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Sample records for early cellular responses

  1. Two distinct cellular proteins interact with the EIa-responsive element of an adenovirus early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen-Durr, P; Wintzerith, M; Reimund, B; Hauss, C; Kédinger, C

    1990-01-01

    EIa-dependent transactivation of the adenovirus EIIa early (EIIaE) promoter is correlated with the activation of the cellular transcription factor E2F. In this study we identified a cellular protein, C alpha, that is distinct from E2F and that binds two sites in the EIIaE promoter, one of which overlaps with the proximal E2F binding site of the EIIaE promoter. The possible involvement of C alpha in the EIa responsiveness of this promoter is discussed. Images PMID:2139142

  2. Early detection of disease program: Evaluation of the cellular immune response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, B. S.; Knight, V.; Martin, R. R.; Kasel, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The early cellular responses of specific components of the leukocyte and epithelial cell populations to foreign challenges of both an infectious and noninfectious character were evaluated. Procedures for screening potential flight crews were developed, documented, and tested on a control population. Methods for preparing suitable populations of lymphocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages, and epithelial cells were first established and evaluated. Epithelial cells from viral infected individuals were screened with a number of anti-viral antisera. This procedure showed the earliest indication of disease as well as providing a specific diagnosis to the physicians. Both macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were studied from normal individuals, smokers, and patients with viral infections. Newer techniques enabling better definition of lymphocyte subpopulations were then developed, namely the E and EAC rosette procedures for recognition of T (thymus-derived) and B (bone-marrow-derived) lymphocyte subpopulations. Lymphocyte and lymphocyte subpopulation response to multiple mitogens have been evaluated.

  3. Early changes in staurosporine-induced differentiated RGC-5 cells indicate cellular injury response to nonlethal blue light exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Huang, Chen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Minshu

    2015-06-01

    damage of staurosporine-differentiated RGC-5 cells. These increases in oxidative stress and mitochondrial content were the early steps of the cellular response to the exposure of relatively low doses (10 J cm(-2)) of blue light.

  4. The effect of human hair keratin hydrogel on early cellular response to sciatic nerve injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Pace, Lauren A; Plate, Johannes F; Smith, Thomas L; Van Dyke, Mark E

    2013-08-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries requiring surgery can be repaired by autograft, the clinical "gold standard", allograft, or nerve conduits. Most published clinical studies show the effectiveness of nerve conduits in small size defects in sensory nerves. Many preclinical studies suggest that peripheral nerve regeneration through conduits can be enhanced and repair lengths increased with the use of a biomaterial filler in the conduit lumen. We have previously shown that a luminal hydrogel filler derived from human hair keratin (HHK) can improve electrophysiological and histological outcomes in mouse, rabbit, and non-human primate nerve injury models, but insight into potential mechanisms has been lacking. Based on the premise that a keratin biomaterial (KOS) hydrogel provides an instantaneous structural matrix within the lumen, the current study compares the cellular behavior elicited by KOS hydrogel to Matrigel (MAT) and saline (SAL) conduit fillers in a 1 cm rat sciatic nerve injury model at early stages of regeneration. While there was little difference in initial cellular influx, the KOS group showed earlier migration of dedifferentiated Schwann cells (SC) from the proximal nerve end compared to the other groups. The KOS group also showed faster SC dedifferentiation and myelin debris clearance, and decreased macrophage infiltration during Wallerian degeneration of the distal nerve tissue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cord blood Streptococcus pneumoniae‐specific cellular immune responses predict early pneumococcal carriage in high‐risk infants in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Francis, J. P.; Richmond, P. C.; Strickland, D.; Prescott, S. L.; Pomat, W. S.; Michael, A.; Nadal‐Sims, M. A.; Edwards‐Devitt, C. J.; Holt, P. G.; Lehmann, D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In areas where Streptococcus pneumoniae is highly endemic, infants experience very early pneumococcal colonization of the upper respiratory tract, with carriage often persisting into adulthood. We aimed to explore whether newborns in high‐risk areas have pre‐existing pneumococcal‐specific cellular immune responses that may affect early pneumococcal acquisition. Cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) of 84 Papua New Guinean (PNG; high endemic) and 33 Australian (AUS; low endemic) newborns were stimulated in vitro with detoxified pneumolysin (dPly) or pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA; families 1 and 2) and compared for cytokine responses. Within the PNG cohort, associations between CBMC dPly and PspA‐induced responses and pneumococcal colonization within the first month of life were studied. Significantly higher PspA‐specific interferon (IFN)‐γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)‐α, interleukin (IL)‐5, IL‐6, IL‐10 and IL‐13 responses, and lower dPly‐IL‐6 responses were produced in CBMC cultures of PNG compared to AUS newborns. Higher CBMC PspA‐IL‐5 and PspA‐IL‐13 responses correlated with a higher proportion of cord CD4 T cells, and higher dPly‐IL‐6 responses with a higher frequency of cord antigen‐presenting cells. In the PNG cohort, higher PspA‐specific IL‐5 and IL‐6 CBMC responses were associated independently and significantly with increased risk of earlier pneumococcal colonization, while a significant protective effect was found for higher PspA‐IL‐10 CBMC responses. Pneumococcus‐specific cellular immune responses differ between children born in pneumococcal high versus low endemic settings, which may contribute to the higher risk of infants in high endemic settings for early pneumococcal colonization, and hence disease. PMID:27859014

  6. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to 56Fe irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Samy S.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A.; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a ;priming; dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a ;challenge; dose of 56Fe in a mouse model. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of 56Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of 56Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Results: Exposure to 56Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before 56Fe prevented all of the responses to 56Fe. Conclusions: This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions.

  7. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to (56)Fe irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Samy S; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a "priming" dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a "challenge" dose of (56)Fe in a mouse model. Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of (56)Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of (56)Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Exposure to (56)Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before (56)Fe prevented all of the responses to (56)Fe. This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to 56Fe irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Samy S.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A.; Boerma, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a “priming” dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a “challenge” dose of 56Fe in a mouse model. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of 56Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of 56Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Results Exposure to 56Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before 56Fe prevented all of the responses to 56Fe. Conclusions This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions. PMID:26948008

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Early Cellular Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses to Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Solid Organ Allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Day, Judy D.; Metes, Diana M.; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of the early inflammatory response in transplantation is formulated with ordinary differential equations. We first consider the inflammatory events associated only with the initial surgical procedure and the subsequent ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) events that cause tissue damage to the host as well as the donor graft. These events release damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), thereby initiating an acute inflammatory response. In simulations of this model, resolution of inflammation depends on the severity of the tissue damage caused by these events and the patient’s (co)-morbidities. We augment a portion of a previously published mathematical model of acute inflammation with the inflammatory effects of T cells in the absence of antigenic allograft mismatch (but with DAMP release proportional to the degree of graft damage prior to transplant). Finally, we include the antigenic mismatch of the graft, which leads to the stimulation of potent memory T cell responses, leading to further DAMP release from the graft and concomitant increase in allograft damage. Regulatory mechanisms are also included at the final stage. Our simulations suggest that surgical injury and I/R-induced graft damage can be well-tolerated by the recipient when each is present alone, but that their combination (along with antigenic mismatch) may lead to acute rejection, as seen clinically in a subset of patients. An emergent phenomenon from our simulations is that low-level DAMP release can tolerize the recipient to a mismatched allograft, whereas different restimulation regimens resulted in an exaggerated rejection response, in agreement with published studies. We suggest that mechanistic mathematical models might serve as an adjunct for patient- or sub-group-specific predictions, simulated clinical studies, and rational design of immunosuppression. PMID:26441988

  10. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  11. STAT3 and importins are novel mediators of early molecular and cellular responses in experimental duodenal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Khomenko, Tetyana; Deng, Xiaoming; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Tarnawski, Andrzej; Patel, Khushin N; Sandor, Zsuzsanna; Szabo, Sandor

    2014-02-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a transcription factor that directly upregulates VEGF, Ref-1, p21, and anti-apoptotic genes such as Bcl-xL. In this study, we hypothesized that STAT3 signaling is activated and provides a critical protective role that is required for enterocyte survival during the early phases of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers. We studied the effect of inhibition of STAT3 activity on cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers in rats and egr-1 knockout mice using STAT3/DNA binding assay, immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analyses. We found that G-quartet oligodeoxynucleotides T40214, a specific inhibitor of STAT3/DNA binding, aggravated cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers in rats 2.8-fold (p < 0.05). In the pre-ulcerogenic stage, cysteamine induced STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, its translocation to nuclei, an increased expression and nuclear translocation of importin α and β in the rat duodenal mucosa. Cysteamine enhanced the binding of STAT3 to its DNA consensus sequences at 6, 12, and 24 h after cysteamine by 1.5-, 1.8-, and 3.5-fold, respectively, and activated the expression of STAT3 target genes such as VEGF, Bcl-xL, Ref-1, and STAT3-induced feedback inhibitor, a suppressor of cytokine signaling 3. We also demonstrated that egr-1 knockout mice, which are more susceptible to cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers, had lower levels of STAT3 expression, its phosphorylation, expression of importin α or β, and STAT3/DNA binding than wild-type mice in response to cysteamine. Thus, STAT3 represents an important new molecular mechanism in experimental duodenal ulceration.

  12. Protective cellular responses to Burkholderia mallei infection.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Caroline A; Lever, M Stephen; Griffin, Kate F; Bancroft, Gregory J; Lukaszewski, Roman A

    2010-10-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a Gram-negative bacillus causing the disease glanders in humans. During intraperitoneal infection, BALB/c mice develop a chronic disease characterised by abscess formation where mice normally die up to 70 days post-infection. Although cytokine responses have been investigated, cellular immune responses to B. mallei infection have not previously been characterised. Therefore, the influx and activation status of splenic neutrophils, macrophages and T cells was examined during infection. Gr-1+ neutrophils and F4/80+ macrophages infiltrated the spleen 5 h post-infection and an increase in activated macrophages, neutrophils and T cells occurred by 24 h post-infection. Mice depleted of Gr-1+ cells were acutely susceptible to B. mallei infection, succumbing to the infection 5 days post-infection. Mice depleted of both CD4 and CD8 T cells did not succumb to the infection until 14 days post-infection. Infected μMT (B cell) and CD28 knockout mice did not differ from wildtype mice whereas iNOS-2 knockout mice began to succumb to the infection 30 days post-infection. The data presented suggests that Gr-1+ cells, activated early in B. mallei infection, are essential for controlling the early, innate response to B. mallei infection and T cells or nitric oxide are important during the later stages of infection. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Cellular immune response experiment MA-031

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, B. S.

    1976-01-01

    Significant changes in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) lymphocytic responsiveness occurred in the cellular immune response of three astronauts during the 9 day flight of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. Parameters studied were white blood cell concentrations, lymphocyte numbers, B- and T-lymphocyte distributions in peripheral blood, and lymphocyte responsiveness to PHA, pokeweed mitogen, Concanavalin A, and influenza virus antigen.

  14. Phosphoprotein profiles of candidate markers for early cellular responses to low-dose γ-radiation in normal human fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Ji-Hye; Yun, Jung Mi; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, In Kyung; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ionizing radiation causes biological damage that leads to severe health effects. However, the effects and subsequent health implications caused by exposure to low-dose radiation are unclear. The objective of this study was to determine phosphoprotein profiles in normal human fibroblast cell lines in response to low-dose and high-dose γ-radiation. We examined the cellular response in MRC-5 cells 0.5 h after exposure to 0.05 or 2 Gy. Using 1318 antibodies by antibody array, we observed ≥1.3-fold increases in a number of identified phosphoproteins in cells subjected to low-dose (0.05 Gy) and high-dose (2 Gy) radiation, suggesting that both radiation levels stimulate distinct signaling pathways. Low-dose radiation induced nucleic acid–binding transcription factor activity, developmental processes, and multicellular organismal processes. By contrast, high-dose radiation stimulated apoptotic processes, cell adhesion and regulation, and cellular organization and biogenesis. We found that phospho-BTK (Tyr550) and phospho-Gab2 (Tyr643) protein levels at 0.5 h after treatment were higher in cells subjected to low-dose radiation than in cells treated with high-dose radiation. We also determined that the phosphorylation of BTK and Gab2 in response to ionizing radiation was regulated in a dose-dependent manner in MRC-5 and NHDF cells. Our study provides new insights into the biological responses to low-dose γ-radiation and identifies potential candidate markers for monitoring exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation. PMID:28122968

  15. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciT

    Not Available

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  16. Characterizing heterogeneous cellular responses to perturbations.

    PubMed

    Slack, Michael D; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2008-12-09

    Cellular populations have been widely observed to respond heterogeneously to perturbation. However, interpreting the observed heterogeneity is an extremely challenging problem because of the complexity of possible cellular phenotypes, the large dimension of potential perturbations, and the lack of methods for separating meaningful biological information from noise. Here, we develop an image-based approach to characterize cellular phenotypes based on patterns of signaling marker colocalization. Heterogeneous cellular populations are characterized as mixtures of phenotypically distinct subpopulations, and responses to perturbations are summarized succinctly as probabilistic redistributions of these mixtures. We apply our method to characterize the heterogeneous responses of cancer cells to a panel of drugs. We find that cells treated with drugs of (dis-)similar mechanism exhibit (dis-)similar patterns of heterogeneity. Despite the observed phenotypic diversity of cells observed within our data, low-complexity models of heterogeneity were sufficient to distinguish most classes of drug mechanism. Our approach offers a computational framework for assessing the complexity of cellular heterogeneity, investigating the degree to which perturbations induce redistributions of a limited, but nontrivial, repertoire of underlying states and revealing functional significance contained within distinct patterns of heterogeneous responses.

  17. Dynamics of Cellular Responses to Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik; Sorace, Ron; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the consequences of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation is an important public health concern. While the risk of low dose radiation has been estimated by extrapolation from data at higher doses according to the linear non-threshold model, it has become clear that cellular responses can be very different at low compared to high radiation doses. Important phenomena in this respect include radioadaptive responses as well as low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) and increased radioresistance (IRR). With radioadaptive responses, low dose exposure can protect against subsequent challenges, and two mechanisms have been suggested: an intracellular mechanism, inducing cellular changes as a result of the priming radiation, and induction of a protected state by inter-cellular communication. We use mathematical models to examine the effect of these mechanisms on cellular responses to low dose radiation. We find that the intracellular mechanism can account for the occurrence of radioadaptive responses. Interestingly, the same mechanism can also explain the existence of the HRS and IRR phenomena, and successfully describe experimentally observed dose-response relationships for a variety of cell types. This indicates that different, seemingly unrelated, low dose phenomena might be connected and driven by common core processes. With respect to the inter-cellular communication mechanism, we find that it can also account for the occurrence of radioadaptive responses, indicating redundancy in this respect. The model, however, also suggests that the communication mechanism can be vital for the long term survival of cell populations that are continuously exposed to relatively low levels of radiation, which cannot be achieved with the intracellular mechanism in our model. Experimental tests to address our model predictions are proposed. PMID:24722167

  18. Q fever in pregnant goats: humoral and cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis caused by the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Both humoral and cellular immunity are important in the host defence against intracellular bacteria. Little is known about the immune response to C. burnetii infections in domestic ruminants even though these species are the major source of Q fever in humans. To investigate the goat’s immune response we inoculated groups of pregnant goats via inhalation with a Dutch outbreak isolate of C. burnetii. All animals were successfully infected. Phase 1 and Phase 2 IgM- and IgG-specific antibodies were measured. Cellular immune responses were investigated by interferon-gamma, enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot test (IFN-γ Elispot), lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) and systemic cytokines. After two weeks post inoculation (wpi), a strong anti-C. burnetii Phase 2 IgM and IgG antibody response was observed while the increase in IgM anti-Phase 1 antibodies was less pronounced. IgG anti-Phase 1 antibodies started to rise at 6 wpi. Cellular immune responses were observed after parturition. Our results demonstrated humoral and cellular immune responses to C. burnetii infection in pregnant goats. Cell-mediated immune responses did not differ enough to distinguish between Coxiella-infected and non-infected pregnant animals, whereas a strong-phase specific antibody response is detected after 2 wpi. This humoral immune response may be useful in the early detection of C. burnetii-infected pregnant goats. PMID:23915213

  19. Cytomegalovirus: pathophysiological mechanisms of the cytomegalovirus-induced cellular responses

    SciT

    Nokta, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection of fibroblasts of human origin is associated with a cascade of morphologic cellular responses which in other systems have been associated with regulation of intracellular free (IF) (Ca/sup + +/). In the present study, the relationship of specific ion fluxes (Ca/sup + +/, Na/sup +/) to the development of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-induced morphologic cellular responses was investigated. An influx of Ca/sup + +/ was observed by the first hour after CMV infection (PI), and total calcium sequestered by infected cells was enhanced by 5 hr Pl. A gradual rise in intracellular free (IF) (Ca/sup + +/) was observedmore » that continued through 48 hour postinfection (hr Pl). The IF (Ca/sup + +/) response to CMV infection was shown to be multiplicity dependent, require viable virus, and occur under conditions consistent with the expression of immediate early CMV genes. Development and progression of cytomegaly was found to be independent of CMV DNA synthesis and appeared to be dependent on the IF (Ca/sup + +/) response. Ca/sup + +/ influx blockers (e.g. verapamil) and cyclic nucleotide modulators (e.g. papaverine) inhibited both Ca/sup + +/ responses and cytomegaly. Quabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake and sequestering of Ca/sup + +/ increased in parallel with development of cytomegaly. There may be a relationship between Ca/sup + +/ influx, IF (Ca/sup + +/), activation of the Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchanger, induction of Na/sup +/, Cl/sup -/, HCO/sub 3/ cotransport, Na/sup +/ entry, Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase activity and development of CMV-induced morphologic cellular responses including cytomegaly.« less

  20. The early transcriptional response of human granulocytes to infection with Candida albicans is not essential for killing but reflects cellular communications.

    PubMed

    Fradin, Chantal; Mavor, Abigail L; Weindl, Günther; Schaller, Martin; Hanke, Karin; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Mollenkopf, Hans; Hube, Bernhard

    2007-03-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic opportunistic fungus that can cause life-threatening systemic infections following hematogenous dissemination in patients susceptible to nosocomial infection. Neutrophils form part of the innate immune response, which is the first line of defense against microbes and is particularly important in C. albicans infections. To compare the transcriptional response of leukocytes exposed to C. albicans, we investigated the expression of key cytokine genes in polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes after incubation with C. albicans for 1 h. Isolated mononuclear cells expressed high levels of genes encoding proinflammatory signaling molecules, whereas neutrophils exhibited much lower levels, similar to those observed in whole blood. The global transcriptional profile of neutrophils was examined by using an immunology-biased human microarray to determine whether different morphological forms or the viability of C. albicans altered the transcriptome. Hyphal cells appeared to have the broadest effect, although the most strongly induced genes were regulated independently of morphology or viability. These genes were involved in proinflammatory cell-cell signaling, cell signal transduction, and cell growth. Generally, genes encoding known components of neutrophil granules showed no upregulation at this time point; however, lactoferrin, a well-known candidacidal peptide, was secreted by neutrophils. Addition to inhibitors of RNA or protein de novo synthesis did not influence the killing activity within 30 min. These results support the general notion that neutrophils do not require gene transcription to mount an immediate and direct attack against microbes. However, neutrophils exposed to C. albicans express genes involved in communication with other immune cells.

  1. Cellular Stress Response to Engineered Nanoparticles: Effect of Size, Surface Coating, and Cellular Uptake

    EPA Science Inventory

    CELLULAR STRESS RESPONSE TO ENGINEERED NANOPARTICLES: EFFECT OF SIZE, SURFACE COATING, AND CELLULAR UPTAKE RY Prasad 1, JK McGee2, MG Killius1 D Ackerman2, CF Blackman2 DM DeMarini2 , SO Simmons2 1 Student Services Contractor, US EPA, RTP, NC 2 US EPA, RTP, NC The num...

  2. Hypoxia affects cellular responses to plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Liew, Sien-Yei; Stanbridge, Eric J; Yusoff, Khatijah; Shafee, Norazizah

    2012-11-21

    Microenvironmental conditions contribute towards varying cellular responses to plant extract treatments. Hypoxic cancer cells are known to be resistant to radio- and chemo-therapy. New therapeutic strategies specifically targeting these cells are needed. Plant extracts used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) can offer promising candidates. Despite their widespread usage, information on their effects in hypoxic conditions is still lacking. In this study, we examined the cytotoxicity of a series of known TCM plant extracts under normoxic versus hypoxic conditions. Pereskia grandifolia, Orthosiphon aristatus, Melastoma malabathricum, Carica papaya, Strobilanthes crispus, Gynura procumbens, Hydrocotyle sibthorpioides, Pereskia bleo and Clinacanthus nutans leaves were dried, blended into powder form, extracted in methanol and evaporated to produce crude extracts. Human Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells were treated with various concentrations of the plant extracts under normoxia or hypoxia (0.5% oxygen). 24h after treatment, an MTT assay was performed and the IC(50) values were calculated. Effect of the extracts on hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) activity was evaluated using a hypoxia-driven firefly luciferase reporter assay. The relative cytotoxicity of each plant extract on Saos-2 cells was different in hypoxic versus normoxic conditions. Hypoxia increased the IC(50) values for Pereskia grandifola and Orthosiphon aristatus extracts, but decreased the IC(50) values for Melastoma malabathricum and Carica papaya extracts. Extracts of Strobilanthes crispus, Gynura procumbens, Hydrocotyle sibthorpioides had equivalent cytotoxic effects under both conditions. Pereskia bleo and Clinacanthus nutans extracts were not toxic to cells within the concentration ranges tested. The most interesting result was noted for the Carica papaya extract, where its IC(50) in hypoxia was reduced by 3-fold when compared to the normoxic condition. This reduction was found to be associated with HIF

  3. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated. PMID:27375618

  4. Cellular Immune Response to Cytomegalovirus Infection After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Calvin C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; First, M. Roy; Schiff, Gilbert M.; Phair, John P.

    1978-01-01

    A prospective study of 15 patients who received renal transplants defined the effect of renal transplantation on the cellular immune response to cytomegalovirus infection. Of 15 patients, 14 developed cytomegalovirus infection, usually in the first 2 months after transplantation, and all infections were accompanied by a normal humoral immune response. After the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy and transplantation, there was a general depression of lymphocyte transformation, as reflected in the response to phytohemagglutinin, accompanied by a specific defect in cellular immunity, as indicated by lymphocyte transformation to cytomegalovirus antigen. Eleven patients had cellular immunity to cytomegalovirus before transplantation, and all of these became negative in the first month after transplantation. In subsequent months, only 6 of the 14 study patients with cytomegalovirus infection developed specific cellular immune responses to cytomegalovirus. This occurred most often in patients who had severe febrile illnesses in association with infection. The specific cellular immune response which developed in the posttransplant period did not persist in three of the patients. This study demonstrates the dissociation of the humoral and cellular immune response to cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients and indicates the importance of the loss of cellular immunity in the appearance of infection. Previously infected patients lost their cell-mediated immunity and had reactivation infections despite the presence of serum antibody. PMID:215541

  5. Cellular Response to Ionizing Radiation: A MicroRNA Story

    PubMed Central

    Halimi, Mohammad; Asghari, S. Mohsen; Sariri, Reyhaneh; Moslemi, Dariush; Parsian, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. They play a crucial role in diverse cellular pathways. Ionizing radiation (IR) is one of the most important treatment protocols for patients that suffer from cancer and affects directly or indirectly cellular integration. Recently it has been discovered that microRNA-mediated gene regulation interferes with radio-related pathways in ionizing radiation. Here, we review the recent discoveries about miRNAs in cellular response to IR. Thoroughly understanding the mechanism of miRNAs in radiation response, it will be possible to design new strategies for improving radiotherapy efficiency and ultimately cancer treatment. PMID:24551775

  6. Simulating Quantitative Cellular Responses Using Asynchronous Threshold Boolean Network Ensembles

    EPA Science Inventory

    With increasing knowledge about the potential mechanisms underlying cellular functions, it is becoming feasible to predict the response of biological systems to genetic and environmental perturbations. Due to the lack of homogeneity in living tissues it is difficult to estimate t...

  7. Cellular response of preosteoblasts to nanograined/ultrafine-grained structures.

    PubMed

    Misra, R D K; Thein-Han, W W; Pesacreta, T C; Hasenstein, K H; Somani, M C; Karjalainen, L P

    2009-06-01

    Metallic materials with submicron- to nanometer-sized grains provide surfaces that are different from conventional polycrystalline materials because of the large proportion of grain boundaries with high free energy. In the study described here, the combination of cellular and molecular biology, materials science and engineering advances our understanding of cell-substrate interactions, especially the cellular activity between preosteoblasts and nanostructured metallic surfaces. Experiments on the effect of nano-/ultrafine grains have shown that cell attachment, proliferation, viability, morphology and spread are favorably modulated and significantly different from conventional coarse-grained structures. Additionally, immunofluorescence studies demonstrated stronger vinculin signals associated with actin stress fibers in the outer regions of the cells and cellular extensions on nanograined/ultrafine-grained substrate. These observations suggest enhanced cell-substrate interaction and activity. The differences in the cellular response on nanograined/ultrafine-grained and coarse-grained substrates are attributed to grain size and degree of hydrophilicity. The outcomes of the study are expected to reduce challenges to engineer bulk nanostructured materials with specific physical and surface properties for medical devices with improved cellular attachment and response. The data lay the foundation for a new branch of nanostructured materials for biomedical applications.

  8. [Early mobilization. Competencies, responsibilities, milestones].

    PubMed

    Nydahl, P; Dewes, M; Dubb, R; Filipovic, S; Hermes, C; Jüttner, F; Kaltwasser, A; Klarmann, S; Klas, K; Mende, H; Rothaug, O; Schuchhardt, D

    2016-03-01

    Early mobilization is an evident, interprofessional concept to improve the outcome of intensive care patients. It reduces psychocognitive deficits and delirium and attenuates a general deconditioning, including atrophy of the respiratory pump and skeletal muscles. In this regard the interdisciplinary approach of early mobilization, taking into account different levels of mobilization, appears to be beneficial. The purpose of this study was to explore opinions on collaboration and tasks between different professional groups. During the 25th Bremen Conference on Intensive Medicine and Nursing on 20 February 2015, a questionnaire survey was carried out among the 120 participants of the German Early Mobilization Network meeting. In all, 102 questionnaires were analyzed. Most participants reported on the interdisciplinarity of the approach, but none of the tasks and responsibilities concerning early mobilization can be assigned to a single professional group. The practical implementation of mobilizing orally intubated patients may require two registered nurses as well as a physical therapist. Implementation in daily practice seems to be heterogeneous. There is no consensus regarding collaboration, competencies, and responsibilities with respect to early mobilization of intensive care patients. The approach to date has been characterized by a lack of interprofessional communication, which may lead to an inefficient use of the broad and varied base of knowledge and experienceof the different professions.

  9. Altered cellular magnesium responsiveness to hyperglycemia in hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, M; Dominguez, L J; Bardicef, O; Resnick, L M

    2001-09-01

    Previous studies by our group have identified ionic aspects of insulin resistance in hypertension, in which cellular responses to insulin were influenced by the basal intracellular ionic environment-the lower the cytosolic free magnesium (Mg(i)), the less Mg(i) increased following insulin stimulation. To investigate whether this ionic insulin resistance represents a more general abnormality of cellular responsiveness in hypertension, we studied Mg(i) responses to nonhormonal signals such as hyperglycemia (15 mmol/L) and used (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to measure Mg(i) in erythrocytes from normal (NL, n=14) and hypertensive (HTN, n=12) subjects before and 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after in vitro glucose incubations. Basal Mg(i) levels were significantly lower in HTN subjects than in NL subjects (169+/-10 versus 205+/-8 micromol.L(-1), P<0.01). In NL cells, hyperglycemia significantly lowered Mg(i), from 205+/-8 micromol.L(-1) (basal, T=0) to 181+/-8, 162+/-6, 152+/-7, and 175+/-9 micromol.L(-1) (T=30, 60, 120, and 180, respectively; P<0.005 versus T=0 at all times). In HTN cells, maximal Mg(i) responses to hyperglycemia were blunted, from 169+/-10 micromol.L(-1) (basal, T=0) to 170+/-11, 179+/-12, 181+/-14, and 173+/-15 micromol.L(-1) (T=30, 60, 120, and 180, respectively; P=NS versus T=0 at all times). For all subjects, Mg(i) responses to hyperglycemia were closely related to basal Mg(i) levels: the higher the Mg(i), the greater the response (n=26, r=0.620, P<0.001). Thus, (1) erythrocytes from hypertensive vis-à-vis normotensive subjects are resistant to the ionic effects of extracellular hyperglycemia on Mg(i) levels, and (2) cellular ionic responses to glucose depend on the basal Mg(i) environment. Altogether, these data support a role for altered extracellular glucose levels in regulating cellular magnesium metabolism and also suggest the importance of ionic factors in determining cellular responsiveness to nonhormonal as well as

  10. Micro-thermocouple probe for measurement of cellular thermal responses.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Kakuta, N; Mabuchi, K; Yamada, Y

    2005-01-01

    We have produced micro-thermocouple probes for the measurement of cellular thermal responses. Cells generate heat with their metabolisms and more heat with reactions to a certain physical or chemical stimulation. Therefore, the analysis of the cellular thermal responses would provide new physiological information. However, a real-time thermal measurement technique on a target of a single cell has not been established. In this study, glass micropipettes, which are widely used in bioengineering and medicine, are used for the base of the thermocouple probes. Using microfabrication techniques, the junction of two different metal films is formed at the micropipette tip with a diameter of 1 μm. This probe can inject a chemical substance into a cell and to detect its subsequent temperature changes simultaneously.

  11. Toll immune signal activates cellular immune response via eicosanoids.

    PubMed

    Shafeeq, Tahir; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kim, Yonggyun

    2018-07-01

    Upon immune challenge, insects recognize nonself. The recognition signal will propagate to nearby immune effectors. It is well-known that Toll signal pathway induces antimicrobial peptide (AMP) gene expression. Eicosanoids play crucial roles in mediating the recognition signal to immune effectors by enhancing humoral immune response through activation of AMP synthesis as well as cellular immune responses, suggesting a functional cross-talk between Toll and eicosanoid signals. This study tested a cross-talk between these two signals. Two signal transducing factors (MyD88 and Pelle) of Toll immune pathway were identified in Spodoptera exigua. RNA interference (RNAi) of either SeMyD88 or SePelle expression interfered with the expression of AMP genes under Toll signal pathway. Bacterial challenge induced PLA 2 enzyme activity. However, RNAi of these two immune factors significantly suppressed the induction of PLA 2 enzyme activity. Furthermore, RNAi treatment prevented gene expression of cellular PLA 2 . Inhibition of PLA 2 activity reduced phenoloxidase activity and subsequent suppression in cellular immune response measured by hemocyte nodule formation. However, immunosuppression induced by RNAi of Toll signal molecules was significantly reversed by addition of arachidonic acid (AA), a catalytic product of PLA 2 . The addition also significantly reduced the enhanced fungal susceptibility of S. exigua treated by RNAi against two Toll signal molecules. These results indicate that there is a cross-talk between Toll and eicosanoid signals in insect immunity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HSV-I and the cellular DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samantha; Weller, Sandra K

    2015-04-01

    Peter Wildy first observed genetic recombination between strains of HSV in 1955. At the time, knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms was limited, and it has only been in the last decade that particular DNA damage response (DDR) pathways have been examined in the context of viral infections. One of the first reports addressing the interaction between a cellular DDR protein and HSV-1 was the observation by Lees-Miller et al . that DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit levels were depleted in an ICP0-dependent manner during Herpes simplex virus 1 infection. Since then, there have been numerous reports describing the interactions between HSV infection and cellular DDR pathways. Due to space limitations, this review will focus predominantly on the most recent observations regarding how HSV navigates a potentially hostile environment to replicate its genome.

  13. Antioxidant responses and cellular adjustments to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Miguel, Verónica; Mennerich, Daniela; Kietzmann, Thomas; Sánchez-Pérez, Patricia; Cadenas, Susana; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-12-01

    Redox biological reactions are now accepted to bear the Janus faceted feature of promoting both physiological signaling responses and pathophysiological cues. Endogenous antioxidant molecules participate in both scenarios. This review focuses on the role of crucial cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, and their capacity to interact with oxidants and to establish networks with other critical enzymes such as peroxiredoxins. We discuss the importance of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway as an example of a transcriptional antioxidant response and we summarize transcriptional routes related to redox activation. As examples of pathophysiological cellular and tissular settings where antioxidant responses are major players we highlight endoplasmic reticulum stress and ischemia reperfusion. Topologically confined redox-mediated post-translational modifications of thiols are considered important molecular mechanisms mediating many antioxidant responses, whereas redox-sensitive microRNAs have emerged as key players in the posttranscriptional regulation of redox-mediated gene expression. Understanding such mechanisms may provide the basis for antioxidant-based therapeutic interventions in redox-related diseases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Historical perspectives of cellular oxygen sensing and responses to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, S

    2000-04-01

    The responses to acute and chronic hypoxia begin with oxygen sensing, and this historical perspective is written in line with this concept. The earliest pertinent work started with studies on fermentation in yeast in the 17th century, before the discovery of oxygen. It required 200 yr to localize the oxygen sensing within the cells and another 100 yr to discover the cellular oxidation reactions. Today, the consensus is that the mitochondrial respiratory chain is in part the site of oxygen sensing. In addition, membrane-bound NAD(P)H oxidase possibly takes part in oxygen sensing. Oxygen-sensing mechanisms occur in a tissue-specific fashion. For example, the carotid body responds to hypoxia promptly by eliciting a ventilatory response, whereas erythropoietin production in response to hypoxia requires more time, involving new expression of genes. The mechanism has therefore moved from the cells to genes.

  15. Paracrine communication maximizes cellular response fidelity in wound signaling

    PubMed Central

    Handly, L Naomi; Pilko, Anna; Wollman, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Population averaging due to paracrine communication can arbitrarily reduce cellular response variability. Yet, variability is ubiquitously observed, suggesting limits to paracrine averaging. It remains unclear whether and how biological systems may be affected by such limits of paracrine signaling. To address this question, we quantify the signal and noise of Ca2+ and ERK spatial gradients in response to an in vitro wound within a novel microfluidics-based device. We find that while paracrine communication reduces gradient noise, it also reduces the gradient magnitude. Accordingly we predict the existence of a maximum gradient signal to noise ratio. Direct in vitro measurement of paracrine communication verifies these predictions and reveals that cells utilize optimal levels of paracrine signaling to maximize the accuracy of gradient-based positional information. Our results demonstrate the limits of population averaging and show the inherent tradeoff in utilizing paracrine communication to regulate cellular response fidelity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09652.001 PMID:26448485

  16. Cellular Bases of Light-regulated Gravity Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the most significant research accomplished in our NAG2-1347 project on the cellular bases of light-regulated gravity responses, It elaborates mainly on our discovery of the role of calcium currents in gravity-directed polar development in single germinating spore cells of the fern Ceratopteris, our development of RNA silencing as a viable method of suppressing the expression of specific genes in Ceratopteris, and on the structure, expression and distribution of members of the annexin family in flowering plants, especially Arabidopsis.

  17. Mitochondria, Energetics, Epigenetics, and Cellular Responses to Stress

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Kimberly; Worth, Leroy; Haugen, Astrid C.; Meyer, Joel N.; Domann, Frederick E.; Van Houten, Bennett; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Bultman, Scott J.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Begley, Thomas J.; Sobol, Robert W.; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Ideker, Trey; Santos, Janine H.; Copeland, William C.; Tice, Raymond R.; Balshaw, David M.; Tyson, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cells respond to environmental stressors through several key pathways, including response to reactive oxygen species (ROS), nutrient and ATP sensing, DNA damage response (DDR), and epigenetic alterations. Mitochondria play a central role in these pathways not only through energetics and ATP production but also through metabolites generated in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as mitochondria–nuclear signaling related to mitochondria morphology, biogenesis, fission/fusion, mitophagy, apoptosis, and epigenetic regulation. Objectives: We investigated the concept of bidirectional interactions between mitochondria and cellular pathways in response to environmental stress with a focus on epigenetic regulation, and we examined DNA repair and DDR pathways as examples of biological processes that respond to exogenous insults through changes in homeostasis and altered mitochondrial function. Methods: The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences sponsored the Workshop on Mitochondria, Energetics, Epigenetics, Environment, and DNA Damage Response on 25–26 March 2013. Here, we summarize key points and ideas emerging from this meeting. Discussion: A more comprehensive understanding of signaling mechanisms (cross-talk) between the mitochondria and nucleus is central to elucidating the integration of mitochondrial functions with other cellular response pathways in modulating the effects of environmental agents. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of mitochondrial functions in epigenetic regulation and DDR with environmental stress. Development and application of novel technologies, enhanced experimental models, and a systems-type research approach will help to discern how environmentally induced mitochondrial dysfunction affects key mechanistic pathways. Conclusions: Understanding mitochondria–cell signaling will provide insight into individual responses to environmental hazards, improving prediction of hazard and susceptibility to

  18. Marine molluscs in environmental monitoring. I. Cellular and molecular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresler, Vladimir; Abelson, Avigdor; Fishelson, Lev; Feldstein, Tamar; Rosenfeld, Michael; Mokady, Ofer

    2003-10-01

    levels of biological organization—the molecular and cellular level—the parameters measured may have the capacity not only for biomonitoring environmental quality, but also for early warning.

  19. Activation of cellular immune response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mora, A; Pérez-Mateo, M; Viedma, J A; Carballo, F; Sánchez-Payá, J; Liras, G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators have recently been implicated as potential markers of severity in acute pancreatitis. AIMS: To determine the value of neopterin and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase as markers of activation of cellular immunity and as early predictors of disease severity. PATIENTS: Fifty two non-consecutive patients classified according to their clinical outcome into mild (n = 26) and severe pancreatitis (n = 26). METHODS: Neopterin in serum and the PMN elastase/A1PI complex in plasma were measured during the first three days of hospital stay. RESULTS: Within three days after the onset of acute pancreatitis, PMN elastase was significantly higher in the severe pancreatitis group. Patients with severe disease also showed significantly higher values of neopterin on days 1 and 2 but not on day 3 compared with patients with mild disease. There was a significant correlation between PMN elastase and neopterin values on days 1 and 2. PMN elastase on day 1 predicted disease severity with a sensitivity of 76.7% and a specificity of 91.6%. Neopterin did not surpass PMN elastase in the probability of predicting disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that activation of cellular immunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and may be a main contributory factor to disease severity. Neopterin was not superior to PMN elastase in the prediction of severity. PMID:9245935

  20. The endoplasmic reticulum: structure, function and response to cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Dianne S; Blower, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a large, dynamic structure that serves many roles in the cell including calcium storage, protein synthesis and lipid metabolism. The diverse functions of the ER are performed by distinct domains; consisting of tubules, sheets and the nuclear envelope. Several proteins that contribute to the overall architecture and dynamics of the ER have been identified, but many questions remain as to how the ER changes shape in response to cellular cues, cell type, cell cycle state and during development of the organism. Here we discuss what is known about the dynamics of the ER, what questions remain, and how coordinated responses add to the layers of regulation in this dynamic organelle.

  1. Stability and cellular responses to fluorapatite-collagen composites.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byung-Ho; Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Su-Hee; Bae, Chang-Jun; Koh, Young-Hag; Kong, Young-Min; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2005-06-01

    Fluorapatite (FA)-collagen composites were synthesized via a biomimetic coprecipitation method in order to improve the structural stability and cellular responses. Different amounts of ammonium fluoride (NH4F), acting as a fluorine source for FA, were added to the precipitation of the composites. The precipitated composites were freeze-dried and isostatically pressed in a dense body. The added fluorine was incorporated nearly fully into the apatite structure (fluoridation), and a near stoichiometric FA-collagen composite was obtained with complete fluoridation. The freeze-dried composites had a typical biomimetic network, consisting of collagen fibers and precipitates of nano-sized apatite crystals. The human osteoblast-like cells on the FA-collagen composites exhibited significantly higher proliferation and differentiation (according to alkaline phosphatase activity) than those on the hydroxyapatite-collagen composite. These enhanced osteoblastic cell responses were attributed to the fluorine release and the reduced dissolution rate.

  2. Differential Activation of Cellular DNA Damage Responses by Replication-Defective and Replication-Competent Adenovirus Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Anand; Jayaram, Sumithra

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) mutants that lack early region 4 (E4) activate the phosphorylation of cellular DNA damage response proteins. In wild-type Ad type 5 (Ad5) infections, E1b and E4 proteins target the cellular DNA repair protein Mre11 for redistribution and degradation, thereby interfering with its ability to activate phosphorylation cascades important during DNA repair. The characteristics of Ad infection that activate cellular DNA repair processes are not yet well understood. We investigated the activation of DNA damage responses by a replication-defective Ad vector (AdRSVβgal) that lacks E1 and fails to produce the immediate-early E1a protein. E1a is important for activating early gene expression from the other viral early transcription units, including E4. AdRSVβgal can deliver its genome to the cell, but it is subsequently deficient for viral early gene expression and DNA replication. We studied the ability of AdRSVβgal-infected cells to induce cellular DNA damage responses. AdRSVβgal infection does activate formation of foci containing the Mdc1 protein. However, AdRSVβgal fails to activate phosphorylation of the damage response proteins Nbs1 and Chk1. We found that viral DNA replication is important for Nbs1 phosphorylation, suggesting that this step in the viral life cycle may provide an important trigger for activating at least some DNA repair proteins. PMID:23015708

  3. Cellular autofluorescence imaging for early diagnosis of cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkeste, Karine; Deniset, Ariane; Lecart, Sandrine; Leveque-Fort, Sandrine; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre; Ferlicot, Sophie; Eschwege, Pascal

    2005-08-01

    Urinary cytology is employed in diagnostic guidelines of bladder cancer in anatomo-pathological laboratories mostly for its ability to diagnose non detectable cancers using cystoscopy, but also because it is a non-invasive and non-constraining technique for a regular follow-up of the more exposed populations. The impossibility to detect such cancers is mainly due to their localization either in the bladder or in the upper urinary tract and the prostate. However, urinary cytology lacks sensitivity, especially for the detection of low grade low stage tumors due to inherent limitation of morphological criteria to distinguish low grade tumor cells from normal urothelial cells. For this purpose, we developed, in addition to urinary cytology, an original screening of these cytological slides by using spectrally-resolved and time-resolved fluorescence as a contrast factor, without changing any parameters in the cytological slide preparation. This method takes advantage of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, continuously tunable in the spectral range 700-950 nm allowing the observation of most endogenous cellular chromophores by biphotonic excitation. A commercial confocal microscope was also used in the measurements allowing an excitation of the samples between 458 nm and 633 nm. We observed that the fluorescence emission is differentially distributed in normal and pathological urothelial cells. Spectral- and time-resolved measurements attested this difference over about one hundred cases which have been tested to confirm the high accuracy of this non-invasive technique.

  4. The roles of cellular and molecular components of a hematoma at early stage of bone healing.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Hoi Ting; Leung, Ping Chung; Ko, Chun Hay

    2018-04-01

    Bone healing is a complex repair process that commences with the formation of a blood clot at the injured bone, termed hematoma. It has evidenced that a lack of a stable hematoma causes delayed bone healing or non-union. The hematoma at the injured bone constitutes the early healing microenvironment. It appears to dictate healing pathways that ends in a regenerative bone. However, the hematoma is often clinically removed from the damaged site. Conversely, blood-derived products have been used in bone tissue engineering for treating critical sized defects, including fibrin gels and platelet-rich plasma. A second generation of platelet concentrate that is based on leukocyte and fibrin content has also been developed and introduced in market. Conflicting effect of these products in bone repair are reported. We propose that the bone healing response becomes dysregulated if the blood response and subsequent formation and properties of a hematoma are altered. This review focuses on the central structural, cellular, and molecular components of a fracture hematoma, with a major emphasis on their roles in regulating bone healing mechanism, and their interactions with mesenchymal stem cells. New angles towards a better understanding of these factors and relevant mechanisms involved at the beginning of bone healing may help to clarify limited or adverse effects of blood-derived products on bone repair. We emphasize that the recreation of an early hematoma niche with critical compositions might emerge as a viable therapeutic strategy for enhanced skeletal tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Marine Bivalve Cellular Responses to Beta Blocker Exposures ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    β blockers are prescription drugs used for medical treatment of hypertension and arrhythmias. They prevent binding of agonists such as catecholamines to β adrenoceptors. In the absence of agonist induced activation of the receptor, adenylate cyclase is not activated which in turn limits cAMP production and protein kinase A activation, preventing increases in blood pressure and arrhythmias. After being taken therapeutically, commonly prescribed β blockers may make their way to coastal habitats via discharge from waste water treatment plants (WWTP) posing a potential risk to aquatic organisms. The aim of our research is to evaluate cellular responses of three commercially important marine bivalves - Eastern oysters, blue mussels and hard clams - upon exposure to two β blocker drugs, propranolol and metoprolol, and to find molecular initiating events (MIEs) indicative of the exposure. Bivalves were obtained from Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA) and acclimated in the laboratory. Following acclimation, gills and hepatopancreas (HP) tissues were harvested and separately exposed to 0, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 ng/l of each drug. Tissues were bathed in 30 parts per thousand (ppt) filtered seawater, antibiotic mix, Leibovitz nutrient media, and the test drug. Exposures were conducted for 24 hours and samples were saved for cellular biomarker assays. A lysosomal destabilization assay, which is a marker of membrane damage, was also performed at the end of each exposure.

  6. Humoral and Cellular Immune Response in Canine Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Popiel, J; Chełmońska-Soyta, A

    2015-07-01

    Hypothyroidism is one of the most common endocrine diseases in dogs and is generally considered to be autoimmune in nature. In human hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is destroyed by both cellular (i.e. autoreactive helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes) and humoral (i.e. autoantibodies specific for thyroglobulin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine) effector mechanisms. Other suggested factors include impaired peripheral immune suppression (i.e. the malfunction of regulatory T cells) or an additional pro-inflammatory effect of T helper 17 lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunological changes in canine hypothyroidism. Twenty-eight clinically healthy dogs, 25 hypothyroid dogs without thyroglobulin antibodies and eight hypothyroid dogs with these autoantibodies were enrolled into the study. There were alterations in serum proteins in hypothyroid dogs compared with healthy controls (i.e. raised concentrations of α-globulins, β2- and γ-globulins) as well as higher concentration of acute phase proteins and circulating immune complexes. Hypothyroid animals had a lower CD4:CD8 ratio in peripheral blood compared with control dogs and diseased dogs also had higher expression of interferon γ (gene and protein expression) and CD28 (gene expression). Similar findings were found in both groups of hypothyroid dogs. Canine hypothyroidism is therefore characterized by systemic inflammation with dominance of a cellular immune response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential cellular immune response of Galleria mellonella to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Arteaga Blanco, Luis Andrés; Crispim, Josicelli Souza; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Pereira, Monalessa Fábia; Bazzolli, Denise Mara Soares; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, we have investigate the cellular immune response of Galleria mellonella larvae against three strains of the gram-negative bacterium Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae: low-virulence (780), high-virulence (1022) and the serotype 8 reference strain (R8). Prohemocytes, plasmatocytes, granulocytes, oenocytoids and spherulocytes were distinguished according to their size and morphology, their molecular markers and dye-staining properties and their role in the immune response. Total hemocyte count, differential hemocyte count, lysosome activity, autophagic response, cell viability and caspase-3 activation were determined in circulating hemocytes of naive and infected larvae. The presence of the autophagosome protein LC3 A/B within the circulating hemocytes of G. mellonella was dependent on and related to the infecting A. pleuropneumoniae strain and duration of infection. Hemocytes treated with the high-virulence strain expressed higher levels of LC3 A/B, whereas treatment with the low-virulence strain induced lower expression levels of this protein in the cells. Moreover, our results showed that apoptosis in circulating hemocytes of G. mellonella larvae after exposure to virulent bacterial strains occurred simultaneously with excessive cell death response induced by stress and subsequent caspase-3 activation.

  8. Early detection and rapid response

    Westbrooks, Randy G.; Eplee, Robert E.; Simberloff, Daniel; Rejmánek, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Prevention is the first line of defense against introduced invasive species - it is always preferable to prevent the introduction of new invaders into a region or country. However, it is not always possible to detect all alien hitchhikers imported in cargo, or to predict with any degree of certainty which introduced species will become invasive over time. Fortunately, the majority of introduced plants and animals don't become invasive. But, according to scientists at Cornell University, costs and losses due to species that do become invasive are now estimated to be over $137 billion/year in the United States. Early detection and rapid response (EDRR) is the second line of defense against introduced invasive species - EDRR is the preferred management strategy for preventing the establishment and spread of invasive species. Over the past 50 years, there has been a gradual shift away from large and medium scale federal/state single-agency-led weed eradication programs in the United States, to smaller interagency-led projects involving impacted and potential stakeholders. The importance of volunteer weed spotters in detecting and reporting suspected new invasive species has also been recognized in recent years.

  9. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-01-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes. PMID:26387537

  10. Mechano-biological Coupling of Cellular Responses to Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Mian; Wang, Yuren; Zheng, Huiqiong; Shang, Peng; Duan, Enkui; Lü, Dongyuan

    2015-11-01

    Cellular response to microgravity is a basic issue in space biological sciences as well as space physiology and medicine. It is crucial to elucidate the mechano-biological coupling mechanisms of various biological organisms, since, from the principle of adaptability, all species evolved on the earth must possess the structure and function that adapts their living environment. As a basic element of an organism, a cell usually undergoes mechanical and chemical remodeling to sense, transmit, transduce, and respond to the alteration of gravitational signals. In the past decades, new computational platforms and experimental methods/techniques/devices are developed to mimic the biological effects of microgravity environment from the viewpoint of biomechanical approaches. Mechanobiology of plant gravisensing in the responses of statolith movements along the gravity vector and the relevant signal transduction and molecular regulatory mechanisms are investigated at gene, transcription, and protein levels. Mechanotransduction of bone or immune cell responses and stem cell development and tissue histogenesis are elucidated under microgravity. In this review, several important issues are briefly discussed. Future issues on gravisensing and mechanotransducing mechanisms are also proposed for ground-based studies as well as space missions.

  11. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-05-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes.

  12. Ethanol Cellular Defense Induce Unfolded Protein Response in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although, many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two S. cerevisiae strains, CECT10094, and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico) respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR) and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus, our data suggest that there

  13. Cellular Mechanisms of Gravitropic Response in Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Sergei; Smolikova, Galina; Pozhvanov, Gregory; Suslov, Dmitry

    The evolutionary success of land plants in adaptation to the vectorial environmental factors was based mainly on the development of polarity systems. In result, normal plant ontogenesis is based on the positional information. Polarity is a tool by which the developing plant organs and tissues are mapped and the specific three-dimensional structure of the organism is created. It is due to their polar organization plants are able to orient themselves relative to the gravity vector and different vectorial cues, and to respond adequately to various stimuli. Gravitation is one of the most important polarized environmental factor that guides the development of plant organisms in space. Every plant can "estimate" its position relative to the gravity vector and correct it, if necessary, by means of polarized growth. The direction and the magnitude of gravitational stimulus are constant during the whole plant ontogenesis. The key plant response to the action of gravity is gravitropism, i.e. the directed growth of organs with respect to the gravity vector. This response is a very convenient model to study the mechanisms of plant orientation in space. The present report is focused on the main cellular mechanisms responsible for graviropic bending in higher plants. These mechanisms and structures include electric polarization of plant cells, Ca ({2+) }gradients, cytoskeleton, G-proteins, phosphoinositides and the machinery responsible for asymmetric auxin distribution. Those mechanisms tightly interact demonstrating some hierarchy and multiple feedbacks. The Ca (2+) gradients provide the primary physiological basis of polarity in plant cells. Calcium ions influence on the bioelectric potentials, the organization of actin cytoskeleton, the activity of Ca (2+) -binding proteins and Ca (2+) -dependent protein kinases. Protein kinases modulate transcription factors activity thereby regulating the gene expression and switching the developmental programs. Actin cytoskeleton affects

  14. Pairing of heterochromatin in response to cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, H I; Mullenders, L H F; Boei, J J W A

    2006-07-01

    We previously reported that exposure of human cells to DNA-damaging agents (X-rays and mitomycin C (MMC)) induces pairing of the homologous paracentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 9 (9q12-13). Here, we show that UV irradiation and also heat shock treatment of human cells lead to similar effects. Since the various agents induce very different types and frequencies of damage to cellular constituents, the data suggest a general stress response as the underlying mechanism. Moreover, local UV irradiation experiments revealed that pairing of heterochromatin is an event that can be triggered without induction of DNA damage in the heterochromatic sequences. The repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells (group F) previously shown to fail pairing after MMC displayed elevated pairing after heat shock treatment but not after UV exposure. Taken together, the present results indicate that pairing of heterochromatin following exposure to DNA-damaging agents is initiated by a general stress response and that the sensing of stress or the maintenance of the paired status of the heterochromatin might be dependent on DNA repair.

  15. Dichotomy of protective cellular immune responses to human visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, E A G; Ayed, N B; Musa, A M; Ibrahim, M E; Mukhtar, M M; Zijlstra, E E; Elhassan, I M; Smith, P G; Kieny, P M; Ghalib, H W; Zicker, F; Modabber, F; Elhassan, A M

    2005-01-01

    Healing/protective responses in human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) are associated with stimulation/production of Th1 cytokines, such as interferon IFN-γ, and conversion in the leishmanin skin test (LST). Such responses were studied for 90 days in 44 adult healthy volunteers from VL non-endemic areas, with no past history of VL/cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) and LST non-reactivity following injection with one of four doses of Alum-precipitated autoclaved Leishmania major (Alum/ALM) ± bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), a VL candidate vaccine. The vaccine was well tolerated with minimal localized side-effects and without an increase in antileishmanial antibodies or interleukin (IL)-5. Five volunteers (5/44; 11·4%) had significant IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to Leishmania antigens in their prevaccination samples (P = 0·001) but were LST non-reactive. On day 45, more than half the volunteers (26/44; 59·0%) had significantly high LST indurations (mean 9·2 ± 2·7 mm) and high IFN-γ levels (mean 1008 ± 395; median 1247 pg/ml). Five volunteers had significant L. donovani antigen-induced IFN-γ production (mean 873 ± 290; median 902; P = 0·001), but were non-reactive in LST. An additional five volunteers (5/44; 11·4%) had low IFN-γ levels (mean 110 ± 124 pg/ml; median 80) and were non-reactive in LST (induration = 00 mm). The remaining eight volunteers had low IFN-γ levels, but significant LST induration (mean 10 ± 2·9 mm; median 11). By day 90 the majority of volunteers (27/44; 61·4%) had significant LST induration (mean 10·8 ± 9·9 mm; P < 0·001), but low levels of L. donovani antigen-induced IFN-γ (mean 66·0 ± 62 pg/ml; P > 0.05). Eleven volunteers (11/44; 25%) had significantly high levels of IFN-γ and LST induration, while five volunteers had low levels of IFN-γ (<100 pg/ml) and no LST reactivity (00 mm). One volunteer was lost to follow-up. In conclusion, it is hypothesized that cellular immune

  16. Dichotomy of protective cellular immune responses to human visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Khalil, E A G; Ayed, N B; Musa, A M; Ibrahim, M E; Mukhtar, M M; Zijlstra, E E; Elhassan, I M; Smith, P G; Kieny, P M; Ghalib, H W; Zicker, F; Modabber, F; Elhassan, A M

    2005-05-01

    cellular immune responses to human VL are dichotomatous, and that IFN-gamma production and the LST response are not in a causal relationship. Following vaccination and probably cure of VL infection, the IFN-gamma response declines with time while the LST response persists. LST is a simple test that can be used to assess candidate vaccine efficacy.

  17. Plant Nucleolar Stress Response, a New Face in the NAC-Dependent Cellular Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, Iwai; Sugiyama, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    The nucleolus is the most prominent nuclear domain, where the core processes of ribosome biogenesis occur vigorously. All these processes are finely orchestrated by many nucleolar factors to build precisely ribosome particles. In animal cells, perturbations of ribosome biogenesis, mostly accompanied by structural disorders of the nucleolus, cause a kind of cellular stress to induce cell cycle arrest, senescence, or apoptosis, which is called nucleolar stress response. The best-characterized pathway of this stress response involves p53 and MDM2 as key players. p53 is a crucial transcription factor that functions in response to not only nucleolar stress but also other cellular stresses such as DNA damage stress. These cellular stresses release p53 from the inhibition by MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase targeting p53, in various ways, which leads to p53-dependent activation of a set of genes. In plants, genetic impairments of ribosome biogenesis factors or ribosome components have been shown to cause characteristic phenotypes, including a narrow and pointed leaf shape, implying a common signaling pathway connecting ribosomal perturbations and certain aspects of growth and development. Unlike animals, however, plants have neither p53 nor MDM2 family proteins. Then the question arises whether plant cells have a nucleolar stress response pathway. In recent years, it has been reported that several members of the plant-specific transcription factor family NAC play critical roles in the pathways responsive to various cellular stresses. In this mini review, we outline the plant cellular stress response pathways involving NAC transcription factors with reference to the p53-MDM2-dependent pathways of animal cells, and discuss the possible involvement of a plant-unique, NAC-mediated pathway in the nucleolar stress response in plants.

  18. The cellular immunity and oxidative stress markers in early pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Daglar, Korkut; Biberoglu, Ebru; Kirbas, Ayse; Dirican, Aylin Onder; Genc, Metin; Avci, Aslihan; Biberoglu, Kutay

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether changes in cellular immunity and oxidative stress in pregnancy have any association with spontaneous miscarriage. Circulating adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity as a marker of cellular immunity and malondialdehyde (MDA) and catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) as markers of T lymphocyte activation and parameters of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense were compared between 40 women with early pregnancy loss and another 40 women with ungoing healthy pregnancy. Women with miscarriage had higher serum ADA and GPx levels when compared with women with normal pregnancy (p = 0.034 and p < 0.001, respectively). Although serum MDA level was slightly higher in women with miscarriage, the difference was not significant (p = 0.083). CAT levels were alike in both groups. We have demonstrated an increased cellular immunity and perhaps a compensated oxidative stress related to increased antioxidant activation in women with early spontaneous pregnancy loss.

