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Sample records for early arthritis patients

  1. Early diagnosis of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Butler, Bennet A; Fitz, David W; Lawton, Cort D; Li, Daniel D; Balderama, Earvin S; Stover, Michael D

    2018-05-01

    Septic arthritis results in rapid joint destruction if not properly diagnosed and treated. A work up for septic arthritis includes a peripheral white blood cell count, inflammatory markers, and a joint aspiration. In the general population, the interpretation of these labs has been well-defined by prior studies. To this point, no study has determined how immunosuppressive states affect this work up. Patients with immunosuppressive conditions who received a joint aspiration for a painful joint were retrospectively identified. Laboratory results from their work up were gathered and analyzed. 216 patients were included in the study, 21 of whom were diagnosed with septic arthritis. The average aspiration WBC count was 74,190 with 88% PMNs. 81% had a positive gram stain. Laboratory values for immunosuppressed patients with septic arthritis were similar to those associated with septic arthritis in historical general population controls. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ivy Y; Karpus, Olga N; Turner, Jason D; Hardie, Debbie; Marshall, Jennifer L; de Hair, Maria J H; Maijer, Karen I; Tak, Paul P; Raza, Karim; Hamann, Jörg; Buckley, Christopher D; Gerlag, Danielle M; Filer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST) of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied. ST from 56 patients included in two different early arthritis cohorts and 7 non-inflammatory controls was analysed using immunofluorescence to detect stromal markers CD55, CD248, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and podoplanin. Diagnostic classification (gout, psoriatic arthritis, unclassified arthritis (UA), parvovirus associated arthritis, reactive arthritis and RA), disease outcome (resolving vs persistent) and clinical variables were determined at baseline and after follow-up, and related to the expression of stromal markers. We observed expression of all stromal markers in ST of early arthritis patients, independent of diagnosis or prognostic outcome. Synovial expression of FAP was significantly higher in patients developing early RA compared to other diagnostic groups and non-inflammatory controls. In RA FAP protein was expressed in both lining and sublining layers. Podoplanin expression was higher in all early inflammatory arthritis patients than controls, but did not differentiate diagnostic outcomes. Stromal marker expression was not associated with prognostic outcomes of disease persistence or resolution. There was no association with clinical or sonographic variables. Stromal cell markers CD55, CD248, FAP and podoplanin are expressed in ST in the earliest stage of arthritis. Baseline expression of FAP is higher in early synovitis patients who fulfil classification criteria for RA over time. These results suggest that significant fibroblast activation occurs in RA in the early window of disease.

  3. Self-limiting arthritis among patients fulfilling the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis in a very early arthritis cohort.

    PubMed

    Norli, Ellen Sauar; Brinkmann, Gina H; Kvien, Tore K; Bjørneboe, Olav; Haugen, Anne J; Nygaard, Halvor; Thunem, Cathrine; Lie, Elisabeth; Mjaavatten, Maria D

    2016-12-01

    To study occurrence of and factors associated with self-limiting arthritis among patients fulfilling the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (2010 RA criteria) in patients with ≤16 weeks׳ duration of joint swelling. We applied the 2010 RA criteria in 1118 patients included in a 2-year longitudinal cohort. In all, 256 patients fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria at baseline; outcome was defined as either "self-limiting arthritis" (no DMARD use during follow-up, no swollen joints at last assessment, and no final clinical diagnosis of RA) or "persistent disease." The associations between baseline characteristics, including the components of the 2010 RA criteria score, and outcomes were studied. In total, 36 of 256 patients (14.1%) classified as having RA had self-limiting arthritis. These patients differed from patients with persistent disease according to ACPA positivity (11.1% vs. 65.0%, p < 0.001), duration of joint swelling (median = 47.5 vs. 66.0 days, p = 0.002), 2010 RA criteria points (median = 6.0 vs. 7.0, p < 0.001), and ever smoking (52.8% vs. 74.5%, p = 0.01). Having no serology points and no duration points were independent predictors of self-limiting arthritis. The rate of self-limiting arthritis was 2.7% vs. 29.4% among ACPA positive vs. ACPA negative patients (p < 0.001), and 32.5% when duration of joint swelling was <4 weeks vs. 10.6% with longer duration (p < 0.001). Negative ACPA status, short duration of joint swelling and being a never smoker were factors associated with self-limiting arthritis in early arthritis patients classified as having RA at presentation. Our findings contribute to identify patients who potentially do not need DMARDs and who should not be included in early RA clinical drug trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Disease Characteristics and Rheumatoid Arthritis Development in Patients with Early Undifferentiated Arthritis: A 2-year Followup Study.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Gina H; Norli, Ellen S; Kvien, Tore K; Haugen, Anne J; Grøvle, Lars; Nygaard, Halvor; Bjørneboe, Olav; Thunem, Cathrine; Mjaavatten, Maria D; Lie, Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    To examine the 2-year disease course in patients with undifferentiated arthritis (UA) focusing on fulfillment of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) classification criteria. Data were provided by the Norwegian Very Early Arthritis Clinic study, which included patients presenting with ≥ 1 swollen joint of ≤ 16 weeks' duration. UA was defined as patients not fulfilling the 2010 ACR/EULAR RA criteria and who did not have a clinical diagnosis other than RA at baseline. The main outcome was fulfillment of the 2010 RA criteria. Secondary outcomes were disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) use, resolution of synovitis without use of DMARD during followup, and final clinical diagnosis. We included 477 patients with UA of whom 47 fulfilled the 2010 ACR/EULAR RA criteria during followup (UA-RA) and 430 did not (UA-non-RA). Of the UA-RA patients, 70% fulfilled the criteria within the first 6 months. UA-RA patients were older, more often positive for rheumatoid factor and anticitrullinated protein antibodies, female, and ever smokers, and they more often presented with polyarticular arthritis, small joint involvement, and a swollen shoulder joint. During followup, 53% of UA-RA patients vs 13% of UA-non-RA patients used DMARD (p < 0.001). Overall, 71% of patients with UA achieved absence of clinical synovitis at final followup without use of DMARD. The most frequent final clinical diagnosis was UA (61%). Only 9.8% of patients with UA fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria during 2-year followup. Small joint involvement and swollen shoulder joint were among the factors associated with RA development. In two-thirds of patients with UA, the arthritis resolved without use of DMARD.

  5. The Relationship Between Cardiac Conduction Times, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Inflammation in Patients with Early Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Turk, Samina A; Heslinga, Sjoerd C; Dekker, Jill; Britsemmer, Linda; van der Lugt, Véronique; Lems, Willem F; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Nurmohamed, Michael T

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of conduction disorders in patients with early arthritis and the relationship with inflammation and traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a 2-fold higher risk of sudden cardiac death, possibly owing to conduction disorders. This increased risk might already be present at the clinical onset of arthritis. Therefore, we assessed electrocardiography, blood pressure, 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), lipid profile, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) level in 480 patients with early arthritis at baseline and after 1 year. The prevalence of conduction disorders was 12.5%. Conduction times at baseline were not associated with DAS28, ESR, or CRP levels and did not change during antirheumatic treatment. Baseline and the improvement in DAS28 (European League Against Rheumatism response), ESR, and CRP were significantly associated with heart rate, lipid profile, and blood pressure. Elevated total cholesterol and blood pressure were associated with an increased QRS time. The change in heart rate differed 7.3 bpm between patients with the least versus largest DAS improvement. The prevalence of conduction disorders in patients with early arthritis was 12.5%, which is similar to the general population and was not associated with changes in inflammation markers. However, a high cholesterol was associated with a prolonged QRS time. Therefore, the emphasis of CV risk management in arthritis should not be only on treatment of disease activity but also on traditional CV risk factors. The relationship between the improvement in disease activity and heart rate is remarkable because this could imply a 10-year CV mortality risk difference of 24%.

  6. Are rheumatoid arthritis patients discernible from other early arthritis patients using 1.5T extremity magnetic resonance imaging? a large cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée; Huizinga, Tom W J; Bloem, Johan L; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Reijnierse, Monique

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) research. A European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) task force recently suggested that MRI can improve the certainty of RA diagnosis. Because this recommendation may reflect a tendency to use MRI in daily practice, thorough studies on the value of MRI are required. Thus far no large studies have evaluated the accuracy of MRI to differentiate early RA from other patients with early arthritis. We performed a large cross-sectional study to determine whether patients who are clinically classified with RA differ in MRI features compared to patients with other diagnoses. In our study, 179 patients presenting with early arthritis (median symptom duration 15.4 weeks) underwent 1.5T extremity MRI of unilateral wrist, metacarpophalangeal, and metatarsophalangeal joints according to our arthritis protocol, the foot without contrast. Images were scored according to OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring (RAMRIS) by 2 independent readers. Tenosynovitis was also assessed. The main outcome was fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA. Test characteristics and areas under the receiver-operator-characteristic curves (AUC) were evaluated. In subanalyses, the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria were used as outcome, and analyses were stratified for anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). The ACR 1987 criteria were fulfilled in 43 patients (24.0%). Patients with RA had higher scores for synovitis, tenosynovitis, and bone marrow edema (BME) than patients without RA (p < 0.05). ACPA-positive patients had more BME (median scores 6.5 vs. 4.25, p = 0.016) than ACPA-negative patients. For all MRI features, the predictive value for the presence of RA was low (< 50%). For all MRI features the AUC were < 0.70. Patients who fulfilled ACR/EULAR 2010 criteria but not ACR87 criteria for RA had less synovitis than patients who were positive for RA according to

  7. Prognosis of seronegative patients in a large prospective cohort of patients with early inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barra, Lillian; Pope, Janet E; Orav, John E; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Keystone, Edward C; Thorne, J Carter; Tin, Diane; Bykerk, Vivian P

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid factor (RF) and anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) are believed to be associated with more severe rheumatoid arthritis; however, studies in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA) have yielded conflicting results. Our study determined the prognosis of baseline ACPA-negative and RF-negative patients. Patients enrolled in the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort had IgM RF and IgG anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies 2 (anti-CCP2) measured at baseline. Remission was defined as a Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS28) < 2.6 using logistic regression accounting for confounders at 12-month and 24-month followup. Of the 841 patients, 216 (26%) were negative for both RF and anti-CCP2. Compared to seropositive subjects, seronegative subjects were older (57 ± 15 vs 51 ± 14 yrs), more males proportionately (31% vs 23%), and had shorter length of symptoms (166 ± 87 vs 192 ± 98 days), and at baseline had higher mean swollen joint count (SJC; 8.8 ± 6.8 vs 6.5 ± 5.6), DAS28 (5.0 ± 1.6 vs 4.8 ± 1.5), and erosive disease (32% vs 24%, p < 0.05). Treatment was similar between the 2 groups. At 24-month followup, seronegative compared to seropositive subjects had greater mean change (Δ ± SD) in disease activity measures: ΔSJC counts (-6.9 ± 7.0 vs -5.1 ± 5.9), ΔDAS28 (-2.4 ± 2.0 vs -1.8 ± 1.8), and ΔC-reactive protein (-11.0 ± 17.9 vs -6.4 ± 17.5, p < 0.05). Accounting for confounders, antibody status was not significantly associated with remission. However, at 12-month followup, ACPA-positive subjects were independently more likely to have new erosive disease (OR 2.94, 95% CI 1.45-5.94). Although seronegative subjects with EIA have higher baseline DAS28 compared to seropositive subjects, they have a good response to treatment and are less likely to develop erosive disease during followup.

  8. A rational use of glucocorticoids in patients with early arthritis has a minimal impact on bone mass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Glucocorticoid (GC)-induced osteoporosis is a frequent complication in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. However, little information exists about the consequences of GC use in patients with early arthritis. Here we describe the variables underlying the use of GC in early arthritis, as well as its effect on bone-mineral density. Methods Data from 116 patients in our early arthritis register were analyzed (90 women; median age, 52.5 years, interquartile range (IQR, 38.5-66); 6-month median disease duration at entry (IQR, 4-9)). In this register, the clinical and treatment information was recorded systematically, including the cumulative GC dose. Lumbar spine, hip, and forearm bone-mineral density (BMD) measurements were performed at entry and after a 2-year follow-up. A multivariate analysis was performed to establish the variables associated with the use of GCs, as well as those associated with variations in BMD. Results Of the patients with early arthritis studied, 67% received GCs during the 2-year follow-up. GCs were more frequently prescribed to elderly patients, those with higher basal disease activity and disability, and patients with positive rheumatoid factor. When adjusted for these variables, GCs were less frequently prescribed to female patients. The use of GCs was associated with an increase of BMD in the ultradistal region of the forearm, although it induced a significant loss of BMD in the medial region of the forearm. No relevant effect of GC was noted on the BMD measured at other locations. Conclusions The frequent use of GCs as a "bridge therapy" in patients with early arthritis does not seem to be associated with relevant loss of bone mass. Moreover, cumulative GC administration might be associated with an increase of juxtaarticular BMD. PMID:20331862

  9. Early Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Neil John

    2015-11-01

    Skin psoriasis is a major risk factor for the development of psoriatic arthritis. Recent studies have shown that delayed diagnosis is associated with long-term adverse outcomes. Screening questionnaires have revealed a potential burden of undiagnosed disease. Lifestyle factors and genetic and soluble biomarkers have come under scrutiny as risk factors. Imaging modalities may have an important role in detecting early change. With more effective treatments, it may be possible to prevent significant joint damage and associated disability. However, the precise nature of accurate and cost-effective screening strategies remains to be determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Achievement of NICE quality standards for patients with new presentation of inflammatory arthritis: observations from the National Clinical Audit for Rheumatoid and Early Inflammatory Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ledingham, Joanna M; Snowden, Neil; Rivett, Ali; Galloway, James; Ide, Zoe; Firth, Jill; MacPhie, Elizabeth; Kandala, Ngianga; Dennison, Elaine M; Rowe, Ian

    2017-02-01

    A national audit was performed assessing the early management of suspected inflammatory arthritis by English and Welsh rheumatology units. The aim of this audit was to measure the performance of rheumatology services against National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) quality standards (QSs) for the management of early inflammatory arthritis benchmarked to regional and national comparators for the first time in the UK. All individuals >16 years of age presenting to rheumatology services in England and Wales with suspected new-onset inflammatory arthritis were included in the audit. Information was collected against six NICE QSs that pertain to early inflammatory arthritis management. We present national data for the 6354 patients recruited from 1 February 2014 to 31 January 2015; 97% of trusts and health boards in England and Wales participated in this audit. Only 17% of patients were referred by their general practitioner within 3 days of first presentation. Specialist rheumatology assessment occurred within 3 weeks of referral in 38% of patients. The target of DMARD initiation within 6 weeks of referral was achieved in 53% of RA patients; 36% were treated with combination DMARDs and 82% with steroids within the first 3 months of specialist care. Fifty-nine per cent of patients received structured education on their arthritis within 1 month of diagnosis. In total, 91% of patients had a treatment target set; the agreed target was achieved within 3 months of specialist review in only 27% of patients. Access to urgent advice via a telephone helpline was reported to be available in 96% of trusts. The audit has highlighted gaps between NICE standards and delivery of care, as well as substantial geographic variability. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Patient- and clinician-reported outcomes for patients with new presentation of inflammatory arthritis: observations from the National Clinical Audit for Rheumatoid and Early Inflammatory Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ledingham, Joanna M; Snowden, Neil; Rivett, Ali; Galloway, James; Ide, Zoe; Firth, Jill; MacPhie, Elizabeth; Kandala, Ngianga; Dennison, Elaine M; Rowe, Ian

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to conduct a national audit assessing the impact and experience of early management of inflammatory arthritis by English and Welsh rheumatology units. The audit enables rheumatology services to measure for the first time their performance, patient outcomes and experience, benchmarked to regional and national comparators. All individuals >16 years of age presenting to English and Welsh rheumatology services with suspected new-onset inflammatory arthritis were included in the audit. Clinician- and patient-derived outcome and patient-reported experience measures were collected. Data are presented for the 6354 patients recruited from 1 February 2014 to 31 January 2015. Ninety-seven per cent of English and Welsh trusts participated. At the first specialist assessment, the 28-joint DAS (DAS28) was calculated for 2659 (91%) RA patients [mean DAS28 was 5.0 and mean Rheumatoid Arthritis Impact of Disease (RAID) score was 5.6]. After 3 months of specialist care, the mean DAS28 was 3.5 and slightly >60% achieved a meaningful DAS28 reduction. The average RAID score and reduction in RAID score were 3.6 and 2.4, respectively. Of the working patients ages 16-65 years providing data, 7, 5, 16 and 37% reported that they were unable to work, needed frequent time off work, occasionally and rarely needed time off work due to their arthritis, respectively; only 42% reported being asked about their work. Seventy-eight per cent of RA patients providing data agreed with the statement 'Overall in the last 3 months I have had a good experience of care for my arthritis'; <2% disagreed. This audit demonstrates that most RA patients have severe disease at the time of presentation to rheumatology services and that a significant number continue to have high disease activity after 3 months of specialist care. There is a clear need for the National Health Service to develop better systems for capturing, coding and integrating information from outpatient clinics, including measures of

  12. Genome-wide association study of response to methotrexate in early rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Bongartz, Tim; Massey, Jonathan; Mifsud, Borbala; Spiliopoulou, Athina; Scott, Ian C; Wang, Jianmei; Morgan, Michael; Plant, Darren; Colombo, Marco; Orchard, Peter; Twigg, Sarah; McInnes, Iain B; Porter, Duncan; Freeston, Jane E; Nam, Jackie L; Cordell, Heather J; Isaacs, John D; Strathdee, Jenna L; Arnett, Donna; de Hair, Maria J H; Tak, Paul P; Aslibekyan, Stella; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Padyukov, Leonid; Bridges, S Louis; Pitzalis, Costantino; Cope, Andrew P; Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Emery, Paul; Barnes, Michael R; Agakov, Felix; McKeigue, Paul; Mushiroda, Taisei; Kubo, Michiaki; Weinshilboum, Richard; Barton, Anne; Morgan, Ann W; Barrett, Jennifer H

    2018-05-25

    Methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy is a common first treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but many patients do not respond adequately. In order to identify genetic predictors of response, we have combined data from two consortia to carry out a genome-wide study of response to MTX in 1424 early RA patients of European ancestry. Clinical endpoints were change from baseline to 6 months after starting treatment in swollen 28-joint count, tender 28-joint count, C-reactive protein and the overall 3-component disease activity score (DAS28). No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reached genome-wide statistical significance for any outcome measure. The strongest evidence for association was with rs168201 in NRG3 (p = 10 -7 for change in DAS28). Some support was also seen for association with ZMIZ1, previously highlighted in a study of response to MTX in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Follow-up in two smaller cohorts of 429 and 177 RA patients did not support these findings, although these cohorts were more heterogeneous.

  13. Patient and clinician reported outcomes for patients with new presentation of inflammatory arthritis: observations from the National Clinical Audit for Rheumatoid and Early Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ledingham, JM; Snowden, N; Rivett, A; Galloway, J; Firth, J; Ide, Z; MacPhie, E; Kandala, N; Dennison, EM; Rowe, I

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to conduct a national audit assessing the impact and experience of early management of inflammatory arthritis by English and Welsh rheumatology units. The audit enables rheumatology services to measure for the first time their performance, patient outcomes and experience, benchmarked to regional and national comparators. Methods All individuals >16 years of age presenting to English and Welsh rheumatology services with suspected new-onset inflammatory arthritis were included in the audit. Clinician- and patient-derived outcome and patient-reported experience measures were collected. Results Data are presented for the 6354 patients recruited from 1 February 2014 to 31 January 2015. Ninety-seven per cent of English and Welsh trusts participated. At the first specialist assessment, the 28-joint DAS (DAS28) was calculated for 2659 (91%) RA patients [mean DAS28 was 5.0 and mean Rheumatoid Arthritis Impact of Disease (RAID) score was 5.6]. After 3 months of specialist care, the mean DAS28 was 3.5 and slightly >60% achieved a meaningful DAS28 reduction. The average RAID score and reduction in RAID score were 3.6 and 2.4, respectively. Of the working patients ages 16–65 years providing data, 7, 5, 16 and 37% reported that they were unable to work, needed frequent time off work, occasionally and rarely needed time off work due to their arthritis, respectively; only 42% reported being asked about their work. Seventy-eight per cent of RA patients providing data agreed with the statement ‘Overall in the last 3 months I have had a good experience of care for my arthritis’; <2% disagreed. Conclusion This audit demonstrates that most RA patients have severe disease at the time of presentation to rheumatology services and that a significant number continue to have high disease activity after 3 months of specialist care. There is a clear need for the National Health Service to develop better systems for capturing, coding and integrating information from

  14. Spanish Cultural Adaptation of the Questionnaire Early Arthritis for Psoriatic Patients.

    PubMed

    García-Gavín, J; Pérez-Pérez, L; Tinazzi, I; Vidal, D; McGonagle, D

    2017-12-01

    The Early Arthritis for Psoriatic patients (EARP) questionnaire is a screening tool for psoriatic arthritis. The original Italian version has good measurement properties but the EARP required translation and adaptation for use in Spain. This article describes the cultural adaptation process as a step prior to validation. We used the principles of good practice for the cross-cultural adaptation of patient-reported outcomes measurement established by the International Society Pharmacoeconomics and Outcome Research. The steps in this process were preparation, forward translation, reconciliation, back-translation and review, harmonization, cognitive debriefing and review, and proofreading. During preparation the developers of the original questionnaire were asked for their permission to adapt the EARP for use in Spain and to act as consultants during the process. The original questionnaire was translated into Spanish by native Spanish translators, who made slight changes that were approved by the questionnaire's developers. The Spanish version was then back-translated into Italian; that version was reviewed to confirm equivalence with the original Italian text. The reconciled Spanish EARP was then tested for comprehensibility and interpretation in a group of 35 patients. All the patients answered all items without making additional comments. This cultural adaptation of the EARP questionnaire for Spanish populations is the first step towards its later use in routine clinical practice. The application of a cross-cultural adaptation method ensured equivalence between the original and Spanish versions of the EARP. The Spanish questionnaire will be validated in a second stage. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Developing the Thai Siriraj Psoriatic Arthritis Screening Tool and validating the Thai Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool and the Early Arthritis for Psoriatic Patients questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chiowchanwisawakit, Praveena; Wattanamongkolsil, Luksame; Srinonprasert, Varalak; Petcharat, Chonachan; Siriwanarangsun, Palanan; Katchamart, Wanruchada

    2016-10-01

    To validate the Thai language version of the Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool (PEST) and the Early Arthritis for Psoriatic Patients Questionnaire (EARP), as well as also to develop a new tool for screening psoriatic arthritis (PsA) among psoriasis (Ps) patients. This was a cross-sectional study. Ps patients visiting the psoriasis clinic at Siriraj Hospital were recruited. They completed the EARP and PEST. Full musculoskeletal history, examination, and radiography were evaluated. PsA was diagnosed by a rheumatologist's evaluation and fulfillment of the classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, sensitivity, and specificity were used to evaluate the performances of the tools. The Siriraj Psoriatic Arthritis Screening Tool (SiPAT) contained questions most relevant to peripheral arthritis, axial inflammation, and enthesitis, selected from multivariate analysis. Of a total of 159 patients, the prevalence of PsA was 78.6 %. The ROC curve analyses of Thai EARP, PEST, and SiPAT were 0.90 (95 % CI 0.84, 0.96), 0.85 (0.78, 0.92), and 0.89 (0.83, 0.95), respectively. The sensitivities of SiPAT, Thai EARP, and PEST were 91.0, 83.0, and 72.0 %, respectively, while the specificities were 69.0, 79.3, and 89.7 %, respectively. All screening questionnaires showed good diagnostic performances. SiPAT could be considered as a screening tool with its desirable properties: higher sensitivity and taking less time. Thai PEST and EARP could possibly be sequentially administered for people with a positive test from SiPAT to reduce the number of false positives.

  16. Is HLA-B27 increased in patients diagnosed with undifferentiated arthritis? Results from the Leiden early arthritis cohort.

    PubMed

    van Gaalen, Floris; van den Berg, Rosaline; Verhoog, Inge; Schonkeren, Joris; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette; Huizinga, Tom; van der Heijde, Désirée M

    2014-10-01

    Undifferentiated arthritis (UA) is a common form of arthritis. According to the Assessment of Spondyloarthritis international Society (ASAS) criteria for peripheral spondyloarthritis (pSpA), HLA-B27 can be used to help classify patients with pSpA. We tested whether HLA-B27 is increased in patients diagnosed with UA. Prevalence of HLA-B27 was compared between healthy controls and patients with UA. SpA features were compared between HLA-B27-positive and -negative UA, and SpA. We found 10.1% of UA (38/375) versus 7.2% (403/5584) of controls were HLA-B27-positive (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.1; p = 0.037). HLA-B27-positive patients with UA had more SpA features than HLA-B27-negative patients (mean 1.6, SD 1.0, and 0.9 SD 0.6; p < 0.001), but patients with SpA had significantly more SpA features (mean 4.5, SD 1.5; p < 0.001). Family history and preceding infection were features more common in HLA-B27-positive than in HLA-B27-negative UA (15.8% vs 1.3%, p = 0.04 and 15.8% vs 2.6%, p = 0.04). After HLA-B27 testing, 21 additional patients (5.6%) with UA could potentially have been classified with pSpA according to the ASAS criteria. HLA-B27 is more common in patients with UA than in controls. However, the yield of HLA-B27 testing in UA is low. Our results suggest that HLA-B27 testing should be reserved for patients with additional SpA features.

  17. Effectiveness of early adalimumab therapy in psoriatic arthritis patients from Reuma.pt - EARLY PsA.

    PubMed

    Santos, Helena; Eusébio, Mónica; Borges, Joana; Gonçalves, Diana; Ávila-Ribeiro, Pedro; Faria, Daniela Santos; Lopes, Carina; Rovisco, João; Águeda, Ana; Nero, Patrícia; Valente, Paula; Cravo, Ana Rita; Santos, Maria José

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients initiating adalimumab (ADA), with short- and long-term disease duration and to evaluate the potential effect of concomitant conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARD) or glucocorticoids. Methods Analyses included adult PsA patients registered in the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register (Reuma.pt) between June 2008-June 2016 who received ADA for ≥3 months. Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC) response, tender and swollen joint count, inflammatory parameters, patient (PtGA) and physician global assessment (PhGA), Disease Activity Score-28 joints (DAS28), and Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) were compared between patients with <5 years of disease (early PsA) and those with ≥5 years of disease duration (late PsA). Time to achieving PsARC response was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Of 135 PsA patients treated with ADA, 126 had information on disease duration (earlyPsA, n=41). PsARC response was achieved by 72.9% of the patients (88.0% early PsA vs 62.2% late PsA; P=0.022) after 3 months and by 85.4% after 24 months (100% early PsA vs 75.9% late PsA; P=0.044). Early PsA patients achieved significantly less painful joints (2.7 vs 6.7, p=0.006), lower mean C-reactive protein (0.5 mg/dL vs 1.3 mg/dL; P=0.011), and PhGA (18.3 vs 28.1; P=0.020) at 3 months. In the long term, early PsA patients also had fewer swollen joints (0.3 vs 1.7; P=0.030) and lower PhGA (6.3 vs 21.9; P<0.001), C-reactive protein (0.4 mg/dL vs 1.0 mg/dL; P=0.026), and DAS28 (2.2 vs 3.2; P=0.030). HAQ-DI decreased in both groups reaching a mean value at 24 months of 0.4 and 0.8 (P=ns) in early and late PsA, respectively. Early PsA patients obtained PsARC response more rapidly than late PsA (3.8 and 7.4 months, respectively; P=0.008). Concomitant csDMARDs showed clinical benefit (2-year PsARC response, 88.3% vs 60.0%; P=0.044). Concomitant glucocorticoids

  18. Hepcidin plasma levels are not associated with changes in haemoglobin in early rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Østgård, R D; Glerup, H; Jurik, A G; Kragstrup, T W; Stengaard-Pedersen, K; Hetland, M L; Hørslev-Petersen, K; Junker, P; Deleuran, B W

    2017-11-01

    A reduction in haemoglobin level is a frequent complication among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Hepcidin has been linked to disturbed erythropoiesis. The objective of this study was to investigate the longitudinal changes in hepcidin in patients with early RA. Hepcidin plasma concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in patients with early RA (n = 80) and healthy volunteers (HV, n = 40). Haemoglobin and other iron-related proteins were also measured. At baseline, all patients had active disease and were treatment naïve. Patients were treated with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and with additional adalimumab (ADA, n = 42) or placebo (PLA, n = 38) during 52 weeks, using a treat-to-target strategy, aiming for a 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) < 3.2. At baseline, hepcidin levels [median (interquartile range)] were 9.7 ng/mL (5.2-19.4 ng/mL) in DMARD + ADA and 11.3 ng/mL (5.9-19.1 ng/mL) in DMARD + PLA. Both were significantly higher than seen in HV (6.0 ng/mL (3.3-9.3 ng/mL) (p < 0.001). After 12 months, both treatment regimens resulted in normalization of hepcidin. DAS28 correlated with hepcidin at baseline (r = 0.48, p < 0.001). No correlation was observed between levels of haemoglobin and hepcidin at baseline or during the 52 week follow-up. No change in haemoglobin levels was seen as a function of hepcidin changes. In a mixed statistical model, no single factor was connected with the regulation of haemoglobin in early RA. The changes in hepcidin were not associated with changes in haemoglobin levels. Thus, hepcidin could not be used as a prognostic marker in patients with early RA.

  19. Longitudinal study of clinical prognostic factors in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: the PREDICT study.

    PubMed

    Bird, Paul; Nicholls, Dave; Barrett, Rina; de Jager, Julien; Griffiths, Hedley; Roberts, Lynden; Tymms, Kathleen; McCloud, Philip; Littlejohn, Geoffrey

    2017-04-01

    To assess the association between baseline clinical prognostic factors and subsequent Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS28) remission in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data were collected using point of care clinical software from participating rheumatology centres. Patients aged 18 years or over whose date of clinical onset of RA was within the previous 12-24 months, who had at least 6 months of follow-up data and a DAS28-ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) score recorded between 12 and 24 months from first being seen for RA were included. Data collected included baseline demographics, mode of disease onset, pattern of joint involvement at onset, smoking status, DAS28, rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA), time from symptom onset to presentation and disease activity at baseline. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression of DAS28-ESR remission between 12 and 24 months after first assessment were performed. Data from 1017 patients were analyzed: 70% female; mean age 60 years (SD: 14.7); 70% RF-positive, 58% ACPA-positive. The strongest age and sex adjusted baseline predictors of DAS28-ESR remission at 12-24 months were remission at baseline (odds ratio [OR]: 4.49, 95% CI: 2.17-9.29, P < 0.001), being male (OR: 2.42, 95% CI: 1.46-4.01, P < 0.001), abstaining from alcohol (P < 0.001) and being lower weight (OR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97-1.00, P = 0.015). There was no statistically significant association between joint onset patterns, mode of onset, RF, ACPA or smoking status. In this observational study, patients with early RA at risk of not achieving remission include those with high disease activity at baseline, women, those who drink alcohol and those with higher body weight. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Phrasing of the patient global assessment in the rheumatoid arthritis ACR/EULAR remission criteria: an analysis of 967 patients from two databases of early and established rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Gossec, Laure; Kirwan, John Richard; de Wit, Maarten; Balanescu, Andra; Gaujoux-Viala, Cecile; Guillemin, Francis; Rat, Anne-Christine; Saraux, Alain; Fautrel, Bruno; Kvien, Tore K; Dougados, Maxime

    2018-06-01

    The ACR/EULAR Boolean remission criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) include a strict cutoff for patient global assessment (PGA, value ≤ 1/10). Near-remission corresponds to remission for joint counts and C-reactive protein but with PGA > 1. The objective was to explore whether the contribution of PGA to remission and near-remission varied according to the wording of the PGA and in relation to disease duration. In patients with early arthritis (N = 731, French ESPOIR cohort) or established RA (N = 236 patients from across Europe), frequency of remission versus near-remission was assessed according to the phrasing used for PGA (global health versus disease activity). In 967 patients (mean [standard deviation] age 49.7 [12.7] years, 76.7% women), remission was infrequent: range 12.9-16.7% (according to wording of PGA) in early RA and 6.8-7.2% in established RA. Near-remission was more frequent: 13.0-16.8% in early RA and 13.1-13.6% in established RA. The ratio of remission to near-remission was higher in the early arthritis cohort (0.8-1.3 versus 0.5-0.5 in established RA). Using the disease activity PGA led to more remission and less near-remission than the global health PGA in the early arthritis cohort (12.9 vs 16.7% near-remission, respectively, p = 0.047) but not in established RA. The proportion of patients who can be classified as remission or near-remission differs in early RA compared to establish RA and depends upon the formulation of the PGA question. PGA referring to disease activity and not global health may be preferred in early disease, if the objective is more alignment with inflammation assessment.

  1. Determining early referral criteria for patients with suspected inflammatory arthritis presenting to primary care physicians: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Almoallim, Hani; Janoudi, Nahid; Attar, Suzan M; Garout, Mohammed; Algohary, Shereen; Siddiqui, Muhammad Irfanullah; Alosaimi, Hanan; Ibrahim, Ashraf; Badokhon, Amira; Algasemi, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Early diagnosis and initiation of treatment for inflammatory arthritis can greatly improve patient outcome. We aimed to provide standardized and validated criteria for use by primary care physicians (PCPs) in the identification of individuals requiring referral to a rheumatologist. We analyzed the predictive value of a wide variety of demographic variables, patient-reported complaints, physical examination results, and biomarkers in order to identify the most useful factors for indicating a requirement for referral. Patients for this cross-sectional study were enrolled from various centers of the city of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, if they were ≥18 years of age and presented to a PCP with small joint pain that had been present for more than 6 weeks. A total of 203 patients were enrolled, as indicated by the sample size calculation. Each patient underwent a standardized physical examination, which was subsequently compared to ultrasound findings. Biomarker analysis and a patient interview were also carried out. Results were then correlated with the final diagnosis made by a rheumatologist. A total of 9 variables were identified as having high specificity and good predictive value: loss of appetite, swelling of metacarpophalangeal joint 2 or 5, swelling of proximal inter-phalangeal joint 2 or 3, wrist swelling, wrist tenderness, a positive test for rheumatoid factor, and a positive test for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Nine variables should be the basis of early referral criteria. It should aid PCPs in making appropriate early referrals of patients with suspected inflammatory arthritis, accelerating diagnosis and initiation of treatment.

  2. Anti-MCV antibodies predict radiographic progression in Greek patients with very early (<3 months duration) rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barouta, Georgia; Katsiari, Christina G; Alexiou, Ioannis; Liaskos, Christos; Varna, Areti; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Germenis, Anastasios E; Sakkas, Lazaros I

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (MCV) antibodies in very early rheumatoid arthritis (VERA) and in established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Seventy-one patients with undifferentiated arthritis (UA) of <3 months duration, 141 with established RA, 53 with other rheumatic diseases, and 40 healthy individuals were included in the study. Anti-MCV, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, and rheumatoid factor (RF) were determined and hand radiographs were recorded. Patients were assessed prospectively for 2 years, and hand radiographs were repeated. Diagnostic performance of anti-MCV was studied with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and evaluation of sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. Forty-six percent of UA patients progressed to RA at 2 years. In VERA patients, sensitivity of anti-MCV was 52 %, compared to 44 % of anti-CCP and 37 % of RF, while specificity was 91 %, compared to 91 % of RF and 84 % of anti-CCP. Anti-MCV were detected in 25 % of VERA patients negative for both anti-CCP and RF. In established RA, anti-MCV did not sustain its diagnostic performance. By multivariable analysis, anti-MCV, but not anti-CCP or RF, showed significant correlation with radiographic progression in VERA patients. In established RA, anti-MCV, anti-CCP, and RF were associated with active disease (p ≤ 0.03) and joint damage (p ≤ 0.004). By multivariate analysis, the strongest factors for radiographic damage were disease duration (p = 0.000), HAQ score (p = 0.000), and RF (p = 0.002). In conclusion, in patients with very early UA, anti-MCV predict both progression to RA and radiological damage, and therefore, anti-MCV antibody testing may be useful in every day practice.

  3. Twenty‐Year Outcome and Association Between Early Treatment and Mortality and Disability in an Inception Cohort of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results From the Norfolk Arthritis Register

    PubMed Central

    Gwinnutt, James M.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.; MacGregor, Alexander J.; Chipping, Jacqueline R.; Marshall, Tarnya; Lunt, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the outcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over 20 years from symptom onset, and to assess the association between early treatment (with disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs/steroids) and mortality and disability during follow‐up. Methods Patients recruited to the Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR) between 1990 and 1994 who met the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism RA criteria at baseline were included in this analysis. Demographic and clinical variables were collected at baseline and at years 1–3, 5, 7, 10, 15, and 20. Disease activity (swollen joint count [SJC]/tender joint count [TJC]), disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI]), and mortality over 20 years were determined. Associations between treatment group (early treatment [ET], treatment ≤6 months after symptom onset; late treatment [LT], treatment >6 months after symptom onset; never treatment [NT], no treatment) and mortality and disability were assessed using weighted pooled logistic regression and weighted multilevel mixed‐effects linear regression, respectively. Inverse weights were used to account for confounding by indication and censoring. Results This study included 602 patients with RA (median age 56 years [interquartile range 44–68 years]; 65.9% women). The median SJCs and TJCs were low during the follow‐up period (1–3 swollen joints and 3–6 tender joints). The median HAQ DI score increased after year 1 but remained at low/moderate levels (median 1.25 after year 10). The risk of mortality was reduced in the ET and LT groups compared with that in the NT group. The ET group and the NT group had comparable HAQ DI scores during the follow‐up period (β = 0.03, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] −0.06, 0.12), while the HAQ DI score was increased in the LT group (for LT versus NT, β = 0.10 [95% CI 0.02, 0.17]). Conclusion The results of this study indicate the importance of

  4. Predictors of satisfactory improvements in pain for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis in a treat-to-target study.

    PubMed

    Ten Klooster, Peter M; Vonkeman, Harald E; Oude Voshaar, Martijn A H; Siemons, Liseth; van Riel, Piet L C M; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify baseline predictors of achieving patient-perceived satisfactory improvement (PPSI) in pain after 6 months of treat to target in patients with early RA. Baseline and 6 month data were used from patients included in the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring remission induction cohort study. Simple and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify significant predictors of achieving an absolute improvement of 30 mm or a relative improvement of 50% on a visual analogue scale for pain. At 6 months, 125 of 209 patients (59.8%) achieved an absolute PPSI and 130 patients (62.2%) achieved a relative PPSI in pain. Controlling for baseline pain, having symmetrical arthritis was the strongest independent predictor of achieving an absolute [odds ratio (OR) 3.17, P = 0.03] or relative (OR 3.44, P = 0.01) PPSI. Additionally, anti-CCP positivity (OR 2.04, P = 0.04) and having ≤12 tender joints (OR 0.29, P = 0.01) were predictive of achieving a relative PPSI. The total explained variance of baseline predictors was 30% for absolute and 18% for relative improvements, respectively. Symmetrical joint involvement, anti-CCP positivity and fewer tender joints at baseline are prognostic signs for achieving satisfactory improvement in pain after 6 months of treat to target in patients with early RA. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Chronic comorbidity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Kroot, E J; van Gestel, A M; Swinkels, H L; Albers, M M; van de Putte, L B; van Riel, P L

    2001-07-01

    To study the presence of chronic coexisting diseases in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its effect on RA treatment, disease course, and outcome during the first years of the disease. From January 1985 to December 1990, 186 patients with recent onset RA were enrolled in a prospective longitudinal study. Between January 1991 and November 1992 patients were interviewed on the basis of a comorbidity questionnaire. For analysis the diseases were coded according to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) medical diagnoses. Disease activity during the period of followup was measured by the Disease Activity Score. Outcome in terms of physical disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire) and radiological damage (Sharp's modified version) over 3 and 6 year periods was determined. In the group of 186 patients, with mean disease duration of 4.3 years at January 1991, 50 patients (27%) reported at least one chronic coexisting disease. The most frequently reported coexisting diseases were of cardiovascular (29%), respiratory (18%), or dermatological (11%) origin. For the major part (66%) chronic coexisting diseases were already present before onset of RA. No statistically significant differences in use of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs or corticosteroids were observed between RA patients with and without chronic coexisting diseases. No statistically significant differences were found in disease activity or in outcome in terms of physical disability and radiological damage over 3 and 6 year periods between the 2 groups with RA. The results showed that about 27% of patients with RA in this inception cohort had at least one chronic coexisting disease. Treatment, disease course, and outcome did not differ between patients with and without chronic coexisting diseases during the first years of the disease.

  6. The foot as a barrier in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis - an interview study among Swedish women and men.

    PubMed

    Björk, Mathilda; Thyberg, Ingrid; Valtersson, Eva; Östlund, Gunnel; Stenström, Birgitta; Sverker, Annette

    2017-12-01

    Foot impairments are related to reduced mobility and participation restrictions in daily activities in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new biological medications are effective and reduce disease activity, but not disability to the same extent. Foot impairments are assumed to be related to participation restrictions also in patients with early RA, diagnosed after the introduction of biological medications. The knowledge of foot impairments needs to be more explored after the introduction of biological disease-modifying drugs (bDMARDs). The aim of this study was to explore the patients' perspective of foot impairments related to early RA. The sample included 59 patients (20-63 years) who were interviewed about participation dilemmas in daily life using the Critical Incident Technique. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data related to foot impairments were extracted and analyzed thematically. A research partner validated the analysis. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee. Patients with early RA described a variety of participation restrictions related to foot impairments: 1) foot hindrances in domestic life, 2) foot impairments influencing work, 3) leisure activities restricted by one's feet 4) struggling to be mobile 5) foot impairments as an early sign of rheumatic disease. There is a need to focus on foot impairments related to early RA, and for health care professionals to understand these signs. A suggestion for future research is to conduct a longitudinal follow-up of foot impairment related to medication, disease activity and disability in patients diagnosed after the introduction of bDMARDs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Infliximab in active early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Breedveld, F; Emery, P; Keystone, E; Patel, K; Furst, D; Kalden, J; St, C; Weisman, M; Smolen, J; Lipsky, P; Maini, R

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of the combination of infliximab plus methotrexate (MTX) on the progression of structural damage in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Subanalyses were carried out on data for patients with early RA in the Anti-TNF Therapy in RA with Concomitant Therapy (ATTRACT) study, in which 428 patients with active RA despite MTX therapy received placebo with MTX (MTX-only) or infliximab 3 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg every (q) 4 or 8 weeks with MTX (infliximab plus MTX) for 102 weeks. Early RA was defined as disease duration of 3 years or less; 82 of the 428 patients (19%) met this definition. Structural damage was assessed with the modified van der Heijde-Sharp score. The changes from baseline to week 102 in total modified van der Heijde-Sharp score were compared between the infliximab plus MTX groups and the MTX-only group. Results: The erosion and joint space narrowing scores from baseline to week 102 in the cohort of patients with early RA decreased significantly in each infliximab dose regimen compared with the MTX-only regimen. Consistent benefit was seen in the joints of both hands and feet. Conclusions: Infliximab combined with MTX inhibited the progression of structural damage in patients with early RA during the 2 year period of treatment. Early intervention with infliximab in patients with active RA despite MTX therapy may provide long term benefits by preventing radiographic progression and preserving joint integrity. PMID:14722203

  8. Angiopoietin-2 serum levels correlate with severity, early onset and cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    López-Mejías, Raquel; Corrales, Alfonso; Genre, Fernanda; Hernández, José L; Ochoa, Rodrigo; Blanco, Ricardo; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Martín, Javier; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and high risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt-2), a marker of endothelial cell activation, has been proposed as a mediator of angiogenesis, which might play an important role in the regulation of endothelial integrity and inflammation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether Angpt-2 is related to severity and CV disease in RA patients. Angpt-2 serum levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 290 patients with RA. A control group of 100 individuals frequency matched by age and sex and classic CV risk factors and CV disease was also assessed. Eighty-four patients with RA (28.9%) had experienced CV events. Also, extra-articular manifestations were present in 41 (14%) of these patients. Although there were not significant differences between patients and controls, a correlation between age at the time of disease onset and Angpt-2 was observed in RA patients (r=-0.31; p=0.02). Angpt-2 serum levels also correlated positively with extra-articular disease (mean±standard deviation in RA patients with and without extra-articular manifestations were 2476±1716 pg/ml and 1897±1228 pg/ml, respectively; p=0.01). Moreover, after adjustment for sex, age at RA diagnosis and CV risk factors, Angpt-2 levels were higher in RA patients with CV disease than in RA patients without CV complications (2472±1826 pg/ml vs. 1875±1101 pg/ml; p=0.05). Angpt-2 serum levels remained significantly higher in RA patients with CV disease compared to those without CV disease after additional adjustment for extra-articular manifestations (p=0.04). Our results show that Angpt-2 serum levels correlate with disease severity, early onset and CV disease in RA patients.

  9. Improvements in diagnostic tools for early detection of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Salvatore; Palazzi, Carlo; Gilio, Michele; Leccese, Pietro; Padula, Angela; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2016-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory disease characterized by a wide clinical spectrum. The early diagnosis of PsA is currently a challenging topic. Areas covered: The literature was extensively reviewed for studies addressing the topic area "diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis". This review will summarize improvements in diagnostic tools, especially referral to the rheumatologist, the role of patient history and clinical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging techniques in getting an early and correct diagnosis of PsA. Expert commentary: Due to the heterogeneity of its expression, PsA may be easily either overdiagnosed or underdiagnosed. A diagnosis of PsA should be taken into account every time a patient with psoriasis or a family history of psoriasis shows peripheral arthritis, especially if oligoarticular or involving the distal interphalangeal joints, enthesitis or dactylitis. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are useful for diagnosing PsA early, particularly when isolated enthesitis or inflammatory spinal pain occur.

  10. Longterm Work Productivity Costs Due to Absenteeism and Permanent Work Disability in Patients with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Nationwide Register Study of 7831 Patients.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Janne A; Kautiainen, Hannu; Rantalaiho, Vappu; Puolakka, Kari T

    2016-12-01

    To estimate the development and potential disproportional distribution of longterm productivity costs (PC) and their determinants leading to work absenteeism and permanent work disability in working-aged patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A cohort of subjects with early RA was created by identifying the new cases of RA from the national drug reimbursement register that had been granted a special reimbursement for their antirheumatic medications for RA from 2000-2007. The dataset was enriched by cross-linking with other national registries detailing work absenteeism days and permanent disability pensions. In the base case, the human capital approach was applied to estimate PC based on subjects' annual number of absenteeism days and incomes. Hurdle regression analysis was applied to study the determinants of PC. Among the 7831 subjects with early RA, the mean (bootstrapped 95% CI) annual PC per person-observation year was €4800 (4547-5070). The annual PC declined after the first year of RA diagnosis, but increased significantly in subsequent years. In addition, the PC was heavily disproportionally concentrated in a small fraction of patients with RA, because only around 20% of patients accounted for the majority of total annual PC. The initiation of active drug treatment during the first 3 months after RA diagnosis significantly reduced the cumulative PC when compared with no drug treatment. The longterm PC increased significantly in parallel with years elapsing after RA diagnosis. Further, the majority of these PC are incurred by a small proportion of patients.

  11. Clinical and radiological outcomes of 5-year drug-free remission-steered treatment in patients with early arthritis: IMPROVED study.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Gülşah; Heimans, Lotte; Bergstra, Sytske Anne; Goekoop, Robbert J; van Oosterhout, Maikel; van Groenendael, Johannes H L M; Peeters, André J; Steup-Beekman, Gerda M; Lard, Leroy R; de Sonnaville, Peter B J; Grillet, Bernard A M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Allaart, Cornelia F

    2018-01-01

    To determine the 5-year outcomes of early remission induction therapy followed by targeted treatment aimed at drug-free remission (DFR) in patients with early arthritis. In 12 hospitals, 610 patients with early (<2 years) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or undifferentiated arthritis (UA) started on methotrexate (MTX) 25 mg/week and prednisone (60 mg/day tapered to 7.5 mg/day). Patients not in early remission (Disease Activity Score <1.6 after 4 months) were randomised (single blind) to arm 1, adding hydroxychloroquine 400 mg/day and sulfasalazine 2000 mg/day, or arm 2, switching to MTX plus adalimumab 40 mg/2 weeks. Treatment adjustments over time aimed at DFR. Outcomes were remission percentages, functional ability, toxicity and radiological damage progression after 5 years. After 4 months, 387 patients were in early remission, 83 were randomised to arm 1 and 78 to arm 2. After 5 years, 295/610 (48%) patients were in remission, 26% in sustained DFR (SDFR) (≥1 year) (220/387 (57%) remission and 135/387 (35%) SDFR in the early remission group, 50% remission, 11% SDFR in the randomisation arms without differences between the arms). More patients with UA (37% vs 23% RA, p=0.001) and more anticitrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-negative patients (37% vs 18% ACPA-positive, p<0.001) achieved SDFR.Overall, mean Health Assessment Questionnaire was 0.6 (0.5), and median (IQR) damage progression was 0.5 (0-2.7) Sharp/van der Heijde points, with only five patients showing progression >25 points in 5 years. Five years of DFR-steered treatment in patients with early RA resulted in almost normal functional ability without clinically relevant joint damage across treatment groups. Patients who achieved early remission had the best clinical outcomes. There were no differences between the randomisation arms. SDFR is a realistic treatment goal. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved

  12. Early Remission Is a Realistic Target in a Majority of Patients with DMARD-naive Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rannio, Tuomas; Asikainen, Juha; Kokko, Arto; Hannonen, Pekka; Sokka, Tuulikki

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed remission rates at 3 and 12 months in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who were naive for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and who were treated in a Finnish rheumatology clinic from 2008 to 2011. We compared remission rates and drug treatments between patients with RA and patients with undifferentiated arthritis (UA). Data from all DMARD-naive RA and UA patients from the healthcare district were collected using software that includes demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity, medications, and patient-reported outcomes. Our rheumatology clinic applies the treat-to-target principle, electronic monitoring of patients, and multidisciplinary care. Out of 409 patients, 406 had data for classification by the 2010 RA criteria of the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism. A total of 68% were female, and mean age (SD) was 58 (16) years. Respectively, 56%, 60%, and 68% were positive for anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and RF/anti-CCP, and 19% had erosive disease. The median (interquartile range) duration of symptoms was 6 (4-12) months. A total of 310 were classified as RA and 96 as UA. The patients with UA were younger, had better functional status and lower disease activity, and were more often seronegative than the patients with RA. The 28-joint Disease Activity Score (3 variables) remission rates of RA and UA patients at 3 months were 67% and 58% (p = 0.13), and at 12 months, 71% and 79%, respectively (p = 0.16). Sustained remission was observed in 57%/56% of RA/UA patients. Patients with RA used more conventional synthetic DMARD combinations than did patients with UA. None used biological DMARD at 3 months, and only 2.7%/1.1% of the patients (RA/UA) used them at 12 months (p = 0.36). Remarkably high remission rates are achievable in real-world DMARD-naive patients with RA or UA.

  13. Effectiveness of a clinical practice intervention in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Descalzo, Miguel Ángel; Carbonell, Jordi; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Sanmartí, Raimon; Balsa, Alejandro; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentín; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; Ivorra-Cortés, José; Lisbona, Pilar; Alperi, Mercedes; Jiménez-Garcia, Rodrigo; Carmona, Loreto

    2012-03-01

    To compare the outcome of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in a country where early clinics were established versus the outcome of patients in nonprotocolized clinics. We compared 2 multicenter cohorts: an RA cohort derived from an early arthritis registry set in 36 reference hospitals in which a specific intervention was established (Evaluation of a Model for Arthritis Care in Spain [SERAP]), and a historical control cohort of patients with early RA attending 34 rheumatology departments (Prognosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis [PROAR] cohort). Effectiveness was tested by comparing the change in the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), the change in the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and the change in the Sharp/van der Heijde radiologic score using marginal structural models. A total of 161 early RA patients were recruited in the PROAR cohort and 447 in the SERAP cohort. Being a SERAP patient was inversely correlated with activity, resulting in a decrease of -0.24 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] -0.39, -0.08) units in the population average of the DAS28 after adjustment was made. Moreover, intervention may be seen as a protective factor of radiologic damage, with a decrease of -0.05 (95% CI -0.09, -0.01) units in the logarithm of the total Sharp/van der Heijde score. On the other hand, a decrease in functional impairment was detected, but intervention was not statistically associated with HAQ changes. Preventing major radiographic progression in a 2-year term inside structured and organized special programs for the management of disease, such as early arthritis clinics, are effective compared to nonprotocolized referrals, treatment, and followup. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. The Effect of Reduced or Withdrawn Etanercept-methotrexate Therapy on Patient-reported Outcomes in Patients with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wiland, Piotr; Dudler, Jean; Veale, Douglas; Tahir, Hasan; Pedersen, Ron; Bukowski, Jack; Vlahos, Bonnie; Williams, Theresa; Gaylord, Stefanie; Kotak, Sameer

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of a clinical trial to assess the effects of treatment reduction and withdrawal on patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in patients with early, moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who achieved 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) low disease activity (LDA) or remission with etanercept (ETN) plus methotrexate (MTX) therapy. During treatment induction, patients received open-label ETN 50 mg weekly plus MTX for 52 weeks. In the reduced-treatment phase, patients with DAS28-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) ≤ 3.2 at Week 39 and DAS28-ESR < 2.6 at Week 52 in the open-label phase were randomized to double-blind treatment with ETN 25 mg plus MTX, MTX, or placebo (PBO) for 39 weeks (weeks 0-39). In the third phase, patients who achieved DAS28 remission (DAS28-ESR < 2.6) or LDA (2.6 ≤ DAS28-ESR ≤ 3.2) at Week 39 in the double-blind phase had all treatment withdrawn and were observed for an additional 26 weeks (weeks 39-65). Of the 306 patients enrolled, 193 were randomized in the double-blind phase and 131 participated in the treatment-withdrawal phase. After reduction or withdrawal of ETN 50 mg/MTX, patients reduced to ETN 25 mg/MTX experienced slight, nonsignificant declines in the majority of PRO measures, whereas switching to PBO or MTX alone caused significant declines. Presenteeism and activity impairment scores were significantly better in the ETN reduced-dose group versus MTX monotherapy and PBO at Week 39 (p ≤ 0.05). In patients with early RA who achieved remission while receiving full-dose ETN/MTX, continuing combination therapy at a lower dose did not cause a significant worsening of PRO response, but switching to MTX alone or PBO did. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00913458.

  15. Work instability and financial loss in early inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Looper, Karl J; Mustafa, Sally S; Zelkowitz, Phyllis; Purden, Margaret; Baron, Murray

    2012-12-01

    Inflammatory arthritis is associated with a high degree of work instability and financial burden. In this study, we examine the extent of work instability and financial loss as well as their association with disease characteristics during the first 18 months of inflammatory arthritis. One hundred and four patients in the early phase (more than 6 weeks, < 18 months) of inflammatory arthritis were recruited from a larger early inflammatory arthritis registry. Questionnaires recorded sociodemographic data and disease characteristics, including pain assessed using the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and physical functioning measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical functioning score. The Rheumatoid Arthritis Work Instability Scale (RA-WIS) was used to measure patient-perceived functioning in the workplace and the Financial Loss Questionnaire (FLQ) measured the impact on family finances. Participants' mean age was 56 years, 70.2% were female and 49.0% were working. Average yearly household income was < 60 000 Canadian dollars (CAD) for 38.5% of the sample. Of our working patients, 43% had a medium or high risk of work loss as measured by the RA-WIS and 35% reported a financial loss. On multivariate analysis, MPQ and SF-36 contributed to the dependent variable work instability, while age and SF-36 contributed to financial loss. This study identifies pain and physical dysfunction as potential modifiable risk factors for negative socioeconomic repercussions of illness in early inflammatory arthritis. © 2012 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2012 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Early diagnosis and treatment of steroid-induced diabetes mellitus in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoshi; Ogishima, Hiroshi; Kondo, Yuya; Sugihara, Makoto; Hayashi, Taichi; Chino, Yusuke; Goto, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Isao; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    To reveal how often patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or any of other connective tissue diseases (CTDs) who take prednisolone (PSL) manifest postprandial hyperglycemia, and to evaluate the effects of divided daily dose administration of PSL, and of acarbose and nateglinide, on RA patients. The blood sugar (BS) levels of the patients were measured after meals. For in-patients who showed postprandial hyperglycemia, the daily dose of PSL was divided and nateglinide and/or acarbose were/was added if their BS levels did not improve sufficiently. The patients with BS levels that were well controlled for three months were compared with the patients with poorly controlled BS levels. The BS levels of 78 patients, including 16 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), were measured after meals, and 27 of them were newly diagnosed with DM. Five of 14 patients who took a steady dose of PSL showed high BS levels after lunch (over 200 mg/dl) without elevated HbA1c. The combination therapy of divided-dose PSL and nateglinide and/or acarbose improved postprandial hyperglycemia significantly. The period from the start of PSL administration to intervention was significantly longer in patients with good control at three months than the corresponding period in those with poor control. The prevalence of postprandial hyperglycemia was high in patients with RA/CTD taking PSL; accordingly, measurement of the BS level after each meal was valuable. Combination therapy of divided-dose PSL and nateglinide and/or acarbose improved postprandial hyperglycemia.

  17. Painful Joints? Early Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Key

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print this issue Painful Joints? Early Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Key En español Send us your comments ... type of arthritis. It’s far more common than rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is caused by wear and tear on ...

  18. Impact of early diagnosis on functional disability in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dam; Choi, Chan-Bum; Lee, Jiyoung; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Won, Soyoung; Bang, So-Young; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Chung, Won Tae; Hong, Seung-Jae; Jun, Jae-Bum; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Jong; Koh, Eunmi; Lee, Hye-Soon; Lee, Jaejoon; Lee, Jisoo; Lee, Sang-Heon; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Sung Won; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Yoo, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Bo Young; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims To determine whether early diagnosis is beneficial for functional status of various disease durations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Methods A total of 4,540 RA patients were enrolled as part of the Korean Observational Study Network for Arthritis (KORONA). We defined early diagnosis as a lag time between symptom onset and RA diagnosis of ≤ 12 months, whereas patients with a longer lag time comprised the delayed diagnosis group. Demographic characteristics and outcomes were compared between early and delayed diagnosis groups. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the impact of early diagnosis on the development of functional disability in RA patients. Results A total of 2,597 patients (57.2%) were included in the early diagnosis group. The average Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI) score was higher in the delayed diagnosis group (0.64 ± 0.63 vs. 0.70 ± 0.66, p < 0.01), and the proportion of patients with no functional disability (HAQ = 0) was higher in the early diagnosis group (22.9% vs. 20.0%, p = 0.02). In multivariable analyses, early diagnosis was independently associated with no functional disability (odds ratio [OR], 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.40). In a subgroup analysis according to disease duration, early diagnosis was associated with no functional disability in patients with disease duration < 5 years (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.72) but not in patients with longer disease duration (for 5 to 10 years: OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.52; for ≥ 10 years: OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.28). Conclusions Early diagnosis is associated with no functional disability, especially in patients with shorter disease duration. PMID:27618867

  19. Role of erosions typical of rheumatoid arthritis in the 2010 ACR/EULAR rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria: results from a very early arthritis cohort.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Gina Hetland; Norli, Ellen S; Bøyesen, Pernille; van der Heijde, Désirée; Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Nygaard, Halvor; Bjørneboe, Olav; Thunem, Cathrine; Kvien, Tore K; Mjaavatten, Maria D; Lie, Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    To determine how the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) definition of erosive disease (erosion criterion) contributes to the number of patients classified as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/EULAR RA classification criteria (2010 RA criteria) in an early arthritis cohort. Patients from the observational study Norwegian Very Early Arthritis Clinic with joint swelling ≤16 weeks, a clinical diagnosis of RA or undifferentiated arthritis, and radiographs of hands and feet were included. Erosive disease was defined according to the EULAR definition accompanying the 2010 RA criteria. We calculated the additional number of patients being classified as RA based on the erosion criteria at baseline and during follow-up. Of the 289 included patients, 120 (41.5%) fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria, whereas 15 (5.2%) fulfilled only the erosion criterion at baseline. 118 patients had radiographic follow-up at 2 years, of whom 6.8% fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria and only one patient fulfilled solely the erosion criterion during follow-up. Few patients with early arthritis were classified as RA based on solely the erosion criteria, and of those who did almost all did so at baseline. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Emotions related to participation restrictions as experienced by patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study (the Swedish TIRA project).

    PubMed

    Östlund, Gunnel; Björk, Mathilda; Thyberg, Ingrid; Thyberg, Mikael; Valtersson, Eva; Stenström, Birgitta; Sverker, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Psychological distress is a well-known complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but knowledge regarding emotions and their relationship to participation restrictions is scarce. The objective of the study was to explore emotions related to participation restrictions by patients with early RA. In this study, 48 patients with early RA, aged 20-63 years, were interviewed about participation restrictions using the critical incident technique. Information from transcribed interviews was converted into dilemmas and linked to International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) participation codes. The emotions described were condensed and categorized. Hopelessness and sadness were described when trying to perform daily activities such as getting up in the mornings and getting dressed, or not being able to perform duties at work. Sadness was experienced in relation to not being able to continue leisure activities or care for children. Examples of fear descriptions were found in relation to deteriorating health and fumble fear, which made the individual withdraw from activities as a result of mistrusting the body. Anger and irritation were described in relation to domestic and employed work but also in social relations where the individual felt unable to continue valued activities. Shame or embarrassment was described when participation restrictions became visible in public. Feelings of grief, aggressiveness, fear, and shame are emotions closely related to participation restrictions in everyday life in early RA. Emotions related to disability need to be addressed both in clinical settings in order to optimize rehabilitative multi-professional interventions and in research to achieve further knowledge.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor treatment and the risk of incident cardiovascular events in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rishi J; Rao, Jaya K; Hansen, Richard A; Fang, Gang; Maciejewski, Matthew; Farley, Joel

    2014-11-01

    To compare the risk of cardiovascular (CV) events between use of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors (TNFi) and nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A nested case-control study was conducted using data from Truven's MarketScan commercial and Medicare claims database for patients with early RA who started treatment with either a TNFi or a nonbiologic DMARD between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010. Date of CV event diagnosis for cases was defined as the event date, and 12 age-matched and sex-matched controls were sampled using incidence density sampling. Drug exposure was defined into the following mutually exclusive categories hierarchically: (1) current use of TNFi (with or without nonbiologics), (2) past use of TNFi (with or without nonbiologics), (3) current use of nonbiologics only, and (4) past use of nonbiologics only. Current use was defined as any use in the period 90 days prior to the event date. Conditional logistic regression models were used to derive incidence rate ratios (IRR). From the cohort of patients with early RA, 279 cases of incident CV events and 3348 matched controls were identified. The adjusted risk of CV events was not significantly different between current TNFi users and current nonbiologic users (IRR 0.92, 95% CI 0.59-1.44). However, past users of nonbiologics showed significantly higher risk compared to current nonbiologic users (IRR 1.47, 95% CI 1.04-2.08). No differences in the CV risk were found between current TNFi and current nonbiologic DMARD treatment in patients with early RA.

  2. Hearing status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Daraei, M; Jalessi, M; Peyvandi, A A; Amini, E; Ranjbar, L A; Daneshi, A

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is thought to induce conductive hearing loss and/or sensorineural hearing loss. This study evaluated the function of the middle ear and cochlea, and the related factors. Pure tone audiometry, speech reception thresholds, speech discrimination scores, tympanometry, acoustic reflexes, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were assessed in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy volunteers. Pure tone audiometry results revealed a higher bone conduction threshold in the rheumatoid arthritis group, but there was no significant difference when evaluated according to the sensorineural hearing loss definition. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions related prevalence of conductive or mixed hearing loss, tympanometry values, acoustic reflexes, and speech discrimination scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Sensorineural hearing loss was significantly more prevalent in patients who used azathioprine, cyclosporine and etanercept. Higher bone conduction thresholds in some frequencies were detected in rheumatoid arthritis patients that were not clinically significant. Sensorineural hearing loss is significantly more prevalent in refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  3. Epidemiological evaluation quality of life in patients suffering from early rheumatoid arthritis: a pragmatic, prospective, randomized, blind allocation controlled of a modular program group intervention.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Hadi; Chopra, Arvind; Farrokhseresht, Reza; Sarmukaddam, Sanjeev; Noghabi, Fariba Asadi; Bedekar, Nilima; Madani, Abdolhosain

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology has taken on new roles in the management of health care services. In this study, we developed a non-pharmacological self-management modular program group intervention and evaluated its efficacy as an adjunct therapy in patients suffering from early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients were randomized to either participate in a non-equivalent intervention group along with the standard of care or only receive standard-of-care treatment at a community rheumatology center. The outcomes measured were a pain visual analog scale (VAS), patient general health (GH) on a VAS, and the Short Form 36 Health Survey version 2 scale measuring quality of life. These parameters were evaluated in the first week to obtain baseline values, and at 20, 32, 48, and 60 weeks to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention group. The patients were randomized, with 100 patients in the intervention group and 106 in the control group. The intervention and control groups were similar with regard to the percentage of women (86% vs. 89.6%), tobacco usage (25% vs. 19.8%), mean age (42.6±13.2 years vs. 46.6±10.9 years), and disease duration (15.3±6.7 months vs. 14.5±6.6 months). The mean outcomes were significantly different between the two groups, and post-hoc pairwise analysis demonstrated significant deterioration in the control group in contrast to improvement in the intervention group at the second, third, fourth, and fifth evaluations. Improvements were often seen as early as the 12-week and 24-week follow-up visits. Epidemiology contributes to the evaluation of how well specific therapies or other health interventions prevent or control health problems. The modular program group intervention implemented in this study appears to be a suitable and feasible method to facilitate much more comprehensive management of early RA in socioeconomically challenged communities.

