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Sample records for early b-type stars

  1. Fundamental properties of nearby single early B-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieva, María-Fernanda; Przybilla, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    Aims: Fundamental parameters of a sample of 26 apparently slowly-rotating single early B-type stars in OB associations and in the field within a distance of ≲400 pc from the Sun are presented and compared to high-precision data from detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs). Together with surface abundances for light elements the data are used to discuss the evolutionary status of the stars in context of the most recent Geneva grid of models for core hydrogen-burning stars in the mass-range ~6 to 18 M⊙ at metallicity Z = 0.014. Methods: The fundamental parameters are derived on the basis of accurate and precise atmospheric parameters determined earlier by us from non-LTE analyses of high-quality spectra of the sample stars, utilising the new Geneva stellar evolution models. Results: Evolutionary masses plus radii and luminosities are determined to better than typically 5%, 10%, and 20% uncertainty, respectively, facilitating the mass-radius and mass-luminosity relationships to be recovered for single core hydrogen-burning objects with a similar precision as derived from DEBs. Good agreement between evolutionary and spectroscopic masses is found. Absolute visual and bolometric magnitudes are derived to typically ~0.15-0.20 mag uncertainty. Metallicities are constrained to better than 15-20% uncertainty and tight constraints on evolutionary ages of the stars are provided. Overall, the spectroscopic distances and ages of individual sample stars agree with independently derived values for the host OB associations. Signatures of mixing with CN-cycled material are found in 1/3 of the sample stars. Typically, these are consistent with the amount predicted by the new Geneva models with rotation. The presence of magnetic fields appears to augment the mixing efficiency. In addition, a few objects are possibly the product of binary evolution. In particular, the unusual characteristics of τ Sco point to a blue straggler nature, due to a binary merger. Conclusions: The accuracy

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Magnetic early B-type stars. I. (Shultz+, 2018)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, M.; Wade, G. A.; Rivinius, Th.; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Bohlender, D.; Monin, D.; Sikora, J.; Mimes Collaboration; Binamics Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    Longitudinal magnetic field measurements of early B-type stars derived from 1) least-squares deconvolution profiles extracted from high-resolution spectropolarimetric data (ESPaDOnS, Narval, HARPSpol), using masks consisting of metallic lines, metallic + He lines, individual chemical elements, as well as single-line H measurements; and 2) from single-line low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations with dimaPol. (3 data files).

  3. The chemical abundance analysis of normal early A- and late B-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Ryabchikova, T.; Bagnulo, S.; Alecian, E.; Grunhut, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Wade, G.

    2009-09-01

    Context: Modern spectroscopy of early-type stars often aims at studying complex physical phenomena such as stellar pulsation, the peculiarity of the composition of the photosphere, chemical stratification, the presence of a magnetic field, and its interplay with the stellar atmosphere and the circumstellar environment. Comparatively less attention is paid to identifying and studying the “normal” A- and B-type stars and testing how the basic atomic parameters and standard spectral analysis allow one to fit the observations. By contrast, this kind of study is paramount for eventually allowing one to correctly quantify the impact of the various physical processes that occur inside the atmospheres of A- and B-type stars. Aims: We wish to establish whether the chemical composition of the solar photosphere can be regarded as a reference for early A- and late B-type stars. Methods: We have obtained optical high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra of three slowly rotating early-type stars (HD 145788, 21 Peg and π Cet) that show no obvious sign of chemical peculiarity, and performed a very accurate LTE abundance analysis of up to 38 ions of 26 elements (for 21 Peg), using a vast amount of spectral lines visible in the spectral region covered by our spectra. Results: We provide an exhaustive description of the abundance characteristics of the three analysed stars with a critical review of the line parameters used to derive the abundances. We compiled a table of atomic data for more than 1100 measured lines that may be used in the future as a reference. The abundances we obtained for He, C, Al, S, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Sr, Y, and Zr are compatible with the solar ones derived with recent 3D radiative-hydrodynamical simulations of the solar photosphere. The abundances of the remaining studied elements show some degree of discrepancy compared to the solar photosphere. Those of N, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, and Nd may well be ascribed to non-LTE effects; for P, Cl, Sc and

  4. The magnetic early B-type stars I: magnetometry and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, M. E.; Wade, G. A.; Rivinius, Th; Neiner, C.; Alecian, E.; Bohlender, D.; Monin, D.; Sikora, J.; MiMeS Collaboration; BinaMIcS Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    The rotational and magnetic properties of many magnetic hot stars are poorly characterized, therefore the Magnetism in Massive Stars and Binarity and Magnetic Interactions in various classes of Stars collaborations have collected extensive high-dispersion spectropolarimetric data sets of these targets. We present longitudinal magnetic field measurements for 52 early B-type stars (B5-B0), with which we attempt to determine their rotational periods Prot. Supplemented with high-resolution spectroscopy, low-resolution Dominion Astrophysical Observatory circular spectropolarimetry, and archival Hipparcos photometry, we determined Prot for 10 stars, leaving only five stars for which Prot could not be determined. Rotational ephemerides for 14 stars were refined via comparison of new to historical magnetic measurements. The distribution of Prot is very similar to that observed for the cooler Ap/Bp stars. We also measured v sin i and vmac for all stars. Comparison to non-magnetic stars shows that v sin i is much lower for magnetic stars, an expected consequence of magnetic braking. We also find evidence that vmac is lower for magnetic stars. Least-squares deconvolution profiles extracted using single-element masks revealed widespread, systematic discrepancies in between different elements: this effect is apparent only for chemically peculiar stars, suggesting it is a consequence of chemical spots. Sinusoidal fits to H line measurements (which should be minimally affected by chemical spots), yielded evidence of surface magnetic fields more complex than simple dipoles in six stars for which this has not previously been reported; however, in all six cases, the second- and third-order amplitudes are small relative to the first-order (dipolar) amplitudes.

  5. The Lyman-Continuum Fluxes and Stellar Parameters of O and Early B-Type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vacca, William D.; Garmany, Catherine D.; Shull, J. Michael

    1996-01-01

    Using the results of the most recent stellar atmosphere models applied to a sample of hot stars, we construct calibrations of effective temperature (T(sub eff)), and gravity (log(sub g)) with a spectral type and luminosity class for Galactic 0-type and early B-type stars. From the model results we also derive an empirical relation between the bolometric correction and T(sub eff) and log g. Using a sample of stars with known distances located in OB associations in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud, we derive a new calibration of M(sub v) with spectral class. With these new calibrations and the stellar atmosphere models of Kurucz, we calculate the physical parameters and ionizing photon luminosities in the H(0) and He(0) continua for O and early B-type stars. We find substantial differences between our values of the Lyman- continuum luminosity and those reported in the literature. We also discuss the systematic discrepancy between O-type stellar masses derived from spectroscopic models and those derived from evolutionary tracks. Most likely, the cause of this 'mass discrepancy' lies primarily in the atmospheric models, which are plane parallel and hydrostatic and therefore do not account for an extended atmosphere and the velocity fields in a stellar wind. Finally, we present a new computation of the Lyman-continuum luminosity from 429 known O stars located within 2.5 kpc of the Sun. We find the total ionizing luminosity from this population ((Q(sub 0)(sup T(sub ot))) = 7.0 x 10(exp 51) photons/s) to be 47% larger than that determined using the Lyman continuum values tabulated by Panagia.

  6. A Grid of NLTE Line-blanketed Model Atmospheres of Early B-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Thierry; Hubeny, Ivan

    2007-03-01

    We have constructed a comprehensive grid of 1540 metal line-blanketed, NLTE, plane-parallel, hydrostatic model atmospheres for the basic parameters appropriate to early B-type stars. The BSTAR2006 grid considers 16 values of effective temperatures, 15,000 K<=Teff<=30,000 K with 1000 K steps, 13 surface gravities, 1.75<=logg<=4.75 with 0.25 dex steps, six chemical compositions, and a microturbulent velocity of 2 km s-1. The lower limit of logg for a given effective temperature is set by an approximate location of the Eddington limit. The selected chemical compositions range from twice to one-tenth of the solar metallicity and metal-free. Additional model atmospheres for B supergiants (logg<=3.0) have been calculated with a higher microturbulent velocity (10 km s-1) and a surface composition that is enriched in helium and nitrogen and depleted in carbon. This new grid complements our earlier OSTAR2002 grid of O-type stars (our Paper I). The paper contains a description of the BSTAR2006 grid and some illustrative examples and comparisons. NLTE ionization fractions, bolometric corrections, radiative accelerations, and effective gravities are obtained over the parameter range covered by the grid. By extrapolating radiative accelerations, we have determined an improved estimate of the Eddington limit in absence of rotation between 55,000 and 15,000 K. The complete BSTAR2006 grid is available at the TLUSTY Web site.

  7. Understand B-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    When observations of B stars made from space are added to observations made from the ground and the total body of observational information is confronted with theoretical expectations about B stars, it is clear that nonthermal phenomena occur in the atmospheres of B stars. The nature of these phenomena and what they imply about the physical state of a B star and how a B star evolves are examined using knowledge of the spectrum of a B star as a key to obtaining an understanding of what a B star is like. Three approaches to modeling stellar structure (atmospheres) are considered, the characteristic properties of a mantle, and B stars and evolution are discussed.

  8. Interpretation of the BRITE oscillation spectra of the early B-type stars: ν Eri and α Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, P.; Daszyńska-Daszkiewicz, J.; Pamyatnykh, A.; Handler, G.; Pigulski, A.

    2017-09-01

    ν Eridani is a well known multiperiodic β Cephei pulsator which exhibits also the SPB (Slowly Pulsating B-type stars) type modes. Recent frequency analysis of the BRITE photometry of α Lupi showed that the star is also a hybrid β Cep/SPB pulsator, in which both high and low frequencies were detected. We construct complex seismic models in order to account for the observed frequency range, the values of the frequencies themselves and the non-adiabatic parameter f for the dominant mode. Our studies suggest that significant modifications of the opacity profile at the temperature range log{T}\\in (5.0-5.5) are necessary to fulfill all these requirements.

  9. Non-LTE, line-blanketed model atmospheres for late O- and early B-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigsby, James A.; Morrison, Nancy D.; Anderson, Lawrence S.

    1992-01-01

    The use of non-LTE line-blanketed model atmospheres to analyze the spectra of hot stars is reported. The stars analyzed are members of clusters and associations, have spectral types in the range O9-B2 and luminosity classes in the range III-IV, have slow to moderate rotation, and are photometrically constant. Sampled line opacities of iron-group elements were incorporated in the radiative transfer solution; solar abundances were assumed. Good to excellent agreement is obtained between the computed profiles and essentially all the line profiles used to fix the model, and reliable stellar parameters are derived. The synthetic M II 5581 equivalent widths agree well with the observed ones at the low end of the temperature range studied, but, above 25,000 K, the synthetic line is generally stronger than the observed line. The behavior of the observed equivalent widths of N II, N III, C II and C III lines as a function of Teff is studied. Most of the lines show much scatter, with no consistent trend that could indicate abundance differences from star to star.

  10. Present-day cosmic abundances. A comprehensive study of nearby early B-type stars and implications for stellar and Galactic evolution and interstellar dust models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieva, M.-F.; Przybilla, N.

    2012-03-01

    Context. Early B-type stars are ideal indicators for present-day cosmic abundances since they preserve their pristine abundances and typically do not migrate far beyond their birth environments over their short lifetimes, in contrast to older stars like the Sun. They are also unaffected by depletion onto dust grains, unlike the cold/warm interstellar medium (ISM) or H ii regions. Aims: A carefully selected sample of early B-type stars in OB associations and the field within the solar neighbourhood is studied comprehensively. Quantitative spectroscopy is used to characterise their atmospheric properties in a self-consistent way. Present-day abundances for the astrophysically most interesting chemical elements are derived in order to investigate whether a present-day cosmic abundance standard can be established. Methods: High-resolution and high-S/N FOCES, FEROS and ELODIE spectra of well-studied sharp-lined early B-type stars are analysed in non-LTE. Line-profile fits based on extensive model grids and an iterative analysis methodology are used to constrain stellar parameters and elemental abundances at high accuracy and precision. Atmospheric parameters are derived from the simultaneous establishment of independent indicators, from multiple ionization equilibria and the Stark-broadened hydrogen Balmer lines, and they are confirmed by reproduction of the stars' global spectral energy distributions. Results: Effective temperatures are constrained to 1-2% and surface gravities to less than 15% uncertainty, along with accurate rotational, micro- and macroturbulence velocities. Good agreement of the resulting spectroscopic parallaxes with those from the new reduction of the Hipparcos catalogue is obtained. Absolute values for abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe are determined to better than 25% uncertainty. The synthetic spectra match the observations reliably over almost the entire visual spectral range. Three sample stars, γ Ori, o Per and θ1 Ori D, are

  11. Pulsation of late B-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beardsley, W. R.; Worek, T. F.; King, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Radial velocity observations of three of the brightest stars in the Pleiades, Alcyone, Maia and Taygeta, made during the course of one night, 25 October 1976, are discussed. All three stars were discovered to be pulsating with periods of a few hours. Analysis of all published radial velocities for each star, covering more than 70 years and approximately 100,000 cycles, has established the value of the periods to eight decimal places, and demonstrated constancy of the periods. However, amplitudes of the radial velocity variations change over long time intervals, and changes in spectral line intensities are observed in phase with the pulsation. All three stars may also be members of binary systems.

  12. Investigating the Magnetospheres of Rapidly Rotating B-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, C. L.; Petit, V.; Nazé, Y.; Wade, G. A.; Townsend, R. H.; Owocki, S. P.; Cohen, D. H.; David-Uraz, A.; Shultz, M.

    2017-11-01

    Recent spectropolarimetric surveys of bright, hot stars have found that ~10% of OB-type stars contain strong (mostly dipolar) surface magnetic fields (~kG). The prominent paradigm describing the interaction between the stellar winds and the surface magnetic field is the magnetically confined wind shock (MCWS) model. In this model, the stellar wind plasma is forced to move along the closed field loops of the magnetic field, colliding at the magnetic equator, and creating a shock. As the shocked material cools radiatively it will emit X-rays. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in detecting and characterizing the hot wind material confined by the magnetic fields of these stars. Some B-type stars are found to have very short rotational periods. The effects of the rapid rotation on the X-ray production within the magnetosphere have yet to be explored in detail. The added centrifugal force due to rapid rotation is predicted to cause faster wind outflows along the field lines, leading to higher shock temperatures and harder X-rays. However, this is not observed in all rapidly rotating magnetic B-type stars. In order to address this from a theoretical point of view, we use the X-ray Analytical Dynamical Magnetosphere (XADM) model, originally developed for slow rotators, with an implementation of new rapid rotational physics. Using X-ray spectroscopy from ESA's XMM-Newton space telescope, we observed 5 rapidly rotating B-types stars to add to the previous list of observations. Comparing the observed X-ray luminosity and hardness ratio to that predicted by the XADM allows us to determine the role the added centrifugal force plays in the magnetospheric X-ray emission of these stars.

  13. X-rays from Magnetic B-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Corinne; Petit, Véronique; Caballero-Nieves, Saida Maria; Nazé, Yaël; Owocki, Stan; Wade, Gregg; Cohen, David; Townsend, Richard; David-Uraz, Alexandre; Shultz, Matt

    2018-01-01

    Recent surveys have found that ~10% of OB-type stars host strong (~1kG), mostly dipolar magnetic fields. The prominent idea describing the interaction between the stellar winds and the magnetic field is the magnetically confined wind shock model. In this model, the ionized wind material is forced to move along the closed magnetic field loops and collides at the magnetic equator creating a shock. As the shocked material cools radiatively it will emit X-rays. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in detecting and characterizing the wind material confined by the magnetic fields of these stars. Some of these magnetic B-type stars are found to have very short rotational periods. The effects of the rapid rotation on the X-ray production within the magnetosphere have yet to be explored in detail. The added centrifugal force is predicted to cause faster wind outflows along the field lines, which could lead to higher shock temperatures and harder X-rays. However, this is not observed in all rapidly rotating magnetic B-type stars. In order to address this question from a theoretical point of view, we use the X-ray Analytical Dynamical Magnetosphere model, developed for slow rotators and implement the physics of rapid rotation. Using X-ray spectroscopy from ESA’s XMM-Newton space telescope, we observed 5 rapidly rotating B-types stars to add to the previous list of observations. Comparing the observed X-ray luminosity and hardness ratio to that predicted by the XADM allows us to determine the role an added centrifugal acceleration plays in the magnetospheres of these stars.

  14. Two spotted and magnetic early B-type stars in the young open cluster NGC 2264 discovered by MOST and ESPaDOnS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Zwintz, K.; Castro, N.; Langer, N.; Lorenz, D.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Alecian, E.; Wade, G. A.; Barnes, T. G.; Thoul, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Star clusters are known as superb tools for understanding stellar evolution. In a quest for understanding the physical origin of magnetism and chemical peculiarity in about 7% of the massive main-sequence stars, we analysed two of the ten brightest members of the ~10 Myr old Galactic open cluster NGC 2264, the early B-dwarfs HD 47887 and HD 47777. We find accurate rotation periods of 1.95 and 2.64 days, respectively, from MOST photometry. We obtained ESPaDOnS spectropolarimetric observations, through which we determined stellar parameters, detailed chemical surface abundances, projected rotational velocities, and the inclination angles of the rotation axis. Because we found only small (<5 km s-1) radial velocity variations, most likely caused by spots, we can rule out that HD 47887 and HD 47777 are close binaries. Finally, using the least-squares deconvolution technique, we found that both stars possess a large-scale magnetic field with an average longitudinal field strength of about 400 G. From a simultaneous fit of the stellar parameters we determine the evolutionary masses of HD 47887 and HD 47777 to be 9.4+0.6-0.7 M⊙ and 7.6+0.5-0.5 M⊙. Interestingly, HD 47777 shows a remarkable helium underabundance, typical of helium-weak chemically peculiar stars, while the abundances of HD 47887 are normal, which might imply that diffusion is operating in the lower mass star but not in the slightly more massive one. Furthermore, we argue that the rather slow rotation, as well as the lack of nitrogen enrichment in both stars, can be consistent with both the fossil and the binary hypothesis for the origin of the magnetic field. However, the presence of two magnetic and apparently single stars near the top of the cluster mass-function may speak in favour of the latter. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Microsatellite Systems Canada Inc. (MSCI), formerly part of Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for

  15. Boron Abundances in A and B-type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Boron abundances in A- and B-type stars may be a successful way to track evolutionary effects in these hot stars. The light elements - Li, Be, and B - are tracers of exposure to temperatures more moderate than those in which the H-burning CN-cycle operates. Thus, any exposure of surface stellar layers to deeper layers will affect these light element abundances. Li and Be are used in this role in investigations of evolutionary processes in cool stars, but are not observable in hotter stars. An investigation of boron, however, is possible through the B II 1362 A resonance line. We have gathered high resolution spectra from the IUE database of A- and B-type stars near 10 solar mass for which nitrogen abundances have been determined. The B II 1362 A line is blended throughout; the temperature range of this program, requiring spectrum syntheses to recover the boron abundances. For no star could we synthesize the 1362 A region using the meteoritic/solar boron abundance of log e (B) = 2.88; a lower boron abundance was necessary which may reflect evolutionary effects (e.g., mass loss or mixing near the main-sequence), the natal composition of the star forming regions, or a systematic error in the analyses (e.g., non-LTE effects). Regardless of the initial boron abundance, and despite the possibility of non-LTE effects, it seems clear that boron is severely depleted in some stars. It may be that the nitrogen and boron abundances are anticorrelated, as would be expected from mixing between the H-burning and outer stellar layers. If, as we suspect, a residue of boron is present in the A-type supergiants, we may exclude a scenario in which mixing occurs continuously between the surface and the deep layers operating the CN-cycle. Further exploitation of the B II 1362 A line as an indicator of the evolutionary status of A- and B-type stars will require a larger stellar sample to be observed with higher signal-to-noise as attainable with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  16. An Einstein Observatory SAO-based catalog of B-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillo, F.; Sciortino, S.; Micela, G.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    About 4000 X-ray images obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to measure the 0.16-4.0 keV emission from 1545 B-type SAO stars falling in the about 10 percent of the sky surveyed with the IPC. Seventy-four detected X-ray sources with B-type stars are identified, and it is estimated that no more than 15 can be misidentified. Upper limits to the X-ray emission of the remaining stars are presented. In addition to summarizing the X-ray measurements and giving other relevant optical data, the present extensive catalog discusses the reduction process and analyzes selection effects associated with both SAO catalog completeness and IPC target selection procedures. It is concluded that X-ray emission, at the level of Lx not less than 10 exp 30 ergs/s, is quite common in B stars of early spectral types (B0-B3), regardless of luminosity class, but that emission, at the same level, becomes less common, or nonexistent, in later B-type stars.

  17. The nature of the late B-type stars HD 67044 and HD 42035

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, R.; Gebran, M.; Royer, F.

    2016-04-01

    While monitoring a sample of apparently slowly rotating superficially normal bright late B and early A stars in the northern hemisphere, we have discovered that HD 67044 and HD 42035, hitherto classified as normal late B-type stars, are actually respectively a new chemically peculiar star and a new spectroscopic binary containing a very slow rotator HD 42035 S with ultra-sharp lines (v_{{e}}sin i= 3.7 km s^{-1}) and a fast rotator HD 42035 B with broad lines. The lines of Ti ii, Cr ii, Mn ii, Sr ii, Y ii, Zr ii and Ba ii are conspicuous features in the high resolution SOPHIE spectrum (R=75000) of HD 67044. The Hg ii line at 3983.93 Å is also present as a weak feature. The composite spectrum of HD 42035 is characterised by very sharp lines formed in HD 42035 S superimposed onto the shallow and broad lines of HD 42035 B. These very sharp lines are mostly due to light elements from C to Ni, the only heavy species definitely present are strontium and barium. Selected lines of 21 chemical elements from He up to Hg have been synthesized using model atmospheres computed with ATLAS9 and the spectrum synthesis code SYNSPEC48 including hyperfine structure of various isotopes when relevant. These synthetic spectra have been adjusted to high resolution high signal-to-noise spectra of HD 67044 and HD 42035 S in order to derive abundances of these key elements. HD 67044 is found to have distinct enhancements of Ti, Cr, Mn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba and Hg and underabundances in He, C, O, Ca and Sc which shows that this star is not a superficially normal late B-type star, but actually is a new CP star most likely of the HgMn type. HD 42035 S has provisional underabundances of the light elements from C to Ti and overabundances of heavier elements (except for Fe and Sr which are also underabundant) up to barium. These values are lower limits to the actual abundances as we cannot currently place properly the continuum of HD 42035 S. More accurate fundamental parameters and abundances for HD

  18. The Origin of B-type Runaway Stars: Non-LTE Abundances as a Diagnostic

    SciT

    McEvoy, Catherine M.; Dufton, Philip L.; Smoker, Jonathan V.

    There are two accepted mechanisms to explain the origin of runaway OB-type stars: the binary supernova (SN) scenario and the cluster ejection scenario. In the former, an SN explosion within a close binary ejects the secondary star, while in the latter close multibody interactions in a dense cluster cause one or more of the stars to be ejected from the region at high velocity. Both mechanisms have the potential to affect the surface composition of the runaway star. tlusty non-LTE model atmosphere calculations have been used to determine the atmospheric parameters and the C, N, Mg, and Si abundances formore » a sample of B-type runaways. These same analytical tools were used by Hunter et al. for their analysis of 50 B-type open-cluster Galactic stars (i.e., nonrunaways). Effective temperatures were deduced using the Si-ionization balance technique, surface gravities from Balmer line profiles, and microturbulent velocities derived using the Si spectrum. The runaways show no obvious abundance anomalies when compared with stars in the open clusters. The runaways do show a spread in composition that almost certainly reflects the Galactic abundance gradient and a range in the birthplaces of the runaways in the Galactic disk. Since the observed Galactic abundance gradients of C, N, Mg, and Si are of a similar magnitude, the abundance ratios (e.g., N/Mg) are as obtained essentially uniform across the sample.« less

  19. Rosat detections of X-ray emission from young B-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Zinnecker, H.; Cruddace, R.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    We present first results of a series of pointings of the Rosat HRI at visual binaries consisting of a B-star with a later-type companion. The binaries selected for this study are very likely physical pairs. Dating of the B-type stars with respect to the zero-age main sequence, as well as spectroscopic observations of the late-type stars, provides evidence for the extreme youth of these systems with ages typically near or below 10 exp 8 yr. Surprisingly, the late-B component was in many cases detected as an X-ray source, in contrast to previous findings that X-ray emission among late-B field stars is rather uncommon.

  20. Testing the Wind-shock Paradigm for B-Type Star X-Ray Production with θ Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, T. F.; Petit, V.; Cohen, D.; Leutenegger, M.

    2017-11-01

    We present Chandra X-ray grating spectroscopy of the B0.2V star, θ Carina. θ Car is in a critical transition region between the latest O-type and earliest B-type stars, where some stars are observed to have UV-determined wind densities much lower than theoretically expected (e.g., Marcolino et al. 2009). In general, X-ray emission in this low-density wind regime should be less prominent than for O-stars (e.g., Martins et al. 2005), but observations suggest a higher than expected X-ray emission filling factor (Lucy 2012; Huenemoerder et al. 2012); if a larger fraction of the wind is shock-heated, it could explain the weak UV wind signature seen in weak wind stars, but this might severely challenge predictions of radiatively-driven wind theory. We measured the line widths of several He-, H-like and Fe ions and the f/i ratio of He-like ions in the X-ray spectrum, which improves upon the results from Nazé et al. (2008) (XMM-Newton RGS) with additional measurements (Chandra HETG) of Mgxi and Sixiii by further constraining the X-ray emission location. The f/i ratio is modified by the proximity to the UV-emitting stellar photosphere, and is therefore a diagnostic of the radial location of the X-ray emitting plasma. The measured widths of X-ray lines are narrow, <300 km s-1 and the f/i ratios place the X-rays relatively close to the surface, both implying θ Car is a weak wind star. The measured widths are also consistent with other later-type stars in the weak wind regime, β Cru (Cohen et al. 2008), for example, and are smaller on average than earlier weak wind stars such as μ Col (Huenemoerder et al. 2012). This could point to a spectral type divide, where one hypothesis, low density, works for early-B type stars and the other hypothesis, a larger fraction of shock-heated gas, explains weak winds in late-O type stars. Archival IUE data still needs to be analyzed to determine the mass loss rate and hydrodynamical simulations will be compared with observations to

  1. The IACOB project . III. New observational clues to understand macroturbulent broadening in massive O- and B-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simón-Díaz, S.; Godart, M.; Castro, N.; Herrero, A.; Aerts, C.; Puls, J.; Telting, J.; Grassitelli, L.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The term macroturbulent broadening is commonly used to refer to a certain type of non-rotational broadening affecting the spectral line profiles of O- and B-type stars. It has been proposed to be a spectroscopic signature of the presence of stellar oscillations; however, we still lack a definitive confirmation of this hypothesis. Aims: We aim to provide new empirical clues about macroturbulent spectral line broadening in O- and B-type stars to evaluate its physical origin. Methods: We used high-resolution spectra of 430 stars with spectral types in the range O4 - B9 (all luminosity classes) compiled in the framework of the IACOB project. We characterized the line broadening of adequate diagnostic metal lines using a combined Fourier transform and goodness-of-fit technique. We performed a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the whole sample using automatic tools coupled with a huge grid of fastwind models to determine their effective temperatures and gravities. We also incorporated quantitative information about line asymmetries into our observational description of the characteristics of the line profiles, and performed a comparison of the shape and type of line-profile variability found in a small sample of O stars and B supergiants with still undefined pulsational properties and B main-sequence stars with variable line profiles owing to a well-identified type of stellar oscillations or to the presence of spots in the stellar surface. Results: We present a homogeneous and statistically significant overview of the (single snapshot) line-broadening properties of stars in the whole O and B star domain. We find empirical evidence of the existence of various types of non-rotational broadening agents acting in the realm of massive stars. Even though all these additional sources of line-broadening could be quoted and quantified as a macroturbulent broadening from a practical point of view, their physical origin can be different. Contrarily to the early- to

  2. Non-LTE Line-Blanketed Model Atmospheres of B-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, T.; Hubeny, I.

    2005-12-01

    We present an extension of our OSTAR2002 grid of NLTE model atmospheres to B-type stars. We have calculated over 1,300 metal line-blanketed, NLTE, plane-parallel, hydrostatic model atmospheres for the basic parameters appropriate to B stars. The grid covers 16 effective temperatures from 15,000 to 30,000 K, with 1000 K steps, 13 surface gravities, log g≤ 4.75 down to the Eddington limit, and 5 compositions (2, 1, 0.5, 0.2, and 0.1 times solar). We have adopted a microturbulent velocity of 2 km/s for all models. In the lower surface gravity range (log g≤ 3.0), we supplemented the main grid with additional model atmospheres accounting for higher microtutbulent velocity (10 km/s) and for alterated surface composition (He and N-rich, C-deficient), as observed in B supergiants. The models incorporate basically all known atomic levels of 46 ions of H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, S, and Fe, which are grouped into 1127 superlevels. Models and spectra will be available at our Web site, http://nova.astro.umd.edu.

  3. B-type natriuretic peptide measurement for early diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Seror, Jeremy; Lefevre, Guillaume; Berkane, Nathalie; Richard, Frederic; Bornes, Marie; Uzan, Serge; Berkane, Nadia

    2014-12-01

    Calcium-channel blockers administered to pregnant women as tocolytic agents can cause acute pulmonary edema. The first signs of this severe complication can be atypical and so delay introduction of appropriate therapy. We describe three cases in whom B-type natriuretic peptide measurements proved to be relevant in early diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women with acute pulmonary edema. B-type natriuretic peptide measurement in this setting could contribute to timely diagnosis and improve follow-up. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Exploring X-ray Emission from Winds in Two Early B-type Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, John P.; Hole, Tabetha; Ignace, Richard; Oskinova, Lida

    2017-01-01

    The winds of the most massive (O-type) stars have been well studied, but less is known about the winds of early-type B stars, especially in binaries. Extending O-star wind theory to these smaller stars, we would expect them to emit X-rays, and when in a B-star binary system, the wind collision should emit additional X-rays. This combined X-ray flux from nearby B-star binary systems should be detectable with current telescopes. Yet X-ray observations of two such systems with the Chandra Observatory not only show far less emission than predicted, but also vary significantly from each other despite having very similar observed characteristics. We will present these observations, and our work applying the classic Castor, Abbott, and Klein (CAK) wind theory, combined with more recent analytical wind-shock models, attempting to reproduce this unexpected range of observations.

  5. IRAS 22150+6109 - a young B-type star with a large disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhozhay, Olga V.; Miroshnichenko, Anatoly S.; Kuratov, Kenesken S.; Zakhozhay, Vladimir A.; Khokhlov, Serik A.; Zharikov, Sergey V.; Manset, Nadine

    2018-06-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic analysis and spectral energy distribution (SED) modelling of the optical counterpart of the infrared source IRAS 22150+6109. The source was suggested to be a Herbig Be star located in the star-forming region L 1188. Absorption lines in the optical spectrum indicate a spectral type B3, while weak Balmer emission lines reflect the presence of a circumstellar gaseous disc. The star shows no excess radiation in the near-infrared spectral region and a strong excess in the far-infrared that we interpret as radiation from a large disc, the inner edge of which is located very far from the star (550 au) and does not attenuate its radiation. We conclude that IRAS 22150+6109 is an intermediate-mass star that is currently undergoing a short pre-main-sequence evolutionary stage.

  6. High Resolution Optical Spectroscopy of an Intriguing High-Latitude B-Type Star HD119608

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, T.

    2018-01-01

    We present an LTE analysis of high resolution echelle optical spectra obtained with the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) and the UCLES spectrograph for a B1Ib high galactic latitude supergiant HD119608. A fresh determination of the atmospheric parameters using line-blanketed LTE model atmospheres and spectral synthesis provided T eff = 23 300 ± 1000 K, log g = 3.0 ± 0.3, and the microturbulent velocity ξ = 6.0 ± 1.0 kms-1 and [Fe/H] = 0.16. The rotational velocity of the star was derived fromC, O, N, Al, and Fe lines as v sin i = 55.8 ± 1.3 kms-1. Elemental abundances were obtained for 10 different species. He, Al, and P abundances of the star were determined for the first time. In the spectra, hot post-AGB status as well as the Pop I characteristics of the star were examined. The approximately solar carbon and oxygen abundances, along with mild excess in helium and nitrogen abundances do not stipulate a CNO processed surface composition, hence a hot post-AGB status. The LTE abundances analysis also indicates solar sulphur and moderately enriched magnesium abundances. The average abundances of B dwarfs of well studied OB associations and Population I stars show a striking resemblance to abundances obtained for HD119608 in this study. This may imply a runaway status for the star.

  7. Modeling Circumstellar Disks of B-Type Stars with Observations from the Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grzenia, B. J.; Tycner, C.; Jones, C. E.; Rinehart, S. A.; vanBelle, G. T.; Sigut, T. A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Geometrical (uniform disk) and numerical models were calculated for a set of B-emission (Be) stars observed with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI). Physical extents have been estimated for the disks of a total of15 stars via uniform disk models. Our numerical non-LTE models used parameters for the B0, B2, B5, and B8spectral classes and following the framework laid by previous studies, we have compared them to infrared K-band interferometric observations taken at PTI. This is the first time such an extensive set of Be stars observed with long-baseline interferometry has been analyzed with self-consistent non-LTE numerical disk models.

  8. Time-resolved multicolour photometry of bright B-type variable stars in Scorpius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handler, G.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.

    2013-09-01

    Context. The first two of a total of six nano-satellites that will constitute the BRITE-Constellation space photometry mission have recently been launched successfully. Aims: In preparation for this project, we carried out time-resolved colour photometry in a field that is an excellent candidate for BRITE measurements from space. Methods: We acquired 117 h of Strömgren uvy data during 19 nights. Our targets comprised the β Cephei stars κ and λ Sco, the eclipsing binary μ1 Sco, and the variable super/hypergiant ζ1 Sco. Results: For κ Sco, a photometric mode identification in combination with results from the spectroscopic literature suggests a dominant (l,m) = (1, -1) β Cephei-type pulsation mode of the primary star. The longer period of the star may be a rotational variation or a g-mode pulsation. For λ Sco, we recover the known dominant β Cephei pulsation, a longer-period variation, and observed part of an eclipse. Lack of ultraviolet data precludes mode identification for this star. We noticed that the spectroscopic orbital ephemeris of the closer pair in this triple system is inconsistent with eclipse timings and propose a refined value for the orbital period of the closer pair of 5.95189 ± 0.00003 d. We also argue that the components of the λ Sco system are some 30% more massive than previously thought. The binary light curve solution of μ1 Sco requires inclusion of the irradiation effect to explain the u light curve, and the system could show additional low amplitude variations on top of the orbital light changes. ζ1 Sco shows long-term variability on a time scale of at least two weeks that we prefer to interpret in terms of a variable wind or strange mode pulsations. Based on observations carried out at the South African Astronomical ObservatoryReduced time series for all stars are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/557/A1

  9. Carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances in atmospheres of the 5-11 M⊙ B-type main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimkov, Leonid S.; Lambert, David L.; Poklad, Dmitry B.; Rachkovskaya, Tamara M.; Rostopchin, Sergey I.

    2013-02-01

    Fundamental parameters and the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances are determined for 22 B-type stars with distances d ≤ 600 pc and slow rotation (v sin i ≤ 66 km s-1). The stars are selected according to their effective temperatures Teff and surface gravities log g, namely: Teff is between 15 300 and 24 100 K and log g is mostly greater than 3.75; therefore, stars with medium masses of 5-11 M⊙ are selected. Theory predicts for the stars with such parameters that the C, N and O abundances in their atmospheres should correspond to their initial values. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) analysis of C ii, N ii and O ii lines is implemented. The following mean C, N and O abundances are obtained: log ɛ(C) = 8.31 ± 0.13, log ɛ(N) = 7.80 ± 0.12 and log ɛ(O) = 8.73 ± 0.13. These values are in very good agreement with recent data on the C, N and O abundances for nearby B stars from other authors; it is important that different techniques are applied by us and other authors. When excluding for the stars HR 1810 and HR 2938, which can be mixed, we obtain the following mean abundances for the remaining 20 stars: log ɛ(C) = 8.33 ± 0.11, log ɛ(N) = 7.78 ± 0.09 and log ɛ(O) = 8.72 ± 0.12; these values are in excellent agreement with a present-day cosmic abundance standard (CAS) of Nieva & Przybilla. The derived mean N and O abundances in unevolved B stars are very close to the solar photospheric abundances, as well as to the protosolar ones. However, the mean C abundance is somewhat lower than the solar one; this small but stable carbon deficiency is confirmed by other authors. One may suggest two possibilities to explain the observed C deficiency. First, current non-LTE computations of C ii lines are still partially inadequate. In this case the C deficiency is invalid, so one may conclude that the Sun and the local unevolved B stars have the same metallicity. This would mean that during the Sun's life (i.e. for the past 4.5 × 109 yr) the

  10. Open clusters. III. Fundamental parameters of B stars in NGC 6087, NGC 6250, NGC 6383, and NGC 6530 B-type stars with circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidelman, Y.; Cidale, L. S.; Zorec, J.; Panei, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Stellar physical properties of star clusters are poorly known and the cluster parameters are often very uncertain. Methods: Our goals are to perform a spectrophotometric study of the B star population in open clusters to derive accurate stellar parameters, search for the presence of circumstellar envelopes, and discuss the characteristics of these stars. The BCD spectrophotometric system is a powerful method to obtain stellar fundamental parameters from direct measurements of the Balmer discontinuity. To this end, we wrote the interactive code MIDE3700. The BCD parameters can also be used to infer the main properties of open clusters: distance modulus, color excess, and age. Furthermore, we inspected the Balmer discontinuity to provide evidence for the presence of circumstellar disks and identify Be star candidates. We used an additional set of high-resolution spectra in the Hα region to confirm the Be nature of these stars. Results: We provide Teff, log g, Mv, Mbol, and spectral types for a sample of 68 stars in the field of the open clusters NGC 6087, NGC 6250, NGC 6383, and NGC 6530, as well as the cluster distances, ages, and reddening. Then, based on a sample of 230 B stars in the direction of the 11 open clusters studied along this series of three papers, we report 6 new Be stars, 4 blue straggler candidates, and 15 B-type stars (called Bdd) with a double Balmer discontinuity, which indicates the presence of circumstellar envelopes. We discuss the distribution of the fraction of B, Be, and Bdd star cluster members per spectral subtype. The majority of the Be stars are dwarfs and present a maximum at the spectral type B2-B4 in young and intermediate-age open clusters (<40 Myr). Another maximum of Be stars is observed at the spectral type B6-B8 in open clusters older than 40 Myr, where the population of Bdd stars also becomes relevant. The Bdd stars seem to be in a passive emission phase. Conclusions: Our results support previous statements that the

  11. A combined multiwavelength VLA/ALMA/Chandra study unveils the complex magnetosphere of the B-type star HR5907

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Oskinova, L. M.; Ignace, R.; Buemi, C. S.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Leone, F.; Phillips, N. M.; Agliozzo, C.; Todt, H.; Cerrigone, L.

    2018-05-01

    We present new radio/millimeter measurements of the hot magnetic star HR 5907 obtained with the VLA and ALMA interferometers. We find that HR 5907 is the most radio luminous early type star in the cm-mm band among those presently known. Its multi-wavelength radio light curves are strongly variable with an amplitude that increases with radio frequency. The radio emission can be explained by the populations of the non-thermal electrons accelerated in the current sheets on the outer border of the magnetosphere of this fast-rotating magnetic star. We classify HR 5907 as another member of the growing class of strongly magnetic fast-rotating hot stars where the gyro-synchrotron emission mechanism efficiently operates in their magnetospheres. The new radio observations of HR 5907 are combined with archival X-ray data to study the physical condition of its magnetosphere. The X-ray spectra of HR 5907 show tentative evidence for the presence of non-thermal spectral component. We suggest that non-thermal X-rays originate a stellar X-ray aurora due to streams of non-thermal electrons impacting on the stellar surface. Taking advantage of the relation between the spectral indices of the X-ray power-law spectrum and the non-thermal electron energy distributions, we perform 3-D modelling of the radio emission for HR 5907. The wavelength-dependent radio light curves probe magnetospheric layers at different heights above the stellar surface. A detailed comparison between simulated and observed radio light curves leads us to conclude that the stellar magnetic field of HR 5907 is likely non-dipolar, providing further indirect evidence of the complex magnetic field topology of HR 5907.

  12. WW Geminorum: An Early B-type Eclipsing Binary Evolving into the Contact Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Yang, Y.; Dai, H.-F.; Yin, X.-G.

    2014-11-01

    WW Gem is a B-type eclipsing binary with a period of 1.2378 days. The CCD photometry of this binary was performed in 2013 December using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Stations of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated W-D program, the photometric model was deduced from the VRI light curves. The results imply that WW Gem is a near-contact eclipsing binary whose primary component almost fills its Roche lobe. The photometric mass ratio is q ph = 0.48(± 0.05). All collected times of minimum light, including two new ones, were used for the period studies. The orbital period changes of WW Gem could be described by an upward parabola, possibly overlaid by a light-time orbit with a period of P mod = 7.41(± 0.04) yr and a semi-amplitude of A = 0.0079 days(± 0.0005 days), respectively. This kind of cyclic oscillation may be attributed to the light-travel time effect via the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +3.47(±0.04) × 10-8 day yr-1, which may be explained by the conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transfer, the massive binary WW Gem may be evolving into a contact binary.

  13. WW Geminorum: An early B-type eclipsing binary evolving into the contact phase

    SciT

    Yang, Y.-G.; Dai, H.-F.; Yin, X.-G.

    2014-11-01

    WW Gem is a B-type eclipsing binary with a period of 1.2378 days. The CCD photometry of this binary was performed in 2013 December using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Stations of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated W-D program, the photometric model was deduced from the VRI light curves. The results imply that WW Gem is a near-contact eclipsing binary whose primary component almost fills its Roche lobe. The photometric mass ratio is q {sub ph} = 0.48(± 0.05). All collected times of minimum light, including two new ones, were used for the periodmore » studies. The orbital period changes of WW Gem could be described by an upward parabola, possibly overlaid by a light-time orbit with a period of P {sub mod} = 7.41(± 0.04) yr and a semi-amplitude of A = 0.0079 days(± 0.0005 days), respectively. This kind of cyclic oscillation may be attributed to the light-travel time effect via the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +3.47(±0.04) × 10{sup –8} day yr{sup –1}, which may be explained by the conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transfer, the massive binary WW Gem may be evolving into a contact binary.« less

  14. The pulsationally modulated radial crossover signature of the slowly rotating magnetic B-type star ξ1 CMa★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, M.; Kochukhov, O.; Wade, G. A.; Rivinius, Th

    2018-04-01

    We report the latest set of spectropolarimetric observations of the magnetic β Cep star ξ1 CMa. The new observations confirm the long-period model of Shultz et al. (2017), who proposed a rotational period of about 30 years and predicted that in 2018 the star should pass through a magnetic null. In perfect agreement with this projection, all longitudinal magnetic field ⟨Bz⟩ measurements are close to 0 G. Remarkably, individual Stokes V profiles all display a crossover signature, which is consistent with ⟨Bz⟩ ˜ 0 but is not expected when vsin i ˜ 0. The crossover signatures furthermore exhibit pulsationally modulated amplitude and sign variations. We show that these unexpected phenomena can all be explained by a `radial crossover' effect related to the star's radial pulsations, together with an important deviation of the global field topology from a purely dipolar structure, which we explore via a dipole+quadrupole configuration as the simplest non-dipolar field.

  15. CRITICAL EVALUATION OF MAGNETIC FIELD DETECTIONS REPORTED FOR PULSATING B-TYPE STARS IN LIGHT OF ESPaDOnS, NARVAL, AND REANALYZED FORS1/2 OBSERVATIONS

    SciT

    Shultz, M.; Wade, G. A.; Grunhut, J.

    2012-05-01

    Recent spectropolarimetric studies of seven slowly pulsating B (SPB) and {beta} Cep stars have suggested that photospheric magnetic fields are more common in B-type pulsators than in the general population of B stars, suggesting a significant connection between magnetic and pulsational phenomena. We present an analysis of new and previously published spectropolarimetric observations of these stars. New Stokes V observations obtained with the high-resolution ESPaDOnS and Narval instruments confirm the presence of a magnetic field in one of the stars ({epsilon} Lup), but find no evidence of magnetism in five others. A re-analysis of the published longitudinal field measurements obtainedmore » with the low-resolution FORS1/2 spectropolarimeters finds that the measurements of all stars show more scatter from zero than can be attributed to Gaussian noise, suggesting the presence of a signal and/or systematic underestimation of error bars. Re-reduction and re-measurement of the FORS1/2 spectra from the ESO archive demonstrates that small changes in reduction procedure lead to substantial changes in the inferred longitudinal field, and substantially reduces the number of field detections at the 3{sigma} level. Furthermore, we find that the published periods are not unique solutions to the time series of either the original or the revised FORS1/2 data. We conclude that the reported field detections, proposed periods, and field geometry models for {alpha} Pyx, 15 CMa, 33 Eri, and V1449 Aql are artifacts of the data analysis and reduction procedures, and that magnetic fields at the reported strength are no more common in SPB/{beta} Cep stars than in the general population of B stars.« less

  16. The pulsationally modulated radial crossover signature of the slowly rotating magnetic B-type star ξ1 CMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, M.; Kochukhov, O.; Wade, G. A.; Rivinius, Th

    2018-07-01

    We report the latest set of spectropolarimetric observations of the magnetic β Cep star ξ1 CMa. The new observations confirm the long-period model of Shultz et al. (2017), who proposed a rotational period of about 30 years and predicted that in 2018 the star should pass through a magnetic null. In perfect agreement with this projection, all longitudinal magnetic field ⟨Bz⟩ measurements are close to 0 G. Remarkably, individual Stokes V profiles all display a crossover signature, which is consistent with ⟨Bz⟩ ˜ 0 but is not expected when v sin i ˜ 0. The crossover signatures furthermore exhibit pulsationally modulated amplitude and sign variations. We show that these unexpected phenomena can all be explained by a `radial crossover' effect related to the star's radial pulsations, together with an important deviation of the global field topology from a purely dipolar structure, that we explore via a dipole+quadrupole configuration as the simplest non-dipolar field.

  17. [Clinical significance of early percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with Braunwald III-B type unstable angina pectoris].

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakao, Koichi; Horiuchi, Kenji; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Honda, Takashi

    2003-06-01

    To assess the efficacy of early invasive strategy for the treatment of Braunwald III-B type unstable angina pectoris. This study included 573 consecutive patients of whom 267 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (312 lesions). The patients were divided into two groups, 95 treated with the early invasive strategy of coronary angiography within 24 hr of admission (Group PCI-I) and the remaining 172 treated with the early conservative strategy of coronary angiography 24 hr after admission (Group PCI-C). No significant differences were noted in the baseline characteristics of the two groups except for ST segment elevation on electrocardiography at presentation, which occurred significantly less frequently in Group PCI-C (36.8% vs 8.1%, p < 0.0001). The initial success rate of percutaneous coronary intervention was sufficiently high in both groups (Group PCI-I: 96.9% vs Group PCI-C: 97.7%, NS). Acute myocardial infarction occurred in six patients of Group PCI-C (3.5%) because of the side branch occlusion. There was no in-hospital death or emergent coronary artery bypass grafting. During the 6-month follow-up, there were no significant differences in the death rates (2.1% vs 1.7%), the death or myocardial infarction rates (5.3% vs 5.8%) and the target lesion revascularization ratio (26.0% vs 25.7%) between Group PCI-I and Group PCI-C. The clinical outcomes of the early invasive strategy for unstable angina pectoris were almost equivalent to those of the early conservative strategy, despite more frequent ST segmental elevation at admission in Group PCI-I. These findings suggest that the early invasive strategy for unstable angina pectoris may be acceptable even in the current Japanese clinical setting without the use of GP IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist, low molecular weight heparin or clopidogrel.

  18. Fourier analysis of He 4471/Mg 4481 line profiles for separating rotational velocity and axial inclination in rapidly rotating B-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Y.; Kawanomoto, S.; Ohishi, N.

    2017-11-01

    While the effect of rotation on spectral lines is complicated in rapidly rotating stars because of the appreciable gravity-darkening effect differing from line to line, it is possible to make use of this line-dependent complexity to separately determine the equatorial rotation velocity (ve) and the inclination angle (i) of rotational axis. Although linewidths of spectral lines were traditionally used for this aim, we tried in this study to apply the Fourier method, which utilizes the unambiguously determinable first-zero frequency (σ1) in the Fourier transform of line profile. Equipped with this technique, we analysed the profiles of He I 4471 and Mg I 4481 lines of six rapidly rotating (ve sin i ∼ 150-300 km s-1) late B-type stars, while comparing them with the theoretical profiles simulated on a grid of models computed for various combination of (ve, i). According to our calculation, σ1 tends to be larger than the classical value for given ve sin i. This excess progressively grows with an increase in ve, and is larger for the He line than the Mg line, which leads to {σ} 1^He > {σ} 1^Mg. It was shown that ve and i are separately determinable from the intersection of two loci (sets of solutions reproducing the observed σ1 for each line) on the ve versus i plane. Yet, line profiles alone are not sufficient for their unique discrimination, for which photometric information (such as colours) needs to be simultaneously employed.

  19. The Development of STAR Early Literacy. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Renaissance Inst., Inc., Madison, WI.

    This report describes the development and testing of a computerized early literacy diagnostic assessment for students in prekindergarten to grade 3 that can measure skills across a variety of preliteracy and reading domains. The STAR Early Literacy assessment was developed by a team of more than 50 people, including literacy experts,…

  20. N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide in the early evaluation of suspected acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Haaf, Philip; Balmelli, Cathrin; Reichlin, Tobias; Twerenbold, Raphael; Reiter, Miriam; Meissner, Julia; Schaub, Nora; Stelzig, Claudia; Freese, Michael; Paniz, Patricia; Meune, Christophe; Drexler, Beatrice; Freidank, Heike; Winkler, Katrin; Hochholzer, Willibald; Mueller, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Myocardial ischemia is a strong trigger of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) release. As ischemia precedes necrosis in acute myocardial infarction, we hypothesized that NT-proBNP might be useful in the early diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. In a prospective multicenter study, NT-proBNP was measured at presentation in 658 consecutive patients with acute chest pain. The final diagnosis was adjudicated by 2 independent cardiologists. Patients were followed long term regarding mortality. Acute myocardial infarction was the adjudicated final diagnosis in 117 patients (18%). NT-proBNP levels at presentation were significantly higher in acute myocardial infarction as compared with patients with other final diagnoses (median 886 pg/mL vs 135 pg/mL, P <.001). The diagnostic accuracy of NT-proBNP for acute myocardial infarction as quantified by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-0.83). When added to cardiac troponin T, NT-proBNP significantly increased the AUC from 0.89 (95% CI, 0.84-0.93) to 0.91 (95% CI, 0.88-0.94; P=.033). Cumulative 24-month mortality rates were 0% in the first, 1.3% in the second, 8.3% in the third, and 23.3% in the fourth quartile of NT-proBNP (P <.001). NT-proBNP (AUC 0.85, 95% CI, 0.81-0.89) predicted all-cause mortality independently of and more accurately than both cardiac troponin T (AUC 0.66, 95% CI, 0.58-0.74; P <.001) and the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction risk score (AUC 0.79, 95% CI, 0.74-0.84; P <.001). Net reclassification improvement (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction vs additionally NT-proBNP) was 0.188 (P <.009), and integrated discrimination improvement was 0.100 (P <.001). Use of NT-proBNP improves the early diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. B-type natriuretic peptide expression and cardioprotection is regulated by Akt dependent signaling at early reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Breivik, L; Jensen, A; Guvåg, S; Aarnes, E K; Aspevik, A; Helgeland, E; Hovland, S; Brattelid, T; Jonassen, A K

    2015-04-01

    Exogenously administered B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been shown to offer cardioprotection through activation of particulate guanylyl cyclase (pGC), protein kinase G (PKG) and KATP channel opening. The current study explores if cardioprotection afforded by short intermittent BNP administration involves PI3K/Akt/p70s6k dependent signaling, and whether this signaling pathway may participate in regulation of BNP mRNA expression at early reperfusion. Isolated Langendorff perfused rat hearts were subjected to 30min of regional ischemia and 120min of reperfusion (IR). Applying intermittent 3×30s infusion of BNP peptide in a postconditioning like manner (BNPPost) reduced infarct size by >50% compared to controls (BNPPost 17±2% vs. control 42±4%, p<0.001). Co-treatment with inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt/p70s6k pathway (wortmannin, SH-6 and rapamycin) completely abolished the infarct-limiting effect of BNP postconditioning (BNPPost+Wi 36±5%, BNPPost+SH-6 41±4%, BNPPost+Rap 37±6% vs. BNPPost 17±2%, p<0.001). Inhibition of natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR) by isatin also abrogated BNPPost cardioprotection (BNPPost+isatin 46±2% vs. BNPPost 17±2%, p<0.001). BNPPost also significantly phosphorylated Akt and p70s6k at early reperfusion, and Akt phosphorylation was inhibited by SH-6 and isatin. Myocardial BNP mRNA levels in the area at risk (AA) were significantly elevated at early reperfusion as compared to the non-ischemic area (ANA) (Ctr(AA) 2.7±0.5 vs. Ctr(ANA) 1.2±0.2, p<0.05) and the ischemic control tissue (Ctr(AA) 2.7±0.5 vs. ischemia 1.0±0.1, p<0.05). Additional experiments also revealed a significant higher BNP mRNA level in ischemic postconditioned (IPost) hearts as compared to ischemic controls (IPost 6.7±1.3 vs. ischemia 1.0±0.2, p<0.05), but showed no difference from controls run in parallel (Ctr 5.4±0.8). Akt inhibition by SH-6 completely abrogated this elevation (IPost 6.7±1.3 vs. IPost+SH-6 1.8±0.7, p<0.05) (Ctr 5.4±0.8 vs. SH-6 1.5±0

  2. Combined Measurement of Soluble ST2 and Amino-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Provides Early Assessment of Severity in Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tolppanen, Heli; Rivas-Lasarte, Mercedes; Lassus, Johan; Sadoune, Malha; Gayat, Etienne; Pulkki, Kari; Arrigo, Mattia; Krastinova, Evguenia; Sionis, Alessandro; Parissis, John; Spinar, Jindrich; Januzzi, James; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Mortality in cardiogenic shock complicating acute coronary syndrome is high, and objective risk stratification is needed for rational use of advanced therapies such as mechanical circulatory support. Traditionally, clinical variables have been used to judge risk in cardiogenic shock. The aim of this study was to assess the added value of serial measurement of soluble ST2 and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide to clinical parameters for risk stratification in cardiogenic shock. CardShock (www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01374867) is a prospective European multinational study of cardiogenic shock. The main study introduced CardShock risk score, which is calculated from seven clinical variables at baseline, and was associated with short-term mortality. Nine tertiary care university hospitals. Patients with cardiogenic shock caused by acute coronary syndrome (n=145). In this substudy, plasma samples from the study patients were analyzed at eight time points during the ICU or cardiac care unit stay. Additional prognostic value of the biomarkers was assessed with incremental discrimination improvement. The combination of soluble ST2 and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide showed excellent discrimination for 30-day mortality (area under the curve, 0.77 at 12 hr up to 0.93 at 5-10 d after cardiogenic shock onset). At 12 hours, patients with both biomarkers elevated (soluble ST2, ≥ 500 ng/mL and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, ≥ 4,500 ng/L) had higher 30-day mortality (79%) compared to those with one or neither biomarkers elevated (31% or 10%, respectively; p < 0.001). Combined measurement of soluble ST2 and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide at 12 hours added value to CardShock risk score, correctly reclassifying 11% of patients. The combination of results for soluble ST2 and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide provides early risk assessment beyond clinical variables in patients with acute coronary syndrome

  3. The VLT-FLAMES survey of massive stars: mass loss and rotation of early-type stars in the SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokiem, M. R.; de Koter, A.; Evans, C. J.; Puls, J.; Smartt, S. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Herrero, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D. J.; Najarro, F.; Villamariz, M. R.; Yoon, S.-C.

    2006-09-01

    We have studied the optical spectra of a sample of 31 O-and early B-type stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, 21 of which are associated with the young massive cluster NGC 346. Stellar parameters are determined using an automated fitting method (Mokiem et al. 2005, A&A, 441, 711), which combines the stellar atmosphere code FASTWIND (Puls et al. 2005, A&A, 435, 669) with the genetic algorithm based optimisation routine PIKAIA (Charbonneau 1995, ApJS, 101, 309). Comparison with predictions of stellar evolution that account for stellar rotation does not result in a unique age, though most stars are best represented by an age of 1-3 Myr. The automated method allows for a detailed determination of the projected rotational velocities. The present day v_r sin i distribution of the 21 dwarf stars in our sample is consistent with an underlying rotational velocity (v_r) distribution that can be characterised by a mean velocity of about 160 - 190 km s-1 and an effective half width of 100 - 150 km s-1. The vr distribution must include a small percentage of slowly rotating stars. If predictions of the time evolution of the equatorial velocity for massive stars within the environment of the SMC are correct (Maeder & Meynet 2001, A&A, 373, 555), the young age of the cluster implies that this underlying distribution is representative for the initial rotational velocity distribution. The location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of the stars showing helium enrichment is in qualitative agreement with evolutionary tracks accounting for rotation, but not for those ignoring v_r. The mass loss rates of the SMC objects having luminosities of log L*/L⊙ ≳ 5.4 are in excellent agreement with predictions by Vink et al. (2001, A&A, 369, 574). However, for lower luminosity stars the winds are too weak to determine dot{M} accurately from the optical spectrum. Three targets were classifiedas Vz stars, two of which are located close to the theoretical zero-age main sequence. Three lower

  4. Hα Monitoring of Early-Type Emission Line Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Steven P.; Boettcher, E.; Wilson, S.; Hosek, M.

    2011-05-01

    We have begun a narrowband imaging program to monitor Hα emission in early-type stars in young open clusters and associations. A minority of early-type stars, particularly Be stars, show Hα in emission due to extended atmospheres and non-equilibrium conditions. Emission features commonly vary irregularly over a range of timescales (Porter, J.M. & Rivinus, T., P.A.S.P. 115:1153-1170, 2003). Some of the brightest such stars, e.g. γ Cas, have been spectroscopically monitored for Hα variability to help constrain models of the unstable disk, but there is relatively little ongoing monitoring in samples including fainter stars (Peters, G., Be Star Newsletter 39:3, 2009). Our program uses matched 5nm-wide on-band (656nm) and off-band (645nm) filters, in conjunction with the Hopkins Observatory 0.6-m telescope and CCD camera. Aperture photometry is done on all early-type stars in each frame, and results expressed as on-band to off-band ratios. Though wavelength-dependent information is lost compared with spectroscopy, imaging allows us to observe much fainter (and therefore many more) objects. Observing young clusters, rather than individual target stars, allows us to record multiple known and candidate emission line stars per frame, and provides multiple "normal" reference stars of similar spectral type. Observations began in the summer of 2010. This project has the potential to produce significant amounts of raw data, so a semi-automated data reduction process has been developed, including astrometric and photometric tasks. Early results, including some preliminary light curves and recovery of known Be stars at least as faint as R=13.9, are presented. We gratefully acknowledge support for student research through an REU grant to the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium from the National Science Foundation, and from the Division III Research Funding Committee of Williams College.

  5. Metallicities and Nucleosynthesis Patterns in Early Generation Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, T.

    2004-05-01

    I review our present knowledge of the Metallicity Distribution Function of stars in the low-metallicity tail of the halo population of the Galaxy, and the variety of observed elemental signatures that might be associated with particular astrophysical origins in the early Universe. Such signatures include stars that exhibit (a) highly and mildly enhanced r-process element ratios, as compared to the solar ratios, (b) highly s-process enriched stars, (c) stars showing large enrichments of both the r- and and s-process elements, and (d) stars that are greatly enhanced in the light element species, such as CNO, and (in some cases) the alpha elements. Because the stars in which these characteristics are observed all have metallicity [Fe/H] ≤ -2.5, they are inferred to have formed no more than 0.5-1 Gyrs after the Big Bang, prior to the final assemblage of the Milky Way. As such, they provide our best available probes of the nature of early element producers, such as Type II SN and hypernovae, as well as binaries that included (now deceased) stars of intermediate (1.5 - 3 Mo) masses. I outline ongoing and future plans for dramatically accelerating the pace of discovery of these rare, but clearly important, objects. Partial support for this work has been received from NSF grants AST 00-98508 and AST 00-98549, and from JINA, the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, an NSF Physics Frontier Center.

  6. Early Results from NICER Observations of Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Ozel, Feryal; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gendreau, Keith C.; Bult, Peter; Cackett, Ed; Chenevez, Jerome; Fabian, Andy; Guillot, Sebastien; Guver, Tolga; Homan, Jeroen; Keek, Laurens; Lamb, Frederick; Ludlam, Renee; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Markwardt, Craig B.; Miller, Jon M.; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Wolff, Michael T.

    2018-01-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) offers significant new capabilities for the study of accreting neuton stars relative to previous X-ray missions including large effective area, low background, and greatly improved low-energy response. The NICER Burst and Accretion Working Group has designed a 2 Ms observation program to study a number of phenomena in accreting neutron stars including type-I X-ray bursts, superbursts, accretion-powered pulsations, quasi-periodic oscillations, and accretion disk reflection spectra. We present some early results from the first six months of the NICER mission.

  7. Nearby star cluster yields insights into early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-07-01

    The nebula offers a unique opportunity for a close-up glimpse of the "firestorm" accompanying the birth of extremely massive stars, each blazing with the brilliance of 300,000 of our suns. Such galactic fireworks were much more common billions of years ago in the early universe, when most star formation took place. "This is giving us new insights into the physical mechanisms governing star formation in far away galaxies that existed long ago," says Mohammad Heydari-Malayeri (Paris Observatory, France), who headed the international team of astronomers who made the discovery using Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Because these stars are deficient in heavier elements, they also evolve much like the universe's earliest stars, which were made almost exclusively of the primordial elements hydrogen and helium that were created in the big bang. The Small Magellanic Cloud is a unique laboratory for studying star formation in the early universe since it is the closest and best seen galaxy containing so-called "metal-poor" first- and second -generation type stars. These observations show that massive stars may form in groups. "As a result, it is more likely some of these stars are members of double and multiple star systems," says Heydari-Malayeri. "The multiple systems will affect stellar evolution considerably by ejecting a great deal of matter into space." This furious rate of mass loss from these stars is evident in the Hubble picture, which reveals dramatic shapes sculpted in the nebula's wall of glowing gases by violent stellar winds and shock waves. "This implies a very turbulent environment typical of young star formation regions," Heydari-Malayeri adds. He believes one of the members of the cluster may be an extremely rare and short-lived class of super-hot star (50,000 degrees Kelvin) called a Wolf-Rayet. This star represents a violent, transitional phase in the final years of a massive star's existence - before it ultimately explodes as a supernova. "If

  8. NEARBY MASSIVE STAR CLUSTER YIELDS INSIGHTS INTO EARLY UNIVERSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA Hubble Space Telescope 'family portrait' of young, ultra-bright stars nested in their embryonic cloud of glowing gases. The celestial maternity ward, called N81, is located 200,000 light-years away in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), a small irregular satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. Hubble's exquisite resolution allows astronomers to pinpoint 50 separate stars tightly packed in the nebula's core within a 10 light-year diameter - slightly more than twice the distance between earth and the nearest star to our sun. The closest pair of stars is only 1/3 of a light-year apart (0.3 arcseconds in the sky). This furious rate of mass loss from these super-hot stars is evident in the Hubble picture that reveals dramatic shapes sculpted in the nebula's wall of glowing gases by violent stellar winds and shock waves. A pair of bright stars in the center of the nebula is pouring out most of the ultraviolet radiation to make the nebula glow. Just above them, a small dark knot is all that's left of the cold cloud of molecular hydrogen and dust the stars were born from. Dark absorption lanes of residual dust trisect the nebula. The nebula offers a unique opportunity for a close-up glimpse at the 'firestorm' accompanying the birth of extremely massive stars, each blazing with the brilliance of 300,000 of our suns. Such galactic fireworks were much more common billions of years ago in the early universe, when most star formation took place. The 'natural-color' view was assembled from separate images taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, in ultraviolet light and two narrow emission lines of ionized Hydrogen (H-alpha, H-beta). The picture was taken on September 4, 1997. Credit: Mohammad Heydari-Malayeri (Paris Observatory, France), NASA/ESA

  9. Five-Star Schools: Defining Quality in Early Childhood Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzog, Nancy B.