  19. Colorectal Carcinogenesis: A Cellular Response to Sustained Risk Environment

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Kim Y. C.; Ooi, Cheng Cheng; Zucker, Michelle H.; Lockett, Trevor; Williams, Desmond B.; Cosgrove, Leah J.; Topping, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The current models for colorectal cancer (CRC) are essentially linear in nature with a sequential progression from adenoma through to carcinoma. However, these views of CRC development do not explain the full body of published knowledge and tend to discount environmental influences. This paper proposes that CRC is a cellular response to prolonged exposure to cytotoxic agents (e.g., free ammonia) as key events within a sustained high-risk colonic luminal environment. This environment is low in substrate for the colonocytes (short chain fatty acids, SCFA) and consequently of higher pH with higher levels of free ammonia and decreased mucosal oxygen supply as a result of lower visceral blood flow. All of these lead to greater and prolonged exposure of the colonic epithelium to a cytotoxic agent with diminished aerobic energy availability. Normal colonocytes faced with this unfavourable environment can transform into CRC cells for survival through epigenetic reprogramming to express genes which increase mobility to allow migration and proliferation. Recent data with high protein diets confirm that genetic damage can be increased, consistent with greater CRC risk. However, this damage can be reversed by increasing SCFA supply by feeding fermentable fibre as resistant starch or arabinoxylan. High protein, low carbohydrate diets have been shown to alter the colonic environment with lower butyrate levels and apparently greater mucosal exposure to ammonia, consistent with our hypothesis. Evidence is drawn from in vivo and in vitro genomic and biochemical studies to frame experiments to test this proposition. PMID:23807509

  20. Responses of plant seedlings to hypergravity: cellular and molecular aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoson, T.; Yoshioka, R.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Takeba, G.

    Hypergravity produced by centrifugation has been used to analyze the responses of plant seedlings to gravity stimulus. Elongation growth of stem organs is suppressed by hypergravity, which can be recognized as a way for plants to resist gravitational force. The mechanisms inducing growth suppression under hypergravity conditions were analyzed at cellular and molecular levels. When growth was suppressed by hypergravity, a decrease in the cell wall extensibility was brought about in various plants. Hypergravity also induced a cell wall thickening and an increase in the molecular mass of the certain hemicellulosic polysaccharides. Both a decrease in the activities hydrolyzing such polysaccharides and an increase in the apoplast pH were involved in such changes in the cell wall constituents. Thus, the cell wall metabolism is greatly modified under hypergravity conditions, which causes a decrease in the cell wall extensibility, thereby inhibiting elongation growth in stem organs. On the other hand, to identify genes involved in hypergravity-induced growth suppression, changes in gene expression by hypergravity treatment were analyzed in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by differential display method. Sixty-two genes were expressed differentially: expression levels of 39 genes increased, whereas those of 23 genes decreased under hypergravity conditions. The expression of these genes was further analyzed using RT-PCR. One of genes upregulated by hypergravity encoded hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid, a key precursor of hormones such as gibberellic acid and abscisic acid. The expression of HMGR gene increased within several hours after hypergravity treatment. Also, compactin, an inhibitor of HMGR activity, prevented hypergravity-induced growth suppression, suggesting that HMGR is involved in suppression of Arabidopsis hypocotyl growth by hypergravity. In addition, hypergravity increased the expression levels of CCR1 and

  1. Initiating a regenerative response; cellular and molecular features of wound healing in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    DuBuc, Timothy Q; Traylor-Knowles, Nikki; Martindale, Mark Q

    2014-03-26

    Wound healing is the first stage of a series of cellular events that are necessary to initiate a regenerative response. Defective wound healing can block regeneration even in animals with a high regenerative capacity. Understanding how signals generated during wound healing promote regeneration of lost structures is highly important, considering that virtually all animals have the ability to heal but many lack the ability to regenerate missing structures. Cnidarians are the phylogenetic sister taxa to bilaterians and are highly regenerative animals. To gain a greater understanding of how early animals generate a regenerative response, we examined the cellular and molecular components involved during wound healing in the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. Pharmacological inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) signaling blocks regeneration and wound healing in Nematostella. We characterized early and late wound healing events through genome-wide microarray analysis, quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization to identify potential wound healing targets. We identified a number of genes directly related to the wound healing response in other animals (metalloproteinases, growth factors, transcription factors) and suggest that glycoproteins (mucins and uromodulin) play a key role in early wound healing events. This study also identified a novel cnidarian-specific gene, for a thiamine biosynthesis enzyme (vitamin B synthesis), that may have been incorporated into the genome by lateral gene transfer from bacteria and now functions during wound healing. Lastly, we suggest that ERK signaling is a shared element of the early wound response for animals with a high regenerative capacity. This research describes the temporal events involved during Nematostella wound healing, and provides a foundation for comparative analysis with other regenerative and non-regenerative species. We have shown that the same genes that heal puncture wounds are also

  2. Initiating a regenerative response; cellular and molecular features of wound healing in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wound healing is the first stage of a series of cellular events that are necessary to initiate a regenerative response. Defective wound healing can block regeneration even in animals with a high regenerative capacity. Understanding how signals generated during wound healing promote regeneration of lost structures is highly important, considering that virtually all animals have the ability to heal but many lack the ability to regenerate missing structures. Cnidarians are the phylogenetic sister taxa to bilaterians and are highly regenerative animals. To gain a greater understanding of how early animals generate a regenerative response, we examined the cellular and molecular components involved during wound healing in the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. Results Pharmacological inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) signaling blocks regeneration and wound healing in Nematostella. We characterized early and late wound healing events through genome-wide microarray analysis, quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization to identify potential wound healing targets. We identified a number of genes directly related to the wound healing response in other animals (metalloproteinases, growth factors, transcription factors) and suggest that glycoproteins (mucins and uromodulin) play a key role in early wound healing events. This study also identified a novel cnidarian-specific gene, for a thiamine biosynthesis enzyme (vitamin B synthesis), that may have been incorporated into the genome by lateral gene transfer from bacteria and now functions during wound healing. Lastly, we suggest that ERK signaling is a shared element of the early wound response for animals with a high regenerative capacity. Conclusions This research describes the temporal events involved during Nematostella wound healing, and provides a foundation for comparative analysis with other regenerative and non-regenerative species. We have shown that the same genes that

  3. Delineating unique cellular responses to PDT (Invited paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David

    2005-04-01

    Photodamage to mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or lysosomes can lead to activation of the apoptotic program, as can exposure of cells to the non-peptidic Bcl-2/Bcl-xL antagonist HA14-1. Many signaling pathways are evoked by photodynamic therapy (PDT), presumably from oxidative stress effects. To discover which of the latter effects might be unique to PDT, we compared some photodynamic effects with HA14-1 treatment, using murine leukemia L1210 cells in culture. Two photosensitizers were employed: the porphycene CPO and the chlorin NPe6. The former targets the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and causes Bcl-2 photodamage, while NPe6 targets lysosomes, resulting in protease-induced cleavage and activation of Bid to form the pro-apoptotic product t-Bid. PDT at either target will lead to loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm, translocation of cytochrome c to the cytosol and an apoptotic response. Photodynamic effects of CPO or NPe6 led to activation of several 'stress proteins' and intracellular oxidation of the probe dihydrodichlorofluorescein (H2DCF). All of these effects were mimicked by HA14-1, indicating that these early responses to PDT result from initiation of apoptosis, however achieved. After CPO-catalyzed PDT or HA14-1 treatment, we observed a prompt release of Ca2+ into the cytosol, but this was insufficient to significantly alter mitochondrial calcium levels. The apoptotic response to HA14-1 or Bcl-2 photodamage was markedly promoted by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor staurosporin (STS). These effects were not observed after photodamage catalyzed by NPe6, indicating that calcium release and PKC interactions are associated with loss of Bcl-2 function, but not Bid activation.

  4. Early caregiving and physiological stress responses.

    PubMed

    Luecken, Linda J; Lemery, Kathryn S

    2004-05-01

    Inadequate early caregiving has been associated with risks of stress-related psychological and physical illness over the life span. Dysregulated physiological stress responses may represent a mechanism linking early caregiving to health outcomes. This paper reviews evidence linking early caregiving to physiological responses that can increase vulnerability to stress-related illness. A number of high-risk family characteristics, including high conflict, divorce, abuse, and parental psychopathology, are considered in the development of stress vulnerability. Three theoretical pathways linking caregiving to physiological stress responses are outlined: genetic, psychosocial, and cognitive-affective. Exciting preliminary evidence suggests that early caregiving can impact long-term physiological stress responses. Directions for future research in this area are suggested.

  5. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Outside the protection of the geomagnetic field, astronauts and other living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, have effects on cellular responses to DNA damage induced by exposure to radiation or cytotoxic chemicals is still unknown, as is their impact on the radiation risks for astronauts and on the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damages in the DNA were measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (g-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ki-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in g-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect initial transcriptional responses of the DNA damage response genes to

  6. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, affects on the cellular response to DNA damage induced by exposures to radiation or other toxic chemicals will have an impact on the radiation risks for the astronauts, as well as on the mutation rate in microorganisms, is still an open question. Although the possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on the cellular response to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induces DNA damages including the double strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damage in the DNA was measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ti-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in -H2AX between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect the response of the DNA damage response genes to bleomycin treatment.

  7. Telomere length and early severe social deprivation: linking early adversity and cellular aging

    PubMed Central

    Drury, SS; Theall, K; Gleason, MM; Smyke, AT; De Vivo, I; Wong, JYY; Fox, NA; Zeanah, CH; Nelson, CA

    2012-01-01

    Accelerated telomere length attrition has been associated with psychological stress and early adversity in adults; however, no studies have examined whether telomere length in childhood is associated with early experiences. The Bucharest Early Intervention Project is a unique randomized controlled trial of foster care placement compared with continued care in institutions. As a result of the study design, participants were exposed to a quantified range of time in institutional care, and represented an ideal population in which to examine the association between a specific early adversity, institutional care and telomere length. We examined the association between average relative telomere length, telomere repeat copy number to single gene copy number (T/S) ratio and exposure to institutional care quantified as the percent of time at baseline (mean age 22 months) and at 54 months of age that each child lived in the institution. A significant negative correlation between T/S ratio and percentage of time was observed. Children with greater exposure to institutional care had significantly shorter relative telomere length in middle childhood. Gender modified this main effect. The percentage of time in institutional care at baseline significantly predicted telomere length in females, whereas the percentage of institutional care at 54 months was strongly predictive of telomere length in males. This is the first study to demonstrate an association between telomere length and institutionalization, the first study to find an association between adversity and telomere length in children, and contributes to the growing literature linking telomere length and early adversity. PMID:21577215

  8. Cellular Responses to Beta Blocker Exposures in Marine ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    β blockers are prescription drugs used for medical treatment of hypertension and arrhythmias. They prevent activation of adenylate cyclase and increases in blood pressure by limiting cAMP production and protein kinase A activation. After being taken therapeutically, β blockers may make their way to coastal habitats via discharge from waste water treatment plants, posing a potential risk to aquatic organisms. The aim of our research is to evaluate cellular biomarkers of β blocker exposure using two drugs, propranolol and metoprolol, in three commercially important marine bivalves -Crassostrea virginica, Mytilus edulis and Mercenaria mercenaria. Bivalves were obtained from Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA) and acclimated in the laboratory. Following acclimation, gills and hepatopancreas tissues were harvested and separately exposed to 0, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 ng/l of each drug for 24 hours. Samples were preserved for cellular biomarker assays. Elevated cellular damage and changes in enzymatic activities were noted at environmentally relevant concentrations, and M. mercenaria was found to be the most sensitive bivalve out of the three species tested. These studies enhance our understanding of the potential impacts of commonly used prescription medication on organisms in coastal ecosystems, and demonstrate that filter feeders such as marine bivalves may serve as good model organisms to examine the effects of water soluble drugs. Evaluating a suite of biomarkers

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa RhlR is required to neutralize the cellular immune response in a Drosophila melanogaster oral infection model

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, Stefanie; Haller, Samantha; Drenkard, Eliana; Lee, Janice; Yu, Shen; Kocks, Christine; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth mechanistic understanding of microbial infection necessitates a molecular dissection of host–pathogen relationships. Both Drosophila melanogaster and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been intensively studied. Here, we analyze the infection of D. melanogaster by P. aeruginosa by using mutants in both host and pathogen. We show that orally ingested P. aeruginosa crosses the intestinal barrier and then proliferates in the hemolymph, thereby causing the infected flies to die of bacteremia. Host defenses against ingested P. aeruginosa included an immune deficiency (IMD) response in the intestinal epithelium, systemic Toll and IMD pathway responses, and a cellular immune response controlling bacteria in the hemocoel. Although the observed cellular and intestinal immune responses appeared to act throughout the course of the infection, there was a late onset of the systemic IMD and Toll responses. In this oral infection model, P. aeruginosa PA14 did not require its type III secretion system or other well-studied virulence factors such as the two-component response regulator GacA or the protease AprA for virulence. In contrast, the quorum-sensing transcription factor RhlR, but surprisingly not LasR, played a key role in counteracting the cellular immune response against PA14, possibly at an early stage when only a few bacteria are present in the hemocoel. These results illustrate the power of studying infection from the dual perspective of host and pathogen by revealing that RhlR plays a more complex role during pathogenesis than previously appreciated. PMID:21987808

  10. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  11. β1-Integrin Deletion From the Lens Activates Cellular Stress Responses Leading to Apoptosis and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yichen; Terrell, Anne M.; Riggio, Brittany A.; Anand, Deepti; Lachke, Salil A.; Duncan, Melinda K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Previous research showed that the absence of β1-integrin from the mouse lens after embryonic day (E) 13.5 (β1MLR10) leads to the perinatal apoptosis of lens epithelial cells (LECs) resulting in severe microphthalmia. This study focuses on elucidating the molecular connections between β1-integrin deletion and this phenotype. Methods RNA sequencing was performed to identify differentially regulated genes (DRGs) in β1MLR10 lenses at E15.5. By using bioinformatics analysis and literature searching, Egr1 (early growth response 1) was selected for further study. The activation status of certain signaling pathways (focal adhesion kinase [FAK]/Erk, TGF-β, and Akt signaling) was studied via Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Mice lacking both β1-integrin and Egr1 genes from the lenses were created (β1MLR10/Egr1−/−) to study their relationship. Results RNA sequencing identified 120 DRGs that include candidates involved in the cellular stress response, fibrosis, and/or apoptosis. Egr1 was investigated in detail, as it mediates cellular stress responses in various cell types, and is recognized as an upstream regulator of numerous other β1MLR10 lens DRGs. In β1MLR10 mice, Egr1 levels are elevated shortly after β1-integrin loss from the lens. Further, pErk1/2 and pAkt are elevated in β1MLR10 LECs, thus providing the potential signaling mechanism that causes Egr1 upregulation in the mutant. Indeed, deletion of Egr1 from β1MLR10 lenses partially rescues the microphthalmia phenotype. Conclusions β1-integrin regulates the appropriate levels of Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation in LECs, whereas its deficiency results in the overexpression of Egr1, culminating in reduced cell survival. These findings provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the microphthalmia observed in β1MLR10 mice. PMID:28763805

  12. Selecting the correct cellular model for assessing of the biological response of collagen-based biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, Natalia; Hamaia, Samir; Bax, Daniel V; Malcor, Jean-Daniel; Schuster, Carlos F; Gullberg, Donald; Farndale, Richard W; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2018-01-01

    the cell adhesion results, showing receptor class- and species-specificities. The understanding of the physiologically relevant cell anchorage characteristics of bio-constructs may assist in the selection of (1) the optimum collagen source for cellular supports and (2) the correct cellular model for their biological assessment. This, in turn, may allow reliable prediction of the biological performance of bio-scaffolds in vivo for specific TE applications. Integrins play a vital role in cellular responses to environmental cues during early-stage cell-substrate interaction. We describe physiologically relevant cell anchorage to collagen substrates that present different affinity cell-recognition motifs, to provide experimental tools to assist in understanding integrin binding. Using different cell types and recombinant integrin α1-I-domains, we found that cellular response was highly dependent on collagen type, origin and EDC-crosslinking status, as well as on the integrin class and species of origin. This comprehensive study establishes selectivity amongst the four collagen-binding integrins and species-specific properties that together may influence choice of cell type and receptor in different experimental settings. This work offers key guidance in selecting of the correct cellular model for the biological testing of collagen-based biomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Diffusion MRI in early cancer therapeutic response assessment

    PubMed Central

    Galbán, C. J.; Hoff, B. A.; Chenevert, T. L.; Ross, B. D.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging biomarkers for the predictive assessment of treatment response in patients with cancer earlier than standard tumor volumetric metrics would provide new opportunities to individualize therapy. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI), highly sensitive to microenvironmental alterations at the cellular level, has been evaluated extensively as a technique for the generation of quantitative and early imaging biomarkers of therapeutic response and clinical outcome. First demonstrated in a rodent tumor model, subsequent studies have shown that DW-MRI can be applied to many different solid tumors for the detection of changes in cellularity as measured indirectly by an increase in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water molecules within the lesion. The introduction of quantitative DW-MRI into the treatment management of patients with cancer may aid physicians to individualize therapy, thereby minimizing unnecessary systemic toxicity associated with ineffective therapies, saving valuable time, reducing patient care costs and ultimately improving clinical outcome. This review covers the theoretical basis behind the application of DW-MRI to monitor therapeutic response in cancer, the analytical techniques used and the results obtained from various clinical studies that have demonstrated the efficacy of DW-MRI for the prediction of cancer treatment response. PMID:26773848

  14. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otvos, Laszlo; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Kovalszky, Ilona; Olah, Julia; Hewitson, Tim; Stawikowska, Roma; Stawikowski, Maciej; Cudic, Predrag; Lin, Feng; Wade, John; Surmacz, Eva; Lovas, Sandor

    2014-10-01

    The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC). In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399). The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM - low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400) was designed that counteracted 10-1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400) at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions.

  15. TopBP1 deficiency causes an early embryonic lethality and induces cellular senescence in primary cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon; Ko, Eun; Lee, Kyung Yong; Ko, Min Ji; Park, Seo Young; Kang, Jeeheon; Jeon, Chang Hwan; Lee, Ho; Hwang, Deog Su

    2011-02-18

    TopBP1 plays important roles in chromosome replication, DNA damage response, and other cellular regulatory functions in vertebrates. Although the roles of TopBP1 have been studied mostly in cancer cell lines, its physiological function remains unclear in mice and untransformed cells. We generated conditional knock-out mice in which exons 5 and 6 of the TopBP1 gene are flanked by loxP sequences. Although TopBP1-deficient embryos developed to the blastocyst stage, no homozygous mutant embryos were recovered at E8.5 or beyond, and completely resorbed embryos were frequent at E7.5, indicating that mutant embryos tend to die at the peri-implantation stage. This finding indicated that TopBP1 is essential for cell proliferation during early embryogenesis. Ablation of TopBP1 in TopBP1(flox/flox) mouse embryonic fibroblasts and 3T3 cells using Cre recombinase-expressing retrovirus arrests cell cycle progression at the G(1), S, and G(2)/M phases. The TopBP1-ablated mouse cells exhibit phosphorylation of H2AX and Chk2, indicating that the cells contain DNA breaks. The TopBP1-ablated mouse cells enter cellular senescence. Although RNA interference-mediated knockdown of TopBP1 induced cellular senescence in human primary cells, it induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Therefore, TopBP1 deficiency in untransformed mouse and human primary cells induces cellular senescence rather than apoptosis. These results indicate that TopBP1 is essential for cell proliferation and maintenance of chromosomal integrity.

  16. Cellular evaluation of the toxicity of combustion derived particulate matter: influence of particle grinding and washing on cellular response.

    PubMed

    Katterman, Matthew E; Birchard, Stephanie; Seraphin, Supapan; Riley, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing interest in continual monitoring of air for the presence of inhalation health hazards, such as particulate matter, produced through combustion of fossil fuels. Currently there are no means to rapidly evaluate the relative toxicity of materials or to reliably predict potential health impact due to the complexity of the composition, size, and physical properties of particulate matter. This research evaluates the feasibility of utilizing cell cultures as the biological recognition element of an inhalation health monitoring system. The response of rat lung type II epithelial (RLE-6TN) cells to a variety of combustion derived particulates and their components has been evaluated. The focus of the current work is an evaluation of how particles are delivered to a cellular sensing array and to what degree does washing or grinding of the particles impacts the cellular response. There were significant differences in the response of these lung cells to PM's of varying sources. Mechanical grinding or washing was found to alter the toxicity of some of these particulates; however these effects were strongly dependent on the fuel source. Washing reduced toxicity of oil PM's, but had little effect on those from diesel or coal. Mechanical grinding could significantly increase the toxicity of coal PM's, but not for oil or diesel.

  17. The evolution of early cellular systems viewed through the lens of biological interactions.

    PubMed

    Poole, Anthony M; Lundin, Daniel; Rytkönen, Kalle T

    2015-01-01

    The minimal cell concept represents a pragmatic approach to the question of how few genes are required to run a cell. This is a helpful way to build a parts-list, and has been more successful than attempts to deduce a minimal gene set for life by inferring the gene repertoire of the last universal common ancestor, as few genes trace back to this hypothetical ancestral state. However, the study of minimal cellular systems is the study of biological outliers where, by practical necessity, coevolutionary interactions are minimized or ignored. In this paper, we consider the biological context from which minimal genomes have been removed. For instance, some of the most reduced genomes are from endosymbionts and are the result of coevolutionary interactions with a host; few such organisms are "free-living." As few, if any, biological systems exist in complete isolation, we expect that, as with modern life, early biological systems were part of an ecosystem, replete with organismal interactions. We favor refocusing discussions of the evolution of cellular systems on processes rather than gene counts. We therefore draw a distinction between a pragmatic minimal cell (an interesting engineering problem), a distributed genome (a system resulting from an evolutionary transition involving more than one cell) and the looser coevolutionary interactions that are ubiquitous in ecosystems. Finally, we consider the distributed genome and coevolutionary interactions between genomic entities in the context of early evolution.

  18. Early Cellular Changes in the Ascending Aorta and Myocardium in a Swine Model of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Rabya; Huang, Thomas; Mahmood, Feroze; Owais, Khurram; Bardia, Amit; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Liu, David; Senthilnathan, Venkatachalam; Lassaletta, Antonio D; Sellke, Frank; Matyal, Robina

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with pathological remodeling of the heart and adjacent vessels. The early biochemical and cellular changes underlying the vascular damage are not fully understood. In this study, we sought to establish the nature, extent, and initial timeline of cytochemical derangements underlying reduced ventriculo-arterial compliance in a swine model of metabolic syndrome. Yorkshire swine (n = 8 per group) were fed a normal diet (ND) or a high-cholesterol (HCD) for 12 weeks. Myocardial function and blood flow was assessed before harvesting the heart. Immuno-blotting and immuno-histochemical staining were used to assess the cellular changes in the myocardium, ascending aorta and left anterior descending artery (LAD). There was significant increase in body mass index, blood glucose and mean arterial pressures (p = 0.002, p = 0.001 and p = 0.024 respectively) in HCD group. At the cellular level there was significant increase in anti-apoptotic factors p-Akt (p = 0.007 and p = 0.002) and Bcl-xL (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01) in the HCD aorta and myocardium, respectively. Pro-fibrotic markers TGF-β (p = 0.01), pSmad1/5 (p = 0.03) and MMP-9 (p = 0.005) were significantly increased in the HCD aorta. The levels of pro-apoptotic p38MAPK, Apaf-1 and cleaved Caspase3 were significantly increased in aorta of HCD (p = 0.03, p = 0.04 and p = 0.007 respectively). Similar changes in coronary arteries were not observed in either group. Functionally, the high cholesterol diet resulted in significant increase in ventricular end systolic pressure and-dp/dt (p = 0.05 and p = 0.007 respectively) in the HCD group. Preclinical metabolic syndrome initiates pro-apoptosis and pro-fibrosis pathways in the heart and ascending aorta, while sparing coronary arteries at this early stage of dietary modification.

  19. Induction of the cellular stress response in Chironomus (Diptera)

    SciT

    Pardalis, G.; Hudson, L.A.; Ciborowski, J.J.H.

    1995-12-31

    The accumulation of stress or heat shock proteins is involved in the protection and defense of a cell from environmentally induced damage. Under stressful conditions, cytoplasmic stress protein 70 migrates to the nucleus where it assists in the restoration of the nucleolar function. The authors have demonstrated a dose-response relationship between incidence of decreased nucleolar size in chironomid salivary glands and degree of sediment contamination. Reduced nucleolar size is indicative of reduced nucleolar function. The relationship between nucleolus size and stress protein accumulation is being explored. They are conducting experiments on chironomids to characterize the response elicited by heat shockmore » and PAH exposure in the laboratory to determine if the simultaneous action of more than one stressor can significantly alter the stress response. Simultaneous studies are being conducted to validate these biomarkers in mesocosm caging experiments. Aspects of the response will be useful as biomarkers of general stress.« less

  20. MagR Alone Is Insufficient to Confer Cellular Calcium Responses to Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Keliang; You, He; Chen, Yanbo; Chu, Pengcheng; Hu, Meiqin; Shen, Jianying; Guo, Wei; Xie, Can; Lu, Bai

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic manipulation of cell activity offers advantages over optical manipulation but an ideal tool remains elusive. The MagR protein was found through its interaction with cryptochrome (Cry) and the protein in solution appeared to respond to magnetic stimulation (MS). After we initiated an investigation on the specific role of MagR in cellular response to MS, a subsequent study claimed that MagR expression alone could achieve cellular activation by MS. Here we report that despite systematically testing different ways of measuring intracellular calcium and different MS protocols, it was not possible to detect any cellular or neuronal responses to MS in MagR-expressing HEK cells or primary neurons from the dorsal root ganglion and the hippocampus. By contrast, in neurons co-expressing MagR and channelrhodopin, optical but not MS increased calcium influx in hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that MagR alone is not sufficient to confer cellular magnetic responses. PMID:28360843

  1. Cellular responses to recurrent pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in the adult zebrafish brain

    PubMed Central

    Duy, Phan Q; Berberoglu, Michael A; Beattie, Christine E; Hall, Charles W

    2017-01-01

    A seizure is a sustained increase in brain electrical activity that can result in loss of consciousness and injury. Understanding how the brain responds to seizures is important for development of new treatment strategies for epilepsy, a neurological condition characterized by recurrent and unprovoked seizures. Pharmacological induction of seizures in rodent models results in a myriad of cellular alterations, including inflammation, angiogenesis, and adult neurogenesis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the cellular responses to recurrent pentylenetetrazole seizures in the adult zebrafish brain. We subjected zebrafish to five once daily pentylenetetrazole induced seizures and characterized the cellular consequences of these seizures. In response to recurrent seizures, we found histologic evidence of vasodilatation, perivascular leukocyte egress and leukocyte proliferation suggesting seizure-induced acute CNS inflammation. We also found evidence of increased proliferation, neurogenesis, and reactive gliosis. Collectively, our results suggest that the cellular responses to seizures in the adult zebrafish brain are similar to those observed in mammalian brains. PMID:28238851

  2. Coordination of cellular differentiation, polarity, mitosis and meiosis - New findings from early vertebrate oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Elkouby, Yaniv M; Mullins, Mary C

    2017-10-15

    A mechanistic dissection of early oocyte differentiation in vertebrates is key to advancing our knowledge of germline development, reproductive biology, the regulation of meiosis, and all of their associated disorders. Recent advances in the field include breakthroughs in the identification of germline stem cells in Medaka, in the cellular architecture of the germline cyst in mice, in a mechanistic dissection of chromosomal pairing and bouquet formation in meiosis in mice, in tracing oocyte symmetry breaking to the chromosomal bouquet of meiosis in zebrafish, and in the biology of the Balbiani body, a universal oocyte granule. Many of the major events in early oogenesis are universally conserved, and some are co-opted for species-specific needs. The chromosomal events of meiosis are of tremendous consequence to gamete formation and have been extensively studied. New light is now being shed on other aspects of early oocyte differentiation, which were traditionally considered outside the scope of meiosis, and their coordination with meiotic events. The emerging theme is of meiosis as a common groundwork for coordinating multifaceted processes of oocyte differentiation. In an accompanying manuscript we describe methods that allowed for investigations in the zebrafish ovary to contribute to these breakthroughs. Here, we review these advances mostly from the zebrafish and mouse. We discuss oogenesis concepts across established model organisms, and construct an inclusive paradigm for early oocyte differentiation in vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Early warning of illegal development for protected areas by integrating cellular automata with neural networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Lao, Chunhua; Liu, Yilun; Liu, Xiaoping; Chen, Yimin; Li, Shaoying; Ai, Bing; He, Zijian

    2013-11-30

    Ecological security has become a major issue under fast urbanization in China. As the first two cities in this country, Shenzhen and Dongguan issued the ordinance of Eco-designated Line of Control (ELC) to "wire" ecologically important areas for strict protection in 2005 and 2009 respectively. Early warning systems (EWS) are a useful tool for assisting the implementation ELC. In this study, a multi-model approach is proposed for the early warning of illegal development by integrating cellular automata (CA) and artificial neural networks (ANN). The objective is to prevent the ecological risks or catastrophe caused by such development at an early stage. The integrated model is calibrated by using the empirical information from both remote sensing and handheld GPS (global positioning systems). The MAR indicator which is the ratio of missing alarms to all the warnings is proposed for better assessment of the model performance. It is found that the fast urban development has caused significant threats to natural-area protection in the study area. The integration of CA, ANN and GPS provides a powerful tool for describing and predicting illegal development which is in highly non-linear and fragmented forms. The comparison shows that this multi-model approach has much better performances than the single-model approach for the early warning. Compared with the single models of CA and ANN, this integrated multi-model can improve the value of MAR by 65.48% and 5.17% respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Differential activation of eIF2 kinases in response to cellular stresses in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ke; Narasimhan, Jana; Wek, Ronald C

    2004-12-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2) is an important mechanism mitigating cellular injury in response to diverse environmental stresses. While all eukaryotic organisms characterized to date contain an eIF2 kinase stress response pathway, the composition of eIF2 kinases differs, with mammals containing four distinct family members and the well-studied lower eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing only a single eIF2 kinase. We are interested in the mechanisms by which multiple eIF2 kinases interface with complex stress signals and elicit response pathways. In this report we find that in addition to two previously described eIF2 kinases related to mammalian HRI, designated Hri1p and Hri2p, the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe expresses a third eIF2 kinase, a Gcn2p ortholog. To delineate the roles of each eIF2 kinase, we constructed S. pombe strains expressing only a single eIF2 kinase gene or deleted for the entire eIF2 kinase family. We find that Hri2p is the primary activated eIF2 kinase in response to exposure to heat shock, arsenite, or cadmium. Gcn2p serves as the primary eIF2 kinase induced during a nutrient downshift, treatment with the amino acid biosynthetic inhibitor 3-aminotriazole, or upon exposure to high concentrations of sodium chloride. In one stress example, exposure to H(2)O(2), there is early tandem activation of both Hri2p and Gcn2p. Interestingly, with extended stress conditions there is activation of alternative secondary eIF2 kinases, suggesting that eukaryotes have mechanisms of coordinate activation of eIF2 kinase in their stress remediation responses. Deletion of these eIF2 kinases renders S. pombe more sensitive to many of these stress conditions.

  5. Cellular responses to endogenous electrochemical gradients in morphological development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desrosiers, M. F.

    1996-01-01

    Endogenous electric fields give vectorial direction to morphological development in Zea mays (sweet corn) in response to gravity. Endogenous electrical fields are important because of their ability to influence: (1) intercellular organization and development through their effects on the membrane potential, (2) direct effects such as electrophoresis of membrane components, and (3) both intracellular and extracellular transport of charged compounds. Their primary influence is in providing a vectorial dimension to the progression of one physiological state to another. Gravity perception and transduction in the mesocotyl of vascular plants is a complex interplay of electrical and chemical gradients which ultimately provide the driving force for the resulting growth curvature called gravitropism. Among the earliest events in gravitropism are changes in impedance, voltage, and conductance between the vascular stele and the growth tissues, the cortex, in the mesocotyl of corn shoots. In response to gravistimulation: (1) a potential develops which is vectorial and of sufficient magnitude to be a driving force for transport between the vascular stele and cortex, (2) the ionic conductance changes within seconds showing altered transport between the tissues, and (3) the impedance shows a transient biphasic response which indicates that the mobility of charges is altered following gravistimulation and is possibly the triggering event for the cascade of actions which leads to growth curvature.

  6. Genetic variation in the cellular response of Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Cladocera) to its bacterial parasite.

    PubMed

    Auld, Stuart K J R; Scholefield, Jennifer A; Little, Tom J

    2010-11-07

    Linking measures of immune function with infection, and ultimately, host and parasite fitness is a major goal in the field of ecological immunology. In this study, we tested for the presence and timing of a cellular immune response in the crustacean Daphnia magna following exposure to its sterilizing endoparasite Pasteuria ramosa. We found that D. magna possesses two cell types circulating in the haemolymph: a spherical one, which we call a granulocyte and an irregular-shaped amoeboid cell first described by Metchnikoff over 125 years ago. Daphnia magna mounts a strong cellular response (of the amoeboid cells) just a few hours after parasite exposure. We further tested for, and found, considerable genetic variation for the magnitude of this cellular response. These data fostered a heuristic model of resistance in this naturally coevolving host-parasite interaction. Specifically, the strongest cellular responses were found in the most susceptible hosts, indicating resistance is not always borne from a response that destroys invading parasites, but rather stems from mechanisms that prevent their initial entry. Thus, D. magna may have a two-stage defence--a genetically determined barrier to parasite establishment and a cellular response once establishment has begun.

  7. Genetic variation in the cellular response of Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Cladocera) to its bacterial parasite

    PubMed Central

    Auld, Stuart K. J. R.; Scholefield, Jennifer A.; Little, Tom J.

    2010-01-01

    Linking measures of immune function with infection, and ultimately, host and parasite fitness is a major goal in the field of ecological immunology. In this study, we tested for the presence and timing of a cellular immune response in the crustacean Daphnia magna following exposure to its sterilizing endoparasite Pasteuria ramosa. We found that D. magna possesses two cell types circulating in the haemolymph: a spherical one, which we call a granulocyte and an irregular-shaped amoeboid cell first described by Metchnikoff over 125 years ago. Daphnia magna mounts a strong cellular response (of the amoeboid cells) just a few hours after parasite exposure. We further tested for, and found, considerable genetic variation for the magnitude of this cellular response. These data fostered a heuristic model of resistance in this naturally coevolving host–parasite interaction. Specifically, the strongest cellular responses were found in the most susceptible hosts, indicating resistance is not always borne from a response that destroys invading parasites, but rather stems from mechanisms that prevent their initial entry. Thus, D. magna may have a two-stage defence—a genetically determined barrier to parasite establishment and a cellular response once establishment has begun. PMID:20534618

  8. Cellular specificity of the gravitropic motor response in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. L.; Ishikawa, H.

    1997-01-01

    A number of features of the gravitropic response of roots are not readily accounted for by the classical Cholodny-Went theory. These include the observations that (i) in the later stages of the response the growth gradient is reversed with no evident reversal of the auxin gradient; (ii) a major component of the acceleration of growth along the upper side occurs in the distal elongation zone (DEZ), a group of cells located between the meristem and the main elongation, not within the central elongation zone; and (iii) the initiation of differential growth in the DEZ appears to be independent of the establishment of auxin asymmetry. Alternative candidates for mediation of differential growth in the DEZ include calcium ions and protons. Gravi-induced curvature is accompanied by polar movement of calcium toward the lower side of the maize root tip and the DEZ is shown to be particularly sensitive to growth inhibition by calcium. Also, gravistimulation of maize roots causes enhanced acid efflux from the upper side of the DEZ. Evidence for gravi-induced modification of ion movements in the root tip includes changes in intracellular potentials and current flow. It is clear that there is more than one motor region in the root with regard to gravitropic responses and there is evidence that the DEZ itself consists of more than one class of responding cells. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the mechanism of gravitropic curvature, the physiological properties of the sub-zones of the root apex need to be thoroughly characterized with regard to their sensitivity to hormones, calcium, acid pH and electrical perturbations.

  9. [Effect of early high fat diet on pancreatic β cellularity and insulin sensibility in young rats].

    PubMed

    Xie, Kun-Xia; Xiao, Yan-Feng; Xu, Er-Di; Yin, Chun-Yan; Yi, Xiao-Qing; Chang, Ming

    2010-09-01

    To study the effects of early high fat diet on sugar metaboliam, insulin sensibility and pancreatic β cellularity in young rats. Sixty male weaned young rats were randomly fed with high fat diet (high fat group) and normal diet (control group). The body weight, viscus fattiness and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) were measured after 3, 6 and 9 weeks. Serum insulin level was measured with radioimmunoassay. The ultrastructure of pancreas was observed under an electricmicroscope. The high fat group had significantly higher body weight and visceral fat weight than the control group after 3 weeks. There were no significant differences in the FPG level between the two groups at all time points. The levels of fasting insulin and HOMAIR in the high fat group were significantly higher than those in the control group after 3, 6 and 9 weeks (P<0.01). Dilation of rough endoplasmic reticulum and mild swelling of mitochondria of islet β-cells were observed in the high fat group after 6 weeks. Early high fat diet may induce a reduction in insulin sensitivity and produce insulin resistance in young rats. Endoplasmic reticulum expansion in β-cells may be an early sign of β-cell damage due to obesity.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Early Molecular and Cellular Changes in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; McCann, Bryony; Kauppinen, Risto A; Coulthard, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical trials have demonstrated that slowing or reversing pathology in Alzheimer's disease is likely to be possible only in the earliest stages of disease, perhaps even before significant symptoms develop. Pathology in Alzheimer's disease accumulates for well over a decade before symptoms are detected giving a large potential window of opportunity for intervention. It is therefore important that imaging techniques detect subtle changes in brain tissue before significant macroscopic brain atrophy. Current diagnostic techniques often do not permit early diagnosis or are too expensive for routine clinical use. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the most versatile, affordable, and powerful imaging modality currently available, being able to deliver detailed analyses of anatomy, tissue volumes, and tissue state. In this mini-review, we consider how MRI might detect patients at risk of future dementia in the early stages of pathological change when symptoms are mild. We consider the contributions made by the various modalities of MRI (structural, diffusion, perfusion, relaxometry) in identifying not just atrophy (a late-stage AD symptom) but more subtle changes reflective of early dementia pathology. The sensitivity of MRI not just to gross anatomy but to the underlying "health" at the cellular (and even molecular) scales, makes it very well suited to this task.

  11. Protoparvovirus Interactions with the Cellular DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Kinjal; Etingov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Protoparvoviruses are simple single-stranded DNA viruses that infect many animal species. The protoparvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) infects murine and transformed human cells provoking a sustained DNA damage response (DDR). This DDR is dependent on signaling by the ATM kinase and leads to a prolonged pre-mitotic cell cycle block that features the inactivation of ATR-kinase mediated signaling, proteasome-targeted degradation of p21, and inhibition of cyclin B1 expression. This review explores how protoparvoviruses, and specifically MVM, co-opt the common mechanisms regulating the DDR and cell cycle progression in order to prepare the host nuclear environment for productive infection. PMID:29088070

  12. Protoparvovirus Interactions with the Cellular DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Kinjal; Etingov, Igor; Pintel, David J

    2017-10-31

    Protoparvoviruses are simple single-stranded DNA viruses that infect many animal species. The protoparvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) infects murine and transformed human cells provoking a sustained DNA damage response (DDR). This DDR is dependent on signaling by the ATM kinase and leads to a prolonged pre-mitotic cell cycle block that features the inactivation of ATR-kinase mediated signaling, proteasome-targeted degradation of p21, and inhibition of cyclin B1 expression. This review explores how protoparvoviruses, and specifically MVM, co-opt the common mechanisms regulating the DDR and cell cycle progression in order to prepare the host nuclear environment for productive infection.

  13. Massive cellular disruption occurs during early imbibition of Cuphea seeds containing crystallized triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Volk, Gayle M; Crane, Jennifer; Caspersen, Ann M; Hill, Lisa M; Gardner, Candice; Walters, Christina

    2006-11-01

    The transition from anhydrobiotic to hydrated state occurs during early imbibition of seeds and is lethal if lipid reserves in seeds are crystalline. Low temperatures crystallize lipids during seed storage. We examine the nature of cellular damage observed in seeds of Cuphea wrightii and C. lanceolata that differ in triacylglycerol composition and phase behavior. Intracellular structure, observed using transmission electron microscopy, is profoundly and irreversibly perturbed if seeds with crystalline triacylglycerols are imbibed briefly. A brief heat treatment that melts triacylglycerols before imbibition prevents the loss of cell integrity; however, residual effects of cold treatments in C. wrightii cells are reflected by the apparent coalescence of protein and oil bodies. The timing and temperature dependence of cellular changes suggest that damage arises via a physical mechanism, perhaps as a result of shifts in hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions when triacylglycerols undergo phase changes. Stabilizers of oil body structure such as oleosins that rely on a balance of physical forces may become ineffective when triacylglycerols crystallize. Recent observations linking poor oil body stability and poor seed storage behavior are potentially explained by the phase behavior of the storage lipids. These findings directly impact the feasibility of preserving genetic resources from some tropical and subtropical species.

  14. Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Strontium Stress†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven D.; Martin, Madhavi; Deshpande, Sameer; Seal, Sudipta; Huang, Katherine; Alm, Eric; Yang, Yunfeng; Wu, Liyou; Yan, Tingfen; Liu, Xueduan; Arkin, Adam; Chourey, Karuna; Zhou, Jizhong; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2006-01-01

    The physiology and transcriptome dynamics of the metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 in response to nonradioactive strontium (Sr) exposure were investigated. Studies indicated that MR-1 was able to grow aerobically in complex medium in the presence of 180 mM SrCl2 but showed severe growth inhibition at levels above that concentration. Temporal gene expression profiles were generated from aerobically grown, mid-exponential-phase MR-1 cells shocked with 180 mM SrCl2 and analyzed for significant differences in mRNA abundance with reference to data for nonstressed MR-1 cells. Genes with annotated functions in siderophore biosynthesis and iron transport were among the most highly induced (>100-fold [P < 0.05]) open reading frames in response to acute Sr stress, and a mutant (SO3032::pKNOCK) defective in siderophore production was found to be hypersensitive to SrCl2 exposure, compared to parental and wild-type strains. Transcripts encoding multidrug and heavy metal efflux pumps, proteins involved in osmotic adaptation, sulfate ABC transporters, and assimilative sulfur metabolism enzymes also were differentially expressed following Sr exposure but at levels that were several orders of magnitude lower than those for iron transport genes. Precipitate formation was observed during aerobic growth of MR-1 in broth cultures amended with 50, 100, or 150 mM SrCl2 but not in cultures of the SO3032::pKNOCK mutant or in the abiotic control. Chemical analysis of this precipitate using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and static secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated extracellular solid-phase sequestration of Sr, with at least a portion of the heavy metal associated with carbonate phases. PMID:16391131

  15. Molecular Signaling Network Motifs Provide a Mechanistic Basis for Cellular Threshold Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sudin; Conolly, Rory B.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasingly, there is a move toward using in vitro toxicity testing to assess human health risk due to chemical exposure. As with in vivo toxicity testing, an important question for in vitro results is whether there are thresholds for adverse cellular responses. Empirical evaluations may show consistency with thresholds, but the main evidence has to come from mechanistic considerations. Objectives: Cellular response behaviors depend on the molecular pathway and circuitry in the cell and the manner in which chemicals perturb these circuits. Understanding circuit structures that are inherently capable of resisting small perturbations and producing threshold responses is an important step towards mechanistically interpreting in vitro testing data. Methods: Here we have examined dose–response characteristics for several biochemical network motifs. These network motifs are basic building blocks of molecular circuits underpinning a variety of cellular functions, including adaptation, homeostasis, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. For each motif, we present biological examples and models to illustrate how thresholds arise from specific network structures. Discussion and Conclusion: Integral feedback, feedforward, and transcritical bifurcation motifs can generate thresholds. Other motifs (e.g., proportional feedback and ultrasensitivity)produce responses where the slope in the low-dose region is small and stays close to the baseline. Feedforward control may lead to nonmonotonic or hormetic responses. We conclude that network motifs provide a basis for understanding thresholds for cellular responses. Computational pathway modeling of these motifs and their combinations occurring in molecular signaling networks will be a key element in new risk assessment approaches based on in vitro cellular assays. Citation: Zhang Q, Bhattacharya S, Conolly RB, Clewell HJ III, Kaminski NE, Andersen ME. 2014. Molecular signaling network motifs provide a

  16. Utilizing Fibronectin Integrin-Binding Specificity to Control Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Haylee; Nicosia, John; Dysart, Marilyn; Barker, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Cells communicate with the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibronectin (Fn) through integrin receptors on the cell surface. Controlling integrin–Fn interactions offers a promising approach to directing cell behavior, such as adhesion, migration, and differentiation, as well as coordinated tissue behaviors such as morphogenesis and wound healing. Recent Advances: Several different groups have developed recombinant fragments of Fn that can control epithelial to mesenchymal transition, sequester growth factors, and promote bone and wound healing. It is thought that these physiological responses are, in part, due to specific integrin engagement. Furthermore, it has been postulated that the integrin-binding domain of Fn is a mechanically sensitive switch that drives binding of one integrin heterodimer over another. Critical Issues: Although computational simulations have predicted the mechano-switch hypothesis and recent evidence supports the existence of varying strain states of Fn in vivo, experimental evidence of the Fn integrin switch is still lacking. Future Directions: Evidence of the integrin mechano-switch will enable the development of new Fn-based peptides in tissue engineering and wound healing, as well as deepen our understanding of ECM pathologies, such as fibrosis. PMID:26244106

  17. Linking physiological and cellular responses to thermal stress: β-adrenergic blockade reduces the heat shock response in fish.

    PubMed

    Templeman, Nicole M; LeBlanc, Sacha; Perry, Steve F; Currie, Suzanne

    2014-08-01

    When faced with stress, animals use physiological and cellular strategies to preserve homeostasis. We were interested in how these high-level stress responses are integrated at the level of the whole animal. Here, we investigated the capacity of the physiological stress response, and specifically the β-adrenergic response, to affect the induction of the cellular heat shock proteins, HSPs, following a thermal stress in vivo. We predicted that blocking β-adrenergic stimulation during an acute heat stress in the whole animal would result in reduced levels of HSPs in red blood cells (RBCs) of rainbow trout compared to animals where adrenergic signaling remained intact. We first determined that a 1 h heat shock at 25 °C in trout acclimated to 13 °C resulted in RBC adrenergic stimulation as determined by a significant increase in cell swelling, a hallmark of the β-adrenergic response. A whole animal injection with the β2-adrenergic antagonist, ICI-118,551, successfully reduced this heat-induced RBC swelling. The acute heat shock caused a significant induction of HSP70 in RBCs of 13 °C-acclimated trout as well as a significant increase in plasma catecholamines. When heat-shocked fish were treated with ICI-118,551, we observed a significant attenuation of the HSP70 response. We conclude that circulating catecholamines influence the cellular heat shock response in rainbow trout RBCs, demonstrating physiological/hormonal control of the cellular stress response.

  18. Nanoparticle-allergen interactions mediate human allergic responses: protein corona characterization and cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Radauer-Preiml, Isabella; Andosch, Ancuela; Hawranek, Thomas; Luetz-Meindl, Ursula; Wiederstein, Markus; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta; Himly, Martin; Boyles, Matthew; Duschl, Albert

    2016-01-16

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) interact with different biomolecules as soon as they are in contact, resulting in the formation of a biomolecule 'corona'. Hence, the 'corona' defines the biological identity of the ENMs and could affect the response of the immune system to ENM exposure. With up to 40 % of the world population suffering from type I allergy, a possible modulation of allergen effects by binding to ENMs is highly relevant with respect to work place and consumer safety. Therefore, the aim of this present study was to gain an insight into the interactions of gold nanoparticles with different seasonally and perennially occurring outdoor and indoor allergens. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were conjugated with the major allergens of birch pollen (Bet v 1), timothy grass pollen (Phl p 5) and house dust mite (Der p 1). The AuNP-allergen conjugates were characterized by means of TEM negative staining, dynamic light scattering (DLS), z-potential measurements and hyperspectral imaging. Furthermore, 3D models were constructed, based on the characterization data, to visualize the interaction between the allergens and the AuNPs surface. Differences in the activation of human basophil cells derived from birch/grass pollen- and house dust mite-allergic patients in response to free allergen and AuNP-allergen conjugates were determined using the basophil activation assay (BAT). Potential allergen corona replacement during BAT was controlled for using Western blotting. The protease activity of AuNP-Der p 1 conjugates compared to free Der p 1 was assessed, by an enzymatic activity assay and a cellular assay pertaining to lung type II alveolar epithelial cell tight junction integrity. The formation of a stable corona was found for all three allergens used. Our data suggest, that depending on the allergen, different effects are observed after binding to ENMs, including enhanced allergic responses against Der p 1 and also, for some patients, against Bet v 1. Moreover elevated

  19. pH-Responsive Micelle-Based Cytoplasmic Delivery System for Induction of Cellular Immunity.

    PubMed

    Yuba, Eiji; Sakaguchi, Naoki; Kanda, Yuhei; Miyazaki, Maiko; Koiwai, Kazunori

    2017-11-04

    (1) Background: Cytoplasmic delivery of antigens is crucial for the induction of cellular immunity, which is an important immune response for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. To date, fusogenic protein-incorporated liposomes and pH-responsive polymer-modified liposomes have been used to achieve cytoplasmic delivery of antigen via membrane rupture or fusion with endosomes. However, a more versatile cytoplasmic delivery system is desired for practical use. For this study, we developed pH-responsive micelles composed of dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (DLPC) and deoxycholic acid and investigated their cytoplasmic delivery performance and immunity-inducing capability. (2) Methods: Interaction of micelles with fluorescence dye-loaded liposomes, intracellular distribution of micelles, and antigenic proteins were observed. Finally, antigen-specific cellular immune response was evaluated in vivo using ELIspot assay. (3) Results: Micelles induced leakage of contents from liposomes via lipid mixing at low pH. Micelles were taken up by dendritic cells mainly via macropinocytosis and delivered ovalbumin (OVA) into the cytosol. After intradermal injection of micelles and OVA, OVA-specific cellular immunity was induced in the spleen. (4) Conclusions: pH-responsive micelles composed of DLPC and deoxycholic acid are promising as enhancers of cytosol delivery of antigens and the induction capability of cellular immunity for the treatment of cancer immunotherapy and infectious diseases.

  20. Mosaic HIV-1 vaccines expand the breadth and depth of cellular immune responses in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; O'Brien, Kara L; Simmons, Nathaniel L; King, Sharon L; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Sun, Ying-Hua; La Porte, Annalena; Riggs, Ambryice M; Lynch, Diana M; Clark, Sarah L; Backus, Katherine; Perry, James R; Seaman, Michael S; Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G; Szinger, James J; Fischer, Will; Muldoon, Mark; Korber, Bette

    2010-03-01

    The worldwide diversity of HIV-1 presents an unprecedented challenge for vaccine development. Antigens derived from natural HIV-1 sequences have elicited only a limited breadth of cellular immune responses in nonhuman primate studies and clinical trials to date. Polyvalent 'mosaic' antigens, in contrast, are designed to optimize cellular immunologic coverage of global HIV-1 sequence diversity. Here we show that mosaic HIV-1 Gag, Pol and Env antigens expressed by recombinant, replication-incompetent adenovirus serotype 26 vectors markedly augmented both the breadth and depth without compromising the magnitude of antigen-specific T lymphocyte responses as compared with consensus or natural sequence HIV-1 antigens in rhesus monkeys. Polyvalent mosaic antigens therefore represent a promising strategy to expand cellular immunologic vaccine coverage for genetically diverse pathogens such as HIV-1.

  1. Assessment of Different Strategies to Determine MAP-specific Cellular Immune Responses in Cattle

    Assessment of cellular immunity in cattle against Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by established methods remains unsatisfactory for diagnostic purposes. Recent studies conclude that analysis of T-cell subset responsiveness may improve diagnostic outcome. Aim of this study was to iden...

  2. Mitochondrial correlates of signaling processes involved with the cellular response to eimeria infection in broiler chickens

    Host cellular responses to coccidiosis infection are consistent with elements of apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. These processes are enhanced in the cell through cell-directed signaling or repressed through parasite-derived inhibitors of these processes favoring the survival of the parasite. Acr...

  3. Comparison of Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccine in Weaned Pigs

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare humoral and cellular immune responses to inactivated swine influenza virus (SIV) vaccine. Methods: Fifty 3-week-old weaned pigs from a herd free of SIV and PRRSV were randomly divided into the non-vaccinated control group and vaccinated group containing 25 pigs each....

  4. Comparison of Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccine in Weaned Pigs

    Humoral and cellular immune responses to inactivated swine influenza virus (SIV) vaccine were evaluated and compared. Fifty 3-week-old weaned pigs from a herd free of SIV and PRRSV were randomly divided into the non-vaccinated control group and vaccinated group containing 25 pigs each. Pigs were va...

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  6. Heat shock cognate 71 (HSC71) regulates cellular antiviral response by impairing formation of VISA aggregates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Shu-Wen; Lei, Cao-Qi; Zhou, Qian; Li, Shu; Shu, Hong-Bing; Wang, Yan-Yi

    2013-05-01

    In response to viral infection, RIG-I-like RNA helicases detect viral RNA and signal through the mitochondrial adapter protein VISA. VISA activation leads to rapid activation of transcription factors IRF3 and NF-κB, which collaborate to induce transcription of type I interferon (IFN) genes and cellular antiviral response. It has been demonstrated that VISA is activated by forming prion-like aggregates. However, how this process is regulated remains unknown. Here we show that overexpression of HSC71 resulted in potent inhibition of virus-triggered transcription of IFNB1 gene and cellular antiviral response. Consistently, knockdown of HSC71 had opposite effects. HSC71 interacted with VISA, and negatively regulated virus-triggered VISA aggregation. These findings suggest that HSC71 functions as a check against VISA-mediated antiviral response.

  7. Global functional analyses of cellular responses to pore-forming toxins.

    PubMed

    Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Los, Ferdinand C O; Huffman, Danielle L; Wachi, Shinichiro; Kloft, Nicole; Husmann, Matthias; Karabrahimi, Valbona; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bellier, Audrey; Ha, Christine; Sagong, Youn; Fan, Hui; Ghosh, Partho; Hsieh, Mindy; Hsu, Chih-Shen; Chen, Li; Aroian, Raffi V

    2011-03-01

    Here we present the first global functional analysis of cellular responses to pore-forming toxins (PFTs). PFTs are uniquely important bacterial virulence factors, comprising the single largest class of bacterial protein toxins and being important for the pathogenesis in humans of many Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Their mode of action is deceptively simple, poking holes in the plasma membrane of cells. The scattered studies to date of PFT-host cell interactions indicate a handful of genes are involved in cellular defenses to PFTs. How many genes are involved in cellular defenses against PFTs and how cellular defenses are coordinated are unknown. To address these questions, we performed the first genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen for genes that, when knocked down, result in hypersensitivity to a PFT. This screen identifies 106 genes (∼0.5% of genome) in seven functional groups that protect Caenorhabditis elegans from PFT attack. Interactome analyses of these 106 genes suggest that two previously identified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, one (p38) studied in detail and the other (JNK) not, form a core PFT defense network. Additional microarray, real-time PCR, and functional studies reveal that the JNK MAPK pathway, but not the p38 MAPK pathway, is a key central regulator of PFT-induced transcriptional and functional responses. We find C. elegans activator protein 1 (AP-1; c-jun, c-fos) is a downstream target of the JNK-mediated PFT protection pathway, protects C. elegans against both small-pore and large-pore PFTs and protects human cells against a large-pore PFT. This in vivo RNAi genomic study of PFT responses proves that cellular commitment to PFT defenses is enormous, demonstrates the JNK MAPK pathway as a key regulator of transcriptionally-induced PFT defenses, and identifies AP-1 as the first cellular component broadly important for defense against large- and small-pore PFTs.

  8. Silver Nanoparticle-Mediated Cellular Responses in Various Cell Lines: An in Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted increased interest and are currently used in various industries including medicine, cosmetics, textiles, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, owing to their unique physical and chemical properties, particularly as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Recently, several studies have reported both beneficial and toxic effects of AgNPs on various prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. To develop nanoparticles for mediated therapy, several laboratories have used a variety of cell lines under in vitro conditions to evaluate the properties, mode of action, differential responses, and mechanisms of action of AgNPs. In vitro models are simple, cost-effective, rapid, and can be used to easily assess efficacy and performance. The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and biocompatibility of AgNPs depend on many factors such as size, shape, surface charge, surface coating, solubility, concentration, surface functionalization, distribution of particles, mode of entry, mode of action, growth media, exposure time, and cell type. Cellular responses to AgNPs are different in each cell type and depend on the physical and chemical nature of AgNPs. This review evaluates significant contributions to the literature on biological applications of AgNPs. It begins with an introduction to AgNPs, with particular attention to their overall impact on cellular effects. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the reasons for different cell types exhibiting differential responses to nanoparticles even when they possess similar size, shape, and other parameters. Firstly, we discuss the cellular effects of AgNPs on a variety of cell lines; Secondly, we discuss the mechanisms of action of AgNPs in various cellular systems, and try to elucidate how AgNPs interact with different mammalian cell lines and produce significant effects; Finally, we discuss the cellular activation of various signaling molecules in response to AgNPs, and conclude with future perspectives

  9. Intraspecific variation in cellular and biochemical heat response strategies of Mediterranean Xeropicta derbentina [Pulmonata, Hygromiidae].