  4. Epidemiological evaluation quality of life in patients suffering from early rheumatoid arthritis: a pragmatic, prospective, randomized, blind allocation controlled of a modular program group intervention

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Epidemiology has taken on new roles in the management of health care services. In this study, we developed a non-pharmacological self-management modular program group intervention and evaluated its efficacy as an adjunct therapy in patients suffering from early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Patients were randomized to either participate in a non-equivalent intervention group along with the standard of care or only receive standard-of-care treatment at a community rheumatology center. The outcomes measured were a pain visual analog scale (VAS), patient general health (GH) on a VAS, and the Short Form 36 Health Survey version 2 scale measuring quality of life. These parameters were evaluated in the first week to obtain baseline values, and at 20, 32, 48, and 60 weeks to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention group. RESULTS: The patients were randomized, with 100 patients in the intervention group and 106 in the control group. The intervention and control groups were similar with regard to the percentage of women (86% vs. 89.6%), tobacco usage (25% vs. 19.8%), mean age (42.6±13.2 years vs. 46.6±10.9 years), and disease duration (15.3±6.7 months vs. 14.5±6.6 months). The mean outcomes were significantly different between the two groups, and post-hoc pairwise analysis demonstrated significant deterioration in the control group in contrast to improvement in the intervention group at the second, third, fourth, and fifth evaluations. Improvements were often seen as early as the 12-week and 24-week follow-up visits. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiology contributes to the evaluation of how well specific therapies or other health interventions prevent or control health problems. The modular program group intervention implemented in this study appears to be a suitable and feasible method to facilitate much more comprehensive management of early RA in socioeconomically challenged communities. PMID:26552423

  5. Evidence for early disease-modifying drugs in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David L

    2004-01-01

    Some research evidence supports early aggressive treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using combination therapy with two or more disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) plus steroids, or even DMARDs plus an anti-TNF. By contrast, conservatively delayed DMARD monotherapy, given after non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have failed, has been criticised. However, recent long-term studies highlight the complexities in evaluating whether to abandon pyramidal treatment in favour of early DMARDs. Although patients given early DMARD therapy show short-term benefits, longer-term results show no prolonged clinical advantages from early DMARDs. By 5 years patients receiving early DMARDs had similar disease activity and comparable health assessment questionnaire scores to patients who received DMARDs later in their disease course. X-ray progression was persistent and virtually identical in both groups. These negative findings do not invalidate the case for early DMARD therapy, as it is gives sustained reductions in disease activity in the early years of treatment without excessive risks from adverse effects. However, early DMARDs alone do not adequately control RA in the longer term. This may require starting with very aggressive therapy or treating patients more aggressively after early DMARD therapy has been initiated. PMID:14979927

  6. Early response to therapy predicts 6-month and 1-year disease activity outcomes in psoriatic arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Schoels, Monika M; Landesmann, Uriel; Alasti, Farideh; Baker, Daniel; Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    In PsA management, remission and low disease activity represent preferential treatment targets. We aimed at evaluating the predictive value and clinical use of initial therapeutic response for subsequent achievement of these targets. Based on data of 216 patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of golimumab (GO-REVEAL), we performed diagnostic testing analyses using 3- and 6-month disease activity as tests for treatment outcomes to understand the implications of early response. In regression analyses, we estimated the probabilities for achieving at least LDA. Disease activity was measured by the disease activity index for PsA (DAPSA). Three-month DAPSA levels were excellent tests for disease activity at 6 months (and at 1 year), with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.92 (and 0.88, respectively). The estimated probability for 6-month LDA could be quantified as <22% if patients did not reach at least moderate disease activity after 3 months on golimumab. Similar data were seen for early DAPSA response: patients achieving a DAPSA 85% at 3 months had an 84% probability for 6-month LDA or REM. All results were validated in an independent trial cohort of patients treated with infliximab (IMPACT 2). Three months after implementation of therapy in PsA, it is already possible to evaluate the potential for accomplishing therapeutic goals. This substantiates the choice of the 3-month assessment as essential for treatment adaptations.

  7. Circadian relationships between interleukin (IL)-6 and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hormones: failure of IL-6 to cause sustained hypercortisolism in patients with early untreated rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Crofford, L J; Kalogeras, K T; Mastorakos, G; Magiakou, M A; Wells, J; Kanik, K S; Gold, P W; Chrousos, G P; Wilder, R L

    1997-04-01

    Systemic symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are mediated, at least in part, by elevated levels of circulating interleukin (IL)-6, and this cytokine is also a potent stimulus of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. To evaluate the 24-h circadian secretory dynamics of ACTH, cortisol, and IL-6 and their interactions in patients with early untreated RA, we recruited and studied five newly diagnosed, untreated RA patients early in the course of their disease and five age-, gender-, and race-matched control subjects. We collected serial blood samples over 24 h and measured plasma ACTH and cortisol every 30 min and IL-6 every hour. The 24-h collection was followed by administration of ovine CRH (oCRH) and post-oCRH serial blood samples over 2 h. We analyzed the 24-h overall levels of these hormones and their circadian variations and performed time-lagged cross-correlation analyses among them. The untreated RA patients had 24 h time-integrated plasma ACTH, plasma cortisol levels, and urinary free cortisol excretion that were not significantly different from control subjects, in spite of their disease activity. However, an earlier morning surge of plasma ACTH and cortisol in the patients was suggested. Plasma ACTH and cortisol responses to oCRH were similar in RA patients and controls. IL-6 levels were significantly increased in the RA patients compared with control subjects during the early morning hours (P < 0.05). There was pronounced circadian variation of plasma Il-6 levels. In the RA patients, we detected a positive temporal correlation between plasma levels of IL-6 and ACTH/cortisol, with elevated levels of IL-6 before the elevations of ACTH and cortisol by 1 and 2 h, respectively. In the same patients, we detected a negative effect of cortisol upon IL-6 exerted with a delay of 5 h. The data presented here suggest that although endogenous IL-6 may stimulate secretion of ACTH and cortisol, overall activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis remains

  8. Validating and assessing the sensitivity of the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index-derived Short Form-6D in patients with early aggressive rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Amjadi, Sogol S; Maranian, Paul M; Paulus, Harold E; Kaplan, Robert M; Ranganath, Veena K; Furst, Daniel E; Khanna, Puja P; Khanna, Dinesh

    2009-06-01

    New methodologies allow the scores for the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI) to be translated into preferences/utility scores. We evaluated the construct validity of the HAQ-DI-derived Short Form-6D (SF-6D) score and assessed its responsiveness to change over 6- and 12-month followup periods in patients with early aggressive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients (n=277) participating in an RA observational study completed self-reported measures of symptoms and the HAQ-DI at baseline and at 6 and 12 months. Total Sharp scores, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were assessed along with clinical data. Construct validity was assessed by examining the association between SF-6D score and patient-reported and clinical measures using Spearman correlation coefficients. The responsiveness of SF-6D to change was assessed using patient and physician assessments of the disease as clinical anchors. The magnitude of responsiveness was calculated using SF-6D effect size (ES). Mean SF-6D scores were 0.690, 0.720, and 0.723 at baseline and 6 and 12-month followup, respectively. Baseline patient-reported measures had moderate to high correlations with baseline SF-6D (r=0.43 to 0.52); whereas clinical measures had negligible to low correlations with SF-6D (r=0.001 to 0.32). ES was moderate for the groups that were deemed to have improved (ES 0.63-0.75) but negligible to small for those that did not (ES 0.13-0.46). Our data support the validity and responsiveness of the HAQ-DI derived SF-6D score in an early RA cohort. These results support the use of the HAQ-DI derived SF-6D in RA cohorts and clinical trials lacking preference-based measures.

  9. Disability evaluation in arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Luck, J V; Beardmore, T D; Kaufman, R

    1987-08-01

    During the working years, rheumatic conditions are the foremost cause of disability in the United States. Disability evaluation for Social Security applicants and Workers' Compensation patients is commonplace in orthopedic practices. Yet, formal education in this aspect of patient care is rare both during and after residency. Because of a lack of understanding and sophistication the physician who knows the patient better than any other evaluator often play a minor role in the determination of disability. Disability Evaluation Under Social Security--A Handbook for Physicians lists the medical criteria necessary for qualification. Severely disabled arthritis patients will not always fit into these various categories and may have to be considered under the rule of medical equivalency. Workers' Compensation statutes vary somewhat from state to state but generally include disability criteria. Familiarity with these criteria and the process involved will allow the orthopedist to communicate more meaningfully with administrators and will reduce much of the frustration and some of the cost inherent in this system. When subjective complaint (illness) is in excess of apparent organic pathology (disease), team evaluation under the direction of the treating physician will help sort out the dilemma and develop a treatment plan. One hopes that this will bring the illness more in line with the disease, and thus reduce the disability.

  10. Value of ultrasonography as a marker of early response to abatacept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and an inadequate response to methotrexate: results from the APPRAISE study

    PubMed Central

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Wakefield, Richard J; Berner-Hammer, Hilde; Vittecoq, Olivier; Filippou, Georgios; Balint, Peter; Möller, Ingrid; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Naredo, Esperanza; Østergaard, Mikkel; Boers, Maarten; Gaillez, Corine; Van Holder, Karina; Le Bars, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study the responsiveness of a combined power Doppler and greyscale ultrasound (PDUS) score for assessing synovitis in biologic-naïve patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) starting abatacept plus methotrexate (MTX). Methods In this open-label, multicentre, single-arm study, patients with RA (MTX inadequate responders) received intravenous abatacept (∼10 mg/kg) plus MTX for 24 weeks. A composite PDUS synovitis score, developed by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology–European League Against Rheumatism (OMERACT–EULAR)-Ultrasound Task Force, was used to evaluate individual joints. The maximal score of each joint was added into a Global OMERACT–EULAR Synovitis Score (GLOESS) for bilateral metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPs) 2–5 (primary objective). The value of GLOESS containing other joint sets was explored, along with clinical efficacy. Results Eighty-nine patients completed the 24-week treatment period. The earliest PDUS sign of improvement in synovitis was at week 1 (mean change in GLOESS (MCPs 2–5): −0.7 (95% CIs −1.2 to −0.1)), with continuous improvement to week 24. Early improvement was observed in the component scores (power Doppler signal at week 1, synovial hyperplasia at week 2, joint effusion at week 4). Comparable changes were observed for 22 paired joints and minimal joint subsets. Mean Disease Activity Score 28 (C reactive protein) was significantly reduced from weeks 1 to 24, reaching clinical meaningful improvement (change ≥1.2) at week 8. Conclusions In this first international prospective study, the composite PDUS score is responsive to abatacept. GLOESS demonstrated the rapid onset of action of abatacept, regardless of the number of joints examined. Ultrasound is an objective tool to monitor patients with RA under treatment. Trial registration number NCT00767325. PMID:26590174

  11. The Impact of Inflammation on Metabolomic Profiles in Patients With Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Stephen P; Kapoor, Sabrina R; Viant, Mark R; Byrne, Jonathan J; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D; Kitas, George D; Raza, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Inflammatory arthritis is associated with systemic manifestations including alterations in metabolism. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy–based metabolomics to assess metabolic fingerprints in serum from patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and those with early arthritis. Methods. Serum samples were collected from newly presenting patients with established RA who were naive for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, matched healthy controls, and 2 groups of patients with synovitis of ≤3 months' duration whose outcomes were determined at clinical followup. Serum metabolomic profiles were assessed using 1-dimensional 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Discriminating metabolites were identified, and the relationships between metabolomic profiles and clinical variables including outcomes were examined. Results. The serum metabolic fingerprint in established RA was clearly distinct from that of healthy controls. In early arthritis, we were able to stratify the patients according to the level of current inflammation, with C-reactive protein correlating with metabolic differences in 2 separate groups (P < 0.001). Lactate and lipids were important discriminators of inflammatory burden in both early arthritis patient groups. The sensitivities and specificities of models to predict the development of either RA or persistent arthritis in patients with early arthritis were low. Conclusion. The metabolic fingerprint reflects inflammatory disease activity in patients with synovitis, demonstrating that underlying inflammatory processes drive significant changes in metabolism that can be measured in the peripheral blood. The identification of metabolic alterations may provide insights into disease mechanisms operating in patients with inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23740368

  12. Preventing progression from arthralgia to arthritis: targeting the right patients.

    PubMed

    van Steenbergen, Hanna W; da Silva, José A Pereira; Huizinga, Tom W J; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2018-01-01

    Early treatment is associated with improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggesting that a 'window of opportunity', in which the disease is most susceptible to disease-modifying treatment, exists. Autoantibodies and markers of systemic inflammation can be present long before clinical arthritis, and maturation of the immune response seems to coincide with the development of RA. The pre-arthritis phase associated with symptoms such as as joint pain without clinical arthritis (athralgia) is now hypothesized to fall within the aforementioned window of opportunity. Consequently, disease modulation in this phase might prevent the occurrence of clinically apparent arthritis, which would result in a persistent disease course if untreated. Several ongoing proof-of-concept trials are now testing this hypothesis. This Review highlights the importance of adequate risk prediction for the correct design, execution and interpretation of results of these prevention trials, as well as considerations when translating these findings into clinical practice. The patients' perspectives are discussed, and the accuracy with which RA development can be predicted in patients presenting with arthralgia is evaluated. Currently, the best starting position for preventive studies is proposed to be the inclusion of patients with an increased risk of RA, such as those identified as fulfilling the EULAR definition of 'arthralgia suspicious for progression to RA'.

  13. Early Changes of the Cortical Micro-Channel System in the Bare Area of the Joints of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Werner, David; Simon, David; Englbrecht, Matthias; Stemmler, Fabian; Simon, Christoph; Berlin, Andreas; Haschka, Judith; Renner, Nina; Buder, Thomas; Engelke, Klaus; Hueber, Axel J; Rech, Jürgen; Schett, Georg; Kleyer, Arnd

    2017-08-01

    To characterize the specific structural properties of the erosion-prone bare area of the human joint, and to search for early microstructural changes in this region during rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the initial part of the study, human cadaveric hand joints were examined for exact localization of the bare area of the metacarpal heads, followed by detection of cortical micro-channels (CoMiCs) in this region by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) and, after anatomic dissection, validation of the presence of CoMiCs by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). In the second part of the study, the number and distribution of CoMiCs were analyzed in 107 RA patients compared to 105 healthy individuals of similar age and sex distribution. Investigation by HR-pQCT combined with adaptive thresholding allowed the detection of CoMiCs in the bare area of human cadaveric joints. The existence of CoMiCs in the bare area was additionally validated by micro-CT. In healthy individuals, the number of CoMiCs increased with age. RA patients showed significantly more CoMiCs compared to healthy individuals (mean ± SD 112.9 ± 54.7/joint versus 75.2 ± 41.9/joint; P < 0.001), with 20-49-year-old RA patients exhibiting similar numbers of CoMiCs as observed in healthy individuals older than age 65 years. Importantly, CoMiCs were already found in RA patients very early in their disease course, with enrichment in the erosion-prone radial side of the joint. CoMiCs represent a new form of structural change in the joints of patients with RA. Although the number of CoMiCs increases with age, RA patients develop CoMiCs much earlier in life, and such changes can even occur at the onset of the disease. CoMiCs therefore represent an interesting new opportunity to assess structural changes in RA. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. What are the goals and principles of management in the early treatment of rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Bykerk, Vivian Patricia; Keystone, Edward Clark

    2005-02-01

    The management of patients with new-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) requires an awareness of the potential issues and needs that are unique to each patient with regards to their perceptions of their disease, physical needs and nutritional issues. Arthritis specialists should have a clear approach to the goals of management that are specific to patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA). In this chapter, evidence for the goals and principles of management in the early treatment of RA is discussed. Patient education, the role of self-management, physical therapies, exercise, diet and drug management are addressed. This chapter aims to provide clinicians with a clear understanding of which interventions have supporting evidence and where further research is required. Where evidence for patients with ERA is lacking, evidence from patients with established RA is reviewed.

  15. A Phase III Study Evaluating Continuation, Tapering, and Withdrawal of Certolizumab Pegol After One Year of Therapy in Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Clifton O.; Burmester, Gerd‐Rüdiger; Bykerk, Vivian P.; Furst, Daniel E.; Mariette, Xavier; van der Heijde, Désirée; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; VanLunen, Brenda; Ecoffet, Cécile; Cioffi, Christopher; Emery, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objective In disease‐modifying antirheumatic drug–naive patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had achieved sustained low disease activity (a Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate of ≤3.2 at both week 40 and week 52) after 1 year of treatment with certolizumab pegol (CZP) at a standard dose (200 mg every 2 weeks plus optimized methotrexate [MTX]), we evaluated whether continuation of CZP treatment at a standard dose or at a reduced frequency (200 mg every 4 weeks plus MTX) was superior to stopping CZP (placebo plus MTX) in maintaining low disease activity for 1 additional year. Methods A total of 293 patients from period 1 of our study were re‐randomized 2:3:2 in period 2 to CZP at a standard dose (n = 84), CZP at a reduced frequency (n = 127), or placebo plus MTX (CZP stopped) (n = 82). The primary end point was the percentage of patients who maintained low disease activity throughout weeks 52–104 without flares. We used a hierarchical testing scheme, comparing CZP at a standard dose with CZP stopped. If P < 0.05 was achieved, then CZP at a reduced frequency was compared with CZP stopped (nonresponder imputation). Results The 293 patients from period 1 represented 36% fewer patients than projected, yielding a smaller number of patients eligible for period 2. Higher proportions of patients treated with the standard and reduced frequency regimens maintained low disease activity than those who had stopped CZP (48.8% and 53.2%, respectively, versus 39.2% [P = 0.112 and P = 0.041, respectively; nominal P value, first hierarchical test not significant]). Similar trends were observed for radiographic nonprogression (change from baseline of ≤0.5 in modified Sharp/van der Heijde score; 79.2% and 77.9% of patients, respectively, versus 70.3%) and normative physical function (Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index score of ≤0.5; 71.4% and 70.6% of patients, respectively, versus 57

  16. Novel autoantibody markers for early and seronegative rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Somers, Klaartje; Geusens, Piet; Elewaut, Dirk; De Keyser, Filip; Rummens, Jean-Luc; Coenen, Marieke; Blom, Marlies; Stinissen, Piet; Somers, Veerle

    2011-02-01

    Approximately one-third of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are seronegative for the 2 serological RA markers, rheumatoid factor (RF) and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (ACCP). Moreover, the sensitivities of both markers are lower in the diagnostically important early disease phase. The aim of this study was to identify additional autoantibody markers for early RA and for RF-negative, ACCP-negative (seronegative) RA. We screened an RA synovium cDNA phage display library with autoantibodies in plasma from 10 early (symptoms of maximum 1 year) and 10 seronegative (RF-negative, ACCP-negative) RA patients with validation in 72 additional RA patients and 121 controls (38 healthy controls, 43 patients with other inflammatory rheumatic diseases, 20 osteoarthritis patients and 20 subjects with mechanical joint complaints). Fourteen novel autoantibodies were identified that showed a 54% sensitivity and 90% specificity for RA. For 11 of these autoantibodies, an exclusive presence was demonstrated in RA patients (100% specificity, 37% sensitivity) as compared to controls. All early RA patients were positive for at least one of the identified autoantibodies and antibody-positivity was associated with a shorter disease duration (P = 0.0087). 52% of RA patients who initially tested negative for RF and ACCP, tested positive for at least one of the 14 novel autoantibodies, resulting in a 19% increase in sensitivity compared to current serological testing. Moreover, 5 identified autoantibodies were detected more frequently in seronegative RA patients, indicating that these autoantibodies constitute novel candidate markers for this RA subtype. We demonstrated that the targets of 3 of these 5 autoantibodies had an increased expression in RA synovial tissue compared to control synovial tissue, pointing towards a biological rationale for these auto antibody targets in RA. In conclusion, we identified novel candidate autoantibody markers for RA that can be

  17. Estimating the monetary value of the annual productivity gained in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis receiving etanercept plus methotrexate: interim results from the PRIZE study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bansback, Nick; Sun, Huiying; Pedersen, Ronald; Kotak, Sameer; Anis, Aslam H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To measure and value the impact of combined etanercept (ETN) and methotrexate (MTX) therapy on work productivity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over 52 weeks. Methods MTX- and biological-naïve patients with RA (symptom onset ≤12 months; Disease Activity Score based on a 28-joint count (DAS28) >3.2) received open-label ETN50/MTX for 52 weeks. The Valuation of Lost Productivity (VOLP) questionnaire, measuring paid and unpaid work productivity impacts, was completed approximately every 13 weeks. Bootstrapping methods were used to test changes in VOLP outcomes over time. One-year productivity impacts were compared between responders (DAS28 ≤3.2) at week 13 and non-responders using zero-inflated models for time loss and two-part models for total costs of lost productivity. Results 196 patients were employed at baseline and had ≥1 follow-up with VOLP. Compared with baseline, at week 52, patients gained 33.4 h per 3 months in paid work and 4.2 h per week in unpaid work. Total monetary productivity gains were €1322 per 3 months. Over the 1-year period, responders gained paid (231 h) and unpaid work loss (122 h) compared with non-responders, which amounted to a gain of €3670 for responders. Conclusions This is the first clinical trial to measure and value the impact of biological treatment on all the labour input components that affect overall productivity. Combination therapy with ETN50/MTX was associated with a significant productivity gain for patients with early RA who were still observed at week 52. Over the 1-year treatment period, responders at week 13 suffered significantly less productivity loss than non-responders suggesting this gain was related to treatment response. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00913458 PMID:26535135

  18. Cost-utility of COBRA-light versus COBRA therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: the COBRA-light trial

    PubMed Central

    ter Wee, Marieke M; Coupé, Veerle MH; den Uyl, Debby; Blomjous, Birgit S; Kooijmans, Esmee; Kerstens, Pit JSM; Nurmohamed, Mike T; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Boers, Maarten; Lems, Willem F

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if COmbinatie therapie Bij Reumatoïde Artritis (COBRA)-light therapy is cost-effective in treating patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with COBRA therapy. Methods This economic evaluation was performed next to the open-label, randomised non-inferiority COBRA-light trial in 164 patients with early RA. Non-responders to COBRA or COBRA-light received etanercept (50 mg/week) for 3–6 months. The societal perspective analysis took medical direct, non-medical direct and indirect costs into account. Costs were measured with patient cost diaries for the follow-up period of 52 weeks. Bootstrapping techniques estimated uncertainty around the cost-effectiveness ratios, presented in cost-effectiveness planes. Results 164 patients were randomised to either COBRA or COBRA-light strategy. At week 52, COBRA-light proved to be non-inferior to COBRA therapy on all clinical outcome measures. The results of the base-case cost-utility analysis (intention-to-treat analyses) revealed that COBRA-light strategy is more expensive (k€9.3 (SD 0.9) compared with COBRA (k€7.2 (SD 0.8)), but the difference in costs were not significant (k€2.0; 95% CI –0.3 to 4.4). Also, both strategies produced similar quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). The sensitivity analyses showed robustness of these results. In a per-protocol sensitivity analysis, in which costs of etanercept were assumed to be provided as prescribed according to protocol, both arms had much higher costs: COBRA-light: k€11.5 (8.3) compared with k€8.5 (6.8) for COBRA, and the difference in costs was significant (k€2.9; 0.6 to 5.3). Conclusions In the base-case cost-utility analysis, the two strategies produced similar QALYs for similar costs. But it is anticipated that if protocol had been followed correctly, the COBRA-light strategy would have been more costly due to additional etanercept costs, for a limited health gain. Given the limited added benefit and high costs of starting

  19. Cost-utility of COBRA-light versus COBRA therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: the COBRA-light trial.

    PubMed

    Ter Wee, Marieke M; Coupé, Veerle Mh; den Uyl, Debby; Blomjous, Birgit S; Kooijmans, Esmee; Kerstens, Pit Jsm; Nurmohamed, Mike T; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Boers, Maarten; Lems, Willem F

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate if COmbinatie therapie Bij Reumatoïde Artritis (COBRA)-light therapy is cost-effective in treating patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with COBRA therapy. This economic evaluation was performed next to the open-label, randomised non-inferiority COBRA-light trial in 164 patients with early RA. Non-responders to COBRA or COBRA-light received etanercept (50 mg/week) for 3-6 months. The societal perspective analysis took medical direct, non-medical direct and indirect costs into account. Costs were measured with patient cost diaries for the follow-up period of 52 weeks. Bootstrapping techniques estimated uncertainty around the cost-effectiveness ratios, presented in cost-effectiveness planes. 164 patients were randomised to either COBRA or COBRA-light strategy. At week 52, COBRA-light proved to be non-inferior to COBRA therapy on all clinical outcome measures. The results of the base-case cost-utility analysis (intention-to-treat analyses) revealed that COBRA-light strategy is more expensive (k€9.3 (SD 0.9) compared with COBRA (k€7.2 (SD 0.8)), but the difference in costs were not significant (k€2.0; 95% CI -0.3 to 4.4). Also, both strategies produced similar quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). The sensitivity analyses showed robustness of these results. In a per-protocol sensitivity analysis, in which costs of etanercept were assumed to be provided as prescribed according to protocol, both arms had much higher costs: COBRA-light: k€11.5 (8.3) compared with k€8.5 (6.8) for COBRA, and the difference in costs was significant (k€2.9; 0.6 to 5.3). In the base-case cost-utility analysis, the two strategies produced similar QALYs for similar costs. But it is anticipated that if protocol had been followed correctly, the COBRA-light strategy would have been more costly due to additional etanercept costs, for a limited health gain. Given the limited added benefit and high costs of starting etanercept in the presence of low disease

  20. European multicentre pilot survey to assess vitamin D status in rheumatoid arthritis patients and early development of a new Patient Reported Outcome questionnaire (D-PRO).

    PubMed

    Vojinovic, Jelena; Tincani, Angela; Sulli, Alberto; Soldano, Stefano; Andreoli, Laura; Dall'Ara, Francesca; Ionescu, Ruxandra; Pasalic, Katarina Simic; Balcune, Inete; Ferraz-Amaro, Ivan; Tlustochowicz, Małgorzata; Butrimiene, Irena; Punceviciene, Egle; Toroptsova, Natalia; Grazio, Simeon; Morovic-Vergles, Jadranka; Masaryk, Pavol; Otsa, Kati; Bernardes, Miguel; Boyadzhieva, Vladimira; Salaffi, Fausto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2017-05-01

    To collect data on vitamin D (25(OH)D) serum levels in a large number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients from different European countries, to investigate their relation with disease activity, disability, quality of life, and possibly to construct a new Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) questionnaire in order to self-estimate if they are at risk for vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency-related clinical implications (D-PRO). This was a European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) supported cross-sectional study (project No CLI064) which involved 625 RA patients (mean age 55±11years, mean disease duration 11±9years), 276 age and sex matched healthy subjects, and rheumatologists working in academic institutions or hospital centres, as well as PARE organizations (patient representatives) from 13 European countries. Serum samples for 25(OH)D level measurement were collected during winter time and analyzed in a central laboratory using chemiluminescence immunoassay (DiaSorin). Patient past medical history was recorded. RA patients were provided with three questionnaires: the Rheumatoid Arthritis Impact Diseases score (RAID), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and the new D-PRO questionnaire at the time of 25(OH)D serum sampling. D-PRO questionnaire consisted of three domains, Symptom Risk Score (SRS), Habitus Risk Score (HRS) and Global Risk Score (SRS+HRS=GRS), constructed with items possibly related to vitamin D deficiency. D-PRO was correlated with both clinical and PRO scores. DAS28-CRP was also evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed by non parametric tests. Mean serum concentration of 25(OH)D in RA patients (17.62±9.76ng/ml) was found significantly lower if compared to the levels obtained in matched controls (18.95±9.45ng/ml) (p=0.01), with statistically significant differences among several European countries. Negative correlations were found between 25(OH)D serum levels and DAS28-CRP (p<0.001), RAID (p=0.05) and HAQ (p=0.04) scores in the RA

  1. Early and sustained efficacy with apremilast monotherapy in biological-naïve patients with psoriatic arthritis: a phase IIIB, randomised controlled trial (ACTIVE).

    PubMed

    Nash, Peter; Ohson, Kamal; Walsh, Jessica; Delev, Nikolay; Nguyen, Dianne; Teng, Lichen; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Aelion, Jacob A

    2018-05-01

    Evaluate apremilast efficacy across various psoriatic arthritis (PsA) manifestations beginning at week 2 in biological-naïve patients with PsA. Patients were randomised (1:1) to apremilast 30 mg twice daily or placebo. At week 16, patients whose swollen and tender joint counts had not improved by ≥10% were eligible for early escape. At week 24, all patients received apremilast through week 52. Among 219 randomised patients (apremilast: n=110; placebo: n=109), a significantly greater American College of Rheumatology 20 response at week 16 (primary outcome) was observed with apremilast versus placebo (38.2% (42/110) vs 20.2% (22/109); P=0.004); response rates at week 2 (first assessment) were 16.4% (18/110) versus 6.4% (7/109) (P=0.025). Improvements in other efficacy outcomes, including 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS-28) using C reactive protein (CRP), swollen joint count, Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), enthesitis and morning stiffness severity, were observed with apremilast at week 2. At week 16, apremilast significantly reduced PsA disease activity versus placebo, with changes in DAS-28 (CRP) (P<0.0001), HAQ-DI (P=0.023) and Gladman Enthesitis Index (P=0.001). Improvements were maintained with continued treatment through week 52. Over 52 weeks, apremilast's safety profile was consistent with prior phase 3 studies in psoriasis and PsA. During weeks 0-24, the incidence of protocol-defined diarrhoea was 11.0% (apremilast) and 8.3% (placebo); serious adverse event rates were 2.8% (apremilast) and 4.6% (placebo). In biological-naïve patients with PsA, onset of effect with apremilast was observed at week 2 and continued through week 52. The safety profile was consistent with previous reports. NCT01925768; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Expression of the Inherently Autoreactive Idiotope 9G4 on Autoantibodies to Citrullinated Peptides and on Rheumatoid Factors in Patients with Early and Established Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cambridge, Geraldine; Moura, Rita A.; Santos, Tania; Khawaja, Akif A.; Polido-Pereira, Joaquim; Canhão, Helena; Leandro, Maria J.; Fonseca, João E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The pre-symptomatic stage of Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoantibodies. High levels and epitope spread by Rheumatoid factors (RhF) and autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins signify progression towards disease expression. In established RA, the persistence of high autoantibody levels reflects production by both long-lived plasma cells and short-lived plasmablasts. Neither the relative contributions to pathogenesis by autoantibodies from either source, nor the factors responsible for deciding the fate of autoantigen specific ‘parent’ B-cells, is understood. Phenotypic markers identifying subsets of autoreactive B-cells are therefore of interest in understanding the origin and perpetuation of the autoimmune response in RA. One such phenotypic marker is the rat monoclonal antibody, 9G4, which recognises an idiotope on immunoglobuins derived from the inherently autoreactive VH-gene, VH4-34. We therefore investigated whether the 9G4 idiotope was expressed on autoantibodies in patients with RA. Methodology/Principal Findings Sera from 19 patients with established RA and those with <1year history of untreated polyarthritis either resolving into RA (n = 42) or non-RA diagnosis (n = 31) were included. Autoantibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCP), RhF and co-expression of the 9G4 idiotope were measured by ELISA. 9G4 recognised a population of anti-CCP antibodies in the majority of sera from patients with established disease and also in samples from patients with early disaese. 9G4+RhF levels were generally lower and not associated with positivity for, or levels of 9G4+CCP. Conclusions/Significance The persistence of 9G4+ immunoglobulins, of any isotype, in serum is rare. We describe here the novel finding of 9G4 expression on anti-CCP antibodies in patients from the earliest symptoms of RA through to established disease. Our results suggest that 9G4 expression on anti-CCP autoantibodies was

  3. Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tracy Y.; Li, Edmund K.; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. In addition to skin and joint involvement, there is increasing evidence suggesting that patients with PsA also have an increase in risk of clinical and subclinical cardiovascular diseases, mostly due to accelerating atherosclerosis. Both conventional and nonconventional cardiovascular risk factors contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in PsA. Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in PsA, acting independently and/or synergistically with the conventional risk factors. In this paper, we discuss the current literature indicating that patients with PsA are at risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22645614

  4. Impact of etanercept tapering on work productivity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: results from the PRIZE study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bansback, Nick; Sun, Huiying; Pedersen, Ronald; Kotak, Sameer; Anis, Aslam H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess changes in work productivity in patients who have achieved response using etanercept (ETN) 50 mg+methotrexate (MTX) (phase I) are randomised to ETN 25 mg+MTX versus MTX versus placebo (phase II) and then withdrawn from treatment (phase III). Methods Patients included in the analysis were in employment entering phase II of the PRIZE trial and had one or more follow-ups. Phase II was a 39-week, randomised and double-blind comparison of the 3 dose-reduction treatments. Phase III was a 26-week observational study where treatment was withdrawn. The Valuation of Lost Productivity was completed approximately every 13 weeks to estimate productivity impacts from a societal perspective. Results A total of 120 participants were included in our analyses. During phase II, ETN25+MTX or MTX improved paid work productivity by over 100 hours compared with placebo, amounting to a gain of €1752 or €1503, respectively. ETN25+MTX compared with placebo gains €1862 in total paid/unpaid productivity. At week 52, the 3-month paid work productivity loss was 21.8, 12.8 and 14.0 hours, respectively. The productivity loss increased at week 64 from week 52, dropped at week 76 for all treatment groups and then continued rising after week 76 for the placebo group (71.9 hours at week 91) but not for the other 2 groups (21.9 hours for ETX25+MTX and 27.6 hours for MTX). Conclusions The work productivity gain in phase I as a result of ETN50+MTX was marginally lost in the dose-reduction treatment groups, ETN25+MTX and MTX, but substantially lost in the placebo group during phase II. Trial registration number NCT00913458; Results. PMID:27486524

  5. Optimizing Exercise Programs for Arthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulware, Dennis W.; Byrd, Shannon L.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise can help decrease pain and improve function in people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Physicians must provide individualized, realistic, enjoyable exercise programs that help affected joints, build fitness, and maximize patient compliance. Physicians must also provide appropriate follow-up care, adjusting the exercise program…

  6. Dialysis treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hezemans, R L; Krediet, R T; Arisz, L

    1995-07-01

    The results of dialysis treatment in 24 rheumatoid arthritis patients, 20 chronic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 4 juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), were analysed. Presence of secondary amyloidosis, renal function, morbidity and survival were examined. Amyloidosis was present in 13 patients. Especially among amyloidosis patients, renal function declined rapidly in the last year before dialysis started. On average, 63 days per patient-year were spent in the hospital, 58% was dialysis-related, mainly due to vascular access problems. Hospitalization was even more widespread in amyloidosis patients (79 days, 72% dialysis-related). Median survival in RA patients with amyloidosis was 11 months; in RA patients without amyloidosis this was 29 months. Two-year survival was only 1 out of 10 for the RA amyloidosis patients; for the RA non-amyloidosis patients this was 5 out of 6 (p < 0.01). Cardiovascular causes of death were most frequent. In conclusion, high morbidity and low survival make RA patients with amyloidosis a high-risk group on renal replacement therapy.

  7. Early Psoriatic Arthritis Versus Early Seronegative Rheumatoid Arthritis: Role of Dermoscopy Combined with Ultrasonography for Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zabotti, Alen; Errichetti, Enzo; Zuliani, Francesca; Quartuccio, Luca; Sacco, Stefania; Stinco, Giuseppe; De Vita, Salvatore

    2018-05-01

    Exclusion of psoriatic skin/nail lesions is important in differentiating early seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) from early polyarticular psoriatic arthritis (EPsA) and such manifestations may go unnoticed in atypical or minimally expressed cases. The aim of this study is to assess the usefulness of integrated rheumatological-dermatological evaluation in highlighting dermatological lesions missed on rheumatological examination and to investigate the role of ultrasonography (US) and dermoscopy in improving the recognition of subclinical psoriatic findings. Patients with a new diagnosis of seropositive or seronegative ERA and EPsA with prevalent hands involvement were recruited. All were reassessed for the presence of psoriatic lesions during an integrated rheumatological-dermatological clinical evaluation and underwent hands US and proximal nailfold dermoscopy. Seventy-three consecutive subjects were included in the study: 25 with seropositive ERA, 23 with seronegative ERA, and 25 with EPsA. One-fourth of the subjects initially diagnosed as seronegative ERA presented cutaneous or nail psoriasis on integrated rheumatological-dermatological evaluation, thereby being reclassified as EPsA. The presence of at least 1 extrasynovial feature on hand US and dotted vessels on proximal nailfold dermoscopy was significantly associated with EPsA, with a sensitivity of 68.0% and 96.0% and a specificity of 88.1% and 83.3% for US and dermoscopy, respectively. When used together, specificity for PsA diagnosis raised to 90.5%. Integrated rheumatological-dermatological clinical evaluation may be helpful in identifying patients with EPsA misclassified as seronegative ERA. Additionally, US and dermoscopy may be used as supportive tools in identifying subclinical psoriatic features, which may come in handy in distinguishing EPsA from ERA.

  8. What are the dominant cytokines in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Ridgley, Laura A.; Anderson, Amy E.; Pratt, Arthur G.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease of evolving immune dysregulation that culminates in joint destruction and disability. The principle by which pro-inflammatory cytokines may be therapeutically targeted to abrogate disease is well established, but has yet to translate into reliable cures for patients. Emerging insights into cytokine-mediated pathobiology during rheumatoid arthritis development are reviewed, and their implications for future treatment strategies considered. Recent findings Accumulating data highlight cytokine perturbations before the clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis. Some of these have now been linked to the arthritogenic activation of autoantibodies and associated pain and bone destruction in affected joints. These observations suggest cytokines may trigger the transition from systemic immunity to arthritis. Cytokine exposure could furthermore ‘prime’ synovial stromal cells to perpetuate a dominant pro-inflammatory environment. By facilitating cross-talk between infiltrating immune cells and even sustaining ectopic lymphoid structure development in some cases, cytokine interplay ultimately underpins the failure of arthritis to resolve. Summary Successful therapeutic stratification will depend upon an increasingly sophisticated appreciation of how dominant players amongst cytokine networks vary across time and anatomical space during incipient rheumatoid arthritis. The prize of sustained remission for all patients justifies the considerable effort required to achieve this understanding. PMID:29206659

  9. 2016 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis.

    PubMed

    Combe, Bernard; Landewe, Robert; Daien, Claire I; Hua, Charlotte; Aletaha, Daniel; Álvaro-Gracia, Jose María; Bakkers, Margôt; Brodin, Nina; Burmester, Gerd R; Codreanu, Catalin; Conway, Richard; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Fonseca, Joao; Raza, Karim; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Smolen, Josef S; Skingle, Diana; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Kvien, Tore K; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette; van Vollenhoven, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    Since the 2007 recommendations for the management of early arthritis have been presented, considerable research has been published in the field of early arthritis, mandating an update of the 2007 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for management of early arthritis. In accordance with the 2014 EULAR Standardised Operating Procedures, the expert committee pursued an approach that was based on evidence in the literature and on expert opinion. The committee involved 20 rheumatologists, 2 patients and 1 healthcare professional representing 12 European countries. The group defined the focus of the expert committee and target population, formulated a definition of 'management' and selected the research questions. A systematic literature research (SLR) was performed by two fellows with the help of a skilled librarian. A set of draft recommendations was proposed on the basis of the research questions and the results of the SLR. For each recommendation, the categories of evidence were identified, the strength of recommendations was derived and the level of agreement was determined through a voting process. The updated recommendations comprise 3 overarching principles and 12 recommendations for managing early arthritis. The selected statements involve the recognition of arthritis, referral, diagnosis, prognostication, treatment (information, education, pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions), monitoring and strategy. Eighteen items were identified as relevant for future research. These recommendations provide rheumatologists, general practitioners, healthcare professionals, patients and other stakeholders with an updated EULAR consensus on the entire management of early arthritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Monetary value of lost productivity over a five year follow up in early rheumatoid arthritis estimated on the basis of official register data on patients' sickness absence and gross income: experience from the FIN-RACo trial.

    PubMed

    Puolakka, K; Kautiainen, H; Pekurinen, M; Möttönen, T; Hannonen, P; Korpela, M; Hakala, M; Arkela-Kautiainen, M; Luukkainen, R; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2006-07-01

    To explore the monetary value of rheumatoid arthritis related loss of productivity in patients with early active disease. In a prospective cohort substudy of the FIN-RACo Trial, 162 patients with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis, aged 18 to 65 years and available to the workforce, were followed up for five years. Loss of work productivity in euros 2002 was estimated by data on absence for sickness and on income (human capital approach) from official databases. Treatment responses were evaluated by area under the curve (AUC) of the ACR-N measure and by increase in number of erosions in radiographs of hands and feet. The health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) at six months was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). In all, 120 (75%) patients, women more often (82%) than men (61%) (p=0.002), lost work days. The mean lost productivity per patient-year was euro7217 (95% confidence interval (CI), 5561 to 9148): for women, euro6477 (4858 to 8536) and for men, euro8443 (5389 to 12,898). There was an inverse correlation with improvement: euro1101 (323 to 2156) and euro14 952 (10,662 to 19,852) for the highest and lowest quartiles of AUC of ARC-N, respectively. Lost productivity was associated with increase in the number of erosions and with disability in "changing and maintaining body position" subcategory of the ICF. Despite remission targeted treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, early rheumatoid arthritis results in substantial loss of productivity. A good improvement in the disease reduces the loss markedly.

  11. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161(+)Th1 Cells) to CD161(+)Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161(+)Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161(+)Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase.

  12. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161+Th1 Cells) to CD161+Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161+Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161+Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase. PMID:27123445

  13. Trial of early aggressive therapy in polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Carol A; Giannini, Edward H; Spalding, Steven J; Hashkes, Philip J; O'Neil, Kathleen M; Zeft, Andrew S; Szer, Ilona S; Ringold, Sarah; Brunner, Hermine I; Schanberg, Laura E; Sundel, Robert P; Milojevic, Diana; Punaro, Marilynn G; Chira, Peter; Gottlieb, Beth S; Higgins, Gloria C; Ilowite, Norman T; Kimura, Yukiko; Hamilton, Stephanie; Johnson, Anne; Huang, Bin; Lovell, Daniel J

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether aggressive treatment initiated early in the course of rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive or RF-negative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can induce clinical inactive disease within 6 months. Between May 2007 and October 2010, a multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 2 aggressive treatments was conducted in 85 children ages 2-16 years with polyarticular JIA of <12 months' duration. Patients received either methotrexate (MTX) 0.5 mg/kg/week (maximum 40 mg) subcutaneously, etanercept 0.8 mg/kg/week (maximum 50 mg), and prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day (maximum 60 mg) tapered to 0 by 17 weeks (arm 1), or MTX (same dosage as arm 1), etanercept placebo, and prednisolone placebo (arm 2). The primary outcome measure was clinical inactive disease at 6 months. An exploratory phase determined the rate of clinical remission on medication (6 months of continuous clinical inactive disease) at 12 months. By 6 months, clinical inactive disease had been achieved in 17 (40%) of 42 patients in arm 1 and 10 (23%) of 43 patients in arm 2 (χ(2) = 2.91, P = 0.088). After 12 months, clinical remission on medication was achieved in 9 patients in arm 1 and 3 patients in arm 2 (P = 0.053). There were no significant interarm differences in adverse events. Although this study did not meet its primary end point, early aggressive therapy in this cohort of children with recent-onset polyarticular JIA resulted in clinical inactive disease by 6 months and clinical remission on medication within 12 months of treatment in substantial proportions of patients in both arms. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Early-onset arthritis in retired National Football League players.

    PubMed

    Golightly, Yvonne M; Marshall, Stephen W; Callahan, Leigh F; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2009-09-01

    Injury has been identified as a potential risk factor for osteoarthritis. However, no previous study has addressed playing-career injuries and subsequent osteoarthritis in a large sample of former athletes. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and determinants of arthritis and osteoarthritis in retired professional football players. Self-reported arthritis prevalence and retrospectively-recalled injury history were examined in a cross-sectional survey of 2,538 retired football players. Football players reported a high incidence of injury from their professional playing days (52.8% reported knee injuries, 74.1% reported ligament/tendon injuries, and 14.2% reported anterior cruciate ligament tears). For those under 60 years, 40.6% of retired NFL players reported arthritis, compared with 11.7% of U.S. males (prevalence ratio = 3.5, 95% CI: 3.3 to 3.7). Within the retired NFL player cohort, osteoarthritis was more prevalent in those with a history of knee injury (prevalence ratio = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.5 to 1.9) and ligament/tendon injury (prevalence ratio = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.4 to 1.9). In males under the age of 60, arthritis is over 3 times more prevalent in retired NFL players than in the general U.S. population. This excess of early-onset arthritis may be due to the high incidence of injury in football.

  15. Everyday ethics and help-seeking in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, A.; Adam, P.; Cox, S.M.; Li, L.C.

    2018-01-01

    Background Sociological understandings of chronic illness have revealed tensions and complexities around help-seeking. Although ethics underpins healthcare, its application in the area of chronic illness is limited. Here we apply an ethical framework to interview accounts and identify ethical challenges in the early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with eight participants who had been diagnosed with RA in the 12 months prior to recruitment. Applying the concepts of autonomous decision-making and procedural justice highlighted ethical concerns which arose throughout the help-seeking process. Analysis was based on the constant-comparison approach. Results Individuals described decision-making, illness actions and the medical encounter. The process was complicated by inadequate knowledge about symptoms, common-sense understandings about the GP appointment, difficulties concerning access to specialists, and patient–practitioner interactions. Autonomous decision-making and procedural justice were compromised. The accounts revealed contradictions between the policy ideals of active self-management, patient-centred care and shared decision-making, and the everyday experiences of individuals. Conclusions For ethical healthcare there is a need for: public knowledge about early RA symptoms; more effective patient–practitioner communication; and increased support during the wait between primary and secondary care. Healthcare facilities and the government may consider different models to deliver services to people requiring rheumatology consults. PMID:20610465

  16. Trial of Early Aggressive Therapy in Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Carol A.; Giannini, Edward H.; Spalding, Steven J.; Hashkes, Philip J.; O’Neil, Kathleen M.; Zeft, Andrew S.; Szer, Ilona S.; Ringold, Sarah; Brunner, Hermine I.; Schanberg, Laura E.; Sundel, Robert P.; Milojevic, Diana; Punaro, Marilynn G.; Chira, Peter; Gottlieb, Beth S.; Higgins, Gloria C.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Kimura, Yukiko; Hamilton, Stephanie; Johnson, Anne; Huang, Bin; Lovell, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine if aggressive treatment initiated early in the course of rheumatoid factor positive or negative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (poly-JIA) can induce clinical inactive disease (CID) within 6 months. METHODS Between May 2007 and October 2010 a multi-center, prospective, double blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial of two aggressive treatments was conducted in 85 children aged 2 to 16 years with polyarticular JIA of less than 12 months duration. Patients received either methotrexate 0.5 mg/kg/wk SQ (40 mg max), etanercept 0.8 mg/kg/wk (50 mg max), prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/d (60 mg max) tapered to 0 by 17 weeks (Arm 1), or methotrexate (same dose as Arm 1), etanercept placebo, and prednisolone placebo (Arm 2). The primary outcome was CID at 6 months. An exploratory phase determined the rate of clinical remission on medication (6 months of continuous CID) at 12 months. RESULTS By 6 months, 17 of 42 (40%) of patients in Arm 1 and 10 of 43 (23%) in Arm 2 had achieved CID (X2 = 2.91; p = 0.088). After 12 months, 9 patients in Arm 1 and 3 in Arm 2 achieved clinical remission on medication (p = 0.0534). There were no significant inter-arm differences in adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Although this study did not meet its primary endpoint, early aggressive therapy in this cohort of children with recent onset polyarticular JIA resulted in substantial proportions of patients in both arms achieving CID by 6 months and clinical remission on medication within 12 months of treatment. PMID:22183975

  17. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; v. d. Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as ‘JIA-uveitis’) has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze uveitis activity, complications and visual prognosis in adulthood. Methods In this multicenter study, 67 adult patients (129 affected eyes) with JIA-uveitis were retrospectively studied for best corrected visual acuity, visual fields, uveitis activity, topical/systemic treatments, ocular complications, and ocular surgeries during their 18th, 22nd and 30th year of life. Because treatment strategies changed after the year 1990, outcomes were stratified for onset of uveitis before and after 1990. Results Sixty-two of all 67 included patients (93%) had bilateral uveitis. During their 18th life year, 4/52 patients (8%) had complete remission, 28/52 (54%) had uveitis activity and 37/51 patients (73%) were on systemic immunomodulatory treatment. Bilateral visual impairment or legal blindness occurred in 2/51 patients (4%); unilateral visual impairment or legal blindness occurred in 17/51 patients (33%) aged 18 years. The visual prognosis appeared to be slightly better for patients with uveitis onset after the year 1990 (for uveitis onset before 1990 (n = 7) four patients (58%) and for uveitis onset after 1990 (n = 44) 13 patients (30%) were either visual impaired or blind). At least one ocular surgery was performed in 10/24 patients (42%) between their 18th and 22nd year of life. Conclusions Bilateral visual outcome in early adulthood in patients with JIA-uveitis appears to be fairly good, although one third of the patients developed one visually impaired or blind eye. However, a fair amount of the patients suffered from ongoing uveitis activity and needed ongoing treatment as well as surgical interventions. Awareness of these findings is important for ophthalmologists and

  18. Visceral leishmaniasis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient receiving methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Reina, Delia; Cerdà, Dacia; Güell, Elena; Martínez Montauti, Joaquín; Pineda, Antonio; Corominas, Hèctor

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are susceptible to severe infections such as leishmaniasis. As L. infantum is endemic in the Mediterranean region, it is necessary to rule this infectious process out in any RA patient presenting with fever and pancytopenia. An early diagnosis based on a high suspicion can prevent a fatal outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Ratio of Circulating IFNγ (+) "Th17 Cells" in Memory Th Cells Is Inversely Correlated with the Titer of Anti-CCP Antibodies in Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Based on Flow Cytometry Methods of the Human Immunology Project.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with chronic joint inflammation characterized by activated T cells. IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. However, it remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we validated the methods of the Human Immunology Project using only the cell-surface marker through measuring the actual expression of IL-17 and IFNγ. We also evaluated the expression of CD161 in human Th17 cells. We then tried to identify Th17 cells, IL-17(+)Th17 cells, and IFNγ (+)Th17 cells in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients using the standardized method of the Human Immunology Project. Our findings validated the method and the expression of CD161. The ratio of IFNγ (+)Th17 cells in memory T cells was inversely correlated to the titers of anti-CCP antibodies in the early-onset RA patients. These findings suggest that Th17 cells play important roles in the early phase of RA and that anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with early phase RA, especially those with high titers of CCP antibodies.

  20. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  1. Autoantibodies to two novel peptides in seronegative and early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    De Winter, Liesbeth M; Hansen, Wendy L J; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Geusens, Piet; Lenaerts, Jan; Somers, Klaartje; Stinissen, Piet; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Somers, Veerle

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent progress in biomarker discovery for RA diagnostics, still over one-third of RA patients-and even more in early disease-present without RF or ACPA. The aim of this study was to confirm the presence of previously identified autoantibodies to novel Hasselt University (UH) peptides in early and seronegative RA. Screening for antibodies against novel UH peptides UH-RA.1, UH-RA.9, UH-RA.14 and UH-RA.21, was performed in two large independent cohorts. Peptide ELISAs were developed to screen for the presence of antibodies to UH-RA peptides. First, 292 RA patients (including 39 early patients), 90 rheumatic and 97 healthy controls from UH were studied. Antibody reactivity to two peptides (UH-RA.1 and UH-RA.21) was also evaluated in 600 RA patients, 309 patients with undifferentiated arthritis and 157 rheumatic controls from the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic cohort. In both cohorts, 38% of RA patients were seronegative for RF and ACPA. Testing for autoantibodies to UH-RA.1 and UH-RA.21 reduced the serological gap from 38% to 29% in the UH cohort (P = 0.03) and from 38% to 32% in the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic cohort (P = 0.01). Furthermore, 19-33% of early RA patients carried antibodies to these peptides. Specificities in rheumatic controls ranged from 82 to 96%. Whereas antibodies against UH-RA.1 were related to remission, anti-UH-RA.21 antibodies were associated with inflammation, joint erosion and higher tender and swollen joint counts. This study validates the presence of antibody reactivity to novel UH-RA peptides in seronegative and early RA. This might reinforce current diagnostics and improve early diagnosis and intervention in RA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Expression of chemokines CXCL4 and CXCL7 by synovial macrophages defines an early stage of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, L; Adlard, N; Juarez, M; Smallie, T; Snow, M; Buckley, C D; Raza, K; Filer, A; Scheel-Toellner, D

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives For our understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), it is important to elucidate the mechanisms underlying early stages of synovitis. Here, synovial cytokine production was investigated in patients with very early arthritis. Methods Synovial biopsies were obtained from patients with at least one clinically swollen joint within 12 weeks of symptom onset. At an 18-month follow-up visit, patients who went on to develop RA, or whose arthritis spontaneously resolved, were identified. Biopsies were also obtained from patients with RA with longer symptom duration (>12 weeks) and individuals with no clinically apparent inflammation. Synovial mRNA expression of 117 cytokines was quantified using PCR techniques and analysed using standard and novel methods of data analysis. Synovial tissue sections were stained for CXCL4, CXCL7, CD41, CD68 and von Willebrand factor. Results A machine learning approach identified expression of mRNA for CXCL4 and CXCL7 as potentially important in the classification of early RA versus resolving arthritis. mRNA levels for these chemokines were significantly elevated in patients with early RA compared with uninflamed controls. Significantly increased CXCL4 and CXCL7 protein expression was observed in patients with early RA compared with those with resolving arthritis or longer established disease. CXCL4 and CXCL7 co-localised with blood vessels, platelets and CD68+ macrophages. Extravascular CXCL7 expression was significantly higher in patients with very early RA compared with longer duration RA or resolving arthritis Conclusions Taken together, these observations suggest a transient increase in synovial CXCL4 and CXCL7 levels in early RA. PMID:25858640

  3. Expression of chemokines CXCL4 and CXCL7 by synovial macrophages defines an early stage of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yeo, L; Adlard, N; Biehl, M; Juarez, M; Smallie, T; Snow, M; Buckley, C D; Raza, K; Filer, A; Scheel-Toellner, D

    2016-04-01

    For our understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), it is important to elucidate the mechanisms underlying early stages of synovitis. Here, synovial cytokine production was investigated in patients with very early arthritis. Synovial biopsies were obtained from patients with at least one clinically swollen joint within 12 weeks of symptom onset. At an 18-month follow-up visit, patients who went on to develop RA, or whose arthritis spontaneously resolved, were identified. Biopsies were also obtained from patients with RA with longer symptom duration (>12 weeks) and individuals with no clinically apparent inflammation. Synovial mRNA expression of 117 cytokines was quantified using PCR techniques and analysed using standard and novel methods of data analysis. Synovial tissue sections were stained for CXCL4, CXCL7, CD41, CD68 and von Willebrand factor. A machine learning approach identified expression of mRNA for CXCL4 and CXCL7 as potentially important in the classification of early RA versus resolving arthritis. mRNA levels for these chemokines were significantly elevated in patients with early RA compared with uninflamed controls. Significantly increased CXCL4 and CXCL7 protein expression was observed in patients with early RA compared with those with resolving arthritis or longer established disease. CXCL4 and CXCL7 co-localised with blood vessels, platelets and CD68(+) macrophages. Extravascular CXCL7 expression was significantly higher in patients with very early RA compared with longer duration RA or resolving arthritis Taken together, these observations suggest a transient increase in synovial CXCL4 and CXCL7 levels in early RA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Early arthritis induces disturbances at bone nanostructural level reflected in decreased tissue hardness in an animal model of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cascão, Rita; Finnilä, Mikko A. J.; Lopes, Inês P.; Saarakkala, Simo; Zioupos, Peter; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Arthritis induces joint erosions and skeletal bone fragility. Objectives The main goal of this work was to analyze the early arthritis induced events at bone architecture and mechanical properties at tissue level. Methods Eighty-eight Wistar rats were randomly housed in experimental groups, as follows: adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) (N = 47) and a control healthy group (N = 41). Rats were monitored during 22 days for the inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight and sacrificed at different time points (11 and 22 days post disease induction). Bone samples were collected for histology, micro computed tomography (micro-CT), 3-point bending and nanoindentation. Blood samples were also collected for bone turnover markers and systemic cytokine quantification. Results At bone tissue level, measured by nanoindentation, there was a reduction of hardness in the arthritic group, associated with an increase of the ratio of bone concentric to parallel lamellae and of the area of the osteocyte lacuna. In addition, increased bone turnover and changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties were observed in arthritic animals, since the early phase of arthritis, when compared with healthy controls. Conclusion We have shown in an AIA rat model that arthritis induces very early changes at bone turnover, structural degradation and mechanical weakness. Bone tissue level is also affected since the early phase of arthritis, characterized by decreased tissue hardness associated with changes in bone lamella organization and osteocyte lacuna surface. These observations highlight the pertinence of immediate control of inflammation in the initial stages of arthritis. PMID:29315314

  5. Improving inflammatory arthritis management through tighter monitoring of patients and the use of innovative electronic tools

    PubMed Central

    van Riel, Piet; Combe, Bernard; Abdulganieva, Diana; Bousquet, Paola; Courtenay, Molly; Curiale, Cinzia; Gómez-Centeno, Antonio; Haugeberg, Glenn; Leeb, Burkhard; Puolakka, Kari; Ravelli, Angelo; Rintelen, Bernhard; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2016-01-01

    Treating to target by monitoring disease activity and adjusting therapy to attain remission or low disease activity has been shown to lead to improved outcomes in chronic rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Patient-reported outcomes, used in conjunction with clinical measures, add an important perspective of disease activity as perceived by the patient. Several validated PROs are available for inflammatory arthritis, and advances in electronic patient monitoring tools are helping patients with chronic diseases to self-monitor and assess their symptoms and health. Frequent patient monitoring could potentially lead to the early identification of disease flares or adverse events, early intervention for patients who may require treatment adaptation, and possibly reduced appointment frequency for those with stable disease. A literature search was conducted to evaluate the potential role of patient self-monitoring and innovative monitoring of tools in optimising disease control in inflammatory arthritis. Experience from the treatment of congestive heart failure, diabetes and hypertension shows improved outcomes with remote electronic self-monitoring by patients. In inflammatory arthritis, electronic self-monitoring has been shown to be feasible in patients despite manual disability and to be acceptable to older patients. Patients' self-assessment of disease activity using such methods correlates well with disease activity assessed by rheumatologists. This review also describes several remote monitoring tools that are being developed and used in inflammatory arthritis, offering the potential to improve disease management and reduce pressure on specialists. PMID:27933206

  6. Mitigation of disease- and treatment-related risks in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Martin; Lundholm, Amy

    2017-03-20

    Psoriatic arthritis is a part of the family of diseases referred to as spondyloarthropathies, a diverse group of chronic inflammatory disorders with common clinical, radiographic, and genetic features. Peripheral arthritis is the most common symptom of psoriatic arthritis and patients also frequently experience involvement of the entheses, spine, skin, and nails. Due to the diverse clinical spectrum of disease severity, tissues affected, and associated comorbidities, the treatment of psoriatic arthritis can be challenging and it is necessary to mitigate risks associated with both the disease and its treatment. These risks include disease-specific, treatment-related, and psychological risks. Disease-specific risks include those associated with disease progression that can limit functional status and be mitigated through early diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Risks also arise from comorbidities that are associated with psoriatic arthritis such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal inflammation. Patient outcomes can be affected by the treatment strategy employed and the pharmacologic agents administered. Additionally, it is important for physicians to be aware of risks specific to each therapeutic option. The impact of psoriatic arthritis is not limited to the skin and joints and it is common for patients to experience quality-of-life impairment. Patients are also more likely to have depression, anxiety, and alcoholism. This article reviews the many risks associated with psoriatic arthritis and provides guidance on mitigating these risks.

  7. T-Helper 17 Cell Cytokine Responses in Lyme Disease Correlate With Borrelia burgdorferi Antibodies During Early Infection and With Autoantibodies Late in the Illness in Patients With Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sulka, Katherine B.; Pianta, Annalisa; Crowley, Jameson T.; Arvikar, Sheila L.; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Steere, Allen C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Control of Lyme disease is attributed predominantly to innate and adaptive T-helper 1 cell (TH1) immune responses, whereas the role of T-helper 17 cell (TH17) responses is less clear. Here we characterized these inflammatory responses in patients with erythema migrans (EM) or Lyme arthritis (LA) to elucidate their role early and late in the infection. Methods. Levels of 21 cytokines and chemokines, representative of innate, TH1, and TH17 immune responses, were assessed by Luminex in acute and convalescent sera from 91 EM patients, in serum and synovial fluid from 141 LA patients, and in serum from 57 healthy subjects. Antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi or autoantigens were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. Compared with healthy subjects, EM patients had significantly higher levels of innate, TH1, and TH17-associated mediators (P ≤ .05) in serum. In these patients, the levels of inflammatory mediators, particularly TH17-associated cytokines, correlated directly with B. burgdorferi immunoglobulin G antibodies (P ≤ .02), suggesting a beneficial role for these responses in control of early infection. Late in the disease, in patients with LA, innate and TH1-associated mediators were often >10-fold higher in synovial fluid than serum. In contrast, the levels of TH17-associated mediators were more variable, but correlated strongly with autoantibodies to endothelial cell growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase 10, and apolipoprotein B-100 in joints of patients with antibiotic-refractory LA, implying a shift in TH17 responses toward an autoimmune phenotype. Conclusions. Patients with Lyme disease often develop pronounced TH17 immune responses that may help control early infection. However, late in the disease, excessive TH17 responses may be disadvantageous by contributing to autoimmune responses associated with antibiotic-refractory LA. PMID:28077518

  8. T-Helper 17 Cell Cytokine Responses in Lyme Disease Correlate With Borrelia burgdorferi Antibodies During Early Infection and With Autoantibodies Late in the Illness in Patients With Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Strle, Klemen; Sulka, Katherine B; Pianta, Annalisa; Crowley, Jameson T; Arvikar, Sheila L; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Steere, Allen C

    2017-04-01

    Control of Lyme disease is attributed predominantly to innate and adaptive T-helper 1 cell (TH1) immune responses, whereas the role of T-helper 17 cell (TH17) responses is less clear. Here we characterized these inflammatory responses in patients with erythema migrans (EM) or Lyme arthritis (LA) to elucidate their role early and late in the infection. Levels of 21 cytokines and chemokines, representative of innate, TH1, and TH17 immune responses, were assessed by Luminex in acute and convalescent sera from 91 EM patients, in serum and synovial fluid from 141 LA patients, and in serum from 57 healthy subjects. Antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi or autoantigens were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with healthy subjects, EM patients had significantly higher levels of innate, TH1, and TH17-associated mediators (P ≤ .05) in serum. In these patients, the levels of inflammatory mediators, particularly TH17-associated cytokines, correlated directly with B. burgdorferi immunoglobulin G antibodies (P ≤ .02), suggesting a beneficial role for these responses in control of early infection. Late in the disease, in patients with LA, innate and TH1-associated mediators were often >10-fold higher in synovial fluid than serum. In contrast, the levels of TH17-associated mediators were more variable, but correlated strongly with autoantibodies to endothelial cell growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase 10, and apolipoprotein B-100 in joints of patients with antibiotic-refractory LA, implying a shift in TH17 responses toward an autoimmune phenotype. Patients with Lyme disease often develop pronounced TH17 immune responses that may help control early infection. However, late in the disease, excessive TH17 responses may be disadvantageous by contributing to autoimmune responses associated with antibiotic-refractory LA. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions

  9. Verna Wright Lecture: Psoriatic Arthritis: The Need for Early Intervention.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Neil J

    2015-11-01

    About 30% of individuals with skin psoriasis will develop an inflammatory disease of the peripheral or axial skeleton involving synovial and/or entheseal tissue termed psoriatic arthritis (PsA). In most cases psoriasis will precede PsA by several years. Hence skin psoriasis provides an opportune model to investigate genetic and environmental factors that interact and contribute to the development of a common form of inflammatory arthritis. Further, the preexisting presence of psoriasis represents a unique opportunity for the early detection of arthritis and the potential for more effective intervention. However, despite the presence of psoriasis, there may be delay in the diagnosis of PsA that is associated with adverse longterm outcome. Undiagnosed disease is not uncommon, as demonstrated by studies applying screening questionnaires to primary care and dermatology clinic populations. Other potential risk factors, such as obesity and smoking, the presence of certain genetic and biomarker profiles, combined with accurate imaging modalities, offer the potential for more targeted screening. So in future it should be possible to detect PsA at a much earlier stage and prevent significant joint damage and associated disability before it happens.

  10. [Pulmonary infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Noboru; Tsuchiya, Yutaka; Tokunaga, Daidou; Miyahara, Yousuke; Yamaguchi, Shouzaburo; Saito, Hiroo; Ubukata, Mikio; Kurashima, Kazuyoshi; Yanagisawa, Tsutomu; Sugita, Yutaka

    2007-06-01

    We studied 149 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (mean age 68.0 years; 68 men, 81 women) with pulmonary infections. The mean age at the onset of RA and the duration of RA was 57.2 +/- 15.2 years and 10.9 +/- 11.5 years, respectively. Pulmonary infections included nontuberculous mycobacteriosis in 59 patients (Mycobacterium avium complex infection, 50 cases : Mycobacterium kansasii infection, 4 cases; others, 5 cases), pneumonia in 46 patients, pulmonary tuberculosis in 28 patients, pulmonary aspergillosis in 12 patients, pulmonary cryptococcosis in 5 patients, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia in 5 patients, lung abscess in 9 patients, exacerbation of bronchiectasis in 7 patients, and empyema in 4 patients. One hundred percent of patients with exacerbation of bronchiectasis, 91.7% of patients with pulmonary aspergillosis, 87% of patients with pneumonia, and 81.4% of patients with nontuberculous mycobacteriosis had underlying lung diseases. The pulmonary infections during therapy with steroids were pulmonary tuberculosis (78.6%), pneumonia (65.2%), and pulmonary aspergillosis (58.3%), while the pulmonary infections during methotrexate treatment were Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (80%), pulmonary cryptococcosis (40%), and pulmonary tuberculosis (28.6%). Pulmonary infections in RA patients who were taking TNFalpha inhibitors included 1 patient each with nontuberculous mycobacteriosis, pneumonia, pulmonary tuberculosis, and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. Among the RA patients with lung abscess, malignancy was noted in 55.6%, and diabetes mellitus in 22.2%. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the second-most-common cause of pneumonia and cause of all exacerbations of bronchiectasis. As well as immunosuppressive medications (steroids, methotrexate, TNFalpha inhibitors) and systemic comorbid diseases, underlying lung diseases could be one of the risk factor for pulmonary infections in patients with RA. The dominant risk factor for each pulmonary infection in patients with RA

  11. Conversion to seronegative status after abatacept treatment in patients with early and poor prognostic rheumatoid arthritis is associated with better radiographic outcomes and sustained remission: post hoc analysis of the AGREE study.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Diahann T S L; Emery, Paul; Smolen, Josef S; Westhovens, Rene; Le Bars, Manuela; Connolly, Sean E; Ye, June; Toes, René E M; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the T-cell costimulation blocker abatacept on anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and associations between changes in serological status and clinical response. Post hoc analysis of the phase III AGREE study in methotrexate (MTX)-naïve patients with early RA and poor prognostic factors. Patients were randomised to abatacept (~10 mg/kg intravenously according to weight range) or placebo, plus MTX over 12 months followed by open-label abatacept plus MTX for 12 months. Autoantibody titres were determined by ELISA at baseline and months 6 and 12 (double-blind phase). Conversion to seronegative status and its association with clinical response were assessed at months 6 and 12. Abatacept plus MTX was associated with a greater decrease in ACPA (but not RF) titres and higher rates of both ACPA and RF conversion to seronegative status versus MTX alone. More patients converting to ACPA seronegative status receiving abatacept plus MTX achieved remission according to Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (C-reactive protein) or Clinical Disease Activity Index than patients who remained ACPA seropositive. Patients who converted to ACPA seronegative status treated with abatacept plus MTX had a greater probability of achieving sustained remission and less radiographic progression than MTX alone or patients who remained ACPA seropositive (either treatment). Treatment with abatacept plus MTX was more likely to induce conversion to ACPA/RF seronegative status in patients with early, erosive RA. Conversion to ACPA seronegative status was associated with better clinical and radiographic outcomes. NCT00122382.