    2012-01-01

    Hakeem, Emily, Jose, and Latisha are all entering preschool in the fall. Their mothers are looking for the highest quality early childhood program they can find. Is there a guide for them to find a five-star program? Are all certified or accredited programs of equal quality? How do these parents and guardians know what defines quality in early…

  10. Centaurus X-3. [early x-ray binary star spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Cowley, A. P.; Crampton, D.; Van Paradus, J.; White, N. E.

    1979-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of Krzeminski's star at dispersions 25-60 A/mm are described. The primary is an evolved star of type O6-O8(f) with peculiarities, some of which are attributable to X-ray heating. Broad emission lines at 4640A (N III), 4686 A(He II) and H-alpha show self-absorption and do not originate entirely from the region near the X-ray star. The primary is not highly luminous (bolometric magnitude about -9) and does not show signs of an abnormally strong stellar wind. The X-ray source was 'on' at the time of optical observations. Orbital parameters are presented for the primary, which yield masses of 17 + or - 2 and 1.0 + or - 3 solar masses for the stars. The optical star is undermassive for its luminosity, as are other OB-star X-ray primaries. The rotation is probably synchronized with the orbital motion. The distance to Cen X-3 is estimated to be 10 + or - 1 kpc. Basic data for 12 early-type X-ray primaries are discussed briefly

  11. Reionization of Hydrogen and Helium by Early Stars and Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyithe, J. Stuart B.; Loeb, Abraham

    2003-04-01

    We compute the reionization histories of hydrogen and helium caused by the ionizing radiation fields produced by stars and quasars. For the quasars we use a model based on halo-merger rates that reproduces all known properties of the quasar luminosity function at high redshifts. The less constrained properties of the ionizing radiation produced by stars are modeled with two free parameters: (i) a transition redshift, ztran, above which the stellar population is dominated by massive, zero-metallicity stars and below which it is dominated by a Scalo mass function; and (ii) the product of the escape fraction of stellar ionizing photons from their host galaxies and the star formation efficiency, fescf*. We constrain the allowed range of these free parameters at high redshifts on the basis of the lack of the H I Gunn-Peterson trough at z<~6 and the upper limit on the total intergalactic optical depth for electron scattering, τes<0.18, from recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. We find that quasars ionize helium by a redshift z~4, but cannot reionize hydrogen by themselves before z~6. A major fraction of the allowed combinations of fescf* and ztran leads to an early peak in the ionized fraction because of the presence of metal-free stars at high redshifts. This sometimes results in two reionization epochs, namely, an early H II or He III overlap phase followed by recombination and a second overlap phase. Even if early overlap is not achieved, the peak in the visibility function for scattering of the CMB often coincides with the early ionization phase rather than with the actual reionization epoch. Consequently, τes does not correspond directly to the reionization redshift. We generically find values of τes>~7%, which should be detectable by the MAP satellite.

  12. Spectral analysis of early-type stars using a genetic algorithm based fitting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokiem, M. R.; de Koter, A.; Puls, J.; Herrero, A.; Najarro, F.; Villamariz, M. R.

    2005-10-01

    We present the first automated fitting method for the quantitative spectroscopy of O- and early B-type stars with stellar winds. The method combines the non-LTE stellar atmosphere code fastwind from Puls et al. (2005, A&A, 435, 669) with the genetic algorithm based optimization routine pikaia from Charbonneau (1995, ApJS, 101, 309), allowing for a homogeneous analysis of upcoming large samples of early-type stars (e.g. Evans et al. 2005, A&A, 437, 467). In this first implementation we use continuum normalized optical hydrogen and helium lines to determine photospheric and wind parameters. We have assigned weights to these lines accounting for line blends with species not taken into account, lacking physics, and/or possible or potential problems in the model atmosphere code. We find the method to be robust, fast, and accurate. Using our method we analysed seven O-type stars in the young cluster Cyg OB2 and five other Galactic stars with high rotational velocities and/or low mass loss rates (including 10 Lac, ζ Oph, and τ Sco) that have been studied in detail with a previous version of fastwind. The fits are found to have a quality that is comparable or even better than produced by the classical “by eye” method. We define errorbars on the model parameters based on the maximum variations of these parameters in the models that cluster around the global optimum. Using this concept, for the investigated dataset we are able to recover mass-loss rates down to ~6 × 10-8~M⊙ yr-1 to within an error of a factor of two, ignoring possible systematic errors due to uncertainties in the continuum normalization. Comparison of our derived spectroscopic masses with those derived from stellar evolutionary models are in very good agreement, i.e. based on the limited sample that we have studied we do not find indications for a mass discrepancy. For three stars we find significantly higher surface gravities than previously reported. We identify this to be due to differences in

  13. Star Formation-Driven Winds in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, Matthew; Lundgren, Britt; Brammer, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Measuring the extent of star formation-driven winds from galaxies in the early universe is crucial for understanding of how galaxies evolve over cosmic time. Using WFC3/IR grism data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have measured the star formation rates and star formation rate surface densities of several hundred galaxies at redshift (z) = 1, when the universe was roughly half its present age. The galaxies we examine are also probed by background quasars, whose spectra provide information about the extent of metal-enriched gas in their halos. We use a computational pipeline to measure the density of the star formation in each galaxy and correlate these measurements with detections of Mg II absorption in nearby quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our preliminary results support a model in which galaxies with high SFR surface densities drive metal-enriched gas out of the disk and into these galaxies’ extended halos, where that gas is detected in the spectra of more distant quasars.

  14. The Formation and Early Evolution of Embedded Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    We propose to combine Spitzer, WISE, Herschel, and other archival spacecraft data with an existing ground- and space-based mm-wave to near-IR survey of molecular clouds over a large portion of the Milky Way, in order to systematically study the formation and early evolution of massive stars and star clusters, and provide new observational calibrations for a theoretical paradigm of this key astrophysical problem. Central Objectives: The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is a large, unbiased, uniform, and panchromatic survey of massive star and cluster formation and early evolution, covering 20°x6° of the Galactic Plane. Its uniqueness lies in the comprehensive molecular spectroscopy of 303 massive dense clumps, which have also been included in several archival spacecraft surveys. Our objective is a systematic demographic analysis of massive star and cluster formation, one which has not been possible without knowledge of our CHaMP cloud sample, including all clouds with embedded clusters as well as those that have not yet formed massive stars. For proto-clusters deeply embedded within dense molecular clouds, analysis of these space-based data will: 1. Yield a complete census of Young Stellar Objects in each cluster. 2. Allow systematic measurements of embedded cluster properties: spectral energy distributions, luminosity functions, protostellar and disk fractions, and how these vary with cluster mass, age, and density. Combined with other, similarly complete and unbiased infrared and mm data, CHaMP's goals include: 3. A detailed comparison of the embedded stellar populations with their natal dense gas to derive extinction maps, star formation efficiencies and feedback effects, and the kinematics, physics, and chemistry of the gas in and around the clusters. 4. Tying the demographics, age spreads, and timescales of the clusters, based on pre-Main Sequence evolution, to that of the dense gas clumps and Giant Molecular Clouds. 5. A

  15. New insight into the physics of atmospheres of early type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.

    1981-01-01

    The phenomenon of mass loss and stellar winds from hot stars are discussed. The mass loss rate of early type stars increases by about a factor of 100 to 1000 during their evolution. This seems incompatible with the radiation driven wind models and may require another explanation for the mass loss from early type stars. The winds of early type stars are strongly variable and the stars may go through active phases. Eclipses in binary systems by the stellar winds can be used to probe the winds. A few future IUE studies are suggested.

  16. Observations of Nonthermal Radio Emission from Early-type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, D. C.; Bieging, J. H.; Churchwell, E.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of a wider survey of radio emission from O, B, and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, five new stars whose radio emission is dominated by a nonthermal mechanism of unknown origin were discovered. From statistics of distance-limited samples of stars, it is estimated that the minimum fraction of stars which are nonthermal emitters is 25% for the OB stars and 10% for the WR stars. The characteristics of this new class of nonthermal radio emitter are investigated.

  17. Structural analysis of star-forming blue early-type galaxies. Merger-driven star formation in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Koshy

    2017-02-01

    Context. Star-forming blue early-type galaxies at low redshift can give insight to the stellar mass growth of L⋆ elliptical galaxies in the local Universe. Aims: We wish to understand the reason for star formation in these otherwise passively evolving red and dead stellar systems. The fuel for star formation can be acquired through recent accretion events such as mergers or flyby. The signatures of such events should be evident from a structural analysis of the galaxy image. Methods: We carried out structural analysis on SDSS r-band imaging data of 55 star-forming blue elliptical galaxies, derived the structural parameters, analysed the residuals from best-fit to surface brightness distribution, and constructed the galaxy scaling relations. Results: We found that star-forming blue early-type galaxies are bulge-dominated systems with axial ratio >0.5 and surface brightness profiles fitted by Sérsic profiles with index (n) mostly >2. Twenty-three galaxies are found to have n< 2; these could be hosting a disc component. The residual images of the 32 galaxy surface brightness profile fits show structural features indicative of recent interactions. The star-forming blue elliptical galaxies follow the Kormendy relation and show the characteristics of normal elliptical galaxies as far as structural analysis is concerned. There is a general trend for high-luminosity galaxies to display interaction signatures and high star formation rates. Conclusions: The star-forming population of blue early-type galaxies at low redshifts could be normal ellipticals that might have undergone a recent gas-rich minor merger event. The star formation in these galaxies will shut down once the recently acquired fuel is consumed, following which the galaxy will evolve to a normal early-type galaxy.

  18. Star formation in globular clusters and dwarf galaxies and implications for the early evolution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Douglas N. C.; Murray, Stephen D.

    1991-01-01

    Based upon the observed properties of globular clusters and dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, we present important theoretical constraints on star formation in these systems. These constraints indicate that protoglobular cluster clouds had long dormant periods and a brief epoch of violent star formation. Collisions between protocluster clouds triggered fragmentation into individual stars. Most protocluster clouds dispersed into the Galactic halo during the star formation epoch. In contrast, the large spread in stellar metallicity in dwarf galaxies suggests that star formation in their pregenitors was self-regulated: we propose the protocluster clouds formed from thermal instability in the protogalactic clouds and show that a population of massive stars is needed to provide sufficient UV flux to prevent the collapsing protogalactic clouds from fragmenting into individual stars. Based upon these constraints, we propose a unified scenario to describe the early epochs of star formation in the Galactic halo as well as the thick and thin components of the Galactic disk.

  19. Early-Type Galaxy Star Formation Histories in Different Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Patrick; Graves, G.

    2014-01-01

    We use very high-S/N stacked spectra of ˜29,000 nearby quiescent early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to investigate variations in their star formation histories (SFHs) with environment at fixed position along and perpendicular to the Fundamental Plane (FP). We separate galaxies in the three-dimensional FP space defined by galaxy effective radius Re, central stellar velocity dispersion σ, and surface brightness residual from the FP, ΔIe. We use the SDSS group catalogue of Yang et al. to further separate galaxies into three categories by their “identities” within their respective dark matter halos: central “Brightest Group Galaxies” (BGGs); Satellites; and Isolateds (those which are “most massive” in a dark matter halo with no Satellites). Within each category, we construct high-S/N mean stacked spectra to determine mean singleburst ages, [Fe/H], and [Mg/Fe] based on the stellar population synthesis models of R. Schiavon. This allows us to study variations in the stellar population properties (SPPs) with local group environment at fixed structure (i.e., fixed position in FP-space). We find that the SFHs of quiescent ETGs are almost entirely determined by their structural parameters σ and ΔIe. Any variation with local group environment at fixed structure is only slight: Satellites have the oldest stellar populations, 0.02 dex older than BGGs and 0.04 dex older than Isolateds; BGGs have the highest Fe-enrichments, 0.01 dex higher than Isolateds and 0.02 dex higher than Satellites; there are no differences in Mg-enhancement between BGGs, Isolateds, and Satellites. Our observation that, to zeroth-order, the SFHs of quiescent ETGs are fully captured by their structures places important qualitative constraints on the degree to which late-time evolutionary processes (those which occur after a galaxy’s initial formation and main star-forming lifetime) can alter their SFHs/structures.

  20. EVIDENCE FOR GRANULATION IN EARLY A-TYPE STARS

    SciT

    Kallinger, Thomas; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2010-03-01

    Stars with spectral types earlier than about F0 on (or close) to the main sequence have long been believed to lack observable surface convection, although evolutionary models of A-type stars do predict very thin surface convective zones. We present evidence for granulation in two {delta} Scuti stars of spectral type A2: HD 174936 and HD 50844. Recent analyses of space-based CoRoT data revealed up to some 1000 frequencies in the photometry of these stars. The frequencies were interpreted as individual pulsation modes. If true, there must be large numbers of nonradial modes of very high degree l which should suffermore » cancellation effects in disk-integrated photometry (even of high space-based precision). The p-mode interpretation of all the frequencies in HD 174936 and HD 50844 depends on the assumption of white (frequency-independent) noise. Our independent analyses of the data provide an alternative explanation: most of the peaks in the Fourier spectra are the signature of non-white granulation background noise, and less than about 100 of the frequencies are actual stellar p-modes in each star. We find granulation timescales which are consistent with scaling relations that describe cooler stars with known surface convection. If the granulation interpretation is correct, the hundreds of low-amplitude Fourier peaks reported in recent studies are falsely interpreted as independent pulsation modes and a significantly lower number of frequencies are associated with pulsation, consistent with only modes of low degree.« less

  1. Copernicus observations of the N v resonance doublet in 53 early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, D. C.; Bohlin, R. C.; Savage, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    UV spectra in the wavelength interval 1170-1270 A are presented for 53 early-type stars ranging in spectral type from O6.5 V to B2.5 IV. The sample includes four Wolf-Rayet stars, seven known Oe-Be stars, and six galactic halo OB stars. A qualitative analysis of the stellar N v doublet reveals that: (1) N v is present in all stars hotter and more luminous than type B0 for the main sequence, B1 for giants, and B2 for supergiants; (2) shell components of N v and an unidentified absorption feature at 1230 A are present in about half of the stars; (3) the column density of N v is well correlated with bolometric luminosity over the spectral range O6 to B2; and (4) the ratio of emission to absorption equivalent width is a factor of 2 smaller in the main sequence stars than in supergiants, which suggests that the wind structure changes as a star evolves. For several stars, this ratio is too small to be explained by traditional wind models.

  2. Evaluation of Delaware Stars for Early Success: Year 1 Report. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Heather L.; Karoly, Lynn A.; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Tamargo, Jennifer; Setodji, Claude Messan

    2014-01-01

    Delaware was in the first group of states to receive a federal grant in 2012 to improve early care and education services and increase the number of infants, toddlers, and preschool-age children in high-quality programs. One component of the state's grant is a rigorous validation process for Delaware Stars for Early Success, a voluntary quality…

  3. Comparison of Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Versus B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Cystatin C to Predict Early Acute Kidney Injury and Outcome in Patients With Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ruocco, Gaetano; Pellegrini, Marco; De Gori, Carmelo; Del Castillo, Gabriele; Franci, Beatrice; Nuti, Ranuccio; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) has been described in chronic heart failure (HF) as marker of tubular damage and renal dysfunction; however, less data are available in patients with acute HF. Because of high rate of acute kidney injury (AKI) development, we aimed to investigate the role of NGAL in predicting early AKI development; second, we compared NGAL with respect to cystatin C, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), renal function, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) for outcome prediction. We measured admission serum NGAL, cystatin C, and BNP in 231 patients affected to acute HF; all patients were submitted to daily creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and measurement to identify inhospital AKI defined by Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-Stage Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria. We also measured admission and discharge estimated glomerular filtration rate, creatinine, and BUN to evaluate their prognostic role during a 6-month follow-up period; 78 patients developed AKI during hospitalization. In these subjects, NGAL levels were significantly increased respect to patients without AKI (295 ± 228 vs 129 ± 108 ng/ml, p <0.001). A cutoff of 134 ng/ml has been related to AKI with good sensibility and specificity (85% and 80%, respectively; area under the curve 0.81, p <0.001). BNP was also mildly increased (1,000 ± 906 vs 746 ± 580 pg/ml, p = 0.03) but not cystatin C. Patients with chronic kidney disease demonstrated higher NGAL levels compared with subjects with preserved renal function (258 ± 249 and 120 ± 77 ng/ml, p <0.001). The receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that increased NGAL values were associated with increased mortality (cutoff 170 ng/ml, sensibility 60%, specificity 82%, accuracy 71%, area under the curve 0.77, p <0.001). The same significant correlation was also found for BUN at discharge (cutoff 100 mg/dl, sensibility 65%, specificity 85%, accuracy 71%, area under the curve 0

  4. What the Most Metal-poor Stars Tell Us About the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frebel, Anna

    2008-05-01

    The chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the early Universe is a key topic in modern astrophysics. The most metal-poor Galactic halo stars are now frequently used in an attempt to reconstruct the onset of the chemical and dynamical formation processes of the Galaxy. These stars are an easily-accessible local equivalent of the high-redshift Universe, and can thus be used to carry out field-field cosmology. The discovery of two astrophysically very important metal-poor objects has recently lead to a significant advance in the field. One object is the most iron-poor star yet found (with [Fe/H]=-5.4). The other stars displays the strongest known overabundances of heavy neutron-capture elements, such as uranium, and nucleo-chronometry yields a stellar age of 13 Gyr. Both stars already serve as benchmark objects for various theoretical studies with regard to nucleosynthesis processes in the early Galaxy. I will discuss how the abundance patterns of these and other metal-poor stars solidify and advance our understanding of the early Universe, and provide constraints on the nature of the first stars, as well as their explosion mechanisms and corresponding supernova nucleosynthesis yields. Large samples of these old objects are also employed to test theoretical predictions about the formation of the very first low-mass stars. In the near future, the combined power of near-field cosmology results with those of the next-generation facilities (e.g., MWA, JWST, GMT) may yield exceptional details about the formation processes of the first generations of stars and galaxies.

  5. UBV and H. beta. photometry of faint early-type stars in Crux and Centaurus

    SciT

    Muzzio, J.C.; Feinstein, A.; Orsatti, A.M.

    1976-08-01

    UBV and H..beta.. photoelectric observations of faint early-type stars in a small region in Crux near the open cluster Hogg 15 and another in Centaurus are presented. The data suggest large absorption in Crux and small absorption in Centaurus. The spread in the distance moduli of the observed stars seems to be in agreement with the view that a spiral arm is seen tangentially near l = 305/sup 0/.

  6. The Copernicus observations - Interstellar or circumstellar material. [UV spectra of early stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Williams, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    It is suggested that the sharp absorption lines observed in the ultraviolet spectra of early-type stars by the Copernicus satellite may be entirely accounted for by the circumstellar material in the H II regions and associated transition zones around the observed stars. If this interpretation is correct, the Copernicus results yield little information on the state of any interstellar (as opposed to circumstellar) gas and, in particular, shed little light on the degree of element depletion in interstellar space.

  7. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  8. SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF METAL-POOR STARS FROM LAMOST: EARLY RESULTS

    SciT

    Li, Hai-Ning; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-10

    We report on early results from a pilot program searching for metal-poor stars with LAMOST and follow-up high-resolution observation acquired with the MIKE spectrograph attached to the Magellan II telescope. We performed detailed abundance analysis for eight objects with iron abundances [Fe/H] < -2.0, including five extremely metal-poor (EMP; [Fe/H] < -3.0) stars with two having [Fe/H] < -3.5. Among these objects, three are newly discovered EMP stars, one of which is confirmed for the first time with high-resolution spectral observations. Three program stars are regarded as carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, including two stars with no enhancement in their neutron-capturemore » elements, which thus possibly belong to the class of CEMP-no stars; one of these objects also exhibits significant enhancement in nitrogen, and is thus a potential carbon and nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor star. The [X/Fe] ratios of the sample stars generally agree with those reported in the literature for other metal-poor stars in the same [Fe/H] range. We also compared the abundance patterns of individual program stars with the average abundance pattern of metal-poor stars and find only one chemically peculiar object with abundances of at least two elements (other than C and N) showing deviations larger than 0.5 dex. The distribution of [Sr/Ba] versus [Ba/H] agrees that an additional nucleosynthesis mechanism is needed aside from a single r-process. Two program stars with extremely low abundances of Sr and Ba support the prospect that both main and weak r-processes may have operated during the early phase of Galactic chemical evolution. The distribution of [C/N] shows that there are two groups of carbon-normal giants with different degrees of mixing. However, it is difficult to explain the observed behavior of the [C/N] of the nitrogen-enhanced unevolved stars based on current data.« less

  9. Hazardous Early Days In (and Beyond) the Habitable Zones Around Ultra-Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Joel

    Although a majority of stars in the solar neighborhood are of mid- to late-M type, the magnetically-induced coronal (X-ray) and chromospheric (UV, H-alpha) activity of such stars remain essentially unexplored for the important age range 10-100 Myr. Such information on high-energy processes associated with young M stars would provide much-needed constraints on models of the effects of stellar irradiation on the physics and chemistry of planet-forming disks and newborn planets. In addition, X-ray and UV observations of ultra-low-mass young stars can serve to probe the (presently ill-defined) spectral type boundary that determines which very low-mass objects will eventually become M stars -- as opposed to brown dwarfs (BDs) -- following their pre-main sequence evolutionary stages. Via ADAP support, we have developed the GALEX Nearby Young Star Search (GALNYSS), a search method that combines GALEX, 2MASS, WISE and proper motion catalog information to identify nearby, young, lowmass stars. We have applied this method to identify ~2000 candidate young (10-100 Myr), low-mass (M-type) stars within 150 pc. These GALNYSS-identified young star candidates are distributed over the entire GALEX-covered sky, and their spectral types peak in the M3-4 range; followup optical spectroscopic work is ongoing (Rodriguez et al. 2013, ApJ, 774, 101). We now propose an ADA program to determine the X-ray properties of representative stars among these GALNYSS candidates, so as to confirm their youth and investigate the early evolution of coronal activity near the low-mass star/BD boundary and the effects of such activity on planet formation. Specifically, we will exploit the presence in the HEASARC archives of XMM-Newton and (to a lesser extent) Chandra X-ray Observatory data for a few dozen GALNYSS candidates that have been observed serendipitously by one or both of these space observatories. The proposed ADA program will yield the full reduction and analysis of these as-yet unexplored data

  10. Solar-Type Stars with the Suppression of Convection at an Early Stage of Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshina, A. V.; Baturin, V. A.; Ayukov, S. V.; Gorshkov, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of a solar-mass star before and on the main sequence is analyzed in light of the diminished efficiency of convection in the first 500 Myr. A numerical simulation has been performed with the CESAM2k code. It is shown that the suppression of convection in the early stages of evolution leads to a somewhat higher lithium content than that predicted by the classical solar model. In addition, the star's effective temperature decreases. Ignoring this phenomenon may lead to errors in age and mass determinations for young stars (before the main sequence) from standard evolutionary tracks in the temperature-luminosity diagram. At a later stage of evolution, after 500 Myr, the efficiency of convection tends to the solar value. At this stage, the star's inner structure becomes classical; it does not depend on the previous history. On the contrary, the photospheric lithium abundance contains information about the star's past. In other words, there may exist main-sequence solar-mass stars of the same age (above 500 Myr), radius, and luminosity, yet with different photospheric lithium contents. The main results of this work add considerably to the popular method for determining the age of solar-type stars from lithium abundances.

  11. DD 13 - A very young and heavily reddened early O star in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Fitzpatrick, Edward L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates the Large Magellanic Cloud star DD 13, which is likely the major ionizing source of the nebula N159A. New optical spectroscopy and new estimates of the broadband photometric properties of DD 13 are obtained. A spectral type of O3-O6 V, E(B-V) = 0.64, and M(V) = -6.93 is found. The spectral type cannot be more precisely defined due to contamination of the spectral data by nebular emission, obliterating the important He I classification lines. These results, plus a published estimate of the Lyman continuum photon injection rate into N159A, suggest that DD 13 actually consists of about 2-4 young, early O stars still enshrouded by their natal dust cloud. The star DD 13 may be a younger example of the type of tight cluster represented by the LMC 'star' Sk-66 deg 41, recently revealed to be composed of six or more components.

  12. High-velocity runaway stars from three-body encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Gualandris, A.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2010-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of dynamical encounters between hard, massive binaries and a very massive star (VMS; formed through runaway mergers of ordinary stars in the dense core of a young massive star cluster) to explore the hypothesis that this dynamical process could be responsible for the origin of high-velocity (≥ 200 - 400 km s-1) early or late B-type stars. We estimated the typical velocities produced in encounters between very tight massive binaries and VMSs (of mass of ≥ 200 M⊙) and found that about 3 - 4% of all encounters produce velocities ≥ 400 km s-1, while in about 2% of encounters the escapers attain velocities exceeding the Milky Ways's escape velocity. We therefore argue that the origin of high-velocity (≥ 200 - 400 km s-1) runaway stars and at least some so-called hypervelocity stars could be associated with dynamical encounters between the tightest massive binaries and VMSs formed in the cores of star clusters. We also simulated dynamical encounters between tight massive binaries and single ordinary 50 - 100 M⊙ stars. We found that from 1 to ≃ 4% of these encounters can produce runaway stars with velocities of ≥ 300 - 400 km s-1 (typical of the bound population of high-velocity halo B-type stars) and occasionally (in less than 1% of encounters) produce hypervelocity (≥ 700 km s-1) late B-type escapers.

  13. Delaware Stars for Early Success. QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Delaware's Stars for Early Success prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators…

  14. An Evaluation of the Early Alert (STAR) Program at Central Piedmont Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammon, J. B.

    2017-01-01

    Central Piedmont Community College is exploring ways to help at-risk students achieve academic success by utilizing an early-alert system called Success Through Academic Reporting (STAR). All First-Time, Full-time Degree-seeking students (FFD) receive an opportunity for follow-up services that support a centralized strategy, which has the…

  15. Abundance profiling of extremely metal-poor stars and supernova properties in the early universe

    SciT

    Tominaga, Nozomu; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi, E-mail: tominaga@konan-u.ac.jp, E-mail: iwamoto.nobuyuki@jaea.go.jp, E-mail: nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-04-20

    After the big bang nucleosynthesis, the first heavy element enrichment in the universe was made by a supernova (SN) explosion of a population (Pop) III star (Pop III SN). The abundance ratios of elements produced from Pop III SNe are recorded in abundance patterns of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. The observations of the increasing number of EMP stars have made it possible to statistically constrain the explosion properties of Pop III SNe. We present Pop III SN models whose nucleosynthesis yields well reproduce, individually, the abundance patterns of 48 such metal-poor stars as [Fe/H] ≲ – 3.5. We then derivemore » relations between the abundance ratios of EMP stars and certain explosion properties of Pop III SNe: the higher [(C + N)/Fe] and [(C + N)/Mg] ratios correspond to the smaller ejected Fe mass and the larger compact remnant mass, respectively. Using these relations, the distributions of the abundance ratios of EMP stars are converted to those of the explosion properties of Pop III SNe. Such distributions are compared with those of the explosion properties of present day SNe: the distribution of the ejected Fe mass of Pop III SNe has the same peak as that of the present day SNe but shows an extended tail down to ∼10{sup –2}-10{sup –5} M {sub ☉}, and the distribution of the mass of the compact remnant of Pop III SNe is as wide as that of the present-day, stellar-mass black holes. Our results demonstrate the importance of large samples of EMP stars obtained by ongoing and future EMP star surveys and subsequent high-dispersion spectroscopic observations in clarifying the nature of Pop III SNe in the early universe.« less

  16. Exploring simulated early star formation in the context of the ultrafaint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corlies, Lauren; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Wise, John H.

    2018-04-01

    Ultrafaint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) are typically assumed to have simple, stellar populations with star formation ending at reionization. Yet as the observations of these galaxies continue to improve, their star formation histories (SFHs) are revealed to be more complicated than previously thought. In this paper, we study how star formation, chemical enrichment, and mixing proceed in small, dark matter haloes at early times using a high-resolution, cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation. The goals are to inform the future use of analytic models and to explore observable properties of the simulated haloes in the context of UFD data. Specifically, we look at analytic approaches that might inform metal enrichment within and beyond small galaxies in the early Universe. We find that simple assumptions for modelling the extent of supernova-driven winds agree with the simulation on average, whereas inhomogeneous mixing and gas flows have a large effect on the spread in simulated stellar metallicities. In the context of the UFDs, this work demonstrates that simulations can form haloes with a complex SFH and a large spread in the metallicity distribution function within a few hundred Myr in the early Universe. In particular, bursty and continuous star formation are seen in the simulation and both scenarios have been argued from the data. Spreads in the simulated metallicities, however, remain too narrow and too metal-rich when compared to the UFDs. Future work is needed to help reduce these discrepancies and advance our interpretation of the data.

  17. Magnifying the Early Episodes of Star Formation: Super Star Clusters at Cosmological Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzella, E.; Castellano, M.; Meneghetti, M.; Mercurio, A.; Caminha, G. B.; Cupani, G.; Calura, F.; Christensen, L.; Merlin, E.; Rosati, P.; Gronke, M.; Dijkstra, M.; Mignoli, M.; Gilli, R.; De Barros, S.; Caputi, K.; Grillo, C.; Balestra, I.; Cristiani, S.; Nonino, M.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Pentericci, L.; Fontana, A.; Comastri, A.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Bergamini, P.; Tozzi, P.

    2017-06-01

    We study the spectrophotometric properties of a highly magnified (μ ≃ 40{--}70) pair of stellar systems identified at z = 3.2222 behind the Hubble Frontier Field galaxy cluster MACS J0416. Five multiple images (out of six) have been spectroscopically confirmed by means of VLT/MUSE and VLT/X-Shooter observations. Each image includes two faint ({m}{UV}≃ 30.6), young (≲ 100 Myr), low-mass (< {10}7 {M}⊙ ), low-metallicity (12 + Log(O/H) ≃ 7.7, or 1/10 solar), and compact (30 pc effective radius) stellar systems separated by ≃ 300 pc after correcting for lensing amplification. We measured several rest-frame ultraviolet and optical narrow ({σ }v≲ 25 km s-1) high-ionization lines. These features may be the signature of very hot (T> {{50,000}} K) stars within dense stellar clusters, whose dynamical mass is likely dominated by the stellar component. Remarkably, the ultraviolet metal lines are not accompanied by Lyα emission (e.g., C IV/Lyα > 15), despite the fact that the Lyα line flux is expected to be 150 times brighter (inferred from the Hβ flux). A spatially offset, strongly magnified (μ > 50) Lyα emission with a spatial extent ≲ 7.6 kpc2 is instead identified 2 kpc away from the system. The origin of such a faint emission could be the result of fluorescent Lyα induced by a transverse leakage of ionizing radiation emerging from the stellar systems and/or may be associated with an underlying and barely detected object (with {m}{UV}> 34 de-lensed). This is the first confirmed metal-line emitter at such low-luminosity and redshift without Lyα emission—suggesting that, at least in some cases, a non-uniform covering factor of the neutral gas might hamper the Lyα detection. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory for Astronomical research in the southern hemisphere, under ESO programmes P095.A-0840, P095.A-0653, and P186.A-0798.

  18. HD 66051: the first eclipsing binary hosting an early-type magnetic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochukhov, O.; Johnston, C.; Alecian, E.; Wade, G. A.

    2018-05-01

    Early-type magnetic stars are rarely found in close binary systems. No such objects were known in eclipsing binaries prior to this study. Here we investigated the eclipsing, spectroscopic double-lined binary HD 66051, which exhibits out-of-eclipse photometric variations suggestive of surface brightness inhomogeneities typical of early-type magnetic stars. Using a new set of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations, we discovered a weak magnetic field on the primary and found intrinsic, element-dependent variability in its spectral lines. The magnetic field structure of the primary is dominated by a nearly axisymmetric dipolar component with a polar field strength Bd ≈ 600 G and an inclination with respect to the rotation axis of βd = 13°. A weaker quadrupolar component is also likely to be present. We combined the radial velocity measurements derived from our spectra with archival optical photometry to determine fundamental masses (3.16 and 1.75 M⊙) and radii (2.78 and 1.39 R⊙) with a 1-3% precision. We also obtained a refined estimate of the effective temperatures (13000 and 9000 K) and studied chemical abundances for both components with the help of disentangled spectra. We demonstrate that the primary component of HD 66051 is a typical late-B magnetic chemically peculiar star with a non-uniform surface chemical abundance distribution. It is not an HgMn-type star as suggested by recent studies. The secondary is a metallic-line star showing neither a strong, global magnetic field nor intrinsic spectral variability. Fundamental parameters provided by our work for this interesting system open unique possibilities for probing interior structure, studying atomic diffusion, and constraining binary star evolution.

  19. The Abundances of the Iron Group Elements in Early B Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C.

    FUSE observations of four sharp-lined early B main-sequence band stars in the Magellanic Clouds will be carried through to determine the abundances of the heavy elements, especially those of the Fe group. The FUSE spectral region contains numerous Fe III lines, including the resonance multiplet (UV1) near 1130 A that is excellent for abundance determinations and two strong multiplets of V III, an ion that does not produce measurable lines longward of 1200 A in metal-deficient stars. In addition there are several measurable lines from Cr III and Mn III. Although abundances of the Fe-peak elements are of interest because they are important for assessing opacities for stellar evolution calculations and the validity of theoretical calculations of explosive nucleosynthesis, ground-based studies do not yield this information because measurable lines from these species, except for a few Fe III lines, are found only in the UV spectral region. The abundances of heavy elements provide information on the production of such elements in previous generations of stars. From FUSE data obtained in Cycle 3 we are determining the abundances of the Fe group elements in two sharp-lined early B stars in the SMC (AV 304, a field star, and NGC346-637, a star in a mini-starburst cluster). This project will allow one to compare the abundances in AV 304 and NGC346-637 with those in the LMC and other regions in the SMC and look for asymmetry in heavy element production in the Magellanic Clouds.

  20. Two-dimensional models of fast rotating early-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Rotation has now become an unavoidable parameter of stellar models, but for most massive or intermediate-mass stars rotation is fast, at least of a significant fraction of the critical angular velocity. Current spherically symmetric models try to cope with this feature of the stars using various approximations, like for instance the so-called shellular rotation usually accompanied with a diffusion that is meant to represent the mixing induced by rotationally generated flows. Such approximations may be justified in the limit of slow rotation where anisotropies and associated flows are weak. However, when rotation is fast, say larger than 50% of the critical velocities the use of a spherically symmetric 1D-model is doubtful. This is not only because of the centrifugal flattening of the star, but also because of the flows that are induced by the baroclinic torque that naturally appears in the radiative envelope of an early-type (rotating) star. These flows face the cylindrical symmetry of the Coriolis force and the spheroidal symmetry of the effective gravity.In this talk I shall present the latest results of the ESTER project that has taken up the challenge of making two-dimensional (axisymmetric) models of stars rotating at any rotation rate. In particular, I will focus on main sequence massive and intermediate-mass stars. I'll show what should be expected in such stars as far as the differential rotation and the associated meridional circulation are concerned, notably the emergence of a Stewartson layer along the tangential cylinder of the core. I'll also indicate what may be inferred about the evolution of an intermediate-mass star at constant angular momentum and how Be stars may form. I shall finally give some comparisons between models and observations of the gravity darkening on some nearby fast rotators as it has been derived from interferometric observations. In passing, I'll also discuss how 2D models can help to recover the fundamental parameters of a star.

  1. Colliding winds from early-type stars in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Ian R.; Blondin, John M.; Pollock, A. M. T.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of the wind and shock structure formed by the wind collision in early-type binary systems is examined by means of a 2D hydrodynamics code, which self-consistently accounts for radiative cooling, and represents a significant improvement over previous attempts to model these systems. The X-ray luminosity and spectra of the shock-heated region, accounting for wind attenuation and the influence of different abundances on the resultant level and spectra of X-ray emission are calculated. A variety of dynamical instabilities that are found to dominate the intershock region is examined. These instabilities are found to be particularly important when postshock material is able to cool. These instabilities disrupt the postshock flow and add a time variability of order 10 percent to the X-ray luminosity. The X-ray spectrum of these systems is found to vary with the nuclear abundances of winds. These theoretical models are used to study several massive binary systems, in particular V444 Cyg and HD 193793.

  2. Reversal of Fortune: Increased Star Formation Efficiencies in the Early Histories of Dwarf Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madau, Piero; Weisz, Daniel R.; Conroy, Charlie

    2014-08-01

    On dwarf galaxy scales, the different shapes of the galaxy stellar mass function and the dark halo mass function require a star-formation efficiency (SFE) in these systems that is currently more than 1 dex lower than that of Milky Way-size halos. Here, we argue that this trend may actually be reversed at high redshift. Specifically, by combining the resolved star-formation histories of nearby isolated dwarfs with the simulated mass-growth rates of dark matter halos, we show that the assembly of these systems occurs in two phases: (1) an early, fast halo accretion phase with a rapidly deepening potential well, characterized by a high SFE; and (2) a late, slow halo accretion phase where, perhaps as a consequence of reionization, the SFE is low. Nearby dwarfs have more old stars than predicted by assuming a constant or decreasing SFE with redshift, a behavior that appears to deviate qualitatively from the trends seen among more massive systems. Taken at face value, the data suggest that at sufficiently early epochs, dwarf galaxy halos above the atomic cooling mass limit can be among the most efficient sites of star formation in the universe.

  3. Green Peas emit X-rays: Extreme Star Formation in Early Universe Analog Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brorby, Matthew; Kaaret, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Luminous compact galaxies (LCGs), Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs), and Lyman Break Analog galaxies (LBAs) are all used as proxies for star-forming galaxies in the early Universe (z ≥ 6). The X-ray emission from such galaxies has been found to be elevated compared to other star-forming galaxies in our local Universe. It has been suggested that this may be due to the lower metallicity seen in these proxies to high-redshift galaxies and the elevated X-ray emission may affect the heating and Reionization evolution of the early Universe. Our previous studies have suggested the existence of an LX-SFR-metallicity plane for all star-forming galaxies. We present these results in the context of our newest Joint Chandra/HST study containing the first X-ray detection of the Green Pea galaxies, a population of compact starburst galaxies discovered by volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo Project (Cardamone+2009). The galaxies were given the name Green Peas due to their compact size and green appearance in the gri composite images from SDSS. The green color is caused by a strong [OIII]λ5007Å emission line, an indicator of recent star formation. We observed a few of the most promising candidates with joint Chandra/HST observation and discuss our findings here.

  4. On the origin of the hypervelocity runaway star HD 271791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the origin of the early-B-type runaway star HD 271791 and show that its extremely high velocity (≃530 - 920km s-1) cannot be explained within the framework of the binary-supernova ejection scenario. Instead, we suggest that HD 271791 attained its peculiar velocity in the course of a strong dynamical encounter between two hard, massive binaries or through an exchange encounter between a hard, massive binary and a very massive star, formed through runaway mergers of ordinary massive stars in the dense core of a young massive star cluster.

  5. Measurements of eight early-type stars angular diameters using VEGA/CHARA interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challouf, M.; Nardetto, N.; Mourard, D.; Aroui, H.; Delaa, O.

    2014-12-01

    The surface brightness color (SBC) relation is an important tool to derive the distance of extragalatic eclipsing binaries. We determined the uniform disc angular diameter of the eight following early-type stars using VEGA/CHARA interferometric observations: θ_{UD}[δ Cyg] = 0.766 ± 0.047 mas, θ_{UD}[γ Lyr] = 0.742& ± 0.010 mas, θ_{UD}[γ Ori] = 0.701 ± 0.005 mas, θ_{UD}[ζ Peg] = 0.539 ± 0.009 mas, θ_{UD}[λ Aql] = 0.529 ± 0.003 mas, θ_{UD}[ζ Per] = 0.531 ± 0.007 mas, θ_{UD}[ι Her] = 0.304 ± 0.010 mas and θ_{UD}[8 Cyg] = 0.229 ± 0.011 mas (by extending V-K range from -0.76 to 0.02) with typical precision of about 1.5%. By combining these data with previous angular diameter determinations available in the literature, Challouf et al. (2014) provide for the very first time a SBC relation for early-type stars (-1≤V-K≤0) with a precision of about 0.16 magnitude or 7% in term of angular diameter (when using this SBC relation to derive the angular diameter of early-type stars).

  6. Early type galaxies: Mapping out the two-dimensional space of galaxy star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Genevieve J.

    Early type galaxies form a multi-parameter family, as evidenced by the two- dimensional (2-D) Fundamental Plane relationship. However, their star formation histories are often treated as a one-dimensional mass sequence. This dissertation presents a systematic study of the relationship between the multi- parameter structural properties of early type galaxies and their star formation histoires. We demonstrate that the stellar populations of early type galaxies span a 2-D space, which means that their star formation histories form a two- parameter family. This 2-D family is then mapped onto several familiar early type galaxy scaling relations, including the color-magnitude relation, the Fundamental Plane, and a cross-section through the Fundamental Plane. We find that the stellar population properties, and therefore the star formation histories of early type galaxies depend most strongly on galaxy velocity dispersion (s), rather than on luminosity ( L ), stellar mass ( M [low *] ), or dynamical mass ( M dyn ). Interestingly, stellar populations are independent of the radius ( R e ) of the galaxies. At fixed s, they show correlated residuals through the thickness of the Fundamental Plane (FP) in the surface-brightness ( I e ) dimension, such that low-surface-brightness galaxies are older, less metal-enriched, and more enhanced in Mg relative to Fe than their counterparts at the same s and R e on the FP midplane. Similarly, high- surface-brightness galaxies are younger, more metal-rich, and less Mg-enhanced than their counterparts on the FP midplane. These differences suggest that the duration of star formation varies through the thickness of the FP. If the dynamical mass-to-light ratios of early type galaxies ( M dyn /L ) were constant for all such galaxies, the FP would be equivalent to the plane predicted by the virial relation. However, the observed FP does not exactly match the virial plane. The FP is tilted from the virial plane, indicating that M dyn /L varies

  7. On the origin of high-velocity runaway stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Gualandris, Alessia; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2009-06-01

    We explore the hypothesis that some high-velocity runaway stars attain their peculiar velocities in the course of exchange encounters between hard massive binaries and a very massive star (either an ordinary 50-100Msolar star or a more massive one, formed through runaway mergers of ordinary stars in the core of a young massive star cluster). In this process, one of the binary components becomes gravitationally bound to the very massive star, while the second one is ejected, sometimes with a high speed. We performed three-body scattering experiments and found that early B-type stars (the progenitors of the majority of neutron stars) can be ejected with velocities of >~200-400kms-1 (typical of pulsars), while 3-4Msolar stars can attain velocities of >~300-400kms-1 (typical of the bound population of halo late B-type stars). We also found that the ejected stars can occasionally attain velocities exceeding the Milky Ways's escape velocity.

  8. B- and A-Type Stars in the Taurus-Auriga Star-Forming Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), t Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  9. The peculiar, luminous early-type emission line stars of the Magellanic clouds: A preliminary taxonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, S. N.; Sanduleak, N.

    1982-01-01

    A sample of some 20 early type emission supergiants in the Magellanic clouds was observed with both the SWP and LWR low resolution mode of IUE. All stars have strong H-emission, some showing P-Cygni structure as well with HeI, HeII, FeII and other ions also showing strong emission. It is found that the stars fall into three distinct groups on the basis of the HeII/HeI and HeI/HI strengths: (1) HeII strong, HeI, HI; (2) HeII absent, HeI, HI strong; (3) HeI absent, HI, FeII, FeII, strong in addition to low excitation ions. The two most extreme emission line stars found in the Clouds S 134/LMC and S 18/SMC are discussed. Results for the 2200A feature in these supergiants, and evidence for shells around the most luminous stars in the clouds are also described.

  10. STAR - Research Experiences at National Laboratory Facilities for Pre-Service and Early Career Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, J. M.; Rebar, B.; Buxner, S.

    2012-12-01

    The STEM Teacher and Researcher (STAR) Program provides pre-service and beginning teachers the opportunity to develop identity as both teachers and researchers early in their careers. Founded and implemented by the Center for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education (CESaME) at California Polytechnic State University on behalf of the California State University (CSU) system, STAR provides cutting edge research experiences and career development for students affiliated with the CSU system. Over the past three summers, STAR has also partnered with the NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program to include Noyce Scholars from across the country. Key experiences are one to three summers of paid research experience at federal research facilities associated with the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Anchoring beginning teachers in the research community enhances participant understanding of what it means to be both researchers and effective teachers. Since its inception in 2007, the STAR Program has partnered with 15 national lab facilities to provide 290 research experiences to 230 participants. Several of the 68 STAR Fellows participating in the program during Summer 2012 have submitted abstracts to the Fall AGU Meeting. Through continued partnership with the Noyce Scholar Program and contributions from outside funding sources, the CSU is committed to sustaining the STAR Program in its efforts to significantly impact teacher preparation. Evaluation results from the program continue to indicate program effectiveness in recruiting high quality science and math majors into the teaching profession and impacting their attitudes and beliefs towards the nature of science and teaching through inquiry. Additionally, surveys and interviews are being conducted of participants who are now teaching in the classroom as

  11. An XMM Investigation of Non-Thermal Phenomena in the Winds of Early-Type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The X-ray emission from early-type stars is believed to arise from a stellar wind distribution of shocks. Hence, X-ray analyses of these stars must include the effects of stellar wind X-ray absorption, which, in general dominates the ISM absorption. Although the absorption cross sections for the wind and ISM are essentially identical above 1 keV, there is substantial differences below 1 keV. Typically, if one only uses ISM cross sections to obtain fits to X-ray spectra, the fits usually indicate a model deficiency at energies below 1 keV which is attributed to the large increase in ISM cross sections at these energies. This deficiency can be eliminated by using stellar wind absorption models with a fixed ISM component. Since all early-type stars have substantial X-ray emission below 1 keV, than inclusion of wind absorption has proven to be a critical component in fitting X-ray spectra at low energies, verifying that these X-rays are indeed arising from within the stellar wind.

  12. New radio detections of early-type pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Brown, Alexander; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of VLA radio continuum observations of 13 early-type pre-main-sequence stars selected from the 1984 catalog of Finkenzeller and Mundt are presented. The stars HD 259431 and MWC 1080 were detected at 3.6 cm, while HD 200775 and TY CrA were detected at both 3.6 and 6 cm. The flux density of HD 200775 has a frequency dependence consistent with the behavior expected for free-free emission originating in a fully ionized wind. However, an observation in A configuration suggests that the source geometry may not be spherically symmetric. In contrast, the spectral index of TY CrA is negative with a flux behavior implying nonthermal emission. The physical mechanism responsible for the nonthermal emission has not yet been identified, although gyrosynchrotron and synchrotron processes cannot be ruled out.

  13. Exploring the dusty star-formation in the early Universe using intensity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagache, Guilaine

    2018-05-01

    In the last decade, it has become clear that the dust-enshrouded star formation contributes significantly to early galaxy evolution. Detection of dust is therefore essential in determining the properties of galaxies in the high-redshift universe. This requires observations at the (sub-)millimeter wavelengths. Unfortunately, sensitivity and background confusion of single dish observations on the one hand, and mapping efficiency of interferometers on the other hand, pose unique challenges to observers. One promising route to overcome these difficulties is intensity mapping of fluctuations which exploits the confusion-limited regime and measures the collective light emission from all sources, including unresolved faint galaxies. We discuss in this contribution how 2D and 3D intensity mapping can measure the dusty star formation at high redshift, through the Cosmic Infrared Background (2D) and [CII] fine structure transition (3D) anisotropies.

  14. The star formation history of early-type galaxies as a function of mass and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, M. S.; Bressan, A.; Nikolic, B.; Alexander, P.; Annibali, F.; Rampazzo, R.

    2006-08-01

    Using the third data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we have rigorously defined a volume-limited sample of early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.005 < z <= 0.1. We have defined the density of the local environment for each galaxy using a method which takes account of the redshift bias introduced by survey boundaries if traditional methods are used. At luminosities greater than our absolute r-band magnitude cut-off of -20.45, the mean density of environment shows no trend with redshift. We calculate the Lick indices for the entire sample and correct for aperture effects and velocity dispersion in a model-independent way. Although we find no dependence of redshift or luminosity on environment, we do find that the mean velocity dispersion, σ, of early-type galaxies in dense environments tends to be higher than in low-density environments. Taking account of this effect, we find that several indices show small but very significant trends with environment that are not the result of the correlation between indices and velocity dispersion. The statistical significance of the data is sufficiently high to reveal that models accounting only for α-enhancement struggle to produce a consistent picture of age and metallicity of the sample galaxies, whereas a model that also includes carbon enhancement fares much better. We find that early-type galaxies in the field are younger than those in environments typical of clusters but that neither metallicity, α-enhancement nor carbon enhancement are influenced by the environment. The youngest early-type galaxies in both field and cluster environments are those with the lowest σ. However, there is some evidence that the objects with the largest σ are slightly younger, especially in denser environments. Independent of environment both the metallicity and α-enhancement grow monotonically with σ. This suggests that the typical length of the star formation episodes which formed the stars of early-type galaxies

  15. Water on the Early M Supergiant Stars α Orionis and μ Cephei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.

    2000-08-01

    We reanalyze the spectra of α Ori (M2 Iab) and μ Cep (M2 Ia) observed with the balloon-borne telescope Stratoscope II more than 35 years ago, and we confirm the presence of water in these early M supergiant stars. This identification was first proposed by the Stratoscope observers themselves (Woolf, Schwarzschild, and Rose in 1964; and Danielson, Woolf, and Gaustad in 1965), but this important discovery was overlooked for a long time without any follow-up observation. Consequently, this finding has so far had little influence on the theory of the atmosphere of red supergiant stars. A reason for this may be due to an early criticism by Wing and Spinrad, who suggested CN instead of H2O for the spectral features observed by Stratoscope II. This alternative proposition has more easily been accepted since CN has widely been observed from the Sun to red supergiants, while H2O has been observed only in very cool stars such as Mira variables. In fact, we confirm that the self-consistent photospheric model of the early M supergiants shows CN bands but no H2O band in the near-infrared. Nevertheless, we find that the contribution of CN is only minor and that H2O should be the dominant absorber for the 1.4 and 1.9 μm features on the Stratoscope spectra of α Ori and μ Cep, a conclusion opposite to that of Wing and Spinrad. The observed spectra can best be interpreted by the water gas with the column density of the order of 1020 cm-2 and temperature about 1500+/-500 K, but they cannot be originating in the photosphere. We suggest a possible presence of a gaseous component not as hot as the chromosphere but warmer than the cool expanding envelope. On the other hand, we notice that the mid-infrared pure-rotation lines of H2O recently discovered on Betelgeuse (α Ori) and Antares (α Sco) by Jennings and Sada may partly be originating in the photosphere, even though the larger part should again be nonphotospheric in origin. Thus, the presence of water possibly originating in

  16. Dust-obscured star-forming galaxies in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Lovell, Christopher C.; Thomas, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by recent observational constraints on dust reprocessed emission in star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 6 and above, we use the very large cosmological hydrodynamical simulation BLUETIDES to explore predictions for the amount of dust-obscured star formation in the early Universe (z > 8). BLUETIDES matches current observational constraints on both the UV luminosity function and galaxy stellar mass function and predicts that approximately 90 per cent of the star formation in high-mass (M* > 1010 M⊙) galaxies at z = 8 is already obscured by dust. The relationship between dust attenuation and stellar mass predicted by BLUETIDES is consistent with that observed at lower redshift. However, observations of several individual objects at z > 6 are discrepant with the predictions, though it is possible that their uncertainties may have been underestimated. We find that the predicted surface density of z ≥ 8 submm sources is below that accessible to current Herschel, SCUBA-2 and Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA) submm surveys. However, as ALMA continues to accrue an additional surface area the population of z > 8 dust-obscured galaxies may become accessible in the near future.

  17. The very high rotators in the late-B and early-A stars: Shell stars with Si IV and C IV features the case of HD 119921

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freireferrero, R.; Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Grady, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    Study of several stars in the late B and early A spectral types shows that very high rotators are associated with shell characteristics (sometimes not detected at all in the visible spectra) and also with C IV and some Si IV spectral absorption features which can be explained by circumstellar phenomena superimposed over stellar metallic blends. These particularities are evidenced by comparison with other spectra of low and high rotators in the same spectral range. HD 119921, a star with similar characteristics to the other ones of the sample, is given special attention. A possible scenario is suggested to explain the observed superionization features.

  18. Star formation in early-type galaxies: the role of stellar winds and kinematics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Silvia; Negri, Andrea; Ciotti, Luca

    2015-08-01

    Early-Type galaxies (ETGs) host a hot ISM produced mainly by stellar winds, and heated by Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) and the thermalization of stellar motions. Recent high resolution 2D hydrodynamical simulations (Negri et al. 2014) showed that ordered rotation in the stellar component alters significantly the evolution of the hot ISM, and results in the formation of a centrifugally supported cold equatorial disc. This agrees well with the recent evidence that approximately 50% of massive ETGs host significant quantities of cold gas (Morganti et al. 2006; Young et al. 2014), often in settled configurations, sharing the same kinematics of the stars. In particular, in a systematic investigation of the ATLAS3D sample, the most massive fast-rotating ETGs always have kinematically aligned gas, which suggests an internal origin for it, and molecular gas is detected only in fast rotators (Davis et al. 2011). The observed cold gas seems also to provide material for low level star formation (SF) activity (Combes et al. 2007, Davis et al. 2014). Interestingly, in the ATLAS3D sample, SF and young stellar populations are detected only in fast rotators (Sarzi et al. 2013). In a recent work we investigated whether and how SF takes place in the cold gas disc typically produced in rotating ETGs by our previous 2D simulations, by adding to them the possibility for the gas to form stars (Negri et al. 2015). We also inserted the injection of mass, momentum and energy appropriate for the newly (and continuously) forming stellar population. We found that subsequent generations of stars are formed, and that most of the extended and massive cold disc is consumed by this process, leaving at the present epoch cold gas masses that compare well with those observed. The mass in secondary generations of stars resides mostly in a disc, and could be related to a younger, more metal rich disky stellar component indeed observed in fast rotator ETGs (Cappellari et al. 2013). Most of the mass in

  19. Chromospherically active stars. IV - HD 178450 = V478 Lyr: An early-type BY Draconis type binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the variable star HD 178450 = V478 Lyr is a chromospherically active G8 V single-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 2.130514 days. This star is characterized by strong UV emission features and a filled-in H-alpha absorption line which is variable in strength. Classified as an early-type BY Draconis system, it is similar to the BY Dra star HD 175742 = V775 Her. The unseen secondary of HD 178450 has a mass of about 0.3 solar masses and is believed to be an M2-M3 dwarf.

  20. Identifying Massive Runaway Stars by Detecting Infrared Bowshock Nebula: Four OB Stars and a New Massive Early-B Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorber, Rebecca L.; Rebecca L. Sorber, Henry A. Kobulnicky, Daniel A. Dale, Matthew S. Povich, William T. Chick, Heather N. Wernke, Julian E. Andrews, Stephan Munari, Grace M. Olivier, Danielle Schurhammer

    2016-01-01

    Though the main sequence evolution of OB type stars is relatively well known, the mass loss rates for these stars are still highly uncertain. Some OB stars are gravitationally ejected from their birth sites, traveling at speeds of 30 km/s or more which results in a prominent bowshock nebulae. We identified OB bowshock candidates at low Galactic latitudes by visual inspection of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) 22-micron images. Each candidate was observed using the Longslit Spectrograph at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) 2.3 meter telescope. We present here the results from observing four such candidates, and all four are confirmed as early type stars: GO92.3191+0.0591 (B1V) (aka ALS11826), GO86.551014-1.0873935 (B2V; a probable short-period binary), G076.6921-2.4071 (B5V), and G075.5711-0.2558 (B0V) (aka HD 194303). These results enlarge the sample of candidate runaway massive stars hosting bowshocks and provide a promising sample of such objects for studying stellar mass loss. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation Grants AST-1063146 (REU), AST-1411851 (RUI), and AST-1412845.

  1. Early Results from Star Date: M83 - A Citizen Science Project to Age Date Star Clusters in the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heartley, Jeremy; Whitmore, B. C.; Blair, W. P.; Christian, C. A.; Donaldson, T.; Hammer, D.; Smith, S.; Viana, A.

    2014-01-01

    The M83 Citizen Science Project is a collaborative effort currently in development between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and Zooniverse under the guidance of Dr. Brad Whitmore as part of Cy 19 proposal 12513 (PI - Dr. William Blair). This unique citizen science project will allow users to analyze individual star clusters within The Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, M83. The project will show users color-composite images taken with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ask them to estimate the age of the star cluster. Through a multistage process, the project will educate and familiarize the user with the appearance of each age category based on the presence and shape of H-alpha emission, degree of resolution of the individual stars, and color of the cluster. (Whitmore et al. 2011). Additionally, the project will involve the actual measurement of the star cluster and H-alpha cloud radii to be used for further assessment and reinforcement of age. The data from this project and the statistics it yields will quantify these ages which can then be used to inform the debate between universal and environmental models of star cluster formation and destruction in galaxies. The tentative launch date is December 2013, therefore early results should be available at the time of the conference.

  2. Chemical characterization of the early evolutionary phases of high-mass star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerner, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is a very complex process and up to date no comprehensive theory about it exists. This thesis studies the early stages of high-mass star-forming regions and employs astrochemistry as a tool to probe their different physical conditions. We split the evolutionary sequence into four observationally motivated stages that are based on a classification proposed in the literature. The sequence is characterized by an increase of the temperatures and densities that strongly influences the chemistry in the different stages. We observed a sample of 59 high-mass star-forming regions that cover the whole sequence and statistically characterized the chemical compositions of the different stages. We determined average column densities of 18 different molecular species and found generally increasing abundances with stage. We fitted them for each stage with a 1D model, such that the result of the best fit to the previous stage was used as new input for the following. This is a unique approach and allowed us to infer physical properties like the temperature and density structure and yielded a typical chemical lifetime for the high-mass star-formation process of 1e5 years. The 18 analyzed molecular species also included four deuterated molecules whose chemistry is particularly sensitive to thermal history and thus is a promising tool to infer chemical ages. We found decreasing trends of the D/H ratios with evolutionary stage for 3 of the 4 molecular species and that the D/H ratio depends more on the fraction of warm and cold gas than on the total amount of gas. That indicates different chemical pathways for the different molecules and confirms the potential use of deuterated species as chemical age indicators. In addition, we mapped a low-mass star forming region in order to study the cosmic ray ionization rate, which is an important parameter in chemical models. While in chemical models it is commonly fixed, we found that it ! strongly varies with

  3. Early spectra of the gravitational wave source GW170817: Evolution of a neutron star merger.

    PubMed

    Shappee, B J; Simon, J D; Drout, M R; Piro, A L; Morrell, N; Prieto, J L; Kasen, D; Holoien, T W-S; Kollmeier, J A; Kelson, D D; Coulter, D A; Foley, R J; Kilpatrick, C D; Siebert, M R; Madore, B F; Murguia-Berthier, A; Pan, Y-C; Prochaska, J X; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rest, A; Adams, C; Alatalo, K; Bañados, E; Baughman, J; Bernstein, R A; Bitsakis, T; Boutsia, K; Bravo, J R; Di Mille, F; Higgs, C R; Ji, A P; Maravelias, G; Marshall, J L; Placco, V M; Prieto, G; Wan, Z

    2017-12-22

    On 17 August 2017, Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) was discovered as the optical counterpart of the binary neutron star gravitational wave event GW170817. We report time-series spectroscopy of SSS17a from 11.75 hours until 8.5 days after the merger. Over the first hour of observations, the ejecta rapidly expanded and cooled. Applying blackbody fits to the spectra, we measured the photosphere cooling from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] kelvin, and determined a photospheric velocity of roughly 30% of the speed of light. The spectra of SSS17a began displaying broad features after 1.46 days and evolved qualitatively over each subsequent day, with distinct blue (early-time) and red (late-time) components. The late-time component is consistent with theoretical models of r-process-enriched neutron star ejecta, whereas the blue component requires high-velocity, lanthanide-free material. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Long-orbital-period Prepolars Containing Early K-type Donor Stars. Bottleneck Accretion Mechanism in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovmassian, G.; González–Buitrago, D.; Zharikov, S.; Reichart, D. E.; Haislip, J. B.; Ivarsen, K. M.; LaCluyze, A. P.; Moore, J. P.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    We studied two objects identified as cataclysmic variables (CVs) with periods exceeding the natural boundary for Roche-lobe-filling zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) secondary stars. We present observational results for V1082 Sgr with a 20.82 hr orbital period, an object that shows a low luminosity state when its flux is totally dominated by a chromospherically active K star with no signs of ongoing accretion. Frequent accretion shutoffs, together with characteristics of emission lines in a high state, indicate that this binary system is probably detached, and the accretion of matter on the magnetic white dwarf takes place through stellar wind from the active donor star via coupled magnetic fields. Its observational characteristics are surprisingly similar to V479 And, a 14.5 hr binary system. They both have early K-type stars as donor stars. We argue that, similar to the shorter-period prepolars containing M dwarfs, these are detached binaries with strong magnetic components. Their magnetic fields are coupled, allowing enhanced stellar wind from the K star to be captured and channeled through the bottleneck connecting the two stars onto the white dwarf’s magnetic pole, mimicking a magnetic CV. Hence, they become interactive binaries before they reach contact. This will help to explain an unexpected lack of systems possessing white dwarfs with strong magnetic fields among detached white+red dwarf systems.

  5. The ATLAS3D Project - XXX. Star formation histories and stellar population scaling relations of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-04-01

    We present the stellar population content of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey. Using spectra integrated within apertures covering up to one effective radius, we apply two methods: one based on measuring line-strength indices and applying single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement; and one based on spectral fitting to derive non-parametric star formation histories, mass-weighted average values of age, metallicity, and half-mass formation time-scales. Using homogeneously derived effective radii and dynamically determined galaxy masses, we present the distribution of stellar population parameters on the Mass Plane (MJAM, σe, R^maj_e), showing that at fixed mass, compact early-type galaxies are on average older, more metal-rich, and more alpha-enhanced than their larger counterparts. From non-parametric star formation histories, we find that the duration of star formation is systematically more extended in lower mass objects. Assuming that our sample represents most of the stellar content of today's local Universe, approximately 50 per cent of all stars formed within the first 2 Gyr following the big bang. Most of these stars reside today in the most massive galaxies (>1010.5 M⊙), which themselves formed 90 per cent of their stars by z ˜ 2. The lower mass objects, in contrast, have formed barely half their stars in this time interval. Stellar population properties are independent of environment over two orders of magnitude in local density, varying only with galaxy mass. In the highest density regions of our volume (dominated by the Virgo cluster), galaxies are older, alpha-enhanced, and have shorter star formation histories with respect to lower density regions.

  6. Low-mass galaxy assembly in simulations: regulation of early star formation by radiation from massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Klypin, Anatoly; Colín, Pedro; Ceverino, Daniel; Arraki, Kenza S.; Primack, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent success in forming realistic present-day galaxies, simulations still form the bulk of their stars earlier than observations indicate. We investigate the process of stellar mass assembly in low-mass field galaxies, a dwarf and a typical spiral, focusing on the effects of radiation from young stellar clusters on the star formation (SF) histories. We implement a novel model of SF with a deterministic low efficiency per free-fall time, as observed in molecular clouds. Stellar feedback is based on observations of star-forming regions, and includes radiation pressure from massive stars, photoheating in H II regions, supernovae and stellar winds. We find that stellar radiation has a strong effect on the formation of low-mass galaxies, especially at z > 1, where it efficiently suppresses SF by dispersing cold and dense gas, preventing runaway growth of the stellar component. This behaviour is evident in a variety of observations but had so far eluded analytical and numerical models without radiation feedback. Compared to supernovae alone, radiation feedback reduces the SF rate by a factor of ˜100 at z ≲ 2, yielding rising SF histories which reproduce recent observations of Local Group dwarfs. Stellar radiation also produces bulgeless spiral galaxies and may be responsible for excess thickening of the stellar disc. The galaxies also feature rotation curves and baryon fractions in excellent agreement with current data. Lastly, the dwarf galaxy shows a very slow reduction of the central dark matter density caused by radiation feedback over the last ˜7 Gyr of cosmic evolution.