    PubMed

    Troschinski, Sandra; Di Lellis, Maddalena A; Sereda, Sergej; Hauffe, Torsten; Wilke, Thomas; Triebskorn, Rita; Köhler, Heinz-R

    2014-01-01

    Dry and hot environments challenge the survival of terrestrial snails. To minimize overheating and desiccation, physiological and biochemical adaptations are of high importance for these animals. In the present study, seven populations of the Mediterranean land snail species Xeropicta derbentina were sampled from their natural habitat in order to investigate the intraspecific variation of cellular and biochemical mechanisms, which are assigned to contribute to heat resistance. Furthermore, we tested whether genetic parameters are correlated with these physiological heat stress response patterns. Specimens of each population were individually exposed to elevated temperatures (25 to 52°C) for 8 h in the laboratory. After exposure, the health condition of the snails' hepatopancreas was examined by means of qualitative description and semi-quantitative assessment of histopathological effects. In addition, the heat-shock protein 70 level (Hsp70) was determined. Generally, calcium cells of the hepatopancreas were more heat resistant than digestive cells - this phenomenon was associated with elevated Hsp70 levels at 40°C.We observed considerable variation in the snails' heat response strategy: Individuals from three populations invested much energy in producing a highly elevated Hsp70 level, whereas three other populations invested energy in moderate stress protein levels - both strategies were in association with cellular functionality. Furthermore, one population kept cellular condition stable despite a low Hsp70 level until 40°C exposure, whereas prominent cellular reactions were observed above this thermal limit. Genetic diversity (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene) within populations was low. Nevertheless, when using genetic indices as explanatory variables in a multivariate regression tree (MRT) analysis, population structure explained mean differences in cellular and biochemical heat stress responses, especially in the group exposed to 40°C. Our

  10. Intraspecific Variation in Cellular and Biochemical Heat Response Strategies of Mediterranean Xeropicta derbentina [Pulmonata, Hygromiidae

    PubMed Central

    Troschinski, Sandra; Di Lellis, Maddalena A.; Sereda, Sergej; Hauffe, Torsten; Wilke, Thomas; Triebskorn, Rita; Köhler, Heinz-R.

    2014-01-01

    Dry and hot environments challenge the survival of terrestrial snails. To minimize overheating and desiccation, physiological and biochemical adaptations are of high importance for these animals. In the present study, seven populations of the Mediterranean land snail species Xeropicta derbentina were sampled from their natural habitat in order to investigate the intraspecific variation of cellular and biochemical mechanisms, which are assigned to contribute to heat resistance. Furthermore, we tested whether genetic parameters are correlated with these physiological heat stress response patterns. Specimens of each population were individually exposed to elevated temperatures (25 to 52°C) for 8 h in the laboratory. After exposure, the health condition of the snails' hepatopancreas was examined by means of qualitative description and semi-quantitative assessment of histopathological effects. In addition, the heat-shock protein 70 level (Hsp70) was determined. Generally, calcium cells of the hepatopancreas were more heat resistant than digestive cells - this phenomenon was associated with elevated Hsp70 levels at 40°C.We observed considerable variation in the snails' heat response strategy: Individuals from three populations invested much energy in producing a highly elevated Hsp70 level, whereas three other populations invested energy in moderate stress protein levels - both strategies were in association with cellular functionality. Furthermore, one population kept cellular condition stable despite a low Hsp70 level until 40°C exposure, whereas prominent cellular reactions were observed above this thermal limit. Genetic diversity (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene) within populations was low. Nevertheless, when using genetic indices as explanatory variables in a multivariate regression tree (MRT) analysis, population structure explained mean differences in cellular and biochemical heat stress responses, especially in the group exposed to 40°C. Our

  11. Enhanced Medial Collateral Ligament Healing using Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Dosage Effects on Cellular Response and Cytokine Profile

    PubMed Central

    Saether, Erin E.; Chamberlain, Connie S.; Leiferman, Ellen M.; Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn R.; Li, Wan Ju; Brickson, Stacey L.; Vanderby, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have potential therapeutic applications for musculoskeletal injuries due to their ability to differentiate into several tissue cell types and modulate immune and inflammatory responses. These immune-modulatory properties were examined in vivo during early stage rat medial collateral ligament healing. Two different cell doses (low dose 1×106 or high dose 4×106 MSCs) were administered at the time of injury and compared with normal ligament healing at days 5 and 14 post-injury. At both times, the high dose MSC group demonstrated a significant decrease in M2 macrophages compared to controls. At day 14, fewer M1 macrophages were detected in the low dose group compared to the high dose group. These results, along with significant changes in procollagen I, proliferating cells, and endothelialization suggest that MSCs can alter the cellular response during healing in a dose-dependent manner. The higher dose ligaments also had increased expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines at day 5 (IL-1β, IFNγ, IL-2) and increased expression of IL-12 at day 14. Mechanical testing at day 14 revealed increased failure strength and stiffness in low dose ligaments compared to controls. Based on these improved mechanical properties, MSCs enhanced functional healing when applied at a lower dose. Different doses of MSCs uniquely affected the cellular response and cytokine expression in healing ligaments. Interestingly, the lower dose of cells proved to be most effective in improving functional properties. PMID:24174129

  12. Early-life stress impacts the developing hippocampus and primes seizure occurrence: cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Early-life stress includes prenatal, postnatal, and adolescence stress. Early-life stress can affect the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and cause cellular and molecular changes in the developing hippocampus that can result in neurobehavioral changes later in life. Epidemiological data implicate stress as a cause of seizures in both children and adults. Emerging evidence indicates that both prenatal and postnatal stress can prime the developing brain for seizures and an increase in epileptogenesis. This article reviews the cellular and molecular changes encountered during prenatal and postnatal stress, and assesses the possible link between these changes and increases in seizure occurrence and epileptogenesis in the developing hippocampus. In addititon, the priming effect of prenatal and postnatal stress for seizures and epileptogenesis is discussed. Finally, the roles of epigenetic modifications in hippocampus and HPA axis programming, early-life stress, and epilepsy are discussed. PMID:24574961

  13. Electromagnetic field therapy delays cellular senescence and death by enhancement of the heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Perez, Felipe P; Zhou, Ximing; Morisaki, Jorge; Jurivich, Donald

    2008-04-01

    Hormesis may result when mild repetitive stress increases cellular defense against diverse injuries. This process may also extend in vitro cellular proliferative life span as well as delay and reverse some of the age-dependent changes in both replicative and non-replicative cells. This study evaluated the potential hormetic effect of non-thermal repetitive electromagnetic field shock (REMFS) and its impact on cellular aging and mortality in primary human T lymphocytes and fibroblast cell lines. Unlike previous reports employing electromagnetic radiation, this study used a long wave length, low energy, and non-thermal REMFS (50MHz/0.5W) for various therapeutic regimens. The primary outcomes examined were age-dependent morphological changes in cells over time, cellular death prevention, and stimulation of the heat shock response. REMFS achieved several biological effects that modified the aging process. REMFS extended the total number of population doublings of mouse fibroblasts and contributed to youthful morphology of cells near their replicative lifespan. REMFS also enhanced cellular defenses of human T cells as reflected in lower cell mortality when compared to non-treated T cells. To determine the mechanism of REMFS-induced effects, analysis of the cellular heat shock response revealed Hsp90 release from the heat shock transcription factor (HSF1). Furthermore, REMFS increased HSF1 phosphorylation, enhanced HSF1-DNA binding, and improved Hsp70 expression relative to non-REMFS-treated cells. These results show that non-thermal REMFS activates an anti-aging hormetic effect as well as reduces cell mortality during lethal stress. Because the REMFS configuration employed in this study can potentially be applied to whole body therapy, prospects for translating these data into clinical interventions for Alzheimer's disease and other degenerative conditions with aging are discussed.

  14. Organochlorine pesticide, endosulfan induced cellular and organismal response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anurag; Mishra, M; Shukla, A K; Kumar, R; Abdin, M Z; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2012-06-30

    The effect of endosulfan (0.02-2.0μgmL(-1)) to Drosophila melanogaster (Oregon R(+)) at the cellular and organismal levels was examined. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster and the strains transgenic for hsp70, hsp83 and hsp26 were exposed to endosulfan through food for 12-48h to examine the heat shock proteins (hsps), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, anti-oxidant stress markers and xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. We observed a concentration- and time-dependent significant induction of only small hsps (hsp23>hsp22) in the exposed organism in concurrence with a significant induction of ROS generation, oxidative stress and xenobiotic metabolism markers. Sub-organismal response was to be propagated towards organismal response, i.e., delay in the emergence of flies and decreased locomotor behaviour. Organisms with diminished locomotion also exhibited significantly lowered acetylcholinesterase activity. A significant positive correlation observed among ROS generation and different cellular endpoints (small hsps, oxidative stress markers, cytochrome P450 activities) in the exposed organism indicate a modulatory role of ROS in endosulfan-mediated cellular toxicity. The study thus suggests that the adverse effects of endosulfan in exposed Drosophila are manifested both at cellular and organismal levels and recommends Drosophila as an alternative animal model for screening the risk caused by environmental chemicals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ontological representation, integration, and analysis of LINCS cell line cells and their cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Ong, Edison; Xie, Jiangan; Ni, Zhaohui; Liu, Qingping; Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Lin, Yu; Cooper, Daniel; Terryn, Raymond; Stathias, Vasileios; Chung, Caty; Schürer, Stephan; He, Yongqun

    2017-12-21

    Aiming to understand cellular responses to different perturbations, the NIH Common Fund Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) program involves many institutes and laboratories working on over a thousand cell lines. The community-based Cell Line Ontology (CLO) is selected as the default ontology for LINCS cell line representation and integration. CLO has consistently represented all 1097 LINCS cell lines and included information extracted from the LINCS Data Portal and ChEMBL. Using MCF 10A cell line cells as an example, we demonstrated how to ontologically model LINCS cellular signatures such as their non-tumorigenic epithelial cell type, three-dimensional growth, latrunculin-A-induced actin depolymerization and apoptosis, and cell line transfection. A CLO subset view of LINCS cell lines, named LINCS-CLOview, was generated to support systematic LINCS cell line analysis and queries. In summary, LINCS cell lines are currently associated with 43 cell types, 131 tissues and organs, and 121 cancer types. The LINCS-CLO view information can be queried using SPARQL scripts. CLO was used to support ontological representation, integration, and analysis of over a thousand LINCS cell line cells and their cellular responses.

  16. Early Alterations of Brain Cellular Energy Homeostasis in Huntington Disease Models*

    PubMed Central

    Mochel, Fanny; Durant, Brandon; Meng, Xingli; O'Callaghan, James; Yu, Hua; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Wheeler, Vanessa C.; Humbert, Sandrine; Schiffmann, Raphael; Durr, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Brain energy deficit has been a suggested cause of Huntington disease (HD), but ATP depletion has not reliably been shown in preclinical models, possibly because of the immediate post-mortem changes in cellular energy metabolism. To examine a potential role of a low energy state in HD, we measured, for the first time in a neurodegenerative model, brain levels of high energy phosphates using microwave fixation, which instantaneously inactivates brain enzymatic activities and preserves in vivo levels of analytes. We studied HD transgenic R6/2 mice at ages 4, 8, and 12 weeks. We found significantly increased creatine and phosphocreatine, present as early as 4 weeks for phosphocreatine, preceding motor system deficits and decreased ATP levels in striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of R6/2 mice. ATP and phosphocreatine concentrations were inversely correlated with the number of CAG repeats. Conversely, in mice injected with 3-nitroproprionic acid, an acute model of brain energy deficit, both ATP and phosphocreatine were significantly reduced. Increased creatine and phosphocreatine in R6/2 mice was associated with decreased guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase and creatine kinase, both at the protein and RNA levels, and increased phosphorylated AMP-dependent protein kinase (pAMPK) over AMPK ratio. In addition, in 4-month-old knock-in HdhQ111/+ mice, the earliest metabolic alterations consisted of increased phosphocreatine in the frontal cortex and increased the pAMPK/AMPK ratio. Altogether, this study provides the first direct evidence of chronic alteration in homeostasis of high energy phosphates in HD models in the earliest stages of the disease, indicating possible reduced utilization of the brain phosphocreatine pool. PMID:22123819

  17. Protein O-GlcNAcylation: A critical regulator of the cellular response to stress.

    PubMed

    Chatham, John C; Marchase, Richard B

    2010-01-01

    The post-translational modification of serine and threonine residues of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins by the O-linked attachment of the monosaccharide ß-N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a highly dynamic and ubiquitous protein modification that plays a critical role in regulating numerous biological processes. Much of our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of O-GlcNAc on cellular function has been in the context of chronic disease processes. However, there is increasing evidence that O-GlcNAc levels are increased in response to stress and that acute augmentation of this response is cytoprotective, at least in the short term. Conversely, a reduction in O-GlcNAc levels appears to be associated with decreased cell survival in response to an acute stress. Here we summarize our current understanding of protein O-GlcNAcylation on the cellular response to stress and in mediating cellular protective mechanisms focusing primarily on the cardiovascular system as an example. We consider the potential link between O-GlcNAcylation and cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and explore the parallels between O-GlcNAc signaling and redox signaling. We also discuss the apparent paradox between the reported adverse effects of increased O-GlcNAcylation with its recently reported role in mediating cell survival mechanisms.

  18. Seasonal variations of cellular stress response of the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Feidantsis, Konstantinos; Antonopoulou, Efthimia; Lazou, Antigone; Pörtner, Hans O; Michaelidis, Basile

    2013-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the seasonal cellular stress response in vital organs, like the heart, the liver, the whole blood and the skeletal (red and white) muscles of the Mediterranean fish Sparus aurata during a 1-year acclimatization period in the field, in two examined depths (0-2 m and 10-12 m). Processes studied included heat shock protein expression and protein kinase activation. Molecular responses were addressed through the expression of Hsp70 and Hsp90, the phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinases and particularly p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK-1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3). The induction of Hsp70 and Hsp90 and the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, JNKs and ERKs in the examined five tissues of the gilthead sea bream indicated a cellular stress response under the prism of a seasonal pattern which was characterized by distinct tissue specificity. Specifically, Hsp induction and MAPK activation occurred before peak summer water temperatures, with no further increases in their levels despite increases in water temperatures. Moreover, although water temperature did not vary significantly with depth of immersion, significant effects of depth on cellular stress response were observed, probably caused by different light regime. The expression and the activation of these certain proteins can be used as tools to define the extreme thermal limits of the gilthead sea bream.

  19. Metabolic and cellular stress responses of catfish, Horabagrus brachysoma (Günther) acclimated to increasing temperatures.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Rishikesh S; Das, Tilak; Debnath, Dipesh; Yengkokpam, Sona; Baruah, Kartik; Tiwari, Lalchand R; Pal, Asim K

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the metabolic and cellular stress responses in an endemic catfish Horabagrus brachysoma acclimated to ambient (26°C), 31, 33 and 36°C for 30 days. After acclimation, fish were sampled to investigate changes in the levels of blood glucose, tissue glycogen and ascorbic acid, activities of enzymes involved in glycolysis (LDH), citric acid cycle (MDH), gluconeogenesis (FBPase and G6Pase), pentose phosphate pathway (G6PDH), protein metabolism (AST and ALT), phosphate metabolism (ACP and ALP) and energy metabolism (ATPase), and HSP70 levels in various tissues. Acclimation to higher temperatures (33 and 36°C) significantly increased activities of LDH, MDH, ALP, ACP, AST, ALT and ATPase and blood glucose levels, whereas decreased the G6PDH enzyme activity and, tissue glycogen and ascorbic acid. Results indicated an overall increase in the carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism implying increased metabolic demands for maintaining homeostasis in fish acclimated to higher temperatures (33 and 36°C). We observed tissue specific response of HSP70 in H. brachysoma, with significant increase in gill and liver at 33 and 36°C, and in brain and muscle at 36°C, enabling cellular protection at higher acclimation temperatures. In conclusion, H. brachysoma adjusted metabolic and cellular responses to withstand increased temperatures, however, these responses suggest that the fish was under stress at 33°C or higher temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Generation of anti-porcine CD69 monoclonal antibodies and their usefulness to evaluate early activation of cellular immunity by flow cytometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yumiko; Okutani, Mie; Ogawa, Shohei; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Inoue, Ryo

    2018-05-01

    T cell-mediated cellular immunity and humoral immunity are equally important for the prevention of diseases. To assess activation of human and mouse cellular immunity, early activation markers of lymphocytes are often used in flow cytometry targeting expression of CD69 molecules. Response of humoral immunity against infection or vaccination has been well investigated in pigs, but that of cellular immunity has been largely neglected due to lack of direct evaluation tools. Thus, in pig research a proper assay of antibody reacted with porcine CD69 is still unavailable. In the present study, two anti-porcine CD69 mAb-producing mouse hybridomas, 01-14-22-51 (IgG2b-κ) and 01-22-44-102 (IgG2a-κ), both showing fine reactivity with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin-stimulated porcine peripheral blood lymphocytes in flow cytometry, were established. When porcine peripheral blood lymphocytes were activated with PMA and ionomycin and analyzed by flow cytometry, it was found that both mAbs generated in this study stained about 70% of lymphocytes. In contrast, after an identical procedure, only 5% and 13.5% of lymphocytes were stained with anti-interferon-γ mAb and anti-tumor necrosis factor-α mAb, respectively. These results indicate that evaluation of cellular immunity activation turns more sensitive after using our newly generated mAbs. © 2018 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  1. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Hou, Rui; Su, Hailin; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin

    2012-01-01

    Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  2. Skeletal muscle plasticity: cellular and molecular responses to altered physical activity paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Haddad, Fadia

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine our current understanding of the chain of events known to be involved in the adaptive process whereby specific genes and their protein products undergo altered expression; specifically, skeletal muscle adaptation in response to altered loading states will be discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of the contractile protein, myosin heavy chain gene expression. This protein, which is both an important structural and regulatory protein comprising the contractile apparatus, can be expressed as different isoforms, thereby having an impact on the functional diversity of the muscle. Because the regulation of the myosin gene family is under the control of a complex set of processes including, but not limited to, activity, hormonal, and metabolic factors, this protein will serve as a cellular "marker" for studies of muscle plasticity in response to various mechanical perturbations in which the quantity and type of myosin isoform, along with other important cellular proteins, are altered in expression.

  3. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    SciT

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellularmore » mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  4. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular response to biophysical cues using synthetic biology approaches

    PubMed Central

    Denning, Denise; Roos, Wouter H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of synthetic surfaces and materials to influence and study cell behavior has vastly progressed our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in cellular response to physicochemical and biophysical cues. Reconstituting cytoskeletal proteins and interfacing them with a defined microenvironment has also garnered deep insight into the engineering mechanisms existing within the cell. This review presents recent experimental findings on the influence of several parameters of the extracellular environment on cell behavior and fate, such as substrate topography, stiffness, chemistry and charge. In addition, the use of synthetic environments to measure physical properties of the reconstituted cytoskeleton and their interaction with intracellular proteins such as molecular motors is discussed, which is relevant for understanding cell migration, division and structural integrity, as well as intracellular transport. Insight is provided regarding the next steps to be taken in this interdisciplinary field, in order to achieve the global aim of artificially directing cellular response. PMID:27266767

  5. JAK/STAT signaling in Drosophila muscles controls the cellular immune response against parasitoid infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hairu; Kronhamn, Jesper; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Korkut, Gül Gizem; Hultmark, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The role of JAK/STAT signaling in the cellular immune response of Drosophila is not well understood. Here, we show that parasitoid wasp infection activates JAK/STAT signaling in somatic muscles of the Drosophila larva, triggered by secretion of the cytokines Upd2 and Upd3 from circulating hemocytes. Deletion of upd2 or upd3, but not the related os (upd1) gene, reduced the cellular immune response, and suppression of the JAK/STAT pathway in muscle cells reduced the encapsulation of wasp eggs and the number of circulating lamellocyte effector cells. These results suggest that JAK/STAT signaling in muscles participates in a systemic immune defense against wasp infection. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  6. A nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpusik, Adam

    2017-02-01

    We present a nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection. The main advantage of this approach is that it preserves the essential qualitative features of the original continuous model (non-negativity and boundedness of the solution, equilibria and their stability conditions), while being easy to implement. All of the qualitative features are preserved independently of the chosen step-size. Numerical simulations of our approach and comparison with other conventional simulation methods are presented.

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase reduces inflammatory responses and cellular senescence in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-Yu; Li, Yang-Yang; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jun; Yao, Hong-Wei

    2017-04-04

    Current drug therapy fails to reduce lung destruction of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has emerged as an important integrator of signals that control energy balance and lipid metabolism. However, there are no studies regarding the role of AMPK in reducing inflammatory responses and cellular senescence during the development of emphysema. Therefore, we hypothesize that AMPK reduces inflammatroy responses, senescence, and lung injury. To test this hypothesis, human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) were treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in the presence of a specific AMPK activator (AICAR, 1 mM) and inhibitor (Compound C, 5 μM). Elastase injection was performed to induce mouse emphysema, and these mice were treated with a specific AMPK activator metformin as well as Compound C. AICAR reduced, whereas Compound C increased CSE-induced increase in IL-8 and IL-6 release and expression of genes involved in cellular senescence. Knockdown of AMPKα1/α2 increased expression of pro-senescent genes (e.g., p16, p21, and p66shc) in BEAS-2B cells. Prophylactic administration of an AMPK activator metformin (50 and 250 mg/kg) reduced while Compound C (4 and 20 mg/kg) aggravated elastase-induced airspace enlargement, inflammatory responses and cellular senescence in mice. This is in agreement with therapeutic effect of metformin (50 mg/kg) on airspace enlargement. Furthermore, metformin prophylactically protected against but Compound C further reduced mitochondrial proteins SOD2 and SIRT3 in emphysematous lungs. In conclusion, AMPK reduces abnormal inflammatory responses and cellular senescence, which implicates as a potential therapeutic target for COPD/emphysema.

  8. Analysis of the Cellular Stress Response During Ebola Virus Infection by Immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Emily V; Schmidt, Kristina M

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, the use of immunofluorescence analysis as a tool to examine stress granule (SG) formation in Ebola virus (EBOV)-infected cells is described. The following protocol focuses on the process of inducing and analyzing the cellular stress response, including treatment of cells with inducers and inhibitors of the SG formation, and also describes EBOV infection, DNA transfection, and the usage of different cell lines.

  9. The cellular responses of the rat to an intraperitoneal inoculation of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis larvae

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Z.; Wertheim, Guta

    1973-01-01

    The cellular responses to intraperitoneal inoculation of infective (L3) or non-infective (L2) larvae of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were studied in unprimed rats. Peritoneal macrophages adhered to the larvae immediately after inoculation and the coated larvae became attached to the omentum. As additional inflammatory cells, appearing in the peritoneal exudate, adhered to the larvae, nodules were formed which with time organized into granulomas. The initial response was not specific and consisted of an intense neutrophilia which developed in all rats a few hours after inoculation and lasted 24 hours. Thereafter the cellular responses were distinctly different in the case of each larval stage. In rats receiving L3 larvae an intense eosinophilia in the peritoneal exudate began to develop 7 days after inoculation, and islands of numerous pyroninophilic blast- and plasma cells were present at the periphery of the granuloma. The L3 larvae survived in the granulomas for 7–10 days. The granulomas formed around the L2 larvae consisted mainly of macrophages; the number of eosinophils did not rise above normal and there were no pyroninophilic cells. The L2 larvae survived in the granuloma for 3 days. In control rats, in which an intestinal infection was established by subcutaneous administration of larvae, no changes were detected in the cellular composition of the peritoneal exudate. The significance of these responses is discussed in relation to recent reports about the cellular composition of antigenic and non-antigenic granulomas. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10 PMID:4705618

  10. Frequent cellular phone use modifies hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to a cellular phone call after mental stress in healthy children and adolescents: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Geronikolou, Styliani A; Chamakou, Aikaterini; Mantzou, Aimilia; Chrousos, George; KanakaGantenbein, Christina

    2015-12-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is the main "gate-keeper" of the organism's response to every somatic or mental stress. This prospective study aims to investigate the HPA-axis response to a cellular phone call exposure after mental stress in healthy children and adolescents and to assess the possible predictive role of baseline endocrine markers to this response. Two groups of healthy school-age children aged 11-14 (12.5±1.5) years were included in the study, the one comprising those who are occasional users of a cellular phone (Group A) while the second those who do regularly use one (Group B). Blood samples were obtained from all participants at 8.00 am after a 12-hour overnight fasting for thyroid hormone, glucose, insulin, and cortisol levels determination. The participants performed the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C) (5 minoral task followed by 5 min arithmetic task). Salivary cortisol samples were obtained at baseline, 10' and 20' min after the TSST-C and 10' and 20' after a 5 minute cellular phone call. Significant changes in the salivary cortisol levels were noted between 10' and 20' mins after the cellular phone call with different responses between the two groups. Baseline thyroid hormone levels seem to predict the cortisol response to mental stress mainly in group A, while HOMA had no impact on salivary cortisol response at any phase of the test, in either group. HPA axis response to cellular phone after mental stress in children and adolescents follow a different pattern in frequent users than in occasional users that seems to be influenced by the baseline thyroid hormone levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The CK1 Family: Contribution to Cellular Stress Response and Its Role in Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Knippschild, Uwe; Krüger, Marc; Richter, Julia; Xu, Pengfei; García-Reyes, Balbina; Peifer, Christian; Halekotte, Jakob; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Bischof, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Members of the highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed pleiotropic CK1 family play major regulatory roles in many cellular processes including DNA-processing and repair, proliferation, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicular trafficking, apoptosis, and cell differentiation. As a consequence of cellular stress conditions, interaction of CK1 with the mitotic spindle is manifold increased pointing to regulatory functions at the mitotic checkpoint. Furthermore, CK1 is able to alter the activity of key proteins in signal transduction and signal integration molecules. In line with this notion, CK1 is tightly connected to the regulation and degradation of β-catenin, p53, and MDM2. Considering the importance of CK1 for accurate cell division and regulation of tumor suppressor functions, it is not surprising that mutations and alterations in the expression and/or activity of CK1 isoforms are often detected in various tumor entities including cancer of the kidney, choriocarcinomas, breast carcinomas, oral cancer, adenocarcinomas of the pancreas, and ovarian cancer. Therefore, scientific effort has enormously increased (i) to understand the regulation of CK1 and its involvement in tumorigenesis- and tumor progression-related signal transduction pathways and (ii) to develop CK1-specific inhibitors for the use in personalized therapy concepts. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding CK1 regulation, function, and interaction with cellular proteins playing central roles in cellular stress-responses and carcinogenesis. PMID:24904820

  12. Cellular cytotoxic response induced by highly purified multi-wall carbon nanotube in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao

    2011-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes, a promising nanomaterial with unique characteristics, have applications in a variety of fields. The cytotoxic effects of carbon nanotubes are partially due to the induction of oxidative stress; however, the detailed mechanisms of nanotube cytotoxicity and their interaction with cells remain unclear. In this study, the authors focus on the acute toxicity of vapor-grown carbon fiber, HTT2800, which is one of the most highly purified multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) by high-temperature thermal treatment. The authors exposed human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to HTT2800 and measured the cellular uptake, mitochondrial function, cellular LDH release, apoptotic signaling, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. The HTT2800-exposed cells showed cellular uptake of the carbon nanotube, increased cell death, enhanced DNA damage, and induced cytokine release. However, the exposed cells showed no obvious intracellular ROS generation. These cellular and molecular findings suggest that HTT2800 could cause a potentially adverse inflammatory response in BEAS-2B cells.

  13. Cellular immune responses to platelet factor 4 and heparin complexes in patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Nazy, Ishac; Clare, Rumi; Staibano, Phillip; Warkentin, Theodore E; Larche, Mark; Moore, Jane C; Smith, James W; Whitlock, Richard P; Kelton, John G; Arnold, Donald M

    2018-05-03

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an adverse reaction to heparin characterized by thrombocytopenia and thrombotic complications. HIT is caused by pathogenic antibodies that bind to complexes of platelet factor 4 and heparin (PF4/heparin) leading to platelet activation and inducing a hypercoagulable state. Previous studies have shown immunity to PF4/heparin occurs early in life even before heparin exposure; however, the immunogenesis of HIT is not well characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate cellular proliferation in response to PF4/heparin complexes in patients with HIT. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy controls (n = 30), postoperative cardiac surgery patients who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, n = 17), and patients with confirmed HIT (n = 41) were cultured with PF4 and PF4/heparin. Cellular proliferation was assessed by 3 H-thymidine uptake and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) detection. PBMCs proliferated in the presence of PF4 and was enhanced by the addition of heparin in all study groups. CPB and HIT patients exhibited significantly higher proliferative responses compared to healthy controls. PBMC proliferation was antigen-specific, depended on the presence of platelets, and only CD14 + cells were identified as proliferating cells. Culture supernatants were tested for the levels of regulatory cytokines and both CPB and HIT patients produced significantly lower levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 compared to healthy controls. These findings further demonstrate that cellular immune sensitization to PF4/heparin occurs before heparin exposure and suggests that immune dysregulation can contribute to the immunogenesis of HIT. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Early vertebrate origin and diversification of small transmembrane regulators of cellular ion transport.

    PubMed

    Pirkmajer, Sergej; Kirchner, Henriette; Lundell, Leonidas S; Zelenin, Pavel V; Zierath, Juleen R; Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Chibalin, Alexander V

    2017-07-15

    Small transmembrane proteins such as FXYDs, which interact with Na + ,K + -ATPase, and the micropeptides that interact with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase play fundamental roles in regulation of ion transport in vertebrates. Uncertain evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships among these regulators of ion transport have led to inconsistencies in their classification across vertebrate species, thus hampering comparative studies of their functions. We discovered the first FXYD homologue in sea lamprey, a basal jawless vertebrate, which suggests small transmembrane regulators of ion transport emerged early in the vertebrate lineage. We also identified 13 gene subfamilies of FXYDs and propose a revised, phylogeny-based FXYD classification that is consistent across vertebrate species. These findings provide an improved framework for investigating physiological and pathophysiological functions of small transmembrane regulators of ion transport. Small transmembrane proteins are important for regulation of cellular ion transport. The most prominent among these are members of the FXYD family (FXYD1-12), which regulate Na + ,K + -ATPase, and phospholamban, sarcolipin, myoregulin and DWORF, which regulate the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA). FXYDs and regulators of SERCA are present in fishes, as well as terrestrial vertebrates; however, their evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships are obscure, thus hampering comparative physiological studies. Here we discovered that sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a representative of extant jawless vertebrates (Cyclostomata), expresses an FXYD homologue, which strongly suggests that FXYDs predate the emergence of fishes and other jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). Using a combination of sequence-based phylogenetic analysis and conservation of local chromosome context, we determined that FXYDs markedly diversified in the lineages leading to cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) and bony

  15. Cellular Stress Responses, The Hormesis Paradigm, and Vitagenes: Novel Targets for Therapeutic Intervention in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carolin; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Calabrese, Edward J.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Despite the capacity of chaperones and other homeostatic components to restore folding equilibrium, cells appear poorly adapted for chronic oxidative stress that increases in cancer and in metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. Modulation of endogenous cellular defense mechanisms represents an innovative approach to therapeutic intervention in diseases causing chronic tissue damage, such as in neurodegeneration. This article introduces the concept of hormesis and its applications to the field of neuroprotection. It is argued that the hormetic dose response provides the central underpinning of neuroprotective responses, providing a framework for explaining the common quantitative features of their dose–response relationships, their mechanistic foundations, and their relationship to the concept of biological plasticity, as well as providing a key insight for improving the accuracy of the therapeutic dose of pharmaceutical agents within the highly heterogeneous human population. This article describes in mechanistic detail how hormetic dose responses are mediated for endogenous cellular defense pathways, including sirtuin and Nrf2 and related pathways that integrate adaptive stress responses in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. Particular attention is given to the emerging role of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide gases in hormetic-based neuroprotection and their relationship to membrane radical dynamics and mitochondrial redox signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1763–1811. PMID:20446769

  16. Protein aggregation as a cellular response to oxidative stress induced by heme and iron

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcellos, Luiz R. C.; Dutra, Fabianno F.; Siqueira, Mariana S.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Dahan, Jennifer; Kiarely, Ellen; Carneiro, Leticia A. M.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Travassos, Leonardo H.

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases include a variety of conditions with diverse etiologies in which red blood cells are destroyed and large amounts of hemeproteins are released. Heme has been described as a potent proinflammatory molecule that is able to induce multiple innate immune responses, such as those triggered by TLR4 and the NLRP3 inflammasome, as well as necroptosis in macrophages. The mechanisms by which eukaryotic cells respond to the toxic effects induced by heme to maintain homeostasis are not fully understood, however. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized cellular response induced by heme: the formation of p62/SQTM1 aggregates containing ubiquitinated proteins in structures known as aggresome-like induced structures (ALIS). This action is part of a response driven by the transcription factor NRF2 to the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species induced by heme that results in the expression of genes involved in antioxidant responses, including p62/SQTM1. Furthermore, we show that heme degradation by HO-1 is required for ALIS formation, and that the free iron released on heme degradation is necessary and sufficient to induce ALIS. Moreover, ferritin, a key protein in iron metabolism, prevents excessive ALIS formation. Finally, in vivo, hemolysis promotes an increase in ALIS formation in target tissues. Our data unravel a poorly understood aspect of the cellular responses induced by heme that can be explored to better understand the effects of free heme and free iron during hemolytic diseases such as sickle cell disease, dengue fever, malaria, and sepsis. PMID:27821769

  17. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  18. The cellular magnetic response and biocompatibility of biogenic zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Sandhya; Céspedes, Eva; Soukup, Dalibor; Byrne, James M.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Telling, Neil D.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic moment and anisotropy of magnetite nanoparticles can be optimised by doping with transition metal cations, enabling their properties to be tuned for different biomedical applications. In this study, we assessed the suitability of bacterially synthesized zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications. To do this we measured cellular viability and activity in primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human osteosarcoma-derived cells. Using AC susceptibility we studied doping induced changes in the magnetic response of the nanoparticles both as stable aqueous suspensions and when associated with cells. Our findings show that the magnetic response of the particles was altered after cellular interaction with a reduction in their mobility. In particular, the strongest AC susceptibility signal measured in vitro was from cells containing high-moment zinc-doped particles, whilst no signal was observed in cells containing the high-anisotropy cobalt-doped particles. For both particle types we found that the moderate dopant levels required for optimum magnetic properties did not alter their cytotoxicity or affect osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells. Thus, despite the known cytotoxicity of cobalt and zinc ions, these results suggest that iron oxide nanoparticles can be doped to sufficiently tailor their magnetic properties without compromising cellular biocompatibility.

  19. Characterization of the cellular response triggered by gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalies, Stefan; Keil, Sebastian; Sender, Sina; Hammer, Susanne C.; Antonopoulos, Georgios C.; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Meyer, Heiko; Heinemann, Dag

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based transfection techniques have proven high applicability in several cell biologic applications. The delivery of different molecules using these techniques has been extensively investigated. In particular, new high-throughput approaches such as gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection allow efficient delivery of antisense molecules or proteins into cells preserving high cell viabilities. However, the cellular response to the perforation procedure is not well understood. We herein analyzed the perforation kinetics of single cells during resonant gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation with an 850-ps laser system at a wavelength of 532 nm. Inflow velocity of propidium iodide into manipulated cells reached a maximum within a few seconds. Experiments based on the inflow of FM4-64 indicated that the membrane remains permeable for a few minutes for small molecules. To further characterize the cellular response postmanipulation, we analyzed levels of oxidative heat or general stress. Although we observed an increased formation of reactive oxygen species by an increase of dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, heat shock protein 70 was not upregulated in laser-treated cells. Additionally, no evidence of stress granule formation was visible by immunofluorescence staining. The data provided in this study help to identify the cellular reactions to gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation.

  20. TWO INNEXINS OF Spodoptera litura INFLUENCES HEMICHANNEL AND GAP JUNCTION FUNCTIONS IN CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zunyu; Li, Ming; Yu, Dongshuai; Yan, Zhang; Liu, Xinyi; Ji, Xinglai; Yang, Yang; Hu, Jiansheng; Luo, Kaijun

    2015-09-01

    Insect cellular immune responses include encapsulation, nodule formation, and phagocytosis. Hemichannels and gap junctions are involved in these cellular actions. Innexins (Inxs: analogous to the vertebrate connexins) form hemichannels and gap junctions, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their biology is still unclear. In this article, we reported a steady-state level of Inxs (SpliInxs) in hemocytes of Spodoptera litura, which formed nonfunctional hemichannels on the cell surface to maintain normal metabolism. We also reported that two innnexins (SpliInx2 and SpliInx3) were expressed significantly higher in hemocytes compared to other tissues, suggesting that they play important roles in hemocytes. Amino acid analysis found that two cysteine residues in two extracellular loops provided the capability for SpliInx2 and SpliInx3 hemichannels to dock into gap junctions. Western blotting demonstrated that both extracellular and intracellular loops of SpliInx3 and the extracellular loops of SpliInx2 might undergo posttranslational modification during the formation of a steady-state hemichannel. During hemichannel formation, SpliInx2 presented as one isoform, while SpliInx3 presented as three isoforms. These results provide fundamental knowledge for further study of how steady-state levels of SpliInxs are dynamically adjusted to perform cellular immune responses under immune challenge. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The cellular magnetic response and biocompatibility of biogenic zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Sandhya; Céspedes, Eva; Soukup, Dalibor; Byrne, James M.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Telling, Neil D.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic moment and anisotropy of magnetite nanoparticles can be optimised by doping with transition metal cations, enabling their properties to be tuned for different biomedical applications. In this study, we assessed the suitability of bacterially synthesized zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications. To do this we measured cellular viability and activity in primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human osteosarcoma-derived cells. Using AC susceptibility we studied doping induced changes in the magnetic response of the nanoparticles both as stable aqueous suspensions and when associated with cells. Our findings show that the magnetic response of the particles was altered after cellular interaction with a reduction in their mobility. In particular, the strongest AC susceptibility signal measured in vitro was from cells containing high-moment zinc-doped particles, whilst no signal was observed in cells containing the high-anisotropy cobalt-doped particles. For both particle types we found that the moderate dopant levels required for optimum magnetic properties did not alter their cytotoxicity or affect osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells. Thus, despite the known cytotoxicity of cobalt and zinc ions, these results suggest that iron oxide nanoparticles can be doped to sufficiently tailor their magnetic properties without compromising cellular biocompatibility. PMID:28045082

  2. EFFECT OF X-IRRADIATION ON THE CELLULAR AND HUMORAL RESPONSES TO ANTIGEN

    SciT

    Speirs, R.S.

    1962-01-01

    Mice were immunized by 6 subcutaneous injections of tetanus toxoid before exposure to 500 r x radiation. At various times after irradiation the animals were challenged with intraperitoneal injections of tetanus toxoid and serum antibody titers were determined. Results indicate that the time of irradiation in relation to antigen injection greatly influences the cellular response as well as antibody production. High radiation doses prior to antigen injection reduce the number of cells capable of responding and also inhibit the production of antibody. As the animals recovered from the effects of irradiation the production of antibody appeared to reflect the capacitymore » of the eosinophils to respond. It was concluded that eosinophils play an intermediate role in the cellular everts that lead to the production of antibody. (C.H.)« less

  3. Induction of a Cellular DNA Damage Response by Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Facilitates Viral Replication and Mediates Apoptotic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Quan, Rong; Yan, Xu; Li, Zixue; Hou, Lei; Wang, Naidong; Yang, Yi; Jiang, Haijun; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Cellular DNA damage response (DDR) triggered by infection of DNA viruses mediate cell cycle checkpoint activation, DNA repair, or apoptosis induction. In the present study, infection of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which serves as a major etiological agent of PCV2-associated diseases (PCVAD), was found to elicit a DNA damage response (DDR) as observed by the phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA32 following infection. The response requires active viral replication, and all the ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase), ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related kinase), and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) are the transducers of the DDR signaling events in the PCV2-infected cells as demonstrated by the phosphorylation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK signalings as well as reductions in their activations after treatment with specific kinase inhibitors. Inhibitions of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK activations block viral replication and prevent apoptotic responses as observed by decreases in cleaved poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3 as well as fragmented DNA following PCV2 infection. These results reveal that PCV2 is able to exploit the cellular DNA damage response machinery for its own efficient replication and for apoptosis induction, further extending our understanding for the molecular mechanism of PCV2 infection. PMID:27982097

  4. Cellular Levels of Oxidative Stress Affect the Response of Cervical Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Vonetta M.; Kokoza, Anatolii; Bashkirova, Svetlana; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of advanced and relapsed cervical cancer is frequently ineffective, due in large part to chemoresistance. To examine the pathways responsible, we employed the cervical carcinoma-derived SiHa and CaSki cells as cellular models of resistance and sensitivity, respectively, to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents, doxorubicin, and cisplatin. We compared the proteomic profiles of SiHa and CaSki cells and identified pathways with the potential to contribute to the differential response. We then extended these findings by comparing the expression level of genes involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism through the use of a RT-PCR array. The analyses demonstrated that the resistant SiHa cells expressed higher levels of antioxidant enzymes. Decreasing or increasing oxidative stress led to protection or sensitization, respectively, in both cell lines, supporting the idea that cellular levels of oxidative stress affect responsiveness to treatment. Interestingly, doxorubicin and cisplatin induced different profiles of ROS, and these differences appear to contribute to the sensitivity to treatment displayed by cervical cancer cells. Overall, our findings demonstrate that cervical cancer cells display variable profiles with respect to their redox-generating and -adaptive systems, and that these different profiles have the potential to contribute to their responses to treatments with chemotherapy. PMID:25478571

  5. Cellular and humoral immune responses during tuberculosis infection: useful knowledge in the era of biological agents.

    PubMed

    Matucci, Andrea; Maggi, Enrico; Vultaggio, Alessandra

    2014-05-01

    In this review, recent insights into innate and adaptive cellular and humoral immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are discussed and the role of specific cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is highlighted. According to recent findings, the immune system plays a key role in avoiding mycobacteria dissemination. The importance of different cell types (macrophages, dendritic cells, interferon-γ-producing T cells) as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-12, and IL-23/IL-17 have been demonstrated. Alveolar macrophages are considered the first cells infected by Mtb during respiratory infection. Mtb proliferates within alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells and induces the release of cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-12. Toll-like receptors-stimulated dendritic cells link innate and adaptive immunity by promoting polarization of effector T cells. The efficient induction of Th1 immunity is decisive in defense against Mtb. In fact, host effector immune response against Mtb is related to the presence of a Th1 response. The definition of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the immune response to Mtb can be helpful in developing new preventive strategies to avoid infection relapse, particularly in patients treated with biological agents.

  6. The transition between immune and disease states in a cellular automaton model of clonal immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzi, Michele; Celada, Franco; Ruffo, Stefano; Seiden, Philip E.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper we extend the Celada-Seiden (CS) model of the humoral immune response to include infections virus and killer T cells (cellular response). The model represents molecules and cells with bitstrings. The response of the system to virus involves a competition between the ability of the virus to kill the host cells and the host's ability to eliminate the virus. We find two basins of attraction in the dynamics of this system, one is identified with disease and the other with the immune state. There is also an oscillating state that exists on the border of these two stable states. Fluctuations in the population of virus or antibody can end the oscillation and drive the system into one of the stable states. The introduction of mechanisms of cross-regulation between the two responses can bias the system towards one of them. We also study a mean field model, based on coupled maps, to investigate virus-like infections. This simple model reproduces the attractors for average populations observed in the cellular automaton. All the dynamical behavior connected to spatial extension is lost, as is the oscillating feature. Thus the mean field approximation introduced with coupled maps destroys oscillations.

  7. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    SciT

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F.; Mughal, Nadeem A.

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a highmore » VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  8. Species as Stressors: Heterospecific Interactions and the Cellular Stress Response under Global Change.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Alex R; King, Emily E; Boyer, Kirsten; Tsukimura, Brian; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic global change is predicted to increase the physiological stress of organisms through changes in abiotic conditions such as temperature, pH, and pollution. However, organisms can also experience physiological stress through interactions with other species, especially parasites, predators, and competitors. The stress of species interactions could be an important driver of species' responses to global change as the composition of biological communities change through factors such as distributional and phenological shifts. Interactions between biotic and abiotic stressors could also induce non-linear physiological stress responses under global change. One of the primary means by which organisms deal with physiological stress is through the cellular stress response (CSR), which is broadly the upregulation of a conserved set of genes that facilitate the removal and repair of damaged macromolecules. Here, we present data on behavioral interactions and CSR gene expression for two competing species of intertidal zone porcelain crab (Petrolisthes cinctipes and Petrolisthes manimaculis). We found that P. cinctipes and P. manimaculis engage in more agonistic behaviors when interacting with heterospecifics than conspecifics; however, we found no evidence that heterospecific interactions induced a CSR in these species. In addition to our new data, we review the literature with respect to CSR induction via species interactions, focusing on predator-prey systems and heterospecific competition. We find extensive evidence for predators to induce cellular stress and aspects of the CSR in prey, even in the absence of direct physical contact between species. Effects of heterospecific competition on the CSR have been studied far less, but we do find evidence that agonistic interactions with heterospecifics can induce components of the CSR. Across all published studies, there is clear evidence that species interactions can lead to cellular stress and induction of the CSR

  9. Genetic variants in cellular transport do not affect mesalamine response in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hailiang; Rivas, Manuel; Kaplan, Jess L.; Daly, Mark J.; Winter, Harland S.

    2018-01-01

    Background and aims Mesalamine is commonly used to treat ulcerative colitis (UC). Although mesalamine acts topically, in vitro data suggest that intracellular transport is required for its beneficial effect. Genetic variants in mucosal transport proteins may affect this uptake, but the clinical relevance of these variants has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine whether variants in genes involved in cellular transport affect the response to mesalamine in UC. Methods Subjects with UC from a 6-week clinical trial using multiple doses of mesalamine were genotyped using a genome-wide array that included common exome variants. Analysis focused on cellular transport gene variants with a minor allele frequency >5%. Mesalamine response was defined as improvement in Week 6 Physician’s Global Assessment (PGA) and non-response as a lack of improvement in Week 6 PGA. Quality control thresholds included an individual genotyping rate of >90%, SNP genotyping rate of >98%, and exclusion for subjects with cryptic relatedness. All included variants met Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p>0.001). Results 457 adults with UC were included with 280 responders and 177 non-responders. There were no common variants in transporter genes that were associated with response to mesalamine. The genetic risk score of responders was similar to that of non-responders (p = 0.18). Genome-wide variants demonstrating a trend towards mesalamine response included ST8SIA5 (p = 1x10-5). Conclusions Common transporter gene variants did not affect response to mesalamine in adult UC. The response to mesalamine may be due to rare genetic events or environmental factors such as the intestinal microbiome. PMID:29579042

  10. Deciphering the Acute Cellular Phosphoproteome Response to Irradiation with X-rays, Protons and Carbon Ions*

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Martin; Dokic, Ivana; Schlegel, Julian; Warnken, Uwe; Debus, Jürgen; Abdollahi, Amir; Schnölzer, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a cornerstone of cancer therapy. The recently established particle therapy with raster-scanning protons and carbon ions landmarks a new era in the field of high-precision cancer medicine. However, molecular mechanisms governing radiation induced intracellular signaling remain elusive. Here, we present the first comprehensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic study applying stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry to decipher cellular response to irradiation with X-rays, protons and carbon ions. At protein expression level limited alterations were observed 2 h post irradiation of human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, 181 phosphorylation sites were found to be differentially regulated out of which 151 sites were not hitherto attributed to radiation response as revealed by crosscheck with the PhosphoSitePlus database. Radiation-induced phosphorylation of the p(S/T)Q motif was the prevailing regulation pattern affecting proteins involved in DNA damage response signaling. Because radiation doses were selected to produce same level of cell kill and DNA double-strand breakage for each radiation quality, DNA damage responsive phosphorylation sites were regulated to same extent. However, differential phosphorylation between radiation qualities was observed for 55 phosphorylation sites indicating the existence of distinct signaling circuitries induced by X-ray versus particle (proton/carbon) irradiation beyond the canonical DNA damage response. This unexpected finding was confirmed in targeted spike-in experiments using synthetic isotope labeled phosphopeptides. Herewith, we successfully validated uniform DNA damage response signaling coexisting with altered signaling involved in apoptosis and metabolic processes induced by X-ray and particle based treatments. In summary, the comprehensive insight into the radiation-induced phosphoproteome landscape is instructive for the design

  11. Role of cytoskeleton and elastic moduli in cellular response to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary L.; Roth, Caleb; Tolstykh, Gleb; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are known to increase cell membrane permeability to small molecules in accordance with dosages. As previous work has focused on nsPEF exposures in whole cells, electrodeformation may contribute to this induced-permeabilization in addition to other biological mechanisms. Here, we hypothesize that cellular elasticity, based upon the cytoskeleton, affects nsPEF-induced decrease in cellular viability. Young's moduli of various types of cells have been calculated from atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve data, showing that CHO cells are stiffer than non-adherent U937 and Jurkat cells, which are more susceptible to nsPEF exposure. To distinguish any cytoskeletal foundation for these observations, various cytoskeletal reagents were applied. Inhibiting actin polymerization significantly decreased membrane integrity, as determined by relative propidium uptake and phosphatidylserine externalization, upon exposure at 150 kV/cm with 100 pulses of 10 ns pulse width. Exposure in the presence of other drugs resulted in insignificant changes in membrane integrity and 24-hour viability. However, Jurkat cells showed greater lethality than latrunculin-treated CHO cells of comparable elasticity. From these results, it is postulated that cellular elasticity rooted in actin-membrane interaction is only a minor contributor to the differing responses of adherent and non-adherent cells to nsPEF insults.

  12. Ultraviolet Radiation: Cellular Antioxidant Response and the Role of Ocular Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Marchitti, Satori A.; Chen, Ying; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposes the human eye to near constant oxidative stress. Evidence suggests that UVR is the most important environmental insult leading to the development of a variety of ophthalmoheliosis disorders. UVR-induced reactive oxygen species are highly reactive with DNA, proteins and cellular membranes, resulting in cellular and tissue damage. Antioxidant defense systems present in ocular tissues function to combat reactive oxygen species and protect the eye from oxidative damage. Important enzymatic antioxidants are the superoxide dismutases, catalase, glutathione peroxidases, glutathione reductase and members of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily. Glutathione, ascorbic and uric acids, α-tocopherol, NADPH and ferritin serve as small molecule, nonenzymatic antioxidants. Ocular tissues have high levels of these antioxidants which are essential for the maintenance of redox homeostasis in the eye and protection against oxidative damage. ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1, present abundantly in the cornea and lens, have been shown to have unique roles in the defense against UVR and the downstream effects of oxidative stress. This review presents the properties and functions of ocular antioxidants that play critical roles in the cellular response to UVR exposure, including a focused discussion of the unique roles that the ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 enzymes have as multi-functional ocular antioxidants. PMID:21670692

  13. Cellular Response to Reagent-Free Electron-Irradiated Gelatin Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wisotzki, Emilia I; Friedrich, Ralf P; Weidt, Astrid; Alexiou, Christoph; Mayr, Stefan G; Zink, Mareike

    2016-06-01

    As a biomaterial, it is well established that gelatin exhibits low cytotoxicity and can promote cellular growth. However, to circumvent the potential toxicity of chemical crosslinkers, reagent-free crosslinking methods such as electron irradiation are highly desirable. While high energy irradiation has been shown to exhibit precise control over the degree of crosslinking, these hydrogels have not been thoroughly investigated for biocompatibility and degradability. Here, NIH 3T3 murine fibroblasts are seeded onto irradiated gelatin hydrogels to examine the hydrogel's influence on cellular viability and morphology. The average projected area of cells seeded onto the hydrogels increases with irradiation dose, which correlates with an increase in the hydrogel's shear modulus up to 10 kPa. Cells on these hydrogels are highly viable and exhibits normal cell cycles, particularly when compared to those grown on glutaraldehyde crosslinked gelatin hydrogels. However, proliferation is reduced on both types of crosslinked samples. To mimic the response of the hydrogels in physiological conditions, degradability is monitored in simulated body fluid to reveal strongly dose-dependent degradation times. Overall, given the low cytotoxicity, influence on cellular morphology and variability in degradation times of the electron irradiated gelatin hydrogels, there is significant potential for application in areas ranging from regenerative medicine to mechanobiology. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Differences in the Cellular Response to Acute Spinal Cord Injury between Developing and Mature Rats Highlights the Potential Significance of the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Theresa C.; Mathews, Kathryn J.; Mao, Yilin; Nguyen, Tara; Gorrie, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    There exists a trend for a better functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) in younger patients compared to adults, which is also reported for animal studies; however, the reasons for this are yet to be elucidated. The post injury tissue microenvironment is a complex milieu of cells and signals that interact on multiple levels. Inflammation has been shown to play a significant role in this post injury microenvironment. Endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPC), in the ependymal layer of the central canal, have also been shown to respond and migrate to the lesion site. This study used a mild contusion injury model to compare adult (9 week), juvenile (5 week) and infant (P7) Sprague-Dawley rats at 24 h, 1, 2, and 6 weeks post-injury (n = 108). The innate cells of the inflammatory response were examined using counts of ED1/IBA1 labeled cells. This found a decreased inflammatory response in the infants, compared to the adult and juvenile animals, demonstrated by a decreased neutrophil infiltration and macrophage and microglial activation at all 4 time points. Two other prominent cellular contributors to the post-injury microenvironment, the reactive astrocytes, which eventually form the glial scar, and the NPC were quantitated using GFAP and Nestin immunohistochemistry. After SCI in all 3 ages there was an obvious increase in Nestin staining in the ependymal layer, with long basal processes extending into the parenchyma. This was consistent between age groups early post injury then deviated at 2 weeks. The GFAP results also showed stark differences between the mature and infant animals. These results point to significant differences in the inflammatory response between infants and adults that may contribute to the better recovery indicated by other researchers, as well as differences in the overall injury progression and cellular responses. This may have important consequences if we are able to mirror and manipulate this response in patients of all ages; however

  15. Giardia-specific cellular immune responses in post-giardiasis chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hanevik, Kurt; Kristoffersen, Einar; Mørch, Kristine; Rye, Kristin Paulsen; Sørnes, Steinar; Svärd, Staffan; Bruserud, Øystein; Langeland, Nina

    2017-01-28

    The role of pathogen specific cellular immune responses against the eliciting pathogen in development of post-infectious chronic fatigue syndrome (PI-CFS) is not known and such studies are difficult to perform. The aim of this study was to evaluate specific anti-Giardia cellular immunity in cases that developed CFS after Giardia infection compared to cases that recovered well. Patients reporting chronic fatigue in a questionnaire study three years after a Giardia outbreak were clinically evaluated five years after the outbreak and grouped according to Fukuda criteria for CFS and idiopathic chronic fatigue. Giardia specific immune responses were evaluated in 39 of these patients by proliferation assay, T cell activation and cytokine release analysis. 20 Giardia exposed non-fatigued individuals and 10 healthy unexposed individuals were recruited as controls. Patients were clinically classified into CFS (n = 15), idiopathic chronic fatigue (n = 5), fatigue from other causes (n = 9) and recovered from fatigue (n = 10). There were statistically significant antigen specific differences between these Giardia exposed groups and unexposed controls. However, we did not find differences between the Giardia exposed fatigue classification groups with regard to CD4 T cell activation, proliferation or cytokine levels in 6 days cultured PBMCs. Interestingly, sCD40L was increased in patients with PI-CFS and other persons with fatigue after Giardia infection compared to the non-fatigued group, and correlated well with fatigue levels at the time of sampling. Our data show antigen specific cellular immune responses in the groups previously exposed to Giardia and increased sCD40L in fatigued patients.

  16. Psychedelics Recruit Multiple Cellular Types and Produce Complex Transcriptional Responses Within the Brain.

    PubMed

    Martin, David A; Nichols, Charles D

    2016-09-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in psychedelics, substances that profoundly alter perception and cognition and have recently demonstrated therapeutic efficacy to treat anxiety, depression, and addiction in the clinic. The receptor mechanisms that drive their molecular and behavioral effects involve activation of cortical serotonin 5-HT 2A receptors, but the responses of specific cellular populations remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that a small subset of 5-HT 2A -expressing excitatory neurons is directly activated by psychedelics and subsequently recruits other select cell types including subpopulations of inhibitory somatostatin and parvalbumin GABAergic interneurons, as well as astrocytes, to produce distinct and regional responses. To gather data regarding the response of specific neuronal populations, we developed methodology for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to segregate and enrich specific cellular subtypes in the brain. These methods allow for robust neuronal sorting based on cytoplasmic epitopes followed by downstream nucleic acid analysis, expanding the utility of FACS in neuroscience research. Copyright © 2016 Forschungsgesellschaft für Arbeitsphysiologie und Arbeitschutz e.V. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cellular stress responses to chronic heat shock and shell damage in temperate Mya truncata.

    PubMed

    Sleight, Victoria A; Peck, Lloyd S; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A; Smith, Valerie J; Clark, Melody S

    2018-05-12

    Acclimation, via phenotypic flexibility, is a potential means for a fast response to climate change. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underpinning phenotypic flexibility can provide a fine-scale cellular understanding of how organisms acclimate. In the last 30 years, Mya truncata populations around the UK have faced an average increase in sea surface temperature of 0.7 °C and further warming of between 1.5 and 4 °C, in all marine regions adjacent to the UK, is predicted by the end of the century. Hence, data are required on the ability of M. truncata to acclimate to physiological stresses, and most notably, chronic increases in temperature. Animals in the present study were exposed to chronic heat-stress for 2 months prior to shell damage and subsequently, only 3, out of 20 damaged individuals, were able to repair their shells within 2 weeks. Differentially expressed genes (between control and damaged animals) were functionally enriched with processes relating to cellular stress, the immune response and biomineralisation. Comparative transcriptomics highlighted genes, and more broadly molecular mechanisms, that are likely to be pivotal in this lack of acclimation. This study demonstrates that discovery-led transcriptomic profiling of animals during stress-response experiments can shed light on the complexity of biological processes and changes within organisms that can be more difficult to detect at higher levels of biological organisation.