  12. Conversion to seronegative status after abatacept treatment in patients with early and poor prognostic rheumatoid arthritis is associated with better radiographic outcomes and sustained remission: post hoc analysis of the AGREE study

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Paul; Smolen, Josef S; Westhovens, Rene; Le Bars, Manuela; Connolly, Sean E; Ye, June; Toes, René E M; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2018-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of the T-cell costimulation blocker abatacept on anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and associations between changes in serological status and clinical response. Methods Post hoc analysis of the phase III AGREE study in methotrexate (MTX)-naïve patients with early RA and poor prognostic factors. Patients were randomised to abatacept (~10 mg/kg intravenously according to weight range) or placebo, plus MTX over 12 months followed by open-label abatacept plus MTX for 12 months. Autoantibody titres were determined by ELISA at baseline and months 6 and 12 (double-blind phase). Conversion to seronegative status and its association with clinical response were assessed at months 6 and 12. Results Abatacept plus MTX was associated with a greater decrease in ACPA (but not RF) titres and higher rates of both ACPA and RF conversion to seronegative status versus MTX alone. More patients converting to ACPA seronegative status receiving abatacept plus MTX achieved remission according to Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (C-reactive protein) or Clinical Disease Activity Index than patients who remained ACPA seropositive. Patients who converted to ACPA seronegative status treated with abatacept plus MTX had a greater probability of achieving sustained remission and less radiographic progression than MTX alone or patients who remained ACPA seropositive (either treatment). Conclusions Treatment with abatacept plus MTX was more likely to induce conversion to ACPA/RF seronegative status in patients with early, erosive RA. Conversion to ACPA seronegative status was associated with better clinical and radiographic outcomes. Trial registration number NCT00122382 PMID:29657830

  13. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is often needed for rheumatoid arthritis Water therapy Massage Other things you can do include: Get plenty ... to reduce pain from hip, knee, ankle, or foot arthritis. MEDICINES Medicines may be prescribed along with ...

  14. Identification of a transitional fibroblast function in very early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Filer, Andrew; Ward, Lewis S C; Kemble, Samuel; Davies, Christopher S; Munir, Hafsa; Rogers, Rebekah; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher Dominic; Nash, Gerard B; McGettrick, Helen M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Synovial fibroblasts actively regulate the inflammatory infiltrate by communicating with neighbouring endothelial cells (EC). Surprisingly, little is known about how the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) alters these immunomodulatory properties. We examined the effects of phase of RA and disease outcome (resolving vs persistence) on fibroblast crosstalk with EC and regulation of lymphocyte recruitment. Methods Fibroblasts were isolated from patients without synovitis, with resolving arthritis, very early RA (VeRA; symptom ≤12 weeks) and established RA undergoing joint replacement (JRep) surgery. Endothelial-fibroblast cocultures were formed on opposite sides of porous filters. Lymphocyte adhesion from flow, secretion of soluble mediators and interleukin 6 (IL-6) signalling were assessed. Results Fibroblasts from non-inflamed and resolving arthritis were immunosuppressive, inhibiting lymphocyte recruitment to cytokine-treated endothelium. This effect was lost very early in the development of RA, such that fibroblasts no longer suppressed recruitment. Changes in IL-6 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) signalling appeared critical for the loss of the immunosuppressive phenotype. In the absence of exogenous cytokines, JRep, but not VeRA, fibroblasts activated endothelium to support lymphocyte. Conclusions In RA, fibroblasts undergo two distinct changes in function: first a loss of immunosuppressive responses early in disease development, followed by the later acquisition of a stimulatory phenotype. Fibroblasts exhibit a transitional functional phenotype during the first 3 months of symptoms that contributes to the accumulation of persistent infiltrates. Finally, the role of IL-6 and TGF-β1 changes from immunosuppressive in resolving arthritis to stimulatory very early in the development of RA. Early interventions targeting ‘pathogenic’ fibroblasts may be required in order to restore protective regulatory processes. PMID:28847766

  15. Dietary Therapy in Patients With Inflammatory Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Rauli; Mäkilä, Heli; Peltomaa, Ritva

    2017-01-01

    Context • The exact etiology of rheumatoid disease is currently unknown. Changes in the microbiota of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, chronic bacterial infection of the upper urinary tract, increased permeability of the GI tract, and food sensitivities have been classified among the factors that may cause or aggravate the disease. Dietary deficiencies also may render patients more susceptible to inflammatory conditions and disorders of the immunological system. Objective • The study intended to determine the effects of a therapy consisting of dietary elimination, dietary supplements, and probiotics, collectively called DDP therapy, which is given either independently or in combination with conventional pharmacological agents. Design • The research team designed a retrospective survey, sending out a detailed questionnaire to determine the outcomes for patients who had received DDP therapy. Setting • The study took place at an antioxidant clinic in Helsinki, Finland. Participants • The participants were 104 patients with inflammatory arthritis who had undergone DDP therapy at the clinic. Intervention • The dietary elimination in DDP therapy included the omission of all animal milks, wheat, rye, barley, and oats, and the patients were asked to avoid added sugar and yeast. The dietary supplements included multivitamins with the main antioxidants, n-3-omega polyunsaturated fatty acids, and curcuminoids. The probiotic supplement most often used consisted of a mixture of 109 CFU/d of Bifidobacterium lactis and 109 CFU/d of Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Outcome Measures • The physician who had given the DDP therapy analyzed the patients' case histories to form his opinion on the efficacy of the therapy. In addition, a detailed questionnaire was sent to the 104 patients to obtain their evaluations of the outcomes for the DDP therapy. Results • Seventy-nine of the 104 patients (76%) returned their questionnaires. Of those respondents, 72 patients (91%) were

  16. Preclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Roman, Mary J; Moeller, Elfi; Davis, Adrienne; Paget, Stephen A; Crow, Mary K; Lockshin, Michael D; Sammaritano, Lisa; Devereux, Richard B; Schwartz, Joseph E; Levine, Daniel M; Salmon, Jane E

    2006-02-21

    Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with increased morbidity and mortality because of cardiovascular disease, independent of traditional risk factors. To determine the prevalence of preclinical atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to identify clinical and biological markers for atherosclerotic disease in this patient population. Matched, cross-sectional study. Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. 98 consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis who were followed by rheumatologists and 98 controls matched on age, sex, and ethnicity. Cardiovascular risk factor ascertainment and carotid ultrasonography in all participants; disease severity, disease treatment, and inflammatory markers in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Despite a more favorable risk factor profile, patients with rheumatoid arthritis had a 3-fold increase in carotid atherosclerotic plaque (44% vs. 15%; P < 0.001). The relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and carotid atherosclerotic plaque remained after accounting for age, serum cholesterol levels, smoking history, and hypertensive status; adjusted predicted prevalence was 7.4% (95% CI, 3.4% to 15.2%) for the control group and 38.5% (CI, 25.4% to 53.5%) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Age (P < 0.001) and current cigarette use (P < 0.014) were also significantly associated with carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Among patients with rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis was related to age, hypertension status, and use of tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors (a possible marker of disease severity). The study had a cross-sectional design, and inflammatory markers were determined only once. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have a high prevalence of preclinical atherosclerosis independent of traditional risk factors, suggesting that chronic inflammation and, possibly, disease severity are atherogenic in this population.

  17. Low prevalence of work disability in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA) and early rheumatoid arthritis at enrollment into a multi-site registry: results from the catch cohort.

    PubMed

    Mussen, Lauren; Boyd, Tristan; Bykerk, Vivian; de Leon, Faye; Li, Lihua; Boire, Gilles; Hitchon, Carol; Haraoui, Boulos; Thorne, J Carter; Pope, Janet

    2013-02-01

    We determined the prevalence of work disability in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) and undifferentiated early inflammatory arthritis (EIA) patients at first enrollment into the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) who met the 2010 ACR criteria versus those not meeting criteria, to determine the impact of meeting new criteria on work disability status. Data at first visit into the cohort were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the association of other variables in our database with work disability. 1,487 patients were enrolled in the CATCH study, a multi-site observational, prospective cohort of patients with EIA. 934 patients were excluded (505 based on missing criteria for ACR 2010 classification, as anti-CCP was absent, and 429 were not working for other reasons). Of the 553 patients included, 71 % were female with mean disease duration of 6.4 months. 524 (94.8 %) were employed while 29 (5.2 %) reported work disability at first visit. There were no differences between those meeting 2010 ACR criteria versus those who did not. Baseline characteristics associated with work disability were male gender, age, education, income, HAQ, and positive RF status. The mean HAQ score in work disabled patients was 1.4 versus 0.9 in those who were working (p < 0.001). Disease activity score (DAS28) was not associated with work disability (p = 0.069), nor was tender joint count, swollen joint count, anti-CCP, patient global assessment, or SF-12v2. In the regression model, work disability was associated with lower income levels (p = 0.01) and worse HAQ scores (OR 2.33; p = 0.001), but not significantly associated with male gender (p = 0.08), older age (>50 years; p = 0.3), lower education (p = 0.3) or RF positivity (p = 0.6). We found rates of work disability to be low at entry into this EIA cohort compared to previous studies. There may be potential for intervention in ERA to prevent the development of work

  18. Assessing Medication Adherence in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-26

    REV1E\\\\’ER 50. "E PFlEV101JS EOmC»lS ARE C . E1E ?~e 3 01 3 FlIll!!S D ~.!!fitt Assessing Medication Adherence in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA...Background • Rheumatoid arthritis - Affecting 1-3 million Americans - Seventy percent are women - Associated with higher risk of heart disease and stroke...and Objectives Purpose: Assess medication adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis Objectives: 1. Primary: Assess whether there is a correlation

  19. Role overload, pain and physical dysfunction in early rheumatoid or undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis in Canada.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Sally Sabry; Looper, Karl Julian; Zelkowitz, Phyllis; Purden, Margaret; Baron, Murray

    2012-05-03

    Inflammatory arthritis impairs participation in societal roles. Role overload arises when the demands by a given role set exceed the resources; time and energy, to carry out the required tasks. The present study examines the association between role overload and disease outcomes in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Patients (n = 104) of 7.61 months mean duration of inflammatory arthritis completed self-report questionnaires on sociodemographics, disease characteristics and role overload. Pain was assessed using the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and physical functioning was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical functioning score. Role overload was measured by the Role Overload Scale. Patients indicated the number of social roles they occupied from a total of the three typical roles; marital, parental and paid work. Participants' mean age was 56 years and 70.2% were female. Role overload was not correlated to the number of social roles, however, it was positively associated with pain (p = 0.004) and negatively associated with physical functioning (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, role overload was negatively associated with physical functioning after controlling for the relevant sociodemographic variables. This study identifies a possible reciprocal relationship between role overload and physical functioning in patients with EIA.

  20. Role overload, pain and physical dysfunction in early rheumatoid or undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammatory arthritis impairs participation in societal roles. Role overload arises when the demands by a given role set exceed the resources; time and energy, to carry out the required tasks. The present study examines the association between role overload and disease outcomes in early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Methods Patients (n = 104) of 7.61 months mean duration of inflammatory arthritis completed self-report questionnaires on sociodemographics, disease characteristics and role overload. Pain was assessed using the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and physical functioning was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical functioning score. Role overload was measured by the Role Overload Scale. Patients indicated the number of social roles they occupied from a total of the three typical roles; marital, parental and paid work. Results Participants’ mean age was 56 years and 70.2% were female. Role overload was not correlated to the number of social roles, however, it was positively associated with pain (p = 0.004) and negatively associated with physical functioning (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, role overload was negatively associated with physical functioning after controlling for the relevant sociodemographic variables. Conclusion This study identifies a possible reciprocal relationship between role overload and physical functioning in patients with EIA. PMID:22554167

  1. Early detection of rheumatoid arthritis in rats and humans with 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy: imaging synovial neoangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Zhang, Guojian; Wang, Xiangcheng; Zhao, Zhenfang; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xuemei; Li, Xiao-Feng

    2017-01-24

    To validate 99mTc-labeled arginylglycylaspartic acid (99mTc-3PRGD2) scintigraphy as a means to image synovial neoangiogenesis in joints afflicted by rheumatoid arthritis and to investigate its potential in the early detection and management of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis were generated in Sprague Dawley rats by type II collagen immunization and papain injection, respectively. Rats were imaged with 99mTc-3PRGD2 and 99mTc- methyl diphosphonate (99mTc MDP). X-ray images were also obtained and assessed by a radiologist. Immunohistochemistry of αvβ3 and CD31confirmed the onset of synovial neoangiogenesis. The effect of bevacizumab on rheumatoid arthritis was followed with 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy. A patient with rheumatoid arthritis and a healthy volunteer were scanned with 99mTc-3PRGD2. Two weeks after immunization, a significant increase in 99mTc-3PRGD2 was observed in the joints of the rheumatoid arthritis model though uptake in osteoarthritis model and untreated controls was low. 99mTc-MDP whole body scans failed to distinguish early rheumatoid arthritis joints from healthy controls. The expression of αvβ3 and CD31was significantly higher in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis rats compared to normal controls. In serial 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy studies, 99mTc-3PRGD2 uptake increased in parallel with disease progression. Bevacizumab anti-angiogenetic therapy both improved the symptoms of the rheumatoid arthritis rats and significantly decreased 99mTc-3PRGD2 uptake. Significantly higher 99mTc-3PRGD2 accumulation was also observed in rheumatoid arthritis joints in the patient. Our findings indicate that 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy could detect early rheumatoid arthritis by imaging the associated synovial neoangiogenesis, and may be useful in disease management.

  2. Clinical benefit of 1-year certolizumab pegol (CZP) add-on therapy to methotrexate treatment in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis was observed following CZP discontinuation: 2-year results of the C-OPERA study, a phase III randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Eguchi, Katsumi; Watanabe, Akira; Origasa, Hideki; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Yamanishi, Yuji; Kita, Yasuhiko; Matsubara, Tsukasa; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Shoji, Toshiharu; Togo, Osamu; Okada, Toshiyuki; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Koike, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the clinical impact of 1-year certolizumab pegol (CZP) therapy added to the first year of 2-year methotrexate (MTX) therapy, compared with 2-year therapy with MTX alone. Methods MTX-naïve patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with poor prognostic factors were eligible to enter Certolizumab-Optimal Prevention of joint damage for Early RA (C-OPERA), a multicentre, randomised, controlled study, which consisted of a 52-week double-blind (DB) period and subsequent 52-week post treatment (PT) period. Patients were randomised to optimised MTX+CZP (n=159) or optimised MTX+placebo (PBO; n=157). Following the DB period, patients entered the PT period, receiving MTX alone (CZP+MTX→MTX; n=108, PBO+MTX→MTX; n=71). Patients who flared could receive rescue treatment with open-label CZP. Results 34 CZP+MTX→MTX patients and 14 PBO+MTX→MTX patients discontinued during the PT period. From week 52 through week 104, significant inhibition of total modified total Sharp score progression was observed for CZP+MTX versus PBO+MTX (week 104: 84.2% vs 67.5% (p<0.001)). Remission rates decreased after CZP discontinuation; however, higher rates were maintained through week 104 in CZP+MTX→MTX versus PBO+MTX→MTX (41.5% vs 29.3% (p=0.026), 34.6% vs 24.2% (p=0.049) and 41.5% vs 33.1% (p=0.132) at week 104 in SDAI, Boolean and DAS28(erythrocyte sedimentation rate) remission. CZP retreated patients due to flare (n=28) showed rapid clinical improvement. The incidence of overall adverse events was similar between groups. Conclusions In MTX-naïve patients with early RA with poor prognostic factors, an initial 1 year of add-on CZP to 2-year optimised MTX therapy brings radiographic and clinical benefit through 2 years, even after stopping CZP. Trial registration number NCT01451203. PMID:28153828

  3. Clinical benefit of 1-year certolizumab pegol (CZP) add-on therapy to methotrexate treatment in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis was observed following CZP discontinuation: 2-year results of the C-OPERA study, a phase III randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Eguchi, Katsumi; Watanabe, Akira; Origasa, Hideki; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Yamanishi, Yuji; Kita, Yasuhiko; Matsubara, Tsukasa; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Shoji, Toshiharu; Togo, Osamu; Okada, Toshiyuki; van der Heijde, Désirée; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Koike, Takao

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the clinical impact of 1-year certolizumab pegol (CZP) therapy added to the first year of 2-year methotrexate (MTX) therapy, compared with 2-year therapy with MTX alone. MTX-naïve patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with poor prognostic factors were eligible to enter Certolizumab-Optimal Prevention of joint damage for Early RA (C-OPERA), a multicentre, randomised, controlled study, which consisted of a 52-week double-blind (DB) period and subsequent 52-week post treatment (PT) period. Patients were randomised to optimised MTX+CZP (n=159) or optimised MTX+placebo (PBO; n=157). Following the DB period, patients entered the PT period, receiving MTX alone (CZP+MTX→MTX; n=108, PBO+MTX→MTX; n=71). Patients who flared could receive rescue treatment with open-label CZP. 34 CZP+MTX→MTX patients and 14 PBO+MTX→MTX patients discontinued during the PT period. From week 52 through week 104, significant inhibition of total modified total Sharp score progression was observed for CZP+MTX versus PBO+MTX (week 104: 84.2% vs 67.5% (p<0.001)). Remission rates decreased after CZP discontinuation; however, higher rates were maintained through week 104 in CZP+MTX→MTX versus PBO+MTX→MTX (41.5% vs 29.3% (p=0.026), 34.6% vs 24.2% (p=0.049) and 41.5% vs 33.1% (p=0.132) at week 104 in SDAI, Boolean and DAS28(erythrocyte sedimentation rate) remission. CZP retreated patients due to flare (n=28) showed rapid clinical improvement. The incidence of overall adverse events was similar between groups. In MTX-naïve patients with early RA with poor prognostic factors, an initial 1 year of add-on CZP to 2-year optimised MTX therapy brings radiographic and clinical benefit through 2 years, even after stopping CZP. NCT01451203. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of hand and foot MRI for early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Wouter P; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Mangnus, Lukas; Newsum, Elize C; Bloem, Johan L; Huizinga, Tom W J; le Cessie, Saskia; Reijnierse, Monique; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2017-08-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of MRI for early RA. In some RA patients, a classifiable diagnosis cannot be made at first presentation; these patients present with unclassified arthritis (UA). The use of MRI for early diagnosis of RA is recommended, yet the evidence for its reliability is limited. MRI of hand and foot was performed in 589 early arthritis patients included in the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (229 presented with RA, 159 with other arthritides and 201 with UA). Symptom-free controls provided a reference for defining an abnormal MRI. In preliminary investigations, MRI of patients who presented with RA was compared with MRI of symptom-free controls and of patients with other arthritides. Thereafter, the value of MRI in early RA diagnosis was determined in UA patients using the 1-year follow-up on fulfilling the 1987 RA criteria and start of disease-modifying drugs as outcomes. Preliminary investigations were promising. Of the UA patients, 14% developed RA and 37% started disease-modifying treatment. MRI-detected tenosynovitis was associated with RA development independent of other types of MRI-detected inflammation [odds ratio (OR) = 7.5, 95% CI: 2.4, 23] and also independent of age and other inflammatory measures (swollen joints, CRP) (OR = 4.2, 95% CI: 1.4, 12.9). Within UA patients, the negative predictive value of abnormal tenosynovitis was 95% (95% CI: 89%, 98%) and the positive predictive value 25% (95% CI: 17%, 35%). The performance was best in the subgroup of UA patients presenting with oligoarthritis (18% developed RA): the positive predictive value was 36% (95% CI: 23%, 52%), the negative predictive value was 98% (95% CI: 88%, 100%), the sensitivity was 93% (95% CI: 70%, 99%) and the specificity was 63% (95% CI: 51%, 74%). MRI contributes to the identification of UA patients who will develop RA, mostly in UA patients presenting with oligoarthritis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for

  5. LOW BONE MINERAL DENSITY AMONG PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS.

    PubMed

    Arain, Shafique Rehman; Riaz, Amir; Nazir, Lubna; Umer, Tahira Perveen; Rasool, Tabe

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an early and common feature in rheumatoid arthritis. Apart from other manifestations, Osteoporosis is an extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis whichmay result in increased risk of fractures, morbidity mortality, and associated healthcare costs. This study evaluates bone mineral density changes in patients withrheumatoid arthritis of recent-onset. This cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in the Rheumatology Department of a tertiary care hospital in Karachi. Data was collected from 76 patients presenting with seropositive or seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. Bone mineral density of these patients measured at lumbar spine and hip by using dual energy x-ray absorptiometrys can. Variables like age, gender, BMI, menstrual status, disease duration, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, vitamin D level, clinical disease activity index and seropositivity for rheumatoid arthritis were measured along with outcome variables. A total of 104 patients fulfilling inclusion criteria were registered with 28 excluded from study. A mong the remaining 76 patients, 68 (89.50%) were female, with mean age of patients (with low bone mineral density) as 50.95 ± 7.87 years. Nineteen (25%) patients had low bone mineral density, 68.52% had low BMD at spine while 10.52% at hip and 21.05% at spine and hip both. Low bone mineral density was found higher in patients with seronegative 7 (50%) as compared to seropositive patients 12 (19.4%) (p-value 0.017), whereas low bone mineral d ensity was found higher 12 (70.6%) among post-menopausal women. Low BMD was found in 25% of patients at earlier stage of the rheumatoid arthritis with seropositivity, age and menopausal status as significant risk factors.

  6. Intensive combination treatment regimens, including prednisolone, are effective in treating patients with early rheumatoid arthritis regardless of additional etanercept: 1-year results of the COBRA-light open-label, randomised, non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    ter Wee, Marieke M; den Uyl, Debby; Boers, Maarten; Kerstens, Pit; Nurmohamed, Mike; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Lems, Willem F

    2015-06-01

    Recently, we documented the likely non-inferiority of Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoïde Artritis (COBRA)-light therapy (methotrexate increased to 25 mg/week with initial prednisolone 30 mg/day) compared with the original COBRA therapy (methotrexate 7.5 mg/week, sulfasalazine 2 g/day, with initial prednisolone 60 mg/day) after 26 weeks in patients with early active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To assess the non-inferiority of COBRA-light versus COBRA after 1 year in terms of disease activity (DAS44), functional outcome (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)) and radiographic progression (Sharp/van der Heijde score (SHS)), and to assess the effect of adding etanercept. An open-label, randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial of 162 patients with active early RA, following a treat-to-target protocol incorporating the addition of etanercept if DAS44 ≥1.6 at weeks 26 or 39. Both groups showed major improvements in DAS44 after 52 weeks: mean (SD) -2.41 (1.2) in the COBRA and -2.02 (1.0) in the COBRA-light group (p=ns). In both groups, functional ability improved and radiological progression of joints was minimal. At least one adverse event was reported in 96% of the patients in both groups. In total, 25 serious adverse events occurred: 9 vs 16 in COBRA and COBRA-light, respectively. Treatment actually instituted was often less intensive than required by the protocol: of the total population, 108 patients (67%) required etanercept (more in the COBRA-light group), but only 67 of these (62%) actually received it. Intensive COBRA or COBRA-light therapy has major, comparably favourable effects on disease activity, functional ability and radiological outcome after 1 year in patients with early RA. Protocolised addition of etanercept was often not implemented by treating rheumatologists, and patients receiving it appeared to have limited added benefit, probably because of low disease activity levels at its initiation. ISRCTN55552928. Published by the BMJ

  7. Improvement in work place and household productivity for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab plus methotrexate: work outcomes and their correlations with clinical and radiographic measures from a randomized controlled trial companion study.

    PubMed

    van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Cifaldi, Mary A; Ray, Saurabh; Chen, Naijun; Weisman, Michael H

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate household and work place outcomes for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who were homemakers or employed workers, respectively, and who were treated with adalimumab plus methotrexate versus methotrexate monotherapy. We also determined baseline predictors of household and work place outcomes. Data were from a health economic companion study to PREMIER, a 2-year, randomized controlled trial of methotrexate-naive patients with early RA (<3 years) who received treatment with adalimumab plus methotrexate, adalimumab, or methotrexate. Absenteeism (number of days missed or unfit to work), presenteeism (self-judgment of the effects of RA on job or household performance), and employment status were collected from self-reports at baseline and varying time points during the study. Household and work place outcomes were generally similar for homemakers and employed workers. Over 2 years, patients who received combination therapy missed approximately half as many days as patients who received methotrexate (17.4 versus 36.9 days for employed workers; 7.9 versus 18.6 days for homemakers). Presenteeism was lower (reflecting better productivity) for combination therapy than methotrexate monotherapy. The likelihood of gaining/retaining employment over 2 years was greater for combination therapy than methotrexate monotherapy (odds ratio 1.530, 95% confidence interval 1.038-2.255; P = 0.0318). Baseline radiographic progression was an independent predictor for retaining/gaining employment at 2 years. Compared with methotrexate monotherapy, combination therapy was associated with more positive work outcomes: less absenteeism, less presenteeism, and greater likelihood of gaining/retaining employment. Radiographic progression at baseline was predictive of the ability to retain or gain employment.

  8. [Significance of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase assay in early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Liu, J; Zhu, L; Zhang, X W; Li, Z G

    2016-12-18

    To explore the titer of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) for early diagnosis of the outpatient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in real life, and to analyze its relationship with disease activity. In the study, 1 051 patients with arthritis were collected in the group who had joints tender and swelling, and 90 cases of healthy people as a control group. ELISA method was used to detect the serum level of GPI, and according to clinical features and laboratory test, all the patients including 525 RA patients, the other patients including osteoarthritis (OA), 134 cases of seronegative spine joint disease (SpA), 104 cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 31 cases of primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS), 24 cases of gout arthritis (GA), 22 cases of other connective tissue diseases (including polymyalgia rheumatica, dermatomyositis, systemic sclerosis, adult Still disease) and 46 cases of other diseases (including 165 cases of osteoporosis, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, traumatic osteomyelitis, bone and joint disease, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, tumor). The diagnostic values of GPI were assessed, and the differences between the GPI positive and negative groups of the RA patients in clinical characteristics, disease activity, severity and inflammatory index analyzed. The positive rate of serum GPI in the patients with RA was 55.4%, contrasting to other autoimmune diseases (14.3%) and healthy controls (7.78%)(P<0.001). Compared with the OA and SpA patients, the RA group was increased more significantly, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.001). The diagnostic value of GPI alone for RA was 0.39 mg/L, the sensitivity was 54.2%, and specificity was 87.3%. The positive rate of GPI in RF negative patients was 36.1%; the positive rate of GPI in anti-CCP antibody negative patients was 34.2%; the positive rate of GPI in RF and anti-CCP antibody negative patients was 24.1%. The level of GPI had positive correlation (P<0.05) with ESR, RF, anti

  9. Induction therapy with adalimumab plus methotrexate for 24 weeks followed by methotrexate monotherapy up to week 48 versus methotrexate therapy alone for DMARD-naive patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: HIT HARD, an investigator-initiated study.

    PubMed

    Detert, Jacqueline; Bastian, Hans; Listing, Joachim; Weiß, Anja; Wassenberg, Siegfried; Liebhaber, Anke; Rockwitz, Karin; Alten, Rieke; Krüger, Klaus; Rau, Rolf; Simon, Christina; Gremmelsbacher, Eva; Braun, Tanja; Marsmann, Bettina; Höhne-Zimmer, Vera; Egerer, Karl; Buttgereit, Frank; Burmester, Gerd-R

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the long-term effects of induction therapy with adalimumab (ADA) plus methotrexate (MTX) in comparison with placebo (PBO) plus MTX in DMARD-naïve patients with active early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with active early RA (disease duration of ≤12 months) were randomly assigned to receive 40 mg ADA subcutaneously every other week (eow) plus MTX 15 mg/week subcutaneously or PBO plus MTX subcutaneously at 15 mg/week over 24 weeks. Thereafter, all patients received MTX monotherapy up to week 48. The primary outcome was the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) at week 48. Secondary outcomes included proportions of patients in remission (DAS28<2.6), ACR responses, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score and radiographic progression. 87 patients were assigned to ADA/MTX and 85 patients to PBO/MTX. At baseline, DAS28 was 6.2±0.8 in the ADA/MTX and 6.3±0.9 in the PBO/MTX groups. At week 24, treatment with ADA/MTX compared with PBO/MTX resulted in a greater reduction in DAS28 (3.0±1.2 vs 3.6±1.4; p=0.009) and other secondary outcomes such as DAS28 remission rate (47.9% vs 29.5%; p=0.021) and HAQ (0.49±0.6 vs 0.72±0.6; p=0.0014). At week 48, the difference in clinical outcomes between groups was not statistically significant (DAS28: 3.2±1.4 vs 3.4±1.6; p=0.41). Radiographic progression at week 48 was significantly greater in patients administered PBO/MTX (Sharp/van der Heijde score: ADA/MTX 2.6 vs PBO/MTX 6.4; p=0.03, Ratingen score: 1.7 vs 4.2; p=0.01). A greater reduction in radiographic progression after initial combination therapy with ADA and MTX was seen at week 48, even after discontinuation of ADA treatment at week 24. This sustained effect was not found at the primary endpoint (DAS28 reduction).

  10. Reduction in Serum Uric Acid May Be Related to Methotrexate Efficacy in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Data from the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason J.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; Dresser, George K.; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Thorne, Carter; Tin, Diane; Jamal, Shahin; Keystone, Edward C.; Pope, Janet E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The mechanism of action of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex. It may increase adenosine levels by blocking its conversion to uric acid (UA). This study was done to determine if methotrexate lowers UA in early RA (ERA). METHODS Data were obtained from Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort, an incident ERA cohort. All ERA patients with serial UA measurements were included, comparing those with methotrexate use vs. no methotrexate exposure (controls). Analyses were exploratory. Patients with concomitant gout or taking UA-lowering therapies were excluded. RESULTS In total, 49 of the 2,524 ERA patients were identified with data available for both pre-methotrexate UA levels and post-methotrexate UA levels (300 µmol/L and 273 µmol/L, respectively; P = 0.035). The control group not taking methotrexate had a mean baseline UA level of 280 µmol/L and a follow-up level of 282 µmol/L (P = 0.448); mean change in UA with methotrexate was −26.8 µmol/L vs. 2.3 µmol/L in the no methotrexate group (P = 0.042). Methotrexate users with a decrease in UA had a disease activity score of 2.37 for 28 joints when compared with the controls (3.26) at 18 months (P = 0.042). Methotrexate users with decreased UA had a lower swollen joint count (SJC) of 0.9 at 18 months, whereas methotrexate users without lowering of UA had an SJC of 4.5 (P = 0.035). Other analyses were not significant. CONCLUSIONS Methotrexate response is associated with lowering of serum UA in ERA compared to nonusers. This may be due to changes in adenosine levels. Methotrexate response is associated with lower UA and fewer swollen joints compared to nonresponders. PMID:27081318

  11. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract. Rheumatoid arthritis happens when the body’s own defense system doesn’t work properly. It affects joints ... conditions. These include: Lupus happens when the body’s defense system harms the joints, heart, skin, kidneys, and ...

  12. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Walking ability as a measure of treatment effect in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, J; Brydson, G; Fraser, S; Grant, M

    2001-04-01

    To assess the clinical usefulness of a prototype walkmat system in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-four subjects with early RA and symptomatic forefoot disease requiring therapy with second-line drugs were recruited. Each subject underwent clinical assessment together with gait analysis on the contact sensitive walkmat system and Kistler forceplate before and after six months of treatment with second-line drugs. Two subjects were lost to follow-up. There was the expected improvement in disease activity in response to therapy. Significant differences were also demonstrated in defined gait parameters that indicated improved weight-bearing and enhanced forefoot propulsion. Medical therapy improved walking ability in patients with RA and the walkmat system provided a useful adjunct to existing outcome measures in the assessment of lower limb function.

  14. The effect of rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibodies on the incidence of cardiovascular events in a large inception cohort of early inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barra, Lillian J; Pope, Janet E; Hitchon, Carol; Boire, Gilles; Schieir, Orit; Lin, Daming; Thorne, Carter J; Tin, Diane; Keystone, Edward C; Haraoui, Boulos; Jamal, Shahin; Bykerk, Vivian P

    2017-05-01

    . RA is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events (CVEs). The objective was to estimate independent effects of RA autoantibodies on the incident CVEs in patients with early RA. Patients were enrolled in the Canadian Early Inflammatory Arthritis Cohort, a prospective multicentre inception cohort. Incident CVEs, including acute coronary syndromes and cerebrovascular events, were self-reported by the patient and partially validated by medical chart review. Seropositive status was defined as either RF or ACPA positive. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards survival analysis was used to estimate the effects of seropositive status on incident CVEs, controlling for RA clinical variables and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. . A total of 2626 patients were included: the mean symptom duration at diagnosis was 6.3 months ( s . d . 4.6), the mean age was 53 years ( s . d . 15), 72% were female and 86% met classification criteria for RA. Forty-six incident CVEs occurred over 6483 person-years [incidence rate 7.1/1000 person-years (95% confidence interval 5.3, 9.4)]. The CVE rate did not differ in seropositive vs seronegative subjects and seropositivity was not associated with incident CVEs in multivariable Cox regression models. Baseline covariates independently associated with incident CVEs were older age, a history of hypertension and a longer duration of RA symptoms prior to diagnosis. The rate of CVEs early in the course of inflammatory arthritis was low; however, delays in the diagnosis of arthritis increased the rate of CVEs. Hypertension was the strongest independent risk factor for CVEs. Results support early aggressive management of RA disease activity and co-morbidities to prevent severe complications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Adverse effects of methotrexate in three psoriatic arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Hideki; Watarai, Akira; Nakano, Toshiaki; Katayama, Chieko; Nishiyama, Hiromi; Katsuoka, Kensei

    2014-04-01

    Methotrexate, a folic acid analogue with anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effects, is commonly used to treat patients with severe destructive psoriatic arthritis and has considerable efficacy. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and MTX therapy result in less treatment discontinuation due to adverse events. Despite its efficacy, MTX may result in adverse effects including hepatic, pulmonary, and renal toxicity as well as lymphoproliferative disorders and predisposition to infection. We herein report rare adverse effects of MTX treatment, specifically asymptomatic pulmonary tuberculosis, renal cell carcinoma, and lateral uveitis, in three psoriatic arthritis patients treated with MTX. MTX is an important drug for the treatment for psoriatic arthritis patient, but an awareness of the possible adverse effects is needed.

  16. Proteomic analysis of secreted proteins in early rheumatoid arthritis: anti‐citrulline autoreactivity is associated with up regulation of proinflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Hueber, Wolfgang; Tomooka, Beren H; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Kidd, Brian A; Drijfhout, Jan W; Fries, James F; van Venrooij, Walther J; Metzger, Allan L; Genovese, Mark C; Robinson, William H

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To identify peripheral blood autoantibody and cytokine profiles that characterise clinically relevant subgroups of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis using arthritis antigen microarrays and a multiplex cytokine assay. Methods Serum samples from 56 patients with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis of <6 months' duration were tested. Cytokine profiles were also determined in samples from patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (n = 21), and from healthy individuals (n = 19). Data were analysed using Kruskal–Wallis test with Dunn's adjustment for multiple comparisons, linear correlation tests, significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) and hierarchical clustering software. Results Distinct antibody profiles were associated with subgroups of patients who exhibited high serum levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)1β, IL6, IL13, IL15 and granulocyte macrophage colony‐stimulating factor. Significantly increased autoantibody reactivity against citrullinated epitopes was observed in patients within the cytokine “high” subgroup. Increased levels of TNFα, IL1α, IL12p40 and IL13, and the chemokines eotaxin/CCL11, monocyte chemoattractant protein‐1 and interferon‐inducible protein 10, were present in early rheumatoid arthritis as compared with controls (p<0.001). Chemokines showed some of the most impressive differences. Only IL8/CXCL8 concentrations were higher in patients with PsA/ankylosing spondylitis (p = 0.02). Conclusions Increased blood levels of proinflammatory cytokines are associated with autoantibody targeting of citrullinated antigens and surrogate markers of disease activity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. Proteomic analysis of serum autoantibodies, cytokines and chemokines enables stratification of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis into molecular subgroups. PMID:16901957

  17. Discordant inflammation and pain in early and established rheumatoid arthritis: Latent Class Analysis of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network and British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register data.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Daniel F; Ferguson, Eamonn; Young, Adam; Kiely, Patrick D W; Walsh, David A

    2016-12-13

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity is often measured using the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28). We aimed to identify and independently verify subgroups of people with RA that may be discordant with respect to self-reported and objective disease state, with potentially different clinical needs. Data were derived from three cohorts: (1) the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network (ERAN) and the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register (BSRBR), (2) those commencing tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors and (3) those using non-biologic drugs. In latent class analysis, we used variables related to pain, central pain mechanisms or inflammation (pain, vitality, mental health, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, swollen joint count, tender joint count, visual analogue scale of general health). Clinically relevant outcomes were examined. Five, four and four latent classes were found in the ERAN, BSRBR TNF inhibitor and non-biologic cohorts, respectively. The proportions of people assigned with >80% probability into latent classes were 76%, 58% and 72% in the ERAN, TNF inhibitor and non-biologic cohorts, respectively. The latent classes displayed either concordance between measures indicative of mild, moderate or severe disease activity; discordantly worse patient-reported measures despite less markedly elevated inflammation; or discordantly less severe patient-reported measures despite elevated inflammation. Latent classes with discordantly worse patient-reported measures represented 12%, 40% and 21% of the ERAN, TNF inhibitor and non-biologic cohorts, respectively; contained more females; and showed worse function. In those latent classes with worse scores at baseline, DAS28 and function improved over 1 year (p < 0.001 for all comparisons), and scores differed less at follow-up than at baseline. Discordant latent classes can be identified in people with RA, and these findings are robust across three cohorts with varying disease duration and

  18. The impact of arthritis on the early employment experiences of young adults: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Jetha, Arif

    2015-07-01

    Young adulthood is an important transitional life phase that can determine a person's career trajectory. To date, little research has examined the influence of arthritis on early work experiences. This literature review aims at examining the impact of arthritis on the early career phase of young adults and identifying the barriers to employment. Two independent reviewers searched bibliographic databases for arthritis conditions and a series of employment-related keywords and subject headings. Information on authors, publication year; study design, sample characteristics (e.g., number of participants, age, gender, arthritis type); work outcomes measured; and specific barriers to employment was recorded. Nine studies were uncovered in the review. All studies examined young people with juvenile arthritis (9 of 9 studies) and consisted of sample sizes with less then 150 participants (6 of 9 studies) who were primarily recruited from clinics (7 of 9 studies). All were cross-sectional designs. Employment status was primarily examined and ranged from 11% to 71%. Although not always statistically significant, young adults with arthritis were less likely to be employed when compared to their healthy peers. Greater disease severity, less educational attainment and being female were related to not participating in paid work. This review brings to light the paucity of studies examining the early employment experiences of young adults with arthritis. There is a need to expand research to contribute to recommendations for sustained and productive employment across the working life course. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spleen and liver enlargement in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, María Eugenia; Ceccato, Federico; Paira, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with a seropositive, erosive, and non-nodular rheumatoid arthritis of 15 year of evolution. The patient had poor compliance with medical visits and treatment. She came to the clinic with persistent pancytopenia and spleen and liver enlargement. Liver and bone marrow biopsies were carried out and amyloidosis, neoplasias and infections were ruled out. We discuss the differential diagnosis of pancytopenia and spleen and liver enlargement in a long-standing rheumatoid arthritis patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Gender differences in Latin-American patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barragán-Martínez, Carolina; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Pineda-Tamayo, Ricardo; Mantilla, Rubén D; Castellanos-de la Hoz, Juan; Bernal-Macías, Santiago; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-12-01

    Data on the effect of gender in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in non-Caucasian populations is scarce. Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) is a large population with unique characteristics, including high admixture. Our aim was to examine the effect of gender in patients with RA in LAC. This was a 2-phase study. First we conducted a cross-sectional and analytical study in which 1128 consecutive Colombian patients with RA were assessed. Second, a systematic review of the literature was done to evaluate the effect of gender in LAC patients with RA. Our results show a high prevalence of RA in LAC women with a ratio of 5.2 women per man. Colombian women with RA are more at risk of having an early age at onset and developing polyautoimmunity and abdominal obesity, and they perform more household duties than their male counterparts. However, male gender was associated with the presence of extra-articular manifestations. Of a total of 641 potentially relevant articles, 38 were considered for final analysis, in which several factors and outcomes related to gender were identified. RA in LAC women is not only more common but presents with some clinical characteristics that differ from RA presentation in men. Some of those characteristics could explain the high rates of disability and worse prognosis observed in women with RA in LAC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Brief Report: Predicting Functional Disability: One-Year Results From the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Inception Cohort.

    PubMed

    Kronisch, Caroline; McLernon, David J; Dale, James; Paterson, Caron; Ralston, Stuart H; Reid, David M; Tierney, Ann; Harvie, John; McKay, Neil; Wilson, Hilary E; Munro, Robin; Saunders, Sarah; Richmond, Ruth; Baxter, Derek; McMahon, Mike; Kumar, Vinod; McLaren, John; Siebert, Stefan; McInnes, Iain B; Porter, Duncan; Macfarlane, Gary J; Basu, Neil

    2016-07-01

    To identify baseline prognostic indicators of disability at 1 year within a contemporary early inflammatory arthritis inception cohort and then develop a clinically useful tool to support early patient education and decision-making. The Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (SERA) inception cohort is a multicenter, prospective study of patients with newly presenting RA or undifferentiated arthritis. SERA data were analyzed to determine baseline predictors of disability (defined as a Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ] score of ≥1) at 1 year. Clinical and psychosocial baseline exposures were entered into a forward stepwise logistic regression model. The model was externally validated using newly accrued SERA data and subsequently converted into a prediction tool. Of the 578 participants (64.5% female), 36.7% (n = 212) reported functional disability at 1 year. Functional disability was independently predicted by baseline disability (odds ratio [OR] 2.67 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.98, 3.59]), depression (OR 2.52 [95% CI 1.18, 5.37]), anxiety (OR 2.37 [95% CI 1.33, 4.21]), being in paid employment with absenteeism during the last week (OR 1.19 [95% CI 0.63, 2.23]), not being in paid employment (OR 2.36 [95% CI 1.38, 4.03]), and being overweight (OR 1.61 [95% CI 1.04, 2.50]). External validation (using 113 newly acquired patients) evidenced good discriminative performance with a C statistic of 0.74, and the calibration slope showed no evidence of model overfit (P = 0.31). In the context of modern early inflammatory arthritis treatment paradigms, predictors of disability at 1 year appear to be dominated by psychosocial rather than more traditional clinical measures. This indicates the potential benefit of early access to nonpharmacologic interventions targeting key psychosocial factors, such as mental health and work disability. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  3. Serum soluble CD30 in early arthritis: a sign of inflammation but not a predictor of outcome.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, E; Matinlauri, I; Kautiainen, H; Luosujärvi, R; Kaipiainen-Seppänen, O

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate serum soluble CD30 levels (sCD30) in an early arthritis series and assess their ability to predict the outcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and undifferentiated arthritis (UA) at one year follow-up. Serum sCD30 levels were measured by ELISA from 92 adult patients with RA and UA at baseline and from 60 adult controls. The patients were followed up for one year in the Kuopio 2000 Arthritis Survey. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine cut off points of sCD30 in RA and UA that select the inflammatory disease from controls. Sensitivity, specificity and positive likelihood ratio, and their 95 % CIs were calculated for sCD30 levels in RA and UA. Median serum sCD30 levels were higher in RA 25.1 (IQ range 16.3-38.6) IU/ml (p<0.001) and in UA 23.4 (15.4-35.6) IU/ml (p<0.001) than in controls 15.1 (10.7-20.8) IU/ml. No differences were recorded between RA and UA (p=0.840). Serum sCD30 levels at baseline did not predict remission at one year follow-up. Serum sCD30 levels were higher in RA and UA than in controls at baseline but they did not predict remission at one year follow-up in this series.

  4. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Arterial Hypertension and Its Correlation with Inflammatory Activity in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bajraktari, Ismet H; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Berisha, Idriz; Lahu, Ali; Kryeziu, Avni; Durmishi, Bastri; Bajraktari, Halit; Bahtiri, Elton

    2017-08-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease that worsens during the course of the disease and can cause disability. Early RA refers to the onset of symptoms within the past 3 months. In RA, increased levels of mediators of inflammation may cause arterial stiffness consequently leading to arterial hypertension. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of asymptomatic arterial hypertension in early RA patients as well as the correlation with parameters of inflammation. One hundred and seventy-nine early RA patients diagnosed in agreement with ACR/EULAR (American College of Rheumatology/ European League against Rheumatism) 2010 criteria were consecutively included in the study. CRP (C-reactive protein) and anti CCP (Antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides) serum levels, WBC (white blood cells) count and ESR (Erythrocyte sedimentation rate), likewise DAS-28 (28-joint disease activity score) were determined in all included patients. Parametric tests were used to compare the characteristics of the groups and to test the correlation of the variables. Statistical data analysis revealed that a majority of the patients were females (n = 141; 78.7%); the mean age at RA onset was 49.13 ± 12.13 years. Overall prevalence of hypertension was 44.13 % (n = 79). In comparison with the normotensive patients, the hypertensive patients were older and had significantly higher values of CRP, ESR, anti-CCP and DAS-28. A highly significant positive correlation between all the study parameters and systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed. Presence of significantly higher values of CRP, ESR, anti-CCP and DAS-28 in hypertensive patients indicate that inflammation is associated with an increased risk of hypertension. In this context, early screening for arterial hypertension and adequate therapeutic measures should be considered in early RA patients.

  5. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Arterial Hypertension and Its Correlation with Inflammatory Activity in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bajraktari, Ismet H.; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Berisha, Idriz; Lahu, Ali; Kryeziu, Avni; Durmishi, Bastri; Bajraktari, Halit; Bahtiri, Elton

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease that worsens during the course of the disease and can cause disability. Early RA refers to the onset of symptoms within the past 3 months. In RA, increased levels of mediators of inflammation may cause arterial stiffness consequently leading to arterial hypertension. AIM: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of asymptomatic arterial hypertension in early RA patients as well as the correlation with parameters of inflammation. METHODS: One hundred and seventy-nine early RA patients diagnosed in agreement with ACR/EULAR (American College of Rheumatology/ European League against Rheumatism) 2010 criteria were consecutively included in the study. CRP (C-reactive protein) and anti CCP (Antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides) serum levels, WBC (white blood cells) count and ESR (Erythrocyte sedimentation rate), likewise DAS-28 (28-joint disease activity score) were determined in all included patients. Parametric tests were used to compare the characteristics of the groups and to test the correlation of the variables. RESULTS: Statistical data analysis revealed that a majority of the patients were females (n = 141; 78.7%); the mean age at RA onset was 49.13 ± 12.13 years. Overall prevalence of hypertension was 44.13 % (n = 79). In comparison with the normotensive patients, the hypertensive patients were older and had significantly higher values of CRP, ESR, anti-CCP and DAS-28. A highly significant positive correlation between all the study parameters and systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed. CONCLUSION: Presence of significantly higher values of CRP, ESR, anti-CCP and DAS-28 in hypertensive patients indicate that inflammation is associated with an increased risk of hypertension. In this context, early screening for arterial hypertension and adequate therapeutic measures should be considered in early RA patients. PMID:28932306

  6. The Relationship between Personality, Supportive Transactions and Support Satisfaction, and Mental Health of Patients with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis. Results from the Dutch Part of the Euridiss Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suurmeijer, Th. P. B. M.; Van Sonderen, F. L. P.; Krol, B.; Doeglas, D. M.; Van Den Heuvel, W. J. A.; Sanderman, R.

    2005-01-01

    The relationships between two personality characteristics (neuroticism, extraversion), three types of supportive transactions (emotional support, social companionship, instrumental support) and satisfaction with these transactions, and two aspects of mental health (feelings of anxiety and depressive mood) were studied among 280 patients with early…

  7. [Subclinical sensorineural hearing loss in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Treviño-González, José Luis; Villegas-González, Mario Jesús; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo Enrique; Montero-Cantu, Carlos Alberto; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernán; Garza-Elizondo, Mario Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The rheumatoid arthritis is a clinical entity capable to cause hearing impairment that can be diagnosed promptly with high frequencies audiometry. To detect subclinical sensorineural hearing loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Cross-sectional study on patients with rheumatoid arthritis performing high frequency audiometry 125Hz to 16,000Hz and tympanometry. The results were correlated with markers of disease activity and response to therapy. High frequency audiometry was performed in 117 female patients aged from 19 to 65 years. Sensorineural hearing loss was observed at a sensitivity of pure tones from 125 to 8,000 Hz in 43.59%, a tone threshold of 10,000 to 16,000Hz in 94.02% patients in the right ear and in 95.73% in the left ear. Hearing was normal in 8 (6.84%) patients. Hearing loss was observed in 109 (93.16%), and was asymmetric in 36 (30.77%), symmetric in 73 (62.37%), bilateral in 107 (91.45%), unilateral in 2 (1.71%), and no conduction and/or mixed hearing loss was encountered. Eight (6.83%) patients presented vertigo, 24 (20.51%) tinnitus. Tympanogram type A presented in 88.90% in the right ear and 91.46% in the left ear, with 5.98 to 10.25% type As. Stapedius reflex was present in 75.3 to 85.2%. Speech discrimination in the left ear was significantly different (p = 0.02)in the group older than 50 years. No association was found regarding markers of disease activity, but there was an association with the onset of rheumatoid arthritis disease. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had a high prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss for high and very high frequencies. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Successful leukocytapheresis therapy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Keisuke; Torigoe, Masataka; Iwakura, Mikako; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Ishii, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old female undergoing maintenance hemodialysis in whom early-phase rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was successfully treated by leukocytapheresis (LCAP). The effects of prednisone, tacrolimus, and etanercept were limited, but LCAP was highly effective and its efficacy continued even after cessation of LCAP. Moreover, remission was maintained for 2 years after discontinuation of medication. LCAP may be an important treatment option for RA patients with end-stage renal failure who are on hemodialysis.

  9. Insufficiency fractures of the distal tibia misdiagnosed as cellulitis in three patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Straaton, K.V.; Lopez-Mendez, A.; Alarcon, G.S.

    We describe 3 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who presented with diffuse pain, swelling, and erythema of the distal aspect of the lower extremity, suggestive of either cellulitis or thrombophlebitis, but were found to have insufficiency fractures of the distal tibia. The value of technetium-99m diphosphonate bone scintigraphy in the early recognition of these fractures and a possible explanation for the associated inflammatory symptoms are discussed.

  10. Arthritis secondary to meningococcal disease: A case series of 7 patients.

    PubMed

    Masson-Behar, Vanina; Jacquier, Hervé; Richette, Pascal; Ziza, Jean-Marc; Zeller, Valérie; Rioux, Christophe; Coustet, Baptiste; Dieudé, Philippe; Ottaviani, Sébastien

    2017-07-01

    Arthritis secondary to invasive meningococcemia is rare and has been described as a direct result of bacteremia or as immunoallergic-type arthritis, related to the immune complex. Only a few case series have been reported.This multicenter study aimed to describe the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of arthritis secondary to meningococcal infection.We performed a 5-year retrospective study. We included all patients with inflammatory joint symptoms and proven meningococcal disease defined by the identification of Neisseria meningitidis in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or synovial fluid. Septic arthritis was defined by the identification of N meningitidis in joint fluid. Immune-mediated arthritis was considered to be arthritis occurring after at least 1 day of invasive meningococcal disease without positive joint fluid culture.A total of 7 patients (5 males) with joint symptoms and meningococcal disease were identified. The clinical presentation was mainly oligoarticular and the knee was the most frequent joint site. Five patients had septic arthritis and 4 had immune-mediated arthritis; 2 had septic arthritis followed by immune-mediated arthritis. Immune-mediated arthritis occurred 3 to 7 days after meningococcal meningitis, and treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) led to improvement without complications.Physicians must be vigilant to the different clinical presentations in patients with arthritis associated with invasive meningococcal disease. If immune-mediated arthritis is suspected, NSAIDs are usually efficient.

  11. Predictors of work disability after start of anti-TNF therapy in a national cohort of Swedish patients with rheumatoid arthritis: does early anti-TNF therapy bring patients back to work?

    PubMed

    Olofsson, T; Petersson, I F; Eriksson, J K; Englund, M; Nilsson, J A; Geborek, P; Jacobsson, L T H; Askling, J; Neovius, M

    2017-07-01

    To examine predictors of work ability gain and loss after anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) start, respectively, in working-age patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with a special focus on disease duration. Patients with RA, aged 19-62 years, starting their first TNF inhibitor 2006-2009 with full work ability (0 sick leave/disability pension days during 3 months before bio-start; n=1048) or no work ability (90 days; n=753) were identified in the Swedish biologics register (Anti-Rheumatic Treatment In Sweden, ARTIS) and sick leave/disability pension days retrieved from the Social Insurance Agency. Outcome was defined as work ability gain ≥50% for patients without work ability at bio-start and work ability loss ≥50% for patients with full work ability, and survival analyses conducted. Baseline predictors including disease duration, age, sex, education level, employment, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Disease Activity Score 28 and relevant comorbidities were estimated using Cox regression. During 3 years after anti-TNF start, the probability of regaining work ability for totally work-disabled patients was 35% for those with disease duration <5 years and 14% for disease duration ≥5 years (adjusted HR 2.1 (95% CI 1.4 to 3.2)). For patients with full work ability at bio-start, disease duration did not predict work ability loss. Baseline disability pension was also a strong predictor of work ability gain after treatment start. A substantial proportion of work-disabled patients with RA who start anti-TNF therapy regain work ability. Those initiating treatment within 5 years of symptom onset have a more than doubled 3-year probability of regaining work ability compared with later treatment starts. This effect seems largely due to the impact of disease duration on disability pension status. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Septic arthritis in haemodialysis patients: a seven-year multi-centre review.

    PubMed

    Al-Nammari, S S; Gulati, V; Patel, R; Bejjanki, N; Wright, M

    2008-04-01

    To determine relevant demographics, clinical features, and outcomes for septic arthritis in patients on haemodialysis for end-stage renal failure. A multi-centre retrospective review was performed from 1999 to 2005. 15 cases were identified. The mean age of the patients at diagnosis was 67 (range, 23-89) years and 11 were male. All had multiple co-morbidities and additional risk factors for sepsis. The primary sources of sepsis were dialysis access-related (n=12), unknown in 2, and unrelated soft tissue infection in one. All patients presented with acute monoarticular symptoms; the knee joint was affected in 11 patients. The white cell count, neutrophil count, and C-reactive protein concentration were elevated in 10, 10, and 15 patients, respectively. All patients had positive synovial fluid cultures and blood cultures were positive in 14. Organisms isolated were all skin commensals, being staphylococcal in 13 and streptococcal in 2. Six patients had concomitant rheumatological disease (gout in 4, pseudogout in one, and rheumatoid arthritis in one). Two had urate crystals in the synovial fluid (noted by microscopy). All patients underwent antimicrobial therapy for a mean of 36 days, together with joint washouts and debridement. 12 patients were cured of infection; 2 developed chronic sepsis secondary to localised osteomyelitis; and one died of sepsis. Septic arthritis is a potentially devastating condition. Early and aggressive joint lavage and debridement combined with appropriate antimicrobial therapy is imperative. A high index of suspicion is necessary in haemodialysis patients; the diagnosis of septic arthritis must be presumed until proven otherwise.

  13. Application of a prediction model for the progression of rheumatoid arthritis in patients with undifferentiated arthritis.

    PubMed

    Arana-Guajardo, Ana; Pérez-Barbosa, Lorena; Vega-Morales, David; Riega-Torres, Janett; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge; Garza-Elizondo, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Different prediction rules have been applied to patients with undifferentiated arthritis (UA) to identify those that progress to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The Leiden Prediction Rule (LPR) has proven useful in different UA cohorts. To apply the LPR to a cohort of patients with UA of northeastern Mexico. We included 47 patients with UA, LPR was applied at baseline. They were evaluated and then classified after one year of follow-up into two groups: those who progressed to RA (according to ACR 1987) and those who did not. 43% of the AI patients developed RA. In the RA group, 56% of patients obtained a score ≤ 6 and only 15% ≥ 8. 70% who did not progress to RA had a score between 6 and ≤ 8. There was no difference in median score of LPR between groups, p=0.940. Most patients who progressed to RA scored less than 6 points in the LPR. Unlike what was observed in other cohorts, the model in our population did not allow us to predict the progression of the disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Outcome of total ankle arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and noninflammatory arthritis. A multicenter cohort study comparing clinical outcome and safety.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Elizabeth; Pinsker, Ellie; Younger, Alastair S E; Penner, Murray J; Wing, Kevin J; Dryden, Peter J; Glazebrook, Mark; Daniels, Timothy R

    2014-11-05

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis often have degeneration of the ankle and ipsilateral hindfoot joints. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing total ankle arthroplasty have a higher risk of wound breakdown and infection. We compared intermediate-term clinical outcomes after total ankle arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and patients with noninflammatory arthritis. Fifty patients with rheumatoid arthritis were compared with fifty patients with noninflammatory arthritis (the control group), matched for age within ten years, prosthesis type, and follow-up time. All patients underwent total ankle arthroplasty. Revisions and major complications were noted. Outcome scores included the Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale (AOS) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey. The groups were similar with respect to body mass index and length of follow-up (mean, 63.8 months for the rheumatoid arthritis group and 65.6 months for noninflammatory arthritis group); the rheumatoid arthritis group was younger (mean, 58.5 years compared with 61.2 years). The mean AOS pain scores were significantly different in the rheumatoid arthritis and noninflammatory arthritis groups preoperatively (p < 0.01), but were similar following total ankle arthroplasty (mean and standard deviation, 18.5 ± 17.8 for the rheumatoid arthritis group and 19.7 ± 16.5 for the noninflammatory arthritis group; p = 0.93). Both groups showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) with regard to the AOS scores for pain and disability and SF-36 physical component summary scores following surgery. Postoperatively, AOS disability and SF-36 physical component summary scores were better for patients with noninflammatory arthritis. There were seven revisions in the rheumatoid arthritis group and five in noninflammatory arthritis group. There was one major wound complication in the rheumatoid arthritis cohort and none in the control cohort. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis benefit from total ankle arthroplasty and

  15. Peer-to-peer mentoring for individuals with early inflammatory arthritis: feasibility pilot.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Sharron; Veinot, Paula; Embuldeniya, Gayathri; Brooks, Sydney; Sale, Joanna; Huang, Sicong; Zhao, Alex; Richards, Dawn; Bell, Mary J

    2013-03-01

    To examine the feasibility and potential benefits of early peer support to improve the health and quality of life of individuals with early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Feasibility study using the 2008 Medical Research Council framework as a theoretical basis. A literature review, environmental scan, and interviews with patients, families and healthcare providers guided the development of peer mentor training sessions and a peer-to-peer mentoring programme. Peer mentors were trained and paired with a mentee to receive (face-to-face or telephone) support over 12 weeks. Two academic teaching hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Nine pairs consisting of one peer mentor and one mentee were matched based on factors such as age and work status. Mentee outcomes of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)/biological treatment use, self-efficacy, self-management, health-related quality of life, anxiety, coping efficacy, social support and disease activity were measured using validated tools. Descriptive statistics and effect sizes were calculated to determine clinically important (>0.3) changes. Peer mentor self-efficacy was assessed using a self-efficacy scale. Interviews conducted with participants examined acceptability and feasibility of procedures and outcome measures, as well as perspectives on the value of peer support for individuals with EIA. Themes were identified through constant comparison. Mentees experienced improvements in the overall arthritis impact on life, coping efficacy and social support (effect size >0.3). Mentees also perceived emotional, informational, appraisal and instrumental support. Mentors also reported benefits and learnt from mentees' fortitude and self-management skills. The training was well received by mentors. Their self-efficacy increased significantly after training completion. Participants' experience of peer support was informed by the unique relationship with their peer. All participants were unequivocal about the need for

  16. Fatigue and sleep quality in rheumatoid arthritis patients during hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Szady, Paulina; Bączyk, Grażyna; Kozłowska, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease of connective tissue characterised by chronic course with periods of exacerbation and remission. Even in the early stages of the disease patients report the occurrence of fatigue and sleep disorders. Reduced sleep quality and chronic fatigue are common among patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of the research was to evaluate the severity of fatigue and sleep quality assessment among patients hospitalised with rheumatoid arthritis and to determine the relation between the level of symptoms of fatigue and sleep quality and variables such as: age, gender, disease duration, marital status, applied pharmacological treatment, and pain intensity. The study involved 38 patients (12 men and 26 women) hospitalised in the Rheumatologic Ward of the Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital of the University of Medical Sciences. The average age of the entire group was 56.26 years. Fatigue was evaluated with use of Polish version of Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F), while in order to evaluate sleep quality within the examined group of patients the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the analysed group have lower sleep quality, and within subjects with such a diagnosis the fatigue is present. The relation was found between fatigue and such variables as: age, illness duration, marital status, applied pharmacological treatment, and severity of pain. Sleep quality within patients with RA is correlated by such variables as: age, gender, applied pharmaceutical treatment, and severity of pain. It was identified that patients with lower sleep quality experience increased levels of fatigue. There is a need to clarify which factors determine the level of fatigue and sleep quality in patients suffering from RA in future population-based research and to indicate to doctors, nurses, psychologists, and physiotherapists the significance and importance of

  17. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Ayla; Gözüm, Sebahat

    2010-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with arthritis, the types of complementary and alternative medicine used, pertinent socio-demographic factors associated with complementary and alternative medicine use and its perceived efficacy. Arthritis is a major health issue, and the use of complementary and alternative medicine among patients with arthritis is common. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from 250 patients with arthritis at the physiotherapy and immunology clinics Atatürk University Hospital in eastern Turkey between May-July 2005 using a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The instrument included questions on socio-demographic information, disease specifics and complementary and alternative medicine usage. Seventy-six per cent of participants reported use of at least one form of complementary and alternative medicine in the previous year. Complementary and alternative medicine users and non-users were not significantly different in most socio-demographic characteristics including age, gender, marital status and education level with the exception of economic status. We categorised treatment into six complementary and alternative medicine categories: 62.6% of patients used thermal therapies; 41.5% used oral herbal therapies; 40.5% used hot therapies; 32.6% used externally applied (skin) therapies; 28.4% used massage and 12.6% used cold therapies. All forms of complementary and alternative medicine except thermal and oral herbal therapies were perceived as very effective by more than half of study participants. Complementary and alternative medicine therapy is widely used by patients with arthritis and has perceived beneficial effects. It is important for nurses and other health care professionals to be knowledgeable about the use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies when providing care to patients with arthritis because of

  18. Evaluation of clinical and cytogenetic parameters in rheumatoid arthritis patients for effective diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chandirasekar, R; Kumar, B Lakshman; Jayakumar, R; Uthayakumar, V; Jacob, Raichel; Sasikala, K

    2015-01-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the commonest inflammatory joint disease, affecting nearly 1% of the adult population worldwide. Early and accurate diagnosis and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have become increasingly important. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the relationships between hematological, biochemical, immunological and cytogenetic parameters in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy normal controls. The study group comprised of 126 RA patients and equal number of healthy normal control subjects. The blood was collected and analyzed for biochemical, immunological, enzymatic and cytogenetic parameters. Results of the present study indicated that 20% of RA patient's hematological, 31% of biochemical and 70% immunological parameters had a significant difference from the controls and reference range. The RF and anti-CCP antibody levels were also positive in 70% of RA patients. A significant increase in minor chromosomal abnormalities was also observed in patients as compared to controls. The knowledge about autoimmune diseases is very low among the South Indian population. The present study has thus helped in understanding the RA disease in a better way based on a pattern of various clinical markers of the disease condition which might help in planning therapeutic intervention strategies and create awareness about the disease management among RA patients of the population studied. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Baseline patient reported outcomes are more consistent predictors of long-term functional disability than laboratory, imaging or joint count data in patients with early inflammatory arthritis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gwinnutt, James M; Sharp, Charlotte A; Symmons, Deborah P M; Lunt, Mark; Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2018-03-15

    To assess baseline predictors of long-term functional disability in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA). We conducted a systematic review of the literature from 1990 to 2017 using MEDLINE and EMBASE. Studies were included if (i) they were prospective observational studies, (ii) all patients had IA with symptom duration ≤2 years at baseline, (iii) follow-up was at least 5 years, and (iv) baseline predictors of HAQ score at long-term follow-up (i.e., ≥5 years following baseline) were assessed. Information on the included studies and estimates of the association between baseline variables and long-term HAQ scores were extracted from the full manuscripts. Of 1037 abstracts identified by the search strategy, 37 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were included in the review. Older age at baseline and female gender were reported to be associated with higher long-term HAQ scores in the majority of studies assessing these relationships, as were higher baseline HAQ and greater pain scores (total patients included in analyses reporting significant associations/total number of patients analysed: age 9.8k/10.7k (91.6%); gender 9.9k/11.3k (87.4%); HAQ 4.0k/4.0k (99.0%); pain 2.8k/2.9k (93.6%)). Tender joint count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and DAS28 were also reported to predict long-term HAQ score; other disease activity measures were less consistent (tender joints 2.1k/2.5k (84.5%); erythrocyte sedimentation rate 1.6k/2.2k (72.3%); DAS28 888/1.1k (79.2%); swollen joints 684/2.6k (26.6%); C-reactive protein 279/510 (54.7%)). Rheumatoid factor (RF) and erosions were not useful predictors (RF 546/4.6k (11.9%); erosions 191/2.7k (7.0%)), whereas the results for anti-citrullinated protein antibody positivity were equivocal (ACPA 2.0k/3.8k (52.9%)). Baseline age, gender, HAQ and pain scores are associated with long-term disability and knowledge of these may aid the assessment of prognosis. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  20. Podiatry services for patients with arthritis: an unmet need.

    PubMed

    Rome, Keith; Chapman, Jonathan; Williams, Anita E; Gow, Peter; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2010-03-05

    Foot problems are extremely common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is ample evidence that foot pain, either alone or as a comorbidity, contributes significantly to disability. Despite the high prevalence of foot disease in RA, this problem is often trivialised or underappreciated. The inequity in foot health provision for patients with rheumatic disorders in New Zealand has recently been highlighted. Expertise in dealing with foot problems is often limited among healthcare professionals, and it has been argued that better integration of podiatric services into rheumatology services would be beneficial. The aim of this paper is to highlight the major issues related to foot care for patients with arthritis and provide key recommendations that should implemented to improve access to podiatric services in New Zealand.

  1. Contemporary treatment principles for early rheumatoid arthritis: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Patrick D W; Brown, Andrew K; Edwards, Christopher J; O'Reilly, David T; Ostör, Andrew J K; Quinn, Mark; Taggart, Allister; Taylor, Peter C; Wakefield, Richard J; Conaghan, Philip G

    2009-07-01

    RA has a substantial impact on both patients and healthcare systems. Our objective is to advance the understanding of modern management principles in light of recent evidence concerning the condition's diagnosis and treatment. A group of practicing UK rheumatologists formulated contemporary management principles and clinical practice recommendations concerning both diagnosis and treatment. Areas of clinical uncertainty were documented, leading to research recommendations. A fundamental concept governing treatment of RA is minimization of cumulative inflammation, referred to as the inflammation-time area under the curve (AUC). To achieve this, four core principles of management were identified: (i) detect and refer patients early, even if the diagnosis is uncertain: patients should be referred at the first suspicion of persistent inflammatory polyarthritis and rheumatology departments should provide rapid access to a diagnostic and prognostic service; (ii) treat RA immediately: optimizing outcomes with conventional DMARDs and biologics requires that effective treatment be started early-ideally within 3 months of symptom onset; (iii) tight control of inflammation in RA improves outcome: frequent assessments and an objective protocol should be used to make treatment changes that maintain low-disease activity/remission at an agreed target; (iv) consider the risk-benefit ratio and tailor treatment to each patient: differing patient, disease and drug characteristics require long-term monitoring of risks and benefits with adaptations of treatments to suit individual circumstances. These principles focus on effective control of the inflammatory process in RA, but optimal uptake may require changes in service provision to accommodate appropriate care pathways.