  7. Embedded Filaments in IRAS 05463+2652: Early Stage of Fragmentation and Star Formation Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Devaraj, R.; Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.

    2017-10-01

    We present a multiwavelength data analysis of IRAS 05463+2652 (hereafter I05463+2652) to study star formation mechanisms. A shell-like structure around I05463+2652 is evident in the Herschel column density map, which is not associated with any ionized emission. Based on the Herschel submillimeter images, several parsec-scale filaments (including two elongated filaments, “s-fl” and “nw-fl” having lengths of ˜6.4 and ˜8.8 pc, respectively) are investigated in the I05463+2652 site. The Herschel temperature map depicts all these features in a temperature range of ˜11-13 K. 39 clumps are identified and have masses between ˜ 70{--}945 {M}⊙ . The majority of clumps (having {M}{clump}≳ 300 {M}⊙ ) are distributed toward the shell-like structure. 175 young stellar objects (YSOs) are selected using the photometric 1-5 μm data and a majority of these YSOs are distributed toward the four areas of high column density (≳ 5× {10}21 cm-2 A V ˜ 5.3 mag) in the shell-like structure, where massive clumps and a spatial association with filament(s) are also observed. The knowledge of observed masses per unit length of elongated filaments and critical mass length reveals that they are supercritical. The filament “nw-fl” is fragmented into five clumps (having {M}{clump}˜ 100{--}545 {M}⊙ ) and contains noticeable YSOs, while the other filament “s-fl” is fragmented into two clumps (having {M}{clump}˜ 170{--}215 {M}⊙ ) without YSOs. Together, these observational results favor the role of filaments in the star formation process in I05480+2545. This study also reveals the filament “s-fl,” containing two starless clumps, at an early stage of fragmentation.

  8. Concurrent formation of supermassive stars and globular clusters: implications for early self-enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieles, Mark; Charbonnel, Corinne; Krause, Martin G. H.; Hénault-Brunet, Vincent; Agertz, Oscar; Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.; Bastian, Nathan; Gualandris, Alessia; Zocchi, Alice; Petts, James A.

    2018-04-01

    We present a model for the concurrent formation of globular clusters (GCs) and supermassive stars (SMSs, ≳ 103 M⊙) to address the origin of the HeCNONaMgAl abundance anomalies in GCs. GCs form in converging gas flows and accumulate low-angular momentum gas, which accretes onto protostars. This leads to an adiabatic contraction of the cluster and an increase of the stellar collision rate. A SMS can form via runaway collisions if the cluster reaches sufficiently high density before two-body relaxation halts the contraction. This condition is met if the number of stars ≳ 106 and the gas accretion rate ≳ 105 M⊙/Myr, reminiscent of GC formation in high gas-density environments, such as - but not restricted to - the early Universe. The strong SMS wind mixes with the inflowing pristine gas, such that the protostars accrete diluted hot-hydrogen burning yields of the SMS. Because of continuous rejuvenation, the amount of processed material liberated by the SMS can be an order of magnitude higher than its maximum mass. This `conveyor-belt' production of hot-hydrogen burning products provides a solution to the mass budget problem that plagues other scenarios. Additionally, the liberated material is mildly enriched in helium and relatively rich in other hot-hydrogen burning products, in agreement with abundances of GCs today. Finally, we find a super-linear scaling between the amount of processed material and cluster mass, providing an explanation for the observed increase of the fraction of processed material with GC mass. We discuss open questions of this new GC enrichment scenario and propose observational tests.

  9. The Abundances of the Fe Group Elements in Early B Stars in the Magellanic Clouds and Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine J.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2016-01-01

    The abundances of three Fe Group elements (V, Cr, and Fe) in 9 early main-sequence band B stars in the LMC, 7 in the SMC , and two in the Magellanic Bridge have been determined from archival FUSE observations and the Hubeny/Lanz NLTE programs TLUSTY/SYNSPEC. Lines from the Fe group elements, except for a few weak multiplets of Fe III, are not observable in the optical spectral region. The best set of lines in the FUSE spectral region are Fe III (UV1), V III 1150 Å, and Cr III 1137 Å. The abundances of these elements in early B stars are a marker for recent SNe Ia activity, as a single exploding white dwarf can deliver 0.5 solar masses of Ni-56 that decays into Fe to the ISM. The Fe group abundances in an older population of stars primarily reflect SNe II activity, in which a single explosion delivers only 0.07 solar masses of Ni-56 to the ISM (the rest remains trapped in the neutron star). The abundances of the Fe group elements in early B stars not only track SNe Ia activity but are also important for computing evolutionary tracks for massive stars. In general, the Fe abundance relative to the sun's value is comparable to the mean abundances for the lighter elements in the Clouds/Bridge but the values of [V,Cr/Fe]sun are smaller. This presentation will discuss the spatial distribution of the Fe Group elements in the Magellanic Clouds, and compare it with our galaxy in which the abundance of Fe declines with radial distance from the center. Support from NASA grants NAG5-13212, NNX10AD66G, STScI HST-GO-13346.22, and USC's Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) program is greatly appreciated.

  10. Heavy element synthesis in the oldest stars and the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Cowan, John J; Sneden, Christopher

    2006-04-27

    The first stars in the Universe were probably quite different from those born today. Composed almost entirely of hydrogen and helium (plus a tiny trace of lithium), they lacked the heavier elements that determine the formation and evolution of younger stars. Although we cannot observe the very first stars--they died long ago in supernovae explosions--they created heavy elements that were incorporated into the next generation. Here we describe how observations of heavy elements in the oldest surviving stars in our Galaxy's halo help us understand the nature of the first stars--those responsible for the chemical enrichment of our Galaxy and Universe.

  11. A survey of interstellar neutral potassium. I - Abundances and physical conditions in clouds toward 188 early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaffee, F. H., Jr.; White, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of interstellar absorption in the resonance doublet 7664, 7698 A of neutral potassium toward 188 early-type stars at a spectral resolution of 8 km/s are reported. The 7664 A line is successfully separated from nearly coincident telluric O2 absorption for all but a few of the 165 stars for which K I absorption is detected, making possible an abundance analysis by the doublet ratio method. The relationships between the potassium abundances and other atomic abundances, the abundance of molecular hydrogen, and interstellar reddening are investigated.

  12. Evidence for Different Disk Mass Distributions between Early- and Late-type Be Stars in the BeSOS Survey

    SciT

    Arcos, C.; Kanaan, S.; Curé, M.

    The circumstellar disk density distributions for a sample of 63 Be southern stars from the BeSOS survey were found by modeling their H α emission line profiles. These disk densities were used to compute disk masses and disk angular momenta for the sample. Average values for the disk mass are 3.4 × 10{sup −9} and 9.5 × 10{sup −10} M {sub ⋆} for early (B0–B3) and late (B4–B9) spectral types, respectively. We also find that the range of disk angular momentum relative to the star is (150–200) J {sub ⋆}/ M {sub ⋆} and (100–150) J {sub ⋆}/ M {submore » ⋆}, again for early- and late-type Be stars, respectively. The distributions of the disk mass and disk angular momentum are different between early- and late-type Be stars at a 1% level of significance. Finally, we construct the disk mass distribution for the BeSOS sample as a function of spectral type and compare it to the predictions of stellar evolutionary models with rapid rotation. The observed disk masses are typically larger than the theoretical predictions, although the observed spread in disk masses is typically large.« less

  13. ALE OF TWO CLUSTERS YIELDS SECRETS OF STAR BIRTH IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image shows rich detail, previously only seen in neighboring star birth regions, in a pair of star clusters 166,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), in the southern constellation Doradus. The field of view is 130 light-years across and was taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. HST's unique capabilities -- ultraviolet sensitivity, ability to see faint stars, and high resolution -- have been utilized fully to identify three separate populations in this concentration of nearly 10,000 stars down to the 25th magnitude (more that twice as many as can be seen over the entire sky with the naked eye on a clear night on Earth). The field of view is only 130 light-years across. Previous observations with ground-based telescopes resolve less than 1,000 stars in the same region. About 60 percent of the stars belong to the dominant yellow cluster called NGC 1850, which is estimated to be 50 million years old. A scattering of white stars in the image are massive stars that are only about 4 million years old and represent about 20 percent of the stars in the image. (The remainder are field stars in the LMC.) Besides being much younger, the white stars are much more loosely distributed than the yellow cluster. The significant difference between the two cluster ages suggests these are two separate star groups that lie along the same line of sight. The younger, more open cluster probably lies 200 light-years beyond the older cluster. If it were in the foreground, then dust contained in the white cluster would obscure stars in the older yellow cluster. To observe two well-defined star populations separated by such a small gap of space is unusual. This juxtaposition suggests that supernova explosions in the older cluster might have triggered the birth of the younger cluster. This color composite image is assembled from exposures taken in ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared light. Yellow stars correspond to Main

  14. Extended main sequence turnoffs in intermediate-age star clusters: a correlation between turnoff width and early escape velocity

    SciT

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Kalirai, Jason S.

    2014-12-10

    We present a color-magnitude diagram analysis of deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a mass-limited sample of 18 intermediate-age (1-2 Gyr old) star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, including eight clusters for which new data were obtained. We find that all star clusters in our sample feature extended main-sequence turnoff (eMSTO) regions that are wider than can be accounted for by a simple stellar population (including unresolved binary stars). FWHM widths of the MSTOs indicate age spreads of 200-550 Myr. We evaluate the dynamical evolution of clusters with and without initial mass segregation. Our main results are (1) the fractionmore » of red clump (RC) stars in secondary RCs in eMSTO clusters scales with the fraction of MSTO stars having pseudo-ages of ≲1.35 Gyr; (2) the width of the pseudo-age distributions of eMSTO clusters is correlated with their central escape velocity v {sub esc}, both currently and at an age of 10 Myr. We find that these two results are unlikely to be reproduced by the effects of interactive binary stars or a range of stellar rotation velocities. We therefore argue that the eMSTO phenomenon is mainly caused by extended star formation within the clusters; and (3) we find that v {sub esc} ≥ 15 km s{sup –1} out to ages of at least 100 Myr for all clusters featuring eMSTOs, and v {sub esc} ≤ 12 km s{sup –1} at all ages for two lower-mass clusters in the same age range that do not show eMSTOs. We argue that eMSTOs only occur for clusters whose early escape velocities are higher than the wind velocities of stars that provide material from which second-generation stars can form. The threshold of 12-15 km s{sup –1} is consistent with wind velocities of intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars and massive binary stars in the literature.« less

  15. UIT Observations of Early-Type Galaxies and Analysis of the FUSE Spectrum of a Subdwarf B Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work covers Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) observations of early-type galaxies (155 nm) and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of a Galactic subdwarf B star (sdB). Early UV space astronomy missions revealed that early-type galaxies harbor a population of stars with effective temperatures greater than that of the main sequence turn-off (about 6,000 K) and UV emission that is very sensitive to characteristics of the stellar population. We present UV (155 nm) surface photometry and UV-B color profiles for 8 E and SO galaxies observed by UIT. Some objects have de Vaucouleurs surface brightness profiles, while others have disk-like profiles, but we find no other evidence for the presence of a disk or young, massive stars. There is a wide range of UV-B color gradients, but there is no correlation with metallicity gradients. SdB stars are the leading candidate UV emitters in old, high metallicity stellar populations (e.g., early-type galaxies). We observed the Galactic sdB star PG0749+658 with FUSE and derived abundances with the aim of constraining models of the heavy element distribution in sdB atmospheres. All of the elements measured are depleted with respect to solar, except for Cr and Mn, which are about solar, and Ni, which is enhanced. This work was supported in part by NASA grants NAG5-700 and NAG5-6403 to the University of Virginia and NAS5-32985 to Johns Hopkins University.

  16. Two-dimensional models of early-type fast rotating stars: the ESTER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, Michel

    In this talk I present the latest results of the ESTER project that has taken up the challenge of building two dimensional (axisymmetric) models of stars rotating at any rotation rate. In particular, I focus on main sequence massive and intermediate mass stars. I show what should be expected in such stars as far as the differential rotation and the associated meridional circulation are concerned, notably the emergence of a Stewartson layer along the tangent cylinder of the core. I also indicate what may be inferred about the evolution of an intermediate-mass star at constant angular momentum and how Be stars may form. I finally give some comparisons between models and observations of the gravity darkening on some nearby fast rotators as it has been derived from interferometric observations. In passing, I also discuss how 2D models can help to recover the fundamental parameters of a star.

  17. Spectral classification with the International Ultraviolet Explorer: An atlas of B-type spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rountree, Janet; Sonneborn, George

    1993-01-01

    New criteria for the spectral classification of B stars in the ultraviolet show that photospheric absorption lines in the 1200-1900A wavelength region can be used to classify the spectra of B-type dwarfs, subgiants, and giants on a 2-D system consistent with the optical MK system. This atlas illustrates a large number of such spectra at the scale used for classification. These spectra provide a dense matrix of standard stars, and also show the effects of rapid stellar rotation and stellar winds on the spectra and their classification. The observational material consists of high-dispersion spectra from the International Ultraviolet Explorer archives, resampled to a resolution of 0.25 A, uniformly normalized, and plotted at 10 A/cm. The atlas should be useful for the classification of other IUE high-dispersion spectra, especially for stars that have not been observed in the optical.

  18. Spiral-like star-forming patterns in CALIFA early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Vílchez, J. M.; Kehrig, C.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Breda, I.; Lehnert, M. D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Ziegler, B.; Dos Reis, S. N.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Bomans, D. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Walcher, C. J.; García-Benito, R.; Márquez, I.; Del Olmo, A.; Mollá, M.; Marino, R. A.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Based on a combined analysis of SDSS imaging and CALIFA integral field spectroscopy data, we report on the detection of faint (24 <μr mag/□″< 26) star-forming spiral-arm-like features in the periphery of three nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs). These features are of considerable interest because they document the still ongoing inside-out growth of some local ETGs and may add valuable observational insight into the origin and evolution of spiral structure in triaxial stellar systems. A characteristic property of the nebular component in the studied ETGs, classified I+, is a two-radial-zone structure, with the inner zone that displays faint (EW(Hα) ≃ 1 Å) low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) properties, and the outer one (3 Å

  19. Probing Minor-merger-driven Star Formation In Early-type Galaxies Using Spatially-resolved Spectro-photometric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviraj, Sugata; Crockett, M.; Silk, J.; O'Connell, R. W.; Whitmore, B.; Windhorst, R.; Cappellari, M.; Bureau, M.; Davies, R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies that leverage the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum have revealed widespread recent star formation in early-type galaxies (ETGs), traditionally considered to be old, passively-evolving systems. This recent star formation builds 20% of the ETG stellar mass after z 1, driven by repeated minor mergers between ETGs and small, gas-rich satellites. We demonstrate how spatially-resolved studies, using a combination of high-resolution UV-optical imaging and integral-field spectroscopy (IFS), is a powerful tool to quantify the assembly history of individual ETGs and elucidate the poorly-understood minor-merger process. Using a combination of WFC3 UV-optical (2500-8200 angstroms) imaging and IFS from the SAURON project of the ETG NGC 4150, we show that this galaxy experienced a merger with mass ratio 1:15 around 0.9 Gyr ago, which formed 3% of its stellar mass and a young kinematically-decoupled core. A UV-optical analysis of its globular cluster system shows that the bulk of the stars locked up in these clusters likely formed 6-7 Gyrs in the past. We introduce a new HST-WFC3 programme, approved in Cycle 19, which will leverage similar UV-optical imaging of a representative sample of nearby ETGs from SAURON to study the recent star formation and its drivers in unprecedented detail and put definitive constraints on minor-merger-driven star formation in massive galaxies at late epochs.

  20. The Abundances of the Fe Group Elements in Early B Stars in the Magellanic Clouds and Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine Joan; Adelman, Saul Joseph

    2015-08-01

    The abundances of the Fe-peak elements (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni) are of interest as they are important for assessing opacities for stellar evolution calculations, confirming theoretical calculations of explosive nucleosynthesis, and inferring the past history of supernova activity in a galaxy. FUSE FUV spectra of early B stars in the LMC and SMC and HST/STIS FUV/NUV spectra of nearby B stars in our galaxy are analyzed with the Hubeny/Lanz programs TLUSTY/SYNSPEC to determine abundance for the Fe group elements and produce a map of these abundances in the Magellanic Clouds (MC) and Magellanic Bridge (MB). Except for four weak multiplets of Fe III there are no measurable lines from the Fe group in the optical region. The Fe group species found in the FUV spectra of early B stars are primarily in the second stage of ionization. The best set of lines in the FUSE spectral region are Fe III (UV1), V III 1150 Å, and Cr III 1137 Å. Analysis of the galactic B stars provides a good assessment of the reliability of the atomic parameters that are used for the MC calculations. Twenty-two early B stars in the MC and MB and five in our galaxy were analyzed. In general the Fe group abundances range from solar to slightly below solar in our region of the galaxy. But in the MCs the abundances of V, Cr, and Fe tend to be significantly lower than the mean metal abundances for the galaxy. Maps of the Fe group abundances and their variations in the LMC and SMC, tracers of recent enrichment of the ISM from supernova activity, are shown. Support from NASA grants NAG5-13212, NNX10AD66G, STScI HST-GO-13346.22, and USC’s Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) program is greatly appreciated.

  1. uvbyβ photometry of early type open cluster and field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handler, G.

    2011-04-01

    Context. The β Cephei stars and slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars are massive main sequence variables. The strength of their pulsational driving strongly depends on the opacity of iron-group elements. As many of those stars naturally occur in young open clusters, whose metallicities can be determined in several fundamental ways, it is logical to study the incidence of pulsation in several young open clusters. Aims: To provide the foundation for such an investigation, Strömgren-Crawford uvbyβ photometry of open cluster target stars was carried out to determine effective temperatures, luminosities, and therefore cluster memberships. Methods: In the course of three observing runs, uvbyβ photometry for 168 target stars was acquired and transformed into the standard system by measurements of 117 standard stars. The list of target stars also included some known cluster and field β Cephei stars, as well as β Cephei and SPB candidates that are targets of the asteroseismic part of the Kepler satellite mission. Results: The uvbyβ photometric results are presented. The data are shown to be on the standard system, and the properties of the target stars are discussed: 140 of these are indeed OB stars, a total of 101 targets lie within the β Cephei and/or SPB star instability strips, and each investigated cluster contains such potential pulsators. Conclusions: These measurements will be taken advantage of in a number of subsequent publications. Based on measurements obtained at McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas at Austin.Tables 3-6 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/528/A148

  2. GHRS observations and theoretical modeling of early type stars in R136a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Koter, A.; Heap, S.; Hubeny, I.; Lanz, T.; Hutchings, J.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Maran, S.; Schmutz, W.

    1994-05-01

    We present the first spectroscopic observations of individual stars in R136a, the most dense part of the starburst cluster 30 Doradus in the LMC. Spectra of two stars are scheduled to be obtained with the GHRS on board the HST: R136a5, the brightest of the complex and R136a2, a Wolf-Rayet star of type WN. The 30 Doradus cluster is the only starburst region in which individual stars can be studied. Therefore, quantitative knowledge of the basic stellar parameters will yield valuable insight into the formation of massive stars in starbursts and into their subsequent evolution. Detailed modeling of the structure of the atmosphere and wind of these stars will also lead to a better understanding of the mechanism(s) that govern their dynamics. We present the first results of our detailed quantitative spectral analysis using state-of-the-art non-LTE model atmospheres for stars with extended and expanding atmospheres. The models are computed using the Improved-Sobolev Approximation wind code (ISA-WIND) of de Koter, Schmutz & Lamers (1993, A&A 277, 561), which has been extended to include C, N and Si. Our model computations are not based on the core-halo approximation, but use a unified treatment of the photosphere and wind. This approach is essential for Wolf-Rayet stars. Our synthetic spectra, dominated by the P Cygni profiles of the UV resonance lines, also account for the numerous weak metal lines of photospheric origin.

  3. THE O- AND B-TYPE STELLAR POPULATION IN W3: BEYOND THE HIGH-DENSITY LAYER

    SciT

    Kiminki, Megan M.; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Bagley, Micaela B.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results from our survey of the star-forming complex W3, combining VRI photometry with multiobject spectroscopy to identify and characterize the high-mass stellar population across the region. With 79 new spectral classifications, we bring the total number of spectroscopically confirmed O- and B-type stars in W3 to 105. We find that the high-mass slope of the mass function in W3 is consistent with a Salpeter IMF, and that the extinction toward the region is best characterized by an R{sub V} of approximately 3.6. B-type stars are found to be more widely dispersed across the W3 giant molecularmore » cloud (GMC) than previously realized: they are not confined to the high-density layer (HDL) created by the expansion of the neighboring W4 H ii region into the GMC. This broader B-type population suggests that star formation in W3 began spontaneously up to 8–10 Myr ago, although at a lower level than the more recent star formation episodes in the HDL. In addition, we describe a method of optimizing sky subtraction for fiber spectra in regions of strong and spatially variable nebular emission.« less

  4. A Rare Early-type Star Revealed in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. J.; Hainich, R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Hamann, W.-R.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Todt, H.

    2012-07-01

    Sk 183 is the visually brightest star in the N90 nebula, a young star-forming region in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We present new optical spectroscopy from the Very Large Telescope which reveals Sk 183 to be one of the most massive O-type stars in the SMC. Classified as an O3-type dwarf on the basis of its nitrogen spectrum, the star also displays broadened He I absorption, which suggests a later type. We propose that Sk 183 has a composite spectrum and that it is similar to another star in the SMC, MPG 324. This brings the number of rare O2- and O3-type stars known in the whole of the SMC to a mere four. We estimate physical parameters for Sk 183 from analysis of its spectrum. For a single-star model, we estimate an effective temperature of 46 ± 2 kK, a low mass-loss rate of ~10-7 M ⊙ yr-1, and a spectroscopic mass of 46+9 -8 M ⊙ (for an adopted distance modulus of 18.7 mag to the young population in the SMC Wing). An illustrative binary model requires a slightly hotter temperature (~47.5 kK) for the primary component. In either scenario, Sk 183 is the earliest-type star known in N90 and will therefore be the dominant source of hydrogen-ionizing photons. This suggests Sk 183 is the primary influence on the star formation along the inner edge of the nebula.

  5. Empirical effective temperatures and bolometric corrections for early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Code, A. D.; Bless, R. C.; Davis, J.; Brown, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    An empirical effective temperature for a star can be found by measuring its apparent angular diameter and absolute flux distribution. The angular diameters of 32 bright stars in the spectral range O5f to F8 have recently been measured with the stellar interferometer at Narrabri Observatory, and their absolute flux distributions have been found by combining observations of ultraviolet flux from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-2) with ground-based photometry. In this paper, these data have been combined to derive empirical effective temperatures and bolometric corrections for these 32 stars.

  6. Amino-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and B-Type Natriuretic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    McKie, Paul M.; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Martin, Fernando L.; Urban, Lynn H.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Jacobsen, Steven J.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies report that, in the absence of heart failure and renal failure, plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has prognostic value for mortality. We sought to confirm and extend these previous studies to assess BNP, measured by 3 distinct assays, as a biomarker for mortality in a strategy to enhance efforts at primary prevention and to better understand the clinical phenotype of such subjects at risk. We used a community-based cohort of 2042 subjects from Olmsted County, Minn, and individuals with heart or renal failure were excluded. BNP was assessed using 3 assays including Biosite and Shionogi for mature, biologically active BNP and the Roche assay for apparently nonbiologically active amino-terminal pro-BNP (NT-proBNP). Thorough echocardiographic and clinical data were recorded for all of the participants. Median follow-up for mortality was 5.6 years. BNP by all 3 of the assays was predictive of mortality. NT-proBNP and Biosite assays remained significant even after adjustment for traditional clinical risk factors and echocardiographic abnormalities including left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Echocardiography documented widespread structural changes in those with increasing BNP levels yet below levels observed in heart failure. We report in a large, well-characterized community-based cohort, free of heart failure, the first study to compare 3 distinct BNP assays as biomarkers for mortality in the same cohort. Our findings confirm the potential use of NT-proBNP and BNP biomarkers for future events and underscore that these peptides may also serve as biomarkers for underlying cardiac remodeling secondary to diverse cardiovascular disease entities. PMID:16585413

  7. Neutron-captures in Low Mass Stars and the Early Solar System Record of Short-lived Radioactivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busso, Maurizio; Vescovi, Diego; Trippella, Oscar; Palmerini, Sara; Cristallo, Sergio; Piersanti, Luciano

    2018-01-01

    Noticeable improvements were recently introduced in the modelling of n-capture nucleosynthesis in the advanced evolutionary stages of giant stars (Asymptotic Giant Branch, or AGB, stars). Two such improvements are closely linked together and concern the introduction of non-parameterized, physical models for extended mixing processes and the adoption of accurate reaction rates for H- and He-burning reactions, including the one for the main neutron source 13C(α,n)16O. These improvements profited of a longstanding collaboration between stellar physicists and C. Spitaleri's team and of his seminal work both as a leader in the Nuclear Astrophysics scenario and as a talent-scout in the recruitment of young researchers in the field. We present an example of the innovative results that can be obtained thanks to the novelties introduced, by estimating the contributions from a nearby AGB star to the synthesis of short-lived (t1/2 ≤ 10 Myr) radioactive nuclei which were alive in early Solar System condensates. We find that the scenario indicating an AGB star as the source of such radioactivities, discussed for many years by researchers in this field, appears now to be no longer viable, when the mentioned improvements of AGB models and nuclear parameters are considered.

  8. The Abundances of the Fe Group Elements in Three Early B Stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, G. J.; Adelman, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    The photospheric abundances of V, Cr, and Fe have been determined for three sharp-lined early B stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud using FUV spectra obtained from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and the Kurucz LTE model atmosphere/spectrum synthesis codes ATLAS9/SYNTHE. The program stars include NGC1818/D1, NGC2004/B15, and NGC2004/B30 (star designations are from Robertson 1974, A&AS, 15, 261). The calculations were carried through with model parameters close to those adopted by Korn et al. (2000, A&A, 353, 655). Values of Teff, log g, ξ T, and v sin I are 25000/4.0/0/30, 20000/3.1/6/25, and 23500/3.3/14/30 for NGC1818/D1, NGC2004/B15, and NGC2004/B30, respectively. The abundances quoted below are in sequence for the latter stars. The vanadium abundances, [V/H], determined from V III λ λ 1150,1152 (UV 2), are -0.6, -0.9, and -0.9 dex. Cr was determined from Cr III λ λ 1118,1136. Values of -0.5, -0.8, and -0.7 dex were found. Uncertainties in the V and Cr abundances are ˜0.3 dex. The Fe abundance is primarily from 7 lines of Fe III (UV 1) in the region λ λ 1122-32. Values are -0.8±0.3, ˜-1.1, and -0.4±0.3. Since there is no evidence for N enhancement in the program stars ([N/H] ˜ -0.9, -1.0, and -0.6 from the N III doublet at 1183,1184 Å) the photospheric abundances have probably not been altered by mixing of processed material from the star's interior and the derived abundances represent pristine values for the two young clusters in the LMC. It should be noted that the N and Fe abundances derived for NGC1818/D1 are about 0.5 dex lower than those determined by Korn et al. from much weaker optical lines. We will discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy. The generally low abundances for the Fe group elements in these young cluster B stars imply that supernova activity has been minimal in the regions of the LMC in which the stars were formed. GJP appreciates support from NASA grant NAG5-13212.

  9. The IUE Mega Campaign: Wind Variability and Rotation in Early-Type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, D.; Fullerton, A. W.; Nichols, J. S.; Owocki, S. P.; Prinja, R. K.; St-Louis, N.; Willis, A. J.; Altner, B.; Bolton, C. T.; Cassinelli, J. P.; hide

    1995-01-01

    Wind variability in OB stars may be ubiquitous and a connection between projected stellar rotation velocity and wind activity is well established. However, the origin of this connection is unknown. To probe the nature of the rotation connection, several of the attendees at the workshop on Instability and Variability of Hot-Star Winds drafted an IUE observing proposal. The goal of this program was to follow three stars for several rotations to determine whether the rotation connection is correlative or causal. The stars selected for monitoring all have rotation periods less than or equal to 5 days. They were HD 50896 (WN5), HD 64760 (BO.5 Ib), and HD 66811 (zeta Pup; 04 If(n)). During 16 days of nearly continuous observations in 1995 January (dubbed the 'MEGA' campaign), 444 high-dispersion IUE spectra of these stars were obtained. This Letter presents an overview of the results of the MEGA campaign and provides an introduction to the three following Letters, which discuss the results for each star.

  10. FEATURE B, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, INTERIOR VIEW OF SEAWARD ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE B, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, INTERIOR VIEW OF SEAWARD ROOM FROM DOORWAY, VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Shore Pillbox Complex-Type 1 Pillbox, Along shoreline, seaward of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  11. FEATURE B, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, SOUTH AND WEST SIDES, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE B, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, SOUTH AND WEST SIDES, VIEW FACING NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Shore Pillbox Complex-Type 1 Pillbox, Along shoreline, seaward of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  12. The boron-to-beryllium ratio in halo stars - A signature of cosmic-ray nucleosynthesis in the early Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Schramm, D. N.; Olive, K. A.; Fields, B.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) spallation production of Li, Be, and B in the early Galaxy with particular attention to the uncertainties in the predictions of this model. The observed correlation between the Be abundance and the metallicity in metal-poor Population II stars requires that Be was synthesized in the early Galaxy. We show that the observations and such Population II GCR synthesis of Be are quantitatively consistent with the big bang nucleosynthesis production of Li-7. We find that there is a nearly model independent lower bound to B/Be of about 7 for GCR synthesis. Recent measurements of B/Be about 10 in HD 140283 are in excellent agreement with the predictions of Population II GCR nucleosynthesis. Measurements of the boron abundance in additional metal-poor halo stars is a key diagnostic of the GCR spallation mechanism. We also show that Population II GCR synthesis can produce amounts of Li-6 which may be observed in the hottest halo stars.

  13. Is the Ratio of Observed X-ray Luminosity to Bolometric Luminosity in Early-type Stars Really a Constant?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    The observed X-ray emission from early-type stars can be explained by the recombination stellar wind model (or base coronal model). The model predicts that the true X-ray luminosity from the base coronal zone can be 10 to 1000 times greater than the observed X-ray luminosity. From the models, scaling laws were found for the true and observed X-ray luminosities. These scaling laws predict that the ratio of the observed X-ray luminosity to the bolometric luminosity is functionally dependent on several stellar parameters. When applied to several other O and B stars, it is found that the values of the predicted ratio agree very well with the observed values.

  14. The abundances of the elements in sharp-lined early type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1992-01-01

    An International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observing strategy that has yielded co-added spectra with enhanced S/N ratios for several A and B stars was established. New observations by Roby and Adelman using the same technique were added two new Hg-Mn stars into this sample. A long-term study of elemental abundances in this uniform, high-quality set of IUE spectra for 13 stars was begun. The first stages of this project are reported: abundances for N, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. The study of the Fe-peak elements show that our data set can provide accurate abundances and that abundances obtained from UV and optical spectra often are in good agreement. The groundwork for selfconsistent abundance analyses of more exotic elements in our long term project was provided.

  15. Probing the chemical environments of early star formation: A multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardegree-Ullman, Emily Elizabeth

    Chemical compositions of prestellar and protostellar environments in the dense interstellar medium are best quantified using a multidisciplinary approach. For my dissertation, I completed two projects to measure molecular abundances during the earliest phases of star formation. The first project investigates gas phase CO depletion in molecular cloud cores, the progenitors of star systems, using infrared photometry and molecular line spectroscopy at radio wavelengths. Hydrogenation of CO depleted onto dust is an important first step toward building complex organic molecules. The second project constrains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundances toward young stellar objects (YSO). Band strengths measured from laboratory spectroscopy of pyrene/water ice mixtures were applied to estimate abundances from features attributed to PAHs in observational YSO spectra. PAHs represent a distinct but important component of interstellar organic material that is widely observed but not well quantified in star-forming regions.

  16. Multiplicity At Early Stages Of Star Formation, Small Clusters. Observations Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masao

    2017-07-01

    The SOLA (Soul of Lupus with ALMA) project is conducting comprehensive studies of the Lupus Molecular Clouds and their star formation processes covering 10-10^4 AU scale. Our goal is to exploit ALMA and other facilities over a wide wavelength range to establish a prototypical low-mass star forming scenario based on the Lupus region. In the presentation, we will focus on angular momentum in dense cores in a filament, molecular outflows from young stars, and Class 0/I binary survey in Lupus as well as overview of our projects. Our binary survey was conducted in ALMA cycle 2 and achieved at 0.2-0.3 arcsec resolution discovering new binary systems in Lupus. At the same time, we obtained EX Lup, EXor type burst source, data in ALMA Cycle 3.

  17. Multiplicity at Early Stages of Star Formation, Small Clusters. Observations Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masao

    2017-06-01

    The SOLA (Soul of Lupus with ALMA) project is conducting comprehensive studies of the Lupus Molecular Clouds and their star formation processes covering 10-10^4 AU scale. Our goal is to exploit ALMA and other facilities over a wide wavelength range to establish a prototypical low-mass star forming scenario based on the Lupus region. In the presentation, we will focus on angular momentum in dense cores in a filament, molecular outflows from young stars, and Class 0/I binary survey in Lupus as well as overview of our projects. Our binary survey was conducted in ALMA cycle 2 and achieved at 0.2-0.3 arcsec resolution discovering new binary systems in Lupus. At the same time, we obtained EX Lup, EXor type burst source, data in ALMA Cycle 3.

  18. Observational Effects of Magnetism in O Stars: Surface Nitrogen Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Wade, G. A.; Donati, J. F.; Bouret, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the surface nitrogen content of the six magnetic O stars known to date as well as of the early B-type star Tau Sco.. We compare these abundances to predictions of evolutionary models to isolate the effects of magnetic field on the transport of elements in stellar interiors. Methods. We conduct a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the ample stars with state-of-the-art atmosphere models. We rely on high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPADONS at CFHT and NARVAL at TBL. Atmosphere models and synthetic spectra are computed with the code CMFGEN. Values of N/H together with their uncertainties are determined and compared to predictions of evolutionary models. Results. We find that the magnetic stars can be divided into two groups: one with stars displaying no N enrichment (one object); and one with stars most likely showing extra N enrichment (5 objects). For one star (Ori C) no robust conclusion can be drawn due to its young age. The star with no N enrichment is the one with the weakest magnetic field, possibly of dynamo origin. It might be a star having experienced strong magnetic braking under the condition of solid body rotation, but its rotational velocity is still relatively large. The five stars with high N content were probably slow rotators on the zero age main sequence, but they have surface N/H typical of normal O stars, indicating that the presence of a (probably fossil) magnetic field leads to extra enrichment. These stars may have a strong differential rotation inducing shear mixing. Our results shOuld be viewed as a basis on which new theoretical simulations can rely to better understand the effect of magnetism on the evolution of massive stars.

  19. Ghostly Halos in Dwarf Galaxies: a probe of star formation in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hoyoung; Ricotti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We carry out numerical simulations to characterize the size, stellar mass, and stellar mass surface density of extended stellar halos in dwarf galaxies as a function of dark matter halo mass. We expect that for galaxies smaller than a critical value, these ghostly halos will not exist because the smaller galactic subunits that build it up, do not form any stars. The detection of ghostly halos around isolated dwarf galaxies is a sensitive test of the efficiency of star formation in the first galaxies and of whether ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way are fossils of the first galaxies.

  20. Solution of the comoving-frame equation of transfer in spherically symmetric flows. V - Multilevel atoms. [in early star atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalas, D.; Kunasz, P. B.

    1978-01-01

    The coupled radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations for multilevel ionic structures in the atmospheres of early-type stars are solved. Both lines and continua are treated consistently; the treatment is applicable throughout a transonic wind, and allows for the presence of background continuum sources and sinks in the transfer. An equivalent-two-level-atoms approach provides the solution for the equations. Calculations for simplified He (+)-like model atoms in parameterized isothermal wind models indicate that subordinate line profiles are sensitive to the assumed mass-loss rate, and to the assumed structure of the velocity law in the atmospheres.

  1. An ALMA view of star formation efficiency suppression in early-type galaxies after gas-rich minor mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Voort, Freeke; Davis, Timothy A.; Matsushita, Satoki; Rowlands, Kate; Shabala, Stanislav S.; Allison, James R.; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Sansom, Anne E.; van der Werf, Paul P.

    2018-05-01

    Gas-rich minor mergers contribute significantly to the gas reservoir of early-type galaxies (ETGs) at low redshift, yet the star formation efficiency (SFE; the star formation rate divided by the molecular gas mass) appears to be strongly suppressed following some of these events, in contrast to the more well-known merger-driven starbursts. We present observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of six ETGs, which have each recently undergone a gas-rich minor merger, as evidenced by their disturbed stellar morphologies. These galaxies were selected because they exhibit extremely low SFEs. We use the resolving power of ALMA to study the morphology and kinematics of the molecular gas. The majority of our galaxies exhibit spatial and kinematical irregularities, such as detached gas clouds, warps, and other asymmetries. These asymmetries support the interpretation that the suppression of the SFE is caused by dynamical effects stabilizing the gas against gravitational collapse. Through kinematic modelling we derive high velocity dispersions and Toomre Q stability parameters for the gas, but caution that such measurements in edge-on galaxies suffer from degeneracies. We estimate merger ages to be about 100 Myr based on the observed disturbances in the gas distribution. Furthermore, we determine that these galaxies lie, on average, two orders of magnitude below the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation for star-forming galaxies as well as below the relation for relaxed ETGs. We discuss potential dynamical processes responsible for this strong suppression of star formation surface density at fixed molecular gas surface density.

  2. Very massive runaway stars from three-body encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Gualandris, Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Very massive stars preferentially reside in the cores of their parent clusters and form binary or multiple systems. We study the role of tight very massive binaries in the origin of the field population of very massive stars. We performed numerical simulations of dynamical encounters between single (massive) stars and a very massive binary with parameters similar to those of the most massive known Galactic binaries, WR 20a and NGC 3603-A1. We found that these three-body encounters could be responsible for the origin of high peculiar velocities (≥70 km s-1) observed for some very massive (≥60-70 M⊙) runaway stars in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud (e.g. λ Cep, BD+43°3654, Sk -67°22, BI 237, 30 Dor 016), which can hardly be explained within the framework of the binary-supernova scenario. The production of high-velocity massive stars via three-body encounters is accompanied by the recoil of the binary in the opposite direction to the ejected star. We show that the relative position of the very massive binary R145 and the runaway early B-type star Sk-69°206 on the sky is consistent with the possibility that both objects were ejected from the central cluster, R136, of the star-forming region 30 Doradus via the same dynamical event - a three-body encounter.

  3. Light Chemical Elements in Stars: Mysteries and Unsolved Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimkov, L. S.

    2018-06-01

    The first eight elements of the periodic table are discussed: H, He, Li, Be, B, C, N, and O. They are referred to as key elements, given their important role in stellar evolution. It is noteworthy that all of them were initially synthesized in the Big Bang. The primordial abundances of these elements calculated using the Standard Model of the Big Bang (SMBB) are presented in this review. The good agreement between the SMBB and observations of the primordial abundances of the isotopes of hydrogen and helium, D, 3He, and 4He, is noted, but there is a difference of 0.5 dex for lithium (the isotope 7Li) between the SMBB and observations of old stars in the galactic halo that has not yet been explained. The abundances of light elements in stellar atmospheres depends on the initial rotation velocity, so the typical rotation velocities of young Main Sequence (MS) stars are examined. Since the data on the abundances of light elements in stars are very extensive, the main emphasis in this review is on several unsolved problems. The helium abundance He/H in early B-type of the MS stars shows an increment with age; in particular, for the most massive B stars with masses M = 12-19M ⊙, He/H increases by more than a factor of two toward the end of the MS. Theoretical models of stars with rotation cannot explain such a large increase in He/H. For early B- and late O-type MS stars that are components of close binary systems, He/H undergoes a sharp jump in the middle of the MS stage that is a mystery for the theory. The anomalous abundance of helium (and lithium) in the atmospheres of chemically peculiar stars (types He-s, He-w, HgMn, Ap, and Am) is explained in terms of the diffusion of atoms in surface layers of the stars, but this hypothesis cannot yet explain all the features of the chemical composition of these stars. The abundances of lithium, beryllium, and boron in FGK-dwarfs manifest a trend with decreasing effective temperature T eff as well as a dip at T eff 6600 K in

  4. Nearby Early-type Galactic Nuclei at High Resolution: Dynamical Black Hole and Nuclear Star Cluster Mass Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dieu D.; Seth, Anil C.; Neumayer, Nadine; Kamann, Sebastian; Voggel, Karina T.; Cappellari, Michele; Picotti, Arianna; Nguyen, Phuong M.; Böker, Torsten; Debattista, Victor; Caldwell, Nelson; McDermid, Richard; Bastian, Nathan; Ahn, Christopher C.; Pechetti, Renuka

    2018-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the nuclear star clusters (NSCs) and massive black holes (BHs) of four of the nearest low-mass early-type galaxies: M32, NGC 205, NGC 5102, and NGC 5206. We measure the dynamical masses of both the BHs and NSCs in these galaxies using Gemini/NIFS or VLT/SINFONI stellar kinematics, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, and Jeans anisotropic models. We detect massive BHs in M32, NGC 5102, and NGC 5206, while in NGC 205, we find only an upper limit. These BH mass estimates are consistent with previous measurements in M32 and NGC 205, while those in NGC 5102 and NGC 5206 are estimated for the first time and both found to be <106 M ⊙. This adds to just a handful of galaxies with dynamically measured sub-million M ⊙ central BHs. Combining these BH detections with our recent work on NGC 404's BH, we find that 80% (4/5) of nearby, low-mass ({10}9{--}{10}10 M ⊙ {σ }\\star ∼ 20{--}70 km s‑1) early-type galaxies host BHs. Such a high occupation fraction suggests that the BH seeds formed in the early epoch of cosmic assembly likely resulted in abundant seeds, favoring a low-mass seed mechanism of the remnants, most likely from the first generation of massive stars. We find dynamical masses of the NSCs ranging from 2 to 73 × 106 M ⊙ and compare these masses to scaling relations for NSCs based primarily on photometric mass estimates. Color gradients suggest that younger stellar populations lie at the centers of the NSCs in three of the four galaxies (NGC 205, NGC 5102, and NGC 5206), while the morphology of two are complex and best fit with multiple morphological components (NGC 5102 and NGC 5206). The NSC kinematics show they are rotating, especially in M32 and NGC 5102 (V/{σ }\\star ∼ 0.7).

  5. Weak and Compact Radio Emission in Early High-Mass Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosero, Viviana; P. Hofner, M. Claussen, S. Kurtz, R. Cesaroni, E. D. Araya, C. Carrasco-González, L. F. Rodríguez, K. M. Menten, F. Wyrowski, L. Loinard, S. P. Ellingsen

    2018-01-01

    High-mass protostars are difficult to detect: they have short evolutionary timescales, they tend to be located at large distances, and they are usually embedded within complicated cluster environments. In this work, we aimed to identify and analyze candidates at the earliest stages of high-mass star formation, where only low-level (< 1 mJy) radio emission is expected. We used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to achieve one of the most sensitive (image RMS < 3 -- 10 μJy/beam) centimeter continuum surveys towards high-mass star forming regions to date, with observations at 1.3 and 6 cm and an angular resolution < 0.5". The sample is composed of cold molecular clumps with and without infrared sources (CMC--IRs and CMCs, respectively) and hot molecular cores (HMCs), covering a wide range of parameters such as bolometric luminosity and distance. We detected 70 radio continuum sources that are associated with dust clumps, most of which are weak and compact. We detected centimeter wavelength sources in 100% of our HMCs, which is a higher fraction than previously expected and suggests that radio continuum may be detectable at weak levels in all HMCs. The lack of radio detections for some objects in the sample (including most CMCs) contributes strong evidence that these are prestellar clumps, providing interesting constraints and ideal follow up candidates for studies of the earliest stages of high-mass stars. Our results show further evidence for an evolutionary sequence in the formation of high-mass stars, from starless cores (i.e., CMCs) to relatively more evolved ones (i.e., HMCs). Many of our detections have morphologies and other observational parameters that resemble collimated ionized jets, which is highly relevant for recent theoretical models based on core accretion that predict that the first stages of ionization from high-mass stars are in the form of jets. Additionally, we found that properties of ionized jets from low and high-mass stars are extremely well

  6. The early dynamical evolution of star clusters near the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, So-Myoung; Goodwin, Simon P.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2018-07-01

    We examine the dynamical evolution of both Plummer sphere and substructured (fractal) star-forming regions in Galactic Centre (GC) strong tidal fields to see what initial conditions could give rise to an Arches-like massive star cluster by ˜2 Myr. We find that any initial distribution has to be contained within its initial tidal radius to survive, which sets a lower limit of the initial density of the Arches of ˜600 M⊙ pc-3 if the Arches is at 30 pc from the GC, or ˜200 M⊙ pc-3 if the Arches is at 100 pc from the GC. Plummer spheres that survive change little other than to dynamically mass segregate, but initially fractal distributions rapidly erase substructure, dynamically mass segregate and by 2 Myr look extremely similar to initial Plummer spheres, therefore it is almost impossible to determine the initial conditions of clusters in strong tidal fields.

  7. The early dynamical evolution of star clusters near the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, So-Myoung; Goodwin, Simon P.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2018-04-01

    We examine the dynamical evolution of both Plummer sphere and substructured (fractal) star forming regions in Galactic Centre (GC) strong tidal fields to see what initial conditions could give rise to an Arches-like massive star cluster by ˜2 Myr. We find that any initial distribution has to be contained within its initial tidal radius to survive, which sets a lower limit of the initial density of the Arches of ˜ 600 M⊙ pc-3 if the Arches is at 30 pc from the GC, or ˜ 200 M⊙ pc-3 if the Arches is at 100 pc from the GC. Plummer spheres that survive change little other than to dynamically mass segregate, but initially fractal distributions rapidly erase substructure, dynamically mass segregate and by 2 Myr look extremely similar to initial Plummer spheres, therefore it is almost impossible to determine the initial conditions of clusters in strong tidal fields.

  8. Early-20th-century visual observations of M13 variable stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, W.; Barnard, E. E.

    2016-08-01

    In 1900 E. E. Barnard published 37 visual observations of Variable 2 (V2) in the globular clustter M13 made in 1899 and 1900. A review of Barnard's notebooks revealed he made many additional brightness estimates up to 1911, and he had also recorded the variations of V1 starting in 1904. These data provide the earliest-epoch light curves for these stars and thus are useful for studying their period changes. This paper presents Barnard's observations of the M13 variables along with their derived heliocentric Julian Dates and approximate V magnitudes. These include 231 unpublished observations of V2 and 94 of V1. How these data will be of value for determing period changes by these stars is described.

  9. Different regions of line formation in the envelope of the early emission line star HD 190073

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringuelet, A. E.; Rovira, M.; Cidale, L.; Sahade, J.

    1987-01-01

    A description is presented of the spectral features that characterize the spectrum of HD 190073 both in the photographic region (360-660 nm), and in the IUE UV (115-320 nm). A number of different types of profiles can be distinguished, and this seems to imply that many different 'broad' regions of line formation coexist in the extended envelope of the star, including regions with densities differing in several orders of magnitude.

  10. A survey of mass-loss effects in early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Intermediate-resolution data obtained with the Copernicus satellite are surveyed in order to define the region in the H-R diagram where mass loss occurs. The survey includes 40 stars, providing good coverage of supergiants from O4 to A2 and main-sequence stars from O4 to B7 as well as spotty coverage of late O giants and intermediate to late B stars. The spectral transitions examined are primarily resonance lines of ions of abundant elements plus some lines arising from excited states (e.g., C III at 1175.7 A and Si IV at 1122.5 A). Observed P Cygni profiles are discussed along with interesting features of some individual profiles. The data are shown to indicate that mass-loss effects occur over a wide portion of the H-R diagram, that mass ejection generally occurs when the holometric magnitude is greater than -6.0, and that the mass-ejection rate is usually high enough to produce P Cygni profile whenever the N V feature at 1240 A is present in a spectrum.

  11. FEATURE B, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, INTERIOR VIEW FROM SEAWARD ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE B, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, INTERIOR VIEW FROM SEAWARD ROOM LOOKING THROUGH ENTRY HALL TO REAR ROOM BEYOND, SHOWING DRILLED-OUT OPENING, VIEW FACING NORTH -NORTHWEST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Shore Pillbox Complex-Type 1 Pillbox, Along shoreline, seaward of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  12. The challenge of measuring magnetic fields in strongly pulsating stars: the case of HD 96446

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, S. P.; Hubrig, S.; Ilyin, I.; Schöller, M.; Briquet, M.

    2017-01-01

    Among the early B-type stars, He-rich Bp stars exhibit the strongest large-scale organized magnetic fields with a predominant dipole contribution. The presence of β Cep-like pulsations in the typical magnetic early Bp-type star HD 96446 was announced a few years ago, but the analysis of the magnetic field geometry was hampered by the absence of a reliable rotation period and a sophisticated procedure for accounting for the impact of pulsations on the magnetic field measurements. Using new spectropolarimetric observations and a recently determined rotation period based on an extensive spectroscopic time series, we investigate the magnetic field model parameters of this star under more detailed considerations of the pulsation behaviour of line profiles.

  13. Cooking up the First Stars

    2011-11-10

    Scientists are simulating how the very first stars in our universe were born. The stars we see today formed out of collapsing clouds of gas and dust. In the very early universe, however, the stars had fewer ingredients available.

  14. The early stages of massive star formation: tracing the physical and chemical conditions in hot cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcutt, Hannah

    2015-04-01

    Molecules are essential to the formation of stars, by allowing radiation to escape the cloud and cooling to occur. Over 180 molecules have been detected in interstellar environments, ranging from comets to interstellar clouds. Their spectra are useful probes of the conditions in which these molecules form. Comparison of rest frequencies to observed frequencies can provide information about the velocity of gas and indicate physical structures. The density, temperature, and excitation conditions of gas can be determined directly from the spectra of molecules. Furthermore, by taking a chemical inventory of a particular object, one can gain an understanding of the chemical processes occurring within a cloud. The class of molecules known as complex molecules (>6 atoms), are of particular interest when probing the conditions in massive starforming environments, as they are observed to trace a more compact region than smaller molecules. This thesis details the work of my PhD, to explore how complex molecules can be used to trace the physical and chemical conditions in hot cores (HCs), one of the earliest stages of massive star formation. This work combines both the observations and chemical modelling of several different massive star-forming regions. We identify molecular transitions observed in the spectra of these regions, and calculate column densities and rotation temperatures of these molecules (Chapters 2 and 3). In Chapter 4, we chemically model the HCs, and perform a comparison between observational column densities and chemical modelling column densities. In Chapter 5, we look at the abundance ratio of three isomers, acetic acid, glycolaldehyde, and methyl formate, to ascertain whether this ratio can be used as an indicator of HC evolution. Finally, we explore the chemistry of the HC IRAS 17233-3606, to identify emission features in the spectra, and determine column densities and rotation temperatures of the detected molecules.

  15. Zooming in on star formation in the brightest galaxies of the early Universe discovered with the Planck and Herschel satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canameras, Raoul

    2016-09-01

    Strongly gravitationally lensed galaxies offer an outstanding opportunity to characterize the most intensely star-forming galaxies in the high-redshift universe. In the most extreme cases, one can probe the mechanisms that underlie the intense star formation on the scales of individual star-forming regions. This requires very fortuitous gravitational lensing configurations offering magnification factors >>10, which are particularly rare toward the high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies. The Planck's Dusty GEMS (Gravitationally Enhanced subMillimeter Sources) sample contains eleven of the brightest high-redshift galaxies discovered with the Planck submillimeter all-sky survey, with flux densities between 300 and 1000 mJy at 350 microns, factors of a few brighter than the majority of lensed sources previously discovered with other surveys. Six of them are above the 90% completeness limit of the Planck Catalog of Compact Sources (PCCS), suggesting that they are among the brightest high-redshift sources on the sky selected by their active star formation. This thesis comes within the framework of the extensive multi-wavelength follow-up programme designed to determine the overall properties of the high-redshift sources and to probe the lensing configurations. Firstly, to characterize the intervening lensing structures and calculate lensing models, I use optical and near/mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy. I deduce that our eleven GEMS are aligned with intervening matter overdensities at intermediate redshift, either massive isolated galaxies or galaxy groups and clusters. The foreground sources exhibit evolved stellar populations of a few giga years, characteristic of early-type galaxies. Moreover, the first detailed models of the light deflection toward the GEMS suggest magnification factors systematically >10, and >20 for some lines-of-sight. Secondly, we observe the GEMS in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter domains in order to characterize the background

  16. HAZMAT. I. The evolution of far-UV and near-UV emission from early M stars

    SciT

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Barman, Travis S., E-mail: shkolnik@lowell.edu, E-mail: barman@lpl.arizona.edu

    2014-10-01

    The spectral energy distribution, variability, and evolution of the high-energy radiation from an M dwarf planet host is crucial in understanding the planet's atmospheric evolution and habitability and in interpreting the planet's spectrum. The star's extreme-UV (EUV), far-UV (FUV), and near-UV (NUV) emission can chemically modify, ionize, and erode the atmosphere over time. This makes determining the lifetime exposure of such planets to stellar UV radiation critical for both the evolution of a planet's atmosphere and our potential to characterize it. Using the early M star members of nearby young moving groups, which sample critical ages in planet formation andmore » evolution, we measure the evolution of the GALEX NUV and FUV flux as a function of age. The median UV flux remains at a 'saturated' level for a few hundred million years, analogous to that observed for X-ray emission. By the age of the Hyades Cluster (650 Myr), we measure a drop in UV flux by a factor of 2-3 followed by a steep drop from old (several Gyrs) field stars. This decline in activity beyond 300 Myr follows roughly t {sup –1}. Despite this clear evolution, there remains a wide range, of 1-2 orders of magnitude, in observed emission levels at every age. These UV data supply the much-needed constraints to M dwarf upper-atmosphere models, which will provide empirically motivated EUV predictions and more accurate age-dependent UV spectra as inputs to planetary photochemical models.« less

  17. Empirical mass-loss rates for 25 O and early B stars, derived from Copernicus observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gathier, R.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Snow, T. P.

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet line profiles are fitted with theoretical line profiles in the cases of 25 stars covering a spectral type range from O4 to B1, including all luminosity classes. Ion column densities are compared for the determination of wind ionization, and it is found that the O VI/N V ratio is dependent on the mean density of the wind and not on effective temperature value, while the Si IV/N V ratio is temperature-dependent. The column densities are used to derive a mass-loss rate parameter that is empirically correlated against the mass-loss rate by means of standard stars with well-determined rates from IR or radio data. The empirical mass-loss rates obtained are compared with those derived by others and found to vary by as much as a factor of 10, which is shown to be due to uncertainties or errors in the ionization fractions of models used for wind ionization balance prediction.

  18. Overview of Conceptual Design of Early VentureStar(TM) Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, M. K.

    2000-01-01

    One of NASA's goals is to enable commercial access to space at a cost of $1000/lb (an order of magnitude less than today's cost) by approximately 2010. Based on results from the 1994 Congressionally mandated, NASA led, Access-to-Space Study, an all rocket-powered single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle was, selected as the best option for meeting the goal. To address the technology development issues and the follow-on development of an operational vehicle, NASA initiated the X-33 program. The focus of this paper is on the contributions made by the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), from 1997-1998, to the conceptual design of the Lockheed Martin Skunk Work's (LMSW) operational reusable single-stage-to-orbit VentureStar(sup TM) vehicle. The LaRC effort has been in direct support of LMSW and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The primary objectives have been to reduce vehicle dry weight and improve flyability of the VentureStar(sup TM) concepts. This paper will briefly describe the analysis methods used and will present several of the concepts analyzed and design trades completed.

  19. R associations. VI - The reddening law in dust clouds and the nature of early-type emission stars in nebulosity from a study of five associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, W.; Warner, J. W.; Miller, D. P.; Herzog, A.

    1982-01-01

    Positions, identification charts, UBVRIKLMN photometry and spectral types are given for stars, illuminating reflection nebulae that are visible on the POSS prints, which have been identified in five associations. With a ratio of total to selective extinction of 4.2, the reddening law applicable to the dust clouds in which the stars are embedded is steeper than normal. The five associations exhibit 18 early-type stars with circumstellar shells, of which those with spectral types earlier than B5 characteristically have weak IR excesses, in contrast to the strong excesses indicative of circumstellar dust, of later-type stars. Color-magnitude charts show a distribution lying above the ZAMS by up to about 2 mag for both the circumstellar shell stars and those classified as rapid rotators. It is suggested that (1) rapid rotation accounts for the scatter in the color-magnitude diagram, and (2) many of the nebulous early-type emission-line stars are rapid rotators rather than pre-main sequence objects.

  20. The Origin of Dust in the Early Universe: Probing the Star Formation History of Galaxies by Their Dust Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Two distinct scenarios for the origin of the approximately 4 x 10(exp 8) Solar Mass of dust observed in the high-redshift (z = 6.4) quasar J1148+5251 have been proposed. The first assumes that this galaxy is much younger than the age of the universe at that epoch so that only supernovae, could have produced this dust. The second scenario assumes a significantly older galactic age, so that the dust could have formed in lower-mass AGB stars. Presenting new integral solutions for the chemical evolution of metals and dust in galaxies, we offer a critical evaluation of these two scenarios. ^N;"(,, show that the AGB scenario is sensitive to the details of the galaxy's star formation history (SFH), which must consist of an early intense starburst followed by a period of low stellar activity. The presence or absence of massive amounts of dust in high-redshift galaxies can therefore be used to infer their SFH. However, a problem with the AGB scenario is that it produces a stellar mass that is significantly larger than the inferred dynamical mass of J1148+5251, an yet unresolved discrepancy. If this problem persists, then additional sites for the growth or formation of dust, such as molecular clouds or dense clouds around active galactic nuclei, must be considered.

  1. The helium 10830 A line in early-type stars - An atlas of Fabry-Perot scans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meisel, D. D.; Frank, Z. A.; Packard, M. L.; Saunders, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    Representative profiles of He I 10830 A in 65 early-type (O6-A1) stars over a wide range of luminosity are presented. The atlas scans were obtained using the Vaughan Fabry-Perot interferometer on the C. E. K. Mees 0.6 m and KPNO 0.9 m telescopes and usually cover a range of plus or minus 15 A at 1 A resolution with sampling distances between 0.5 A and 2 A depending on the photometer integration time required to reach reasonable Poisson counting statistics. The majority of the scans show very shallow, broad features which do not agree with plane-parallel NLTE model atmosphere calculations of the 10830 line by Auer and Mihalas (1972). Difficulties connected with previous theoretical studies of this line are briefly discussed, and suggestions for possible future modifications to the theory are made.

  2. Modeling populations of rotationally mixed massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brott, I.

    2011-02-01

    Stars: Rotation and Nitrogen Enrichment as the Key to Understanding Massive Star Evolution'', I.Hunter, I.Brott, D.J. Lennon, N. Langer, C. Trundle, A. de Koter, C.J. Evans and R.S.I. Ryans The Astrophysical Journal, 2008, 676, L29-L32 Ch. 4: ``The VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive Stars: Constraints on Stellar Evolution from the Chemical Compositions of Rapidly Rotating Galactic and Magellanic Cloud B-type Stars '', I. Hunter, I. Brott, N. Langer, D.J. Lennon, P.L. Dufton, I.D. Howarth R.S.I. Ryan, C. Trundle, C. Evans, A. de Koter and S.J. Smartt Published in Astronomy & Astropysics, 2009, 496, 841- 853 Ch. 5: ``Rotating Massive Main-Sequence Stars II: Simulating a Population of LMC early B-type Stars as a Test of Rotational Mixing '', I. Brott, C. J. Evans, I. Hunter, A. de Koter, N. Langer, P. L. Dufton, M. Cantiello, C. Trundle, D. J. Lennon, S.E. de Mink, S.-C. Yoon, P. Anders submitted to Astronomy & Astrophysics Ch 6: ``The Nature of B Supergiants: Clues From a Steep Drop in Rotation Rates at 22 000 K - The possibility of Bi-stability braking'', Jorick S. Vink, I. Brott, G. Graefener, N. Langer, A. de Koter, D.J. Lennon Astronomy & Astrophysics, 2010, 512, L7

  3. Early spectra of the gravitational wave source GW170817: Evolution of a neutron star merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappee, B. J.; Simon, J. D.; Drout, M. R.; Piro, A. L.; Morrell, N.; Prieto, J. L.; Kasen, D.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kollmeier, J. A.; Kelson, D. D.; Coulter, D. A.; Foley, R. J.; Kilpatrick, C. D.; Siebert, M. R.; Madore, B. F.; Murguia-Berthier, A.; Pan, Y.-C.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Rest, A.; Adams, C.; Alatalo, K.; Bañados, E.; Baughman, J.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bitsakis, T.; Boutsia, K.; Bravo, J. R.; Di Mille, F.; Higgs, C. R.; Ji, A. P.; Maravelias, G.; Marshall, J. L.; Placco, V. M.; Prieto, G.; Wan, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Two neutron stars merging together generate a gravitational wave signal and have also been predicted to emit electromagnetic radiation. When the gravitational wave event GW170817 was detected, astronomers rushed to search for the source using conventional telescopes (see the Introduction by Smith). Coulter et al. describe how the One-Meter Two-Hemispheres (1M2H) collaboration was the first to locate the electromagnetic source. Drout et al. present the 1M2H measurements of its optical and infrared brightness, and Shappee et al. report their spectroscopy of the event, which is unlike previously detected astronomical transient sources. Kilpatrick et al. show how these observations can be explained by an explosion known as a kilonova, which produces large quantities of heavy elements in nuclear reactions.

  4. Early star catalogues of the southern sky. De Houtman, Kepler (second and third classes), and Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, F.; van Gent, R. H.

    2011-06-01

    De Houtman in 1603, Kepler in 1627 and Halley in 1679 published the earliest modern catalogues of the southern sky. We provide machine-readable versions of these catalogues, make some comparisons between them, and briefly discuss their accuracy on the basis of comparison with data from the modern Hipparcos Catalogue. We also compare our results for De Houtman with those by Knobel in 1917 finding good overall agreement. About half of the ~ 200 new stars (with respect to Ptolemaios) added by De Houtman are in twelve new constellations, half in old constellations like Centaurus, Lupus and Argo. The right ascensions and declinations given by De Houtman have error distributions with widths of about 40', the longitudes and latitudes given by Kepler have error distributions with widths of about 45'. Halley improves on this by more than an order of magnitude to widths of about 3', and all entries in his catalogue can be identified. The measurement errors of Halley are due to a systematic deviation of his sextant (increasing with angle to 2' at 60°) and random errors of 0.7 arcmin. The position errors in the catalogue of Halley are dominated by the position errors in the reference stars, which he took from Brahe. The full Tables Houtman, Classis, Aliter and Halley (see Tables 6, 7, 8) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/530/A93

  5. Mid-Infrared Observational and Theoretical Studies of Star Formation and Early Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    The first 2 years of this program were used to make mid-IR observations of regions of star formation in the Orion nebula with the UCSD mid-IR camera at the UCSD/University of Minnesota telescope at Mt. Lemmon. These observations attempted to make the first systematic study of an extended region, known to have newly forming stars, and expected to have complex mid-IR emission. We discovered, to our surprise, that most of the thermal emission originated from extended sources rather than from point sources. This interesting observation made the analysis of the data much more complex, since the chop/nod procedures used at these wavelengths produce a differential measurement of the emission in one region compared to that in the adjacent region. Disentangling complex extended emission in such a situation is very difficult. In parallel with this work we were also observing comets in the thermal infrared, the other component of the original proposal. Some spectacular data on the comet Swift-Tuttle was acquired and published. A changing jet structure observed over a 2 week period is described. The rotation period of the comet can be measured at 66 hours. The size of the nucleus can also be estimated (at 30 km) from the observed excess flux from the nucleus. These data have lead to the development of models describing the action of dust particles of differing sizes and composition leaving the nucleus. The spatial distribution of the predicted IR emission has been compared to the observed jet structures, leading to estimates of both particles sizes, relative amounts of silicate vs organic grains, and the amounts of dust emitted in the jets vs isotopic emission.

