from the 19th Century to the Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waaijer, Cathelijn J. F.

    2015-01-01

    In modern academic career systems there are a large number of entry positions, much smaller numbers of intermediate positions, and still fewer full professorships. We examine how this system has developed in Germany, the country where the modern academic system was introduced, tracing the historical development of academic positions since the…

  6. [The Library of Medicine of Córdoba, witness and protagonist of knowledge from the end of the 19th Century to the beginning of 21st Century].

    PubMed

    Graciela Cañete, M

    2004-01-01

    In the nineteenth century, was founded the Medicine's Library of the National University Faculty of Medicine, center of knowledge, new ideas and teaching. The history library sector hold the valuable inheritance that represent the collection of Teachers Doctors, Pablo Mirizzi, Temístocles Castellano, Pedro Ara, José F. Verna, Juan Martín Allende located with the books and thesis of the XIX century and beginning of XX century. In 1986 it integrates the National Health Science Information Network and also, the Latino American and the Caribbean Health Science Information Network. The health libraries are in front of a new paradigm. The technologies of information and communication require new methods for administration of the information's resources and services, to answer the society information needs in the knowledge age. The traditional and virtual library is one unit that complement sources in different supports, electronic publications and interactive networks. It is the nexus between the scientific inheritance and the society, and it's mission is: Give local and virtual information's services and management the information's resources, basis of the knowledge society, support of teaching, investigation and extension of the Medical Sciences Faculty of the Córdoba National University.

  7. [The suspicion of simulation. A psychiatric case history between appropriation and disciplinary action at the end of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, Annett; Hess, Volker

    2009-01-01

    This case history explores how the question of agency was dealt with historically in two developing, normative orders of deviant behaviour. Examining the institutional career of the supposed adulterer, marriage swindler, and craft baker, we can trace the different observation regimes and systems of knowledge acquisition in the prison and in psychiatry, in both institutions there was talk of simulated madness; the explanations, however, were different. For the prison doctors and civil servants, the baker was a criminal; his deviant behaviour was a matter of consciously planned-out deception. For the examining psychiatrist, on the other hand, he was mentally ill and could not be held responsible for his own behaviour. The case also shows how the suspicion of simulated madness stabilized an intermediate space between the two regimes that can be seen in the incoherence of the historical sources. This conflict was never resolved; the very indecisiveness marked the defiance and agency of the historical actor that could not be clearly decided within the institutional observation regimes and their methods of recording.

  8. [Natural science vs. natural philosophy: Friedrich Theodor von Frerichs and the emergence of modern western medicine in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Werner

    2016-12-01

    The beginnings of modern western medicine reach to about 1800 when under the liberating influence of French Revolution observation of diseases was started to follow more scientifically justified criteria. At that time speculative doctrines prevailed, e. g. those set up natural philosopher Schelling. In this context Internist Friedrich Theodor von Frerichs at Berlin Charité University Hospital gained great merits because of his struggle for a scientifically-based experimental clinical medicine. This is demonstrated nicely in a recently found autograph document. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Loss of genetic diversity in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) associated with the fur trade of the 18th and 19th centuries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, S.; Jameson, R.; Etnier, M.; Flemings, M.; Bentzen, P.

    2002-01-01

    During 1969 and 1970, surveys of the endangered Yuma Clapper Rail were conducted using taped calls to elicit responses from the birds. During the two summers, more than 158 Yuma clappers were located in cattailtule marshes along the Colorado River south of Needles, California, to the International Boundary, a distance of about 240 miles. Clappers (probably of the same race) were also found in estuarian marshes of the Colorado River Delta of Mexico; in the Salton Sea; in two freshwater marsh areas near Phoenix, Arizona; and in two freshwater marshes adjacent to the lower Gila River near Tacna, Arizona.....Populations of Sonora Clapper Rails were discovered as permanent residents in five separate mangrove swamps along the west coast of Mexico in the vicinity of Kino Bay, Sonora. These observations were farther north than any heretofore reported for the race R. l. rhizophorae, and the swamps also represent the extreme northward limit of mangroves in Sonora.....During the winter, Yuma clappers did not respond to taped calls north of the International Boundary, whereas clappers along the coast of Sonora readily answered the calls during the same period of time. We conclude that most Yuma Clapper Rails migrate from their summer habitat along the Colorado River in September and do not return to the breeding areas until late April.

  10. Hydraulic Study of the Water Supply to the City of Seville through Its Aqueduct between the 17th and 19th Centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrés, Candela; Robador, María Dolores; Albardonedo, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    The aqueduct of the Caños de Carmona was in operation from 1172 until its demolition in 1912.Its infrastructure was an essential resource to supply water to the city of Seville. This study attempts to analyse the supply and distribution system used in the city in the Modern Age. The research is focused mainly on obtaining water from the Santa Lucia spring to 19 km in Alcala de Guadaira, its route through the aqueduct, the division for the distribution between different users in the general partition ark and its subsequent distribution to the final destinations. This study aims to develop a hypothesis about the principles of water distribution through the city and to estimate the percentage of water going to each client based on the theoretical concession that should reach each home.

  11. [Artur Wołyński--A forgotten Polish historian in Italy in the second half of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Piskurewicz, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Artur Wołyński (1844-1893) was, undoubtedly, one of the most interesting personages of Polish émigrés after January Uprising. He belonged to these circles of Polish émigrés, who were able to reconcile their patriotic aspirations with realities and interest of the countries that entertained them. As far as Wołyński is concerned, it found its expression in the efforts that were made in order to assimilate two nations--Polish and Italian people--appealing to the common history and familiar cultural traditions. An important element of integrating all the above-discussed actions was his scientific activity. The mentioned activity included, first of all, his studies on Nicolaus Copernicus and Galileo Galilei. In the article were analyzed more comprehensive scientific descriptions dedicated to Copernicus and Galileo prepared by Wołyński, and their significance and opinions on them of the learned, whose works treated on Copernicus and Galileo as well. Secondly, in the field of scientific activity of Wołyńiski, one can also observe his researches and the process of elaborating sources for Polish and Italian his tory, particularly concerning the 17th century. However, most of his attention Wołyński paid to collecting and working out the materials concerning January Uprising. Speaking a modern language, one can say that Wołyński in a way polled the insurgents of January Uprising sending to them an appropriate list of questions, additionally allowing for their biographies. In the paper was also included a detailed description of this broad initiative together with its results. Up till now, not much attention has been paid to this significant scientific activity and its contexts. So, the present article is to remind of meritorious personage of Wołyński, and particularly of his output within the realm of history of science, history of Polish and Italian relationships, and of the role he played in bequeathing memory of January Uprising.

  12. The survival of 19th-century scientific optimism: the public discourse on science in Belgium in the aftermath of the Great War (ca. 1919-1930).

    PubMed

    Onghena, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    In historiography there is a tendency to see the Great War as marking the end of scientific optimism and the period that followed the war as a time of discord. Connecting to current (inter)national historiographical debate on the question of whether the First World War meant a disruption from the pre-war period or not, this article strives to prove that faith in scientific progress still prevailed in the 1920s. This is shown through the use of Belgium as a case study, which suggests that the generally adopted cultural pessimism in the post-war years did not apply to the public rhetoric of science in this country. Diverse actors -- scientists, industrialists, politicians, the public opinion, and the military staff -- declared a confidence in science, enhanced by wartime results. Furthermore, belief in science in Belgium was not affected by public outcry over the use of mustard gas, unlike in the former belligerent countries where the gas became an unpleasant reminder of how science was used during the war. Even German science with its industrial applications remained the norm after 1918. In fact, the faith in science exhibited during the pre-war years continued to exist, at least until the 1920s, despite anti-German sentiments being voiced by many sections of Belgian society in the immediate aftermath of the war.

  13. The Christian's Duty toward the Deaf: Differing Christian Views on Deaf Schooling and Education in 19th-Century Dutch Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijsseling, Corrie; Tellings, Agnes

    2009-01-01

    A historical study is conducted into the founding of three boarding schools for Deaf children in the Netherlands, in 1790, 1840, and 1888. The article focuses on how three different religious views inspired divergent perspectives on citizenship and the role of the state, the church, and charity in helping Deaf people become well-integrated…

  14. Women's Rights and Wedding Bells: 19th-Century Pro-Family Rhetoric and (Re)Enforcement of the Gender Status Quo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Researchers suggest that backlashes to feminism may appear in the form of pro-family campaigns. Social scientists have observed themes in the current pro-marriage movement to support this claim; others note historical cycles of pro-family backlash to feminism. This article is a sociohistorical analysis of texts from a leading organized advocate of…

  15. Elephantiasis, elastin, and chronic wound healing: 19th century and contemporary viewpoints relevant to hypotheses concerning lymphedema, leprosy, erysipelas, and psoriasis--review and reflections.

    PubMed

    Ryan, T J

    2009-03-01

    Both wound healing and lymphedema have fibrosis of the skin in common. They also share destruction of elastin by elastases from neutrophils as a significant feature. These are not new observations, and the writings of Unna and Kaposi are recalled. The contemporary observations on elastin by Gerli and his team are discussed in the light of these much earlier opinions.

  16. The Place of Identity Dissonance and Emotional Motivations in Bio-Cultural Models of Religious Experience: A Report from the 19th Century.

    PubMed

    Powell, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Durham University's 'Hearing the Voice' project involves a multi-disciplinary exploration of hallucinatory-type phenomena in an attempt to revaluate and reframe discussions of these experiences. As part of this project, contemporaneous religious experiences (supernatural voices and visions) in the United States from the first half of the nineteenth century have been analysed, shedding light on the value and applicability of contemporary bio-cultural models of religious experience for such historical cases. In particular, this essay outlines four historical cases, seeking to utilise and to refine four theoretical models, including anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann's 'absorption hypothesis', by returning to something like William James' concern with 'discordant personalities'. Ultimately, the paper argues that emphasis on the role of identity dissonance must not be omitted from the analytical tools applied to these nineteenth-century examples, and perhaps should be retained for any study of religious experience generally.

  17. Sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field in the second half of the 19th century inferred from ground-based magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmyanin, M.; Ponyavin, D. I.

    2012-12-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) polarities can be inferred in the pre-satellite era using Svalgaard-Mansurov effect, according to which different IMF directions lead to different geomagnetic variations at polar stations. Basing on this effect we propose a method to derive a sector structure of the IMF when only ground based data are available. Details of the method and results have been presented in our recent paper: Vokhmyanin, M. V., and D. I. Ponyavin (2012), Inferring interplanetary magnetic field polarities from geomagnetic variations, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A06102, doi:10.1029/2011JA017060. Using data from eight stations: Sitka, Sodankyla, Godhavn, Lerwick, Thule, Baker Lake, Vostok and Mirny, we reconstructed sector structure back to 1905. The quality of inferring from 1965 to 2005 ranges between 78% and 90% depending on the used set of stations. Our results show both high success rate and good agreement with the well-known Russell-McPherron and Rosenberg-Coleman effects. In the current study we applied the technique to historical data of Helsinki observatory where digital versions of hourly geomagnetic components are available from 1844 to 1897. Helsinki station stopped operates at the beginning of 20th century. Thus, to create a model describing the local Svalgaard-Mansurov effect we analyzed data from Nurmijarvi station located near the same region. The success rate of reconstruction from 1965 to 2005 is around 82%. So we assume that the IMF polarities obtained for the period 1869-1889 have sufficient quality. Inferred sector structure at this time consists of two sectors typically for all declining phases of solar activity cycle. Catalogue of IMF proxies seem to be important in analyzing structure and dynamics of solar magnetic fields in the past.; Left: Bartels diagram of IMF sector structure inferred from Helsinki data. Right: sunspot number indicating solar cycles.

  18. The christian's duty toward the deaf: differing christian views on deaf schooling and education in 19th-century Dutch society.

    PubMed

    Tijsseling, Corrie; Tellings, Agnes

    2009-01-01

    A historical study is conducted into the founding of three boarding schools for Deaf children in The Netherlands, in 1790, 1840, and 1888. The article focuses on how three different religious views inspired divergent perspectives on citizenship and the role of the state, the church, and charity in helping Deaf people to become well-integrated citizens. For each school, a brief general context and a brief description of its political and religious background is given. The founding of the school, with accompanying difficulties, is then described, as well as the fundamental ideas of the founders regarding the image of the Deaf person, Deaf children and their capacities, societal goals of the institution, subject matter considered important in the school, further relevant organizational aspects, and financing and the responsibilities of state, church, charity, and private enterprise. The views of the three institutions are compared and contrasted.

  19. [The Journal de chimie médicale (Journal of Medical Chemistry) : a major innovation on French public health during the 19th century ].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2017-03-01

    JBA Chevallier is first known for his publication in 1850 of his book on falsifications. But he had also a major role for the opening of the pharmacy world to toxicological and Public Health issues, through the founding in 1825, and the management for more than 50 years, of the Journal de chimie médicale, de pharmacie et de toxicologie (Journal of Medical Chemistry, of Pharmacy and of Toxicology). The purpose of the present study has been to look at the evolution of that publication over the years and to compare its content with the reference pharmaceutical journal at that time : the Journal de pharmacie et de chimie (Journal of Pharmacy and Chemistry). One can observe that the editorial lines of both journals will progressively diverge from each other, but Chevallier remained strongly connected with pharmacy, his journal merging finally in 1876 with the Répertoire de pharmacie (Index of Pharmacy).

  20. The dynamics and ethnic composition of the population of Russia in the era of imperialism (from the end of the 19th century to 1917).

    PubMed

    Bruk, S I; Kabuzan, V M

    1989-02-01

    "The authors critically survey tsarist censuses before the October Revolution and Soviet works on historical demography, and they re-estimate population numbers, natural and mechanical increase, and internal and external migration between 1897 and 1917, as well as changes in ethnic composition." excerpt

  1. Grape harvest dates as indicator of spring-summer mean maxima temperature variations in the Minho region (NW of Portugal) since the 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J.; Fatela, F.; Moreno, F.; Leorri, E.; Taborda, R.; Trigo, R.

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports a climatic reconstruction approach for the Minho region (NW of Portugal) using grape harvest dates (GHD) as proxy of surface air temperature. This new GHD series was built based on the records from a set of local and regional newspapers (1854-1978) and the annuals of a Wine Producers Cooperative (1978-2010). The strong inverse correlation between Minho GHD and the mean maxima temperatures of the preceding March to August months (GSTmax), registered at the Braga weather station for the overlap period 1941-2009, allowed a reconstruction, with associated statistical uncertainties, of the regional GSTmax back to 1856. These were then used to characterize the main climatic episodes in the region during the last 154 years. The most noticeable feature that emerges from the comparison of the Minho GSTmax with the global annual average temperatures of Jones et al. (2013) is that these regional temperatures, in clear contrast with the global warming observed from around 1990 onwards, show no noteworthy increasing trend. The influence of climatic variability was examined also in terms of the relations between GSTmax (1950-2009) and the main meteorological teleconnection patterns affecting the North Atlantic European sector where the Minho region is included. Data support the hypothesis that persistent positive modes of spring-summer Scandinavian (SCA) and summer East Atlantic/Western Russia patterns triggered lower GSTmax, especially in the 60s-80s. The search for solar imprints in the Minho region climate identified the SCA mode as a promising connection between the two, since it is significantly inversely correlated with both, the TSI and the GSTmax. Like in other traditional European viticultural regions, the Minho GHD have shown to be a valuable tool for understanding the interactions between large-scale circulation modes and regional/local climatic conditions. Besides it will deliver a reliable assessment of climatic proxies from geological record, like tidal marsh benthic foraminifera assemblages.