  18. Sparse feature selection methods identify unexpected global cellular response to strontium-containing materials

    PubMed Central

    Autefage, Hélène; Littmann, Elena; Hedegaard, Martin A. B.; Von Erlach, Thomas; O’Donnell, Matthew; Burden, Frank R.; Winkler, David A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing sophistication of biomaterials design and functional characterization studies, little is known regarding cells’ global response to biomaterials. Here, we combined nontargeted holistic biological and physical science techniques to evaluate how simple strontium ion incorporation within the well-described biomaterial 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) influences the global response of human mesenchymal stem cells. Our objective analyses of whole gene-expression profiles, confirmed by standard molecular biology techniques, revealed that strontium-substituted BG up-regulated the isoprenoid pathway, suggesting an influence on both sterol metabolite synthesis and protein prenylation processes. This up-regulation was accompanied by increases in cellular and membrane cholesterol and lipid raft contents as determined by Raman spectroscopy mapping and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy analyses and by an increase in cellular content of phosphorylated myosin II light chain. Our unexpected findings of this strong metabolic pathway regulation as a response to biomaterial composition highlight the benefits of discovery-driven nonreductionist approaches to gain a deeper understanding of global cell–material interactions and suggest alternative research routes for evaluating biomaterials to improve their design. PMID:25831522

  19. The quantification of cellular viability and inflammatory response to stainless steel alloys.

    PubMed

    Bailey, LeeAnn O; Lippiatt, Sherry; Biancanello, Frank S; Ridder, Stephen D; Washburn, Newell R

    2005-09-01

    The biocompatibility of metallic alloys is critical to the success of many orthopedic therapies. Corrosion resistance and the immune response of the body to wear debris products ultimately determine the performance of these devices. The establishment of quantitative tests of biocompatibility is an important issue for biomaterials development. We have developed an in vitro model to measure the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and in this study investigated the cellular responses induced by nitrogenated and 316L stainless steel alloys in both particulate and solid form. We utilized a murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, to characterize and compare the mRNA profiles of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in these cells using real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry were used to probe the viability of the population and to examine the apoptotic pathway. The goals of this work were to develop improved measurement methods for the quantification of cellular inflammatory responses to biomaterials and to obtain data that leads to an enhanced understanding of the ways in which the body responds to biomaterials. Using these techniques, we observed evidence for an association between the upregulation of IL-1beta and reversible apoptosis, and the upregulation of TNF-alpha and irreversible apoptosis.

  20. Differential Cellular Responses to Hedgehog Signalling in Vertebrates—What is the Role of Competence?

    PubMed Central

    Kiecker, Clemens; Graham, Anthony; Logan, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    A surprisingly small number of signalling pathways generate a plethora of cellular responses ranging from the acquisition of multiple cell fates to proliferation, differentiation, morphogenesis and cell death. These diverse responses may be due to the dose-dependent activities of signalling factors, or to intrinsic differences in the response of cells to a given signal—a phenomenon called differential cellular competence. In this review, we focus on temporal and spatial differences in competence for Hedgehog (HH) signalling, a signalling pathway that is reiteratively employed in embryos and adult organisms. We discuss the upstream signals and mechanisms that may establish differential competence for HHs in a range of different tissues. We argue that the changing competence for HH signalling provides a four-dimensional framework for the interpretation of the signal that is essential for the emergence of functional anatomy. A number of diseases—including several types of cancer—are caused by malfunctions of the HH pathway. A better understanding of what provides differential competence for this signal may reveal HH-related disease mechanisms and equip us with more specific tools to manipulate HH signalling in the clinic. PMID:29615599

  1. Cellular and molecular responses of Neurospora crassa to non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyungsoon; Ryu, Young H.; Hong, Young J.; Choi, Eun H.; Uhm, Han S.

    2012-02-01

    Filamentous fungi have been rarely explored in terms of plasma treatments. This letter presents the cellular and molecular responses of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa to an argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The viability and cell morphology of N. crassa spores exposed to plasma were both significantly reduced depending on the exposure time when treated in water. The intracellular genomic DNA content was dramatically reduced in fungal tissues after a plasma treatment and the transcription factor tah-3 was found to be required for fungal tolerance to a harsh plasma environment.

  2. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, M. P.; Reukov, V. V.; Thompson, G. L.; Vertegel, A. A.; Guo, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Jesse, S.

    2009-10-01

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  3. Human leukocyte antigens and cellular immune responses to anthrax vaccine adsorbed.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Pankratz, V Shane; Vierkant, Robert A; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Quinn, Conrad P; Kaslow, Richard A; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2013-07-01

    Interindividual variations in vaccine-induced immune responses are in part due to host genetic polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and other gene families. This study examined associations between HLA genotypes, haplotypes, and homozygosity and protective antigen (PA)-specific cellular immune responses in healthy subjects following immunization with Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA). While limited associations were observed between individual HLA alleles or haplotypes and variable lymphocyte proliferative (LP) responses to AVA, analyses of homozygosity supported the hypothesis of a "heterozygote advantage." Individuals who were homozygous for any HLA locus demonstrated significantly lower PA-specific LP than subjects who were heterozygous at all eight loci (median stimulation indices [SI], 1.84 versus 2.95, P = 0.009). Similarly, we found that class I (HLA-A) and class II (HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1) homozygosity was significantly associated with an overall decrease in LP compared with heterozygosity at those three loci. Specifically, individuals who were homozygous at these loci had significantly lower PA-specific LP than subjects heterozygous for HLA-A (median SI, 1.48 versus 2.13, P = 0.005), HLA-DQA1 (median SI, 1.75 versus 2.11, P = 0.007), and HLA-DQB1 (median SI, 1.48 versus 2.13, P = 0.002) loci, respectively. Finally, homozygosity at an increasing number (≥ 4) of HLA loci was significantly correlated with a reduction in LP response (P < 0.001) in a dose-dependent manner. Additional studies are needed to reproduce these findings and determine whether HLA-heterozygous individuals generate stronger cellular immune response to other virulence factors (Bacillus anthracis LF and EF) than HLA-homozygous subjects.

  4. The importance of the cellular stress response in the pathogenesis and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Philip L; Balogh, Gabor; Rivas, Eric; Kavanagh, Kylie; Vigh, Laszlo

    2014-07-01

    Organisms have evolved to survive rigorous environments and are not prepared to thrive in a world of caloric excess and sedentary behavior. A realization that physical exercise (or lack of it) plays a pivotal role in both the pathogenesis and therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus (t2DM) has led to the provocative concept of therapeutic exercise mimetics. A decade ago, we attempted to simulate the beneficial effects of exercise by treating t2DM patients with 3 weeks of daily hyperthermia, induced by hot tub immersion. The short-term intervention had remarkable success, with a 1 % drop in HbA1, a trend toward weight loss, and improvement in diabetic neuropathic symptoms. An explanation for the beneficial effects of exercise and hyperthermia centers upon their ability to induce the cellular stress response (the heat shock response) and restore cellular homeostasis. Impaired stress response precedes major metabolic defects associated with t2DM and may be a near seminal event in the pathogenesis of the disease, tipping the balance from health into disease. Heat shock protein inducers share metabolic pathways associated with exercise with activation of AMPK, PGC1-a, and sirtuins. Diabetic therapies that induce the stress response, whether via heat, bioactive compounds, or genetic manipulation, improve or prevent all of the morbidities and comorbidities associated with the disease. The agents reduce insulin resistance, inflammatory cytokines, visceral adiposity, and body weight while increasing mitochondrial activity, normalizing membrane structure and lipid composition, and preserving organ function. Therapies restoring the stress response can re-tip the balance from disease into health and address the multifaceted defects associated with the disease.

  5. Reviewing the current evidence supporting early B-cells as the cellular origin of Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sauer, C M; Haugg, A M; Chteinberg, E; Rennspiess, D; Winnepenninckx, V; Speel, E-J; Becker, J C; Kurz, A K; Zur Hausen, A

    2017-08-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly malignant skin cancer characterized by early metastases and poor survival. Although MCC is a rare malignancy, its incidence is rapidly increasing in the U.S. and Europe. The discovery of the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has enormously impacted our understanding of its etiopathogenesis and biology. MCCs are characterized by trilinear differentiation, comprising the expression of neuroendocrine, epithelial and B-lymphoid lineage markers. To date, it is generally accepted that the initial assumption of MCC originating from Merkel cells (MCs) is unlikely. This is owed to their post-mitotic character, absence of MCPyV in MCs and discrepant protein expression pattern in comparison to MCC. Evidence from mouse models suggests that epidermal/dermal stem cells might be of cellular origin in MCC. The recently formulated hypothesis of MCC originating from early B-cells is based on morphology, the consistent expression of early B-cell lineage markers and the finding of clonal immunoglobulin chain rearrangement in MCC cells. In this review we elaborate on the cellular ancestry of MCC, the identification of which could pave the way for novel and more effective therapeutic regimens. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical factors that influence the cellular responses of saphenous veins used for arterial bypass.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Michael; Kikuchi, Shinsuke; Chen, Lihua; Tang, Gale L; Wight, Tom N; Kenagy, Richard D

    2018-06-15

    When an autogenous vein is harvested and used for arterial bypass, it suffers physical and biologic injuries that may set in motion the cellular processes that lead to wall thickening, fibrosis, stenosis, and ultimately graft failure. Whereas the injurious effects of surgical preparation of the vein conduit have been extensively studied, little is known about the influence of the clinical environment of the donor leg from which the vein is obtained. We studied the cellular responses of fresh saphenous vein samples obtained before implantation in 46 patients undergoing elective lower extremity bypass surgery. Using an ex vivo model of response to injury, we quantified the outgrowth of cells from explants of the adventitial and medial layers of the vein. We correlated this cellular outgrowth with the clinical characteristics of the patients, including the Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection classification of the donor leg for ischemia, wounds, and infection as well as smoking and diabetes. Cellular outgrowth was significantly faster and more robust from the adventitial layer than from the medial layer. The factors of leg ischemia (P < .001), smoking (P = .042), and leg infection (P = .045) were associated with impaired overall outgrowth from the adventitial tissue on multivariable analysis. Only ischemia (P = .046) was associated with impaired outgrowth of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from the medial tissue. Co-culture of adventitial cells and SMCs propagated from vein explants revealed that adventitial cells significantly inhibited the growth of SMCs, whereas SMCs promoted the growth of adventitial cells. The AA genotype of the -838C>A p27 polymorphism (previously associated with superior graft patency) enhanced these effects, whereas the factor of smoking attenuated adventitial cell inhibition of SMC growth. Comparing gene expression, the cells cultured from the media overexpress Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways associated with inflammation and

  7. Somatic mutations reveal asymmetric cellular dynamics in the early human embryo

    DOE PAGES

    Ju, Young Seok; Martincorena, Inigo; Gerstung, Moritz; ...

    2017-03-22

    Somatic cells acquire mutations throughout the course of an individual’s life. Mutations occurring early in embryogenesis are often present in a substantial proportion of, but not all, cells in postnatal humans and thus have particular characteristics and effects. Depending on their location in the genome and the proportion of cells they are present in, these mosaic mutations can cause a wide range of genetic disease syndromes and predispose carriers to cancer. They have a high chance of being transmitted to offspring as de novo germline mutations and, in principle, can provide insights into early human embryonic cell lineages and theirmore » contributions to adult tissues. Although it is known that gross chromosomal abnormalities are remarkably common in early human embryos, our understanding of early embryonic somatic mutations is very limited. Here we use whole-genome sequences of normal blood from 241 adults to identify 163 early embryonic mutations. We estimate that approximately three base substitution mutations occur per cell per cell-doubling event in early human embryogenesis and these are mainly attributable to two known mutational signatures. We used the mutations to reconstruct developmental lineages of adult cells and demonstrate that the two daughter cells of many early embryonic cell-doubling events contribute asymmetrically to adult blood at an approximately 2:1 ratio. As a result, this study therefore provides insights into the mutation rates, mutational processes and developmental outcomes of cell dynamics that operate during early human embryogenesis.« less

  8. Somatic mutations reveal asymmetric cellular dynamics in the early human embryo

    SciT

    Ju, Young Seok; Martincorena, Inigo; Gerstung, Moritz

    Somatic cells acquire mutations throughout the course of an individual’s life. Mutations occurring early in embryogenesis are often present in a substantial proportion of, but not all, cells in postnatal humans and thus have particular characteristics and effects. Depending on their location in the genome and the proportion of cells they are present in, these mosaic mutations can cause a wide range of genetic disease syndromes and predispose carriers to cancer. They have a high chance of being transmitted to offspring as de novo germline mutations and, in principle, can provide insights into early human embryonic cell lineages and theirmore » contributions to adult tissues. Although it is known that gross chromosomal abnormalities are remarkably common in early human embryos, our understanding of early embryonic somatic mutations is very limited. Here we use whole-genome sequences of normal blood from 241 adults to identify 163 early embryonic mutations. We estimate that approximately three base substitution mutations occur per cell per cell-doubling event in early human embryogenesis and these are mainly attributable to two known mutational signatures. We used the mutations to reconstruct developmental lineages of adult cells and demonstrate that the two daughter cells of many early embryonic cell-doubling events contribute asymmetrically to adult blood at an approximately 2:1 ratio. As a result, this study therefore provides insights into the mutation rates, mutational processes and developmental outcomes of cell dynamics that operate during early human embryogenesis.« less

  9. DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate nanoparticles elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhakta, Gajadhar; Nurcombe, Victor; Maitra, Amarnath; Shrivastava, Anju

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of pEGFP (plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein)-encapsulated PEGylated (meaning polyethylene glycol coated) magnesium phosphate nanoparticles (referred to as MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles) for the induction of immune responses was investigated in a mouse model. MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles induced enhanced serum antibody and antigen-specific T-lymphocyte responses, as well as increased IFN-? and IL-12 levels compared to naked pEGFP when administered via intravenous, intraperitoneal or intramuscular routes. A significant macrophage response, both in size and activity, was also observed when mice were immunized with the nanoparticle formulation. The response was highly specific for the antigen, as the increase in interaction between macrophages and lymphocytes as well as lymphocyte proliferation took place only when they were re-stimulated with recombinant green fluorescence protein (rGFP). Thus the nanoparticle formulation elicited both humoral as well as cellular responses. Cytokine profiling revealed the induction of Th-1 type responses. The results suggest DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate (MgPi) nanoparticles may constitute a safer, more stable and cost-efficient DNA vaccine formulation. PMID:24936399

  10. Long-term memory cellular immune response to dengue virus after a natural primary infection.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Beatríz; García, Gissel; Pérez, Ana B; Morier, Luis; Rodríguez, Rayner; Alvarez, Mayling; Guzmán, María G

    2002-06-01

    This study was conducted to examine the memory T-cell response to dengue virus 20 years after a primary infection. We took advantage of the exceptional epidemiologic situation in Cuba, where the population initially suffered two large successive epidemics due to dengue virus 1 and 2 respectively over a 4-year period. Thereafter, no dengue virus circulation was subsequently observed, except for the Santiago de Cuba municipality. T-cell response was evaluated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 20 individuals with history of a primary infection by dengue virus 1 or 2. Methods previously shown to induce lymphoproliferation of CD4+ memory T-cell subpopulations were used. We evaluated the proliferative responses generated in those PBMCs after stimulation with dengue virus 1, 2, 3 and 4 antigens in a serotype-specific and serotype-crossreactive way. Serotype-specific and serotype-crossreactive lymphoproliferative responses in all PBMCs donated by dengue immune donors were observed. The serotype-crossreactive response for dengue 2 was stronger than for the rest of the serotypes. This is the first report of cellular memory lymphocyte response specific for dengue virus detected 20 years after a primary infection by dengue.

  11. Microbial Degradation of Cellular Kinases Impairs Innate Immune Signaling and Paracrine TNFα Responses

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Kenneth; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2016-01-01

    The NFκB and MAPK signaling pathways are critical components of innate immunity that orchestrate appropriate immune responses to control and eradicate pathogens. Their activation results in the induction of proinflammatory mediators, such as TNFα a potent bioactive molecule commonly secreted by recruited inflammatory cells, allowing for paracrine signaling at the site of an infection. In this study we identified a novel mechanism by which the opportunistic pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis dampens innate immune responses by disruption of kinase signaling and degradation of inflammatory mediators. The intracellular immune kinases RIPK1, TAK1, and AKT were selectively degraded by the P. gingivalis lysine-specific gingipain (Kgp) in human endothelial cells, which correlated with dysregulated innate immune signaling. Kgp was also observed to attenuate endothelial responsiveness to TNFα, resulting in a reduction in signal flux through AKT, ERK and NFκB pathways, as well as a decrease in downstream proinflammatory mRNA induction of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. A deficiency in Kgp activity negated decreases to host cell kinase protein levels and responsiveness to TNFα. Given the essential role of kinase signaling in immune responses, these findings highlight a unique mechanism of pathogen-induced immune dysregulation through inhibition of cell activation, paracrine signaling, and dampened cellular proinflammatory responses. PMID:27698456

  12. Cellular Response to a Novel Fetal Acellular Collagen Matrix: Implications for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rennert, Robert C.; Garg, Ravi K.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. PriMatrix (TEI Biosciences Inc., Boston, MA, USA) is a novel acellular collagen matrix derived from fetal bovine dermis that is designed for use in partial- and full-thickness wounds. This study analyzes the cellular response to PriMatrix in vivo, as well as the ability of this matrix to facilitate normal tissue regeneration. Methods. Five by five mm squares of rehydrated PriMatrix were implanted in a subcutaneous fashion on the dorsum of wild-type mice. Implant site tissue was harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and flow cytometric analyses at multiple time points until day 28. Results. PriMatrix implants were found to go through a biological progression initiated by a transient infiltrate of inflammatory cells, followed by mesenchymal cell recruitment and vascular development. IHC analysis revealed that the majority of the implanted fetal dermal collagen fibers persisted through day 28 but underwent remodeling and cellular repopulation to form tissue with a density and morphology consistent with healthy dermis. Conclusions. PriMatrix implants undergo progressive in vivo remodeling, facilitating the regeneration of histologically normal tissue through a mild inflammatory and progenitor cell response. Regeneration of normal tissue is especially important in a wound environment, and these findings warrant further investigation of PriMatrix in this setting. PMID:23970899

  13. Cellular response to a novel fetal acellular collagen matrix: implications for tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Robert C; Sorkin, Michael; Garg, Ravi K; Januszyk, Michael; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. PriMatrix (TEI Biosciences Inc., Boston, MA, USA) is a novel acellular collagen matrix derived from fetal bovine dermis that is designed for use in partial- and full-thickness wounds. This study analyzes the cellular response to PriMatrix in vivo, as well as the ability of this matrix to facilitate normal tissue regeneration. Methods. Five by five mm squares of rehydrated PriMatrix were implanted in a subcutaneous fashion on the dorsum of wild-type mice. Implant site tissue was harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and flow cytometric analyses at multiple time points until day 28. Results. PriMatrix implants were found to go through a biological progression initiated by a transient infiltrate of inflammatory cells, followed by mesenchymal cell recruitment and vascular development. IHC analysis revealed that the majority of the implanted fetal dermal collagen fibers persisted through day 28 but underwent remodeling and cellular repopulation to form tissue with a density and morphology consistent with healthy dermis. Conclusions. PriMatrix implants undergo progressive in vivo remodeling, facilitating the regeneration of histologically normal tissue through a mild inflammatory and progenitor cell response. Regeneration of normal tissue is especially important in a wound environment, and these findings warrant further investigation of PriMatrix in this setting.

  14. On the mechanism of Cr (VI)-induced carcinogenesis: dose dependence of uptake and cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Husler, J; Ye, J; Leonard, S S; Cutler, D; Chen, F; Wang, S; Zhang, Z; Ding, M; Wang, L; Shi, X

    2001-06-01

    Cr (VI) compounds are widely used industrial chemicals and are recognized human carcinogens. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with these compounds remain to be investigated. The present study focused on dose-dependence of Cr (VI)-induced uptake and cellular responses. The results show that Cr (VI) is able to enter the cells (human lung epithelial cell line A549) at low concentration (< 10 microM) and that the Cr (VI) uptake appears to be a combination of saturable transport and passive diffusion. Electron spin resonance (ESR) trapping measurements showed that upon stimulation with Cr (VI), A549 cells were able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amount of ROS generated depended on the Cr (VI) concentration. ROS generation involved NADPH-dependent flavoenzymes. Cr (VI) affected the following cellular parameters in a dose-dependent manner, (a) activation of nuclear transcription factors NF-kappaB, and p53, (b) DNA damage, (c) induction of cell apoptosis, and (d) inhibition of cell proliferation. The activation of transcription factors was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and western blot analysis, DNA damage by single cell gel electrophoresis assay, cell apoptosis by DNA fragmentation assay, and cell proliferation by a non-radioactive ELISA kit. At the concentration range used in the present study, no thresholds were found in all of these cell responses to Cr (VI). The results may guide further research to better understand and evaluate the risk of Cr (VI)-induced carcinogenesis at low levels of exposure.

  15. Cellular Response to Doping of High Porosity Foamed Alumina with Ca, P, Mg, and Si.

    PubMed

    Soh, Edwin; Kolos, Elizabeth; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-03-13

    Foamed alumina was previously synthesised by direct foaming of sulphate salt blends varying ammonium mole fraction (AMF), foaming heating rate and sintering temperature. The optimal product was produced with 0.33AMF, foaming at 100 °C/h and sintering at 1600 °C. This product attained high porosity of 94.39%, large average pore size of 300 µm and the highest compressive strength of 384 kPa. To improve bioactivity, doping of porous alumina by soaking in dilute or saturated solutions of Ca, P, Mg, CaP or CaP + Mg was done. Saturated solutions of Ca, P, Mg, CaP and CaP + Mg were made with excess salt in distilled water and decanted. Dilute solutions were made by diluting the 100% solution to 10% concentration. Doping with Si was done using the sol gel method at 100% concentration only. Cell culture was carried out with MG63 osteosarcoma cells. Cellular response to the Si and P doped samples was positive with high cell populations and cell layer formation. The impact of doping with phosphate produced a result not previously reported. The cellular response showed that both Si and P doping improved the biocompatibility of the foamed alumina.

  16. A Library of Phosphoproteomic and Chromatin Signatures for Characterizing Cellular Responses to Drug Perturbations.

    PubMed

    Litichevskiy, Lev; Peckner, Ryan; Abelin, Jennifer G; Asiedu, Jacob K; Creech, Amanda L; Davis, John F; Davison, Desiree; Dunning, Caitlin M; Egertson, Jarrett D; Egri, Shawn; Gould, Joshua; Ko, Tak; Johnson, Sarah A; Lahr, David L; Lam, Daniel; Liu, Zihan; Lyons, Nicholas J; Lu, Xiaodong; MacLean, Brendan X; Mungenast, Alison E; Officer, Adam; Natoli, Ted E; Papanastasiou, Malvina; Patel, Jinal; Sharma, Vagisha; Toder, Courtney; Tubelli, Andrew A; Young, Jennie Z; Carr, Steven A; Golub, Todd R; Subramanian, Aravind; MacCoss, Michael J; Tsai, Li-Huei; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2018-04-25

    Although the value of proteomics has been demonstrated, cost and scale are typically prohibitive, and gene expression profiling remains dominant for characterizing cellular responses to perturbations. However, high-throughput sentinel assays provide an opportunity for proteomics to contribute at a meaningful scale. We present a systematic library resource (90 drugs × 6 cell lines) of proteomic signatures that measure changes in the reduced-representation phosphoproteome (P100) and changes in epigenetic marks on histones (GCP). A majority of these drugs elicited reproducible signatures, but notable cell line- and assay-specific differences were observed. Using the "connectivity" framework, we compared signatures across cell types and integrated data across assays, including a transcriptional assay (L1000). Consistent connectivity among cell types revealed cellular responses that transcended lineage, and consistent connectivity among assays revealed unexpected associations between drugs. We further leveraged the resource against public data to formulate hypotheses for treatment of multiple myeloma and acute lymphocytic leukemia. This resource is publicly available at https://clue.io/proteomics. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular Mechanism for Cellular Response to β-Escin and Its Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Dominik; Zegrocka-Stendel, Oliwia; Perzanowska, Anna; Dutkiewicz, Malgorzata; Kowalewska, Magdalena; Grabowska, Iwona; Maciejko, Dorota; Fogtman, Anna; Dadlez, Michal; Koziak, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    β-escin is a mixture of triterpene saponins isolated from the horse chestnut seeds (Aesculus hippocastanum L.). The anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory and venotonic properties of β-escin have been the most extensively clinically investigated effects of this plant-based drug and randomized controlled trials have proved the efficacy of β-escin for the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency. However, despite the clinical recognition of the drug its pharmacological mechanism of action still remains largely elusive. To determine the cellular and molecular basis for the therapeutic effectiveness of β-escin we performed discovery and targeted proteomic analyses and in vitro evaluation of cellular and molecular responses in human endothelial cells under inflammatory conditions. Our results demonstrate that in endothelial cells β-escin potently induces cholesterol synthesis which is rapidly followed with marked fall in actin cytoskeleton integrity. The concomitant changes in cell functioning result in a significantly diminished responses to TNF-α stimulation. These include reduced migration, alleviated endothelial monolayer permeability, and inhibition of NFκB signal transduction leading to down-expression of TNF-α-induced effector proteins. Moreover, the study provides evidence for novel therapeutic potential of β-escin beyond the current vascular indications.

  18. Molecular Mechanism for Cellular Response to β-Escin and Its Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Perzanowska, Anna; Dutkiewicz, Malgorzata; Kowalewska, Magdalena; Grabowska, Iwona; Maciejko, Dorota; Fogtman, Anna; Dadlez, Michal; Koziak, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    β-escin is a mixture of triterpene saponins isolated from the horse chestnut seeds (Aesculus hippocastanum L.). The anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory and venotonic properties of β-escin have been the most extensively clinically investigated effects of this plant-based drug and randomized controlled trials have proved the efficacy of β-escin for the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency. However, despite the clinical recognition of the drug its pharmacological mechanism of action still remains largely elusive. To determine the cellular and molecular basis for the therapeutic effectiveness of β-escin we performed discovery and targeted proteomic analyses and in vitro evaluation of cellular and molecular responses in human endothelial cells under inflammatory conditions. Our results demonstrate that in endothelial cells β-escin potently induces cholesterol synthesis which is rapidly followed with marked fall in actin cytoskeleton integrity. The concomitant changes in cell functioning result in a significantly diminished responses to TNF-α stimulation. These include reduced migration, alleviated endothelial monolayer permeability, and inhibition of NFκB signal transduction leading to down-expression of TNF-α—induced effector proteins. Moreover, the study provides evidence for novel therapeutic potential of β-escin beyond the current vascular indications. PMID:27727329

  19. An improved sample loading technique for cellular metabolic response monitoring under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gikunda, Millicent Nkirote

    To monitor cellular metabolism under pressure, a pressure chamber designed around a simple-to-construct capillary-based spectroscopic chamber coupled to a microliter-flow perfusion system is used in the laboratory. Although cyanide-induced metabolic responses from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) could be controllably induced and monitored under pressure, previously used sample loading technique was not well controlled. An improved cell-loading technique which is based on use of a secondary inner capillary into which the sample is loaded then inserted into the capillary pressure chamber, has been developed. As validation, we demonstrate the ability to measure the chemically-induced metabolic responses at pressures of up to 500 bars. This technique is shown to be less prone to sample loss due to perfusive flow than the previous techniques used.

  20. Lengthening our perspective: morphological, cellular, and molecular responses to eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Hyldahl, Robert D; Hubal, Monica J

    2014-02-01

    The response of skeletal muscle to unaccustomed eccentric exercise has been studied widely, yet it is incompletely understood. This review is intended to provide an up-to-date overview of our understanding of how skeletal muscle responds to eccentric actions, with particular emphasis on the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of damage and recovery. This review begins by addressing the question of whether eccentric actions result in physical damage to muscle fibers and/or connective tissue. We next review the symptomatic manifestations of eccentric exercise (i.e., indirect damage markers, such as delayed onset muscle soreness), with emphasis on their relatively poorly understood molecular underpinnings. We then highlight factors that potentially modify the muscle damage response following eccentric exercise. Finally, we explore the utility of using eccentric training to improve muscle function in populations of healthy and aging individuals, as well as those living with neuromuscular disorders. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Early Anthropogenic Hypothesis: Challenges and Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddiman, William F.

    2007-12-01

    Ruddiman (2003) proposed that late Holocene anthropogenic intervention caused CH4 and CO2 increases that kept climate from cooling and that preindustrial pandemics caused CO2 decreases and a small cooling. Every aspect of this early anthropogenic hypothesis has been challenged: the timescale, the issue of stage 11 as a better analog, the ability of human activities to account for the gas anomalies, and the impact of the pandemics. This review finds that the late Holocene gas trends are anomalous in all ice timescales; greenhouse gases decreased during the closest stage 11 insolation analog; disproportionate biomass burning and rice irrigation can explain the methane anomaly; and pandemics explain half of the CO2 decrease since 1000 years ago. Only ˜25% of the CO2 anomaly can, however, be explained by carbon from early deforestation. The remainder must have come from climate system feedbacks, including a Holocene ocean that remained anomalously warm because of anthropogenic intervention.

  2. Impaired cellular immune response to tetanus toxoid but not to cytomegalovirus in effectively HAART-treated HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Alsina, Laia; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Fortuny, Clàudia

    2013-05-07

    Despite of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the response to vaccines in HIV-infected children is poor and short-lived, probably due to a defect in cellular immune responses. We compared the cellular immune response (assessed in terms of IFN-γ production) to tetanus toxoid and to cytomegalovirus in a series of 13 HIV-perinatally-infected children and adolescents with optimal immunovirological response to first line antiretroviral therapy, implemented during chronic infection. A stronger cellular response to cytomegalovirus (11 out of 13 patients) was observed, as compared to tetanus toxoid (1 out of 13; p=0.003). These results suggest that the repeated exposition to CMV, as opposed to the past exposition to TT, is able to maintain an effective antigen-specific immune response in stable HIV-infected pediatric patients and strengthen current recommendations on immunization practices in these children. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. 7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    SciT

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations withmore » a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.« less

  4. Humoral and cellular immune responses after influenza vaccination in patients with postcancer fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Prinsen, Hetty; van Laarhoven, Hanneke WM; Pots, Jeanette M; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Mulder, Sasja F; van Herpen, Carla ML; Jacobs, Joannes FM; Leer, Jan Willem H; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Stelma, Foekje F; Torensma, Ruurd; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare humoral and cellular immune responses to influenza vaccination in cancer survivors with and without severe symptoms of fatigue. Severely fatigued (n = 15) and non-fatigued (n = 12) disease-free cancer survivors were vaccinated against seasonal influenza. Humoral immunity was evaluated at baseline and post-vaccination by a hemagglutination inhibition assay. Cellular immunity was evaluated at baseline and post-vaccination by lymphocyte proliferation and activation assays. Regulatory T cells were measured at baseline by flow cytometry and heat-shock protein 90 alpha levels by ELISA. Comparable humoral immune responses were observed in fatigued and non-fatigued patients, both pre- and post-vaccination. At baseline, fatigued patients showed a significantly diminished cellular proliferation upon virus stimulation with strain H3N2 (1414 ± 1201 counts), and a trend in a similar direction with strain H1N1 (3025 ± 2339 counts), compared to non-fatigued patients (3099 ± 2401 and 5877 ± 4604 counts, respectively). The percentage of regulatory T lymphocytes was significantly increased (4.4 ± 2.1% versus 2.4 ± 0.8%) and significantly lower amounts of interleukin 2 were detected prior to vaccination in fatigued compared to non-fatigued patients (36.3 ± 44.3 pg/ml vs. 94.0 ± 45.4 pg/ml with strain H3N2 and 28.4 ± 44.0 pg/ml versus 74.5 ± 56.1 pg/ml with strain H1N1). Pre-vaccination heat-shock protein 90 alpha concentrations, post-vaccination cellular proliferation, and post-vaccination cytokine concentrations did not differ between both groups. In conclusion, influenza vaccination is favorable for severely fatigued cancer survivors and should be recommended when indicated. However, compared to non-fatigued cancer survivors, fatigued cancer survivors showed several significant differences in immunological reactivity at baseline, which warrants further investigation. PMID:25996472

  5. Uninfected Bystander Cells Impact the Measurement of HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jonathan; Prévost, Jérémie; Baxter, Amy E; von Bredow, Benjamin; Ding, Shilei; Medjahed, Halima; Delgado, Gloria G; Brassard, Nathalie; Stürzel, Christina M; Kirchhoff, Frank; Hahn, Beatrice H; Parsons, Matthew S; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Evans, David T; Finzi, Andrés

    2018-03-20

    The conformation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) substantially impacts antibody recognition and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses. In the absence of the CD4 receptor at the cell surface, primary Envs sample a "closed" conformation that occludes CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes. The virus controls CD4 expression through the actions of Nef and Vpu accessory proteins, thus protecting infected cells from ADCC responses. However, gp120 shed from infected cells can bind to CD4 present on uninfected bystander cells, sensitizing them to ADCC mediated by CD4i antibodies (Abs). Therefore, we hypothesized that these bystander cells could impact the interpretation of ADCC measurements. To investigate this, we evaluated the ability of antibodies to CD4i epitopes and broadly neutralizing Abs (bNAbs) to mediate ADCC measured by five ADCC assays commonly used in the field. Our results indicate that the uninfected bystander cells coated with gp120 are efficiently recognized by the CD4i ligands but not the bNabs. Consequently, the uninfected bystander cells substantially affect in vitro measurements made with ADCC assays that fail to identify responses against infected versus uninfected cells. Moreover, using an mRNA flow technique that detects productively infected cells, we found that the vast majority of HIV-1-infected cells in in vitro cultures or ex vivo samples from HIV-1-infected individuals are CD4 negative and therefore do not expose significant levels of CD4i epitopes. Altogether, our results indicate that ADCC assays unable to differentiate responses against infected versus uninfected cells overestimate responses mediated by CD4i ligands. IMPORTANCE Emerging evidence supports a role for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in protection against HIV-1 transmission and disease progression. However, there are conflicting reports regarding the ability of nonneutralizing antibodies targeting CD4-inducible (CD4i) Env epitopes to mediate

  6. Investigating the Cellular and Metabolic Responses of World-Class Canoeists Training: A Sportomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Wagner Santos; Viveiros de Castro, Luis; Deane, Elizabeth; Magno-França, Alexandre; Bassini, Adriana; Cameron, Luiz-Claudio

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: We have been using the Sportomics approach to evaluate biochemical and hematological changes in response to exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic and hematologic responses of world-class canoeists during a training session; (2) Methods: Blood samples were taken at different points and analyzed for their hematological properties, activities of selected enzymes, hormones, and metabolites; (3) Results: Muscle stress biomarkers were elevated in response to exercise which correlated with modifications in the profile of white blood cells, where a leukocyte rise was observed after the canoe session. These results were accompanied by an increase in other exercise intensity parameters such as lactatemia and ammonemia. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol increased during the exercise sessions. The acute rise in both erythrocytes and white blood profile were probably due to muscle cell damage, rather than hepatocyte integrity impairment; (4) Conclusion: The cellular and metabolic responses found here, together with effective nutrition support, are crucial to understanding the effects of exercise in order to assist in the creation of new training and recovery planning. Also we show that Sportomics is a primal tool for training management and performance improvement, as well as to the understanding of metabolic response to exercise. PMID:27845704

  7. Accelerated telomere shortening: Tracking the lasting impact of early institutional care at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Kathryn L; Esteves, Kyle; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A; Drury, Stacy S

    2016-12-30

    Studies examining the association between early adversity and longitudinal changes in telomere length within the same individual are rare, yet are likely to provide novel insight into the subsequent lasting effects of negative early experiences. We sought to examine the association between institutional care history and telomere shortening longitudinally across middle childhood and into adolescence. Buccal DNA was collected 2-4 times, between the ages of 6 and 15 years, in 79 children enrolled in the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP), a longitudinal study exploring the impact of early institutional rearing on child health and development. Children with a history of early institutional care (n=50) demonstrated significantly greater telomere shortening across middle childhood and adolescence compared to never institutionalized children (n=29). Among children with a history of institutional care, randomization to high quality foster care was not associated with differential telomere attrition across development. Cross-sectional analysis of children randomized to the care as usual group indicated shorter telomere length was associated with greater percent of the child's life spent in institutional care up to age 8. These results suggest that early adverse care from severe psychosocial deprivation may be embedded at the molecular genetic level through accelerated telomere shortening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Accelerated telomere shortening: Tracking the lasting impact of early institutional care at the cellular level

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Kathryn L.; Esteves, Kyle; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A.; Drury, Stacy S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies examining the association between early adversity and longitudinal changes in telomere length within the same individual are rare, yet are likely to provide novel insight into the subsequent lasting effects of negative early experiences. We sought to examine the association between institutional care history and telomere shortening longitudinally across middle childhood and into adolescence. Buccal DNA was collected 2 to 4 times, between the ages of 6 and 15 years, in 79 children enrolled in the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP), a longitudinal study exploring the impact of early institutional rearing on child health and development. Children with a history of early institutional care (n=50) demonstrated significantly greater telomere shortening across middle childhood and adolescence compared to never institutionalized children (n=29). Among children with a history of institutional care, randomization to high quality foster care was not associated with differential telomere attrition across development. Cross-sectional analysis of children randomized to the care as usual group indicated shorter telomere length was associated with greater percent of the child’s life spent in institutional care up to age 8. These results suggest that early adverse care from severe psychosocial deprivation may be embedded at the molecular genetic level through accelerated telomere shortening. PMID:27677058

  9. Proteomic identification of early salicylate- and flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Huoming; Yu, Boying; Xiong, Liming; Xia, Yiji

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the early defense responses against pathogen infection in plants. The mechanism about the initial and direct regulation of the defense signaling pathway by ROS remains elusive. Perturbation of cellular redox homeostasis by ROS is believed to alter functions of redox-sensitive proteins through their oxidative modifications. Here we report an OxiTRAQ-based proteomic study in identifying proteins whose cysteines underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells during the early response to salicylate or flg22, two defense pathway elicitors that are known to disturb cellular redox homeostasis. Among the salicylate- and/or flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins are those involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, RNA processing, post-translational modifications, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. The identification of the salicylate-/flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins provides a foundation from which further study can be conducted toward understanding biological significance of their oxidative modifications during the plant defense response. PMID:25720653

  10. Cellular Immune Responses against Simian T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Target Tax in Infected Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Iris; Giret, Teresa M.; Magnani, Diogo M.; Maxwell, Helen S.; Umland, Oliver; Perry, Jessica K.; Pecotte, Jerilyn K.; Brasky, Kathleen M.; Barber, Glen N.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are currently 5 million to 10 million human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected people, and many of them will develop severe complications resulting from this infection. A vaccine is urgently needed in areas where HTLV-1 is endemic. Many vaccines are best tested in nonhuman primate animal models. As a first step in designing an effective HTLV-1 vaccine, we defined the CD8+ and CD4+ T cell response against simian T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (STLV-1), a virus closely related to HTLV-1, in olive baboons (Papio anubis). Consistent with persistent antigenic exposure, we observed that STLV-1-specific CD8+ T cells displayed an effector memory phenotype and usually expressed CD107a, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). To assess the viral targets of the cellular immune response in STLV-1-infected animals, we used intracellular cytokine staining to detect responses against overlapping peptides covering the entire STLV-1 proteome. Our results show that, similarly to humans, the baboon CD8+ T cell response narrowly targeted the Tax protein. Our findings suggest that the STLV-1-infected baboon model may recapitulate some of the important aspects of the human response against HTLV-1 and could be an important tool for the development of immune-based therapy and prophylaxis. IMPORTANCE HTLV-1 infection can lead to many different and often fatal conditions. A vaccine deployed in areas of high prevalence might reduce the incidence of HTLV-1-induced disease. Unfortunately, there are very few animal models of HTLV-1 infection useful for testing vaccine approaches. Here we describe cellular immune responses in baboons against a closely related virus, STLV-1. We show for the first time that the immune response against STLV-1 in naturally infected baboons is largely directed against the Tax protein. Similar findings in humans and the sequence similarity between the human and baboon viruses suggest that the STLV-1-infected baboon

  11. Deciphering the Acute Cellular Phosphoproteome Response to Irradiation with X-rays, Protons and Carbon Ions.

    PubMed

    Winter, Martin; Dokic, Ivana; Schlegel, Julian; Warnken, Uwe; Debus, Jürgen; Abdollahi, Amir; Schnölzer, Martina

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy is a cornerstone of cancer therapy. The recently established particle therapy with raster-scanning protons and carbon ions landmarks a new era in the field of high-precision cancer medicine. However, molecular mechanisms governing radiation induced intracellular signaling remain elusive. Here, we present the first comprehensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic study applying stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry to decipher cellular response to irradiation with X-rays, protons and carbon ions. At protein expression level limited alterations were observed 2 h post irradiation of human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, 181 phosphorylation sites were found to be differentially regulated out of which 151 sites were not hitherto attributed to radiation response as revealed by crosscheck with the PhosphoSitePlus database.Radiation-induced phosphorylation of the p(S/T)Q motif was the prevailing regulation pattern affecting proteins involved in DNA damage response signaling. Because radiation doses were selected to produce same level of cell kill and DNA double-strand breakage for each radiation quality, DNA damage responsive phosphorylation sites were regulated to same extent. However, differential phosphorylation between radiation qualities was observed for 55 phosphorylation sites indicating the existence of distinct signaling circuitries induced by X-ray versus particle (proton/carbon) irradiation beyond the canonical DNA damage response. This unexpected finding was confirmed in targeted spike-in experiments using synthetic isotope labeled phosphopeptides. Herewith, we successfully validated uniform DNA damage response signaling coexisting with altered signaling involved in apoptosis and metabolic processes induced by X-ray and particle based treatments.In summary, the comprehensive insight into the radiation-induced phosphoproteome landscape is instructive for the design of

  12. Cellular response to alkylating agent MNNG is impaired in STAT1-deficients cells.

    PubMed

    Ah-Koon, Laurent; Lesage, Denis; Lemadre, Elodie; Souissi, Inès; Fagard, Remi; Varin-Blank, Nadine; Fabre, Emmanuelle E; Schischmanoff, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    The SN 1 alkylating agents activate the mismatch repair system leading to delayed G2 /M cell cycle arrest and DNA repair with subsequent survival or cell death. STAT1, an anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic transcription factor is known to potentiate p53 and to affect DNA-damage cellular response. We studied whether STAT1 may modulate cell fate following activation of the mismatch repair system upon exposure to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Using STAT1-proficient or -deficient cell lines, we found that STAT1 is required for: (i) reduction in the extent of DNA lesions, (ii) rapid phosphorylation of T68-CHK2 and of S15-p53, (iii) progression through the G2 /M checkpoint and (iv) long-term survival following treatment with MNNG. Presence of STAT1 is critical for the formation of a p53-DNA complex comprising: STAT1, c-Abl and MLH1 following exposure to MNNG. Importantly, presence of STAT1 allows recruitment of c-Abl to p53-DNA complex and links c-Abl tyrosine kinase activity to MNNG-toxicity. Thus, our data highlight the important modulatory role of STAT1 in the signalling pathway activated by the mismatch repair system. This ability of STAT1 to favour resistance to MNNG indicates the targeting of STAT1 pathway as a therapeutic option for enhancing the efficacy of SN1 alkylating agent-based chemotherapy. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  13. Cellular immune response of pigeons in the conditions of endotoxin fever and pyrogenic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dudek, K; Bednarek, D

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in selected parameters of cellular immune response in the conditions of endotoxin fever and pyrogenic tolerance in pigeons. On the first day of observation the experimental birds (n = 18) were intravenously injected with Escherichia coli LPS at a dose of 10 microg/kg b.w., while the control animals (n = 6) received apyrogenic physiological saline also in the form of injection. On the second and the third day of the experiment LPS was injected additionally at 24 h intervals. Four and a half hours after the saline and pyrogen administration blood samples were collected from the control and experimental pigeons. The following immunological assays were performed: WBC, leucogram and immunophenotyping of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood, i.e. CD 3+ (T lymphocytes), CD 4+ (T helper lymphocytes) and CD 8+ (T suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes) cells. In the conditions of endotoxin fever (i.e. after the first LPS injection) leucopenia, monocytopenia, heterophilia and eosinophilia were observed. Additionally, the immunophenotyping of peripheral blood lymphocytes indicated an increase in percentage of CD 3+, CD 4+ and CD 8+ cells in response to the single injection of LPS. In contrast, the consecutive injections of LPS, which created a pyrogenic tolerance effect, caused a decrease in WBC value, heteropenia, eosinopenia and lymphocytosis. Moreover, during this state an increase in percentage of CD 3+ and CD 8+ cells was demonstrated in contrast to the percentage of CD 4+ lymphocytes. The general tendencies in cellular immune response of the affected pigeons in the conditions of endotoxin fever and pyrogenic tolerance aim at activation of defence mechanisms against LPS for its prompt elimination from the animal's organism.

  14. Logic-Based and Cellular Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Bortezomib Responses in U266 Human Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chudasama, Vaishali L.; Ovacik, Meric A.; Abernethy, Darrell R.

    2015-01-01

    Systems models of biological networks show promise for informing drug target selection/qualification, identifying lead compounds and factors regulating disease progression, rationalizing combinatorial regimens, and explaining sources of intersubject variability and adverse drug reactions. However, most models of biological systems are qualitative and are not easily coupled with dynamical models of drug exposure-response relationships. In this proof-of-concept study, logic-based modeling of signal transduction pathways in U266 multiple myeloma (MM) cells is used to guide the development of a simple dynamical model linking bortezomib exposure to cellular outcomes. Bortezomib is a commonly used first-line agent in MM treatment; however, knowledge of the signal transduction pathways regulating bortezomib-mediated cell cytotoxicity is incomplete. A Boolean network model of 66 nodes was constructed that includes major survival and apoptotic pathways and was updated using responses to several chemical probes. Simulated responses to bortezomib were in good agreement with experimental data, and a reduction algorithm was used to identify key signaling proteins. Bortezomib-mediated apoptosis was not associated with suppression of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) protein inhibition in this cell line, which contradicts a major hypothesis of bortezomib pharmacodynamics. A pharmacodynamic model was developed that included three critical proteins (phospho-NFκB, BclxL, and cleaved poly (ADP ribose) polymerase). Model-fitted protein dynamics and cell proliferation profiles agreed with experimental data, and the model-predicted IC50 (3.5 nM) is comparable to the experimental value (1.5 nM). The cell-based pharmacodynamic model successfully links bortezomib exposure to MM cellular proliferation via protein dynamics, and this model may show utility in exploring bortezomib-based combination regimens. PMID:26163548

  15. Cellular changes in tears associated with keratoconjunctival responses induced by nasal allergy

    PubMed Central

    Pelikan, Z

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic keratoconjunctivitis occurs in a primary form, caused by an allergic reaction localized in the conjunctiva, and in a secondary form, induced by an allergic reaction originating in the nasal mucosa. Various hypersensitivity mechanisms involved in the keratoconjunctivitis forms result in different keratoconjunctival response types. Purpose To investigate the cytologic changes in tears during the secondary immediate (SIKCR), late (SLKCR), and delayed (SDYKCR) keratoconjunctival responses. Methods In 61 patients, comprising 20 SIKCRs, 23 SLKCRs, and 18 SDYKCRs, nasal provocation tests (NPTs) with allergens and 61 phosphate-buffered control challenges were repeated and supplemented with cell counting in the tears. Results The SIKCR (P<0.01), appearing 10–120 min after the NPT, was associated with increased eosinophil and mast cell counts in tears. The SLKCR (P<0.01), appearing 5–12 h after the NPT, was accompanied by increased counts of eosinophils, neutrophils, basophils, and conjunctival epithelial and goblet cells. The SDYKCR (P<0.05), appearing 24–48 h after NPT, was associated with increased counts of lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, basophils, conjunctival epithelial, corneal epithelial and goblet cells. Conclusions The SIKCR, SLKCR, and SDYKCR, induced by nasal allergy, were associated with different cellular profiles in the tears. The cells, except mast, epithelial and goblet cells, displaying no intracellular changes, migrated probably from the conjunctival capillaries, in response to the factors released during the primary allergic reaction in the nasal mucosa and subsequently penetrating into the conjunctiva. These results demonstrate a causal role of nasal allergy and diagnostic value of NPT combined with recording of ocular features and cellular profiles in tears in some keratoconjunctivitis patients. PMID:24434662

  16. Cellular changes in tears associated with keratoconjunctival responses induced by nasal allergy.

    PubMed

    Pelikan, Z

    2014-04-01

    Allergic keratoconjunctivitis occurs in a primary form, caused by an allergic reaction localized in the conjunctiva, and in a secondary form, induced by an allergic reaction originating in the nasal mucosa. Various hypersensitivity mechanisms involved in the keratoconjunctivitis forms result in different keratoconjunctival response types. To investigate the cytologic changes in tears during the secondary immediate (SIKCR), late (SLKCR), and delayed (SDYKCR) keratoconjunctival responses. In 61 patients, comprising 20 SIKCRs, 23 SLKCRs, and 18 SDYKCRs, nasal provocation tests (NPTs) with allergens and 61 phosphate-buffered control challenges were repeated and supplemented with cell counting in the tears. The SIKCR (P<0.01), appearing 10-120 min after the NPT, was associated with increased eosinophil and mast cell counts in tears. The SLKCR (P<0.01), appearing 5-12 h after the NPT, was accompanied by increased counts of eosinophils, neutrophils, basophils, and conjunctival epithelial and goblet cells. The SDYKCR (P<0.05), appearing 24-48 h after NPT, was associated with increased counts of lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, basophils, conjunctival epithelial, corneal epithelial and goblet cells. The SIKCR, SLKCR, and SDYKCR, induced by nasal allergy, were associated with different cellular profiles in the tears. The cells, except mast, epithelial and goblet cells, displaying no intracellular changes, migrated probably from the conjunctival capillaries, in response to the factors released during the primary allergic reaction in the nasal mucosa and subsequently penetrating into the conjunctiva. These results demonstrate a causal role of nasal allergy and diagnostic value of NPT combined with recording of ocular features and cellular profiles in tears in some keratoconjunctivitis patients.

  17. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations by electron microscopy: probing cellular alterations in early carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K.; Taflove, Allen; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Backman, Vadim

    2011-04-01

    Most cancers are curable if they are diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Recent studies suggest that nanoarchitectural changes occur within cells during early carcinogenesis and that such changes precede microscopically evident tissue alterations. It follows that the ability to comprehensively interrogate cell nanoarchitecture (e.g., macromolecular complexes, DNA, RNA, proteins and lipid membranes) could be critical to the diagnosis of early carcinogenesis. We present a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of biological tissues by quantifying their degree of disorder at the nanoscale. Transmission electron microscopy images of human tissues are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. The properties of nanoscale disorder are then studied by statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the spatially localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. Our results show an increase in the disorder of human colonic epithelial cells in subjects harboring early stages of colon neoplasia. Furthermore, our findings strongly suggest that increased nanoscale disorder correlates with the degree of tumorigenicity. Therefore, the IPR technique provides a practicable tool for the detection of nanoarchitectural alterations in the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. Potential applications of the technique for early cancer screening and detection are also discussed. Originally submitted for the special focus issue on physical oncology.

  18. Early Campus Response to Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Linda J.; Zdziarski, Eugene L.

    2008-01-01

    As major events define generations and tragedies define and refine protocol response to significant incidents, a sense of comfort and confidence is attained as the authors train individually and organizationally to respond to extreme events, and yet those who have experienced them know that no plan goes as it should. There are, however, steps or…

  19. Menarche: Responses of Early Adolescent Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrory, Arlene

    1990-01-01

    Investigated responses of menarcheal age females to menarche. Results from 95 girls indicated that premenarcheal girls thought menses was more debilitating than did postmenarcheal girls. Subjects who had been menstruating longer considered menses natural event but denied its effects. Found no significant difference in overall self-esteem and…

  20. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    SciT

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cellmore » migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.« less

  1. Early Effects of Salinity on Water Transport in Arabidopsis Roots. Molecular and Cellular Features of Aquaporin Expression1

    PubMed Central

    Boursiac, Yann; Chen, Sheng; Luu, Doan-Trung; Sorieul, Mathias; van den Dries, Niels; Maurel, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Aquaporins facilitate the uptake of soil water and mediate the regulation of root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) in response to a large variety of environmental stresses. Here, we use Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants to dissect the effects of salt on both Lpr and aquaporin expression and investigate possible molecular and cellular mechanisms of aquaporin regulation in plant roots under stress. Treatment of plants by 100 mm NaCl was perceived as an osmotic stimulus and induced a rapid (half-time, 45 min) and significant (70%) decrease in Lpr, which was maintained for at least 24 h. Macroarray experiments with gene-specific tags were performed to investigate the expression of all 35 genes of the Arabidopsis aquaporin family. Transcripts from 20 individual aquaporin genes, most of which encoded members of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) and tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) subfamilies, were detected in nontreated roots. All PIP and TIP aquaporin transcripts with a strong expression signal showed a 60% to 75% decrease in their abundance between 2 and 4 h following exposure to salt. The use of antipeptide antibodies that cross-reacted with isoforms of specific aquaporin subclasses revealed that the abundance of PIP1s decreased by 40% as early as 30 min after salt exposure, whereas PIP2 and TIP1 homologs showed a 20% to 40% decrease in abundance after 6 h of treatment. Expression in transgenic plants of aquaporins fused to the green fluorescent protein revealed that the subcellular localization of TIP2;1 and PIP1 and PIP2 homologs was unchanged after 45 min of exposure to salt, whereas a TIP1;1-green fluorescent protein fusion was relocalized into intracellular spherical structures tentatively identified as intravacuolar invaginations. The appearance of intracellular structures containing PIP1 and PIP2 homologs was occasionally observed after 2 h of salt treatment. In conclusion, this work shows that exposure of roots to salt induces changes in

  2. Parallel Implementation of Triangular Cellular Automata for Computing Two-Dimensional Elastodynamic Response on Arbitrary Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leamy, Michael J.; Springer, Adam C.

    In this research we report parallel implementation of a Cellular Automata-based simulation tool for computing elastodynamic response on complex, two-dimensional domains. Elastodynamic simulation using Cellular Automata (CA) has recently been presented as an alternative, inherently object-oriented technique for accurately and efficiently computing linear and nonlinear wave propagation in arbitrarily-shaped geometries. The local, autonomous nature of the method should lead to straight-forward and efficient parallelization. We address this notion on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) hardware using a Java-based object-oriented CA code implementing triangular state machines (i.e., automata) and the MPI bindings written in Java (MPJ Express). We use MPJ Express to reconfigure our existing CA code to distribute a domain's automata to cores present on a dual quad-core shared-memory system (eight total processors). We note that this message passing parallelization strategy is directly applicable to computer clustered computing, which will be the focus of follow-on research. Results on the shared memory platform indicate nearly-ideal, linear speed-up. We conclude that the CA-based elastodynamic simulator is easily configured to run in parallel, and yields excellent speed-up on SMP hardware.

  3. Prostaglandin E2 promotes intestinal repair through an adaptive cellular response of the epithelium.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; VanDussen, Kelli L; Malvin, Nicole P; Ryu, Stacy H; Wang, Yi; Sonnek, Naomi M; Lai, Chin-Wen; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2017-01-04

    Adaptive cellular responses are often required during wound repair. Following disruption of the intestinal epithelium, wound-associated epithelial (WAE) cells form the initial barrier over the wound. Our goal was to determine the critical factor that promotes WAE cell differentiation. Using an adaptation of our in vitro primary epithelial cell culture system, we found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2 ) signaling through one of its receptors, Ptger4, was sufficient to drive a differentiation state morphologically and transcriptionally similar to in vivo WAE cells. WAE cell differentiation was a permanent state and dominant over enterocyte differentiation in plasticity experiments. WAE cell differentiation was triggered by nuclear β-catenin signaling independent of canonical Wnt signaling. Creation of WAE cells via the PGE 2 -Ptger4 pathway was required in vivo, as mice with loss of Ptger4 in the intestinal epithelium did not produce WAE cells and exhibited impaired wound repair. Our results demonstrate a mechanism by which WAE cells are formed by PGE 2 and suggest a process of adaptive cellular reprogramming of the intestinal epithelium that occurs to ensure proper repair to injury. © 2016 The Authors.

  4. Cellular Notch responsiveness is defined by phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent signals

    PubMed Central

    Mckenzie, Grahame; Ward, George; Stallwood, Yvette; Briend, Emmanuel; Papadia, Sofia; Lennard, Andrew; Turner, Martin; Champion, Brian; Hardingham, Giles E

    2006-01-01

    Background Notch plays a wide-ranging role in controlling cell fate, differentiation and development. The PI3K-Akt pathway is a similarly conserved signalling pathway which regulates processes such as differentiation, proliferation and survival. Mice with disrupted Notch and PI3K signalling show phenotypic similarities during haematopoietic cell development, suggesting functional interaction between these pathways. Results We show that cellular responsiveness to Notch signals depends on the activity of the PI3K-Akt pathway in cells as diverse as CHO cells, primary T-cells and hippocampal neurons. Induction of the endogenous PI3K-Akt pathway in CHO cells (by the insulin pathway), in T-cells (via TCR activation) or in neurons (via TrKB activation) potentiates Notch-dependent responses. We propose that the PI3K-Akt pathway exerts its influence on Notch primarily via inhibition of GSK3-beta, a kinase known to phosphorylate and regulate Notch signals. Conclusion The PI3K-Akt pathway acts as a "gain control" for Notch signal responses. Since physiological levels of intracellular Notch are often low, coincidence with PI3K-activation may be crucial for induction of Notch-dependent responses. PMID:16507111

  5. TimeXNet Web: Identifying cellular response networks from diverse omics time-course data.

    PubMed

    Tan, Phit Ling; López, Yosvany; Nakai, Kenta; Patil, Ashwini

    2018-05-14

    Condition-specific time-course omics profiles are frequently used to study cellular response to stimuli and identify associated signaling pathways. However, few online tools allow users to analyze multiple types of high-throughput time-course data. TimeXNet Web is a web server that extracts a time-dependent gene/protein response network from time-course transcriptomic, proteomic or phospho-proteomic data, and an input interaction network. It classifies the given genes/proteins into time-dependent groups based on the time of their highest activity and identifies the most probable paths connecting genes/proteins in consecutive groups. The response sub-network is enriched in activated genes/proteins and contains novel regulators that do not show any observable change in the input data. Users can view the resultant response network and analyze it for functional enrichment. TimeXNet Web supports the analysis of high-throughput data from multiple species by providing high quality, weighted protein-protein interaction networks for 12 model organisms. http://txnet.hgc.jp/. ashwini@hgc.jp. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bone response to mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    To define the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the osteogenic response of bone to increased loading, several key steps must be defined: sensing of the mechanical signal by cells in bone, transduction of the mechanical signal to a biochemical one, and transmission of that biochemical signal to effector cells. Osteocytes are likely to serve as sensors of loading, probably via interstitial fluid flow produced during loading. Evidence is presented for the role of integrins, the cell's actin cytoskeleton, G proteins, and various intracellular signaling pathways in transducing that mechanical signal to a biochemical one. Nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and insulin-like growth factors all play important roles in these pathways. There is growing evidence for modulation of these mechanotransduction steps by endocrine factors, particularly parathyroid hormone and estrogen. The efficiency of this process is also impaired in the aged animal, yet what remains undefined is at what step mechanotransduction is affected.