  6. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps : Looking at the early stages of star-formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, Ludovic

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite has provided an unprecedented view of the submm sky, allowing us to search for the dust emission of Galactic cold sources. Combining Planck-HFI all-sky maps in the high frequency channels with the IRAS map at 100um, we built the Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results XXVIII 2015), counting 13188 sources distributed over the whole sky, and following mainly the Galactic structures at low and intermediate latitudes. This is the first all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold sources obtained with a single instrument at this resolution and sensitivity, which opens a new window on star-formation processes in our Galaxy.I will briefly describe the colour detection method used to extract the Galactic cold sources, i.e., the Cold Core Colour Detection Tool (CoCoCoDeT, Montier et al. 2010), and its application to the Planck data. I will discuss the statistical distribution of the properties of the PGCC sources (in terms of dust temperature, distance, mass, density and luminosity), which illustrates that the PGCC catalogue spans a large variety of environments and objects, from molecular clouds to cold cores, and covers various stages of evolution. The Planck catalogue is a very powerful tool to study the formation and the evolution of prestellar objects and star-forming regions.I will finally present an overview of the Herschel Key Program Galactic Cold Cores (PI. M.Juvela), which allowed us to follow-up about 350 Planck Galactic Cold Clumps, in various stages of evolution and environments. With this program, the nature and the composition of the 5' Planck sources have been revealed at a sub-arcmin resolution, showing very different configurations, such as starless cold cores or multiple Young Stellar objects still embedded in their cold envelope.

  7. Evolution of X-ray activity of 1-3 Msun late-type stars in early post-main-sequence phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolato, N.; Maggio, A.; Sciortino, S.

    2000-09-01

    We have investigated the variation of coronal X-ray emission during early post-main-sequence phases for a sample of 120 late-type stars within 100 pc, and with estimated masses in the range 1-3 Msun, based on Hipparcos parallaxes and recent evolutionary models. These stars were observed with the ROSAT/PSPC, and the data processed with the Palermo-CfA pipeline, including detection and evaluation of X-ray fluxes (or upper limits) by means of a wavelet transform algorithm. We have studied the evolutionary history of X-ray luminosity and surface flux for stars in selected mass ranges, including stars with inactive A-type progenitors on the main sequence and lower mass solar-type stars. Our stellar sample suggests a trend of increasing X-ray emission level with age for stars with masses M > 1.5 Msun, and a decline for lower-mass stars. A similar behavior holds for the average coronal temperature, which follows a power-law correlation with the X-ray luminosity, independently of their mass and evolutionary state. We have also studied the relationship between X-ray luminosity and surface rotation rate for stars in the same mass ranges, and how this relationships departs from the Lx ~ vrot2 law followed by main-sequence stars. Our results are interpreted in terms of a magnetic dynamo whose efficiency depends on the stellar evolutionary state through the mass-dependent changes of the stellar internal structure, including the properties of envelope convection and the internal rotation profile.

  8. Tracing early evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation with molecular lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marseille, M. G.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Herpin, F.; Jacq, T.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Despite its major role in the evolution of the interstellar medium, the formation of high-mass stars (M ≥ 10 M_⊙) remains poorly understood. Two types of massive star cluster precursors, the so-called massive dense cores (MDCs), have been observed, which differ in terms of their mid-infrared brightness. The origin of this difference has not yet been established and may be the result of evolution, density, geometry differences, or a combination of these. Aims: We compare several molecular tracers of physical conditions (hot cores, shocks) observed in a sample of mid-IR weakly emitting MDCs with previous results obtained in a sample of exclusively mid-IR bright MDCs. We attempt to understand the differences between these two types of object. Methods: We present single-dish observations of HDO, H_218O, SO2, and CH3OH lines at λ = 1.3-3.5 mm. We study line profiles and estimate abundances of these molecules, and use a partial correlation method to search for trends in the results. Results: The detection rates of thermal emission lines are found to be very similar for both mid-IR quiet and bright objects. The abundances of H2O, HDO (10-13 to 10-9 in the cold outer envelopes), SO2 and CH3OH differ from source to source but independently of their mid-IR flux. In contrast, the methanol class I maser emission, a tracer of outflow shocks, is found to be strongly anti-correlated with the 12 μm source brightnesses. Conclusions: The enhancement of the methanol maser emission in mid-IR quiet MDCs may be indicative of a more embedded nature. Since total masses are similar between the two samples, we suggest that the matter distribution is spherical around mid-IR quiet sources but flattened around mid-IR bright ones. In contrast, water emission is associated with objects containing a hot molecular core, irrespective of their mid-IR brightness. These results indicate that the mid-IR brightness of MDCs is an indicator of their evolutionary stage.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Nearby B-type stars abundances (Morel+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, T.; Butler, K.

    2008-06-01

    This Table gives the adopted loggf values, EW measurements (in mA) and line-by-line abundances (on the scale in which log[epsilon(H)]=12). A blank indicates that the EW was not reliably measurable, the line was considered blended for the relevant temperature range or yielded a discrepant abundance. The accuracy of the EW measurements is discussed in Sect.3 of the paper. The wing of HeI 4387.9 was taken as pseudo continuum in the case of NeII 4391.99. (2 data files).

  10. Unexpected effects of a trap in CCD echelle spectra of B-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Nancy D.; Zimba, Jason R.

    1990-01-01

    Because of the nature of echelle spectra, cosmetic defects such as traps may mimic real spectral features. An example from spectra taken at CTIO with a GEC CCD is presented, and it is shown how the affected pixels can be eliminated from the reduced spectrum, at a slight cost in signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. The evolution of surface magnetic fields in young solar-type stars II: the early main sequence (250-650 Myr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folsom, C. P.; Bouvier, J.; Petit, P.; Lèbre, A.; Amard, L.; Palacios, A.; Morin, J.; Donati, J.-F.; Vidotto, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    There is a large change in surface rotation rates of sun-like stars on the pre-main sequence and early main sequence. Since these stars have dynamo-driven magnetic fields, this implies a strong evolution of their magnetic properties over this time period. The spin-down of these stars is controlled by interactions between stellar and magnetic fields, thus magnetic evolution in turn plays an important role in rotational evolution. We present here the second part of a study investigating the evolution of large-scale surface magnetic fields in this critical time period. We observed stars in open clusters and stellar associations with known ages between 120 and 650 Myr, and used spectropolarimetry and Zeeman Doppler Imaging to characterize their large-scale magnetic field strength and geometry. We report 15 stars with magnetic detections here. These stars have masses from 0.8 to 0.95 M⊙, rotation periods from 0.326 to 10.6 d, and we find large-scale magnetic field strengths from 8.5 to 195 G with a wide range of geometries. We find a clear trend towards decreasing magnetic field strength with age, and a power law decrease in magnetic field strength with Rossby number. There is some tentative evidence for saturation of the large-scale magnetic field strength at Rossby numbers below 0.1, although the saturation point is not yet well defined. Comparing to younger classical T Tauri stars, we support the hypothesis that differences in internal structure produce large differences in observed magnetic fields, however for weak-lined T Tauri stars this is less clear.

  12. Studies of early-type variable stars. XIV. Spectroscopic orbit and absolute parameters of HU Tauri.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.; Hill, G.; Hilditch, R. W.

    1995-09-01

    We present a new spectroscopic orbit for the Algol-type eclipsing binary system HU Tau (HD 29365, P=2.0563 days α(2000.0) = 04 38 15.80, δ= +20 41 05.3, V=5.87-6.8, B8V + G2). We find : m_1_ sin^3^i=4.17+/-0.09Msun_, m_2_ sin^3^i=1.07+/-0.025Msun_, (a_p_+a_s_)sin i=11.8 +/-0.1Rsun_, m_1_/m_2_=3.90+/-0.07. The spectroscopic orbit includes corrections for non-Keplerian effects derived from the solutions of the BV light curves of Ito (1988). We have been able to derive much improved absolute parameters for this system as follows: M_1_=4.43+/-0.09Msun_, M_2_=1.14+/-0.03Msun_, R _1_=2.57+/-0.03Rsun_, R _2_=4.21+/-0.03Rsun_, log(L_1_/Lsun_)= 2.09+/-0.15, log(L_2_/Lsun_)= 0.92+/-0.05. Comparison of HU Tau with non-conservative case B evolution models of De Greve (1993) suggests that the system evolved from an initial mass ratio <~0.5. However, the orbital period of HU Tau is more than 3 days shorter than any of the model systems, and the observed secondary luminosity of order 10 times less than a model star of the same mass during the slow mass transfer phase.

  13. From red star rising to rocket's red glare: space travel, the early years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Steven

    2007-07-01

    'We choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.' President John Fitzgerald Kennedy, 12 September 1962. It is now 50 years since the first artificial satellite was launched. This article looks at the early years of space travel and some of the key moments during that time.

  14. Interstellar C IV and Si IV column densities toward early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Equivalent widths and deduced column densities of Si IV and C IV are examined for 18 early-type close binaries, and physical processes responsible for the origin of these ions in the interstellar medium are investigated. The available C IV/Si IV column density ratios typically lie within a narrow range from 0.8 to 4.5, and there is evidence that the column density of C IV is higher than that of N V along most lines of sight, suggesting that C IV is not formed in the same hot region as O VI. In addition, the existence of regions with a narrowly defined new temperature range around 50,000 deg K is indicated. The detection of the semitorrid gas of Bruhweiler, Kondo, and McCluskey (1978, 1979) is substantiated, and the relation of this gas to the observations of coronal gas in the galactic halo is discussed.

  15. The stars and the state: Astronomy, astrology, and the politics of natural knowledge in early medieval Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhrman, Kristina Mairi

    This dissertation examines the social factors involved in the practices of observational astrology (Ch. tianwen, Jp. tenmon ) and calendrical astronomy (Ch. lifa, Jp. rekihō) at the Japanese court. The production and monopolization of astrological and astronomical knowledge had, from the time of the Han Dynasty in China, been part of the state bureaucracy and one of the signs of legitimate rule. In the seventh century, Japan too had imported and implemented these state sciences of the Chinese-style imperium. However, by the twelfth century, while state control of astronomical knowledge continued to operate at a surface level, within the Japanese court bureaucracy dissent and debate reigned. A number of lineages and factions cooperated or competed over astronomical and astrological facts, which resulted in a situation where there was no unified "truth" about the stars accepted by the majority of elite members of the court. The political fragmentation and factionalism that characterized the early medieval Japanese state was also to be found in knowledge about the natural world circulating at court. The major reason for this fragmentation of knowledge was the diversity of the population that produced this same knowledge, a population that did not share either a common identity or definition of practice. Astrological and astronomical knowledge was no longer produced solely by the technical bureaucrats whose offices had been established in the eighth-century Chinese-style law codes (Jp. ritsuryō)—instead, these officials contested with other legitimate but non-official purveyors of natural knowledge: Buddhist monks and court scholars and mathematicians prominent among them. Furthermore, the statements of fact produced by all three of these factions were subject to critique and revision by members of the top echelon of the court bureaucracy, the elite nobility. Clearly there were no

  16. Using ALMA to Resolve the Nature of the Early Star-Forming Large-Scale Structure G073

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R.; Kneissl, R.; Polletta, M.; Clarenc, B.; Dole, H. A.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Scott, D.; Béthermin, M.; Lagache, G.; Montier, L.

    2017-07-01

    Galaxy clusters at large redshift are key targets for understanding the nature of the early Universe, yet locating them has proven to be very challenging. Recently, a large sample of over 2000 high-z candidate structures have been found using Planck's all-sky submillimetre maps, and a subset of 234 have been followed up with Herschel-SPIRE, which showed that the emission can be attributed to large far-infrared overdensities. However, the individual galaxies giving rise to the emission seen by Planck and Herschel have not yet been resolved nor characterized, so we do not yet know whether these sources are the progenitors of present-day, massive galaxy clusters. In an attempt to address this, we targeted the eight brightest Herschel-SPIRE peaks in the centre of the Planck peak G073.4-57.5 using ALMA at 1.3 mm, and complemented these observations with multi-wavelength data from Spitzer-IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 μm and from CFHT-WIRCam at 1.2 and 2.2 μm. We also utilize data on G073.4-57.5 at 850 μm from JCMT's SCUBA-2 instrument. We detect a total of 18 millimetre galaxies brighter than 0.3mJy in 2.4arcmin2. In every case we are able to match these to their NIR counterparts, and while the most significant SCUBA-2 sources are not included in the ALMA pointings, we find an 8σ detection when stacking the ALMA source positions in the 850 μm data. We derive photometric redshifts, IR luminosities, star-formation rates, stellar masses, dust temperatures, and dust masses; the photometric redshifts are concentrated around z ≃ 1 and z ≃ 2 and the NIR colours show a "red" sequence, while the star-formation rates indicate that three of the galaxies are "starbursts". Serendipitous CO line detections of two of the galaxies appear to match their photometric redshifts with z = 2.05. We find that the ALMA source density is 8-30 times higher than average background estimates, and thus also larger than seen in typical "proto-cluster" fields. The evidence seems to be indicating the

  17. Evolution of solitary density waves in stellar winds of early-type stars: A simple explanation of discrete absorption component behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Klein, Larry; Altner, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    We model the evolution of a density shell propagating through the stellar wind of an early-type star, in order to investigate the effects of such shells on UV P Cygni line profiles. Unlike previous treatments, we solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations, using an explicit time-differencing scheme, and present a parametric study of the density, velocity, and temperature response. Under the assumed conditions, relatively large spatial scale, large-amplitude density shells propagate as stable waves through the supersonic portion of the wind. Their dynamical behavior appears to mimic propagating 'solitary waves,' and they are found to accelerate at the same rate as the underlying steady state stellar wind (i.e., the shell rides the wind). These hydrodynamically stable structures quantitatively reproduce the anomalous 'discrete absorption component' (DAC) behavior observed in the winds of luminous early-type stars, as illustrated by comparisons of model predictions to an extensive International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) time series of spectra of zeta Puppis (O4f). From these comparisons, we find no conclusive evidence indicative of DACs accelerating at a significantly slower rate than the underlying stellar wind, contrary to earlier reports. In addition, these density shells are found to be consistent within the constraints set by the IR observations. We conclude that the concept of propagating density shells should be seriously reconsidered as a possible explanation of the DAC phenomenon in early-type stars.

  18. Chemical Composition of Galactic Disk Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishenina, T. V.; Basak, N. Yu.; Gorbaneva, T. I.; Soubiran, C.; Kovtyukh, V. V.

    Abundances of Na, Al, Ca, in the stars of galactic disks are obtained. The separation of thin and stars on cinematic criterion was made early. The behavior of chemical element abundances with metallicity for studied stars was presented.

  19. Detection of magnetic field in the B2 star ρ Ophiuchi A with ESO FORS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillitteri, I.; Fossati, L.; Castro Rodriguez, N.; Oskinova, L.; Wolk, S. J.

    2018-02-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that magnetism and enhanced X-ray emission are likely correlated in early B-type stars: similar fractions of them ( 10%) are strong and hard X-ray sources and possess strong magnetic fields. It is also known that some B-type stars have spots on their surface. Yet up to now no X-ray activity associated with spots on early-type stars was detected. In this Letter we report the detection of a magnetic field on the B2V star ρ Oph A. Previously, we assessed that the X-ray activity of this star is associated with a surface spot, herewith we establish its magnetic origin. We analyze spectra of ρ Oph A obtained with the FORS2 spectrograph at ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at two epochs, and detect a longitudinal component of the magnetic field of the order of 500 G in one of the datasets. The detection of the magnetic field only at one epoch can be explained by stellar rotation which is also invoked to explain observed periodic X-ray activity. From archival HARPS ESO VLT high resolution spectra we derived the fundamental stellar parameters of ρ Oph A and further constrained its age. We conclude that ρ Oph A provides strong evidence for the presence of active X-ray emitting regions on young magnetized early type stars. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programmes 099.D-0067(A) and 078.C-0403(A).

  20. Elvis to Eminem: quantifying the price of fame through early mortality of European and North American rock and pop stars.

    PubMed

    Bellis, Mark A; Hennell, Tom; Lushey, Clare; Hughes, Karen; Tocque, Karen; Ashton, John R

    2007-10-01

    Rock and pop stars are frequently characterised as indulging in high-risk behaviours, with high-profile deaths amongst such musicians creating an impression of premature mortality. However, studies to date have not quantified differences between mortality experienced by such stars and general populations. This study measures survival rates of famous musicians (n = 1064) from their point of fame and compares them to matched general populations in North America and Europe. We describe and utilise a novel actuarial survival methodology which allows quantification of excess post-fame mortality in pop stars. Individuals from North America and Europe performing on any album in the All-Time Top 1000 albums from the music genres rock, punk, rap, R&B, electronica and new age. From 3 to 25 years post fame, both North American and European pop stars experience significantly higher mortality (more than 1.7 times) than demographically matched populations in the USA and UK, respectively. After 25 years of fame, relative mortality in European (but not North American) pop stars begins to return to population levels. Five-year post-fame survival rates suggest differential mortality between stars and general populations was greater in those reaching fame before 1980. Pop stars can suffer high levels of stress in environments where alcohol and drugs are widely available, leading to health-damaging risk behaviour. However, their behaviour can also influence would-be stars and devoted fans. Collaborations between health and music industries should focus on improving both pop star health and their image as role models to wider populations.

  1. Elvis to Eminem: quantifying the price of fame through early mortality of European and North American rock and pop stars

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, Mark A; Hennell, Tom; Lushey, Clare; Hughes, Karen; Tocque, Karen; Ashton, John R

    2007-01-01

    Background Rock and pop stars are frequently characterised as indulging in high‐risk behaviours, with high‐profile deaths amongst such musicians creating an impression of premature mortality. However, studies to date have not quantified differences between mortality experienced by such stars and general populations. Objective This study measures survival rates of famous musicians (n = 1064) from their point of fame and compares them to matched general populations in North America and Europe. Design We describe and utilise a novel actuarial survival methodology which allows quantification of excess post‐fame mortality in pop stars. Participants Individuals from North America and Europe performing on any album in the All‐Time Top 1000 albums from the music genres rock, punk, rap, R&B, electronica and new age. Results From 3 to 25 years post fame, both North American and European pop stars experience significantly higher mortality (more than 1.7 times) than demographically matched populations in the USA and UK, respectively. After 25 years of fame, relative mortality in European (but not North American) pop stars begins to return to population levels. Five‐year post‐fame survival rates suggest differential mortality between stars and general populations was greater in those reaching fame before 1980. Conclusion Pop stars can suffer high levels of stress in environments where alcohol and drugs are widely available, leading to health‐damaging risk behaviour. However, their behaviour can also influence would‐be stars and devoted fans. Collaborations between health and music industries should focus on improving both pop star health and their image as role models to wider populations. PMID:17873227

  2. Endothelial actions of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2012-05-01

    The cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is critically involved in the maintenance of arterial blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. Its cGMP-producing GC-A receptor is densely expressed in the microvascular endothelium of the lung and systemic circulation, but the functional relevance is controversial. Some studies reported that ANP stimulates endothelial cell permeability, whereas others described that the peptide attenuates endothelial barrier dysfunction provoked by inflammatory agents such as thrombin or histamine. Many studies in vitro addressed the effects of ANP on endothelial proliferation and migration. Again, both pro- and anti-angiogenic properties were described. To unravel the role of the endothelial actions of ANP in vivo, we inactivated the murine GC-A gene selectively in endothelial cells by homologous loxP/Cre-mediated recombination. Our studies in these mice indicate that ANP, via endothelial GC-A, increases endothelial albumin permeability in the microcirculation of the skin and skeletal muscle. This effect is critically involved in the endocrine hypovolaemic, hypotensive actions of the cardiac hormone. On the other hand the homologous GC-A-activating B-type NP (BNP), which is produced by cardiac myocytes and many other cell types in response to stressors such as hypoxia, possibly exerts more paracrine than endocrine actions. For instance, within the ischaemic skeletal muscle BNP released from activated satellite cells can improve the regeneration of neighbouring endothelia. This review will focus on recent advancements in our understanding of endothelial NP/GC-A signalling in the pulmonary versus systemic circulation. It will discuss possible mechanisms accounting for the discrepant observations made for the endothelial actions of this hormone-receptor system and distinguish between (patho)physiological and pharmacological actions. Lastly it will emphasize the potential therapeutical implications derived from the

  3. EPISODIC ACCRETION AT EARLY STAGES OF EVOLUTION OF LOW-MASS STARS AND BROWN DWARFS: A SOLUTION FOR THE OBSERVED LUMINOSITY SPREAD IN H-R DIAGRAMS?

    SciT

    Baraffe, I.; Chabrier, G.; Gallardo, J.

    2009-09-01

    We present evolutionary models for young low-mass stars and brown dwarfs taking into account episodic phases of accretion at early stages of the evolution, a scenario supported by recent large surveys of embedded protostars. An evolution including short episodes of vigorous accretion followed by longer quiescent phases can explain the observed luminosity spread in H-R diagrams of star-forming regions at ages of a few Myr, for objects ranging from a few Jupiter masses to a few tenths of a solar mass. The gravitational contraction of these accreting objects strongly departs from the standard Hayashi track at constant T{sub eff}. Themore » best agreement with the observed luminosity scatter is obtained if most of the accretion shock energy is radiated away. The obtained luminosity spread at 1 Myr in the H-R diagram is equivalent to what can be misinterpreted as an {approx}10 Myr age spread for non-accreting objects. We also predict a significant spread in radius at a given T{sub eff}, as suggested by recent observations. These calculations bear important consequences for our understanding of star formation and early stages of evolution and on the determination of the initial mass function for young ({<=} a few Myr) clusters. Our results also show that the concept of a stellar birthline for low-mass objects has no valid support.« less

  4. B-type natriuretic peptide and echocardiography reflect volume changes during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Burlingame, Janet M.; Yamasato, Kelly; Ahn, Hyeong Jun; Seto, Todd; Tang, W. H. Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and cardiac structure and function in normal women through pregnancy and the postpartum. Methods In this prospective observational study, we obtained serial transthoracic echocardiograms, BNP, and NT-proBNP at seven intervals from 6 weeks’ gestation through 12 months postpartum. Women with hypertension or cardiac disease were excluded. Using 6–12 months postpartum as reference for non-pregnant levels, echocardiogram measurements and BNP/NT-proBNP were compared over time using linear mixed models with Tukey-Kramer adjustment for multiple comparisons. Results Of 116 patients, data was available for 78–114 healthy pregnant or postpartum women within each time interval, and 102 patients provided data for ≥ 4 intervals. Compared to 6–12 months postpartum, BNP and NT-proBNP remained stable through pregnancy and delivery, increased within 48 h postpartum (P < 0.0001), then returned to baseline. Left ventricular volume increased within 48 h postpartum (P = 0.021) while left atrial volume increased at 18–24 weeks (P = 0.0002), 30–36 weeks (P < 0.0001) and within 48 h postpartum (P = 0.002). The transmittal early/late diastolic velocity (E/A) ratio, transmittal early/peak mitral annulus diastolic velocity (E/E′) ratio, isovolumic relaxation times, and mitral valve deceleration times were similar within 48 h and 6–12 months postpartum. Conclusion In normal women, BNP/NT-proBNP, left atrial, and left ventricular volumes increase within 48 h postpartum without indications of altered diastolic function. PMID:28195551

  5. B-type natriuretic peptides and mortality after stroke

    PubMed Central

    García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Giralt, Dolors; Bustamante, Alejandro; Etgen, Thorleif; Jensen, Jesper K.; Sharma, Jagdish C.; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Saritas, Ayhan; Chen, Xingyong; Whiteley, William N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To measure the association of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal fragment of BNP (NT-proBNP) with all-cause mortality after stroke, and to evaluate the additional predictive value of BNP/NT-proBNP over clinical information. Methods: Suitable studies for meta-analysis were found by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE databases until October 26, 2012. Weighted mean differences measured effect size; meta-regression and publication bias were assessed. Individual participant data were used to estimate effects by logistic regression and to evaluate BNP/NT-proBNP additional predictive value by area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, and integrated discrimination improvement and categorical net reclassification improvement indexes. Results: Literature-based meta-analysis included 3,498 stroke patients from 16 studies and revealed that BNP/NT-proBNP levels were 255.78 pg/mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 105.10–406.47, p = 0.001) higher in patients who died; publication bias entailed the loss of this association. Individual participant data analysis comprised 2,258 stroke patients. After normalization of the data, patients in the highest quartile had double the risk of death after adjustment for clinical variables (NIH Stroke Scale score, age, sex) (odds ratio 2.30, 95% CI 1.32–4.01 for BNP; and odds ratio 2.63, 95% CI 1.75–3.94 for NT-proBNP). Only NT-proBNP showed a slight added value to clinical prognostic variables, increasing discrimination by 0.028 points (integrated discrimination improvement index; p < 0.001) and reclassifying 8.1% of patients into correct risk mortality categories (net reclassification improvement index; p = 0.003). Neither etiology nor time from onset to death affected the association of BNP/NT-proBNP with mortality. Conclusion: BNPs are associated with poststroke mortality independent of NIH Stroke Scale score, age, and sex. However, their translation to clinical practice seems difficult because BNP

  6. Modeling the early evolution of massive OB stars with an experimental wind routine. The first bi-stability jump and the angular momentum loss problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Z.; Puls, J.; Wade, G. A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Stellar evolution models of massive stars are very sensitive to the adopted mass-loss scheme. The magnitude and evolution of mass-loss rates significantly affect the main sequence evolution, and the properties of post-main sequence objects, including their rotational velocities. Aims: Driven by potential discrepancies between theoretically predicted and observationally derived mass-loss rates in the OB star range, we aim in particular to investigate the response to mass-loss rates that are lower than currently adopted, in parallel with the mass-loss behavior at the "first" bi-stability jump. Methods: We performed 1D hydrodynamical model calculations of single 20-60 M⊙ Galactic (Z = 0.014) stars where the effects of stellar winds are already significant in the main sequence phase. We have developed an experimental wind routine to examine the behavior and response of the models under the influence of different mass-loss rates. This observationally guided, simple and flexible wind routine is not a new mass-loss description but a useful tool based on the wind-momentum luminosity relation and other scaling relations, and provides a meaningful base for various tests and comparisons. Results: The main result of this study indicates a dichotomy between solutions of currently debated problems regarding mass-loss rates of hot massive stars. In a fully diffusive approach, and for commonly adopted initial rotational velocities, lower mass-loss rates than theoretically predicted require to invoke an additional source of angular momentum loss (either due to bi-stability braking, or yet unidentified) to brake down surface rotational velocities. On the other hand, a large jump in the mass-loss rates due to the bi-stability mechanism (a factor of 5-7 predicted by Vink et al. (2000, A&A, 362, 295), but a factor of 10-20 in modern models of massive stars) is challenged by observational results, and might be avoided if the early mass-loss rates agreed with the theoretically

  7. A search for peculiar stars in the open cluster Hogg 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariddi, Stefano; Azatyan, Naira M.; Kurfürst, Petr; Štofanová, Lýdia; Netopil, Martin; Paunzen, Ernst; Pintado, Olga I.; Aidelman, Yael J.

    2018-01-01

    The study of chemically peculiar (CP) stars in open clusters provides valuable information about their evolutionary status. Their detection can be performed using the Δa photometric system, which maps a characteristic flux depression at λ ∼ 5200 Å. This paper aims at studying the occurrence of CP stars in the earliest stages of evolution of a stellar population by applying this technique to Hogg 16, a very young Galactic open cluster ( ∼ 25 Myr). We identified several peculiar candidates: two B-type stars with a negative Δa index (CD - 60 4701, CPD - 60 4706) are likely emission-line (Be) stars, even though spectral measurements are necessary for a proper classification of the second one; a third object (CD - 60 4703), identified as a Be candidate in literature, appears to be a background B-type supergiant with no significant Δa index, which does not rule out the possibility that it is indeed peculiar as the normality line of Δa for supergiants has not been studied in detail yet. A fourth object (CD - 60 4699) appears to be a magnetic CP star of 8 M⊙, but obtained spectral data seem to rule out this hypothesis. Three more magnetic CP star candidates are found in the domain of early F-type stars. One is a probable nonmember and close to the border of significance, but the other two are probably pre-main sequence cluster objects. This is very promising, as it can lead to very strong constraints to the diffusion theory. Finally, we derived the fundamental parameters of Hogg 16 and provide for the first time an estimate of its metal content.

  8. Empirical ionization fractions in the winds and the determination of mass-loss rates for early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Gathier, R.; Snow, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    From a study of the UV lines in the spectra of 25 stars from 04 to B1, the empirical relations between the mean density in the wind and the ionization fractions of O VI, N V, Si IV, and the excited C III (2p 3P0) level were derived. Using these empirical relations, a simple relation was derived between the mass-loss rate and the column density of any of these four ions. This relation can be used for a simple determination of the mass-loss rate from O4 to B1 stars.

  9. Nitrogen line spectroscopy of O-stars. II. Surface nitrogen abundances for O-stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero González, J. G.; Puls, J.; Najarro, F.; Brott, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Nitrogen is a key element for testing the impact of rotational mixing on evolutionary models of massive stars. Recent studies of the nitrogen surface abundance in B-type stars within the VLT-FLAMES survey of massive stars have challenged part of the corresponding predictions. To obtain a more complete picture of massive star evolution, and to allow for additional constraints, these studies need to be extended to O-stars. Aims: This is the second paper in a series aiming at the analysis of nitrogen abundances in O-type stars, to establish tighter constraints on the early evolution of massive stars. In this paper, we investigate the N ivλ4058 emission line formation, provide nitrogen abundances for a substantial O-star sample in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and compare our (preliminary) findings with recent predictions from stellar evolutionary models. Methods: Stellar and wind parameters of our sample stars were determined by line profile fitting of hydrogen, helium and nitrogen lines, exploiting the corresponding ionization equilibria. Synthetic spectra were calculated by means of the NLTE atmosphere/spectrum synthesis code fastwind, using a new nitrogen model atom. We derived nitrogen abundances for 20 O- and 5 B-stars by analyzing all nitrogen lines (from different ionization stages) present in the available optical spectra. Results: The dominating process responsible for emission at N ivλ4058 in O-stars is the strong depopulation of the lower level of the transition, which increases as a function of Ṁ. Unlike the N iii triplet emission, resonance lines do not play a role for typical mass-loss rates and below. We find (almost) no problem in fitting the nitrogen lines, in particular the "f" features. Only for some objects, where lines from N iii/N iv/N v are visible in parallel, we need to opt for a compromise solution. For five objects in the early B-/late O-star domain that have been previously analyzed by different methods and model atmospheres, we

  10. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  11. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (˜10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ˜10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ˜1{{M}⊙} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}⊙} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}⊙} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  12. A NEAR-INFRARED STUDY OF THE STAR-FORMING REGION RCW 34

    SciT

    Van der Walt, D. J.; De Villiers, H. M.; Czanik, R. J.

    2012-07-15

    We report the results of a near-infrared imaging study of a 7.8 Multiplication-Sign 7.8 arcmin{sup 2} region centered on the 6.7 GHz methanol maser associated with the RCW 34 star-forming region using the 1.4 m IRSF telescope at Sutherland. A total of 1283 objects were detected simultaneously in J, H, and K for an exposure time of 10,800 s. The J - H, H - K two-color diagram revealed a strong concentration of more than 700 objects with colors similar to what is expected of reddened classical T Tauri stars. The distribution of the objects on the K versus Jmore » - K color-magnitude diagram is also suggestive that a significant fraction of the 1283 objects is made up of lower mass pre-main-sequence stars. We also present the luminosity function for the subset of about 700 pre-main-sequence stars and show that it suggests ongoing star formation activity for about 10{sup 7} years. An examination of the spatial distribution of the pre-main-sequence stars shows that the fainter (older) part of the population is more dispersed over the observed region and the brighter (younger) subset is more concentrated around the position of the O8.5V star. This suggests that the physical effects of the O8.5V star and the two early B-type stars on the remainder of the cloud out of which they formed could have played a role in the onset of the more recent episode of star formation in RCW 34.« less

  13. High S/N Echelle spectroscopy in young stellar groups. II. Rotational velocities of early-type stars in SCO OB2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. G. A.; Verschueren, W.

    1997-03-01

    We investigate the rotational velocities of early-type stars in the Sco OB2 association. We measure v.sin(i) for 156 established and probable members of the association. The measurements are performed with three different techniques, which are in increasing order of expected v.sin(i): 1) converting the widths of spectral lines directly to v.sin(i), 2) comparing artificially broadened spectra of low v.sin(i) stars to the target spectrum, 3) comparing the HeI λ4026 line profile to theoretical models. The sample is extended with literature data for 47 established members of Sco OB2. Analysis of the v.sin(i) distributions shows that there are no significant differences between the subgroups of Sco OB2. We find that members of the binary population of Sco OB2 on the whole rotate more slowly than the single stars. In addition, we find that the B7-B9 single star members rotate significantly faster than their B0-B6 counterparts. We test various hypotheses for the distribution of v.sin(i) in the association. The results show that we cannot clearly exclude any form of random distribution of the direction and/or magnitude of the intrinsic rotational velocity vector. We also investigate the effects of rotation on colours in the Walraven photometric system. We show that positions of B7-B9 single dwarfs above the main sequence are a consequence of rotation. This establishes the influence of rotation on the Walraven colours, due primarily to surface gravity effects.

  14. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  15. Sequential N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Measurements During Albumin Replacement in Patients With Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Masson, Serge; Caironi, Pietro; Fanizza, Caterina; Carrer, Sara; Caricato, Anselmo; Fassini, Paola; Vago, Tarcisio; Romero, Marilena; Tognoni, Gianni; Gattinoni, Luciano; Latini, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is a frequent complication in patients with severe sepsis and can worsen the prognosis. We investigated whether circulating biomarkers related to myocardial function and injury predicted outcome and were associated with albumin replacement. A multicenter, randomized clinical trial about albumin replacement in severe sepsis or septic shock (the Albumin Italian Outcome Sepsis trial). Forty ICUs in Italy. Nine hundred and ninety-five patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Randomization to albumin and crystalloid solutions or crystalloid solutions alone. Plasma concentrations of N- terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T were measured 1, 2, and 7 days after enrollment. We tested the relationship of single marker measurements or changes over time with clinical events, organ dysfunctions, albumin replacement, and ICU or 90-day mortality in the overall population and after stratification by shock. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels were abnormal in 97.4% of the patients and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T in 84.5%, with higher concentrations in those with shock. After extensive adjustments, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations predicted ICU or 90-day mortality, better than high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T. Early changes in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide or high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T concentrations were independently associated with subsequent mortality in patients with shock. Patients given albumin had significantly higher N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels; in addition, early rise in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide was associated with a better outcome in this subgroup. Circulating N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T are frequently elevated in severe sepsis or septic shock and have relevant prognostic value, which may be important in monitoring the clinical efficacy of

  16. The sun, moon and stars of the southern Levant at Gezer and Megiddo: Cultural astronomy in Chalcolithic/Early and Middle Bronze Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Sara Lee

    Astronomical images are found on monumental structures and decorative art, and metaphorically in seasonal myths, and are documented by calendars. In Israel and the southern Levant, images of the sun, the moon, and the stars were common decorating motifs. They were found on walls, pottery, and seals and date to as early as the Chalcolithic period; for example, the wall painting of a star at Teleilat Ghassul (North 1961). This dissertation establishes that the people of the Levant were aware of the apparent movement of the sun, and this will be discussed in Chapter 4. They began recording through representation drawings, astronomical phenomena no later than the Chalcolithic/Early Bronze Age and continued to do so late into the Middle Bronze Age. The argument moves beyond the simple use of symbols to the use of images to represent constellations, with the focus on the constellation Leo in Chapter 5. Furthermore, the use of astronomy as a power and political tool is also suggested in Chapter 6. Nonetheless, the primary purpose that is addressed here is the tendency in Syro-Palestinian archaeology has been to attribute technological evidence found in the northern and southern Levant as diffused from Egypt or Assyria, particularly astronomy. This dissertation firmly establishes that astronomy was used in the southern Levant before any significant contact with the civilizations of Egypt or Assyria.

  17. A Reconnaissance of the 900-1200 A Spectra of Early O Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walborn, Nolan

    1999-01-01

    Far-UV spectrograms of ten very hot stars in the Magellanic Clouds were obtained with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope during the Astro-2 mission in March 1995. Very few normal OB stars were observed during Astro-1, and the only significant prior sample of such objects in this wavelength range was that obtained by Copernicus of stars near the Sun. The Magellanic Cloud sample offers the advantages of low reddening, a range in metallicity, and more extreme temperatures and luminosities than represented in the near solar neighborhood. Several interesting phenomena were found in the HUT MC sample, including very strong O VI wind profiles in O3 spectra; anomalous CNO wind features corresponding to abundances altered by stellar nucleosynthesis; weak wind features due to the metal deficiency of the Small Magellanic Cloud; and interstellar molecular hydrogen features originating in the MCs. The results were presented and discussed as a small atlas, and they were shown at the Pittsburgh AAS meeting in June 1995. A correlative atlas of Copernicus data was also prepared and published under the auspices of this grant. These publications will serve as resources for the characterization of the FUSE observations of related objects to hopefully be obtained soon. I believe that the large differences among the strong wind features in the HUT data, corresponding to CNO and systemic metallicity effects, are amenable to some relative quantitative analysis, and I shall endeavor to promote such in conjunction with HST data at longer wavelengths for the same stars (which has also not yet been completely analyzed) at a future opportunity.

  18. Elemental abundance analyses with DAO spectrograms: XXX. The middle B through early A stars ξ2 Ceti (B9 III), 21 Aquilae (B8 II-III), ι Aquilae (B5 III), and ι Delphini (A2V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Westbrook, P. C.; Gulliver, A. F.

    2010-04-01

    This series of high quality elemental abundance analyses of mostly main-sequence band normal and peculiar B, A, and F stars defines their properties and provides data for the comparison with the analyses of somewhat similar stars and with theoretical predictions. Most use high dispersion and high S/N (≥ 200) spectrograms obtained with CCD detectors at the long camera of the Coudé spectrograph of the 1.22-m Dominion Astrophysical Observatory telescope. Here we reanalyze 21 Aql with better quality spectra and increase the number of stars consistently analyzed in the spectral range B5 to A2 by analyzing three new stars for this series. In the early A stars the normal and non-mCP stars have abundances with overlapping ranges. But more stars are needed especially in the B5 to B9 range. ξ2 Cet on average has a solar composition with a few abundances outside the solar range while both 21 Aql and ι Aql have abundances marginally less than solar. The abundances of ι Del are greater than solar with a few elements such as Ca being less than solar. It is an Am star. Table 3 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/ftp/cats/J/other/AN/331/378

  19. Inferring the star-formation histories of the most massive and passive early-type galaxies at z < 0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citro, Annalisa; Pozzetti, Lucia; Moresco, Michele; Cimatti, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Context. In the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological framework, massive galaxies are the end-points of the hierarchical evolution and are therefore key probes for understanding how the baryonic matter evolves within the dark matter halos. Aims: The aim of this work is to use the archaeological approach in order to infer the stellar population properties and star formation histories of the most massive (M > 1010.75 M⊙) and passive early-type galaxies (ETGs) at 0 < z < 0.3 (corresponding to a cosmic time interval of ~3.3 Gyr) based on stacked, high signal-to-noise (S/N), spectra extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our study is focused on the most passive ETGs in order to avoid the contamination of galaxies with residual star formation activity and extract the evolutionary information on the oldest envelope of the global galaxy population. Methods: Unlike most previous studies in this field, we did not rely on individual absorption features such as the Lick indices, but we used the information present in the full spectrum with the STARLIGHT public code, adopting different stellar population synthesis models. Successful tests have been performed to assess the reliability of STARLIGHT to retrieve the evolutionary properties of the ETG stellar populations such as the age, metallicity and star formation history. The results indicate that these properties can be derived with accuracy better than 10% at S/N ≳ 10-20, and also that the procedure of stacking galaxy spectra does not introduce significant biases into their retrieval. Results: Based on our spectral analysis, we found that the ETGs of our sample are very old systems - the most massive ones are almost as old as the Universe. The stellar metallicities are slightly supersolar, with a mean of Z ~ 0.027 ± 0.002 and Z ~ 0.029 ± 0.0015 (depending on the spectral synthesis models used for the fit) and do not depend on redshift. Dust extinction is very low, with a mean of AV ~ 0.08 ± 0.030 mag

  20. KELT-20b: A Giant Planet with a Period of P ˜ 3.5 days Transiting the V ˜ 7.6 Early A Star HD 185603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Michael B.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Zhou, George; Gaudi, B. Scott; Stassun, Keivan G.; Johnson, Marshall C.; Bieryla, Allyson; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Stevens, Daniel J.; Collins, Karen A.; Penev, Kaloyan; Quinn, Samuel N.; Latham, David W.; Villanueva, Steven, Jr.; Eastman, Jason D.; Kielkopf, John F.; Oberst, Thomas E.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Cohen, David H.; Joner, Michael D.; Stephens, Denise C.; Relles, Howard; Corfini, Giorgio; Gregorio, Joao; Zambelli, Roberto; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Calkins, Michael L.; Berlind, Perry; Ciardi, David R.; Dressing, Courtney; Patel, Rahul; Gagnon, Patrick; Gonzales, Erica; Beatty, Thomas G.; Siverd, Robert J.; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Kuhn, Rudolf B.; Colón, Knicole D.; James, David; Pepper, Joshua; Fulton, Benjamin J.; McLeod, Kim K.; Stockdale, Christopher; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; DePoy, D. L.; Gould, Andrew; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia; Johnson, John A.; Wright, Jason; McCrady, Nate; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Johnson, Samson A.; Sergi, Anthony; Wilson, Maurice; Sliski, David H.

    2017-11-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-20b, a hot Jupiter transiting a V˜ 7.6 early A star, HD 185603, with an orbital period of P≃ 3.47 days. Archival and follow-up photometry, Gaia parallax, radial velocities, Doppler tomography, and AO imaging were used to confirm the planetary nature of KELT-20b and characterize the system. From global modeling we infer that KELT-20 is a rapidly rotating (v\\sin {I}* ≃ 120 {km} {{{s}}}-1) A2V star with an effective temperature of {T}{eff}={8730}-260+250 K, mass of {M}* ={1.76}-0.20+0.14 {M}⊙ , radius of {R}* ={1.561}-0.064+0.058 {R}⊙ , surface gravity of {log}{g}* ={4.292}-0.020+0.017, and age of ≲ 600 {Myr}. The planetary companion has a radius of {R}P={1.735}-0.075+0.070 {R}{{J}}, a semimajor axis of a={0.0542}-0.0021+0.0014 au, and a linear ephemeris of {{BJD}}{TDB}=2457503.120049+/- 0.000190 +E(3.4741070+/- 0.0000019). We place a 3σ upper limit of ˜ 3.5 {M}{{J}} on the mass of the planet. Doppler tomographic measurements indicate that the planetary orbit normal is well aligned with the projected spin axis of the star (λ =3\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 4+/- 2\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 1). The inclination of the star is constrained to 24\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 4< {I}* < 155\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 6, implying a three-dimensional spin-orbit alignment of 1\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 3< \\psi < 69\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 8. KELT-20b receives an insolation flux of ˜ 8× {10}9 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2, implying an equilibrium temperature of of ˜2250 K, assuming zero albedo and complete heat redistribution. Due to the high stellar {T}{eff}, KELT-20b also receives an ultraviolet (wavelength d≤slant 91.2 nm) insolation flux of ˜ 9.1× {10}4 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2, possibly indicating significant atmospheric ablation. Together with WASP-33, Kepler-13 A, HAT-P-57, KELT-17, and KELT-9, KELT-20 is the sixth A star host of a transiting giant planet, and the third-brightest host (in V) of a transiting planet.

  1. Quantitative UV spectroscopy of early O stars on the Magellanic Clouds: The determination of the stellar metallicities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haser, Stefan M.; Pauldrach, Adalbert W. A.; Lennon, Danny J.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lennon, Maguerite; Puls, Joachim; Voels, Stephen A.

    1997-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of four O stars in the Magellanic Clouds obtained with the faint object spectrograph of the Hubble Space Telescope are analyzed with respect to their metallicity. The metal abundances are derived from the stellar parameters and the mass loss rate with a two step procedure: hydrodynamic radiation-driven wind models with metallicity as a free parameter are constructed to fit the observed wind momentum rate and thus yield a dynamical metallicity, and synthetic spectra are computed for different metal abundances and compared to the observed spectra in order to obtain a spectroscopic metallicity.

  2. Flattening and surface-brightness of the fast-rotating star δ Persei with the visible VEGA/CHARA interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challouf, M.; Nardetto, N.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Mourard, D.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; Aroui, H.; Farrington, C.; Ligi, R.; Meilland, A.; Mouelhi, M.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Rapid rotation is a common feature for massive stars, with important consequences on their physical structure, flux distribution and evolution. Fast-rotating stars are flattened and show gravity darkening (non-uniform surface intensity distribution). Another important and less studied impact of fast-rotation in early-type stars is its influence on the surface brightness colour relation (hereafter SBCR), which could be used to derive the distance of eclipsing binaries. Aims: The purpose of this paper is to determine the flattening of the fast-rotating B-type star δ Per using visible long-baseline interferometry. A second goal is to evaluate the impact of rotation and gravity darkening on the V - K colour and surface brightness of the star. Methods: The B-type star δ Per was observed with the VEGA/CHARA interferometer, which can measure spatial resolutions down to 0.3 mas and spectral resolving power of 5000 in the visible. We first used a toy model to derive the position angle of the rotation axis of the star in the plane of the sky. Then we used a code of stellar rotation, CHARRON, in order to derive the physical parameters of the star. Finally, by considering two cases, a static reference star and our best model of δ Per, we can quantify the impact of fast rotation on the surface brightness colour relation (SBCR). Results: We find a position angle of 23 ± 6 degrees. The polar axis angular diameter of δ Per is θp = 0.544 ± 0.007 mas, and the derived flatness is r = 1.121 ± 0.013. We derive an inclination angle for the star of I = 85+ 5-20 degrees and a projected rotation velocity Vsini = 175+ 8-11 km s-1 (or 57% of the critical velocity). We find also that the rotation and inclination angle of δ Per keeps the V - K colour unchanged while it decreasing its surface-brightness by about 0.05 mag. Conclusions: Correcting the impact of rotation on the SBCR of early-type stars appears feasible using visible interferometry and dedicated models.

  3. Be Stars in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Matthew L.; Wisniewski, John; Choi, Yumi; Williams, Ben; Lomax, Jamie; Bjorkman, Karen; Durbin, Meredith; Johnson, Lent Cliff; Lewis, Alexia; Lutz, Julie; Sigut, Aaron; Wallach, Aislynn; Dalcanton, Julianne

    2018-01-01

    We identify Be candidate stars in M31 using two-epoch F625W + F658N photometry from HST/ACS+WFC3 combined with the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) Catalog. Using the PHAT catalog allows us to extract stellar parameters such as surface temperature and gravity, thereby allowing us to identify the main sequence B type stars in the field of view. Be candidate stars are identified by comparing their HST narrow-band Hα excess magnitudes with that predicted by Kurucz spectra. We find 314 Be candidate stars out of 5699 B + Be candidate stars (5.51%) in our first epoch and 301 Be candidate stars out of 5769 B + Be candidate stars (5.22%) in our second epoch. Our Be fraction, while lower than that of the SMC, LMC, and MW, is possibly consistent with the fact the M31 has a higher metallicity than the other galaxies because Be fraction varies inversely with metallicity. We note that earlier spectral types have the largest Be fraction, and that the Be fraction strictly declines as the spectral type increases to later types. We then match our Be candidate stars with clusters, establishing that 39 of 314 are cluster stars in epoch one and 36 of 301 stars are cluster stars in epoch two. We assign ages, using the cluster age to characterize cluster Be candidate stars and star formation histories to characterize field Be candidate stars. Finally, we determine which Be candidate stars exhibited disk loss or disk growth between epochs, finding that, of the Be stars that did not show source confusion or low SNR in one of the epochs, 65 / 265 (24.5%) showed disk loss or renewal, while 200 / 265 (75.5%) showed only small changes in Hα excess. Our research provides context for the parameters of candidate Be stars in M31, which will be useful in further determining the nature of Be stars. This paper was supported by a grant from STScI via GO-13857.

  4. Lessons from the Lone Star State: Designing a Sustainable Financial Model to Expand Early College High School in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberger, Susan; Santos, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Texas is a national leader in creating early college high schools, an innovative small school model that blends secondary and postsecondary education with intensive supports to increase college readiness and success for underachieving students. The state has 29 early college schools, with more opening in the 2008-2009 academic year, thanks largely…

  5. Preparation, structure, and digestibility of crystalline A- and B-type aggregates from debranched waxy starches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liming; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-05-25

    Highly crystalline A- and B-type aggregates were prepared from short linear α-1,4 glucans generated from completely debranched waxy maize and waxy potato starches by manipulating the chain length and crystallization conditions including starch solids concentration and crystallization temperature. The A-type crystalline products were more resistant to enzyme digestion than the B-type crystalline products, and the digestibility of the A- and B-type allomorphs was not correlated with the size of the aggregates formed. Annealing increased the peak melting temperature of the B-type crystallites, making it similar to that of the A-type crystallites, but did not improve the enzyme resistance of the B-type crystalline products. The possible reason for these results was due to the compact morphology as well as the denser packing pattern of double helices in A-type crystallites. Our observations counter the fact that most B-type native starches are more enzyme-resistant than A-type native starches. Crystalline type per se does not seem to be the key factor that controls the digestibility of native starch granules; the resistance of native starches with a B-type X-ray diffraction pattern is probably attributed to the other structural features in starch granules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Early-type objects in NGC 6611 and the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martayan, C.; Floquet, M.; Hubert, A. M.; Neiner, C.; Frémat, Y.; Baade, D.; Fabregat, J.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: An important question about Be stars is whether they are born as such or whether they have become Be stars during their evolution. It is necessary to observe young clusters to answer this question. Methods: To this end, observations of stars in NGC 6611 and the star-formation region of Eagle Nebula were carried out with the ESO-WFI in slitless spectroscopic mode and at the VLT-GIRAFFE (R ≃ 6400-17 000). The targets for the GIRAFFE observations were pre-selected from the literature and our catalogue of emission-line stars based on the WFI study. GIRAFFE observations allowed us to study the population of the early-type stars accurately both with and without emission lines. For this study, we determined the fundamental parameters of OBA stars thanks to the GIRFIT code. We also studied the status of the objects (main sequence or pre-main sequence stars) by using IR data, membership probabilities, and location in HR diagrams. Results: The nature of the early-type stars with emission-line stars in NGC 6611 and its surrounding environment is derived. The slitless observations with the WFI clearly indicate a small number of emission-line stars in M16. We observed with GIRAFFE 101 OBA stars, among them 9 are emission-line stars with circumstellar emission in Hα. We found that W080 could be a new He-strong star, like W601. W301 is a possible classical Be star, W503 is a mass-transfer eclipsing binary with an accretion disk, and the other ones are possible Herbig Ae/Be stars. We also found that the rotational velocities of main sequence B stars are 18% lower than those of pre-main sequence B stars, in good agreement with theory about the evolution of rotational velocities. Combining adaptive optics, IR data, spectroscopy, and radial velocity indications, we found that 27% of the B-type stars are binaries. We also redetermined the age of NGC 6611 found equal to 1.2-1.8 Myears, in good agreement with the most recent determinations.

  7. Sizing up the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyajian, Tabetha S.

    For the main part of this dissertation, I have executed a survey of nearby, main sequence A, F, and G-type stars with the CHARA Array, successfully measuring the angular diameters of forty-four stars to better than 4% accuracy. The results of these observations also yield empirical determinations of stellar linear radii and effective temperatures for the stars observed. In addition, these CHARA-determined temperatures, radii, and luminosities are fit to Yonsei-Yale isochrones to constrain the masses and ages of the stars. These quantities are compared to the results found in Allende Prieto & Lambert (1999), Holmberg et al. (2007), and Takeda (2007), who indirectly determine these same properties by fitting models to observed photometry. I find that for most cases, the models underestimate the radius of the star by ~ 12%, while in turn they overestimate the effective temperature by ~ 1.5-4%, when compared to my directly measured values, with no apparent correlation to the star's metallicity or color index. These overestimated temperatures and underestimated radii in these works appear to cause an additional offset in the star's surface gravity measurements, which consequently yield higher masses and younger ages, in particular for stars with masses greater than ~ 1.3 [Special characters omitted.] . Alternatively, these quantities I measure are also compared to direct measurements from a large sample of eclipsing binary stars in Andersen (1991), and excellent agreement is seen within both data sets. Finally, a multi-parameter solution is found to fit color-temperature-metallicity values of the stars in this sample to provide a new calibration of the effective temperature scale for these types of stars. Published work in the field of stellar interferometry and optical spectroscopy of early-type stars are presented in Appendix D and E, respectively. INDEX WORDS: Interferometry, Infrared, Stellar Astronomy, Fundamental Properties, Effective Temperatures, Stellar Radii

  8. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  9. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  10. New CCD photometric investigation of the early-type overcontact binary BH Cen in the young star-forming Galactic cluster IC 2944

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Er-Gang; Qian, Sheng-Bang; Zejda, Miloslav; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jia

    2018-05-01

    BH Cen is a short-period early-type binary with a period of 0.792d in the extremely young star-forming cluster IC 2944. New multi-color CCD photometric light curves in U, B, V, R and I bands are presented and are analyzed by using the Wilson-Devinney code. It is detected that BH Cen is a high-mass-ratio overcontact binary with a fill-out factor of 46.4% and a mass ratio of 0.89. The derived orbital inclination i is 88.9 degrees, indicating that it is a totally eclipsing binary and the photometric parameters can be determined reliably. By adding new eclipse times, the orbital period changes in the binary are analyzed. It is confirmed that the period of BH Cen shows a long-term increase while it undergoes a cyclic oscillation with an amplitude of A 3 = 0.024 d and a period of P 3 = 50.3 yr. The high mass ratio, overcontact configuration and long-term continuous increase in the orbital period all suggest that BH Cen is in the evolutionary state after the shortest-period stage of Case A mass transfer. The continuous increase in period can be explained by mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one at a rate of Ṁ 2 = 2.8 × 10‑6 M ⊙ per year. The cyclic change can be plausibly explained by the presence of a third body because both components in the BH Cen system are early-type stars. Its mass is determined to be no less than 2.2 M ⊙ at an orbital separation of about 32.5 AU. Since no third light was found during the photometric solution, it is possible that the third body may be a candidate for a compact object.

  11. WEAK AND COMPACT RADIO EMISSION IN EARLY HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS. I. VLA OBSERVATIONS

    SciT

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; Claussen, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present a high-sensitivity radio continuum survey at 6 and 1.3 cm using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array toward a sample of 58 high-mass star-forming regions. Our sample was chosen from dust clumps within infrared dark clouds with and without IR sources (CMC–IRs and CMCs, respectively), and hot molecular cores (HMCs), with no previous, or relatively weak radio continuum detection at the 1 mJy level. Due to the improvement in the continuum sensitivity of the Very Large Array, this survey achieved map rms levels of ∼3–10  μ Jy beam{sup −1} at sub-arcsecond angular resolution. We extracted 70 continuum sourcesmore » associated with 1.2 mm dust clumps. Most sources are weak, compact, and prime candidates for high-mass protostars. Detection rates of radio sources associated with the millimeter dust clumps for CMCs, CMC–IRs, and HMCs are 6%, 53%, and 100%, respectively. This result is consistent with increasing high-mass star formation activity from CMCs to HMCs. The radio sources located within HMCs and CMC–IRs occur close to the dust clump centers, with a median offset from it of 12,000 au and 4000 au, respectively. We calculated 5–25 GHz spectral indices using power-law fits and obtained a median value of 0.5 (i.e., flux increasing with frequency), suggestive of thermal emission from ionized jets. In this paper we describe the sample, observations, and detections. The analysis and discussion will be presented in Paper II.« less

  12. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  13. Dehydration breakdown of antigorite and the formation of B-type olivine CPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Wallis, Simon R.; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Seto, Yusuke; Miyake, Akira; Matsumoto, Megumi

    2014-02-01

    Peridotite formed by contact metamorphism and dehydration breakdown of an antigorite schist from the Happo area, central Japan shows a strong olivine crystallographic preferred orientation (Ol CPO). The lack of mesoscale deformation structures associated with the intrusion and the lack of microstructural evidence for plastic deformation of neoblastic grains suggest that olivine CPO in this area did not form as a result of solid-state deformation. Instead, the good correspondence between the original antigorite orientation and the orientation of the newly formed olivine implies the CPO formed by topotactic growth of the olivine after antigorite. Ol CPO is likely to develop by a similar process in subduction zone environments where foliated serpentinite is dragged down to depths where antigorite is no longer stable. The Happo Ol CPO has a strong a-axis concentration perpendicular to the lineation and within the foliation-commonly referred to as B-type Ol CPO. Seismic fast directions parallel to the ocean trench are observed in many convergent margins and are consistent with the presence of B-type Ol CPO in the mantle wedge of these regions. Experimental work has shown that B-type CPO can form by dislocation creep under hydrous conditions at relatively high stresses. There are, however, several discrepancies between the characteristics of natural and laboratory samples with B-type Ol CPO. (1) The formation conditions (stress and temperature) of some natural examples with B-type CPO fall outside those predicted by experiments. (2) In deformation experiments, slip in the crystallographic c-axis direction is important but has not been observed in natural examples of B-type CPO. (3) Experimental work suggests the presence of H2O and either high shear stress or relatively low temperatures are essential for the formation of B-type CPO. These conditions are most likely to be achieved close to subduction boundaries, but these regions are also associated with serpentinization

  14. Troponin T and Pro–B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Fetuses of Type 1 Diabetic Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Noirin E.; Higgins, Mary F.; Amaruso, Michael; Foley, Michael; McAuliffe, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cardiomyopathy is noted in up to 40% of infants of diabetic mothers, and the exact mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether fetal serum markers of cardiac function differ between normal and type 1 diabetic pregnancies and to examine the relationship between these markers and fetal cardiac structure and function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a prospective observational study of 45 type 1 diabetic pregnancies and 39 normal pregnancies. All participants had concentrations of fetal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP) and troponin-T (TnT) measured at the time of delivery. All patients with type 1 diabetes had Doppler evaluation of the umbilical artery, middle cerebral artery, and ductus venosus in the third trimester, and a subset (n = 21) had detailed fetal echocardiograms performed in each trimester. RESULTS Fetal proBNP and TnT concentrations were higher in the diabetic cohort than in the normal cohort (P < 0.05). ProBNP correlated positively with interventricular septum thickness (P < 0.05) but not with cardiac function indexes in the third trimester. In patients with poor glycemic control, there was a significant positive correlation (P < 0.05) between fetal TnT and the third trimester umbilical artery pulsatility index. There were also increased levels of fetal TnT in infants with poor perinatal outcome (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Biochemical markers of cardiac dysfunction are elevated in infants of diabetic mothers, especially those with cardiomyopathy or poor perinatal outcome. Hyperglycemia in early pregnancy may affect myocardial and placental development, thus contributing to the susceptibility to hypoxia seen in these infants. PMID:19690080

  15. Rosettes, Engrailed Edges, and Star-Shaped Patterns: Between Rediscovery and Forgetfulness in the Early Accounts of Vibrating Liquid Drops Floating over Hot Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Seán M

    2017-12-01

    Small drops of liquid brought into contact with very hot surfaces float above it as beautiful, slightly flattened spheroids without coming to the boil. An example of film boiling, drops that are sessile can often suddenly and quite unexpectedly start to oscillate forming highly symmetric patterns of surprising pulchritude. The rim of these oscillating drops take on "star-shaped" patterns with many different modes of vibration possible. Still an object of study today, their discovery, early accounts, rediscovery and ensuing controversies over claims of priority, before quietly slipping away from the collective memory of the scientific community to become all but forgotten makes for a compelling story in the early history of film boiling. The episode serves not only as a valuable reminder of the importance the history of science can play in highlighting past achievements that would otherwise remain unknown to the modern practitioner. It also provides an example of how external pressures and personal ambition can often influence the work of a scientist in their pursuit of self-recognition and acclaim amongst their peers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Massive stars, disks, and clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeckel, Nickolas Barry

    The formation of an isolated massive star is inherently more complex than the relatively well-understood collapse of an isolated, low-mass star. The dense, clustered environment where massive stars are predominantly found further complicates the picture, and suggests that interactions with other stars may play an important role in the early life of these objects. In this thesis we present the results of numerical hydrodynamic experiments investigating interactions between a massive protostar and its lower-mass cluster siblings. We explore the impact of these interactions on the orientation of disks and outflows, which are potentially observable indications of encounters during the formation of a star. We show that these encounters efficiently form eccentric binary systems, and in clusters similar to Orion they occur frequently enough to contribute to the high multiplicity of massive stars. We suggest that the massive protostar in Cepheus A is currently undergoing a series of interactions, and present simulations tailored to that system. We also apply the numerical techniques used in the massive star investigations to a much lower-mass regime, the formation of planetary systems around Solar- mass stars. We perform a small number of illustrative planet-planet scattering experiments, which have been used to explain the eccentricity distribution of extrasolar planets. We add the complication of a remnant gas disk, and show that this feature has the potential to stabilize the system against strong encounters between planets. We present preliminary simulations of Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a protoplanetary disk, and consider the impact of the flow on the disk properties as well as the impact of the disk on the accretion flow.

  17. The APOGEE-2 Survey of the Orion Star-forming Complex. I. Target Selection and Validation with Early Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, J.’Neil; Covey, Kevin R.; Suárez, Genaro; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Schlafly, Edward; Downes, Juan Jose; Ybarra, Jason E.; Hernandez, Jesus; Stassun, Keivan; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Getman, Konstantin; Feigelson, Eric; Borissova, Jura; Kim, J. Serena; Roman-Lopes, A.; Da Rio, Nicola; De Lee, Nathan; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Kounkel, Marina; Majewski, Steven R.; Mennickent, Ronald E.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Pan, Kaike; Shetrone, Matthew; Zasowski, Gail; Chambers, Ken; Magnier, Eugene; Valenti, Jeff

    2018-06-01

    The Orion Star-forming Complex (OSFC) is a central target for the APOGEE-2 Young Cluster Survey. Existing membership catalogs span limited portions of the OSFC, reflecting the difficulty of selecting targets homogeneously across this extended, highly structured region. We have used data from wide-field photometric surveys to produce a less biased parent sample of young stellar objects (YSOs) with infrared (IR) excesses indicative of warm circumstellar material or photometric variability at optical wavelengths across the full 420 square degree extent of the OSFC. When restricted to YSO candidates with H < 12.4, to ensure S/N ∼ 100 for a six-visit source, this uniformly selected sample includes 1307 IR excess sources selected using criteria vetted by Koenig & Liesawitz (2014) and 990 optical variables identified in the Pan-STARRS1 3π survey: 319 sources exhibit both optical variability and evidence of circumstellar disks through IR excess. Objects from this uniformly selected sample received the highest priority for targeting, but required fewer than half of the fibers on each APOGEE-2 plate. We filled the remaining fibers with previously confirmed and new color–magnitude selected candidate OSFC members. Radial velocity measurements from APOGEE-1 and new APOGEE-2 observations taken in the survey’s first year indicate that ∼90% of the uniformly selected targets have radial velocities consistent with Orion membership. The APOGEE-2 Orion survey will include >1100 bona fide YSOs whose uniform selection function will provide a robust sample for comparative analyses of the stellar populations and properties across all sub-regions of Orion.

  18. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  19. Pulsating B and Be stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diago, P. D.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Fabregat, J.; Martayan, C.