  2. The Place of Identity Dissonance and Emotional Motivations in Bio-Cultural Models of Religious Experience: A Report from the 19th Century

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Durham University’s ‘Hearing the Voice’ project involves a multi-disciplinary exploration of hallucinatory-type phenomena in an attempt to revaluate and reframe discussions of these experiences. As part of this project, contemporaneous religious experiences (supernatural voices and visions) in the United States from the first half of the nineteenth century have been analysed, shedding light on the value and applicability of contemporary bio-cultural models of religious experience for such historical cases. In particular, this essay outlines four historical cases, seeking to utilise and to refine four theoretical models, including anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann’s ‘absorption hypothesis’, by returning to something like William James’ concern with ‘discordant personalities’. Ultimately, the paper argues that emphasis on the role of identity dissonance must not be omitted from the analytical tools applied to these nineteenth-century examples, and perhaps should be retained for any study of religious experience generally. PMID:28989797

  3. 19th-Century Politics in the Formation of Appalachian Kentucky Counties: The McGuires and the Creation of Owsley and Lee Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, John Russell, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    During the Constitutional Convention of 1890, one delegate characterized the history of county formation in Kentucky as a process whereby "fifteen or thirty or forty people" created "outrageous special legislation" to make laws that "were not for the benefit of the people at large, but only for the benefit of people who…

  4. [Portable pharmacies during the 19th century, starting from the example of Reichard' pharmacy in his guided for travelers in Europe (1805)].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    The portable pharmacy of Reichard, in his 1805 Guide for travelers in Europe is an example among others of a growing determination to answer the needs of the people to have access to drugs even in absence of health care professionals. One can observe the ultimate result by looking at portable pharmacies offered for sale by companies such as Menier and Pharmacie Centrale de France, but also by individual pharmacists. In spite of favorable changes of health care in all countries during the XXe century, portable pharmacy and kits are still widely proposed for sale, on Internet for example, for frequent diseases, including for pets!

  5. [Old age in primary school readers: a journey through the end of the 19th century to the start of the 21st century in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Oddone, María Julieta

    2013-04-01

    This article presents the content (discourse) analysis of messages transmitted by primary school readers in the period between 1880 to 2012. This study allowed us to explore the image of old age and aging that society has and passes on to new generations as well as the role assigned to this generational group. The historical periods that provide the context for the data were defined according to the continuity of or the turning points in the social values transmitted in the reading materials. The role assigned to elderly people and the image of old age that the Argentine society passed on and continues to pass on to younger generations demonstrate that each period described has its own model of aging.

  6. Five Hundred Pages and a Topic of Her Own: Successfully Designing an Advanced Writing Course on 19th Century British Women Novelists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Amy Criniti

    2009-01-01

    During the fourth year of Amy Phillips' teaching assistantship in the spring semester of 2008, she was asked to teach a 300-level advanced writing course in which she was given the creative freedom to design the syllabus, choose the textbooks, craft all assignments, and organize the course content. However, there was one stipulation: the course,…

  7. Structure of "Ventilation and Warming" in Notes on Nursing Written by Florence Nightingale in 19th Century: Introduction of Basic Physics to Nursing Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogoh, Kazutoshi

    "Basic Natural Science" for freshmen at Miyazaki Prefectural Nursing University has a component including physics. Here students learn three principles of thermal transfer; conduction, radiation, and convection through a series of experiments. The purpose of these experiments is to understand the structure of a method for the caring of breathing and temperature of patients as written in "Ventilation and Warming", the first chapter of F. Nightingale's Notes on Nursing. Students can then apply this structure to retain fresh air in today's hospital rooms, and can then appreciate studying real physics incorporated into fundamental knowledge for nursing practice.

  8. 19th century pioneering of intensive therapy in North America. Part 3: the Fell-O'Dwyer apparatus and William P Northrup.

    PubMed

    Trubuhovich, Ronald V

    2009-03-01

    Two previous articles in this series have described the reintroduction of forced respiration for ventilatory difficulties, particularly in opiate poisoning (by George Fell), and successful use of intralaryngeal tubes designed for treating airway obstruction in diphtheritic acute laryngitis (by Joseph O'Dwyer). In 1891, O'Dwyer extended the applications of Fell's system, introducing a longer orolaryngeal tube, replacing Fell's methods of inflating the lungs, which had been with a somewhat unsatisfactory facemask or through a tracheotomy tube. The combined system became known as the "Fell-O'Dwyer apparatus". Use of the apparatus widened, to include treating apnoea from intracranial disasters (by William P Northrup, especially) and, on the initiative of Rudolph Matas, in delivering anaesthesia and maintaining lung inflation to enable intrathoracic surgery (by FW Parham). Although the apparatus was used beyond New York (eg, in New Orleans by J D Bloom, especially for neonatal apnoea), it is difficult to find other than nonspecific references. Matas and Bloom improved O'Dwyer's original system, but after the clinical success of Charles Elsberg's continuous insufflation anaesthesia for thoracic surgery, 1909, American anaesthetists came to prefer that.

  9. The Joseph Barker, Jr. Home: A Comparative Architectural and Historical Study of a 19th Century Brick and Frame Dwelling in Washington County, Ohio,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    wooden structure would be safer than one of stone or brick may have been. The New Madrid earthquake of December 18 11 did hit the middle Mississippi River...Hood 1958: 1; Barker 1927: 389). Joseph Barker’s father, Deacon Ephraim, was a housewright and builder of churches in New Hampshire and also worked as a...of Ohio, the Barker family migrated to the Ohio Valley from New England, specifically from Amherst, New Hampshire, in 1789 (Hood 1958: iii). Barker was

  10. The impact of kin availability, parental religiosity, and nativity on fertility differentials in the late 19th-century United States

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, J. David; Roberts, Evan

    2017-01-01

    METHODS Most quantitative research on fertility decline in the United States ignores the potential impact of cultural and familial factors. We rely on new complete-count data from the 1880 U.S. census to construct couple-level measures of nativity/ethnicity, religiosity, and kin availability. We include these measures with a comprehensive set of demographic, economic, and contextual variables in Poisson regression models of net marital fertility to assess their relative importance. We construct models with and without area fixed effects to control for unobserved heterogeneity. CONTRIBUTION All else being equal, we find a strong impact of nativity on recent net marital fertility. Fertility differentials among second generation couples relative to the native-born white population of native parentage were in most cases less than half of the differential observed among first generation immigrants, suggesting greater assimilation to native-born American childbearing norms. Our measures of parental religiosity and familial propinquity indicated a more modest impact on marital fertility. Couples who chose biblical names for their children had approximately 3% more children than couples relying on secular names while the presence of a potential mother-in-law in a nearby households was associated with 2% more children. Overall, our results demonstrate the need for more inclusive models of fertility behavior that include cultural and familial covariates. PMID:29720893

  11. An international campaign of the 19th century to determine the solar parallax. The US Naval expedition to the southern hemisphere 1849-1852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrimpf, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    In 1847 Christian Ludwig Gerling, Marburg (Germany), suggested the solar parallax to be determined by measuring the position of Venus close to its inferior conjunction, especially at the stationary points, from observatories on nearly the same meridian but widely differing in latitude. James M. Gilliss, astronomer at the newly founded U.S. Naval Observatory, enthusiastically adopted this idea and procured a grant for the young astronomical community of the United States for an expedition to Chile. There they were to observe several conjunctions of Venus and oppositions of Mars, while the accompanying measurements were to be taken at the US Naval Observatory in Washington D.C. and the Harvard College Observatory at Cambridge, USA. This expedition was supported by A.V. Humboldt, C.F. Gauß, J.F. Encke, S.C. Walker, A.D. Bache, B. Peirce and others. From 1849 to 1852 not only were astronomical, but also meteorological and magnetic observations and measurements recorded, mainly in Santa Lucia close to Santiago, Chile. By comparing these measurements with those taken simultaneously at other observatories around the world the solar parallax could be calculated, although incomplete data from the corresponding northern observatories threatened the project's success. In retrospect this expedition can be recognized as the foundation of the Chilean astronomy. The first director of the new National Astronomical Observatory of Chile was Dr. C.W. Moesta, a Hessian student of Christian Ludwig Gerling's. The exchange of data between German, American and other astronomers during this expedition was well mediated by J.G. Flügel, consul of the United States of America and representative of the Smithsonian Institution in Europe, who altogether played a major role in nurturing the relationship between the growing scientific community in the U.S. and the well established one in Europe at that time.

  12. The impact of kin availability, parental religiosity, and nativity on fertility differentials in the late 19th-century United States.

    PubMed

    Hacker, J David; Roberts, Evan

    2017-12-01

    Most quantitative research on fertility decline in the United States ignores the potential impact of cultural and familial factors. We rely on new complete-count data from the 1880 U.S. census to construct couple-level measures of nativity/ethnicity, religiosity, and kin availability. We include these measures with a comprehensive set of demographic, economic, and contextual variables in Poisson regression models of net marital fertility to assess their relative importance. We construct models with and without area fixed effects to control for unobserved heterogeneity. All else being equal, we find a strong impact of nativity on recent net marital fertility. Fertility differentials among second generation couples relative to the native-born white population of native parentage were in most cases less than half of the differential observed among first generation immigrants, suggesting greater assimilation to native-born American childbearing norms. Our measures of parental religiosity and familial propinquity indicated a more modest impact on marital fertility. Couples who chose biblical names for their children had approximately 3% more children than couples relying on secular names while the presence of a potential mother-in-law in a nearby households was associated with 2% more children. Overall, our results demonstrate the need for more inclusive models of fertility behavior that include cultural and familial covariates.

  13. Reviving the Ganges Water Machine: potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasinghe, Upali Ananda; Muthuwatta, Lal; Surinaidu, Lagudu; Anand, Sumit; Jain, Sharad Kumar

    2016-03-01

    -basins in the western part of the Ganges basin. Overall, a revived GWM plan has the potential to meet 45-84 Bm3year-1 of unmet water demand.

  14. The Molecular Timeline of a Reviving Bacterial Spore

    PubMed Central

    Sinai, Lior; Rosenberg, Alex; Smith, Yoav; Segev, Einat; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2015-01-01

    Summary The bacterial spore can rapidly convert from a dormant to a fully active cell. Here we study this remarkable cellular transition in Bacillus subtilis and reveal the identity of the newly synthesized proteins throughout spore revival. Our analysis uncovers a highly ordered developmental program that correlates with the spore morphological changes and reveals the spatial and temporal molecular events fundamental to reconstruct a cell. As opposed to current knowledge, we found that translation takes place during the earliest revival event, termed germination, a process hitherto considered to occur without the need for any macromolecule synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that translation is required for execution of germination and relies on the bona fide translational factors RpmE and Tig. Our study sheds light on the spore revival process and on the vital building blocks underlying cellular awakening, thereby paving the way for designing new antimicrobial agents to eradicate spore-forming pathogens. PMID:25661487

  15. 3 CFR 8943 - Proclamation 8943 of March 25, 2013. Establishment of the Harriet Tubman-Underground Railroad...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... a Methodist congregation. Later, in the mid-19th century, African Americans split off from the... Underground Railroad. It is representative of the landscape of this region in the early and mid-19th century... Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431) (the “Antiquities Act”), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to...

  16. Synchronous optical pumping of quantum revival beats for atomic magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, S. J.; Meares, P. J.; Romalis, M. V.

    2007-05-15

    We observe quantum beats with periodic revivals due to nonlinear spacing of Zeeman levels in the ground state of potassium atoms, and demonstrate their synchronous optical pumping by double modulation of the pumping light at the Larmor frequency and the revival frequency. We show that synchronous pumping increases the degree of spin polarization by a factor of 4. As a practical example, we explore the application of this double-modulation technique to atomic magnetometers operating in the geomagnetic field range, and find that it can increase the sensitivity and reduce magnetic-field-orientation-dependent measurement errors endemic to alkali-metal magnetometers.

  17. Entanglement revive and information flow within the decoherent environment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jia-Dong; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2016-08-10

    In this paper, the dynamics of entanglement is investigated in the presence of a noisy environment. We reveal its revival behavior and probe the mechanisms of this behavior via an information-theoretic approach. By analyzing the correlation distribution and the information flow within the composite system including the qubit subsystem and a noisy environment, it has been found that the subsystem-environment coupling can induce the quasi-periodic entanglement revival. Furthermore, the dynamical relationship among tripartite correlations, bipartite entanglement and local state information is explored, which provides a new insight into the non-Markovian mechanisms during the evolution.

  18. Quantum revival for elastic waves in thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Marc; Lefebvre, Gautier; Sebbah, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    Quantum revival is described as the time-periodic reconstruction of a wave packet initially localized in space and time. This effect is expected in finite-size systems which exhibit commensurable discrete spectrum such as the infinite quantum well. Here, we report on the experimental observation of full and fractional quantum revival for classical waves in a two dimensional cavity. We consider flexural waves propagating in thin plates, as their quadratic dispersion at low frequencies mimics the dispersion relation of quantum systems governed by Schrödinger equation. Time-dependent excitation and measurement are performed at ultrasonic frequencies and reveal a periodic reconstruction of the initial elastic wave packet.

  19. Reconstructing Early Industrial Contributions to Legacy Trace Metal Contamination in Southwestern Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D.; Hillman, A. L.; Pompeani, D. P.; Abbott, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The remobilization of legacy contamination stored in floodplain sediments remains a threat to ecosystem and human health, particularly with potential changes in global precipitation patterns and flooding regimes. Vehicular and industrial emissions are often the dominant, recognized source of anthropogenic trace metal loadings to ecosystems today. However, loadings from early industrial activities are poorly characterized and potential sources of trace metal inputs. While potential trace metal contamination from these activities is recognized (e.g., the historical use of lead arsenate as a pesticide), the magnitude and distribution of legacy contamination is often unknown. This presentation reconstructs a lake sediment record of trace metal inputs from an oxbow lake in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sediment cores were analyzed for major and trace metal chemistry, carbon to nitrogen ratios, bulk density, and magnetic susceptibility. Sediment trace metal chemistry in this approximately 250 year record (180 cm) record changes in land use and industry both in the 19th century and the 20th century. Of particular interest is early 19th century loadings of arsenic and calcium to the lake, likely attributable to pesticides and lime used in tanning processes near the lake. After this period of tanning dominated inputs, sediment barium concentrations rise, likely reflecting the onset of coal mining operations and resulting discharge of acid mine drainage to surface waters. In the 20th century portion of our record (70 -20 cm), patterns in sediment zinc, cadmium, and lead concentrations are dominated by the opening and closing of the nearby Donora Zinc Works and the American Steel & Wire Works, infamous facilities in the history of air quality regulation. The most recent sediment chemistry records periods include the enactment of air pollution legislation (~ 35 cm), and the phase out of tetraethyl leaded gasoline (~30 cm). Our study documents the impact of early industry in the

  20. 7 CFR 97.22 - Revival of an application abandoned for failure to reply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... regulations in this part, may be revived as a pending application within 3 months of such abandonment, upon a.... A request to revive an abandoned application shall be accompanied by a written statement showing the...

  1. Reconstructing Early Industrial Contributions to Legacy Trace Metal Contamination in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Robert J; Bain, Daniel J; Hillman, Aubrey L; Pompeani, David P; Finkenbinder, Matthew S; Abbott, Mark B

    2017-04-18

    Early industrial trace metal loadings are poorly characterized but potentially substantial sources of trace metals to the landscape. The magnitude of legacy contamination in southwestern Pennsylvania, the cradle of North American fossil fuel industrialization, is reconstructed from trace metal concentrations in a sediment core with proxies including major and trace metal chemistry, bulk density, and magnetic susceptibility. Trace metal chemistry in this sediment record reflects 19th and 20th century land use and industry. In particular, early 19th century arsenic loadings to the lake are elevated from pesticides used by early European settlers at a lakeside tannery. Later, sediment barium concentrations rise, likely reflecting the onset of acidic mine drainage from coal operations. Twentieth century zinc, cadmium, and lead concentrations are dominated by emissions from the nearby, infamous Donora Zinc Works yet record both the opening of a nearby coal-fired power plant and amendments to the Clean Air Act. The impact of early industry is substantial and rivals more recent metal fluxes, resulting in a significant potential source of contaminated sediments. Thus, modern assessments of trace metal contamination cannot ignore early industrial inputs, as the potential remobilization of legacy contamination would impact ecosystem and human health.