  7. UV laser-ablated surface textures as potential regulator of cellular response.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Prafulla; Lai, Karen; Sung, Hak-Joon; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Kohn, Joachim

    2010-06-01

    Textured surfaces obtained by UV laser ablation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) films were used to study the effect of shape and spacing of surface features on cellular response. Two distinct patterns, cones and ripples with spacing from 2 to 25 μm, were produced. Surface features with different shapes and spacings were produced by varying pulse repetition rate, laser fluence, and exposure time. The effects of the surface texture parameters, i.e., shape and spacing, on cell attachment, proliferation, and morphology of neonatal human dermal fibroblasts and mouse fibroblasts were studied. Cell attachment was the highest in the regions with cones at ∼4 μm spacing. As feature spacing increased, cell spreading decreased, and the fibroblasts became more circular, indicating a stress-mediated cell shrinkage. This study shows that UV laser ablation is a useful alternative to lithographic techniques to produce surface patterns for controlling cell attachment and growth on biomaterial surfaces.

  8. Influence of Echinococcus multilocularis infection on reproduction and cellular immune response of mice.

    PubMed

    Antolová, D; Reiterová, K

    2010-05-01

    The influence of secondary Echinococcus multilocularis infection on reproduction and cellular immune response of mice was studied in BALB/c mice infected with 2000 E. multilocularis protoscoleces. Of the total infected mothers, 11.7% did not give birth and 10% of uninfected ones did not deliver. Both, healthy and infected mothers, produced on average 6-7 offspring per litter. The changes in production of seral IFN-gamma, TNF and IL-10 did not significantly influence the course of gravidity. On the other hand, more intensive metacestode growth was observed after the delivery. This study confirmed the ability of host organism to adapt to severe damage caused by E. multilocularis, not only in normal conditions, but also during pregnancy.

  9. Cellular Responses Evoked by Different Surface Characteristics of Intraosseous Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Feller, Liviu; Jadwat, Yusuf; Khammissa, Razia A. G.; Meyerov, Robin; Lemmer, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The properties of biomaterials, including their surface microstructural topography and their surface chemistry or surface energy/wettability, affect cellular responses such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. The nanotopography of moderately rough implant surfaces enhances the production of biological mediators in the peri-implant microenvironment with consequent recruitment of differentiating osteogenic cells to the implant surface and stimulates osteogenic maturation. Implant surfaces with moderately rough topography and with high surface energy promote osteogenesis, increase the ratio of bone-to-implant contact, and increase the bonding strength of the bone to the implant at the interface. Certain features of implant surface chemistry are also important in enhancing peri-implant bone wound healing. It is the purpose of this paper to review some of the more important features of titanium implant surfaces which have an impact on osseointegration. PMID:25767803

  10. Glutathione determination by the Tietze enzymatic recycling assay and its relationship to cellular radiation response.

    PubMed Central

    Eady, J. J.; Orta, T.; Dennis, M. F.; Stratford, M. R.; Peacock, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Large fluctuations in glutathione content were observed on a daily basis using the Tietze enzyme recycling assay in a panel of six human cell lines of varying radiosensitivity. Glutathione content tended to increase to a maximum during exponential cell proliferation, and then decreased at different rates as the cells approached plateau phase. By reference to high-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry of the fluorescent bimane derivative we were able to verify that these changes were real. However, the Tietze assay was occasionally unable to detect glutathione in two of our cell lines (MGH-U1 and AT5BIVA), although the other methods indicated its presence. The existence of an inhibitory activity responsible for these anomalies was confirmed through spiking our samples with known amounts of glutathione. We were unable to detect a direct relationship between cellular glutathione concentration and aerobic radiosensitivity in our panel of cell lines. PMID:7577452

  11. Hormesis, cellular stress response and vitagenes as critical determinants in aging and longevity.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Cornelius, Carolin; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Iavicoli, Ivo; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Calabrese, Edward J

    2011-08-01

    Understanding mechanisms of aging and determinants of life span will help to reduce age-related morbidity and facilitate healthy aging. Average lifespan has increased over the last centuries, as a consequence of medical and environmental factors, but maximal life span remains unchanged. Extension of maximal life span is currently possible in animal models with measures such as genetic manipulations and caloric restriction (CR). CR appears to prolong life by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage. But ROS formation, which is positively implicated in cellular stress response mechanisms, is a highly regulated process controlled by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways. By sensing the intracellular nutrient and energy status, the functional state of mitochondria, and the concentration of ROS produced in mitochondria, the longevity network regulates life span across species by co-ordinating information flow along its convergent, divergent and multiply branched signaling pathways, including vitagenes which are genes involved in preserving cellular homeostasis during stressful conditions. Vitagenes encode for heat shock proteins (Hsp) Hsp32, Hsp70, the thioredoxin and the sirtuin protein systems. Dietary antioxidants, such as carnosine, carnitines or polyphenols, have recently been demonstrated to be neuroprotective through the activation of hormetic pathways, including vitagenes. The hormetic dose-response, challenges long-standing beliefs about the nature of the dose-response in a lowdose zone, having the potential to affect significantly the design of pre-clinical studies and clinical trials as well as strategies for optimal patient dosing in the treatment of numerous diseases. Given the broad cytoprotective properties of the heat shock response there is now strong interest in discovering and developing pharmacological agents capable of inducing stress responses. In this review we discuss the most current and up to date

  12. Radiation-quality dependent cellular response in mutation induction in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, Hisashi; Liu, Cui Hua

    2009-09-01

    We studied cellular responses in normal human fibroblasts induced with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types, such as gamma rays, neutrons and high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions. The cells were pretreated with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations (approximately 1 mGy/7-8 h) of 137Cs gamma rays, 241Am-Be neutrons, helium, carbon and iron ions before irradiations with an X-ray challenging dose (1.5 Gy). Helium (LET = 2.3 keV/microm), carbon (LET = 13.3 keV/microm) and iron (LET = 200 keV/microm) ions were produced by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. No difference in cell-killing effect, measured by a colony forming assay, was observed among the pretreatment with different radiation types. In mutation induction, which was detected in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) locus to measure 6-thioguanine resistant clones, there was no difference in mutation frequency induced by the X-ray challenging dose between unpretreated and gamma-ray pretreated cells. In the case of the pretreatment of heavy ions, X-ray-induced mutation was around 1.8 times higher in helium-ion pretreated and 4.0 times higher in carbon-ion pretreated cells than in unpretreated cells (X-ray challenging dose alone). However, the mutation frequency in cells pretreated with iron ions was the same level as either unpretreated or gamma-ray pretreated cells. In contrast, it was reduced at 0.15 times in cells pretreated with neutrons when compared to unpretreated cells. The results show that cellular responses caused by the influence of hprt mutation induced in cells pretreated with low-dose-rate or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types were radiation-quality dependent manner.

  13. Exploring early public responses to geoengineering.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Nick; Corner, Adam; Parkhill, Karen; Spence, Alexa; Butler, Catherine; Poortinga, Wouter

    2012-09-13

    Proposals for geoengineering the Earth's climate are prime examples of emerging or 'upstream' technologies, because many aspects of their effectiveness, cost and risks are yet to be researched, and in many cases are highly uncertain. This paper contributes to the emerging debate about the social acceptability of geoengineering technologies by presenting preliminary evidence on public responses to geoengineering from two of the very first UK studies of public perceptions and responses. The discussion draws upon two datasets: qualitative data (from an interview study conducted in 42 households in 2009), and quantitative data (from a subsequent nationwide survey (n=1822) of British public opinion). Unsurprisingly, baseline awareness of geoengineering was extremely low in both cases. The data from the survey indicate that, when briefly explained to people, carbon dioxide removal approaches were preferred to solar radiation management, while significant positive correlations were also found between concern about climate change and support for different geoengineering approaches. We discuss some of the wider considerations that are likely to shape public perceptions of geoengineering as it enters the media and public sphere, and conclude that, aside from technical considerations, public perceptions are likely to prove a key element influencing the debate over questions of the acceptability of geoengineering proposals.

  14. Aluminum hydroxide colloid vaccine encapsulated in yeast shells with enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Jia, Zhenghu; Yang, Chengmao; Song, Mei; Jing, Zhe; Zhao, Yapu; Wu, Zhenzhou; Zhao, Liqing; Wei, Dongsheng; Yin, Zhinan; Hong, Zhangyong

    2018-06-01

    Aluminum salt (Alum) is one of the most important immune adjuvants approved for use in humans, however it is not suitable for vaccination against various chronic infectious diseases and cancers for not being able to induce cell-mediated (Th1) immunity. Here, we encapsulated an Alum colloid inside β-glucan particles (GPs), which are a type of natural particles derived from the yeast glucan shells, to prepare hybrid GP-Alum (GP-Al) adjuvant particles with a very uniform size of 2-4 μm. These hybrid particles can be used to load antigen proteins through a simple mixing procedure, and can be highly specifically targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and strongly activate dendritic cells (DCs) maturation and cytokine secretion. In an animal model, they elicit a strong Th1-biased immune response and extremely high antibody titer, and cause marked prophylactic and therapeutic effects against tumors. As Alum has been proven to be a safe adjuvant to induce strong humoral responses and β-glucans are safe for human use, this very uniform hybrid Alum particulate system could have important application as a vaccine carrier to stimulate humoral and cellular immune responses at the same time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cellular, physiological, and molecular adaptive responses of Erwinia amylovora to starvation.

    PubMed

    Santander, Ricardo D; Oliver, James D; Biosca, Elena G

    2014-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, a destructive disease of rosaceous plants distributed worldwide. This bacterium is a nonobligate pathogen able to survive outside the host under starvation conditions, allowing its spread by various means such as rainwater. We studied E. amylovora responses to starvation using water microcosms to mimic natural oligotrophy. Initially, survivability under optimal (28 °C) and suboptimal (20 °C) growth temperatures was compared. Starvation induced a loss of culturability much more pronounced at 28 °C than at 20 °C. Natural water microcosms at 20 °C were then used to characterize cellular, physiological, and molecular starvation responses of E. amylovora. Challenged cells developed starvation-survival and viable but nonculturable responses, reduced their size, acquired rounded shapes and developed surface vesicles. Starved cells lost motility in a few days, but a fraction retained flagella. The expression of genes related to starvation, oxidative stress, motility, pathogenicity, and virulence was detected during the entire experimental period with different regulation patterns observed during the first 24 h. Further, starved cells remained as virulent as nonstressed cells. Overall, these results provide new knowledge on the biology of E. amylovora under conditions prevailing in nature, which could contribute to a better understanding of the life cycle of this pathogen. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interplay between Ubiquitin, SUMO, and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in the Cellular Response to Genotoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Stefania; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cells employ a complex network of molecular pathways to cope with endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress. This multilayered response ensures that genomic lesions are efficiently detected and faithfully repaired in order to safeguard genome integrity. The molecular choreography at sites of DNA damage relies heavily on post-translational modifications (PTMs). Protein modifications with ubiquitin and the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO have recently emerged as important regulatory means to coordinate DNA damage signaling and repair. Both ubiquitylation and SUMOylation can lead to extensive chain-like protein modifications, a feature that is shared with yet another DNA damage-induced PTM, the modification of proteins with poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Chains of ubiquitin, SUMO, and PAR all contribute to the multi-protein assemblies found at sites of DNA damage and regulate their spatio-temporal dynamics. Here, we review recent advancements in our understanding of how ubiquitin, SUMO, and PAR coordinate the DNA damage response and highlight emerging examples of an intricate interplay between these chain-like modifications during the cellular response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27148359

  17. Time-lapse analysis of potential cellular responsiveness to Johrei, a Japanese healing technique

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Ryan; Moore, Dan; Yount, Garret

    2005-01-01

    Background Johrei is an alternative healing practice which involves the channeling of a purported universal healing energy to influence the health of another person. Despite little evidence to support the efficacy of such practices the use of such treatments is on the rise. Methods We assessed cultured human cancer cells for potential responsiveness to Johrei treatment from a short distance. Johrei treatment was delivered by practitioners who participated in teams of two, alternating every half hour for a total of four hours of treatment. The practitioners followed a defined set of mental procedures to minimize variability in mental states between experiments. An environmental chamber maintained optimal growth conditions for cells throughout the experiments. Computerized time-lapse microscopy allowed documentation of cancer cell proliferation and cell death before, during and after Johrei treatments. Results Comparing eight control experiments with eight Johrei intervention experiments, we found no evidence of a reproducible cellular response to Johrei treatment. Conclusion Cell death and proliferation rates of cultured human cancer cells do not appear responsive to Johrei treatment from a short distance. PMID:15667653

  18. Comparison of the humoral and cellular immune responses between body and head lice following bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Hyeon; Min, Jee Sun; Kang, Jae Soon; Kwon, Deok Ho; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Strycharz, Joseph; Koh, Young Ho; Pittendrigh, Barry Robert; Clark, J Marshall; Lee, Si Hyeock

    2011-05-01

    The differences in the immune response between body lice, Pediculus humanus humanus, and head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, were investigated initially by measuring the proliferation rates of two model bacteria, a Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and a Gram-negative Escherichia coli, following challenge by injection. Body lice showed a significantly reduced immune response compared to head lice particularly to E. coli at the early stage of the immune challenge. Annotation of the body louse genome identified substantially fewer immune-related genes compared with other insects. Nevertheless, all required genetic components of the major immune pathways, except for the immune deficiency (Imd) pathway, are still retained in the body louse genome. Transcriptional profiling of representative genes involved in the humoral immune response, following bacterial challenge, revealed that both body and head lice, regardless of their developmental stages, exhibited an increased immune response to S. aureus but little to E. coli. Head lice, however, exhibited a significantly higher phagocytotic activity against E. coli than body lice, whereas the phagocytosis against S. aureus differed only slightly between body and head lice. These findings suggest that the greater immune response in head lice against E. coli is largely due to enhanced phagocytosis and not due to differences in the humoral immune response. The reduced phagocytotic activity in body lice could be responsible, in part, for their increased vector competence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Uninfected Bystander Cells Impact the Measurement of HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jonathan; Prévost, Jérémie; Baxter, Amy E.; Ding, Shilei; Medjahed, Halima; Delgado, Gloria G.; Brassard, Nathalie; Stürzel, Christina M.; Kirchhoff, Frank; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Parsons, Matthew S.; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Evans, David T.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The conformation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) substantially impacts antibody recognition and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses. In the absence of the CD4 receptor at the cell surface, primary Envs sample a “closed” conformation that occludes CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes. The virus controls CD4 expression through the actions of Nef and Vpu accessory proteins, thus protecting infected cells from ADCC responses. However, gp120 shed from infected cells can bind to CD4 present on uninfected bystander cells, sensitizing them to ADCC mediated by CD4i antibodies (Abs). Therefore, we hypothesized that these bystander cells could impact the interpretation of ADCC measurements. To investigate this, we evaluated the ability of antibodies to CD4i epitopes and broadly neutralizing Abs (bNAbs) to mediate ADCC measured by five ADCC assays commonly used in the field. Our results indicate that the uninfected bystander cells coated with gp120 are efficiently recognized by the CD4i ligands but not the bNabs. Consequently, the uninfected bystander cells substantially affect in vitro measurements made with ADCC assays that fail to identify responses against infected versus uninfected cells. Moreover, using an mRNA flow technique that detects productively infected cells, we found that the vast majority of HIV-1-infected cells in in vitro cultures or ex vivo samples from HIV-1-infected individuals are CD4 negative and therefore do not expose significant levels of CD4i epitopes. Altogether, our results indicate that ADCC assays unable to differentiate responses against infected versus uninfected cells overestimate responses mediated by CD4i ligands. PMID:29559570

  20. Perturbation of gut bacteria induces a coordinated cellular immune response in the purple sea urchin larva.

    PubMed

    Ch Ho, Eric; Buckley, Katherine M; Schrankel, Catherine S; Schuh, Nicholas W; Hibino, Taku; Solek, Cynthia M; Bae, Koeun; Wang, Guizhi; Rast, Jonathan P

    2016-10-01

    The purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) genome sequence contains a complex repertoire of genes encoding innate immune recognition proteins and homologs of important vertebrate immune regulatory factors. To characterize how this immune system is deployed within an experimentally tractable, intact animal, we investigate the immune capability of the larval stage. Sea urchin embryos and larvae are morphologically simple and transparent, providing an organism-wide model to view immune response at cellular resolution. Here we present evidence for immune function in five mesenchymal cell types based on morphology, behavior and gene expression. Two cell types are phagocytic; the others interact at sites of microbial detection or injury. We characterize immune-associated gene markers for three cell types, including a perforin-like molecule, a scavenger receptor, a complement-like thioester-containing protein and the echinoderm-specific immune response factor 185/333. We elicit larval immune responses by (1) bacterial injection into the blastocoel and (2) seawater exposure to the marine bacterium Vibrio diazotrophicus to perturb immune state in the gut. Exposure at the epithelium induces a strong response in which pigment cells (one type of immune cell) migrate from the ectoderm to interact with the gut epithelium. Bacteria that accumulate in the gut later invade the blastocoel, where they are cleared by phagocytic and granular immune cells. The complexity of this coordinated, dynamic inflammatory program within the simple larval morphology provides a system in which to characterize processes that direct both aspects of the echinoderm-specific immune response as well as those that are shared with other deuterostomes, including vertebrates.

  1. Impact of Malaria Preexposure on Antiparasite Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses after Controlled Human Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Obiero, Joshua M.; Shekalaghe, Seif; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Mpina, Maxmillian; Bijker, Else M.; Roestenberg, Meta; Teelen, Karina; Billingsley, Peter F.; Sim, B. Kim Lee; James, Eric R.; Daubenberger, Claudia A.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Abdulla, Salim

    2015-01-01

    To understand the effect of previous malaria exposure on antiparasite immune responses is important for developing successful immunization strategies. Controlled human malaria infections (CHMIs) using cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites provide a unique opportunity to study differences in acquisition or recall of antimalaria immune responses in individuals from different transmission settings and genetic backgrounds. In this study, we compared antiparasite humoral and cellular immune responses in two cohorts of malaria-naive Dutch volunteers and Tanzanians from an area of low malarial endemicity, who were subjected to the identical CHMI protocol by intradermal injection of P. falciparum sporozoites. Samples from both trials were analyzed in parallel in a single center to ensure direct comparability of immunological outcomes. Within the Tanzanian cohort, we distinguished one group with moderate levels of preexisting antibodies to asexual P. falciparum lysate and another that, based on P. falciparum serology, resembled the malaria-naive Dutch cohort. Positive P. falciparum serology at baseline was associated with a lower parasite density at first detection by quantitative PCR (qPCR) after CHMI than that for Tanzanian volunteers with negative serology. Post-CHMI, both Tanzanian groups showed a stronger increase in anti-P. falciparum antibody titers than Dutch volunteers, indicating similar levels of B-cell memory independent of serology. In contrast to the Dutch, Tanzanians failed to increase P. falciparum-specific in vitro recall gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production after CHMI, and innate IFN-γ responses were lower in P. falciparum lysate-seropositive individuals than in seronegative individuals. In conclusion, positive P. falciparum lysate serology can be used to identify individuals with better parasite control but weaker IFN-γ responses in circulating lymphocytes, which may help to stratify volunteers in future CHMI trials in areas where malaria is

  2. Utilization of the cellular stress response to sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Siegelin, Markus David

    2012-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising death ligand who has received significant attention due to its specific anti-cancer activity. Recently, a number of clinical trials involving either recombinant soluble TRAIL or agonistic death receptor (DR) antibodies have even been initiated. One major caveat in TRAIL-based anti-cancer therapies is that a considerable number of cancer cells are notorious resistant to apoptosis induction by TRAIL. Overcoming this primary or secondary evolved resistance is an utmost important goal of present cancer research. The current literature suggests that TRAIL resistance is mediated by a number of endogenous factors. According to recent research, stress-related transcription factors have acquired a pivotal role in the sensitization of highly resistant cancer cells, for example, pancreatic cancer and glioblastoma cells, to TRAIL-mediated cell death. Out of this transcription factor family, C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) is linked to the control of DR-mediated apoptosis by modulation of several apoptotic and anti-apoptotic factors. Stress responses in certain organelles, such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, are potent inductors of CHOP expression. This report focuses on the influence of stress responses on endogenous or acquired resistance to extrinsic apoptosis in tumor cells and summarizes recent findings and results. The Medline and ClinicalTrials database with key words were used for this review. A potential novel treatment strategy for highly treatment-resistant tumors is the induction of a cellular stress response in cancer cells. The induction of an organelle-related stress response, such as nuclear, ER and mitochondrial stress, leads to a dramatic sensitization of a broad variety of cancer cells of different tumor entities to the apoptotic ligand, TRAIL. Importantly, non-neoplastic cells are not sensitized to TRAIL-mediated cell death through the unfolded protein response in

  3. Staphylococcus aureus Strain Newman Photoinactivation and Cellular Response to Sunlight Exposure.

    PubMed

    McClary, Jill S; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2017-09-01

    Sunlight influences microbial water quality of surface waters. Previous studies have investigated photoinactivation mechanisms and cellular photostress responses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), including Escherichia coli and enterococci, but further work is needed to characterize photostress responses of bacterial pathogens. Here we investigate the photoinactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (strain Newman), a pigmented, waterborne pathogen of emerging concern. We measured photodecay using standard culture-based assays and cellular membrane integrity and investigated photostress response by measuring the relative number of mRNA transcripts of select oxidative stress, DNA repair, and metabolism genes. Photoinactivation experiments were performed in both oxic and anoxic systems to further investigate the role of oxygen-mediated and non-oxygen-mediated photoinactivation mechanisms. S. aureus lost culturability much faster in oxic systems than in anoxic systems, indicating an important role for oxygen in photodecay mechanisms. S. aureus cell membranes were damaged by sunlight exposure in anoxic systems but not in oxic systems, as measured by cell membrane permeability to propidium iodide. After sunlight exposure, S. aureus increased expression of a gene coding for methionine sulfoxide reductase after 12 h of sunlight exposure in the oxic system and after 6 h of sunlight exposure in the anoxic system, suggesting that methionine sulfoxide reductase is an important enzyme for defense against both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent photostresses. This research highlights the importance of oxygen in bacterial photoinactivation in environmentally relevant systems and the complexity of the bacterial photostress response with respect to cell structure and transcriptional regulation. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogenic bacterium that causes gastrointestinal, respiratory, and skin infections. In severe cases, S. aureus infection can lead to life

  4. Predicting in vivo cardiovascular properties of β-blockers from cellular assays: a quantitative comparison of cellular and cardiovascular pharmacological responses

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jillian G.; Kemp, Philip; March, Julie; Fretwell, Laurice; Hill, Stephen J.; Gardiner, Sheila M.

    2011-01-01

    β-Adrenoceptor antagonists differ in their degree of partial agonism. In vitro assays have provided information on ligand affinity, selectivity, and intrinsic efficacy. However, the extent to which these properties are manifest in vivo is less clear. Conscious freely moving rats, instrumented for measurement of heart rate (β1; HR) and hindquarters vascular conductance (β2; HVC) were used to measure receptor selectivity and ligand efficacy in vivo. CGP 20712A caused a dose-dependent decrease in basal HR (P<0.05, ANOVA) at 5 doses between 6.7 and 670 μg/kg (i.v.) and shifted the dose-response curve for isoprenaline to higher agonist concentrations without altering HVC responses. In contrast, at doses of 67 μg/kg (i.v.) and above, ICI 118551 substantially reduced the HVC response to isoprenaline without affecting HR responses. ZD 7114, xamoterol, and bucindolol significantly increased basal HR (ΔHR: +122±12, +129±11, and +59±11 beats/min, respectively; n=6), whereas other β-blockers caused significant reductions (all at 2 mg/kg i.v.). The agonist effects of xamoterol and ZD 7114 were equivalent to that of the highest dose of isoprenaline. Bucindolol, however, significantly antagonized the response to the highest doses isoprenaline. An excellent correlation was obtained between in vivo and in vitro measures of β1-adrenoceptor efficacy (R2=0.93; P<0.0001).—Baker, J. G., Kemp, P., March, J., Fretwell, L., Hill, S. J., Gardiner, S. M. Predicting in vivo cardiovascular properties of β-blockers from cellular assays: a quantitative comparison of cellular and cardiovascular pharmacological responses. PMID:21865315

  5. Early Passage Dependence of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Mechanics Influences Cellular Invasion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Stephen T; Lin, Wei-Chun; Booth, Elizabeth A; Ladoux, Benoit; Lazarus, Hillard M; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-07-01

    The cellular structures and mechanical properties of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) vary significantly during culture and with differentiation. Previously, studies to measure mechanics have provided divergent results using different quantitative parameters and mechanical models of deformation. Here, we examine hMSCs prepared for clinical use and subject them to mechanical testing conducive to the relevant deformability associated with clinical injection procedures. Micropipette aspiration of hMSCs shows deformation as a viscoelastic fluid, with little variation from cell to cell within a population. After two passages, hMSCs deform as viscoelastic solids. Further, for clinical applicability during stem cell migration in vivo, we investigated the ability of hMSCs to invade into micropillar arrays of increasing confinement from 12 to 8 μm spacing between adjacent micropillars. We find that hMSC samples with reduced deformability and cells that are more solid-like with passage are more easily able to enter the micropillar arrays. Increased cell fluidity is an advantage for injection procedures and optimization of cell selection based on mechanical properties may enhance efficacy of injected hMSC populations. However, the ability to invade and migrate within tight interstitial spaces appears to be increased with a more solidified cytoskeleton, likely from increased force generation and contractility. Thus, there may be a balance between optimal injection survival and in situ tissue invasion.

  6. Characterization of cellular immune response and innate immune signaling in human and nonhuman primate primary mononuclear cells exposed to Burkholderia mallei.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shahabuddin; Amemiya, Kei; Bernhards, Robert C; Ulrich, Robert G; Waag, David M; Saikh, Kamal U

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei infection causes melioidosis and is often characterized by severe sepsis. Although rare in humans, Burkholderia mallei has caused infections in laboratory workers, and the early innate cellular response to B. mallei in human and nonhuman primates has not been characterized. In this study, we examined the primary cellular immune response to B. mallei in PBMC cultures of non-human primates (NHPs), Chlorocebus aethiops (African Green Monkeys), Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque), and Macaca mulatta (Rhesus macaque) and humans. Our results demonstrated that B. mallei elicited strong primary pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) equivalent to the levels of B. pseudomallei in primary PBMC cultures of NHPs and humans. When we examined IL-1β and other cytokine responses by comparison to Escherichia coli LPS, African Green Monkeys appears to be most responsive to B. mallei than Cynomolgus or Rhesus. Characterization of the immune signaling mechanism for cellular response was conducted by using a ligand induced cell-based reporter assay, and our results demonstrated that MyD88 mediated signaling contributed to the B. mallei and B. pseudomallei induced pro-inflammatory responses. Notably, the induced reporter activity with B. mallei, B. pseudomallei, or purified LPS from these pathogens was inhibited and cytokine production was attenuated by a MyD88 inhibitor. Together, these results show that in the scenario of severe hyper-inflammatory responses to B. mallei infection, MyD88 targeted therapeutic intervention may be a successful strategy for therapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The nociception genes painless and Piezo are required for the cellular immune response of Drosophila larvae to wasp parasitization.

    PubMed

    Tokusumi, Yumiko; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Schulz, Robert A

    2017-05-13

    In vertebrates, interaction between the nervous system and immune system is important to protect a challenged host from stress inputs from external sources. In this study, we demonstrate that sensory neurons are involved in the cellular immune response elicited by wasp infestation of Drosophila larvae. Multidendritic class IV neurons sense contacts from external stimuli and induce avoidance behaviors for host defense. Our findings show that inactivation of these sensory neurons impairs the cellular response against wasp parasitization. We also demonstrate that the nociception genes encoding the mechanosensory receptors Painless and Piezo, both expressed in class IV neurons, are essential for the normal cellular immune response to parasite challenge. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Erika; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Takita, Hiroko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Momose, Takehito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Murakami, Shusuke; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold were, respectively, approximately 2.5-fold and 1.4-fold greater than those of the control. Particularly, the infiltration of ED2-positive (M2) macrophages and blood vessels were prominent in the GO scaffold. Dog bone-formation tests showed that 1 µg/mL GO scaffold implantation enhanced bone formation. New bone formation following GO scaffold implantation was enhanced fivefold compared to that in control subjects. These results suggest that GO was biocompatible and had high bone-formation capability for the scaffold

  9. Reduced Sleep During Social Isolation Leads to Cellular Stress and Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marishka K; Strus, Ewa; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2017-07-01

    Social isolation has a multitude of negative consequences on human health including the ability to endure challenges to the immune system, sleep amount and efficiency, and general morbidity and mortality. These adverse health outcomes are conserved in other social species. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, social isolation leads to increased aggression, impaired memory, and reduced amounts of daytime sleep. There is a correlation between molecules affected by social isolation and those implicated in sleep in Drosophila. We previously demonstrated that acute sleep loss in flies and mice induced the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive signaling pathway. One mechanism indicating UPR upregulation is elevated levels of the endoplasmic reticular chaperone BiP/GRP78. We previously showed that BiP overexpression in Drosophila led to increased sleep rebound. Increased rebound sleep has also been demonstrated in socially isolated (SI) flies. D. melanogaster were used to study the effect of social isolation on cellular stress. SI flies displayed an increase in UPR markers; there were higher BiP levels, increased phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α, and increased splicing of xbp1. These are all indicators of UPR activation. In addition, the effects of isolation on the UPR were reversible; pharmacologically and genetically altering sleep in the flies modulated the UPR. The reduction in sleep observed in SI flies is a cellular stressor that results in UPR induction. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society]. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Frequent biphasic cellular responses of permanent fish cell cultures to deoxynivalenol (DON)

    SciT

    Pietsch, Constanze, E-mail: constanze.pietsch@unibas.ch; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Wettstein, Felix E.

    Contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins is a major problem for fish feed mainly due to usage of contaminated ingredients for production and inappropriate storage of feed. The use of cereals for fish food production further increases the risk of a potential contamination. Potential contaminants include the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) which is synthesized by globally distributed fungi of the genus Fusarium. The toxicity of DON is well recognized in mammals. In this study, we confirm cytotoxic effects of DON in established permanent fish cell lines. We demonstrate that DON is capable of influencing the metabolic activity and cell viability inmore » fish cells as determined by different assays to indicate possible cellular targets of this toxin. Evaluation of cell viability by measurement of membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and lysosomal function after 24 h of exposure of fish cell lines to DON at a concentration range of 0-3000 ng ml{sup -1} shows a biphasic effect on cells although differences in sensitivity occur. The cell lines derived from rainbow trout are particularly sensitive to DON. The focus of this study lies, furthermore, on the effects of DON at different concentrations on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the different fish cell lines. The results show that DON mainly reduces ROS production in all cell lines that were used. Thus, our comparative investigations reveal that the fish cell lines show distinct species-related endpoint sensitivities that also depend on the type of tissue from which the cells were derived and the severity of exposure. - Highlights: > DON uptake by cells is not extensive. > All fish cell lines are sensitive to DON. > DON is most cytotoxic to rainbow trout cells. > Biphasic cellular responses were frequently observed. > Our results are similar to studies on mammalian cell lines.« less

  11. A novel model for studies of blood-mediated long-term responses to cellular transplants

    PubMed Central

    Lindblom, Susanne; Hong, Jaan; Nilsson, Bo; Korsgren, Olle; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Aims Interaction between blood and bio-surfaces is important in many medical fields. With the aim of studying blood-mediated reactions to cellular transplants, we developed a whole-blood model for incubation of small volumes for up to 48 h. Methods Heparinized polyvinyl chloride tubing was cut in suitable lengths and sealed to create small bags. Multiple bags, with fresh venous blood, were incubated attached to a rotating wheel at 37°C. Physiological variables in blood were monitored: glucose, blood gases, mono- and divalent cations and chloride ions, osmolality, coagulation (platelet consumption, thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT)), and complement activation (C3a and SC5b-9), haemolysis, and leukocyte viability. Results Basic glucose consumption was high. Glucose depletion resulted in successive elevation of extracellular potassium, while sodium and calcium ions decreased due to inhibition of energy-requiring ion pumps. Addition of glucose improved ion balance but led to metabolic acidosis. To maintain a balanced physiological environment beyond 6 h, glucose and sodium hydrogen carbonate were added regularly based on analyses of glucose, pH, ions, and osmotic pressure. With these additives haemolysis was prevented for up to 72 h and leukocyte viability better preserved. Despite using non-heparinized blood, coagulation and complement activation were lower during long-term incubations compared with addition of thromboplastin and collagen. Conclusion A novel whole-blood model for studies of blood-mediated responses to a cellular transplant is presented allowing extended observations for up to 48 h and highlights the importance of stringent evaluations and adjustment of physiological conditions. PMID:25322825

  12. Giardiasis in mice: analysis of humoral and cellular immune responses to Giardia muris.

    PubMed

    Anders, R F; Roberts-Thomson, I C; Mitchell, G F

    1982-01-01

    Humoral and cellular immune responses have been evaluated in two inbred strains of mice which differ markedly in their susceptibility to infection with Giardia muris. Serum IgG and IgA antibody levels and IgA levels in intestinal washes were determined by a solid-phase radioimmunoassay using G. muris antigen prepared by sonication of trophozoites, while cell-mediated immunity was assessed by a radiometric ear-assay for delayed-type hypersensitivity. Following infection of BALB/c mice (resistant) and C3H/He mice (susceptible), the IgG and IgA antibody levels in serum progressively increased over the period of study with C3H/He mice having significantly higher titres of IgA antibodies than BALB/c late in the infection. Systemic immunization with G. muris trophozoites resulted in high titres of IgG antibodies in the serum. IgA antibodies were detected in intestinal washes 2 weeks after infection with a subsequent fall in levels in BALB/c mice but a progressive increase levels in C3H/He mice. Prior immunization resulted in IgA antibodies being detected earlier in the intestinal washings after a challenge infection. Delayed-type hypersensitivity to G. muris antigens could not be detected during an infection but a positive response was elicited following antigen priming in mice pretreated with cyclophosphamide. The immune responses evaluated in this study were assessed using a whole G. muris trophozoite sonicate and variations in the quantitative aspects of the responses did not account for observed differences in the course of infection in the two strains of mice.

  13. Cellular Responses in Sea Fan Corals: Granular Amoebocytes React to Pathogen and Climate Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Mydlarz, Laura D.; Holthouse, Sally F.; Peters, Esther C.; Harvell, C. Drew

    2008-01-01

    Background Climate warming is causing environmental change making both marine and terrestrial organisms, and even humans, more susceptible to emerging diseases. Coral reefs are among the most impacted ecosystems by climate stress, and immunity of corals, the most ancient of metazoans, is poorly known. Although coral mortality due to infectious diseases and temperature-related stress is on the rise, the immune effector mechanisms that contribute to the resistance of corals to such events remain elusive. In the Caribbean sea fan corals (Anthozoa, Alcyonacea: Gorgoniidae), the cell-based immune defenses are granular acidophilic amoebocytes, which are known to be involved in wound repair and histocompatibility. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate for the first time in corals that these cells are involved in the organismal response to pathogenic and temperature stress. In sea fans with both naturally occurring infections and experimental inoculations with the fungal pathogen Aspergillus sydowii, an inflammatory response, characterized by a massive increase of amoebocytes, was evident near infections. Melanosomes were detected in amoebocytes adjacent to protective melanin bands in infected sea fans; neither was present in uninfected fans. In naturally infected sea fans a concurrent increase in prophenoloxidase activity was detected in infected tissues with dense amoebocytes. Sea fans sampled in the field during the 2005 Caribbean Bleaching Event (a once-in-hundred-year climate event) responded to heat stress with a systemic increase in amoebocytes and amoebocyte densities were also increased by elevated temperature stress in lab experiments. Conclusions/Significance The observed amoebocyte responses indicate that sea fan corals use cellular defenses to combat fungal infection and temperature stress. The ability to mount an inflammatory response may be a contributing factor that allowed the survival of even infected sea fan corals during a stressful climate

  14. The early cellular signatures of protective immunity induced by live viral vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Siegfried; Bethke, Nicole; Böthe, Matthias; Sommerick, Sophie; Frentsch, Marco; Romagnani, Chiara; Niedrig, Matthias; Thiel, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Here, we have used primary vaccination of healthy donors with attenuated live yellow fever virus 17D (YFV-17D) as a model to study the generation of protective immunity. In short intervals after vaccination, we analyzed the induction of YFV-17D specific T- and B-cell immunity, bystander activation, dendritic cell subsets, changes in serum cytokine levels, and YFV-17D-specific antibodies. We show activation of innate immunity and a concomitant decline of numbers of peripheral blood T and B cells. An early peak of antigen-specific T cells at day 2, followed by mobilization of innate immune cells, preceded the development of maximal adaptive immunity against YFV-17D at day 14 after vaccination. Interestingly, potent adaptive immunity as measured by high titers of neutralizing YFV-17D-specific antibodies, correlated with early activation and recruitment of YFV-17D-specific CD4(+) T cells and higher levels of sIL-6R. Thus our data might provide new insights into the interplay of innate and adaptive immunity for the induction of protective immunity. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Discovery of Cellular Proteins Required for the Early Steps of HCV Infection Using Integrative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae-Seong; Kwon, Oh Sung; Kim, Sanguk; Jang, Sung Key

    2013-01-01

    Successful viral infection requires intimate communication between virus and host cell, a process that absolutely requires various host proteins. However, current efforts to discover novel host proteins as therapeutic targets for viral infection are difficult. Here, we developed an integrative-genomics approach to predict human genes involved in the early steps of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. By integrating HCV and human protein associations, co-expression data, and tight junction-tetraspanin web specific networks, we identified host proteins required for the early steps in HCV infection. Moreover, we validated the roles of newly identified proteins in HCV infection by knocking down their expression using small interfering RNAs. Specifically, a novel host factor CD63 was shown to directly interact with HCV E2 protein. We further demonstrated that an antibody against CD63 blocked HCV infection, indicating that CD63 may serve as a new therapeutic target for HCV-related diseases. The candidate gene list provides a source for identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:23593195

  16. Molecular deconstruction, detection, and computational prediction of microenvironment-modulated cellular responses to cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Labarge, Mark A; Parvin, Bahram; Lorens, James B

    2014-04-01

    The field of bioengineering has pioneered the application of new precision fabrication technologies to model the different geometric, physical or molecular components of tissue microenvironments on solid-state substrata. Tissue engineering approaches building on these advances are used to assemble multicellular mimetic-tissues where cells reside within defined spatial contexts. The functional responses of cells in fabricated microenvironments have revealed a rich interplay between the genome and extracellular effectors in determining cellular phenotypes and in a number of cases have revealed the dominance of microenvironment over genotype. Precision bioengineered substrata are limited to a few aspects, whereas cell/tissue-derived microenvironments have many undefined components. Thus, introducing a computational module may serve to integrate these types of platforms to create reasonable models of drug responses in human tissues. This review discusses how combinatorial microenvironment microarrays and other biomimetic microenvironments have revealed emergent properties of cells in particular microenvironmental contexts, the platforms that can measure phenotypic changes within those contexts, and the computational tools that can unify the microenvironment-imposed functional phenotypes with underlying constellations of proteins and genes. Ultimately we propose that a merger of these technologies will enable more accurate pre-clinical drug discovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular deconstruction, detection, and computational prediction of microenvironment-modulated cellular responses to cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    LaBarge, Mark A; Parvin, Bahram; Lorens, James B

    2014-01-01

    The field of bioengineering has pioneered the application of new precision fabrication technologies to model the different geometric, physical or molecular components of tissue microenvironments on solid-state substrata. Tissue engineering approaches building on these advances are used to assemble multicellular mimetic-tissues where cells reside within defined spatial contexts. The functional responses of cells in fabricated microenvironments has revealed a rich interplay between the genome and extracellular effectors in determining cellular phenotypes, and in a number of cases has revealed the dominance of microenvironment over genotype. Precision bioengineered substrata are limited to a few aspects, whereas cell/tissue-derived microenvironments have many undefined components. Thus introducing a computational module may serve to integrate these types of platforms to create reasonable models of drug responses in human tissues. This review discusses how combinatorial microenvironment microarrays and other biomimetic microenvironments have revealed emergent properties of cells in particular microenvironmental contexts, the platforms that can measure phenotypic changes within those contexts, and the computational tools that can unify the microenvironment-imposed functional phenotypes with underlying constellations of proteins and genes. Ultimately we propose that a merger of these technologies will enable more accurate pre-clinical drug discovery. PMID:24582543

  18. Rab3 is involved in cellular immune responses of the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Song, Cai-Xia; Li, Yu-Ping; Li, Li; Wei, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Jia-Lin; Liu, Xu-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Rab3, a member of the Rab GTPase family, has been found to be involved in innate immunity. However, the precise function of this GTPase in innate immunity remains unknown. In this study, we identified a Rab3 gene (Ha-Rab3) from the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera and studied its roles in innate immune responses. Expression of Ha-Rab3 was upregulated in the hemocytes of H. armigera larvae after the injection of Escherichia coli or chromatography beads. The dsRNA-mediated knockdown of Ha-Rab3 gene in H. armigera larval hemocytes led to significant reduction in the phagocytosis and nodulation activities of hemocytes against E. coli, significant increase in the bacterial load in larval hemolymph, and significant reduction in the encapsulation activities of hemocytes toward invading chromatography beads. Furthermore, Ha-Rab3 knockdown significantly suppressed spreading of plasmatocytes. These results suggest that Ha-Rab3 plays important roles in H. armigera cellular immune responses, possibly by mediating spreading of hemocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular responses to disruption of the permeability barrier in a three-dimensional organotypic epidermal model

    SciT

    Ajani, Gati; Sato, Nobuyuki; Mack, Judith A.

    2007-08-15

    Repeated injury to the stratum corneum of mammalian skin (caused by friction, soaps, or organic solvents) elicits hyperkeratosis and epidermal thickening. Functionally, these changes serve to restore the cutaneous barrier and protect the organism. To better understand the molecular and cellular basis of this response, we have engineered an in vitro model of acetone-induced injury using organotypic epidermal cultures. Rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), grown on a collagen raft in the absence of any feeder fibroblasts, developed all the hallmarks of a true epidermis including a well-formed cornified layer. To induce barrier injury, REK cultures were treated with intermittent 30-s exposuresmore » to acetone then were fixed and paraffin-sectioned. After two exposures, increased proliferation (Ki67 and BrdU staining) was observed in basal and suprabasal layers. After three exposures, proliferation became confined to localized buds in the basal layer and increased terminal differentiation was observed (compact hyperkeratosis of the stratum corneum, elevated levels of K10 and filaggrin, and heightened transglutaminase activity). Thus, barrier disruption causes epidermal hyperplasia and/or enhances differentiation, depending upon the extent and duration of injury. Given that no fibroblasts are present in the model, the ability to mount a hyperplastic response to barrier injury is an inherent property of keratinocytes.« less

  20. Cellular responses during morphological transformation in Azospirillum brasilense and Its flcA knockout mutant.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xingsheng; McMillan, Mary; Coumans, Joëlle V F; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J; Pereg, Lily

    2014-01-01

    FlcA is a response regulator controlling flocculation and the morphological transformation of Azospirillum cells from vegetative to cyst-like forms. To understand the cellular responses of Azospirillum to conditions that cause morphological transformation, proteins differentially expressed under flocculation conditions in A. brasilense Sp7 and its flcA knockout mutant were investigated. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of wild-type (Sp7) and a flcA deletion mutant (Sp7-flcAΔ) revealed a total of 33 differentially expressed 2-DE gel spots, with 22 of these spots confidently separated to allow protein identification. Analysis of these spots by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and MASCOT database searching identified 48 proteins (≥10% emPAI in each spot). The functional characteristics of these proteins included carbon metabolism (beta-ketothiolase and citrate synthase), nitrogen metabolism (Glutamine synthetase and nitric oxide synthase), stress tolerance (superoxide dismutase, Alkyl hydroperoxidase and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit) and morphological transformation (transducer coupling protein). The observed differences between Sp7 wild-type and flcA- strains enhance our understanding of the morphological transformation process and help to explain previous phenotypical observations. This work is a step forward in connecting the Azospirillum phenome and genome.

  1. Cellular Responses during Morphological Transformation in Azospirillum brasilense and Its flcA Knockout Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Coumans, Joëlle V. F.; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J.; Pereg, Lily

    2014-01-01

    FlcA is a response regulator controlling flocculation and the morphological transformation of Azospirillum cells from vegetative to cyst-like forms. To understand the cellular responses of Azospirillum to conditions that cause morphological transformation, proteins differentially expressed under flocculation conditions in A. brasilense Sp7 and its flcA knockout mutant were investigated. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of wild-type (Sp7) and a flcA deletion mutant (Sp7-flcAΔ) revealed a total of 33 differentially expressed 2-DE gel spots, with 22 of these spots confidently separated to allow protein identification. Analysis of these spots by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and MASCOT database searching identified 48 proteins (≥10% emPAI in each spot). The functional characteristics of these proteins included carbon metabolism (beta-ketothiolase and citrate synthase), nitrogen metabolism (Glutamine synthetase and nitric oxide synthase), stress tolerance (superoxide dismutase, Alkyl hydroperoxidase and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit) and morphological transformation (transducer coupling protein). The observed differences between Sp7 wild-type and flcA − strains enhance our understanding of the morphological transformation process and help to explain previous phenotypical observations. This work is a step forward in connecting the Azospirillum phenome and genome. PMID:25502569

  2. Comparative analysis of different laser systems to study cellular responses to DNA damage in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangduo; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Stephens, Jared; Heale, Jason T.; Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Shi, Linda Z.; Kim, Jong-Soo; Yokomori, Kyoko; Berns, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Proper recognition and repair of DNA damage is critical for the cell to protect its genomic integrity. Laser microirradiation ranging in wavelength from ultraviolet A (UVA) to near-infrared (NIR) can be used to induce damage in a defined region in the cell nucleus, representing an innovative technology to effectively analyze the in vivo DNA double-strand break (DSB) damage recognition process in mammalian cells. However, the damage-inducing characteristics of the different laser systems have not been fully investigated. Here we compare the nanosecond nitrogen 337 nm UVA laser with and without bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), the nanosecond and picosecond 532 nm green second-harmonic Nd:YAG, and the femtosecond NIR 800 nm Ti:sapphire laser with regard to the type(s) of damage and corresponding cellular responses. Crosslinking damage (without significant nucleotide excision repair factor recruitment) and single-strand breaks (with corresponding repair factor recruitment) were common among all three wavelengths. Interestingly, UVA without BrdU uniquely produced base damage and aberrant DSB responses. Furthermore, the total energy required for the threshold H2AX phosphorylation induction was found to vary between the individual laser systems. The results indicate the involvement of different damage mechanisms dictated by wavelength and pulse duration. The advantages and disadvantages of each system are discussed. PMID:19357094

  3. In utero exposure to Onchocerca volvulus: relationship to subsequent infection intensity and cellular immune responsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Elson, L H; Days, A; Calvopiña, M; Paredes, W; Araujo, E; Guderian, R H; Bradley, J E; Nutman, T B

    1996-01-01

    Afro-Ecuadorian individuals from an area where Onchocerca volvulus is hyperendemic have been monitored for infection over the past 16 years. To determine whether in utero exposure to O. volvulus biases a child's subsequent immune responses, children (9 to 16 years old) for whom the mother's infection status was known were chosen for study. Children of infected mothers (n = 19) had significantly higher levels of skin microfilariae than children of uninfected mothers (n = 13; P = 0.021). While the serum levels of O. volvulus-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgG subclasses, and IgE showed no significant differences between the two groups of children, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of children of infected mothers produced higher levels of Th2-type cytokines to several parasite antigens and lower levels of Th1-type cytokines to nonparasite antigens than those of children of uninfected mothers. Thus, in utero exposure to O. volvulus has a long-term effect on the child's subsequent cellular immune response that may render the child more susceptible to O. volvulus infection postnatally. PMID:8945547

  4. Overexpression of the base excision repair NTHL1 glycosylase causes genomic instability and early cellular hallmarks of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Limpose, Kristin L; Trego, Kelly S; Li, Zhentian; Leung, Sara W; Sarker, Altaf H; Shah, Jason A; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Werner, Erica M; Dynan, William S; Cooper, Priscilla K; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Base excision repair (BER), which is initiated by DNA N-glycosylase proteins, is the frontline for repairing potentially mutagenic DNA base damage. The NTHL1 glycosylase, which excises DNA base damage caused by reactive oxygen species, is thought to be a tumor suppressor. However, in addition to NTHL1 loss-of-function mutations, our analysis of cancer genomic datasets reveals that NTHL1 frequently undergoes amplification or upregulation in some cancers. Whether NTHL1 overexpression could contribute to cancer phenotypes has not yet been explored. To address the functional consequences of NTHL1 overexpression, we employed transient overexpression. Both NTHL1 and a catalytically-dead NTHL1 (CATmut) induce DNA damage and genomic instability in non-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) when overexpressed. Strikingly, overexpression of either NTHL1 or CATmut causes replication stress signaling and a decrease in homologous recombination (HR). HBEC cells that overexpress NTHL1 or CATmut acquire the ability to grow in soft agar and exhibit loss of contact inhibition, suggesting that a mechanism independent of NTHL1 catalytic activity contributes to acquisition of cancer-related cellular phenotypes. We provide evidence that NTHL1 interacts with the multifunctional DNA repair protein XPG suggesting that interference with HR is a possible mechanism that contributes to acquisition of early cellular hallmarks of cancer. PMID:29522130

  5. A fresh look at the fossil evidence for early Archaean cellular life

    PubMed Central

    Brasier, Martin; McLoughlin, Nicola; Green, Owen; Wacey, David

    2006-01-01

    The rock record provides us with unique evidence for testing models as to when and where cellular life first appeared on Earth. Its study, however, requires caution. The biogenicity of stromatolites and ‘microfossils’ older than 3.0 Gyr should not be accepted without critical analysis of morphospace and context, using multiple modern techniques, plus rejection of alternative non-biological (null) hypotheses. The previous view that the co-occurrence of biology-like morphology and carbonaceous chemistry in ancient, microfossil-like objects is a presumptive indicator of biogenicity is not enough. As with the famous Martian microfossils, we need to ask not ‘what do these structures remind us of?’, but ‘what are these structures?’ Earth's oldest putative ‘microfossil’ assemblages within 3.4–3.5 Gyr carbonaceous cherts, such as the Apex Chert, are likewise self-organizing structures that do not pass tests for biogenicity. There is a preservational paradox in the fossil record prior to ca 2.7 Gyr: suitable rocks (e.g. isotopically light carbonaceous cherts) are widely present, but signals of life are enigmatic and hard to decipher. One new approach includes detailed mapping of well-preserved sandstone grains in the ca 3.4 Gyr Strelley Pool Chert. These can contain endolithic microtubes showing syngenicity, grain selectivity and several levels of geochemical processing. Preliminary studies invite comparison with a class of ambient inclusion trails of putative microbial origin and with the activities of modern anaerobic proteobacteria and volcanic glass euendoliths. PMID:16754605

  6. Cellular Interactions and Immune Response of Spherical Nucleic Acid (SNA) Nanoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massich, Matthew David

    Spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanoconjugates consist of a densely packed monolayer shell of highly-oriented oligonucleotides covalently bound to a gold nanoparticle core. The nanoconjugates exhibit several important qualities, which make them useful for various biological applications, such as antisense gene regulation strategies and the intracellular detection of biomolecules. The focus of this thesis was to characterize the nanoconjugates interaction with cultured cells and specifically the immune response to their intracellular presence. The immune response of macrophage cells to internalized nanoconjugates was studied, and due to the dense functionalization of oligonucleotides on the surface of the nanoparticle and the resulting high localized salt concentration the innate immune response to the nanoconjugates is ˜25-fold less when compared to a lipoplex carrying the same sequence. Additionally, genome-wide expression profiling was used to study the biological response of cultured cells to the nanoconjugates. The biological response of HeLa cells to gold nanoparticles stabilized by weakly bound ligands was significant, yet when these same nanoparticles were stably functionalized with covalently attached oligonucleotides the cells showed no measurable response. In human keratinocytes, the oligonucleotide sequences caused 427 genes to be differentially expressed when complexed with Dharmafect, but when the oligonucleotides were conjugated to nanoparticles only 7 genes were differentially expressed. Beyond characterizing the cellular interactions and immune response of the nanoconjugates, the optimal length of siRNA (from 19--34 base pairs) that induces the most gene knockdown while maintaining limited immune activation was determined to be 24 base pairs. Further, the SNAs were shown to be useful as a potential antiviral gene therapy by demonstrating approximately 50% knockdown of the Ebola VP35 gene. Lastly, a scanning probe-enabled method was used to rapidly

  7. Gene, Immune and Cellular Responses to Single and Combined Space Flight Conditions-B (TripleLux-B):

    2015-03-31

    ISS043E070945 (03/31/2015) --- ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, Expedition 43 flight engineer aboard the International Space Station, is seen working on a science experiment that includes photographic documentation of Cellular Responses to Single and Combined Space Flight Conditions. Some effects of the space environment level appear to act at the cellular level and it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms of these effects. This science project uses invertebrate hemocytes to focus on two aspects of cellular function which may have medical importance. The synergy between the effects of the space radiation environment and microgravity on cellular function is the goal of this experiment along with studying the impairment of immune functions under spaceflight conditions.