  2. Early detection of rheumatoid arthritis in rats and humans with 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy: imaging synovial neoangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangcheng; Zhao, Zhenfang; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xuemei; Li, Xiao-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To validate 99mTc-labeled arginylglycylaspartic acid (99mTc-3PRGD2) scintigraphy as a means to image synovial neoangiogenesis in joints afflicted by rheumatoid arthritis and to investigate its potential in the early detection and management of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis were generated in Sprague Dawley rats by type II collagen immunization and papain injection, respectively. Rats were imaged with 99mTc-3PRGD2 and 99mTc- methyl diphosphonate (99mTc MDP). X-ray images were also obtained and assessed by a radiologist. Immunohistochemistry of αvβ3 and CD31confirmed the onset of synovial neoangiogenesis. The effect of bevacizumab on rheumatoid arthritis was followed with 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy. A patient with rheumatoid arthritis and a healthy volunteer were scanned with 99mTc-3PRGD2. Results: Two weeks after immunization, a significant increase in 99mTc-3PRGD2 was observed in the joints of the rheumatoid arthritis model though uptake in osteoarthritis model and untreated controls was low. 99mTc-MDP whole body scans failed to distinguish early rheumatoid arthritis joints from healthy controls. The expression of αvβ3 and CD31was significantly higher in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis rats compared to normal controls. In serial 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy studies, 99mTc-3PRGD2 uptake increased in parallel with disease progression. Bevacizumab anti-angiogenetic therapy both improved the symptoms of the rheumatoid arthritis rats and significantly decreased 99mTc-3PRGD2 uptake. Significantly higher 99mTc-3PRGD2 accumulation was also observed in rheumatoid arthritis joints in the patient. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy could detect early rheumatoid arthritis by imaging the associated synovial neoangiogenesis, and may be useful in disease management. PMID:27992368

  3. Allergic manifestations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Asa Reckner; Wingren, Gun; Skogh, Thomas; Svernell, Olle; Ernerudh, Jan

    2003-10-01

    A functional dichotomy between Th1- and Th2-type immune responses has been suggested. This study was performed to investigate whether rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease with indications of Th1-deviated immune activation, is inversly related to atopic conditions which are Th2-mediated. Two hundred and sixty-three adult cases of RA, fulfilling the American Rheumatism Association (ARA) 1987 Revised Classification Criteria for RA, were identified in 1995 and compared with 541 randomly selected population referents. The presence of atopic manifestations was established through a postal questionnaire and by demonstrating circulating IgE antibodies to common allergens. RA was inversely associated with certain manifestations of rhinitis, which were regarded as the most reliable indicators of atopic disease in the present study. However, no negative association was seen between RA and asthma and eczema, respectively. The main results give some support for an inverse relationship between RA and rhinitis. The prevalence of circulating IgE antibodies was however similar in cases and controls, suggesting that the T-cell commitment mainly occurs in the affected organs.

  4. Differences in bone structure between rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis patients relative to autoantibody positivity.

    PubMed

    Kocijan, Roland; Finzel, Stephanie; Englbrecht, Matthias; Engelke, Klaus; Rech, Juergen; Schett, Georg

    2014-11-01

    To investigate whether trabecular and cortical bone structure differ between patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). So far, no study has performed a detailed comparative analysis of bone structure in patients with RA and PsA. 110 patients (60 RA, 50 PsA) received high-resolution peripheral quantitative CT of the distal radius. Demographic and disease-specific parameters including anti-rheumatic treatment, bone erosion status and previous fractures were recorded. RA and PsA patients were comparable in age, gender, body mass index, disease duration, disease activity, functional status, antirheumatic treatment and bone erosion status. No significant differences were found for volumetric bone mineral density (BMD), including total BMD (300±77 vs 316±62 mgHA/cm(3)), trabecular BMD (152±46 vs 165±40 mgHA/cm(3)) and cortical BMD (787±113 vs 818±76 mgHA/cm(3)) when comparing RA patients to PsA patients, respectively. However, in contrast to seronegative RA, seropositive RA showed significantly reduced trabecular BMD (p=0.007), bone volume per tissue volume (p=0.007) and trabecular number (p=0.044), as well as a strong trend towards higher trabecular inhomogeneity compared to PsA patients. In the regression analysis, higher age, female gender and presence of autoantibodies were independently associated with trabecular bone loss. Seropositive RA exhibits more profound changes in trabecular bone architecture than seronegative RA or PsA. The data support the concept that seropositive RA is a disease entity that is distinct from seronegative RA and PsA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Update on the Treatment of Uveitis in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Asproudis, Ioannis; Katsanos, Andreas; Kozeis, Nikolaos; Tantou, Alexandra; Konstas, Anastasios G

    2017-12-01

    Chronic uveitis is a common extra-articular manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The classic clinical picture is one of chronic anterior uveitis, which usually remains asymptomatic until ocular complications arise. The risk of uveitis is increased in girls with an early onset of oligoarthritis and positive antinuclear antibodies. Even though the inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis is initially limited in the anterior part of the eye, chronic active inflammation may eventually cause significant damage to the posterior pole. Complications may include band keratopathy, cataract, secondary glaucoma, posterior synechiae, cystoid macular edema, and hypotony. The cooperation of ophthalmologists with rheumatologists may help define the best treatment plan. The ophthalmic therapeutic regimen includes topical corticosteroids and mydriatics, while in severe cases immunosuppressive and biological agents are introduced. Surgical management of complications might be needed.

  6. 14-3-3η Autoantibodies: Diagnostic Use in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Boire, Gilles; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Wichuk, Stephanie; Turk, Samina; Boers, Maarten; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Bykerk, Vivian; Keystone, Ed; Tak, Paul Peter; van Kuijk, Arno W; Landewé, Robert; van der Heijde, Desiree; Murphy, Mairead; Marotta, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    To describe the expression and diagnostic use of 14-3-3η autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 14-3-3η autoantibody levels were measured using an electrochemiluminescent multiplexed assay in 500 subjects (114 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-naive patients with early RA, 135 with established RA, 55 healthy, 70 autoimmune, and 126 other non-RA arthropathy controls). 14-3-3η protein levels were determined in an earlier analysis. Two-tailed Student t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests compared differences among groups. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves were generated and diagnostic performance was estimated by area under the curve (AUC), as well as specificity, sensitivity, and likelihood ratios (LR) for optimal cutoffs. Median serum 14-3-3η autoantibody concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in patients with early RA (525 U/ml) when compared with healthy controls (235 U/ml), disease controls (274 U/ml), autoimmune disease controls (274 U/ml), patients with osteoarthritis (259 U/ml), and all controls (265 U/ml). ROC curve analysis comparing early RA with healthy controls demonstrated a significant (p < 0.0001) AUC of 0.90 (95% CI 0.85-0.95). At an optimal cutoff of ≥ 380 U/ml, the ROC curve yielded a sensitivity of 73%, a specificity of 91%, and a positive LR of 8.0. Adding 14-3-3η autoantibodies to 14-3-3η protein positivity enhanced the identification of patients with early RA from 59% to 90%; addition of 14-3-3η autoantibodies to anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) and/or rheumatoid factor (RF) increased identification from 72% to 92%. Seventy-two percent of RF- and ACPA-seronegative patients were positive for 14-3-3η autoantibodies. 14-3-3η autoantibodies, alone and in combination with the 14-3-3η protein, RF, and/or ACPA identified most patients with early RA.

  7. Aggressive treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis: recognizing the window of opportunity and treating to target goals.

    PubMed

    Resman-Targoff, Beth H; Cicero, Marco P

    2010-11-01

    Evidence supports the use of aggressive therapy for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Clinical outcomes in patients with early RA can improve with a treat-to-target approach that sets the goal at disease remission. The current selection of antirheumatic therapies, including conventional and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), has made disease remission a realistic target for patients with early RA. The challenge is selecting the optimal antirheumatic drug or combination of drugs for initial and subsequent therapy to balance the clinical benefits, risks, and economic considerations. In some cases, the use of biologic agents as part of the treatment regimen has shown superior results compared with conventional DMARDs alone in halting the progression of disease, especially in reducing radiographic damage. However, the use of biologic agents as initial therapy is challenged by cost-effectiveness analyses, which favor the use of conventional DMARDs. The use of biologic agents may be justified in certain patients with poor prognostic factors or those who experience an inadequate response to conventional DMARDs as a means to slow or halt disease progression and its associated disability. In these cases, the higher cost of treatment with biologic agents may be offset by decreased societal costs, such as lost work productivity, and increased health-related quality of life. Further research is needed to understand optimal strategies for balancing costs, benefits, and risks of antirheumatic drugs. Some key questions are (1) when biologic agents are appropriate for initial therapy, and (2) when to conclude that response to conventional DMARDs is inadequate and biologic agents should be initiated.

  8. Patient-centred care in established rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Voshaar, M J H; Nota, I; van de Laar, M A F J; van den Bemt, B J F

    2015-01-01

    Review of the evidence on patient-centred care (PCC) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) shows that involving the patient as an individual - with unique needs, concerns and preferences - has a relevant impact on treatment outcomes (safety, effectiveness and costs). This approach empowers patients to take personal responsibility for their treatment. Because clinicians are only able to interact personally with their patients just a few hours per year, patients with a chronic condition such as RA should be actively involved in the management of their disease. To stimulate this active role, five different PCC activities can be distinguished: (1) patient education, (2) patient involvement/shared decision-making, (3) patient empowerment/self-management, (4) involvement of family and friends and (5) physical and emotional support. This article reviews the existing knowledge on these five PCC activities in the context of established RA management, especially focused on opportunities to increase medication adherence in established RA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical and MRI outcome of cervical spine lesions in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated with anti-TNFα drugs early in disease course.

    PubMed

    Ključevšek, Damjana; Emeršič, Nina; Toplak, Nataša; Avčin, Tadej

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome of cervical spine arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), who received anti-TNFα early in the course of cervical spine arthritis. Medical charts and imaging of JIA patients with cervical spine involvement were reviewed in this retrospective study. Data, including age at disease onset, JIA type, disease activity, treatment and clinical outcome were collected. Initial and followup MRI examinations of cervical spine were performed according to the hospital protocol to evaluate the presence of inflammation and potential chronic/late changes. Fifteen JIA patients with MRI proved cervical spine inflammation (11 girls, 4 boys, median age 6.3y) were included in the study: 9 had polyarthritis, 3 extended oligoarthritis, 2 persistent oligoarthritis and 1 juvenile psoriatic arthritis. All children were initially treated with high-dose steroids and methotrexate. In addition, 11 patients were treated with anti-TNFα drug within 3 months, and 3 patients within 7 months of cervical spine involvement confirmed by MRI. Mean observation time was 2.9y, mean duration of anti-TNFα treatment was 2.2y. Last MRI showed no active inflammation in 12/15 children, allowing to stop biological treatment in 3 patients, and in 3/15 significant reduction of inflammation. Mild chronic changes were found on MRI in 3 children. Early treatment with anti-TNFα drugs resulted in significantly reduced inflammation or complete remission of cervical spine arthritis proved by MRI, and prevented the development of serious chronic/late changes. Repeated MRI examinations are suggested in the follow-up of JIA patients with cervical spine arthritis.

  10. A tumor endoprosthesis is useful in elderly rheumatoid arthritis patient with acute intercondylar fracture of the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Naito, Yohei; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Nakamura, Tomoki; Sudo, Akihiro

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the use of total knee arthroplasty using a tumor prosthesis in the treatment of elderly patients with an intercondylar fracture of the distal femur. Supracondylar fractures of the femur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are difficult to treat due to joint deformity. We present outcomes for treating intercondylar fractures of the distal femur in rheumatoid arthritis patient using a tumor endoprosthesis. This technique allows early mobilization of the patient, with restoration of a good range of knee motion. A tumor prosthesis appears to be a viable treatment option for intercondylar femoral fractures in elderly patients. It is well tolerated and permits early ambulation and return to activities of daily living.

  11. Ratio of Circulating IFNγ + “Th17 Cells” in Memory Th Cells Is Inversely Correlated with the Titer of Anti-CCP Antibodies in Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Based on Flow Cytometry Methods of the Human Immunology Project

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with chronic joint inflammation characterized by activated T cells. IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. However, it remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we validated the methods of the Human Immunology Project using only the cell-surface marker through measuring the actual expression of IL-17 and IFNγ. We also evaluated the expression of CD161 in human Th17 cells. We then tried to identify Th17 cells, IL-17+Th17 cells, and IFNγ +Th17 cells in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients using the standardized method of the Human Immunology Project. Our findings validated the method and the expression of CD161. The ratio of IFNγ +Th17 cells in memory T cells was inversely correlated to the titers of anti-CCP antibodies in the early-onset RA patients. These findings suggest that Th17 cells play important roles in the early phase of RA and that anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with early phase RA, especially those with high titers of CCP antibodies. PMID:27294146

  12. Do Genetic Susceptibility Variants Associate with Disease Severity in Early Active Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian C; Rijsdijk, Frühling; Walker, Jemma; Quist, Jelmar; Spain, Sarah L; Tan, Rachael; Steer, Sophia; Okada, Yukinori; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Cope, Andrew P; Lewis, Cathryn M

    2015-07-01

    Genetic variants affect both the development and severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recent studies have expanded the number of RA susceptibility variants. We tested the hypothesis that these associated with disease severity in a clinical trial cohort of patients with early, active RA. We evaluated 524 patients with RA enrolled in the Combination Anti-Rheumatic Drugs in Early RA (CARDERA) trials. We tested validated susceptibility variants - 69 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), 15 HLA-DRB1 alleles, and amino acid polymorphisms in 6 HLA molecule positions - for their associations with progression in Larsen scoring, 28-joint Disease Activity Scores, and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores over 2 years using linear mixed-effects and latent growth curve models. HLA variants were associated with joint destruction. The *04:01 SNP (rs660895, p = 0.0003), *04:01 allele (p = 0.0002), and HLA-DRβ1 amino acids histidine at position 13 (p = 0.0005) and valine at position 11 (p = 0.0012) significantly associated with radiological progression. This association was only significant in anticitrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive patients, suggesting that while their effects were not mediated by ACPA, they only predicted joint damage in ACPA-positive RA. Non-HLA variants did not associate with radiograph damage (assessed individually and cumulatively as a weighted genetic risk score). Two SNP - rs11889341 (STAT4, p = 0.0001) and rs653178 (SH2B3-PTPN11, p = 0.0004) - associated with HAQ scores over 6-24 months. HLA susceptibility variants play an important role in determining radiological progression in early, active ACPA-positive RA. Genome-wide and HLA-wide analyses across large populations are required to better characterize the genetic architecture of radiological progression in RA.

  13. Nailfold capillaroscopy in 430 patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rajaei, Alireza; Dehghan, Pooneh; Amiri, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular changes are one of the first obvious steps in numerous inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nailfold video capillaroscopy (NFC) is an easy, reliable and safe method for evaluating peripheral microangiopathy. The objective of this study was to examine nailfold microcirculation in RA patients, assess morphological and structural changes quantitatively and qualitatively, and recognize useful changes. A total of 430 patients diagnosed with RA were examined in a period of 4 years. NFC was performed on all fingers of both hands in each patient. Different parameters indicating microvascular changes were detected and analyzed; such as microvascular architecture, capillary distribution disturbances, capillary morphology, capillary density, efferent/afferent limb ratio, subpapillary venular plexus and morphological abnormalities. The obtained results were categorized into normal pattern, nonspecific morphological abnormality and scleroderma pattern. The mean age of participants was 51.03±14.54 (19-87 years) that consisted of 359 females and 71 males. Based on the findings, angiogenesis (74.7%) was the most pathological condition observed after tortuosity (99.5%). 7.2% and 20.9% of patients were categorized into normal and scleroderma pattern group, respectively. Among morphological abnormalities, angiogenesis, isolated enlarged loop, irregular enlarged loop and architectural derangement were significantly more frequent in scleroderma than normal pattern (p<0.001). NFC may play an important role in monitoring RA disease and patients' follow-up. Therefore, in our opinion it could be considered in the course and follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. [Gold salt alveolitis in 3 patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Music, E; Tomsic, M; Logar, D

    1995-06-01

    When the characteristic symptoms for an interstitial pulmonary disease arise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a drug-induced alveolitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis. In such cases, the administration of the drug and gold salts should be stopped. The cases of three patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had been treated with gold salts for 2 months (A), 23 months (B), and 36 months (C) are presented. The total dose of sodium aureothiomalate amounted to 280 mg for patient A, 1150 mg for patient B, and 2190 mg for patient C. Clinical signs, X-rays of the lungs, pulmonary function tests, and laboratory tests were evaluated for the three patients while, for patient A BAL as well as provocation tests were additionally performed before and after therapy. In this case, the histological picture of the lungs is presented; biopsies were taken during the first BAL. The clinical complaints of all 3 patients were similar, with the alveolitis being observed as diffuse in one case and above all in the upper regions in two cases on radiology. This led to differing degrees of diffusion disorders in the lungs. In patient A, the diagnosis was made in the stage of progressive fibrotic alveolitis and was treated with D-penicillamine. All 3 patients received steroids over 3-6 months and the gold salts were stopped. Because of the long duration and doubtful differential diagnosis for patient A with either rheumatoid lung or gold salt alveolitis, a provocation test with sodium aureothiomalate was performed. All 3 patients had blood eosinophilia while, in case A, a thrombopenia was also found. A gold salt alveolitis can occur as a side effect of gold salts in addition to skin vasculitis and hematological disorders. When the gold salt administration is not stopped a fibrotic alveolitis can develop. The provocation test can be diagnostically useful to distinguish between a rheumatoid lung and gold salt alveolitis.

  15. Periodontitis in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective follow-up study in Finnish population

    PubMed Central

    Äyräväinen, Leena; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis with special emphasis on the role of antirheumatic drugs in periodontal health. Design Prospective follow-up study. Patients with early untreated RA and chronic active RA were examined at baseline and 16 months later. Controls were examined once. Settings and participants The study was conducted in Finland from September 2005 to May 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital. Overall, 124 participants were recruited for dental and medical examinations: 53 were patients with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naїve RA (ERA), 28 were patients with chronic RA (CRA) with insufficient response to conventional DMARDs. After baseline examination, patients with ERA started treatment with synthetic DMARDs and patients with CRA with biological DMARDs. Controls were 43 age-matched, gender-matched and community-matched participants. Outcome measures Degree of periodontitis (defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology). Prevalence of periodontal bacteria (analysed from plaque samples), clinical rheumatological status by Disease Activity Score, 28-joint count (DAS28), function by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and treatment response by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. Results Moderate periodontitis was present in 67.3% of patients with ERA, 64.3% of patients with CRA and 39.5% of control participants (p=0.001). Further, patients with RA had significantly more periodontal findings compared with controls, recorded with common periodontal indexes. In the re-examination, patients with RA still showed poor periodontal health in spite of treatment with DMARDs after baseline examination. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis was higher in patients with ERA with periodontal probing depth ≥4 mm compared with patients with CRA and controls. Antirheumatic medication did not seem

  16. Periodontitis in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective follow-up study in Finnish population.

    PubMed

    Äyräväinen, Leena; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-31

    To investigate the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis with special emphasis on the role of antirheumatic drugs in periodontal health. Prospective follow-up study. Patients with early untreated RA and chronic active RA were examined at baseline and 16 months later. Controls were examined once. The study was conducted in Finland from September 2005 to May 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital. Overall, 124 participants were recruited for dental and medical examinations: 53 were patients with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naїve RA (ERA), 28 were patients with chronic RA (CRA) with insufficient response to conventional DMARDs. After baseline examination, patients with ERA started treatment with synthetic DMARDs and patients with CRA with biological DMARDs. Controls were 43 age-matched, gender-matched and community-matched participants. Degree of periodontitis (defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology). Prevalence of periodontal bacteria (analysed from plaque samples), clinical rheumatological status by Disease Activity Score, 28-joint count (DAS28), function by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and treatment response by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. Moderate periodontitis was present in 67.3% of patients with ERA, 64.3% of patients with CRA and 39.5% of control participants (p=0.001). Further, patients with RA had significantly more periodontal findings compared with controls, recorded with common periodontal indexes. In the re-examination, patients with RA still showed poor periodontal health in spite of treatment with DMARDs after baseline examination. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis was higher in patients with ERA with periodontal probing depth ≥4 mm compared with patients with CRA and controls. Antirheumatic medication did not seem to affect the results. Moderate periodontitis was more frequent in

  17. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of human leukocyte proteins from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Willard, K.E.; Thorsrud, A.K.; Munthe, E.

    Human leukocyte proteins from more than 150 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, together with age- and sex-matched controls, were analyzed by use of the ISO-DALT technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, psoriatic arthritis, calcium tendinitis, post-infectious arthritis, and asymmetrical seronegative arthritis were also included as positive controls. Synthesis of several proteins, referred to by number as members of the Rheuma set, is shown to increase in the leukocyte preparations from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Several of these proteins are specific to monocytes or granulocytes; others are of unknown cellular origin, but appear to bemore » unique to rheumatoid arthritis. The Rheuma proteins appear to be indicators of disease activity, because their increased synthesis can be correlated with sedimentation rate and other clinical indices of rheumatoid disease activity.« less

  18. Peer-to-peer mentoring for individuals with early inflammatory arthritis: feasibility pilot

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Sharron; Veinot, Paula; Embuldeniya, Gayathri; Brooks, Sydney; Sale, Joanna; Huang, Sicong; Zhao, Alex; Richards, Dawn; Bell, Mary J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the feasibility and potential benefits of early peer support to improve the health and quality of life of individuals with early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Design Feasibility study using the 2008 Medical Research Council framework as a theoretical basis. A literature review, environmental scan, and interviews with patients, families and healthcare providers guided the development of peer mentor training sessions and a peer-to-peer mentoring programme. Peer mentors were trained and paired with a mentee to receive (face-to-face or telephone) support over 12 weeks. Setting Two academic teaching hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants Nine pairs consisting of one peer mentor and one mentee were matched based on factors such as age and work status. Primary outcome measure Mentee outcomes of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs)/biological treatment use, self-efficacy, self-management, health-related quality of life, anxiety, coping efficacy, social support and disease activity were measured using validated tools. Descriptive statistics and effect sizes were calculated to determine clinically important (>0.3) changes. Peer mentor self-efficacy was assessed using a self-efficacy scale. Interviews conducted with participants examined acceptability and feasibility of procedures and outcome measures, as well as perspectives on the value of peer support for individuals with EIA. Themes were identified through constant comparison. Results Mentees experienced improvements in the overall arthritis impact on life, coping efficacy and social support (effect size >0.3). Mentees also perceived emotional, informational, appraisal and instrumental support. Mentors also reported benefits and learnt from mentees’ fortitude and self-management skills. The training was well received by mentors. Their self-efficacy increased significantly after training completion. Participants’ experience of peer support was informed by the unique

  19. Is there subclinical enthesitis in early psoriatic arthritis? A clinical comparison with power doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Freeston, J E; Coates, L C; Helliwell, P S; Hensor, E M A; Wakefield, R J; Emery, P; Conaghan, P G

    2012-10-01

    Enthesitis is a recognized feature of spondylarthritides (SpA), including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Previously, ultrasound imaging has highlighted the presence of subclinical enthesitis in established SpA, but there are little data on ultrasound findings in early PsA. The aim of our study was to compare ultrasound and clinical examination (CE) for the detection of entheseal abnormalities in an early PsA cohort. Forty-two patients with new-onset PsA and 10 control subjects underwent CE of entheses for tenderness and swelling, as well as gray-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound of a standard set of entheses. Bilateral elbow lateral epicondyles, Achilles tendons, and plantar fascia were assessed by both CE and ultrasound, the latter scored using a semiquantitative (SQ) scale. Inferior patellar tendons were assessed by ultrasound alone. A GS SQ score of >1 and/or a PD score of >0 was used to describe significant ultrasound entheseal abnormality. A total of 24 (57.1%) of 42 patients in the PsA group and 0 (0%) of 10 controls had clinical evidence of at least 1 tender enthesis. In the PsA group, for sites assessed by both CE and ultrasound, 4% (7 of 177) of nontender entheses had a GS score >1 and/or a PD score >0 compared to 24% (9 of 37) of tender entheses. CE overestimated activity in 28 (13%) of 214 of entheses. All the nontender ultrasound-abnormal entheses were in the lower extremity. The prevalence of subclinical enthesitis in this early PsA cohort was low. CE may overestimate active enthesitis. The few subclinically inflamed entheses were in the lower extremity, where mechanical stress is likely to be more significant. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Infliximab treatment in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranju; Cuchacovich, Raquel; Huang, Wenqun; Espinoza, Luis R

    2002-03-01

    We describe a 60-year-old woman with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and endstage renal disease secondary to hypertensive nephrosclerosis undergoing hemodialysis. She had tried multiple antirheumatic medications; however, their usefulness was limited due to toxic side effects or lack of efficacy. She was then treated with chimeric antitumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody (infliximab), which resulted in immediate improvement in clinical and laboratory measures. After about 2 years of therapy, no side effects have been observed. This report expands the spectrum of infliximab to include RA patients with renal insufficiency.

  1. Incidence and Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors Among Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriasis, or Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Radner, Helga; Lesperance, Tamara; Accortt, Neil A; Solomon, Daniel H

    2017-10-01

    To estimate prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, or psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Patients with RA, psoriasis, or PsA were identified based on medical and pharmacy claims from the MarketScan claims databases from January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2014. Primary outcomes included age- and sex-standardized prevalence of CV risk factors during the 12 months preceding diagnosis date and incidence rates per 1,000 patient-years, with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) during followup. Prevalence for RA, psoriasis, and PsA cohorts for hypertension was 18.6% (95% CI 18.3-18.8), 16.6% (95% CI 16.3-17.0), and 19.9% (95% CI 19.4-20.4), respectively; for diabetes mellitus 6.2% (95% CI 6.1-6.4), 6.3% (95% CI 6.0-6.5), and 7.8% (95% CI 7.4-8.2); for hyperlipidemia 9.9% (95% CI 9.7-10.1), 10.4% (95% CI 10.2-10.7), and 11.6% (95% CI 11.2-12.0); and for obesity 4.4% (95% CI 4.2-4.6), 3.8% (95% CI 3.5-4.0), and 6.0% (95% CI 5.6-6.5). Incidence rates per 1,000 patient-years during followup for RA, psoriasis, and PsA cohorts, respectively, for hypertension were 74.0 (95% CI 72.5-75.5), 68.2 (95% CI 65.9-70.4), and 79.8 (95% CI 76.3-83.3); for diabetes mellitus 10.6 (95% CI 10.1-11.1), 13.0 (95% CI 12.1-13.8), and 14.7 (95% CI 13.5-16.0); for hyperlipidemia 40.3 (95% CI 39.4-41.3), 47.1 (95% CI 45.4-48.7), and 52.0 (95% CI 49.6-54.3); and for obesity 24.4 (95% CI 23.4-25.4), 26.4 (95% CI 25.0-27.8), and 32.9 (95% CI 30.6-35.2). Patients with RA, psoriasis, and PsA have high prevalence and incidence of CV risk factors, suggesting the need for risk factor monitoring of these patients. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Tailored first-line biologic therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Fabrizio; Niccoli, Laura; Nannini, Carlotta; Cassarà, Emanuele; Kaloudi, Olga; Giulio Favalli, Ennio; Becciolini, Andrea; Biggioggero, Martina; Benucci, Maurizio; Li Gobbi, Francesca; Grossi, Valentina; Infantino, Maria; Meacci, Francesca; Manfredi, Mariangela; Guiducci, Serena; Bellando-Randone, Silvia; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Foti, Rosario; Di Gangi, Marcella; Mosca, Marta; Tani, Chiara; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Goletti, Delia

    2016-04-01

    A multidisciplinary expert panel, the Italian board for the TAilored BIOlogic therapy (ITABIO), was constituted to formulate evidence-based decisional statements for the first-line tailored biologic therapy in patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Systematic review of the literature to identify English-language articles on the variables influencing the first-line biologic choice, including the efficacy and safety of the drug, the route of administration, the availability of response predictor biomarkers, the need of monotherapy, the patient socio-economic status, lifestyle, cultural level, personality, fertility and childbearing potential in women, the presence of comorbidities, the host-related risk factors for infection and latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) reactivation, the cardiovascular (CV) risk, and costs. Some variables, including the patients' preference, the indication for anti-TNF monotherapy in potential childbearing women, and the intravenous route with dose titration in obese subjects resulted valid for all the three rheumatic conditions. Further, evidence of a better cost-effectiveness profile for etanercept (ETN) and biosimilar infliximab (IFX) in RA was found. Any biologic may be employed in absence of choice driving factors in RA. Otherwise, a high infection risk or LTBI positivity drive the choice toward abatacept (ABA), tocilizumab (TCZ), or ETN. TCZ should be the first choice if monotherapy is required. High rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) titers should drive the choice toward TCZ or ABA, while in patients at high CVD risk anti-TNF choice, with preference for ETN, seems appropriate. Presence of anterior uveitis or inflammatory bowel disease drives the choice to monoclonal antibody anti-TNFs (MoAb anti-TNFs). In PsA, ustekinumab (UTK), and to a lesser extent ETN, represents the first choice in patients at high infection and TB risk. Anti-TNFs or

  3. Functional disability and health-related quality of life in South Africans with early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hodkinson, B; Musenge, E; Ally, M; Meyer, P W A; Anderson, R; Tikly, M

    2012-10-01

    The severity and predictors of functional disability and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a cohort of South Africans with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were investigated. Changes in the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) following 12 months of traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) were studied in previously DMARD-naïve adults with disease duration ≤ 2 years. The majority of the 171 patients were female (82%), Black Africans (89%) with a mean (SD) symptom duration of 11.6 (7.0) months. In the 134 patients seen at 12 months, there were significant improvements in the HAQ and all domains of the SF-36 but 92 (69%) still had substantial functional disability (HAQ > 0.5) and 89 (66%) had suboptimal mental health [SF-36 mental composite score (MCS) < 66.6]. Multivariate analysis showed that female sex (p = 0.05) and high baseline HAQ score (p < 0.01) predicted substantial functional disability at 12 months. Unemployment (p = 0.03), high baseline pain (p = 0.02), and HAQ score (p = 0.04) predicted suboptimal mental health, with a trend towards a low level of schooling being significant (p = 0.08). Early RA has a broad impact on HRQoL in indigent South Africans, with a large proportion of patients still showing substantial functional disability and suboptimal mental health despite 12 months of DMARD therapy. Further research is needed to establish the role of interventions including psychosocial support, rehabilitation programmes, and biological therapy to improve physical function and HRQoL in this population.

  4. Indium-111 leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Uno, K.; Matsui, N.; Nohira, K.

    1986-03-01

    This study evaluates the usefulness of labeled leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In 33 patients, the incidence of pain and swelling in 66 wrist joints and 66 knee joints was compared with the accumulation of (/sup 111/In)leukocytes. No accumulation of (/sup 111/In)leukocytes was seen in any of the patients' wrists (0/12) or knee joints (0/14) when both pain and swelling were absent. In contrast, 93% (25/27) of wrist joints and 80% (24/30) of knee joints with both pain and swelling were positive by (/sup 111/In)leukocyte scintigraphy. There was little correlation between the stage of the disease, as determinedmore » by radiography, and (/sup 111/In)leukocyte accumulation. This study suggests that (/sup 111/In)leukocyte imaging may be a reliable procedure for monitoring the activity of rheumatoid arthritis, especially for confirming the lack of an ongoing inflammatory response.« less

  5. Cable Television and Health Promotion: A Feasibility Study with Arthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David

    1985-01-01

    Describes a study undertaken to ascertain the extent to which arthritis patients could be targeted by arthritis-related programming over a local cable system. Some conceptual and practical issues involved in targeting chronic patient groups for health programming are discussed. (Author/CT)

  6. [Dyslipidemia and atherogenic risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Batún Garrido, José Antonio de Jesús; Olán, Francisco; Hernández Núñez, Éufrates

    2016-01-01

    Dyslipidaemia is one of the main risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have 2-3 times more cardiovascular risk, which is partly due to the pattern of lipids which increase the atherogenic index. A descriptive, cross-sectional, observational and prospective study was conducted on 82 patients, selected for their lipid profile. Variables associated with the disease and the drugs used were recorded. Atherogenic risk was calculated, with Chi square being used for categorical variables, and the Mann-Whitney test for the continuous ones. The dyslipidaemia frequency was 54.9%. The most frequent age range of dyslipidaemia was between 51 and 60 years. Patients with type i obesity had a higher frequency of dyslipidaemia. Less dyslipidaemia was found with a lower rate of disease activity. Patients with cyclic citrullinated anti-peptide antibodies and positive rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate>13mm or CRP>2mg/L had a higher frequency of dyslipidaemia. The mean Castelli atherogenic index was 4.36, the index of Kannel was 2.59, and triglycerides/HDL-c ratio was 3.83.Patients with dyslipidaemia showed a higher frequency of positive rheumatoid factor (P=.0008), and those patients who were taking hydroxychloroquine had a lower frequency of dyslipidaemia P=.03. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have a pro-atherogenic lipid profile. It is important to know this and treat it to reduce cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Dilemmas of participation in everyday life in early rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study (The Swedish TIRA Project).

    PubMed

    Sverker, Annette; Östlund, Gunnel; Thyberg, Mikael; Thyberg, Ingrid; Valtersson, Eva; Björk, Mathilda

    2015-01-01

    To explore the experiences of today's patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with respect to dilemmas of everyday life, especially regarding patterns of participation restrictions in valued life activities. A total of 48 patients, aged 20-63, three years post-RA diagnosis were interviewed using the Critical Incident Technique. Transcribed interviews were condensed into meaningful units describing actions/situations. These descriptions were linked to ICF participation codes according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) linking rules. Dilemmas in everyday life were experienced in domestic life, interpersonal interactions and relationships, community, social and civic life. Most dilemmas were experienced in domestic life, including participation restrictions in, e.g. gardening, repairing houses, shovelling snow, watering pot plants, sewing or walking the dog. Also many dilemmas were experienced related to recreation and leisure within the domain community, social and civic life. The different dilemmas were often related to each other. For instance, dilemmas related to community life were combined with dilemmas within mobility, such as lifting and carrying objects. Participation restrictions in today's RA patients are complex. Our results underline that the health care needs to be aware of the patients' own preferences and goals to support the early multi-professional interventions in clinical practice. Implications of Rehabilitation Today's rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients experience participation restrictions in activities not included in International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) core set for RA or in traditionally questionnaires with predefined activities. The health care need to be aware of the patients' own preferences and goals to meet the individual needs and optimize the rehabilitation in early RA in clinical practice.

  8. Comparison of composite measures of disease activity in an early seropositive rheumatoid arthritis cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Veena K; Yoon, Jeonglim; Khanna, Dinesh; Park, Grace S; Furst, Daniel E; Elashoff, David A; Jawaheer, Damini; Sharp, John T; Gold, Richard H; Keystone, Edward C; Paulus, Harold E

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate concordance and agreement of the original DAS44/ESR‐4 item composite disease activity status measure with nine simpler derivatives when classifying patient responses by European League of Associations for Rheumatology (EULAR) criteria, using an early rheumatoid factor positive (RF+) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patient cohort. Methods Disease‐modifying anti‐rheumatic drug‐naïve RF+ patients (n = 223; mean duration of symptoms, 6 months) were categorised as ACR none/20/50/70 responders. One‐way analysis of variance and two‐sample t tests were used to investigate the relationship between the ACR response groups and each composite measure. EULAR reached/change cut‐point scores were calculated for each composite measure. EULAR (good/moderate/none) responses for each composite measure and the degree of agreement with the DAS44/ESR‐4 item were calculated for 203 patients. Results Patients were mostly female (78%) with moderate to high disease activity. A centile‐based nomogram compared equivalent composite measure scores. Changes from baseline in the composite measures in patients with ACRnone were significantly less than those of ACR20/50/70 responders, and those for ACR50 were significantly different from those for ACR70. EULAR reached/change cut‐point scores for our cohort were similar to published cut‐points. When compared with the DAS44/ESR‐4 item, EULAR (good/moderate/none) percentage agreements were 92 with the DAS44/ESR‐3 item, 74 with the Clinical Disease Activity Index, and 80 with the DAS28/ESR‐4 item, the DAS28/CRP‐4 item and the Simplified Disease Activity Index. Conclusion The relationships of nine different RA composite measures against the DAS44/ESR‐4 item when applied to a cohort of seropositive patients with early RA are described. Each of these simplified status and response measures could be useful in assessing patients with RA, but the specific measure selected should be pre‐specified and

  9. Women's accounts of help-seeking in early rheumatoid arthritis from symptom onset to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Anne; Backman, Catherine L; Adam, Paul; Li, Linda C

    2014-12-01

    As interest in gender and health grows, the notion that women are more likely than men to consult doctors is increasingly undermined as more complex understandings of help seeking and gender emerge. While men's reluctance to seek help is associated with practices of masculinities, there has been less consideration of women's help-seeking practices. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that predominantly affects women and requires prompt treatment but considerable patient-based delays persist along the care pathway. This paper examines women's accounts of help seeking in early RA from symptom onset to diagnosis. We conducted in-depth interviews with 37 women with RA <12 months in Canada. Analysis was based on a constant comparison, thematic approach informed by narrative analysis. The women's accounts featured masculine practices associated with men's help-seeking. The women presented such behaviours as relational, e.g. rooted in family socialisation and a determination to maintain roles and 'normal' life. Our findings raise questions about how far notions of gender operate to differentiate men and women's help seeking and may indicate more similarities than differences. Recognising this has implications for policy and practice initiatives for both men and women. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Lactobacillus salivarius Isolated from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis and Increases Treg Frequency in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Juan; Zou, Qinghua; Zhong, Bing; Wang, Heng; Mou, Fangxiang; Wu, Like; Fang, Yongfei

    2016-12-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus salivarius was more abundant in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an inflammatory autoimmune disease wherein the gut microbiota is altered, than in healthy individuals. However, the effect of L. salivarius in RA is unclear. Hence, we investigated the effect of L. salivarius isolated from patients with RA on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. L. salivarius UCC118 or L. plantarum WCFS1 isolated from patients with RA was administered orally for 5 weeks, starting from 2 weeks before the induction of arthritis in DBA/1 mice. Clinical score progression, histological changes, serum cytokine concentrations, and the proportion of interleukin (IL)-17-producing T cells [T helper 17 (Th17)] and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the spleen were evaluated. Bone erosion was evaluated by micro-computed tomography. CIA mice treated with either L. salivarius or L. plantarum showed lower arthritis scores, milder synovial infiltration, and less bone erosion when compared with phosphate-buffered, saline-treated CIA mice. Administration of L. salivarius and L. plantarum reduced the Th17 cell fraction and increased the Treg fraction. L. salivarius-treated CIA mice displayed a significant increase in serum anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels. Thus, pretreatment with L. salivarius could significantly improve CIA in mice and may help alleviate RA in a clinical setting.

  11. Septic arthritis by Sphingobacterium multivorum in imunocompromised pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Maiana Darwich; Cavallo, Rafael Ruiz; Carvalhães, Cecilia Helena Vieira Franco Godoy; Ferrarini, Maria Aparecida Gadiani

    2016-09-01

    To report a case septic arthritis with a rare pathogen in a immunosuppressed child. Male patient, 6 years old, had liver transplant 5 and half years ago due to biliary atresia. Patient was using tacrolimus 1mg q.12hours. This patient started to have pain in left foot and ankle and had one episode of fever 3 days before hospital admission. Physical Examination showed weight 17kg, height 109cm, temperature 36,4°C, with pain, swelling and heat in the left ankle, without other clinical signs. Initial tests: hemoglobin 11,7g/dL hematocrit 36.4%, leukocyte count 17600/uL (7% banded neutrophils, 70% segmented neutrophils, 2% eosinophils, basophils 1%, 13% lymphocytes, 7% monocytes) C-reactive protein 170,88mg/L. Joint ultrasound showed moderate effusion in the site. Patient was submitted to surgical procedure and S. multivorum was isolated from the effusion. The germ was susceptible to broad spectrum cephalosporins (ceftriaxone and cefepime) and fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin), and it was resistant to carbapenemic antibiotics and aminoglycosides. He was treated intravenously with oxacillin for 15 days and ceftriaxone for 13 days, and orally with ciprofloxacin for 15 days, with good outcome. The Sphingobacterium multivorum is a gram negative bacillus that belongs to Flavobacteriaceae family and it is considered non-pathogenic. It has rarely been described as a cause of infections in humans, especially in hospital environment and in immunosuppressed patients. This case report is relevant for its unusual etiology and for the site affected, which may be the first case of septic arthritis described. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Shared decision making for patients living with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Deborah; El Miedany, Yasser

    Providing adequate care for people with inflammatory arthritis is an ongoing challenge. In recent years significant progress has been made in the treatment of inflammatory arthritic conditions. The availability of a wide range of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs as well as biologic therapies has not only improved treatment, but also made treatment decisions much more complex. This wider range of improved treatment options happened at the same time as a clear move towards patient-centred care and implementing shared decision making for both medical and surgical conditions. Implementing shared decision making has been reported to be associated with higher satisfaction and better adherence to therapy. Electronic shared decision making has more recently been suggested as a tool for clinical practice. The aim of this article is to look at further integrating shared decision making in standard rheumatology practice in view of the available evidence and the outcomes of a study looking at a recently developed patient shared decision guide.

  13. Factors associated with sustained remission in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Martire, María Victoria; Marino Claverie, Lucila; Duarte, Vanesa; Secco, Anastasia; Mammani, Marta

    2015-01-01

    To find out the factors that are associated with sustained remission measured by DAS28 and boolean ACR EULAR 2011 criteria at the time of diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Medical records of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in sustained remission according to DAS28 were reviewed. They were compared with patients who did not achieved values of DAS28<2.6 in any visit during the first 3 years after diagnosis. We also evaluated if patients achieved the boolean ACR/EULAR criteria. Variables analyzed: sex, age, smoking, comorbidities, rheumatoid factor, anti-CCP, ESR, CRP, erosions, HAQ, DAS28, extra-articular manifestations, time to initiation of treatment, involvement of large joints, number of tender joints, number of swollen joints, pharmacological treatment. Forty five patients that achieved sustained remission were compared with 44 controls. The variables present at diagnosis that significantly were associated with remission by DAS28 were: lower values of DAS28, HAQ, ESR, NTJ, NSJ, negative CRP, absence of erosions, male sex and absence of involvement of large joints. Only 24.71% achieved the boolean criteria. The variables associated with sustained remission by these criteria were: lower values of DAS28, HAQ, ESR, number of tender joints and number of swollen joints, negative CRP and absence of erosions. The factors associated with sustained remission were the lower baseline disease activity, the low degree of functional disability and lower joint involvement. We consider it important to recognize these factors to optimize treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Nailfold capillaroscopy in 430 patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rajaei, Alireza; Dehghan, Pooneh; Amiri, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Microvascular changes are one of the first obvious steps in numerous inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nailfold video capillaroscopy (NFC) is an easy, reliable and safe method for evaluating peripheral microangiopathy. The objective of this study was to examine nailfold microcirculation in RA patients, assess morphological and structural changes quantitatively and qualitatively, and recognize useful changes. Methods: A total of 430 patients diagnosed with RA were examined in a period of 4 years. NFC was performed on all fingers of both hands in each patient. Different parameters indicating microvascular changes were detected and analyzed; such as microvascular architecture, capillary distribution disturbances, capillary morphology, capillary density, efferent/afferent limb ratio, subpapillary venular plexus and morphological abnormalities. The obtained results were categorized into normal pattern, nonspecific morphological abnormality and scleroderma pattern. Results: The mean age of participants was 51.03±14.54 (19-87 years) that consisted of 359 females and 71 males. Based on the findings, angiogenesis (74.7%) was the most pathological condition observed after tortuosity (99.5%). 7.2% and 20.9% of patients were categorized into normal and scleroderma pattern group, respectively. Among morphological abnormalities, angiogenesis, isolated enlarged loop, irregular enlarged loop and architectural derangement were significantly more frequent in scleroderma than normal pattern (p<0.001). Conclusion: NFC may play an important role in monitoring RA disease and patients’ follow-up. Therefore, in our opinion it could be considered in the course and follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:29201317

  15. Laryngeal assessment by videolaryngostroboscopy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Puerta, José A; Cisternas, Ariel; Hernández, M Victoria; Ruiz-Esquide, Virginia; Vilaseca, Isabel; Sanmartí, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the larynx involvement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a clinical setting and correlate with the different clinical features related to more aggressive disease. Cross-sectional study including 36 consecutive patients with RA. Reflux symptoms were evaluated by the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI) and vocal cord impairment by the Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10). Laryngeal involvement was done by videolaryngostroboscopy (VLS). The mean age was 56,3 ± 14 years with a mean disease duration of 2,6 ± 3,1 years (range 0-16 years). Voice use was considered as professional users in 33%. Twenty-four (67%) out of 36 patients had abnormal findings of VLS. One patient had larynx nodules (bamboo nodules). Eleven patients (31%) were diagnosed with muscle tension dysphonia, and there were symptoms and signs of pharyngeal-laryngeal reflux in 23 (64%) patients. No signs of cricoarytenoid joint impairment was found. Organic larynx involvement was uncommon in patients with RA. However symptoms and signs of pharyngeal-laryngeal reflux were seen in around 60% of patients. There was no correlation between the clinical phenotype, severity of disease, immunological profile or treatment with VLS findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Feelings of guilt and shame in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ten Klooster, Peter M; Christenhusz, Lieke C A; Taal, Erik; Eggelmeijer, Frank; van Woerkom, Jan-Maarten; Rasker, Johannes J

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to determine whether patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience more general feelings of guilt and shame than their peers without RA and to examine possible correlates of guilt and shame in RA. In a cross-sectional survey study, 85 out-patients with RA (77 % female; median disease duration, 11 years) and 59 peer controls completed the Experience of Shame Scale (ESS) and the Test of Self-Conscious Affect (TOSCA). Patients additionally completed measures of health status, self-efficacy, cognitive emotion regulation, and numerical rating scales for life satisfaction and happiness. Patients and peer controls were well matched for sociodemographic characteristics. No significant differences between patients and controls were found for guilt or different types of shame as measured with the TOSCA or ESS. In multivariate analyses, female patients reported more feelings of bodily shame and higher guilt proneness, while younger patients reported more character and bodily shame. Worse social functioning and more self-blaming coping strategies were the strongest independent correlates of shame. Shame proneness was only independently associated with more self-blame, whereas guilt proneness was only associated with female sex. None of the physical aspects of the disease, including pain and physical functioning, correlated with feelings of guilt and shame. Patients with longstanding RA do not experience more general feelings of shame or guilt than their peers without RA. Shame and guilt in RA is primarily associated with demographic and psychosocial characteristics and not with physical severity of the disease.

  17. Gonococcal arthritis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sena Corrales, Gabriel; Mora Navas, Laura; Palacios Muñoz, Rosario; García López, Victoria; Márquez Solero, Manuel; Santos González, Jesús

    We report a case of gonococcal arthritis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and review 17 previously published cases; only one patient presented urethritis, and blood cultures were positive in one case. Gonococcal arthritis is rare in HIV-infected patients and is not usually associated with other symptoms. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute arthritis in patients with HIV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  18. Early and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis: distinct molecular signatures identified by gene-expression profiling in synovia

    PubMed Central

    Lequerré, Thierry; Bansard, Carine; Vittecoq, Olivier; Derambure, Céline; Hiron, Martine; Daveau, Maryvonne; Tron, François; Ayral, Xavier; Biga, Norman; Auquit-Auckbur, Isabelle; Chiocchia, Gilles; Le Loët, Xavier; Salier, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a heterogeneous disease and its underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Because previous microarray studies have only focused on long-standing (LS) RA compared to osteoarthritis, we aimed to compare the molecular profiles of early and LS RA versus control synovia. Methods Synovial biopsies were obtained by arthroscopy from 15 patients (4 early untreated RA, 4 treated LS RA and 7 controls, who had traumatic or mechanical lesions). Extracted mRNAs were used for large-scale gene-expression profiling. The different gene-expression combinations identified by comparison of profiles of early, LS RA and healthy synovia were linked to the biological processes involved in each situation. Results Three combinations of 719, 116 and 52 transcripts discriminated, respectively, early from LS RA, and early or LS RA from healthy synovia. We identified several gene clusters and distinct molecular signatures specifically expressed during early or LS RA, thereby suggesting the involvement of different pathophysiological mechanisms during the course of RA. Conclusions Early and LS RA have distinct molecular signatures with different biological processes participating at different times during the course of the disease. These results suggest that better knowledge of the main biological processes involved at a given RA stage might help to choose the most appropriate treatment. PMID:19563633

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of Triple Therapy Versus Etanercept Plus Methotrexate in Early Aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Hawre; O'Dell, James R; Bridges, S Louis; Cofield, Stacey; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Mikuls, Ted R; Moreland, Larry W; Michaud, Kaleb

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of all 4 interventions in the Treatment of Early Aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis (TEAR) clinical trial: immediate triple (IT), immediate etanercept (IE), step-up triple (ST), and step-up etanercept (SE). Step-up interventions started with methotrexate and added either etanercept or sulfasalazine plus hydroxychloroquine to patients with persistent disease activity. We built a Markov cohort model that uses individual-level data from the TEAR trial, published literature, and supplemental clinical data. Costs were in US dollars, benefits in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), perspective was societal, and the time horizon was 5 years. The immediate strategies were more efficacious than step-up strategies. SE and IE were more costly than ST and IT, primarily due to treatment cost differences. In addition, IT was the least expensive and most effective strategy when the time horizon was 1 and 2 years. When the time horizon was 5 years, IE was marginally more effective than IT (3.483 versus 3.476 QALYs), but IE was substantially more expensive than IT ($148,800 versus $52,600), producing an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $12.5 million per QALY. These results were robust to both one-way deterministic and joint probabilistic sensitivity analyses. IT was highly cost-effective in the majority of scenarios. Although IE was more effective in 5 years, a substantial reduction in the cost of biologic agents was required in order for IE to become cost-effective in early aggressive RA under willingness-to-pay thresholds that most health care settings may find acceptable. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Effective Treatment for Rapid Improvement of Both Disease Activity and Self-Reported Physical Activity in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Konijn, Nicole P C; van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Boers, Maarten; den Uyl, Debby; Ter Wee, Marieke M; Kerstens, Pit; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Nurmohamed, Michael; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Lems, Willem F

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the longitudinal relationship between disease activity and self-reported physical activity (PA) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis during the first year of treatment with combination therapy. PA was measured with the Short Questionnaire to Assess Health-Enhancing Physical Activity at baseline, 13 weeks, 26 weeks, and 52 weeks after start of treatment in the context of the Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoïde Artritis-Light trial. The reported PA classified patients as meeting or not meeting the World Health Organization (WHO) PA guideline (cutoff: 150 minutes of moderate-to-intense activity per week). Other measurements included the Disease Activity Score (DAS). Since both treatment arms showed equal treatment effect, these were analyzed as 1 group with simple before-after analyses and generalized estimating equations (GEE). In these analyses, 140 patients (86% of the trial population, 66% women, mean age 52 years) with complete data were included. At entry, 69% of the patients met the WHO PA guideline, increasing to 90% at week 13, and remaining stable at 89% after 1 year (P < 0.001). Mean DAS improved from 4.0 to 1.8 during the first year of treatment (P < 0.001). In GEE analyses, DAS decreases were significantly associated with PA increases (P = 0.008). Patients with clinically relevant responses (expressed as DAS remission, European League Against Rheumatism good response or American College of Rheumatology criteria for 70% improvement response) showed higher PA levels compared to nonresponders, regardless of the definition of response, for both the WHO and Dutch PA guideline. Early rheumatoid arthritis patients using combination therapy improved both disease activity and PA, a beneficial effect persisting for at least 1 year. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. A new podiatry service for patients with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rome, Keith; Erikson, Kathryn; Ng, Anthony; Gow, Peter J; Sahid, Hazra; Williams, Anita E

    2013-03-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the impact of a new podiatric rheumatology service on reducing foot pain, impairment and disability in patients with foot problems associated with rheumatic disease, and to report on patient satisfaction with the service. A retrospective study of 245 patients with rheumatic disease at Counties Manukau DHB was conducted. Foot pain, impairment and disability were measured using a self-reporting patient outcome measure, the Foot Function Index. A range of podiatric interventions were reported. A self-administered, postal patient satisfaction questionnaire was sent to 148 patients. Over two-thirds of patients were observed with hallux valgus (bunions). The results demonstrate a significant reduction in foot pain (p<0.001) from initial visit to second visit (18% reduction in pain). A significant decrease in foot disability (p=0.04) was found from initial visit to second visit. No significant differences were seen with foot impairment (p=0.78). A variety of intervention measures were used with 24% of patients being prescribed foot orthoses and 28% of patients given footwear advice. The patient satisfaction survey found 84% of patients reported they were satisfied with the new service and 80% of patients reported that the service helped with their foot problems. The current service meets the needs of patients who suffer from rheumatological foot conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and gout. The need for good foot education, provision of foot orthoses and advice on footwear are crucial to reduce the burden on patients with rheumatological foot conditions.

  2. Characteristic and Outcome of Psoriatic Arthritis Patients with Hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    AlJohani, Roa'A; Polachek, Ari; Ye, Justine Yang; Chandran, Vinod; Gladman, Dafna D

    2018-02-01

    To determine the characteristics of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who have hyperuricemia (HUC) and their outcomes, especially cardiovascular (CVD) and kidney diseases. Patients have been followed prospectively at the PsA clinic according to a standard protocol at 6- to 12-month intervals. We defined HUC in men > 450 µ mol/l or women > 360 µ mol/l. We matched patients with HUC based on sex and age ± 5 years with normal uric acid patients. Demographics information and disease characteristics were reviewed. Outcomes of patients with HUC, especially CVD and kidney diseases, were recorded. Conditional logistic regression was performed to determine factors independently associated with HUC in patients with PsA. There were 325 (31.9%) out of 1019 patients with PsA who had HUC. Of these, 318 cases were matched to 318 controls. There were 11 (3.4%) out of 325 patients with HUC who had gout. Patients with HUC had longer disease duration and a higher Psoriasis Area and Severity Index. They had more concurrent comorbidities, including CVD and metabolic diseases, as well as higher prevalence of kidney stones and higher creatinine. Only 1 patient with HUC was treated with allopurinol at first evaluation visit and 7 patients during followup. Over the followup, 163 of the 318 patients had persistent HUC (pHUC) for more than 2 visits. Patients with pHUC developed more myocardial infarction, heart failure, and renal impairment. Multivariate analysis showed an association between pHUC, PsA disease duration, and obesity. HUC is common in patients with PsA, especially in those with longer disease duration and obesity. Proper control of HUC and metabolic diseases may play a preventive role in improving PsA outcomes.

  3. Assessment of rheumatoid arthritis patients' adherence to treatment.

    PubMed

    Gadallah, Mohsen A; Boulos, Dina N K; Gebrel, Asmaa; Dewedar, Sahar; Morisky, Donald E

    2015-02-01

    Reports on adherence among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Egypt and the Middle East region are lacking. This study aimed to measure adherence to treatment among a sample of patients with RA at Ain Shams University Rheumatology outpatient clinic and to assess factors affecting it. A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out at the rheumatology outpatient clinic on a sample of 140 patients with RA. An interview questionnaire was used to measure adherence using the 8-item Morisky's scale, factors affecting adherence to treatment like patients satisfaction were assessed using the short form patient satisfaction questionnaire, also patients' knowledge, beliefs and rate of prescription refilling were assessed. Disease Activity Score-28 was used as an objective method to assess RA disease activity. According to Morisky's scale, 90.6% and 9.4% were classified as low and moderately adherent, respectively, none was classified as highly adherent to treatment. Important barriers to adherence reported were fear of side effects, nonavailability of free drugs in hospital pharmacy and cost of medications. Younger patients (P=0.002) and those reporting greater general satisfaction (P=0.02) were more likely to be adherent. In addition, on-time refill rates of medication (P=0.001) and disease activity (P=0.02) were associated with higher adherence scores and thus further validated the results of the adherence questionnaire. Higher adherence was associated with more positive beliefs on medication, greater satisfaction with health care and less disease activity.

  4. A Technique for the Management of Concomitant Scaphotrapezoid Arthritis in Patients With Thumb Metacarpotrapezial Arthritis: Interposition Arthroplasty With a Capitate Suture Anchor.

    PubMed

    Warganich, Tibor; Shin, Alexander Y

    2017-06-01

    Scaphotrapezoid (ST) arthritis is a common source of pain and disability that typically presents with concomitant basilar thumb arthritis. ST arthritis is often under recognized and under diagnosed as a source of continued pain after successful basilar thumb arthroplasty. Untreated, symptomatic ST arthritis can cause failure of an otherwise successfully executed thumb carpometacarpal arthroplasty due to persistent pain, which is frustrating to the patient and surgeon. Although multiple surgical treatment options have been described for basilar thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis, there is no gold standard for the treatment of ST arthritis. We describe a surgical technique with a minimal trapezoid excision and interpositional arthroplasty using an acellular allograft secured with a suture anchor in the capitate.

  5. Recommendations for optimizing methotrexate treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Alfonso E; Perkins, Elizabeth L; Jay, Randy; Efthimiou, Petros

    2017-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) remains the cornerstone therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with well-established safety and efficacy profiles and support in international guidelines. Clinical and radiologic results indicate benefits of MTX monotherapy and combination with other agents, yet patients may not receive optimal dosing, duration, or route of administration to maximize their response to this drug. This review highlights best practices for MTX use in RA patients. First, to improve the response to oral MTX, a high initial dose should be administered followed by rapid titration. Importantly, this approach does not appear to compromise safety or tolerability for patients. Treatment with oral MTX, with appropriate dose titration, then should be continued for at least 6 months (as long as the patient experiences some response to treatment within 3 months) to achieve an accurate assessment of treatment efficacy. If oral MTX treatment fails due to intolerability or inadequate response, the patient may be “rescued” by switching to subcutaneous delivery of MTX. Consideration should also be given to starting with subcutaneous MTX given its favorable bioavailability and pharmacodynamic profile over oral delivery. Either initiation of subcutaneous MTX therapy or switching from oral to subcutaneous administration improves persistence with treatment. Upon transition from oral to subcutaneous delivery, MTX dosage should be maintained, rather than increased, and titration should be performed as needed. Similarly, if another RA treatment is necessary to control the disease, the MTX dosage and route of administration should be maintained, with titration as needed. PMID:28435338

  6. [Anxiety level and its determinants in rheumatoid arthritis patients].

    PubMed

    Mojs, Ewa; Ziarko, Michał; Kaczmarek, Łukasz; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease with many somatic, psychological and social consequences. Somatic consequences are connected mainly with increasing levels of negative emotions such as depression, anxiety and a tendency to react with anger to many daily life situations. Additionally, loss of hope has been reported as another effect of rheumatoid arthritis. The goal of the study was to describe anxiety levels and its determinants in RA patients. The study was carried out on 31 RA patients, 22 (71%) of whom were females and 9 (29%) of whom were males. The respondents were assessed with a set of questionnaires such as Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC), The Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) and Eysenck's Personality Questionnaire - Revised (EPQ-R). We have found the relationship between anxiety as (1) a state and external locus of control - powerful others (tau-b = 0.23, p = 0.09), task - oriented style of coping (tau-b = -0.34, p = 0.01), emotion-oriented style of coping (tau-b = 0.33, p = 0.02) and neuroticism levels (tau-b = 0.29, p = 0.03) and (2) anxiety as a trait and external locus of control - powerful others (tau-b = 0.40, p = 0.01), task - oriented style of coping (tau-b = 0.36, p = 0.01), emotion-oriented style of coping (tau-b = 0.33, p = 0.02) and neuroticism levels (tau-b = 0.47, p = 0,01).

  7. Thrombokinetics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with D-penicillamine.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Gallus, A S; Brooks, P M; Tampi, R; Geddes, R; Hill, W

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of D-penicillamine induced thrombocytopenia in rheumatoid arthritis was investigated by measuring platelet life-span and platelet production rate in 2 groups of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with 250-750 mg/day D-penicillamine, 14 with a normal platelet count and 9 with thrombocytopenia (platelet count 50-130 X 10(9)/1). Age matched control patients not treated with D-penicillamine included 14 with rheumatoid arthritis and 9 with osteoarthritis. The platelet life-span was normal, but platelet production rate was significantly reduced in the thrombocytopenic patients, suggesting that D-penicillamine causes thrombocytopenia through bone marrow suppression. PMID:6742902

  8. Acetabular overcoverage in the horizontal plane: an underdiagnosed trigger of early hip arthritis. A CT scan study in young adults.

    PubMed

    Valera, Màrius; Ibáñez, Natalia; Sancho, Rogelio; Llauger, Jaume; Gich, Ignasi

    2018-01-01

    Acetabular overcoverage promotes hip osteoarthritis causing a pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement. Acetabular coverage in the horizontal plane is usually poorly defined in imaging studies and may be misdiagnosed. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of acetabular overcoverage measured in the frontal plane and in the horizontal plane by CT scan and to determine its relationship with other anatomic features in the onset of hip arthritis in young adults. We compared prospectively CT scans from two groups of adults of 55 years or younger: the patient group (n = 30) consisted of subjects with diagnosis of early hip arthritis (Tönnis Grade I or II) and the control group (n = 31) consisted of subjects with healthy hips. Two independent observers analyzed centre edge angle (CEA), acetabular anteversion angle (AAA), anterior sector acetabular angle (AASA), posterior sector acetabular angle (PASA), horizontal acetabular sector angle (HASA), femoral anteversion angle (FAVA), alpha angle (AA), and Mckibbin Instability Index (MI). Angles measuring the acetabular coverage on the horizontal plane (AASA, PASA and, HASA) were significantly higher in the patient group (p < 0.001, p = 0.03 and p < 0.001, respectively). Pearson's correlation coefficient showed a positive correlation between CEA and HASA in patients (r = 0.628) and in controls (r = 0.660). However, a high CEA (> 35º) was strongly associated with a high HASA (> 160º) in patients (p = 0.024) but not in controls (p = 0.21), suggesting that pincer should be simultaneously present in the horizontal and frontal plane to trigger hip degeneration. No significant association was detected between a high alpha angle (> 60º) and a high CEA (> 35º suggesting that a mixed pincer-cam aetiology was not prevalent in our series. Multivariate regression analysis showed the most significant predictors of degenerative joint disease were HASA (p = 0.008), AA (p = 0.048) and ASAA (p = 0

  9. Serum Biomarkers for Discrimination between Hepatitis C-Related Arthropathy and Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Siloşi, Isabela; Boldeanu, Lidia; Biciuşcă, Viorel; Bogdan, Maria; Avramescu, Carmen; Taisescu, Citto; Padureanu, Vlad; Boldeanu, Mihail Virgil; Dricu, Anica; Siloşi, Cristian Adrian

    2017-06-19

    In the present study, we aimed to estimate the concentrations of cytokines (interleukin 6, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, TNF-α) and auto-antibodies (rheumatoid factor IgM isotype, IgM-RF, antinuclear auto-antibodies, ANA, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies IgG isotype, IgG anti-CCP3.1, anti-cardiolipin IgG isotype, IgG anti-aCL) in serum of patients with eRA (early rheumatoid arthritis) and HCVrA (hepatitis C virus-related arthropathy) and to assess the utility of IL-6, TNF-α together with IgG anti-CCP and IgM-RF in distinguishing between patients with true eRA and HCVrA, in the idea of using them as differential immunomarkers. Serum samples were collected from 54 patients (30 diagnosed with eRA-subgroup 1 and 24 with HCVrA-subgroup 2) and from 28 healthy control persons. For the evaluation of serum concentrations of studied cytokines and auto-antibodies, we used immunoenzimatique techniques. The serum concentrations of both proinflammatory cytokines were statistically significantly higher in patients of subgroup 1 and subgroup 2, compared to the control group ( p < 0.0001). Our study showed statistically significant differences of the mean concentrations only for ANA and IgG anti-CCP between subgroup 1 and subgroup 2. We also observed that IL-6 and TNF-α better correlated with auto-antibodies in subgroup 1 than in subgroup 2. In both subgroups of patients, ROC curves indicated that IL-6 and TNF-α have a higher diagnostic utility as markers of disease. In conclusion, we can say that, due to high sensitivity for diagnostic accuracy, determination of serum concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α, possibly in combination with auto-antibodies, could be useful in the diagnosis and distinguishing between patients with true eRA and HCV patients with articular manifestation and may prove useful in the monitoring of the disease course.

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis patient perceptions on the value of predictive testing for treatments: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanta; Peters, Sarah; Barton, Anne

    2016-11-08

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a long term condition that requires early treatment to control symptoms and improve long-term outcomes. Lack of response to RA treatments is not only a waste of healthcare resources, but also causes disability and distress to patients. Identifying biomarkers predictive of treatment response offers an opportunity to improve clinical decisions about which treatment to recommend in patients and could ultimately lead to better patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the understanding of and factors affecting Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients' decisions around predictive treatment testing. A qualitative study was conducted with a purposive sample of 16 patients with RA from three major UK cities. Four focus groups explored patient perceptions of the use of biomarker tests to predict response to treatments. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis by three researchers. Data were organised within three interlinking themes: [1] Perceptions of predictive tests and patient preference of tests; [2] Utility of the test to manage expectations; [3] The influence of the disease duration on take up of predictive testing. During consultations for predictive testing, patients felt they would need, first, careful explanations detailing the consequences of untreated RA and delayed treatment response and, second, support to balance the risks of tests, which might be invasive and/or only moderately accurate, with the potential benefits of better management of symptoms. This study provides important insights into predictive testing. Besides supporting clinical decision making, the development of predictive testing in RA is largely supported by patients. Developing strategies which communicate risk information about predictive testing effectively while reducing the psychological burden associated with this information will be essential to maximise uptake.