  2. Distinguishing between Development and Change: Reviving Organismic-Developmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raeff, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to contribute to the revival of Heinz Werner's organismic-developmental theory by considering some of its key claims in relation to contemporary developmental theory and research. The organismic-developmental definition of development in terms of differentiation and integration is first discussed in relation to…

  3. VIEW LOOKING EAST AT 23 GREGG ST., A GOTHIC REVIVAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING EAST AT 23 GREGG ST., A GOTHIC REVIVAL HOUSE BUILT C. 1848 FOR FAMILIES OF MILL WORKERS, NOW WITH ADDITION ON SIDE. NOTE BOARD AND BATTEN VERTICAL SIDING AND DECORATIVE BARGE BOARDS IN FRONT GABLE - 23 Gregg Street (House), Graniteville, Aiken County, SC

  4. MEDICAL REVIVALISM AND THE NATIONAL MOVEMENT IN BRITISH INDIA

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Poonam

    1990-01-01

    The author discusses here the efforts made to revive Ayurveda in the twentieth century by the protagonists of Ayurveda during the national movement and appraises how far political support and State patronage did good for the recrudescence of Ayurveda. PMID:22556501

  5. 38 CFR 8.3 - Revival of insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... policyholder unpaid dividends, refundable premiums, pure insurance risk credits, other refundable credits or... sufficient to place another policy in force. (9) Where more than one policy is involved and credits are not needed or are insufficient to revive the policy on which the credits arose, the credits will be used...

  6. Management of Vaginal Atrophy: Implications from the REVIVE Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Susan; Kingsberg, Sheryl; Krychman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) is a chronic and progressive medical condition common in postmenopausal women. Symptoms of VVA such as dyspareunia, vaginal dryness, irritation, and itching can negatively impact sexual function and quality of life. The REVIVE (REal Women’s VIews of Treatment Options for Menopausal Vaginal ChangEs) survey assessed knowledge about VVA and recorded attitudes about interactions with healthcare providers (HCPs) and available treatment options for VVA. The REVIVE survey identified unmet needs of women with VVA symptoms such as poor understanding of the condition, poor communication with HCPs despite the presence of vaginal symptoms, and concerns about the safety, convenience, and efficacy of available VVA treatments. HCPs can address these unmet needs by proactively identifying patients with VVA and educating them about the condition as well as discussing treatment preferences and available therapies for VVA. PMID:24987271

  7. Management of Vaginal Atrophy: Implications from the REVIVE Survey.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Susan; Kingsberg, Sheryl; Krychman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) is a chronic and progressive medical condition common in postmenopausal women. Symptoms of VVA such as dyspareunia, vaginal dryness, irritation, and itching can negatively impact sexual function and quality of life. The REVIVE (REal Women's VIews of Treatment Options for Menopausal Vaginal ChangEs) survey assessed knowledge about VVA and recorded attitudes about interactions with healthcare providers (HCPs) and available treatment options for VVA. The REVIVE survey identified unmet needs of women with VVA symptoms such as poor understanding of the condition, poor communication with HCPs despite the presence of vaginal symptoms, and concerns about the safety, convenience, and efficacy of available VVA treatments. HCPs can address these unmet needs by proactively identifying patients with VVA and educating them about the condition as well as discussing treatment preferences and available therapies for VVA.

  8. Periodic and quasiperiodic revivals in periodically driven interacting quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitz, David J.; Lazarides, Achilleas; Bar Lev, Yevgeny

    2018-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that interparticle interactions generically destroy dynamical localization in periodically driven systems, resulting in diffusive transport and heating. In this Rapid Communication we rigorously construct a family of interacting driven systems which are dynamically localized and effectively decoupled from the external driving potential. We show that these systems exhibit tunable periodic or quasiperiodic revivals of the many-body wave function and thus of all physical observables. By numerically examining spinless fermions on a one-dimensional lattice we show that the analytically obtained revivals of such systems remain stable for finite systems with open boundary conditions while having a finite lifetime in the presence of static spatial disorder. We find this lifetime to be inversely proportional to the disorder strength.

  9. Three-dimensional analysis of the early development of the dentition

    PubMed Central

    Peterkova, R; Hovorakova, M; Peterka, M; Lesot, H

    2014-01-01

    Tooth development has attracted the attention of researchers since the 19th century. It became obvious even then that morphogenesis could not fully be appreciated from two-dimensional histological sections. Therefore, methods of three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions were employed to visualize the surface morphology of developing structures and to help appreciate the complexity of early tooth morphogenesis. The present review surveys the data provided by computer-aided 3D analyses to update classical knowledge of early odontogenesis in the laboratory mouse and in humans. 3D reconstructions have demonstrated that odontogenesis in the early stages is a complex process which also includes the development of rudimentary odontogenic structures with different fates. Their developmental, evolutionary, and pathological aspects are discussed. The combination of in situ hybridization and 3D reconstruction have demonstrated the temporo-spatial dynamics of the signalling centres that reflect transient existence of rudimentary tooth primordia at loci where teeth were present in ancestors. The rudiments can rescue their suppressed development and revitalize, and then their subsequent autonomous development can give rise to oral pathologies. This shows that tooth-forming potential in mammals can be greater than that observed from their functional dentitions. From this perspective, the mouse rudimentary tooth primordia represent a natural model to test possibilities of tooth regeneration. PMID:24495023

  10. Collapse–revival of quantum discord and entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xue-Qun, E-mail: xqyan867@tom.com; Zhang, Bo-Ying

    2014-10-15

    In this paper the correlations dynamics of two atoms in the case of a micromaser-type system is investigated. Our results predict certain quasi-periodic collapse and revival phenomena for quantum discord and entanglement when the field is in Fock state and the two atoms are initially in maximally mixed state, which is a special separable state. Our calculations also show that the oscillations of the time evolution of both quantum discord and entanglement are almost in phase and they both have similar evolution behavior in some time range. The fact reveals the consistency of quantum discord and entanglement in some dynamicalmore » aspects. - Highlights: • The correlations dynamics of two atoms in the case of a micromaser-type system is investigated. • A quasi-periodic collapse and revival phenomenon for quantum discord and entanglement is reported. • A phenomenon of correlations revivals different from that of non-Markovian dynamics is revealed. • The oscillations of time evolution of both quantum discord and entanglement are almost in phase in our system. • Quantum discord and entanglement have similar evolution behavior in some time range.« less

  11. Early German Plans for a Southern Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    As early as the 18th and 19th centuries, French and English observers were active in South Africa. Around the beginning of the 20th century the Heidelberg astronomer Max Wolf (1863-1932) proposed a southern observatory. In 1907 Hermann Carl Vogel (1841-1907), director of the Astrophysical Observatory Potsdam, suggested a southern station in Spain. His ideas for building an observatory in Windhuk for photographing the sky and measuring the solar constant were taken over by the Göttingen astronomers. In 1910 Karl Schwarzschild (1873-1916), after having visited the observatories in America, pointed out the usefulness of an observatory in South West Africa, where it would have better weather than in Germany and also give access to the southern sky. Seeing tests were begun in 1910 by Potsdam astronomers, but WW I stopped the plans. In 1928 Erwin Finlay-Freundlich (1885-1964), inspired by the Hamburg astronomer Walter Baade (1893-1960), worked out a detailed plan for a southern observatory with a reflecting telescope, spectrographs and an astrograph with an objective prism. Paul Guthnick (1879-1947), director of the Berlin observatory, in cooperation with APO Potsdam and Hamburg, made a site survey to Africa in 1929 and found the conditions in Windhuk to be ideal. Observations were started in the 1930s by Berlin and Breslau astronomers, but were stopped by WW II. In the 1950s, astronomers from Hamburg and The Netherlands renewed the discussion in the framework of European cooperation, and this led to the founding of ESO in 1963, as is well described by Blaauw (1991). Blaauw, Adriaan: ESO's Early History. The European Southern Observatory from Concept to Reality. Garching bei München: ESO 1991.

  12. A Pooled Analysis of the Phase 3 REVIVE Trials: Randomized, Double-blind Studies to EValuate the Safety and Efficacy of Iclaprim Versus Vancomycin for trEatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, David B; Corey, G Ralph; Holland, Thomas L; Lodise, Thomas; O'Riordan, William; Wilcox, Mark H; File, Thomas M; Dryden, Matthew; Balser, Barbara; Desplats, Eve; Torres, Antoni

    2018-05-18

    Iclaprim, a diaminopyrimidine antibiotic, was compared with vancomycin for the treatment of patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) in two studies (REVIVE-1 and REVIVE-2). We explored the efficacy and tolerability of iclaprim in a pooled analysis of results from both studies. REVIVE-1 and REVIVE-2 were Phase 3, double-blind, randomized (1:1), multicenter, active-controlled, non-inferiority (margin of 10%) trials, each designed to enroll 600 patients a piece with ABSSSI. The studies used identical study protocols. Iclaprim 80 mg and vancomycin 15 mg/kg were administered IV every 12 hours for 5-14 days. The primary endpoint was a ≥20% reduction from baseline in lesion size (early clinical response [ECR]) at the early time point (48 to 72 hours after the start of study drug) in the intent-to-treat population. In REVIVE-1, ECR at the early time point was 80.9% with iclaprim vs. 81.0% with vancomycin (treatment difference, -0.13%; 95% confidence interval, -6.42% to 6.17%). In REVIVE-2, ECR was 78.3% with iclaprim vs. 76.7% with vancomycin (treatment difference: 1.58%, 95% CI: -5.10% to 8.26%). The pooled ECR was 79.6% with iclaprim vs. 78.8% with vancomycin (treatment difference: 0.75%, 95% CI: -3.84 to 5.35%). Iclaprim and vancomycin were comparable for the incidence of mostly mild adverse events, except for a higher incidence of elevated serum creatinine with vancomycin (n=7) compared with iclaprim (n=0). Iclaprim achieved noninferiority compared with vancomycin for early clinical response at the early time point and secondary endpoints with a similar safety profile in two Phase 3 studies for the treatment of ABSSSI suspected or confirmed to be caused by Gram-positive pathogens. NCT02600611 and NCT02607618. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Newspapers as early meteorological data sources in Andalusia (southern Spain), 1796-1830.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Montes, S.; Rodrigo, F. S.

    2010-09-01

    The growing evidence of an anthropogenically induced climatic change and the need to compare present-day climate with that of the past centuries, has boosted the search of early meteorological data from all kind of historical archives. Among the documentary data sources, early newspapers deserve special attention. Anonymous observers began to send their data to local newspapers to ensure that people were informed of them. Hardly anything is known of the conditions in which these recording were made, and press collections conserved from late 18th century to mid-19th century are fragmentary. However, it is interesting to analyze the potential of these newspapers as climatic data sources in a period prior to the existence of an official meteorological service. In this work, some examples of Andalusian cities (southern Spain) are analyzed and their utility as data sources is studied: El Mensagero (1796-1797), El Publicista (1812-1813), Diario Constitucional (1820) of Granada, Diario del Gobierno de Sevilla (1812-1813), Diario de Sevilla (1826-1831), Diario de Sevilla de Comercio, Artes y Literatura (1829-1830) of Seville, and Diario Mercantil de Cádiz (1802-1803, 1816-1830) of Cádiz. Future research is outlined.

  14. Early decades of Madras Medical College: Apothecaries.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ramya; Raman, Anantanarayanan

    2016-01-01

    The Government at Fort St George determined that a school for instructing and training candidates towards the titles of 'apothecary' was necessary to improve medical help to people in the 1830s. This led to the establishment of the medical school in Madras (presently Chennai) in 1835. The school got renamed as the Madras Medical College in 1850. From 1835, the Madras Medical School offered formal training to personnel to be called either 'apothecaries' or 'dressers' under the superintendence of William Mortimer, who was assisted by George Harding in teaching at the school. Apothecary D'Beaux and Dresser P. S. Muthuswami Mudaliar were subordinate assistants. These apothecaries were recruited essentially under the Subordinate Medical Service of Madras, which was established in 1812 and included non-commissioned medical servants. The Madras apothecaries launched the Madras Apothecaries Society in 1864, which aimed at promoting and advancing medical science and knowledge. This society existed until 1871. Formal training of apothecaries ceased in Madras by the later decades of the 19th century, although informal training continued, especially for army cadets and women. Establishment of medical schools in Royapuram (which developed as the Stanley Medical College and Hospital), Tanjavur and Madurai, in the early decades of the 20th century and the 'branch' of Madras Medical College in Calicut during the Second World War changed the complexion of training of medical personnel immensely in pre- 1947 Madras Presidency. The Royapuram and other Medical Schools in Madras trained medical practitioners granting the title 'Licensed Medical Practitioner' (LMP). Whether the apothecary-dresser training at the 'old' Madras Medical College had a role to play in these developments remains to be verified.

  15. NASA seeks to revive lost probe that traced solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voosen, Paul

    2018-02-01

    NASA's Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE), a satellite that failed in 2005, was recently discovered to be reactivated by an amateur astronomer. Until its demise, IMAGE provided unparalleled views of solar storms crashing into Earth's magnetosphere, a capability that has not been replaced since. The amateur astronomer was on the search for Zuma, a classified U.S. satellite that's believed to have failed after launch. He instead discovered IMAGE, broadcasting again, likely thanks to a reboot that occurred after its batteries drained during a past solar eclipse. NASA scientists are now working to communicate with the satellite in the hopes of reviving its six scientific instruments.