    2008-03-01

    Context: Stellar pulsations in main-sequence B-type stars are driven by the κ-mechanism due to the Fe-group opacity bump. The current models do not predict the presence of instability strips in the B spectral domain at very low metallicities. As the metallicity of the SMC is lower than Z = 0.005, it constitutes a very suitable object to test these predictions. Aims: The main objective is to investigate the existence of B-type pulsators at low metallicities, searching for short-term periodic variability in absorption-line B and Be stars in the SMC. The analysis has been performed in a sample of 313 B and Be stars with fundamental astrophysical parameters accurately determined from high-resolution spectroscopy. Methods: Photometric light curves of the MACHO project have been analyzed using standard Fourier techniques and linear and non-linear least squares fitting methods. The position of the pulsating stars in the HR diagram has been used to ascertain their nature and to map the instability regions in the SMC. Results: We have detected 9 absorption-line B stars showing short-period variability, two among them being multiperiodic. One star is most likely a β Cephei variable and the remaining 8 are SPB stars. The SPB instability strip in the SMC is shifted towards higher temperatures than the Galaxy. In the Be star sample, 32 stars are short-period variables, 20 among them multiperiodic. 4.9% of B stars and 25.3% of Be stars are pulsating stars. Conclusions: β Cephei and SPB stars do exist at the SMC metallicity. The fractions of SPB stars and pulsating Be stars in the SMC are lower than in the Galaxy. The fraction of pulsating Be stars in the SMC is much higher than the fraction of pulsating absorption-line B stars, as in the Galaxy.

  20. The Magnetic Properties of Galactic OB Stars from the Magnetism in Massive Stars Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Gregg A.; Grunhut, Jason; Petit, Veronique; Neiner, Coralie; Alecian, Evelyne; Landstreet, John; MiMeS Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    The Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project represents the largest systematic survey of stellar magnetism ever undertaken. Comprising nearly 4500 high resolution polarised spectra of nearly 550 Galactic B and O-type stars, the MiMeS survey aims to address interesting and fundamental questions about the magnetism of hot, massive stars: How and when are massive star magnetic fields generated, and how do they evolve throughout stellar evolution? How do magnetic fields couple to and interact with the powerful winds of OB stars, and what are the consequences for the wind structure, momentum flux and energetics? What are the detailed physical mechanisms that lead to the anomalously slow rotation of many magnetic massive stars? What is the ultimate impact of stellar magnetic fields -- both direct and indirect -- on the evolution of massive stars? In this talk we report results from the analysis of the B-type stars observed within the MiMeS survey. The sample consists of over 450 stars ranging in spectral type from B9 to B0, and in evolutionary stage from the pre-main sequence to the post-main sequence. In addition to general statistical results concerning field incidence, strength and topology, we will elaborate our conclusions for subsamples of special interest, including the Herbig and classical Be stars, pulsating B stars and chemically peculiar B stars.

  1. The VLT-FLAMES survey of massive stars: wind properties and evolution of hot massive stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokiem, M. R.; de Koter, A.; Evans, C. J.; Puls, J.; Smartt, S. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Herrero, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D. J.; Najarro, F.; Villamariz, M. R.; Vink, J. S.

    2007-04-01

    We have studied the optical spectra of a sample of 28 O- and early B-type stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, 22 of which are associated with the young star forming region N11. Our observations sample the central associations of LH9 and LH10, and the surrounding regions. Stellar parameters are determined using an automated fitting method (Mokiem et al. 2005), which combines the stellar atmosphere code fastwind (Puls et al. 2005) with the genetic algorithm based optimisation routine pikaia (Charbonneau 1995). We derive an age of 7.0 ± 1.0 and 3.0 ± 1.0 Myr for LH9 and LH10, respectively. The age difference and relative distance of the associations are consistent with a sequential star formation scenario in which stellar activity in LH9 triggered the formation of LH10. Our sample contains four stars of spectral type O2. From helium and hydrogen line fitting we find the hottest three of these stars to be 49{-}54 kK (compared to 45{-}46 kK for O3 stars). Detailed determination of the helium mass fraction reveals that the masses of helium enriched dwarfs and giants derived in our spectroscopic analysis are systematically lower than those implied by non-rotating evolutionary tracks. We interpret this as evidence for efficient rotationally enhanced mixing leading to the surfacing of primary helium and to an increase of the stellar luminosity. This result is consistent with findings for SMC stars by Mokiem et al. (2006). For bright giants and supergiants no such mass discrepancy is found; these stars therefore appear to follow tracks of modestly or non-rotating objects. The set of programme stars was sufficiently large to establish the mass loss rates of OB stars in this Z ˜ 1/2 Z⊙ environment sufficiently accurate to allow for a quantitative comparison with similar objects in the Galaxy and the SMC. The mass loss properties are found to be intermediate to massive stars in the Galaxy and SMC. Comparing the derived modified wind momenta D_mom as a function of

  2. ALMA Observations of N83C in the Early Stage of Star Formation in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Homma, Aya; Onishi, Toshikazu; Tokuda, Kazuki; Harada, Ryohei; Morioka, Yuuki; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Saigo, Kazuya; Kawamura, Akiko; Mizuno, Norikazu; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Muller, Erik; Fukui, Yasuo; Meixner, Margaret; Indebetouw, Remy; Sewiło, Marta; Bolatto, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    We have performed Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations in the 12CO(J=2-1), 13CO(J=2-1), C18O(J=2-1), 12CO(J=3-2), 13CO(J=3-2), and CS(J=7-6) lines toward the active star-forming region N83C in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), whose metallicity is about one-fifth of the Milky Way (MW). The ALMA observations first reveal subparsec-scale molecular structures in 12CO(J=2-1) and 13CO(J=2-1) emissions. We found strong CO peaks associated with young stellar objects (YSOs) identified by the Spitzer Space Telescope, and we also found that overall molecular gas is distributed along the edge of the neighboring {{H}} II region. We derived a gas density of ˜ {10}4 cm-3 in molecular clouds associated with YSOs based on the virial mass estimated from the 12CO(J=2-1) emission. This high gas density is presumably due to the effect of the {{H}} II region under the low-metallicity (and accordingly small-dust content) environment in the SMC; far-UV radiation from the {{H}} II region can easily penetrate and photodissociate the outer layer of 12CO molecules in the molecular clouds, and thus only the innermost parts of the molecular clouds are observed even in 12CO emission. We obtained the CO-to-H2 conversion factor {X}{CO} of 7.5× {10}20 cm-2 (K km s-1)-1 in N83C based on virial masses and CO luminosities, and it is four times larger than that in the MW, 2 × {10}20 cm-2 (K km s-1)-1. We also discuss the difference in the nature between two high-mass YSOs, each of which is associated with a molecular clump with a mass of about a few × {10}3 {M}⊙ .

  3. Magnetic B stars observed with BRITE: Spots, magnetospheres, binarity, and pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G. A.; Cohen, D. H.; Fletcher, C.; Handler, G.; Huang, L.; Krticka, J.; Neiner, C.; Niemczura, E.; Pablo, H.; Paunzen, E.; Petit, V.; Pigulski, A.; Rivinius, Th.; Rowe, J.; Rybicka, M.; Townsend, R.; Shultz, M.; Silvester, J.; Sikora, J.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic B-type stars exhibit photometric variability due to diverse causes, and consequently on a variety of timescales. In this paper we describe interpretation of BRITE photometry and related ground-based observations of four magnetic B-type systems: ɛ Lupi, τ Sco, a Cen and ɛ CMa.

  4. The Evolution of Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S. Josephine

    1993-04-01

    -type stars (^13C-rich carbon stars) have been suggested to be transition objects between M-type stars and C-type stars. An optical spectroscopic study of these silicate carbon stars was performed at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) in Victoria in 1991. CCGCS 1653, CCGCS 4222, CCGCS 4923 and CCGCS 5848 have been confirmed to be J stars. CCGCS 1158 and CCGCS 4729 are provisionally identified as J stars. A preliminary spectral analysis has also been carried out. Model calculations are presented on the evolution from the visual carbon stars to infrared carbon stars, and on the evolution of infrared carbon stars. A new empirical opacity function for the SiC grain is derived based on the LRS spectra of a selected sample of infrared carbon stars. A two-shell model has been developed with an oxygen-rich detached shell and a newly-forming SiC dust shell. The energy distributions of ~110 transition objects which are late-stage visual carbon stars or early-stage infrared carbon stars are fitted with this Interrupted Mass Loss Model. Furthermore, the model tracks successfully explain the "C" shaped distribution of the transition objects in the IRAS 12 microns/25 microns/60 microns colour-colour diagram. The energy distributions of ~150 infrared carbon stars are also matched with a radiative transfer dust shell model using only SiC dust. The colour evolution of infrared carbon stars can be explained with a continuous increase in mass loss rate on the AGB. An evolutionary scenario of AGB stars is suggested. There is a branching of M-type and C-type stars on the AGB with each branch evolving independently to the planetary nebula stage. The initial mass of the star in the main sequence may be the factor that determines which branch the star will follow. (SECTION: Dissertation Abstracts)

  5. [CII] At 1 < z < 2: Observing Star Formation in the Early Universe with Zeus (1 and 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Oberst, T.; Parshley, S.; Stacey, G.; Benford, D.; staguhn, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of the [CII] 158 micron fine structure line from six submillimeter galaxies with redshifts between 1.12 and 1.73. This more than doubles the total number of [CII] 158 micron detections reported from high redshift sources. These observations were made with the Redshift(z) and Early Universe Spectrometer(ZEUS) at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii between December 2006 and March 2009. ZEUS is a background limited submm echelle grating spectrometer (Hailey-Dunsheath 2009). Currently we are constructing ZEUS-2. This new instrument will utilize the same grating but will feature a two dimensional transition-edge sensed bolometer array with SQUID multiplexing readout system enabling simultaneous background limited observations in the 200, 340,450 and 650 micron telluric windows. ZEUS-2 will allow for long slit imaging spectroscopy in nearby galaxies and a [CII] survey from z 0.25 to 2.5.

  6. Young Star Clusters: Keys to Understanding Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, B.

    2012-12-01

    Young, coeval clusters of stars provide the perfect laboratory in which to test our understanding of how massive stars evolve. Early optical observations limited us to a handful of low-mass clusters within 1kpc. However, thanks to the recent progress in infrared astronomy, the Milky Way's population of young massive star clusters is now beginning to be revealed. Here, I will review the recent progress made in this field, what it has told us about the evolution of massive stars to supernova and beyond, the prospects for this field, and some issues that should be taken into account when interpreting the results.

  7. Impacts of ocean acidification on early life-history stages and settlement of the coral-eating sea star Acanthaster planci.

    PubMed

    Uthicke, Sven; Pecorino, Danilo; Albright, Rebecca; Negri, Andrew Peter; Cantin, Neal; Liddy, Michelle; Dworjanyn, Symon; Kamya, Pamela; Byrne, Maria; Lamare, Miles

    2013-01-01

    Coral reefs are marine biodiversity hotspots, but their existence is threatened by global change and local pressures such as land-runoff and overfishing. Population explosions of coral-eating crown of thorns sea stars (COTS) are a major contributor to recent decline in coral cover on the Great Barrier Reef. Here, we investigate how projected near-future ocean acidification (OA) conditions can affect early life history stages of COTS, by investigating important milestones including sperm motility, fertilisation rates, and larval development and settlement. OA (increased pCO2 to 900-1200 µatm pCO2) significantly reduced sperm motility and, to a lesser extent, velocity, which strongly reduced fertilization rates at environmentally relevant sperm concentrations. Normal development of 10 d old larvae was significantly lower under elevated pCO2 but larval size was not significantly different between treatments. Settlement of COTS larvae was significantly reduced on crustose coralline algae (known settlement inducers of COTS) that had been exposed to OA conditions for 85 d prior to settlement assays. Effect size analyses illustrated that reduced settlement may be the largest bottleneck for overall juvenile production. Results indicate that reductions in fertilisation and settlement success alone would reduce COTS population replenishment by over 50%. However, it is unlikely that this effect is sufficient to provide respite for corals from other negative anthropogenic impacts and direct stress from OA and warming on corals.

  8. A cadmium-transporting P1B-type ATPase in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Adle, David J; Sinani, Devis; Kim, Heejeong; Lee, Jaekwon

    2007-01-12

    Detoxification and homeostatic acquisition of metal ions are vital for all living organisms. We have identified PCA1 in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an overexpression suppressor of copper toxicity. PCA1 possesses signatures of a P1B-type heavy metal-transporting ATPase that is widely distributed from bacteria to humans. Copper resistance conferred by PCA1 is not dependent on catalytic activity, but it appears that a cysteine-rich region located in the N terminus sequesters copper. Unexpectedly, when compared with two independent natural isolates and an industrial S. cerevisiae strain, the PCA1 allele of the common laboratory strains we have examined possesses a missense mutation in a predicted ATP-binding residue conserved in P1B-type ATPases. Consistent with a previous report that identifies an equivalent mutation in a copper-transporting P1B-type ATPase of a Wilson disease patient, the PCA1 allele found in laboratory yeast strains is nonfunctional. Overexpression or deletion of the functional allele in yeast demonstrates that PCA1 is a cadmium efflux pump. Cadmium as well as copper and silver, but not other metals examined, dramatically increase PCA1 protein expression through post-transcriptional regulation and promote subcellular localization to the plasma membrane. Our study has revealed a novel metal detoxification mechanism in yeast mediated by a P1B-type ATPase that is unique in structure, substrate specificity, and mode of regulation.

  9. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  14. The UV-brightest Stars of M33 and Its Nucleus: Discovery, Photometry, and Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Bianchi, Luciana; Hutchings, John B.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1996-10-01

    We investigate the UV-brightest sources in the nearby galaxy M33. Our catalog of 356 sources is constructed from far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1500 A) and near-ultraviolet (NUV; 2400 A) images obtained with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) matched with ground-based UBV data. We find that our survey is limited by the FUV flux and is complete to Flambda1500_ = 2.5 x 10^-15^ ergs cm^-2^ s^-1^ A^-1^, other than in the most crowded regions; this corresponds roughly to M_bol_ = -9.2 to -10.0 (or masses of 40-60 M_sun_), for T_eff_ = 50,000^deg^ to 10,000^deg^. We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 images of several M33 fields to conclude that at least one-half of our sample is uncontaminated by unresolved neighbors, at least at the 0.1" (0.4 pc) level, a resolution similar to that achieved in the LMC from the ground. Spectral types have been obtained for 131 of our objects. We discuss the spatial distribution of the UIT sources, finding that they provide an excellent tracer of the spiral arm pattern and confirm that star formation continues in the nuclear region to the present day. Our survey has found a large number of O and early B-type supergiants, including stars as early as O6, but the optical spectroscopic sample is dominated by later type B supergiants, as these are the visually brighter. Among the brightest stars (both at 1500A and at V) are the "superluminous" Wolf-Rayet stars first discovered by Conti & Massey in the largest H II regions of M33; these objects are now known to be small groups of stars in modest analog to R136 in 30 Dor. In general, our survey has failed to detect the known W-R stars, as they are too faint, but we did find several new late-type WN stars and composite systems, which are brighter. Two stars of high absolute visual magnitude (M_V_ ~-9.0) are found to be B I + WN binaries, similar to HDE 269546 in the LMC; one of these is multiple at HST resolution. Most interesting, perhaps, is our finding six Ofpe/WN9 "slash" stars, five of them

  15. Star formation history and chemical enrichment in the early Universe: clues from the rest-optical and rest-UV spectra of z~2-3 star-forming galaxies in the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Allison L.

    2017-01-01

    Galaxies at the peak of cosmic star formation (z~2-3) exhibit significantly higher star formation rates and gas fractions at fixed stellar mass than nearby galaxies. These z~2-3 galaxies are also distinct in terms of their nebular spectra, reflecting important differences not only in the physical conditions of their interstellar medium (e.g., electron density and gas-phase metallicity), but also in the details of their massive stellar populations, especially their ionizing radiation fields. Jointly observing galaxies' HII regions, at rest-UV and rest-optical wavelengths, and massive stars, at rest-UV wavelengths, is central to constructing a framework for understanding the differences between z~2-3 and z~0 star-forming galaxies and for self-consistently explaining the trends observed in the high-redshift population. My thesis is based on data from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS), which uniquely combines observations of individual galaxies in these two bandpasses. In total, the near-infrared component of the KBSS includes spectra of >700 z~2-3 galaxies obtained with Keck/MOSFIRE. I will present these results along with a detailed analysis of the full rest-optical (3600-7000 Ang) nebular spectra of ~400 galaxies, showing that high-redshift galaxies exhibit uniformly high degrees of ionization and excitation with respect to most z~0 galaxies. Combined with observations of the same galaxies' rest-UV spectra (obtained with Keck/LRIS) and photoionization model predictions, these results suggest that the disparity arises from differences in the shape of the ionizing radiation field at fixed gas-phase oxygen abundance, most likely due to the effects of Fe-poor massive binary stars. My comprehensive spectroscopic study of an unprecedentedly large sample of z~2-3 galaxies offers compelling evidence that the distinct chemical abundance patterns observed in these galaxies are the result of systematic differences in their star formation histories.

  16. Identification of a mouse B-type cyclin which exhibits developmentally regulated expression in the germ line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. L.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    To begin to examine the function of cyclins in mammalian germ cells, we have screened an adult mouse testis cDNA library for the presence of B-type cyclins. We have isolated cDNAs that encode a murine B-type cyclin, which has been designated cycB1. cycB1 was shown to be expressed in several adult tissues and in the midgestation mouse embryo. In the adult tissues, the highest levels of cycB1 transcripts were seen in the testis and ovary, which contain germ cells at various stages of differentiation. The major transcripts corresponding to cycB1 are 1.7 and 2.5 kb, with the 1.7 kb species being the predominant testicular transcript and the 2.5 kb species more abundant in the ovary. Examination of cDNAs corresponding to the 2.5 kb and 1.7 kb mRNAs revealed that these transcripts encode identical proteins, differing only in the polyadenylation signal used and therefore in the length of their 3' untranslated regions. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the predominant sites of cycB1 expression in the testis and ovary were in the germinal compartment, particularly in early round spermatids in the testis and growing oocytes in the ovary. Thus cycB1 is expressed in both meiotic and postmeiotic cells. This pattern of cycB1 expression further suggests that cycB1 may have different functions in the two cell types, only one of which correlates with progression of the cell cycle.

  17. Mesopotamian Star Lists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Wayne

    Sumerian and Akkadian names of stars and constellations occur in cuneiform texts for over 2,000 years, from the third millennium BC down to the death of cuneiform in the early first millennium AD, but no fully comprehensive list was ever compiled in antiquity. Lists of stars and constellations are available in both the lexical tradition and astronomical-astrological tradition of the cuneiform scribes. The longest list in the former is that in the series Urra = hubullu, in the latter, those in Mul-Apin.

  18. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  19. APEX/SABOCA observations of small-scale structure of infrared-dark clouds . I. Early evolutionary stages of star-forming cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan, Sarah E.; Henning, Thomas; Beuther, Henrik

    2013-11-01

    Infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) harbor the early phases of cluster and high-mass star formation and are comprised of cold (~20 K), dense (n > 104 cm-3) gas. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of IRDCs is dominated by the far-infrared and millimeter wavelength regime, and our initial Herschel study examined IRDCs at the peak of the SED with high angular resolution. Here we present a follow-up study using the SABOCA instrument on APEX which delivers 7.8″ angular resolution at 350 μm, matching the resolution we achieved with Herschel/PACS, and allowing us to characterize substructure on ~0.1 pc scales. Our sample of 11 nearby IRDCs are a mix of filamentary and clumpy morphologies, and the filamentary clouds show significant hierarchical structure, while the clumpy IRDCs exhibit little hierarchical structure. All IRDCs, regardless of morphology, have about 14% of their total mass in small scale core-like structures which roughly follow a trend of constant volume density over all size scales. Out of the 89 protostellar cores we identified in this sample with Herschel, we recover 40 of the brightest and re-fit their SEDs and find their properties agree fairly well with our previous estimates (⟨ T ⟩ ~ 19 K). We detect a new population of "cold cores" which have no 70 μm counterpart, but are 100 and 160 μm-bright, with colder temperatures (⟨ T ⟩ ~ 16 K). This latter population, along with SABOCA-only detections, are predominantly low-mass objects, but their evolutionary diagnostics are consistent with the earliest starless or prestellar phase of cores in IRDCs. Based on observations carried out with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR), Onsala Space Observatory (OSO), and the European Southern Observatory (ESO).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. B-type natriuretic peptide-guided treatment for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Julie; Heneghan, Carl J; Perera, Rafael; Clements, Alison M; Glasziou, Paul P; Kearley, Karen E; Pidduck, Nicola; Roberts, Nia W; Tyndel, Sally; Wright, F Lucy; Bankhead, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a condition in which the heart does not pump enough blood to meet all the needs of the body. Symptoms of heart failure include breathlessness, fatigue and fluid retention. Outcomes for patients with heart failure are highly variable; however on average, these patients have a poor prognosis. Prognosis can be improved with early diagnosis and appropriate use of medical treatment, use of devices and transplantation. Patients with heart failure are high users of healthcare resources, not only due to drug and device treatments, but due to high costs of hospitalisation care. B-type natriuretic peptide levels are already used as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure, but could offer to clinicians a possible tool to guide drug treatment. This could optimise drug management in heart failure patients whilst allaying concerns over potential side effects due to drug intolerance. Objectives To assess whether treatment guided by serial BNP or NT-proBNP (collectively referred to as NP) monitoring improves outcomes compared with treatment guided by clinical assessment alone. Search methods Searches were conducted up to 15 March 2016 in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database in the Cochrane Library. Searches were also conducted in the Science Citation Index Expanded, the Conference Proceedings Citation Index on Web of Science (Thomson Reuters), World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry and ClinicalTrials.gov. We applied no date or language restrictions. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials of NP-guided treatment of heart failure versus treatment guided by clinical assessment alone with no restriction on follow-up. Adults treated for heart failure, in both in-hospital and out-of-hospital settings, and trials reporting a

  1. The donor star of the X-ray pulsar X1908+075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Núñez, S.; Sander, A.; Gímenez-García, A.; Gónzalez-Galán, A.; Torrejón, J. M.; Gónzalez-Fernández, C.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2015-06-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries consist of a massive donor star and a compact object. While several of those systems have been well studied in X-rays, little is known for most of the donor stars as they are often heavily obscured in the optical and ultraviolet regime. There is an opportunity to observe them at infrared wavelengths, however. The goal of this study is to obtain the stellar and wind parameters of the donor star in the X1908+075 high-mass X-ray binary system with a stellar atmosphere model to check whether previous studies from X-ray observations and spectral morphology lead to a sufficient description of the donor star. We obtained H- and K-band spectra of X1908+075 and analysed them with the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code. For the first time, we calculated a stellar atmosphere model for the donor star, whose main parameters are: Mspec = 15 ± 6 M⊙, T∗ = 23-3+6 kK, log geff = 3.0 ± 0.2 and log L/L⊙ = 4.81 ± 0.25. The obtained parameters point towards an early B-type (B0-B3) star, probably in a supergiant phase. Moreover we determined a more accurate distance to the system of 4.85 ± 0.50 kpc than the previously reported value. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. The puzzling spectrum of HD 94509. Sounding out the extremes of Be shell star spectral morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, C. R.; Przybilla, N.; Hubrig, S.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The spectral features of HD 94509 are highly unusual, adding an extreme to the zoo of Be and shell stars. The shell dominates the spectrum, showing lines typical for spectral types mid-A to early-F, while the presence of a late/mid B-type central star is indicated by photospheric hydrogen line wings and helium lines. Numerous metallic absorption lines have broad wings but taper to narrow cores. They cannot be fit by Voigt profiles. Aims: We describe and illustrate unusual spectral features of this star, and make rough calculations to estimate physical conditions and abundances in the shell. Furthermore, the central star is characterized. Methods: We assume mean conditions for the shell. An electron density estimate is made from the Inglis-Teller formula. Excitation temperatures and column densities for Fe i and Fe ii are derived from curves of growth. The neutral H column density is estimated from high Paschen members. The column densities are compared with calculations made with the photoionization code Cloudy. Atmospheric parameters of the central star are constrained employing non-LTE spectrum synthesis. Results: Overall chemical abundances are close to solar. Column densities of the dominant ions of several elements, as well as excitation temperatures and the mean electron density are well accounted for by a simple model. Several features, including the degree of ionization, are less well described. Conclusions: HD 94509 is a Be star with a stable shell, close to the terminal-age main sequence. The dynamical state of the shell and the unusually shaped, but symmetric line profiles, require a separate study.

  3. Impact of Modifiable Risk Factors on B-type Natriuretic Peptide and Cardiac Troponin T Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pratyaksh K.; Pradhan, Aruna D.; Cook, Nancy R.; Ridker, Paul M.; Everett, Brendan M.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use, physical activity, diet, and cigarette smoking are modifiable cardiovascular risk factors that have a substantial impact on the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death. We hypothesized that these behaviors may alter concentrations of cardiac troponin, a marker of myocyte injury, and B-type natriuretic peptide, a marker of myocyte stress. Both markers have shown strong association with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In 519 women with no evidence of cardiovascular disease, we measured circulating concentrations of cardiac troponin T, using a high-sensitivity assay (hsTnT), and the amino-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). We used logistic regression to determine if these behaviors were associated with detectable hsTnT (>3 ng/L) or with NT-proBNP in the highest quartile (≥127.3 ng/L). The median (Q1-Q3) NT-proBNP of the cohort was 68.8 (40.3–127.3), and 30.8% (160/519) of the cohort had detectable circulating hsTnT. In adjusted models, women who drank 1–6 drinks per week had lower odds of having a detectable hsTnT (0.58, 95% CI: 0.34–0.96) and lower odds of having an elevated NT-proBNP (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.32–0.96). We were subsequently able to validate the results for B-type natriuretic peptide in a large independent cohort. In conclusion, our results suggest that regular alcohol consumption is associated with lower concentrations of hsTnT and NT-proBNP, two cardiovascular biomarkers associated with cardiovascular risk, and raise the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of alcohol consumption may be mediated by direct effects on the myocardium. PMID:26739393

  4. B-type natriuretic peptides. A diagnostic breakthrough in heart failure.

    PubMed

    McCullough, P A

    2003-04-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a neurohormone synthesized in the cardiac ventricles, which is released as N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and then enzymatically cleaved in to the NT fragment and the immunoreactive BNP. Both tests have been used to identify patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Important considerations for these tests include their half-lives in plasma, dependence on renal function for clearance, and the interpretation of their units of measure. In general, a BNP level below 100 pg/mL has strong negative predictive value in the assessment of patients with dyspnea caused by a disorder other than CHF. In addition, BNP levels can be used to gauge the effect of short-term treatment of acutely decompensated heart failure, and the peptide has been shown to be a reliable independent predictor of sudden cardiac death. In the absence of renal dysfunction NT-proBNP has also been shown to be an independent predictor of sudden death in CHF patients. Because both a large area of myonecrosis or concomitant left ventricular failure are related to prognosis in acute coronary syndromes, B-type natriuretic peptides have also been linked to outcomes in this condition. This article describes the physiology and timing of release of B-type natriuretic peptides and the rationale for their use in the following settings: 1) evaluation of decompensated CHF, 2) screening for chronic CHF, 3) prognosis of CHF and sudden death, and 4) prognosis in acute coronary syndromes with inferred left ventricular dysfunction.

  5. Clinical implications of B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro--B-type natriuretic peptide in the care of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Wayne Causey, Marlin; Singh, Niten

    2014-12-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (also known as brain natriuretic peptide or BNP) is a physiologic marker that is often used to assess a patient's global cardiovascular health. BNP is secreted from the ventricular cardiac myocytes in response to stretch that occurs due to increased intravascular volume. PreproBNP is cleaved into BNP and N-terminal proBNP (NT proBNP) to cause diuresis, natriuresis, and vasodilation, and can be measured with a blood laboratory assay test or point-of-care testing. BNP/NT proBNP has been most extensively studied in the diagnosis and management of heart failure, but within the past 5 years, interest has carried over to vascular surgery patients. Studies have demonstrated that elevated levels of BNP/NT-proBNP (typically >100 pg/mL/>300 pg/mL) are associated with major adverse cardiac events at 30 and 180 days. Additional analysis of BNP/NT-proBNP has demonstrated that patients can be classified as very low risk (<19 pg/mL), low risk (<100 pg/mL), intermediate risk (100 to 400 pg/mL), or high risk (>400 pg/mL). BNP/NT-proBNP in the low- and very-low-risk groups suggests patients are unlikely to have a major adverse cardiac event. An elevated BNP/NT-proBNP, excluding those with reasons for abnormal values, suggests the need for additional risk stratification and medical risk factor optimization. A preoperative measure of BNP or NT-proBNP affords an easy and rapid opportunity to individually and objectively quantify perioperative cardiovascular risk. Recent studies have also identified other biomarkers, none superior to BNP or NT-proBNP, but that, when used concomitantly, aid in further stratifying perioperative risk and will likely be the focus of future investigations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. B-type and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptides are equally useful in assessing patent ductus arteriosus in very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    König, Kai; Guy, Katelyn J; Drew, Sandra M; Barfield, Charles P

    2015-04-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-BNP (NTproBNP) have been shown to correlate with the size of the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants. We investigated whether BNP or NTproBNP was more closely correlated with PDA size. This prospective observational study included preterm infants born <32 weeks' gestation who had an echocardiogram performed within the first four days of life. Blood samples were taken simultaneously for BNP and NTproBNP measurements prior to echocardiographic examination. Of the 60 infants recruited, 58 had complete data sets. The cohort's mean and standard deviation (SD) gestational age was 27(+3) (2(+2)) weeks, the mean (SD) birthweight was 1032 (315) grams, and 46 (79.3%) infants had a PDA with a mean (SD) diameter of 3.2 (0.9) mm. Median and interquartile range (IQR) BNP levels were 486.5 (219-1316) pg/mL for infants with a PDA and 190 (95.5-514.5) pg/mL for infants without a PDA. Median (IQR) NTproBNP levels were 10 858.5 (6319-42 108) pg/mL for infants with a PDA and 7488 (3363-14 227.5) pg/mL for infants without a PDA. Both BNP (R = 0.35, p = 0.0066) and NTproBNP (R = 0.31, p = 0.018) were significantly correlated with PDA size. BNP and NTproBNP are similarly useful for assessing PDA size in preterm infants. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Bilinear identities for an extended B-type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Runliang; Cao, Tiancheng; Liu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Yunbo

    2016-03-01

    We construct bilinear identities for wave functions of an extended B-type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (BKP) hierarchy containing two types of (2+1)-dimensional Sawada-Kotera equations with a self-consistent source. Introducing an auxiliary variable corresponding to the extended flow for the BKP hierarchy, we find the τ -function and bilinear identities for this extended BKP hierarchy. The bilinear identities generate all the Hirota bilinear equations for the zero-curvature forms of this extended BKP hierarchy. As examples, we obtain the Hirota bilinear equations for the two types of (2+1)-dimensional Sawada-Kotera equations in explicit form.

  8. How bright planets became dim stars: planetary speculations in John Herschel's double star astronomy.

    PubMed

    Case, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Previous research on the origins of double star astronomy in the early nineteenth century emphasized the role mathematical methods and instrumentation played in motivating early observations of these objects. The work of the British astronomer John Herschel, however, shows that questions regarding the physical nature of double stars were also important. In particular, an analysis of John Herschel's early work on double stars illustrates the way in which speculations regarding these objects were shaped by assumptions of the properties of stars themselves. For Herschel, a major consideration in double star astronomy was distinguishing between types of double stars. Optical doubles were useful in determining parallax while binary doubles were not. In practice, classification of a specific double star pair into one of these categories was based on the assumption that stars were of approximately the same luminosity and thus differences in relative brightness between stars were caused by difference in distances. Such assumptions, though ultimately abandoned, would lead Herschel in the 1830s to advance the possibility that the dim companion stars in certain double star pairs were not stars at all but in fact planets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. How bright planets became dim stars: planetary speculations in John Herschel's double star astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, S.

    2014-03-01

    Previous research on the origins of double star astronomy in the early nineteenth century emphasized the role mathematical methods and instrumentation played in motivating early observations of these objects. The work of the British astronomer John Herschel, however, shows that questions regarding the physical nature of double stars were also important. In particular, an analysis of John Herschel's early work on double stars illustrates the way in which speculations regarding these objects were shaped by assumptions of the properties of stars themselves. For Herschel, a major consideration in double star astronomy was distinguishing between types of double stars. Optical doubles were useful in determining parallax while binary doubles were not. In practice, classification of a specific double star pair into one of these categories was based on the assumption that stars were of approximately the same luminosity and thus differences in relative brightness between stars were caused by difference in distances. Such assumptions, though ultimately abandoned, would lead Herschel in the 1830s to advance the possibility that the dim companion stars in certain double star pairs were not stars at all but in fact planets.

  10. A home for old stars

    2015-12-14

    This image, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the globular cluster Terzan 1. Lying around 20 000 light-years from us in the constellation of Scorpius (The Scorpion), it is one of about 150 globular clusters belonging to our galaxy, the Milky Way. Typical globular clusters are collections of around a hundred thousand stars, held together by their mutual gravitational attraction in a spherical shape a few hundred light-years across. It is thought that every galaxy has a population of globular clusters. Some, like the Milky Way, have a few hundred, while giant elliptical galaxies can have several thousand. They contain some of the oldest stars in a galaxy, hence the reddish colours of the stars in this image — the bright blue ones are foreground stars, not part of the cluster. The ages of the stars in the globular cluster tell us that they were formed during the early stages of galaxy formation! Studying them can also help us to understand how galaxies formed. Terzan 1, like many globular clusters, is a source of X-rays. It is likely that these X-rays come from binary star systems that contain a dense neutron star and a normal star. The neutron star drags material from the companion star, causing a burst of X-ray emission. The system then enters a quiescent phase in which the neutron star cools, giving off X-ray emission with different characteristics, before enough material from the companion builds up to trigger another outburst.

  11. Circumbinary Planets Orbiting the Rapidly Pulsating Subdwarf B-type Binary NY Vir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.-B.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Dai, Z.-B.; Fernández-Lajús, E.; Xiang, F.-Y.; He, J.-J.

    2012-02-01

    We report here the tentative discovery of a Jovian planet in orbit around the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B-type (sdB-type) eclipsing binary NY Vir. By using newly determined eclipse times together with those collected from the literature, we detect that the observed-calculated (O - C) curve of NY Vir shows a small-amplitude cyclic variation with a period of 7.9 yr and a semiamplitude of 6.1 s, while it undergoes a downward parabolic change (revealing a period decrease at a rate of \\dot{P}=-9.2\\times {10^{-12}}). The periodic variation was analyzed for the light-travel-time effect via the presence of a third body. The mass of the tertiary companion was determined to be M 3sin i' = 2.3(± 0.3)M Jupiter when a total mass of 0.60 M ⊙ for NY Vir is adopted. This suggests that it is most probably a giant circumbinary planet orbiting NY Vir at a distance of about 3.3 astronomical units (AU). Since the rate of period decrease cannot be explained by true angular momentum loss caused by gravitational radiation or/and magnetic braking, the observed downward parabolic change in the O - C diagram may be only a part of a long-period (longer than 15 years) cyclic variation, which may reveal the presence of another Jovian planet (~2.5 M Jupiter) in the system.

  12. B-type natriuretic peptide levels and continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Sareyyupoglu, Basar; Boilson, Barry A; Durham, Lucian A; McGregor, Christopher G A; Daly, Richard C; Redfield, Margaret M; Edwards, Brooks S; Frantz, Robert P; Pereira, Naveen L; Park, Soon J

    2010-01-01

    We postulated that postoperative B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels would be reflective of the degree of hemodynamic support rendered by various pump speeds settings (RPM) of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Twenty LVAD patients were evaluated prospectively (Jarvik 2000: n = 9, HeartMate II: n = 11). The mean age was 57.7 ± 14.9 years, and 14 were male. B-type natriuretic peptide levels were drawn while the patients were supported on LVADs at variable RPM settings. The RPM settings were correlated with the changes in BNP levels. Eleven patients underwent LVAD implantation for a lifelong support while the rest were as a bridge therapy to transplantation. Four patients required LVAD change out for various causes of pump failure. Postoperative BNP levels decreased dramatically with the initiation of LVAD support. The levels correlated inversely with the degree of hemodynamic support rendered at various RPM settings of the HeartMate II (p < 0.001). Overall, BNP levels decreased significantly in 2 days after RPM increase. We observed a significant inverse correlation between the postoperative BNP levels and the degree of LVAD support. The effective LVAD support seems to result in a marked reduction in BNP levels, and monitoring serial BNP levels may be helpful in managing patients supported on continuous LVAD.

  13. Statistical imprints of CMB B -type polarization leakage in an incomplete sky survey analysis

    SciT

    Santos, Larissa; Wang, Kai; Hu, Yangrui

    2017-01-01

    One of the main goals of modern cosmology is to search for primordial gravitational waves by looking on their imprints in the B -type polarization in the cosmic microwave background radiation. However, this signal is contaminated by various sources, including cosmic weak lensing, foreground radiations, instrumental noises, as well as the E -to- B leakage caused by the partial sky surveys, which should be well understood to avoid the misinterpretation of the observed data. In this paper, we adopt the E / B decomposition method suggested by Smith in 2006, and study the imprints of E -to- B leakage residualsmore » in the constructed B -type polarization maps, B( n-circumflex ), by employing various statistical tools. We find that the effects of E -to- B leakage are negligible for the B-mode power spectrum, as well as the skewness and kurtosis analyses of B-maps. However, if employing the morphological statistical tools, including Minkowski functionals and/or Betti numbers, we find the effect of leakage can be detected at very high confidence level, which shows that in the morphological analysis, the leakage can play a significant role as a contaminant for measuring the primordial B -mode signal and must be taken into account for a correct explanation of the data.« less

  14. Massive stars in advanced evolutionary stages, and the progenitor of GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Oskinova, Lidia; Todt, Helge; Sander, Andreas; Hainich, Rainer; Shenar, Tomer; Ramachandran, Varsha

    2017-11-01

    The recent discovery of a gravitational wave from the merging of two black holes of about 30 solar masses each challenges our incomplete understanding of massive stars and their evolution. Critical ingredients comprise mass-loss, rotation, magnetic fields, internal mixing, and mass transfer in close binary systems. The imperfect knowledge of these factors implies large uncertainties for models of stellar populations and their feedback. In this contribution we summarize our empirical studies of Wolf-Rayet populations at different metallicities by means of modern non-LTE stellar atmosphere models, and confront these results with the predictions of stellar evolution models. At the metallicity of our Galaxy, stellar winds are probably too strong to leave remnant masses as high as ~30 M⊙, but given the still poor agreement between evolutionary tracks and observation even this conclusion is debatable. At the low metallicity of the Small Magellanic Cloud, all WN stars which are (at least now) single are consistent with evolving quasi-homogeneously. O and B-type stars, in contrast, seem to comply with standard evolutionary models without strong internal mixing. Close binaries which avoided early merging could evolve quasi-homogeneously and lead to close compact remnants of relatively high masses that merge within a Hubble time.

  15. Symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of symbiotic star systems are discussed, based on a review of recent observational data. A model of a symbiotic star system is presented which illustrates how a cool red-giant star is embedded in a nebula whose atoms are ionized by the energetic radiation from its hot compact companion. UV outbursts from symbiotic systems are explained by two principal models: an accretion-disk-outburst model which describes how material expelled from the tenuous envelope of the red giant forms an inwardly-spiralling disk around the hot companion, and a thermonuclear-outburst model in which the companion is specifically a white dwarf which superheats the material expelled from the red giant to the point where thermonuclear reactions occur and radiation is emitted. It is suspected that the evolutionary course of binary systems is predetermined by the initial mass and angular momentum of the gas cloud within which binary stars are born. Since red giants and Mira variables are thought to be stars with a mass of one or two solar mass, it is believed that the original cloud from which a symbiotic system is formed can consist of no more than a few solar masses of gas.

  16. Massive binary stars as a probe of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiminki, Daniel C.

    2010-10-01

    Massive stars are among the largest and most influential objects we know of on a sub-galactic scale. Binary systems, composed of at least one of these stars, may be responsible for several types of phenomena, including type Ib/c supernovae, short and long gamma ray bursts, high-velocity runaway O and B-type stars, and the density of the parent star clusters. Our understanding of these stars has met with limited success, especially in the area of their formation. Current formation theories rely on the accumulated statistics of massive binary systems that are limited because of their sample size or the inhomogeneous environments from which the statistics are collected. The purpose of this work is to provide a higher-level analysis of close massive binary characteristics using the radial velocity information of 113 massive stars (B3 and earlier) and binary orbital properties for the 19 known close massive binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association. This work provides an analysis using the largest amount of massive star and binary information ever compiled for an O-star rich cluster like Cygnus OB2, and compliments other O-star binary studies such as NGC 6231, NGC 2244, and NGC 6611. I first report the discovery of 73 new O or B-type stars and 13 new massive binaries by this survey. This work involved the use of 75 successful nights of spectroscopic observation at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory in addition to observations obtained using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph at WIYN, the HIRES echelle spectrograph at KECK, and the Hamilton spectrograph at LICK. I use these data to estimate the spectrophotometric distance to the cluster and to measure the mean systemic velocity and the one-sided velocity dispersion of the cluster. Finally, I compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo models, the results of which indicate that the binary fraction of the cluster is 57 +/- 5% and that the indices for the power law distributions, describing the log of the periods, mass

  17. B-type natriuretic peptide-guided treatment for heart failure.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Julie; Heneghan, Carl J; Perera, Rafael; Clements, Alison M; Glasziou, Paul P; Kearley, Karen E; Pidduck, Nicola; Roberts, Nia W; Tyndel, Sally; Wright, F Lucy; Bankhead, Clare

    2016-12-22

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart does not pump enough blood to meet all the needs of the body. Symptoms of heart failure include breathlessness, fatigue and fluid retention. Outcomes for patients with heart failure are highly variable; however on average, these patients have a poor prognosis. Prognosis can be improved with early diagnosis and appropriate use of medical treatment, use of devices and transplantation. Patients with heart failure are high users of healthcare resources, not only due to drug and device treatments, but due to high costs of hospitalisation care. B-type natriuretic peptide levels are already used as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure, but could offer to clinicians a possible tool to guide drug treatment. This could optimise drug management in heart failure patients whilst allaying concerns over potential side effects due to drug intolerance. To assess whether treatment guided by serial BNP or NT-proBNP (collectively referred to as NP) monitoring improves outcomes compared with treatment guided by clinical assessment alone. Searches were conducted up to 15 March 2016 in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database in the Cochrane Library. Searches were also conducted in the Science Citation Index Expanded, the Conference Proceedings Citation Index on Web of Science (Thomson Reuters), World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry and ClinicalTrials.gov. We applied no date or language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials of NP-guided treatment of heart failure versus treatment guided by clinical assessment alone with no restriction on follow-up. Adults treated for heart failure, in both in-hospital and out-of-hospital settings, and trials reporting a clinical outcome were included. Two review authors

  18. X-shooter Finds an Extremely Primitive Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; François, P.; Sbordone, L.; Monaco, L.; Spite, M.; Spite, F.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Cayrel, R.; Zaggia, S.; Hammer, F.; Randich, S.; Molaro, P.; Hill, V.

    2011-12-01

    Low-mass extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars hold the fossil record of the chemical composition of the early phases of the Universe in their atmospheres. Chemical analysis of such objects provides important constraints on these early phases. EMP stars are rather rare objects: to dig them out, large amounts of data have to be considered. We have analysed stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using an automatic procedure and selected a sample of good candidate EMP stars, which we observed with the spectrographs X-shooter and UVES. We could confirm the low metallicity of our sample of stars, and we succeeded in finding a record metal-poor star.

  19. Chameleon stars

    SciT

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science of the NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, 265 a, Chui Street, Bishkek, 720071; Folomeev, Vladimir

    2011-10-15

    We consider a gravitating spherically symmetric configuration consisting of a scalar field nonminimally coupled to ordinary matter in the form of a perfect fluid. For this system we find static, regular, asymptotically flat solutions for both relativistic and nonrelativistic cases. It is shown that the presence of the nonminimal interaction leads to substantial changes both in the radial matter distribution of the star and in the star's total mass. A simple stability test indicates that, for the choice of parameters used in the paper, the solutions are unstable.

  20. A snapshot of the inner dusty regions of a R CrB-type variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leão, I. C.; de Laverny, P.; Chesneau, O.; Mékarnia, D.; de Medeiros, J. R.

    2007-05-01

    Context: R Coronae Borealis (R CrB) variable stars are suspected to sporadically eject optically thick dust clouds causing, when one of them lies on the line-of-sight, a huge brightness decline in visible light. Direct detections with 8-m class adaptive optics of such clouds located at about 0.2-0.3 arcsec from the center (~1000 stellar radii) were recently reported for RY Sgr, the brightest R CrB of the southern hemisphere. Aims: Mid-infrared interferometric observations of RY Sgr allowed us to explore the circumstellar regions much closer to the central star (~20-40 mas) to look for the signature of any heterogeneities and to characterize them. Methods: Using the VLTI/MIDI instrument, five dispersed visibility curves in the N-band were recorded in May and June 2005 with different projected baselines oriented towards two roughly perpendicular directions. The large spatial frequencies' visibility curves exhibit a sinusoidal shape, whereas, at shorter spatial frequencies' visibility curves follow a Gaussian decrease. These observations are well interpreted with a geometrical model consisting of a central star surrounded by an extended circumstellar envelope in which one bright cloud is embedded. Results: Within this simple geometrical scheme, the inner 110 AU dusty environment of RY Sgr is dominated at the time of observations by a single dusty cloud, which at 10 μm represents ~10% of the total flux of the whole system, slightly less that the star flux. The cloud is located at about 100 stellar radii (or ~30 AU) from the center toward the East-North-East direction (or the symmetric direction with respect to center) within a circumstellar envelope whose FWHM is about 120 stellar radii. This first detection of a cloud so close to the central star supports the classical scenario of the R CrB brightness variations in the optical spectral domain and demonstrates the feasibility of a temporal monitoring of the dusty environment of this star on a monthly scale. Based on

  1. Interpretation of B-type natriuretic peptides in the era of angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Paulo; Fonseca, Cândida; Franco, Fátima; Andrade, Aurora; Brito, Dulce

    2017-12-01

    Assessment of serum levels of natriuretic peptides, especially the amino-terminal portion (NT-proBNP) and the carboxy-terminal portion (BNP) of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, has had a highly significant clinical impact on the diagnosis and prognostic stratification of patients with heart failure (HF). They are now an instrument with recognized value in this context and several studies have demonstrated their value in tailoring therapy for these patients. Following the recent advent of angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors (ARNIs), there is a need to review how these two biomarkers are interpreted in HF. The use of ARNIs is associated with a reduction in NT-proBNP but an increase in BNP levels. The authors of this concise article review the interpretation of natriuretic peptide levels in the light of the most recent evidence. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential Models for B-Type Open-Closed Topological Landau-Ginzburg Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babalic, Elena Mirela; Doryn, Dmitry; Lazaroiu, Calin Iuliu; Tavakol, Mehdi

    2018-05-01

    We propose a family of differential models for B-type open-closed topological Landau-Ginzburg theories defined by a pair (X,W), where X is any non-compact Calabi-Yau manifold and W is any holomorphic complex-valued function defined on X whose critical set is compact. The models are constructed at cochain level using smooth data, including the twisted Dolbeault algebra of polyvector-valued forms and a twisted Dolbeault category of holomorphic factorizations of W. We give explicit proposals for cochain level versions of the bulk and boundary traces and for the bulk-boundary and boundary-bulk maps of the Landau-Ginzburg theory. We prove that most of the axioms of an open-closed TFT (topological field theory) are satisfied on cohomology and conjecture that the remaining two axioms (namely non-degeneracy of bulk and boundary traces and the topological Cardy constraint) are also satisfied.

  3. Catalogue of UBVRI photometry of T Tauri stars and analysis of the causes of their variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, W.; Herbst, D. K.; Grossman, E. J.; Weinstein, D.

    1994-11-01

    A computer-based catalogue of UBVRI photoelectric photometry of T Tauri stars and their earlier type analogs has been compiled. It presently includes over 10 000 entries on 80 stars and will be updated on a regular basis; it is available on Internet. The catalogue is used to analyze the sometimes bizarre light variations of pre-main-sequence stars on time scales of days to months in an attempt to illuminate the nature and causes of the phenomenon. It is useful in discussing their light variations to divide the stars into three groups according to their spectra. These are: weak T Tauri stars (WTTS; spectral class later than K0 and WH-alpha less than 10 A, classical T Tauri stars (CTTS; spectral class later than K0 and WH-alpha greater than 10 A), and early type T Tauri stars (ETTS; spectral class of K0 or earlier). Three distinct types of variability are displayed by stars in the catalogue. Type I variations are periodic in VRI and undoubtedly caused by rotational modulation of a star with an asymmetric distribution of cool spots on its surface. Irregular flare activity is sometimes seen on such stars in U and B. Type I variations are easiest to see on WTTS but are clearly present on CTTS and ETTS as well. Type II variations are caused by hot 'spots' or zones and, it is argued, result from changes in the excess or 'veiling' continuum commonly attributed to an accretion boundary layer or impact zone of a magnetically channeled accretion flow. This type of variation is seen predominantly or solely in CTTS. A sub-category, designated Type IIp, consists of stars which display periodic variations caused by hot spots. Whereas cool spots may last for hundreds or thousands of rotations, hot spots appear to come and go on a much shorter time scale. This suggests that both unsteady accretion and rotation of the star contribute to Type II variations. It is shown that a third type of variation exists among ETTS, including stars as early as A type. UX Ori is a typical example

  4. Toward the first stars: hints from the CEMP-no stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choplin, A.

    2017-12-01

    CEMP-no stars are iron-deficient, carbon-rich stars, with no or little s- and r-elements. Because of their very low iron content, they are often considered to be closely linked to the first stars. Their origin is still a matter of debate. Understanding their formation could provide very valuable information on the first stars, early nucleosynthesis, early galactic chemical evolution and first supernovae. The most explored formation scenario for CEMP-no stars suggests that CEMP-no stars formed from the ejecta (wind and/or supernova) of a massive source star, that lived before the CEMP-no star. Here we discuss models of fast rotating massive source stars with and without triggering a late mixing event just before the end of the life of the source star. We find that without this late mixing event, the bulk of observed CEMP-no stars cannot be reproduced by our models. On the opposite, the bulk is reproductible if adding the late mixing event in the source star models.

  5. Star quality.

    PubMed

    Dent, Emma

    2007-09-20

    Around 150 wards are participating in the voluntary Star Wards scheme to provide mental health inpatients with more activities with therapeutic value. Suggested activities range from a library, to horse riding Internet access and comedy. Service users are particularly keen to have more exercise, which can be a challenge in inpatient settings.

  6. Star Power

    None

    2018-01-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  7. A 30 kpc Chain of "Beads on a String" Star Formation between Two Merging Early Type Galaxies in the Core of a Strong-lensing Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant R.; Gladders, Michael D.; Baum, Stefi A.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Cooke, Kevin C.; Dahle, Håkon; Davis, Timothy A.; Florian, Michael; Rigby, Jane R.; Sharon, Keren; Soto, Emmaris; Wuyts, Eva

    2014-08-01

    New Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet and optical imaging of the strong-lensing galaxy cluster SDSS J1531+3414 (z = 0.335) reveals two centrally dominant elliptical galaxies participating in an ongoing major merger. The interaction is at least somewhat rich in cool gas, as the merger is associated with a complex network of 19 massive superclusters of young stars (or small tidal dwarf galaxies) separated by ~1 kpc in projection from one another, combining to an estimated total star formation rate of ~5 M ⊙ yr-1. The resolved young stellar superclusters are threaded by narrow Hα, [O II], and blue excess filaments arranged in a network spanning ~27 kpc across the two merging galaxies. This morphology is strongly reminiscent of the well-known "beads on a string" mode of star formation observed on kiloparsec scales in the arms of spiral galaxies, resonance rings, and in tidal tails between interacting galaxies. Nevertheless, the arrangement of this star formation relative to the nuclei of the two galaxies is difficult to interpret in a dynamical sense, as no known "beads on a string" systems associated with kiloparsec-scale tidal interactions exhibit such lopsided morphology relative to the merger participants. In this Letter, we present the images and follow-up spectroscopy and discuss possible physical interpretations for the unique arrangement of the young stellar clusters. While we suggest that this morphology is likely to be dynamically short-lived, a more quantitative understanding awaits necessary multiwavelength follow-up, including optical integral field spectroscopy, ALMA submillimeter interferometry, and Chandra X-ray imaging.

  8. Will sacubitril-valsartan diminish the clinical utility of B-type natriuretic peptide testing in acute cardiac care?

    PubMed

    Mair, Johannes; Lindahl, Bertil; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Huber, Kurt; Thygesen, Kristian; Plebani, Mario; Möckel, Martin; Müller, Christian; Jaffe, Allan S

    2017-06-01

    Since the approval of sacubitril-valsartan for the treatment of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, a commonly raised suspicion is that a wider clinical use of this new drug may diminish the clinical utility of B-type natriuretic peptide testing as sacubitril may interfere with B-type natriuretic peptide clearance. In this education paper we critically assess this hypothesis based on the pathophysiology of the natriuretic peptide system and the limited published data on the effects of neprilysin inhibition on natriuretic peptide plasma concentrations in humans. As the main clinical application of B-type natriuretic peptide testing in acute cardiac care is and will be the rapid rule-out of suspected acute heart failure there is no significant impairment to be expected for B-type natriuretic peptide testing in the acute setting. However, monitoring of chronic heart failure patients on sacubitril-valsartan treatment with B-type natriuretic peptide testing may be impaired. In contrast to N-terminal-proBNP, the current concept that the lower the B-type natriuretic peptide result in chronic heart failure patients, the better the prognosis during treatment monitoring, may no longer be true.

  9. Discovery of a New Dusty B[E] Star in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisniewski, John P.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Clampin, Mark

    2007-01-01

    We present new optical spectroscopic and Spitzer IRAC photometric observations of a B-type star in the SMC cluster NGC 346, NGC 346:KWBBe 200. We detect numerous Fe II, [O I], [Fe II], as well as strong P-Cygni profile H I emission lines in its optical spectrum. The star's near-IR color and optical to IR SED clearly indicate the presence of an infrared excess, consistent with the presence of gas and warm, T -800 K, circumstellar dust. Based on a crude estimate of the star's luminosity and the observed spectroscopic line profile morphologies, we find that the star is likely to be a B-type supergiant. We suggest that NGC 346:KWBBe 200 is a newly discovered B[e] supergiant star, and represents the fifth such object to be identified in the SMC.

  10. First Spectra of O Stars in R136A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Sara

    1994-01-01

    Hubble images of the cluster, R136a, in the LMC indicate that the cluster contains 3 Wolf-Rayet stars, R136a1,-a2, and a3 (Campbell et al. 1992) and numerous O and B-type stars. Although models for WR stars are not well enough developed to infer the basic parameters of the 3 WR stars in R136a, models for O stars are well well established, and they suggest that the O stars in R136a are relatively normal, having initial masses no higher than 60 Msun (Heap et al. 1992, Malumuth & Heap 1992, di Marchi et al. 1993); there are no unusual "super-massive" stars in R136a. With HST/GHRS/CoSTAR, it will be possible to obtain spectra of an O star in R136a without contam- ination by WR stars. These spectra will be able to confirm or invalidate the photometric results. Thus, these spectra will have implications both for the population of R136a and for the validity of stellar population studies of giant extragalactic HII regions and starbursts that are based entirely on photometry.

  11. Interacting Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieles, M.

    2013-06-01

    The early evolution of star cluster formation is a complicated phase in which several astrophysical processes with different time-scales operate simultaneously. From kinematical data of the young massive cluster R136 it was recently found that the cluster is in virial equilibrium; despite its young age it has already settled in a dynamical equilibrium. Somewhat surprisigly, about a quarter of the (kinetic) energy is in a rotational component. From HST observations of R136 a small clump of stars to the North-East of R136 was found, with indications that this clump is interacting/merging with R136. In this talk I will discuss whether these two observational results should be connected, i.e. whether the rotation signal is due to an ongoing "dry" interaction. The results are illustrated with a suite of N-body simulations of R136 like systems.

  12. Sleuthing the Isolated Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    In the early 1990's, isolated thermally-emitting neutron stars accreting from the interstellar medium were predicted to show up in their thousands in the ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey. The glut of sources would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the equation of state of ultra-dense matter. Only seven objects have been firmly identified to date. The reasons for this discrepency are discussed and recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of these objects are described. Spectra of the brightest of the isolated neutron star candidates, RX J1856.5-3754, continue to present interpretational difficulties for current neutron star model atmospheres and alternative models are briefly discussed. RX J1856.5-3754 remains a valid quark star candidate.

  13. Weighing the Smallest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    in large telescopes. Astronomers have however found ways to overcome this difficulty. For this, they rely on a combination of a well-considered observational strategy with state-of-the-art instruments. High contrast camera First, astronomers searching for very low mass objects look at young nearby stars because low-mass companion objects will be brightest while they are young, before they contract and cool off. In this particular case, an international team of astronomers [1] led by Laird Close (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona), studied the star AB Doradus A (AB Dor A). This star is located about 48 light-years away and is "only" 50 million years old. Because the position in the sky of AB Dor A "wobbles", due to the gravitational pull of a star-like object, it was believed since the early 1990s that AB Dor A must have a low-mass companion. To photograph this companion and obtain a comprehensive set of data about it, Close and his colleagues used a novel instrument on the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. This new high-contrast adaptive optics camera, the NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager, or NACO SDI [2], was specifically developed by Laird Close and Rainer Lenzen (Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany) for hunting extrasolar planets. The SDI camera enhances the ability of the VLT and its adaptive optics system to detect faint companions that would normally be lost in the glare of the primary star. A world premiere ESO PR Photo 03/05 ESO PR Photo 03/05 Infrared image of AB Doradus A and its companion [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 406 pix - 99k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 812 pix - 235k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 03/05 is an enhanced, false-colour near-infrared image of AB Dor A and C. The faint companion "AB Dor C" - seen as the pink dot at 8 o'clock - is 120 times fainter than its primary star. The tiny separation between A and C, only 0.156 arcsec, is smaller than a one Euro coin seen at 20 km distance. Nevertheless, the new

  14. Decrease in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels and Successful Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Satoshi; Inden, Yasuya; Kato, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Aya; Mizutani, Yoshiaki; Ito, Tadahiro; Kamikubo, Yosuke; Kanzaki, Yasunori; Hirai, Makoto; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the association between B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with heart failure. This study aimed to examine the impact of elimination of AF by catheter ablation on BNP levels in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Fifty-four AF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 50%, who underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation therapy of AF, were included. BNP sampling was performed at baseline, 3 days, and 1 month after ablation. After a follow-up period of 6 months, the BNP levels decreased significantly in the nonrecurrence group (n = 35; median 126.3 [interquartile 57.2-206.5] pg/mL, 63.5 [23.9-180.2] pg/mL, and 45.9 [21.9-160.3] pg/mL, P < 0.001, respectively), but not in the recurrence group (n = 19; 144.7 [87.1-217.3] pg/mL, 88.8 [12.9-213.2] pg/mL, and 118.5 [51.6-298.2] pg/mL, P = 0.368, respectively). The patients in the nonrecurrence group had a higher percentage relative reduction in BNP levels from baseline to 1 month after ablation than those in the recurrence group (56.5 [-9.0-77.4]% vs -2.4 [-47.1-60.9]%, P = 0.027). Additionally, a relative reduction in BNP levels significantly correlated with an increase in LVEF after ablation (r = 0.486, P < 0.001). Plasma BNP levels decreased significantly with successful catheter ablation of AF in patients with impaired LVEF. The decrease in BNP levels might be associated with early recovery of cardiac function and subsequent maintenance of sinus rhythm at follow-up. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Release kinetics of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in a clinical model of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Christoph; Gaede, Luise; Dörr, Oliver; Troidl, Christian; Voss, Sandra; Hoffmann, Jedrzej; Paszko, Agata; Weber, Michael; Rolf, Andreas; Hamm, Christian; Nef, Holger; Möllmann, Helge

    2014-02-15

    N-terminal segment of B-type natriuretic peptide prohormone (NT-proBNP) is elevated in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) thus providing both diagnostic information and prognostic information. The aim of the present study was to determine the time course of NT-proBNP release in patients undergoing transcoronary ablation of septal hypertrophy (TASH) a procedure mimicking AMI. We analyzed the release kinetics of NT-proBNP in 18 consecutive patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy undergoing TASH. Serum samples were collected prior to and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, and 105 min, and 2, 4, 8, and 24h after TASH. NT-proBNP concentrations showed a continuous increase during the first 75 min with a significant percent change compared to baseline value already 15 min after TASH (105.6% [IQR 102.2-112.7]; P<0.001). All patients had a significant increase of NT-proBNP at 45 min (range of percent increase [min-max]: 103.5-137.2%; range of absolute increase [min-max]: 23.5-304.0 ng/L). NT-proBNP concentrations decreased below the baseline value until the 8th h after initiation of myocardial infarction. NT-proBNP concentration increases immediately after induction of myocardial infarction proving early evidence of myocardial injury despite the decrease of the left ventricular wall stress due to the TASH related reduction of the left ventricular outflow gradient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The SMC B-type supergiant AzV322: a g-mode pulsator with a circumstellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennickent, R. E.; Kołaczkowski, Z.; Soszyński, I.; Cabezas, M.; Garrido, H. E.

    2018-01-01

    We present a photometric and spectroscopic study of AzV322, an emission line object located in the Small Magellanic Cloud previously classified between O9 and B0. We analyse 17.5 yr of I- and V-band OGLE-II, -III and -IV light curves and find four significant frequencies, viz. f1 = 0.386 549 ± 0.000 003, f2 = 0.101 177 ± 0.000 005, f3 = 0.487 726 ± 0.000 015 and f4 = 0.874 302 ± 0.000 020 cycles d-1 . The f1 frequency (period 2.587 00 ± 0.000 02 d) provides the stronger periodogram peak and gives a single wave light curve of full amplitude 0.066 mag in the I band. High-resolution optical spectroscopy confirms the early B-type spectral type and reveals prominent double peak Balmer, Paschen, O I 8446 and He I 5875 emissions. The spectral energy distribution shows significant colour excess towards long wavelengths possibly attributed to free-free emission in a disc -like envelope. Our analysis yields Teff = 23 000 ± 1500 K, log g = 3.0 ± 0.5, M = 16 ± 1 M⊙, R = 31.0 ± 1.1 R⊙ and Lbol = 104.87 ± 0.06 L⊙. AzV322 might be a member of the new class of slowly pulsating B supergiants introduced by Saio et al. and documented by Lefever, Puls & Aerts; however its circumstellar disc makes it an hither to unique object. Furthermore, we notice that an O-C analysis for f1 reveals quasi-cyclic changes for the times of maximum in a time-scale of 20 yr, which might indicate a light-travel time effect in a very wide orbit binary with an undetected stellar component.