  11. Efficacy study of multimedia rheumatoid arthritis patient education program.

    PubMed

    Unk, Julie A; Brasington, Richard

    2014-07-01

    The research goal of improving patient adherence was assessed in this randomized controlled trial of the outcomes of a 15-min multimedia educational program when compared to educational literature for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. One hundred eight RA patients from a Midwestern rheumatology outpatient clinic completed the self-reported Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ), the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ), and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) at baseline and 1 month after education. A paired samples t-test was use for data analyses to determine if there was a significant difference in the change between the groups at preintervention and 1-month postintervention. There were no significant differences in the scores between the two groups from pretest to posttest. Results from this study showed that medication adherence, illness perception, and disability were not improved by use of multimedia or the literature within 1 month. Findings from this research study showed that a short multimedia educational program is as effective as printed materials to educate patients with RA about their disease and treatment. However, neither multimedia nor literature affects medication adherence, illness perception, or disability as self-reported by patients with RA. ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  12. Use of NSAIDs in treating patients with arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, almost universally describe pain and stiffness as important contributors to reduced health-related quality of life. Of the treatment options available, NSAIDs are the most widely used agents for symptomatic treatment. NSAIDs are effective anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs by virtue of their ability to inhibit biosynthesis of prostaglandins at the level of the cyclooxygenase enzyme. However, many of the adverse effects of NSAIDs are also related to inhibition of prostaglandin production, making their use problematic in some patient populations. For the clinician, understanding the biology of prostaglandin as it relates to gastrointestinal, renal, and cardiovascular physiology and the pharmacologic properties of specific NSAIDs is key to using these drugs safely. Of particular importance is the recognition of co-morbid conditions and concomitant drugs that may increase the risk of NSAIDs in particular patients. In patients with risk factors for NSAID toxicity, using the lowest dose of a drug with a short half-life only when it is needed is likely to be the safest treatment option. For those patients whose symptoms cannot be managed with intermittent treatment, using protective strategies is essential. PMID:24267197

  13. BRONJ in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a multicenter case series.

    PubMed

    Di Fede, O; Bedogni, A; Giancola, F; Saia, G; Bettini, G; Toia, F; D'Alessandro, N; Firenze, A; Matranga, D; Fedele, S; Campisi, G

    2016-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a potentially severe adverse effect of various medications (bisphosphonates, anti-resorptive, and anti-angiogenic drugs). ONJ pathogenesis is still unclear although some risk factors have been recognized. Of these, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been hypothesized as a potential risk factor for developing ONJ. This observational study will describe a multicenter case series of patients affected with RA and ONJ, and it will attempt to evaluate the association between features of ONJ and pharmacological, systemic, and site variables. Demographic, pharmacological, and clinical data from 18 RA patients with ONJ were collected and registered from three Italian centers (i.e., Palermo, Verona, and Padua) from 2004 to 2013. Sixteen (88.9%) patients were in therapy for RA: 9 of 18 (50.0%) with systemic steroids, 3 of 18 (16.7%) with methotrexate, and 4 of 18 (22.2%) with both medications. Two patients were not receiving treatment for RA. All patients took NBPs for secondary osteoporosis (average NBP duration of 69 months, range: 20-130): Fifteen (83.3%) patients were treated with single NBPs, while three (16.7%) with different molecules; one patient was also treated with denosumab. Mandible was affected more frequently (66.7%) than maxilla (33.3%); one patient presented multiple ONJ events. This is the first multicenter case series in the international literature regarding our topic. Focusing on our data, it could be hypothesized that patients with RA may be more susceptible to ONJ than the majority of osteometabolic patients. In our opinion, it could be important to monitor also denosumab or other biological drug side effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Annual acquisition and administration cost of biologic response modifiers per patient with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Bonafede, Machaon; Joseph, George J; Princic, Nicole; Harrison, David J

    2013-09-01

    To estimate annual biologic response modifier (BRM) cost per treated patient with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and/or ankylosing spondylitis receiving etanercept, abatacept, adalimumab, certolizumab, golimumab, infliximab, rituximab, or ustekinumab. This was a cohort study of 69,349 commercially insured individuals in a nationwide claims database with one of these conditions that had a claim for one of these BRMs between January 2008 and December 2010 (the index BRM/index date). Cost per treated patient was calculated as the total BRM acquisition and administration cost to the payer in the first year after the index date (including costs of other BRMs after switching) divided by the number of patients who received the index BRM. Etanercept was selected as the reference for comparisons. Etanercept was the most commonly used index BRM (n = 32,298; 47%), followed by adalimumab (n = 20,582; 30%), infliximab (n = 11,157; 16%), abatacept (n = 2633; 4%), rituximab (n = 1359; 2%), golimumab (n = 687; <1%), ustekinumab (n = 388; <1%), and certolizumab (n = 245; <1%). Using etanercept as the reference, the cost per treated patient in the first year across all four conditions was 102% for adalimumab and 108% for infliximab. Newer BRMs had costs relative to etanercept that were 90% to 102% for rheumatoid arthritis, 132% for psoriasis, 100% for psoriatic arthritis, and 94% for ankylosing spondylitis. Potential study limitations were the lack of clinical information (e.g., disease severity, treatment outcomes) or indirect costs, the inability to compare costs of newer BRMs across all four conditions, and much smaller sample sizes for newer BRMs. Of the BRMs that are approved for indications within all four conditions studied, etanercept had the lowest cost per treated patient when assessed across all four conditions.

  15. Molecular Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher J; Feldman, Jeffrey L; Beech, Jonathan; Shields, Kathleen M; Stover, Jennifer A; Trepicchio, William L; Larsen, Glenn; Foxwell, Brian MJ; Brennan, Fionula M; Feldmann, Marc; Pittman, Debra D

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis. Currently, diagnosis of RA may take several weeks, and factors used to predict a poor prognosis are not always reliable. Gene expression in RA may consist of a unique signature. Gene expression analysis has been applied to synovial tissue to define molecularly distinct forms of RA; however, expression analysis of tissue taken from a synovial joint is invasive and clinically impractical. Recent studies have demonstrated that unique gene expression changes can be identified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with cancer, multiple sclerosis, and lupus. To identify RA disease-related genes, we performed a global gene expression analysis. RNA from PBMCs of 9 RA patients and 13 normal volunteers was analyzed on an oligonucleotide array. Compared with normal PBMCs, 330 transcripts were differentially expressed in RA. The differentially regulated genes belong to diverse functional classes and include genes involved in calcium binding, chaperones, cytokines, transcription, translation, signal transduction, extracellular matrix, integral to plasma membrane, integral to intracellular membrane, mitochondrial, ribosomal, structural, enzymes, and proteases. A k-nearest neighbor analysis identified 29 transcripts that were preferentially expressed in RA. Ten genes with increased expression in RA PBMCs compared with controls mapped to a RA susceptibility locus, 6p21.3. These results suggest that analysis of RA PBMCs at the molecular level may provide a set of candidate genes that could yield an easily accessible gene signature to aid in early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:17515956

  16. Adalimumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Keiichi; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hayami, Noriko; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Hasegawa, Eiko; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Hoshino, Junichi; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei

    2013-03-01

    To elucidate the safety of adalimumab for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with renal insufficiency, including those with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis. Sixty-five RA patients, including 2 patients undergoing hemodialysis, treated with adalimumab in our hospital from December 1, 2008 to June 30, 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Renal function was evaluated by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated from the Cockcroft-Gault formula at the start and end of followup after adalimumab treatment. The proportion of the patients who discontinued or switched adalimumab treatment and the change of the eGFR were compared between patients with (n = 39) and without (n = 26) renal insufficiency, defined as an eGFR <60 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) . There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in the proportion of the patients who discontinued or switched adalimumab treatment (51.3% versus 50.0%; P = 0.53). The mean ± SD changes of eGFR were from 41.6 ± 13.3 to 43.4 ± 17.9 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) in patients with renal insufficiency and from 83.6 ± 17.5 to 83.0 ± 16.8 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) in patients without renal insufficiency, and the differences in each group were not statistically significant (P = 0.92 and P = 0.78, respectively). No severe infections or other severe adverse events were observed in either group during adalimumab treatment. Our data indicate that adalimumab does not worsen renal function and has no serious adverse events even for RA patients with renal insufficiency, including those undergoing hemodialysis, and suggest that it could be a potential therapeutic option for them. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Trends in Joint Replacement Surgery in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Young, Bradley L; Watson, Shawna L; Perez, Jorge L; McGwin, Gerald; Singh, Jasvinder A; Ponce, Brent A

    2018-02-01

    This study analyzed trends in large total joint arthroplasties (TJA) and in the proportion of these procedures performed on patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The US Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2002-2012) was used to identify the incidences of total shoulder (TSA), elbow (TEA), knee (TKA), hip (THA), and ankle (TAA) arthroplasty and the proportion of these performed with coexisting RA. The prevalence of RA among patients with TJA increased 3.0%. The prevalence of RA among cases of TEA and TSA decreased by 50% (p < 0.0001) and 18% (p = 0.0016), respectively; a 38.0% decrease occurred in the prevalence of RA among TAA (p = 0.06); and nonsignificant increases were seen among THA and TKA. The average age difference between RA and non-RA patients undergoing TJA narrowed by 2 years (p < 0.0001). There was a greater reduction in the proportion of TSA, TEA, and TAA groups among women with RA than men with RA. In the TSA and TEA groups, there was a reduction in the proportion of whites with RA, but not blacks. The proportion of privately insured TSA and TAA patients with RA decreased, while patients with RA undergoing TSA, TEA, or TAA who were receiving Medicaid (government medical insurance) remained relatively stable over time. The prevalence of RA has decreased among TSA and TEA patients. A nonsignificant decline occurred among TAA patients. The average age of TJA patients with RA is beginning to mirror those without RA. Sex ratios for TSA, TEA, and TAA patients are following a similar pattern. These results may be evidence of the success of modern RA treatment strategies.

  18. MRI evidence of persistent joint inflammation and progressive joint damage despite clinical remission during treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Forslind, K; Svensson, B

    2016-01-01

    To determine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of bones and joints in patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated for 2 years from diagnosis with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and glucocorticoids. Thirteen patients with early RA were treated according to clinical practice and followed with MRI, radiographs, and Disease Activity Score calculated on 28 joints (DAS28) at inclusion (baseline) and after 1, 4, 7, 13, and 25 months. MRI of the dominant wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were assessed for synovitis, bone oedema, and erosions using the RA MRI Score (RAMRIS) and for tenosynovitis by an MRI tenosynovitis scoring method. Radiographs were assessed by the van der Heijde modified Sharp score (SHS). Clinical remission was defined by a DAS28 < 2.6. MRI at baseline detected inflammation in joints and tendons in all patients as well as erosions in 10 out of 13 patients. Over time, the erosion score increased while the synovitis and tenosynovitis scores remained almost unchanged. Bone oedema strongly correlated with synovitis. Synovitis and tenosynovitis correlated well with the erosion score at baseline but not thereafter. The MRI changes showed that joint damage started early and continued in the presence of persistent synovial and tenosynovial inflammation. The observations made in this small study suggest that the treatment goal of 'clinical remission' should be supplemented by a 'joint remission' goal. To this end, MRI is an appropriate tool. Further studies are needed to evaluate the optimal use of MRI in early RA.

  19. Clinical and serological characteristics of Ecuadorian patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Carlos; Maldonado, Génessis; Paredes, Carlos; Ferro, Christian; Moreno, Mario; Vera, Claudia; Vargas, Sara; Calapaqui, Wendy; Vallejo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune inflammatory disease, wherein late diagnosis and treatment leads to deformities and disability. Objective The aim of the study was to assess and describe the clinical and immunological characteristics, activity status of the disease, and functional capacity in a cohort of Ecuadorian patients with RA. Methods This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study conducted on a population of patients with prediagnosed RA from public and private Ecuadorian rheumatology clinics. This study investigated 400 patients with a mean age of 50 years, 353 (82.25%) of which were female. Results The study showed that 44.3%, 83.5%, 60.3%, 41.8%, 37.5%, and 11.5% had an acute onset of the disease, symmetrical polyarthritis, morning stiffness exceeding 1 h, dry eyes, dry mouth, and rheumatoid nodules, respectively. A total of 89.7% presented with positive rheumatoid factor, and 96.5% were anti-citrullinated protein antibody positive. Conclusion This is the largest Ecuadorian cohort of patients with RA; clinical features are similar to those of other Latin American populations. PMID:28652830

  20. Clinical and serological characteristics of Ecuadorian patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Carlos; Maldonado, Génessis; Paredes, Carlos; Ferro, Christian; Moreno, Mario; Vera, Claudia; Vargas, Sara; Calapaqui, Wendy; Vallejo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune inflammatory disease, wherein late diagnosis and treatment leads to deformities and disability. The aim of the study was to assess and describe the clinical and immunological characteristics, activity status of the disease, and functional capacity in a cohort of Ecuadorian patients with RA. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study conducted on a population of patients with prediagnosed RA from public and private Ecuadorian rheumatology clinics. This study investigated 400 patients with a mean age of 50 years, 353 (82.25%) of which were female. The study showed that 44.3%, 83.5%, 60.3%, 41.8%, 37.5%, and 11.5% had an acute onset of the disease, symmetrical polyarthritis, morning stiffness exceeding 1 h, dry eyes, dry mouth, and rheumatoid nodules, respectively. A total of 89.7% presented with positive rheumatoid factor, and 96.5% were anti-citrullinated protein antibody positive. This is the largest Ecuadorian cohort of patients with RA; clinical features are similar to those of other Latin American populations.

  1. Lower extremity arthroplasty in patients with inflammatory arthritis: preoperative and perioperative management.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Susan M; Figgie, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Spondylarthritis, which includes conditions such as ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis are the most common forms of inflammatory arthritis. Joint inflammation and damage may result in the need for arthroplasty, and the surgeon must be aware of the perioperative challenges associated with these systemic diseases. In patients with inflammatory arthritis who have polyarticular disease and spinal involvement at the time of presentation for lower extremity arthroplasty, preoperative evaluation must include careful evaluation of all joints, including the cervical spine. Preoperative assessment and perioperative management must be appropriate to minimize cardiac and pulmonary complications. Finally, the perioperative management of medications used to manage inflammatory arthritis is critical because these medications may increase the risk of infection and compromise wound healing.

  2. Could early rheumatoid arthritis resolve after periodontitis treatment only?: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Simonetta; Biondo, Michela I; Fiorentino, Chiara; Argento, Giuseppe; Paolantonio, Michele; Di Murro, Carlo; Malagnino, Vito A; Canzoni, Marco; Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; D'Amelio, Raffaele

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated polyarthritis; currently no pathogenic agent has been identified as a disease trigger. A patient with RA, presumably caused by periodontal infection, whose remission has been observed after periodontitis treatment in absence of specific RA therapy, is reported here for the first time, to our knowledge. A 61-year-old male patient presented migrant arthritis associated with antibodies against citrullinated protein antigens positivity. The clinical features allowed to make RA diagnosis according to the 2010 European League against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology RA classification criteria. X-ray of the second upper molar showed chronic apical periodontitis. After its treatment, arthritis remission has been observed in the absence of specific RA therapy. It has been suggested that periodontitis may have a trigger role in RA pathogenesis. This could be explained by the enzymatic action of Porphyromonas gingivalis, probably leading to break tolerance to collagen. The identification and subsequent treatment of periodontitis should therefore be considered pivotal in RA prophylaxis and management.

  3. Interleukin-27 inhibits ectopic lymphoid-like structure development in early inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bombardieri, Michele; Greenhill, Claire J.; McLeod, Louise; Nerviani, Alessandra; Rocher-Ros, Vidalba; Cardus, Anna; Williams, Anwen S.; Pitzalis, Costantino; Jenkins, Brendan J.

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic lymphoid-like structures (ELSs) reminiscent of secondary lymphoid organs often develop at sites of chronic inflammation where they contribute to immune-mediated pathology. Through evaluation of synovial tissues from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we now show that low interleukin-27 (IL-27) expression corresponds with an increased incidence of ELS and gene signatures associated with their development and activity. The presence of synovial ELS was also noted in mice deficient in the IL-27 receptor (IL-27R) after the onset of inflammatory arthritis. Here, pathology was associated with increased synovial expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, homeostatic chemokines, and transcriptional regulators linked with lymphoid neogenesis. In both clinical and experimental RA, synovial ELS coincided with the heightened local expression of cytokines and transcription factors of the Th17 and T follicular helper (Tfh) cell lineages, and included podoplanin-expressing T cells within lymphoid aggregates. IL-27 inhibited the differentiation of podoplanin-expressing Th17 cells, and an increased number of these cells were observed in IL-27R–deficient mice with inflammatory arthritis. Thus, IL-27 appears to negatively regulate ELS development in RA through control of effector T cells. These studies open new opportunities for patient stratification and treatment. PMID:26417004

  4. Health assessment questionnaire score is the best predictor of 5-year quality of life in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jean-David; Dougados, Maxime; Goupille, Philippe; Cantagrel, Alain; Meyer, Olivier; Sibilia, Jean; Daurès, Jean-Pierre; Combe, Bernard

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate and determine prognostic factors of 5-year quality of life in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A cohort of 191 patients with RA and disease duration < 1 year was prospectively followed over 5 years. The outcome measure was quality of life as assessed by the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales 2 (AIMS2). Univariate analysis, then stepwise multiple logistic regression, was used to find independent baseline prognostic variables. After accounting for death, loss of followup, and missing data, 158 patients (82.72%) were included in the analysis. The mean AIMS2 physical, symptom, psychological, social interaction, and work scores after 5 years were 1.6 (range 0-6.88), 4.0 (0-10), 3.48 (0-9.22), 4.06 (0-8.69), and 1.87 (0-8.13), respectively. The AIMS2 physical component was significantly correlated with Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score at 5 years. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the baseline values able to predict the 5-year physical, psychological, symptom, social interaction, and work status were, respectively: HAQ score and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), body mass index (BMI), HAQ; erosion score and sex, HAQ; ESR and anti-perinuclear antibody; matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) level, joint space narrowing, and tender joint scores; HAQ score and age. The multidimensional structure of the AIMS2 allowed us to assess the 5-year health-related quality of life in early RA. Using this instrument as an outcome variable, prognostic factors were selected and varied widely depending on the evaluated domain. The baseline HAQ score was the best predictive factor of 4 of the 5 domains of the AIMS2.

  5. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in arthritis patients in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ai-Ling; Gu, Yuan-Lin; Zhou, Na; Cong, Wei; Li, Guang-Xing; Elsheikha, Hany M; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2017-10-25

    There is accumulating evidence for an increased susceptibility to infection in patients with arthritis. We sought to understand the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in arthritis patients in eastern China, given the paucity of data on the magnitude of T. gondii infection in these patients. Seroprevalence of T. gondii infection was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using a crude antigen of the parasite in 820 arthritic patients, and an equal number of healthy controls, from Qingdao and Weihai cities, eastern China. Sociodemographic, clinical and lifestyle information on the study participants were also obtained. The prevalence of anti-T. gondii IgG was significantly higher in arthritic patients (18.8%) compared with 12% in healthy controls (P < 0.001). Twelve patients with arthritis had anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies - comparable with 10 control patients (1.5% vs 1.2%). Demographic factors did not significantly influence these seroprevalence frequencies. The highest T. gondii infection seropositivity rate was detected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (24.8%), followed by reactive arthritis (23.8%), osteoarthritis (19%), infectious arthritis (18.4%) and gouty arthritis (14.8%). Seroprevalence rates of rheumatoid arthritis and reactive arthritis were significantly higher when compared with controls (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). A significant association was detected between T. gondii infection and cats being present in the home in arthritic patients (odds ratio [OR], 1.68; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24 - 2.28; P = 0.001). These findings are consistent with and extend previous results, providing further evidence to support a link between contact with cats and an increased risk of T. gondii infection. Our study is also the first to confirm an association between T. gondii infection and arthritis patients in China. Implications for better prevention and control of T. gondii infection in arthritis patients are discussed

  6. Understanding vaccination rates and attitudes among patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Diana S; Ruderman, Eric M; Brown, Tiffany; Lee, Ji Young; Mixon, Amanda; Liss, David T; Baker, David W

    2016-03-01

    Appropriate vaccinations are important for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), who are often treated with highly immunosuppressive therapies that increase their risk of infection. However, rates of vaccination among patients with RA are below optimal levels. We conducted a patient survey to assess self-reported vaccination status and to compare that status with electronic health record (EHR) data. We recruited randomly selected patients with RA in an academic practice in 2013. Eligible participants had a diagnosis of RA, at least 1 visit to a rheumatology clinic in each of the previous 2 years, were 18 years or older, and had English listed as their preferred language. The survey included the following domains: a) patient self-reported receipt of influenza, pneumococcal (PNVX), and herpes zoster (HZVX) vaccinations; b) attitudes about these vaccines, including reasons for unvaccinated status, if applicable; and c) provider recommendations about these vaccines. Based on participants' self-report, we found a high vaccination rate for influenza during the previous season (79.4%), a moderate rate of any previous vaccination for pneumococcus (53.9%), and a very low rate of any previous vaccination for herpes zoster (7.8%). If we assume that all self-reports are accurate and we include vaccinations recorded in the EHR that were not reported by patients, the vaccination rates were approximately 8% to 9% higher for PNVX and HZVX. Vaccination rates are low among patients with RA based on self-report data. Further research is needed to investigate system-level barriers to vaccination and the impact of evidence-based, provider-level interventions on vaccination rates.

  7. Low immunogenicity of tocilizumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Burmester, Gerd R; Choy, Ernest; Kivitz, Alan; Ogata, Atsushi; Bao, Min; Nomura, Akira; Lacey, Stuart; Pei, Jinglan; Reiss, William; Pethoe-Schramm, Attila; Mallalieu, Navita L; Wallace, Thomas; Michalska, Margaret; Birnboeck, Herbert; Stubenrauch, Kay; Genovese, Mark C

    2017-06-01

    Subcutaneous (SC) and intravenous formulations of tocilizumab (TCZ) are available for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), based on the efficacy and safety observed in clinical trials. Anti-TCZ antibody development and its impact on safety and efficacy were evaluated in adult patients with RA treated with intravenous TCZ (TCZ-IV) or TCZ-SC as monotherapy or in combination with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs). Data from 5 TCZ-SC and 8 TCZ-IV phase III clinical trials and 1 TCZ-IV clinical pharmacology safety study (>50 000 samples) were pooled to assess the immunogenicity profile of TCZ-SC and TCZ-IV (8974 total patients). The analysis included antidrug antibody (ADA) measurement following TCZ-SC or TCZ-IV treatment as monotherapy or in combination with csDMARDs, after dosing interruptions or in TCZ-washout samples, and the correlation of ADAs with clinical response, adverse events or pharmacokinetics (PK). The proportion of patients who developed ADAs following TCZ-SC or TCZ-IV treatment was 1.5% and 1.2%, respectively. ADA development was also comparable between patients who received TCZ monotherapy and those who received concomitant csDMARDs (0.7-2.0%). ADA development did not correlate with PK or safety events, including anaphylaxis, hypersensitivity or injection-site reactions, and no patients who developed ADAs had loss of efficacy. The immunogenicity risk of TCZ-SC and TCZ-IV treatment was low, either as monotherapy or in combination with csDMARDs. Anti-TCZ antibodies developed among the small proportion of patients had no evident impact on PK, efficacy or safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Age at onset determines severity and choice of treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Disease activity, severity and comorbidity contribute to increased mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the impact of age at disease onset on prognostic risk factors and treatment in patients with early disease. Methods In this study, 950 RA patients were followed regularly from the time of inclusion (<12 months from symptom onset) for disease activity (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), tender and/or swollen joints, Visual Analogue Scale pain and global scores, and Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28)) and function (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)). Disease severity, measured on the basis of radiographs of the hands and feet (erosions based on Larsen score), extraarticular disease, nodules, and comorbidities and treatment (disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), corticosteroids, biologics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) were recorded at the time of inclusion and at 5 years. Autoantibodies (rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibodies and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (ACPAs)) and genetic markers (human leucocyte antibody (HLA) shared epitope and protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22)) were analysed at the time of inclusion. Data were stratified as young-onset RA (YORA) and late-onset RA (LORA), which were defined as being below or above the median age at the time of onset of RA (58 years). Results LORA was associated with lower frequency of ACPA (P < 0.05) and carriage of PTPN22-T variant (P < 0.01), but with greater disease activity at the time of inclusion measured on the basis of ESR (P < 0.001), CRP (P < 0.01) and accumulated disease activity (area under the curve for DAS28 score) at 6 months (P < 0.01), 12 months (P < 0.01) and 24 months (P < 0.05), as well as a higher HAQ score (P < 0.01) compared with YORA patients. At baseline and 24 months, LORA was more often associated with erosions (P < 0.01 for both) and higher

  9. Herpes Zoster and Tofacitinib Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Kevin L; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Valdez, Hernan; Mortensen, Eric; Chew, Robert; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Kawabata, Thomas; Riese, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk for herpes zoster (HZ) (i.e., shingles). The aim of this study was to determine whether treatment with tofacitinib increases the risk of HZ in patients with RA. Methods HZ cases were identified as those reported by trial investigators from the databases of the phase II, phase III, and long-term extension (LTE) clinical trials in the Tofacitinib RA Development Program. Crude incidence rates (IRs) of HZ per 100 patient-years (with 95% confidence intervals [95% CIs]) were calculated by exposure group. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate potential risk factors for HZ (e.g., age, prednisone use). Results Among 4,789 participants, 239 were identified as having tofacitinib-associated HZ during the phase II, phase III, and LTE trials, of whom 208 (87%) were female and whose median age was 57 years (range 21–75 years). One HZ case (0.4%) was multidermatomal; none of the cases involved visceral dissemination or death. Twenty-four patients with HZ (10%) permanently discontinued treatment with tofacitinib, and 16 (7%) were either hospitalized or received intravenous antiviral drugs. The crude HZ IR across the development program was 4.4 per 100 patient-years (95% CI 3.8–4.9), but the IR was substantially higher within Asia (7.7 per 100 patient-years, 95% CI 6.4–9.3). Older age was associated with HZ (odds ratio 1.9, 95% CI 1.5–2.6), and IRs for HZ were similar between patients receiving 5 mg tofacitinib twice daily (4.4 per 100 patient-years, 95% CI 3.2–6.0) and those receiving 10 mg twice daily (4.2 per 100 patient-years, 95% CI 3.1–5.8). In the phase III trials among placebo recipients, the incidence of HZ was 1.5 per 100 patient-years (95% CI 0.5–4.6). Conclusion In the Tofacitinib RA Development Program, increased rates of HZ were observed in patients treated with tofacitinib compared with those receiving placebo, particularly among patients within Asia. Complicated HZ

  10. Patient Preferences Regarding Rheumatoid Arthritis Therapies: A Conjoint Analysis.

    PubMed

    Louder, Anthony M; Singh, Amitabh; Saverno, Kim; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Aten, Aaron J; Koenig, Andrew S; Pasquale, Margaret K

    2016-04-01

    Tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), provides patients with an alternative to subcutaneously or intravenously administered biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Little is known about patient preference for novel RA treatments. To investigate patient preferences for attributes associated with RA treatments. A choice-based conjoint survey was mailed to 1400 randomly selected commercially insured patients (aged 21-80 years) diagnosed with RA, who were continuously enrolled from May 1, 2012, through April 30, 2013, and had ≥2 medical claims for International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code 714.0 and no previous biologic DMARD use. Treatment attributes included route of administration; monthly out-of-pocket cost; frequency of administration; ability to reduce daily joint pain and swelling; likelihood of serious adverse events; improvement in the ability to perform daily tasks; and medication burden. Mean attribute importance scores were calculated after adjusting for patient demographics (eg, age, sex, years since diagnosis) using a hierarchical Bayes model. Patient preferences for each treatment attribute were ranked by the importance score. Part-worth utilities (ie, preference scores) were used to perform a conjoint market simulation. A total of 380 patients (response rate, 27.1%) returned the survey. Their mean age (± standard deviation) was 54.9 (± 9.3) years. Nonrespondents were 2 years younger (mean, 52.9 years; P = .002) but did not differ significantly from respondents in known clinical characteristics. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, mean patients' ranking of treatment attribute importance, in decreasing order, was route of administration, 34.1 (± 15.5); frequency of administration, 16.4 (± 6.8); serious adverse events, 12.0 (± 9.3); cost, 10.1 (± 6.2); medication burden, 9.8 (± 8.2); joint pain reduction

  11. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: The study group included 112 patients (56 men, 56 women; median age 49.7±12 years) with psoriasis, 25 of them were affected by psoriatic arthritis. A group of 112 subjects without psoriasis (56 men, 56 women; median age 47.7±17 years) served as controls. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were evaluated according to the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Psoriasis patients were subgrouped according to the presence/absence of psoriatic arthritis and by gender, to assess the prevalence of traditional symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders. RESULTS: Patients with psoriasis, and to an even greater extent those with psoriatic arthritis, were more frequently affected by symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders, including an internal temporomandibular joint opening derangement than healthy subjects. A statistically significant increase in symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, in opening derangement, bruxism and sounds of temporomandibular joint was found in patients with psoriatic arthritis as compared with psoriasis patients without arthritis and controls. CONCLUSIONS: psoriasis seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders, causing an increase in orofacial pain and an altered chewing function. PMID:26019683

  12. Transcriptional signature associated with early rheumatoid arthritis and healthy individuals at high risk to develop the disease

    PubMed Central

    Macías-Segura, N.; Bastian, Y.; Santiago-Algarra, D.; Castillo-Ortiz, J. D.; Alemán-Navarro, A. L.; Jaime-Sánchez, E.; Gomez-Moreno, M.; Saucedo-Toral, C. A.; Lara-Ramírez, Edgar E.; Zapata-Zuñiga, M.; Enciso-Moreno, L.; González-Amaro, R.; Ramos-Remus, C.; Enciso-Moreno, J. A.

    2018-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying the loss of tolerance in the early and preclinical stages of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this work was to identify the transcriptional profile and signaling pathways associated to non-treated early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and subjects at high risk. Several biomarker candidates for early RA are proposed. Methods Whole blood total RNA was obtained from non-treated early RA patients with <1 year of evolution as well as from healthy first-degree relatives of patients with RA (FDR) classified as ACCP+ and ACCP- according to their antibodies serum levels against cyclic citrullinated peptides. Complementary RNA (cRNA) was synthetized and hybridized to high-density microarrays. Data was analyzed in Genespring Software and functional categories were assigned to a specific transcriptome identified in subjects with RA and FDR ACCP positive. Specific signaling pathways for genes associated to RA were identified. Gene expression was evaluated by qPCR. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate these genes as biomarkers. Results A characteristic transcriptome of 551 induced genes and 4,402 repressed genes were identified in early RA patients. Bioinformatics analysis of the data identified a specific transcriptome in RA patients. Moreover, some overlapped transcriptional profiles between patients with RA and ACCP+ were identified, suggesting an up-regulated distinctive transcriptome from the preclinical stages up to progression to an early RA state. A total of 203 pathways have up-regulated genes that are shared between RA and ACCP+. Some of these genes show potential to be used as progression biomarkers for early RA with area under the curve of ROC > 0.92. These genes come from several functional categories associated to inflammation, Wnt signaling and type I interferon pathways. Conclusion The presence of a specific transcriptome in whole blood of RA patients suggests the activation

  13. S100A8/A9 in psoriatic plaques from patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Triggianese, Paola; Botti, Elisabetta; Narcisi, Alessandra; Conigliaro, Paola; Giunta, Alessandro; Teoli, Miriam; Perricone, Roberto; Costanzo, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate levels of the calcium-binding proteins S100A8 and S100A9 in the skin of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Skin punch biopsies were obtained from patients with psoriatic arthritis and healthy control subjects. S100A8/A9 were semiquantified via immunohistochemistry and semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction. The study included biopsies from nine patients with psoriatic arthritis and nine control subjects. S100A8 and S100A9 were present at visibly higher levels in psoriatic plaques compared with normal skin samples. S100A8 and S100A9 RNA levels were significantly higher in the peripheral region of plaques compared with the central region. Both S100A8 and S100A9 may represent good therapeutic targets in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Disease Severity and Domain Specific Arthritis Self-Efficacy: Relationships to Pain and Functioning in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Tamara J.; Shelby, Rebecca A.; Keefe, Francis J.; Godiwala, Neha; Lumley, Mark A.; Mosley-Williams, Angelia; Rice, John R.; Caldwell, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective Examining the degree to which disease severity and domains of self-efficacy (pain, function, other symptoms) explain pain and functioning in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods Patients (N=263) completed the Arthritis Impact Measurements Scales-2 to assess pain and functioning (physical, affective, and social), the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale to assess three self-efficacy domains (pain, physical function, other); disease severity was assessed with C-reactive protein, physician's rating, abnormal joint count. Structural equation modeling was used to examine hypotheses: 1) does disease severity have a direct relationship with pain and each area of functioning, 2) does disease severity have a direct relationship with each arthritis self-efficacy domain, and 3) do the self-efficacy domains mediate the relationship between disease severity and RA pain and each area of functioning. Results Disease severity was related to pain, physical functioning, and each self-efficacy domain (β's=.28-.56; p's<.001). Each self-efficacy domain was related to its respective domain of functioning (e.g., self-efficacy for pain was related to pain) (β's=.36-.54; p's<.001). Self-efficacy mediated the relationship between disease severity and pain and functioning (β's=.12-.19; p's<.001). Self-efficacy for pain control and to perform functional tasks accounted for 32-42% of disease severity's total effect on their respective outcomes (e.g., self-efficacy for pain control accounted for 32% of disease severity's total effect on pain). Variance accounted for by the total model was 52% for pain, 53% for physical functioning, and 44% for affective and social functioning. Conclusions Disease severity and self-efficacy both impact RA functioning and intervening in these areas may lead to better outcomes. PMID:20535796

  15. [Vaccines and preventive activities in patients with inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Casals-Sánchez, J L; Casals Vázquez, C; Vázquez Sánchez, M Á; Giménez Basallote, S

    2013-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis and eligible for immunosuppressive therapy account for more than 1% of general population, and represents a significant workload on family doctors. They are prone to other comorbidities, with an increased cardiovascular risk and a higher incidence of infections than the general population, especially skin infections and pneumonitis. This comorbidity can be considered vulnerable to a prevention program-prevention of cardiovascular risk, cancer screening, vaccination schedule for adults. As for prevention through vaccination, importance should be given to pneumococcal infection - significant in adults aged 50 or over, especially amongst immunosuppressed patients. The 13-valent conjugate vaccine, which has been recently approved for adults, must be considered. An attempt has been made to write a simple, applicable document on preventive measures that should be implemented both at primary and secondary care level for those adults. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Multidisciplinary Care Models for Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Queiro, Rubén; Coto, Pablo; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Navío Marco, Teresa; de la Cueva, Pablo; Pujol Busquets, Manel; García Font, Mercè; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Alvarez Vega, Jose Luis; Chaves Álvarez, Antonio Javier; Sánchez Parera, Ricardo; Ruiz Carrascosa, Jose Carlos; Rodríguez Martínez, Fernando José; Pardo Sánchez, José; Feced Olmos, Carlos; Pujol, Conrad; Galindez, Eva; Pérez Barrio, Silvia; Urruticoechea Arana, Ana; Hergueta, Mercedes; Luelmo, Jesús; Gratacós, Jordi

    To describe (structure, processes) of the multidisciplinary care models in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in Spain, as well as barriers and facilitators of their implementation. A qualitative study was performed following structured interviews with 24 professionals (12 rheumatologists, 12 dermatologists who provide multidisciplinary care for patients with PsA). We collected data related to the hospital, department, population and multidisciplinary care model (type, physical and human resources, professional requirements, objectives, referral criteria, agendas, protocols, responsibilities, decision- making, research and education, clinical sessions, development and planning of the model, advantages and disadvantages of the model, barriers and facilitators in the implementation of the model. The models characteristics are described. We analyzed 12 multidisciplinary care models in PsA, with at least 1-2 years of experience, and 3 subtypes of models, face-to-face, parallel, and preferential circuit. All are adapted to the hospital and professionals characteristics. A proper implementation planning is essential. The involvement and empathy between professionals and an access and well-defined referral criteria are important facilitators in the implementation of a model. The management of agendas and data collection to measure the multidisciplinary care models health outcomes are the main barriers. There are different multidisciplinary care models in PsA that can improve patient outcomes, system efficiency and collaboration between specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving patient outlook in rheumatoid arthritis: experience with abatacept.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Mary

    2008-10-01

    To examine the importance of improving patient outlook in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to discuss the role of the nurse practitioner (NP) who, through the assessment of patient-reported outcomes and in acting as an advocate for the patient with the wider healthcare team, has a crucial part to play in managing the overall well-being of the patient. This article will draw on the clinical experience to date with abatacept, a first-in-class therapy that has been approved for the treatment of RA in patients with an inadequate response to either traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as methotrexate, or biological DMARDs, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists. A comprehensive literature search was performed using the National Library of Medicine (MEDLINE), EMBASE, and BIOSIS databases (restricted to articles posted between January 2000 and February 2007) with the search terms CTLA-4Ig, abatacept, and primary clinical trial publications in patients with RA. The clinical data are summarized in this review along with safety data presented in the prescribing information. Recent changes in the approach to RA treatment, particularly the advent of biological therapies, have impacted the role of the NP. The role of the NP is integral to the management of RA and in maximizing patient outcomes, through educating patients to make informed choices regarding their treatment, ensuring the safe administration of therapies and monitoring response to therapy, and in acting as an advocate for the patient within the wider healthcare team. The use of more patient-centered measures of response are gaining increasing importance both in clinical trials and in clinical practice, and as such the NP has an important role in ensuring that both the physical and the psychological needs of patients are met. Clinical trials to date have shown that abatacept provides significant and clinically meaningful improvements in patient-reported outcomes, as well as

  18. Lumiracoxib does not affect methotrexate pharmacokinetics in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Stefan N; Rordorf, Christiane M; Milosavljev, Slavica; Branson, Janice M; Chales, Gérard H; Juvin, Robert R; Lafforgue, Pierre; Le Parc, Jean Marie; Tavernier, Christian G; Meyer, Olivier C

    2004-10-01

    Methotrexate and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are frequently coadministered in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To evaluate the effect of lumiracoxib, a novel cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, on methotrexate pharmacokinetics and short-term safety in patients with RA. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study enrolled 18 patients (mean age 49.1 y) with stable RA. Patients were randomized to receive methotrexate 7.5-15 mg orally once weekly plus either lumiracoxib 400 mg/day or placebo for 7 days. Patients then received the other treatment combination for an additional 7 days. Serial blood and urine were collected for 24 hours after the methotrexate dose on day 1 (methotrexate alone) and days 8 and 15 (combination treatment). Plasma methotrexate pharmacokinetics (AUC(0-t), maximum concentration [C(max)], time to C(max)) and methotrexate protein binding were similar for methotrexate alone (108.0 ng.h/mL, 26.7 ng/mL, 1.5 h, and 57.1%, respectively), methotrexate/lumiracoxib (110.2 ng.h/mL, 27.5 ng/mL, 1.0 h, and 53.7%, respectively), and methotrexate/placebo (101.8 ng.h/mL, 22.6 ng/mL, 1.0 h, and 57.0%, respectively). Similarly, no clinically significant difference was found in the urinary excretion of methotrexate. Mean exposure to the 7-OH metabolite was lower when methotrexate was given with lumiracoxib compared with placebo, shown by a reduction in AUC and C(max), although similar amounts of the metabolite were recovered in urine following both lumiracoxib and placebo. Coadministration of methotrexate and lumiracoxib was well tolerated. Lumiracoxib had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics, protein binding, or urinary excretion of coadministered methotrexate in patients with RA.

  19. Chikungunya Arthritis Mechanisms in the Americas (CAMA): A cross sectional analysis of chikungunya arthritis patients 22 months post-infection demonstrates a lack of viral persistence in synovial fluid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-30

    Chikungunya Arthritis Mechanisms in the Americas (CAMA): 1 A cross-sectional analysis of chikungunya arthritis patients 22-months post -infection...school or less level of education (94%). CHIKV arthritis 58 patients (Median 22-months (IQR 21-23) post -CHIKV infection) had moderate disease...rheumatoid arthritis are being tested in this patient population. However, such therapeutics could be 76 dangerous if active virus is still present

  20. When a patient suspected with juvenile idiopathic arthritis turns out to be diagnosed with an infectious disease - a review of Lyme arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Orczyk, Krzysztof; Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2017-05-08

    The Lyme arthritis is a common manifestation of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete. Despite its infectious background, the inflammation clinically and histopatologically resembles juvenile idiopathic arthritis. As it affects a considerable number of Lyme disease patients, it should be routinely considered in differential diagnosis. Development of arthritis is partially dependent on spirochetal factors, including the ribosomal spacer type and the sequence of outer surface protein C. Immunological background involves Th1-related response, but IL-17 provides an additional route of developing arthritis. Autoimmune mechanisms may lead to antibiotic-refractory arthritis. The current diagnostic standard is based on a 2-step testing: ELISA screening and immunoblot confirmation. Other suggested methods contain modified two-tier test with C6 ELISA instead of immunoblot. An initial 28-day course of oral antibiotics (doxycycline, cefuroxime axetil or amoxicillin) is a recommended treatment. Severe cases require further anti-inflammatory management. Precise investigation of new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches is advisable.

  1. Early, structured disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy reduces cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis--a single centre study using non-biologic drugs.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sumit; Sarkate, Pankaj; Ghosh, Sudip; Biswas, Monodeep; Ghosh, Alakendu

    2013-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, being a chronic disease requires long-term management of patients with drugs. The increasing cost of biologics in this era of disease management led us to devise a treatment regime, optimal for use in a developing country like India, which was economical as well as effective in controlling disease activity. To investigate if combination therapy with DMARDs can reduce cardiovascular risk in early Rheumatoid Arthritis, besides controlling disease activity. A small cohort of early Rheumatoid subjects with disease duration less than 1 year were treated with a structured DMARD regime and were followed up over a year. Disease activity score, C-reactive protein (CRP) and cardiac risk markers like lipid panel and carotid intima-medial thickness were monitored at 6 months and 1 year. A significant reduction (p < 0.001) of disease activity as well as cardiac risk parameters were observed. Our study showed that treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis with a combination regime of traditional DMARDs is highly effective in controlling disease activity as well as cardiovascular risk.

  2. Factors influencing the patient with rheumatoid arthritis in their decision to seek podiatry.

    PubMed

    Blake, A; Mandy, P J; Stew, G

    2013-12-01

    Despite the level of foot involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the literature to support early assessment of foot care needs, local referral of patients to podiatry has been occurring too late to instigate certain preventative interventions. Preliminary fieldwork has highlighted that the primary responsibility for the instigation of this lies with the patient. The present study describes the factors that influence the patient with RA in their decision to self-report foot problems. A case study research strategy was employed. Nine patients attending the outpatient rheumatology department participated in the study and data were gathered through semi-structured interviews. This information was analysed using a framework approach. The key themes derived from the data suggested that there are a variety of factors influencing the patient's decision to self-report foot concerns. Some will act to encourage the action and others will act to oppose it. Other factors can influence the decision either way, depending on the individual patient (psychological state, previous experience, body image changes). In addition, age, gender, and cultural and social aspects are also significant. Due to the multitude of factors influencing the individual's decision to seek help, the patient cannot be given sole responsibility for their foot health if we wish to achieve timely and appropriate podiatry, as recommended in the literature. Responsibility should be three-way; the patient, the members of the rheumatology team and, once in the podiatry service, the podiatrist should maintain this. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Polypharmacy and Unplanned Hospitalizations in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Filkova, Maria; Carvalho, João; Norton, Sam; Scott, David; Mant, Tim; Molokhia, Mariam; Cope, Andrew; Galloway, James

    2017-12-01

    Polypharmacy (PP), the prescribing of multiple drugs for an individual, is rising in prevalence. PP associates with an increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and hospital admissions. We investigated the relationship between PP, characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the risk of unplanned hospital admissions. Patients from a hospital RA cohort were retrospectively analyzed. Information was collected from electronic medical records. Cox proportional hazards were used to compare hospitalization risk according to levels of PP. Admissions were adjudicated to determine whether an ADR was implicated. The study included 1101 patients; the mean number of all medications was 5. PP correlated with increasing age, disease duration, disease activity, and disability. At least 1 unplanned admission occurred for 16% of patients. Patients taking ≥ 10 medications had an adjusted HR for hospitalization of 3.1 (95% CI 2.1-4.5), compared to those taking 0-5 medications. Corticosteroid use associated with a doubling in adjusted risk of admission of 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.4). The most common reason for hospitalization was infection (28%). While in half of all admissions an ADR was a possible contributing factor, only 2% of admissions were found to directly result from an ADR. PP is common in RA and is a prognostic marker associated with increased risk of acute hospitalizations. Our data suggest that PP may be an indicator of comorbidity burden rather than a contributing cause of a drug-related toxicity. PP should be monitored to minimize inappropriate combination of prescribed medications. PP may be a useful predictor of clinical outcomes in epidemiologic studies.

  4. Treating to the target of remission in early rheumatoid arthritis is cost-effective: results of the DREAM registry.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Marloes; Kievit, Wietske; Kuper, Hillechiena H; Braakman-Jansen, Louise M A; Bernelot Moens, Hein J; Zijlstra, Theo R; den Broeder, Alfons A; van Riel, Piet L C M; Fransen, Jaap; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-12-13

    Where health economic studies are frequently performed using modelling, with input from randomized controlled trials and best guesses, we used real-life data to analyse the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a treatment strategy aiming to the target of remission compared to usual care in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We used real-life data from comparable cohorts in the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring (DREAM) registry: the DREAM remission induction cohort (treat-to-target, T2T) and the Nijmegen early RA inception cohort (usual care, UC). Both cohorts were followed prospectively using the DREAM registry methodology. All patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA and were included in the cohort at the time of diagnosis. The T2T cohort was treated according to a protocolised strategy aiming at remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) < 2.6). The UC cohort was treated without DAS28-guided treatment decisions. EuroQol-5D utility scores were estimated from the Health Assessment Questionnaire. A health care perspective was adopted and direct medical costs were collected. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) per patient in remission and incremental cost utility ratio (ICUR) per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained were calculated over two and three years of follow-up. Two year data were available for 261 T2T patients and 213 UC patients; an extended follow-up of three years was available for 127 and 180 patients, respectively. T2T produced higher remission percentages and a larger gain in QALYs than UC. The ICER was € 3,591 per patient in remission after two years and T2T was dominant after three years. The ICUR was € 19,410 per QALY after two years and T2T was dominant after three years. We can conclude that treating to the target of remission in early RA is cost-effective compared with UC. The data suggest that in the third year, T2T becomes cost-saving.

  5. [Influence of physical treatment on disease activity and health status of patients with chronic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Mustur, Dusan; Vujasinović-Stupar, Nada; Ille, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    This is an open uncontrolled study about effects of physical treatment on disease activity parameters of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. The aim of the study was to establish if there was any improvement of disease activity parameters after four weeks of physical and spa treatment. We compared morning stiffness, tender and swollen joint count, body pain level and Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS-28) in patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and assessed the effect of physical and spa treatment on those parameters. The research encompassed 109 patients: 69 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA group) and 40 with psoriatic arthritis (PA group). They were from Norway, staying for four weeks in June-September 2003. The groups served as their own controls--"one group pre-test post test" study. Disease activity measurement was made twice: at the beginning and at the end of treatment. The therapeutic set consisted of mud applications, kinesitherapy, mineral water pool and electrotherapy. At the beginning there was no significant difference in observed disease activity parameters between patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis (p > 0.05). After four weeks of physical and spa treatment disease activity was significantly reduced in all observed parameters in both groups: morning stiffness (p < 0.001 RA + PA), tender joint count (p < 0.01 RA + PA), swollen joint count (p < 0.01 RA; p < 0.05 PA), body pain (p < 0.01 RA + PA) and DAS-28 score (p < 0.01 RA+PA). Physical and spa treatment, together with climatic factors in Igalo, lead to a significant reduction of disease activity parameters of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis.

  6. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics.

  7. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  8. Demographic Features of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bajraktari, Ismet H.; Teuta, Backa-Çiço; Vjollca, Sahatçiu-Meka; Bajraktari, Halit; Saiti, Valton; Krasniqi, Blerim; Muslimi, Fikret

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory illness characterized by polyarthritis of small and large joints which in the course of time may progress to disability. Material and methods: In our prospective study were included 951 patients (females 730, and males 221 respectively) with an average age 51.3 year old, diagnosed with RA in accordance with ACR-EULAR/2010 criteria. The purpose of the paper is to investigate gender, age, group age by gender, level of education, residing place, nationality, religion, social condition, marital status, and vocation in our patients. Statistical processing has been carried out with program SPSS 20.0, SigmaStat 2.03, SigmaPlot 2000, MedCalc and Excel 2010. Most present group age was 40 – 49 year old with difference in distribution based on gender. Results: The largest number of them had completed secondary education, most of them originated from rural areas, were farmers by vocation and housewives. The database created by this survey can serve for building the RA patients’ national registry. This registry can serve for further researches and planning the management of RA as a systemic rheumatic disease that has an immense social, economic and health impact. Largest portion of RA patients were farmers and housewives respectively (38% and 32.2% respectively). Vocations such as: retail sellers, workers in administration, education, factory, maintenance, and artisan workers had similar incidence in both genders that ranged from 9.7% to 6.2%, whereas these vocations among males ranged from 11.3% to 2.7%. PMID:25649180

  9. [Financial cost of early rheumatoid arthritis in the first year of medical attention: three clinical scenarios in a third-tier university hospital in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Mora, Claudia; González, Andrés; Díaz, Jorge; Quintana, Gerardo

    2009-03-01

    In Colombia, the cost burden of chronic diseases is not well known, either globally or in localized areas of the health system. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of most common chronic diseases, and represents a high cost for the health system. The direct medical costs were estimated for rheumatoid arthritis patients in the in the first year of diagnosis at a level 3 university hospital in Colombia. Three therapy settings for early rheumatoid arthritis patients were established in the first year of diagnosis according to national and international guidelines. Each setting included treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs or biologic therapy based on disease severity as measured by Disease Activity Score 28. All direct medical costs were included: specialized medical care, diagnostic tests and drugs. Cost information was obtained from the Central Military Hospital finance department in Bogotá and the national manual of drug prices based on the "Farmaprecios" 2007 guide, a reference in general use by health institutions. Results. The average of cost of medical care in patients with mild, moderate and severe disease was US $1689, $1805 and $23,441 respectively. The recommended retail prices of the medicines published in "Farmaprecios" was US $1418, $1821 and $31,931. When the charges levied by several major health institutions were compared, substantial increases were noted, US $4936, $7716 and $123,661, respectively. Drug costs represented 86% of total cost, laboratory costs were 10% and medical attention was only 4%. Drugs costs were the principal component of the total direct medical cost, and it increased 40 times when a biological therapy is used. Complete economic evaluation studies are necesary to estimate the viability and clinical relevance of biological therapy for early rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Patient Disease Perceptions and Coping Strategies for Arthritis in a Developing Nation: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is little prior research on the burden of arthritis in the developing world. We sought to document how patients with advanced arthritis living in the Dominican Republic are affected by and cope with their disease. Methods We conducted semi-structured, one-to-one interviews with economically disadvantaged Dominican patients with advanced knee and/or hip arthritis in the Dominican Republic. The interviews, conducted in Spanish, followed a moderator's guide that included topics such as the patients' understanding of disease etiology, their support networks, and their coping mechanisms. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim in Spanish, and systematically analyzed using content analysis. We assessed agreement in coding between two investigators. Results 18 patients were interviewed (mean age 60 years, median age 62 years, 72% women, 100% response rate). Patients invoked religious and environmental theories of disease etiology, stating that their illness had been caused by God's will or through contact with water. While all patients experienced pain and functional limitation, the social effects of arthritis were gender-specific: women noted interference with homemaking and churchgoing activities, while men experienced disruption with occupational roles. The coping strategies used by patients appeared to reflect their beliefs about disease causation and included prayer and avoidance of water. Conclusions Patients' explanatory models of arthritis influenced the psychosocial effects of the disease and coping mechanisms used. Given the increasing reach of global health programs, understanding these culturally influenced perceptions of disease will be crucial in successfully treating chronic diseases in the developing world. PMID:21985605

  11. Targeting inflammation in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiayun; Shang, Qing; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis have increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) compared with the general population. Subclinical carotid atherosclerosis and increased arterial stiffness are also common in these patients, which may serve as surrogate end points for cardiovascular (CV) events in clinical trials. Although exact mechanisms are still unclear, persistent systemic inflammation in patients with inflammatory arthritis may contribute to the development of CVD. Dysregulated innate immunity pathways in these patients may also play a role in accelerating atherosclerosis. During the last decade, effective suppression of inflammation by biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs has improved the disease outcome dramatically in patients with inflammatory arthritis. Growing evidence suggests that antitumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy may prevent CVD in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Nonetheless, data on non-TNF biologics are limited. Whether anti-TNF therapy may prevent CVD in patients with spondyloarthritis also remained unclear. In this review, we summarized the effect of both anti-TNF and non-TNF biologics on the CV system, including traditional CVD risk factors, endothelial function, arterial stiffness, subclinical atherosclerosis, and clinical CVD in patients with inflammatory arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional Outcome and Graft Retention in Patients With Septic Arthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Steinhaus, Michael E; Mehran, Nima; Schulz, Brian S; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of clinical and functional outcomes after treatment for septic arthritis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A systematic review of the literature was performed. Two reviewers assessed and confirmed the methodologic quality of each study. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were assessed for pertinent data, and when available, similar outcomes were combined to generate frequency-weighted means. Nineteen studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria for this review, reporting on a total of 203 infected knees. The mean age was 27.5 years and the mean length of follow-up was 44.2 months, with male patients comprising 88% of the population. Hamstring and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts were used in 63% and 33% of patients, respectively, with 78% of patients retaining their grafts. The studies reported mean flexion and extension deficits of 5.8° and 1.0°, respectively, and laxity testing showed a mean difference of 1.9 mm. The studies reported mean Lysholm, International Knee Documentation Committee, and Tegner scores of 82.1, 68.2, and 5.6, respectively. Of the patients, 83% reported an ability to return to activities of daily living whereas 67% reported a return to their preinjury level of athletics. Evidence of new degenerative changes was seen in 22% of patients. Septic arthritis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction remains a very infrequent event, affecting 0.5% of patients. On average, outcomes in these patients are comparable with those in patients in whom infection does not develop, including postoperative range of motion, residual instability, Lysholm scores, and return to preinjury level of activity. These patients do exhibit decreased International Knee Documentation Committee scores compared with patients without septic arthritis, however. The impact of this differential is not clear, but this scoring difference suggests that septic arthritis may be associated with more severe symptoms

  13. Triple DMARD treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis modulates synovial T cell activation and plasmablast/plasma cell differentiation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wechalekar, Mihir D.; Guo, Yanxia; Yin, Xuefeng; Weedon, Helen; Proudman, Susanna M.; Smith, Malcolm D.; Nagpal, Sunil

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to investigate the genome-wide transcriptional effects of a combination of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (tDMARD; methotrexate, sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine) in synovial tissues obtained from early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. While combination DMARD strategies have been investigated for clinical efficacy, very little data exists on the potential molecular mechanism of action. We hypothesized that tDMARD would impact multiple biological pathways, but the specific pathways were unknown. Methods Paired synovial biopsy samples from early RA patients before and after 6 months of tDMARD therapy were collected by arthroscopy (n = 19). These biopsies as well as those from subjects with normal synovium (n = 28) were profiled by total RNA sequencing. Results Large differences in gene expression between RA and control biopsies (over 5000 genes) were identified. Despite clinical efficacy, the expression of a restricted set of less than 300 genes was reversed after 6 months of treatment. Many genes remained elevated, even in patients who achieved low disease activity. Interestingly, tDMARD downregulated genes included those involved in T cell activation and signaling and plasmablast/plasma cell differentiation and function. Conclusions We have identified transcriptomic signatures that characterize synovial tissue from RA patients with early disease. Analysis after 6 months of tDMARD treatment highlight consistent alterations in expression of genes related to T cell activation and plasmablast/plasma cell differentiation. These results provide novel insight into the biology of early RA and the mechanism of tDMARD action and may help identify novel drug targets to improve rates of treatment-induced disease remission. PMID:28863153

  14. Triple DMARD treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis modulates synovial T cell activation and plasmablast/plasma cell differentiation pathways.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Alice M; Wechalekar, Mihir D; Guo, Yanxia; Yin, Xuefeng; Weedon, Helen; Proudman, Susanna M; Smith, Malcolm D; Nagpal, Sunil

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the genome-wide transcriptional effects of a combination of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (tDMARD; methotrexate, sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine) in synovial tissues obtained from early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. While combination DMARD strategies have been investigated for clinical efficacy, very little data exists on the potential molecular mechanism of action. We hypothesized that tDMARD would impact multiple biological pathways, but the specific pathways were unknown. Paired synovial biopsy samples from early RA patients before and after 6 months of tDMARD therapy were collected by arthroscopy (n = 19). These biopsies as well as those from subjects with normal synovium (n = 28) were profiled by total RNA sequencing. Large differences in gene expression between RA and control biopsies (over 5000 genes) were identified. Despite clinical efficacy, the expression of a restricted set of less than 300 genes was reversed after 6 months of treatment. Many genes remained elevated, even in patients who achieved low disease activity. Interestingly, tDMARD downregulated genes included those involved in T cell activation and signaling and plasmablast/plasma cell differentiation and function. We have identified transcriptomic signatures that characterize synovial tissue from RA patients with early disease. Analysis after 6 months of tDMARD treatment highlight consistent alterations in expression of genes related to T cell activation and plasmablast/plasma cell differentiation. These results provide novel insight into the biology of early RA and the mechanism of tDMARD action and may help identify novel drug targets to improve rates of treatment-induced disease remission.

  15. Disease activity decrease is associated with improvement in work productivity over 1 year in early axial spondyloarthritis (SPondyloArthritis Caught Early cohort).

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, Miranda; Ez-Zaitouni, Zineb; Fongen, Camilla; Landewé, Robert; Ramonda, Roberta; van der Heijde, Désirée; van Gaalen, Floris A

    2017-12-01

    To assess if a change in disease activity is associated with a change in work productivity loss (WPL) over 1 year in early axial SpA (axSpA) patients. Baseline and 1 year data of axSpA patients in the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early cohort were analysed. Linear regression models were built explaining the change in the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) over time by the change in absenteeism, presenteeism, WPL and activity impairment over time. Effect modification and confounding were tested for age, gender, arm of Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society classification criteria, HLA-B27, duration of chronic back pain, profession and medication. At baseline, in 105 axSpA patients (48% female, mean age 30.8 years, mean symptom duration 13.6 months, 92% HLA-B27 positive, 24% radiographic sacroiliitis), the mean ASDAS was 2.4 (s.d. 1.0), absenteeism 9% (s.d. 23), presenteeism 33% (s.d. 28), WPL 36% (s.d. 30) and activity impairment 37% (s.d. 25). After 1 year, the mean ASDAS decreased to 2.0 (s.d. 0.8) and absenteeism, presenteeism, WPL and activity impairment improved to 6% (s.d. 22), 26% (s.d. 26), 27% (s.d. 29) and 27% (s.d. 26), respectively. Models showed that if ASDAS decreased 1 unit, absenteeism, presenteeism, WPL and activity impairment improved by 5, 17, 16 and 18%, respectively. The impact of disease activity on work productivity was higher in patients with shorter symptom duration and the impact on absenteeism was higher in patients starting pharmacological treatment. In early axSpA patients, work productivity and daily activities are seriously impacted at baseline and 1 year. However, decreasing disease activity is associated with marked improvements in work productivity and daily activities. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Independent associations of total and high molecular weight adiponectin with cardiometabolic risk and surrogate markers of enhanced early atherogenesis in black and white patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Dessein, Patrick H; Woodiwiss, Angela J; Norton, Gavin R; Tsang, Linda; Solomon, Ahmed

    2013-09-20

    Whether adiponectin levels associate with atherogenesis in RA is uncertain. We examined the independent relationships of total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin concentrations with cardiometabolic risk and surrogate markers of enhanced early atherogenesis in black and white patients with RA. We determined total and HMW adiponectin concentrations and those of endothelial activation molecules including soluble E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), in 210 (119 black and 91 white) RA patients. Associations were determined in potential confounder and mediator adjusted mixed regression models. Total and HMW adiponectin concentrations related similarly to metabolic risk factors and endothelial activation. In all patients, total and HMW adiponectin concentrations associated paradoxically with high systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure (partial R = 0.155 to 0.241, P ≤ 0.03). Ethnic origin did not impact on these relationships (interaction P ≥ 0.09). Total and HMW adiponectin concentrations associated with those of glucose in white and black patients respectively (partial R = -0.304, P = 0.006 and -0.246, P = 0.01). In black but not white participants, total and HMW adiponectin concentrations also related favorably to lipid profiles (partial R = 0.292 to 0.360, P ≤ 0.003 for HDL cholesterol concentrations, -0.269 to -0.299, P ≤ 0.006 for triglyceride concentrations and -0.302 to -0.390, P ≤ 0.002 for total-HDL cholesterol ratio) and the number of metabolic risk factors (partial R = -0.210 to -0.238, P ≤ 0.03). In white but not black patients, total and HMW adiponectin concentrations associated paradoxically with overall endothelial activation as estimated by a standard z-score of endothelial activation molecule concentrations (partial R = 0.262, P = 0.01 and 0.252, P = 0.02); in the respective models, the extent of effect of total and HMW

  17. Direct and indirect medical costs incurred by Canadian patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a 12 year study.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A E; Zowall, H; Levinton, C; Assimakopoulos, H; Sibley, J T; Haga, M; Shiroky, J; Neville, C; Lubeck, D P; Grover, S A; Esdaile, J M

    1997-06-01

    To perform the first prospective longitudinal study of direct (health services utilized) and indirect costs (diminished productivity represented by income loss) incurred by patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Saskatoon and Montreal, followed for up to 12 and 4 years, respectively. 1063 patients reported on health status, health services utilization, and diminished productivity every 6 months. Annual direct costs were $3788 (1994 Canadian dollars) in the late 1980s and $4656 in the early 1990s. Given that the average age exceeded 60 years, few participated in labor force activities or considered themselves disabled from the labor force and their indirect costs were substantially less, $2165 in the late 1980s and $1597 in the early 1990s. Institutional stays and medications made up at least 80% of total direct costs. Lengths of stay in acute care facilities remained constant, but the rate of hospitalization increased in the early 1990s, increasing average hospital costs per patient from $1563 in the late 1980s to $2023 in the early 1990s. For nonacute care facilities, rate of admission as well as length of stay increased over time, increasing costs per patient in Saskatoon 5-fold, from $291 to $1605. Those with greater functional disability incurred substantially higher direct and those under 65 years incurred higher indirect costs. Direct costs are higher than indirect costs. The major component is due to institutional stays that, in contrast to other direct cost components, is increased in the older and more disabled. Measures to reduce longterm disability by earlier, more aggressive intervention have the potential to produce considerable cost savings. However, it is unknown which strategies will have the greatest effect on outcome and accordingly, how resources can be optimally allocated.

  18. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with septic arthritis: A hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Egea, María-Carmen; Blanco, Antonio; Fernández-Roblas, Ricardo; Gadea, Ignacio; García-Cañete, Joaquín; Sandoval, Enrique; Valdazo, María; Esteban, Jaime

    2014-06-01

    To determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics, etiology, underlying conditions, and outcomes of patients with primary septic arthritis and no prosthetic joints at a university hospital. A retrospective study was performed between 2005 and 2012. Records from the Microbiology Department were reviewed, and patients with a positive culture of synovial fluid or biopsy were selected for the study. Clinical charts were reviewed using a designed protocol. 41 patients were diagnosed with septic arthritis with a positive culture. Most were diagnosed with monoarticular (85.37%) and monomicrobial (92.68%) arthritis. The most commonly involved joint was the knee (34.15%). The most frequent underlying conditions were hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (58.54%). Two cases of chronic arthritis, both caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were detected. The most frequently used antibiotic combinations were cloxacillin + ciprofloxacin and vancomycin + ciprofloxacin. Surgical treatment included needle aspiration, open joint debridement, or arthroscopic techniques. Twelve cases had a poor outcome (destructive articular disease), and 3 patients died from staphylococcal sepsis. In our hospital, septic arthritis is primarily acute, monoarticular, and monomicrobial; affects higher joints, is caused by S. aureus, and occurs in adult patients with underlying diseases. Outcome is good in most patients, although more than 25% of cases had articular sequels.

  19. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with septic arthritis: A hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Egea, María-Carmen; Blanco, Antonio; Fernández-Roblas, Ricardo; Gadea, Ignacio; García-Cañete, Joaquín; Sandoval, Enrique; Valdazo, María; Esteban, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics, etiology, underlying conditions, and outcomes of patients with primary septic arthritis and no prosthetic joints at a university hospital. Methods A retrospective study was performed between 2005 and 2012. Records from the Microbiology Department were reviewed, and patients with a positive culture of synovial fluid or biopsy were selected for the study. Clinical charts were reviewed using a designed protocol. Results 41 patients were diagnosed with septic arthritis with a positive culture. Most were diagnosed with monoarticular (85.37%) and monomicrobial (92.68%) arthritis. The most commonly involved joint was the knee (34.15%). The most frequent underlying conditions were hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (58.54%). Two cases of chronic arthritis, both caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were detected. The most frequently used antibiotic combinations were cloxacillin + ciprofloxacin and vancomycin + ciprofloxacin. Surgical treatment included needle aspiration, open joint debridement, or arthroscopic techniques. Twelve cases had a poor outcome (destructive articular disease), and 3 patients died from staphylococcal sepsis. Conclusions In our hospital, septic arthritis is primarily acute, monoarticular, and monomicrobial; affects higher joints, is caused by S. aureus, and occurs in adult patients with underlying diseases. Outcome is good in most patients, although more than 25% of cases had articular sequels. PMID:25104892

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of Tight Control of Inflammation in Early Psoriatic Arthritis: Economic Analysis of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, John L; Meads, David M; Hulme, Claire T; Mcparland, Lucy; Brown, Sarah; Coates, Laura C; Moverley, Anna R; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G; Helliwell, Philip S

    2018-03-01

    Treat-to-target approaches have proved to be effective in rheumatoid arthritis, but have not been studied in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). This study was undertaken to examine the cost-effectiveness of tight control (TC) of inflammation in early PsA compared to standard care. Cost-effectiveness analyses were undertaken alongside a UK-based, open-label, multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Taking the perspective of the health care sector, effectiveness was measured using the 3-level EuroQol 5-domain, which allows for the calculation of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) are presented, which represent the additional cost per QALY gained over a 48-week time horizon. Sensitivity analyses are presented assessing the impact of variations in the analytical approach and assumptions on the cost-effectiveness estimates. The mean cost and QALYs were higher in the TC group: £4,198 versus £2,000 and 0.602 versus 0.561. These values yielded an ICER of £53,948 per QALY. Bootstrapped uncertainty analysis suggests that the TC has a 0.07 probability of being cost-effective at a £20,000 threshold. Stratified analysis suggests that with certain costs being controlled, an ICER of £24,639 can be calculated for patients with a higher degree of disease severity. A tight control strategy to treat PsA is an effective intervention in the treatment pathway; however, this study does not find tight control to be cost-effective in most analyses. Lower drug prices, targeting polyarthritis patients, or reducing the frequency of rheumatology visits may improve value for money metrics in future studies. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Transient anorexia, hyper-nociception and cognitive impairment in early adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Skurlova, M; Stofkova, A; Kiss, A; Belacek, J; Pecha, O; Deykun, K; Jurcovicova, J

    2010-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, pain, anorexia, and cognitive changes. The enhanced production of cytokines appears before the full manifestation of the disease. So far, any experimental data on behavioral effects of early arthritis are lacking. In the present series we describe anorexia early changes in, pain hyper-sensitivity and altered cognitive behavior during the first four days of adjuvant arthritis in rats (AA), when no clinical signs are yet apparent. AA was induced to male Lewis rats by a single injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (cFA) at the base of the tail. Plasma leptin and ghrelin were measured using specific RIA methods. Gene expressions for food-regulatory peptides, neuropeptide-Y (NPY) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the hypothalamic arcuate nuclei (nARC), were quantitated by TaqMan real-time PCR. Pain sensation was measured on all four limbs and tail by the plantar test. Cognitive functions were tested in the Morris water maze (MWM). Levels of orexigenic ghrelin as well as mRNA expression of orexigenic NPY in nucleus arcuatus (nRC)re significantly enhanced on day 2 of AA only. Reduced body weight and food intake persisted by day 4 with the most profound reduction on day 2. The mRNA for anorexigenic IL-1β in the nARC was significantly enhanced on days 2 and 4. Enhanced pain sensitivity was observed on day 2, as was the cognitive impairment given by longer time to find the hidden platform, longer time spent in thigmotaxis zone, and longer trajectory. The less effective strategy used to find the hidden platform was observed up to the day 4 of AA. Early stage of AA brings about reduced body weight, food intake, and activation of central orexigenic pathways. The observed anorexia could be ascribed to the over-expression of anorexigenic IL-1β which dominates over the NPY orexigenic effects. On day 2 of AA higher pain sensitivity and cognitive impairment appear. All the observed change tend

  2. The occurrence of a geode in the olecranon of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Torikai, Eiji; Kageyama, Yasunori; Sugiyama, Eiji; Ogiwara, Yoshihiro; Irisawa, Satoshi; Nagano, Akira

    2006-03-01

    Geode, a subchondral cyst, is sometimes seen in the femur, knee, or wrist in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). But the onset of a giant geode at the olecranon is extremely rare in a patient with RA. We describe herein a rare case of a giant geode at the olecranon in a patient with RA.