  16. On p53 revival using system oriented drug dosage design.

    PubMed

    Haseeb, Muhammad; Azam, Shumaila; Bhatti, A I; Azam, Rizwan; Ullah, Mukhtar; Fazal, Sahar

    2017-02-21

    We propose a new paradigm in the drug design for the revival of the p53 pathway in cancer cells. It is shown that the current strategy of using small molecule based Mdm2 inhibitors is not enough to adequately revive p53 in cancerous cells, especially when it comes to the extracting pulsating behavior of p53. This fact has come to notice when a novel method for the drug dosage design is introduced using system oriented concepts. As a test case, small molecule drug Mdm2 repressor Nutlin 3a is considered. The proposed method determines the dose of Nutlin to revive p53 pathway functionality. For this purpose, PBK dynamics of Nutlin have also been integrated with p53 pathway model. The p53 pathway is the focus of researchers for the last thirty years for its pivotal role as a frontline cancer suppressant protein due to its effect on cell cycle checkpoints and cell apoptosis in response to a DNA strand break. That is the reason for finding p53 being absent in more than 50% of tumor cancers. Various drugs have been proposed to revive p53 in cancer cells. Small molecule based drugs are at the foremost and are the subject of advanced clinical trials. The dosage design of these drugs is an important issue. We use control systems concepts to develop the drug dosage so that the cancer cells can be treated in appropriate time. We investigate by using a computational model how p53 protein responds to drug Nutlin 3a, an agent that interferes with the MDM2-mediated p53 regulation. The proposed integrated model describes in some detail the regulation network of p53 including the negative feedback loop mediated by MDM2 and the positive feedback loop mediated by Mdm2 mRNA as well as the reversible represses of MDM2 caused by Nutlin. The reported PBK dynamics of Nutlin 3a are also incorporated to see the full effect. It has been reported that p53 response to stresses in two ways. Either it has a sustained (constant) p53 response, or there are oscillations in p53 concentration. The

  17. Pollen reconstructions, tree-rings and early climate data from Minnesota, USA: a cautionary tale of bias and signal attentuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Jacques, J. M.; Cumming, B. F.; Smol, J. P.; Sauchyn, D.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution proxy reconstructions are essential to assess the rate and magnitude of anthropogenic global warming. High-resolution pollen records are being critically examined for the production of accurate climate reconstructions of the last millennium, often as extensions of tree-ring records. Past climate inference from a sedimentary pollen record depends upon the stationarity of the pollen-climate relationship. However, humans have directly altered vegetation, and hence modern pollen deposition is a product of landscape disturbance and climate, unlike in the past with its dominance of climate-derived processes. This could cause serious bias in pollen reconstructions. In the US Midwest, direct human impacts have greatly altered the vegetation and pollen rain since Euro-American settlement in the mid-19th century. Using instrumental climate data from the early 1800s from Fort Snelling (Minnesota), we assessed the bias from the conventional method of inferring climate from pollen assemblages in comparison to a calibration set from pre-settlement pollen assemblages and the earliest instrumental climate data. The pre-settlement calibration set provides more accurate reconstructions of 19th century temperature than the modern set does. When both calibration sets are used to reconstruct temperatures since AD 1116 from a varve-dated pollen record from Lake Mina, Minnesota, the conventional method produces significant low-frequency (centennial-scale) signal attenuation and positive bias of 0.8-1.7 oC, resulting in an overestimation of Little Ice Age temperature and an underestimation of anthropogenic warming. We also compared the pollen-inferred moisture reconstruction to a four-century tree-ring-inferred moisture record from Minnesota and Dakotas, which shows that the tree-ring reconstruction is biased towards dry conditions and records wet periods relatively poorly, giving a false impression of regional aridity. The tree-ring chronology also suggests varve

  18. [On "early pathologic anatomy" and "anatomy of medical structure": continuity or point of epistemological rupture?].

    PubMed

    Lellouch, Alain

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the technical, conceptual and institutional changes from which, through macroscopic pathology, a new medical science (microscopic pathology) emerged. The "early" pathology was mainly implemented by the Ecole de Paris, at the beginning of the 19th century. After 1850, histo-pathology emerged, in German university institutes (which were separate buildings from the wards and from the dissecting rooms of the hospitals). The birth of histo-pathology is also linked with technical improvements in mass manufactured microscopes, with better techniques for fixing and staining histological samples and lastly, in (1848) withVirchow's cellular theory. Among French doctors, only one, the very famous physician Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) was aware of these dramatic changes. Charcot wrote many texts which are testimonies of an epistemological rupture between two very different types of medicine, the old French "médecine d'hôpital" and the new "lab medicine", developed in German speaking countries and based on the microscope.

  19. Historical aspects of the early Soviet/Russian manned space program.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    2001-10-01

    Human spaceflight was one of the great physiological and engineering triumphs of the 20th century. Although the history of the United States manned space program is well known, the Soviet program was shrouded in secrecy until recently. Konstantin Edvardovich Tsiolkovsky (1857-1935) was an extraordinary Russian visionary who made remarkable predictions about space travel in the late 19th century. Sergei Pavlovich Korolev (1907-1966) was the brilliant "Chief Designer" who was responsible for many of the Soviet firsts, including the first artificial satellite and the first human being in space. The dramatic flight of Sputnik 1 was followed within a month by the launch of the dog Laika, the first living creature in space. Remarkably, the engineering work for this payload was all done in less than 4 wk. Korolev's greatest triumph was the flight of Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin (1934-1968) on April 12, 1961. Another extraordinary feat was the first extravehicular activity by Aleksei Arkhipovich Leonov (1934-) using a flexible airlock that emphasized the entrepreneurial attitude of the Soviet engineers. By the mid-1960s, the Soviet program was overtaken by the United States program and attempts to launch a manned mission to the Moon failed. However, the early Soviet manned space program has a preeminent place in the history of space physiology.

  20. The early modern kidney--nephrology in and about the nineteenth century. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2013-01-01

    The 19th century was a period of momentous scientific discoveries, technological achievements, and societal changes. A beneficiary of these revolutionary upheavals was medical empiricism that supplanted the rationalism of the past giving rise to early modern scientific medicine. Continued reliance on sensory data now magnified by technical advances generated new medical information that could be quantified with increasing precision, verified by repeated experimentation, and validated by statistical analysis. The institutionalization and integration of these methodologies into medical education were a defining step that assured their progress and perpetuation. Major advances were made in the nosography of diseases of the kidney, notably that of the diagnosis of progressive kidney disease from the presence of albuminuria by Richard Bright (1789-1858); and of renal structure and function, notably the demonstration of the continuity of the glomerular capsule with the tubular basement membrane by William Bowman (1816-1892), and the arguments for hemodynamic physical forces mediated glomerular filtration by Carl Ludwig (1816-1895) and for active tubular transport by Rudolf Heidenhain (1834-1897). Improvements in microscopy and tissue processing were instrumental in describing the cellular ultrastructure of the glomerulus and tubular segments, but their integrated function remained to be elucidated. The kidney continued to be considered a tubular secretory organ and its pathology attributed to injury of the interstitium (interstitial nephritis) or tubules (parenchymatous nephritis). © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Early 20th century untrained nursing staff in the Rockhampton district: a necessary evil?

    PubMed

    Madsen, Wendy

    2005-08-01

    This paper explores the role of untrained nursing staff within the nursing services of the Rockhampton region, Queensland, Australia, throughout the early 20th century. It details who these nurses were, where they worked and how their work was affected by factors such as legislation and social changes. Despite the increasing prevalence of trained nurses from the late 19th century, nurses who had never undergone any formal training continued to gain work in hospitals, institutions and their local communities. This paper is an historical analysis of a wide range of primary source material relating to untrained nursing staff. The primary source material used related specifically to a limited geographical region in Australia. Untrained nursing staff primarily worked as private duty nurses at the beginning of the 20th century. However, as the century progressed, their opportunities to work as untrained nursing staff tended towards institutions dealing with the chronically ill and the aged. As a result of this transition, their profile altered from that of a married/widowed woman living at home with dependents to one who could live on-site at the institution with no dependents. Furthermore, the level of autonomy of the untrained nurse decreased dramatically throughout this period from being relatively independent to being under the control of a trained nurse within the institution. Consideration of the historical evolution of untrained nursing staff challenges some of the assumptions made about this category of nurse, assumptions that can affect current relationships between professional nurses and others who undertake nursing work.

  2. [Early achievements of the Danish pharmaceutical industry--2. The minor and almost forgotten pharmaceutical companies].

    PubMed

    Grevsen, Jørgen V; Kirkegaard, Hanne; Kruse, Edith; Kruse, Poul R

    2009-01-01

    The article series provides an account in words and pictures of the Danish pharmaceutical industry's products from the earliest times until about 1950. Part 2 deals with products from 16 minor pharmaceutical companies, founded in the last decades of the 19th century and the first decades of the 20th century. Mentioned in chronological order, according to year of foundation, the companies are: C.R. Evers & Co., Jensen & Langebek-Petersens chemisk-techniske Fabrik, Leerbeck & Holms kemiske Fabriker, A/S Skelskør Frugtplantage, Fabriken Ferrin, Chr. F. Petri, Erslevs kemiske Laboratorium, A/S Edward Jacobsen, Th. Fallesen-Schmidt, Fabriken Ferraton, Chemia, Fabriken Kemisan, Central-Laboratoriet, F.F. Gonget & Co., A/S Ejco, and M. Schultz chemiske Fabrik. None of these minor pharmaceutical companies exist today as independent firms. All of them are either closed down or merged into other firms after a number of years. The bigger pharmaceutical companies ensured their continued existence by research and development of new products. The minor companies were not innovative to the same extent, but they played a role at an early stage in the production of Danish copy medicine and in that way a role in the establishment of a Danish generic pharmaceutical industry. The earliest products included dietetic preparations as malt products and albumin maltose products, and iron preparations, often with an admixture of medicine substances. Real medicines such as sleeping, analgesic and antipyretic medicines as well as anesthetics followed later.

  3. The bias and signal attenuation present in conventional pollen-based climate reconstructions as assessed by early climate data from Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    St Jacques, Jeannine-Marie; Cumming, Brian F; Sauchyn, David J; Smol, John P

    2015-01-01

    The inference of past temperatures from a sedimentary pollen record depends upon the stationarity of the pollen-climate relationship. However, humans have altered vegetation independent of changes to climate, and consequently modern pollen deposition is a product of landscape disturbance and climate, which is different from the dominance of climate-derived processes in the past. This problem could cause serious signal distortion in pollen-based reconstructions. In the north-central United States, direct human impacts have strongly altered the modern vegetation and hence the pollen rain since Euro-American settlement in the mid-19th century. Using instrumental temperature data from the early 1800 s from Fort Snelling (Minnesota), we assessed the signal distortion and bias introduced by using the conventional method of inferring temperature from pollen assemblages in comparison to a calibration set from pre-settlement pollen assemblages and the earliest instrumental climate data. The early post-settlement calibration set provides more accurate reconstructions of the 19th century instrumental record, with less bias, than the modern set does. When both modern and pre-industrial calibration sets are used to reconstruct past temperatures since AD 1116 from pollen counts from a varve-dated record from Lake Mina, Minnesota, the conventional inference method produces significant low-frequency (centennial-scale) signal attenuation and positive bias of 0.8-1.7 °C, resulting in an overestimation of Little Ice Age temperature and likely an underestimation of the extent and rate of anthropogenic warming in this region. However, high-frequency (annual-scale) signal attenuation exists with both methods. Hence, we conclude that any past pollen spectra from before Euro-American settlement in this region should be interpreted using a pre-Euro-American settlement pollen set, paired to the earliest instrumental climate records. It remains to be explored how widespread this problem is

  4. Poinsinet's Edition of the Naturalis historia (1771-1782) and the Revival of Pliny in the Sciences of the Enlightenment.

    PubMed

    Loveland, Jeff; Schmitt, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the revival of Pliny's Naturalis historia within the scientific culture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, focusing on a French effort to produce an edition with annotations by scientists and scholars. Between the Renaissance and the early eighteenth century, the Naturalis historia had declined in scientific importance. Increasingly, it was relegated to the humanities, as we demonstrate with a review of editions. For a variety of reasons, however, scientific interest in the Naturalis historia grew in the second half of the eighteenth century. Epitomizing this interest was a plan for a scientifically annotated, Latin-French edition of the Naturalis historia. Initially coordinated by the French governmental minister Malesherbes in the 1750s, the edition was imperfectly realized by Poinsinet a few decades later. It was intended to rival two of the period's other distinguished multi-volume books of knowledge, Diderot and D'Alembert's Encyclopédie and Buffon's Histoire naturelle, to which we compare it. Besides narrating the scientific revival of the Historia naturalis during this period, we examine its causes and the factors contributing to its end in the first half of the nineteenth century.

  5. 37 CFR 1.137 - Revival of abandoned application, terminated or limited reexamination prosecution, or lapsed patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... petition may be filed pursuant to this paragraph to revive an abandoned application, a reexamination... unintentional, a petition may be filed pursuant to this paragraph to revive an abandoned application, a... fee. (d) Terminal disclaimer. (1) Any petition to revive pursuant to this section in a design...

  6. 37 CFR 1.958 - Petition to revive inter partes reexamination prosecution terminated for lack of patent owner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Petition to revive inter..., Terminating of Reexamination Prosecution, and Petitions to Revive in Inter Partes Reexamination § 1.958 Petition to revive inter partes reexamination prosecution terminated for lack of patent owner response. (a...

  7. Reviving the lithium metal anode for high-energy batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dingchang; Liu, Yayuan; Cui, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have had a profound impact on our daily life, but inherent limitations make it difficult for Li-ion chemistries to meet the growing demands for portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-scale energy storage. Therefore, chemistries beyond Li-ion are currently being investigated and need to be made viable for commercial applications. The use of metallic Li is one of the most favoured choices for next-generation Li batteries, especially Li-S and Li-air systems. After falling into oblivion for several decades because of safety concerns, metallic Li is now ready for a revival, thanks to the development of investigative tools and nanotechnology-based solutions. In this Review, we first summarize the current understanding on Li anodes, then highlight the recent key progress in materials design and advanced characterization techniques, and finally discuss the opportunities and possible directions for future development of Li anodes in applications.

  8. Pharmacogenomics to Revive Drug Development in Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Marie-Pierre; de Denus, Simon; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-01

    Investment in cardiovascular drug development is on the decline as large cardiovascular outcomes trials require considerable investments in time, efforts and financial resources. Pharmacogenomics has the potential to help revive the cardiovascular drug development pipeline by providing new and better drug targets at an earlier stage and by enabling more efficient outcomes trials. This article will review some of the recent developments highlighting the value of pharmacogenomics for drug development. We discuss how genetic biomarkers can enable the conduct of more efficient clinical outcomes trials by enriching patient populations for good responders to the medication. In addition, we assess past drug development programs which support the added value of selecting drug targets that have established genetic evidence supporting the targeted mechanism of disease. Finally, we discuss how pharmacogenomics can provide valuable evidence linking a drug target to clinically relevant outcomes, enabling novel drug discovery and drug repositioning opportunities.

  9. Direct weak localization signature with ultracold atoms: the CBS revival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josse, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold atomic systems in presence of disorder have attracted a lot of interest over the past decade, in particular to study the physics of Anderson localization (AL) in a renewed perspective. Landmark experiments have been demonstrated, in 1D and 3D geometries. However many challenges remain and new ideas have emerged, as for instance the search for original signatures of Anderson localization in momentum space. Here I will describe our progresses along that line where a weak localization effect has been directly observed, i.e. the Coherent Backscattering (CBS) phenomenon. In particular I will report on the recent observation of suppression and revival of CBS when a controlled dephasing kick is applied to the system. This observation demonstrates a novel and general method, introduced by T. Micklitz and coworkers, to study probe phase coherence in disordered systems by manipulating time reversal symmetry.

  10. Radar Image with Color as Height, Sman Teng, Temple, Cambodia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-11

    This image, taken by NASA Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar AIRSAR in 2002, is of Cambodia Angkor region revealing a temple upper-right not depicted on early 19th Century French archeological survey maps and American topographic maps.

  11. δ15N Values in Crassostrea virginica Shells Provides Early Direct Evidence for Nitrogen Loading to Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, H. D.; Andrus, C. F. T.; Lambert, W. J.; Rick, T. C.; Gillikin, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    Crassostrea virginica is one of the most common estuarine bivalves in the United States’ east coast and is frequently found in archaeological sites and sub-fossil deposits. Although there have been several sclerochronological studies on stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in the shells of this species, less is known about δ15N values within their shells, which could be a useful paleoenvironmental proxy to assess estuarine nitrogen dynamics. Modern C. virginica samples were collected in Chesapeake Bay for comparison with archaeological shells from nearby sites ranging in age from ~100 to 3,200 years old. Left valves were sampled by milling the hinge area and the resulting powder was analyzed for %N and δ15N values. Comparison of δ15N values between C. virginica shells shows relatively constant values from ~1250 BC to ~1800 AD. After ~1800 AD, there are rapid increases in 15N enrichment in the shells, which continue to increase in value up to the modern shell values. The increase in δ15N values is evidence of early anthropogenic impact in Chesapeake Bay. These results corroborate the observation that coastal nitrogen pollution occurred earlier than the 19th century and support the use of oyster shell δ15N values as a useful environmental proxy.