  8. Do Surface Porosity and Pore Size Influence Mechanical Properties and Cellular Response to PEEK?

    PubMed

    Torstrick, F Brennan; Evans, Nathan T; Stevens, Hazel Y; Gall, Ken; Guldberg, Robert E

    2016-11-01

    Despite its widespread use in orthopaedic implants such as soft tissue fasteners and spinal intervertebral implants, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) often suffers from poor osseointegration. Introducing porosity can overcome this limitation by encouraging bone ingrowth; however, the corresponding decrease in implant strength can potentially reduce the implant's ability to bear physiologic loads. We have previously shown, using a single pore size, that limiting porosity to the surface of PEEK implants preserves strength while supporting in vivo osseointegration. However, additional work is needed to investigate the effect of pore size on both the mechanical properties and cellular response to PEEK. (1) Can surface porous PEEK (PEEK-SP) microstructure be reliably controlled? (2) What is the effect of pore size on the mechanical properties of PEEK-SP? (3) Do surface porosity and pore size influence the cellular response to PEEK? PEEK-SP was created by extruding PEEK through NaCl crystals of three controlled ranges: 200 to 312, 312 to 425, and 425 to 508 µm. Micro-CT was used to characterize the microstructure of PEEK-SP. Tensile, fatigue, and interfacial shear tests were performed to compare the mechanical properties of PEEK-SP with injection-molded PEEK (PEEK-IM). The cellular response to PEEK-SP, assessed by proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, vascular endothelial growth factor production, and calcium content of osteoblast, mesenchymal stem cell, and preosteoblast (MC3T3-E1) cultures, was compared with that of machined smooth PEEK and Ti6Al4V. Micro-CT analysis showed that PEEK-SP layers possessed pores that were 284 ± 35 µm, 341 ± 49 µm, and 416 ± 54 µm for each pore size group. Porosity and pore layer depth ranged from 61% to 69% and 303 to 391 µm, respectively. Mechanical testing revealed tensile strengths > 67 MPa and interfacial shear strengths > 20 MPa for all three pore size groups. All PEEK-SP groups exhibited > 50% decrease

  9. Data Portal for the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) program: integrated access to diverse large-scale cellular perturbation response data

    PubMed Central

    Koleti, Amar; Terryn, Raymond; Stathias, Vasileios; Chung, Caty; Cooper, Daniel J; Turner, John P; Vidović, Dušica; Forlin, Michele; Kelley, Tanya T; D’Urso, Alessandro; Allen, Bryce K; Torre, Denis; Jagodnik, Kathleen M; Wang, Lily; Jenkins, Sherry L; Mader, Christopher; Niu, Wen; Fazel, Mehdi; Mahi, Naim; Pilarczyk, Marcin; Clark, Nicholas; Shamsaei, Behrouz; Meller, Jarek; Vasiliauskas, Juozas; Reichard, John; Medvedovic, Mario; Ma’ayan, Avi; Pillai, Ajay

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) program is a national consortium funded by the NIH to generate a diverse and extensive reference library of cell-based perturbation-response signatures, along with novel data analytics tools to improve our understanding of human diseases at the systems level. In contrast to other large-scale data generation efforts, LINCS Data and Signature Generation Centers (DSGCs) employ a wide range of assay technologies cataloging diverse cellular responses. Integration of, and unified access to LINCS data has therefore been particularly challenging. The Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) LINCS Data Coordination and Integration Center (DCIC) has developed data standards specifications, data processing pipelines, and a suite of end-user software tools to integrate and annotate LINCS-generated data, to make LINCS signatures searchable and usable for different types of users. Here, we describe the LINCS Data Portal (LDP) (http://lincsportal.ccs.miami.edu/), a unified web interface to access datasets generated by the LINCS DSGCs, and its underlying database, LINCS Data Registry (LDR). LINCS data served on the LDP contains extensive metadata and curated annotations. We highlight the features of the LDP user interface that is designed to enable search, browsing, exploration, download and analysis of LINCS data and related curated content. PMID:29140462

  10. The molecular and cellular response of normal and progressed human bronchial epithelial cells to HZE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Larsen, Jill

    We have used a model of non-oncogenically immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cells to determine the response of such cells to particles found outside the protection of the earth’s electromagnetic field. We have identified an enhanced frequency of cellular transformation, as measured by growth in soft agar, for both 56Fe and 28Si (1 GeV/n) that is maximal (4-6 fold) at 0.25 Gy and 0.40 Gy, respectively. At 4 months post-irradiation 38 individual soft agar clones were isolated. These clones were characterized extensively for cellular and molecular changes. Gene expression analysis suggested that these clones had down-regulated several genes associated with anti-oxidant pathways including GLS2, GPX1 and 4, SOD2, PIG3, and NQO1 amongst others. As a result, many of these transformed clones were exposed to high levels of intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS), although there appeared not to be any enhanced mitochondrial ROS. DNA repair pathways associated with ATM/ATR signaling were also upregulated. However, these transformants do not develop into tumors when injected into immune-compromised mice, suggesting that they have not progressed sufficiently to become oncogenic. Therefore we chose 6 soft agar clones for continuous culture for an additional 14 months. Amongst the 6 clones, only one clone showed any significant change in phenotype. Clone 3kt-ff.2a, propagated for 18 months, were 2-fold more radioresistant, had a shortened doubling time and the background rate of transformation more than doubled. Furthermore, the morphology of transformed clones changed. Clones from this culture are being compared to the original clone as well as the parental HBEC3KT and will be injected into immune-compromised mice for oncogenic potential. Oncogenically progressed HBECs, HBEC3KT cells that overexpress a mutant RAS gene and where p53 has been knocked down, designated HBEC3KTR53, responded quite differently to HZE particle exposure. First, these cells are more

  11. Assessment of the cellular and electrophysiological response of cardiomyocytes to radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Alexander; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Friess, Johannes; Thielemann, Christiane; Mr; Frank, Simon

    Cardiac disease is considered as a late effect resulting from an exposure during long-term space missions. Yet, the underlying mechanisms and the impact of radiation quality and dose are not well understood. To address this topic, we used cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) as a model system. This model has already been successfully used for cardiotoxicity screening of new drugs. Both, the cellular and electrophysiological response to X-ray irradiation were examined. Cellular endpoints such as the induction of micronuclei, apoptosis, number of binucleated cells and expression of connexin43 (Cx 43) were analyzed by standard techniques. For electrophysiological studies a microelectrode array (MEA) was used allowing non-invasive recordings of electrical signals such as signal amplitude and shape, beat rate and conduction velocity. Data analysis was performed using the MATLAB based software DrCell. As a first approach, cardiomyocytes were generated by differentiation of mESC via the formation of embryoid bodies. However, the system proved to be unsuitable due to large intra- and inter-sample variations. In consecutive experiments we used commercially available Cor.At cells, i.e. a pure culture of mESC derived cardiomyocytes. For the analysis of cellular and electrophysiological endpoints Cor.At cells were seeded onto chamber slides or MEA chips, respectively. Irradiation with 0.5 and 2 Gy X-rays (250 kV, 16 mA) was performed two days after seeding. At that time cardiomyocytes are electrically coupled through gap junctions and form a spontaneously beating network. Samples were examined up to four days after exposure. Analysis of the electrophysiological data revealed only minor differences between controls and X-irradiated samples indicating the functionality of cardiomyocytes is not within the dose range examined. Currently, further experiments are performed to statistically verify this finding. Additionally, the expression of Cx 43, a major

  12. Resistance to tumour challenge after tumour laser thermotherapy is associated with a cellular immune response

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, K; Myllymäki, L; Jansner, K; Stenram, U; Tranberg, K-G

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILT) of an experimental liver tumour is superior to surgical excision, at least partly due to a laser-induced immunological effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the time–response relationship of the ILT-induced immunisation and the cellular response of macrophages and lymphocytes. A dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma was transplanted into the liver of syngeneic rats. Rats with tumour were treated 6–8 days later (tumour size 0.25–0.40 cm3) with ILT of tumour or resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. Two groups of rats without tumour were treated with resection of a normal liver lobe or ILT of normal liver. A challenging tumour was implanted into the liver of each rat 2, 5 or 10 weeks after primary treatment. Rats were killed 6, 12 and 48 days (or earlier due to their condition) after challenge (n=8 in all groups). Immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine lymphocytes (CD8, CD4) and macrophages (ED1, ED2) in rats having had treatment of a primary tumour. Interstitial laser thermotherapy of the first tumour was followed by eradication of challenging tumour and absence of tumour spread. This contrasted with rapid growth and spread of challenging tumour in the other groups. In the challenging vital tumour tissue and in the interface between the tumour and surroundings, the number of ED1 macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes was higher in rats having been treated with the ILT of tumour than in those having undergone resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. The number of ED2 macrophages and CD4 lymphocytes was low and did not vary between these two groups. Interstitial laser thermotherapy elicited an immune response that eradicated a challenging tumour and was associated with increased numbers of tumour-infiltrating macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes. PMID:16091763

  13. Functional and cellular responses to laser injury in the rat snake retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Elliott, W. Rowe, III; Kumar, Neeru

    2007-02-01

    Acute (1-hr, 6-hr) and longer term (24-hr) effects of laser injury on retinal function and cellular responses have been studied in the Great Plains rat snake, Elaphe guttata emoryi. This animal is of interest for vision research because its eye has an all-cone retina. A linear array of 5 thermal lesions was placed in the retina of anesthetized animals, near the area centralis, using a Nd:VO 4 laser (532 nm), that delivered 50 mW per 10-msec pulse. Retinal function was assessed with the pattern electroretinogram (PERG), recorded before and after the placement of the lesions. PERGs were elicited with counterphased square-wave gratings, and were analyzed by Fourier analysis. The fate of lesioned cells was assessed by immunohistological staining for the transcription factor, NF-κB (which is activated by ionizing and nonionizing radiation), as well as for the apoptosis marker, caspase-9. The normal snake PERG had the maximum, real amplitude frequency component, determined by Fourier analysis, at the reversal frequency of the grating (i.e. shifts/sec). In the hour following the lesion-producing laser exposures, the PERG response exhibited frequency doubling, i.e. a new response waveform appeared at twice the reversal frequency. By 24-hr post exposure, many lesioned photoreceptors stained positively for both NF-κB and caspase 9. Because the PERG largely reflects retinal ganglion cell activity, the appearance of frequency doubling in the PERG suggests that complementary (push-pull) inputs to ganglion cells are disrupted by the laser lesions. The immunohistological results indicate that activation of NF- B is not necessarily associated with photoreceptor survival after a laser injury.

  14. Cellular response to high pulse repetition rate nanosecond pulses varies with fluorescent marker identity

    SciT

    Steelman, Zachary A., E-mail: zachary.steelman@duke.edu; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Beier, Hope T.

    Nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP's) are a well-studied phenomena in biophysics that cause substantial alterations to cellular membrane dynamics, internal biochemistry, and cytoskeletal structure, and induce apoptotic and necrotic cell death. While several studies have attempted to measure the effects of multiple nanosecond pulses, the effect of pulse repetition rate (PRR) has received little attention, especially at frequencies greater than 100 Hz. In this study, uptake of Propidium Iodide, FM 1–43, and YO-PRO-1 fluorescent dyes in CHO-K1 cells was monitored across a wide range of PRRs (5 Hz–500 KHz) using a laser-scanning confocal microscope in order to better understand how high frequency repetition ratesmore » impact induced biophysical changes. We show that frequency trends depend on the identity of the dye under study, which could implicate transmembrane protein channels in the uptake response due to their chemical selectivity. Finally, YO-PRO-1 fluorescence was monitored in the presence of Gadolinium (Gd{sup 3+}), Ruthenium Red, and in calcium-free solution to elucidate a mechanism for its unique frequency trend. - Highlights: • Pulse repetition rate (PRR) is understudied in nanosecond electric pulsing. • 200 V pulses were applied to CHO-K1 cells from 5 Hz to 500 KHz. • Pulsing was repeated using a variety of fluorophores and imaging conditions. • The response is highly dependent on the fluorophore and the imaging conditions. • This may implicate protein channels in the nanoporation response.« less

  15. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CELLRAD)": Hardware and biological system tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment ;Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space; (CELLRAD, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CELLRAD in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  16. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  17. Ubiquitylation-dependent regulation of NEIL1 by Mule and TRIM26 is required for the cellular DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Matthew J; Carter, Rachel J; Nickson, Catherine M; Williams, Sarah C; Parsons, Jason L

    2017-01-25

    Endonuclease VIII-like protein 1 (NEIL1) is a DNA glycosylase involved in initiating the base excision repair pathway, the major cellular mechanism for repairing DNA base damage. Here, we have purified the major E3 ubiquitin ligases from human cells responsible for regulation of NEIL1 by ubiquitylation. Interestingly, we have identified two enzymes that catalyse NEIL1 polyubiquitylation, Mcl-1 ubiquitin ligase E3 (Mule) and tripartite motif 26 (TRIM26). We demonstrate that these enzymes are capable of polyubiquitylating NEIL1 in vitro, and that both catalyse ubiquitylation of NEIL1 within the same C-terminal lysine residues. An siRNA-mediated knockdown of Mule or TRIM26 leads to stabilisation of NEIL1, demonstrating that these enzymes are important in regulating cellular NEIL1 steady state protein levels. Similarly, a mutant NEIL1 protein lacking residues for ubiquitylation is more stable than the wild type protein in vivo We also demonstrate that cellular NEIL1 protein is induced in response to ionising radiation (IR), although this occurs specifically in a Mule-dependent manner. Finally we show that stabilisation of NEIL1, particularly following TRIM26 siRNA, contributes to cellular resistance to IR. This highlights the importance of Mule and TRIM26 in maintaining steady state levels of NEIL1, but also those required for the cellular DNA damage response. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Blood gene expression profiling of an early acetaminophen response.

    PubMed

    Bushel, P R; Fannin, R D; Gerrish, K; Watkins, P B; Paules, R S

    2017-06-01

    Acetaminophen can adversely affect the liver especially when overdosed. We used whole blood as a surrogate to identify genes as potential early indicators of an acetaminophen-induced response. In a clinical study, healthy human subjects were dosed daily with 4 g of either acetaminophen or placebo pills for 7 days and evaluated over the course of 14 days. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels for responders to acetaminophen increased between days 4 and 9 after dosing, and 12 genes were detected with expression profiles significantly altered within 24 h. The early responsive genes separated the subjects by class and dose period. In addition, the genes clustered patients who overdosed on acetaminophen apart from controls and also predicted the exposure classifications with 100% accuracy. The responsive genes serve as early indicators of an acetaminophen exposure, and their gene expression profiles can potentially be evaluated as molecular indicators for further consideration.

  19. Blood Gene Expression Profiling of an Early Acetaminophen Response

    PubMed Central

    Bushel, Pierre R.; Fannin, Rick D.; Gerrish, Kevin; Watkins, Paul B.; Paules, Richard S.

    2018-01-01

    Acetaminophen can adversely affect the liver especially when overdosed. We used whole blood as a surrogate to identify genes as potential early indicators of an acetaminophen-induced response. In a clinical study, healthy human subjects were dosed daily with 4g of either acetaminophen or placebo pills for 7 days and evaluated over the course of 14 days. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels for responders to acetaminophen increased between days 4 and 9 after dosing and 12 genes were detected with expression profiles significantly altered within 24 hrs. The early responsive genes separated the subjects by class and dose period. In addition, the genes clustered patients who overdosed on acetaminophen apart from controls and also predicted the exposure classifications with 100% accuracy. The responsive genes serve as early indicators of an acetaminophen exposure and their gene expression profiles can potentially be evaluated as molecular indicators for further consideration. PMID:26927286

  20. Considerations on the role of cardiolipin in cellular responses to PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Rachel L.; Azizuddin, Kashif; Berlin, Jeffrey C.; Burda, Clemens; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Samia, Anna C. S.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2004-06-01

    Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid containing two phosphatidyl glycerol moieties and four fatty acids per molecule. It is found exclusively in the mitochondrial inner membrane and at the contact sites between the inner and outer membranes. The acridine derivative, nonyl-acridine orange (NAO), is a highly specific probe of cardiolipin, with a binding affinity approximately two orders of magnitude greater than that for binding to other anionic phospholipids. We recently reported that when NAO is bound in the mitochondria of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells and activated at 488 nm, NAO could transfer fluorescence resonance energy to the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4. This observation indicates that one site of Pc 4 binding is very near to NAO and therefore very near to cardiolipin. The average distance between the two fluorophores was calculated to be 7 nm. In the present study, we have extended the observation to the endogenously synthesized photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX, an intermediate in heme biosynthesis that is used for photodynamic therapy of several types of malignant and non-malignant conditions. Protoporphyrin IX is generated in the mitochondria but is known to bind to other cellular sites as well, especially the endoplasmic reticulum. The ability of this molecule to accept resonance energy from NAO in cells is consistent with a localization of at least some of the molecules in the mitochondria either on the inner membrane, the site of cardiolipin, or within about 10 nm of it. Since protoporphyrin IX binds with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, a component of the permeability transition pore complex that forms at contact sites between the inner and outer membranes, our observations provide evidence for the close association of several critical molecules for mitochondrial functions and suggest that cardiolipin may be an early oxidative target during PDT with at least two photosensitizers.

  1. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    SciT

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S

    2009-09-09

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitativemore » analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.« less

  2. Effect of dispersants of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on cellular uptake and biological responses

    PubMed Central

    Haniu, Hisao; Saito, Naoto; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Kim, Yoong-Ahm; Park, Ki Chul; Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Usui, Yuki; Aoki, Kaoru; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Hara, Kazuo; Takanashi, Seiji; Okamoto, Masanori; Ishigaki, Norio; Nakamura, Koichi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Although there have been many reports about the cytotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), the results are still controversial. To investigate one possible reason, the authors investigated the influence of MWCNT dispersants on cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity was examined (measured by alamarBlue® assay), as well as intracellular MWCNT concentration and cytokine secretion (measured by flow cytometry) in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) exposed to a type of highly purified MWCNT vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF®, Shōwa Denkō Kabushiki-gaisha, Tokyo, Japan) in three different dispersants (gelatin, carboxylmethyl cellulose, and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine). The authors also researched the relationship between the intracellular concentration of MWCNTs and cytotoxicity by using two cell lines, BEAS-2B and MESO-1 human malignant pleural mesothelioma cells. The intracellular concentration of VGCF was different for each of the three dispersants, and the levels of cytotoxicity and inflammatory response were correlated with the intracellular concentration of VGCF. A relationship between the intracellular concentration of VGCF and cytotoxic effects was observed in both cell lines. The results indicate that dispersants affect VGCF uptake into cells and that cytotoxicity depends on the intracellular concentration of VGCF, not on the exposed dosage. Thus, toxicity appears to depend on exposure time, even at low VGCF concentrations, because VGCF is biopersistent. PMID:22228997

  3. Electrospun PCL/Gelatin composite fibrous scaffolds: mechanical properties and cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ruijuan; He, Jing; Meng, Guolong; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Fang

    2016-06-01

    Electrospinning of hybrid polymer has gained widespread interest by taking advantages of the biological property of the natural polymer and the mechanical property of the synthetic polymer. However, the effect of the blend ratio on the above two properties has been less reported despite the importance to balance these two properties in various tissue engineering applications. To this aim, we investigated the electrospun PCL/Gelatin composite fibrous scaffolds with different blend ratios of 4:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, respectively. The morphology of the electrospun samples was observed by SEM and the result showed that the fiber diameter distribution became more uniform with the increase of the gelatin content. The mechanical testing results indicated that the 2:1 PCL/Gelatin sample had both the highest tensile strength of 3.7 MPa and the highest elongation rate of about 90%. Surprisingly, the 2:1 PCL/Gelatin sample also showed the best mesenchymal stem cell responses in terms of attachment, spreading, and cytoskeleton organization. Such correlation might be partly due to the fact that the enhanced mechanical property, an integral part of the physical microenvironment, likely played an important role in regulating the cellular functions. Overall, our results indicated that the PCL/Gelatin sample with the blend ratio of 2:1 was a superior candidate for scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  4. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested on A. castellanii trophozoites. Doses of disinfectants leading to up to a 3-log reduction were compared by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. Chlorine treatment led to size reduction, permeabilization, and retraction of pseudopods. In addition, treatment with chlorine dioxide led to a vacuolization of the cytoplasm. Monochloramine had a dose-dependent effect. At the highest doses monochloramine treatment resulted in almost no changes in cell size and permeability, as shown by flow cytometry, but the cell surface became smooth and dense, as seen by electron microscopy. We show that these disinfectants globally induced size reduction, membrane permeabilization, and morphological modifications but that they have a different mode of action on A. castellanii. PMID:21602398

  5. Cellular Stress Response Gene Expression During Upper and Lower Body High Intensity Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Kochanowicz, Andrzej; Sawczyn, Stanisław; Niespodziński, Bartłomiej; Mieszkowski, Jan; Kochanowicz, Kazimierz

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to compare the effect of upper and lower body high-intensity exercise on chosen genes expression in athletes and non-athletes. Method Fourteen elite male artistic gymnasts (EAG) aged 20.6 ± 3.3 years and 14 physically active men (PAM) aged 19.9 ± 1.0 years performed lower and upper body 30 s Wingate Tests. Blood samples were collected before, 5 and 30 minutes after each effort to assess gene expression via PCR. Results Significantly higher mechanical parameters after lower body exercise was observed in both groups, for relative power (8.7 ± 1.2 W/kg in gymnasts, 7.2 ± 1.2 W/kg in controls, p = 0.01) and mean power (6.7 ± 0.7 W/kg in gymnasts, 5.4 ± 0.8 W/kg in controls, p = 0.01). No differences in lower versus upper body gene expression were detected for all tested genes as well as between gymnasts and physical active man. For IL-6 m-RNA time-dependent effect was observed. Conclusions Because of no significant differences in expression of genes associated with cellular stress response the similar adaptive effect to exercise may be obtained so by lower and upper body exercise. PMID:28141870

  6. Computer simulation of a cellular automata model for the immune response in a retrovirus system

    SciT

    Pandey, R.B.

    1989-02-01

    Immune response in a retrovirus system is modeled by a network of three binary cell elements to take into account some of the main functional features of T4 cells, T8 cells, and viruses. Two different intercell interactions are introduced, one of which leads to three fixed points while the other yields bistable fixed points oscillating between a healthy state and a sick state in a mean field treatment. Evolution of these cells is studied for quenched and annealed random interactions on a simple cubic lattice with a nearest neighbor interaction using inhomogenous cellular automata. Populations of T4 cells and viralmore » cells oscillate together with damping (with constant amplitude) for annealed (quenched) interaction on increasing the value of mixing probability B from zero to a characteristic value B/sub ca/ (B/sub cq/). For higher B, the average number of T4 cells increases while that of the viral infected cells decreases monotonically on increasing B, suggesting a phase transition at B/sub ca/ (B/sub cq/).« less

  7. Computer simulation of a cellular automata model for the immune response in a retrovirus system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. B.

    1989-02-01

    Immune response in a retrovirus system is modeled by a network of three binary cell elements to take into account some of the main functional features of T4 cells, T8 cells, and viruses. Two different intercell interactions are introduced, one of which leads to three fixed points while the other yields bistable fixed points oscillating between a healthy state and a sick state in a mean field treatment. Evolution of these cells is studied for quenched and annealed random interactions on a simple cubic lattice with a nearest neighbor interaction using inhomogenous cellular automata. Populations of T4 cells and viral cells oscillate together with damping (with constant amplitude) for annealed (quenched) interaction on increasing the value of mixing probability B from zero to a characteristic value B ca ( B cq). For higher B, the average number of T4 cells increases while that of the viral infected cells decreases monotonically on increasing B, suggesting a phase transition at B ca ( B cq).

  8. Cellular Response to the high protein digestibility/high-Lysine (hdhl) sorghum mutation.

    PubMed

    Benmoussa, Mustapha; Chandrashekar, Arun; Ejeta, Gebisa; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2015-12-01

    A high protein digestibility/high-lysine mutant P721Q (hdhl) with a multi-folded protein body morphology has been developed, with a 22kDa α-kafirin single point mutation having also been recently identified. Relatively little is known regarding the resulting cellular response in hdhl endosperm. The aim is to elucidate these biochemical changes. Two-dimentional gel electrophoresis showed an apparent increase of non-kafirin and a decrease in kafirins content in hdhl endosperm. Mass spectrometry data yielded the identity of differentially expressed non-kafirin proteins in hdhl, wild-type lines such as cytoskeleton and chaperones proteins, and also others involved in amino acids and carbohydrates biochemical synthesis pathways. Western blot analysis showed that chaperone proteins were more highly expressed in the hdhl than the wild-type sorghum and confirmed the non-kafirin proteins proteomic results. Two-dimentional gel electrophoresis showed that the γ-kafirin subunits content had decreased, and the 22kDa α-kafirin subunit was increased in hdhl without any apparent molecular mass change. The observed differential expression most likely led to proteins interactions between γ- and α-kafirin subunits in particular, which resulted in a kafirins packing differently to form the protein body's multi-folded morphology, while also improving its digestibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cellular and molecular responses to increased skeletal muscle loading after irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Haddad, Fadia; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    2002-01-01

    Irradiation of rat skeletal muscles before increased loading has been shown to prevent compensatory hypertrophy for periods of up to 4 wk, possibly by preventing satellite cells from proliferating and providing new myonuclei. Recent work suggested that stem cell populations exist that might allow irradiated muscles to eventually hypertrophy over time. We report that irradiation essentially prevented hypertrophy in rat muscles subjected to 3 mo of functional overload (OL-Ir). The time course and magnitude of changes in cellular and molecular markers of anabolic and myogenic responses were similar in the OL-Ir and the contralateral nonirradiated, overloaded (OL) muscles for the first 3-7 days. These markers then returned to control levels in OL-Ir muscles while remaining elevated in OL muscles. The number of myonuclei and amount of DNA were increased markedly in OL but not OL-Ir muscles. Thus it appears that stem cells were not added to the irradiated muscles in this time period. These data are consistent with the theory that the addition of new myonuclei may be required for compensatory hypertrophy in the rat.

  10. A minimally invasive optical trapping system to understand cellular interactions at onset of an immune response

    PubMed Central

    Glass, David G.; McAlinden, Niall; Millington, Owain R.

    2017-01-01

    T-cells and antigen presenting cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune response system and how they interact is crucial in how the body effectively fights infection or responds to vaccines. Much of the experimental work studying interaction forces between cells has looked at the average properties of bulk samples of cells or applied microscopy to image the dynamic contact between these cells. In this paper we present a novel optical trapping technique for interrogating the force of this interaction and measuring relative interaction forces at the single-cell level. A triple-spot optical trap is used to directly manipulate the cells of interest without introducing foreign bodies such as beads to the system. The optical trap is used to directly control the initiation of cell-cell contact and, subsequently to terminate the interaction at a defined time point. The laser beam power required to separate immune cell pairs is determined and correlates with the force applied by the optical trap. As proof of concept, the antigen-specific increase in interaction force between a dendritic cell and a specific T-cell is demonstrated. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that this interaction force is completely abrogated when T-cell signalling is blocked. As a result the potential of using optical trapping to interrogate cellular interactions at the single cell level without the need to introduce foreign bodies such as beads is clearly demonstrated. PMID:29220398

  11. Short-term stress enhances cellular immunity and increases early resistance to squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Saul, Alison N; Daugherty, Christine; Holmes, Tyson H; Bouley, Donna M; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to chronic/long-term stress that suppresses/dysregulates immune function, an acute/short-term fight-or-flight stress response experienced during immune activation can enhance innate and adaptive immunity. Moderate ultraviolet-B (UV) exposure provides a non-invasive system for studying the naturalistic emergence, progression and regression of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Because SCC is an immunoresponsive cancer, we hypothesized that short-term stress experienced before UV exposure would enhance protective immunity and increase resistance to SCC. Control and short-term stress groups were treated identically except that the short-term stress group was restrained (2.5h) before each of nine UV-exposure sessions (minimum erythemal dose, 3-times/week) during weeks 4-6 of the 10-week UV exposure protocol. Tumors were measured weekly, and tissue collected at weeks 7, 20, and 32. Chemokine and cytokine gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Compared to controls, the short-term stress group showed greater cutaneous T-cell attracting chemokine (CTACK)/CCL27, RANTES, IL-12, and IFN-gamma gene expression at weeks 7, 20, and 32, higher skin infiltrating T cell numbers (weeks 7 and 20), lower tumor incidence (weeks 11-20) and fewer tumors (weeks 11-26). These results suggest that activation of short-term stress physiology increased chemokine expression and T cell trafficking and/or function during/following UV exposure, and enhanced Type 1 cytokine-driven cell-mediated immunity that is crucial for resistance to SCC. Therefore, the physiological fight-or-flight stress response and its adjuvant-like immuno-enhancing effects, may provide a novel and important mechanism for enhancing immune system mediated tumor-detection/elimination that merits further investigation.

  12. Human T-cell leukemia virus-I tax oncoprotein functionally targets a subnuclear complex involved in cellular DNA damage-response.

    PubMed

    Haoudi, Abdelali; Daniels, Rodney C; Wong, Eric; Kupfer, Gary; Semmes, O John

    2003-09-26

    The virally encoded oncoprotein Tax has been implicated in HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation. The exact mechanism by which this protein contributes to the oncogenic process is not known. However, it has been hypothesized that Tax induces genomic instability via repression of cellular DNA repair. We examined the effect of de novo Tax expression upon the cell cycle, because appropriate activation of cell cycle checkpoints is essential to a robust damage-repair response. Upon induction of tax expression, Jurkat T-cells displayed a pronounced accumulation in G2/M that was reversible by caffeine. We examined the G2-specific checkpoint signaling response in these cells and found activation of the ATM/chk2-mediated pathway, whereas the ATR/chk1-mediated response was unaffected. Immunoprecipitation with anti-chk2 antibody results in co-precipitation of Tax demonstrating a direct interaction of Tax with a chk2-containing complex. We also show that Tax targets a discrete nuclear site and co-localizes with chk2 and not chk1. This nuclear site, previously identified as Tax Speckled Structures (TSS), also contains the early damage response factor 53BP1. The recruitment of 53BP1 to TSS is dependent upon ATM signaling and requires expression of Tax. Specifically, Tax expression induces redistribution of diffuse nuclear 53BP1 to the TSS foci. Taken together these data suggest that the TSS describe a unique nuclear site involved in DNA damage recognition, repair response, and cell cycle checkpoint activation. We suggest that association of Tax with this multifunctional subnuclear site results in disruption of a subset of the site-specific activities and contributes to cellular genomic instability.

  13. Cellular responses to low-gravity: Pilot studies on suborbital rockets and orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1993-01-01

    The allocated funding supported, in part, experiments conducted on two Consort sounding rockets and five Shuttle flights. The primary parameters investigated were signal transduction in response to various mediators, cellular differentiation and metabolism in microgravity, and effect of microgravity on cytoskeletal morphology. Achievements include: demonstration of effect of spaceflight on the actin cytoskeleton in mouse osteoblasts and frog cells; confirmation that the T cell receptor-mediated signal transduction pathway in T lymphocytes is not affected by low-gravity compared to non-TCR-mediated stimulation (Con-A) which classically does not promote proliferative response; indication that microgravity may allow separation of proliferative signaling and secretory function in lymphocytes; demonstration that T lymphocytes and bone cells utilized less glucose indicating a shift in metabolism and confirming Spacelab results with WI-38 cells which used significantly less glucose, during spaceflight; confirmation that activation of human splenic B cells with a number of different mediators is not affected during spaceflight; demonstration of increased prostaglandin synthesis during reduced bone cell growth suggesting an effect of microgravity on prostaglandin-induced mitogenesis. The funding contributed significantly to the database described above and resulted in submission of six collaborative abstracts in 1993 (five to the ASGSB Annual Meeting and one to the ASCB Annual Meeting). Two abstracts were presented at the 1992 ASGSB Annual Meeting in Tucson. In addition, several peer reviewed papers are being generated and data will be included as background in preparation of future proposals, which hopefully will allow us to continue this type of extremely productive collaborative research.

  14. Evolution of a Cellular Immune Response in Drosophila: A Phenotypic and Genomic Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Jaramillo, Laura; Paspati, Angeliki; van de Zande, Louis; Vermeulen, Cornelis Joseph; Schwander, Tanja; Wertheim, Bregje

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genomic basis of evolutionary adaptation requires insight into the molecular basis underlying phenotypic variation. However, even changes in molecular pathways associated with extreme variation, gains and losses of specific phenotypes, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we investigate the large interspecific differences in the ability to survive infection by parasitoids across 11 Drosophila species and identify genomic changes associated with gains and losses of parasitoid resistance. We show that a cellular immune defense, encapsulation, and the production of a specialized blood cell, lamellocytes, are restricted to a sublineage of Drosophila, but that encapsulation is absent in one species of this sublineage, Drosophila sechellia. Our comparative analyses of hemopoiesis pathway genes and of genes differentially expressed during the encapsulation response revealed that hemopoiesis-associated genes are highly conserved and present in all species independently of their resistance. In contrast, 11 genes that are differentially expressed during the response to parasitoids are novel genes, specific to the Drosophila sublineage capable of lamellocyte-mediated encapsulation. These novel genes, which are predominantly expressed in hemocytes, arose via duplications, whereby five of them also showed signatures of positive selection, as expected if they were recruited for new functions. Three of these novel genes further showed large-scale and presumably loss-of-function sequence changes in D. sechellia, consistent with the loss of resistance in this species. In combination, these convergent lines of evidence suggest that co-option of duplicated genes in existing pathways and subsequent neofunctionalization are likely to have contributed to the evolution of the lamellocyte-mediated encapsulation in Drosophila. PMID:24443439

  15. Robust Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Pertussis in Adults After a First Acellular Booster Vaccination.

    PubMed

    van der Lee, Saskia; van Rooijen, Debbie M; de Zeeuw-Brouwer, Mary-Lène; Bogaard, Marjan J M; van Gageldonk, Pieter G M; Marinovic, Axel Bonacic; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2018-01-01

    To reduce the pertussis disease burden, nowadays several countries recommend acellular pertussis (aP) booster vaccinations for adults. We aimed to evaluate the immunogenicity of a first adult aP booster vaccination at childbearing age. In 2014, healthy adults aged 25-29 years ( n  = 105), vaccinated during infancy with four doses of whole-cell pertussis (wP) vaccine, received a Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and aP) booster vaccination. Blood samples were collected longitudinally pre-booster, 2 and 4 weeks, and 1 year and 2 years post-booster. Tdap vaccine antigen-specific antibody levels and memory B- and T-cell responses were determined at all time points. Antibody persistence was calculated using a bi-exponential decay model. Upon booster vaccination, the IgG levels specific to all Tdap vaccine antigens were significantly increased. After an initial rapid decline in the first year, PT-IgG antibody decay was limited (15%) in the second year post-booster. The duration of a median level of PT-IgG ≥20 IU/mL was estimated to be approximately 9 years. Vaccine antigen-specific memory B- and T-cell numbers increased and remained at high levels although a significant decline was observed after 4 weeks post-booster. However, Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokine production remained above pre-booster levels for 2 years. The Tdap booster vaccination in wP-primed Dutch adults induced robust long-term humoral and cellular immune responses to pertussis antigens. Furthermore, PT-IgG levels are predicted to remain above the presumed protective cut-off for at least 9 years which might deserves further attention in evaluating the current recommendation to revaccinate women during every new pregnancy.

  16. Persistent effects of chronic clozapine on the cellular and behavioral responses to LSD in mice

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, José L.; Holloway, Terrell; Umali, Adrienne; Rayannavar, Vinayak; Sealfon, Stuart C.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In schizophrenia patients, optimal treatment with antipsychotics requires weeks to months of sustained drug therapy. However, single administration of antipsychotic drugs can reverse schizophrenia-like behavioral alterations in rodent models of psychosis. This raises questions about the physiological relevance of such antipsychotic-like activity. Objective This study evaluates the effects of chronic treatment with clozapine on the cellular and behavioral responses induced by the hallucinogenic serotonin 5-HT2A receptor agonist lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) as a mouse model of psychosis. Method Mice were treated chronically (21 days) with 25 mg/kg/day clozapine. Experiments were conducted 1, 7, 14, and 21 days after the last clozapine administration. [3H]Ketanserin binding and 5-HT2A mRNA expression were determined in mouse somatosensory cortex. Head-twitch behavior, expression of c-fos, which is induced by all 5-HT2A agonists, and expression of egr-1 and egr-2, which are LSD-like specific, were assayed. Results Head-twitch response was decreased and [3H]ketanserin binding was downregulated in 1, 7, and 14 days after chronic clozapine. 5-HT2A mRNA was reduced 1 day after chronic clozapine. Induction of c-fos, but not egr-1 and egr-2, was rescued 7 days after chronic clozapine. These effects were not observed after short treatment (2 days) with clozapine or chronic haloperidol (1 mg/kg/day). Conclusion Our findings provide a murine model of chronic atypical antipsychotic drug action and suggest downregulation of the 5-HT2A receptor as a potential mechanism involved in these persistent therapeutic-like effects. PMID:22842765

  17. Evolution of a cellular immune response in Drosophila: a phenotypic and genomic comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Jaramillo, Laura; Paspati, Angeliki; van de Zande, Louis; Vermeulen, Cornelis Joseph; Schwander, Tanja; Wertheim, Bregje

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the genomic basis of evolutionary adaptation requires insight into the molecular basis underlying phenotypic variation. However, even changes in molecular pathways associated with extreme variation, gains and losses of specific phenotypes, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we investigate the large interspecific differences in the ability to survive infection by parasitoids across 11 Drosophila species and identify genomic changes associated with gains and losses of parasitoid resistance. We show that a cellular immune defense, encapsulation, and the production of a specialized blood cell, lamellocytes, are restricted to a sublineage of Drosophila, but that encapsulation is absent in one species of this sublineage, Drosophila sechellia. Our comparative analyses of hemopoiesis pathway genes and of genes differentially expressed during the encapsulation response revealed that hemopoiesis-associated genes are highly conserved and present in all species independently of their resistance. In contrast, 11 genes that are differentially expressed during the response to parasitoids are novel genes, specific to the Drosophila sublineage capable of lamellocyte-mediated encapsulation. These novel genes, which are predominantly expressed in hemocytes, arose via duplications, whereby five of them also showed signatures of positive selection, as expected if they were recruited for new functions. Three of these novel genes further showed large-scale and presumably loss-of-function sequence changes in D. sechellia, consistent with the loss of resistance in this species. In combination, these convergent lines of evidence suggest that co-option of duplicated genes in existing pathways and subsequent neofunctionalization are likely to have contributed to the evolution of the lamellocyte-mediated encapsulation in Drosophila.

  18. Limited Colonization Undermined by Inadequate Early Immune Responses Defines the Dynamics of Decidual Listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Rizzuto, Gabrielle; Tagliani, Elisa; Manandhar, Priyanka; Erlebacher, Adrian; Bakardjiev, Anna I

    2017-08-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes causes foodborne systemic disease in pregnant women, which can lead to preterm labor, stillbirth, or severe neonatal disease. Colonization of the maternal decidua appears to be an initial step in the maternal component of the disease as well as bacterial transmission to the placenta and fetus. Host-pathogen interactions in the decidua during this early stage of infection remain poorly understood. Here, we assessed the dynamics of L. monocytogenes infection in primary human decidual organ cultures and in the murine decidua in vivo A high inoculum was necessary to infect both human and mouse deciduas, and the data support the existence of a barrier to initial colonization of the murine decidua. If successful, however, colonization in both species was followed by significant bacterial expansion associated with an inability of the decidua to mount appropriate innate cellular immune responses. The innate immune deficits included the failure of bacterial foci to attract macrophages and NK cells, cell types known to be important for early defenses against L. monocytogenes in the spleen, as well as a decrease in the tissue density of inflammatory Ly6C hi monocytes in vivo These results suggest that the infectivity of the decidua is not the result of an enhanced recruitment of L. monocytogenes to the gestational uterus but rather is due to compromised local innate cellular immune responses. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Neuronal Cellular Responses to Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure: Implications Regarding Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reale, Marcella; Kamal, Mohammad A.; Patruno, Antonia; Costantini, Erica; D'Angelo, Chiara; Pesce, Miko; Greig, Nigel H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1mT; frequency, 50-Hz) on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2 −, which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT) activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a decline in CAT

  20. Genetically defined race, but not sex, is associated with higher humoral and cellular immune responses to measles vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Emily A.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Haralambieva, Iana H.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Larrabee, Beth R.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    In addition to host genetic and environmental factors, variations in immune responses to vaccination are influenced by demographic variables, such as race and sex. The influence of genetic race and sex on measles vaccine responses is not well understood, yet important for the development of much-needed improved measles vaccines with lower failure rates. We assessed associations between genetically defined race and sex with measles humoral and cellular immunity after measles vaccination in three independent and geographically distinct cohorts totaling 2,872 healthy racially diverse children, older adolescents, and young adults. We found no associations between biological sex and either humoral or cellular immunity to measles vaccine, and no correlation between humoral and cellular immunity in these study subjects. Genetically defined race was, however, significantly associated with both measles vaccine-induced humoral and cellular immune responses, with subjects genetically classified as having African-American ancestry demonstrating significantly higher antibody and cell-mediated immune responses relative to subjects of Caucasian ancestry. This information may be useful in designing novel measles vaccines that are optimally effective across human genetic backgrounds. PMID:27591105

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for cellular stress and low-grade inflammation induced by a super-low dose of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Baker, Bianca; Maitra, Urmila; Geng, Shuo; Li, Liwu

    2014-06-06

    Super-low-dose endotoxemia in experimental animals and humans is linked to low-grade chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of a super-low dose of LPS on low-grade inflammation in macrophages as well as underlying mechanisms. We observed that a super-low dose of LPS induces mitochondrial fission and cell necroptosis in primary murine macrophages, dependent upon interleukin 1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK-1). Mechanistically, our study reveals that a super-low dose of LPS causes protein ubiquitination and degradation of mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), a molecule required for maintaining proper mitochondrial fusion. A super-low dose of LPS also leads to dephosphorylation and activation of Drp1, a molecule responsible for mitochondrial fission and cell necroptosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that a super-low dose of LPS activates receptor interacting protein 3 kinase (RIP3), a key molecule critical for the assembly of the necrosome complex, the initiation of Drp1 dephosphorylation, and necroptosis. The effects of a super-low dose of LPS are abolished in macrophages harvested from IRAK-1-deficient mice. Taken together, our study identified a novel molecular pathway that leads to cellular stress and necroptosis in macrophages challenged with a super-low dose of endotoxin. This may reconcile low-grade inflammation often associated with low-grade endotoxemia. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Early response to psychological trauma--what GPs can do.

    PubMed

    Wade, Darryl; Howard, Alexandra; Fletcher, Susan; Cooper, John; Forbes, David

    2013-09-01

    There is a high prevalence of psychological trauma exposure among primary care patients. General practitioners are well placed to provide appropriate support for patients coping with trauma. This article outlines an evidence-based early response to psychological trauma. Psychological first aid is the preferred approach in providing early assistance to patients who have experienced a traumatic event. General practitioners can be guided by five empirically derived principles in their early response: promoting a sense of safety, calming, self efficacy, connectedness and hope. Structured psychological interventions, including psychological debriefing, are not routinely recommended in the first few weeks following trauma exposure. General practitioner self care is an important aspect of providing post-trauma patient care.

  3. Early Twentieth Century Responses to the Drug Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfennig, Dennis Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Describes early twentieth-century responses to the drug problem in the United States. Discusses pressure from the media and reformers to control the availability of drugs such as opium and cocaine that were widely available in over-the-counter medications. Focuses on New York State, which took the lead in enacting drug control legislation. (DK)

  4. A Comparison of Responsive Interventions on Kindergarteners' Early Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mary E.; Rawlinson, D'Ann; Simmons, Deborah C.; Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-man; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Simmons, Leslie E.; Fogarty, Melissa; Oslund, Eric; Coyne, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effects of Tier 2 reading interventions that operated in response-to-intervention contexts. Kindergarten children (N = 90) who were identified as at risk for reading difficulties were stratified by school and randomly assigned to receive (a) Early Reading Intervention (ERI; Pearson/Scott Foresman, 2004) modified in response…

  5. A Framework for Providing Culturally Responsive Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a framework that offers a way for early intervention (EI) service providers to better meet the needs of the culturally diverse children and families they serve. This framework was created to organize existing research and literature on cultural responsiveness in a way that fit the unique context of EI. The…

  6. The Reasons behind Early Adolescents' Responses to Peer Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellmore, Amy; Chen, Wei-Ting; Rischall, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Victims of school-based peer harassment face a range of risks including psycho-social, physical, and academic harm. The aim of the present study was to examine the behavioral coping responses used by early adolescents when they face peer victimization. To meet this aim, 216 sixth grade students (55% girls) from two urban middle schools and 254…

  7. Humoral and cellular immune response of mice challenged with Yersinia pestis antigenic preparations.

    PubMed

    Leal, Elida A; Moreira, Josimar D; Nunes, Fernanda F; Souza, Larissa R; Martins, Janaina M; Toledo, Vicente P C; Almeida, Alzira M P; Guimarães, Tania M P

    The plague, which is an infectious disease caused by Yersinia pestis, still threatens many populations in several countries. The worldwide increase in human plague cases and the potential use of the bacteria as a biological weapon reinforce the need to study the immunity that is induced by potential vaccine candidates. To determine the immunogenicity of antigenic preparations based on the F1 protein and the total extract from Y. pestis, we assessed the role of these antigens in inducing an immune response. The immunogenicity of antigenic preparations based on the Y. pestis (YP) total extract and the Y. pestis fraction 1 capsular antigen protein (F1) was determined in Swiss-Webster mice immunized with 40μg or 20μg for each preparation. Immunophenotyping was performed by flow cytometry. Animals immunized with the YP total extract did not elicit detectable anti-F1 antibodies (Ab) in the hemaglutination/inhibition (HA/HI) test. Animals immunized with 40μg or 20μg of the F1 protein produced anti-F1 Abs, with titres ranging from 1/16 to 1/8132. The average of CD3 + -CD4 + and CD3 + -CD8 + T cells did not differ significantly between the groups. Neither YP total extract nor F1 protein induced a significant expression of IFN-γ and IL-10 in CD4 + T lymphocytes. In addition, F1 failed to induce IFN-γ expression in CD8 + T cells, unlike the YP total extract. The results showed that F1 protein is not an immunogenic T cell antigen, although the YP total extract (40μg dose) favoured CD8 + T cell-mediated cellular immunity. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of Autophagy in Porcine Kidney Cells by Quantum Dots: A Common Cellular Response to Nanomaterials?

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Stephan T.; Zolnik, Banu S.; McLeland, Christopher B.; Clogston, Jeffery; Zheng, Jiwen; McNeil, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are being investigated as novel in vivo imaging agents. The leaching of toxic metals from these QDs in biological systems is of great concern. This study compared the cytotoxic mechanisms of two QD species made of different core materials (cadmium selenide [CdSe] vs. indium gallium phosphide [InGaP]) but similar core sizes (5.1 vs. 3.7 nm) and surface compositions (both ZnS capped, lipid-coated and pegylated). The CdSe QD was found to be 10-fold more toxic to porcine renal proximal tubule cells (LLC-PK1) than the InGaP QD on a molar basis, as determined by MTT assay (48 h IC50 10nM for CdSe vs. 100nM for InGaP). Neither of the QD species induced appreciable oxidative stress, as determined by lipid peroxide and reduced glutathione content, suggesting that toxicity was not metal associated. In agreement, treatment of cells with CdSe QDs was not associated with changes in metallothionein-IA (MT-IA) gene expression or Cd-associated caspase 3 enzyme activation. By contrast, incubation of the LLC-PK1 cells with the InGaP QD resulted in a dramatic increase in MT-IA expression by 21- and 43-fold, at 8 and 24 h, respectively. The most remarkable finding was evidence of extensive autophagy in QD-treated cells, as determined by Lysotracker Red dye uptake, TEM, and LC3 immunobloting. Autophagy induction has also been described for other nanomaterials and may represent a common cellular response. These data suggest that QD cytotoxicity is dependent upon properties of the particle as a whole, and not exclusively the metal core materials. PMID:18632727

  9. Multiple Channel Bridges for Spinal Cord Injury: Cellular Characterization of Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Laporte, Laura De; Zelivyanskaya, Marina L.; Whittlesey, Kevin J.; Anderson, Aileen J.; Cummings, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Bridges for treatment of the injured spinal cord must stabilize the injury site to prevent secondary damage and create a permissive environment that promotes regeneration. The host response to the bridge is central to creating a permissive environment, as the cell types that respond to the injury have the potential to secrete both stimulatory and inhibitory factors. We investigated multiple channel bridges for spinal cord regeneration and correlated the bridge structure to cell infiltration and axonal elongation. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) bridges were fabricated by a gas foaming/particulate leaching process. Channels within the bridge had diameters of 150 or 250 μm, and the main body of the bridge was highly porous with a controllable pore size. Upon implantation in a rat spinal cord hemisection site, cells infiltrated into the bridge pores and channels, with the pore size influencing the rate of infiltration. The pores had significant cell infiltration, including fibroblasts, macrophages, S-100β-positive cells, and endothelial cells. The channels of the bridge were completely infiltrated with cells, which had aligned axially, and consisted primarily of fibroblasts, S-100β-positive cells, and endothelial cells. Reactive astrocytes were observed primarily outside of the bridge, and staining for chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans was decreased in the region surrounding the bridge relative to studies without bridges. Neurofilament staining revealed a preferential growth of the neural fibers within the bridge channels relative to the pores. Multiple channel bridges capable of supporting cellular infiltration, creating a permissive environment, and directing the growth of neural fibers have potential for promoting and directing spinal cord regeneration. PMID:19382871

  10. Early Peritoneal Immune Response during Echinococcus granulosus Establishment Displays a Biphasic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Marqués, Juan Martín; Chabalgoity, José Alejandro; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Background Cystic echinococcosis is a worldwide distributed helminth zoonosis caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Human secondary cystic echinococcosis is caused by dissemination of protoscoleces after accidental rupture of fertile cysts and is due to protoscoleces ability to develop into new metacestodes. In the experimental model of secondary cystic echinococcosis mice react against protoscoleces producing inefficient immune responses, allowing parasites to develop into cysts. Although the chronic phase of infection has been analyzed in depth, early immune responses at the site of infection establishment, e.g., peritoneal cavity, have not been well studied. Because during early stages of infection parasites are thought to be more susceptible to immune attack, this work focused on the study of cellular and molecular events triggered early in the peritoneal cavity of infected mice. Principal Findings Data obtained showed disparate behaviors among subpopulations within the peritoneal lymphoid compartment. Regarding B cells, there is an active molecular process of plasma cell differentiation accompanied by significant local production of specific IgM and IgG2b antibodies. In addition, peritoneal NK cells showed a rapid increase with a significant percentage of activated cells. Peritoneal T cells showed a substantial increase, with predominance in CD4+ T lymphocytes. There was also a local increase in Treg cells. Finally, cytokine response showed local biphasic kinetics: an early predominant induction of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-15), followed by a shift toward a Th2-type profile (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13). Conclusions Results reported here open new ways to investigate the involvement of immune effectors players in E. granulosus establishment, and also in the sequential promotion of Th1- toward Th2-type responses in experimental secondary cystic echinococcosis. These data would be relevant for designing rational therapies

  11. Differential cellular responses by oncogenic levels of c-Myc expression in long-term confluent retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiping; Cheng, Xiangdong; Samma, Muhammad Kaleem; Kung, Sam K P; Lee, Clement M; Chiu, Sung Kay

    2018-06-01

    c-Myc is a highly pleiotropic transcription factor known to control cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and cellular transformation. Normally, ectopic expression of c-Myc is associated with promoting cell proliferation or triggering cell death via activating p53. However, it is not clear how the levels of c-Myc lead to different cellular responses. Here, we generated a series of stable RPE cell clones expressing c-Myc at different levels, and found that consistent low level of c-Myc induced cellular senescence by activating AP4 in post-confluent RPE cells, while the cells underwent cell death at high level of c-Myc. In addition, high level of c-Myc could override the effect of AP4 on cellular senescence. Further knockdown of AP4 abrogated senescence-like phenotype in cells expressing low level of c-Myc, and accelerated cell death in cells with medium level of c-Myc, indicating that AP4 was required for cellular senescence induced by low level of c-Myc.

  12. Human Papillomavirus Types 16 and 18 Early-expressed Proteins Differentially Modulate the Cellular Redox State and DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gregorio, Alfredo; Manzo-Merino, Joaquín; Gonzaléz-García, María Cecilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Valverde, Mahara; Rojas, Emilio; Rodríguez-Sastre, María Alexandra; García-Cuellar, Claudia María; Lizano, Marcela

    2018-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been proposed as a risk factor for cervical cancer development. However, few studies have evaluated the redox state associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. The aim of this work was to determine the role of the early expressed viral proteins E1, E2, E6 and E7 from HPV types 16 and 18 in the modulation of the redox state in an integral form. Therefore, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH), levels and activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, were analysed in epithelial cells ectopically expressing the viral proteins. Our research shows that E6 oncoproteins decreased GSH and catalase protein levels, as well as its enzymatic activity, which was associated with an increase in ROS production and DNA damage. In contrast, E7 oncoproteins increased GSH, as well as catalase protein levels and its activity, which correlated with a decrease in ROS without affecting DNA integrity. The co-expression of both E6 and E7 oncoproteins neutralized the effects that were independently observed for each of the viral proteins. Additionally, the combined expression of E1 and E2 proteins increased ROS levels with the subsequent increase in the marker for DNA damage phospho-histone 2AX (γH2AX). A decrease in GSH, as well as SOD2 levels and activity were also detected in the presence of E1 and E2, even though catalase activity increased. This study demonstrates that HPV early expressed proteins differentially modulate cellular redox state and DNA damage. PMID:29483822

  13. Autoimmune response of IgE antibodies to cellular self-antigens in systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ajax Mercês; Santiago, Mittermayer Barreto; Guerra, Fernanda Garcia; Pereira, Mariana Menezes; Sousa Atta, Maria Luiza B

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients may exhibit high total IgE and antinuclear IgE antibodies (ANA-IgE). Here, we investigated the specificity of ANA-IgE in SLE patients and the involvement of cytokines in this immune response. Sera from 92 SLE patients and 68 healthy controls were evaluated for the presence of antinuclear IgE antibodies by immunoperoxidase with HEp-2,000(R) cells and immunoblotting with IgG-depleted sera. Total IgE, IgE specific to allergens, and serum cytokine levels were determined by ELISA. Antinuclear IgE antibodies were detected only in SLE patients (29/92, 31.5%). High total IgE was associated with ANA-IgE (p < 0.0001), but was not associated with IgE antibodies to allergens. In the immunoblotting, ANA-IgE reacted with nucleosomes (23/29, 79.3%), dsDNA (14/29, 48.3%), SS-A/Ro (14/29, 48.3%), SS-B/La (2/29, 18.7%), Sm (14/29, 48.3%) and RNP (18/29, 62.1%). Patients with ANA-IgE had very low serum IL-4, less IL-5 than controls (p < 0.05), more IL-10 than seronegative patients (p < 0.05), and unaltered IFN-gamma levels. The IL-5/IL-10 ratio was lower in ANA-IgE seropositive patients in comparison with either seronegative patients (p < 0.05) or healthy controls (p = 0.001). Controls displayed higher IL-5/IFN-gamma ratios than either SLE patients with ANA-IgE (p < 0.05) or patients without these immunoglobulins (p < 0.01). We conclude that IgE antibodies against cell autoantigens involved in protein expression, cellular proliferation, and cell death are present in patients with SLE. Interleukin-10 seems to down-regulate this IgE autoimmune response in SLE. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Molecular basis of cellular response to cisplatin chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; Reed, Eddie; Li, Qingdi Q

    2004-11-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent anticancer agents, displaying significant clinical activity against a variety of solid tumors. For more than two decades, the most effective systemic chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality among men and women in the western world, was cisplatin-based combination treatment. Unfortunately, the outcome of cisplatin therapy on NSCLC seems to have reached a plateau. Therefore, the biological mechanisms of cisplatin action need to be understood in order to overcome the treatment plateau on NSCLC. Moreover, the development of resistance is a hurdle in the use of this drug. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this chemoresistance are largely unknown. Possible mechanisms of acquired resistance to cisplatin include reduced intracellular accumulation of cisplatin, enhanced drug inactivation by metallothionine and glutathione, increased repair activity of DNA damage, and altered expression of oncogenes and regulatory proteins. In addition, it is generally accepted that cytotoxicity of cisplatin is mediated through induction of apoptosis and arrest of cell cycle resulting from its interaction with DNA, such as the formation of cisplatin-DNA adducts, which activates multiple signaling pathways, including those involving p53, Bcl-2 family, caspases, cyclins, CDKs, pRb, PKC, MAPK and PI3K/Akt. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic genes and mutations in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway may contribute to the inability of cells to detect DNA damage or to induce apoptosis. Towards an understanding of the molecular basis of the cellular response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in NSCLC, in this review we provide some insights into the pathways involved in cisplatin damage from entering the cells to execution of apoptosis or survival of NSCLC cells. We believe that as more and more molecular mechanisms of response to cisplatin-based therapy are unraveled, this knowledge should

  15. Activation of WIP1 Phosphatase by HTLV-1 Tax Mitigates the Cellular Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dayaram, Tajhal; Lemoine, Francene J.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Marriott, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic instability stemming from dysregulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA damage response (DDR) is a common feature of many cancers. The cancer adult T cell leukemia (ATL) can occur in individuals infected with human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), and ATL cells contain extensive chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting that they have defects in the recognition or repair of DNA damage. Since Tax is the transforming protein encoded by HTLV-1, we asked whether Tax can affect cell cycle checkpoints and the DDR. Using a combination of flow cytometry and DNA repair assays we showed that Tax-expressing cells exit G1 phase and initiate DNA replication prematurely following damage. Reduced phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX) and RPA2, phosphoproteins that are essential to properly initiate the DDR, was also observed in Tax-expressing cells. To determine the cause of decreased DDR protein phosphorylation in Tax-expressing cells, we examined the cellular phosphatase, WIP1, which is known to dephosphorylate γH2AX. We found that Tax can interact with Wip1 in vivo and in vitro, and that Tax-expressing cells display elevated levels of Wip1 mRNA. In vitro phosphatase assays showed that Tax can enhance Wip1 activity on a γH2AX peptide target by 2-fold. Thus, loss of γH2AX in vivo could be due, in part, to increased expression and activity of WIP1 in the presence of Tax. siRNA knockdown of WIP1 in Tax-expressing cells rescued γH2AX in response to damage, confirming the role of WIP1 in the DDR. These studies demonstrate that Tax can disengage the G1/S checkpoint by enhancing WIP1 activity, resulting in reduced DDR. Premature G1 exit of Tax-expressing cells in the presence of DNA lesions creates an environment that tolerates incorporation of random mutations into the host genome. PMID:23405243

  16. Early cellular evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the evolutionary developments that occurred subsequent to the origin of ancestral cells. Microbial physiology and ecology are potential sharp tools for shaping concepts of microbial evolution. Some popular unjustified assumptions are discussed. It is considered that certain principles derived mainly from the advances of molecular biology can be used to order the natural groups (genera) of extant prokaryotes and their patterns phylogenetically.

  17. Potential Mechanisms for Cancer Resistance in Elephants and Comparative Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Humans.

    PubMed

    Abegglen, Lisa M; Caulin, Aleah F; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S; Kiso, Wendy K; Schmitt, Dennis L; Waddell, Peter J; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T; Maley, Carlo C; Schiffman, Joshua D

    2015-11-03

    Evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n = 644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n = 8), patients with LFS (n = 10), and age-matched human controls (n = 11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95% CI, 0%-5%]; African wild dog, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; lion, 2% [95% CI, 0%-7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95% CI, 3.14%-6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25% cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In response to DNA damage, elephant lymphocytes underwent p53-mediated apoptosis

  18. Potential mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and comparative cellular response to DNA damage in humans

    DOE PAGES

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; ...