  3. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of bariatric surgery on patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Jeffrey A.; Halperin, Florencia; Karlson, Jonathan C.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Bermas, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated the effect of weight loss after bariatric surgery among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of RA patients who underwent bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, or sleeve gastrectomy) at two medical centers. We obtained anthropometrics, laboratory values, RA disease activity, and medication use at baseline (prior to surgery), at six and twelve months post-surgery, and at most recent follow-up visits. RA disease activity was determined by clinical or validated measures. At each post-surgical visit, characteristics were compared to baseline. Results We identified 53 RA patients who underwent bariatric surgery. At baseline prior to surgery, mean body mass index was 47.8 kg/m2 (SD 7.7), mean weight was 128.2 kg (SD 24.1), and 57% had moderate/high RA disease activity. Twelve months post-surgery, subjects lost a mean of 41.0 kg (SD 17.3), 70% (SD 24) of excess weight (P<0.001). RA disease activity significantly improved at post-surgical visits (P<0.001). At 12 months post-surgery, 6% had moderate/high disease activity compared to 57% at baseline (P<0.001). At most recent follow-up (mean 5.8 years [SD 3.2] after surgery), 74% were in remission compared to 26% at baseline (P<0.001). Subjects had significantly lower erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and RA-related medication use at follow-up visits compared to baseline (P<0.05). Conclusion After substantial weight loss from bariatric surgery, RA patients had lower disease activity, decreased serum inflammatory markers, and less RA-related medication usage. Weight loss may be an important non-pharmacologic strategy to reduce RA disease activity. However, other factors, such as improved efficacy of medications, improved physical activity, and metabolic changes, may also have contributed to these post-surgical improvements. PMID:26018243

  5. IL-6-driven STAT signalling in circulating CD4+ lymphocytes is a marker for early anticitrullinated peptide antibody-negative rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Amy E; Pratt, Arthur G; Sedhom, Mamdouh A K; Doran, John Paul; Routledge, Christine; Hargreaves, Ben; Brown, Philip M; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh; Isaacs, John D; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2016-02-01

    A previously identified signal transduction and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) target-enriched gene signature in circulating CD4+ T cells of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was prominent in autoantibody-negative individuals. Here, interleukin (IL)-6-mediated STAT signalling was investigated in circulating lymphocytes of an independent early arthritis patient cohort, seeking further insight into RA pathogenesis and biomarkers of potential clinical utility. Constitutive and IL-6-induced expression of phosphorylated STAT1 (pSTAT1) and pSTAT3 was determined in T and B cells using Phosflow cytometric analysis in patients with RA and controls. Contemporaneous levels of serum cytokines were measured by immunoassay. Induced gene expression was measured in cultured CD4+T cells by quantitative real-time PCR. Among circulating lymphocytes of 187 patients with early arthritis, constitutive pSTAT3 correlated with serum IL-6 levels maximally in CD4+ T cells. Increased constitutive pSTAT3, but not pSTAT1, was observed in circulating CD4+ T cells of patients with early anticitrullinated peptide autoantibody (ACPA)-negative RA compared with disease controls, and these levels decreased alongside markers of disease activity with IL-6R-targeted treatment. Among patients presenting with seronegative undifferentiated arthritis (UA) the ratio of constitutive pSTAT3:pSTAT1 in CD4+ T cells contributed substantially to an algorithm for predicting progression to classifiable RA during a median of 20 months follow-up (area under receiver operator characteristic curve=0.84; p<0.001). Our findings support a particular role for IL-6-driven CD4+ T cell activation via STAT3 during the induction of RA, particularly as a feature of ACPA-negative disease. CD4+ T cell pSTAT measurements show promise as biomarkers of UA-RA progression and now require independent validation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  6. The immediate effects of taping therapy on knee pain and depression in patients with degenerative arthritis.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Won; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Park, Chi-Bok

    2018-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to identify the immediate effects of taping therapy on knee pain and depression among patients with degenerative arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] In total, 32 patients with degenerative arthritis were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the experimental group that underwent taping therapy and the control group that underwent regular treatment (16 patients per group). In the experimental group, therapeutic tape was wrapped all around the knee joint. Pain and depression were measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), respectively. [Results] The intra-group comparison showed significant differences in VAS and BDI for the experimental group. The intergroup comparison showed that the differences in VAS and BDI within the experimental group appeared significant relative to the control group. [Conclusion] It was observed that taping therapy showed an immediate effect in decreasing knee pain and depression among patients with degenerative arthritis.

  7. Independent associations of total and high molecular weight adiponectin with cardiometabolic risk and surrogate markers of enhanced early atherogenesis in black and white patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Whether adiponectin levels associate with atherogenesis in RA is uncertain. We examined the independent relationships of total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin concentrations with cardiometabolic risk and surrogate markers of enhanced early atherogenesis in black and white patients with RA. Methods We determined total and HMW adiponectin concentrations and those of endothelial activation molecules including soluble E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), in 210 (119 black and 91 white) RA patients. Associations were determined in potential confounder and mediator adjusted mixed regression models. Results Total and HMW adiponectin concentrations related similarly to metabolic risk factors and endothelial activation. In all patients, total and HMW adiponectin concentrations associated paradoxically with high systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure (partial R = 0.155 to 0.241, P ≤0.03). Ethnic origin did not impact on these relationships (interaction P ≥0.09). Total and HMW adiponectin concentrations associated with those of glucose in white and black patients respectively (partial R = -0.304, P = 0.006 and -0.246, P = 0.01). In black but not white participants, total and HMW adiponectin concentrations also related favorably to lipid profiles (partial R = 0.292 to 0.360, P ≤0.003 for HDL cholesterol concentrations, -0.269 to -0.299, P ≤0.006 for triglyceride concentrations and -0.302 to -0.390, P ≤0.002 for total-HDL cholesterol ratio) and the number of metabolic risk factors (partial R = -0.210 to -0.238, P ≤0.03). In white but not black patients, total and HMW adiponectin concentrations associated paradoxically with overall endothelial activation as estimated by a standard z-score of endothelial activation molecule concentrations (partial R = 0.262, P = 0.01 and 0.252, P = 0.02); in the respective models, the extent of

  8. Assessment of global DNA methylation in peripheral blood cell subpopulations of early rheumatoid arthritis before and after methotrexate.

    PubMed

    de Andres, María C; Perez-Pampin, Eva; Calaza, Manuel; Santaclara, Francisco J; Ortea, Ignacio; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-08-29

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression that has been insufficiently studied in the blood of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, as only T cells and total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with established RA have been studied and with conflicting results. Five major blood cell subpopulations: T, B and NK cells, monocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, were isolated from 19 early RA patients and 17 healthy controls. Patient samples were taken before and 1 month after the start of treatment with methotrexate (MTX). Analysis included DNA methylation with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry-selected reaction monitoring (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS-SRM) and expression levels of seven methylation-specific enzymes by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD)-naïve early RA patients showed global DNA hypomethylation in T cells and monocytes, together with a lower expression of DNA methyltrasnferase 1 (DNMT1), the maintenance DNA methyltransferase, which was also decreased in B cells. Furthermore, significantly increased expression of ten-eleven translocation1 (TET1), TET2 and TET3, enzymes involved in demethylation, was found in monocytes and of TET2 in T cells. There was also modest decreased expression of DNMT3A in B cells and of growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45A (GADD45A) in T and B cells. Treatment with MTX reverted hypomethylation in T cells and monocytes, which were no longer different from controls, and increased global methylation in B cells. In addition, DNMT1 and DNMT3A showed a trend to reversion of their decreased expression. Our results confirm global DNA hypomethylation in patients with RA with specificity for some blood cell subpopulations and their reversal with methotrexate treatment. These changes are accompanied by parallel changes in the levels of enzymes involved in methylation, suggesting

  9. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boros, Christina; Whitehead, Ben

    2010-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood, occurring in approximately 1:500 children. Despite a recent expansion in treatment options and improvement of outcomes, significant morbidity still occurs. This article outlines the clinical manifestations, assessment, detection of complications, treatment options and monitoring requirements, with the aid of guidelines recently published by The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, which provide practical support for general practitioners to ensure best practice care and to prevent lifelong disability in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. General practice plays an important role in the early detection, initial management and ongoing monitoring of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Early detection involves understanding the classification framework for subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and being aware of the clinical manifestations and how to look for them, through history, examination and appropriate investigation. The major extra-articular manifestations of juvenile idiopathic arthritis are uveitis and growth disturbance. Treatment options include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, methotrexate, biologic agents, and corticosteroids. Management using a multidisciplinary approach can prevent long term sequelae. Unfortunately, approximately 50% of children will have active disease as adults.

  10. Risk of Incident Liver Disease in Patients with Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis, and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Ogdie, Alexis; Grewal, Sungat K; Noe, Megan H; Shin, Daniel B; Takeshita, Junko; Chiesa Fuxench, Zelma C; Carr, Rotonya M; Gelfand, Joel M

    2018-04-01

    Relatively little is known about the risk for incident liver disease in psoriasis (PsO), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We performed a cohort study among patients with PsO, PsA, or RA and matched controls in The Health Improvement Network from 1994 to 2014. Outcomes of interest were any liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cirrhosis (any etiology). Among patients with PsO (N = 197,130), PsA (N = 12,308), RA (N = 54,251), and matched controls (N = 1,279,754), the adjusted hazard ratios for any liver disease were elevated among patients with PsO (without systemic therapy [ST] 1.37; with ST 1.97), PsA (without ST 1.38; with ST 1.67), and RA without an ST (1.49) but not elevated in patients with RA prescribed an ST (0.96). Incident nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was highest in patients with PsO prescribed an ST (2.23) and PsA with an ST (2.11). The risk of cirrhosis was highest among patients with PsO with an ST (2.62) and PsA without an ST (3.15). Additionally, the prevalence of liver disease and cirrhosis increased in a stepwise fashion with increasing body surface area affected by PsO (P for trend <0.001). More so than RA, PsO and PsA are associated with liver disease, particularly nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cirrhosis, and this was true even among patients without ST exposure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The development of a questionnaire to evaluate rheumatoid arthritis patient's knowledge about methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Fayet, Françoise; Savel, Carine; Rodere, Malory; Pereira, Bruno; Abdi, Dihya; Mathieu, Sylvain; Tournadre, Anne; Soubrier, Martin; Dubost, Jean-Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Assess knowledge concerning methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients by means of a questionnaire. Methotrexate is the standard drug for rheumatoid arthritis treatment. It has potentially serious side effects that can be largely prevented by making sure that patients are well informed and comply with prescription guidelines. Cross-sectional survey. A questionnaire on methotrexate (mode of action, administration, drug interactions), side effects, monitoring and lifestyle implications was offered to all the rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with the drug seen between March and September 2013 in a large hospital in France. One hundred and eighty-three patients (143 women), mean age 60 (13·5) years, with a median disease duration of 12 years [7-20] and treated with methotrexate for eight years [5-13] took part. Methotrexate was identified as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug by 78% of the patients. The weekly administration method was well assimilated (97%); 67% indicated that the rationale for folic acid was to reduce treatment toxicity. Only 21% knew that trimethoprim was contraindicated. Half were aware of the haematologic risk and 36% were aware of the risk of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. There was knowledge concerning laboratory testing (80%), but 54% thought they were only being monitored for rheumatoid arthritis activity. Only 13% of the men, but 90% of the women, of childbearing age knew that contraception was essential, and 75% indicated that alcohol consumption should be limited. A low knowledge score correlated significantly with age and low educational level. It was independent of sex, duration of treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis patient's knowledge concerning methotrexate is poor, particularly for the most serious side effects (haematologic and hypersensitivity pneumonitis), interactions with trimethoprim, and in men, the need for contraception. Patient knowledge concerning methotrexate should be regularly checked and

  12. Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Abdul Hadi; Raghavendra Rao, Nidagurthi Guggilla; Avanapu, Srinivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of present research was to develop matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam filled in capsule for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and Methods: Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam were prepared by direct compression method using microsomal enzyme dependent and pH-sensitive polymers which were further filled into an empty HPMC capsule. To assess the compatibility, FT-IR and DSC studies for pure drug, polymers and their physical mixture were performed. The formulated batches were subjected to physicochemical studies, estimation of drug content, in vitro drug release, drug release kinetics, and stability studies. Results: When FTIR and DSC studies were performed it was found that there was no interaction between lornoxicam and polymers which used. All the physicochemical properties of prepared matrix-mini-tablets were found to be in normal limits. The percentage of drug content was found to be 99.60±0.07%. Our optimized matrix mini-tablets-filled-capsule formulation F30 released lornoxicam after a lag time of 5.02±0.92 hr, 95.48±0.65 % at the end of 8 hr and 99.90±0.83 % at the end of 12 hr. Stability was also found for this formulation as per the guidelines of International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. Conclusion: A novel colon targeted delivery system of lornoxicam was successfully developed by filling matrix-mini-tablets into an empty HPMC capsule shell for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24967065

  13. A randomised controlled trial of occupational therapy for people with early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hammond, A; Young, A; Kidao, R

    2004-01-01

    Occupational therapy (OT) aims at improving performance of daily living tasks, facilitating successful adjustments in lifestyle, and preventing losses of function. To evaluate the effects of a pragmatic, comprehensive OT programme on self management and health status of people with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (<2.5 years). A randomised, controlled "assessor blinded" trial was conducted with assessments made at entry, 6, 12, and 24 months. Main outcomes were AIMS2: physical function (PF), pain visual analogue scale (VAS), and Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale (ASES). Groups had similar disease duration (9 months OT (n = 162) v 10 months control (n = 164)). The OT group received 7.57 (SD 3.04) hours of therapy. Self management significantly increased in the OT group. Otherwise, there were no significant differences in any outcome measures, or between groups, by ACR functional class: AIMS2: PF (F = 0.04; p = 0.96); pain VAS (F = 0.29; p = 0.74); total ASES score (F = 0.93; p = 0.39). OT improved self management but not health status in early RA. Functional ability remains reasonably good for many in the first five years, so preventive benefits of self management may not yet be apparent and longer follow up is needed. Although many considered the education and therapy useful, insufficient numbers in the OT group used self management sufficiently to make a difference. Behavioural approaches can improve adherence and, potentially, the long term benefits. Future research should evaluate OT as a complex intervention and develop programmes from a theoretical and evidence base.

  14. Arthritis Patient Education: How Economic Evaluations Can Inform Health Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ann E.

    1997-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness evaluation of an Arthritis Self-Management Program assessed direct and indirect costs through self-reporting of health services use. Diminished productivity and effectiveness were measured through a visual analog scale and the health status dimensions of the Canadian Medical Outcomes Study short form. (JOW)

  15. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes using flow cytometry in polymyalgia rheumatica, RS3PE and early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Y; Matsuda, M; Ishii, W; Gono, T; Ikeda, S

    2008-01-01

    Clinical pictures of poly-myalgia rheumatica (PMR) and remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) are often indistinguishable from those of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To investigate whether there is a difference in immunological aspects among these 3 disorders, we performed a phenotypic analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Eleven patients with early RA, 14 with PMR and 11 with RS3PE were enrolled in this study. After separation of mononuclear cells from peripheral blood using the Ficoll-Hypaque method, surface markers and intracellular cytokines of lymphocytes were analyzed by 2- or 3-color flow cytometry. Both PMR and RS3PE showed a significant decrease in CD8+CD25+ cells (p<0.05), and significant increases in CD4+IFN-gamma+IL-4- (p<0.05), CD8+IFN-gamma+IL-4- (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively) and CD4+TNF-alpha+ cells (p<0.05) compared with early RA. CD3+CD4+ cells were higher in PMR than in RS3PE (p<0.01), but there were no significant differences in any other phenotypes between these disorders. A decrease in activated cytotoxic/suppressor T cells and increases in circulating Th1 and Tc1 cells may be common characteristics of PMR and RS3PE in comparison with early RA. Both disorders are clearly different from early RA, and probably belong to the same disease entity with regard to phenotypes of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  16. Disease activity in and quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans: the Nordic PAM Study.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, U; Gudbjornsson, B; Iversen, L; Laasonen, L; Ejstrup, L; Ternowitz, T; Ståhle, M

    2017-11-01

    To describe the social status and health-related quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries. Patients with at least one mutilated joint confirmed by radiology were studied. Disease activity involving joints and skin, physician-assessed disease activity, and patient's education and work status were recorded. Data from the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, Health Assessment Questionnaire and Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire were gathered and correlated with disease duration, pain, and general well-being (visual analogue scale). The controls were 58 Swedish patients with long-standing psoriatic arthritis sine PAM. Sixty-seven patients were included. Patients with PAM had a protracted disease history (33 ± 14 years) and disease onset at a relatively early age (30 ± 12 years). Overall inflammatory activity at inclusion was mild to moderate. The mean number of mutilated joints was 8.2 and gross deformity was found in 16% of patients. Forty per cent were treated with biological and 32% with conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Forty-two per cent had retired early or were on sick leave. Impaired functional capacity with little or no ability to perform self-care or everyday tasks was reported by 21% of the patients. Patients between 45 and 60 years of age reported the most impaired quality of life in comparison to the control group. PAM seriously affects social functioning. Whether early recognition of PAM and new forms of therapy can improve disease outcome and quality of life remains to be studied.

  17. The Risk of Diabetes Among Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, and Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Daniel H.; Love, Thorvardur Jon; Canning, Claire; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Background We examined the risk of DM among subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis (PsA/PsO), compared with non-rheumatic controls. Methods We assembled study cohorts using linked health care utilization data from British Columbia. All persons with at least two diagnoses of RA or PsA/PsO were included and compared with a cohort of persons without any known rheumatic disease. The outcome of interest was a diagnosis of new onset DM, as defined by initiation of an anti-diabetic medication. Incidence rates (IR) per 1,000 person-years and incidence rate ratios (IRR) were calculated and Cox regression models examined to determine the hazard ratio (HR) for diabetes by age, gender, systemic immunosuppressive and glucocorticoid use. Results The study cohort consisted of 48,718 subjects with RA, 40,346 with PsA/PsO, and 442,033 without any rheumatic disease. The IR for DM among subjects with RA was 8.6 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI 8.5 – 8.7), PsA/PsO 8.2 (95% CI 8.1 – 8.3), and for non-rheumatic controls 5.8 (95% CI 5.8–5.8). The adjusted HR for RA compared with non-rheumatic controls was 1.5 (95% CI 1.4–1.5) and 1.4 (95% CI 1.3 – 1.5) for PsA/PsO. Conclusions RA and PsA/PsO appear to be associated with an increased risk of DM. The ability of potent anti-rheumatic treatments to reverse this trend warrants study. PMID:20584807

  18. Near-infrared Fluorescence Optical Imaging in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparison to Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Michaela; Ohrndorf, Sarah; Werner, Stephanie G; Schicke, Bernd; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Hamm, Bernd; Backhaus, Marina; Hermann, Kay-Geert A

    2015-07-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) is a novel imaging technology in the detection and evaluation of different arthritides. FOI was validated in comparison to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), greyscale ultrasonography (GSUS), and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Hands of 31 patients with early RA were examined by FOI, MRI, and US. In each modality, synovitis of the wrist, metacarpophalangeal joints (MCP) 2-5, and proximal interphalangeal joints (PIP) 2-5 were scored on a 4-point scale (0-3). Sensitivity and specificity of FOI were analyzed in comparison to MRI and US as reference methods, differentiating between 3 phases of FOI enhancement (P1-3). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to evaluate the agreement of FOI with MRI and US. A total of 279 joints (31 wrists, 124 MCP and 124 PIP joints) were evaluated. With MRI as the reference method, overall sensitivity/specificity of FOI was 0.81/0.00, 0.49/0.84, and 0.86/0.38 for wrist, MCP, and PIP joints, respectively. Under application of PDUS as reference, sensitivity was even higher, while specificity turned out to be low, except for MCP joints (0.88/0.15, 0.81/0.76, and 1.00/0.27, respectively). P2 appears to be the most sensitive FOI phase, while P1 showed the highest specificity. The best agreement of FOI was shown for PDUS, especially with regard to MCP and PIP joints (ICC of 0.57 and 0.53, respectively), while correlation with MRI was slightly lower. FOI remains an interesting diagnostic tool for patients with early RA, although this study revealed limitations concerning the detection of synovitis. Further research is needed to evaluate its full diagnostic potential in rheumatic diseases.

  19. A Case of Disseminated Histoplasmosis in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis on Abatacept.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nina; Doyon, Jeffrey B; Lazarus, Jacob E; Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Johncilla, Melanie E; Agoston, Agoston T; Dalal, Anuj K; Velásquez, Gustavo E

    2018-05-01

    Biologic agents are effective treatments for rheumatoid arthritis but are associated with important risks, including severe infections. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) α inhibitors are known to increase the risk of systemic fungal infections such as disseminated histoplasmosis. Abatacept is a biologic agent with a mechanism different from that of TNFα inhibitors: It suppresses cellular immunity by competing for the costimulatory signal on antigen-presenting cells. The risk of disseminated histoplasmosis for patients on abatacept is not known. We report a case of abatacept-associated disseminated histoplasmosis and review the known infectious complications of abatacept. While the safety of resuming biologic agents following treatment for disseminated histoplasmosis is also not known, abatacept is recommended over TNFα inhibitors for rheumatoid arthritis patients with a prior serious infection. We discuss the evidence supporting this recommendation and discuss alternative treatments for rheumatoid arthritis patients with a history of a serious infection.

  20. Reliability of in-Shoe Plantar Pressure Measurements in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidmar, Gaj; Novak, Primoz

    2009-01-01

    Plantar pressures measurement is a frequently used method in rehabilitation and related research. Metric characteristics of the F-Scan system have been assessed from different standpoints and in different patients, but not its reliability in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Therefore, our objective was to assess reliability of the F-Scan plantar…

  1. [In-patient (early) rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Wallesch, Claus-W; Lautenschläger, Sindy

    2017-04-01

    It is difficult to develop the financing and hospital provision of interventions for early rehabilitation within the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system. In addition to a range of partially rehabilitative complex interventions, the system recognizes three main forms of early rehabilitative interventions: geriatric, neurological/neurosurgical, and interdisciplinary and others. In this article, the appropriate definitions and cost-effectiveness of these procedures are analyzed and compared. The early rehabilitative interventions are characterized by constant cooperation in the therapeutic team, especially neurological early rehabilitation through the incorporation of nursing as a therapeutic profession. Whereas geriatric and neurological early rehabilitation are reflected in the DRG system, the former provided in many general hospitals and the latter mainly in specialized institutions, interdisciplinary early rehabilitation has only occasionally been represented in the DRG system so far. If all acute in-patients who require early rehabilitation should receive such an intervention, an additional fee must be implemented for this this interdisciplinary service.

  2. Hormone, metabolic peptide, and nutrient levels in the earliest phases of rheumatoid arthritis-contribution of free fatty acids to an increased cardiovascular risk during very early disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Man Wai; Koopman, Frieda A; Visscher, Jan P M; de Hair, Maria J; Gerlag, Danielle M; Tak, Paul Peter

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease associated with changes in several hormones and metabolic peptides. Crosstalk between these factors and the immune system may be important for homeostasis during inflammation. Here, we studied the levels of hormones, metabolic peptides, and nutrients in individuals at risk for developing RA (at risk). In total, 18 hormones, metabolic peptides, and nutrients were measured in fasting serum samples from 45 autoantibody-positive individuals at risk, 22 RA patients, and 16 healthy subjects. Triglyceride (TG) levels were also measured in an independent validation cohort of 32 individuals at risk, 20 early arthritis patients, and 20 healthy controls. We found an elevated TG level in individuals at risk and significantly higher TG levels in RA patients compared to healthy controls. These results were confirmed in the validation cohort. Similarly, free fatty acid (FFA) levels showed an increase in individuals at risk and were significantly higher in RA patients compared to healthy controls. In RA patients, FFA levels were positively correlated with disease activity. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and norepinephrine levels were highly significantly increased in individuals at risk and RA patients compared to healthy controls. TG and FFA levels are increased in RA patients and positively correlated with disease activity parameters. The results presented here suggest a role for FFAs in the pathogenesis of RA. Furthermore, PP and norepinephrine may be a biomarker that could assist in the identification of individuals at risk.

  3. Knowledge and perception of cardiovascular disease risk among patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boo, Sunjoo; Oh, Hyunjin; Froelicher, Erika S; Suh, Chang-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The prerequisites for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease are adequate levels of knowledge and being aware of the risk. In this study, the levels of knowledge about cardiovascular disease among patients with rheumatoid arthritis and the perception were evaluated in relation to their actual 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease. This cross-sectional study of 200 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was conducted in a university-affiliated hospital in South Korea. The patients' actual risk of cardiovascular disease was estimated using the Framingham Risk Score. The most common risk factor was physical inactivity, with 77% of the patients not engaging in regular exercise. The patients lacked knowledge about the effects of physical inactivity and anti-inflammatory medication on the development of cardiovascular disease. Misperceptions about the risk of cardiovascular disease were common, i.e., 19.5% of the patients underestimated their risk and 41% overestimated. Hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and smoking were the most prevalent among the patients who underestimated their risk, and these same patients had the lowest level of knowledge about cardiovascular disease. This study demonstrated the rheumatoid arthritis patients' lack of knowledge about the effects of physical inactivity and anti-inflammatory medications on the development of cardiovascular disease, and their misperception of cardiovascular risk was common. As a preventive measure, educational programs about cardiovascular disease should be tailored specifically for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and behavioral interventions, including routine exercise, should be made available at the time of diagnosis.

  4. Prognostic factors in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: a case-control study revealing early predictors and outcome after 14.9 years.

    PubMed

    Flatø, Berit; Lien, Gunhild; Smerdel, Anna; Vinje, Odd; Dale, Knut; Johnston, Virginia; Sørskaar, Dag; Moum, Torbjørn; Ploski, Rafal; Førre, Øystein

    2003-02-01

    arthritis, hip joint involvement, long duration of elevated ESR and IgM RF. Compared with healthy controls, patients with JRA had impaired physical health and lower employment rates after more than 11 years of disease duration. Elevated ESR, extensive and symmetric arthritis, positive IgM RF, DRB1*08, DRB1*01, HLA-B27 and DRB1*08 in combination, early onset, and female sex were early risk factors for an unfavorable outcome.

  5. Effect of rocker shoes on pain, disability and activity limitation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bagherzadeh Cham, Masumeh; Ghasemi, Mohammad Sadegh; Forogh, Bijan; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali; Zabihi Yeganeh, Mozdeh; Eshraghi, Arezoo

    2014-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which affects the joints and soft tissues of the foot and ankle. Rocker shoes may be prescribed for the symptomatic foot in rheumatoid arthritis; however, there is a limited evidence base to support the use of rocker shoes in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of heel-to-toe rocker shoes on pain, disability, and activity limitation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical trial. Seventeen female patients with rheumatoid arthritis of 1 year or more duration, disease activity score of less than 2.6, and foot and ankle pain were recruited. Heel-to-toe rocker shoe was made according to each patient's foot size. All the patients were evaluated immediately, 7 and 30 days after their first visit. Foot Function Index values were recorded at each appointment. With the use of rocker shoes, Foot Function Index values decreased in all subscales. This reduction was noted in the first visit and was maintained throughout the trials. Rocker shoe can improve pain, disability, and activity limitation in patients with rheumatoid foot pain. All the subjects reported improved comfort levels. The results of this study showed that high-top, heel-to-toe rocker shoe with wide toe box was effective at reducing foot and ankle pain. It was also regarded as comfortable and acceptable footwear by the patients with rheumatoid foot problems. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  6. Effect of Fatigue, Older Age, Higher Body Mass Index, and Female Sex on Disability in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Treatment-to-Target Era.

    PubMed

    Twigg, Sarah; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Freeston, Jane; Tan, Ai Lyn; Emery, Paul; Tennant, Alan; Morgan, Ann W

    2018-03-01

    To compare disease activity and disability over 2 years in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) before and after implementation of treat-to-target therapy and identify predictors of adverse outcome. The Yorkshire Early Arthritis Register (YEAR) recruited 725 patients with early RA between 2002 and 2009, treated with a step-up approach. The Inflammatory Arthritis Continuum study (IACON) recruited cases between 2010 and 2014 and treated to target. A total of 384 IACON cases met 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism criteria. Latent growth curves of change in Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) were compared between YEAR and IACON. Latent class growth analysis identified trajectories of change. Baseline predictors of trajectories were identified using logistic regression. The mean DAS28 over 2 years was lower in IACON than in YEAR. Latent trajectories of HAQ change in YEAR were high stable (21% of cohort), moderate reducing (35%), and low reducing (44%). Only moderate reducing (66%) and low reducing (34%) were seen in IACON. In both cohorts, female sex and fatigue predicted adverse HAQ trajectories (high stable and moderate reducing). Odds ratios (ORs) for moderate reducing compared to low reducing for women were 2.58 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.69, 4.49) in YEAR and 5.81 (95% CI 2.44, 14.29) in IACON. ORs per centimeter fatigue visual analog score were 1.13 (95% CI 1.07, 1.20) in YEAR and 1.16 (95% CI 1.12, 1.20) in IACON. Treat-to-target therapy gave more favorable trajectories of change in DAS28 and HAQ, but adverse HAQ trajectory was more likely in women with greater fatigue, suggesting such patients would benefit from interventions to improve function as well as reduce inflammation. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Total fixation of cricoarytenoid joint of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Stevan P; Zivić, Ljubica; Stojanović, Jasmina; Belić, Branislav

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of cricoarytenoid joint fixation in case of rheumatoid arthritis is 17 to 33%. In later stages of rheumatoid arthritis, a gradual fixation of cricoarytenoid joint develops and both halves of the larynx become less movable which calls for endotracheal intubation; while total fixation of this joint demands surgical tracheotomy. Hashimoto thyroiditis can display symptoms which are difficult to distinguish from the ones present in total fixation of cricoarytenoid joint caused by rheumatoid arthritis. A 60-year-old woman in terminal stage of rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto thyroiditis, diagnosed after clinical and other examinations. She was treated for strident breathing with surgical tracheotomy. The microscopic examination of the larynx with the use of laryngoscopic pincers suggested the immovability of the right and very limited movability of the left arytenoid cartilage. A computerized endovideostroboscopy showed only passive vertical vibrating movements of the right vocal cord and irregular vibrations of the left vocal cord. Total fixation of the cricoarytenoid joint can be caused by many pathological processes, but so far references have shown no case of rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto thyroiditis. In differential diagnostics, one of many examinations is the microscopic examination of the larynx, but it is very important to determine the movability of the arytenoid cartilage with the use of appropriate instruments in total endotracheal anaesthesia while the patient is fully relaxed. Movements in cricoarytenoid joints in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and the same conditions are preserved.

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  9. Risk Factors for Clinician-Diagnosed Lyme Arthritis, Facial Palsy, Carditis, and Meningitis in Patients From High-Incidence States

    PubMed Central

    Kwit, Natalie A; Max, Ryan; Mead, Paul S

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Clinical features of Lyme disease (LD) range from localized skin lesions to serious disseminated disease. Information on risk factors for Lyme arthritis, facial palsy, carditis, and meningitis is limited but could facilitate disease recognition and elucidate pathophysiology. Methods Patients from high-incidence states treated for LD during 2005–2014 were identified in a nationwide insurance claims database using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code for LD (088.81), antibiotic treatment history, and clinically compatible codiagnosis codes for LD manifestations. Results Among 88022 unique patients diagnosed with LD, 5122 (5.8%) patients with 5333 codiagnoses were identified: 2440 (2.8%) arthritis, 1853 (2.1%) facial palsy, 534 (0.6%) carditis, and 506 (0.6%) meningitis. Patients with disseminated LD had lower median age (35 vs 42 years) and higher male proportion (61% vs 50%) than nondisseminated LD. Greatest differential risks included arthritis in males aged 10–14 years (odds ratio [OR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.0–4.2), facial palsy (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.6–2.7) and carditis (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.6–3.6) in males aged 20–24 years, and meningitis in females aged 10–14 years (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.1–5.5) compared to the 55–59 year referent age group. Males aged 15–29 years had the highest risk for complete heart block, a potentially fatal condition. Conclusions The risk and manifestations of disseminated LD vary by age and sex. Provider education regarding at-risk populations and additional investigations into pathophysiology could enhance early case recognition and improve patient management. PMID:29326960

  10. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in African-American patients--the need to measure disease burden.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Gail S; Qaiyumi, Seema; Richards, John; Vahabzadeh-Monshie, Hashem; Kindred, Chesahna; Whelton, Sean; Constantinescu, Florina

    2015-10-01

    Gaps in knowledge exist regarding the clinical characteristics of psoriatic disease in ethnic minority patients. We evaluated validated clinical disease measures of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in African-American and Caucasian patients. Adult outpatients with confirmed diagnoses of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and seen at four urban academic institutions were eligible for evaluation. Validated patient and physician-reported disease outcome parameters, quality of life measures of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and frequencies of systemic immunosuppressive therapies and patient comorbidities were documented. Psoriatic arthritis was less frequent in African-Americans compared to Caucasians (30 vs. 64.5 %, respectively, p < 0.001); however, African-Americans had more severe skin involvement [Psoriasis Area and Severity Index 8.4 (10.0) vs. Caucasians 5.5 (6.4), p = 0.06], with greater psychological impact and impaired quality of life. Use of biologic therapies was greater in Caucasian patients (46.2 vs. 13.3 % in African-Americans, p < 0.0001); yet, only one in four patients of the study cohort achieved minimal disease activity. Comorbidity was not associated with frequency of immunosuppressive drug use. In order to achieve a target of low disease activity and to reduce ethnic disparities in the care of psoriatic disease, the routine application of measures of disease status is needed.

  11. Obesity is the main determinant of insulin resistance more than the circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Hernandez, Jesus; Maldonado-Cervantes, Martha Imelda; Reyes, Juan Pablo; Patiño-Marin, Nuria; Maldonado-Cervantes, Enrique; Solorzano-Rodriguez, Claudia; de la Cruz Mendoza, Esperanza; Alvarado-Sanchez, Brenda

    Systemic blockade of TNF-α in Rheumatoid arthritis with insulin resistance seems to produce more improvement in insulin sensitivity in normal weight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis than in obese patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting that systemic-inflammation and obesity are independent risk factors for insulin resistance in Rheumatoid arthritis patients. To evaluate the insulin resistance in: normal weight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, overweight patients with Rheumatoid arthritis, obese Rheumatoid arthritis patients, and matched control subjects with normal weight and obesity; and its association with major cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Assessments included: body mass index, insulin resistance by Homeostasis Model Assessment, ELISA method, and enzymatic colorimetric assay. Outstanding results from these studies include: (1) In Rheumatoid arthritis patients, insulin resistance was well correlated with body mass index, but not with levels of serum cytokines. In fact, levels of cytokines were similar in all Rheumatoid arthritis patients, regardless of being obese, overweight or normal weight (2) Insulin resistance was significantly higher in Rheumatoid arthritis with normal weight than in normal weight (3) No significant difference was observed between insulin resistances of Rheumatoid arthritis with obesity and obesity (4) As expected, levels of circulating cytokines were significantly higher in Rheumatoid arthritis patients than in obesity. Obesity appears to be a dominant condition above inflammation to produce IR in RA patients. The dissociation of the inflammation and obesity components to produce IR suggests the need of an independent therapeutic strategy in obese patients with RA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  12. Frequency of auditory involvement and of associated factors in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Céspedes Cruz, Adriana Ivonne; Méndez Núñez, Myriam; Solís Vallejo, Eunice; Zeferino Cruz, Maritza; Torres Jiménez, Alfonso Ragnar; Ocampo Sánchez, Verónica; Flores Meza, Beatriz; Quintana Ruiz, Norma

    2017-09-08

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of arthritis in children under 16 years of age for more than 6 weeks in the absence of any other known cause. The extra-articular manifestations, especially in the audiovestibular system, are related to the involvement of the joints of the ossicular chain as a result of the inflammatory process in the synovium. Previous clinical studies in pediatric patients have shown conductive or sensorineural hearing loss. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of hearing impairment and of associated factors in patients with JIA. A prospective, analytical study was conducted from January 2013 to August 2014 in 62 patients with JIA aged between 5 and 15 years. The study was approved by the local ethics committee and parents signed their informed consent. All subjects underwent audiological examination involving otomicroscopy, audiometry, tympanometry, stapedius reflex and test for transient otoacoustic emissions (TOAE); rheumatologic evaluation included joint examination and the application of a measure of functional ability (disability) using the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ). Measures of central tendency and of dispersion were used (chi-square for associations and P<.05 for statistical significance). Sixty-two patients were included: 56 girls and 6 boys, mean age 11.9 years and mean disease duration of 3.4 years; 46% had rheumatoid factor (RF)- positive polyarticular JIA, 40% had RF-negative polyarticular JIA, 15% had disease of systemic onset and 3% had oligoarthritis. Active disease was found in 29 patients and 33 were in remission with medication. Of the total of 124 ears evaluated according to the Jerger classification for tympanometry, abnormal findings were observed in 78 that were type As and in 1 that was type Ad, whereas there were 45 type A ears. Hearing loss was disclosed by speech audiometry, rather than by pure tone audiometry. The TOAE

  13. Determinants associated with work participation in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis taking tumor necrosis factor inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Manders, Sofie H M; Kievit, Wietske; Braakman-Jansen, Annemarie L M A; Brus, Herman L M; Hendriks, Lidy; Fransen, Jaap; van de Laar, Mart A F J; van Riel, Piet L C M

    2014-07-01

    Reduced work participation (WP) is a common problem for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and generates high costs for society. Therefore, it is important to explore determinants of WP at the start of tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) treatment, and for changes in WP after 2 years of TNFi treatment. Within the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring (DREAM) biologic register, WP data were available from 508 patients with RA younger than 65 years and without an (early) retirement pension. WP was registered at start of TNFi treatment and after 2 years of followup and was measured by single patient-reported binary questions whether they had work, paid or voluntary, or had a disability allowance or a retirement pension. Determinants measured at baseline were age, sex, disease duration, functional status [through Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI)], 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), rheumatoid factor, presence of erosions, number of previous disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and number of comorbidities. During the 2 years of followup, HAQ-DI response and European League Against Rheumatism response were measured. Univariate analyses (excluded if p value was > 0.2) and multivariate (excluded if p value was > 0.1) logistic regression analyses were used. Determinants associated with WP at baseline were having a better HAQ-DI (OR 0.32, p = 0.000) and male sex (OR 0.65, p = 0.065). After 2 years of TNFi therapy, 11.8% (n = 60) started to work and 13.6% (n = 69) stopped working. Determinants associated with starting to work were better baseline HAQ-DI (OR 0.58), positive RF (OR 2.73), and young age (OR 0.96); and for stopping work, worse baseline HAQ-DI (OR 2.74), low HAQ-DI response (OR 0.31), and comorbidity (OR 2.67), all with p < 0.1. Young patients with RA and a high functional status without any comorbidity will have a better chance of working. This supports the main goal in the management of RA: to suppress disease activity as

  14. Direct and indirect healthcare costs of rheumatoid arthritis patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Hamuryudan, Vedat; Direskeneli, Haner; Ertenli, Ihsan; Inanc, Murat; Karaaslan, Yasar; Oksel, Fahrettin; Ozbek, Suleyman; Pay, Salih; Terzioglu, Ender; Balkan Tezer, Dilara; Hacibedel, Basak; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the annual cost of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Turkey by obtaining real-world data directly from patients. In this cross-sectional study, RA patients from the rheumatology outpatient clinics of 10 university hospitals were interviewed with a standardised questionnaire on RA-related healthcare care costs. The study included 689 RA patients (565 females) with a mean age of 51.2±13.2 years and mean disease duration of 9.4±7.8 years. The mean scores of the Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 and the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (5.08±2.34 and 1.08±0.68, respectively) indicated moderate disease activity and severity for the whole group. One-third of the patients were on biologic agents and 12% had co-morbid conditions. The mean number of annual outpatient visits was 11.7±9.6 per patient. Of the patients, 15% required hospitalisation and 4% underwent surgery. The mean annual direct cost was € 4,954 (median, € 1,805), whereas the mean annual indirect cost was € 2,802 (median, € 608). Pharmacy costs accounted for the highest expenditure (mean, € 2,777; median, € 791), followed by the RA-related consultations and expenses (mean, € 1,600; median, € 696). RA has a substantial economic burden in Turkey, direct costs being higher than indirect costs. Although both direct and indirect costs are lower in Turkey than in Europe with respect to nominal Euro terms, they are higher from the perspectives of purchasing power parity and gross domestic product. Early diagnosis and treatment of RA may positively affect the national economy considering the positive correlation between health care utilisations and increased cost with disease severity.

  15. A five-year model to assess the early cost-effectiveness of new diagnostic tests in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Buisman, Leander R; Luime, Jolanda J; Oppe, Mark; Hazes, Johanna M W; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H

    2016-06-10

    There is a lack of information about the sensitivity, specificity and costs new diagnostic tests should have to improve early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to explore the early cost-effectiveness of various new diagnostic test strategies in the workup of patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) at risk of having RA. A decision tree followed by a patient-level state transition model, using data from published literature, cohorts and trials, was used to evaluate diagnostic test strategies. Alternative tests were assessed as add-on to or replacement of the ACR/EULAR 2010 RA classification criteria for all patients and for intermediate-risk patients. Tests included B-cell gene expression (sensitivity 0.60, specificity 0.90, costs €150), MRI (sensitivity 0.90, specificity 0.60, costs €756), IL-6 serum level (sensitivity 0.70, specificity 0.53, costs €50) and genetic assay (sensitivity 0.40, specificity 0.85, costs €750). Patients with IA at risk of RA were followed for 5 years using a societal perspective. Guideline treatment was assumed using tight controlled treatment based on DAS28; if patients had a DAS28 >3.2 at 12 months or later patients could be eligible for starting biological drugs. The outcome was expressed in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (€2014 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained) and headroom. The B-cell test was the least expensive strategy when used as an add-on and as replacement in intermediate-risk patients, making it the dominant strategy, as it has better health outcomes and lower costs. As add-on for all patients, the B-cell test was also the most cost-effective test strategy. When using a willingness-to-pay threshold of €20,000 per QALY gained, the IL-6 and MRI strategies were not cost-effective, except as replacement. A genetic assay was not cost-effective in any strategy. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis revealed that the B-cell test was consistently superior in all strategies. When

  16. Patients With Thumb Carpometacarpal Arthritis Have Quantifiable Characteristic Expectations That Can Be Measured With a Survey.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lana; Hashmi, Sohaib Z; Nguyen, Joseph; Lee, Steve K; Weiland, Andrew J; Mancuso, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    Although patient expectations associated with major orthopaedic conditions have shown clinically relevant and variable effects on outcomes, expectations associated with thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) arthritis have not been identified, described, or analyzed before, to our knowledge. We asked: (1) Do patients with thumb CMC arthritis express characteristic expectations that are quantifiable and have measurable frequency? (2) Can a survey on expectations developed from patient-derived data quantitate expectations in patients with thumb CMC arthritis? The study was a prospective cohort study. The first phase was a 12-month-period involving interviews of 42 patients with thumb CMC arthritis to define their expectations of treatment. The interview process used techniques and principles of qualitative methodology including open-ended interview questions, unrestricted time, and study size determined by data saturation. Verbatim responses provided content for the draft survey. The second phase was a 12-month period assessing the survey for test-retest reliability with the recruitment of 36 participants who completed the survey twice. The survey was finalized from clinically relevant content, frequency of endorsement, weighted kappa values for concordance of responses, and intraclass coefficient and Cronbach's alpha for interrater reliability and internal consistency. Thirty-two patients volunteered 256 characteristic expectations, which consisted of 21 discrete categories. Expectations with similar concepts were combined by eliminating redundancy while maintaining original terminology. These were reduced to 19 items that comprised a one-page survey. This survey showed high concordance, interrater reliability, and internal consistency, with weighted kappa values between 0.58 and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.39-0.78; p < 0.001); intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.94 (95% CI, 0.94-0.98; p < 0.001), and Cronbach's alpha values of 0.94 and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.91-0.96; p < 0.001). The thumb

  17. The interleukin-20 receptor axis in early rheumatoid arthritis: novel links between disease-associated autoantibodies and radiographic progression.

    PubMed

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Nielsen, Morten Aagaard; Rhodes, Christopher; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Hetland, Merete Lund; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Junker, Peter; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hvid, Malene; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Robinson, William H; Sokolove, Jeremy; Deleuran, Bent

    2016-03-11

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often characterized by the presence of rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, and bone erosions. Current therapies can compromise immunity, leading to risk of infection. The interleukin-20 receptor (IL-20R) axis comprising IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 and their shared receptors activates tissue homeostasis processes but not the immune system. Consequently, modulation of the IL-20R axis may not lead to immunosuppression, making it an interesting drug target. We evaluated the role of the IL-20R axis in RA and associations between plasma cytokine levels and clinical disease. Plasma IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 levels were measured in early RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The IL-20R1 and IL-22R1 levels in paired peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial fluid mononuclear cells from a different cohort of RA patients were evaluated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Monocytes/macrophages were stimulated with heat-aggregated human immunoglobulin immune complexes and immune complexes containing citrullinated fibrinogen, and osteoclasts were incubated with IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24. The plasma concentrations of IL-20 and IL-24 (but not IL-19) were increased in early RA patients compared with healthy controls (both P < 0.002) and decreased after 6 months of treatment (both P < 0.0001). The expression of IL-22R1 (but not IL-20R1) was increased on monocytes from RA synovial fluid compared with monocytes from both RA and healthy control peripheral blood. The plasma concentrations of IL-20 and IL-24 were increased in rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibody positive compared with negative early RA patients (all P < 0.0001). Immune complexes stimulated the production of the IL-20R cytokines by monocytes/macrophages. Increased baseline plasma concentrations of IL-20 and IL-24 were associated with Sharp-van der Heijde score progression after 24

  18. [Sub-maximal aerobic capacity and quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lataoui, S; Belghali, S; Zeglaoui, H; Bouajina, E; Ben Saad, H

    2017-01-01

    Studies about sub-maximal aerobic capacity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are scarce. To assess the sub-maximal aerobic capacity of these patients through the 6-min walk test, estimated age of the "muscular and cardiorespiratory" chain. Thirty-seven consecutive patients (aged 20 to 60 years) with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis will be included. Non-inclusion criteria will be: use of drugs (e.g.; methotrexate, beta-blockers), orthopaedic or rheumatologic conditions (other than rheumatoid arthritis) that may alter walking ability and recent infections. Exclusion criteria will be: 6-min walking test contra-indications and imperfect performance of the required lung function and walking maneuvers. Signs of walking intolerance will be: test interruption, distance ≤lower limit of normal, dyspnea score ≥5/10 (visual analogue scale) at the end of the test, haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) drop ≥5%, cardiac frequency at the end of the test ≤60% of maximum predicted. An estimated "muscular and cardiorespiratory chain" age higher than the chronological one will be considered as a sign of accelerated ageing. A high percentage of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis would show evidences of walking limitation and accelerated "muscular and cardiorespiratory chain" ageing. There would be a significant correlation between the walking test and clinical, biological, radiological and pulmonary function data and the patients' quality-of-life status. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The Impact of Low-Dose Disease-modifying Anti-rheumatics Drugs (DMARDs) on Bone Mineral Density of Premenopausal Women in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Mahmutaj, Vigan; Boshnjaku, Shkumbin

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical polyarthritis and multisystemic involvement. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of low dose of methotrexate on bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This paper follows a retrospective study, which involves 60 female patients with early onset RA diagnosed according to the American Rheumatism Association Criteria (ACR/EULAR 2010). The patients were divided into two groups group I was composed of thirty patients treated with dose of 7.5 mg/weekly methotrexate (MTX), while group II included thirty patients treated with dose of 2 g/daily sulfasalazine (SSZ). The Disease Activity was measured by a combination of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and Disease Activity Score (DAS-28). Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (L2-4), and femoral neck, was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) (Stratos 800). Laboratory findings included: In this study, we found no negative effect on BMD in RA patients treated with low dose MTX in comparison to patients treated with SSZ. There was not observed significant difference in BMD of the lumbar spine, femur neck or trochanter, of MTX and SSZ patients in the pretreatment phase, nor after 12 months of treatment. No significant change in the biochemical parameters of the both groups. Based on the results of our study, low dose of methotrexate has no negative effect on BMD in premenopausal RA patients. We believe that these results might provide new insights and that further longitudinal studies with larger groups of premenopausal RA patients are required.

  20. The Impact of Low-Dose Disease-modifying Anti-rheumatics Drugs (DMARDs) on Bone Mineral Density of Premenopausal Women in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Mahmutaj, Vigan; Boshnjaku, Shkumbin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical polyarthritis and multisystemic involvement. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of low dose of methotrexate on bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Materials and methods: This paper follows a retrospective study, which involves 60 female patients with early onset RA diagnosed according to the American Rheumatism Association Criteria (ACR/EULAR 2010). The patients were divided into two groups group I was composed of thirty patients treated with dose of 7.5 mg/weekly methotrexate (MTX), while group II included thirty patients treated with dose of 2 g/daily sulfasalazine (SSZ). The Disease Activity was measured by a combination of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and Disease Activity Score (DAS-28). Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (L2–4), and femoral neck, was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) (Stratos 800). Laboratory findings included: In this study, we found no negative effect on BMD in RA patients treated with low dose MTX in comparison to patients treated with SSZ. There was not observed significant difference in BMD of the lumbar spine, femur neck or trochanter, of MTX and SSZ patients in the pretreatment phase, nor after 12 months of treatment. No significant change in the biochemical parameters of the both groups. Conclusion: Based on the results of our study, low dose of methotrexate has no negative effect on BMD in premenopausal RA patients. We believe that these results might provide new insights and that further longitudinal studies with larger groups of premenopausal RA patients are required. PMID:27147781

  1. The development and initial validation of a questionnaire to measure help-seeking behaviour in patients with new onset rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stack, Rebecca J; Mallen, Christian D; Deighton, Chris; Kiely, Patrick; Shaw, Karen L; Booth, Alison; Kumar, Kanta; Thomas, Susan; Rowan, Ian; Horne, Rob; Nightingale, Peter; Herron-Marx, Sandy; Jinks, Clare; Raza, Karim

    2015-12-01

    Early treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is vital. However, people often delay in seeking help at symptom onset. An assessment of the reasons behind patient delay is necessary to develop interventions to promote rapid consultation. Using a mixed methods design, we aimed to develop and test a questionnaire to assess the barriers to help seeking at RA onset. Questionnaire items were extracted from previous qualitative studies. Fifteen people with a lived experience of arthritis participated in focus groups to enhance the questionnaire's face validity. The questionnaire was also reviewed by groups of multidisciplinary health-care professionals. A test-retest survey of 41 patients with newly presenting RA or unclassified arthritis assessed the questionnaire items' intraclass correlations. During focus groups, participants rephrased questions, added questions and deleted items not relevant to the questionnaire's aims. Participants organized items into themes: early symptom experience, initial reactions to symptoms, self-management behaviours, causal beliefs, involvement of significant others, pre-diagnosis knowledge about RA, direct barriers to seeking help and relationship with GP. The test-retest survey identified seven items (out of 79) with low intraclass correlations which were removed from the final questionnaire. The involvement of people with a lived experience of arthritis and multidisciplinary health-care professionals in the preliminary validation of the DELAY (delays in evaluating arthritis early) questionnaire has enriched its development. Preliminary assessment established its reliability. The DELAY questionnaire provides a tool for researchers to evaluate individual, cultural and health service barriers to help-seeking behaviour at RA onset. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Variability in depression prevalence in early rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison of the CES-D and HAD-D Scales

    PubMed Central

    Covic, Tanya; Pallant, Julie F; Tennant, Alan; Cox, Sally; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G

    2009-01-01

    Background Depression is common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however reported prevalence varies considerably. Two frequently used instruments to identify depression are the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The objectives of this study were to test if the CES-D and HADS-D (a) satisfy current modern psychometric standards for unidimensional measurement in an early RA sample; (b) measure the same construct (i.e. depression); and (c) identify similar levels of depression. Methods Data from the two scales completed by patients with early RA were fitted to the Rasch measurement model to show that (a) each scale satisfies the criteria of fit to the model, including strict unidimensionality; (b) that the scales can be co-calibrated onto a single underlying continuum of depression and to (c) examine the location of the cut points on the underlying continuum as indication of the prevalence of depression. Results Ninety-two patients with early RA (62% female; mean age = 56.3, SD = 13.7) gave 141 sets of paired CES-D and HAD-D data. Fit of the data from the CES-D was found to be poor, and the scale had to be reduced to 13 items to satisfy Rasch measurement criteria whereas the HADS-D met model expectations from the outset. The 20 items combined (CES-D13 and HADS-D) satisfied Rasch model expectations. The CES-D gave a much higher prevalence of depression than the HADS-D. Conclusion The CES-D in its present form is unsuitable for use in patients with early RA, and needs to be reduced to a 13-item scale. The HADS-D is valid for early RA and the two scales measure the same underlying construct but their cut points lead to different estimates of the level of depression. Revised cut points on the CES-D13 provide comparative prevalence rates. PMID:19200388

  3. Health-related quality of life for patients with rheumatoid arthritis foot involvement.

    PubMed

    Wickman, Amy M; Pinzur, Michael S; Kadanoff, Ruth; Juknelis, Dainius

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disabling form of arthritis that frequently affects the hands and feet. With time, the majority of affected individuals will become disabled. Sixty-nine consecutively selected mild to moderately affected individuals with rheumatoid arthritis provided demographic data and agreed to complete the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SFMA) instrument. Focus group subjects selectively used minimally adaptive nonprescription footwear. Control subjects had similar disease expression, but did not alter their choice of footwear due to their disease. Adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate a significant negative impact on their quality of life with mild or moderate disease expression, as evidenced by poor scores in all six domains of the SFMA. Subjects who used even mildly adaptive nonprescription footwear demonstrated a statistically significant negative impact in mobility (p < .044) and functional index (p < .052) domains as compared with the control population having similar overall disease expression. Focus subjects also demonstrated a trend to less favorable scores in the arm and hand domain. Mean scores of the daily activity, emotional status, and bother index domains fared worse than population norms, but there was no statistical difference between subjects using, or not using, adaptive footwear. Individuals affected with mild to moderate rheumatoid arthritis are disabled as compared with the general population. There is a severe negative impact on mobility and functional capacity when the disease process begins to affect their feet.

  4. Increasing Physical Activity in Patients with Arthritis: A Tailored Health Promotion Program

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Mallinson, Trudy; Fischer, Heidi; Bateman, Jillian; Semanik, Pamela A.; Spring, Bonnie; Ruderman, Eric; Chang, Rowland W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Despite recent studies showing the benefit of physical activity for people with arthritis, the vast majority of persons with arthritis are not sufficiently physically active. The purpose of this report is to describe a tailored health promotion intervention aimed at increasing physical activity among persons with arthritis. The intervention is designed to be useful for health systems and insurers interested in a chronic disease management program that could be disseminated to large populations of arthritis patients. Methods The intervention is carried out by a clinician who is designated as the client’s physical activity advocate. The approach emphasizes motivational interviewing, individualized goal setting, tailored strategies for increasing physical activity and for monitoring progress, and a plan of 2 years of follow-up. The intervention includes a standardized assessment of barriers to and strengths supporting increased lifestyle physical activity. A randomized, controlled trial is underway to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of this intervention. Conclusion This intervention is unique in that it implements a program tailored to the individual that focuses on lifestyle physical activity and long-term monitoring. The approach recognizes that persons with arthritis present with varying levels of motivation for change in physical activity and that behavior change can take a long time to become habitual. PMID:20696695

  5. Deficiencies in provision of integrated multidisciplinary podiatry care for patients with inflammatory arthritis: a UK district general hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Juarez, M; Price, E; Collins, D; Williamson, L

    2010-01-01

    Foot problems are highly prevalent in inflammatory arthritis (IA), especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Chronic inflammation can lead to permanent structural changes, deformity and disability. Early podiatry intervention in RA improves long term outcomes. National guidelines recommend that patients should be treated by a multidisciplinary team with dedicated podiatry services. In clinical practice funding constraints limit availability of these services. To assess prevalence of foot problems and quality and availability of foot care services at a UK district general hospital. 1200 IA patients in Swindon (Wiltshire, UK) were invited to complete an anonymised questionnaire regarding access to foot care services and education/information on foot problems. 448 patients. Prevalence of foot problems: 68%. Only 31% of patients had access to appropriate foot specialist. 24% had received foot assessment within 3 months of diagnosis of IA and 17% yearly review thereafter. Despite high prevalence of foot problems in our population we identified significant deficiencies in provision of integrated multidisciplinary podiatry care. The data we present could be used by others to support business cases to obtain funding to improve the links between rheumatology and podiatry services. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Retinal toxicity related to hydroxychloroquine in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Telek, Hande Husniye; Yesilirmak, Nilufer; Sungur, Gulten; Ozdemir, Yaprak; Yesil, Nesibe Karahan; Ornek, Firdevs

    2017-12-01

    To compare the retinal toxicity due to hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) use in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Patients who were using HCQ due to SLE and RA, and healthy subjects evaluated in this study. Central foveal thickness (CFT), inner-outer segment (IS-OS) junction irregularity, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, mfERG and FAF measurements were performed to evaluate retinal toxicity. Study included 35 eyes of 35 SLE patients, 40 eyes of 40 RA patients and 20 eyes of 20 healthy subjects. In SLE group, retinal abnormality was found in three eyes with mfERG, in one eye with FAF and in four eyes with OCT. In RA group, retinal abnormality was found in 10 eyes with mfERG, in five eyes with FAF and in nine eyes with OCT. A statistically significant difference was found with respect to mfERG between "eyes with abnormal responses and without abnormal responses" and "eyes with abnormal responses and controls" (p < 0.05). A statistically significant difference was found with respect to CFT between "eyes with IS-OS junction irregularities and without IS-OS junction irregularities" and "eyes with/without IS-OS junction irregularities and controls" (p < 0.05). The use of HCQ seems to cause retinal toxicity more often in RA patients compared to SLE patients. For the early detection of retinal changes, OCT and mfERG can be used as screening tools due to their higher sensitivity rates compared to other tests.

  7. Better arthritis care: Patients' expectations and priorities, the competencies that community-based health professionals need to improve their care of people with arthritis?

    PubMed

    Erwin, J; Edwards, K; Woolf, A; Whitcombe, S; Kilty, S

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the competencies that patients think non-specialist community-based nurses and allied health professionals (AHPs) need to enable them to assess, care for and manage arthritis appropriately. Four face-to-face focus groups were held with a total of 16 women and nine men with arthritis, to discuss the care they received from community-based health professionals, the skills and knowledge they expected from community-based health professionals and what they prioritized. People with arthritis wanted health providers to have an understanding of the difference between inflammatory arthritis (IA) and osteoarthritis (OA), of how serious OA can be, and of the unpredictability of IA and flares. They emphasized the need for nurses and AHPs to understand the psychosocial impact of arthritis on individuals, family and friends, and the psychological adjustment needed when diagnosed with IA. They wanted community-based health professionals to have some knowledge of the types of drug treatments that people with IA receive and the implications of taking immunosuppressive drugs. They also wanted them to understand the pain associated with arthritis, particularly OA, which participants felt was not taken seriously enough. They wanted nurses and AHPs in the community to be able to give basic advice on pacing and pain management, to make multidisciplinary referrals, to communicate effectively between referral points and to be able to signpost people to sources of help and good, reliable sources of education and information (especially for OA). They also wanted them to understand that patients who have had a diagnosis for a long time are the experts in their own disease. Other areas which were emphasized as being important were good communication skills and taking a holistic approach to caring for people with arthritis. OA and IA differ significantly, both in their nature and their management. However, patients with arthritis want health

  8. Osteoprotegerin CGA Haplotype Protection against Cerebrovascular Complications in Anti-CCP Negative Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Santos; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; Corrales, Alfonso; Ubilla, Begoña; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Pina, Trinitario; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Balsa, Alejandro; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Carreira, Patricia; Blanco, Ricardo; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Martín, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease with high incidence of cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has been associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic disease in the general population. Several polymorphisms in the OPG gene with functional effects on cardiovascular disease in non-rheumatic individuals have been described. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the effect of three of these functional OPG polymorphisms on the risk of cardiovascular disease in a large and well-characterized cohort of Spanish patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Three OPG gene variants (rs3134063, rs2073618 and rs3134069) were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 2027 Spanish patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody testing was positive in 997 of 1714 tested. Also, 18.3% of the whole series had experienced cardiovascular events, including 5.4% with cerebrovascular accidents. The relationship between OPG variants and cardiovascular events was assessed using Cox regression. Results No association between OPG gene variants and cardiovascular disease was observed in the whole group of rheumatoid arthritis patients or in anti-CCP positive patients. Nevertheless, a protective effect of CGA haplotype on the risk of cardiovascular disease in general, and specifically in the risk of cerebrovascular complications after adjusting for sex, age at disease diagnosis and traditional cardiovascular risk factors was disclosed in anti-CCP negative patients (HR = 0.54; 95%CI: 0.31–0.95; p = 0.032 and HR = 0.17; 95%CI: 0.04–0.78; p = 0.022, respectively). Conclusion Our results indicate a protective effect of the OPG CGA haplotype on cardiovascular risk, mainly due to a protective effect against cerebrovascular events in anti-CCP negative rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:25184828

  9. Value of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of gout in patients presenting with acute arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Vuthiwong, Withawat; Kanthawang, Thanat; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the value of ultrasonographic features of crystal deposition for diagnosing gout in patients presenting with acute arthritis. Ultrasound scanning of the most inflamed joint was performed on 89 consecutively enrolled patients with acute arthritis. Two radiologists independently reviewed the ultrasound images, and a consensus was achieved with a third radiologist when the interpretations of four key ultrasound features of gout differed. Arthrocentesis and crystal analysis using compensated polarized light microscopy of aspirates are considered the gold standards for gout diagnosis. Fifty-three (60%) patients had gout, whereas the remaining 36 (40%) had non-gout arthritis. The mean serum uric acid level was 7.1 mg/dl in patients with gout and 4.7 mg/dl in patients with non-gout arthritis. Three US features differed significantly (p < 0.001) between patients with gout and non-gout arthritis: the double contour sign (42 vs. 8%, respectively), intra-articular aggregates (58 vs. 8%), and tophi (40 vs. 0%). No statistically significant differences in detecting intra-tendinous aggregates (32 vs. 17%, p = 0.14) were observed. The sensitivity and specificity of the double contour sign were 42 and 92%, respectively; those of the intra-articular aggregates were 58 and 92%; and those of tophi were 40 and 100%. The positive predictive values for these three features ranged from 88 to 100%, whereas the negative predictive values ranged from 52 to 60%. When the prevalence is high, these three ultrasound features may be a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of acute gout, particularly when specialized microscopic techniques are not available.

  10. Efficacy and safety of tacrolimus treatment for rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Misuzu; Natsumeda, Masamitsu; Takasugi, Koji; Ueno, Akiko; Ezawa, Kayo; Ezawa, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by progressive joint destruction that requires aggressive treatment using appropriate disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). RA patients with renal failure, however, are intolerant to most DMARDs due to the potential toxicity. In Japan, tacrolimus was approved for the treatment of RA in 2005. Based on its pharmacokinetics, tacrolimus may be administered to the patients undergoing hemodialysis. We report two cases of RA patients on hemodialysis treated effectively and safely with tacrolimus.

  11. Women’s accounts of help-seeking in early rheumatoid arthritis from symptom onset to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Anne; Backman, Catherine L; Adam, Paul; Li, Linda C

    2018-01-01

    Background As interest in gender and health grows, the notion that women are more likely than men to consult doctors is increasingly undermined as more complex understandings of help seeking and gender emerge. While men’s reluctance to seek help is associated with practices of masculinities, there has been less consideration of women’s help-seeking practices. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that predominantly affects women and requires prompt treatment but considerable patient-based delays persist along the care pathway. This paper examines women’s accounts of help seeking in early RA from symptom onset to diagnosis. Methods We conducted in-depth interviews with 37 women with RA <12 months in Canada. Analysis was based on a constant comparison, thematic approach informed by narrative analysis. Results The women’s accounts featured masculine practices associated with men’s help-seeking. The women presented such behaviours as relational, e.g. rooted in family socialisation and a determination to maintain roles and ‘normal’ life. Discussion Our findings raise questions about how far notions of gender operate to differentiate men and women’s help seeking and may indicate more similarities than differences. Recognising this has implications for policy and practice initiatives for both men and women. PMID:24567194

  12. Prevalence of HLA-B27 antigen in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Żuber, Zbigniew; Turowska-Heydel, Dorota; Sobczyk, Małgorzata; Chudek, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) is considered as a risk factor for development of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of HLA-B27 antigen in JIA categories and its influence on disease onset and response to conventional therapy. The retrospective analysis included 461 unselected children with JIA hospitalized in a single reference rheumatology centre between July 2007 and June 2012. The diagnosis was based on criteria by the International League of Association for Rheumatology. HLA-B27 was determined in 387 of all patients (84%) by hybridization of the amplified, labelled product to immobilize it on the microarray probe. HLA-B27 antigen was found in 104 of 383 affected children (27.2%), 48 of 206 girls (23.3%), and 56 of 177 boys (31.6%) - most frequently in patients with enthesitis-related arthritis (71%), psoriatic arthritis (50%) and unclassified cases (86.7%). The age of JIA onset was slightly (by 1 year) but significantly different in patients with and without HLA-B27 antigen [11 (8.5-14) vs. 10 (5-13.5) years.; p < 0.001]. The use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and corticosteroids was more frequently clinically ineffective in HLA-B27 positive than negative patients (23.1% vs. 15.2%; p = 0.09). Patients with polyarthritis, systemic, and psoriatic arthritis more frequently received biological therapy. HLA-B27 positive patients with enthesitis-related arthritis received biological therapy more frequently than HLA-B27 negative ones (20.4% vs. 0, respectively; p = 0.09). HLA-B27 antigen is a strong risk factor for the development of enthesitis-related arthritis, and to a lesser extent for psoriatic arthritis and extended course of oligoarthritis. The presence of this antigen does not affect the disease onset but seems to predict resistance to therapy with disease-modifying drugs and corticosteroids.