  12. Abu-Sahl al-Masihi (died circa 1010 AD): The Persian physician in the early medieval era.

    PubMed

    Taghavi-Shirazi, Maryam; Ghods, Roshanak; Hashem-Dabaghian, Fataneh; Zargaran, Arman

    2018-01-01

    In the early medieval era, in the time which is called the Islamic Golden Age, medicine flourished through the practice of Persian physicians (9th to 12th century AD). Abu-Sahl al-Masihi (died circa 1010 AD) was one of the physicians in that period who had great influence on the progress of medicine by his own writings as well as his influence on great scholars like Biruni and Avicenna as their teacher. He was a polymath and had many writings in various fields of science, in particular medical sciences. Some of his manuscripts in medicine were Al-Mia fil-Tibb (Book of the Hundred), Kitab al-Teb al-Koli (The General Medicine), Ezhar al-Hekmat Allah Ta'ala fi Khalgh al-Ensan (God's Mystery on the Creation of Man), Resalat al-Adwiya (Treatise of Drugs), Osool Elm Nabz (the Principles of Pulse), and Resala f ī Taḥqiq Amral-Waba' (On the determination of the matter of infectious diseases). As a sign of his impact in Persian medicine, many later physicians (until 19th century) referred to and cited his works in their manuscripts several times.

  13. Resources for Teaching about the Frontier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiter, David

    1988-01-01

    Highlights materials relating to the U.S. frontier during the 19th century by citing journal articles and documents related to this topic. Indicates the means for obtaining these works which deal with rural schooling, historical demography, Native Americans, music, revivalism, and Black cowboys. (KO)

  14. Institutional Factors in the Education of Teachers: An Historical Preview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pemberton, S. Macpherson

    This paper presents a historical overview of teacher education in America. It begins with a description of normal schools, whose function was closely tied to the church (e.g., teaching people to read the Bible). Then it covers the educational revival in the 19th century which established free public schools. James Carter, Samuel Hall, and Horace…

  15. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause in five Asian countries: results from the Pan-Asian REVIVE survey.

    PubMed

    Chua, Y; Limpaphayom, K K; Cheng, B; Ho, C M; Sumapradja, K; Altomare, C; Huang, K

    2017-08-01

    The Pan-Asian REVIVE survey aimed to examine women's experiences with genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) and their interactions with health-care professionals (HCPs). Self-completed surveys were administered face-to-face to 5992 women (aged 45-75 years) in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand. Of 638 postmenopausal women with GSM symptoms, only 35% were aware of the GSM condition, most of whom first heard of GSM through their physician (32%). The most common symptoms were vaginal dryness (57%) and irritation (43%). GSM had the greatest impact on sexual enjoyment (65%) and intimacy (61%). Only 25% had discussed their GSM symptoms with a HCP, and such discussions were mostly patient-initiated (64%) rather than HCP-initiated (24%). Only 21% had been clinically diagnosed with GSM and only 24% had ever used treatment for their symptoms. Three-quarters of those who had used treatment for GSM had discussed their symptoms with a HCP compared to only 9% of those who were treatment-naïve. GSM is underdiagnosed and undertreated in Asia. As discussion of GSM with HCPs appears to be a factor influencing women's awareness and treatment status, a more active role by HCPs to facilitate early discussions on GSM and its treatment options is needed.

  16. On the possibility of complete revivals after quantum quenches to a critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, K.; Rajabpour, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    In a recent letter [J. Cardy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 220401 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.220401], the author made a very interesting observation that complete revivals of quantum states after quantum quench can happen in a period that is a fraction of the system size. This is possible for critical systems that can be described by minimal conformal field theories with central charge c <1 . In this paper, we show that these complete revivals are impossible in microscopic realizations of those minimal models. We will prove the absence of the mentioned complete revivals for the critical transverse field Ising chain analytically, and present numerical results for the critical line of the XY chain. In particular, for the considered initial states, we will show that criticality has no significant effect in partial revivals. We also comment on the applicability of quasiparticle picture to determine the period of the partial revivals qualitatively. In particular, we detect a regime in the phase diagram of the XY chain in which one can not determine the period of the partial revivals using the quasiparticle picture.

  17. The history of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of a novel serum autoantibody (termed NMO-IgG or AQP4-Ab) in a subset of patients in 2004 has revived interest in neuromyelitis optica (NMO). While the history of classical multiple sclerosis has been extensively studied, only little is known about the history of NMO. In the present article, we provide a comprehensive review of the early history of this rare but intriguing syndrome. We trace the origins of the concept of NMO in the 19th century medical literature and follow its evolution throughout the 20th and into the 21st century. Finally, we discuss recent proposals to revise the concept of NMO and explain why there is indeed a need for a more systematic and descriptive nomenclature. PMID:23320783

  18. The revival of General Relativity at Princeton: Daring Conservatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Dieter; Blum, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    After General Relativity was established in essentially its present form in 1915 it was celebrated as a great success of mathematical physics. But the initial hopes for this theory as a basis for all of physics began to fade in the next several decades, as General Relativity was relegated to the margins of theoretical physics. Its fate began to rise in the 1950's in a revival of interest and research that over time made gravitational physics one of the hottest research topics it is today. One center of this renaissance was Princeton, where two relative newcomers explored new and different approaches to gravitational physics. Robert Dicke showed that gravity is not as inaccessible to experiment as was thought, and John Wheeler propelled it into the mainstream by proposing highly original and imaginative consequences of Einstein's theory. We will concentrate on these ideas that, in his characteristically intriguing style, Wheeler called "Daring Conservatism" - a term well known to his associates, but one he never mentioned in print. With the aid of unpublished manuscripts and notes we will explore Daring Conservatism's origin and motivation, its successes and failures, and the legacy it left behind.

  19. Fighting fire with fire: the revival of thermotherapy for gliomas.

    PubMed

    Lee Titsworth, William; Murad, Greg J A; Hoh, Brian L; Rahman, Maryam

    2014-02-01

    In 1891, an orthopedic surgeon in New York noted the disappearance of an inoperable sarcoma in a patient after a febrile illness. This observation resulted in experiments assessing the utility of heat therapy or thermotherapy for the treatment of cancer. While it initially fell from favor, thermotherapy has recently made a resurgence, sparking investigations into its anticancer properties. This therapy is especially attractive for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is difficult to target due to the blood-brain barrier and recalcitrant to treatment. Here we briefly review the history of thermotherapy and then more methodically present the current literature as it relates to central nervous system malignancies. Recent developments show that heat is preferentially cytotoxic to tumor cells and induces cellular pathways which result in apoptotic and non-apoptotic death. Techniques to induce hyperthermia include regional hyperthermia by water bath, focused ultrasound, radiofrequency microwaves, laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, and magnetic energy. The recent revival of these therapeutic approaches and their preliminary outcomes in the treatment of GBM is reviewed. From bacterial toxins to infusion of magnetic nanoparticles, hyperthermia has the potential to be an effective and easy-to-execute adjuvant therapy for GBM. Hyperthermia for GBM is a promising therapy as part of a growing armamentarium for malignant glioma treatment.

  20. Strategy and the Revolution in Military Affairs: From Theory to Policy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-27

    incorporation of rifled weapons in the 19th century were constituent parts of a “major” revolution which included fundamental social, economic, and...development (see Figure 3). Still, combat effectiveness is always relative. Percussion- cap rifled muskets of the mid- 19th century were certainly more...breakthrough as when the European powers of the mid- 19th to early 20th centuries combined industrialization, railroads, improved metallurgy and explosives

  1. Cultural Resources Literature Search and Records Review - Upper Mississippi River Basin. Volume 12. Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    1977 An early 19th century occupation of Pike Island, Dakota County, Minnesota. The Minnesota Archaeologist 36 (2):51-60. St. Paul, Minnesota. -19...College of Saint Teresa, Winona, Minnesota. HORTON, LOREN N. 1978 Through the eys of artists: Iowa towns in the 19th century . The Palimpsest 59 (5):133...sites. The Wisconsin Archeologist 54 (3):135-153. LOFSTROM, EDWARD U. 1976 An analysis of temporal change in nineteenth century ceramic assemblage from

  2. Circuit Chautauqua: From Rural Education to Popular Entertainment in Early Twentieth Century America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, John Edward

    In 1874, Methodist minister John Vincent began a Sunday school retreat on the shores of Lake Chautauqua, New York, the mission of which was education. Initial offerings such as Bible reading, biblical geography, and public oration were supplemented with general education and entertainment activities. In the late 19th century, the Chautauqua…

  3. Institutionalising Design Education and Design Promotion in Australia: From Early British Influences to Wider International Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Industrial design has grown in Australia from a series of unnamed activities clustered about an emerging 19th century manufacturing industry into a recognised profession. This transformation largely occurred because of the emergence of specific design education and the support offered by professional design associations. Designers working for the…

  4. Sex differences in the consequences of early-life exposure to epidemiological stress--a life-history approach.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to infectious disease in early life has been suggested to have a negative effect on later-life survival,possibly through the induction of inflammatory responses. Although a life-course perspective emphasizes the importance of both survival and reproduction for individual fitness, to date, no studies have investigated whether early-life exposure to infectious disease has an impact on reproduction as it has been suggested for later survival. To address this question, I have used family reconstitution data from a historical (18th and 19th century) human population in the Krummhörn (Germany) comparing survival and reproduction between an exposed and a non-exposed group. The exposed group comprised those exposed to a high-infectious disease load during prenatal and early postnatal development. The results show a marked sex difference in the impact of early-life exposure to infectious disease. Exposed females show no effect on their life expectancy but significantly reduced fertility (number of children). For exposed males, however, the effect on survival is opponent over time: mortality is increased during childhood but decreased in late adulthood. Above that, exposed males reproduce earlier and have a smaller proportion of surviving children. This study does not support former studies indicating a negative association between early-life disease load and later survival. I argue that due to differences in male and female life strategies, males in general are more vulnerable especially early in life. Hence, adverse environmental conditions may have a stronger effect on male survivability and reproductive performance.

  5. Universality and robustness of revivals in the transverse field XY model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häppölä, Juho; Halász, Gábor B.; Hamma, Alioscia

    2012-03-01

    We study the structure of the revivals in an integrable quantum many-body system, the transverse field XY spin chain, after a quantum quench. The time evolutions of the Loschmidt echo, the magnetization, and the single-spin entanglement entropy are calculated. We find that the revival times for all of these observables are given by integer multiples of Trev≃L/vmax, where L is the linear size of the system and vmax is the maximal group velocity of quasiparticles. This revival structure is universal in the sense that it does not depend on the initial state and the size of the quench. Applying nonintegrable perturbations to the XY model, we observe that the revivals are robust against such perturbations: they are still visible at time scales much larger than the quasiparticle lifetime. We therefore propose a generic connection between the revival structure and the locality of the dynamics, where the quasiparticle speed vmax generalizes into the Lieb-Robinson speed vLR.

  6. Early Levallois and the beginning of the Middle Paleolithic in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Sylvain; Villa, Paola

    2017-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century Pleistocene faunas were discovered in two sites, Sedia del Diavolo and Monte delle Gioie, contained in deposits of the Aniene River in the area of Rome (Latium, Italy). Fieldwork by A.C. Blanc in the late 1930's proved the association of fauna and lithic industry within fluvial deposits interbedded with volcanoclastic layers. A human femoral diaphysis and a metatarsal were later identified in the faunal assemblage from Sedia del Diavolo and evaluated as Neandertal. The lithic assemblages from these two sites were the basis of the definition of the Protopontinian by M. Taschini, which she viewed as a late Middle Pleistocene industry very similar to the later, Upper Pleistocene Pontinian industries, thought to be characteristic of the Latium Mousterian. The chronostratigraphic framework of the Aniene river deposits has been recently updated and the lithic assemblages from these two sites are now confidently dated between 295 and 290 ka, close to the transition from MIS 9 to MIS 8. They fit chronologically between the industries of layers m and d from Torre in Pietra, a site 26 km northwest of Rome. The presence of the Levallois debitage is indisputable yet it occurs within an original technical context, different from what is known in other early occurrences of the Levallois. The date confirms the proposed chronology for the early Levallois in Europe. More importantly these two assemblages demonstrate that this technology can emerge in more diversified contexts than usually described. This suggests that its dispersal in Europe may have been rapid.

  7. Early Levallois and the beginning of the Middle Paleolithic in central Italy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century Pleistocene faunas were discovered in two sites, Sedia del Diavolo and Monte delle Gioie, contained in deposits of the Aniene River in the area of Rome (Latium, Italy). Fieldwork by A.C. Blanc in the late 1930’s proved the association of fauna and lithic industry within fluvial deposits interbedded with volcanoclastic layers. A human femoral diaphysis and a metatarsal were later identified in the faunal assemblage from Sedia del Diavolo and evaluated as Neandertal. The lithic assemblages from these two sites were the basis of the definition of the Protopontinian by M. Taschini, which she viewed as a late Middle Pleistocene industry very similar to the later, Upper Pleistocene Pontinian industries, thought to be characteristic of the Latium Mousterian. The chronostratigraphic framework of the Aniene river deposits has been recently updated and the lithic assemblages from these two sites are now confidently dated between 295 and 290 ka, close to the transition from MIS 9 to MIS 8. They fit chronologically between the industries of layers m and d from Torre in Pietra, a site 26 km northwest of Rome. The presence of the Levallois debitage is indisputable yet it occurs within an original technical context, different from what is known in other early occurrences of the Levallois. The date confirms the proposed chronology for the early Levallois in Europe. More importantly these two assemblages demonstrate that this technology can emerge in more diversified contexts than usually described. This suggests that its dispersal in Europe may have been rapid. PMID:29053710

  8. Archaeogeophysical investigations of early Caddo settlement patterning at the Crenshaw site (3MI6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsen, John R.