  17. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  18. Heavy Metal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    La Silla Telescope Detects Lots of Lead in Three Distant Binaries Summary Very high abundances of the heavy element Lead have been discovered in three distant stars in the Milky Way Galaxy . This finding strongly supports the long-held view that roughly half of the stable elements heavier than Iron are produced in common stars during a phase towards the end of their life when they burn their Helium - the other half results from supernova explosions. All the Lead contained in each of the three stars weighs about as much as our Moon. The observations show that these "Lead stars" - all members of binary stellar systems - have been more enriched with Lead than with any other chemical element heavier than Iron. This new result is in excellent agreement with predictions by current stellar models about the build-up of heavy elements in stellar interiors. The new observations are reported by a team of Belgian and French astronomers [1] who used the Coude Echelle Spectrometer on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory (Chile). PR Photo 26a/01 : A photo of HD 196944 , one of the "Lead stars". PR Photo 26b/01 : A CES spectrum of HD 196944 . The build-up of heavy elements Astronomers and physicists denote the build-up of heavier elements from lighter ones as " nucleosynthesis ". Only the very lightest elements (Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium [2]) were created at the time of the Big Bang and therefore present in the early universe. All the other heavier elements we now see around us were produced at a later time by nucleosynthesis inside stars. In those "element factories", nuclei of the lighter elements are smashed together whereby they become the nuclei of heavier ones - this process is known as nuclear fusion . In our Sun and similar stars, Hydrogen is being fused into Helium. At some stage, Helium is fused into Carbon, then Oxygen, etc. The fusion process requires positively charged nuclei to move very close to each other before they can unite. But with increasing

  19. Flattest Star Ever Seen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    15b/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 464 pix - 35k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 927 pix - 176k] Caption: PR Photo 15b/03 shows the profile of the rapidly rotating star Achernar , as deduced from observations with the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) [3]. The size is indicated in units of 0.001 arcsec (milli-arcsec). Individual angular diameter measurements are indicated by pairs of small points with associated error bars on opposite sides of the center. The fully drawn curve represents the best fitting ellipse. The ratio of the axes is 1.56 ± 0.05. The major axis of this ellipse is a measure of the "real" size of the star. Because of the projection effect, the minor axis shows the largest possible extension in the perpendicular direction. The axes ratio is therefore a minimal value; the star may be even more flattened than suggested by this ellipse. A first attempt to measure the geometrical deformation of a rapidly rotating star was carried out in 1974 with the Narrabri Intensity Interferometer (Australia) on the bright star Altair by British astronomer Hanbury Brown . However, because of technical limitations, those observations were unable to decide between different models for this star. More recently, Gerard T. Van Belle and collaborators observed Altair with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) , measuring its apparent axial ratio as 1.140 ± 0.029 and placing some constraints upon the relationship between rotation velocity and stellar inclination. Achernar is a star of the hot B-type, with a mass of 6 times that of the Sun. The surface temperature is about 20,000 °C and it is located at a distance of 145 light-years. The apparent profile of Achernar ( PR Photo 15b/03 ), based on about 20,000 VLTI interferograms (in the K-band at wavelength 2.2 µm) with a total integration time of over 20 hours, indicates a surprisingly high axial ratio of 1.56 ± 0.05 [3]. This is obviously a result of Achernar's rapid rotation. Theoretical implications of the VLTI observations ESO PR Photo

  20. PRISM Polarimetry of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkstra, Brennan; Lomax, Jamie R.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Skiff, Brian; Covey, Kevin R.; Wisniewski, John P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the early results from our long-term, multi-epoch filter polarization survey of massive stars in and around young Galactic clusters. These BVRI polarization data were obtained using the PRISM instrument mounted on the 1.8m Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory. We first detail the creation of our new semi-automated polarization data reduction pipeline that we developed to process these data. Next, we present our analysis of the instrumental polarization properties of the PRISM instrument, via observations of polarized and unpolarized standard stars. Finally, we present early results on the total and intrinsic polarization behavior of several isolated, previously suggested classical Be stars, and discuss these results in the context of the larger project.BK acknowledges support from a NSF/REU at the University of Oklahoma. This program was also supported by NSF-AST 11411563, 1412110, and 1412135.

  1. Streptococcus group B typing: comparison of counter-immunoelectrophoresis with the precipitin method.

    PubMed

    Kubín, V; Jelínková, J; Franêk, J

    1977-07-01

    The method of counter-immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) was tested for its applicability to group B streptococcus typing. The results obtained were compared with the typing by the ring precipitin test. Identical antigens and identical hyperimmune typing serum batches had been used in both methods. A large majority of 75 freshly isolated strains were typed identically by both methods. Five strains with a weak antigenic outfit were untypable by the ring precipitin test but were typed by CIE owing to a higher sensitivity of CIE method. Two strains were typable by the precipitin test but not by CIE; an explanation for this phenomenon is lacking. The CIE method in group B typing is specific, rapid, highly sensitive and relatively simple. It requires strict maintenance of standard conditions. The method is economical with respect to manipulation and material, requires small amounts of diagnostic antisera. Potent antisera may be used diluted. Moreover, sera for CIE typing need not be absorbed to remove group B antibodies. CIE method is practicable for group B streptococcus typing, especially in laboratories carrying out routine large scale type identification.

  2. B-type natriuretic peptide modulates ghrelin, hunger, and satiety in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Vila, Greisa; Grimm, Gabriele; Resl, Michael; Heinisch, Birgit; Einwallner, Elisa; Esterbauer, Harald; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Mueller, Thomas; Luger, Anton; Clodi, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Chronic heart failure is accompanied by anorexia and increased release of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) from ventricular cardiomyocytes. The pathophysiological mechanisms linking heart failure and appetite regulation remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the impact of intravenous BNP administration on appetite-regulating hormones and subjective ratings of hunger and satiety in 10 healthy volunteers. Participants received in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover, single-blinded study (subject) placebo once and 3.0 pmol/kg/min human BNP-32 once administered as a continuous infusion during 4 h. Circulating concentrations of appetite-regulating peptides were measured hourly. Subjective ratings of hunger and satiety were evaluated by visual analog scales. BNP inhibited the fasting-induced increase in total and acylated ghrelin concentrations over time (P = 0.043 and P = 0.038, respectively). In addition, BNP decreased the subjective rating of hunger (P = 0.009) and increased the feeling of satiety (P = 0.012) when compared with placebo. There were no significant changes in circulating peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide 1, oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide, leptin, and adiponectin concentrations. In summary, our results demonstrate that BNP exerts anorectic effects and reduces ghrelin concentrations in men. These data, taken together with the known cardiovascular properties of ghrelin, support the existence of a heart-gut-brain axis, which could be therapeutically targeted in patients with heart failure and obesity.

  3. Interferon alpha bioactivity critically depends on Scavenger receptor class B type I function

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Marcos; Fioravanti, Jessica; Aranda, Fernando; Paredes, Vladimir; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Méndez, Miriam; Nistal-Villan, Estanislao; Larrea, Esther; Gao, Qinshan; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Prieto, Jesus; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) binds pathogen-associated molecular patterns participating in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction but there is no information regarding potential interactions between SR-B1 and the interferon system. Herein, we report that SR-B1 ligands strongly regulate the transcriptional response to interferon α (IFNα) and enhance its antiviral and antitumor activity. This effect was mediated by the activation of TLR2 and TLR4 as it was annulled by the addition of anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies. In vivo, we maximized the antitumor activity of IFNα co-expressing in the liver a SR-B1 ligand and IFNα by adeno-associated viruses. This gene therapy strategy eradicated liver metastases from colon cancer with reduced toxicity. On the other hand, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SR-B1 blocks the clathrin-dependent interferon receptor recycling pathway with a concomitant reduction in IFNα signaling and bioactivity. This effect can be applied to enhance cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic viruses. Indeed, SR-B1 antagonists facilitate replication of oncolytic viruses amplifying their tumoricidal potential. In conclusion, SR-B1 agonists behave as IFNα enhancers while SR-B1 inhibitors dampen IFNα activity. These results demonstrate that SR-B1 is a suitable pharmacology target to enhance cancer immunotherapy based on IFNα and oncolytic viruses. PMID:27622065

  4. Behavior of B-type natriuretic peptide during mechanical ventilation and spontaneous breathing after extubation.

    PubMed

    Principi, T; Falzetti, G; Elisei, D; Donati, A; Pelaia, P

    2009-04-01

    The behavior of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is assessed during mechanical ventilation (MV) and spontaneous breathing after extubation in critical patients. Thirty patients admitted in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) were enrolled. BNP, fluid balance (FB), airway pressure (AP) and dobutamine infusion needing (DP) were registered in three stages: T0, admission to ICU; T1, before extubation; T2, 24 h after extubation. Patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) had BNP values higher than other patients. The value of BNP during MV was greater than normal in all patients. The cut-off to discriminate patients with heart failure during MV was 286 pgxmL(-1)(sensitivity: 86%; specificity: 90%). The increase of BNP during MV directly correlated with FB and inversely correlated with AP and DP. The plasmatic level of BNP remained higher than normal values 24 h after extubation. The underlying disease of an ICU patient seems to play a relevant role for BNP production and is probably linked to different aspects of therapeutic approach required by the patient. Our data suggest a cut-off value of BNP higher than the usual is necessary to discriminate mechanically-ventilated patients without CHF. This study should be repeated with an enlarged population.

  5. Pathophysiology, prognostic significance and clinical utility of B-type natriuretic peptide in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wiviott, Stephen D; de Lemos, James A; Morrow, David A

    2004-08-16

    The natriuretic hormones are a family of vasoactive peptides that can be measured circulating in the blood. Because they serve as markers of hemodynamic stress, the major focus of the use of natriuretic peptide levels [predominantly B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal (NT)-pro-BNP] has been as an aid to the clinical diagnosis and management of congestive heart failure (CHF). Recently, however, the measurement of natriuretic peptides in the acute coronary syndromes (ACS) has been shown to provide information complementary to traditional biomarkers (of necrosis) such as cardiac troponins and creatine kinase (CK). Studies in several types of acute coronary syndromes [ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST elevation MI (NSTEMI) and unstable angina (UA)] have shown that elevated levels of natriuretic peptides are independently associated with adverse outcomes, particularly mortality. Additional information is obtained from the use natriuretic peptides in combination with other markers of risk including biomarkers of necrosis and inflammation. This review will summarize the scientific rationale and clinical evidence supporting measurement of natriuretic peptides for risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes. Future research is needed to identify therapies of particular benefit for patients with ACS and natriuretic peptide elevation.

  6. Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide concentration in beta-thalassaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Aessopos, Athanasios; Farmakis, Dimitrios; Polonifi, Aikaterini; Tsironi, Maria; Fragodimitri, Christina; Hatziliami, Antonia; Karagiorga, Markisia; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2007-05-01

    Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentration has significant diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value in various forms of heart disease. Whether BNP is also useful in the evaluation and management of thalassaemia heart disease remains to be determined. Eighty three thalassaemia major patients; 8 with acutely decompensated heart failure (New York Heart Association [NYHA] class III or IV, group A), 25 with NYHA class II symptoms and impaired systolic left ventricular function (ejection fraction<55% or fractional shortening<30%, group B) and 50 with normal systolic function (group C), as well as 50 healthy controls, were studied. Assessment included history, physical examination, Doppler echocardiography and plasma BNP determination. Mean BNP levels were 431+/-219 pg/mL (range, 283-890 pg/mL) in group A, 158+/-31 pg/mL in group B, 176+/-54 pg/mL in group C and 43+/-24 pg/mL in controls. BNP levels were significantly higher in group A (p<0.001), but did not differ between groups B and C. Moreover, BNP was not correlated with left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, left ventricular mass, right ventricular diameter index, Doppler diastolic indexes (except in group C), the mean 2-year serum ferritin concentration or the peak serum ferritin concentration in any of the three patient groups. A potential deficiency of BNP-related neurohormonal mechanisms may impair its clinical usefulness in thalassaemia major.

  7. B-type natriuretic peptide testing for detection of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saul, Lauren; Shatzer, Melanie

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) is on the increase with the aging population. Heart failure can manifest as either systolic or diastolic dysfunction. Systolic dysfunction causes impaired ventricular contractility with an ejection fraction of less than 45%. In contrast, diastolic dysfunction is evidenced by impaired ventricular relaxation and an ejection fraction greater than 45%. The diagnosis of HF is challenging with patients who present with acute dyspnea and a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or pneumonia. The pathophysiology of HF and the resulting compensatory mechanisms involve a complex neuroendocrine response that includes a release of natriuretic peptides including B-type natriuretic peptides (BNPs). Elevation of BNP is in response to ventricular wall stress and volume overload from HF. BNP promotes natriuresis, diuresis, and vasodilitation and therefore counteracts some of the deleterious effects of the neuroendocrine response in HF Recently, a new laboratory test for BNP has been developed to assist in rapid identification of patients with HF. Research studies have shown that BNP testing assists in differentiating between cardiac and pulmonary causes of acute dyspnea and could be used to evaluate effectiveness of therapy and as a predictor for length of stay and readmission.

  8. Diverse molecular forms of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nishikimi, Toshio; Minamino, Naoto; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that not only plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)-32, but also plasma proBNP-108 is increased in heart failure (HF), and that the current BNP-32 assay kit crossreacts with proBNP-108. It also was shown that both BNP-32 and proBNP-108 were higher in HF than in normal. The proBNP-108/total BNP (BNP-32 + proBNP-108) ratio was widely distributed and patients with HF with ventricular overload had higher proBNP-108/total BNP ratio than HF patients with atrial overload. Consistent with this finding, proBNP-108 was the major molecular form in ventricular tissue, and BNP-32 was the major molecular form in atrial tissue. In addition, proBNP-108 was the major molecular form of BNP in pericardial fluid. The proBNP-108/total BNP ratio increased with deterioration of HF and decreased with improvement of HF. Thus, not only BNP-32, but also proBNP-108 is increased in HF and the proBNP-108/total BNP ratio also rises in association with pathophysiological conditions such as ventricular overload. A new hypothesis that O-glycosylation at Thr71 in a region close to the cleavage site impairs proBNP-108 processing was proposed. In the future, the precise mechanism of increased proBNP-108 in HF should be elucidated.

  9. The A- and B-type nuclear lamin networks: microdomains involved in chromatin organization and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, Takeshi; Pfleghaar, Katrin; Kojima, Shin-ichiro; Pack, Chan-Gi; Solovei, Irina; Goldman, Anne E.; Adam, Stephen A.; Shumaker, Dale K.; Kinjo, Masataka; Cremer, Thomas; Goldman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear lamins function in the regulation of replication, transcription, and epigenetic modifications of chromatin. However, the mechanisms responsible for these lamin functions are poorly understood. We demonstrate that A- and B-type lamins form separate, but interacting, stable meshworks in the lamina and have different mobilities in the nucleoplasm as determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Silencing lamin B1 (LB1) expression dramatically increases the lamina meshwork size and the mobility of nucleoplasmic lamin A (LA). The changes in lamina mesh size are coupled to the formation of LA/C-rich nuclear envelope blebs deficient in LB2. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of microdissected blebs, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and immunofluorescence localization of modified histones demonstrate that gene-rich euchromatin associates with the LA/C blebs. Enrichment of hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and histone marks for active transcription suggest that blebs are transcriptionally active. However, in vivo labeling of RNA indicates that transcription is decreased, suggesting that the LA/C-rich microenvironment induces promoter proximal stalling of Pol II. We propose that different lamins are organized into separate, but interacting, microdomains and that LB1 is essential for their organization. Our evidence suggests that the organization and regulation of chromatin are influenced by interconnections between these lamin microdomains. PMID:19141474

  10. Discovery of new A- and B-type laxaphycins with synergistic anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weijing; Matthew, Susan; Chen, Qi-Yin; Paul, Valerie J; Luesch, Hendrik

    2018-05-15

    Two new cyclic lipopeptides termed laxaphycins B4 (1) and A2 (2) were discovered from a collection of the marine cyanobacterium Hormothamnion enteromorphoides, along with the known compound laxaphycin A. The planar structures were solved based on a combined interpretation of 1D and 2D NMR data and mass spectral data. The absolute configurations of the subunits were determined by chiral LC-MS analysis of the hydrolysates, advanced Marfey's analysis and 1D and 2D ROESY experiments. Consistent with similar findings on other laxaphycin A- and B-type peptides, laxaphycin B4 (1) showed antiproliferative effects against human colon cancer HCT116 cells with IC 50 of 1.7 µM, while laxaphycins A and A2 (2) exhibited weak activities. The two major compounds isolated from the sample, laxaphycins A and B4, were shown to act synergistically to inhibit the growth of HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. StarBright Learning Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalinowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This article features StarBright Learning Exchange, a program that provides a cross-cultural exchange between Australian and South African early childhood educators. The program was originated when its president, Carol Allen, and her colleague, Karen Williams, decided that they could no longer sit by and watch the unfolding social catastrophe that…

  12. The ALMA early science view of FUor/EXor objects - IV. Misaligned outflows in the complex star-forming environment of V1647 Ori and McNeil's Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, David A.; Cieza, Lucas; Hales, Antonio; Zurlo, Alice; Williams, Jonathan; Ruíz-Rodríguez, Dary; Canovas, Hector; Casassus, Simon; Mužić, Koraljka; Perez, Sebastian; Tobin, John J.; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2018-01-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the star-forming environment surrounding V1647 Ori, an outbursting FUor/EXor pre-main sequence star. Dust continuum and the (J = 2 - 1) 12CO, 13CO, C18O molecular emission lines were observed to characterize the V1647 Ori circumstellar disc and any large scale molecular features present. We detect continuum emission from the circumstellar disc and determine a radius r = 40 au, inclination i = 17°+6-9 and total disc mass of Mdisc of ∼0.1 M⊙. We do not identify any disc structures associated with nearby companions, massive planets or fragmentation. The molecular cloud environment surrounding V1647 Ori is both structured and complex. We confirm the presence of an excavated cavity north of V1647 Ori and have identified dense material at the base of the optical reflection nebula (McNeil's Nebula) that is actively shaping its surrounding environment. Two distinct outflows have been detected with dynamical ages of ∼11 700 and 17 200 yr. These outflows are misaligned suggesting disc precession over ∼5500 yr as a result of anisotropic accretion events is responsible. The collimated outflows exhibit velocities of ∼2 km s-1, similar in velocity to that of other FUor objects presented in this series, but significantly slower than previous observations and model predictions. The V1647 Ori system is seemingly connected by an 'arm' of material to a large unresolved structure located ∼20 arcsec to the west. The complex environment surrounding V1647 Ori suggests it is in the early stages of star formation, which may relate to its classification as both a FUor and EXor type object.

  13. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    galaxy, another has been found in the nearby galaxy IC 1613, and five others are situated in the Magellanic Clouds. Astronomers have also detected the presence of HeII ions in a number of remote galaxies undergoing a phase of intense star formation ("starburst galaxies") and in the vicinity of ultraluminous X-ray sources in very distant galaxies. What is going on in those remote objects in the early Universe? Do we see the action of young and very hot stars or is something unknown going on? What can the existence of those hot nebulae in young galaxies tell about the evolution of our own Milky Way? Searching for the energy source We would like to know, but those distant nebulae are unfortunately too faint to be studied in any reasonable detail, even by means of the largest available telescopes. The only way forward is therefore to look closer at the nearest ones in the hope that they will provide clues about the processes leading to the observed high excitation and thus help to better understand their cousins in those distant galaxies. There appears to be three possible answers to the basic question about the nature of the energetic sources that heat these strange emission nebulae: * very fast particles: if there is in the area a fast-moving gas (more than 100 km/s), the shock created by the impact of this material is able to heat the ambient interstellar medium sufficiently to produce a HeII nebula. * ultraviolet emission from massive stars: according to the most recent model calculations, even the most massive O-type stars do not emit enough ultraviolet light to ionize a sufficient number of helium atoms in the surrounding nebula to produce a detectable HeII nebula. However, some of the hottest stars of the so-called Wolf-Rayet (W-R) type (that are the evolved descendants of O-stars) may produce enough high energy emission to completely ionize the helium atoms in their surroundings. * intense X-ray emission: close binary stars in which one component is a "compact

  14. Star ratings. Stars of wonder.

    PubMed

    Dawes, David

    2002-09-12

    Analysis of trusts that changed their star-rating over the past two years indicates that a change of chief executive was not a significant factor. The length of time in post and the experience of the chief executive were also insignificant. This has serious implications for the theory behind franchising and the evaluation of franchised trusts. Holding chief executives to account for the organisation's performance within their first 12 months is unlikely to be effective.

  15. Winds in hot main-sequence stars near the static limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Nancy D.

    1995-01-01

    This project began with the acquisition of short-wavelength, high-dispersion IUE spectra of selected late O- and early B-type stars that are near the main sequence in open clusters and associations. The profiles of the resonance lines of N(V), Si(IV), and C(IV) were studied, and we found that the C(IV) lines are the most sensitive indicators of mass loss (stellar winds) in stars of this type. The mass loss manifests itself as an extension of the short-wavelength absorption wing of the doublet, while there is no P Cygni-type emission on the long-wavelength side of the line profile. We investigated whether the short-wavelength extension could be caused by blended lines of other ionic species formed in the photosphere. Although blending is present and introduces uncertainty into the estimation of the precise location on the main sequence of the onset of the mass-loss signature, it is a crucial issue only in a few marginal cases. Mass loss certainly overwhelms blending in its influence on the spectrum between spectral types B0 and B1 (effective temperatures in the range 25,000-27,000 K). We defined a parameter called P(sub w), to describe the degree of asymmetry of the C(IV) resonance-line profile, and we studied the dependence of this parameter on the fundamental stellar parameters. For this purpose, we derived new estimates of the stellar T(eff) and log g from a non-LTE, line-blanketed model-atmosphere analysis of these stars (Grigsby, Morrison, and Anderson 1992). In order to estimate the stellar luminosities, we performed an exhaustive search of the literature for the most reliable available estimates of the distances of the clusters and associations to which the program stars belong. The dependence of P(sub w) on stellar temperature and luminosity is also studied.

  16. Massive Stars in the SDSS-IV/APOGEE SURVEY. I. OB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Lopes, A.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Tapia, Mauricio; Chojnowski, Drew; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Y.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Borissova, Jura; Minniti, Dante; Covey, Kevin R.; Longa-Peña, Penélope; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Zamora, Olga; Nitschelm, Christian

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we make use of DR14 APOGEE spectroscopic data to study a sample of 92 known OB stars. We developed a near-infrared semi-empirical spectral classification method that was successfully used in case of four new exemplars, previously classified as later B-type stars. Our results agree well with those determined independently from ECHELLE optical spectra, being in line with the spectral types derived from the “canonical” MK blue optical system. This confirms that the APOGEE spectrograph can also be used as a powerful tool in surveys aiming to unveil and study a large number of moderately and highly obscured OB stars still hidden in the Galaxy.

  17. Massive stars and miniature robots: today's research and tomorrow's technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, William David

    2013-03-01

    This thesis documents the reduction of the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS) data set, whilst also describing the analysis for one of the serendipitous discoveries: the massive binary R139. This high-mass binary will provide an excellent future calibration point for stellar models, in part as it seems to defy certain expectations about its evolution. Out with the VFTS, a search for binary companions around a trio of B-type supergiants is presented. These stars are surrounded by nebulae that closely resemble the triple-ring structure associated with the poorly-understood SN1987A. Do these stars share a similar evolutionary fate? While strong evidence is found for periodic pulsations in one of the stars, there appears to be no indication of a short-period binary companion suggested in the literature. Gathering observations from a wide range of environments builds a fuller picture of massive stars, but the samples remain somewhat limited. The coming generation of extremely large telescopes will open new regions for studies like the VFTS. Fully utilising these remarkable telescopes will require many new technologies, and this thesis presents one such development project. For adaptive-optics corrected, multi-object instruments it will be necessary to position small pick-off mirrors in the telescope¿s focal plane to select the sub-fields on the sky. This could be most efficiently achieved if the mirrors were self-propelled, which has led to a miniature robot project called MAPS - the Micro Autonomous Positioning System. A number of robots have been built with a footprint of only 30 x 30mm. These wirelessly-controlled robots draw their power from the floor on which they operate and have shown the potential to be positioned to an accuracy of tens of microns. This thesis details much of the early design work and testing of the robots, and also the development of the camera imaging system used to determine the position of the robots. The MAPS project is ongoing and a

  18. Spheroidal Populated Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeletti, Lucio; Giannone, Pietro

    2008-10-01

    Globular clusters and low-ellipticity early-type galaxies can be treated as systems populated by a large number of stars and whose structures can be schematized as spherically symmetric. Their studies profit from the synthesis of stellar populations. The computation of synthetic models makes use of various contributions from star evolution and stellar dynamics. In the first sections of the paper we present a short review of our results on the occurrence of galactic winds in star systems ranging from globular clusters to elliptical galaxies, and the dynamical evolution of a typical massive globular cluster. In the subsequent sections we describe our approach to the problem of the stellar populations in elliptical galaxies. The projected radial behaviours of spectro-photometric indices for a sample of eleven galaxies are compared with preliminary model results. The best agreement between observation and theory shows that our galaxies share a certain degree of heterogeneity. The gas energy dissipation varies from moderate to large, the metal yield ranges from solar to significantly oversolar, the dispersion of velocities is isotropic in most of the cases and anisotropic in the remaining instances.

  19. THE PREVALENCE AND IMPACT OF WOLF–RAYET STARS IN EMERGING MASSIVE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciT

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy

    We investigate Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point inmore » the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.{sup 4} We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ∼50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.« less

  20. B-type natriuretic peptide levels in patients with pericardial effusion undergoing pericardiocentesis.

    PubMed

    Lauri, Gianfranco; Rossi, Chiara; Rubino, Mara; Cosentino, Nicola; Milazzo, Valentina; Marana, Ivana; Cabiati, Angelo; Moltrasio, Marco; De Metrio, Monica; Grazi, Marco; Campodonico, Jeness; Assanelli, Emilio; Riggio, Daniela; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Bonomi, Alice; Veglia, Fabrizio; Marenzi, Giancarlo

    2016-06-01

    Pericardial effusion is characterized by progressive accumulation of fluid within the pericardial space, resulting in increased intra-pericardial pressure and compression of the heart. As B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is secreted by the ventricles in response to increased myocardial stretch, we hypothesized that pericardial effusion, as well as its resolution, might influence BNP plasma levels. We prospectively measured, in 146 consecutive patients with pericardial effusion, BNP plasma levels at baseline, soon after, and 24h after pericardiocentesis. A scoring system based on 7 clinical and echocardiographic parameters was developed, and patients were classified according to the number of variables as having low (0-2), intermediate (3-4), or high (5-7) severity score. Out of the 146 patients, 42 (29%) had normal values (<100pg/ml), whereas 104 (71%) had high BNP values at baseline. In the whole population, baseline BNP levels significantly decreased as the severity score increased (r=-0.21; P=0.01). 24h after pericardiocentesis, a significant increase in BNP was observed in patients with intermediate (P=0.004) score and with high (P<0.001) severity score; no increase occurred in low score patients (P=0.56). The higher was the severity score, the steeper was the increase in BNP through the three time-points considered (P=0.04). The results of the present study show that BNP plasma levels are suppressed in the presence of severe pericardial effusion, and that they rise after pericardiocentesis. Future studies should investigate the role of BNP in assisting clinicians in the decision-making process of pericardial fluid drainage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence for functional heterogeneity of circulating B-type natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Liang, Faquan; O'Rear, Jessica; Schellenberger, Ute; Tai, Lungkuo; Lasecki, Michael; Schreiner, George F; Apple, Fred S; Maisel, Alan S; Pollitt, N Stephen; Protter, Andrew A

    2007-03-13

    These studies describe molecular forms of circulating B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) as well as their biological activity. Increased circulating levels of immunoreactive BNP correlate with the severity of heart failure and are considered a sensitive biomarker. However, little is known about the molecular forms of circulating BNP and their biological activity. Western blot analysis was used to characterize immunoreactive BNP species in heart failure plasma. Recombinant proBNP was assessed for reactivity in commercially available BNP assays and cell activity by cyclic guanosine monophosphate production in vascular cells. Heart failure plasma contained both low- (LMW-BNP) and high-molecular-weight (HMW-BNP) forms. The LMW-BNP migrated similarly to a 32-amino acid BNP standard, whereas HMW-BNP, when deglycosylated, was similar to deglycosylated recombinant proBNP. Recombinant proBNP and BNP were equally recognized by the Triage BNP assay (Biosite, San Diego, California). Furthermore, recombinant proBNP and BNP were both recognized by the Advia Centaur BNP test (Bayer Diagnostics, Tarrytown, New York), but only recombinant proBNP was recognized by the Elecsys NTproBNP assay (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, Indiana). Recombinant proBNP exerted significantly less biological activity than BNP on human endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Comparison of effective concentration (50%) values indicates that proBNP is 6- to 8-fold less potent than BNP in these human cells. This study demonstrates that proBNP, constituting a substantial portion of immunoreactive BNP in heart failure plasma, possesses significantly lower biological activity than the processed 32-amino acid hormone. These results implicate a discordance in heart failure between the high circulating levels of immunoreactive BNP and hormone activity, suggesting that some patients may be in a state of natriuretic peptide deficiency.

  2. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) serum levels in rats after forced repeated swimming stress.

    PubMed

    Hadzovic-Dzuvo, Almira; Valjevac, Amina; Avdagić, Nesina; Lepara, Orhan; Zaćiragić, Asija; Jadrić, Radivoj; Alajbegović, Jasmin; Prnjavorac, Besim

    2011-02-01

    To estimate the effects of forced repeated swimming stress on BNP serum levels in rats. Adult male Wistar rats weighting between 280-330 g were divided into two groups: control group (n = 8) and stress group (n = 8). Rats in the stress group were exposed to forced swimming stress daily, for 7 days. The rats were forced to swim in plastic tanks (90 cm wide, 120 cm deep) containing tap water (temperature ca. 25 degrees C). The depth of water was 40 cm. Duration of each swimming session progressively increased from 10 minutes on the first day to 40 minutes on days 6 and 7. Rats were sacrificed and blood was drawn from abdominal aorta for BNP analysis immediately after the last swimming session. B-type natriuretic serum level was determined by ELISA method using RAT BNP-32 kit (Phoenix Pharmaceutical Inc.). There was no statistically significant difference between mean BNP serum level in the stress group after the swimming period (0.81 +/- 0.14 ng/ml) as compared to the unstressed group of rats (0.8 +/- 0.08 ng/ml). After the swimming period mean body weight slightly decreased in the stress group in comparison with values before stress period (296.3 g vs. 272.8 g), but this difference was not statistically significant. The stress period had no influence on food intake in the stress rat group. The workload consisting of 40-minutes long swimming session is not sufficient to provoke BNP release from myocardium in rats.

  3. Glycosylation and Processing of Pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianhao; Jiang, Jingjing; Wang, Wei; Qi, Xiaofei; Sun, Xue-Long; Wu, Qingyu

    2011-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its related peptides are biomarkers for the diagnosis of heart failure. Recent studies identified several O-glycosylation sites, including Thr-71, on human pro-BNP but the functional significance was unclear. In this study, we analyzed glycosylation and proteolytic processing of pro-BNP in cardiomyocytes. Human pro-BNP wild-type (WT) and mutants were expressed in HEK 293 cells and murine HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Pro-BNP and BNP were analyzed by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Glycosidases and glycosylation inhibitors were used to examine carbohydrates on pro-BNP. The effects of furin and corin expression on pro-BNP processing in cells also were examined. We found that in HEK 293 cells, recombinant pro-BNP contained significant amounts of O-glycans with terminal oligosialic acids. Mutation at Thr-71 reduced O-glycans on pro-BNP and increased pro-BNP processing. In HL-1 cardiomyocytes, residue Thr-71 contained little O-glycans, and pro-BNP WT and T71A mutant were processed similarly. In HEK 293 cells, pro-BNP was processed by furin. Mutations at Arg-73 and Arg-76, but not Lys-79, prevented pro-BNP processing. In HL-1 cardiomyocytes, which express furin and corin, single or double mutations at Arg-73, Arg-76 and Lys-79 did not prevent pro-BNP processing. Only when all these three residues were mutated, was pro-BNP processing completely blocked. Our data indicate that pro-BNP glycosylation in cardiomyocytes differed significantly from that in HEK 293 cells. In HEK 293 cells, furin cleaved pro-BNP at Arg-76 whereas in cardiomyocytes corin cleaved pro-BNP at multiple residues including Arg-73, Arg-76 and Lys-79. PMID:21763278

  4. State of the art of immunoassay methods for B-type natriuretic peptides: An update.

    PubMed

    Clerico, Aldo; Franzini, Maria; Masotti, Silvia; Prontera, Concetta; Passino, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to give an update on the state of the art of the immunoassay methods for the measurement of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its related peptides. Using chromatographic procedures, several studies reported an increasing number of circulating peptides related to BNP in human plasma of patients with heart failure. These peptides may have reduced or even no biological activity. Furthermore, other studies have suggested that, using immunoassays that are considered specific for BNP, the precursor of the peptide hormone, proBNP, constitutes a major portion of the peptide measured in plasma of patients with heart failure. Because BNP immunoassay methods show large (up to 50%) systematic differences in values, the use of identical decision values for all immunoassay methods, as suggested by the most recent international guidelines, seems unreasonable. Since proBNP significantly cross-reacts with all commercial immunoassay methods considered specific for BNP, manufacturers should test and clearly declare the degree of cross-reactivity of glycosylated and non-glycosylated proBNP in their BNP immunoassay methods. Clinicians should take into account that there are large systematic differences between methods when they compare results from different laboratories that use different BNP immunoassays. On the other hand, clinical laboratories should take part in external quality assessment (EQA) programs to evaluate the bias of their method in comparison to other BNP methods. Finally, the authors believe that the development of more specific methods for the active peptide, BNP1-32, should reduce the systematic differences between methods and result in better harmonization of results.

  5. Plasma N-Terminal Pro B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Concentrations in Dogs with Pulmonic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, Keiya; HORI, Yasutomo; CHIMURA, Syuuichi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The detailed information between plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and dogs with pulmonic stenosis (PS) is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical utility of measuring plasma NT-proBNP concentrations in dogs with PS and to determine whether plasma NT-proBNP concentration could be used to assess disease severity. This retrospective study enrolled 30 client-owned, untreated dogs with PS (asymptomatic [n=23] and symptomatic [n=7]) and 11 healthy laboratory beagles. Results of physical examination, thoracic radiography and echocardiography were recorded. Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were measured using commercial laboratories. Compared to the healthy control dogs, cardiothoracic ratio was significantly increased in dogs with both asymptomatic and symptomatic PS. Similarly, the ratio of the main pulmonary artery to aorta was significantly decreased in dogs with both asymptomatic and symptomatic PS. The pulmonic pressure gradient in the symptomatic PS dogs was significantly higher than that in the asymptomatic PS dogs. Plasma NT-proBNP concentration was significantly elevated in the symptomatic PS dogs compared to the healthy control dogs and the asymptomatic PS dogs. Furthermore, the Doppler-derived pulmonic pressure gradient was significantly correlated with the plasma NT-proBNP concentration (r=0.78, r2=0.61, P<0.0001). Plasma NT-proBNP concentration >764 pmol/l to identify severe PS had a sensitivity of 76.2% and specificity of 81.8%. The plasma NT-proBNP concentration increased by spontaneous PS, i.e. right-sided pressure overload and can be used as an additional method to assess the severity of PS in dogs. PMID:24561377

  6. Segmental arterial stiffness in relation to B-type natriuretic peptide with preserved systolic heart function.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chih-Hsuan; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Lee, Ping-Ying; Tsai, Jui-Peng; Lai, Yau-Huei; Su, Cheng-Huang; Yeh, Hung-I; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2017-01-01

    Central arterial stiffness has been shown to play a key role in cardiovascular disease. However, evidence regarding such arterial stiffness from various arterial segments in relation to B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) remains elusive. A total of 1255 participants (47.8% men; mean age: 62.6 ± 12.3 [SD] years) with preserved left ventricular function (ejection fraction ≥50%) and ≥1 risk factors were consecutively studied. Arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) by automatic device (VP-2000; Omron Healthcare) for heart-femoral (hf-PWV), brachial-ankle (ba-PWV), and heart-carotid (hc-PWV) segments were obtained and related to BNP concentrations (Abbott Diagnostics, Abbott Park, IL, USA). Subjects in the highest hf-PWV quartile were older and had worse renal function and higher blood pressure (all P < 0.05). Elevated PWV (m/s) was correlated with elevated BNP (pg/ml) (beta coefficient = 19.3, 12.4, 5.9 for hf-PWV, ba-PWV, hc-PWV respectively, all p < 0.05). After accounting for clinical co-variates and left ventricle mass index (LVMI), both hf-PWV and ba-PWV were correlated with higher BNP (beta coefficient = 8.3, 6.4 respectively, P < 0.01 for each). Adding both hf-PWV and ba-PWV to LVMI significantly expanded ROC in predicting abnormal BNP>100 pg/ml (both P < 0.01), but only hf-PWV presented significant integrated discrimination improvement to predict risk for BNP concentrations (0.7%, P = 0.029). A significant segmental PWV associated with biomarker BNP concentrations suggests that arterial stiffness is associated with myocardial damage.

  7. Segmental arterial stiffness in relation to B-type natriuretic peptide with preserved systolic heart function

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chih-Hsuan; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Lee, Ping-Ying; Tsai, Jui-Peng; Lai, Yau-Huei; Su, Cheng-Huang; Yeh, Hung-I; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Background Central arterial stiffness has been shown to play a key role in cardiovascular disease. However, evidence regarding such arterial stiffness from various arterial segments in relation to B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) remains elusive. Methods A total of 1255 participants (47.8% men; mean age: 62.6 ± 12.3 [SD] years) with preserved left ventricular function (ejection fraction ≥50%) and ≥1 risk factors were consecutively studied. Arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) by automatic device (VP-2000; Omron Healthcare) for heart-femoral (hf-PWV), brachial-ankle (ba-PWV), and heart-carotid (hc-PWV) segments were obtained and related to BNP concentrations (Abbott Diagnostics, Abbott Park, IL, USA). Results Subjects in the highest hf-PWV quartile were older and had worse renal function and higher blood pressure (all P < 0.05). Elevated PWV (m/s) was correlated with elevated BNP (pg/ml) (beta coefficient = 19.3, 12.4, 5.9 for hf-PWV, ba-PWV, hc-PWV respectively, all p < 0.05). After accounting for clinical co-variates and left ventricle mass index (LVMI), both hf-PWV and ba-PWV were correlated with higher BNP (beta coefficient = 8.3, 6.4 respectively, P < 0.01 for each). Adding both hf-PWV and ba-PWV to LVMI significantly expanded ROC in predicting abnormal BNP>100 pg/ml (both P < 0.01), but only hf-PWV presented significant integrated discrimination improvement to predict risk for BNP concentrations (0.7%, P = 0.029). Conclusion A significant segmental PWV associated with biomarker BNP concentrations suggests that arterial stiffness is associated with myocardial damage. PMID:28922407

  8. Plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations in dogs with pulmonic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiya; Hori, Yasutomo; Chimura, Syuuichi

    2014-06-01

    The detailed information between plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and dogs with pulmonic stenosis (PS) is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical utility of measuring plasma NT-proBNP concentrations in dogs with PS and to determine whether plasma NT-proBNP concentration could be used to assess disease severity. This retrospective study enrolled 30 client-owned, untreated dogs with PS (asymptomatic [n=23] and symptomatic [n=7]) and 11 healthy laboratory beagles. Results of physical examination, thoracic radiography and echocardiography were recorded. Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were measured using commercial laboratories. Compared to the healthy control dogs, cardiothoracic ratio was significantly increased in dogs with both asymptomatic and symptomatic PS. Similarly, the ratio of the main pulmonary artery to aorta was significantly decreased in dogs with both asymptomatic and symptomatic PS. The pulmonic pressure gradient in the symptomatic PS dogs was significantly higher than that in the asymptomatic PS dogs. Plasma NT-proBNP concentration was significantly elevated in the symptomatic PS dogs compared to the healthy control dogs and the asymptomatic PS dogs. Furthermore, the Doppler-derived pulmonic pressure gradient was significantly correlated with the plasma NT-proBNP concentration (r=0.78, r(2)=0.61, P<0.0001). Plasma NT-proBNP concentration >764 pmol/l to identify severe PS had a sensitivity of 76.2% and specificity of 81.8%. The plasma NT-proBNP concentration increased by spontaneous PS, i.e. right-sided pressure overload and can be used as an additional method to assess the severity of PS in dogs.

  9. B-type natriuretic peptides help in cardioembolic stroke diagnosis: pooled data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Llombart, Víctor; Antolin-Fontes, Albert; Bustamante, Alejandro; Giralt, Dolors; Rost, Natalia S; Furie, Karen; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Biteker, Murat; Castillo, José; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Watanabe, Tetsu; Purroy, Francisco; Zhixin, Wu; Etgen, Thorleif; Hosomi, Naohisa; Jafarian Kerman, Scott Reza; Sharma, Jagdish C; Knauer, Carolin; Santamarina, Estevo; Giannakoulas, George; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Montaner, Joan

    2015-05-01

    Determining the underlying cause of stroke is important to optimize secondary prevention treatment. Increased blood levels of natriuretic peptides (B-type natriuretic peptide/N-terminal pro-BNP [BNP/NT-proBNP]) have been repeatedly associated with cardioembolic stroke. Here, we evaluate their clinical value as pathogenic biomarkers for stroke through a literature systematic review and individual participants' data meta-analysis. We searched publications in PubMed database until November 2013 that compared BNP and NT-proBNP circulating levels among stroke causes. Standardized individual participants' data were collected to estimate predictive values of BNP/NT-proBNP for cardioembolic stroke. Dichotomized BNP/NT-proBNP levels were included in logistic regression models together with clinical variables to assess the sensitivity and specificity to identify cardioembolic strokes and the additional value of biomarkers using area under the curve and integrated discrimination improvement index. From 23 selected articles, we collected information of 2834 patients with a defined cause. BNP/NT-proBNP levels were significantly elevated in cardioembolic stroke until 72 hours from symptoms onset. Predictive models showed a sensitivity >90% and specificity >80% when BNP/NT-proBNP were added considering the lowest and the highest quartile, respectively. Both peptides also increased significantly the area under the curve and integrated discrimination improvement index compared with clinical models. Sensitivity, specificity, and precision of the models were validated in 197 patients with initially undetermined stroke with final pathogenic diagnosis after ancillary follow-up. Natriuretic peptides are strongly increased in cardioembolic strokes. Future multicentre prospective studies comparing BNP and NT-proBNP might aid in finding the optimal biomarker, the best time point, and the optimal cutoff points for cardioembolic stroke identification. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Low temperature dissolution creep induced B-type olivine fabric during serpentinization and deformation in mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Zhang, J.

    2017-12-01

    The B-type olivine fabric (i.e., the [010]ol axes subnormal to foliation and the [001]ol axes subparallel to the lineation) has been regarded as an important olivine fabric for interpreting global trench-parallel S-wave polarization in fore-arc regions. However, strong serpentinization and cold temperature environment in the mantle wedge should inhibit development of the B-type olivine fabric that requires high temperature to activate solid-state plastic deformation. Here we report fabrics of olivine and antigorite generated at low temperatures (300-370 oC) during serpentinization in a fossil mantle wedge of the Val Malenco area, Central Alps. Olivine in the serpentine matrix develops a pronounced B-type fabric, while antigorite in the same matrix displays a strong crystallographic orientation (CPO) with the (001) and the [010] subparallel to foliation and lineation, respectively. The following evidence leads to the conclusion that the B-type olivine fabric is resulted from dissolution creep assisted by grain boundaries sliding (GBS) and grain rotation, rather than solid-state plastic deformation: (1) serpentinization took place at low temperatures and a fluid-enriched environment, ideal for dissolution-precipitation creep; (2) the voids and zigzag boundaries along the interface between antigorite and olivine suggest a fluid dissolution reaction; (3) the primary coarse olivine develops a nearly random fabric, indicating the B-type fabrics in the fine-grained olivine can't be inherited fabrics. These results document for the first time the B-type olivine CPO formed by dissolution creep at low temperatures during serpentinization and provide a mechanism to reconcile petrofabric observations with geophysical observations of trench parallel fast S-wave seismic anisotropy in fore-arc mantle wedge regions.

  11. B-type olivine fabric induced by low temperature dissolution creep during serpentinization and deformation in mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenlong; Zhang, Junfeng; Barou, Fabrice

    2018-01-01

    The B-type olivine fabric (i.e., the [010] axes subnormal to foliation and the [001] axes subparallel to the lineation) has been regarded as an important olivine fabric for interpreting global trench-parallel S-wave polarization in fore-arc regions. However, strong serpentinization and cold temperature environment in the mantle wedge should inhibit development of the B-type olivine fabric that requires high temperature to activate solid-state plastic deformation. Here we report fabrics of olivine and antigorite generated at low temperatures (300-370 °C) during serpentinization in a fossil mantle wedge of the Val Malenco area, Central Alps. Olivine in the serpentine matrix develops a pronounced B-type fabric, while antigorite in the same matrix displays a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) with the (001) planes and the [010] axes subparallel to foliation and lineation, respectively. The following evidence leads to the conclusion that the B-type olivine fabric results from dissolution creep assisted by grain boundary sliding (GBS) and grain rotation, rather than solid-state plastic deformation: (1) serpentinization took place at low temperatures and a fluid-enriched environment, ideal for dissolution-precipitation creep; (2) the voids and zigzag boundaries along the interface between antigorite and olivine suggest a fluid dissolution reaction; (3) the primary coarse olivine develops a nearly random fabric, indicating the B-type fabrics in the fine-grained olivine may not be inherited fabrics. These results document for the first time the B-type olivine CPO formed by dissolution creep at low temperatures during serpentinization and provide a mechanism to reconcile petrofabric observations with geophysical observations of trench parallel fast S-wave seismic anisotropy in fore-arc mantle wedge regions.

  12. Keepers of the double stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-03-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Early catalogues by the Herschels, Struves, and others began with their own discoveries. In 1906 court reporter and amateur astronomer Sherburne Wesley Burnham published a massive double star catalogue containing data from many observers on more than 13,000 systems. Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken produced a much larger catalogue in 1932 and coordinated with Robert Innes of Johannesburg, who catalogued the southern systems. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham's records of observations on handwritten file cards, and eventually turned them over to the Lick Observatory, where astrometrist Hamilton Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and together they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford had the new 120-inch reflector, the world's second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the United States Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley, and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,200,000 measures of more than 125

  13. Ab initio investigation of the surface properties of dispenser B-type and scandate thermionic emission cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Vasilios; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Booske, John H.; Morgan, Dane; Turek, Ladislav; Kirshner, Mark; Kowalczyk, Richard; Wilsen, Craig

    2009-05-01

    Scandate cathodes (BaxScyOz on W) are important thermionic electron emission materials whose emission mechanism remains unclear. Ab initio modeling is used to investigate the surface properties of both scandate and traditional B-type (Ba-O on W) cathodes. We demonstrate that the Ba-O dipole surface structure believed to be present in active B-type cathodes is not thermodynamically stable, suggesting that a nonequilibrium steady state dominates the active cathode's surface structure. We identify a stable, low work function BaxScyOz surface structure, which may be responsible for some scandate cathode properties and demonstrate that multicomponent surface coatings can lower cathode work functions.

  14. Atoms, Stars, and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1991-09-01

    1. Introducing stars and nebulae; 2. Stellar rainbows; 3. Atoms and molecules; 4. The climate in a stellar atmosphere; 5. Analysing the stars; 6. Dwarfs, giants, and supergiants; 7. What makes a star shine?; 8. The youth and middle age of a common star; 9. Wind, dust and pulsations; 10. A star's last hurray?; 11. The interstellar medium and gaseous nebulae; 12. Uncommon stars and their sometimes violent behaviour; 13. High energy astronomy.

  15. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide variability in stable dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Magid A; Hayen, Andrew; Horvath, Andrea R; Dimeski, Goce; Coburn, Amanda; Johnson, David W; Hawley, Carmel M; Campbell, Scott B; Craig, Jonathan C

    2015-04-07

    Monitoring N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may be useful for assessing cardiovascular risk in dialysis patients. However, its biologic variation is unknown, hindering the accurate interpretation of serial concentrations. The aims of this prospective cohort study were to estimate the within- and between-person coefficients of variation of NT-proBNP in stable dialysis patients, and derive the critical difference between measurements needed to exclude biologic and analytic variation. Fifty-five prevalent hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients attending two hospitals were assessed weekly for 5 weeks and then monthly for 4 months between October 2010 and April 2012. Assessments were conducted at the same time in the dialysis cycle and entailed NT-proBNP testing, clinical review, electrocardiography, and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Patients were excluded if they became unstable. This study analyzed 136 weekly and 113 monthly NT-proBNP measurements from 40 and 41 stable patients, respectively. Results showed that 22% had ischemic heart disease; 9% and 87% had left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction, respectively. Respective between- and within-person coefficients of variation were 153% and 27% for weekly measurements, and 148% and 35% for monthly measurements. Within-person variation was unaffected by dialysis modality, hydration status, inflammation, or cardiac comorbidity. NT-proBNP concentrations measured at weekly intervals needed to increase by at least 46% or decrease by 84% to exclude change due to biologic and analytic variation alone with 90% certainty, whereas monthly measurements needed to increase by at least 119% or decrease by 54%. The between-person variation of NT-proBNP was large and markedly greater than within-person variation, indicating that NT-proBNP testing might better be applied in the dialysis population using a relative-change strategy. Serial NT-proBNP concentrations need to double or halve to confidently

  16. B-type natriuretic peptides and mortality after stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Giralt, Dolors; Bustamante, Alejandro; Etgen, Thorleif; Jensen, Jesper K; Sharma, Jagdish C; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Saritas, Ayhan; Chen, Xingyong; Whiteley, William N; Montaner, Joan

    2013-12-03

    To measure the association of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal fragment of BNP (NT-proBNP) with all-cause mortality after stroke, and to evaluate the additional predictive value of BNP/NT-proBNP over clinical information. Suitable studies for meta-analysis were found by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE databases until October 26, 2012. Weighted mean differences measured effect size; meta-regression and publication bias were assessed. Individual participant data were used to estimate effects by logistic regression and to evaluate BNP/NT-proBNP additional predictive value by area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, and integrated discrimination improvement and categorical net reclassification improvement indexes. Literature-based meta-analysis included 3,498 stroke patients from 16 studies and revealed that BNP/NT-proBNP levels were 255.78 pg/mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 105.10-406.47, p = 0.001) higher in patients who died; publication bias entailed the loss of this association. Individual participant data analysis comprised 2,258 stroke patients. After normalization of the data, patients in the highest quartile had double the risk of death after adjustment for clinical variables (NIH Stroke Scale score, age, sex) (odds ratio 2.30, 95% CI 1.32-4.01 for BNP; and odds ratio 2.63, 95% CI 1.75-3.94 for NT-proBNP). Only NT-proBNP showed a slight added value to clinical prognostic variables, increasing discrimination by 0.028 points (integrated discrimination improvement index; p < 0.001) and reclassifying 8.1% of patients into correct risk mortality categories (net reclassification improvement index; p = 0.003). Neither etiology nor time from onset to death affected the association of BNP/NT-proBNP with mortality. BNPs are associated with poststroke mortality independent of NIH Stroke Scale score, age, and sex. However, their translation to clinical practice seems difficult because BNP/NT-proBNP add only minor predictive value to clinical

  17. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels for dynamic risk stratification of patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Heeschen, Christopher; Hamm, Christian W; Mitrovic, Veselin; Lantelme, Nicte-Ha; White, Harvey D

    2004-11-16

    Elevated baseline levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the N-terminal fragments of its prohormone, N-terminal-pro-BNP (NT-proBNP), have been associated with adverse long-term outcome in patients with acute coronary syndromes, whereas the prognostic implications of serial NT-proBNP measurements have not been investigated to date. NT-proBNP, troponin T, and C-reactive protein were measured at baseline and at 48 and 72 hours in 1791 patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes. Death and myocardial infarction were recorded during 30 days of follow-up. After adjustment for independent predictors of cardiac risk, baseline NT-proBNP levels >250 ng/L were associated with higher event rates (adjusted OR, 3.7; 95% CI, 2.3 to 5.7; P<0.001). In troponin T-negative patients, NT-proBNP identified a subgroup of high-risk patients (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.6 to 13.3; P<0.001). The risk in those patients (7.2%) did not significantly differ from that in troponin T-positive patients (9.8%; P=0.25). Importantly, clinical stabilization without refractory ischemia was associated with a rapid (as soon as 48 hours after onset of symptoms) and significant (48 hours; -24%; 72 hours, -49%; both P<0.001) decline in NT-proBNP levels. In patients with high NT-proBNP baseline levels, lack of a rapid decline in NT-proBNP levels (< or =250 ng/L) was linked to an adverse short-term prognosis (OR, 33.7; 95% CI, 8.2 to 138.8; P<0.001). In patients with low NT-proBNP baseline levels, a rise in NT-proBNP levels over 72 hours to >250 ng/L was also linked to an adverse 30-day prognosis (OR, 24.0; 95% CI, 8.4 to 68.5; P<0.001). Neurohumoral activation as evidenced by NT-proBNP appears as a unifying feature that is independent of other biochemical markers (myocardial necrosis, inflammation) and is a powerful and independent determinant of the short-term cardiac risk in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Whether serial measurements of NT-proBNP in patients with ACS may be used to more

  18. Changes in plasma levels of B-type natriuretic peptide with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Koichi; Nishimura, Takashi; Onishi, Katsuya; Oga, Toru; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Jones, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Elevated plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and their association with heart failure have been reported in subjects with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). To examine and compare plasma BNP levels and diastolic and systolic dysfunction in subjects with AECOPD and stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In all, 87 unselected consecutive hospitalizations due to AECOPD in 61 subjects and a total of 190 consecutive subjects with stable COPD were recruited. Plasma BNP levels were compared cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Transthoracic echocardiographic examinations were also performed in the hospitalized subjects. In the hospitalized subjects, the median plasma BNP level (interquartile range) was 55.4 (26.9-129.3) pg/mL and was higher than that of patients with stable COPD: 18.3 (10.0-45.3) for Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease grade I; 25.8 (11.0-53.7) for grade II; 22.1 (9.1-52.6) for grade III; and 17.2 (9.6-22.9) pg/mL for grade I V, all P<0.001. In 15 subjects studied prospectively, the median plasma BNP level was 19.4 (9.8-32.2) pg/mL before AECOPD, 72.7 (27.7-146.3) pg/mL during AECOPD, and 14.6 (12.9-39.0) pg/mL after AECOPD (P<0.0033 and P<0.0013, respectively). Median plasma BNP levels during AECOPD were significantly higher in ten unsuccessfully discharged subjects 260.5 (59.4-555.0) than in 48 successfully discharged subjects 48.5 (24.2-104.0) pg/mL (P=0.0066). Only 5.6% of AECOPD subjects were associated with systolic dysfunction defined as a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%; a further 7.4% were considered to have impaired relaxation defined as an E/A wave velocity ratio <0.8 and a deceleration time of E >240 ms. BNP levels were weakly correlated with the E/peak early diastolic velocity of the mitral annulus (Ea) ratio (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient =0.353, P=0.018), but they were not correlated with the LVEF (Spearman's rank correlation

  19. Probing the clumpy winds of giant stars with high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Victoria; Hell, Natalie; Hirsch, Maria; Garcia, Javier; Huenemoerder, David; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Nowak, Michael; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schulz, Norbert S.; Sundqvists, Jon O.; Townsend, Richard D.; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Line-driven winds from early type stars are structured, with small, overdense clumps embedded in tenuous hot gas. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), systems where a neutron star or a black hole accretes from the line-driven stellar wind of an O/B-type companion, are ideal for studying such winds: the wind drives the accretion onto the compact object and thus the X-ray production. The radiation from close to the compact object is quasi-pointlike and effectively X-rays the wind.We used RXTE and Chandra-HETG observations of two of the brightest HMXBs, Cyg X-1 and Vela X-1, to decipher their wind structure. In Cyg X-1, we show that the orbital variability of absorption can be only explained by a clumpy wind model and constrain the porosity of the wind as well as the onion-like structure of the clumps. In Vela X-1 we show, using the newest reference energies for low ionization Si-lines obtained with LLNL’s EBIT-I, that the ionized phase of the circumstellar medium and the cold clumps have different velocities.

  20. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XXVII. Physical parameters of B-type main-sequence binary systems in the Tarantula nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, R.; Dufton, P. L.; Evans, C. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Howarth, I. D.; de Koter, A.; de Mink, S. E.; Grin, N. J.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D. J.; McEvoy, C. M.; Sana, H.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Símon Díaz, S.; Taylor, W. D.; Thompson, A.; Vink, J. S.

    2017-07-01

    A spectroscopic analysis has been undertaken for the B-type multiple systems (excluding those with supergiant primaries) in the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS). Projected rotational velocities, vesini, for the primaries have been estimated using a Fourier Transform technique and confirmed by fitting rotationally broadened profiles. A subset of 33 systems with vesini ≤ 80 km s-1 have been analysed using a TLUSTY grid of model atmospheres to estimate stellar parameters and surface abundances for the primaries. The effects of a potential flux contribution from an unseen secondary have also been considered. For 20 targets it was possible to reliably estimate their effective temperatures (Teff) but for the other 13 objects it was only possible to provide a constraint of 20 000 ≤ Teff ≤ 26 000 K - the other parameters estimated for these targets will be consequently less reliable. The estimated stellar properties are compared with evolutionary models and are generally consistent with their membership of 30 Doradus, while the nature of the secondaries of 3 SB2 system is discussed. A comparison with a sample of single stars with vesini ≤ 80 km s-1 obtained from the VFTS and analysed with the same techniques implies that the atmospheric parameters and nitrogen abundances of the two samples are similar. However, the binary sample may have a lack of primaries with significant nitrogen enhancements, which would be consistent with them having low rotational velocities and having effectively evolved as single stars without significant rotational mixing. This result, which may be actually a consequence of the limitations of the pathfinder investigation presented in this paper, should be considered as a motivation for spectroscopic abundance analysis of large samples of binary stars, with high quality observational data. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programme 182.D-0222.Tables

  1. On the kinematics of a runaway Be star population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubert, D.; Evans, N. W.

    2018-04-01

    We explore the hypothesis that B type emission-line stars (Be stars) have their origin in mass-transfer binaries by measuring the fraction of runaway Be stars. We assemble the largest-to-date catalogue of 632 Be stars with 6D kinematics, exploiting the precise astrometry of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) from the first Gaia Data Release. Using binary stellar evolution simulations, we make predictions for the runaway and equatorial rotation velocities of a runaway Be star population. Accounting for observational biases, we calculate that if all classical Be stars originated through mass transfer in binaries, then 17.5% of the Be stars in our catalogue should be runaways. The remaining 82.5% should be in binaries with subdwarfs, white dwarfs or neutron stars, because those systems either remained bound post-supernova or avoided the supernova entirely. Using a Bayesian methodology, we compare the hypothesis that each Be star in our catalogue is a runaway to the null hypothesis that it is a member of the Milky Way disc. We find that 13.1^{+2.6}_{-2.4}% of the Be stars in our catalogue are runaways, and identify a subset of 40 high-probability runaways. We argue that deficiencies in our understanding of binary stellar evolution, as well as the degeneracy between velocity dispersion and number of runaway stars, can explain the slightly lower runaway fraction. We thus conclude that all Be stars could be explained by an origin in mass-transfer binaries. This conclusion is testable with the second Gaia data release (DR2).

  2. On the kinematics of a runaway Be star population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubert, D.; Evans, N. W.

    2018-07-01

    We explore the hypothesis that B-type emission-line stars (Be stars) have their origin in mass-transfer binaries by measuring the fraction of runaway Be stars. We assemble the largest-to-date catalogue of 632 Be stars with 6D kinematics, exploiting the precise astrometry of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution from the first Gaia data release. Using binary stellar evolution simulations, we make predictions for the runaway and equatorial rotation velocities of a runaway Be star population. Accounting for observational biases, we calculate that if all classical Be stars originated through mass transfer in binaries, then 17.5 per cent of the Be stars in our catalogue should be runaways. The remaining 82.5 per cent should be in binaries with subdwarfs, white dwarfs, or neutron stars, because those systems either remained bound post-supernova or avoided the supernova entirely. Using a Bayesian methodology, we compare the hypothesis that each Be star in our catalogue is a runaway to the null hypothesis that it is a member of the Milky Way disc. We find that 13.1^{+2.6}_{-2.4} per cent of the Be stars in our catalogue are runaways and identify a subset of 40 high-probability runaways. We argue that deficiencies in our understanding of binary stellar evolution, as well as the degeneracy between velocity dispersion and number of runaway stars, can explain the slightly lower runaway fraction. We thus conclude that all Be stars could be explained by an origin in mass-transfer binaries. This conclusion is testable with the second Gaia data release (DR2).

  3. Seeing Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchin, Chris; Forrest, Robert W.

    Seeing Stars is written for astronomers, regardless of the depth of their theoretical knowledge, who are taking their first steps in observational astronomy. Chris Kitchin and Bob Forrest - both professional astronomers - take a conducted tour of the night sky and suggest suitable observing programmes for everyone from beginners to experts. How is this book different? We are all familiar with the beautiful images of planets and galaxies obtained by spacecraft and giant telescopes - but what can you really see with a small telescope? What should you expect from a small refractor or reflector? And what is the effect of observing from a site near a city? The answers are all here, with many photographs that will illustrate exactly what can be seen with different instruments (everything from the naked eye to a 300mm telescope) - and from different locations.

  4. Ice Stars

    2017-12-08

    Ice Stars - August 4th, 2002 Description: Like distant galaxies amid clouds of interstellar dust, chunks of sea ice drift through graceful swirls of grease ice in the frigid waters of Foxe Basin near Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic. Sea ice often begins as grease ice, a soupy slick of tiny ice crystals on the ocean's surface. As the temperature drops, grease ice thickens and coalesces into slabs of more solid ice. Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  5. Stellar Archaeology: New Science with Old Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frebel, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The early chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the Universe is vital to our understanding of a host of astrophysical phenomena. Since the most metal-poor Galactic stars are relics from the high-redshift Universe, they probe the chemical and dynamical conditions as the Milky Way began to form, the origin and evolution of the elements, and the physics of nucleosynthesis. They also provide constraints on the nature of the first stars, their associated supernovae and initial mass function, and early star and galaxy formation. I will present exemplary metal-poor stars with which these different topics can be addressed. Those are the most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy ([Fe/H] < -5.0), and metal-poor stars with strong overabundances of heavy elements, in particular uranium and thorium, which can be used to radioactively date the stars to be 13 Gyr old. I will then transition to recent discoveries of metal-poor ([Fe/H] -3.0) stars in the least luminous dwarf satellites orbiting the Milky Way. Their stellar chemical signatures support the concept that small systems, analogous to the surviving dwarf galaxies, were the building blocks of the Milky Way's low-metallicity halo. This opens a new window for studying galaxy formation through stellar chemistry.

  6. Tidal breakup of quadruple stars in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragione, Giacomo

    2018-06-01

    The most likely origin of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) is the tidal disruption of a binary star by the supermassive black hole (MBH) in the Galactic Centre (GC). However, HE0437-5439, a 9 M_⊙ B-type main-sequence star moving with a heliocentric radial velocity of about 720 km s^{-1} at a distance of ˜ 60{ kpc}, and the recent discovered hypervelocity binary candidate (HVB), traveling at ˜ 570 km s^{-1}, challenge this standard scenario. Recently, Fragione & Gualandris (2018) have demonstrated that the tidal breakup of a triple star leads to an insufficient rate. Observations show that quadruple stars made up of two binaries orbiting their common center of mass (the so-called 2+2 quadruples) are ≈4% of the stars in the solar neighborhood. Although rarer than triples, 2+2 quadruple stars may have a role in ejecting HVBs as due to their larger energy reservoir. We present a numerical study of 2+2 quadruple disruptions by the MBH in the GC and find that the production of HVBs has a probability ≲ 2 - 4%, which translates into an ejection rate of ≲ 1{ Gyr}^{-1}, comparable to the triple disruption scenario. Given the low ejection rate, we suggest that alternative mechanisms are responsible for the origin of HVBs, as the ejection from the interaction of a young star cluster with the MBH in the GC and the origin in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  7. Nitrogen excess in slowly-rotating β Cephei stars: deep mixing or diffusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, T.; Butler, K.; Aerts, C.; Neiner, C.; Briquet, M.

    2007-06-01

    We present the results of an NLTE abundance study of a small sample of β Cephei stars, which point to the existence of a population of slowly-rotating B-type pulsators exhibiting a significant amount of nitrogen-enriched material at their surface. Although the origin of this nitrogen excess remains unclear, an overabundance preferentially occurring in stars with a detected magnetic field seems to emerge at this stage. Full details can be found in Morel et al. (2006).

  8. Anomalous hydrodynamics kicks neutron stars

    DOE PAGES

    Kaminski, Matthias; Uhlemann, Christoph F.; Bleicher, Marcus; ...