  13. Prevalence of HLA-B27 antigen in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Turowska-Heydel, Dorota; Sobczyk, Małgorzata; Chudek, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) is considered as a risk factor for development of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of HLA-B27 antigen in JIA categories and its influence on disease onset and response to conventional therapy. Material and methods The retrospective analysis included 461 unselected children with JIA hospitalized in a single reference rheumatology centre between July 2007 and June 2012. The diagnosis was based on criteria by the International League of Association for Rheumatology. HLA-B27 was determined in 387 of all patients (84%) by hybridization of the amplified, labelled product to immobilize it on the microarray probe. Results HLA-B27 antigen was found in 104 of 383 affected children (27.2%), 48 of 206 girls (23.3%), and 56 of 177 boys (31.6%) – most frequently in patients with enthesitis-related arthritis (71%), psoriatic arthritis (50%) and unclassified cases (86.7%). The age of JIA onset was slightly (by 1 year) but significantly different in patients with and without HLA-B27 antigen [11 (8.5–14) vs. 10 (5–13.5) years.; p < 0.001]. The use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and corticosteroids was more frequently clinically ineffective in HLA-B27 positive than negative patients (23.1% vs. 15.2%; p = 0.09). Patients with polyarthritis, systemic, and psoriatic arthritis more frequently received biological therapy. HLA-B27 positive patients with enthesitis-related arthritis received biological therapy more frequently than HLA-B27 negative ones (20.4% vs. 0, respectively; p = 0.09). Conclusions HLA-B27 antigen is a strong risk factor for the development of enthesitis-related arthritis, and to a lesser extent for psoriatic arthritis and extended course of oligoarthritis. The presence of this antigen does not affect the disease onset but seems to predict resistance to therapy with disease-modifying drugs and corticosteroids. PMID:27407238

  14. Features and outcomes of hospitalized Thai patients with pyogenic arthritis: analysis from the nationwide hospital database.

    PubMed

    Mahakkanukrauh, Ajanee; Thavornpitak, Yupa; Foocharoen, Chingching; Suwannaroj, Siraphop; Nanagara, Ratanavadee

    2013-08-01

    Pyogenic arthritis (PA) is still a problematic arthritic disease that requires hospitalization. To study the epidemiological characteristics and predictors of treatment outcomes for Thai patients hospitalized with PA. The nationwide hospital database from the 2010 fiscal year was analyzed. Patients 18 years of age onward, who had primary diagnosis of pyogenic arthritis, were included in this study. There were a total of 6242 PA admissions during 2010. It was ranked third among hospitalized musculoskeletal patients after osteoarthritis (OA) and gouty arthritis. The estimated prevalence of PA was 13.5 per 100 000 adult population. Geographic distributions of PA was related to the population density of each region; however it seemed more frequent in the northern and northeastern regions of Thailand. The prevalence increased with age, 3.6 and 43.6 per 100 000 in young adults and the elderly, respectively. Among the 2877 co-morbidities coded, diabetes was the most common, followed by crystal-induced arthritis, existing other foci of infections (urinary tract infection, skin and soft tissue infections and pneumonia) and pre-existing chronic joint diseases (OA,rheumatoid arthritis), respectively. Overall hospital mortality rate was 2.6%. Poorer outcomes were found among patients with chronic liver disease and other existing foci of infections. The prevalence of hospitalized PA is still modest in Thailand, showing the highest prevalence in the advanced age group. Diabetes was the most commonly co-morbidity found; however, poorer outcomes were noted among patients with chronic liver disease and existing multiple sites of infections. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  16. Why are Dutch rheumatologists reluctant to use the COBRA treatment strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Plass, Anne Marie C; Lems, Willem F; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Boers, Maarten

    2007-01-01

    Background The Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis (COBRA) trial has proved that combination therapy with prednisolone, methotrexate and sulphasalazine is superior to sulphasalazine monotherapy in suppressing disease activity and radiological progression of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, 5 years of follow‐up proved that COBRA therapy results in sustained reduction of the rate of radiological progression. Despite this evidence, Dutch rheumatologists seem reluctant to prescribe COBRA therapy. Objective To explore the reasons for the reluctance in Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe COBRA therapy. Methods A short structured questionnaire based on social–psychological theories of behaviour was sent to all Dutch rheumatologists (n = 230). Results The response rate was 50%. COBRA therapy was perceived as both effective and safe, but complex to administer. Furthermore, rheumatologists expressed their concern about the large number of pills that had to be taken, the side effects of high‐dose prednisolone and the low dose of methotrexate. Although the average attitude towards the COBRA therapy was slightly positive (above the neutral point), the majority of responding rheumatologists had a negative intention (below the neutral point) to prescribe COBRA therapy in the near future. Conclusion The reluctance of Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe effective COBRA therapy may be due to perceptions of complexity of the treatment schedule and negative patient‐related consequences of the therapy. PMID:17392349

  17. Comprehensive disease control (CDC): what does achieving CDC mean for patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Emery, Paul; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Bao, Yanjun; Ganguli, Arijit; Mulani, Parvez

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the impact of simultaneous achievement of clinical, functional and structural efficacy, herein referred to as comprehensive disease control (CDC), on short-term and long-term work-related outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain and fatigue. Data were pooled from three randomised trials of adalimumab plus methotrexate for treatment of early-stage or late-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CDC was defined as 28-joint Disease Activity Score using C reactive protein <2.6, Health Assessment Questionnaire <0.5 and change from baseline in modified Total Sharp Score ≤0.5. Changes in scores at weeks 26 and 52 for work-related outcomes, Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical (PCS) and mental component scores (MCS), a Visual Analogue Scale measuring pain (VAS-Pain) and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) were compared between patient groups defined by achievement of CDC at week 26 using linear regression with adjustment for baseline scores. Patients with RA who achieved CDC at week 26 (n=200) had significantly greater improvements in VAS-Pain (46.9 vs 26.9; p<0.0001), FACIT-F (13.3 vs 7.5; p<0.0001), SF-36 PCS (19.7 vs 8.9; p<0.0001) and SF-36 MCS (8.1 vs 5.0; p=0.0004) than those who did not (n=1267). Results were consistent at week 52 and among methotrexate-naive patients with early RA, methotrexate-experienced patients with late-stage RA and patients with inadequate response to methotrexate. Patients with RA who achieved CDC at week 26 had improved short-term and long-term HRQoL, pain, fatigue and work-related outcomes compared with patients who do not. These results demonstrate that the joint achievement of all CDC components provides meaningful benefits to patients. DE019: NCT00195702, PREMIER: NCT00195702, OPTIMA: NCT00195702. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Nail findings in patients with psoriatic arthritis: A cross-sectional study with special reference to transverse grooves.

    PubMed

    Zenke, Yukari; Ohara, Yuri; Kobayashi, Daiki; Arai, Satoru; Kishimoto, Mitsumasa; Okada, Masato; Eto, Hikaru

    2017-11-01

    Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) commonly present with nail manifestations; however, little is known about these manifestations. This study investigated whether nail findings can be used to discriminate between PsA and psoriasis without arthritis. We performed a retrospective analysis of 118 patients with PsA and 974 patients with psoriasis without arthritis who visited St. Luke's International Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) between July 2003 and February 2015. Patients with PsA were classified according to the Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis criteria. Skin lesion severity was assessed by using the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index, and 9 types of nail findings were investigated. The incidence of nail involvement in patients with PsA was 67.6%. Female sex, presence of transverse grooves, onycholysis, and splinter hemorrhages were significantly related to PsA, with transverse grooves demonstrating the strongest association (odds ratio, 5.01; 95% confidence interval, 2.31-10.8; P < .01). Furthermore, the presence of transverse grooves was strongly related to both distal interphalangeal arthritis and enthesitis. The PsA population was relatively small. Nail findings enabled us to distinguish patients with PsA from those without arthritis. The presence of transverse grooves is significantly associated with PsA and may be associated with distal interphalangeal arthritis and enthesitis. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Pharmaceutical care of patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis receiving etanercept].

    PubMed

    Romero Crespo, I; Antón Torres, R; Borrás Blasco, J; Navarro Ruiz, A

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate a pharmaceutical care protocol for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or psoriatic arthritis who begin treatment with etanercept with the objective of identifying potential medication-related problems and implementing therapeutic measures to improve the way this drug is used. An observational, prospective, 3-month study of patients with RA receiving etanercept therapy from March to December 2003 was conducted and a pharmaceutical care protocol was set up. During the first visit, a pharmacotherapeutic record was initiated for each patient, including socio-demographic data, personal history, diagnosis, DMARDs (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs) previously received, and concomitant therapies for other underlying conditions. Patients were briefed on dosage, administration route, and potential adverse events both orally and in writing. Correct drug administration and preservation were verified during the second visit, where potential adverse effects were identified, treatment adherence was confirmed, and, if needed, potential drug interactions with other ongoing medications were disclosed. During the third visit, adherence was assessed, adverse events were recorded, and patients evaluated their response to treatment. Fifty patients were included, 40 with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (80%) and 10 diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis (20%). In all, 72% had received previous treatment with methotrexate (MTX), 40% with leflunomide, 20% with infliximab, 56% with corticoids, 2% with analgesics, 56% with NSAIDs, and 30% with other DMARDs. No significant drug interactions were found. Regarding adherence to treatment, 7.7% of patients skipped one or more doses, with travelling being the most common reason. Adverse events reported included: injection site reaction (27%), headache (7.7%) and nausea (7.7%). At 3 months after treatment onset, a reduction of MTX doses was seen in 18% of patients, of leflunomide dosage in 8%, of corticoids in 18%, of

  20. Development of Evidence-Based Disease Education Literature for Pakistani Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Atta Abbas; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Aftab, Muhammad Tariq; Naqvi, Syed Baqir Shyum; Zehra, Fatima; Ahmad, Rizwan; Ahmad, Niyaz

    2017-11-20

    Rheumatoid arthritis affects 0.5% to 1% of the population globally and is one of the most common causes of disability. Patient education plays a key role in improving treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study was to discuss the process involved in designing an evidence-based disease education literature for rheumatoid arthritis patients of Pakistan in Urdu language with culturally relevant illustrations. A study was conducted to develop disease education literature using Delphi consensus, content validity, and patient feedback. A panel of experts comprised of university professors and health care experts, including health practitioners and pharmacists as well as a social scientist, was set up to assess the need. Eight patients were randomly selected and were asked to give their feedback. Their feedback was incorporated in the development process. The entire process was carried out in eight steps. A disease education literature for patients of rheumatoid arthritis was developed and edited in the form of a booklet. The booklet contained evidence-based information that must be provided to patients in both Urdu and English languages with culturally relevant illustrations. The availability of such literature is significant, as it enables the patients to seek knowledge at home at their convenience. This home-based knowledge support is as helpful as any other means of medical care. The developed literature is planned to be used in further studies which will evaluate its impact in improving knowledge of RA patients.

  1. [Education of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Assessment of a survey of interests].

    PubMed

    Pacheco, D; Berdichevsky, R; Ballesteros, F; Jérez, J; Sobarzo, E; Fuentealba, C; Pino, C; Sanhueza, R; Estefan, M E; Medina, C

    1998-02-01

    The congruence of interests between health care providers and clients is essential if subjects with chronic diseases will be educated. To assess, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, those fields in which they would like to receive education. Eighty eight patients with rheumatoid arthritis were surveyed about the topics in which they would like to be educated. The inquiry included medical aspects, handicap overcoming, social issues and labor aspects. Eighty two percent of patients were interested in medical aspects, 77% in social issues and 71% in handicap overcoming. Eighty three percent of patients with greater handicaps preferred handicap overcoming, 75% social aspects and 74% medical aspects. Younger patients had a greater interest in labor aspects, those with a recently diagnosed disease were interested in their legal rights and those with a prolonged disease wanted information about self help groups. The greater educational interests of patients with rheumatoid arthritis were on medical aspects. However, those impaired by the disease were interested in handicap overcoming. Age and duration of the disease also influenced the educational interests of patients. Thus, education in these patients must be individualized.

  2. Hemorheological parameters are related to subclinical atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria José; Pedro, Luís Mendes; Canhão, Helena; Fernandes E Fernandes, José; Canas da Silva, José; Fonseca, João Eurico; Saldanha, Carlota

    2011-12-01

    Rheological characteristics of blood are strongly linked to atherothrombosis in the general population, but its contribution to atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is currently unclear. This work examines the relationship between blood rheology, traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis in SLE and RA. Whole blood viscosity (WBV), plasma viscosity (PV), erythrocyte deformability (ED), aggregation (EA) and erythrocyte NO production were measured in 197 patients (96 SLE and 101 RA) and compared to 97 controls, all females without previous CV events. Clinical information was obtained and fasting lipids and acute phase reactants were measured. The relationship between hemorheological parameters, CV risk factors and inflammation was assessed in patients and the impact of these variables on carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) was evaluated in univariate followed by multivariate regression analyses. WBV and ED are significantly lower in patients, while EA is elevated as compared with controls. Hemorheological disturbances correlate with CV risk factors and markers of inflammation and are more profound in patients with metabolic syndrome. Multivariable analysis showed that menopause (OR 34.72, 95%CI 4.44-271.77), obesity (OR 4.09, 95%CI 1.00-16.68) and WBV (OR 3.98; 95%CI 1.23-12.83) are positively associated whereas current corticosteroid dose (OR 0.87; 95%CI 0.78-0.98), and erythrocyte NO production (OR 0.16; 95%CI 0.05-0.52) are negatively associated with cIMT. Disturbed hemorheological parameters in SLE and RA women are related to the presence of CV risk factors and inflammation. WBV and erythrocyte NO are independently associated with the early stages of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Immune response profiling in early rheumatoid arthritis: discovery of a novel interaction of treatment response with viral immunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction It remains challenging to predict the outcomes of therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to identify immune response signatures that correlate with clinical treatment outcomes in patients with RA. Methods A cohort of 71 consecutive patients with early RA starting treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) was recruited. Disease activity at baseline and after 21 to 24 weeks of follow-up was measured using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28). Immune response profiling was performed by analyzing multi-cytokine production from peripheral blood cells following incubation with a panel of stimuli, including a mixture of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lysates. Profiles identified via principal components analysis (PCA) for each stimulus were then correlated with the ΔDAS28 from baseline to follow-up. A clinically meaningful improvement in the DAS28 was defined as a decrease of ≥1.2. Results A profile of T-cell cytokines (IL-13, IL-4, IL-5, IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ) produced in response to CMV/EBV was found to correlate with the ΔDAS28 from baseline to follow-up. At baseline, a higher magnitude of the CMV/EBV immune response profile predicted inadequate DAS28 improvement (mean PCA-1 scores: 65.6 versus 50.2; P = 0.029). The baseline CMV/EBV response was particularly driven by IFN-γ (P = 0.039) and IL-4 (P = 0.027). Among patients who attained clinically meaningful DAS28 improvement, the CMV/EBV PCA-1 score increased from baseline to follow-up (mean +11.6, SD 25.5), whereas among patients who responded inadequately to DMARD therapy, the CMV/EBV PCA-1 score decreased (mean -12.8, SD 25.4; P = 0.002). Irrespective of the ΔDAS28, methotrexate use was associated with up-regulation of the CMV/EBV response. The CMV/EBV profile was associated with positive CMV IgG (P <0.001), but not EBV IgG (P = 0.32), suggesting this response was related to

  4. Reductions in Radiographic Progression in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Over Twenty-Five Years: Changing Contribution From Rheumatoid Factor in Two Multicenter UK Inception Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Lewis; Norton, Sam; Nikiphorou, Elena; Jayakumar, Keeranur; McWilliams, Daniel F; Rennie, Kirsten L; Dixey, Josh; Kiely, Patrick; Walsh, David Andrew; Young, Adam

    2017-12-01

    To assess the 5-year progression of erosions and joint space narrowing (JSN) and their associations with rheumatoid factor (RF) status in 2 large, multicenter, early rheumatoid arthritis cohorts, spanning 25 years. Radiographic joint damage was recorded using the Sharp/van der Heijde (SHS) method in the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Study (ERAS), 1986-2001, and the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network (ERAN), 2002-2013. Mixed-effects negative binomial regression estimated changes in radiographic damage over 5 years, including erosions and JSN, separately. RF, along with age, sex, and baseline markers of disease activity were controlled for. A total of 1,216 patients from ERAS and 446 from ERAN had radiographic data. Compared to ERAS, ERAN patients had a lower mean total SHS score at baseline (ERAN 6.2 versus ERAS 10.5; P < 0.001) and mean annual rate of change (ERAN 2.5 per year versus ERAS 6.9 per year; P < 0.001). Seventy-four percent of ERAS and 27% of ERAN patients progressed ≥5 units. Lower scores at baseline in ERAN were largely driven by reductions in JSN (ERAS 3.9 versus ERAN 1.2; P < 0.001), along with erosions (ERAS 1.9 versus ERAN 0.8; P < 0.001). RF was associated with greater progression in each cohort, but the absolute difference in mean annual rate of change for RF-positive patients was substantially higher for ERAS (RF positive 8.6 versus RF negative 5.1; P < 0.001), relative to ERAN (RF positive 2.0 versus RF negative 1.9; P = 0.855). Radiographic progression was shown to be significantly reduced between the 2 cohorts, and was associated with lower baseline damage and other factors, including changes in early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug use. The impact of RF status as a prognostic marker of clinically meaningful change in radiographic progression has markedly diminished in the context of more modern treatment. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Surgically Induced Scleral Necrosis in a Patient With Rheumatoid Arthritis After AGV Implantation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Ichhpujani, Parul; Thakur, Sahil

    2018-03-01

    Surgically induced scleral necrosis (SINS) is a rare entity that has till date not been reported in a patient of glaucoma undergoing Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation. We present a case of primary open-angle glaucoma who underwent AGV implantation followed by development of scleral necrosis, involving both the scleral patch graft and host sclera. After failure of surgical and medical management, AGV had to be explanted. The patient was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and had to be treated with steroids and azathioprine for the same. SINS is a potentially disastrous complication of ocular surgery that can occur in patients with systemic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and requires aggressive management to salvage the eye. SINS can occur with AGV implantation. Treatment may require aggressive medical and surgical intervention. It is imperative to evaluate patients for systemic illness before planning an AGV implant.

  6. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  7. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis II: An Innovative Strategy to Implement Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis Patients through Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Brooks, Sydney; De Angelis, G.; Bell, Mary; Egan, Mary; Poitras, Stephane; King, Judy; Casimiro, Lynn; Loew, Laurianne; Novikov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to determine if an updated online evidence-based educational programme delivered through Facebook is effective in improving the knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy of patients with arthritis in relation to evidence-based self-management rehabilitation interventions for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid…

  8. Switching TNF antagonists in patients with chronic arthritis: an observational study of 488 patients over a four-year period

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Carmona, Loreto

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work is to analyze the survival of infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab in patients who have switched among tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists for the treatment of chronic arthritis. BIOBADASER is a national registry of patients with different forms of chronic arthritis who are treated with biologics. Using this registry, we have analyzed patient switching of TNF antagonists. The cumulative discontinuation rate was calculated using the actuarial method. The log-rank test was used to compare survival curves, and Cox regression models were used to assess independent factors associated with discontinuing medication. Between February 2000 and September 2004, 4,706 patients were registered in BIOBADASER, of whom 68% had rheumatoid arthritis, 11% ankylosing spondylitis, 10% psoriatic arthritis, and 11% other forms of chronic arthritis. One- and two-year drug survival rates of the TNF antagonist were 0.83 and 0.75, respectively. There were 488 patients treated with more than one TNF antagonist. In this situation, survival of the second TNF antagonist decreased to 0.68 and 0.60 at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Survival was better in patients replacing the first TNF antagonist because of adverse events (hazard ratio (HR) for discontinuation 0.55 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34–0.84)), and worse in patients older than 60 years (HR 1.10 (95% CI 0.97–2.49)) or who were treated with infliximab (HR 3.22 (95% CI 2.13–4.87)). In summary, in patients who require continuous therapy and have failed to respond to a TNF antagonist, replacement with a different TNF antagonist may be of use under certain situations. This issue will deserve continuous reassessment with the arrival of new medications. PMID:16507128

  9. Effect of self-efficacy and physical activity goal achievement on arthritis pain and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Knittle, Keegan P; De Gucht, Véronique; Hurkmans, Emalie J; Vlieland, Thea P M Vliet; Peeters, André J; Ronday, H Karel; Maes, Stan

    2011-11-01

    To examine physical activity and achievement of physical activity goals in relation to self-reported pain and quality of life among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At baseline, 271 patients with RA were asked to specify a physical activity goal, and filled in questionnaires assessing physical activity, motivation, and self-efficacy for physical activity, arthritis pain, and quality of life. Six months later, patients indicated to what extent they had achieved their baseline physical activity goal and completed the same set of questionnaires. These data were used to construct multiple mediation models that placed physical activity and physical activity goal achievement as mediators between self-efficacy and motivation on one hand, and arthritis pain and quality of life on the other. A total of 106 patients with RA completed both questionnaires. Self-efficacy at baseline predicted subsequent level of physical activity and achievement of physical activity goals. Goal achievement had a direct effect upon quality of life outcomes. Bootstrapping confidence intervals revealed indirect effects of self-efficacy upon arthritis pain and quality of life through goal achievement, but not through physical activity. Higher levels of self-efficacy for physical activity increase the likelihood that patients will achieve their physical activity goals. Achievement of physical activity goals seems to be related to lower self-reported arthritis pain, and higher levels of quality of life. In practice, clinicians can foster self-efficacy and goal achievement by assisting patients in setting realistic and attainable exercise goals, developing action plans, and by providing feedback on goal progress. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Chinese Registry of rheumatoid arthritis (CREDIT): II. prevalence and risk factors of major comorbidities in Chinese patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shangyi; Li, Mengtao; Fang, Yongfei; Li, Qin; Liu, Ju; Duan, Xinwang; Liu, Yi; Wu, Rui; Shi, Xiaofei; Wang, Yongfu; Jiang, Zhenyu; Wang, Yanhong; Yu, Chen; Wang, Qian; Tian, Xinping; Zhao, Yan; Zeng, Xiaofeng

    2017-11-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis patients are at higher risk of developing comorbidities. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of major comorbidities in Chinese rheumatoid arthritis patients. We also aimed to identify factors associated with these comorbidities. Baseline demographic, clinical characteristics and comorbidity data from RA patients enrolled in the Chinese Registry of rhEumatoiD arthrITis (CREDIT) from Nov 2016 to August 2017 were presented and compared with those from five other registries across the world. Possible factors related to three major comorbidities (cardiovascular disease, fragility fracture and malignancy) were identified using multivariate logistic regression analyses. A total of 13,210 RA patients were included (80.6% female, mean age 52.9 years and median RA duration 4.0 years). Baseline prevalence rates of major comorbidities were calculated: CVD, 2.2% (95% CI 2.0-2.5%); fragility fracture, 1.7% (95% CI 1.5-1.9%); malignancy, 0.6% (95% CI 0.5-0.7%); overall major comorbidities, 4.2% (95% CI 3.9-4.6%). Advanced age was associated with all comorbidities. Male gender and disease duration were positively related to CVD. Female sex and longer disease duration were potential risk factors for fragility fractures. Ever use of methotrexate (MTX) was negatively related to baseline comorbidities. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis in China have similar prevalence of comorbidities with other Asian countries. Advanced age and long disease duration are possible risk factors for comorbidities. On the contrary, MTX may protect RA patients from several major comorbidities, supporting its central role in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Serum concentrations of salicylate and naproxen during concurrent therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Furst, D E; Sarkissian, E; Blocka, K; Cassell, S; Dromgoole, S; Harris, E R; Hirschberg, J M; Josephson, N; Paulus, H E

    1987-10-01

    The kinetic interaction between salicylate and naproxen was investigated in 25 rheumatoid arthritis patients. Kinetic interactions were tested in serum after patients had been on each drug regimen for 1 month. Salicylate decreased serum naproxen concentration from 89.5 mg/liter to 65.9 mg/liter (P less than 0.001) and increased serum naproxen clearance by 56%. Naproxen had minimal effect on serum salicylate concentrations.

  12. Relationship between patient-reported and objective measurements of hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Günay, S M; Tuna, Z; Oskay, D

    2016-12-31

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often results in impairments in upper extremities, especially in the small joints of hand. Involvement of hand brings limitations in activities of daily living. However, it is commonly observed that patient-reported functional status of hand does not always corresponds to their actual physical performance in the clinical setting. The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the relationship between patient self-reported and objectively measured hand functions in patients with RA. Twenty-six patients (51±13 years) with RA diagnosis participated in the study. Hand grip and pinch (lateral, bipod, tripod) strengths were measured and Jebsen Hand Function Test (JHFT) was performed for objective functional performance. Duruöz Hand Index and Beck Depression Inventory - Turkish version were completed by patients. Grip and all three-pinch strength results significantly correlated with Duruöz Hand Index scores (p<0.05). JHFT results except the sentence writing also correlated with the Duruöz scores (p<0.05). Our results showed that self-reported outcome scales might be used for determining functional level of hand in patients with RA in rheumatology practice. Objective quantitative functional tests are the best methods in evaluating functional level of hand, but require valid and reliable equipment with accurate calibration. Therefore, in case of unavailability of objective assessment tools, patient-reported scales may also reflect the real status of hand functions.

  13. Shoe inserts alter plantar loading and function in patients with midfoot arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Smita; Baumhauer, Judith F; Becica, Laura; Nawoczenski, Deborah A

    2009-07-01

    Experimental laboratory study supplemented by a case series. (1) To assess the effect of a 4-week intervention with a full-length insert on functional outcomes in patients with midfoot arthritis; (2) to examine the effect of the custom molded three-quarter-length (3Q) and full-length (FL) carbon graphite insert on plantar loading in patients with midfoot arthritis. Given the coexistence of pain and lower-arched foot alignment in patients with midfoot arthritis, arch-restoring orthotic devices such as the 3Q insert are frequently recommended. However, patients continue to report foot pain despite using the 3Q insert. The FL insert has been proposed as an alternative, but objective data examining its efficacy are lacking. Twenty female patients with midfoot arthritis participated in the study. Functional outcomes were assessed using the Foot Function Index-Revised (FFI-R). Plantar loading during walking was measured in the following conditions: shoe only, shoe with 3Q insert, and shoe with FL insert. Repeated-measures analyses of variance with post hoc analyses were used for statistical analysis. FL insert use for 4 weeks resulted in a 12% improvement in total FFI-R score (mean +/- SD before, 35.6 +/- 10.9; after, 31.1 +/- 9.8 [P = .03]). FL insert use resulted in a 20% reduction in medial midfoot average pressure loading (mean +/- SD, 64.8 +/- 20.4 and 51.0 +/- 15.4 kPa, with 3Q and FL insert respectively [P = .015]) and an 8.5% reduction in medial midfoot contact time (mean +/- SD, 84.9% +/- 6.4% and 76.4% +/- 7.1% of stance, with 3Q and FL insert respectively [P<.01]), compared to the 3Q insert. No differences in plantar loading were discerned between the shoe-only and FL conditions. Symptomatic improvement in patients with midfoot arthritis treated with a FL insert was accompanied by reduced magnitude and duration of loading under the medial midfoot. These preliminary outcomes suggest that the FL insert may be a viable alternative in the conservative management

  14. Use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marguerie, Laurent; Flipo, René-Marc; Grardel, Bruno; Beaurain, Didier; Duquesnoy, Bernard; Delcambre, Bernard

    2002-05-01

    Few prospective placebo-controlled studies have evaluated disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in the treatment of peripheral psoriatic arthritis. To evaluate second-line treatments used in clinical practice in patients with psoriatic arthritis. We studied a cross-section of 100 consecutive patients seen by hospital-based or office-based rheumatologists for psoriatic arthritis. The 55 men and 45 women had a mean age of 48 years (range, 17-79 years) and a mean disease duration of 7 years (range, 1-24 years). The most commonly used DMARDs were sulfasalazine, gold, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine (64, 43, 41 et 17 patients, respectively). These drugs had been stopped because of inefficacy in 31%, 31%, 12%, and 53% of patients, respectively, and because of adverse events in 23%, 44%, 22%, and 41% of patients, respectively. At the time of the study, mean treatment durations were 15, 21, 34, and 12 months, respectively, and the drugs were still being used in 45%, 21%, 66%, and 6% of patients. Our data confirm the value of methotrexate and salazopyrine. Methotrexate had the best risk/benefit ratio. Gold was often responsible for side effects. Hydroxychloroquine was inadequately effective and poorly tolerated.

  15. Hansen's Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis Crossover of Clinical Symptoms: A Case Series of 18 Patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Labuda, Sarah M; Schieffelin, John S; Shaffer, Jeffrey G; Stryjewska, Barbara M

    2017-12-01

    Hansen's Disease (HD) is a rare, chronic granulomatous infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by the noncultivable organism Mycobacterium leprae . Arthritis is the third most common symptom of HD. Subjects with both confirmed HD on skin biopsy and chronic arthritis were identified at the National Hansen's Disease Program (NHDP). We conducted a series of medical chart reviews and extracted and logged personally deidentified data into a database and carried out descriptive analyses. Eighteen of 261 subjects presented to the NDHP with both HD and chronic arthritis between 2001 and 2015. Among these, 16 were male, 16 were white, and 15 were residents of Louisiana. The median age at diagnosis of HD was 67 years. Ten of these subjects were diagnosed with borderline lepromatous leprosy, seven were diagnosed with lepromatous, and one was diagnosed with borderline tuberculoid leprosy. Patients were symptomatic with arthritis for a median of 5.3 years before HD diagnosis. Sixty-two percent of patients (11) were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) before HD diagnosis, and 10 of which were seronegative RA. Hands, feet, wrists, and elbows were most commonly reported as affected joints. Over half of the patients (61%) had completed HD multidrug therapy at the time of review, and 73% of these subjects had persistent joint pain requiring steroids or methotrexate for symptomatic control. Chronic arthritis in HD patients is present in a series of US-acquired cases of HD. Arthritis did not resolve with successful treatment of HD in most cases.

  16. Evaluation of the joint distribution at disease presentation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a large study across continents.

    PubMed

    Bergstra, Sytske Anne; Chopra, Arvind; Saluja, Manjit; Vega-Morales, David; Govind, Nimmisha; Huizinga, Tom W J; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Genetic and environmental risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are population dependent and may affect disease expression. Therefore, we studied tender and swollen joint involvement in patients newly diagnosed with RA in four countries and performed a subanalysis within countries to assess whether the influence of autoantibody positivity affected disease expression. Patients with symptom duration <2 years fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism 2010 RA classification criteria were selected from METEOR (Measurement of Efficacy of Treatment in the Era of Outcome in Rheumatology), an international observational database, and the Dutch Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic. Indian (n=947), Mexican (n=141), South African (n=164) and Dutch (n=947) autoantibody-positive and negative patients with RA, matched by symptom duration, were studied for swollen and tender joint distribution. Between countries, the reported distribution of swollen joint distribution differed, with more knee synovitis in Mexico, South Africa and India compared with the Netherlands (37%, 36%, 30% and 13%) and more elbow (29%, 23%, 7%, 7%) and shoulder synovitis (21%, 11%, 0%, 1%) in Mexico and South Africa compared with India and the Netherlands.Since the number of autoantibody-negative patients in Mexico and South Africa was limited, Indian and Dutch autoantibody-positive and negative patients with RA were compared. The number of swollen and tender joints was higher in autoantibody-negative patients, but the overall distribution of involved joints was similar. Joint involvement at diagnosis does not differ between autoantibody-positive and negative patients with RA in India and the Netherlands. However, joint involvement is reported differently across countries. More research is needed whether these differences are cultural and/or pathogenetic.

  17. My Treatment Approach to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, John M.; Matteson, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has brought important advances in the understanding of rheumatoid arthritis and its management and treatment. New classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, better definitions of treatment outcome and remission, and the introduction of biologic response-modifying drugs designed to inhibit the inflammatory process have greatly altered the approach to managing this disease. More aggressive management of rheumatoid arthritis early after diagnosis and throughout the course of the disease has resulted in improvement in patient functioning and quality of life, reduction in comorbid conditions, and enhanced survival. PMID:22766086

  18. Gram and acridine orange staining for diagnosis of septic arthritis in different patient populations.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Gregory; Seghrouchni, Khalid; Ruffieux, Etienne; Vaudaux, Pierre; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Godinho, Eduardo; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Uçkay, Ilker

    2014-06-01

    The sensitivity of Gram staining is known to be suboptimal for the diagnosis of native joint septic arthritis. We lack information about the accuracy of Gram compared to other microscopic staining techniques for predicting infection in different patient populations. This was a cohort study with cost evaluations at the Orthopaedic Service of Geneva University Hospitals (January 1996-October 2012). Among 500 episodes of arthritis (196 with immunosuppression, 227 with underlying arthroplasties and 69 with gout or other crystals in synovial fluid), Gram staining revealed pathogens in 146 episodes (146/500, 29 %) or in 146 of the 400 culture-positive episodes (37 %). Correlation between the Gram and acridine staining of the same sample was good (Spearman 0.85). Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Gram stain for rapid diagnosis of septic arthritis was 0.37, 0.99, 0.99 and 0.28, respectively, compared to microbiological cultures. Quite similar values were recorded across the different patient subpopulations, in particular for sensitivity values that were 0.33 for patients with prosthetic joint infections, 0.40 for immunosuppressed patients, 0.36 for patients under antibiotic administration and 0.52 for patients with concomitant crystalline disease. The sensitivity of Gram or acridine orange staining for a rapid diagnosis of episodes of septic arthritis is suboptimal compared to microbiological culture, regardless of underlying conditions, immunosuppression or antibiotic therapy. The sensitivity in the presence of synovial fluid crystals is moderate. Acridine orange and Gram stains are equivalent.

  19. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction between rofecoxib and methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J I; Agrawal, N G; Wong, P H; Bachmann, K A; Porras, A G; Miller, J L; Ebel, D L; Sack, M R; Holmes, G B; Redfern, J S; Gertz, B J

    2001-10-01

    Rofecoxib is a highly selective and potent inhibitor of cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2). Methotrexate is a disease-modifying agent with a narrow therapeutic index frequently prescribed for the management of rheumatoid arthritis. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of clinical doses of rofecoxib on the pharmacokinetics of methotrexate in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 25 rheumatoid arthritis patients on stable doses of methotrexate. Patients received oral methotrexate (7.5 to 20 mg) on days -1, 7, 14, and 21. Nineteen patients received rofecoxib 12.5, 25, and 50 mg once daily on days 1 to 7, 8 to 14, and 15 to 21, respectively. Six patients received placebo on days 1 to 21 only to maintain a double-blinded design for assessment of adverse experiences. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed for methotrexate and its major although inactive metabolite, 7-hydroxymethotrexate. The AUC(0-infinity) geometric mean ratios (GMR) and their 90% confidence intervals (90% CI) (rofecoxib + methotrexate/methotrexate alone) for day 7/day -1, day 14/day -1, and day 21/day -1, for rofecoxib 12.5, 25, and 50 mg, were 1.03 (0.93, 1.14), 1.02 (0.92, 1.12), and 1.06 (0.96, 1.17), respectively (p > 0.2 for all comparisons to day -1). All AUC(0-infinity), GMR and Cmax GMR 90% CIs fell within the predefined comparability limits of (0.80, 1.25). Similar results were observed for renal clearance of methotrexate and 7-hydroxymethotrexate at the highest dose of rofecoxib tested (50 mg). It was concluded that rofecoxib at doses of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg once daily has no effect on the plasma concentrations or renal clearance (tested at the highest dose of rofecoxib) of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  20. Ultrasonography for diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of tenosynovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Mads Ammitzbøll

    2018-03-01

    Rheumatod arthritis is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease, characterized by inflammation in joints and tendon sheaths, which frequently leads to permanent and serious disability due to joint destruction, but also tendon and ligament ruptures. Clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis has traditionally been supported by biochemical and radiographic findings. However, imaging modalities like ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have improved the possibility for better management of rheumatoid arthritis patients, due to higher sensitivity and specificity for detecting ongoing inflammation, this thesis is focusing on tenosynovitis as recent studies have shown that inflammation in tendon sheaths, i.e. tenosynovitis, is a very common manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis and may often be mistaken for synovitis. Furthermore, presence of ultrasonographic tenosynovitis may predict clinical flare and erosive progression. 
The main aim of this PhD thesis was to further develop and validate ultrasound as a tool for diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of tenosynovitis. This was investigated in four studies: 
Study I: 3D Doppler Ultrasound findings in healthy wrist and finger tendon sheaths - Can feeding vessels lead to misinterpretation in Doppler-detected tenosynovitis? 
Study II: Image fusion of Ultrasound and MRI and B-flow evaluation of tenosynovitis - A pilot study on new imaging techniques in rheumatoid arthritis patients. 
Study III: Validity and sensitivity to change of the semi-quantitative Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) ultrasound scoring system for tenosynovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and for the quantitative scoring system, pixel index. 
Study IV: Intramuscular versus ultrasound guided intratenosynovial glucocorticoid injection for tenosynovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis - A randomised, double-blind, controlled study with ultrasound and clinical follow up at 4 and 12 weeks. 
From the

  1. Treatment of very early rheumatoid arthritis with symptomatic therapy, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, or biologic agents: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Finckh, Axel; Bansback, Nick; Marra, Carlo A; Anis, Aslam H; Michaud, Kaleb; Lubin, Stanley; White, Marc; Sizto, Sonia; Liang, Matthew H

    2009-11-03

    Long-term control or remission of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be possible with very early treatment. However, no optimal first therapeutic strategy has been determined. To assess the potential cost-effectiveness of major therapeutic strategies for very early RA. Decision analytic model with probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Published data, the National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, and actual 2007 hospital costs. U.S. adults with very early RA (symptom duration patient education, pain management, and low-dose glucocorticoids, and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) at 1 year for nonresponders; early DMARD therapy with methotrexate; and early therapy with biologics and methotrexate. Cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. By reducing the progression of joint erosions and subsequent functional disability, both early intervention strategies increase quality-adjusted life more than the pyramid strategy and save long-term costs. When the cost of very early intervention is factored in, the cost-effectiveness ratio of the early DMARD strategy is $4849 per QALY (95% CI, $0 to $16 354 per QALY) compared with the pyramid strategy, whereas the benefits gained through the early biologic strategy come at a substantial incremental cost. The early DMARD strategy maximizes the effectiveness of early DMARDs and reserves the use of biologics for patients with more treatment-resistant disease of longer duration, for which the incremental benefit of biologics is greater. The early biologic strategy becomes more cost-effective if drug prices are reduced, risk for death is permanently lowered through biologic therapy, patients experience drug-free remission, responders can be selected before therapy initiation, or effective alternative antirheumatic agents are available for

  2. A pilot evaluation of Arthritis Self-Management Program by lay leaders in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ying-Ying; Kwan, Jackie; Chan, Patsy; Poon, Peter K K; Leung, Christine; Tam, Lai-Shan; Li, Edmund K; Kwok, Anna

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this paper are to evaluate the efficacy of a community-based lay-led Arthritis Self-Management Program (ASMP) among patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and evaluate the effectiveness of "shared care collaboration" between hospital and community. We trained 17 lay leaders and recruited patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis via a new shared-care model between hospital rheumatology centers and community organizations. Participants were allocated to interventional group or a wait list control group. Evaluations were completed before, after (6 weeks), and 3 months after ASMP. We performed analysis of covariance with adjustment with age, sex, marital status, education, employment, duration of illness, and disability at baseline. A total of 65 participants and 32 controls completed the study. The mean (SD) age and duration of illness were 52.0 (11.4) and 5.6 (7.3) years, 90.7 % were female, 80.4 % had rheumatoid arthritis; 25.8, 53.6, and 12.4 % referrals were from hospitals, community organizations, and patient self-help groups, respectively. The interventional group had significantly less pain (p = 0.049 at 6 weeks), used more cognitive coping methods (p = 0.008 at 6 weeks, p = 0.041 at 3 months) and practiced more aerobic exercise (p = 0.049 at 6 weeks, p = 0.008 at 3 months) after adjustment of covariance. The interventional group had a trend of improvement in self-efficacy, fatigue, self-rated health, and health distress. A community-based lay-led ASMP showed positive beneficial effects on participants with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Shared-care collaboration between hospitals, community organizations, and patient self-help groups was demonstrated.

  3. Long-Term Effectiveness of Adalimumab in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Observational Analysis from the Corrona Rheumatoid Arthritis Registry.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Dimitrios A; Kremer, Joel M; Griffith, Jenny; Reed, George; Salim, Bob; Karki, Chitra; Garg, Vishvas

    2017-12-01

    Current recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) focus on a treat-to-target approach with the objective of maximizing long-term health-related quality-of-life in patients with RA. Published studies from randomized clinical trials have reported limited data regarding the long-term efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with RA. This study aims to evaluate the long-term (10+ years) persistency and effectiveness of adalimumab in patients with RA in a real-world setting. Included in this study were biologic-naïve adults with RA initiating adalimumab during follow-up enrolled in the Corrona RA registry. More than 10 years of data on persistency of adalimumab and rheumatologist-supplied reasons for discontinuation were examined. Among patients who persisted on adalimumab over the years, clinical [e.g., clinical disease activity index scores (CDAI), physician global assessment, tender joint count, and swollen joint count] and patient-reported outcomes (PRO), such as physical function, pain, fatigue, and morning stiffness, were examined. Of 1791 biologic-naive patients treated with adalimumab who had ≥1 follow-up registry visit, 64.1% were still on therapy at 1 year and 10.2% were still on therapy by the end of year 12. Among patients who persisted on adalimumab for at least 1 year (77.1% female, mean age 53.9 years), 67.0% were in low disease activity (LDA)/remission (CDAI ≤10) and had clinically meaningful improvements from baseline in all clinical assessments and PROs. Initial improvements in LDA/remission and in clinical and PRO assessments observed at year 1 were sustained in those patients who remained on adalimumab over 10 years of follow-up. Among patients who discontinued adalimumab, 61.6% were not in LDA/remission and 41.9% switched to another biologic within 12 months after discontinuing adalimumab. Real-world data demonstrate a sustained effectiveness of adalimumab in the treatment of RA for patients who remained on

  4. Recommendations for the Use of Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance in Patients With Spondyloarthritis, Including Psoriatic Arthritis, and Patients With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Uson, Jacqueline; Loza, Estibaliz; Möller, Ingrid; Acebes, Carlos; Andreu, Jose Luis; Batlle, Enrique; Bueno, Ángel; Collado, Paz; Fernández-Gallardo, Juan Manuel; González, Carlos; Jiménez Palop, Mercedes; Lisbona, María Pilar; Macarrón, Pilar; Maymó, Joan; Narváez, Jose Antonio; Navarro-Compán, Victoria; Sanz, Jesús; Rosario, M Piedad; Vicente, Esther; Naredo, Esperanza

    To develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with spondyloarthritis, including psoriatic arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Recommendations were generated following a nominal group technique. A panel of experts (15 rheumatologists and 3 radiologists) was established in the first panel meeting to define the scope and purpose of the consensus document, as well as chapters, potential recommendations and systematic literature reviews (we used and updated those from previous EULAR documents). A first draft of recommendations and text was generated. Then, an electronic Delphi process (2 rounds) was carried out. Recommendations were voted from 1 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). We defined agreement if at least 70% of participants voted≥7. The level of evidence and grade or recommendation was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine levels of evidence. The full text was circulated and reviewed by the panel. The consensus was coordinated by an expert methodologist. A total of 12 recommendations were proposed for each disease. They include, along with explanations of the validity of US and magnetic resonance imaging regarding inflammation and damage detection, diagnosis, prediction (structural damage progression, flare, treatment response, etc.), monitoring and the use of US guided injections/biopsies. These recommendations will help clinicians use US and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with spondyloarthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  5. Sensorineural Hearing Impairment and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Without Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    MACIAS-REYES, Hector; DURAN-BARRAGAN, Sergio; CARDENAS-CONTRERAS, Cynthia R.; CHAVEZ-MARTIN, Cesar G.; GOMEZ-BAÑUELOS, Eduardo; NAVARRO-HERNANDEZ, Rosa E.; YANOWSKY-GONZALEZ, Carlos O.; GONZALEZ-LOPEZ, Laura; GAMEZ-NAVA, Jorge I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to evaluate the association of hearing impairment with carotid intima-media thickness and subclinical atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Patients and methods A total of 41 RA patients (2 males, 39 females; mean age 46.5±10.2 years; range 20 to 63 years) with no known traditional cardiovascular risk factors were included. Routine clinical and laboratory assessments for RA patients were performed. Pure tone air (250-8000 Hz) and bone conduction (250-6000 Hz) thresholds were obtained, tympanograms and impedance audiometry were conducted. Sensorineural hearing impairment was defined if the average thresholds were ≥25 decibels. Carotid intima-media thickness was assessed and classified with a cut-off point of 0.6 mm. Results Thirteen patients (31.7%) had normal audition, while 28 (68.3%) had hearing impairment. Of these, 22 had bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment. Four patients had conductive hearing impairment (right in three patients and left in one patient). Patients with sensorineural hearing impairment had increased carotid intima-media thickness in the media segment of carotid common artery compared to patients with normal hearing (right ear p=0.007; left ear p=0.075). Thickening of the carotid intima-media thickness was associated with sensorineural hearing impairment in RA patients. Conclusion Rheumatoid arthritis patients should be evaluated by carotid intima-media thickness as a possible contributing factor of hearing impairment in patients without cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:29900940

  6. Discriminant validity, responsiveness and reliability of the arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey assessing workplace and household productivity in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The novel arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS) was developed to estimate patient productivity limitations associated with arthritis within and outside the home, which is an unmet need in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The WPS has been validated in rheumatoid arthritis. This report assesses the discriminant validity, responsiveness and reliability of the WPS in adult-onset PsA. Methods Psychometric properties were assessed using data from the RAPID-PsA trial (NCT01087788) investigating certolizumab pegol (CZP) efficacy and safety in PsA. WPS was completed at baseline and every 4 weeks until Week 24. Validity was evaluated at baseline via known-groups defined using first and third quartiles of patients’ Disease Activity Score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28(CRP)), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Short Form-36 (SF-36) items and PsA Quality of Life (PsAQoL) scores. Responsiveness and reliability were assessed by comparing WPS mean changes at Week 12 in American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR20) or HAQ-DI Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) 0.3 responders versus non-responders, as well as using standardized response means (SRM). All comparisons were conducted on the observed cases in the Randomized Set, regardless of the randomization group, using a non-parametric bootstrap-t method. Results Compared with patients with a better health state, patients with a worse health state had on average 2 to 6 times more household work days lost, more days with reduced household productivity, more days missed of family/social/leisure activities, more days with outside help hired and a significantly higher interference of arthritis per month. Among employed patients, those with a worse health state had 2 to 4 times more workplace days lost, more days with patient workplace productivity reduced, and a significantly higher interference of arthritis on patient workplace productivity versus

  7. Results of a longer than 10-year follow-Up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated by occipitocervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, S; Ijiri, K; Koga, H

    2000-07-15

    Evaluation of results a longer than 10-year follow-up of patients with upper cervical lesions due to rheumatoid arthritis who underwent occipitocervical fusion. To determine the final outcome of patients with upper cervical lesions due to rheumatoid arthritis treated by occipitocervical fusion. There are few studies reporting the final outcome of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated by occipitocervical fusion and observed for longer than 10 years. The subjects were 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with myelopathy who underwent occipitocervical fusion with a rectangular rod more than 10 years ago. All 16 patients had irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation, and 11 also had vertical dislocation of the axis. All patients had preoperative nuchal pain, and were classified into Class II (two patients), Class IIIA (nine patients), and class IIIB (five patients) according to Ranawat's preoperative neurologic classification. The atlas-dens interval remained the same as immediately after surgery. Vertical dislocation returned to the preoperative condition, despite successful surgical correction. Preoperative occipital pain disappeared or was reduced in all cases. Myelopathy improved in 12 of the 16 patients (75%) by more than one class in the Ranawat preoperative neurologic classification. Survival rate at 10 years after surgery was 38%; mean age at death was 70.7 years. The postoperative periods during which patients could walk by themselves ranged from 6 months to 13 years (mean, 7.5 years). Occipitocervical fusion for patients with rheumatoid arthritis is useful for decreasing nuchal pain, reducing myelopathy, and improving prognosis.

  8. Pain, physical functioning, and overeating in obese rheumatoid arthritis patients: do thoughts about pain and eating matter?

    PubMed

    Somers, Tamara J; Wren, Anava A; Blumenthal, James A; Caldwell, David; Huffman, Kim M; Keefe, Francis J

    2014-08-01

    Obese rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients have higher levels of pain, disability, and disease activity than do nonobese patients with RA. Patients' health-related thoughts about arthritis and weight may be important to consider in obese patients with RA who face the dual challenge of managing RA and weight. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships of pain catastrophizing, self-efficacy (ie, confidence) for arthritis management and self-efficacy for weight management to important outcomes in obese patients with RA. We expected that after controlling for demographic and medical variables, higher levels of pain catastrophizing and lower levels of confidence would account for significant and unique variance in pain, physical functioning, and overeating. Participants had a diagnosis of RA and a body mass index of 28 kg/m or greater and completed self-report questionnaires assessing pain, physical functioning, overeating, pain catastrophizing, self-efficacy for arthritis management, self-efficacy for weight management, and a 6-minute walk test. Pain catastrophizing, self-efficacy for arthritis, and self-efficacy for weight management were significantly and uniquely related to RA-related outcomes. Pain catastrophizing was a significant independent predictor of pain severity (β = 0.38); self-efficacy for arthritis was a significant independent predictor of self-report physical functioning (β = -0.37) and the 6-minute walk performance (β = 0.44), and self-efficacy for weight management was a significant independent predictor of overeating (β = -0.58). Pain catastrophizing, self-efficacy for arthritis, and self-efficacy for weight management each contributed uniquely to relate to key outcomes in obese patients with RA. Clinicians should consider assessment of thought processes when assessing and intervening with patients who face dual health challenges; unique intervention approaches may be needed for addressing the challenges of arthritis and weight.

  9. Optimal methotrexate dose is associated with better clinical outcomes than non-optimal dose in daily practice: results from the ESPOIR early arthritis cohort.

    PubMed

    Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile; Rincheval, Nathalie; Dougados, Maxime; Combe, Bernard; Fautrel, Bruno

    2017-12-01

    Although methotrexate (MTX) is the consensual first-line disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), substantial heterogeneity remains with its prescription and dosage, which are often not optimal. To evaluate the symptomatic and structural impact of optimal MTX dose in patients with early RA in daily clinical practice over 2 years. Patients included in the early arthritis ESPOIR cohort who fulfilled the ACR-EULAR (American College of Rheumatology/European League against Rheumatism) criteria for RA and received MTX as a first DMARD were assessed. Optimal MTX dose was defined as ≥10 mg/week during the first 3 months, with escalation to ≥20 mg/week or 0.3 mg/kg/week at 6 months without Disease Activity Score in 28 joints remission. Symptomatic and structural efficacy with and without optimal MTX dose was assessed by generalised logistic regression with adjustment for appropriate variables. Within the first year of follow-up, 314 patients (53%) with RA received MTX as a first DMARD (mean dose 12.2±3.8 mg/week). Only 26.4% (n=76) had optimal MTX dose. After adjustment, optimal versus non-optimal MTX dose was more efficient in achieving ACR-EULAR remission at 1 year (OR 4.28 (95% CI 1.86 to 9.86)) and normal functioning (Health Assessment Questionnaire ≤0.5; OR at 1 year 4.36 (95% CI 2.03 to 9.39)), with no effect on radiological progression. Results were similar during the second year. Optimal MTX dose is more efficacious than non-optimal dose for remission and function in early arthritis in daily practice, with no impact on radiological progression over 2 years. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. The combination of three autoantibodies, ACPA, RF and anti-CarP antibodies is highly specific for rheumatoid arthritis: implications for very early identification of individuals at risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verheul, Marije K; Böhringer, Stefan; van Delft, Myrthe A M; Jones, Jonathan D; Rigby, William F C; Gan, Ryan W; Holers, V Michael; Edison, Jess D; Deane, Kevin D; Janssen, Koen M J; Westra, Johanna; Brink, Mikael; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Huizinga, Tom W J; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; van der Woude, Diane; Toes, Rene E M; Trouw, Leendert A

    2018-05-21

    In rheumatoid arthritis(RA), the autoantibodies anti-citrullinated protein antibodies(ACPA) and rheumatoid factor(RF) are commonly used to aid RA diagnosis. Although these autoantibodies are mainly found in RA, their specificity is not optimal. It is therefore difficult to identify RA patients, especially in very early disease, based on the presence of ACPA and RF alone. Also, anti-carbamylated protein(anti-CarP) antibodies have diagnostic and prognostic value as the presence of anti-CarP antibodies associates with joint damage in RA patients and with future RA development in arthralgia patients. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the value of combined antibody testing in relation to prediction and diagnosis of (early) RA. A literature search resulted in twelve studies, consisting of RA patients, pre-RA individuals, disease controls, healthy first-degree relatives of RA patients or healthy controls, in which data on RF, ACPA and anti-CarP antibody-status was available. Random effects meta-analyses were carried out for several antibody combinations. The individual antibodies are highly prevalent in RA(34%-80%) compared to the control groups, but are also present in non-RA controls(0%-23%). To classify most people correctly as RA or non-RA, the combination of ACPA and/or RF often performs well(specificity:65-100, sensitivity:59-88). However, triple positivity for ACPA, RF and anti-CarP antibodies results in a higher specificity(98-100) (accompanied by a lower sensitivity(11-39)). As the rheumatology field is moving towards very early identification of RA and possible screening for individuals at maximum risk in populations with a low pre-test probability, triple positivity provides interesting information on individuals at risk to develop RA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of etanercept in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Yuko; Inui, Kentaro; Koike, Tatsuya

    2008-01-01

    Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are typically used for the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but most have some nephrotoxicity. In several clinical studies, etanercept had fewer adverse effects on renal function than other DMARDs. We report the case of a 64-year-old woman with RA and renal insufficiency on hemodialysis treated using etanercept therapy. This case suggests that etanercept therapy might be effective in the short term for such patients.

  12. Medical ozone increases methotrexate clinical response and improves cellular redox balance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    León Fernández, Olga Sonia; Viebahn-Haensler, Renate; Cabreja, Gilberto López; Espinosa, Irainis Serrano; Matos, Yanet Hernández; Roche, Liván Delgado; Santos, Beatriz Tamargo; Oru, Gabriel Takon; Polo Vega, Juan Carlos

    2016-10-15

    Medical ozone reduced inflammation, IL-1β, TNF-α mRNA levels and oxidative stress in PG/PS-induced arthritis in rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the medical ozone effects in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate and methotrexate+ozone, and to compare between them. A randomized clinical study with 60 patients was performed, who were divided into two groups: one (n=30) treated with methotrexate (MTX), folic acid and Ibuprophen (MTX group) and the second group (n=30) received the same as the MTX group+medical ozone by rectal insufflation of the gas (MTX+ozone group). The clinical response of the patients was evaluated by comparing Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28), Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated (Anti-CCP) levels, reactants of acute phase and biochemical markers of oxidative stress before and after 20 days of treatment. MTX+ozone reduced the activity of the disease while MTX merely showed a tendency to decrease the variables. Reactants of acute phase displayed a similar picture. MTX+ozone reduced Anti-CCP levels as well as increased antioxidant system, and decreased oxidative damage whereas MTX did not change. Glutathione correlated with all clinical variables just after MTX+ozone. MTX+ozone increased the MTX clinical response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. No side effects were observed. These results suggest that ozone can increase the efficacy of MTX probably because both share common therapeutic targets. Medical ozone treatment is capable of being a complementary therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Bagan, Leticia; Bagan, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis has been regarded as a potential risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic review is made to determine whether nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with RA offers benefits in terms of the clinical activity and inflammatory markers of the disease. Material and Methods A search was made of the Medline-PubMed, Cochrane, Embase and Scopus databases to identify studies on the relationship between the two disease processes, and especially on the effects of nonsurgical treatment in patients of this kind. The search was based on the following keywords: rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontitis (MeSH), rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontal treatment. Results Eight articles on the nonsurgical treatment of patients with periodontitis and RA were finally included in the study. All of them evaluated clinical (DAS28) and laboratory test activity (ESR, CRP, IL-6, TNFα) before and after treatment. A clear decrease in DAS28 score and ESR was recorded, while other parameters such as CRP, IL-6 and TNFα showed a non significant tendency to decrease as a result of treatment. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment improved the periodontal condition of patients with periodontitis and RA, with beneficial effects upon the clinical and laboratory test parameters (DAS28 and ESR), while other inflammatory markers showed a marked tendency to decrease. However, all the studies included in the review involved small samples sizes and follow-up periods of no more than 6 months. Larger and particularly longitudinal studies are therefore needed to more firmly establish possible significant relations between the two disease processes. Key words:Periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal treatment. PMID:26946202

  14. Pain Behavior in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Identification of Pain Behavior Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Sandra J.; Riordan, Paul A.; Keefe, Francis J.; Lefebvre, John C.

    2008-01-01

    This study used Ward’s minimum variance hierarchical cluster analysis to identify homogeneous subgroups of rheumatoid arthritis patients suffering from chronic pain who exhibited similar pain behavior patterns during a videotaped behavior sample. Ninety-two rheumatoid arthritis patients were divided into two samples. Six motor pain behaviors were examined: guarding, bracing, active rubbing, rigidity, grimacing, and sighing. The cluster analysis procedure identified four similar subgroups in Sample 1 and Sample 2. The first subgroup exhibited low levels of all pain behaviors. The second subgroup exhibited a high level of guarding and low levels of other pain behaviors. The third subgroup exhibited high levels of guarding and rigidity and low levels of other pain behaviors. The fourth subgroup exhibited high levels of guarding and active rubbing and low levels of other pain behaviors. Sample 1 contained a fifth subgroup that exhibited a high level of active rubbing and low levels of other pain measures. The results of this study suggest that there are homogeneous subgroups within rheumatoid arthritis patient populations who differ in the motor pain behaviors they exhibit. PMID:18358682

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Rheumatoid Arthritis Small Text Medium Text Large Text Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about ...

  16. Rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibody positivity, but not level, are associated with increased mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: results from two large independent cohorts.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Jennifer H; van Nies, Jessica A B; Chipping, Jackie; Marshall, Tarnya; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Symmons, Deborah P M; Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2014-12-04

    This study aimed to investigate rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) status and levels as predictors of mortality in two large cohorts of patients with early inflammatory arthritis (EIA). Data from the Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR) and Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (EAC) cohorts were used. At baseline, patients had demographic data and smoking status recorded; RF, ACPA and inflammatory markers were measured in the local laboratories. Patients were flagged with national death registers until death or censor date. Antibody status was stratified as negative, low or high positive by RF and ACPA levels individually. In addition, patients were grouped as seronegative, RF positive, ACPA positive or double antibody (RF and ACPA) positive. Cox regression models explored associations between antibody status and mortality adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, inflammatory markers and year of enrolment. A total of 4962 patients were included, 64% were female. Median age at onset was 56 (NOAR) and 54 (EAC) years. In NOAR and EAC respectively, 35% and 42% of patients were ACPA/RF positive. When antibody status was stratified as negative, low or high positive, there were no consistent findings between the two cohorts. Double antibody positivity was associated with excess mortality in both cohorts compared to seronegative patients: NOAR and EAC respective adjusted HR (95% confidence interval) 1.35 (1.09 to 1.68) and 1.58 (1.16 to 2.15). Patients with EIA who are seropositive for both RF and ACPA have increased mortality compared to those who are single positive or seronegative. Antibody level in seropositive patients was not consistently associated with excess mortality.

  17. Evolution of Patient Decision-Making Regarding Medical Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Alexandra L; Coleska, Adriana; Burns, Patricia B; Chung, Kevin C

    2016-03-01

    The migration of health care toward a consumer-driven system favors increased patient participation during the treatment decision-making process. Patient involvement in treatment decision discussions has been linked to increased treatment adherence and patient satisfaction. Previous studies have quantified decision-making styles of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, none of them have considered the evolution of patient involvement after living with RA for many years. We conducted a qualitative study to determine the decision-making model used by long-term RA patients, and to describe the changes in their involvement over time. Twenty participants were recruited from the ongoing Silicone Arthroplasty in Rheumatoid Arthritis study. Semistructured interviews were conducted and data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Nineteen out of 20 participants recalled using the paternalistic decision-making (PDM) model immediately following their diagnosis. Fourteen of the 19 participants who initially used PDM evolved to shared decision-making (SDM). Participants attributed the change in involvement to the development of a trusting relationship with their physician, as well as to becoming educated about the disease. When initially diagnosed with RA, patients may let their physician decide on the best treatment course. However, over time patients may evolve to exercise a more collaborative role. Physicians should understand that even within SDM, each patient can demonstrate a varied amount of autonomy. It is up to the physician to have a discussion with each patient to determine his or her desired level of involvement. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Association between lipid levels and major adverse cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis compared to non-rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Liao, Katherine P; Liu, Jun; Lu, Bing; Solomon, Daniel H; Kim, Seoyoung C

    2015-05-01

    Lower levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol may be associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) risk in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was undertaken to determine whether the complex relationship between levels of LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and CV risk is different in RA patients as compared to non-RA controls. Using data from a US health insurance plan (2003-2012), we conducted a cohort study that included patients with RA and non-RA control subjects matched with regard to age, sex, and index date. The nonlinearity of associations between lipid levels and incidence of major adverse CV events (MACE) was tested. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models to examine for an interaction between lipid levels and RA status in relation to the risk of MACE, after adjustment for CV risk factors. In total, 16,085 RA patients and 48,499 non-RA controls were studied. The mean age was 52.6 years and 78.6% were women. The relationship between LDL cholesterol levels and incidence of MACE was nonlinear and similar between RA patients and non-RA controls (P for interaction = 0.72). No significant increase in CV risk was observed between the lowest quintile of LDL cholesterol levels (≤91.0 mg/dl) and the second, third, or fourth quintiles, whereas the highest quintile (>190.0 mg/dl) conveyed a 40% increase in risk of MACE (hazard ratio [HR] 1.40, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.17-1.68). The relationship between HDL cholesterol levels and incidence of MACE was also nonlinear and similar between RA patients and non-RA controls (P for interaction = 0.39). Compared to the lowest quintile of HDL cholesterol levels, each successive quintile was associated with a reduced risk of MACE (HR 0.45, 95% CI 0.48-0.72 for lowest quintile [≤43.0 mg/dl] versus highest quintile [>71.0 mg/dl]). The complex relationship between LDL cholesterol levels, HDL cholesterol levels, and risk of MACE was nonlinear in RA patients

  19. Prioritizing the patient: optimizing therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. Results of a patient questionnaire in northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Wollenhaupt, Jürgen; Ehlebracht-Koenig, Inge; Groenewegen, André; Fricke, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    A 40-question postal survey was developed to gain insight into the nature of difficulties experienced by patients due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as patient perceptions and priorities regarding their RA treatment. A total of 3000 Lower Saxony, Germany members of Rheuma-Liga (RL), a patient support group for people with RA, were invited to participate between July 1, and August 20, 2009. The questionnaire was divided into four sections: (1) patient demographics, (2) quality of life (QOL), (3) treatment expectations and, (4) patient perceptions of RL. The questionnaire could be completed in writing or via the internet. Of 959 respondents (response rate = 32.0%), 318 had diagnosed RA and were included in the analysis. The respondents were mostly retired (71.2%), female (83.3%), and >60 years of age (63.5%). Members' responses indicated that most were generally satisfied with their current treatment (67.3%), considered it efficacious (84.0%), and reported minimal (none or little) side-effects (61.2%). Patient involvement in treatment decisions, however, was reportedly low (49.6% felt insufficiently involved). Patients' primary impairments were reflected in their treatment priorities: mobility (97.0%), ability to run errands/do shopping (97.1%), do the housework (95.6%), and be independent of others (94.2%). The primary service provided by RL and used by respondents was physiotherapy (70.6%), which was reported to benefit physical function and mood by over 90.0% of respondents. RA had a detrimental effect upon respondents' quality of life, specifically impairing their ability to perform daily tasks and causing pain/emotional distress. Independence and mobility were strong priorities for respondents. Physical therapy, provided by RL, was felt to help both physical and mental/emotional health.

  20. "During early implementation you just muddle through": factors that impacted a statewide arthritis program's implementation.

    PubMed

    Conte, Kathleen P; Marie Harvey, S; Turner Goins, R

    2017-12-01

    The need to scale-up effective arthritis self-management programs is pressing as the prevalence of arthritis increases. The CDC Arthritis Program funds state health departments to work with local delivery systems to embed arthritis programs into their day-to-day work. To encourage organizational ownership and sustainability of programs, funding is restricted to offset program start-up costs. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that impacted the success of implementing an evidence-based arthritis self-management program, funded by the CDC Arthritis Program, into the Oregon Extension Service. We interviewed staff and partners involved in implementation who had and had not successfully delivered Walk With Ease (N = 12) to identify barriers and facilitators to scaling-up. Document analysis of administrative records was used to triangulate and expand on findings. Delivery goals defined by the funder were not met in Year 1: only 3 of the expected 28 programs were delivered. Barriers to implementation included insufficient planning for implementation driven by pressure to deliver programs and insufficient resources to support staff time. Facilitators included centralized administration of key implementation activities and staffs' previous experience implementing new programs. The importance of planning and preparing for implementation cannot be overlooked. Funders, however, eager to see deliverables, continue to define implementation goals in terms of program reach, exclusive of capacity-building. Lack of capacity-building can jeopardize staff buy-in, implementation quality, and sustainability. Based on our findings coupled with support from implementation literature, we offer recommendations for future large-scale implementation efforts operating under such funding restrictions.

  1. Toxoplasmosis seroprevalence in rheumatoid arthritis patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hosseininejad, Zahra; Sharif, Mehdi; Sarvi, Shahabeddin; Amouei, Afsaneh; Hosseini, Seyed Abdollah; Nayeri Chegeni, Tooran; Anvari, Davood; Saberi, Reza; Gohardehi, Shaban; Mizani, Azadeh; Sadeghi, Mitra; Daryani, Ahmad

    2018-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a cosmopolitan infection caused by an intracellular obligatory protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii. Infection to this parasite in immunocompetent patients is usually asymptomatic, but today it is believed that the infection can be a risk factor for a variety of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is an autoimmune disease and the most common type of inflammatory arthritis that is a major cause of disability. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to address the association between RA and toxoplasmosis in light of the available research. Based on the keywords, a systematic search of eight databases was conducted to retrieve the relevant English-language articles. Then, the studies were screened based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The random effect model was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) using forest plot with 95% confidence interval (CI). Overall, 4168 Individual, extracted from 9 articles were included for systematic review evaluation, with 1369 RA patients (46% positive toxoplasmosis) and 2799 individuals as controls (21% positive toxoplasmosis). Then, eight articles (10 datasets) were used for meta-analysis (1244 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 2799 controls). By random effect model, the combined OR was 3.30 (95% CI: 2.05 to 5.30) with P < 0.0001. Although toxoplasmosis could be considered as a potential risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, more and better quality studies are needed to determine the effect of T. gondii infection on induction or exacerbation of RA. Our study was registered at the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO; code: CRD42017069384).