    The Teran map, made during Don Domingo Teran de los Rios' expedition for New Spain, shows a Caddo settlement in 1691 with a vacant mound center and many small farmsteads dispersed across the countryside along both banks of the Red River. This map, combined with the 19th Century photographs taken by William Soule, provides a testable model for the settlement pattern of the Caddo people called the Teran-Soule model. This model states that large numbers of people besides a small caretaker population did not inhabit the mound centers, supporting a vacant mound center hypothesis. Recent studies have begun to challenge this hypothesis, using archaeogeophysical techniques to find structures near Middle to Late Caddo mounds. An archaeogeophysical survey of the Crenshaw site along the Great Bend of the Red River was conducted to determine if structures could be found there. Is the settlement pattern at this early Caddo site, occupied between A.D. 700 and 1400, consistent with the late historic model of a vacant mound center? Is there evidence that both Caddo and Fourche Maline occupations existed in horizontally distinct components? The 3.2 hectare survey identified more than 100 possible structures, of which more than 50 are probably structures associated with the Fourche Maline or early Caddo occupations of the site. Several structures were found in linear patterns, including an oval series of possible structures measuring 90 x 85 m in diameter. While cultural affiliation was not determined for most of these features, some can be attributed to Caddo origin based on architectural attributes, such as extended entranceways. This suggests that Crenshaw was not literally vacant, but the presence of extended entranceways suggests that some of the identified features were special use structures, which does not conflict with the vacant mound center hypothesis. However, the large number of possible structures present with unknown cultural affiliations provides ample opportunities

  9. Revival of the "Sun Festival": An educational and outreach project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montabone, Luca

    2016-10-01

    In ancient times, past civilisations used to celebrate both the winter and summer solstices, which represented key moments in the periodical cycle of seasons and agricultural activities. In 1904, the French astronomer Camille Flammarion, the engineer Gustave Eiffel, the science writer Wilfrid de Fonvielle and the Spanish astronomer Josep Comas i Solà decided to celebrate the summer solstice with a festival of science, art and astronomical observations opened to the public at the Eiffel tower in Paris. For ten consecutive years (1904-1914) on the day of the summer solstice, the "Sun Festival" (Fête du Soleil in French) included scientific and technological lectures and demostrations, celestial observations, music, poetry, danse, cinema, etc. This celebration was interrupted by the First World War, just to resume in Barcelona, Spain, between 1915 and 1937, and in Marseille, France, in the 1930s. It was the founders' dream to extend this celebration to all cities in France and elsewhere.It is only during the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, to our knowledge, that the "Sun Festival" was given another chance in France, thanks to the joint effort of several scientific and cultural centers (Centres de Culture Scientifique, Technique et Industrielle, CCSTI) and the timely support of the European Space Agency (ESA). In this occasion again, the festival was characterized by the combination of science, art and technological innovation around a common denominator: our Sun!We have recently revived the idea of celebrating the summer solstice with a "Sun Festival" dedicated to scientific education and outreach about our star and related topics. This project started last year in Aix-les-Bains, France, with the "Sun and Light Festival" (2015 was the International Year of Light), attended by about 100 people. This year's second edition was in Le Bourget-du-Lac, France. Following the COP21 event, the specific theme was the "Sun and Climate Festival", and we had about 250

  10. Experimental demonstration of revival of oscillations from death in coupled nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, D V; Suresh, K; Chandrasekar, V K; Zou, Wei; Dana, Syamal K; Kathamuthu, Thamilmaran; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a processing delay, a finite response time, in the coupling can revoke the stability of the stable steady states, thereby facilitating the revival of oscillations in the same parameter space where the coupled oscillators suffered the quenching of oscillation. This phenomenon of reviving of oscillations is demonstrated using two different prototype electronic circuits. Further, the analytical critical curves corroborate that the spread of the parameter space with stable steady state is diminished continuously by increasing the processing delay. Finally, the death state is completely wiped off above a threshold value by switching the stability of the stable steady state to retrieve sustained oscillations in the same parameter space. The underlying dynamical mechanism responsible for the decrease in the spread of the stable steady states and the eventual reviving of oscillation as a function of the processing delay is explained using analytical results.

  11. Experimental demonstration of revival of oscillations from death in coupled nonlinear oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilkumar, D. V., E-mail: skumarusnld@gmail.com; Centre for Nonlinear Science and Engineering, School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613 401; Suresh, K.

    We experimentally demonstrate that a processing delay, a finite response time, in the coupling can revoke the stability of the stable steady states, thereby facilitating the revival of oscillations in the same parameter space where the coupled oscillators suffered the quenching of oscillation. This phenomenon of reviving of oscillations is demonstrated using two different prototype electronic circuits. Further, the analytical critical curves corroborate that the spread of the parameter space with stable steady state is diminished continuously by increasing the processing delay. Finally, the death state is completely wiped off above a threshold value by switching the stability of themore » stable steady state to retrieve sustained oscillations in the same parameter space. The underlying dynamical mechanism responsible for the decrease in the spread of the stable steady states and the eventual reviving of oscillation as a function of the processing delay is explained using analytical results.« less

  12. The Irony of Early School Reform: Educational Innovation in Mid-Nineteenth Century Massachusetts. Reflective History Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Michael B.

    This reissue of the seminal 1968 study of the origins of mass popular education in 19th-century Massachusetts is considered one of the first radical revisionist interpretations of U.S. educational history. This new edition retains the original text but includes a new introduction by the author. The study looks at the relation between reformer…

  13. Realization of the revival of silenced echo (ROSE) quantum memory scheme in orthogonal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnegaliev, M. M.; Gerasimov, K. I.; Urmancheev, R. V.; Moiseev, S. A.; Chanelière, T.; Louchet-Chauvet, A.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrated quantum memory scheme on revival of silenced echo in orthogonal geometry in Tm3+: Y3Al5O12 crystal. The retrieval efficiency of ˜14% was demonstrated with the 36 µs storage time. In this scheme for the first time we also implemented a suppression of the revived echo signal by applying an external electric field and the echo signal has been recovered on demand if we then applied a second electric pulse with opposite polarity. This technique opens the possibilities for realizing addressing in multi-qubit quantum memory in Tm3+: Y3Al5O12 crystal.

  14. [Theophile-Jules Pelouze (1807-1867) was one of the French pharmacists who has the most contributed to the evolution of the organic chemisty in the first half of the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Pascal

    2015-03-01

    Through some examples of his works, realized between 1833 and 1845 (studies on the tannin, the reaction of etherification, and on the nature of the chemical function of the glycerin), this article tries to bring to light his scientific approach. This one is not only based on the immediate analysis and the elementary analysis, but also on the study of characteristic chemical reactions, which are going to give him information onto the chemical nature and the constitution of the molecules which he studies. This approach will lead him finally to use these reactions not only in an analytical purpose but also in a purpose of synthesis.

  15. [Richard Freiherr v. Krafft-Ebing and Sigmund Freud--discourse on the "normality" and "perversion" of human sexuality at the close of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality has been defined a central feature of personal identity since the epoch of enlightenment and has gradually become a decisive issue also in societal and political terms. A major transfer from religion and religious institutions to medicine and medical experts and later on to neuropsychiatrists has to be underlined in the primary position to assess "normal" and "deviant" manifestations of sexuality. Richard Freiherr von Krafft-Ebing and Sigmund Freund play an eminent role in this "discourse on sexuality" (M. Foucault) during the nineteenth and beginning twentieth century on the way to modern sexology. Within this overarching context Krafft-Ebing's and Freud's theoretical conceptualizations of sexuality and perversion will be sketched and basic clinical and societal implications there out will be discussed.

  16. Analysis of Factors that have Influenced Outcomes of Battles and Wars: A Data Base of Battles and Engagements. Volume 3. Wars from 1805 through 1900. Part 1. Wars of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    forced the French back, with both sides suffering heavy casualties. Before 0900 hours Napoleon had comtted all of *’-’ his troops but his Imperial...organized Army of the Rhine, had been driven back to Metz by the German armies, which were threatening his line of communications to Paris. On 16 Agust he

  17. An Aspect of Colonialism and Anti-Colonialism: A Comparative Study between the Traces of British Imperialism in English Literature and the Counterpoint of Anti-Colonialism in Bengali Literature of 19th Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haque, Farhana

    2016-01-01

    In "Mansfield Park," Jane Austen has exhibited the English identity lies on property earned by the slave trade in Caribbean Islands. If we go deep inside of the history of Britain we could able to see their awareness and concern over a national identity, and consider American colonies a poor reflection on Britain. The traits of British…

  18. Evaluation of Little Ice Age cooling in Western Central Andes, suggested by paleoELAs, in contrast with global warming since late 19th century deduced from instrumental records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David; Campos, Néstor; Giraldez, Claudia; García, Eduardo; Quiros, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate climate cooling (°C) during the glacial expansion phases using the product GTV•ΔELA, where GTV is the vertical air temperature gradient (°C/m) and ΔELA (m) the difference in level observed between the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) reconstructions for current and past glaciers. With this aim the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio-(AABR) method was used to produce reconstructions of present ELAs (2002-2010) and paleoELAs corresponding to the last glacier advance phase. The reconstructions were produced in three study areas located along a N-S transect of the western cordillera in the Central Andes: the south-western sector of the Nevado Hualcán (9°S, 77°W; Giráldez 2011); the southern slope of the Cordillera Pariaqaqa (12°S, 76°W; Quirós, 2013) and the NW, NE, SE and SW quadrants of the Nevado Coropuna (16°S, 72°W; García 2013; Úbeda 2011; Campos, 2012). The three mountains exceed 6000 m altitude, their summit areas are covered by glaciers, and on their slopes there are existing well-conserved moraines deposited by the last advances near the present front of the ice masses. Although there are no absolute dates to confirm this hypothesis, it has been assumed that the last glacial advances occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), which the oxygen isotopes of the Nevado Huascarán (9°S, 77°W) date to the period 1500-1890. For the Hualcán and Pariaqaqa the mean global value of the Earth's GTV (6.5°C/km) was used, considered valid for the Tropics. On the Coropuna a GTV=8.4°C/km was used, based on high resolution sensors installed in situ since 2007 (Úbeda 2011). This gradient is approaching the upper limit of the dry adiabatic gradient (9.8°C/km), as the Coropuna region is more arid than the other case study areas. The climate cooling estimates deduced from the product GTV•ΔELA were compared with the global warming shown by the 1880-2012 series, ΔT=0.85°C, and 1850/1900-2003/2012, ΔT=0.78°C. The differences are small (averaging 0.05 and 0.12 °C) suggesting that the product GTV•ΔELA may be a good indicator of climate cooling during glacial expansion phases. However, the role played by precipitation has not yet been determined, and this will be examined in future research. Campos (2012). Glacier evolution in the South West slope of Nevado Coropuna (Cordillera Ampato, Peru). Master Thesis. Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain), pp. 55. http://eprints.ucm.es/19889/. García, E. (2013). Evolución glaciar del cuadrante noroeste del Nevado Coropuna. Master Thesis. Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain), p. 50. http://eprints.ucm.es/23671/. Giráldez, C. (2011). Glacier evolution in the South West slope of Nevado Hualcán (Cordillera Blanca, Peru). Master Thesis. Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain), p. 125. http://eprints.ucm.es/14013/. IPCC (2013). Climate Change 2013. The Physical Science Basis. Working Group I Contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge (UK) y New York (USA), 1535 pp. Research funded by Cryocrisis (CGL2012-35858) and www.cryoperu.pe.

  19. History of the membrane (pump) theory of the living cell from its beginning in mid-19th century to its disproof 45 years ago--though still taught worldwide today as established truth.

    PubMed

    Ling, Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    The concept that the basic unit of all life, the cell, is a membrane-enclosed soup of (free) water, (free) K+ (and native) proteins is called the membrane theory. A careful examination of past records shows that this theory has no author in the true sense of the word. Rather, it grew mostly out of some mistaken ideas made by Theodor Schwann in his Cell Theory. (This is not to deny that there is a membrane theory with an authentic author but this authored membrane theory came later and is much more narrowly focussed and accordingly can at best be regarded as an offshoot of the broader and older membrane theory without an author.) However, there is no ambiguity on the demise of the membrane theory, which occurred more than 60 years ago, when a flood of converging evidence showed that the asymmetrical distribution of K+ and Na+ observed in virtually all living cells is not the result of the presence of a membrane barrier that permits some solutes like water and K+ to move in and out of the cell, while barring--absolutely and permanently--the passage of other solutes like Na+. To keep the membrane theory afloat, submicroscopic pumps were installed across the cell membrane to maintain, for example, the level of Na+ in the cell low and the level of K+ high by the ceaseless pumping activities at the expense of metabolic energy. Forty-five year ago this version of the membrane theory was also experimentally disproved. In spite of all these overwhelming evidence against the membrane-pump theory, it still is being taught as verified truth in all high-school and biology textbooks known to us today. Meanwhile, almost unnoticed, a new unifying theory of the living cell, called the association-induction hypothesis came into being some 40 years ago. Also little noticed was the fact that it has received extensive confirmation worldwide and has shown an ability to provide self-consistent interpretations of most if not all known experimental observations that are contradicting the membrane-pump theory as well as other observations that seem to support the membrane pump theory.

  20. Evaluation in the 19th century - how astronomers were chosen for Gotha observatory. (German Title: Evaluation im 19. Jahrhundert - wie Astronomen für die Sternwarte Gotha ausgesucht wurden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strumpf, Manfred

    In his testament, Duke Ernst II of Saxe Gotha and Altenburg instituted a foundation for the maintenance of an astronomical observatory. The interest from which the income of the only astronomer should be paid became insufficient in the course of time, especially after the death of Hansen. The government was not willing to increase the financial means but was nevertheless searching for the impossible, i.e. a reputable scientist who would accept a low salary. Scheibner in Leipzig was charged with the search. He missed two contrasting opportunities: on the one side a classical young astronomer in the tradition lines of Gotha (Leo de Ball) and on the other side a wealthy Hungarian amateur who would have brought the new astrophysics to Gotha (Nikolaus von Konkoly).

  1. [Sanitary conditions, health care and epidemiological situation of infectious diseases in Cracow in the period of Galicia autonomy (since 60ties/70ties of 19th century until 1914)].

    PubMed

    Berner, Włodzimierz

    2008-01-01

    After Galicia had received autonomy at the turn of the 60s and 70s of the XIX century in Cracow the changes in order to repair long-running neglects were introduced. In order to fulfill this aim, cobbled pavement surfaces of the roads as well as sewage and water supply systems were constructed. District sanitary physicians (ten physicians in 1914 after in 1910-1912 neglected suburbs were attached to the city) were supposed to inspect health care of inhabitants. In spite of remarkable results (especially during the ten years before the World War I) there were many challenges, also concerning improvement of housing conditions. Among the most dangerous diseases predominated tuberculosis, followed by scarlet fever, diphteria, measles and whooping cough, typhoid fever and dysentery. Recrudescent typhus fever and smallpox did not cause considerable health danger any more.

  2. [Sanitary conditions, medical care and epidemiology situation of infectious diseases in Lvov in the period of Galicia autonomy (from the years 60ties/70ties of 19th century to the year 1914)].

    PubMed

    Berner, Włodzimierz

    2007-01-01

    Galicia autonomy received at the turn of the 60s and 70s of the XIX century contributed to the formation of organizational basis for activities in favour of improvement of health in the country, including the biggest city of Austrian partition--Lvov. In this city until the World War I outbreak intensive works concerning construction of sewage and water supply systems were performed, what beneficially affected the sanitary conditions in some districts. At the same time despite strenuous efforts, the attempts to provide cobbled permanent surfaces of the majority of roads were unsuccessful. Serious concerns were expressed in relation to living conditions of the Lvov working class. In the situation, the municipal self-governing health service, developed in 1872, with a few district sanitary physicians (7 in 1914) was not able to significantly decrease the incidence of infectious diseases and disease-related mortality rate, however some improvement in this issue was observed. Among the most dangerous diseases predominated tuberculosis, followed by scarlet fever, diphtheria, measles and whooping cough, typhoid fever and dysentery. At the beginning of the XX century the health service managed to eliminate smallpox due to implementation of annual vaccination of infants.