    2016-06-28

    Observations show that, at the beginning of their existence, neutron stars are accelerated briskly to velocities of up to a thousand kilometers per second. We argue that this remarkable effect can be explained as a manifestation of quantum anomalies on astrophysical scales. To theoretically describe the early stage in the life of neutron stars we use hydrodynamics as a systematic effective-field-theory framework. Within this framework, anomalies of the Standard Model of particle physics as underlying microscopic theory imply the presence of a particular set of transport terms, whose form is completely fixed by theoretical consistency. Here, the resulting chiral transportmore » effects in proto-neutron stars enhance neutrino emission along the internal magnetic field, and the recoil can explain the order of magnitude of the observed kick velocities.« less

  9. Gravitational wave asteroseismology with protoneutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2016-08-01

    We examine the time evolution of the frequencies of the gravitational wave after the bounce within the framework of relativistic linear perturbation theory using the results of one-dimensional numerical simulations of core-collapse supernovae. Protoneutron star models are constructed in such a way that the mass and the radius of the protoneutron star become equivalent to the results obtained from the numerical simulations. Then we find that the frequencies of gravitational waves radiating from protoneutron stars strongly depend on the mass and the radius of protoneutron stars, but almost independently of the profiles of the electron fraction and the entropy per baryon inside the star. Additionally, we find that the frequencies of gravitational waves can be characterized by the square root of the average density of the protoneutron star irrespective of the progenitor models, which are completely different from the empirical formula for cold neutron stars. The dependence of the spectra on the mass and the radius is different from that of the g -mode: the oscillations around the surface of protoneutron stars due to the convection and the standing accretion-shock instability. Careful observation of these modes of gravitational waves can determine the evolution of the mass and the radius of protoneutron stars after core bounce. Furthermore, the expected frequencies of gravitational waves are around a few hundred hertz in the early stages after bounce, which must be a good candidate for the ground-based gravitational wave detectors.

  10. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  11. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XII. Rotational velocities of the single O-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.; Sabín-Sanjulían, C.; de Mink, S. E.; Dufton, P. L.; Gräfener, G.; Evans, C. J.; Herrero, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D. J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Markova, N.; Najarro, F.; Puls, J.; Taylor, W. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Context. The 30 Doradus (30 Dor) region of the Large Magellanic Cloud, also known as the Tarantula nebula, is the nearest starburst region. It contains the richest population of massive stars in the Local Group, and it is thus the best possible laboratory to investigate open questions on the formation and evolution of massive stars. Aims: Using ground-based multi-object optical spectroscopy obtained in the framework of the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS), we aim to establish the (projected) rotational velocity distribution for a sample of 216 presumably single O-type stars in 30 Dor. The sample is large enough to obtain statistically significant information and to search for variations among subpopulations - in terms of spectral type, luminosity class, and spatial location - in the field of view. Methods: We measured projected rotational velocities, νesini, by means of a Fourier transform method and a profile fitting method applied to a set of isolated spectral lines. We also used an iterative deconvolution procedure to infer the probability density, P(νe), of the equatorial rotational velocity, νe. Results: The distribution of νesini shows a two-component structure: a peak around 80 kms-1 and a high-velocity tail extending up to ~600 kms-1. This structure is also present in the inferred distribution P(νe) with around 80% of the sample having 0 < νe ≤ 300 kms-1 and the other 20% distributed in the high-velocity region. The presence of the low-velocity peak is consistent with what has been found in other studies for late O- and early B-type stars. Conclusions: Most of the stars in our sample rotate with a rate less than 20% of their break-up velocity. For the bulk of the sample, mass loss in a stellar wind and/or envelope expansion is not efficient enough to significantly spin down these stars within the first few Myr of evolution. If massive-star formation results in stars rotating at birth with a large portion of their break-up velocities, an

  12. New determination of abundances and stellar parameters for a set of weak G-band stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Masseron, T.; Thévenin, F.; Itam-Pasquet, J.; Parthasarathy, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Weak G-band (wGb) stars are a very peculiar class of red giants; they are almost devoided of carbon and often present mild lithium enrichment. Despite their very puzzling abundance patterns, very few detailed spectroscopic studies existed up to a few years ago, which prevented any clear understanding of the wGb phenomenon. We recently proposed the first consistent analysis of published data for a sample of 28 wGb stars and were able to identify them as descendants of early A-type to late B-type stars, although we were not able to conclude on their evolutionary status or the origin of their peculiar abundance pattern. Aims: Using new high-resolution spectra, we present the study of a new sample of wGb stars with the aim of homogeneously deriving their fundamental parameters and surface abundances for a selected set of chemical species that we use to improve our insight on this peculiar class of objects. Methods: We obtained high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra for 19 wGb stars in the southern and northern hemisphere that we used to perform consistent spectral synthesis to derive their fundamental parameters and metallicities, as well as the spectroscopic abundances for Li, C, 12C/13C, N, O, Na, Sr, and Ba. We also computed dedicated stellar evolution models that we used to determine the masses and to investigate the evolutionary status and chemical history of the stars in our sample. Results: We confirm that the wGb stars are stars with initial masses in the range 3.2 to 4.2 M⊙. We suggest that a large fraction could be mildly evolved stars on the subgiant branch currently undergoing the first dredge-up, while a smaller number of stars are more probably in the core He burning phase at the clump. After analysing their abundance pattern, we confirm their strong nitrogen enrichment anti-correlated with large carbon depletion, characteristic of material fully processed through the CNO cycle to an extent not known in evolved intermediate-mass stars

  13. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  14. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  15. Early Soft X-Ray to UV Emission from Double Neutron Star Mergers: Implications from the Long-term Observations of GW170817

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-Yu; Huang, Zhi-Qiu

    2018-01-01

    Recent long-term radio follow-up observations of GW170817 reveal a simple power-law rising light curve, with a slope of {t}0.78, up to 93 days after the merger. The latest X-ray detection at 109 days is also consistent with such a temporal slope. Such a shallow rise behavior requires a mildly relativistic outflow with a steep velocity gradient profile, so that slower material with larger energy catches up with the decelerating ejecta and re-energizes it. It has been suggested that this mildly relativistic outflow may represent a cocoon of material. We suggest that the velocity gradient profile may form during the stage that the cocoon is breaking out of the merger ejecta, resulting from shock propagation down a density gradient. The cooling of the hot relativistic cocoon material immediately after it breaks out should have produced soft X-ray to UV radiation at tens of seconds to hours after the merger. The soft X-ray emission has a luminosity of {L}{{X}}∼ {10}45 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 over a period of tens of seconds for a merger event like GW170817. The UV emission shows a rise initially and peaks at about a few hours with a luminosity of {L}{UV}∼ {10}42 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. The soft X-ray transients could be detected by future wide-angle X-ray detectors, such as the Chinese mission Einstein Probe. This soft X-ray/UV emission would serve as one of the earliest electromagnetic counterparts of gravitation waves from double neutron star mergers and could provide the earliest localization of the sources.

  16. Spectroscopic detections of C III] λ1909 Å at z ≃ 6-7: a new probe of early star-forming galaxies and cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Daniel P.; Richard, Johan; Charlot, Stéphane; Clément, Benjamin; Ellis, Richard; Siana, Brian; Robertson, Brant; Schenker, Matthew; Gutkin, Julia; Wofford, Aida

    2015-06-01

    Deep spectroscopic observations of z ≳ 6.5 galaxies have revealed a marked decline with increasing redshift in the detectability of Ly α emission. While this may offer valuable insight into the end of the reionization process, it presents a challenge to the detailed spectroscopic study of bright photometrically-selected distant sources now being found via deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and particularly those highly magnified sources viewed through foreground lensing clusters. In this paper, we demonstrate the validity of a new way forward via the detection of an alternative diagnostic line, C III] λ1909 Å, seen in spectroscopic exposures of a star-forming galaxy at zLyα = 6.029. We also report tentative detection of C III] λ1909 Å in a galaxy at zLyα = 7.213. The former 3.3σ detection is based on a 3.5 h XShooter spectrum of a bright (J125 = 25.2) gravitationally-lensed galaxy behind the cluster Abell 383. The latter 2.8σ detection is based on a 4.2 h MOSFIRE spectra of one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxies, GN-108036, with J140 = 25.2. Both targets were chosen for their continuum brightness and previously-known redshift (based on Ly α), ensuring that any C III] emission would be located in a favourable portion of the near-infrared sky spectrum. Since the availability of secure Ly α redshifts significantly narrows the wavelength range where C III] is sought, this increases confidence in these, otherwise, low-signal-to-noise ratio detections. We compare our C III] and Ly α equivalent widths in the context of those found at z ≃ 2 from earlier work and discuss the motivation for using lines other than Ly α to study galaxies in the reionization era.

  17. Compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez-Delgado, Gabino; Estevez-Delgado, Joaquin

    2018-05-01

    An analysis and construction is presented for a stellar model characterized by two parameters (w, n) associated with the compactness ratio and anisotropy, respectively. The reliability range for the parameter w ≤ 1.97981225149 corresponds with a compactness ratio u ≤ 0.2644959374, the density and pressures are positive, regular and monotonic decrescent functions, the radial and tangential speed of sound are lower than the light speed, moreover, than the plausible stability. The behavior of the speeds of sound are determinate for the anisotropy parameter n, admitting a subinterval where the speeds are monotonic crescent functions and other where we have monotonic decrescent functions for the same speeds, both cases describing a compact object that is also potentially stable. In the bigger value for the observational mass M = 2.05 M⊙ and radii R = 12.957 Km for the star PSR J0348+0432, the model indicates that the maximum central density ρc = 1.283820319 × 1018 Kg/m3 corresponds to the maximum value of the anisotropy parameter and the radial and tangential speed of the sound are monotonic decrescent functions.

  18. Abundances and Kinematics of OB Stars in the Leading Arm of the Magellanic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Moni Bidin, C.; Casetti-Dinescu, D. I.; Mendez, R. A.; Girard, T. M.; Korchagin, V. I.; Vieira, K.; van Altena, W. F.; Zhao, G.

    2018-01-01

    We determined seven element abundances (He, C, N, O, Mg, Si, and S) and kinematics for eight O-/B- type stars which is selected from 42 candidates (Casetti-Dinescu et al. 2014) of membership in the Leading Arm (LA) of the Magellanic System. The high resolution spectra were taken with the MIKE instrument on the Magellan 6.5m Clay telescope.

  19. Multi-color Photometry of the Hot R Coronae Borealis Star, MV Sagittarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, A. U.; Clem, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    A long term program of photoelectric UBVRI photometry has been combined with AAVSO archival data for the hot, R CrB-type hydrogen deficient star MV Sgr. A deep minimum and a trend of decreasing brightness over time at maximum light thereby become evident. Variations seen via monitoring with a CCD detector also are described.

  20. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  1. The nature of Becklin's star.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penston, M. V.; Allen, D. A.; Hyland, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    The IR point source in the Orion Nebula commonly known as Becklin's star appears to be exceptional because of its extreme colors and the lack of any associated optical object. Characteristics of the spectrum of Becklin's object are examined. It is found that the spectrum is consistent with that of a highly reddened early-type supergiant, in which weak absorption has been masked by low resolution.

  2. Globules and pillars in Cygnus X. II. Massive star formation in the globule IRAS 20319+3958

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djupvik, A. A.; Comerón, F.; Schneider, N.

    2017-03-01

    Globules and pillars, impressively revealed by the Spitzer and Herschel satellites, for example, are pervasive features found in regions of massive star formation. Studying their embedded stellar populations can provide an excellent laboratory to test theories of triggered star formation and the features that it may imprint on the stellar aggregates resulting from it. We studied the globule IRAS 20319+3958 in Cygnus X by means of visible and near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy, complemented with mid-infrared Spitzer/IRAC imaging, in order to obtain a census of its stellar content and the nature of its embedded sources. Our observations show that the globule contains an embedded aggregate of about 30 very young (≲1 Myr) stellar objects, for which we estimate a total mass of 90 M⊙. The most massive members are three systems containing early B-type stars. Two of them most likely produced very compact H II regions, one of them being still highly embedded and coinciding with a peak seen in emission lines characterising the photon dominated region (PDR). Two of these three systems are resolved binaries, and one of those contains a visible Herbig Be star. An approximate derivation of the mass function of the members of the aggregate gives hints of a slope at high masses shallower than the classical Salpeter slope, and a peak of the mass distribution at a mass higher than that at which the widely adopted log-normal initial mass function peaks. The emission distribution of H2 and Brγ, tracing the PDR and the ionised gas phase, respectively, suggests that molecular gas is distributed as a shell around the embedded aggregate, filled with centrally-condensed ionised gas. Both, the morphology and the low excitation of the H II region, indicate that the sources of ionisation are the B stars of the embedded aggregate, rather than the external UV field caused by the O stars of Cygnus OB2. The youth of the embedded cluster, combined with the isolation of the globule

  3. The CoRoT B-type binary HD 50230: a prototypical hybrid pulsator with g-mode period and p-mode frequency spacings⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degroote, P.; Aerts, C.; Michel, E.; Briquet, M.; Pápics, P. I.; Amado, P.; Mathias, P.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Lombaert, R.; Hillen, M.; Morel, T.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Baudin, F.; Catala, C.; Samadi, R.

    2012-06-01

    Context. B-type stars are promising targets for asteroseismic modelling, since their frequency spectrum is relatively simple. Aims: We deduce and summarise observational constraints for the hybrid pulsator, HD 50230, earlier reported to have deviations from a uniform period spacing of its gravity modes. The combination of spectra and a high-quality light curve measured by the CoRoT satellite allow a combined approach to fix the position of HD 50230 in the HR diagram. Methods: To describe the observed pulsations, classical Fourier analysis was combined with short-time Fourier transformations and frequency spacing analysis techniques. Visual spectra were used to constrain the projected rotation rate of the star and the fundamental parameters of the target. In a first approximation, the combined information was used to interpret multiplets and spacings to infer the true surface rotation rate and a rough estimate of the inclination angle. Results: We identify HD 50230 as a spectroscopic binary and characterise the two components. We detect the simultaneous presence of high-order g modes and low-order p and g-modes in the CoRoT light curve, but were unable to link them to line profile variations in the spectroscopic time series. We extract the relevant information from the frequency spectrum, which can be used for seismic modelling, and explore possible interpretations of the pressure mode spectrum. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain. Based on observations made with the ESO telescopes at La Silla Observatory under the ESO Large Programme LP182.D-0356, and on observations made with the Mercator Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, and on observations obtained with the HERMES

  4. Asteroseismology and mass loss in Be stars. Study with CoRoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diago, P. D.

    The general aim of this work is the study of Be stars with the CoRoT space mission. The mechanisms responsible of the production and dynamics of the circumstellar gas in Be stars are still not constrained. Observations of non-radial pulsation beating phenomena connected to outbursts point toward a relevance of pulsation, but this mechanism cannot be generalized. In this regard, the observation of classical Be stars with the high-precision CoRoT satellite is providing important keys to understand the physics of these objects and the nature of the Be phenomenon. In order to study the light variations of the selected stars we use photometric and spectroscopic observations. These observations allow us to extract frequencies, amplitudes and phases of these variations. As we will show, these light variations can be connected with pulsations on the stellar surface. For carrying out the frequency analysis we have developed a new code based on standard Fourier analysis. The point is that this code, called PASPER, allows the frequency analysis of large sets of light curves in an automatic mode. This Ph.D. thesis is arranged as follows: In the first three Chapters we describe the scientific framework of this project, giving a brief description on Asteroseismology, presenting the current status of Be stars, and describing the basics of the Fourier analysis and the rudiments of the time series analysis. At the early begin of this Ph.D. thesis, the CoRoT satellite was still on ground getting ready for the launch. In this context, we perform a search for short-period B and Be star variables in the low metallicity environment of the Magellanic Clouds. This study constitutes the Part I of this Ph.D. thesis. This Part has a double goal: i) to test the frequency analysis codes; and ii) to detect observationally beta Cephei and SPB-like B-type pulsators in low metallicity environments, actually not predicted by the pulsational theory and models. This constitutes the PartI. Part II is

  5. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  6. On the 3He anomaly in hot subdwarf B stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, David; Irrgang, Andreas; Heber, Ulrich; Nieva, Maria F.; Przybilla, Norbert

    2017-12-01

    Decades ago, 3He isotope enrichment in helium-weak B-type main-sequence, in blue horizontal branch and in hot subdwarf B (sdB) stars, i.e., helium-core burning stars of the extreme horizontal branch, were discovered. Diffusion processes in the atmosphere of these stars lead to the observed abundance anomalies. Quantitative spectral analyses of high-resolution spectra to derive photospheric isotopic helium abundance ratios for known 3He sdBs have not been performed yet. We present preliminary results of high-resolution and high S/N spectra to determine the 3He and 4He abundances of nine known 3He sdBs. We used a hybrid local/non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE/NLTE) approach for B-type stars investigating multiple He i lines, including λ4922 Å and λ6678 Å, which show the strongest isotopic shifts in the optical spectral range.We also report the discovery of four new 3He sdBs from the ESO Supernova Progenitor survey. Most of the 3He sdBs cluster in a narrow temperature strip between ˜ 26000 K and ˜ 30000 K and have almost no atmospheric 4He at all. Interestingly, three 3He sdBs show evidence for vertical helium stratification.

  7. Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, David C.; Conti, Peter S.

    1987-01-01

    The properties and evolutionary status of WR stars are examined, reviewing the results of recent observational and theoretical investigations. Topics discussed include spectral types and line strengths, magnitudes and colors, intrinsic variability, IR and radio observations, X-ray observations, the Galactic distribution of WR stars, WR stars in other galaxies, and WR binaries. Consideration is given to the inferred masses, composition, and stellar winds of WR stars; model atmospheres; WR stars and the Galactic environment; and WR stars as a phase of stellar evolution. Diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  8. Probing the 9.7 μm Interstellar Silicate Extinction Profile through the Spitzer/IRS Spectroscopy of OB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhenzhen; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Gao, Jian; Lv, Zhangpan; Yao, Jiawen

    2018-05-01

    The 9.7 μm interstellar spectral feature, arising from the Si-O stretch of amorphous silicate dust, is the strongest extinction feature in the infrared (IR). In principle, the spectral profile of this feature could allow one to diagnose the mineralogical composition of interstellar silicate material. However, observationally, the 9.7 μm interstellar silicate extinction profile is not well determined. Here we utilize the Spitzer/IRS spectra of five early-type (one O- and four B-type) stars and compare them with that of unreddened stars of the same spectral type to probe the interstellar extinction of silicate dust around 9.7 μm. We find that, while the silicate extinction profiles all peak at ˜ 9.7 μm, two stars exhibit a narrow feature of FWHM ˜ 2.0 μm and three stars display a broad feature of FWHM ˜ 3.0 μm. We also find that the width of the 9.7 μm extinction feature does not show any environmental dependence. With a FWHM of ˜ 2.2 μm, the mean 9.7 μm extinction profile, obtained by averaging over our five stars, closely resembles that of the prototypical diffuse interstellar medium along the lines of sight toward Cyg OB2 No. 12 and WR 98a. Finally, an analytical formula is presented to parameterize the interstellar extinction in the IR at 0.9 μm ≲ λ ≲ 15 μm.

  9. A CATALOG OF NEW SPECTROSCOPICALLY CONFIRMED MASSIVE OB STARS IN CARINA

    SciT

    Alexander, Michael J.; Hanes, Richard J.; McSwain, M. Virginia

    2016-12-01

    The Carina star-forming region is one of the largest in the Galaxy, and its massive star population is still being unveiled. The large number of stars combined with high, and highly variable, interstellar extinction makes it inherently difficult to find OB stars in this type of young region. We present the results of a spectroscopic campaign to study the massive star population of the Carina Nebula, with the primary goal to confirm or reject previously identified Carina OB star candidates. A total of 141 known O- and B-type stars and 94 candidates were observed, of which 73 candidates had highmore » enough signal-to-noise ratio to classify. We find 23 new OB stars within the Carina Nebula, a 32% confirmation rate. One of the new OB stars has blended spectra and is suspected to be a double-lined spectroscopic binary (SB2). We also reclassify the spectral types of the known OB stars and discover nine new SB2s among this population. Finally, we discuss the spatial distribution of these new OB stars relative to known structures in the Carina Nebula.« less

  10. Enigma of Runaway Stars Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    . In fact, this is one of the most `perfect' bow shocks of parabolic form ever observed around an OB-runaway. Moreover, the orientation of the bow shock indicates that the system is moving towards the north; its origin must therefore lie somewhere south of its present position in the sky. It also turns out that the accordingly deduced path of HD77581 crosses a well-known OB-association with the designation Vel OB1 . At the measured distance of Vel OB1 of about 6000 lightyears, the observed proper motion and radial velocity of HD77581 indicate a space velocity of 90 km/sec. With this velocity, it would have taken HD77581 and its compact companion about 2.5 million years to travel the distance between Vel OB1 and its present position. This corresponds exactly to the expected time that has passed since the supernova explosion of the progenitor star of Vela~X-1, as deduced from the observed properties of the binary system. The puzzle comes together Now everything fits! The observation of a bow shock around the OB star HD77581 and its compact companion Vela X-1 supports the scenario originally proposed by Blaauw to create OB-runaway stars by the supernova explosion of the binary companion. Following back the path of the system resulted in the discovery of the place where it was born and from where it escaped after the violent supernova explosion which produced the neutron star that now manifests itself as the strong X-ray source known as Vela X-1. More information about this research project This research project is described in ESO Preprint no.~1199 and will appear shortly as a Letter to the Editor in `Astrophysical Journal' (ApJ 475, L37-L40). Notes: [1] Professor Adriaan Blaauw is a well-known Dutch astronomer (Leiden and Groningen). He participated very actively in the build-up of ESO in the 1950's and 60's and he was ESO Director General from 1970 - 1974. He is the author of ` ESO's Early History - The European Southern Observatory from concept to reality ' (1991). [2

  11. Predicted space motions for hypervelocity and runaway stars: proper motions and radial velocities for the Gaia Era

    SciT

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.

    We predict the distinctive three-dimensional space motions of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) and runaway stars moving in a realistic Galactic potential. For nearby stars with distances less than 10 kpc, unbound stars are rare; proper motions alone rarely isolate bound HVSs and runaways from indigenous halo stars. At large distances of 20-100 kpc, unbound HVSs are much more common than runaways; radial velocities easily distinguish both from indigenous halo stars. Comparisons of the predictions with existing observations are encouraging. Although the models fail to match observations of solar-type HVS candidates from SEGUE, they agree well with data for B-type HVS andmore » runaways from other surveys. Complete samples of g ≲ 20 stars with Gaia should provide clear tests of formation models for HVSs and runaways and will enable accurate probes of the shape of the Galactic potential.« less

  12. Have We Finally Found Pop III Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Elusive Population: Population III stars — the theoretical generation of extremely metal-poor stars that should have been formed in the early universe before metals existed — have been conspicuously absent in observations. But a team led by David Sobral (Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of Lisbon, and Leiden Observatory) may have changed this paradigm with their recent detection of an extremely bright galaxy in the early universe. The team's broad survey of distant galaxies using ESO's Very Large Telescope provides a glimpse of the universe as it was only 800 million years after the Big Bang. The survey uncovered several unusually bright galaxies — including the brightest galaxy ever seen at this distance, an important discovery by itself. But further scrutiny of this galaxy, named CR7, produced an even more exciting find: a bright pocket of the galaxy contained no sign of any metals. Follow-up with other telescopes confirmed this initial detection. Formation Waves: Sobral and his team postulate that we are observing this galaxy at just the right time to have caught a cluster of Population III stars — the bright, metal-free region of the galaxy — at the end of a wave of early star formation. The observations of CR7 also suggest the presence of regular stars in clumps around the metal-free pocket. These older, surrounding clusters may have formed stars first, helping to ionize a local bubble in the galaxy and allowing us to now observe the light from CR7. It was previously thought that Population III stars might only be found in small, dim galaxies, making them impossible for us to detect. But CR7 provides an interesting alternative: this galaxy is bright, and the candidate Population III stars are surrounded by clusters of normal stars. This suggests that these first-generation stars might in fact be easier to detect than was originally thought. Additional follow-up observations with other telescopes will help to confirm the

  13. Imaging Variable Stars with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, Margarita

    2011-05-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of astronomical sources, ranging from objects in our solar system to objects in the early Universe, have revolutionized our knowledge of the Universe its origins and contents.I will highlight results from HST observations of variable stars obtained during the past twenty or so years. Multiwavelength observations of numerous variable stars and stellar systems were obtained using the superb HST imaging capabilities and its unprecedented angular resolution, especially in the UV and optical. The HST provided the first detailed images probing the structure of variable stars including their atmospheres and circumstellar environments. AAVSO observations and light curves have been critical for scheduling of many of these observations and provided important information and context for understanding of the imaging results of many variable sources. I will describe the scientific results from the imaging observations of variable stars including AGBs, Miras, Cepheids, semi-regular variables (including supergiants and giants), YSOs and interacting stellar systems with a variable stellar components. These results have led to an unprecedented understanding of the spatial and temporal characteristics of these objects and their place in the stellar evolutionary chains, and in the larger context of the dynamic evolving Universe.

  14. Imaging Variable Stars with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, M.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of astronomical sources, ranging from objects in our solar system to objects in the early Universe, have revolutionized our knowledge of the Universe its origins and contents. I highlight results from HST observations of variable stars obtained during the past twenty or so years. Multiwavelength observations of numerous variable stars and stellar systems were obtained using the superb HST imaging capabilities and its unprecedented angular resolution, especially in the UV and optical. The HST provided the first detailed images probing the structure of variable stars including their atmospheres and circumstellar environments. AAVSO observations and light curves have been critical for scheduling of many of these observations and provided important information and context for understanding of the imaging results of many variable sources. I describe the scientific results from the imaging observations of variable stars including AGBs, Miras, Cepheids, semiregular variables (including supergiants and giants), YSOs and interacting stellar systems with a variable stellar components. These results have led to an unprecedented understanding of the spatial and temporal characteristics of these objects and their place in the stellar evolutionary chains, and in the larger context of the dynamic evolving Universe.

  15. White Dwarf Stars

    1999-12-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

  16. Assembly Line of Stars

    2010-05-06

    This image from NASA Herschel, in the constellation of Vulpecula, shows an entire assembly line of newborn stars. The diffuse glow reveals the widespread cold reservoir of raw material that our Milky Way galaxy has in stock for building stars.

  17. Star formation: Cosmic feast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Low-mass stars form through a process known as disk accretion, eating up material that orbits in a disk around them. It turns out that the same mechanism also describes the formation of more massive stars.

  18. Star formation: Cosmic feast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, Simone

    2017-03-01

    Low-mass stars form through a process known as disk accretion, eating up material that orbits in a disk around them. It turns out that the same mechanism also describes the formation of more massive stars.

  19. Massive Star Makes Waves

    2012-12-18

    The giant star Zeta Ophiuchi, a young, large and hot star located around 370 light-years away, is having a hocking effect on the surrounding dust clouds in this infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

  20. Sloshing Star Goes Supernova

    2014-02-19

    NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.

  1. AgSTAR Accomplishments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Showcases AgSTAR's accomplishments reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the agriculture sector. Through outreach, education, training, and other tools, AgSTAR continues to help evaluate, construct, and maintain anaerobic digesters on livestock farms.

  2. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  3. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  4. Another Death Star?

    2012-12-03

    Although Mimas holds the unofficial designation of Death Star moon, Tethys is seen here also vaguely resembling the space station from Star Wars. Apparently, Tethys doesnt want Mimas to have all the fun!

  5. Observing metal-poor stars with X-Shooter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Sbordone, L.; Monaco, L.; François; , P.

    The extremely metal-poor stars (EMP) hold in their atmospheres the fossil record of the chemical composition of the early phases of the Galactic evolution. The chemical analysis of such objects provides important constraints on these early phases. EMP stars are very rare objects; to dig them out large amounts of data have to be considered. With an automatic procedure, we analysed objects with colours of Turn-Off stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to select a sample of good candidate EMP stars. During the French-Italian GTO of the spectrograph X-Shooter, we observed a sample of these candidates. We could confirm the low metallicity of our sample of stars, and we succeeded in finding a record metal-poor star.

  6. Wolf-Rayet stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud as testbed for massive star evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schootemeijer, A.; Langer, N.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The majority of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars represent the stripped cores of evolved massive stars who lost most of their hydrogen envelope. Wind stripping in single stars is expected to be inefficient in producing WR stars in metal-poor environments such as the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). While binary interaction can also produce WR stars at low metallicity, it is puzzling that the fraction of WR binaries appears to be about 40%, independent of the metallicity. Aim. We aim to use the recently determined physical properties of the twelve known SMC WR stars to explore their possible formation channels through comparisons with stellar models. Methods: We used the MESA stellar evolution code to construct two grids of stellar models with SMC metallicity. One of these consists of models of rapidly rotating single stars, which evolve in part or completely chemically homogeneously. In a second grid, we analyzed core helium burning stellar models assuming constant hydrogen and helium gradients in their envelopes. Results: We find that chemically homogeneous evolution is not able to account for the majority of the WR stars in the SMC. However, in particular the apparently single WR star SMC AB12, and the double WR system SMC AB5 (HD 5980) appear consistent with this channel. We further find a dichotomy in the envelope hydrogen gradients required to explain the observed temperatures of the SMC WR stars. Shallow gradients are found for the WR stars with O star companions, while much steeper hydrogen gradients are required to understand the group of hot apparently single WR stars. Conclusions: The derived shallow hydrogen gradients in the WR component of the WR+O star binaries are consistent with predictions from binary models where mass transfer occurs early, in agreement with their binary properties. Since the hydrogen profiles in evolutionary models of massive stars become steeper with time after the main sequence, we conclude that most of the hot (Teff > 60 k

  7. Stellar Parameters and Radial Velocities of Hot Stars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanes, Richard J.; McSwain, M. Virginia; Povich, Matthew S.

    2018-05-01

    The Carina Nebula is an active star-forming region in the southern sky that is of particular interest due to the presence of a large number of massive stars in a wide array of evolutionary stages. Here, we present the results of the spectroscopic analysis of 82 B-type stars and 33 O-type stars that were observed in 2013 and 2014. For 82 B-type stars without line blending, we fit model spectra from the Tlusty BSTAR2006 grid to the observed profiles of Hγ and He λλ4026, 4388, and 4471 to measure the effective temperatures, surface gravities, and projected rotational velocities. We also measure the masses, ages, radii, bolometric luminosities, and distances of these stars. From the radial velocities measured in our sample, we find 31 single lined spectroscopic binary candidates. We find a high dispersion of radial velocities among our sample stars, and we argue that the Carina Nebula stellar population has not yet relaxed and become virialized.

  8. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  9. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  10. B-type natriuretic peptide in the recognition of critical congenital heart disease in the newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Das, Srikant; Chanani, Nikhil K; Deshpande, Shriprasad; Maher, Kevin O

    2012-08-01

    Infants with congenital heart disease having obstruction to the left ventricular outflow and ductal-dependent systemic circulation can present critically ill with shock. Prompt disease recognition and initiation of prostaglandins are necessary to prevent excess morbidity and mortality. We assessed a large cohort of newborn infants with ductal-dependent systemic circulation to determine if B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is consistently elevated at presentation, potentially aiding in diagnosis and treatment. The clinical records of infants with left-sided obstructive lesions admitted from January 2005 to June 2009 were reviewed. Infants were divided into 2 groups: group 1 was diagnosed with cardiogenic/circulatory shock at presentation, and group 2 consisted of infants with ductal-dependent systemic circulation without evidence of shock. B-type natriuretic peptide levels and other variables between the groups were compared. All patients with critical congenital heart disease presenting with shock had elevated BNP levels, ranging from 553 to greater than 5000 pg/mL. Infants in group 1 (shock, n = 36) had significantly higher median BNP levels of 4100 pg/mL at presentation compared with group 2 patients (no shock, n = 86), who had a median BNP of 656 pg/mL (range, 30-3930 pg/mL; P < 0.001). Every 100 U of increase in BNP at presentation increased the likelihood of shock (odds ratio, 100; P < 0.001). B-type natriuretic peptide is markedly elevated in neonates presenting in shock secondary to left-sided obstructive heart disease and is an important diagnostic tool to aid in the rapid identification and treatment of these patients.

  11. Stars Spring up Out of the Darkness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Stars Spring up Out of the Darkness

    This artist's animation illustrates the universe's early years, from its explosive formation to its dark ages to its first stars and mini-galaxies.

    Scientists using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found patches of infrared light splattered across the sky that might be the collective glow of clumps of the universe's first objects. Astronomers do not know if these first objects were stars or 'quasars,' which are black holes voraciously consuming surrounding gas.

    The movie begins with a flash of color that represents the birth of the universe, an explosion called the Big Bang that occurred about 13.7 billion years ago. A period of darkness ensues, where gas begins to clump together.

    The universe's first stars are then shown springing up out of the gas clumps, flooding the universe with light, an event that probably happened about a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. Though these first stars formed out of gas alone, their deaths seeded the universe with the dusty heavy chemical elements that helped create future generations of stars.

    The first stars, called Population III stars (our star is a Population I star), were much bigger and brighter than any in our nearby universe, with masses about 1,000 times that of our sun. They grouped together into mini-galaxies, which then merged to form galaxies like our own mature Milky Way galaxy.

    The first quasars, not shown here, ultimately became the centers of powerful galaxies that are more common in the distant universe.

  12. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  13. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    2006-12-08

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it.

  14. Magnetized anisotropic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelea, Cristian; Dariescu, Marina-Aura; Dariescu, Ciprian

    2018-05-01

    We extend a known solution-generating technique for isotropic fluids in order to construct more general models of anisotropic stars with poloidal magnetic fields. In particular, we discuss the magnetized versions of some well-known exact solutions describing anisotropic stars and dark energy stars, and we describe some of their properties.

  15. Managing the star performer.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Our culture seems to be endlessly fascinated with its stars in entertainment, athletics, politics, and business, and holds fast to the idea that extraordinary talent accounts for an individual's extraordinary performance. At first glance, managing a star performer in your medical practice may seem like it would be an easy task. However, there's much more to managing a star performer than many practice managers realize. The concern is how to keep the star performer happy and functioning at a high level without detriment to the rest of the medical practice team. This article offers tips for practice managers who manage star performers. It explores ways to keep the star performer motivated, while at the same time helping the star performer to meld into the existing medical practice team. This article suggests strategies for redefining the star performer's role, for holding the star performer accountable for his or her behavior, and for coaching the star performer. Finally, this article offers practical tips for keeping the star performer during trying times, for identifying and cultivating new star performers, and for managing medical practice prima donnas.

  16. Asteroseismology of OB stars with CoRoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degroote, P.; Aerts, C.; Samadi, R.; Miglio, A.; Briquet, M.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Baudin, F.; Catala, C.; Michel, E.

    2010-12-01

    The CoRoT satellite is revolutionizing the photometric study of massive O-type and B-type stars. During its long runs, CoRoT observed the entire main sequence B star domain, from typical hot β Cep stars, via cooler hybrid p- and g-mode pulsators to the SPB stars near the edge of the instability strip. CoRoT lowers the sensitivity barrier from the typical mmag-precision reached from the ground, to the μmag-level reached from space. Within the wealth of detected and identified pulsation modes, relations have been found in the form of multiplets, combination of frequencies, and frequency- and period spacings. This wealth of observational evidence is finally providing strong constraints to test current models of the internal structure and pulsations of hot stars. Aside from the expected opacity driven modes with infinite lifetime, other unexpected types of variability are detected in massive stars, such as modes of stochastic nature. The simultaneous observation of all these light curve characteristics implies a challenge for both observational asteroseismology and stellar modelling. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain.

  17. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XIX. B-type supergiants: Atmospheric parameters and nitrogen abundances to investigate the role of binarity and the width of the main sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, C. M.; Dufton, P. L.; Evans, C. J.; Kalari, V. M.; Markova, N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Vink, J. S.; Walborn, N. R.; Crowther, P. A.; de Koter, A.; de Mink, S. E.; Dunstall, P. R.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Herrero, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D. J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Najarro, F.; Puls, J.; Sana, H.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Taylor, W. D.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Model atmosphere analyses have been previously undertaken for both Galactic and extragalactic B-type supergiants. By contrast, little attention has been given to a comparison of the properties of single supergiants and those that are members of multiple systems. Aims: Atmospheric parameters and nitrogen abundances have been estimated for all the B-type supergiants identified in the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey. These include both single targets and binary candidates. The results have been analysed to investigate the role of binarity in the evolutionary history of supergiants. Methods: tlusty non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model atmosphere calculations have been used to determine atmospheric parameters and nitrogen abundances for 34 single and 18 binary supergiants. Effective temperatures were deduced using the silicon balance technique, complemented by the helium ionisation in the hotter spectra. Surface gravities were estimated using Balmer line profiles and microturbulent velocities deduced using the silicon spectrum. Nitrogen abundances or upper limits were estimated from the N ii spectrum. The effects of a flux contribution from an unseen secondary were considered for the binary sample. Results: We present the first systematic study of the incidence of binarity for a sample of B-type supergiants across the theoretical terminal age main sequence (TAMS). To account for the distribution of effective temperatures of the B-type supergiants it may be necessary to extend the TAMS to lower temperatures. This is also consistent with the derived distribution of mass discrepancies, projected rotational velocities and nitrogen abundances, provided that stars cooler than this temperature are post-red supergiant objects. For all the supergiants in the Tarantula and in a previous FLAMES survey, the majority have small projected rotational velocities. The distribution peaks at about 50 km s-1 with 65% in the range 30 km s-1 ≤ vesini ≤ 60 km s-1. About

  18. Induced Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    Overview: Induced Star Formation and Interactions Introduction Historical Background: First Hints Systematic Studies: Starbursts Interactions and Nuclear activity IRAS and Ultralumious starburst Galaxies The 1990's: HST, Supercomputers, and the Distant Universe Key Questions and Issues Organization of Lectures Star Formation Properties of Normal Galaxies Observational Techniques Results: Star Formation in Normal Galaxies Interpretation: Star Formation Histories Global Star Formation in interacting Galaxies A Gallery of Interactions and Mergers Star Formation Statistics: Guilt By Association Tests SFRs in Interacting vs Noninteracting Galaxies Kinematic Properties and Regulation of SFRs Induced Nuclear Activity and Star Formation Background: Nuclear Spectra and Classification Nuclear Star Formation and Starbursts Nuclear Star Formation and Interactions Induced AGN Activity: Statistics of Seyfert Galaxies Environments of Quasars Kinematic Clues to the Triggering of AGNs Infrared Luminous Galaxies and Starbursts Background: IR Luminous Galaxies and IRAS Infrared Luminosity Function and Spectra Infrared Structure and Morphology Interstellar Gas X-Ray Emission and Superwinds Optical, UV, and Near-Infrared Spectra Radio Continuum Emission Evidence for Interactions and Mergers The Power Source: Starbursts or Dusty AGNs? Spectral Diagnostics of Starbursts Evolutionary Synthesis Models Applications: Integrated Colors of Interacting Galaxies Applications: Hα Emission, Colors, and SFRs Applications: Spectral Modelling of Evolved Starbursts Infrared Starbursts and the IMF in starbursts Triggering and Regulation of Star Formation: The Problem Introduction: Star Formation as a Nonlinear Process The schmidt Law in Normal Galaxies Star Formation Regimes in Interacting Galaxies Summary Triggering and Regulation of Starbusts: Theoretical Ideas Gravitational Star Formation Thresholds Cloud Collision Models Radial Transport of Gas: Clues from Barred Galaxies Simulations of Starbursts

  19. The most luminous stars.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, R M; Davidson, K

    1984-01-20

    Stars with individual luminosities more than a million times that of the sun are now being studied in a variety of contexts. Observational and theoretical ideas about the most luminous stars have changed greatly in the past few years. They can be observed spectroscopically even in nearby galaxies. They are not very stable; some have had violent outbursts in which large amounts of mass were lost. Because of their instabilities, these stars do not evolve to become red superglants as less luminous stars do. Theoretical scenarios for the evolution of these most massive stars depend on the effects of turbulence and mixing combined with high radition densities.

  20. Effects of structural imperfection on gelatinization characteristics of amylopectin starches with A- and B-type crystallinity.

    PubMed

    Genkina, Natalia K; Wikman, Jeanette; Bertoft, Eric; Yuryev, Vladimir P

    2007-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of physical structures on the properties of starch granules. Starches with a high amylopectin content possessing A- and B-type crystallinity were chosen for the study. The gelatinization temperature decreased in the following order: maize (A) > potato (B) > wheat (A) > barley (A), which did not reflect a correlation with the type of crystallinity. Low values of gelatinization temperature were accompanied with high free surface energy of the crystallites. It is proposed that these data are caused by different types of imperfections in starch crystals. Annealing resulted in an enhancement of the gelatinization temperature and a decrease of the free surface energy of the crystallites for all starches reflecting a partial improvement of crystalline perfection. A limited acid hydrolysis (lintnerization) of the starches decreased the gelatinization temperature because of a partial disruption of the crystalline lamellae and an increase of the amount of defects on the edges of the crystallites. Annealing of the lintnerized starches improved the structure of maize and potato starch, giving them similar structural and physicochemical parameters, which was opposite the behavior of the annealed sample from wheat. The possible nature of removable and nonremovable defects inside the crystalline region of the starch granules is discussed. It is concluded that, besides the allomorphic A- and B-types of crystal packing, physical defects in the crystals possess a major impact on starch gelatinization.

  1. Fabrication of B-type carbonate apatite blocks by the phosphorization of free-molding gypsum-calcite composite.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Chowdury Tanira; Takeuchi, Akari; Matsuya, Shigeki; Zaman, Q H M Shawket; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2008-09-01

    B-type carbonate apatite (CO3Ap) block may be an ideal artificial bone substitute because it is closer in chemical composition to bone mineral. In the present study, the feasibility to fabricate CO3Ap blocks was investigated using compositional transformation, which was based on the dissolution-precipitation reaction of a gypsum-calcite composite with free-molding behavior. For the compositional change, or phosphorization, gypsum-calcite composites of varying CaCO3 contents were immersed in 1 mol/L (NH4)3PO4 aqueous solution at 100 degrees C for 24 hours. No macroscopic changes were found after the treatment, whereas microscopic change was observed at SEM level. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and CHN analysis indicated that the composites were B-type CO3Ap containing approximately 6-7 wt% of CO3, a value similar to that of biological bone apatite. Diametral tensile strength of the CO3Ap block was approximately 1-3 MPa. Based on the results obtained, it was therefore concluded that gypsum-calcite was a good candidate for the fabrication of CO3Ap blocks, coupled with the advantage that the composite can be molded to any shape by virtue of the setting property of gypsum.

  2. Hypoglycemic activities of A- and B-type procyanidin oligomer-rich extracts from different Cinnamon barks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaolian; Jia, Qi; Wang, Rui; Wu, Ximin; Wu, Yingchun; Huang, Caiguo; Li, Yiming

    2011-02-15

    Procyanidin oligomers in Cinnamon are thought to be responsible for the biological activity in the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM). To clarify types of procyanidin oligomers in different Cinnamon species and investigate their different effects, the present study investigated procyanidin oligomers in polyphenolic oligomer-rich extracts of three Cinnamon samples by LC-MS methods, and their hypoglycemic activities were detected in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that two of the three samples from Cinnamomum cassia were rich in B-type procyanidin oligomers, and the other sample was rich in A-type procyanidin oligomers. The Cinnamon extracts were administered at doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg body wt. in high-fat diet-fed and low-dose streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice for 14 days. The results showed that blood glucose concentrations were significantly decreased in all Cinnamon extract groups compared with the control group (p<0.05). Administration of the Cinnamon extracts significantly increased the consumption of extracellular glucose in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and normal HepG2 cells compared with the control group. These results suggest that both A- and B-type procyanidin oligomers in different Cinnamon species have hypoglycemic activities and may improve insulin sensitivity in type 2 DM. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. The TAROT Suspected Variable Star Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damerdji, Y.; Klotz, A.; Boër, M.

    2007-04-01

    TAROT (Télescope à Action Rapide pour les Objets Transitoires) is a robotic observatory designed to observe very early optical transients of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). As GRBs do not often occur, we use TAROT for various other celestial targets spread over the sky. For every field observed by TAROT, we computed the magnitudes of every star. From this work, we found 1175 new variable stars brighter than 17 mag. We selected the best variable star candidates and compiled them in the TSVSC1 (TAROT Suspected Variable Star Catalog, ver. 1), which also contains Fourier-series coefficients that fit the light curves. Based on observations collected with the TAROT instrument at the Calern Observatory, France. Complementary observations were carried out with the T80 telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France. Additional material described in § 5 is available in electronic format at the CDS at http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/AJ/.

  4. A Star Close Encounter

    2006-10-03

    The potential planet-forming disk (or "protoplanetary disk") of a sun-like star is being violently ripped away by the powerful winds of a nearby hot O-type star in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. At up to 100 times the mass of sun-like stars, O stars are the most massive and energetic stars in the universe. The O star can be seen to the right of the image, as the large orange spot with the white center. To the left, the comet-like structure is actually a neighboring solar system that is being destroyed by the O star's powerful winds and intense ultraviolet light. In a process called "photoevaporation," immense output from the O star heats up the nearby protoplanetary disk so much that gas and dust boil off, and the disk can no longer hold together. Photon (or light) blasts from the O star then strip the potential planet-forming disk off its neighbor star by blowing away evaporated material. This effect is illustrated in the smaller system's comet-like structure. The system is located about 2,450 light-years away in the star-forming cloud IC 1396. The image was taken with Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer instrument at 24 microns. The picture is a pseudo-color stretch representing intensity. Yellow and white represent hot areas, whereas purple and blue represent relatively cooler, fainter regions.

  5. Kinematics of the inner thousand AU region around the young massive star AFGL 2591-VLA3: a massive disk candidate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-S.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    AFGL 2591-VLA3 may be a special case linking transition of velocity field of massive disks from pure Keplerian rotation to solid-body rotation though definitely more new detections of circumstellar disks around high-mass YSOs are required to examine this hypothesis. Our results support the idea that early B-type stars could be formed with a circumstellar disk from the point of view of the disk-outflow geometry, though the accretion processes in the disk need to be further investigated.

  6. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  7. Spectrophotometry of Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, David

    2017-06-01

    Symbiotic stars are fascinating objects - complex binary systems comprising a cool red giant star and a small hot object, often a white dwarf, both embedded in a nebula formed by a wind from the giant star. UV radiation from the hot star ionises the nebula producing a range of emission lines. These objects have composite spectra with contributions from both stars plus the nebula and these spectra can change on many timescales. Being moderately bright, they lend themselves well to amateur spectroscopy. This paper describes the symbiotic star phenomenon, shows how spectrophotometry can be used to extract astrophysically useful information about the nature of these systems, and gives results for three symbiotic stars based on the author's observations.

  8. Stars Too Old to be Trusted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    Analysing a set of stars in a globular cluster with ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers may have found the solution to a critical cosmological and stellar riddle. Until now, an embarrassing question was why the abundance of lithium produced in the Big Bang is a factor 2 to 3 times higher than the value measured in the atmospheres of old stars. The answer, the researchers say, lies in the fact that the abundances of elements measured in a star's atmosphere decrease with time. ESO PR Photo 30/06 ESO PR Photo 30/06 Globular cluster NGC 6397, with some of the FLAMES-UVES target stars highlighted "Such trends are predicted by models that take into account the diffusion of elements in a star", said Andreas Korn, lead-author of the paper reporting the results in this week's issue of the journal Nature [1,2]. "But an observational confirmation was lacking. That is, until now." Lithium is one of the very few elements to have been produced in the Big Bang. Once astronomers know the amount of ordinary matter present in the Universe [3], it is rather straightforward to derive how much lithium was created in the early Universe. Lithium can also be measured in the oldest, metal-poor stars, which formed from matter similar to the primordial material. But the cosmologically predicted value is too high to reconcile with the measurements made in the stars. Something is wrong, but what? Diffusive processes altering the relative abundances of elements in stars are well known to play a role in certain classes of stars. Under the force of gravity, heavy elements will tend to sink out of visibility into the star over the course of billions of years. "The effects of diffusion are expected to be more pronounced in old, very metal-poor stars", said Korn. "Given their greater age, diffusion has had more time to produce sizeable effects than in younger stars like the Sun." The astronomers thus set up an observational campaign to test these model predictions, studying a variety of stars in

  9. Hayashi and the thermal physics of star-forming clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Richard B.

    2012-09-01

    This brief historical review highlights the early work of Hayashi and his associates on the thermal physics of star-forming clouds, as summarized in the temperature-density diagrams first presented by this group. Some of the more recent developments in this subject, including its application to understanding stellar masses and to understanding the formation of the first stars, are also briefly reviewed.

  10. The High Angular Resolution Multiplicity of Massive Stars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    binaries: visual – stars: early-type – stars: individual ( iota Ori, delta Ori, delta Sco) – techniques: interferometric Online-only material...STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY

  11. Debris Disks Among the Shell Stars: Insights from Spitzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia; Teske, Johanna

    2008-01-01

    Shell stars are a class of early-type stars that show narrow absorption lines in their spectra that appear to arise from circumstellar class. This observationally defined class contains a variety of objects, including evolved stars and classical Be stars. However, some of the main sequence shell stars harbor debris disks and younger protoplanetary disks, though this aspect of the class has been largely overlooked. We surveyed a set of main sequence stars for cool dust using Spitzer MIPS and found four additional systems with IR excesses at both 24 and 70 microns. This indicates that the stars have both circumstellar gas and dust, and are likely to be edge-on debris disks. Our estimate of the disk fraction among nearby main sequence shell stars is 48% +/- 14%. We discuss here the nature of the shell stars and present preliminary results from ground-based optical spectra of the survey target stars. We will also outline our planned studies aimed at further characterization of the shell star class.

  12. N-Terminal Pro-B Type Natriuretic Peptide as a Marker of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia or Death in Very Preterm Neonates: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sellmer, Anna; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth; Bjerre, Jesper Vandborg; Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; McNamara, Patrick J.; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Henriksen, Tine Brink

    2015-01-01

    Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a serious complication of preterm birth. Plasma N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) has been suggested as a marker that may predict BPD within a few days after birth. Objectives To investigate the association between NT-proBNP day three and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death and further to assess the impact of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) on this association in neonates born before 32 gestational weeks. Methods A cohort study of 183 neonates born before 32 gestational weeks consecutively admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. On day three plasma samples were collected and echocardiography carried out. NT-proBNP was measured by routine immunoassays. The combined outcome BPD or death was assessed at 36 weeks of postmenstrual age. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the discrimination ability of NT-proBNP by the natural log continuous measure to recognize BPD or death. The association of BPD or death was assessed in relation to natural log NT-proBNP levels day three. Results The risk of BPD or death increased 1.7-fold with one unit increase of natural log NT-proBNP day three when adjusted for gestational age at birth (OR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.3; 2.3). The association was found both in neonates with and without a PDA. Adjusting for GA, PDA diameter, LA:Ao-ratio, or early onset sepsis did not change the estimate. Conclusion We found NT-proBNP to be associated with BPD or death in very preterm neonates. This association was not only explained by the PDA. We speculate that NT-proBNP may help the identification of neonates at risk of BPD as early as postnatal day three. PMID:26452045

  13. Comparison of copeptin, B-type natriuretic peptide, and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with chronic heart failure: prediction of death at different stages of the disease.

    PubMed

    Neuhold, Stephanie; Huelsmann, Martin; Strunk, Guido; Stoiser, Brigitte; Struck, Joachim; Morgenthaler, Nils G; Bergmann, Andreas; Moertl, Deddo; Berger, Rudolf; Pacher, Richard

    2008-07-22

    This study sought to evaluate the predictive value of copeptin over the entire spectrum of heart failure (HF) and compare it to the current benchmark markers, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Vasopressin has been shown to increase with the severity of chronic HF. Copeptin is a fragment of pre-pro-vasopressin that is synthesized and secreted in equimolar amounts to vasopressin. Both hormones have a short lifetime in vivo, similar to BNPs, but in contrast to vasopressin, copeptin is very stable in vitro. The predictive value of copeptin has been shown in advanced HF, where it was superior to BNP for predicting 24-month mortality. This was a long-term observational study in 786 HF patients from the whole spectrum of heart failure (New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class I to IV, BNP 688 +/- 948 pg/ml [range 3 to 8,536 pg/ml], left ventricular ejection fraction 25 +/- 10% [range 5% to 65%]). The NYHA functional class was the most potent single predictor of 24-month outcome in a stepwise Cox regression model. The BNP, copeptin, and glomerular filtration rate were related to NYHA functional class (p < 0.0001 for trend). Copeptin was the most potent single predictor of mortality in patients with NYHA functional class II (p < 0.0001) and class III (p < 0.0001). In NYHA functional class IV, the outcome of patients was best predicted by serum sodium, but again, copeptin added additional independent information. Increased levels of copeptin are linked to excess mortality, and this link is maintained irrespective of the clinical signs of severity of the disease. Copeptin was superior to BNP or NT-proBNP in this study, but the markers seem to be closely related.

  14. The Evolutionary Status of Be Stars: Results from a Photometric Study of Southern Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSwain, M. Virginia; Gies, Douglas R.

    2005-11-01

    Be stars are a class of rapidly rotating B stars with circumstellar disks that cause Balmer and other line emission. There are three possible reasons for the rapid rotation of Be stars: they may have been born as rapid rotators, spun up by binary mass transfer, or spun up during the main-sequence (MS) evolution of B stars. To test the various formation scenarios, we have conducted a photometric survey of 55 open clusters in the southern sky. Of these, five clusters are probably not physically associated groups and our results for two other clusters are not reliable, but we identify 52 definite Be stars and an additional 129 Be candidates in the remaining clusters. We use our results to examine the age and evolutionary dependence of the Be phenomenon. We find an overall increase in the fraction of Be stars with age until 100 Myr, and Be stars are most common among the brightest, most massive B-type stars above the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS). We show that a spin-up phase at the terminal-age main sequence (TAMS) cannot produce the observed distribution of Be stars, but up to 73% of the Be stars detected may have been spun-up by binary mass transfer. Most of the remaining Be stars were likely rapid rotators at birth. Previous studies have suggested that low metallicity and high cluster density may also favor Be star formation. Our results indicate a possible increase in the fraction of Be stars with increasing cluster distance from the Galactic center (in environments of decreasing metallicity). However, the trend is not significant and could be ruled out due to the intrinsic scatter in our data. We also find no relationship between the fraction of Be stars and cluster density.

  15. Spectropolarimetry of Post-AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trammell, S. R.; Goodrich, R. W.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    1992-12-01

    We have used the technique of optical spectropolarimetry to investigate post-AGB stars, objects that represent the first stages of the transition from the AGB to a planetary nebula. Several of the observed objects display unpolarized emission lines superimposed on a highly polarized continuum. The continuum polarization provides evidence for the presence of an aspherical dust envelope early in the transition process. The observed objects were chosen from several samples: high latitude supergiants with IR excesses that are thought to be post-AGB stars (e.g. Bond et. al. 1984, PASP, 96, 176), their lower latitude counterparts (e.g. Hrivnak et. al. 1989, ApJ, 346, 265), post-AGB stars shown by Johnson & Jones (1991, AJ, 101, 1735) to have high broad band polarizations, and three highly polarized extreme carbon stars investigated by Cohen & Schmidt (1982, ApJ, 259, 693). GL 1403, an extreme carbon star, shows an abrupt position angle rotation at 6000 Angstroms, implying that at blue wavelengths we see a scattered stellar continuum, while the star itself is hidden from direct view. Longward of the position angle rotation, we begin to see the star directly. Menzies & Whitelock (1988, MNRAS, 233, 697) proposed that IRAS 20056+1834, an unreddened GO supergiant with very strong Na I emission lines and a large infrared excess, is a mass-losing star obscured from direct view, in which the photospheric light is seen in reflection. Our data support this interpretation; the Na I emission is unpolarized, indicating that it is produced in the shell, while the continuum is scattered and polarized (5-7%) by the aspherical shell of material. IRAS 20000+3239 also shows unpolarized Na I D emission and is probably similar to IRAS 20056+1834. IRC +10420 exhibits unpolarized Hα emission and GL 2699, an extreme carbon star, displays both polarized and unpolarized Hα as well as unpolarized low excitation forbidden [S II] and [O I] emission lines.

  16. WR and LBV stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochiashvili, Nino; Beradze, Sophie; Kochiashvili, Ia; Natsvlishvili, Rezo; Vardosanidze, Manana

    Evolutionary scenarios of massive stars were revised in recent decades, after finding "unusual", blue progenitor of SN 1987A and after detecting the more massive stars than the accepted 120 M ⊙ maximum limit of stellar masses. A very important relation exists between WR and LBV stars. They represent the earlier, pre-SN evolutionary states of massive stars. WR and LBV stars and "classic" evolutionary scheme of the relation between the different type massive stars are discussed in this article. There also exist the newest evolutionary scenarios for low metallicity massive stars, which give us a different picture of their post main-sequence evolution. There is a rather good tradition of observations and investigations of massive stars at Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory. The authors discuss the new findings on the fate of P Cygni, the LBV star. These results on the reddening of the star and about its next possible outburst in the near future were obtained on the basis of UBV long-term electrophotometric observations of P Cygni by Eugene Kharadze and Nino Magalashvili. The observations were held in 1951-1983 at Abastumani Observatory using 33-cm and 48-cm reflectors.

  17. Star Clusters within FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  18. Miras among C stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battinelli, P.; Demers, S.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Carbon stars are among the brightest intermediate-age stars. They are seen in nearly all galaxies of the Local Group. In the Milky Way they are members of the thin disk but over a hundred have been identified in the Galactic halo. Since the halo consists essentially of an old stellar population, these carbon stars warrant special attention. We believe that such stars are trespassers and belong to streams left over by disrupted dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Aims: By performing photometric monitoring we intend to identify Miras among the halo carbon stars. Methods: We obtained, over several semesters, K and J images centered on the carbon stars in order to determine their variation and periodicity. Results: We establish the variability for a number of stars and identify the Miras among them. We collect data from the literature on the Miras among various carbon star populations and show that the fraction of Miras among carbon stars is fairly constant. We demonstrate that such fractions for the halo and Sagittarius are biased because of the way targets are selected. We finally investigate the near-infrared color distribution of Miras and carbon stars. Based on observations made with the REM Telescope, INAF Chile.The observed K and J magnitudes are available only at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A100

  19. Stars Spring up Out of the Darkness Artist Concept

    2006-12-18

    This artist animation illustrates the universe early years, from its explosive formation to its dark ages to its first stars and mini-galaxies. Scientists using NASA Spitzer Space Telescope found patches of infrared light splattered across the sky.

  20. Young stars of low mass in the Gum nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J. A.; Heyer, Mark H.

    1989-01-01

    Observations are presented for four recently formed stars in the vicinity of the Gum nebula which are heavily obscured by surrounding dust and are associated with small reflection nebulae. HH46 is the only currently active star of the sample, and it is found to have a spectral type in the range of late G-early K, with superimposed emission lines of H-alpha, Ca II, Fe I, Fe II, and weak He I at near zero velocities. It is suggested that the observed scenario of low-mass stars in an older massive star environment may be analogous to the circumstances surrounding the birth of the sun.

  1. Rogue waves and lump solitons for a ?-dimensional B-type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation in fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Tian, Bo; Xie, Xi-Yang; Chai, Jun; Yin, Hui-Min

    2018-07-01

    Under investigation is a ?-dimensional B-type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation, which has applications in the propagation of non-linear waves in fluid dynamics. Through the Hirota method and the extended homoclinic test technique, we obtain the breather-type kink soliton solutions and breather rational soliton solutions. Rogue wave solutions are derived, which come from the derivation of breather rational solitons with respect to x. Amplitudes of the breather-type kink solitons and rogue waves decrease with a non-zero parameter in the equation, ?, increasing when ?. In addition, dark rogue waves are derived when ?. Furthermore, with the aid of the Hirota method and symbolic computation, two types of the lump solitons are obtained with the different choices of the parameters. We graphically study the lump solitons related to the parameter ?, and amplitude of the lump soliton is negatively correlated with ? when ?.

  2. On B-type Open-Closed Landau-Ginzburg Theories Defined on Calabi-Yau Stein Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babalic, Elena Mirela; Doryn, Dmitry; Lazaroiu, Calin Iuliu; Tavakol, Mehdi

    2018-05-01

    We consider the bulk algebra and topological D-brane category arising from the differential model of the open-closed B-type topological Landau-Ginzburg theory defined by a pair (X,W), where X is a non-compact Calabi-Yau manifold and W is a complex-valued holomorphic function. When X is a Stein manifold (but not restricted to be a domain of holomorphy), we extract equivalent descriptions of the bulk algebra and of the category of topological D-branes which are constructed using only the analytic space associated to X. In particular, we show that the D-brane category is described by projective factorizations defined over the ring of holomorphic functions of X. We also discuss simplifications of the analytic models which arise when X is holomorphically parallelizable and illustrate these in a few classes of examples.

  3. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio; Saggio, Isabella

    2016-08-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. © 2016 The Authors.

  4. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  5. Prognostic value of B-Type natriuretic peptides in patients with stable coronary artery disease: the PEACE Trial.

    PubMed

    Omland, Torbjørn; Sabatine, Marc S; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Hsia, Judith; Wergeland, Ragnhild; Landaas, Sverre; Rouleau, Jean L; Domanski, Michael J; Hall, Christian; Pfeffer, Marc A; Braunwald, Eugene

    2007-07-17

    The purpose of this study was to assess the association between B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and the incidence of specific cardiovascular events in low-risk patients with stable coronary disease, the incremental prognostic information obtained from these two biomarkers compared with traditional risk factors, and their ability to identify patients who may benefit from angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition. The prognostic value of BNPs in low-risk patients with stable coronary artery disease remains unclear. Baseline plasma BNP and NT-proBNP concentrations were measured in 3,761 patients with stable coronary artery disease and preserved left ventricular function participating in the PEACE (Prevention of Events With Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibition) study, a placebo-controlled trial of trandolapril. Multivariable Cox regression was used to assess the association between natriuretic peptide concentrations and the incidence of cardiovascular mortality, fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction, heart failure, and stroke. The BNP and NT-proBNP levels were strongly related to the incidence of cardiovascular mortality, heart failure, and stroke but not to myocardial infarction. In multivariable models, BNP remained associated with increased risk of heart failure, whereas NT-proBNP remained associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality, heart failure, and stroke. By C-statistic calculations, BNP and NT-proBNP significantly improved the predictive accuracy of the best available model for incident heart failure, and NT-proBNP also improved the model for cardiovascular death. The magnitude of effect of ACE inhibition on the likelihood of experiencing cardiovascular end points was similar, regardless of either BNP or NT-proBNP baseline concentrations. In low-risk patients with stable coronary artery disease and preserved ventricular function, BNPs provide strong and incremental prognostic

  6. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Assay for the Diagnosis and Prognosis of Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sik

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Measurement of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been reported to be a useful bedside screening tool for the presence of hemodynamically significant PDA (hsPDA) in neonates. This study was conducted to investigate the usefulness of a BNP assay as a biochemical marker for the diagnosis of hsPDA and predictive biomarker of the response to indomethacin in preterm infants. Subjects and Methods Preterm infants born at <37 weeks' gestational age were prospectively enrolled within 24 hours of birth. Plasma BNP levels were measured on days 1, 4, and 7. Significant PDA was diagnosed by large ductal flow with left to right shunt on color Doppler echocardiography, along with clinical features of PDA. Following that, hsPDA was treated with indomethacin. Results A total of 28 preterm infants were prospectively enrolled in this study. Seven infants with PDA had higher on day 4 plasma BNP values (median 654.68 pg/mL; range 428.29-1280.00) compared to the control group (median 124.52 pg/mL; range 37.21-290.49). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for the detection of hsPDA was high: 0.998 (95% confidence interval: 0.995-1.002). The cutoff of BNP concentration for the diagnosis of hsPDA was determined to be 412 pg/mL (sensitivity: 100%; specificity: 95%). Conclusion B-type natriuretic peptide can be a useful biomarker for the screening and diagnosis of PDA in preterm infants. Serial BNP measurements are valuable for assessing the clinical course and indomethacin responsiveness of PDA. PMID:22493614

  7. Beryllium and Boron abundances in population II stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The scientific focus of this program was to undertake UV spectroscopic abundance analyses of extremely metal poor stars with attention to determining abundances of light elements such as beryllium and boron. The abundances are likely to reflect primordial abundances within the early galaxy and help to constrain models for early galactic nucleosynthesis. The general metal abundances of these stars are also important for understanding stellar evolution.