  2. Do schizophrenia patients age early?

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, Venkataram; Kalmady, Sunil V; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2014-08-01

    The etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia is poorly understood. Within the proposed "neurodegeneration paradigm", observations have been put forth for "accelerated aging" in this disorder. This proposition is largely based on the neuroscience research that demonstrates progressive changes in brain as well as other systemic abnormalities supportive of faster aging process in patients with this disorder. In this review, we have summarized the literature related to the concept of early aging in schizophrenia. These studies include P300 abnormalities & visual motion discrimination, neuroimaging findings, telomere dynamics as well as neuropathology of related brain regions. We also propose a role of vitamin D, neuroimmunological changes and elevated oxidative stress as well as mitochondrial dysfunction in addition to the above factors with 'vitamin-D deficiency' as the central paradox. Put together, the evidence supporting early aging in schizophrenia is compelling and this requires further systematic studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy and safety of guselkumab in patients with active psoriatic arthritis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 study.

    PubMed

    Deodhar, Atul; Gottlieb, Alice B; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Dong, Bin; Wang, Yuhua; Zhuang, Yanli; Barchuk, William; Xu, Xie L; Hsia, Elizabeth C

    2018-06-02

    Guselkumab, a human monoclonal antibody that binds to the p19 subunit of interleukin 23, has been approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Psoriatic arthritis is a common comorbidity of psoriasis with an umet need for novel treatments. We assessed the efficacy and safety of guselkumab in patients with active psoriatic arthritis. We did a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2a trial at 34 rheumatology and dermatology practices in Canada, Germany, Poland, Romania, Russia, Spain, and the USA. Eligible participants were aged 18 years or older with active psoriatic arthritis and plaque psoriasis affecting at least 3% of their body surface area, with three or more of 66 tender joints and three or more of 68 swollen joints, who had an inadequate response or intolerance to standard treatments. We randomly assigned patients (2:1) via a central interactive web-response system using computer-generated permuted blocks with a block size of six, stratified by previous anti-tumour necrosis factor-α use, to receive subcutaneous guselkumab 100 mg or placebo at week 0, week 4, and every 8 weeks thereafter for 24 weeks. Patients, investigators, and site staff were masked to treatment assignment until final database lock at week 56. At week 16, patients with less than 5% improvement in swollen and tender joint counts were eligible for early escape to ustekinumab. At week 24, the remaining placebo-treated patients crossed over to receive guselkumab 100 mg at weeks 24, 28, 36, and 44 and guselkumab-treated patients received a placebo injection at week 24, followed by guselkumab injections at weeks 28, 36, and 44. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with at least 20% improvement at week 24 in signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis according to American College of Rheumatology criteria (ACR20) in the modified intention-to-treat population (ie, all randomly assigned patients who received at least one dose of study treatment). Safety

  4. Norwegian scabies in a patient treated with Tripterygium glycoside for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bu, Xiaolin; Fan, Juan; Hu, Xiaoli; Bi, Xinling; Peng, Bin; Zhang, Denghai

    2017-01-01

    We report an 80-year-old male patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis who was treated with tripterygium glycoside, an immunosuppressive agent made from the extract of a Chinese medicinal herb called Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F. The patient had no apparent skin lesions before the treatment, but he developed aggressive hyperkeratotic lesions with rapid progression after using tripterygium glycoside. He was repeatedly diagnosed with eczema, but treatment failed to achieve efficacy. Interestingly, a microscopic examination of the lesions revealed numerous scabies mites and eggs. Thus, we confirmed the diagnosis of Norwegian scabies infection. Treated with crotamiton 10% cream and 10% sulfur ointment for one month, the patient's clinical symptoms disappeared.

  5. Sensitivity to non-acetylated salicylates in a patient with asthma, nasal polyps, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chudwin, D S; Strub, M; Golden, H E; Frey, C; Richmond, G W; Luskin, A T

    1986-08-01

    A woman experienced exacerbations of bronchial asthma after taking aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for rheumatoid arthritis. On oral challenges, she developed an urticarial reaction after tartrazine; urticarial and bronchospastic reactions after salicylsalicylic acid; and urticarial and bronchospastic reactions after choline magnesium trisalicylate. Non-acetylated salicylates have been recommended for use in aspirin- and/or tartrazine-sensitive patients. The results of sensitivity studies of our patient indicates that such patients may also be sensitive to non-acetylated salicylates.

  6. Functional capacity and treatment data from a community based study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, S G; Friesen, W T; Roberts, M S; Francis, H; Flux, W

    1986-01-01

    A community based study of rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to determine patient characteristics and the patterns of treatment. Three hundred and eighty subjects were visited in their homes throughout Tasmania (pop. 430 000) by a research team. The median age of the sample was 60 years (interquartile range (IR) 49-69), with a female predominance of 2.65 to 1. The average onset age was 41 years (IR 30-53). Prescribing data indicated that polypharmacy was not common in the community, and that the use of slow acting antirheumatic drugs (SAARDs) and oral corticosteroids was not widespread. At the time of the study 26% of subjects were assayed fully functional--class I of the American Rheumatism Association's (ARA) functional classifications. The functional capacity data provided evidence that the spectrum of rheumatoid arthritis found in the community differed from that found in specialist rheumatology clinics. PMID:2939806

  7. Certolizumab pegol in a heterogeneous population of patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Enrique R; Dellepiane, Analia; Salvatierra, Gabriela; Benítez, Cristian Alejandro; Salinas, Rodrigo Garcia; Baruzzo, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Aim: To determine the efficacy and safety of certolizumab pegol for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in a real-world setting. Materials & methods: Patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis who initiated therapy with certolizumab were followed for 12 weeks. Response was assessed with Disease Activity Score of 28 joints, European Ligue Against Rheumatism criteria and Simplified Disease Activity Index. Predictors of response were analyzed with binary logistic regression models. Results: Statistically significant decreases in tender and swollen joint counts, laboratory parameters and use of corticosteroids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were found. Disease activity also significantly diminished. Higher Disease Activity Score of 28 joints at baseline was the main predictor of response. No severe adverse events were reported. Conclusion: Certolizumab was effective and well tolerated, particularly in the subpopulation with higher inflammatory burden at baseline. PMID:29682324

  8. Gender differences in emotion regulation and relationships with perceived health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    van Middendorp, Henriët; Geenen, Rinie; Sorbi, Marjolijn J; Hox, Joop J; Vingerhoets, Ad J J M; van Doornen, Lorenz J P; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2005-01-01

    Emotion regulation has been associated with perceived health in rheumatoid arthritis, which is diagnosed three times more often in women than men. Our aim was to examine gender differences in styles of emotion regulation (ambiguity, control, orientation, and expression) and gender-specificity of the associations between emotion regulation and perceived health (psychological well-being, social functioning, physical functioning, and disease activity) in 244 female and 91 male patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Women reported more emotional orientation than men, but did not differ from men with regard to ambiguity, control, and expression. Structural equation modelling showed that relationships between emotion regulation and perceived health were more frequent and stronger for women than men. This held especially for the affective dimension of health, while associations were similar for both women and men with regard to social and physical functioning. Only for women, the association between ambiguity and disease activity was significant, which appeared to be mediated by affective functioning. The observations that women are more emotionally oriented than men and that emotion regulation is more interwoven with psychological health in women than men, support the usefulness of a gender-sensitive approach in research and health care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Early non-response to certolizumab pegol in rheumatoid arthritis predicts treatment failure at one year. Data from a randomised phase III clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Berenbaum, Francis; Pham, Thao; Claudepierre, Pascal; de Chalus, Thibault; Joubert, Jean-Michel; Saadoun, Carine; Riou França, Lionel; Fautrel, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    To compare different early clinical criteria of non-response determined at three months as predictors of clinical failure at one year in patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting therapy with certolizumab pegol. Data were derived from a randomised Phase III clinical trial in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who failed to respond to methotrexate monotherapy. Patients included in this post-hoc analysis were treated with certolizumab pegol (400mg qd reduced to 200mg qd after one month) and with methotrexate. The study duration was twelve months. Response at three months was determined with the American College of Rheumatology-50, Disease Assessment Score-28 ESR, Health Assessment Questionnaire and the Clinical Disease Activity Index. The performance of these measures at predicting treatment failure at twelve months defined by the American College of Rheumatology-50 criteria was determined, using the positive predictive values as the principal evaluation criterion. Three hundred and eighty two patients were available for analysis and 225 completed the twelve-month follow-up. At Week 52, 149 (38.1%) patients met the American College of Rheumatology-50 response criterion. Positive predictive values ranged from 81% for a decrease in Health Assessment Questionnaire- Disability index score since baseline >0.22 to 95% for a decrease in Disease Assessment Score-28 score since baseline≥1.2. Sensitivity was≤70% in all cases. Performance of these measures was similar irrespective of the definition of treatment failure at 12months. Simple clinical measures of disease activity can predict future treatment failure reliably and are appropriate for implementing treat-to-target treatment strategies in everyday practice. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Acarbose Decreases the Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk of Diabetic Patients and Attenuates the Incidence and Severity of Collagen-induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Der-Yuan; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Wu, Chao-Liang; Lai, Kuo-Lung; Lin, Ching-Heng; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Acarbose has been found to decrease some inflammatory parameters in diabetic patients. This study aimed to examine the influence of acarbose on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and on the incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In a nationwide, matched case–control study, we identified 723 incident RA cases and selected 7,230 age-, sex- and RA diagnosis date–matched controls from all newly treated DM patients. We found that use of acarbose at > 16,950 mg per year was associated with a lower RA risk (odds ratio 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41–0.89). In the CIA mouse study, acarbose was orally administered from days -7 to 38 relative to type II collagen (CII) immunization. The results revealed that acarbose at the dose of 500 mg/kg/day attenuated the incidence and severity of arthritis and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17 in the paw tissues. Acarbose further decreased the productions of anti-CII-IgG, IL-17 and IFN-γ by collagen-reactive lymph node cells. This work suggests that the use of acarbose decreased RA risk in DM patients and the incidence of CIA in mice. Acarbose also attenuated the severity of CIA via anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:26678745

  11. Acarbose Decreases the Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk of Diabetic Patients and Attenuates the Incidence and Severity of Collagen-induced Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Der-Yuan; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Wu, Chao-Liang; Lai, Kuo-Lung; Lin, Ching-Heng; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2015-12-18

    Acarbose has been found to decrease some inflammatory parameters in diabetic patients. This study aimed to examine the influence of acarbose on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and on the incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In a nationwide, matched case-control study, we identified 723 incident RA cases and selected 7,230 age-, sex- and RA diagnosis date-matched controls from all newly treated DM patients. We found that use of acarbose at > 16,950 mg per year was associated with a lower RA risk (odds ratio 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41-0.89). In the CIA mouse study, acarbose was orally administered from days -7 to 38 relative to type II collagen (CII) immunization. The results revealed that acarbose at the dose of 500 mg/kg/day attenuated the incidence and severity of arthritis and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17 in the paw tissues. Acarbose further decreased the productions of anti-CII-IgG, IL-17 and IFN-γ by collagen-reactive lymph node cells. This work suggests that the use of acarbose decreased RA risk in DM patients and the incidence of CIA in mice. Acarbose also attenuated the severity of CIA via anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects.

  12. Medication use in juvenile uveitis patients enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Registry.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Lauren A; Zurakowski, David; Angeles-Han, Sheila T; Lasky, Andrew; Rabinovich, C Egla; Lo, Mindy S

    2016-02-16

    There is not yet a commonly accepted, standardized approach in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic uveitis when initial steroid therapy is insufficient. We sought to assess current practice patterns within a large cohort of children with juvenile uveitis. This is a cross-sectional cohort study of patients with uveitis enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRAnet) registry. Clinical information including, demographic information, presenting features, disease complications, and medications were collected. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to assess for associations between medications and clinical characteristics. Ninety-two children with idiopathic and 656 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis were identified. Indication (arthritis or uveitis) for medication use was not available for JIA patients; therefore, detailed analysis was limited to children with idiopathic uveitis. In this group, 94 % had received systemic steroids. Methotrexate (MTX) was used in 76 % of patients, with oral and subcutaneous forms given at similar rates. In multivariable analysis, non-Caucasians were more likely to be treated initially with subcutaneous MTX (P = 0.003). Of the 53 % of patients treated with a biologic DMARD, all received a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. TNF inhibitor use was associated with a higher frequency of cataracts (52 % vs 21 %; P = 0.001) and antinuclear antibody positivity (49 % vs 29 %; P = 0.04), although overall complication rates were not higher in these patients. Among idiopathic uveitis patients enrolled in the CARRAnet registry, MTX was the most commonly used DMARD, with subcutaneous and oral forms equally favored. Patients who received a TNF inhibitor were more likely to be ANA positive and have cataracts.

  13. The cost of care of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis patients in tertiary care rheumatology units in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Malhan, Simten; Pay, Salih; Ataman, Sebnem; Dalkilic, Ediz; Dinc, Ayhan; Erken, Eren; Ertenli, Ihsan; Ertugrul, Esin; Gogus, Feride; Hamuryudan, Vedat; Inanc, Murat; Karaarslan, Yasar; Karadag, Omer; Karakoc, Yuksel; Keskin, Goksal; Kisacik, Bunyamin; Kiraz, Sedat; Oksel, Fahrettin; Oksuz, Ergun; Pirildar, Timur; Sari, Ismail; Soy, Mehmet; Senturk, Taskin; Taylan, Ali

    2012-01-01

    To determine the direct and indirect costs due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients in Turkey. An expert panel was convened to estimate the direct and indirect costs of care of patients with RA and AS in Turkey. The panel was composed of 22 experts chosen from all national tertiary care rheumatology units (n=53). To calculate direct costs, the medical management of RA and AS patients was estimated using 'cost-of-illness' methodology. To measure indirect costs, the number of days of sick leave, the extent of disability, and the levels of early retirement and early death were also evaluated. Lost productivity costs were calculated using the 'human capital approach', based on the minimum wage. The total annual direct costs were 2,917.03 Euros per RA patient and 3,565.9 Euros for each AS patient. The direct costs were thus substantial, but the indirect costs were much higher because of extensive morbidity and mortality rates. The total annual indirect costs were 7,058.99 Euros per RA patient and 6,989.81 for each AS patient. Thus, the total cost for each RA patient was 9,976.01 Euros and that for an AS patient 10,555.72 Euros, in Turkey. From the societal perspective, both RA and AS have become burden in Turkey. The cost of lost productivity is higher than the medical cost. Another important conclusion is that indirect costs constitute 70% and 66% of total costs in patients with RA and AS, respectively.

  14. The Economic Burden of ACPA-Positive Status Among Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shafrin, Jason; Tebeka, Mahlet Gizaw; Price, Kwanza; Patel, Chad; Michaud, Kaleb

    2018-01-01

    Anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) are serological biomarkers associated with early, rapidly progressing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), including more severe disease and joint damage. ACPA testing has become a routine tool for RA diagnosis and prognosis. Furthermore, treatment efficacy has been shown to vary by ACPA-positive status. However, it is not clear if the economic burden of patients with RA varies by ACPA status. To determine if the economic burden of RA varies by patient ACPA status. IMS PharMetrics Plus health insurance claims and electronic medical record (EMR) data from 2010-2015 were used to identify patients with incident RA. Patients were aged ≥ 18 years, had ≥ 1 inpatient or ≥ 2 outpatient claims reporting an RA diagnosis code (ICD-9-CM code 714.0), and had an anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP; a surrogate of ACPA) antibody test within 6 months of diagnosis. Incident patients were defined as those who had no claims with an RA diagnosis code in the 6 months before the first observed RA diagnosis. The primary outcome of interest was RA-related medical expenditures, defined as the sum of payer- and patient-paid amounts for all claims with an RA diagnosis code. Secondary outcomes included health care utilization metrics such as treatment with a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and physician visits. Generalized linear regression models were used for each outcome, controlling for ACPA-positive status (defined as anti-CCP ≥ 20 AU/mL), age, sex, and Charlson Comorbidity Index score as explanatory variables. Of 647,171 patients diagnosed with RA, 89,296 were incident cases, and 47% (n = 42,285) had an anti-CCP test. After restricting this sample to patients with a linked EMR and reported anti-CCP test result, 859 remained, with 24.7% (n = 212) being ACPA-positive. Compared with ACPA-negative patients, adjusted results showed that ACPA-positive patients were more likely to use either conventional (71.2% vs. 49.6%; P < 0

  15. Should tumour necrosis factor antagonist safety information be applied from patients with rheumatoid arthritis to psoriasis? Rates of serious adverse events in the prospective rheumatoid arthritis BIOBADASER and psoriasis BIOBADADERM cohorts.

    PubMed

    García-Doval, I; Hernández, M V; Vanaclocha, F; Sellas, A; de la Cueva, P; Montero, D

    2017-03-01

    Information on the safety of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists frequently arises from their use in rheumatic diseases, their first approved indications, and is later applied to psoriasis. Whether the risk of biological therapy is similar in psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis has been considered a priority research question. To compare the safety profile of anti-TNF drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. We compared two prospective safety cohorts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis that share methods (BIOBADASER and BIOBADADERM). There were 1248 serious or mortal adverse events in 16 230 person-years of follow-up in the rheumatoid arthritis cohort (3171 patients), and 124 in the 2760 person-years of follow-up of the psoriasis cohort (946 patients). Serious and mortal adverse events were less common in patients with psoriasis than in rheumatoid arthritis (incidence rate ratio of serious adverse events in psoriasis/rheumatoid arthritis: 0·6, 95% confidence interval 0·5-0·7). This risk remained after adjustment for sex, age, treatment, disease, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and simultaneous therapy with methotrexate (hazard ratio 0·54, 95% confidence interval 0·47-0·61), and after excluding patients receiving corticosteroids. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed a higher rate of infections, cardiac disorders, respiratory disorders and infusion-related reactions, whereas patients with psoriasis had more skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders and hepatobiliary disorders. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis clinical practice have almost double the risk of serious adverse events compared with patients with psoriasis, with a different pattern of adverse events. Safety data from rheumatoid arthritis should not be fully extrapolated to psoriasis. These differences are likely to apply to other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  16. Advances in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dale, James

    2015-08-01

    Modern early rheumatoid arthritis strategies are usually based upon a number of important overarching principles: 1. early diagnosis facilitates early commencement of disease modifying anti-rheumatic therapy; 2. early commencement of treatment reduces the long-term risk of erosive damage and functional decline; 3. composite disease activity measures should be used to quantify global rheumatoid arthritis disease activity; and 4. therapy should be intensified until a predefined disease activity target has been achieved. A substantial minority of rheumatoid arthritis patients (approximately 40%) will experience an adequate response to methotrexate monotherapy; however, the remainder may require disease modifying anti-rheumatic combination therapy, and/or biologic therapy, to achieve disease activity targets. Importantly, short term trials of methotrexate monotherapy do not appear to disadvantage outcomes provided treatment continues to be intensified if disease activity targets are not achieved. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Randomized clinical trials as reflexive-interpretative process in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    de Jorge, Mercedes; Parra, Sonia; de la Torre-Aboki, Jenny; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel

    2015-08-01

    Patients in randomized clinical trials have to adapt themselves to a restricted language to capture the necessary information to determine the safety and efficacy of a new treatment. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of patients with rheumatoid arthritis after completing their participation in a biologic therapy randomized clinical trial for a period of 3 years. A qualitative approach was used. The information was collected using 15 semi-structured interviews of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Data collection was guided by the emergent analysis until no more relevant variations in the categories were found. The data were analysed using the grounded theory method. The objective of the patients when entering the study was to improve their quality of life by initiating the treatment. However, the experience changed the significance of the illness as they acquired skills and practical knowledge related to the management of their disease. The category "Interactional Empowerment" emerged as core category, as it represented the participative experience in a clinical trial. The process integrates the follow categories: "weight of systematisation", "working together", and the significance of the experience: "the duties". Simultaneously these categories evolved. The clinical trial monitoring activities enabled patients to engage in a reflexive-interpretative mechanism that transformed the emotional and symbolic significance of their disease and improved the empowerment of the patient. A better communicative strategy with the health professionals, the relatives of the patients, and the community was also achieved.

  18. Determination of Serum Trace Elements (Zn, Cu, and Fe) in Pakistani Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Zia; Ullah, Muhammad Ikram; Hussain, Shabbir; Kaul, Haiba; Lone, Khalid P

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease, which mainly involves the joints. RA is prevalent worldwide with increasing prevalence in elderly people. The mechanism of RA pathogenesis is still undefined, and it is interplaying between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Although risk factors for RA are not fully established, various studies have focused on the role of trace elements in association with RA. Trace elements act as co-factors for most of the enzymes, and their deficiency is associated with many untoward effects on human health. The homeostatic alterations in the metabolism of trace elements may partly be due to inflammatory response in RA. The objective of the present study was to determine the serum concentrations and correlation of zinc, copper, and iron in RA patients and healthy controls. The study comprised of 61 RA patients and 61 age- and sex-related healthy individuals of Pakistani population. Serum levels of Zn, Cu, and Fe were measured in all the participants by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Serum Zn and Fe were significantly reduced in the RA patients than those in the healthy controls. Serum Cu concentrations were found elevated in the RA patients. Correlation studies of trace elements determine that there was negative correlation between Zn and Cu in the RA patients and no correlation in the control group. It is very important to explore the deficiency of essential trace metals in biological samples of the RA patients in different populations which may be helpful for diagnosis and supplementary management of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  19. [Preference for etanercept pen versus syringe in patients with chronic arthritis. Nurse education workshop].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Diaz, Silvia; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Roig-Vilaseca, Daniel; Reina, Delia; Cerdà, Dacia; González, Marina; Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Fíguls, Ramon; Corominas, Hèctor

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to evaluate the level of fear of post-injection pain prior to the administration, the difficulty in handling the device, and the level of satisfaction of patients using a pre-filled syringe versus an etanercept pen, as well as to evaluate the usefulness of the training given by nursing staff prior to starting with the pen, and the preferences of patients after using both devices. A prospective study was designed to follow-up a cohort of patients during a 6 months period. The data was collected using questionnaires and analyzed with SPSS 18.00. Rank and McNemar tests were performed. Statistical significance was pre-set at an α level of 0.05. A total of 29 patients were included, of whom 69% female, and with a mean age 52.5±10.9 years. Of these, 48% had rheumatoid arthritis, 28% psoriatic arthritis, 21% ankylosing spondylitis, and 3% undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy. There were no statistically significant differences either with the fear or pain or handling of the device between the syringe and the pen (P=.469; P=.812; P=.169 respectively). At 6 months, 59% of patients referred to being satisfied or very satisfied with the pen. Almost all (93%) found useful or very useful the training given by nursing staff prior to using the pen, and 55% preferred the pen over the pre-filled syringe. The etanercept pen is another subcutaneous device option for patients with chronic arthritis. According to the present study, nursing educational workshops before starting this therapy are recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Adaptation of VITACORA-19 in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    ULUS, Yasemin; TERZİ, Yüksel; ZAHİROĞLU, Yeliz; KESMEN, Hakan; FARİSOĞULLARI, Bayram; AKYOL, Yeşim; BİLGİCİ, Ayhan; KURU, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish language version of VITACORA-19 (psoriatic arthritis quality of life questionnaire) in patients with psoriatic arthritis. Patients and methods The Turkish version of VITACORA-19 questionnaire was obtained after a translation and back translation process. The study sample included 61 PsA patients (22 males, 39 females; mean age 46.5±12.2 years; range 19 to 71 years). To assess the test-retest reliability of the Turkish VITACORA-19, the questionnaire was reapplied 10 to 15 days after the first interview (interclass correlation coefficient). Cronbach’s alpha (a) was used to evaluate the internal consistency. VITACORA-19 was compared with visual analog scale for physician and patient global assessments, the Health Assessment Questionnaire, and Nottingham Health Profile for construct validity. The internal structure of VITACORA-19 was examined by factor analysis. Results The individual item intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.77 to 0.98 and Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.77 to 0.98. The Cronbach's alpha value for whole scale was determined as 0.96. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was 0.90, and Bartlett's test of sphericity had a p<0.001. Turkish VITACORA-19 total scores were correlated negatively with Health Assessment Questionnaire, visual analog scale for pain, and Nottingham Health Profile subgroups, and positively with physician and patient global assessments (p<0.01). Conclusion Turkish version of VITACORA-19 questionnaire is a reliable and valid measure for health-related quality of life in Turkish patients with psoriatic arthritis. PMID:29900999

  1. Impact of a Patient Support Program on Patient Adherence to Adalimumab and Direct Medical Costs in Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis, and Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, David T; Mittal, Manish; Davis, Matthew; Johnson, Scott; Chao, Jingdong; Skup, Martha

    2017-08-01

    AbbVie provides a free-to-patient patient support program (PSP) to assist adalimumab-treated patients with medication costs, nurse support, injection training, pen disposal, and medication reminders. The impact of these services on patient adherence to adalimumab and direct medical costs associated with autoimmune disease has not been assessed. To quantify the relationship between participation in a PSP and outcomes (adalimumab adherence, persistence, and direct medical costs) in patients initiating adalimumab treatment. A longitudinal, retrospective, cohort study was conducted using patient-level data from the PSP combined with Symphony Health Solutions administrative claims data for patients initiating adalimumab between January 2008 and June 2014. The sample included patients aged ≥ 18 years with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis who were biologic-naïve before initiation of adalimumab. Patients who enrolled in the PSP (PSP cohort) were matched to those who did not enroll (non-PSP cohort) based on age, sex, year of treatment initiation, comorbidities, diagnosis, and initiation at a specialty pharmacy. For the PSP cohort, the index date was assigned as the earliest date of PSP enrollment, and time to enrollment following adalimumab initiation was used to assign index dates for the non-PSP cohort. All patients were required to have evidence of medical and pharmacy coverage for at least 6 months before and after their first adalimumab claim and at least 12 months after their index date. Adherence (proportion of days covered during the 12 months following PSP opt-in [index date]) was compared between cohorts using t-tests. Persistence was assessed using survival analysis of discontinuation rates. Medical costs for emergency department, inpatient, physician, and outpatient visits (all-cause and disease-related) and total costs (medical plus drug costs) were compared at

  2. Prevalence of dry eye syndrome and Sjogren's syndrome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kosrirukvongs, Panida; Ngowyutagon, Panotsom; Pusuwan, Pawana; Koolvisoot, Ajchara; Nilganuwong, Surasak

    2012-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis has manifestations in various organs including ophthalmic involvement. The present study evaluates prevalence of dry eye and secondary Sjogren's syndrome using salivary scintigraphy which has not been used in previous reports. To evaluate the prevalence of secondary Sjogren's syndrome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, including clinical characteristics and dry eye, compared with non-Sjogren's syndrome. Descriptive cross sectional study Sixty-one patients with rheumatoid arthritis were recruited at Siriraj Hospital during March 2009-September 2010 and filled in the questionnaires about dry eye for Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) with a history taking of associated diseases, medications, duration of symptoms of dry eyes and dry mouth. The Schirmer I test without anesthesia, tear break-up time, rose bengal staining score, severity of keratitis and salivary scintigraphy were measured and analyzed. Prevalence of secondary Sjogren's syndrome and dry eye were 22.2% (95% CI 15.4 to 30.9) and 46.7% (95% CI 38.0 to 55.6), respectively. Dry eye interpreted from OSDI, Schirmer 1 test, tear break-up time and rose bengal staining was 16.4%, 46.7%, 82% and 3.3% respectively. Fifty-two percent of patients had a history of dry eye and dry mouth with mean duration 27.4 and 29.8 months, respectively. Superficial punctate keratitis and abnormal salivary scintigraphy were found in 58.2% and 77.8%. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate were not correlated with secondary Sjogren's syndrome. Dry eye from OSDI with secondary Sjogren's syndrome (33.3%) compared with non-Sjogren's syndrome (9.5%) was significant difference (p = 0.008). Adjusted odds ratio for secondary Sjogren's syndrome in OSDIL score > 25 was 13.8 (95% CI 2.6 to 73.8, p = 0.002) compared to OSDI score < 25. Awareness and detection of dry eye syndrome and secondary Sjogren's syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis was crucial for evaluation of their severity and proper

  3. Visceral leishmaniasis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Loarce-Martos, Jesús; Garrote-Corral, Sandra; Gioia, Francesca; Bachiller-Corral, Javier

    2017-09-25

    A large number of complications have been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), those of infectious etiology being of special relevance. Their high incidence is closely linked to the use of immunosuppressive medication. The spectrum of agents causing opportunistic infections in patients with RA is very broad; however, there are relatively few cases of Leishmania infection, especially in patients not being treated with biological drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  4. Yellow fever vaccine used in a psoriatic arthritis patient treated with methotrexate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stuhec, Matej

    2014-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccines on the market are contraindicated for immunocompromised and elderly patients. A case of yellow fever vaccine used in a 27-year-old Slovenian male with psoriatic arthritis during treatment with methotrexate is described. We demonstrate a positive case, since there were no adverse effects in concurrent administration of yellow fever vaccine and methotrexate. This patient did not show severe adverse reactions and did not contract yellow fever despite potential exposure. More research is needed on possible adverse effects of concurrent administration of yellow fever vaccine and methotrexate to determine the potential of this method for more frequent use.

  5. Subendocardial viability ratio in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with healthy controls and identification of prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Anyfanti, Panagiota; Triantafyllou, Areti; Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Triantafyllou, Georgios; Koletsos, Nikolaos; Chatzimichailidou, Sophia; Panagopoulos, Panagiotis; Botis, Ioannis; Aslanidis, Spyros; Douma, Stella

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac involvement is common in rheumatoid arthritis. Subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) is a non-invasive measure of microvascular coronary perfusion, yet it remains unclear whether it is affected in rheumatoid arthritis patients. We additionally sought predictors of SEVR in rheumatoid arthritis among a wide range of disease-related parameters, cardiac and hemodynamic factors, and markers of atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, and endothelial dysfunction. SEVR was estimated in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy controls by applanation tonometry, which was also used to evaluate arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity and augmentation index). In the rheumatoid arthritis group, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) was additionally estimated by ultrasound, cardiac and hemodynamic parameters by impedance cardiography, and endothelial dysfunction by measurement of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). In a total of 122 participants, SEVR was lower among 91 patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared to 31 controls (141.4 ± 21.9 vs 153.1 ± 18.7%, p = 0.009) and remained so among 29 rheumatoid arthritis patients without hypertension, diabetes, or cardiovascular diseases, compared to the control group (139.7 ± 21.7 vs 153.1 ± 18.7%, p = 0.013). SEVR did not significantly correlate with arterial stiffness, cIMT, ADMA, or disease-related parameters. Multivariate analysis revealed gender (p = 0.007), blood pressure (p = 0.028), heart rate (p = 0.025), cholesterol levels (p = 0.008), cardiac index (p < 0.001) and left ventricular ejection time (p = 0.004) as independent predictors of SEVR among patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis exhibit lower values of SEVR compared to healthy individuals. Cardiac and hemodynamic parameters, rather than functional indices of endothelial and macrovascular dysfunction, may be useful as predictors of myocardial perfusion in rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Call for action: how to improve use of patient-reported outcomes to guide clinical decision making in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fautrel, Bruno; Alten, Rieke; Kirkham, Bruce; de la Torre, Inmaculada; Durand, Frederick; Barry, Jane; Holzkaemper, Thorsten; Fakhouri, Walid; Taylor, Peter C

    2018-06-01

    Current guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) recommend early treatment and a treat-to-target goal of remission or low disease activity. Over the past decade, this approach has been extremely successful in reducing disease activity and joint damage in patients with RA. At the same time, however, overall patient perception of well-being appears to have decreased with respect to outcome measures considered important by patients themselves, such as pain, fatigue, physical function and quality of life. The timely and effective use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could encourage physicians to focus more on the impact of RA on patients and how patients are feeling. This in turn would facilitate shared decision making between patients and physicians, ultimately leading to a more patient-centered approach and improved patient care. Indeed, PROs provide information about individual patients that complements information provided by physical assessment and composite scores, and can also be used to guide patient care, such as determining whether a clinic visit is needed or whether treatment modifications are necessary. This is particularly important for patients who do not achieve the aspirational target of remission or low disease activity with pharmacological treatment. A number of validated PRO questionnaires are available, but how and which PROs should be incorporated into rheumatology clinical practice as part of the decision-making process is still controversial. Combining PROs with technology, such as computer adaptive tests, electronic PRO systems, web-based platforms and patient dashboards, could further aid PRO integration into daily rheumatology clinical practice.

  7. Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Adaptation of VITACORA-19 in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tander, Berna; Ulus, Yasemin; Terzi, Yüksel; Zahiroğlu, Yeliz; Kesmen, Hakan; Farisoğullari, Bayram; Akyol, Yeşim; Bilgici, Ayhan; Kuru, Ömer

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish language version of VITACORA-19 (psoriatic arthritis quality of life questionnaire) in patients with psoriatic arthritis. The Turkish version of VITACORA-19 questionnaire was obtained after a translation and back translation process. The study sample included 61 PsA patients (22 males, 39 females; mean age 46.5±12.2 years; range 19 to 71 years). To assess the test-retest reliability of the Turkish VITACORA-19, the questionnaire was reapplied 10 to 15 days after the first interview (interclass correlation coefficient). Cronbach's alpha (a) was used to evaluate the internal consistency. VITACORA-19 was compared with visual analog scale for physician and patient global assessments, the Health Assessment Questionnaire, and Nottingham Health Profile for construct validity. The internal structure of VITACORA-19 was examined by factor analysis. The individual item intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.77 to 0.98 and Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.77 to 0.98. The Cronbach's alpha value for whole scale was determined as 0.96. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was 0.90, and Bartlett's test of sphericity had a p<0.001. Turkish VITACORA-19 total scores were correlated negatively with Health Assessment Questionnaire, visual analog scale for pain, and Nottingham Health Profile subgroups, and positively with physician and patient global assessments (p<0.01). Turkish version of VITACORA-19 questionnaire is a reliable and valid measure for health-related quality of life in Turkish patients with psoriatic arthritis.

  8. The efficacy and safety of etanercept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathy on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Senel, Soner; Kisacik, Bunyamin; Ugan, Yunus; Kasifoglu, Timucin; Tunc, Ercan; Cobankara, Veli

    2011-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of long-term use of etanercept therapy in patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on hemodialysis (HD). Selected RA or SpA patients treated with etanercept under HD were retrospectively evaluated. Etanercept-related adverse events were closely recorded for all patients. At the follow-up, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels were monitored. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) for SpA patients and Disease Activity Score (DAS28) for RA patients were measured at every 3 or 6 months. In total five end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients were enrolled to the study. The causes of ESRD in the study subjects were amyloidosis (n = 2), analgesic nephropathy (n = 2), and nephrolithiasis (n = 1). Three were diagnosed as SpA and two were RA. All patients used etanercept. The median age was 39 years (range 22-72 years). The median disease duration was 12 years (range 2-20 years). The median follow-up after etanercept therapy was 18 months (range 5-33 months). DAS28 score decreased after the treatment and did not increase during follow-up in RA patients. BASDAI score decreased after the treatment during follow-up in three patients with SpA. At the follow-up, only one patient was diagnosed with septic arthritis. As a result of our study, etanercept treatment in RA and SpA patients on HD seems to be safe, well tolerated, and effective in most of the patients. Above all, due to impaired host defense in patients with ESRD, enhanced risk of infections should be kept in mind during follow-up period and larger trials are needed to prove the safety of etanercept in HD patients.

  9. A Phase III, Randomized, Controlled Trial of Apremilast in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Results of the PALACE 2 Trial.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Myerson, Gary E; Fleischmann, Roy M; Lioté, Frédéric; Díaz-González, Federico; Van den Bosch, Filip; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Feist, Eugen; Shah, Kamal; Hu, ChiaChi; Stevens, Randall M; Poder, Airi

    2016-09-01

    Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, downregulates intracellular inflammatory mediator synthesis by elevating cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels. The PALACE 2 trial evaluated apremilast efficacy and safety in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) despite prior conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or biologic therapy. Eligible patients were randomized (1:1:1) to placebo, apremilast 20 mg BID, or apremilast 30 mg BID. At Week 16, patients with swollen and tender joint count improvement < 20% entered early escape, with placebo patients rerandomized (1:1) to apremilast 20 mg BID or 30 mg BID while apremilast patients continued on their initial apremilast dose. At Week 24, patients remaining on placebo were rerandomized to apremilast 20 mg BID or 30 mg BID. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving > 20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20) at Week 16. In the intent-to-treat population (N = 484), ACR20 at Week 16 was achieved by more patients receiving apremilast 20 mg BID [37.4% (p = 0.0002)] and 30 mg BID [32.1% (p = 0.0060)] versus placebo (18.9%). Clinically meaningful improvements in signs and symptoms of PsA, physical function, and psoriasis were observed with apremilast through Week 52. The most common adverse events were diarrhea, nausea, headache, and upper respiratory tract infection. Diarrhea and nausea generally occurred early and usually resolved spontaneously with continued treatment. Laboratory abnormalities were infrequent and transient. Apremilast demonstrated clinical improvements in PsA for up to 52 weeks, including signs and symptoms, physical function, and psoriasis. No new safety signals were observed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01212757.

  10. Epistatic interaction between FCRL3 and NFκB1 genes in Spanish patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, A; Sánchez, E; Valdivia, A; Orozco, G; López‐Nevot, M A; Pascual‐Salcedo, D; Balsa, A; Fernández‐Gutiérrez, B; de la Concha, E G; García‐Sánchez, A; Koeleman, B P C; Urcelay, E; Martín, J

    2006-01-01

    Background A Japanese study has described a strong association between rheumatoid arthritis and several polymorphisms located in the Fc receptor‐like 3 (FCRL3) gene, a member of a family of genes related to Fc receptors located on chromosome 1q21–23. Objectives To evaluate the association between rheumatoid arthritis and FCLR3 polymorphisms in a large cohort of Caucasian patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls of Spanish origin. Owing to the described functional link between the FCRL3 polymorphisms and the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NFκB), a functional polymorphism located in the NFκB1 gene was included. Methods 734 patients with rheumatoid arthritis from Madrid and Granada, Spain, were included in the study, along with 736 healthy controls. Polymorphisms in the FCRL3 gene were studied by TaqMan technology. The −94ins/delATTG NFκB1 promoter polymorphism was analysed by fragment analysis after polymerase chain reaction with labelled primers. Genotypes were compared using 3×2 contingency tables and χ2 values. Results No overall differences were found in any of the FCRL3 polymorphisms and in the NFκB1 promoter polymorphism when patients were compared with controls. However, when stratified according to NFκB1 genotypes, a susceptibility effect of FCRL3 polymorphisms was observed in patients who were heterozygotes for NFκB1 (pc = 0.003). Conclusions The FCRL3 polymorphisms associated with rheumatoid arthritis in a Japanese population are not associated per se with rheumatoid arthritis in a Spanish population. A genetic interaction was found between NFκB1 and FCRL3 in Spanish patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings may provide a general rationale for divergent genetic association results in different populations. PMID:16476711

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis: what do MRI and ultrasound show

    PubMed Central

    Jans, Lennart; Teh, James

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common inflammatory arthritis, affecting approximately 1% of the world’s population. Its pathogenesis has not been completely understood. However, there is evidence that the disease may involve synovial joints, subchondral bone marrow as well as intra- and extraarticular fat tissue, and may lead to progressive joint destruction and disability. Over the last two decades, significant improvement in its prognosis has been achieved owing to new strategies for disease management, the emergence of new biologic therapies and better utilization of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate therapy have been recognized as essential for improving clinical outcomes in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. Despite the potential of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging to visualize all tissues typically involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, the diagnosis of early disease remains difficult due to limited specificity of findings. This paper summarizes the pathogenesis phenomena of rheumatoid arthritis and describes rheumatoid arthritis-related features of the disease within the synovium, subchondral bone marrow and articular fat tissue on MRI and ultrasound. Moreover, the paper aims to illustrate the significance of MRI and ultrasound findings in rheumatoid arthritis in the diagnosis of subclinical and early inflammation, and the importance of MRI and US in the follow-up and establishing remission. Finally, we also discuss MRI of the spine in rheumatoid arthritis, which may help assess the presence of active inflammation and complications. PMID:28439423

  12. Altered Natural Killer Cell Subsets in Seropositive Arthralgia and Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Are Associated with Autoantibody Status.

    PubMed

    Chalan, Paulina; Bijzet, Johan; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Boots, Annemieke M H; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    The role of natural killer (NK) cells in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unclear. Therefore, numerical and functional alterations of CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cells in the early stages of RA development were studied. Whole blood samples from newly diagnosed, treatment-naive, seropositive (SP) and seronegative (SN) patients with RA (SP RA, n = 45 and SN RA, n = 12), patients with SP arthralgia (n = 30), and healthy controls (HC, n = 41) were assessed for numbers and frequencies of T cells, B cells, and NK cells. SP status was defined as positive for anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) and/or rheumatoid factor (RF). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used for further analysis of NK cell phenotype and function. Total NK cell numbers were decreased in SP RA and SP arthralgia but not in SN RA. Also, NK cells from SP RA showed a decreased potency for interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production. A selective decrease of CD56(dim), but not CD56(bright), NK cells in SP RA and SP arthralgia was observed. This prompted investigation of CD16 (FcγRIIIa) triggering in NK cell apoptosis and cytokine expression. In vitro, CD16 triggering induced apoptosis of CD56(dim) but not CD56(bright) NK cells from HC. This apoptosis was augmented by adding interleukin 2 (IL-2). Also, CD16 triggering in the presence of IL-2 stimulated IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α expression by CD56(dim) NK cells. The decline of CD56(dim) NK cells in SP arthralgia and SP RA and the in vitro apoptosis of CD56(dim) NK cells upon CD16 triggering suggest a functional role of immunoglobulin G-containing autoantibody (anti-CCP and/or RF)-immune complexes in this process. Moreover, CD16-triggered cytokine production by CD56(dim) NK cells may contribute to systemic inflammation as seen in SP arthralgia and SP RA.

  13. [Anti-rheumatic therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients have been increasing recently. Some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients need hemodialysis (HD), though the proportion is not high. At present, such patients are almost treated with corticosteroids and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs alone, even if they have a high disease activity that would require disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy, partly because the safety of DMARDs in RA patients with end-stage renal disease has not been confirmed. Their joint destruction would be inevitable and lead to impaired activities of daily living. As there are no guidelines for the use of DMARDs in HD patients, here I reviewed the previous reports about the treatment of DMARDs including biologics for patients with RA undergoing HD.

  14. The metabolic profile in early rheumatoid arthritis: a high prevalence of metabolic obesity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Raili; Kull, Mart; Põlluste, Kaja; Aart, Annika; Eglit, Triin; Lember, Margus; Kallikorm, Riina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in early RA patients with age-gender-matched population controls focusing on the presence of MetS in different weight categories. The study group consisted of 91 consecutive patients with early RA and 273 age- and gender-matched controls subjects. MetS was diagnosed according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP-ATP III) criteria. Mean age in both groups was 52 years, and 72.5 % were female. The prevalence of MetS did not differ between the two groups (35.2 % in RA, 34.1 % in control group). Mean systolic blood pressure in the RA group was 137 mmHg, in control group 131 mmHg, P = 0.01, and diastolic blood pressure 85 versus 81 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.01). We found that 20 of 65 (30.8 %) of RA patients compared to 80 of 152 (52.6 %) of the control subjects with elevated blood pressure received antihypertensive treatment (P < 0.01). When comparing subgroups with normal BMI, the odds of having MetS (being metabolically obese) were higher among early RA subjects (OR 5.6, CI 1.3-23.8). Of the individual components of metabolic syndrome, we found increased prevalence of hypertension (OR 2.8, CI 1.3-6.0) and hyperglycemia (OR 2.9, CI 1.0-8.0) in the RA group. Recognition of abnormal metabolic status among normal-weight RA patients who have not yet developed CVD could provide a valuable opportunity for preventative intervention.

  15. Predictors and Effective Factors on Quality of Life Among Iranian Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Saied; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Shokri, Azad; Mottaghi, Payman; Qolipour, Kamal; Kordi, Ayan; Bahman Ziari, Najmeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disorder that leads to joint swelling, stiffness, pain and progressive joint destruction. It is a common disease with prevalence of 1% worldwide that affecting all aspects of patients’ lives. Therefore, this study was conducted to summarize and provide a clear view of quality of life among the patients in Iran through a literature review. Methods: This study was conducted as a literature review over article published between 2000 to 2013, by using data bases comprise of Google scholar, Science Direct, Pubmed, IRANDOC, SID, Medlib, Magiran and by key words: “quality of life”, “rheumatoid arthritis”, “Iran” and their Persian equivalents. Finally 2065 articles assessed and according to the aim of the study are 11 studies synthesized. Extracted results first were summarized in Extraction Table, and then analyzed manually. Results: In reviewed articles rheumatoid arthritis patients’ quality of life was measured by using five different tools, the most important one of them was SF36 questionnaire. Among eight dimensions of SF36 questionnaire, the highest mean according included articles result was social functioning with average score of 63.4 and the lowest for physical limitation (physical role functioning) with score of 43. Overall, mean of eight dimensions was 52.47. The most important factors affecting quality of life were disease severity and pain, depression, income, educational, occupational status, married status, sign of disease, fatigue, anxiety and disease activity scores. Conclusion: The results of the study showed relatively low quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in Iran. Empowering patients by participating them in service delivery process and decision making can improves quality of life and in this regard health care provider must be focused on patient self-care abilities and reinforcing this factor by training them. PMID:24167426

  16. Associations Between Five Important Domains of Health and the Patient Acceptable Symptom State in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Psoriatic Arthritis: A Cross-Sectional Study of 977 Patients.

    PubMed

    Puyraimond-Zemmour, Déborah; Etcheto, Adrien; Fautrel, Bruno; Balanescu, Andra; de Wit, Maarten; Heiberg, Turid; Otsa, Kati; Kvien, Tore K; Dougados, Maxime; Gossec, Laure

    2017-10-01

    To explore the link between a patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) and patient-perceived impact in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). This was a cross-sectional study of unselected patients with definite RA or PsA. Pain, functional capacity, fatigue, coping, and sleep disturbance were assessed using a numeric rating scale (0-10) and compared between patients in PASS or not (Cohen's effect sizes). The domains of health associated with PASS status were assessed by multivariate forward logistic regression, and PASS thresholds were determined using the 75th percentile method and receiver operating characteristic analyses. Among 977 patients (531 with RA, 446 with PsA), the mean ± SD age was 53.4 ± 13.2 years, mean ± SD disease duration was 11.2 ± 10.0 years, and 637 (65.8%) were women. In all, 595 patients (60.9%) were in PASS; they had lower symptom levels, and all domains of health except sleep disturbance discriminated clearly between patients in PASS or not (effect sizes 0.73-1.45 in RA and 0.82-1.52 in PsA). In multivariate analysis, less pain and better coping were predictive of being in PASS. Odds ratios were: RA pain 0.80 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.67-0.96), PsA pain 0.63 (95% CI 0.52-0.75), RA coping 0.84 (95% CI 0.74-0.96), and PsA coping 0.83 (95% CI 0.71-0.97). The cutoffs of symptom intensity (range 0-10), corresponding to PASS for the 5 domains of health and the 2 diseases were similar, i.e., approximately 4-5. In RA and PsA, PASS was associated with the 5 domains of health analyzed, and in particular with less pain and better coping. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. PTGER4 gene variant rs76523431 is a candidate risk factor for radiological joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a genetic study of six cohorts.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ivorra-Cortes, Jose; Carmona, F David; Martín, Javier; Balsa, Alejandro; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Fernandez-Gutiérrez, Benjamín

    2015-11-05

    Prostaglandin E receptor 4 (PTGER4) is implicated in immune regulation and bone metabolism. The aim of this study was to analyze its role in radiological joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Six independent cohorts of patients with RA of European or North American descent were included, comprising 1789 patients with 5083 sets of X-rays. The Hospital Clínico San Carlos Rheumatoid Arthritis, Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal study, and Hospital Universitario de La Paz early arthritis (Spain) cohorts were used as discovery cohorts, and the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (The Netherlands), Wichita (United States), and National Databank for Rheumatic Diseases (United States and Canada) cohorts as replication cohorts. First, the PTGER4 rs6896969 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was genotyped using TaqMan assays and available Illumina Immunochip data and studied in the discovery and replication cohorts. Second, the PTGER4 gene and adjacent regions were analyzed using Immunochip genotyping data in the discovery cohorts. On the basis of pooled p values, linkage disequilibrium structure of the region, and location in regions with transcriptional properties, SNPs were selected for replication. The results from discovery, replication, and overall cohorts were pooled using inverse-variance-weighted meta-analysis. Influence of the polymorphisms on the overall radiological damage (constant effect) and on damage progression over time (time-varying effect) was analyzed. The rs6896969 polymorphism showed a significant association with radiological damage in the constant effect pooled analysis of the discovery cohorts, although no significant association was observed in the replication cohorts or the overall pooled analysis. Regarding the analysis of the PTGER4 region, 976 variants were analyzed in the discovery cohorts. From the constant and time-varying effect analyses, 12 and 20 SNPs, respectively, were selected for replication. Only the rs76523431 variant

  18. Tofacitinib for Psoriatic Arthritis in Patients with an Inadequate Response to TNF Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Dafna; Rigby, William; Azevedo, Valderilio F; Behrens, Frank; Blanco, Ricardo; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Kudlacz, Elizabeth; Wang, Cunshan; Menon, Sujatha; Hendrikx, Thijs; Kanik, Keith S

    2017-10-19

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor that is under investigation for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. We evaluated tofacitinib in patients with active psoriatic arthritis who had previously had an inadequate response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. In this 6-month randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 395 patients, in a 2:2:1:1 ratio, to four regimens: 5 mg of tofacitinib administered orally twice daily (132 patients); 10 mg of tofacitinib twice daily (132 patients); placebo, with a switch to 5 mg of tofacitinib twice daily at 3 months (66 patients); or placebo, with a switch to 10 mg of tofacitinib twice daily at 3 months (65 patients). Data from the patients who received placebo during the first 3 months of the trial were pooled. The primary end points were the percentage of patients who had at least 20% improvement according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR20 response) and the change from baseline score on the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI; scores range from 0 to 3, with higher scores indicating greater disability) at the month 3 analysis. At 3 months, the rates of ACR20 response were 50% with the 5-mg dose of tofacitinib and 47% with the 10-mg dose, as compared with 24% with placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons); the corresponding mean changes from baseline in HAQ-DI score were -0.39 and -0.35, as compared with -0.14 (P<0.001 for both comparisons). Serious adverse events occurred in 4% of the patients who received the 5-mg dose of tofacitinib continuously and in 6% who received the 10-mg dose continuously. Over the course of 6 months, there were four serious infections, three herpes zoster infections, one myocardial infarction, and one ischemic stroke among the patients who received tofacitinib continuously. Elevations of aspartate and alanine aminotransferase concentrations of three or more times the upper limit of the normal range

  19. Methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis patients who are on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, Hasanein; Roussou, Euthalia

    2011-12-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) can be toxic to patients suffering from end stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis even at low doses. This increase in toxicity is more notable in terms of bone marrow suppression in the form of pancytopenia. Many methods of elimination including dialysis itself have been proven ineffective, and alternate treatments with anti-TNF alpha blockers can be considered.

  20. Female patients tend to alter their diet following the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Eeva; Heikkilä, Suvi; Poussa, Tuija; Lagström, Hanna; Saario, Riitta; Salminen, Seppo

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer and rheumatoid arthritis are common diseases which change everyday life among women. This study investigated the beliefs and attitudes of female patients regarding diet and their need for dietary counseling in relation to years since diagnosis, age, and education. Breast cancer (BC) patients were compared to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with a validated questionnaire. Logistic regression models were used to adjust for the differences in demographic patient characteristics between BC and RA. In addition, the influence of demographic variables was studied further in the BC and RA groups, separately or combined. chi(2) testing was used to analyze the associations between demographic and dietary variables. Eight percent of BC patients and 40% of RA patients considered diet a factor contributing to their disease (P < 0.0001). Thirty percent of BC patients and 51% of those with RA reported having changed their diet after their diagnosis (P = 0.0003, chi(2)). The patients with RA had a 3.9 times higher assumption on the diet and disease connection compared to breast cancer patients (OR = 3.92, P = 0.002). Longer (>5 years) time to diagnosis increased the probability 2.6 times. The main reason for the change in diet was the desire for cure. The main changes reported included reduced consumption of animal fat, sugar, and red meat and increased consumption of fruit and vegetables. The source of information was most commonly the mass media and a need for more information on dietary factors relating to disease was expressed. We observed the patients to express an interest in alternative dietary habits, with the focus on a healthier diet. The lack of precise dietary recommendations for individual disease situations was expressed strongly and patients depended on information from outside their treatment center. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  1. Long-term use of mizoribine in rheumatoid arthritis patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Saisho, K; Kurosawa, O; Fukanoki, T; Hanafusa, A; Tajima, N

    2001-06-01

    Abstract Small doses of mizoribine (MZR) were administered to five rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients on hemodialysis (HD). A maintenance dose of 25 mg or less was administered either once per day or once following HD. The Lansbury activity index improved in all patients. The blood concentrations of MZR before and after HD were 0.33-1.79 μg/ml and 0-0.93 μg/ml, respectively. Hence, the rate of elimination by HD ranged from 50.3% to 83.4%. As far as side effects were concerned, alopecia was seen in two patients, and one patient developed shingles. However, the severity of these symptoms was mild and, after discontinuing or reducing the dose of MZR for a certain period of time, we were able to continue its administration. These findings suggest that the long-term administration of MZR is a useful treatment for RA patients on HD.

  2. The use of D-penicillamine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Matthey, F; Perrett, D; Greenwood, R N; Baker, L R

    1986-05-01

    D-penicillamine and its major metabolites cysteine-penicillamine disulphide (CP) and penicillamine disulphide (P2) concentrations were measured in plasma from a hemodialysis patient with rheumatoid arthritis. CP and P2 alone were measured in plasma and a plasma ultrafiltrate from a second patient. On penicillamine 250 mg thrice weekly taken after dialysis pre-dialysis penicillamine concentrations were in the range 5.9-9.9 mumol/l. CP and P2 concentrations remained stable (range 139-197 mumol/l and 10-20 mumol/l) over 5 weeks and were of the same order as previously found in patients with normal renal function on higher doses of the drug. On penicillamine 250 mg daily concentrations of metabolites CP and P2 reach 193 mumol/l and 59.2 mumol/l after 2 and 3 weeks respectively. Concentration of metabolites fell by about half and of penicillamine by about a third after dialysis. Concentration of metabolites in ultrafiltrate were on average 75% lower than in plasma. Penicillamine 250 mg thrice weekly given after dialysis appears to be an appropriate dose for hemodialysis patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. [Post-traumatic arthritis in the young patient : Treatment options before the endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Burkhart, K J; Hollinger, B

    2016-10-01

    In the young patient, treatment of post-traumatic elbow arthritis remains difficult. Total elbow arthroplasty must be delayed for as long as possible. Therapy starts with nonoperative treatment. If this fails, operative options can be discussed. The aim of surgery is to provide a functional range of motion with acceptable pain without obstructing future treatment options. Patients with pain at terminal extension and/or flexion may benefit from arthroscopic or open debridement. Patients with advanced osteoarthritis and pain throughout the complete range of motion, who are too young for total elbow arthroplasty, are offered interposition arthroplasty or arthrodesis. Arthrodesis of the elbow leads to significant restrictions in daily life due to the complete loss of extension/flexion. Therefore, arthrodesis is only offered as treatment in exceptional circumstances. Interposition arthroplasty is a reasonable option for the young patient without significant bony defects, which may provide a stable, functional flexion arc with an acceptable pain level. Interposition arthroplasty preserves the revision options of re-interposition arthroplasty as well as the withdrawal to total elbow arthroplasty. Partial and total elbow arthroplasty are treatment options of elbow arthritis but are not subjects of this article.

  4. Serum ghrelin in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis during treatment with infliximab.

    PubMed

    Magiera, Michal; Kopec-Medrek, Magdalena; Widuchowska, Małgorzata; Kotulska, Anna; Dziewit, Tomasz; Ziaja, Damian; Kucharz, Eugene J; Logiewa-Bazger, Beata; Mazur, Wlodzimierz

    2013-06-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that posses multiple functions, including induction of growth hormone release, regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and control of food intake and energy homeostasis. A few reports on serum ghrelin level in chronic inflammatory states revealed contradictory results. The study was undertaken to determine ghrelin in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving infliximab, a TNF-α blocking agent. Serum ghrelin was determined in 18 female rheumatoid patients before the treatment with infliximab, 1 week after the first infusion and after 53 weeks of medication and compared with 15 age-matched healthy women. Serum ghrelin level was shown to be increased in the patients. A decrease in serum ghrelin level was found after the first infusion of infliximab and similarly decreased ghrelin level but still higher than in the control was shown in the 53rd week of medication. The obtained results suggest that ghrelin level is related to inflammation, and its serum level in patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis behaves similarly to acute-phase reactants.

  5. Development of key performance indicators to evaluate centralized intake for patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barber, Claire E; Patel, Jatin N; Woodhouse, Linda; Smith, Christopher; Weiss, Stephen; Homik, Joanne; LeClercq, Sharon; Mosher, Dianne; Christiansen, Tanya; Howden, Jane Squire; Wasylak, Tracy; Greenwood-Lee, James; Emrick, Andrea; Suter, Esther; Kathol, Barb; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Grant, Sean; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Phillips, Leah; Hendricks, Jennifer; Marshall, Deborah A

    2015-11-14

    Centralized intake is integral to healthcare systems to support timely access to appropriate health services. The aim of this study was to develop key performance indicators (KPIs) to evaluate centralized intake systems for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Phase 1 involved stakeholder meetings including healthcare providers, managers, researchers and patients to obtain input on candidate KPIs, aligned along six quality dimensions: appropriateness, accessibility, acceptability, efficiency, effectiveness, and safety. Phase 2 involved literature reviews to ensure KPIs were based on best practices and harmonized with existing measures. Phase 3 involved a three-round, online modified Delphi panel to finalize the KPIs. The panel consisted of two rounds of rating and a round of online and in-person discussions. KPIs rated as valid and important (≥7 on a 9-point Likert scale) were included in the final set. Twenty-five KPIs identified and substantiated during Phases 1 and 2 were submitted to 27 panellists including healthcare providers, managers, researchers, and patients in Phase 3. After the in-person meeting, three KPIs were removed and six were suggested. The final set includes 9 OA KPIs, 10 RA KPIs and 9 relating to centralized intake processes for both conditions. All 28 KPIs were rated as valid and important. Arthritis stakeholders have proposed 28 KPIs that should be used in quality improvement efforts when evaluating centralized intake for OA and RA. The KPIs measure five of the six dimensions of quality and are relevant to patients, practitioners and health systems.

  6. Infection rates in patients from five rheumatoid arthritis (RA) registries: contextualising an RA clinical trial programme

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Hisashi; Askling, Johan; Berglind, Niklas; Franzen, Stefan; Frisell, Thomas; Garwood, Christopher; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Ho, Meilien; Holmqvist, Marie; Novelli Horne, Laura; Inoue, Eisuke; Michaud, Kaleb; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Reed, George; Symmons, Deborah; Tanaka, Eiichi; Tran, Trung N; Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Wesby-van Swaay, Eveline; Nyberg, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased risk of serious infections. Comparing infection rates across RA populations is complicated by differences in background infection risk, population composition and study methodology. We measured infection rates from five RA registries globally, with the aim to contextualise infection rates from an RA clinical trials population. Methods We used data from Consortium of Rheumatology Research of North America (CORRONA) (USA), Swedish Rheumatology Quality of Care Register (Sweden), Norfolk Arthritis Register (UK), CORRONA International (multiple countries) and Institute of Rheumatology Rheumatoid Arthritis (Japan) and an RA clinical trial programme (fostamatinib). Within each registry, we analysed a main cohort of all patients with RA from January 2000 to last available data. Infection definitions were harmonised across registries. Sensitivity analyses to address potential confounding explored subcohorts defined by disease activity, treatment change and/or prior comorbidities and restriction by calendar time or follow-up. Rates of infections were estimated and standardised to the trial population for age/sex and, in one sensitivity analysis also, for Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score. Results Overall, age/sex-standardised rates of hospitalised infection were quite consistent across registries (range 1.14–1.62 per 100 patient-years). Higher and more consistent rates across registries and with the trial programme overall were seen when adding standardisation for HAQ score (registry range 1.86–2.18, trials rate 2.92) or restricting to a treatment initiation subcohort followed for 18 months (registry range 0.99–2.84, trials rate 2.74). Conclusion This prospective, coordinated analysis of RA registries provided incidence rate estimates for infection events to contextualise infection rates from an RA clinical trial programme and demonstrated relative comparability of hospitalised infection

  7. Rotator cuff surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: clinical outcome comparable to age, sex and tear size matched non-rheumatoid patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, S J; Sun, J-H; Kekatpure, A L; Chun, J-M; Jeon, I-H

    2017-09-01

    Aims This study aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of rotator cuff repair in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with those of patients who have no known history of the disease. We hypothesised that the functional outcomes are comparable between patients and without rheumatoid arthritis and may be affected by the level of disease activity, as assessed from C-reactive protein (CRP) level and history of systemic steroid intake. Patients and methods We conducted a retrospective review of the institutional surgical database from May 1995 to April 2012. Twenty-nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had rotator cuff repair were enrolled as the study group. Age, sex, and tear size matched patients with no disease who were selected as the control group. The mean duration of follow-up was 46 months (range 24-92 months). Clinical outcomes were assessed with the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) questionnaire, Constant score and visual analogue scale (VAS). All data were recorded preoperatively and at regular postoperative follow-up visits. CRP was measured preoperatively as the disease activity marker for rheumatoid arthritis. Medication history was thoroughly reviewed in the study group. Results In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, all shoulder functional scores improved after surgery (ASES 56.1-78.1, Constant 50.8-70.5 and VAS 5.2-2.5; P < 0.001). The functional outcome of surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was comparable to that of the control group (difference with control: ASES 78.1 vs. 85.5, P = 0.093; Constant 70.5 vs. 75.9, P = 0.366; VAS 2.5 vs. 1.8, P = 0.108). Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had an elevated CRP level (> 1 mg/dl) showed inferior clinical outcomes than those with normal CRP levels. Patients with a history of systemic steroid intake showed inferior functional outcomes than those who had not taken steroids. Conclusions Surgical intervention for rotator cuff tear in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

  8. Increased disease activity, severity and autoantibody positivity in rheumatoid arthritis patients with co-existent bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Perry, Elizabeth; Eggleton, Paul; De Soyza, Anthony; Hutchinson, David; Kelly, Clive

    2017-12-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and co-existent bronchiectasis (BRRA) have a five-fold increased mortality compared to rheumatoid arthritis alone. Yet previous studies have found no difference in clinical and serological markers of RA disease severity between BRRA patients and RA alone. However, RA disease activity measures such as Disease Activity Score of 28 joints - C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) have not been studied, so we assessed these parameters in patients with BRRA and RA alone. BRRA patients (n = 53) had high-resolution computed tomography proven bronchiectasis without any interstitial lung disease and ≥ 2 respiratory infections/year. RA alone patients (n = 50) had no clinical or radiological evidence of lung disease. DAS28-CRP, rheumatoid factor (immunoglobulin M) and anti-CCP were measured in all patients, together with detailed clinical and radiology records. In BRRA, bronchiectasis predated RA in 58% of patients. BRRA patients had higher DAS28 scores (3.51 vs. 2.59), higher levels of anti-CCP (89% vs. 46%) and rheumatoid factor (79% vs. 52%) (P = 0.003) compared to RA alone. Where hand and foot radiology findings were recorded, 29/37 BRRA (78%) and 13/30 (43%) RA alone had evidence of erosive change (P = 0.003). There were no significant differences between groups in smoking history or disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug/biologic therapy. Increased levels of RA disease activity, severity and RA autoantibodies are demonstrated in patients with RA and co-existent bronchiectasis compared to patients with RA alone, despite lower tobacco exposure. This study demonstrates that BRRA is a more severe systemic disease than RA alone. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Optical imaging: new tools for arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, David; Jiang, Yebin; Wang, Xueding

    2010-10-01

    Conventional radiography, ultrasound, CT, MRI, and nuclear imaging are the current imaging modalities used for clinical evaluation of arthritis which is highly prevalent and a leading cause of disability. Some of these types of imaging are also used for monitoring disease progression and treatment response of arthritis. However, their disadvantages limit their utilities, such as ionizing radiation for radiography, CT, and nuclear imaging; suboptimal tissue contrast resolution for radiography, CT, ultrasound, and nuclear imaging; high cost for CT and MRI and nuclear imaging; and long data-acquisition time with ensuing patient discomfort for MRI. Recently, there have been considerable advances in nonionizing noninvasive optical imaging which has demonstrated promise for early diagnosis, monitoring therapeutic interventions and disease progression of arthritis. Optical based molecular imaging modalities such as fluorescence imaging have shown high sensitivity in detection of optical contrast agents and can aid early diagnosis and ongoing evaluation of chronic inflammatory arthritis. Optical transillumination imaging or diffuse optical tomography may differentiate normal joint clear synovial fluid from turbid and pink medium early in the inflammatory process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to evaluate fluid composition from joints affected by arthritis. Hemodynamic changes such as angiogenesis, hypervascularization, and hypoxia in arthritic articular tissue can potentially be observed by diffuse optical tomography and photoacoustic tomography. Optical measurements could also facilitate quantification of hemodynamic properties such as blood volume and oxygenation levels at early stages of inflammatory arthritis. Optical imaging provides methodologies which should contribute to detection of early changes and monitoring of progression in pathological characteristics of arthritis, with relatively simple instrumentation.

  10. Necrotizing fasciitis in a patient receiving tocilizumab for rheumatoid arthritis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Gonçalves, Diana; Bernardes, Miguel; Costa, Lúcia

    We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis in a 66-year-old Caucasian woman with rheumatoid arthritis receiving tocilizumab, and provide a review of published cases. The patient exhibited no systemic symptoms and discreet cutaneous inflammatory signals at presentation. She was successfully treated with broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic therapy and surgical debridement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  11. Salmonella ovarian abscess in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA): a case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Yanaihara, N; Okamoto, A

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella ovarian abscess in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is reported here. A 33-year-old nulliparous woman with a 16-year history of RA who had been treated with corticosteroid and immunosuppressive drugs was diagnosed as having a non-typhoidal Salmonella ovarian abscess which might have been preceded by an occurrence of endometriotic cyst. Multidisciplinary therapy including surgical intervention was required to complete the eradication of infection. Although Salmonella ovarian abscess is rare, it may cause a serious complication in the ovary harboring endometriotic cyst through sustained presence of Salmonella bacteraemia.

  12. Leukocytapheresis (LCAP) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis on a maintenance hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, I; Ohi, H; Maruyama, T; Hamada, H; Tomino, Y

    2007-08-01

    A 57-year-old-woman, who was treated with regular maintenance hemodialysis (HD), newly contracted rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Oral predonisolone was effective for allev