  3. The Concert of Europe and Great Power Governance Today: What Can the Order of 19th-Century Europe Teach Policymakers About International Order in the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    powers from the temptations of unilateral opportunism. The best-known and most-important success story here was the creation of the German...possibly mentally ill, the foreign minister committed suicide in the summer of 1822. His successor, George Canning, was a relative Concert skeptic... temptation . As discussed earlier, this was a process that might have started with the divide over liberal revolutions in the 1820s. In the prior

  4. Corporate Takeover of U.S. Catholic Education and the Effect on Catholic Identity: Models from the Church's 19th-Century Schools and 21st-Century Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Gorman, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    There is a movement toward "corporatization" evident in Catholic hospitals, Catholic schools, and Catholic social service agencies taking up management structures and other features and behaviors employed by corporations. Many see these practices as threatening the identity and influence of religion as the profit concerns begin to take…

  5. Who says this is a modern disorder? The early history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Badía, Jose; Martinez-Raga, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a complex, heterogeneous and multifactorial neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by persistent symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. Although the first clinical description of a constellation of symptoms highly resembling to what currently could be diagnosed as ADHD is generally attributed to George F Still in 1902, there are scattered but significant published historical medical, scientific and non-scientific reports, much prior to Still’s lectures, of what is currently conceptualized as ADHD. The present report aimed at exploring the early history of ADHD, prior to the 20th century in the medical literature and in other historical sources, to provide clinicians, researchers and other professionals with a better understanding of the roots and current conceptualization of this disorder. It is possible to find clues and highly suggestive descriptions of individuals presenting symptoms resembling what is currently defined as ADHD in the literature, in paintings or in the Bible. However, the earliest medical reports of individuals with abnormal degrees of inattention, distractibility and overactivity date from the last quarter of the 18th century, included in two of the first textbooks specifically on the subject of mental diseases, published by the German Melchior Adam Weikard and the Scottish Sir Alexander Crichton. During the 19th century some eminent physicians from Germany, France or Great Britain, such as Charles West, Thomas C Albutt, Thomas S Clouston, William W, Ireland, John Haslam, Heinrich Neumann, or Désiré-Magloire Bourneville, among others provided clinical depictions of patients that most likely presently would be diagnosed as having ADHD. Whilst some of the children described by Still and his predecessors may have suffered from a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, many of these patients showed clear symptoms of ADHD and may present with comorbid disorders, as

  6. The Decline and Revival of Music Education in New South Wales Schools, 1920-1956

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaseling, Marilyn; Boyd, William E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper overviews the decline and revival of music education in New South Wales schools from 1920 to 1956. Commencing with a focus on vocal music during the period up to 1932, a time of decline in music teaching, the paper examines initiatives introduced in 1933 to address shortcomings in music education, and the subsequent changes in…

  7. The Postsecular Turn in Education: Lessons from the Mindfulness Movement and the Revival of Confucian Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jinting; Wenning, Mario

    2016-01-01

    It is part of a global trend today that new relationships are being forged between religion and society, between spirituality and materiality, giving rise to announcements that we live in a "postsecular" or "desecularized" world. Taking up two educational movements, the mindfulness movement in the West and the revival of…

  8. Reviving a Community's Adult Education Past: A Case Study of the Library's Role in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Catherine J.

    2010-01-01

    Amidst calls for libraries to regain their socially progressive roots and connections to community, this study analyzes two interwoven cases of nonformal, community education in northeastern Nova Scotia, initiated by libraries that aimed to revive those links. Through a reading circle and a people's school, librarians used historical materials on…

  9. Rural Renaissance in America? The Revival of Population Growth in Remote Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Peter A.; Wheeler, Judith P.

    Presenting narrative and tabular documentation of the revival of population growth in remote, rural areas and the decline of growth in urban areas, this bulletin describes the characteristics of these shifts, considers their possible causes, and suggests some of the problems and potential benefits. Specifically, this report presents the following:…

  10. The Revival of Confucianism in Chinese Schools: A Historical-Political Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Tianlong

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the "back to tradition" movement in Chinese schools and its political nature. It focuses on the launch of the "education in Chinese traditional virtues" project in the 1980s and various new developments at the present time, which continue a revival of Confucianism in Chinese society and education. The…

  11. Collapse and revival of the Fermi sea in a Bose-Fermi mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Deepak; Will, Sebastian; Rigol, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    The collapse and revival of quantum fields is one of the most pristine forms of coherent quantum dynamics far from equilibrium. Until now, it has only been observed in the dynamical evolution of bosonic systems. We report on the first observation of the boson mediated collapse and revival of the Fermi sea in a Bose-Fermi mixture. Specifically, we present a simple model which captures the experimental observations shown in the talk titled Observation of Collapse and Revival Dynamics in the Fermionic Component of a Lattice Bose-Fermi Mixture by Sebastian Will. Our theoretical analysis shows why the results are robust to the presence of harmonic traps during the loading or the time evolution phase. It also makes apparent that the fermionic dynamics is independent of whether the bosonic component consists of a coherent state or localized Fock states with random occupation numbers. Because of the robustness of the experimental results, we argue that this kind of collapse and revival experiment can be used to accurately characterize interactions between bosons and fermions in a lattice.

  12. The near demise and subsequent revival of classical genetics for investigating Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis: RNAi meets next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, Bruce

    2011-10-01

    Molecular genetic investigation of the early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo has contributed substantially to the discovery and general understanding of the genes, pathways, and mechanisms that regulate and execute developmental and cell biological processes. Initially, worm geneticists relied exclusively on a classical genetics approach, isolating mutants with interesting phenotypes after mutagenesis and then determining the identity of the affected genes. Subsequently, the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) led to a much greater reliance on a reverse genetics approach: reducing the function of known genes with RNAi and then observing the phenotypic consequences. Now the advent of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies and the ensuing ease and affordability of whole-genome sequencing are reviving the use of classical genetics to investigate early C. elegans embryogenesis.

  13. Hospital costs for treatment of acute heart failure: economic analysis of the REVIVE II study.

    PubMed

    de Lissovoy, Greg; Fraeman, Kathy; Teerlink, John R; Mullahy, John; Salon, Jeff; Sterz, Raimund; Durtschi, Amy; Padley, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the leading cause of hospital admission among older Americans. The Randomized EValuation of Intravenous Levosimendan Efficacy (REVIVE II) trial compared patients randomly assigned to a single infusion of levosimendan (levo) or placebo (SOC), each in addition to local standard treatments for AHF. We report an economic analysis of REVIVE II from the hospital perspective. REVIVE II enrolled patients (N = 600) hospitalized for treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) who remained dyspneic at rest despite treatment with intravenous diuretics. Case report forms documented index hospital treatment (drug administration, procedures, days of treatment by care unit), as well as subsequent hospital and emergency department admissions during follow-up ending 90 days from date of randomization. These data were used to impute cost of admission based on an econometric cost function derived from >100,000 ADHF hospital billing records selected per REVIVE II inclusion criteria. Index admission mean length of stay (LOS) was shorter for the levo group compared with standard of care (SOC) (7.03 vs 8.96 days, P = 0.008) although intensive care unit (ICU)/cardiac care unit (CCU) days were similar (levo 2.88, SOC 3.22, P = 0.63). Excluding cost for levo, predicted mean (median) cost for the index admission was levo US $13,590 (9,458), SOC $19,021 (10,692) with a difference of $5,431 (1,234) favoring levo (P = 0.04). During follow-up through end of study day 90, no significant differences were observed in numbers of hospital admissions (P = 0.67), inpatient days (P = 0.81) or emergency department visits (P = 0.41). Cost-effectiveness was performed with a REVIVE-II sub-set conforming to current labeling, which excluded patients with low baseline blood pressure. Assuming an average price for levo in countries where currently approved, there was better than 50% likelihood that levo was both cost-saving and improved survival. Likelihood that levo would

  14. Nelson's wound: treatment of spinal cord injury in 19th and early 20th century military conflicts.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, William C; Sloffer, Chris

    2004-01-15

    During the first half of the 19th century, warfare did not provide a background for a systematic analysis of spinal cord injury (SCI). Medical officers participating in the Peninsular and Crimean Wars emphasized the dismal prognosis of this injury, although authors of sketchy civil reports persuaded a few surgeons to operate on closed fractures. The American Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion was the first text to provide summary of results in 642 cases of gunshot wounds of the spine. The low incidence of this injury (0.26%) and the high mortality rate (55%) discouraged the use of surgery in these cases. Improvements in diagnoses and the introduction of x-ray studies in the latter half of the century enabled Sir G. H. Makins, during the Boer War, to recommend delayed intervention to remove bone or bullet fragments in incomplete injuries. The civil experiences of Elsberg and Frazier in the early 20th century promoted a meticulous approach to treatments, whereas efficient transport of injured soldiers during World War I increased the numbers of survivors. Open large wounds or cerebrospinal fluid leakage, signs of cord compression in recovering patients, delayed clinical deterioration, or intractable pain required surgical exploration. Wartime recommendations for urological and skin care prevented sepsis, and burgeoning pension systems provided specialized longterm rehabilitation. By the Armistice, the effective surgical treatment and postoperative care that had developed through decades of interaction between civil and military medicine helped reduce incidences of morbidity and dispel the hopelessness surrounding the combatant with an SCI.

  15. Revival of oscillations from deaths in diffusively coupled nonlinear systems: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Wei; Sebek, Michael; Kiss, István Z.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD) are two structurally different oscillation quenching phenomena in coupled nonlinear systems. As a reverse issue of AD and OD, revival of oscillations from deaths attracts an increasing attention recently. In this paper, we clearly disclose that a time delay in the self-feedback component of the coupling destabilizes not only AD but also OD, and even the AD to OD transition in paradigmatic models of coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators under diverse death configurations. Using a rigorous analysis, the effectiveness of this self-feedback delay in revoking AD is theoretically proved to be valid in an arbitrary network of coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators with generally distributed propagation delays. Moreover, the role of self-feedback delay in reviving oscillations from AD is experimentally verified in two delay-coupled electrochemical reactions.

  16. Perceptions of dyspareunia in postmenopausal women with vulvar and vaginal atrophy: findings from the REVIVE survey.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Murray A

    2014-07-01

    Symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA), including dyspareunia and vaginal dryness, have a distinct negative impact on a woman's quality of life. The REVIVE survey highlighted the lack of awareness of VVA symptoms among postmenopausal women with vaginal symptoms, with many women reluctant to initiate discussions with their healthcare professionals despite the presence of vaginal symptoms. The REVIVE survey also provided insights into women's views of VVA treatments. Women reported displeasure with the vaginal administration route, lack of symptom relief with over-the-counter products, and concerns about the safety of estrogen therapies. With the high prevalence of VVA, obstetricians/gynecologists should become vigilant in identifying women with VVA by implementing screening and discussion of symptoms during routine office visits - providing patients with information about appropriate therapies based on the severity and impact of symptoms, keeping in mind individual preferences and perceptions.

  17. Experimental Quantum-Walk Revival with a Time-Dependent Coin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, P.; Zhang, R.; Qin, H.; Zhan, X.; Bian, Z. H.; Li, J.; Sanders, Barry C.

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a quantum walk with time-dependent coin bias. With this technique we realize an experimental single-photon one-dimensional quantum walk with a linearly ramped time-dependent coin flip operation and thereby demonstrate two periodic revivals of the walker distribution. In our beam-displacer interferometer, the walk corresponds to movement between discretely separated transverse modes of the field serving as lattice sites, and the time-dependent coin flip is effected by implementing a different angle between the optical axis of half-wave plate and the light propagation at each step. Each of the quantum-walk steps required to realize a revival comprises two sequential orthogonal coin-flip operators, with one coin having constant bias and the other coin having a time-dependent ramped coin bias, followed by a conditional translation of the walker.

  18. Revival of oscillations from deaths in diffusively coupled nonlinear systems: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Sebek, Michael; Kiss, István Z; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD) are two structurally different oscillation quenching phenomena in coupled nonlinear systems. As a reverse issue of AD and OD, revival of oscillations from deaths attracts an increasing attention recently. In this paper, we clearly disclose that a time delay in the self-feedback component of the coupling destabilizes not only AD but also OD, and even the AD to OD transition in paradigmatic models of coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators under diverse death configurations. Using a rigorous analysis, the effectiveness of this self-feedback delay in revoking AD is theoretically proved to be valid in an arbitrary network of coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators with generally distributed propagation delays. Moreover, the role of self-feedback delay in reviving oscillations from AD is experimentally verified in two delay-coupled electrochemical reactions.

  19. Reviving a medical wearable computer for teaching purposes.

    PubMed

    Frenger, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In 1978 the author constructed a medical wearable computer using an early CMOS microprocessor and support chips. This device was targeted for use by health-conscious consumers and other early adopters. Its expandable functions included weight management, blood pressure control, diabetes care, medication reminders, smoking cessation, pediatric growth and development, simple medical database, digital communication with a doctor’s office and emergency alert system. Various physiological sensors could be plugged-into the calculator-sized chassis. The device was shown to investor groups but funding was not obtained; by 1992 the author ceased pursuing it. The Computing and Mathematics Chair at a local University, a NASA acquaintance, approached the author to mentor a CS capstone course for Summer 2012. With the author’s guidance, five students proceeded to convert this medical wearable computer design to an iPhone-based implementation using the Apple Xcode Developer Kit and other utilities. The final student device contained a body mass index (BMI) calculator, an emergency alert for 911 or other first responders, a medication reminder, a Doctor’s appointment feature, a medical database, medical Internet links, and a pediatric growth & development guide. The students’ final imple-mentation was successfully demonstrated on an actual iPhone 4 at the CS capstone meeting in mid-Summer.

  20. Clinical trials update from the American Heart Association: REPAIR-AMI, ASTAMI, JELIS, MEGA, REVIVE-II, SURVIVE, and PROACTIVE.

    PubMed

    Cleland, John G F; Freemantle, Nick; Coletta, Alison P; Clark, Andrew L

    2006-01-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials presented at the American Heart Association meeting held in November 2005, relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure. All reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. In REPAIR-AMI an improvement in ejection fraction was observed in post-MI patients following infusion of bone marrow stem cells. However, the ASTAMI study showed no benefit of stem cell implantation in a similar patient cohort. The JELIS study reported a reduction in major coronary events in patients receiving statins plus fish oil compared to statins alone. MEGA showed that low dose statins in a low risk population reduce the incidence of major cardiovascular events. Two studies of levosimendan in acute heart failure gave conflicting results, in the REVIVE-II study levosimendan was reported to have a superior effect on the composite primary outcome compared to placebo, however, in SURVIVE despite a trend to early benefit with levosimendan, there was no difference in effect on long-term outcome versus dobutamine. The PROACTIVE study showed encouraging results for the use of pioglitazone in post-myocardial infarction patients with concomitant type 2 diabetes.

  1. Political Impact of Islamic Revival in a Plural Society: The Case of Malaysia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-02

    could the government check the Islamic rhetoric of PAS nor control the activities of the dakwah groups. As long as the revival at the grass roots...the most important one being continual economic growth and prosperity for Malaysia. RECOMMENDATIONS The study focused on the activities of dakwah ...races indigenous to the peninsula. Used as the basis of their entitlement to certain privileges. Dakwah A generic term for a missionary activity which

  2. Comments on the status of revived old names for some North American birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, R.C.; Browning, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss 44 instances of the use of generic, specific, or subspecific names that differ from those generally in use for North American (sensu AOU 1957) birds. These names are generally older than the names presently used and have been revived on the basis of priority. We examine the basis for the proposed changes and make recommendations as to which names should properly be used in an effort to promote nomenclatural stability in accordance with the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature.

  3. 1903 manuscript revived: Cerebral disturbances in multiple sclerosis (Des troubles cérébraux dans la sclérose en plaques) by Raymond Cestan (1872-1933) and Claudien Philippe (1866-1903).

    PubMed

    Walusinski, O

    2015-04-01

    Philanthropy aimed at helping medical research has been around for a long time. In the 19th century, cash awards were distributed by the French Academy of Medicine according to criteria determined by each generous donor. It was thus that Mrs. Bernard de Civrieux endowed the Academy each year with the task of supporting one or more laureates whose work furthered understanding of "nervous diseases". In 1903, Raymond Cestan (1872-1933) and Claudien Philippe (1866-1903) were selected for their dissertation on "cerebral disturbances" during multiple sclerosis with clinical as well as anatomical-pathological effects. Never published, this innovative manuscript, taken from the library of Fulgence Raymond (1844-1910), will be analysed here after a brief biography of each author. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Fidelity decay in interacting two-level boson systems: Freezing and revivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benet, Luis; Hernández-Quiroz, Saúl; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2011-05-01

    We study the fidelity decay in the k-body embedded ensembles of random matrices for bosons distributed in two single-particle states, considering the reference or unperturbed Hamiltonian as the one-body terms and the diagonal part of the k-body embedded ensemble of random matrices and the perturbation as the residual off-diagonal part of the interaction. We calculate the ensemble-averaged fidelity with respect to an initial random state within linear response theory to second order on the perturbation strength and demonstrate that it displays the freeze of the fidelity. During the freeze, the average fidelity exhibits periodic revivals at integer values of the Heisenberg time tH. By selecting specific k-body terms of the residual interaction, we find that the periodicity of the revivals during the freeze of fidelity is an integer fraction of tH, thus relating the period of the revivals with the range of the interaction k of the perturbing terms. Numerical calculations confirm the analytical results.