  8. Age-Defying Star

    2016-08-29

    An age-defying star called IRAS 19312+1950 exhibits features characteristic of a very young star and a very old star. The object stands out as extremely bright inside a large, chemically rich cloud of material, as shown in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. IRAS 19312+1950 is the bright red star in the center of this image. A NASA-led team of scientists thinks the star -- which is about 10 times as massive as our sun and emits about 20,000 times as much energy -- is a newly forming protostar. That was a big surprise, because the region had not been known as a stellar nursery before. But the presence of a nearby interstellar bubble, which indicates the presence of a recently formed massive star, also supports this idea. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20914

  9. NICER Eyes on Bursting Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    What happens to a neutron stars accretion disk when its surface briefly explodes? A new instrument recently deployed at the International Space Station (ISS) is now watching bursts from neutron stars and reporting back.Deploying a New X-Ray MissionLaunch of NICER aboard a Falcon 9 rocket in June 2017. [NASA/Tony Gray]In early June of 2017, a SpaceX Dragon capsule on a Falcon 9 rocket launched on a resupply mission to the ISS. The pressurized interior of the Dragon contained the usual manifest of crew supplies, spacewalk equipment, and vehicle hardware. But the unpressurized trunk of the capsule held something a little different: the Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER).In the two weeks following launch, NICER was extracted from the SpaceX Dragon capsule and installed on the ISS. And by the end of the month, the instrument was already collecting its first data set: observations of a bright X-ray burst from Aql X-1, a neutron star accreting matter from a low-mass binary companion.Impact of BurstsNICERs goal is to provide a new view of neutron-star physics at X-ray energies of 0.212 keV a window that allows us to explore bursts of energy that neutron stars sometimes emit from their surfaces.Artists impression of an X-ray binary, in which a compact object accretes material from a companion star. [ESA/NASA/Felix Mirabel]In X-ray burster systems, hydrogen- and helium-rich material from a low-mass companion star piles up in an accretion disk around the neutron star. This material slowly funnels onto the neutron stars surface, forming a layer that gravitationally compresses and eventually becomes so dense and hot that runaway nuclear fusion ignites.Within seconds, the layer of material is burned up, producing a burst of emission from the neutron star that outshines even the inner regions of the hot accretion disk. Then more material funnels onto the neutron star and the process begins again.Though we have a good picture of the physics that causes these bursts

  10. Nagyszombat and the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsoldos, E.

    Péter Pázmány, founder of the University of Nagyszombat, considered stars in terms inherited from medieval times. The theses, connected to the university graduation, soon left this definition, and imagined stars as made from sublunar elements. The 1753 decree of the Empress Maria Theresia ordered university professors to publish textbooks. These textbooks, together with the theses showed a definite improvement, defining stars according to contemporary knowledge.

  11. RR Lyrae type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N. N.

    Basic observational data on RR Lyrae type stars are reviewed. It is noted that these stars are used widely to investigate the structure and kinematics of the spherical and intermediate components of the Galaxy, with correct data on the absolute magnitude of these variables being decisive. Attention is given to the relationship between the orbit eccentricity and inclination of osculating RR Lyrae type stars in the Galaxy and their metallicity index.

  12. Star clusters in evolving galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Florent

    2018-04-01

    Their ubiquity and extreme densities make star clusters probes of prime importance of galaxy evolution. Old globular clusters keep imprints of the physical conditions of their assembly in the early Universe, and younger stellar objects, observationally resolved, tell us about the mechanisms at stake in their formation. Yet, we still do not understand the diversity involved: why is star cluster formation limited to 105M⊙ objects in the Milky Way, while some dwarf galaxies like NGC 1705 are able to produce clusters 10 times more massive? Why do dwarfs generally host a higher specific frequency of clusters than larger galaxies? How to connect the present-day, often resolved, stellar systems to the formation of globular clusters at high redshift? And how do these links depend on the galactic and cosmological environments of these clusters? In this review, I present recent advances on star cluster formation and evolution, in galactic and cosmological context. The emphasis is put on the theory, formation scenarios and the effects of the environment on the evolution of the global properties of clusters. A few open questions are identified.

  13. The Massive Star Content of NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melena, Nicholas W.; Massey, Philip; Morrell, Nidia I.; Zangari, Amanda M.

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the massive star content of NGC 3603, the closest known giant H II region. We have obtained spectra of 26 stars in the central cluster using the Baade 6.5 m telescope (Magellan I). Of these 26 stars, 16 had no previous spectroscopy. We also obtained photometry of all of the stars with previous or new spectroscopy, primarily using archival HST Advanced Camera for Surveys/High-Resolution Camera images. The total number of stars that have been spectroscopically classified in NGC 3603 now stands at 38. The sample is dominated by very early O-type stars (O3); there are also several (previously identified) H-rich WN+abs stars. We derive E(B - V) = 1.39, and find that there is very little variation in reddening across the cluster core, in agreement with previous studies. Our spectroscopic parallax is consistent with the kinematic distance only if the ratio of total to selective extinction is anomalously high within the cluster, as argued by Pandey et al. Adopting their reddening, we derive a distance of 7.6 kpc. We discuss the various distance estimates to the cluster, and note that although there has been a wide range of values in the recent literature (6.3-10.1 kpc) there is actually good agreement with the apparent distance modulus of the cluster—the disagreement has been the result of the uncertain reddening correction. We construct our H-R diagram using the apparent distance modulus with a correction for the slight difference in differential reddening from star to star. The resulting H-R diagram reveals that the most massive stars are highly coeval, with an age of 1-2 Myr, and of very high masses (120 Msun). The three stars with Wolf-Rayet features are the most luminous and massive, and are coeval with the non-WRs, in accord with what was found in the R136 cluster. There may be a larger age spread (1-4 Myr) for the lower mass objects (20-40 Msun). Two supergiants (an OC9.7 I and the B1 I star Sher 25) both have an age of about 4 Myr. We compare the

  14. Introduction to neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-01

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  15. Strangeon and Strangeon Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyu, Lai; Renxin, Xu

    2017-06-01

    The nature of pulsar-like compact stars is essentially a central question of the fundamental strong interaction (explained in quantum chromo-dynamics) at low energy scale, the solution of which still remains a challenge though tremendous efforts have been tried. This kind of compact objects could actually be strange quark stars if strange quark matter in bulk may constitute the true ground state of the strong-interaction matter rather than 56Fe (the so-called Witten’s conjecture). From astrophysical points of view, however, it is proposed that strange cluster matter could be absolutely stable and thus those compact stars could be strange cluster stars in fact. This proposal could be regarded as a general Witten’s conjecture: strange matter in bulk could be absolutely stable, in which quarks are either free (for strange quark matter) or localized (for strange cluster matter). Strange cluster with three-light-flavor symmetry is renamed strangeon, being coined by combining “strange nucleon” for the sake of simplicity. A strangeon star can then be thought as a 3-flavored gigantic nucleus, and strangeons are its constituent as an analogy of nucleons which are the constituent of a normal (micro) nucleus. The observational consequences of strangeon stars show that different manifestations of pulsarlike compact stars could be understood in the regime of strangeon stars, and we are expecting more evidence for strangeon star by advanced facilities (e.g., FAST, SKA, and eXTP).

  16. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciT

    Lattimer, James M.

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts canmore » set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.« less

  17. Magnetic neutron star cooling and microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekhin, A. Y.; Chabrier, G.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We study the relative importance of several recent updates of microphysics input to the neutron star cooling theory and the effects brought about by superstrong magnetic fields of magnetars, including the effects of the Landau quantization in their crusts. Methods: We use a finite-difference code for simulation of neutron-star thermal evolution on timescales from hours to megayears with an updated microphysics input. The consideration of short timescales (≲1 yr) is made possible by a treatment of the heat-blanketing envelope without the quasistationary approximation inherent to its treatment in traditional neutron-star cooling codes. For the strongly magnetized neutron stars, we take into account the effects of Landau quantization on thermodynamic functions and thermal conductivities. We simulate cooling of ordinary neutron stars and magnetars with non-accreted and accreted crusts and compare the results with observations. Results: Suppression of radiative and conductive opacities in strongly quantizing magnetic fields and formation of a condensed radiating surface substantially enhance the photon luminosity at early ages, making the life of magnetars brighter but shorter. These effects together with the effect of strong proton superfluidity, which slows down the cooling of kiloyear-aged neutron stars, can explain thermal luminosities of about a half of magnetars without invoking heating mechanisms. Observed thermal luminosities of other magnetars are still higher than theoretical predictions, which implies heating, but the effects of quantizing magnetic fields and baryon superfluidity help to reduce the discrepancy.

  18. Disk Evaporation in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Young stars produce sufficient ultraviolet photon luminosity and mechanical luminosity in their winds to significantly affect the structure and evolution of the accretion disks surrounding them. The Lyman continuum photons create a nearly static, ionized, isothermal 10(exp 4) K atmosphere forms above the neutral disk at small distances from the star. Further out, they create a photoevaporative flow which relatively rapidly destroys the disk. The resulting slow (10-50 km/s) ionized outflow, which persists for approx. greater than 10(exp 5) years for disk masses M(sub d) approx. 0.3M(sub *), may explain the observational characteristics of many ultracompact HII regions. We compare model results to the observed radio free-free spectra and luminosities of ultracompact HII regions and to the interesting source MWC349, which is observed to produce hydrogen masers. We apply the results to Ae and Be stars in order to determine the lifetimes of disks around such stars. We also apply the results to the early solar nebula to explain the the dispersal of the solar nebula and the differences in hydrogen content in the giant planets. Finally, we model the small bright objects ("proplyds") observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV photons from the nearby massive star Theta(sup 1) C.

  19. Asteroid 'Bites the Dust' Around Dead Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope set its infrared eyes upon the dusty remains of shredded asteroids around several dead stars. This artist's concept illustrates one such dead star, or 'white dwarf,' surrounded by the bits and pieces of a disintegrating asteroid. These observations help astronomers better understand what rocky planets are made of around other stars.

    Asteroids are leftover scraps of planetary material. They form early on in a star's history when planets are forming out of collisions between rocky bodies. When a star like our sun dies, shrinking down to a skeleton of its former self called a white dwarf, its asteroids get jostled about. If one of these asteroids gets too close to the white dwarf, the white dwarf's gravity will chew the asteroid up, leaving a cloud of dust.

    Spitzer's infrared detectors can see these dusty clouds and their various constituents. So far, the telescope has identified silicate minerals in the clouds polluting eight white dwarfs. Because silicates are common in our Earth's crust, the results suggest that planets similar to ours might be common around other stars.

  20. Complex organic molecules and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacmann, A.; Faure, A.

    2014-12-01

    Star forming regions are characterised by the presence of a wealth of chemical species. For the past two to three decades, ever more complex organic species have been detected in the hot cores of protostars. The evolution of these molecules in the course of the star forming process is still uncertain, but it is likely that they are partially incorporated into protoplanetary disks and then into planetesimals and the small bodies of planetary systems. The complex organic molecules seen in star forming regions are particularly interesting since they probably make up building blocks for prebiotic chemistry. Recently we showed that these species were also present in the cold gas in prestellar cores, which represent the very first stages of star formation. These detections question the models which were until now accepted to account for the presence of complex organic molecules in star forming regions. In this article, we shortly review our current understanding of complex organic molecule formation in the early stages of star formation, in hot and cold cores alike and present new results on the formation of their likely precursor radicals.

  1. Revisiting hypervelocity stars after Gaia DR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubert, D.; Guillochon, J.; Hawkins, K.; Ginsburg, I.; Evans, N. W.; Strader, J.

    2018-06-01

    Hypervelocity stars are intriguing rare objects traveling at speeds large enough to be unbound from the Milky Way. Several mechanisms have been proposed for producing them, including the interaction of the Galaxy's super-massive black hole (SMBH) with a binary; rapid mass-loss from a companion to a star in a short-period binary; the tidal disruption of an infalling galaxy and finally ejection from the Large Magellanic Cloud. While previously discovered high-velocity early-type stars are thought to be the result of an interaction with the SMBH, the origin of high-velocity late type stars is ambiguous. The second data release of Gaia (DR2) enables a unique opportunity to resolve this ambiguity and determine whether any late-type candidates are truly unbound from the Milky Way. In this paper, we utilize the new proper motion and velocity information available from DR2 to re-evaluate a collection of historical data compiled on the newly-created Open Fast Stars Catalog. We find that almost all previously-known high-velocity late-type stars are most likely bound to the Milky Way. Only one late-type object (LAMOST J115209.12+120258.0) is unbound from the Galaxy. Performing integrations of orbital histories, we find that this object cannot have been ejected from the Galactic centre and thus may be either debris from the disruption of a satellite galaxy or a disc runaway.

  2. Combinations of 148 navigation stars and the star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R.

    1980-01-01

    The angular separation of all star combinations for 148 nav star on the onboard software for space transportation system-3 flight and following missions is presented as well as the separation of each pair that satisfies the viewing constraints of using both star trackers simultaneously. Tables show (1) shuttle star catalog 1980 star position in M 1950 coordinates; (2) two star combination of 148 nav stars; and (3) summary of two star-combinations of the star tracker 5 deg filter. These 148 stars present 10,875 combinations. For the star tracker filters of plus or minus 5 deg, there are 875 combinations. Formalhaut (nav star 26) has the best number of combinations, which is 33.

  3. Circumstellar Disks Around Rapidly Rotating Be-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touhami, Yamina

    2012-01-01

    Be stars are rapidly rotating B-type stars that eject large amounts of gaseous material into a circumstellar equatorial disk. The existence of this disk has been confirmed through the presence of several observational signatures such as the strong hydrogen emission lines, the IR flux excess, and the linear polarization detected from these systems. Here we report simultaneous near-IR interferometric and spectroscopic observations of circumstellar disks around Be stars obtained with the CHARA Array long baseline interferometer and the Mimir spectrograph at Lowell observatory. The goal of this project was to measure precise angular sizes and to characterize the fundamental geometrical and physical properties of the circumstellar disks. We were able to determine spatial extensions, inclinations, and position angles, as well as the gas density profile of the circumstellar disks using an elliptical Gaussian model and a physical thick disk model, and we show that the K-band interferometric angular sizes of the circumstellar disks are correlated with the H-alpha angular sizes. By combining the projected rotational velocity of the Be star with the disk inclination derived from interferometry, we provide estimates of the equatorial rotational velocities of these rapidly rotating Be stars.

  4. ATLASGAL: Chemical evolution of star forming clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figura, Charles C.; Urquhart, James S.; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2017-01-01

    Although massive stars are few in number, they impact their host molecular clouds, clusters, and galaxies in profound ways, playing a vital role in regulating star formation in their host galaxy. Understanding the formation of these massive stars is critical to understanding this evolution, but their rapid early development causes them to reach the main sequence while still shrouded in their natal molecular cloud. Many studies have investigated these regions in a targeted manner, but a full understanding necessitates a broader view at all stages of formation across many star forming regions.We have used mid-infrared continuum surveys to guide selection of a statistically large sample of massive dust clumps from the 10,000 such clumps identified in the ATLASGAL Compact Source Catalogue (CSC), ensuring that all stages of the evolutionary process are included. A final sample of 600 fourth-quadrant sources within 1 degree of the Galactic plane were observed with the Mopra telescope with an 8 GHz bandwidth between 85.2 and 93.4 GHz.We present an overview of our results. We have identified over 30 molecular lines, seven of which with detected hyperfine structure, as well as several mm-radio recombination line transitions. Source velocities indicate that these regions trace the Crux-Scutum, Norma, and Carina Sagitarius arms. We have performed an analysis of linewidth and line intensity ratios, correlating these with star formation stages as identified by IR brightness at the 70 and 24 μm bands, and present several molecular pairs whose linewidth and intensity might serve as significant tracers of the evolutionary stage of star formation. We comment on the results of PCA analysis of the measured parameters for the overall population and the star formation stage subgroups with an eye toward characterising early stellar development through molecular line observations.

  5. Large-scale Organized Magnetic Fields in O, B and A Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathys, G.

    2009-06-01

    The status of our current knowledge of magnetic fields in stars of spectral types ranging from early F to O is reviewed. Fields with large-scale organised structure have now been detected and measured throughout this range. These fields are consistent with the oblique rotator model. In early F to late B stars, their occurrence is restricted to the subgroup of the Ap stars, which have the best studied fields among the early-type stars. Presence of fields with more complex topologies in other A and late B stars has been suggested, but is not firmly established. Magnetic fields have not been studied in a sufficient number of OB stars yet so as to establish whether they occur in all or only in some subset of these stars.

  6. Rise of the First Super-Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, John A.; Downes, Turlough P.

    2018-05-01

    We use high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations to model the formation of massive metal-free stars in the early Universe. By applying Lyman-Werner (LW) backgrounds of 100 J21 and 1000 J21 respectively we construct environments conducive to the formation of massive stars. We find that only in the case of the higher LW backgrounds are super-critical accretion rates realised that are necessary for super-massive star (SMS) formation. Mild fragmentation is observed for both backgrounds. Violent dynamical interactions between the stars that form in the more massive halo formed (1000 J21 background) results in the eventual expulsion of the two most massive stars from the halo. In the smaller mass halo (100 J21 background) mergers of stars occur before any multibody interactions and a single massive Pop III star is left at the centre of the halo at the end of our simulation. Feedback from the very massive Pop III stars is not effective in generating a large HII region with ionising photons absorbed within a few thousand AU of the star. In all cases a massive black hole seed is the expected final fate of the most massive objects. The seed of the massive Pop III star which remained at the centre of the less massive halo experiences steady accretion rates of almost 10-2M_{⊙}/yr and if these rates continue could potentially experience super-Eddington accretion rates in the immediate aftermath of collapsing into a black hole.

  7. Dynamic Processes in Be Star Atmospheres.. 6; Simultaneous X-Ray, Ultraviolet, and Optical Variations in lambda Eridani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.; Murakami, T.; Ezuka, H.; Anandarao, B. G.; Chakraborty, A.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hirata, R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a joint X ray/ultraviolet/ground based study of the abnormal Be star lambda Eri which has previously shown evidence of X ray flaring from Rosat observations in 1991. The 1991 flare event caught the astronomical hot star community by surprise because x ray flares have not been observed from other single B-type stars, before or since. Both optical (H-alpha) and UV/Voyager observations provide evidence for transient heating events near the surface of lambda Eri.

  8. Identifying Young, Nearby Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Rich; Song, Inseok; Zuckerman, Ben; Bessell, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Young stars have certain characteristics, e.g., high atmospheric abundance of lithium and chromospheric activity, fast rotation, distinctive space motion and strong X-ray flux compared to that of older main sequence stars. We have selected a list of candidate young (<100Myr) and nearby (<60pc) stars based on their space motion and/or strong X-ray flux. To determine space motion of a star, one needs to know its coordinates (RA, DEC), proper motion, distance, and radial velocity. The Hipparcos and Tycho catalogues provide all this information except radial velocities. We anticipate eventually searching approx. 1000 nearby stars for signs of extreme youth. Future studies of the young stars so identified will help clarify the formation of planetary systems for times between 10 and 100 million years. Certainly, the final output of this study will be a very useful resource, especially for adaptive optics and space based searches for Jupiter-mass planets and dusty proto-planetary disks. We have begun spectroscopic observations in January, 2001 with the 2.3 m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in New South Wales, Australia. These spectra will be used to determine radial velocities and other youth indicators such as Li 6708A absorption strength and Hydrogen Balmer line intensity. Additional observations of southern hemisphere stars from SSO are scheduled in April and northern hemisphere observations will take place in May and July at the Lick Observatory of the University of California. AT SSO, to date, we have observed about 100 stars with a high resolution spectrometer (echelle) and about 50 stars with a medium spectral resolution spectrometer (the "DBS"). About 20% of these stars turn out to be young stars. Among these, two especially noteworthy stars appear to be the closest T-Tauri stars ever identified. Interestingly, these stars share the same space motions as that of a very famous star with a dusty circumstellar disk--beta Pictoris. This new finding better

  9. Merging strangeon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Yun-Wei; Zhou, En-Ping; Li, Yun-Yang; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2018-02-01

    The state of supranuclear matter in compact stars remains puzzling, and it is argued that pulsars could be strangeon stars. What would happen if binary strangeon stars merge? This kind of merger could result in the formation of a hyper-massive strangeon star, accompanied by bursts of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation (and even a strangeon kilonova explained in the paper). The tidal polarizability of binary strangeon stars is different from that of binary neutron stars, because a strangeon star is self-bound on the surface by the fundamental strong force while a neutron star by the gravity, and their equations of state are different. Our calculation shows that the tidal polarizability of merging binary strangeon stars is favored by GW170817. Three kinds of kilonovae (i.e., of neutron, quark and strangeon) are discussed, and the light curve of the kilonova AT 2017 gfo following GW170817 could be explained by considering the decaying strangeon nuggets and remnant star spin-down. Additionally, the energy ejected to the fireball around the nascent remnant strangeon star, being manifested as a gamma-ray burst, is calculated. It is found that, after a prompt burst, an X-ray plateau could follow in a timescale of 102 ‑ 103 s. Certainly, the results could be tested also by further observational synergies between gravitational wave detectors (e.g., Advanced LIGO) and X-ray telescopes (e.g., the Chinese HXMT satellite and eXTP mission), and especially if the detected gravitational wave form is checked by peculiar equations of state provided by the numerical relativistical simulation.

  10. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  11. How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation. II. Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae

    SciT

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wollenberg, Katharina M. J.

    Metals from Population III (Pop III) supernovae led to the formation of less massive Pop II stars in the early universe, altering the course of evolution of primeval galaxies and cosmological reionization. There are a variety of scenarios in which heavy elements from the first supernovae were taken up into second-generation stars, but cosmological simulations only model them on the largest scales. We present small-scale, high-resolution simulations of the chemical enrichment of a primordial halo by a nearby supernova after partial evaporation by the progenitor star. We find that ejecta from the explosion crash into and mix violently with ablativemore » flows driven off the halo by the star, creating dense, enriched clumps capable of collapsing into Pop II stars. Metals may mix less efficiently with the partially exposed core of the halo, so it might form either Pop III or Pop II stars. Both Pop II and III stars may thus form after the collision if the ejecta do not strip all the gas from the halo. The partial evaporation of the halo prior to the explosion is crucial to its later enrichment by the supernova.« less

  12. How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation. II. Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wollenberg, Katharina M. J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2017-08-01

    Metals from Population III (Pop III) supernovae led to the formation of less massive Pop II stars in the early universe, altering the course of evolution of primeval galaxies and cosmological reionization. There are a variety of scenarios in which heavy elements from the first supernovae were taken up into second-generation stars, but cosmological simulations only model them on the largest scales. We present small-scale, high-resolution simulations of the chemical enrichment of a primordial halo by a nearby supernova after partial evaporation by the progenitor star. We find that ejecta from the explosion crash into and mix violently with ablative flows driven off the halo by the star, creating dense, enriched clumps capable of collapsing into Pop II stars. Metals may mix less efficiently with the partially exposed core of the halo, so it might form either Pop III or Pop II stars. Both Pop II and III stars may thus form after the collision if the ejecta do not strip all the gas from the halo. The partial evaporation of the halo prior to the explosion is crucial to its later enrichment by the supernova.

  13. Fall in readmission rate for heart failure after implementation of B-type natriuretic peptide testing for discharge decision: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Valle, Roberto; Aspromonte, Nadia; Carbonieri, Emanuele; D'Eri, Alessandra; Feola, Mauro; Giovinazzo, Prospero; Noventa, Federica; Prevaldi, Carolina; Barro, Sabrina; Milani, Loredano

    2008-06-06

    B-type natriuretic peptide is the most powerful predictor of long term prognosis in patients hospitalised with heart failure. On an outsetting basis, a decrease in B-type natriuretic peptide levels is associated to a decrease in event rate for outpatients managed using the neuro-hormone levels as the target in heart failure therapy. We have retrospectively checked whether the addition of pre-discharge B-type natriuretic peptide levels to a clinical-instrumental decisional score for discharge decision in patients admitted for heart failure reduced readmission rate for heart failure and related cost. We studied two series of consecutive patients admitted to the Heart Failure Unit due to acute heart failure as a main diagnosis. One-hundred and forty-nine patients discharged on the basis of the sole clinical acumen were compared to one hundred and sixty-six subjects discharged adding B-type natriuretic peptide levels to the decisional score. During a six-month follow-up period, there were 52 readmissions (35%) among the clinical group (n=149) compared with 38 (23%) readmissions in the B-type natriuretic peptide group (n=166) (chi(2)=5.5; P=0.02). Survival did not differ between groups (87%). Changes in B-type natriuretic peptide values were correlated to clinical events: a B-type natriuretic peptide value on discharge of < or =250 pg/ml or a reduction of > or =30% in B-type natriuretic peptide values predicted a 23% event rate (death, plus readmission for heart failure), whereas a far higher percentage (71%) were observed in the remaining patients (chi(2)=32.7; P=0.001). Likewise, the overall costs of care were lower (-7%) in the B-type natriuretic peptide group: 2.781+/-923 vs 2.978+/-1.057 euros per patient respectively. our study suggest that the addition of pre-discharge B-type natriuretic peptide levels to a clinical-instrumental decisional score for discharge decision in patients admitted for heart failure may contribute to reduce the number of readmissions and

  14. Stars Brewing in Cygnus X

    2012-01-10

    A bubbling cauldron of star birth is highlighted in this image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. Massive stars have blown bubbles, or cavities, in the dust and gas -- a violent process that triggers both the death and birth of stars.

  15. Assessment of N-terminal prohormone B-type natriuretic peptide as a measure of vascular and ventricular function in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Jamie; Truong, Uyen; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Hunter, Kendall A.; Shandas, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease that puts excessive mechanical loads on the ventricle due to a gradual increase in pulmonary vascular impedance. We hypothesize that the increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload is reflected in the concentration of circulating biochemical markers of ventricular strain and stress (B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP] and N-terminal prohormone BNP [NT-proBNP]). We retrospectively analyzed right heart catheterization (RHC) and serum biochemical analysis data () for a pediatric PAH cohort with no sign of left ventricular dysfunction. Using RHC data, we computed an estimate of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), compliance, and ventricular-vascular coupling. We also compared how the early onset of interventricular decoupling (characterized as septal flattening) impacts serum NT-proBNP concentrations. Our data revealed correlated NT-proBNP expression with both the resistive and reactive components of RV afterload, an estimate of ventricular-vascular coupling, and a significant increase in biomarker expression in patients with a flattened interventricular septum. Furthermore, the strong correlation between PVR and NT-proBNP appears to break down under flat septum morphology. Over 80% of resistive RV afterload variance is reflected in serum NT-proBNP concentration in pediatric patients with PAH with no sign of left ventricular dysfunction. Reactive afterload appears to contribute to myocardial NT-proBNP release at advanced stages of PAH. Therefore, in mild-to-moderate PAH, resistive afterload is likely the greatest contributor to RV wall stress. These findings could also be used to estimate invasive RHC measurements from serum biochemical analysis, but more work is needed to improve correlations and overcome the issue of interventricular decoupling. PMID:26697173

  16. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations in dogs with right-sided congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    KANNO, Nobuyuki; HORI, Yasutomo; HIDAKA, Yuichi; CHIKAZAWA, Seishiro; KANAI, Kazutaka; HOSHI, Fumio; ITOH, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The clinical utility of plasma natriuretic peptide concentrations in dogs with right-sided congestive heart failure (CHF) remains unclear. We investigated whether plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are useful for assessing the congestive signs of right-sided heart failure in dogs. This retrospective study enrolled 16 healthy dogs and 51 untreated dogs with presence (n=28) or absence (n=23) of right-sided CHF. Medical records of physical examinations, thoracic radiography and echocardiography were reviewed. The plasma concentration of canine ANP was measured with a chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were determined using an enzyme immunoassay. Plasma ANP and NT-proBNP concentrations in dogs with right-sided CHF were significantly higher than in healthy controls and those without right-sided CHF. The plasma NT-proBNP concentration >3,003 pmol/l used to identify right-sided CHF had a sensitivity of 88.5% and specificity of 90.3%. An area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.93. The AUC for NT-proBNP was significantly higher than the AUCs for the cardiothoracic ratio, vertebral heart score, ratio of right ventricular end-diastolic internal diameter to body surface area, tricuspid late diastolic flow and ratio of the velocities of tricuspid early to late diastolic flow. These results suggest that plasma ANP and NT-proBNP concentrations increase markedly in dogs with right-sided CHF. Particularly, NT-proBNP is simple and helpful biomarkers to assess the right-sided CHF. PMID:26607133

  17. Association of plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide concentration with mitral regurgitation severity and outcome in dogs with asymptomatic degenerative mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, V; Serres, F; Tissier, R; Lefebvre, H P; Sampedrano, C Carlos; Gouni, V; Poujol, L; Hawa, G; Pouchelon, J -L

    2009-01-01

    The clinical outcome of dogs affected by degenerative mitral valve disease (MVD) without overt clinical signs is still poorly defined, and criteria for identification of animals that are at a higher risk of early decompensation have not yet been determined. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide plasma concentration (NT-proBNP) is correlated with mitral regurgitation (MR) severity and can predict disease progression in dogs with asymptomatic MVD. Seventy-two dogs with asymptomatic MVD, with or without heart enlargement (International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council: ISACHC classes 1a and 1b), and a control group of 22 dogs were prospectively recruited. Severity of MR was quantitatively assessed from the regurgitation fraction (RF) by the proximal isovelocity surface area method. Consequences of MR were evaluated from measurements of the left atrium/aorta ratio (LA/Ao), fractional shortening (FS), end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular volumes indexed to body surface area (EDVI and ESVI). The relevance of these echo-Doppler indices and NT-proBNP for prediction of outcome at 12 months was studied. A significant correlation was found between NT-proBNP and RF, LA/Ao, FS, and EDVI (P < .05). NT-proBNP was higher in dogs with MVD (ISACHC classes 1a and 1b) compared with the control group (P= .025 and < .001, respectively). The difference was not significant when only dogs from ISACHC class 1a with RF < 30% were considered. Lastly, NT-proBNP was higher in dogs that underwent MVD decompensation at 12 months (P < .05). NT-proBNP is correlated with MVD severity and prognosis in dogs with asymptomatic MVD.

  18. Young and Waltzing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    other) - the detailed analysis showed that the distance between the two components is only 12 solar radii, or a little more than 8 million kilometres. If you would image yourself standing on the surface of the smaller star, the disk of the companion star would extend some 15° in the sky. This is 30 times larger than our view of the Sun! ADONIS observations The short orbital period and the even shorter duration of the eclipses, only 6 hours, posed a real challenge for the observers. They decided to obtain further high-angular resolution observations with the ADaptive Optics Near Infrared System (ADONIS) on the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. Most fortunately, early ADONIS images demonstrated that this binary stellar system has a third companion, sufficiently far away from the two others to be seen as a separate star by ADONIS. This unexpected bonus made it possible to monitor the light changes of the binary system in great detail, by using the third companion as a convenient "reference" star. In December 2000 and January 2001, detailed ADONIS images of the RXJ 0529.4+0041 system were obtained in three near-infrared filters (the J-, H- and K-bands). ADONIS is equipped with the SHARP II camera and eliminates the adverse image-smearing effects of the atmospheric turbulence in real-time by means of a computer-controlled flexible mirror. As expected, the new, extremely sharp images of RXJ 0529.4+0041 greatly improved the achievable photometric precision. In particular, as the image of the third component was perfectly separated from the others, it did not "contaminate" the derived light curve of the eclipsing binary. The movie Primary eclipse Secondary eclipse ESO PR Photo 29a/01 ESO PR Photo 29a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 375 x 400 pix - 87k] [Normal - JPEG: 750 x 800 pix - 240k] ESO PR Photo 29d/01 ESO PR Photo 29d/01 [Preview - JPEG: 375 x 400 pix - 112k] [Normal - JPEG: 750 x 800 pix - 272k] ESO PR Photo 29b/01 ESO PR Photo 29b/01 [Preview - JPEG: 375 x 400 pix

  19. Dusty Dead Star

    2010-03-29

    A composite image from NASA Chandra and Spitzer space telescopes shows the dusty remains of a collapsed star, a supernova remnant called G54.1+0.3. The white source at the center is a dead star called a pulsar.

  20. Science Through ARts (STAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph; Petersen, Ruth; Williams, Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is an educational initiative designed to teach students through a multidisciplinary approach to learning. This presentation describes the STAR pilot project, which will use Mars exploration as the topic to be integrated. Schools from the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and possibly eastern Europe are expected to participate in the pilot project.

  1. Star System Bonanza Illustration

    2014-02-27

    This illustration shows the unusual orbit of planet Kepler-413b around a close pair of orange and red dwarf stars. The planet 66-day orbit is tilted 2.5 degrees with respect to the plane of the binary stars orbit.

  2. Observing Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  3. Science through ARts (STAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Marycay; Kolecki, Joseph C.; Miller, Allan; Petersen, Ruth; Terrell, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is a free, international, cross-curricular program thematically aligned with "The Vision for Space Exploration," a framework of goals and objectives published by NASA in February 2004. Through the STAR program, students in grades 5 through 12 are encouraged to apply their knowledge in creative ways as they approach a…

  4. By Draconis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.

    An optical spectroscopic survey of dK-M stars has resulted in the discovery of several new H-alpha emission objects. Available optical data suggest these stars have a level of chromospheric activity midway between active BY Dra stars and quiet dM's. These "marginal" BY Dra stars are single objects that have rotation velocities slightly higher than that of quiet field stars but below that of active flare/BY Dra objects. The marginal BY Dra stars provide us with a class of objects rotating very near a "trigger velocity" (believed to be 5 km/s) which appears to divide active flare/BY Dra stars from quiet dM's. UV data on Mg II emission fluxes and strength of transition region features such as C IV will serve to fix activity levels in the marginal objects and determine chromosphere and transition-region heating rates. Simultaneous optical magnetic field measures will be used to explore the connection between fieldstrength/filling-factor and atmospheric heating. Comparison of these data with published information on active and quiet dM stars will yield information on the character of the stellar dynamo as it makes a transition from "low" to "high" activity.

  5. How do stars form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscharnuter, W. M.

    1980-02-01

    Modes and model concept of star formation are reviewed, beginning with the theory of Kant (1755), via Newton's exact mathematical formulation of the laws of motion, his recognition of the universal validity of general gravitation, to modern concepts and hypotheses. Axisymmetric and spherically symmetric collapse models are discussed, and the origin of double and multiple star systems is examined.

  6. Nebraska STARS: Achieving Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschewski, Pat; Isernhagen, Jody; Dappen, Leon

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the state of Nebraska passed legislation requiring the assessment of student performance on content standards, but its requirements were very different from those of any other state. Nebraska created what has come to be known as STARS (School-based Teacher-led Assessment and Reporting System). Under STARS, each of Nebraska's nearly 500…

  7. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF X-RAY-SELECTED YOUNG STARS IN THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciT

    Vaidya, Kaushar; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Hsu-Tai

    We present low-resolution optical spectra for 29 X-ray sources identified as either massive star candidates or low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) star candidates in the clusters Trumpler 16 and Trumpler 14 of the Carina Nebula. Spectra of two more objects (one with an X-ray counterpart, and one with no X-ray counterpart), not originally our targets, but found close (∼3″) to two of our targets, are presented as well. Twenty early-type stars, including an O8 star, seven B1–B2 stars, two B3 stars, a B5 star, and nine emission-line stars, are identified. Eleven T Tauri stars, including eight classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) and threemore » weak-lined T Tauri stars, are identified. The early-type stars in our sample are more reddened compared to the previously known OB stars of the region. The Chandra hardness ratios of our T Tauri stars are found to be consistent with the Chandra hardness ratios of T Tauri stars of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Most early-type stars are found to be nonvariable in X-ray emission, except the B2 star J104518.81–594217.9, the B3 star J104507.84–594134.0, and the Ae star J104424.76–594555.0, which are possible X-ray variables. J104452.20–594155.1, a CTTS, is among the brightest and the hardest X-ray sources in our sample, appears to be a variable, and shows a strong X-ray flare. The mean optical and near-infrared photometric variability in the V and K{sub s} bands, of all sources, is found to be ∼0.04 and 0.05 mag, respectively. The T Tauri stars show significantly larger mean variation, ∼0.1 mag, in the K{sub s} band. The addition of one O star and seven B1–B2 stars reported here contributes to an 11% increase of the known OB population in the observed field. The 11 T Tauri stars are the first ever confirmed low-mass PMS stars in the Carina Nebula region.« less

  8. The Neutron Star Zoo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2014-01-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission. XXX Neutron stars are found in a wide variety of sources, displaying an amazing array of behavior. They can be isolated or in binary systems, accreting, heating, cooling, spinning down, spinning up, pulsing, flaring and bursting. The one property that seems to determine their behavior most strongly is their magnetic field strength, structure and evolution. The hot polar caps, bursts and flares of magnetars are likely due to the rapid decay and twisting of their superstrong magnetic fields, whose very existence requires some kind of early dynamo activity. The intermediate-strength magnetic fields of RPPs determines their spin-down behavior and radiation properties. However, the overlap of the magnetar and RPP populations is not understood at present. Why don't high-field RPPs burst or flare? Why don't lower-field magnetars sometimes behave more like RPPs? INS may be old magnetars whose high fields have decayed, but they do not account for the existence of younger RPPs with magnetar-strength fields. Not only the strength of the magnetic field but also its configuration may be important in making a NS a magnetar or a RPP. Magnetic field decay is a critical link between other NS populations as well. "Decay" of the magnetic field is necessary for normal RPPs to evolve into MSPs through accretion and spin up in LMXBs. Some kind of accretion-driven field reduction is the most likely mechanism, but it is controversial since it is not

  9. A window on first-stars models from studies of dwarf galaxies and galactic halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, Aparna

    2018-06-01

    Dwarf galaxies dominate the local universe by number and are predicted to be even more dominant at early times, with many having large star formation rates per unit mass. The cosmological role of dwarf galaxies in the metal enrichment and the reionization of the universe is an important but unresolved problem at present. Nearby low-mass galaxies are much more accessible observationally for detailed study and may be local analogs of the types of galaxies that hosted the first-light sources relevant for reionization. I will share recent results on UV studies of the escaping radiation from nearby low-mass starforming galaxies, as well as the tantalizing similarities in element abundance patterns between local dwarf galaxies and the latest data compilations on extremely metal-poor stars in galactic halos. I will highlight trends of interest in a variety of individual elements at values of [Fe/H] between -7 and -3, including alpha-elements, elements originating mostly in intermediate-mass stars, lithium, titanium, and r-process elements. These trends constrain not only models of the first stars and their supernovae, but provide a window into the physical conditions in early galaxies and when metal-free star formation may have ceased in the early universe.This work was supported by the University of San Francisco Faculty Development Fund, and NSF grant AST-1637339. We thank the Aspen Center for Physics, where some of this work was conducted, and which is supported by National Science Foundation grant PHY-1607611.

  10. Young Star HD 141569

    2017-01-30

    This image shows the dusty disk of planetary material surrounding the young star HD 141569, located 380 light-years away from Earth. It was taken using the vortex coronagraph on the W.M. Keck Observatory. The vortex suppressed light from the star in the center, revealing light from the innermost ring of planetary material around the star (blue). The disk around the star, made of olivine particles, extends from 23 to 70 astronomical units from the star. By comparison, Uranus is over 19 astronomical units from our sun, and Neptune about 30 astronomical units. One astronomical unit is the distance between Earth and our sun. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21090

  11. 'Marginal' BY Draconis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of 52 dK-dM stars, obtained at 640-665 nm (with spectral resolution 70-90 pm) using CCD detectors on the coude-feed telescope at KPNO since 1982, are reported. Data for four stars found to have diluted absorption or weak emission above continuum at H-alpha are presented in tables and spectra and discussed in detail. These objects (Gliese numbers 256, 425A, 900, and 907.1) are shown to be 'marginal' BY Dra stars, single objects of age 2.5-3 Gyr with activity and rotational velocity (3-5 km/s) between those of normal dM stars and those of true BY Dra stars. An explanation based on evolution from the BY Dra stage through marginal BY Dra to inactive dM is proposed.

  12. Rotating stars in relativity.

    PubMed

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  13. Activity Cycles in Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Starspots and stellar activity can be detected in other stars using high precision photometric and spectrometric measurements. These observations have provided some surprises (starspots at the poles - sunspots are rarely seen poleward of 40 degrees) but more importantly they reveal behaviors that constrain our models of solar-stellar magnetic dynamos. The observations reveal variations in cycle characteristics that depend upon the stellar structure, convection zone dynamics, and rotation rate. In general, the more rapidly rotating stars are more active. However, for stars like the Sun, some are found to be inactive while nearly identical stars are found to be very active indicating that periods like the Sun's Maunder Minimum (an inactive period from 1645 to 1715) are characteristic of Sun-like stars.

  14. Producing Runaway Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    How are the hypervelocity stars weve observed in our galaxy produced? A recent study suggests that these escapees could be accelerated by a massive black hole in the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud.A Black Hole SlingshotSince their discovery in 2005, weve observed dozens of candidate hypervelocity stars stars whose velocity in the rest frame of our galaxy exceeds the local escape velocity of the Milky Way. These stars present a huge puzzle: how did they attain these enormous velocities?One potential explanation is known as the Hills mechanism. In this process, a stellar binary is disrupted by a close encounter with a massive black hole (like those thought to reside at the center of every galaxy). One member of the binary is flung out of the system as a result of the close encounter, potentially reaching very large velocities.A star-forming region known as LHA 120-N 11, located within the LMC. Some binary star systems within the LMC might experience close encounters with a possible massive black hole at the LMCs center. [ESA/NASA/Hubble]Blame the LMC?Usually, discussions of the Hills mechanism assume that Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, is the object guilty of accelerating the hypervelocity stars weve observed. But what if the culprit isnt Sgr A*, but a massive black hole at the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the Milky Ways satellite galaxies?Though we dont yet have evidence of a massive black hole at the center of the LMC, the dwarf galaxy is large enough to potentially host one as large as 100,000 solar masses. Assuming that it does, two scientists at the University of Cambridge, Douglas Boubert and Wyn Evans, have now modeled how this black hole might tear apart binary star systems and fling hypervelocity stars around the Milky Way.Models for AccelerationBoubert and Evans determined that the LMCs hypothetical black hole could easily eject stars at ~100 km/s, which is the escape velocity of the

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of star/linear and star/star blends with chemically identical monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakis, P. E.; Avgeropoulos, A.; Freire, J. J.; Kosmas, M.; Vlahos, C.

    2007-11-01

    The effects of chain size and architectural asymmetry on the miscibility of blends with chemically identical monomers, differing only in their molecular weight and architecture, are studied via Monte Carlo simulation by using the bond fluctuation model. Namely, we consider blends composed of linear/linear, star/linear and star/star chains. We found that linear/linear blends are more miscible than the corresponding star/star mixtures. In star/linear blends, the increase in the volume fraction of the star chains increases the miscibility. For both star/linear and star/star blends, the miscibility decreases with the increase in star functionality. When we increase the molecular weight of linear chains of star/linear mixtures the miscibility decreases. Our findings are compared with recent analytical and experimental results.

  16. Association of Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I Polymorphisms with Subclinical Atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Naj, Adam C.; West, Michael; Rich, Stephen S.; Post, Wendy; Kao, W.H. Linda; Wasserman, Bruce A.; Herrington, David M.; Rodriguez, Annabelle

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the association of scavenger receptor class B type I (SCARB1) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and subclinical atherosclerosis (SCA), particularly in subjects of different racial/ethnic backgrounds. We examined this relationship in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods and Results Forty-three SCARB1 tagging SNPs were genotyped. Baseline examinations included fasting lipids and SCA phenotypes (coronary artery calcium [CAC], and common and internal carotid artery thickness [CCIMT and ICIMT]). Examining SNP associations with different SCA phenotypes across multiple racial/ethnic groups with adjustment for multiple covariates, we found the C allele of SNP rs10846744 was associated with higher CCIMT in African American (P=0.03), Chinese (P=0.02), European American (P=0.05), and Hispanic participants (P=0.03), and was strongly associated in pooled analyses (P=0.0002). The results also showed that the association of this SNP with CCIMT was independent of lipids and other well-established cardiovascular risk factors. Stratifying by sex, there appeared to be a strong association of rs10846744 with CCIMT in females, but no genotype-sex interactions were observed. Conclusions Variation in SCARB1 at rs10846744 was significantly associated with CCIMT across racial/ethnic groups in MESA. PMID:20160195

  17. PCR localization of C-type natriuretic peptide and B-type receptor mRNAs in rat nephron segments.

    PubMed

    Terada, Y; Tomita, K; Nonoguchi, H; Yang, T; Marumo, F

    1994-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the presence of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) mRNA and its receptor, natriuretic peptide B-type receptor (ANPR-B) mRNA, in rat renal structures. The microlocalization of mRNAs coding for CNP and ANPR-B was carried out in the rat kidney, using an assay of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in individual microdissected renal tubule segments, glomeruli, vasa recta bundle, and arcuate arteries. The PCR signal for CNP was detected in glomerulus, vasa recta bundle, and arcuate artery. The PCR product of ANPR-B was widely present in renal structures. Relatively large amounts of ANPR-B PCR product were detected in glomerulus, vasa recta bundle, arcuate artery, and distal nephron segments. A relatively high concentration of CNP (10(-7) M) stimulated guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate accumulation in glomerulus, medullary thick ascending limb, cortical collecting duct, and inner medullary collecting duct. Our data demonstrate that CNP can be produced locally in the glomerulus and renal vascular system and that ANPR-B is widely distributed in renal structures. Thus CNP may influence renal function and act in autocrine and paracrine fashions in the kidney.

  18. N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide predicts mortality in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Santiago; Akbar, Muhammad S; Ali, Syed S; Kamdar, Forum; Tsai, Michael Y; Duprez, Daniel A

    2010-09-03

    Left ventricular hypertrophy adversely affects outcomes in patients with hypertension. Whether N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) adds incremental prognostic information in patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is not well established. We aimed to study the prognostic value of NT-proBNP in hypertensive patients with LVH. Echocardiography was performed in 232 patients (mean age 61±15, 102 males, 130 females) for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy. Left ventricular mass was measured according to The American Society of Echocardiography guidelines. A blood sample was taken for NT-proBNP determination. NT-proBNP levels were analyzed in quartiles after log transformation. Long term survival was established by review of electronic medical records. Arterial hypertension was present in 130 patients (56%) and left ventricular hypertrophy was present in 105 patients (45%). In patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, NT-proBNP levels predicted long term survival (Chi-square=10, p=0.01). After adjusting by age, presence of coronary artery disease, ejection fraction, diabetes status, and hypertension; patients in highest NT pro-BNP quartile were twice as likely to die when compared to patients in the lowest NT-ptoBNP quartile (OR=2.2, 95% CI=1.0-4.6, p=0.03). NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of survival in patients with hypertension and increased left ventricular mass. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High-density lipoprotein promotes endothelial cell migration and reendothelialization via scavenger receptor-B type I.

    PubMed

    Seetharam, Divya; Mineo, Chieko; Gormley, Andrew K; Gibson, Linda L; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Chambliss, Ken L; Hahner, Lisa D; Cummings, Melissa L; Kitchens, Richard L; Marcel, Yves L; Rader, Daniel J; Shaul, Philip W

    2006-01-06

    Vascular disease risk is inversely related to circulating levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. However, the mechanisms by which HDL provides vascular protection are unclear. The disruption of endothelial monolayer integrity is an important contributing factor in multiple vascular disorders, and vascular lesion severity is tempered by enhanced endothelial repair. Here, we show that HDL stimulates endothelial cell migration in vitro in a nitric oxide-independent manner via scavenger receptor B type I (SR-BI)-mediated activation of Rac GTPase. This process does not require HDL cargo molecules, and it is dependent on the activation of Src kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases. Rapid initial stimulation of lamellipodia formation by HDL via SR-BI, Src kinases, and Rac is also demonstrable. Paralleling the in vitro findings, carotid artery reendothelialization after perivascular electric injury is blunted in apolipoprotein A-I(-/-) mice, and reconstitution of apolipoprotein A-I expression rescues normal reendothelialization. Furthermore, reendothelialization is impaired in SR-BI(-/-) mice. Thus, HDL stimulates endothelial cell migration via SR-BI-initiated signaling, and these mechanisms promote endothelial monolayer integrity in vivo.

  20. Allopurinol reduces B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations and haemoglobin but does not alter exercise capacity in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gavin, A D; Struthers, A D

    2005-06-01

    To study whether the effect of allopurinol on improvement of endothelial dysfunction in chronic heart failure (CHF) translates into improved exercise capacity and to examine whether allopurinol also improves B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), the other important prognostic marker of CHF. Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled crossover trial. Teaching hospital. 50 patients with CHF (New York Heart Association functional classes II and III) were recruited. 50 patients with CHF were randomly assigned to three months' treatment with allopurinol (300 mg/day) or placebo. At two and three months into treatment, they underwent a modified Bruce exercise protocol and a six minute walk test. Blood was taken for BNP and haemoglobin analysis. Neither exercise test was altered by allopurinol. However, plasma BNP concentrations fell significantly (p = 0.035) with allopurinol (11.9 pmol/l) versus placebo (14.4 pmol/l). Haemoglobin concentrations also fell highly significantly with allopurinol (p = 0.001). An important negative finding is that despite high hopes for it, allopurinol had no effect on exercise capacity in CHF. On the other hand, allopurinol did reduce BNP, which is the best available surrogate marker for prognosis in CHF.

  1. Massive runaway stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2010-09-01

    problem of the origin of runaway stars and the early dynamical evolution of star clusters.

  2. Formation of the First Stars and Blackholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2018-05-01

    Cosmic reionization is thought to be initiated by the first generation of stars and blackholes. We review recent progress in theoretical studies of early structure formation. Cosmic structure formation is driven by gravitational instability of primeval density fluctuations left over from Big Bang. At early epochs, there are baryonic streaming motions with significant relative velocity with respect to dark matter. The formation of primordial gas clouds is typically delayed by the streaming motions, but then physical conditions for the so-called direct collapse blackhole formation are realized in proto-galactic halos. We present a promising model in which intermediate mass blackholes are formed as early as z = 30.

  3. The prognostic value of pre-operative and post-operative B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery: B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide: a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodseth, Reitze N; Biccard, Bruce M; Le Manach, Yannick; Sessler, Daniel I; Lurati Buse, Giovana A; Thabane, Lehana; Schutt, Robert C; Bolliger, Daniel; Cagini, Lucio; Cardinale, Daniela; Chong, Carol P W; Chu, Rong; Cnotliwy, Miłosław; Di Somma, Salvatore; Fahrner, René; Lim, Wen Kwang; Mahla, Elisabeth; Manikandan, Ramaswamy; Puma, Francesco; Pyun, Wook B; Radović, Milan; Rajagopalan, Sriram; Suttie, Stuart; Vanniyasingam, Thuvaraha; van Gaal, William J; Waliszek, Marek; Devereaux, P J

    2014-01-21

    The objective of this study was to determine whether measuring post-operative B-type natriuretic peptides (NPs) (i.e., B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP] and N-terminal fragment of proBNP [NT-proBNP]) enhances risk stratification in adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, in whom a pre-operative NP has been measured. Pre-operative NP concentrations are powerful independent predictors of perioperative cardiovascular complications, but recent studies have reported that elevated post-operative NP concentrations are independently associated with these complications. It is not clear whether there is value in measuring post-operative NP when a pre-operative measurement has been done. We conducted a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis to determine whether the addition of post-operative NP levels enhanced the prediction of the composite of death and nonfatal myocardial infarction at 30 and ≥180 days after surgery. Eighteen eligible studies provided individual patient data (n = 2,179). Adding post-operative NP to a risk prediction model containing pre-operative NP improved model fit and risk classification at both 30 days (corrected quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion: 1,280 to 1,204; net reclassification index: 20%; p < 0.001) and ≥180 days (corrected quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion: 1,320 to 1,300; net reclassification index: 11%; p = 0.003). Elevated post-operative NP was the strongest independent predictor of the primary outcome at 30 days (odds ratio: 3.7; 95% confidence interval: 2.2 to 6.2; p < 0.001) and ≥180 days (odds ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.9 to 2.7; p < 0.001) after surgery. Additional post-operative NP measurement enhanced risk stratification for the composite outcomes of death or nonfatal myocardial infarction at 30 days and ≥180 days after noncardiac surgery compared with a pre-operative NP measurement alone. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology

  4. In-hospital and long-term outcomes of congestive heart failure: Predictive value of B-type and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptides and their ratio.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuxiang; Yang, Jun; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Konishi, Hakuoh; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Masuda, Hiroshi; Shimada, Kazunori; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-01

    Relative changes in B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and amino terminal pro-BNP (NT-proBNP) levels may help to assess the risk of congestive heart failure (CHF). However, whether these levels at the time of admission enable the prediction of outcomes with acute exacerbation remains unknown. The current study determined the abilities of BNP, NT-proBNP and their ratio to predict in-hospital and long-term outcomes of patients with CHF. Patients who were admitted to the cardiac care unit of Juntendo University Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) with acute CHF onset were consecutively enrolled into the present observational study. Serum levels of BNP and NT-proBNP were immediately measured on admission, and other biomarkers and clinical data were also investigated. Of 195 enrolled patients, 16 (8.2%) succumbed to CHF in hospital and 124 (69.3%) reached the endpoint of mortality or readmission following a median follow-up of 14 months. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed body mass index, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin, estimated glomerular filtration rate and C-reactive protein as independent predictors of the NT-proBNP/BNP ratio. BNP, NT-proBNP and their ratio were significantly higher among those who succumbed to CHF than in those who remained alive in hospital (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the ratio was an independent predictor for in-hospital mortality and long-term outcomes. In conclusion, the ratio of NT-proBNP to BNP more effectively predicts in-hospital outcomes than either factor alone and it may also help to predict outcomes among patients with acute exacerbation of HF.

  5. Star Formation Activity Beyond the Outer Arm. I. WISE -selected Candidate Star-forming Regions

    SciT

    Izumi, Natsuko; Yasui, Chikako; Saito, Masao

    The outer Galaxy beyond the Outer Arm provides a good opportunity to study star formation in an environment significantly different from that in the solar neighborhood. However, star-forming regions in the outer Galaxy have never been comprehensively studied or cataloged because of the difficulties in detecting them at such large distances. We studied 33 known young star-forming regions associated with 13 molecular clouds at R {sub G} ≥ 13.5 kpc in the outer Galaxy with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE ) mid-infrared all-sky survey. From their color distribution, we developed a simple identification criterion of star-forming regions inmore » the outer Galaxy with the WISE color. We applied the criterion to all the WISE sources in the molecular clouds in the outer Galaxy at R {sub G} ≥ 13.5 kpc detected with the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) {sup 12}CO survey of the outer Galaxy, of which the survey region is 102.°49 ≤  l  ≤ 141.°54, −3.°03 ≤  b  ≤ 5.°41, and successfully identified 711 new candidate star-forming regions in 240 molecular clouds. The large number of samples enables us to perform the statistical study of star formation properties in the outer Galaxy for the first time. This study is crucial to investigate the fundamental star formation properties, including star formation rate, star formation efficiency, and initial mass function, in a primordial environment such as the early phase of the Galaxy formation.« less

  6. Repeated measurements of NT-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, troponin T or C-reactive protein do not predict future allograft rejection in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Battes, Linda C; Caliskan, Kadir; Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Constantinescu, Alina A; Robertus, Jan L; Akkerhuis, Martijn; Manintveld, Olivier C; Boersma, Eric; Kardys, Isabella

    2015-03-01

    Studies on the prognostic value of serial biomarker assays for future occurrence of allograft rejection (AR) are scarce. We examined whether repeated measurements of NT-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), troponin T (TropT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) predict AR. From 2005 to 2010, 77 consecutive heart transplantation (HTx) recipients were included. The NT-proBNP, TropT, and CRP were measured at 16 ± 4 (mean ± standard deviation) consecutive routine endomyocardial biopsy surveillance visits during the first year of follow-up. Allograft rejection was defined as International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) grade 2R or higher at endomyocardial biopsy. Joint modeling was used to assess the association between repeated biomarker measurements and occurrence of future AR. Joint modeling accounts for dependence among repeated observations in individual patients. The mean age of the patients at HTx was 49 ± 9.2 years, and 68% were men. During the first year of follow-up, 1,136 biopsies and concurrent blood samples were obtained, and 56 patients (73%) experienced at least one episode of AR. All biomarkers were elevated directly after HTx and achieved steady-state after ∼ 12 weeks, both in patients with or without AR. No associations were present between the repeated measurements of NT-proBNP, TropT, or CRP and AR both early (weeks 0-12) and late (weeks 13-52) in the course after HTx (hazard ratios for weeks 13-52: 0.96 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.68), 0.67 (0.27-1.69), and 1.44 (0.90-2.30), respectively, per ln[unit]). Combining the three biomarkers in one model also rendered null results. The temporal evolution of NT-proBNP, TropT, and CRP before AR did not predict occurrence of acute AR both in the early and late course of the first year after HTx.

  7. The MiMeS survey of Magnetism in Massive Stars: magnetic analysis of the O-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunhut, J. H.; Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.; Oksala, M. E.; Petit, V.; Alecian, E.; Bohlender, D. A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Henrichs, H. F.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Kochukhov, O.; MiMeS Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    We present the analysis performed on spectropolarimetric data of 97 O-type targets included in the framework of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) Survey. Mean least-squares deconvolved Stokes I and V line profiles were extracted for each observation, from which we measured the radial velocity, rotational and non-rotational broadening velocities, and longitudinal magnetic field Bℓ. The investigation of the Stokes I profiles led to the discovery of two new multiline spectroscopic systems (HD 46106, HD 204827) and confirmed the presence of a suspected companion in HD 37041. We present a modified strategy of the least-squares deconvolution technique aimed at optimizing the detection of magnetic signatures while minimizing the detection of spurious signatures in Stokes V. Using this analysis, we confirm the detection of a magnetic field in six targets previously reported as magnetic by the MiMeS collaboration (HD 108, HD 47129A2, HD 57682, HD 148937, CPD-28 2561, and NGC 1624-2), as well as report the presence of signal in Stokes V in three new magnetic candidates (HD 36486, HD 162978, and HD 199579). Overall, we find a magnetic incidence rate of 7 ± 3 per cent, for 108 individual O stars (including all O-type components part of multiline systems), with a median uncertainty of the Bℓ measurements of about 50 G. An inspection of the data reveals no obvious biases affecting the incidence rate or the preference for detecting magnetic signatures in the magnetic stars. Similar to A- and B-type stars, we find no link between the stars' physical properties (e.g. Teff, mass, and age) and the presence of a magnetic field. However, the Of?p stars represent a distinct class of magnetic O-type stars.

  8. Carbon Atmosphere Discovered On Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    without pulsations would require a tiny size, consistent only with exotic stars made of strange quark matter. "Our carbon veil solves one of the big questions about the neutron star in Cas A," said Craig Heinke. "People have been willing to consider some weird explanations, so it's a relief to discover a less peculiar solution." Unlike most astronomical objects, neutron stars are small enough to understand on a human scale. For example, neutron stars typically have a diameter of about 14 miles, only slightly longer than a half-marathon. The atmosphere of a neutron star is on an even smaller scale. The researchers calculate that the carbon atmosphere is only about 4 inches thick, because it has been compressed by a surface gravity that is 100 billion times stronger than on Earth. "For people who are used to hearing about immense sizes of things in space, it might be a surprise that we can study something so small," said Ho. "It's also funny to think that such a thin veil over this star played a key role in frustrating researchers." In Earth's time frame, the estimated age of the neutron star in Cas A is only several hundred years, making it about ten times younger than other neutron stars with detected surface emission. Therefore, the Cas A neutron star gives a unique window into the early life of a cooling neutron star. The carbon itself comes from a combination of material that has fallen back after the supernova, and nuclear reactions on the hot surface of the neutron star which convert hydrogen and helium into carbon. The X-ray spectrum and lack of pulsar activity suggest that the magnetic field on the surface of this neutron star is relatively weak. Similarly low magnetic fields are implied for several other young neutron stars by study of their weak X-ray pulsations. It is not known whether these neutron stars will have low magnetic fields for their entire lives, and never become radio pulsars, or whether processes in their interior will lead to the development of

  9. The Infrared Spectral Region of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaschek, Carlos; Andrillat, Y.

    1991-09-01

    1. Stars in the infrared: results from IRAS H. J. G. L. M. Lamers and L. B. F. M. Watera; 2. What is expected from ISO J. P. Baluteau; 3. New infrared instrumentation S. Bensammar; 4. High resolution atomic spectroscopy in the infrared and its application to astrophysics S. Johansson; 5. Spectroscopy of early -type stars C. Jaschek; 6. Spectroscopy of late type stars U. F. Jøgensen; 7. Dust formation and evolution in circumstellar media J. P. J. Lafon; 8. The infrared solar spectrum N. Grevesse; 9. Symbiotic and related objects M. Hack; 10. Stellar photometry and spectrophotometry in the infrared R. F. Wing; 11. Stellar variability in the infrared A. Evans; 12. Circumstellar material in main sequence H. H. Aamann.

  10. Making star teams out of star players.

    PubMed

    Mankins, Michael; Bird, Alan; Root, James

    2013-01-01

    Top talent is an invaluable asset: In highly specialized or creative work, for instance, "A" players are likely to be six times as productive as "B" players. So when your company has a crucial strategic project, why not multiply all that firepower and have a team of your best performers tackle it? Yet many companies hesitate to do this, believing that all-star teams don't work: Big egos will get in the way. The stars won't be able to work with one another. They'll drive the team Leader crazy. Mankins, Bird, and Root of Bain & Company believe it's time to set aside that thinking. They have seen all-star teams do extraordinary work. But there is a right way and a wrong way to organize them. Before you can even begin to assemble such a team, you need to have the right talent management practices, so you hire and develop the best people and know what they're capable of. You have to give the team appropriate incentives and leaders and support staffers who are stars in their own right. And projects that are ill-defined or small scale are not for all-star teams. Use them only for critical missions, and make sure their objectives are clear. Even with the right setup, things can still go wrong. The wise executive will take steps to manage egos, prune non-team-players, and prevent average coworkers from feeling completely undervalued. She will also invest a lot of time in choosing the right team Leader and will ask members for lots of feedback to monitor how that leader is doing.

  11. Dense Axion Stars.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-16

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10^{-14}M_{⊙} if the axion mass is 10^{-4}  eV. We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10^{-20}M_{⊙} to about M_{⊙}. If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  12. Heartbeat Stars Artist Concept

    2016-10-21

    This artist's concept depicts "heartbeat stars," which have been detected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope and others. The illustration shows two heartbeat stars swerving close to one another in their closest approach along their highly elongated orbits around one another. The mutual gravitation of the two stars would cause the stars themselves to become slightly ellipsoidal in shape. A third, more distant star in the system is shown in the upper left. Astronomers speculate that such unseen companions may exist in some of these heartbeat star systems, and could be responsible for maintaining these oddly stretched-out orbits. The overlaid curve depicts the inferred cyclic change in velocities in one such system, called KIC 9965691, looking something like the graph of an electrocardiogram (hence the name "heartbeat stars"). The solid points represent measurements made by the HIRES instrument at the W.M. Keck Observatory, and the curve is the best fit model for the motions of this system. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21075

  13. Course 6: Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, A.

    Contents 1 Introduction 2 Collapse of molecular cores 2.1 Giant molecular clouds and cores 2.2 Conditions for collapse 2.3 Free-fall collapse 2.4 Collapse of an isothermal sphere of gas 2.5 Collapse of a slowly rotating core 3 Observable properties of protostars 3.1 Evidence of infall from molecular line profiles 3.2 SEDs of protostars 3.3 The line spectrumof a protostar 4 Protostellar and pre-main-sequence evolution 4.1 The protostellar phase 4.2 Pre-main-sequence evolution 4.3 The birthline 5 Circumstellar disks 5.1 Accretion disks 5.2 Properties of steady accretion disks 5.3 Reprocessing disks 5.4 Disk-star interaction 6 SEDs of disks 6.1 Power-law disks 6.2 Long-wavelength flux and disk mass 6.3 Comparison with TTS observations: Heating mechanism 7 Disk properties from observations 7.1 Mass accretion rate 7.2 Inner radius 7.3 Masses 7.4 Sizes 8 Disk lifetimes 8.1 Ground-based near and mid-infrared surveys 8.2 Mid-infrared ISOCAMsurveys 8.3 ISOPHOT 60 microm survey 8.4 Surveys at millimeter wavelengths 9 Disk evolution 9.1 Can we observe the early planet formation phase? 9.2 Evidence for grain growth 9.3 Evidence of planetesimals 9.4 Where is the diskmass? 10 Secondary or debris disks 11 Summary

  14. Einstein Observations of X-ray emission from A stars</