    2015-10-08

    Here, evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Design, Setting, and Participants A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n=644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro inmore » the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n=8), patients with LFS (n=10), and age-matched human controls (n=11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. Exposures Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95% CI, 0%-5%]; African wild dog, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; lion, 2% [95% CI, 0%-7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95% CI, 3.14%-6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25% cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In response to DNA damage, elephant lymphocytes

  19. Potential mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and comparative cellular response to DNA damage in humans

    SciT

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley

    Here, evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Design, Setting, and Participants A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n=644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro inmore » the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n=8), patients with LFS (n=10), and age-matched human controls (n=11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. Exposures Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95% CI, 0%-5%]; African wild dog, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; lion, 2% [95% CI, 0%-7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95% CI, 3.14%-6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25% cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In response to DNA damage, elephant lymphocytes

  20. Potential Mechanisms for Cancer Resistance in Elephants and Comparative Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S.; Kiso, Wendy K.; Schmitt, Dennis L.; Waddell, Peter J; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T.; Maley, Carlo C.; Schiffman, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. OBJECTIVE To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n = 644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n = 8), patients with LFS (n = 10), and age-matched human controls (n = 11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. EXPOSURES Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. RESULTS Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95%CI, 0%–5%]; African wild dog, 8%[95%CI, 0%–16%]; lion, 2%[95%CI, 0% –7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95%CI, 3.14%–6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25%cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain

  1. Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce robust humoral and cellular responses in a bovine viral diarrhea virus vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Silveira, Fernando; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; dos Santos, Helton Fernandes; Yendo, Anna Carolina; de Costa, Fernanda; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano; Gosmann, Grace; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2016-04-01

    A saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis leaves (QB-90) and a semi-purified aqueous extract (AE) were evaluated as adjuvants in a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) vaccine in mice. Animals were immunized on days 0 and 14 with antigen plus either QB-90 or AE or an oil-adjuvanted vaccine. Two-weeks after boosting, antibodies were measured by ELISA; cellular immunity was evaluated by DTH, lymphoproliferation, cytokine release and single cell IFN-γ production. Serum anti-BVDV IgG, IgG1 and IgG2b were significantly increased in QB-90- and AE-adjuvanted vaccines. A robust DTH response, increased splenocyte proliferation, Th1-type cytokines and enhanced production of IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were detected in mice that received QB-90-adjuvanted vaccine. The AE-adjuvanted preparation stimulated humoral responses but not cellular immune responses. These findings reveal that QB-90 is capable of stimulating both cellular and humoral immune responses when used as adjuvant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxicity potentials from waste cellular phones, and a waste management policy integrating consumer, corporate, and government responsibilities

    SciT

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Schoenung, Julie M., E-mail: jmschoenung@ucdavis.ed

    Cellular phones have high environmental impact potentials because of their heavy metal content and current consumer attitudes toward purchasing new phones with higher functionality and neglecting to return waste phones into proper take-back systems. This study evaluates human health and ecological toxicity potentials from waste cellular phones; highlights consumer, corporate, and government responsibilities for effective waste management; and identifies key elements needed for an effective waste management strategy. The toxicity potentials are evaluated by using heavy metal content, respective characterization factors, and a pathway and impact model for heavy metals that considers end-of-life disposal in landfills or by incineration. Cancermore » potentials derive primarily from Pb and As; non-cancer potentials primarily from Cu and Pb; and ecotoxicity potentials primarily from Cu and Hg. These results are not completely in agreement with previous work in which leachability thresholds were the metric used to establish priority, thereby indicating the need for multiple or revised metrics. The triple bottom line of consumer, corporate, and government responsibilities is emphasized in terms of consumer attitudes, design for environment (DfE), and establishment and implementation of waste management systems including recycling streams, respectively. The key strategic elements for effective waste management include environmental taxation and a deposit-refund system to motivate consumer responsibility, which is linked and integrated with corporate and government responsibilities. The results of this study can contribute to DfE and waste management policy for cellular phones.« less

  3. Toxicity potentials from waste cellular phones, and a waste management policy integrating consumer, corporate, and government responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Schoenung, Julie M

    2010-01-01

    Cellular phones have high environmental impact potentials because of their heavy metal content and current consumer attitudes toward purchasing new phones with higher functionality and neglecting to return waste phones into proper take-back systems. This study evaluates human health and ecological toxicity potentials from waste cellular phones; highlights consumer, corporate, and government responsibilities for effective waste management; and identifies key elements needed for an effective waste management strategy. The toxicity potentials are evaluated by using heavy metal content, respective characterization factors, and a pathway and impact model for heavy metals that considers end-of-life disposal in landfills or by incineration. Cancer potentials derive primarily from Pb and As; non-cancer potentials primarily from Cu and Pb; and ecotoxicity potentials primarily from Cu and Hg. These results are not completely in agreement with previous work in which leachability thresholds were the metric used to establish priority, thereby indicating the need for multiple or revised metrics. The triple bottom line of consumer, corporate, and government responsibilities is emphasized in terms of consumer attitudes, design for environment (DfE), and establishment and implementation of waste management systems including recycling streams, respectively. The key strategic elements for effective waste management include environmental taxation and a deposit-refund system to motivate consumer responsibility, which is linked and integrated with corporate and government responsibilities. The results of this study can contribute to DfE and waste management policy for cellular phones. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Can early host responses to mycobacterial infection predict eventual disease outcomes?

    PubMed

    de Silva, Kumudika; Begg, Douglas J; Plain, Karren M; Purdie, Auriol C; Kawaji, Satoko; Dhand, Navneet K; Whittington, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Diagnostic tests used for Johne's disease in sheep either have poor sensitivity and specificity or only detect disease in later stages of infection. Predicting which of the infected sheep are likely to become infectious later in life is currently not feasible and continues to be a major hindrance in disease control. We conducted this longitudinal study to investigate if a suite of diagnostic tests conducted in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) exposed lambs at 4 months post infection can accurately predict their clinical status at 12 months post infection. We tracked cellular and humoral responses and quantity of MAP shedding for up to 12 months post challenge in 20 controls and 37 exposed sheep. Infection was defined at necropsy by tissue culture and disease spectrum by lesion type. Data were analysed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models and a subset of variables from the earliest period post inoculation (4 months) was selected for predicting disease outcomes later on (12 months). Sensitivity and specificity of tests and their combinations in series and parallel were determined. Early elevation in faecal MAP DNA quantity and a lower interferon gamma (IFNγ) response were significantly associated with sheep becoming infectious as well as progressing to severe disease. Conversely, early low faecal MAP DNA and higher interleukin-10 responses were significantly associated with an exposed animal developing protective immunity. Combination of early elevated faecal MAP DNA or lower IFNγ response had the highest sensitivity (75%) and specificity (81%) for identifying sheep that would become infectious. Collectively, these results highlight the potential for combined test interpretation to aid in the early prediction of sheep susceptibility to MAP infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Driving mechanisms of passive and active transport across cellular membranes as the mechanisms of cell metabolism and development as well as the mechanisms of cellular distance reactions on hormonal expression and the immune response.

    PubMed

    Ponisovskiy, M R

    2011-01-01

    The article presents mechanisms of cell metabolism, cell development, cell activity, and maintenance of cellular stability. The literature is reviewed from the point of view of these concepts. The balance between anabolic and catabolic processes induces chemical potentials in the extracellular and intracellular media. The chemical potentials of these media are defined as the driving forces of both passive and active transport of substances across cellular membranes. The driving forces of substance transport across cellular membranes as in cellular metabolism and in immune responses and hormonal expressions are considered in the biochemical and biophysical models, reflecting the mechanisms for maintenance of stability of the internal medium and internal energy of an organism. The interactions of passive transport and active transport of substances across cellular walls promote cell proliferation, as well as the mechanism of cellular capacitors, promoting remote reactions across distance for hormonal expression and immune responses. The offered concept of cellular capacitors has given the possibility to explain the mechanism of remote responses of cells to new situations, resulting in the appearance of additional agents. The biophysical model develops an explanation of some cellular functions: cellular membrane action have been identified with capacitor action, based on the similarity of the structures and as well as on similarity of biophysical properties of electric data that confirm the action of the compound-specific interactions of cells within an organism, promoting hormonal expressions and immune responses to stabilize the thermodynamic system of an organism. Comparison of a cellular membrane action to a capacitor has given the possibility for the explanations of exocytosis and endocytosis mechanisms, internalization of the receptor-ligand complex, selection as a receptor reaction to a ligand by immune responses or hormonal effects, reflecting cellular

  6. Ecological comparison of cellular stress responses among populations - normalizing RT-qPCR values to investigate differential environmental adaptations.

    PubMed

    Koenigstein, Stefan; Pöhlmann, Kevin; Held, Christoph; Abele, Doris

    2013-05-16

    Rising temperatures and other environmental factors influenced by global climate change can cause increased physiological stress for many species and lead to range shifts or regional population extinctions. To advance the understanding of species' response to change and establish links between individual and ecosystem adaptations, physiological reactions have to be compared between populations living in different environments. Although changes in expression of stress genes are relatively easy to quantify, methods for reliable comparison of the data remain a contentious issue. Using normalization algorithms and further methodological considerations, we compare cellular stress response gene expression levels measured by RT-qPCR after air exposure experiments among different subpopulations of three species of the intertidal limpet Nacella. Reference gene assessment algorithms reveal that stable reference genes can differ among investigated populations and / or treatment groups. Normalized expression values point to differential defense strategies to air exposure in the investigated populations, which either employ a pronounced cellular stress response in the inducible Hsp70 forms, or exhibit a comparatively high constitutive expression of Hsps (heat shock proteins) while showing only little response in terms of Hsp induction. This study serves as a case study to explore the methodological prerequisites of physiological stress response comparisons among ecologically and phylogenetically different organisms. To improve the reliability of gene expression data and compare the stress responses of subpopulations under potential genetic divergence, reference gene stability algorithms are valuable and necessary tools. As the Hsp70 isoforms have been shown to play different roles in the acute stress responses and increased constitutive defenses of populations in their different habitats, these comparative studies can yield insight into physiological strategies of adaptation to

  7. Ecological comparison of cellular stress responses among populations – normalizing RT-qPCR values to investigate differential environmental adaptations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rising temperatures and other environmental factors influenced by global climate change can cause increased physiological stress for many species and lead to range shifts or regional population extinctions. To advance the understanding of species’ response to change and establish links between individual and ecosystem adaptations, physiological reactions have to be compared between populations living in different environments. Although changes in expression of stress genes are relatively easy to quantify, methods for reliable comparison of the data remain a contentious issue. Using normalization algorithms and further methodological considerations, we compare cellular stress response gene expression levels measured by RT-qPCR after air exposure experiments among different subpopulations of three species of the intertidal limpet Nacella. Results Reference gene assessment algorithms reveal that stable reference genes can differ among investigated populations and / or treatment groups. Normalized expression values point to differential defense strategies to air exposure in the investigated populations, which either employ a pronounced cellular stress response in the inducible Hsp70 forms, or exhibit a comparatively high constitutive expression of Hsps (heat shock proteins) while showing only little response in terms of Hsp induction. Conclusions This study serves as a case study to explore the methodological prerequisites of physiological stress response comparisons among ecologically and phylogenetically different organisms. To improve the reliability of gene expression data and compare the stress responses of subpopulations under potential genetic divergence, reference gene stability algorithms are valuable and necessary tools. As the Hsp70 isoforms have been shown to play different roles in the acute stress responses and increased constitutive defenses of populations in their different habitats, these comparative studies can yield insight into

  8. Cellular fibronectin response to supervised moderate aerobic training in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H.; Gabr, Sami A.; Al-Eisa, Einas

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity is one of the most pivotal targets for the prevention and management of vascular complications, especially endothelial dysfunctions. Cellular fibronectin is an endothelium-derived protein involved in subendothelial matrix assembly. Its plasma levels reflect matrix alterations and vessel wall destruction in patients with type II diabetes. This study investigated the influence of 12 weeks of supervised aerobic training on cellular fibronectin and its relationship with insulin resistance and body weight in type II diabetic subjects. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 50 men with type II diabetes who had a mean age of 48.8 ± 14.6 years and were randomly divided into two groups: an aerobic exercise group (12 weeks, three 50 minutes sessions per week) and control group. To examine changes in cellular fibronectin, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin resistance, fasting insulin, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile, 5 ml of blood was taken from the brachial vein of patients before and 48 hours after completion of the exercise period and after 12 hours of fasting at rest. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS-16 software with the independent and paired t-tests. [Results] A significant decrease was observed in body mass index and body fat percentage in the experimental group. Compared with the control group, the aerobic exercise group showed a significant decrease in cellular fibronectin, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin resistance, fasting insulin, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile after 12 weeks of aerobic exercise. The change in cellular fibronectin showed positive significant correlation with body mass index, diabetic biomarkers, and physical activity level. [Conclusion] The results showed that supervised aerobic exercise as a stimulus can change the levels of cellular fibronectin as matrix metalloproteinase protein a long with improvement of insulin sensitivity and glycosylated hemoglobin in order to prevent

  9. Sublethal pesticide doses negatively affect survival and the cellular responses in American foulbrood-infected honeybee larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Javier Hernández; Krainer, Sophie; Engert, Antonia; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Riessberger-Gallé, Ulrike; Crailsheim, Karl

    2017-02-01

    Disclosing interactions between pesticides and bee infections is of most interest to understand challenges that pollinators are facing and to which extent bee health is compromised. Here, we address the individual and combined effect that three different pesticides (dimethoate, clothianidin and fluvalinate) and an American foulbrood (AFB) infection have on mortality and the cellular immune response of honeybee larvae. We demonstrate for the first time a synergistic interaction when larvae are exposed to sublethal doses of dimethoate or clothianidin in combination with Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of AFB. A significantly higher mortality than the expected sum of the effects of each individual stressor was observed in co-exposed larvae, which was in parallel with a drastic reduction of the total and differential hemocyte counts. Our results underline that characterizing the cellular response of larvae to individual and combined stressors allows unmasking previously undetected sublethal effects of pesticides in colony health.

  10. Sublethal pesticide doses negatively affect survival and the cellular responses in American foulbrood-infected honeybee larvae.

    PubMed

    López, Javier Hernández; Krainer, Sophie; Engert, Antonia; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Riessberger-Gallé, Ulrike; Crailsheim, Karl

    2017-02-01

    Disclosing interactions between pesticides and bee infections is of most interest to understand challenges that pollinators are facing and to which extent bee health is compromised. Here, we address the individual and combined effect that three different pesticides (dimethoate, clothianidin and fluvalinate) and an American foulbrood (AFB) infection have on mortality and the cellular immune response of honeybee larvae. We demonstrate for the first time a synergistic interaction when larvae are exposed to sublethal doses of dimethoate or clothianidin in combination with Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of AFB. A significantly higher mortality than the expected sum of the effects of each individual stressor was observed in co-exposed larvae, which was in parallel with a drastic reduction of the total and differential hemocyte counts. Our results underline that characterizing the cellular response of larvae to individual and combined stressors allows unmasking previously undetected sublethal effects of pesticides in colony health.

  11. Presence of early stage cancer does not impair the early protein metabolic response to major surgery

    PubMed Central

    Klimberg, V. Suzanne; Allasia, Arianna; Deutz, Nicolaas EP

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Combined bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction is a common major surgical procedure in women with breast cancer and in those with a family history of breast cancer. As this large surgical procedure induces muscle protein loss, a preserved anabolic response to nutrition is warranted for optimal recovery. It is unclear whether the presence of early stage cancer negatively affects the protein metabolic response to major surgery as this would mandate perioperative nutritional support. Methods In nine women with early stage (Stage II) breast malignancy and nine healthy women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer undergoing the same large surgical procedure, we examined whether surgery influences the catabolic response to overnight fasting and the anabolic response to nutrition differently. Prior to and within 24 h after combined bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction surgery, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown rates were assessed after overnight fasting and after meal intake by stable isotope methodology to enable the calculation of net protein catabolism in the post‐absorptive state and net protein anabolic response to a meal. Results Major surgery resulted in an up‐regulation of post‐absorptive protein synthesis and breakdown rates (P < 0.001) and lower net protein catabolism (P < 0.05) and was associated with insulin resistance and increased systemic inflammation (P < 0.01). Net anabolic response to the meal was reduced after surgery (P < 0.05) but higher in cancer (P < 0.05) indicative of a more preserved meal efficiency. The significant relationship between net protein anabolism and the amount of amino acids available in the circulation (R 2 = 0.85, P < 0.001) was independent of the presence of non‐cachectic early stage breast cancer or surgery. Conclusions The presence of early stage breast cancer does not enhance the normal catabolic response to major surgery or further attenuates the

  12. Presence of early stage cancer does not impair the early protein metabolic response to major surgery.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Mariëlle P K J; Klimberg, V Suzanne; Allasia, Arianna; Deutz, Nicolaas Ep

    2017-06-01

    Combined bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction is a common major surgical procedure in women with breast cancer and in those with a family history of breast cancer. As this large surgical procedure induces muscle protein loss, a preserved anabolic response to nutrition is warranted for optimal recovery. It is unclear whether the presence of early stage cancer negatively affects the protein metabolic response to major surgery as this would mandate perioperative nutritional support. In nine women with early stage (Stage II) breast malignancy and nine healthy women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer undergoing the same large surgical procedure, we examined whether surgery influences the catabolic response to overnight fasting and the anabolic response to nutrition differently. Prior to and within 24 h after combined bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction surgery, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown rates were assessed after overnight fasting and after meal intake by stable isotope methodology to enable the calculation of net protein catabolism in the post-absorptive state and net protein anabolic response to a meal. Major surgery resulted in an up-regulation of post-absorptive protein synthesis and breakdown rates (P < 0.001) and lower net protein catabolism (P < 0.05) and was associated with insulin resistance and increased systemic inflammation (P < 0.01). Net anabolic response to the meal was reduced after surgery (P < 0.05) but higher in cancer (P < 0.05) indicative of a more preserved meal efficiency. The significant relationship between net protein anabolism and the amount of amino acids available in the circulation (R 2  = 0.85, P < 0.001) was independent of the presence of non-cachectic early stage breast cancer or surgery. The presence of early stage breast cancer does not enhance the normal catabolic response to major surgery or further attenuates the anabolic response to meal intake within 24 h after

  13. Conversion of psychological stress into cellular stress response: roles of the sigma-1 receptor in the process.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruo

    2015-04-01

    Psychiatrists empirically recognize that excessive or chronic psychological stress can result in long-lasting impairments of brain functions that partly involve neuronal cell damage. Recent studies begin to elucidate the molecular pathways activated/inhibited by psychological stress. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis under psychological stress causes inflammatory oxidative stresses in the brain, in part due to elevation of cytokines. Psychological stress or neuropathological conditions (e.g., accumulation of β-amyloids) trigger 'cellular stress responses', which promote upregulation of molecular chaperones to protect macromolecules from degradation. The unfolded protein response, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-specific cellular stress response, has been recently implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders and the pharmacology of certain clinically used drugs. The sigma-1 receptor is an ER protein whose ligands are shown to exert antidepressant-like and neuroprotective actions. Recent studies found that the sigma-1 receptor is a novel ligand-operated ER chaperone that regulates bioenergetics, free radical generation, oxidative stress, unfolded protein response and cytokine signaling. The sigma-1 receptor also regulates morphogenesis of neuronal cells, such as neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and myelination, which can be perturbed by cellular stress. The sigma-1 receptor may thus contribute to a cellular defense system that protects nervous systems against chronic psychological stress. Findings from sigma receptor research imply that not only cell surface monoamine effectors but also intracellular molecules, especially those at the ER, may provide novel therapeutic targets for future drug developments. © 2014 The Author. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  14. Anatomical and cellular responses of Pinus monticola stem tissues to invasion by Cronartium ribicola

    J. W. Hudgins; G. I . McDonald; P. J. Zambino; N. B. Klopfenstein; V. R. Franceschi

    2005-01-01

    White pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) causes extensive damage to white pines and their associated ecosystems across North America. The anatomical and cellular characteristics of C. ribicola colonization in Pinus monticola branch and stem tissues were studied as a basis for understanding host tree reactions that may be related to resistance. Samples examined...

  15. A cellular stress response (CSR) that interacts with NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) is a new regulator of hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Ami; Koyama, Chika; Xu, Jing; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-02-28

    NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) was previously found to contribute to the hypoxic response of cells, but the mechanism was not clarified. In this study, we identified a cellular stress response (CSR) as a new factor interacting with NPR by a yeast two-hybrid system. Overexpression of CSR enhanced the induction of erythropoietin and hypoxia response element (HRE) activity under hypoxia in human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (Hep3B), while knockdown of CSR suppressed them. This new finding regarding the interaction of NPR with CSR provides insight into the function of NPR in hypoxic response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stepwise pH-responsive nanoparticles for enhanced cellular uptake and on-demand intracellular release of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Li, Fang; Tang, Yan; Yang, Shu-di; Li, Ji-Zhao; Yuan, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Xue-Nong

    2017-01-01

    Physicochemical properties, including particle size, zeta potential, and drug release behavior, affect targeting efficiency, cellular uptake, and antitumor effect of nanocarriers in a formulated drug-delivery system. In this study, a novel stepwise pH-responsive nanodrug delivery system was developed to efficiently deliver and significantly promote the therapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX). The system comprised dimethylmaleic acid-chitosan-urocanic acid and elicited stepwise responses to extracellular and intracellular pH. The nanoparticles (NPs), which possessed negative surface charge under physiological conditions and an appropriate nanosize, exhibited advantageous stability during blood circulation and enhanced accumulation in tumor sites via enhanced permeability and retention effect. The tumor cellular uptake of DOX-loaded NPs was significantly promoted by the first-step pH response, wherein surface charge reversion of NPs from negative to positive was triggered by the slightly acidic tumor extracellular environment. After internalization into tumor cells, the second-step pH response in endo/lysosome acidic environment elicited the on-demand intracellular release of DOX from NPs, thereby increasing cytotoxicity against tumor cells. Furthermore, stepwise pH-responsive NPs showed enhanced antiproliferation effect and reduced systemic side effect in vivo. Hence, the stepwise pH-responsive NPs provide a promising strategy for efficient delivery of antitumor agents.

  17. Stepwise pH-responsive nanoparticles for enhanced cellular uptake and on-demand intracellular release of doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-liang; Li, Fang; Tang, Yan; Yang, Shu-di; Li, Ji-zhao; Yuan, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Xiao-feng; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2017-01-01

    Physicochemical properties, including particle size, zeta potential, and drug release behavior, affect targeting efficiency, cellular uptake, and antitumor effect of nanocarriers in a formulated drug-delivery system. In this study, a novel stepwise pH-responsive nanodrug delivery system was developed to efficiently deliver and significantly promote the therapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX). The system comprised dimethylmaleic acid-chitosan-urocanic acid and elicited stepwise responses to extracellular and intracellular pH. The nanoparticles (NPs), which possessed negative surface charge under physiological conditions and an appropriate nanosize, exhibited advantageous stability during blood circulation and enhanced accumulation in tumor sites via enhanced permeability and retention effect. The tumor cellular uptake of DOX-loaded NPs was significantly promoted by the first-step pH response, wherein surface charge reversion of NPs from negative to positive was triggered by the slightly acidic tumor extracellular environment. After internalization into tumor cells, the second-step pH response in endo/lysosome acidic environment elicited the on-demand intracellular release of DOX from NPs, thereby increasing cytotoxicity against tumor cells. Furthermore, stepwise pH-responsive NPs showed enhanced antiproliferation effect and reduced systemic side effect in vivo. Hence, the stepwise pH-responsive NPs provide a promising strategy for efficient delivery of antitumor agents. PMID:28652730

  18. Early Corneal Cellular and Nerve Fiber Pathology in Young Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Identified Using Corneal Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Szalai, Eszter; Deák, Eszter; Módis, László; Németh, Gábor; Berta, András; Nagy, Annamária; Felszeghy, Eniko; Káposzta, Rita; Malik, Rayaz A; Csutak, Adrienne

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify epithelial, stromal, and endothelial cell density, and subbasal nerve morphology in young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus with and without diabetic retinopathy. A total of 28 young patients (mean age, 22.86 ± 9.05 years) with type 1 diabetes, with (n = 18) and without (n = 10) retinopathy, and 17 age-matched healthy control subjects (mean age, 26.53 ± 2.43 years) underwent corneal confocal microscopy (CCM). We found significantly lower epithelial (P < 0.0001) and endothelial (P = 0.001) cell densities and higher keratocyte cell density (P = 0.024) in patients with type 1 diabetes compared to controls. Significantly lower corneal nerve fiber density (P = 0.004), nerve branch density (P = 0.004), total nerve branch density (P = 0.04), and nerve fiber length (P = 0.001), and greater nerve fiber width (P = 0.04) were observed in patients with type 1 diabetes compared to control subjects. Significantly lower epithelial (P < 0.001) and endothelial (P = 0.02) cell densities, nerve branch density (P = 0.02), and nerve fiber length (P = 0.04), and significantly higher keratocyte cell density (P = 0.02) were found in patients with type 1 diabetes without retinopathy compared to control subjects. Corneal confocal microscopy identifies corneal cellular and small nerve fiber pathology in young patients with type 1 diabetes without retinopathy, which increases in severity in those with retinopathy. Corneal confocal microscopy appears to have considerable use as an imaging biomarker for early subclinical pathology in young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  19. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants.

    PubMed

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K(+) accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Carnauba wax nanoparticles enhance strong systemic and mucosal cellular and humoral immune responses to HIV-gp140 antigen

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Mauricio A.; Loxley, Andrew; Eatmon, Christy; Van Roey, Griet; Fairhurst, David; Mitchnick, Mark; Dash, Philip; Cole, Tom; Wegmann, Frank; Sattentau, Quentin; Shattock, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Induction of humoral responses to HIV at mucosal compartments without inflammation is important for vaccine design. We developed charged wax nanoparticles that efficiently adsorb protein antigens and are internalized by DC in the absence of inflammation. HIV-gp140-adsorbed nanoparticles induced stronger in vitro T-cell proliferation responses than antigen alone. Such responses were greatly enhanced when antigen was co-adsorbed with TLR ligands. Immunogenicity studies in mice showed that intradermal vaccination with HIV-gp140 antigen-adsorbed nanoparticles induced high levels of specific IgG. Importantly, intranasal immunization with HIV-gp140-adsorbed nanoparticles greatly enhanced serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses. Our results show that HIV-gp140-carrying wax nanoparticles can induce strong cellular/humoral immune responses without inflammation and may be of potential use as effective mucosal adjuvants for HIV vaccine candidates. PMID:21145913

  1. Carnauba wax nanoparticles enhance strong systemic and mucosal cellular and humoral immune responses to HIV-gp140 antigen.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio A; Loxley, Andrew; Eatmon, Christy; Van Roey, Griet; Fairhurst, David; Mitchnick, Mark; Dash, Philip; Cole, Tom; Wegmann, Frank; Sattentau, Quentin; Shattock, Robin

    2011-02-01

    Induction of humoral responses to HIV at mucosal compartments without inflammation is important for vaccine design. We developed charged wax nanoparticles that efficiently adsorb protein antigens and are internalized by DC in the absence of inflammation. HIV-gp140-adsorbed nanoparticles induced stronger in vitro T-cell proliferation responses than antigen alone. Such responses were greatly enhanced when antigen was co-adsorbed with TLR ligands. Immunogenicity studies in mice showed that intradermal vaccination with HIV-gp140 antigen-adsorbed nanoparticles induced high levels of specific IgG. Importantly, intranasal immunization with HIV-gp140-adsorbed nanoparticles greatly enhanced serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses. Our results show that HIV-gp140-carrying wax nanoparticles can induce strong cellular/humoral immune responses without inflammation and may be of potential use as effective mucosal adjuvants for HIV vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic autofluorescence imaging of head and neck cancer organoids quantifies cellular heterogeneity and treatment response (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Amy T.; Heaster, Tiffany M.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    Treatment options for head and neck cancer are limited, and can cause an impaired ability to eat, talk, and breathe. Therefore, optimized and personalized therapies could reduce unnecessary toxicities from ineffective treatments. Organoids are generated from primary tumor tissue and provide a physiologically-relevant in vitro model to measure drug response. Additionally, multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of the metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD can resolve dynamic cellular response to anti-cancer treatment. This study applies FLIM of NAD(P)H and FAD to head and neck cancer organoids. Head and neck cancer tissue was digested and grown in culture as three-dimensional organoids. Gold standard measures of therapeutic response in vivo indicate stable disease after treatment with cetuximab (antibody therapy) or cisplatin (chemotherapy), and treatment response after combination treatment. In parallel, organoids were treated with cetuximab, cisplatin, or combination therapy for 24 hours. Treated organoids exhibit decreased NAD(P)H lifetime (p<0.05) and increased FAD lifetime (p<0.05) compared with control organoids. Additionally, analysis of cellular heterogeneity identifies distinct subpopulations of cells in response to treatment. A quantitative heterogeneity index predicts in vivo treatment response and demonstrates increased cellular heterogeneity in organoids treated with cetuximab or cisplatin compared with combination treatment. Mapping of cell subpopulations enables characterization of spatial relationships between cell subpopulations. Ultimately, an organoid model combined with metabolic fluorescence imaging could provide a high-throughput platform for drug discovery. Organoids grown from patient tissue could enable individualized treatment planning. These achievements could optimize quality of life and treatment outcomes for head and neck cancer patients.

  3. Global gene expression analysis of early response to chemotherapy treatment in ovarian cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    L'Espérance, Sylvain; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Tetu, Bernard; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2008-02-26

    Chemotherapy (CT) resistance in ovarian cancer (OC) is broad and encompasses diverse unrelated drugs, suggesting more than one mechanism of resistance. To better understand the molecular mechanisms controlling the immediate response of OC cells to CT exposure, we have performed gene expression profiling in spheroid cultures derived from six OC cell lines (OVCAR3, SKOV3, TOV-112, TOV-21, OV-90 and TOV-155), following treatment with 10,0 microM cisplatin, 2,5 microM paclitaxel or 5,0 microM topotecan for 72 hours. Exposure of OC spheroids to these CT drugs resulted in differential expression of genes associated with cell growth and proliferation, cellular assembly and organization, cell death, cell cycle control and cell signaling. Genes, functionally involved in DNA repair, DNA replication and cell cycle arrest were mostly overexpressed, while genes implicated in metabolism (especially lipid metabolism), signal transduction, immune and inflammatory response, transport, transcription regulation and protein biosynthesis, were commonly suppressed following all treatments. Cisplatin and topotecan treatments triggered similar alterations in gene and pathway expression patterns, while paclitaxel action was mainly associated with induction of genes and pathways linked to cellular assembly and organization (including numerous tubulin genes), cell death and protein synthesis. The microarray data were further confirmed by pathway and network analyses. Most alterations in gene expression were directly related to mechanisms of the cytotoxics actions in OC spheroids. However, the induction of genes linked to mechanisms of DNA replication and repair in cisplatin- and topotecan-treated OC spheroids could be associated with immediate adaptive response to treatment. Similarly, overexpression of different tubulin genes upon exposure to paclitaxel could represent an early compensatory effect to this drug action. Finally, multicellular growth conditions that are known to alter gene

  4. Cellular immune responses against CT7 (MAGE-C1) and humoral responses against other cancer-testis antigens in multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    Lendvai, Nikoletta; Gnjatic, Sacha; Ritter, Erika; Mangone, Michael; Austin, Wayne; Reyner, Karina; Jayabalan, David; Niesvizky, Ruben; Jagannath, Sundar; Bhardwaj, Nina; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Old, Lloyd J.

    2010-01-01

    The type I melanoma antigen gene (MAGE) proteins CT7 (MAGE-C1) and MAGE-A3 are commonly expressed in multiple myeloma (MM), and their expression correlates with increased plasma cell proliferation and poor clinical outcome. They belong to the cancer-testis antigen (CTAg) group of tumor-associated proteins, some of which elicit spontaneous immune responses in cancer patients. CT7 and MAGE-A3 are promising antigenic targets for therapeutic tumor vaccines in myeloma; therefore, it is critical to determine if they are immunogenic in MM patients. We analyzed cellular and humoral immune responses against CTAgs in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias: MM, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). Bone marrow lymphocytes from two of four untreated MM patients exhibited CT7-specific cellular immune responses as measured by an autologous cellular immunity assay, the first such immune response to CT7 to be reported in cancer patients. Sera from 24 patients were screened by ELISA for humoral immune responses to CTAgs. Two patients with MM demonstrated positive titers, one for MAGE-A1 and the other for SSX1. These data demonstrate that CTAgs, particularly CT7, are immunogenic in MM patients and merit further exploration as targets of immunological therapy in MM. PMID:20108890

  5. Cellular immune responses against CT7 (MAGE-C1) and humoral responses against other cancer-testis antigens in multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Lendvai, Nikoletta; Gnjatic, Sacha; Ritter, Erika; Mangone, Michael; Austin, Wayne; Reyner, Karina; Jayabalan, David; Niesvizky, Ruben; Jagannath, Sundar; Bhardwaj, Nina; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Old, Lloyd J; Cho, Hearn Jay

    2010-01-29

    The type I melanoma antigen gene (MAGE) proteins CT7 (MAGE-C1) and MAGE-A3 are commonly expressed in multiple myeloma (MM), and their expression correlates with increased plasma cell proliferation and poor clinical outcome. They belong to the cancer-testis antigen (CTAg) group of tumor-associated proteins, some of which elicit spontaneous immune responses in cancer patients. CT7 and MAGE-A3 are promising antigenic targets for therapeutic tumor vaccines in myeloma; therefore, it is critical to determine if they are immunogenic in MM patients. We analyzed cellular and humoral immune responses against CTAgs in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias: MM, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). Bone marrow lymphocytes from two of four untreated MM patients exhibited CT7-specific cellular immune responses as measured by an autologous cellular immunity assay, the first such immune response to CT7 to be reported in cancer patients. Sera from 24 patients were screened by ELISA for humoral immune responses to CTAgs. Two patients with MM demonstrated positive titers, one for MAGE-A1 and the other for SSX1. These data demonstrate that CTAgs, particularly CT7, are immunogenic in MM patients and merit further exploration as targets of immunological therapy in MM.

  6. Early stage response problem for post-disaster incidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungwoo; Shin, Youngchul; Lee, Gyu M.; Moon, Ilkyeong

    2018-07-01

    Research on evacuation plans for reducing damages and casualties has been conducted to advise defenders against threats. However, despite the attention given to the research in the past, emergency response management, designed to neutralize hazards, has been undermined since planners frequently fail to apprehend the complexities and contexts of the emergency situation. Therefore, this study considers a response problem with unique characteristics for the duration of the emergency. An early stage response problem is identified to find the optimal routing and scheduling plan for responders to prevent further hazards. Due to the complexity of the proposed mathematical model, two algorithms are developed. Data from a high-rise building, called Central City in Seoul, Korea, are used to evaluate the algorithms. Results show that the proposed algorithms can procure near-optimal solutions within a reasonable time.

  7. Sensitivity of eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) spermatozoa and oocytes to dispersed oil: Cellular responses and impacts on fertilization and embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vignier, J; Volety, A K; Rolton, A; Le Goïc, N; Chu, F-L E; Robert, R; Soudant, P

    2017-06-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill released millions of barrels of oil and dispersant into the Gulf of Mexico. The timing of the spill coincided with the spawning season of Crassostrea virginica. Consequently, gametes released in the water were likely exposed to oil and dispersant. This study aimed to (i) evaluate the cellular effects of acute exposure of spermatozoa and oocytes to surface slick oil, dispersed mechanically (HEWAF) and chemically (CEWAF), using flow-cytometric (FCM) analyses, and (ii) determine whether the observed cellular effects relate to impairments of fertilization and embryogenesis of gametes exposed to the same concentrations of CEWAF and HEWAF. Following a 30-min exposure, the number of spermatozoa and their viability were reduced due to a physical action of oil droplets (HEWAF) and a toxic action of CEWAF respectively. Additionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in exposed oocytes tended to increase with increasing oil concentrations suggesting that exposure to dispersed oil resulted in an oxidative stress. The decrease in fertilization success (1-h), larval survival (24-h) and increase in abnormalities (6-h and 24-h) may be partly related to altered cellular characteristics. FCM assays are a good predictor of sublethal effects especially on fertilization success. These data suggest that oil/dispersant are cytotoxic to gametes, which may affect negatively the reproduction success and early development of oysters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Early prediction of blonanserin response in Japanese patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Taro; Matsuda, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic used for the treatment of schizophrenia in Japan and Korea. The present study aimed to examine early prediction of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia. An 8-week, prospective, single-arm, flexible-dose clinical trial of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia was conducted under real-world conditions. The inclusion criteria were antipsychotic naïve, and first-episode schizophrenia patients or schizophrenia patients with no consumption of any antipsychotic medication for more than 4 weeks before enrollment in this study. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power were calculated for the response status at week 4 to predict the subsequent response at week 8. Thirty-seven patients were recruited (56.8% of them had first-episode schizophrenia), and 28 (75.7%) completed the trial. At week 8, blonanserin was associated with a significant improvement in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score (P<0.0001) and in positive (P<0.0001), negative (P<0.0001), and general subscale scores (P<0.0001). In terms of percentage improvement of PANSS total scores from baseline to week 8, 64.9% of patients showed a ≥20% reduction in the PANSS total score and 48.6% showed a ≥30% reduction. However, 8.1% of patients experienced at least one adverse event. Using the 20% reduction in the PANSS total score at week 4 as a definition of an early response, the negative predictive values for later responses (ie, reductions of ≥30 and ≥40 in the PANSS total scores) were 88.9% and 94.1%, respectively. The specificities were 80.0% and 51.6%, respectively. Our results suggest that the blonanserin response at week 4 could predict the later response at week 8.

  9. Early prediction of blonanserin response in Japanese patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Taro; Matsuda, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Background Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic used for the treatment of schizophrenia in Japan and Korea. The present study aimed to examine early prediction of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia. Methods An 8-week, prospective, single-arm, flexible-dose clinical trial of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia was conducted under real-world conditions. The inclusion criteria were antipsychotic naïve, and first-episode schizophrenia patients or schizophrenia patients with no consumption of any antipsychotic medication for more than 4 weeks before enrollment in this study. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power were calculated for the response status at week 4 to predict the subsequent response at week 8. Results Thirty-seven patients were recruited (56.8% of them had first-episode schizophrenia), and 28 (75.7%) completed the trial. At week 8, blonanserin was associated with a significant improvement in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score (P<0.0001) and in positive (P<0.0001), negative (P<0.0001), and general subscale scores (P<0.0001). In terms of percentage improvement of PANSS total scores from baseline to week 8, 64.9% of patients showed a ≥20% reduction in the PANSS total score and 48.6% showed a ≥30% reduction. However, 8.1% of patients experienced at least one adverse event. Using the 20% reduction in the PANSS total score at week 4 as a definition of an early response, the negative predictive values for later responses (ie, reductions of ≥30 and ≥40 in the PANSS total scores) were 88.9% and 94.1%, respectively. The specificities were 80.0% and 51.6%, respectively. Conclusion Our results suggest that the blonanserin response at week 4 could predict the later response at week 8. PMID:25285009

  10. ART culture conditions change the probability of mouse embryo gestation through defined cellular and molecular responses.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Caroline; Esteves, Telma Cristina; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Le Gac, Séverine; Nordhoff, Verena; Schlatt, Stefan; Boiani, Michele

    2012-09-01

    Do different human ART culture protocols prepare embryos differently for post-implantation development? The type of ART culture protocol results in distinct cellular and molecular phenotypes in vitro at the blastocyst stage as well as subsequently during in vivo development. It has been reported that ART culture medium affects human development as measured by gestation rates and birthweights. However, due to individual variation across ART patients, it is not possible as yet to pinpoint a cause-effect relationship between choice of culture medium and developmental outcome. In a prospective study, 13 human ART culture protocols were compared two at a time against in vivo and in vitro controls. Superovulated mouse oocytes were fertilized in vivo using outbred and inbred mating schemes. Zygotes were cultured in medium or in the oviduct and scored for developmental parameters 96 h later. Blastocysts were either analyzed or transferred into fosters to measure implantation rates and fetal development. In total, 5735 fertilized mouse oocytes, 1732 blastocysts, 605 fetuses and 178 newborns were examined during the course of the study (December 2010-December 2011). Mice of the B6C3F1, C57Bl/6 and CD1 strains were used as oocyte donors, sperm donors and recipients for embryo transfer, respectively. In vivo fertilized B6C3F1 oocytes were allowed to cleave in 13 human ART culture protocols compared with mouse oviduct and optimized mouse medium (KSOM(aa)). Cell lineage composition of resultant blastocysts was analyzed by immunostaining and confocal microscopy (trophectoderm, Cdx2; primitive ectoderm, Nanog; primitive endoderm, Sox17), global gene expression by microarray analysis, and rates of development to midgestation and to term. Mouse zygotes show profound variation in blastocyst (49.9-91.9%) and fetal (15.7-62.0%) development rates across the 13 ART culture protocols tested (R(2)= 0.337). Two opposite protocols, human tubal fluid/multiblast (high fetal rate) and ISM1/ISM2

  11. Recombinant proteins of Zaire ebolavirus induce potent humoral and cellular immune responses and protect against live virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Axel T; Wong, Teri-Ann S; Lieberman, Michael M; Humphreys, Tom; Clements, David E; Bakken, Russell R; Hart, Mary Kate; Pratt, William D; Dye, John M

    2018-05-24

    Infections with filoviruses in humans are highly virulent, causing hemorrhagic fevers which result in up to 90% mortality. In addition to natural infections, the ability to use these viruses as bioterrorist weapons is of significant concern. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or therapeutics available to combat these infections. The pathogenesis of disease involves the dysregulation of the host's immune system, which results in impairment of the innate and adaptive immune responses, with subsequent development of lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, hemorrhage, and death. Questions remain with regard to the few survivors of infection, who manage to mount an effective adaptive immune response. These questions concern the humoral and cellular components of this response, and whether such a response can be elicited by an appropriate prophylactic vaccine. The data reported herein describe the production and evaluation of a recombinant subunit Ebola virus vaccine candidate consisting of insect cell expressed Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) surface glycoprotein (GP) and the matrix proteins VP24 and VP40. The recombinant subunit proteins are shown to be highly immunogenic in mice, yielding both humoral and cellular responses, as well as highly efficacious, providing up to 100% protection against a lethal challenge with live virus. These results demonstrate proof of concept for such a recombinant non-replicating vaccine candidate in the mouse model of EBOV which helps to elucidate immune correlates of protection and warrants further development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulation of Cellular Stress Response via the Erythropoietin/CD131 Heteroreceptor Complex in Mouse Mesenchymal-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Stefan; Patel, Suraj J; Vasko, Radovan; Shen, Keyue; Iracheta-Vellve, Arvin; Lee, Jungwoo; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Chakraborty, Nilay; Brines, Michael; Cerami, Anthony; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L

    2014-01-01

    Tissue protective properties of erythropoietin (EPO) have let to the discovery of an alternative EPO-signaling via an EPO-R/CD131 receptor complex which can now be specifically targeted through pharmaceutically designed short sequence peptides such as ARA290. However, little is still known about specific functions of alternative EPO-signaling in defined cell populations. In this study we investigated effects of signaling through EPO-R/CD131 complex on cellular stress responses and pro-inflammatory activation in different mesenchymal-derived phenotypes. We show that anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory effects of ARA290 and EPO coincide with the externalization of CD131 receptor component as an immediate response to cellular stress. In addition, alternative EPO-signaling strongly modulated transcriptional, translational or metabolic responses after stressor removal. Specifically, we saw that ARA290 was able overcome a TNFα-mediated inhibition of transcription factor activation related to cell stress responses, most notably of serum response factor (SRF), heat shock transcription factor protein 1 (HSF1) and activator protein 1 (AP1). We conclude that alternative EPO-signaling acts as a modulator of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways and likely plays a role in restoring tissue homeostasis. PMID:25373867

  13. Differential cellular responses in healthy mice and in mice with established airway inflammation when exposed to hematite nanoparticles

    SciT

    Gustafsson, Åsa, E-mail: asa.gustafsson@foi.se; Dept of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University; Bergström, Ulrika

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory and immunological responses in airways and lung-draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), following lung exposure to iron oxide (hematite) nanoparticles (NPs). The responses to the hematite NPs were evaluated in both healthy non-sensitized mice, and in sensitized mice with an established allergic airway disease. The mice were exposed intratracheally to either hematite NPs or to vehicle (PBS) and the cellular responses were evaluated on days 1, 2, and 7, post-exposure. Exposure to hematite NPs increased the numbers of neutrophils, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the airways of non-sensitized mice on days 1 andmore » 2 post-exposure; at these time points the number of lymphocytes was also elevated in the LDLNs. In contrast, exposing sensitized mice to hematite NPs induced a rapid and unspecific cellular reduction in the alveolar space on day 1 post-exposure; a similar decrease of lymphocytes was also observed in the LDLN. The results indicate that cells in the airways and in the LDLN of individuals with established airway inflammation undergo cell death when exposed to hematite NPs. A possible explanation for this toxic response is the extensive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pro-oxidative environment of inflamed airways. This study demonstrates how sensitized and non-sensitized mice respond differently to hematite NP exposure, and it highlights the importance of including individuals with respiratory disorders when evaluating health effects of inhaled nanomaterials. - Highlights: • Hematite NPs induce differential responses in airways of healthy and allergic mice. • Hematite induced an airway inflammation in healthy mice. • Hematite induced cellular reduction in the alveolus and lymph nodes of allergic mice. • Cell death is possible due to extensive pro-oxidative environment in allergic mice. • It is important to include sensitive individuals when valuing health effects of NPs.« less

  14. Modification to the Capsid of the Adenovirus Vector That Enhances Dendritic Cell Infection and Transgene-Specific Cellular Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Worgall, Stefan; Busch, Annette; Rivara, Michael; Bonnyay, David; Leopold, Philip L.; Merritt, Robert; Hackett, Neil R.; Rovelink, Peter W.; Bruder, Joseph T.; Wickham, Thomas J.; Kovesdi, Imi; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2004-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors can be used to transfer and express antigens and function as strong adjuvants and thus are useful platforms for the development of genetic vaccines. Based on the hypothesis that Ad vectors with enhanced infectibility of dendritic cells (DC) may be able to evoke enhanced immune responses against antigens encoded by the vector in vivo, the present study analyzes the vaccine potential of an Ad vector expressing β-galactosidase as a model antigen and genetically modified with RGD on the fiber knob [AdZ.F(RGD)] to more selectively infect DC and consequently enhance immunity against the β-galactosidase antigen. Infection of murine DC in vitro with AdZ.F(RGD) showed an eightfold-increased transgene expression following infection compared to AdZ (also expressing β-galactosidase, but with a wild-type capsid). Binding, cellular uptake, and trafficking in DC were also increased with AdZ.F(RGD) compared to AdZ. To determine whether AdZ.F(RGD) could evoke enhanced immune responses to β-galactosidase in vivo, C57BL/6 mice were immunized with AdZ.F(RGD) or AdZ subcutaneously via the footpad. Humoral responses with both vectors were comparable, with similar anti-β-galactosidase antibody levels following vector administration. However, cellular responses to β-galactosidase were significantly enhanced, with the frequency of CD4+ as well as the CD8+ β-galactosidase-specific gamma interferon response in cells isolated from the draining lymph nodes increased following immunization with AdZ.F(RGD) compared to Ad.Z (P < 0.01). Importantly, this enhanced cellular immune response of the AdZ.F(RGD) vector was sufficient to evoke enhanced inhibition of the growth of preexisting tumors expressing β-galactosidase: BALB/c mice implanted with the CT26 syngeneic β-galactosidase-expressing colon carcinoma cell line and subsequently immunized with AdZ.F(RGD) showed decreased tumor growth and improved survival compared to mice immunized with AdZ. These

  15. Response of cellular stoichiometry and phosphorus storage of the cyanobacteria Aphanizomenon flos-aquae to small-scale turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Xiao, Yan; Yang, Jixiang; Li, Chao; Gao, Xia; Guo, Jinsong

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent mixing, in particular on a small scale, affects the growth of microalgae by changing diffusive sublayers and regulating nutrient fluxes of cells. We tested the nutrient flux hypothesis by evaluating the cellular stoichiometry and phosphorus storage of microalgae under different turbulent mixing conditions. Aphanizomenon flos-aquae were cultivated in different stirring batch reactors with turbulent dissipation rates ranging from 0.001 51 m2/s3 to 0.050 58 m2/s3, the latter being the highest range observed in natural aquatic systems. Samples were taken in the exponential growth phase and compared with samples taken when the reactor was completely stagnant. Results indicate that, within a certain range, turbulent mixing stimulates the growth of A. flos-aquae. An inhibitory effect on growth rate was observed at the higher range. Photosynthesis activity, in terms of maximum effective quantum yield of PSII (the ratio of F v/ F m) and cellular chlorophyll a, did not change significantly in response to turbulence. However, Chl a/C mass ratio and C/N molar ratio, showed a unimodal response under a gradient of turbulent mixing, similar to growth rate. Moreover, we found that increases in turbulent mixing might stimulate respiration rates, which might lead to the use of polyphosphate for the synthesis of cellular constituents. More research is required to test and verify the hypothesis that turbulent mixing changes the diffusive sublayer, regulating the nutrient flux of cells.

  16. Unbiased compound screening with a reporter gene assay highlights the role of p13 in the cardiac cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naoki; Hirouchi, Taisei; Kasai, Atsushi; Higashi, Shintaro; Hiraki, Natsumi; Tanaka, Shota; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Nunomura, Kazuto; Lin, Bangzhong; Omori, Akiko; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Kim, Yoon-Jeong; Doi, Takefumi; Baba, Akemichi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Shintani, Norihito

    2018-01-08

    We recently showed that a 13-kDa protein (p13), the homolog protein of formation of mitochondrial complex V assembly factor 1 in yeast, acts as a potential protective factor in pancreatic islets under diabetes. Here, we aimed to identify known compounds regulating p13 mRNA expression to obtain therapeutic insight into the cellular stress response. A luciferase reporter system was developed using the putative promoter region of the human p13 gene. Overexpression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α, a master player regulating mitochondrial metabolism, increased both reporter activity and p13 expression. Following unbiased screening with 2320 known compounds in HeLa cells, 12 pharmacological agents (including 8 cardiotonics and 2 anthracyclines) that elicited >2-fold changes in p13 mRNA expression were identified. Among them, four cardiac glycosides decreased p13 expression and concomitantly elevated cellular oxidative stress. Additional database analyses showed highest p13 expression in heart, with typically decreased expression in cardiac disease. Accordingly, our results illustrate the usefulness of unbiased compound screening as a method for identifying novel functional roles of unfamiliar genes. Our findings also highlight the importance of p13 in the cellular stress response in heart. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Istanbul Earthquake Early Warning and Rapid Response System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdik, M. O.; Fahjan, Y.; Ozel, O.; Alcik, H.; Aydin, M.; Gul, M.

    2003-12-01

    As part of the preparations for the future earthquake in Istanbul a Rapid Response and Early Warning system in the metropolitan area is in operation. For the Early Warning system ten strong motion stations were installed as close as possible to the fault zone. Continuous on-line data from these stations via digital radio modem provide early warning for potentially disastrous earthquakes. Considering the complexity of fault rupture and the short fault distances involved, a simple and robust Early Warning algorithm, based on the exceedance of specified threshold time domain amplitude levels is implemented. The band-pass filtered accelerations and the cumulative absolute velocity (CAV) are compared with specified threshold levels. When any acceleration or CAV (on any channel) in a given station exceeds specific threshold values it is considered a vote. Whenever we have 2 station votes within selectable time interval, after the first vote, the first alarm is declared. In order to specify the appropriate threshold levels a data set of near field strong ground motions records form Turkey and the world has been analyzed. Correlations among these thresholds in terms of the epicenter distance the magnitude of the earthquake have been studied. The encrypted early warning signals will be communicated to the respective end users by UHF systems through a "service provider" company. The users of the early warning signal will be power and gas companies, nuclear research facilities, critical chemical factories, subway system and several high-rise buildings. Depending on the location of the earthquake (initiation of fault rupture) and the recipient facility the alarm time can be as high as about 8s. For the rapid response system one hundred 18 bit-resolution strong motion accelerometers were placed in quasi-free field locations (basement of small buildings) in the populated areas of the city, within an area of approximately 50x30km, to constitute a network that will enable early

  18. HSPB8 and BAG3 cooperate to promote spatial sequestration of ubiquitinated proteins and coordinate the cellular adaptive response to proteasome insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Solenn M; Lambert, Herman; Rodrigue, Marc-Antoine; Fuchs, Margit; Landry, Jacques; Lavoie, Josée N

    2018-02-05

    BCL2-associated athanogene (BAG)-3 is viewed as a platform that would physically and functionally link distinct classes of molecular chaperones of the heat shock protein (HSP) family for the stabilization and clearance of damaged proteins. In this study, we show that HSPB8, a member of the small heat shock protein subfamily, cooperates with BAG3 to coordinate the sequestration of harmful proteins and the cellular adaptive response upon proteasome inhibition. Silencing of HSPB8, like depletion of BAG3, inhibited targeting of ubiquitinated proteins to the juxtanuclear aggresome, a mammalian system of spatial quality control. However, aggresome targeting was restored in BAG3-depleted cells by a mutant BAG3 defective in HSPB8 binding, uncoupling HSPB8 function from its binding to BAG3. Depletion of HSPB8 impaired formation of ubiquitinated microaggregates in an early phase and interfered with accurate modifications of the stress sensor p62/sequestosome (SQSTM)-1. This impairment correlated with decreased coupling of BAG3 to p62/SQSTM1 in response to stress, hindering Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (KEAP)-1 sequestration and stabilization of nuclear factor E2-related factor (Nrf)-2, an important arm of the antioxidant defense. Notably, the myopathy-associated mutation of BAG3 (P209L), which lies within the HSPB8-binding motif, deregulated the association between BAG3 and p62/SQSTM1 and the KEAP1-Nrf2 signaling axis. Together, our findings support a so-far-unrecognized role for the HSPB8-BAG3 connection in mounting of an efficient stress response, which may be involved in BAG3-related human diseases.-Guilbert, S. M., Lambert, H., Rodrigue, M.-A., Fuchs, M., Landry, J., Lavoie, J. N. HSPB8 and BAG3 cooperate to promote spatial sequestration of ubiquitinated proteins and coordinate the cellular adaptive response to proteasome insufficiency.

  19. Humoral and cellular immune response in mice induced by the classical swine fever virus E2 protein fused to the porcine CD154 antigen.

    PubMed

    Sordo, Yusmel; Suárez, Marisela; Caraballo, Rosalina; Sardina, Talía; Brown, Emma; Duarte, Carlos; Lugo, Joanna; Gil, Lázaro; Perez, Danny; Oliva, Ayme; Vargas, Milagros; Santana, Elaine; Valdés, Rodolfo; Rodríguez, María Pilar

    2018-03-01

    The development of subunit vaccines against classical swine fever is a desirable goal, because it allows discrimination between vaccinated and infected animals. In this study, humoral and cellular immune response elicited in inbred BALB/c mice by immunization with a recombinant classical swine fever virus (CSFV) E2 protein fused to porcine CD154 antigen (E2CD154) was assessed. This model was used as a predictor of immune response in swine. Mice were immunized with E2CD154 emulsified in Montanide ISA50V2 or dissolved in saline on days 1 and 21. Another group received E2His antigen, without CD154, in the same adjuvant. Montanide ISA50V2 or saline served as negative controls for each experimental group. Animals immunized with 12.5 and 2.5 μg/dose of E2CD154 developed the highest titers (>1:2000) of CSFV neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, CSFV specific splenocyte gamma-interferon production, measured after seven and twenty-eight days of immunization, was significantly higher in mice immunized with 12.5 μg of E2CD154. As a conclusion, E2CD154 emulsified in Montanide ISA50 V2 was able to induce a potent humoral and an early cellular immune response in inbred BALB/c mice. Therefore, this immunogen might be an appropriate candidate to elicit immune response in swine, control CSF disease and to eliminate CSFV in swine. Copyright © 2018 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Early-life inflammation, immune response and ageing.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imroze; Agashe, Deepa; Rolff, Jens

    2017-03-15

    Age-related diseases are often attributed to immunopathology, which results in self-damage caused by an inappropriate inflammatory response. Immunopathology associated with early-life inflammation also appears to cause faster ageing, although we lack direct experimental evidence for this association. To understand the interactions between ageing, inflammation and immunopathology, we used the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor as a study organism. We hypothesized that phenoloxidase, an important immune effector in insect defence, may impose substantial immunopathological costs by causing tissue damage to Malpighian tubules (MTs; functionally equivalent to the human kidney), in turn accelerating ageing. In support of this hypothesis, we found that RNAi knockdown of phenoloxidase (PO) transcripts in young adults possibly reduced inflammation-induced autoreactive tissue damage to MTs, and increased adult lifespan. Our work thus suggests a causative link between immunopathological costs of early-life inflammation and faster ageing. We also reasoned that if natural selection weakens with age, older individuals should display increased immunopathological costs associated with an immune response. Indeed, we found that while old infected individuals cleared infection faster than young individuals, possibly they also displayed exacerbated immunopathological costs (larger decline in MT function) and higher post-infection mortality. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PO response partially rescued MTs function in older beetles and resulted in increased lifespan after infection. Taken together, our data are consistent with a direct role of immunopathological consequences of immune response during ageing in insects. Our work is also the first report that highlights the pervasive role of tissue damage under diverse contexts of ageing and immune response. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Early life adversity influences stress response association with smoking relapse.

    PubMed

    al'Absi, Mustafa; Lemieux, Andrine; Westra, Ruth; Allen, Sharon

    2017-11-01

    We examined the hypothesis that stress-related blunting of cortisol in smokers is particularly pronounced in those with a history of severe life adversity. The two aims of this study were first to examine hormonal, craving, and withdrawal symptoms during ad libitum smoking and after the first 24 h of abstinence in smokers who experienced high or low levels of adversity. Second, we sought to examine the relationship between adversity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hormones to predict relapse during the first month of a smoking cessation attempt. Hormonal and self-report measures were collected from 103 smokers (49 women) during ad libitum smoking and after the first 24 h of abstinence. HPA hormones were measured during baseline rest and in response to acute stress in both conditions. All smokers were interested in smoking cessation, and we prospectively used stress response measures to predict relapse during the first 4 weeks of the smoking cessation attempt. The results showed that high adversity was associated with higher distress and smoking withdrawal symptoms. High level of early life adversity was associated with elevated HPA activity, which was found in both salivary and plasma cortisol. Enhanced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stress response was evident in high-adversity but not in low-adversity relapsers. This study demonstrated that early life adversity is associated with stress-related HPA responses. The study also demonstrated that, among smokers who experienced a high level of life adversity, heightened ACTH and cortisol responses were linked with increased risk for smoking relapse.

  2. Early-life inflammation, immune response and ageing

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Age-related diseases are often attributed to immunopathology, which results in self-damage caused by an inappropriate inflammatory response. Immunopathology associated with early-life inflammation also appears to cause faster ageing, although we lack direct experimental evidence for this association. To understand the interactions between ageing, inflammation and immunopathology, we used the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor as a study organism. We hypothesized that phenoloxidase, an important immune effector in insect defence, may impose substantial immunopathological costs by causing tissue damage to Malpighian tubules (MTs; functionally equivalent to the human kidney), in turn accelerating ageing. In support of this hypothesis, we found that RNAi knockdown of phenoloxidase (PO) transcripts in young adults possibly reduced inflammation-induced autoreactive tissue damage to MTs, and increased adult lifespan. Our work thus suggests a causative link between immunopathological costs of early-life inflammation and faster ageing. We also reasoned that if natural selection weakens with age, older individuals should display increased immunopathological costs associated with an immune response. Indeed, we found that while old infected individuals cleared infection faster than young individuals, possibly they also displayed exacerbated immunopathological costs (larger decline in MT function) and higher post-infection mortality. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PO response partially rescued MTs function in older beetles and resulted in increased lifespan after infection. Taken together, our data are consistent with a direct role of immunopathological consequences of immune response during ageing in insects. Our work is also the first report that highlights the pervasive role of tissue damage under diverse contexts of ageing and immune response. PMID:28275145

  3. Comparison between the early cellular response to electron radiation and the production of tumors

    SciT

    Sinclair, Ian P.

    1972-11-01

    The aim of the study is to quantitate radiation-induced cell population changes in various epithelial components of rat skin and to correlate them, if possible with the subsequent production of tumors.