  5. Entanglement revival can occur only when the system-environment state is not a Markov state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargolzahi, Iman

    2018-06-01

    Markov states have been defined for tripartite quantum systems. In this paper, we generalize the definition of the Markov states to arbitrary multipartite case and find the general structure of an important subset of them, which we will call strong Markov states. In addition, we focus on an important property of the Markov states: If the initial state of the whole system-environment is a Markov state, then each localized dynamics of the whole system-environment reduces to a localized subdynamics of the system. This provides us a necessary condition for entanglement revival in an open quantum system: Entanglement revival can occur only when the system-environment state is not a Markov state. To illustrate (a part of) our results, we consider the case that the environment is modeled as classical. In this case, though the correlation between the system and the environment remains classical during the evolution, the change of the state of the system-environment, from its initial Markov state to a state which is not a Markov one, leads to the entanglement revival in the system. This shows that the non-Markovianity of a state is not equivalent to the existence of non-classical correlation in it, in general.

  6. Mechanical thrombectomy in acute embolic stroke: preliminary results with the revive device.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Stefan; Haehnel, Stefan; Herweh, Christian; Pham, Mirko; Stampfl, Sibylle; Ringleb, Peter A; Bendszus, Martin

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and technical feasibility of a new thrombectomy device (Revive; Micrus Endovascular) in the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Ten patients with acute large vessel occlusions were treated with the Revive device between October 2010 and December 2010. Mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission was 19.0; mean duration of symptoms was 172 minutes. Recanalization was assessed using the Thrombolysis In Cerebral Infarction score. Clinical outcome (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) after thrombectomy was determined on Day 1, at discharge, and at Day 30. Vessel recanalization (Thrombolysis In Cerebral Infarction 2b or 3) was successful in all patients without device-related complications. Mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 24 hours after the intervention, at discharge, and at Day 30 was 14.0, 11.5, and 5.1, respectively. At Day 30, 6 patients had a clinical improvement of >8 points or an National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale of 0 to 1, 1 patient showed minor improvement, and 3 patients had died. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 2 patients, of which 1 was fatal. Thrombectomy with the Revive device in patients with stroke with acute large vessel occlusions demonstrated to be technically safe and highly effective. Clinical safety and efficacy have to be established in larger clinical trials.

  7. Coastal Fisheries in the Eastern Baltic Sea (Gulf of Finland) and Its Basin from the 15 to the Early 20th Centuries

    PubMed Central

    Lajus, Julia; Kraikovski, Alexei; Lajus, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes and analyzes original data, extracted from historical documents and scientific surveys, related to Russian fisheries in the southeastern part of the Gulf of Finland and its inflowing rivers during the 15- early 20th centuries. The data allow tracing key trends in fisheries development and in the abundance of major commercial species. In particular, results showed that, over time, the main fishing areas moved from the middle part of rivers downstream towards and onto the coastal sea. Changes in fishing patterns were closely interrelated with changes in the abundance of exploited fish. Anadromous species, such as Atlantic sturgeon, Atlantic salmon, brown trout, whitefish, vimba bream, smelt, lamprey, and catadromous eel were the most important commercial fish in the area because they were abundant, had high commercial value and were easily available for fishing in rivers. Due to intensive exploitation and other human-induced factors, populations of most of these species had declined notably by the early 20th century and have now lost commercial significance. The last sturgeon was caught in 1996, and today only smelt and lamprey support small commercial fisheries. According to historical sources, catches of freshwater species such as roach, ide, pike, perch, ruffe and burbot regularly occurred, in some areas exceeding half of the total catch, but they were not as important as migrating fish and no clear trends in abundance are apparent. Of documented marine catch, Baltic herring appeared in the 16th century, but did not become commercially significant until the 19th century. From then until now herring have been the dominant catch. PMID:24204735

  8. Early examples of art in Scottish hospitals, 2: Crichton Royal Hospital, Dumfries.

    PubMed

    Park, Maureen

    2003-12-01

    Fine art has been used in hospitals for centuries. However, Crichton Royal Hospital in Dumfries pioneered the use of art activity in the treatment of its patients. This article is the second of two which look at examples of art created for, and in, Scottish hospitals in the 19th century. It is suggested that the importance of Scotland's contribution to this movement is unrecognized by many of its modern-day practitioners.

  9. Moist convection and the 2010-2011 revival of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, G. S.; Rogers, J. H.; Giles, R. S.; Payne, A. V.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Vedovato, M.

    2017-04-01

    The transformation of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt (SEB) from its faded, whitened state in 2009-2010 (Fletcher et al., 2011b) to its normal brown appearance is documented via comparisons of thermal-infrared (5-20 μm) and visible-light imaging between November 2010 and November 2011. The SEB revival consisted of convective eruptions triggered over ∼100 days, potentially powered by the latent heat released by the condensation of water. The plumes rise from the water cloud base and ultimately diverge and cool in the stably-stratified upper troposphere. Thermal-IR images from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) were acquired 2 days after the SEB disturbance was first detected as a small white spot by amateur observers on November 9th 2010. Subsequent images over several months revealed the cold, putatively anticyclonic and cloudy plume tops (area 2.5 × 106 km2) surrounded by warm, cloud-free conditions at their peripheries due to subsidence. The latent heating was not directly detectable in the 5-20 μm range. The majority of the plumes erupted from a single source near 140 -160∘ W, coincident with the remnant cyclonic circulation of a brown barge that had formed during the fade. The warm remnant of the cyclone could still be observed in IRTF imaging 5 days before the November 9th eruption. Additional plumes erupted from the leading edge of the central disturbance immediately east of the source, which propagated slowly eastwards to encounter the Great Red Spot. The tropospheric plumes were sufficiently vigorous to excite stratospheric thermal waves over the SEB with a 20 -30∘ longitudinal wavelength and 5-6 K temperature contrasts at 5 mbar, showing a direct connection between moist convection and stratospheric wave activity. The subsidence and compressional heating of dry, unsaturated air warmed the troposphere (particularly to the northwest of the central branch of the revival) and removed the aerosols that had been responsible for the fade. Dark, cloud

  10. Early Period of Modern Architecture in Turkey - A Case Study of Eskisehir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasozen, Rana

    2017-10-01

    Modern architecture in the Western World bore fruit at the beginning of the 20th Century in consequence of the process of modernity and seeking of the proper architecture for it. It was formed firstly towards the end of the 1920s. The main reason of this nonsynchronous development was the inadequacy of enlightenment and industrial revolution during the Ottoman Empire and the lack of formation of an intellectual infrastructure which provides the basis of modernity. However, the Ottoman Westernization occurring in the 19th century constituted the foundations of the Republic modernity founded in 1923. The earliest modern architectural designs in Turkey were first practised by European architects after the foundation of the Republic and internalised and practised extensively by the native architects afterwards. The early modern architecture of Turkey, named as “1930s Modernism”, continued until the beginning of the World War II. This period was formed in between the periods of first and second nationalist architecture movements. The early modern architecture period of Turkey was a period which high-quality designs were made. It was practised and internalised not only in big cities such as Ankara and in Istanbul, but also in the medium and small cities of the country. This situation was not just about a formal exception but about the internalisation of modernity by the society. Eskisehir is one of the most important pioneering cities of the Republic period in terms of industrial and educational developments. The earliest modern buildings were built as the public buildings by the state and non-citizen architects in the inadequate conditions of the country in terms of economy and professional people. The earliest modern houses of the city designed by these architects were the prototypes for the later practices which offered the citizens a new lifestyle. The modern houses were the symbols of prestige and status for the owners and the dwellers. The features of early

  11. The NHLBI REVIVE-IT study: Understanding its discontinuation in the context of current left ventricular assist device therapy.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Francis D; Aaronson, Keith D; Kormos, Robert; Mann, Douglas L; Spino, Cathie; Jeffries, Neal; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C; Mancini, Donna M; McNamara, Dennis M; Grady, Kathleen L; Gorcsan, John; Petrucci, Ralph; Anderson, Allen S; Glick, Henry A; Acker, Michael A; Eduardo Rame, J; Goldstein, Daniel J; Pamboukian, Salpy V; Miller, Marissa A; Timothy Baldwin, J

    2016-11-01

    The National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group in March 2008 to discuss how therapies for heart failure (HF) might be best advanced using clinical trials involving left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). This group opined that the field was ready for a trial to assess the use of long-term ventricular assist device therapy in patients who are less ill than patients currently eligible for destination therapy, which resulted in the Randomized Evaluation of VAD InterVEntion before Inotropic Therapy (REVIVE-IT) pilot study. The specific objective of REVIVE-IT was to compare LVAD therapy with optimal medical management in patients with less advanced HF than current LVAD indications to determine if wider application of permanent LVAD use to less ill patients would be associated with improved survival, quality of life, or functional capacity. REVIVE-IT represented an extraordinary effort to provide data from a randomized clinical trial to inform clinicians, scientists, industry, and regulatory agencies about the efficacy and safety of LVAD therapy in a population with less advanced HF. Despite significant support from the medical community, industry, and governmental agencies, REVIVE-IT failed to accomplish its goal. The reasons for its failure are instructive, and the lessons learned from the REVIVE-IT experience are likely to be relevant to any future study of LVAD therapy in a population with less advanced HF. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  12. Revival and Identification of Bacterial Spores in 25- to 40-Million-Year-Old Dominican Amber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Raul J.; Borucki, Monica K.

    1995-05-01

    A bacterial spore was revived, cultured, and identified from the abdominal contents of extinct bees preserved for 25 to 40 million years in buried Dominican amber. Rigorous surface decontamination of the amber and aseptic procedures were used during the recovery of the bacterium. Several lines of evidence indicated that the isolated bacterium was of ancient origin and not an extant contaminant. The characteristic enzymatic, biochemical, and 16S ribosomal DNA profiles indicated that the ancient bacterium is most closely related to extant Bacillus sphaericus.

  13. Revivals of electron currents and topological-band insulator transitions in 2D gapped Dirac materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romera, E.; Bolívar, J. C.; Roldán, J. B.; de los Santos, F.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the time evolution of electron wave packets in silicene under perpendicular magnetic and electric fields to characterize topological-band insulator transitions. We have found that at the charge neutrality points, the periodicities exhibited by the wave packet dynamics (classical and revival times) reach maximum values, and that the electron currents reflect the transition from a topological insulator to a band insulator. This provides a signature of topological phase transition in silicene that can be extended to other 2D Dirac materials isostructural to graphene and with a buckled structure and a significant spin-orbit coupling.

  14. Seafood Wars: Reviving a Tired Sustainability Education Program with Pop Culture Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peart, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    Texas State Aquarium revived its sustainable seafood education program by embedding expert speakers into the pop culture chef competition. Chefs are nominated by diners and vetted by Aquarium staff. Seafood selections are made in consultation with fishery experts and sustainability partners including Gulf United for Lasting Fisheries. Through these efforts, the Seafood Wars audience has expanded from the over-40 set to college and graduate students, families, and adults of all ages. Surveyed participants at these sell-out events are 100% as, or more likely to purchase and consume featured sustainable selections.

  15. The Best of Two Worlds: Bilingual-Bicultural Education in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Diego; Leggio, Pamela

    This history of bilingual education in the United States begins with the advent of the Spanish in the early 16th century, and traces the development of the phenomenon to the present. Chapters cover (1) early immigration of Spanish and Germans before the Revolution, (2) early 19th century xenophobia, (3) bilingual schooling in the early 19th…

  16. Collapse and revival of entanglement between qubits coupled to a spin coherent state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahari, Iskandar; Spiller, Timothy P.; Dooley, Shane; Hayes, Anthony; McCrossan, Francis

    We extend the study of the Jayne-Cummings (JC) model involving a pair of identical two-level atoms (or qubits) interacting with a single mode quantized field. We investigate the effects of replacing the radiation field mode with a composite spin, comprising N qubits, or spin-1/2 particles. This model is relevant for physical implementations in superconducting circuit QED, ion trap and molecular systems. For the case of the composite spin prepared in a spin coherent state, we demonstrate the similarities of this set-up to the qubits-field model in terms of the time evolution, attractor states and in particular the collapse and revival of the entanglement between the two qubits. We extend our analysis by taking into account an effect due to qubit imperfections. We consider a difference (or “mismatch”) in the dipole interaction strengths of the two qubits, for both the field mode and composite spin cases. To address decoherence due to this mismatch, we then average over this coupling strength difference with distributions of varying width. We demonstrate in both the field mode and the composite spin scenarios that increasing the width of the “error” distribution increases suppression of the coherent dynamics of the coupled system, including the collapse and revival of the entanglement between the qubits.

  17. [About the cultural history of dog-keeping in the early modern age: A (re)reading of rabies treatises.].

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, A

    2010-01-01

    Rabies treatises of the 18th and 19th century are being researched in regard to their significance of the keeping of pets, which started to establish itself at the beginning of the 17th century. In doing so it is clearly recognizable that this keeping of pets had become a constant element of the civil urban life. The treatises also show that the physicians declined the keeping of dogs out of pure pleasure.

  18. Commentary: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    The articles in this special issue make clear that the field of early education is characterized by a breadth and depth of knowledge unimaginable 200 years ago, even to someone as exceptional as Elizabeth Peabody. This radical feminist used early 19th-century ideas of the "woman's sphere" to suggest that a career in early childhood education was…

  19. Marine data management: from early explorers to e-infrastructures (Ian McHarg Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaves, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Ocean observations have been made for as long as Man has been exploring the seas. Early Phoenician and Viking explorers developed extensive knowledge of currents, tides and weather patterns that they shared directly with their peers. Eighteenth century log books from whaling ships and the voyages of explorers, such as Captain Cook, documented sea conditions and weather patterns, and it is these records that are used today to extend oceanographic records back to a time before systematic observing of the ocean began. This historical information is now being used to address the grand challenges being faced by Society in the 21st century in ways that the 18th century seafarers could never have imagined. Systematic ocean observation and the science of modern oceanography began in the late 19th century with the voyages of HMS Challenger. Since these early scientific cruises ocean observation has become more and more sophisticated. Increasingly diverse types of equipment mounted on different types of platforms are generating huge amounts of data delivered in a variety of formats and conforming to a range of standards and best practice. It is this heterogeneity of marine data that has presented one of the greatest challenges for the modern researcher. As marine research becomes increasingly international, cross-disciplinary and multiscale, it presents new and more complex challenges for data stewardship. Increasingly large volumes of interoperable data are needed to address fundamental questions such as the assessment of Man's impact on the marine environment or the sustainable exploitation of available marine resources whilst maintaining the good environmental status of the ocean. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the acquisition and sharing of information about the marine environment from the earliest explorers to the modern day. It will look at some of the challenges faced by today's marine researcher seeking to make use of multidisciplinary and

  20. Endermatic, epidermatic, enepidermatic-the early history of penetration enhancers.

    PubMed

    Helmstädter, Axel

    2011-09-15

    Already at the end of the 18th century, attempts were made to administer drugs transdermally. Several techniques were applied, including rubbing drug substances into the intact or wounded skin. Penetration enhancers were investigated as well, including human and animal body fluids, in particular gastric juice and saliva. In the 19th century, lipophilic solubilizers like chloroform and ether were tried. Although the experiments were mostly done against a pre-rational background some may be worth to be judged under scientific premises. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.