  4. Early cellular responses against tributyltin chloride exposure in primary cultures derived from various brain regions.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sumonto; Siddiqui, Waseem A; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2014-05-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a potent biocide and commonly used in various industrial sectors. Humans are mainly exposed through the food chain. We have previously demonstrated tin accumulation in brain following TBT-chloride (TBTC) exposure. In this study, effect of TBTC on dissociated cells from different brain regions was evaluated. Cytotoxicity assay (MTT), mode of cell death (Annexin V/PI assay), oxidative stress parameters (ROS and lipid peroxidation), reducing power of the cell (GSH), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and intracellular Ca(2+) were evaluated to ascertain the effect of TBTC. Expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was measured to understand the effect on astroglial cells. TBTC as low as 30 nM was found to reduce GSH levels, whereas higher doses of 300 and 3000 nM induced ROS generation and marked loss in cell viability mainly through apoptosis. Striatum showed higher susceptibility than other regions, which may have further implications on various neurological aspects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Early detection of disease program: Evaluation of the cellular immune response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, B. S.; Knight, V.; Martin, R. R.; Kasel, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Surfaces of normal, cultured, and mitogen-stimulated mouse lymphoid cells were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Lymphocytes with smooth, highly villous and intermediate surfaces were observed in cell suspensions from both spleens and thymuses of normal mice and from spleens of congenitally athymic (nude) mice. Several strain-specific surface features were noted, including the spine-like appearance of microvilli on C57B1/6 lymphocytes. Although thymus cell suspensions contained somewhat more smooth cells than did spleen cell preparations, lymphocyte derivation could not be inferred from SEM examination. Studies of cells stimulated with mitogenic agents for thymus-derived lymphocytes (concanavalin A) or for bone marrow-derived lymphocytes (lipopolysaccharide) suggested that, in the mouse, development of a complex villous surface is a general concomitant of lymphocyte activation and transformation.

  6. Escherichia coli cellular responses to exposure to atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma-treated N-acetylcysteine solution.

    PubMed

    Ercan, U K; Sen, B; Brooks, A D; Joshi, S G

    2018-04-06

    To understand the underlying cellular mechanisms during inactivation of Escherichia coli in response to antimicrobial solution of nonthermal plasma-activated N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The recommended techniques were used to demonstrate E. coli cellular and transcriptomic changes caused associated with peroxynitrite and compared with plasma-treated NAC solution. The findings demonstrate that E. coli cells respond to plasma-treated NAC and undergo severe oxidative and nitrosative stress, and leading to stress-induced damages to different components of bacterial cells, which includes loss of membrane potential, formation of oxidized glutathione (GSSG), formation of nitrotyrosine (a known marker of nitrosative stress), DNA damage, and generated a prominent pool of peroxynitrite. Reverse-transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction analysis of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) responsive genes indicated their differential expressions. For the first time, we report that the plasma-treated NAC solution activates predominantly nitrosative stress-responsive genes in E. coli and is responsible for cell death. The reactive species generated in solutions by nonthermal plasma treatment depends on the type of solution or solvent used. The plasma-treated NAC solution rapidly inactivates E. coli, mostly involving highly RNS generated in NAC solution, and has high potential as disinfectant. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. The cellular immune response of Daphnia magna under host-parasite genetic variation and variation in initial dose

    PubMed Central

    Auld, Stuart K. J. R; Edel, Kai H.; Little, Tom J.

    2013-01-01

    In invertebrate-parasite systems, the likelihood of infection following parasite exposure is often dependent on the specific combination of host and parasite genotypes (termed genetic specificity). Genetic specificity can maintain diversity in host and parasite populations and is a major component of the Red Queen hypothesis. However, invertebrate immune systems are thought to only distinguish between broad classes of parasite. Using a natural host-parasite system with a well-established pattern of genetic specificity, the crustacean Daphnia magna and its bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa, we found that only hosts from susceptible host-parasite genetic combinations mounted a cellular response following exposure to the parasite. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that genetic specificity is attributable to barrier defenses at the site of infection (the gut), and that the systemic immune response is general, reporting the number of parasite spores entering the hemocoel. Further supporting this, we found that larger cellular responses occurred at higher initial parasite doses. By studying the natural infection route, where parasites must pass barrier defenses before interacting with systemic immune responses, these data shed light on which components of invertebrate defense underlie genetic specificity. PMID:23025616

  8. The cellular immune response of Daphnia magna under host-parasite genetic variation and variation in initial dose.

    PubMed

    Auld, Stuart K J R; Edel, Kai H; Little, Tom J

    2012-10-01

    In invertebrate-parasite systems, the likelihood of infection following parasite exposure is often dependent on the specific combination of host and parasite genotypes (termed genetic specificity). Genetic specificity can maintain diversity in host and parasite populations and is a major component of the Red Queen hypothesis. However, invertebrate immune systems are thought to only distinguish between broad classes of parasite. Using a natural host-parasite system with a well-established pattern of genetic specificity, the crustacean Daphnia magna and its bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa, we found that only hosts from susceptible host-parasite genetic combinations mounted a cellular response following exposure to the parasite. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that genetic specificity is attributable to barrier defenses at the site of infection (the gut), and that the systemic immune response is general, reporting the number of parasite spores entering the hemocoel. Further supporting this, we found that larger cellular responses occurred at higher initial parasite doses. By studying the natural infection route, where parasites must pass barrier defenses before interacting with systemic immune responses, these data shed light on which components of invertebrate defense underlie genetic specificity. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. A cellular and metabolic assessment of the thermal stress responses in the endemic gastropod Benedictia limnaeoides ongurensis from Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Bedulina, Daria S; Shatilina, Zhanna M; Lubyaga, Yulia A; Vereshchagina, Kseniya P; Timofeyev, Maxim A

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if the Lake Baikal endemic gastropod Benedictia limnaeoides ongurensis, which inhabits in stable cold waters expresses a thermal stress response. We hypothesized that the evolution of this species in the stable cold waters of Lake Baikal resulted in a reduction of its thermal stress-response mechanisms at the biochemical and cellular levels. Contrary to our hypothesis, our results show that exposure to a thermal challenge activates the cellular and biochemical mechanisms of thermal resistance, such as heat shock proteins and antioxidative enzymes, and alters energetic metabolism in B. limnaeoides ongurensis. Thermal stress caused the elevation of heat shock protein 70 and the products of anaerobic glycolysis together with the depletion of glucose and phosphagens in the studied species. Thus, a temperature increase activates the complex biochemical system of stress response and alters the energetic metabolism in this endemic Baikal gastropod. It is concluded that the deepwater Lake Baikal endemic gastropod B. limnaeoides ongurensis retains the ability to activate well-developed biochemical stress-response mechanisms when exposed to a thermal challenge. © 2013.

  10. Differential cellular responses in healthy mice and in mice with established airway inflammation when exposed to hematite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Åsa; Bergström, Ulrika; Ågren, Lina; Österlund, Lars; Sandström, Thomas; Bucht, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory and immunological responses in airways and lung-draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), following lung exposure to iron oxide (hematite) nanoparticles (NPs). The responses to the hematite NPs were evaluated in both healthy non-sensitized mice, and in sensitized mice with an established allergic airway disease. The mice were exposed intratracheally to either hematite NPs or to vehicle (PBS) and the cellular responses were evaluated on days 1, 2, and 7, post-exposure. Exposure to hematite NPs increased the numbers of neutrophils, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the airways of non-sensitized mice on days 1 and 2 post-exposure; at these time points the number of lymphocytes was also elevated in the LDLNs. In contrast, exposing sensitized mice to hematite NPs induced a rapid and unspecific cellular reduction in the alveolar space on day 1 post-exposure; a similar decrease of lymphocytes was also observed in the LDLN. The results indicate that cells in the airways and in the LDLN of individuals with established airway inflammation undergo cell death when exposed to hematite NPs. A possible explanation for this toxic response is the extensive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pro-oxidative environment of inflamed airways. This study demonstrates how sensitized and non-sensitized mice respond differently to hematite NP exposure, and it highlights the importance of including individuals with respiratory disorders when evaluating health effects of inhaled nanomaterials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Osteoporosis and alzheimer pathology: Role of cellular stress response and hormetic redox signaling in aging and bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carolin; Koverech, Guido; Crupi, Rosalia; Di Paola, Rosanna; Koverech, Angela; Lodato, Francesca; Scuto, Maria; Salinaro, Angela T.; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Calabrese, Edward J.; Calabrese, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and osteoporosis are multifactorial progressive degenerative disorders. Increasing evidence shows that osteoporosis and hip fracture are common complication observed in AD patients, although the mechanisms underlying this association remain poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are emerging as intracellular redox signaling molecules involved in the regulation of bone metabolism, including receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-dependent osteoclast differentiation, but they also have cytotoxic effects that include lipoperoxidation and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. ROS generation, which is implicated in the regulation of cellular stress response mechanisms, is an integrated, highly regulated, process under control of redox sensitive genes coding for redox proteins called vitagenes. Vitagenes, encoding for proteins such as heat shock proteins (Hsps) Hsp32, Hsp70, the thioredoxin, and the sirtuin protein, represent a systems controlling a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways relevant to life span and involved in the preservation of cellular homeostasis under stress conditions. Consistently, nutritional anti-oxidants have demonstrated their neuroprotective potential through a hormetic-dependent activation of vitagenes. The biological relevance of dose–response affects those strategies pointing to the optimal dosing to patients in the treatment of numerous diseases. Thus, the heat shock response has become an important hormetic target for novel cytoprotective strategies focusing on the pharmacological development of compounds capable of modulating stress response mechanisms. Here we discuss possible signaling mechanisms involved in the activation of vitagenes which, relevant to bone remodeling and through enhancement of cellular stress resistance provide a rationale to limit the deleterious consequences associated to homeostasis disruption with consequent impact on the aging process. PMID:24959146

  12. RNA-seq analyses of cellular responses to elevated body temperature in the high Antarctic cryopelagic nototheniid fish Pagothenia borchgrevinki.

    PubMed

    Bilyk, Kevin T; Cheng, C-H Christina

    2014-12-01

    Through evolution in the isolated, freezing (-1.9°C) Southern Ocean, Antarctic notothenioid fish have become cold-adapted as well as cold-specialized. Notothenioid cold specialization is most evident in their limited tolerance to heat challenge, and an apparent loss of the near universal inducible heat shock (HSP70) response. Beyond these it remains unclear how broadly cold specialization pervades the underlying tissue-wide cellular responses. We report the first analysis of massively parallel RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify gene expression changes in the liver in response to elevated body temperature of a high-latitude Antarctic nototheniid, the highly cold-adapted and cold-specialized cryopelagic bald notothen, Pagothenia borchgrevinki. From a large (14,873) mapped set of qualified, annotated liver transcripts, we identified hundreds of significantly differentially expressed genes following two and four days of 4°C exposure, suggesting substantial transcriptional reorganization in the liver when body temperature was raised 5°C above native water temperature. Most notably, and in sharp contrast to heat stressed non-polar fish species, was a widespread down-regulation of nearly all classes of molecular chaperones including HSP70, as well as polyubiquitins that are associated with proteosomal degradation of damaged proteins. In parallel, genes involved in the cell cycle were down-regulated by day two of 4°C exposure, signifying slowing cellular proliferation; by day four, genes associated with transcriptional and translational machineries were down-regulated, signifying general slowing of protein biosynthesis. The log2 fold differential transcriptional changes are generally of small magnitudes but significant, and in total portray a broad down turn of cellular activities in response to four days of elevated body temperature in the cold-specialized bald notothen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Distinct Redox Regulation in Sub-Cellular Compartments in Response to Various Stress Conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, Anita; Sanwald, Julia; Pillay, Bethany A.; Meyer, Andreas J.; Perrone, Gabriel G.; Dawes, Ian W.

    2013-01-01

    Responses to many growth and stress conditions are assumed to act via changes to the cellular redox status. However, direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state during growth and stress has never been carried out. Organellar redox state (E GSH) was measured using the fluorescent probes roGFP2 and pHluorin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, we investigated changes in organellar redox state in response to various growth and stress conditions to better understand the relationship between redox-, oxidative- and environmental stress response systems. E GSH values of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome were determined in exponential and stationary phase in various media. These values (−340 to −350 mV) were more reducing than previously reported. Interestingly, sub-cellular redox state remained unchanged when cells were challenged with stresses previously reported to affect redox homeostasis. Only hydrogen peroxide and heat stress significantly altered organellar redox state. Hydrogen peroxide stress altered the redox state of the glutathione disulfide/glutathione couple (GSSG, 2H+/2GSH) and pH. Recovery from moderate hydrogen peroxide stress was most rapid in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial matrix, with the peroxisome the least able to recover. Conversely, the bulk of the redox shift observed during heat stress resulted from alterations in pH and not the GSSG, 2H+/2GSH couple. This study presents the first direct measurement of pH-adjusted redox state in sub-cellular compartments during growth and stress conditions. Redox state is distinctly regulated in organelles and data presented challenge the notion that perturbation of redox state is central in the response to many stress conditions. PMID:23762325

  14. Evasion of Early Antiviral Responses by Herpes Simplex Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Suazo, Paula A.; Ibañez, Francisco J.; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R.; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V.; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; González, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency. PMID:25918478

  15. Cellular stress responses, mitostress and carnitine insufficiencies as critical determinants in aging and neurodegenerative disorders: role of hormesis and vitagenes.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Cornelius, Carolin; Stella, Anna Maria Giuffrida; Calabrese, Edward J

    2010-12-01

    The widely accepted oxidative stress theory of aging postulates that aging results from accumulation of oxidative damage. A prediction of this theory is that, among species, differential rates of aging may be apparent on the basis of intrinsic differences in oxidative damage accrual. Although widely accepted, there is a growing number of exceptions to this theory, most contingently related to genetic model organism investigations. Proteins are one of the prime targets for oxidative damage and cysteine residues are particularly sensitive to reversible and irreversible oxidation. The adaptation and survival of cells and organisms requires the ability to sense proteotoxic insults and to coordinate protective cellular stress response pathways and chaperone networks related to protein quality control and stability. The toxic effects that stem from the misassembly or aggregation of proteins or peptides, in any cell type, are collectively termed proteotoxicity. Despite the abundance and apparent capacity of chaperones and other components of homeostasis to restore folding equilibrium, the cell appears poorly adapted for chronic proteotoxic stress which increases in cancer, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. Pharmacological modulation of cellular stress response pathways has emerging implications for the treatment of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. A critical key to successful medical intervention is getting the dose right. Achieving this goal can be extremely challenging due to human inter-individual variation as affected by age, gender, diet, exercise, genetic factors and health status. The nature of the dose response in and adjacent to the therapeutic zones, over the past decade has received considerable advances. The hormetic dose-response, challenging long-standing beliefs about the nature of the dose-response in a lowdose zone, has the potential to affect significantly the design of pre

  16. Inhibiting the NF-kappaB pathway to assess its function in the cellular response to space radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Kristina; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Testard, Isabelle; Reitz, Guenther

    2012-07-01

    Radiation is regarded as one of the limiting factors for space missions. Therefore the cellular radiation response needs to be studied in order to estimate risks and to develop appropriate countermeasures. Exposure of human cells to ionizing radiation can provoke cell cycle arrest, leading to cellular senescence or premature differentiation, and different types of cell death. Previous heavy ion experiments have shown that the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway is activated by fluences that can be reached during long-term missions and thereby NF-κB was identified as an important modulating factor in the cellular radiation response. It could improve cellular survival after exposure to high radiation doses and influence the cancer risk of astronauts. The classical and the genotoxic stress induced NF-κB pathway result in nuclear translocation of the p65/p50 dimer. Both pathways might contribute to the cellular radiation response. Chemical inhibitors were tested to suppress the NF-κB pathway in recombinant HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells. The efficacy and cytotoxicity of the inhibitors targeting different elements of the NF-κB pathway were analyzed and found mostly inappropriate as inhibitors were partly cytotoxic or unspecific. Alternatively a functional knock-out of RelA (p65) was used to identify the contribution of the NF-κB pathway to different cellular outcomes. Small hairpin RNA constructs (shRNA) were transfected into the HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cell line. Their functionality was assessed by quantitative Reverse Transcriptase real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to verify that the RelA mRNA amount was reduced by more than 80% in the knock-down cells The original cell line had been stably transfected with a reporter system to monitor NF-κB activation by measuring destabilized Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (d2EGFP)-expression. It was shown that after 18 hours d2EGFP reaches its highest expression level after activation of NF-κB and can be measured by FACS analysis

  17. Micro-/nano-engineered cellular responses for soft tissue engineering and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Tay, Chor Yong; Irvine, Scott Alexander; Boey, Freddy Y C; Tan, Lay Poh; Venkatraman, Subbu

    2011-05-23

    The development of biomedical devices and reconstruction of functional ex vivo tissues often requires the need to fabricate biomimetic surfaces with features of sub-micrometer precision. This can be achieved with the advancements in micro-/nano-engineering techniques, allowing researchers to manipulate a plethora of cellular behaviors at the cell-biomaterial interface. Systematic studies conducted on these 2D engineered surfaces have unraveled numerous novel findings that can potentially be integrated as part of the design consideration for future 2D and 3D biomaterials and will no doubt greatly benefit tissue engineering. In this review, recent developments detailing the use of micro-/nano-engineering techniques to direct cellular orientation and function pertinent to soft tissue engineering will be highlighted. Particularly, this article aims to provide valuable insights into distinctive cell interactions and reactions to controlled surfaces, which can be exploited to understand the mechanisms of cell growth on micro-/nano-engineered interfaces, and to harness this knowledge to optimize the performance of 3D artificial soft tissue grafts and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  19. Tetanus toxoid-loaded cationic non-aggregated nanostructured lipid particles triggered strong humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amandeep; Jyoti, Kiran; Rai, Shweta; Sidhu, Rupinder; Pandey, Ravi Shankar; Jain, Upendra Kumar; Katyal, Anju; Madan, Jitender

    2016-05-01

    In the present investigation, non-aggregated cationic and unmodified nanoparticles (TT-C-NLPs4 and TT-NLPs1) were prepared of about 49.2 ± 6.8-nm and 40.8 ± 8.3-nm, respectively. In addition, spherical shape, crystalline architecture and cationic charge were also noticed. Furthermore, integrity and conformational stability of TT were maintained in both TT-C-NLPs4 and TT-NLPs1, as evidenced by symmetrical position of bands and superimposed spectra, respectively in SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism. Cellular uptake in RAW264.7 cells indicating the concentration-dependent internalisation of nanoparticles. Qualitatively, CLSM exhibited enhanced cellular uptake of non-aggregated TT-C-NLPs4 owing to interaction with negatively charged plasma membrane and clevaloe mediated/independent endocytosis. In last, in vivo immunisation with non-aggregated TT-C-NLPs4 elicited strong humoral (anti-TT IgG) and cellular (IFN-γ) immune responses at day 42, as compared to non-aggregated TT-NLPs1 and TT-Alum following booster immunisation at day 14 and 28. Thus, non-aggregated cationic lipid nanoparticles may be a potent immune-adjuvant for parenteral delivery of weak antigens.

  20. Expression and Cellular Distribution of Ubiquitin in Response to Injury in the Developing Spinal Cord of Monodelphis domestica

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Natassya M.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Wheaton, Benjamin J.; Steer, David L.; Truettner, Jessie S.; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Smith, A. Ian; Saunders, Norman R.

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin, an 8.5 kDa protein associated with the proteasome degradation pathway has been recently identified as differentially expressed in segment of cord caudal to site of injury in developing spinal cord. Here we describe ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in spinal cord up to postnatal day P35 in control opossums (Monodelphis domestica) and in response to complete spinal transection (T10) at P7, when axonal growth through site of injury occurs, and P28 when this is no longer possible. Cords were collected 1 or 7 days after injury, with age-matched controls and segments rostral to lesion were studied. Following spinal injury ubiquitin levels (western blotting) appeared reduced compared to controls especially one day after injury at P28. In contrast, after injury mRNA expression (qRT-PCR) was slightly increased at P7 but decreased at P28. Changes in isoelectric point of separated ubiquitin indicated possible post-translational modifications. Cellular distribution demonstrated a developmental shift between earliest (P8) and latest (P35) ages examined, from a predominantly cytoplasmic immunoreactivity to a nuclear expression; staining level and shift to nuclear staining was more pronounced following injury, except 7 days after transection at P28. After injury at P7 immunostaining increased in neurons and additionally in oligodendrocytes at P28. Mass spectrometry showed two ubiquitin bands; the heavier was identified as a fusion product, likely to be an ubiquitin precursor. Apparent changes in ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in development and response to spinal injury suggest an intricate regulatory system that modulates these responses which, when better understood, may lead to potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23626776

  1. Addition of Alanyl-Glutamine to Dialysis Fluid Restores Peritoneal Cellular Stress Responses – A First-In-Man Trial

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Michael; Herzog, Rebecca; Gruber, Katharina; Lichtenauer, Anton Michael; Kuster, Lilian; Csaicsich, Dagmar; Gleiss, Andreas; Alper, Seth L.; Aufricht, Christoph; Vychytil, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Peritonitis and ultrafiltration failure remain serious complications of chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD). Dysfunctional cellular stress responses aggravate peritoneal injury associated with PD fluid exposure, potentially due to peritoneal glutamine depletion. In this randomized cross-over phase I/II trial we investigated cytoprotective effects of alanyl-glutamine (AlaGln) addition to glucose-based PDF. Methods In a prospective randomized cross-over design, 20 stable PD outpatients underwent paired peritoneal equilibration tests 4 weeks apart, using conventional acidic, single chamber 3.86% glucose PD fluid, with and without 8 mM supplemental AlaGln. Heat-shock protein 72 expression was assessed in peritoneal effluent cells as surrogate parameter of cellular stress responses, complemented by metabolomics and functional immunocompetence assays. Results AlaGln restored peritoneal glutamine levels and increased the primary outcome heat-shock protein expression (effect 1.51-fold, CI 1.07–2.14; p = 0.022), without changes in peritoneal ultrafiltration, small solute transport, or biomarkers reflecting cell mass and inflammation. Further effects were glutamine-like metabolomic changes and increased ex-vivo LPS-stimulated cytokine release from healthy donor peripheral blood monocytes. In patients with a history of peritonitis (5 of 20), AlaGln supplementation decreased dialysate interleukin-8 levels. Supplemented PD fluid also attenuated inflammation and enhanced stimulated cytokine release in a mouse model of PD-associated peritonitis. Conclusion We conclude that AlaGln-supplemented, glucose-based PD fluid can restore peritoneal cellular stress responses with attenuation of sterile inflammation, and may improve peritoneal host-defense in the setting of PD. PMID:27768727

  2. Evaluation of cellular immunological responses in mono- and polymorphic clinical forms of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis in India.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, H; Bras-Gonçalves, R; Avishek, K; Kumar Deep, D; Petitdidier, E; Lemesre, J-L; Papierok, G; Kumar, S; Ramesh, V; Salotra, P

    2016-07-01

    Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) is a chronic dermal complication that occurs usually after recovery from visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The disease manifests into macular, papular and/or nodular clinical types with mono- or polymorphic presentations. Here, we investigated differences in immunological response between these two distinct clinical forms in Indian PKDL patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of PKDL and naive individuals were exposed in vitro to total soluble Leishmania antigen (TSLA). The proliferation index was evaluated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based lymphoproliferative assay. Cytokines and granzyme B levels were determined by cytometric bead array. Parasite load in tissue biopsy samples of PKDL was quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The proportion of different lymphoid subsets in peripheral blood and the activated T cell population were estimated using flow cytometry. The study demonstrated heightened cellular immune responses in the polymorphic PKDL group compared to the naive group. The polymorphic group showed significantly higher lymphoproliferation, increased cytokines and granzyme B levels upon TSLA stimulation, and a raised proportion of circulating natural killer (NK) T cells against naive controls. Furthermore, the polymorphic group showed a significantly elevated proportion of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells upon in-vitro TSLA stimulation. Thus, the polymorphic variants showed pronounced cellular immunity while the monomorphic form demonstrated a comparatively lower cellular response. Additionally, the elevated level of both activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, coupled with high granzyme B secretion upon in-vitro TSLA stimulation, indicated the role of cytotoxic cells in resistance to L. donovani infection in polymorphic PKDL. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  3. Pathogen-mimicking vaccine delivery system designed with a bioactive polymer (inulin acetate) for robust humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunny; Kesharwani, Siddharth S; Kuppast, Bhimanna; Bakkari, Mohammed Ali; Tummala, Hemachand

    2017-09-10

    New and improved vaccines are needed against challenging diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, Ebola, influenza, AIDS, and cancer. The majority of existing vaccine adjuvants lack the ability to significantly stimulate the cellular immune response, which is required to prevent the aforementioned diseases. This study designed a novel particulate based pathogen-mimicking vaccine delivery system (PMVDS) to target antigen-presenting-cells (APCs) such as dendritic cells. The uniqueness of PMVDS is that the polymer used to prepare the delivery system, Inulin Acetate (InAc), activates the innate immune system. InAc was synthesized from the plant polysaccharide, inulin. PMVDS provided improved and persistent antigen delivery to APCs as an efficient vaccine delivery system, and simultaneously, activated Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR-4) on APCs to release chemokine's/cytokines as an immune-adjuvant. Through this dual mechanism, PMVDS robustly stimulated both the humoral (>32 times of IgG1 levels vs alum) and the cell-mediated immune responses against the encapsulated antigen (ovalbumin) in mice. More importantly, PMVDS stimulated both cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells of cell-mediated immunity to provide tumor (B16-ova-Melanoma) protection in around 40% of vaccinated mice and significantly delayed tumor progression in rest of the mice. PMVDS is a unique bio-active vaccine delivery technology with broader applications for vaccines against cancer and several intracellular pathogens, where both humoral and cellular immune responses are desired. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA damage induction and/or repair as mammalian cell biomarker for the prediction of cellular radiation response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.

    DNA damage and its repair processes are key factors in cancer induction and also in the treatment of malignancies. Cancer prevention during extended space missions becomes a topic of great importance for space radiobiology. The knowledge of individual responsiveness would allow the protection strategy to be tailored optimally in each case. Radiobiological analysis of cultured cells derived from tissue explants from individuals has shown that measurement of the surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) may be used to predict the individual responsiveness. However, clonogenic assays are timeconsuming, thus alternative assays for the determination of radiore-sponse are being sought. For that reason CHO cell strains having different repair capacities were used for examining whether DNA strand break repair is a suitable experimental design to allow predictive statements. Cellular survival (CFA assay) and DNA strand breaks (total DNA strand breaks: FADU technique; DSBs: non-denaturing elution) were determined in parallel immediately after irradiation as well as after a 24 hour recovery period according to dose. There were no correlations between the dose-response curves of the initial level of DNA strand breaks and parameters that describe clonogenic survival curves (SF2). A good correlation exists between intrinsic cellular radioresistance and the extent of residual DNA strand breaks.

  5. Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with concomitant induction of cellular immune responses by a tetraaza-macrocycle with acetate pendant arms.

    PubMed

    David, S; Ordway, D; Arroz, M J; Costa, J; Delgado, R

    2001-01-01

    The novel tetraaza-macrocyclic compound 3,7,11-tris(carboxymethyl)-3,7,11,17-tetraaza-bicyclo[11.3.1]heptadeca-1(17),13,15-triene, abbreviated as ac3py14, was investigated for its activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for induction of protective cellular immune responses. Perspective results show that ac3py14 and its Fe3+ 1:1 complex, [Fe(ac3py14)], inhibited radiometric growth of several strains of M. tuberculosis. Inhibition with 25 microg/mL varied from 99% for H37Rv to 80% and above for multiple drug-resistant clinical isolates. The capacity of ac3py14 to elicit a beneficial immune response without cellular apoptosis was assessed and compared to the effects of virulent M. tuberculosis. The present study produces evidence that after stimulation with ac3py14 there was significant production of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), whereas the production of interleukin-5 (IL-5) remained low, and there was development of a memory population (CD45RO). The level of binding of Annexin V, a marker of apoptosis, was not sufficient to result in toxic effects toward alphabeta and gammadelta T cells and CD14+ macrophages. This preliminary study is the first report of a compound that simultaneously exerts an inhibitory effect against M. tuberculosis and induces factors associated with protective immune responses.

  6. Sex as a response to oxidative stress: a twofold increase in cellular reactive oxygen species activates sex genes.

    PubMed

    Nedelcu, Aurora M; Marcu, Oana; Michod, Richard E

    2004-08-07

    Organisms are constantly subjected to factors that can alter the cellular redox balance and result in the formation of a series of highly reactive molecules known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). As ROS can be damaging to biological structures, cells evolved a series of mechanisms (e.g. cell-cycle arrest, programmed cell death) to respond to high levels of ROS (i.e. oxidative stress). Recently, we presented evidence that in a facultatively sexual lineage--the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri--sex is an additional response to increased levels of stress, and probably ROS and DNA damage. Here we show that, in V. carteri, (i) sex is triggered by an approximately twofold increase in the level of cellular ROS (induced either by the natural sex-inducing stress, namely heat, or by blocking the mitochondrial electron transport chain with antimycin A), and (ii) ROS are responsible for the activation of sex genes. As most types of stress result in the overproduction of ROS, we believe that our findings will prove to extend to other facultatively sexual lineages, which could be indicative of the ancestral role of sex as an adaptive response to stress and ROS-induced DNA damage. Copyright 2004 The Royal Society

  7. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    SciT

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha; Ramakrishna, Gayatri, E-mail: gayatrirama1@gmail.com

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose ofmore » doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA

  8. SaeRS Is Responsive to Cellular Respiratory Status and Regulates Fermentative Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mashruwala, Ameya A; Gries, Casey M; Scherr, Tyler D; Kielian, Tammy; Boyd, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-01

    Biofilms are multicellular communities of microorganisms living as a quorum rather than as individual cells. The bacterial human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus uses oxygen as a terminal electron acceptor during respiration. Infected human tissues are hypoxic or anoxic. We recently reported that impaired respiration elicits a p rogrammed c ell l ysis (PCL) phenomenon in S. aureus leading to the release of cellular polymers that are utilized to form biofilms. PCL is dependent upon the AtlA murein hydrolase and is regulated, in part, by the SrrAB two-component regulatory system (TCRS). In the current study, we report that the SaeRS TCRS also governs fermentative biofilm formation by positively influencing AtlA activity. The SaeRS-modulated factor fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) also contributed to the fermentative biofilm formation phenotype. SaeRS-dependent biofilm formation occurred in response to changes in cellular respiratory status. Genetic evidence presented suggests that a high cellular titer of phosphorylated SaeR is required for biofilm formation. Epistasis analyses found that SaeRS and SrrAB influence biofilm formation independently of one another. Analyses using a mouse model of orthopedic implant-associated biofilm formation found that both SaeRS and SrrAB govern host colonization. Of these two TCRSs, SrrAB was the dominant system driving biofilm formation in vivo We propose a model wherein impaired cellular respiration stimulates SaeRS via an as yet undefined signal molecule(s), resulting in increasing expression of AtlA and FnBPA and biofilm formation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. N-acetyl-cysteine increases cellular dysfunction in progressive chronic kidney damage after acute kidney injury by dampening endogenous antioxidant responses.

    PubMed

    Small, David M; Sanchez, Washington Y; Roy, Sandrine F; Morais, Christudas; Brooks, Heddwen L; Coombes, Jeff S; Johnson, David W; Gobe, Glenda C

    2018-05-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction exacerbate acute kidney injury (AKI), but their role in any associated progress to chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. Antioxidant therapies often benefit AKI, but their benefits in CKD are controversial since clinical and preclinical investigations often conflict. Here we examined the influence of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) on oxidative stress and mitochondrial function during AKI (20-min bilateral renal ischemia plus reperfusion/IR) and progression to chronic kidney pathologies in mice. NAC (5% in diet) was given to mice 7 days prior and up to 21 days post-IR (21d-IR). NAC treatment resulted in the following: prevented proximal tubular epithelial cell apoptosis at early IR (40-min postischemia), yet enhanced interstitial cell proliferation at 21d-IR; increased transforming growth factor-β1 expression independent of IR time; and significantly dampened nuclear factor-like 2-initiated cytoprotective signaling at early IR. In the long term, NAC enhanced cellular metabolic impairment demonstrated by increased peroxisome proliferator activator-γ serine-112 phosphorylation at 21d-IR. Intravital multiphoton microscopy revealed increased endogenous fluorescence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in cortical tubular epithelial cells during ischemia, and at 21d-IR that was not attenuated with NAC. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy demonstrated persistent metabolic impairment by increased free/bound NADH in the cortex at 21d-IR that was enhanced by NAC. Increased mitochondrial dysfunction in remnant tubular cells was demonstrated at 21d-IR by tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester fluorimetry. In summary, NAC enhanced progression to CKD following AKI not only by dampening endogenous cellular antioxidant responses at time of injury but also by enhancing persistent kidney mitochondrial and metabolic dysfunction.

  10. Comprehensive Interrogation of the Cellular Response to Fluorescent, Detonation and Functionalized Nanodiamonds

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L.; Grobárová, V.; Shen, H.; Man, H. B.; Míčová, J.; Ledvina, M.; Štursa, J.; Nesladek, M.

    2015-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are versatile nanoparticles that are currently being investigated for a variety of applications in drug delivery, biomedical imaging and nanoscale sensing. Although initial studies indicate that these small gems are biocompatible, there is a great deal of variability in synthesis methods and surface functionalization that has yet to be evaluated. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the cellular compatibility of an array of nanodiamond subtypes and surface functionalization strategies. These results demonstrate that NDs are well tolerated by multiple cell types at both functional and gene expression levels. In addition, ND-mediated delivery of daunorubicin is less toxic to multiple cell types than treatment with daunorubicin alone, demonstrating the ability of the ND agent to improve drug tolerance and decrease therapeutic toxicity. Overall, the results here indicate that ND biocompatibility serves as a promising foundation for continued preclinical investigation. PMID:25037888

  11. Comprehensive interrogation of the cellular response to fluorescent, detonation and functionalized nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Moore, Laura; Grobárová, Valéria; Shen, Helen; Man, Han Bin; Míčová, Júlia; Ledvina, Miroslav; Štursa, Jan; Nesladek, Milos; Fišerová, Anna; Ho, Dean

    2014-10-21

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are versatile nanoparticles that are currently being investigated for a variety of applications in drug delivery, biomedical imaging and nanoscale sensing. Although initial studies indicate that these small gems are biocompatible, there is a great deal of variability in synthesis methods and surface functionalization that has yet to be evaluated. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the cellular compatibility of an array of nanodiamond subtypes and surface functionalization strategies. These results demonstrate that NDs are well tolerated by multiple cell types at both functional and gene expression levels. In addition, ND-mediated delivery of daunorubicin is less toxic to multiple cell types than treatment with daunorubicin alone, thus demonstrating the ability of the ND agent to improve drug tolerance and decrease therapeutic toxicity. Overall, the results here indicate that ND biocompatibility serves as a promising foundation for continued preclinical investigation.

  12. Comprehensive interrogation of the cellular response to fluorescent, detonation and functionalized nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Laura; Grobárová, Valéria; Shen, Helen; Man, Han Bin; Míčová, Júlia; Ledvina, Miroslav; Štursa, Jan; Nesladek, Milos; Fišerová, Anna; Ho, Dean

    2014-09-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are versatile nanoparticles that are currently being investigated for a variety of applications in drug delivery, biomedical imaging and nanoscale sensing. Although initial studies indicate that these small gems are biocompatible, there is a great deal of variability in synthesis methods and surface functionalization that has yet to be evaluated. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the cellular compatibility of an array of nanodiamond subtypes and surface functionalization strategies. These results demonstrate that NDs are well tolerated by multiple cell types at both functional and gene expression levels. In addition, ND-mediated delivery of daunorubicin is less toxic to multiple cell types than treatment with daunorubicin alone, thus demonstrating the ability of the ND agent to improve drug tolerance and decrease therapeutic toxicity. Overall, the results here indicate that ND biocompatibility serves as a promising foundation for continued preclinical investigation.

  13. Fish oil supplementation in early infancy modulates developing infant immune responses.

    PubMed

    D'Vaz, N; Meldrum, S J; Dunstan, J A; Lee-Pullen, T F; Metcalfe, J; Holt, B J; Serralha, M; Tulic, M K; Mori, T A; Prescott, S L

    2012-08-01

    Maternal fish oil supplementation during pregnancy has been associated with altered infant immune responses and a reduced risk of infant sensitization and eczema. To examine the effect of early postnatal fish oil supplementation on infant cellular immune function at 6 months of age in the context of allergic disease. In a double-blind randomized controlled trial (ACTRN12606000281594), 420 infants of high atopic risk received fish oil [containing 280 mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and 110 mg eicosapentanoic acid (EPA)] or control oil daily from birth to 6 months. One hundred and twenty infants had blood collected at 6 months of age. Fatty acid levels, induced cytokine responses, T cell subsets and monocyte HLA-DR expression were assessed at 6 months of age. Infant allergies were assessed at 6 and 12 months of age. DHA and EPA levels were significantly higher in the fish oil group and erythrocyte arachidonic acid (AA) levels were lower (all P < 0.05). Infants in the fish oil group had significantly lower IL-13 responses (P = 0.036) to house dust mite (HDM) and higher IFNγ (P = 0.035) and TNF (P = 0.017) responses to phytohaemaglutinin (PHA). Infants with relatively high DHA levels had lower Th2 responses to allergens including lower IL-13 to β-lactoglobulin (BLG) (P = 0.020), and lower IL-5 to BLG (P = 0.045). Postnatal fish oil supplementation increased infant n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels and associated with lowered allergen-specific Th2 responses and elevated polyclonal Th1 responses. Our results add to existing evidence of n-3 PUFA having immunomodulatory properties that are potentially allergy-protective. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Humoral and Cellular Response in Humans After Immunization with Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ruben, Frederick L.; Jackson, George G.; Gotoff, Samuel P.

    1973-01-01

    The peripheral blood lymphocyte response and hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured in nine adults before and after immunization with a killed split influenza virus vaccine. Cord blood lymphocytes were tested with the influenza antigen to exclude a nonspecific mitogenic effect. All of the subjects demonstrated preexisting antibody titers and antigen recognition by lymphocytes prior to immunization. The in vitro lymphocyte response after vaccination parallels the humoral antibody response to influenza antigen. PMID:4762112

  15. Effects of salinity on the cellular physiological responses of Natrinema sp. J7-2

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yunjun; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Shunxi; Yang, Ming; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Jian; Shen, Ping; Chen, Xiangdong

    2017-01-01

    The halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) live in hyersaline environments such as salt lakes, salt ponds and marine salterns. To cope with the salt stress conditions, haloarchaea have developed two fundamentally different strategies: the "salt-in" strategy and the "compatible-solute" strategy. Although investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance to high salt concentrations has made outstanding achievements, experimental study from the aspect of transcription is rare. In the present study, we monitored cellular physiology of Natrinema sp. J7-2 cells incubated in different salinity media (15%, 25% and 30% NaCl) from several aspects, such as cellular morphology, growth, global transcriptome and the content of intracellular free amino acids. The results showed that the cells were polymorphic and fragile at a low salt concentration (15% NaCl) but had a long, slender rod shape at high salt concentrations (25% and 30% NaCl). The cells grew best in 25% NaCl, mediocre in 30% NaCl and struggled in 15% NaCl. An RNA-seq analysis revealed differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in various salinity media. A total of 1,148 genes were differentially expressed, consisting of 719 DEGs (348 up-regulated and 371 down-regulated genes) between cells in 15% vs 25% NaCl, and 733 DEGs (521 up-regulated and 212 down-regulated genes) between cells in 25% vs 30% NaCl. Moreover, 304 genes were commonly differentially expressed in both 15% vs 25% and 25% vs30% NaCl. The DEGs were enriched in different KEGG metabolic pathways, such as amino acids, glycerolipid, ribosome, nitrogen, protoporphyrin, porphyrin and porhiniods. The intracellular predominant free amino acids consisted of the glutamate family (Glu, Arg and Pro), aspartate family (Asp) and aromatic amino acids (Phe and Trp), especially Glu and Asp. PMID:28926633

  16. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Bone-Forming Cell Proliferative Response to Hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, W.; Parra, M.; DaCosta, M.; Wing, A.; Roden, C.; Damsky, C.; Holton, E.; Searby, N.; Globus, R.; Almeida, E.

    2004-01-01

    Life on Earth has evolved under the continuous influence of gravity (1-g). As humans explore and develop space, however, we must learn to adapt to an environment with little or no gravity. Studies indicate that lack of weightbearing for vertebrates occurring with immobilization, paralysis, or in a microgravity environment may cause muscle and bone atrophy through cellular and subcellular level mechanisms. We hypothesize that gravity is needed for the efficient transduction of cell growth and survival signals from the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) (consisting of molecules such as collagen, fibronectin, and laminin) in mechanosensitive tissues. We test for the presence of gravity-sensitive pathways in bone-forming cells (osteoblasts) using hypergravity applied by a cell culture centrifuge. Stimulation of 50 times gravity (50-g) increased proliferation in primary rat osteoblasts for cells grown on collagen Type I and fibronectin, but not on laminin or uncoated surfaces. Survival was also enhanced during hypergravity stimulation by the presence of ECM. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in proliferating cells showed an increase in the number of actively dividing cells from about 60% at 1-g to over 90% at 25-g. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to test for all possible integrins. Our combined results indicate that beta1 and/or beta3 integrin subunits may be involved. These data indicate that gravity mechanostimulation of osteoblast proliferation involves specific matrix-integrin signalling pathways which are sensitive to g-level. Further research to define the mechanisms involved will provide direction so that we may better adapt and counteract bone atrophy caused by the lack of weightbearing.

  17. Investigation of Cellular and Molecular Responses to Pulsed Focused Ultrasound in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Scott R.; Ziadloo, Ali; Hancock, Hilary A.; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Dean, Dana D.; Lewis, Bobbi K.; Frenkel, Victor; Frank, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Continuous focused ultrasound (cFUS) has been widely used for thermal ablation of tissues, relying on continuous exposures to generate temperatures necessary to induce coagulative necrosis. Pulsed FUS (pFUS) employs non-continuous exposures that lower the rate of energy deposition and allow cooling to occur between pulses, thereby minimizing thermal effects and emphasizing effects created by non-thermal mechanisms of FUS (i.e., acoustic radiation forces and acoustic cavitation). pFUS has shown promise for a variety of applications including drug and nanoparticle delivery; however, little is understood about the effects these exposures have on tissue, especially with regard to cellular pro-homing factors (growth factors, cytokines, and cell adhesion molecules). We examined changes in murine hamstring muscle following pFUS or cFUS and demonstrate that pFUS, unlike cFUS, has little effect on the histological integrity of muscle and does not induce cell death. Infiltration of macrophages was observed 3 and 8 days following pFUS or cFUS exposures. pFUS increased expression of several cytokines (e.g., IL-1α, IL-1β, TNFα, INFγ, MIP-1α, MCP-1, and GMCSF) creating a local cytokine gradient on days 0 and 1 post-pFUS that returns to baseline levels by day 3 post-pFUS. pFUS exposures induced upregulation of other signaling molecules (e.g., VEGF, FGF, PlGF, HGF, and SDF-1α) and cell adhesion molecules (e.g., ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) on muscle vasculature. The observed molecular changes in muscle following pFUS may be utilized to target cellular therapies by increasing homing to areas of pathology. PMID:21931834

  18. Cellular mechanism underlying hypothermia-induced ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation in the setting of early repolarization and the protective effect of quinidine, cilostazol, and milrinone.

    PubMed

    Gurabi, Zsolt; Koncz, István; Patocskai, Bence; Nesterenko, Vladislav V; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2014-02-01

    Hypothermia has been reported to induce ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (VT/VF) in patients with early repolarization (ER) pattern. This study examines the cellular mechanisms underlying VT/VF associated with hypothermia in an experimental model of ER syndrome and examines the effectiveness of quinidine, cilostazol, and milrinone to prevent hypothermia-induced arrhythmias. Transmembrane action potentials were simultaneously recorded from 2 epicardial and 1 endocardial site of coronary-perfused canine left ventricular wedge preparations, together with a pseudo-ECG. A combination of NS5806 (3-10 μmol/L) and verapamil (1 μmol/L) was used to pharmacologically model the genetic mutations responsible for ER syndrome. Acetylcholine (3 μmol/L) was used to simulate increased parasympathetic tone, which is known to promote ER. In controls, lowering the temperature of the coronary perfusate to induce mild hypothermia (32°C-34°C) resulted in increased J-wave area on the ECG and accentuated epicardial action potential notch but no arrhythmic activity. In the setting of ER, hypothermia caused further accentuation of the epicardial action potential notch, leading to loss of the action potential dome at some sites but not others, thus creating the substrate for development of phase 2 reentry and VT/VF. Addition of the transient outward current antagonist quinidine (5 μmol/L) or the phosphodiesterase III inhibitors cilostazol (10 μmol/L) or milrinone (5 μmol/L) diminished the ER manifestations and prevented the hypothermia-induced phase 2 reentry and VT/VF. Hypothermia leads to VT/VF in the setting of ER by exaggerating repolarization abnormalities, leading to development of phase 2 reentry. Quinidine, cilostazol, and milrinone suppress the hypothermia-induced VT/VF by reversing the repolarization abnormalities.

  19. Cellular Mechanism Underlying Hypothermia-Induced VT/VF in the Setting of Early Repolarization and the Protective Effect of Quinidine, Cilostazol and Milrinone

    PubMed Central

    Gurabi, Zsolt; Koncz, István; Patocskai, Bence; Nesterenko, Vladislav V.; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypothermia has been reported to induce ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (VT/VF) in patients with early repolarization (ER) pattern. This study examines the cellular mechanisms underlying VT/VF associated with hypothermia in an experimental model of ER syndrome (ERS) and examines the effectiveness of quinidine, cilostazol and milrinone to prevent hypothermia-induced arrhythmias. Method and Results Transmembrane action potentials (AP) were simultaneously recorded from 2 epicardial and 1 endocardial site of coronary-perfused canine left-ventricular wedge preparations, together with a pseudo-ECG. A combination of NS5806 (3–10 µM) and verapamil (1µM) was used to pharmacologically model the genetic mutations responsible for ERS. Acetylcholine (3µM) was used to simulate increased parasympathetic tone, which is known to promote ER. In control, lowering the temperature of the coronary perfusate to induce mild hypothermia (32°C-34°C) resulted in increased J wave area on the ECG and accentuated epicardial AP notch but no arrhythmic activity. In the setting of ER, hypothermia caused further accentuation of the epicardial AP notch, leading to loss of the AP dome at some sites but not others, thus creating the substrate for development of phase-2-reentry and VT/VF. Addition of the Ito antagonist quinidine (5 µM) or the phosphodiesterase III inhibitors cilostazol (10 µM) or milrinone (5 µM), diminished the ER manifestations and prevented the hypothermia-induced phase 2 reentry and VT/VF. Conclusions Hypothermia leads to VT/VF in the setting of ER by exaggerating repolarization abnormalities, leading to development of phase-2-reentry. Quinidine, cilostazol and milrinone suppress the hypothermia-induced VT/VF by reversing the repolarization abnormalities. PMID:24429494

  20. Enhancing early child care quality and learning for toddlers at risk: the responsive early childhood program.

    PubMed

    Landry, Susan H; Zucker, Tricia A; Taylor, Heather B; Swank, Paul R; Williams, Jeffrey M; Assel, Michael; Crawford, April; Huang, Weihua; Clancy-Menchetti, Jeanine; Lonigan, Christopher J; Phillips, Beth M; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; de Villiers, Jill; de Villiers, Peter; Barnes, Marcia; Starkey, Prentice; Klein, Alice

    2014-02-01

    Despite reports of positive effects of high-quality child care, few experimental studies have examined the process of improving low-quality center-based care for toddler-age children. In this article, we report intervention effects on child care teachers' behaviors and children's social, emotional, behavioral, early literacy, language, and math outcomes as well as the teacher-child relationship. The intervention targeted the use of a set of responsive teacher practices, derived from attachment and sociocultural theories, and a comprehensive curriculum. Sixty-five childcare classrooms serving low-income 2- and 3-year-old children were randomized into 3 conditions: business-as-usual control, Responsive Early Childhood Curriculum (RECC), and RECC plus explicit social-emotional classroom activities (RECC+). Classroom observations showed greater gains for RECC and RECC+ teachers' responsive practices including helping children manage their behavior, establishing a predictable schedule, and use of cognitively stimulating activities (e.g., shared book reading) compared with controls; however, teacher behaviors did not differ for focal areas such as sensitivity and positive discipline supports. Child assessments demonstrated that children in the interventions outperformed controls in areas of social and emotional development, although children's performance in control and intervention groups was similar for cognitive skills (language, literacy, and math). Results support the positive impact of responsive teachers and environments providing appropriate support for toddlers' social and emotional development. Possible explanations for the absence of systematic differences in children's cognitive skills are considered, including implications for practice and future research targeting low-income toddlers.

  1. Intracranial baroreflex yielding an early cushing response in human.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E A; Czosnyka, Z; Momjian, S; Czosnyka, M; Bech, R A; Pickard, J D

    2005-01-01

    The Cushing response is a pre-terminal sympatho-adrenal systemic response to very high ICP. Animal studies have demonstrated that a moderate rise of ICP yields a reversible pressure-mediated systemic response. Infusion studies are routine procedures to investigate, by infusing CSF space with saline, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biophysics in patients suspected of hydrocephalus. Our study aims at assessing systemic and cerebral haemodynamic changes during moderate rise of ICP in human. Infusion studies were performed in 34 patients. This is a routine test perform in patients presenting with symptoms of NPH during their pre-shunting assessment. Arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (FV) were non-invasively monitored with photoplethysmography and transcranial Doppler. The rise in ICP (8.2 +/- 5.1 mmHg to 25 +/- 8.3 mmHg) was followed by a significant rise in ABP (106.6 +/- 29.7 mmHg to 115.2 +/- 30.1 mmHg), drop in CPP (98.3 +/- 29 mmHg to 90.2 +/- 30.7 mmHg) and decrease in FV (55.6 +/- 17 cm/s to 51.1 +/- 16.3 cm/s). Increasing ICP did not alter heart rate (70.4 +/- 10.4/min to 70.3 +/- 9.1/min) but augmented the heart rate variance (0.046 +/- 0.058 to 0.067 +/- 0.075/min). In a population suspected of hydrocephalus, our study demonstrated that a moderate rise of ICP yields a reversible pressure-mediated systemic response, demonstrating an early Cushing response in human and a putative intracranial baroreflex.

  2. HDAC4 preserves skeletal muscle structure following long-term denervation by mediating distinct cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Pigna, Eva; Renzini, Alessandra; Greco, Emanuela; Simonazzi, Elena; Fulle, Stefania; Mancinelli, Rosa; Moresi, Viviana; Adamo, Sergio

    2018-02-24

    Denervation triggers numerous molecular responses in skeletal muscle, including the activation of catabolic pathways and oxidative stress, leading to progressive muscle atrophy. Histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) mediates skeletal muscle response to denervation, suggesting the use of HDAC inhibitors as a therapeutic approach to neurogenic muscle atrophy. However, the effects of HDAC4 inhibition in skeletal muscle in response to long-term denervation have not been described yet. To further study HDAC4 functions in response to denervation, we analyzed mutant mice in which HDAC4 is specifically deleted in skeletal muscle. After an initial phase of resistance to neurogenic muscle atrophy, skeletal muscle with a deletion of HDAC4 lost structural integrity after 4 weeks of denervation. Deletion of HDAC4 impaired the activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, delayed the autophagic response, and dampened the OS response in skeletal muscle. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome system or the autophagic response, if on the one hand, conferred resistance to neurogenic muscle atrophy; on the other hand, induced loss of muscle integrity and inflammation in mice lacking HDAC4 in skeletal muscle. Moreover, treatment with the antioxidant drug Trolox prevented loss of muscle integrity and inflammation in in mice lacking HDAC4 in skeletal muscle, despite the resistance to neurogenic muscle atrophy. These results reveal new functions of HDAC4 in mediating skeletal muscle response to denervation and lead us to propose the combined use of HDAC inhibitors and antioxidant drugs to treat neurogenic muscle atrophy.

  3. Comparison of cellular responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and synovium on combined silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haifeng; Wei, Xing; Ding, Xili; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Gang; Li, Ping; Fan, Yubo

    2015-01-01

    As a brand new member in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) families, synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) have been increasingly regarded as a promising therapeutic cell species for musculoskeletal regeneration. However, there are few reports mentioning ligamentogenesis of SMSCs and especially null for their engineering use towards ligament regeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the cellular responses of MSCs derived from bone marrow and synovium on combined silk scaffolds that can be used to determine the cell source most appropriate for tissue-engineered ligament. Rabbit SMSCs and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured in vitro for two weeks after seeding on the combined silk scaffolds. Samples were studied and compared for their cellular morphology, proliferation, collagen production, gene, and protein expression of ligament-related extracellular matrix (ECM) markers. In addition, the two cell types were transfected with green fluorescent protein to evaluate their fate after implantation in an intraarticular environment of the knee joint. After 14 days of culturing, SMSCs showed a significant increase in proliferation as compared with BMSCs. The transcript and protein expression levels of ligament-related ECM markers in SMSCs were significantly higher than those in BMSCs. Moreover, 6 weeks postoperatively, more viable cells were presented in SMSC-loaded constructs than in BMSC-loaded constructs. Therefore, based on the cellular response in vitro and in vivo, SMSCs may represent a more suitable cell source than BMSCs for further study and development of tissue-engineered ligament. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Hot, humid air increases cellular influx during the late-phase response to nasal challenge with antigen.

    PubMed

    Assanasen, P; Baroody, F M; Naureckas, E; Naclerio, R M

    2001-12-01

    Inhalation of hot, humid air (HHA: 37 degrees C, > 95% relative humidity (RH)) partially inhibits the early response to nasal challenge with antigen. To investigate whether HHA inhibited the late-phase response to nasal challenge with antigen and increased hyper-responsiveness of the nasal mucosa to histamine. Twenty subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis, outside of their allergy season, participated in a randomized, 2-way cross-over study. The subjects continuously breathed room air (25 degrees C, 30% RH) or HHA delivered via a face mask during the entire experiment. Subjects were challenged intranasally with antigen 1 h after beginning conditioning. The response was monitored by symptoms and nasal lavage at 2-h intervals after the last antigen challenge. Eight hours after antigen challenge, nasal challenge with histamine was performed. Exposure to HHA significantly increased nasal mucosal temperature from baseline without affecting nasal secretion osmolality. HHA significantly inhibited antigen-induced sneezes, congestion, pruritus, and human serum albumin levels during the early response to antigen challenge. HHA exposure, however, was associated with an 8-fold increase in the eosinophil influx and a 15-fold increase in the levels of eosinophil cationic protein during the late-phase response compared to room air. There were no significant differences in nasal hyper-responsiveness to histamine during either exposure. HHA partially decreases the early response to nasal challenge with antigen, but dramatically increases eosinophil influx. Increasing eosinophil number had no effects on the hyper-responsiveness to histamine. We speculate that the physical conditions of air differentially impact the stages of allergic inflammation.

  5. Characterizing early molecular biomarkers of zinc-induced adaptive and adverseoxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining mechanism-based biomarkers that distinguish adaptive and adverse cellular processes is critical to understanding the health effects of environmental exposures. Here, we examined cellular responses of the tracheobronchial airway to zinc (Zn) exposure. A pharmacokinetic...

  6. Seasonal variations of cellular stress response in the heart and gastrocnemius muscle of the water frog (Pelophylax ridibundus).

    PubMed

    Feidantsis, Konstantinos; Anestis, Andreas; Vasara, Eleni; Kyriakopoulou-Sklavounou, Pasqualina; Michaelidis, Basile

    2012-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the seasonal cellular stress response in the heart and the gastrocnemius muscle of the amphibian Pelophylax ridibundus (former name Rana ridibunda) during an 8 month acclimatization period in the field. Processes studied included heat shock protein expression and protein kinase activation. The cellular stress response was addressed through the expression of Hsp70 and Hsp90 and the phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinases and particularly p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK-1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3). Due to a general metabolic depression during winter hibernation, the induction of Hsp70 and Hsp90 and the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, JNKs and ERKs are retained at low levels of expression in the examined tissues of P. ridibundus. Recovery from hibernation induces increased levels of the specific proteins, probably providing stamina to the animals during their arousal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Selective expression of inhibitory Fcgamma receptor by metastatic melanoma impairs tumor susceptibility to IgG-dependent cellular response.

    PubMed

    Cassard, Lydie; Cohen-Solal, Joel F G; Fournier, Emilie M; Camilleri-Broët, Sophie; Spatz, Alain; Chouaïb, Salem; Badoual, Cécile; Varin, Audrey; Fisson, Sylvain; Duvillard, Pierre; Boix, Charlotte; Loncar, Shannon M; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Houghton, Alan N; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Gresser, Ion; Fridman, Wolf H; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2008-12-15

    During melanoma progression, patients develop anti-tumor immunity including the production of anti-tumor antibodies. Although the strategies developed by malignant cells to escape anti-tumor cellular immunity have been extensively investigated, little is known about tumor resistance to humoral immunity. The main effect of IgG antibodies is to activate the immune response by binding to host Fc gamma receptors (FcgammaR) expressed by immune cells. We previously reported in a limited study that some human metastatic melanoma cells ectopically express the FcgammaRIIB1, an inhibitory isoform of FcgammaR. By analyzing a large panel of different types of human primary and metastatic solid tumors, we report herein that expression of FcgammaRIIB is restricted to melanoma and is acquired during tumor progression. We show that FcgammaRIIB expression prevents the lysis of human metastatic melanoma cells by NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro, independently of the intracytoplasmic region of FcgammaRIIB. Using experimental mouse models, we demonstrate that expression of FcgammaRIIB protects B16F0 melanoma tumors from the ADCC induced by monoclonal and polyclonal anti-tumor IgG in vivo. Thus, our results identify FcgammaRIIB as a marker of human metastatic melanoma that impairs the tumor susceptibility to FcgammaR-dependent innate effector responses. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Tetanus toxoid-loaded layer-by-layer nanoassemblies for efficient systemic, mucosal, and cellular immunostimulatory response following oral administration.

    PubMed

    Harde, Harshad; Agrawal, Ashish Kumar; Jain, Sanyog

    2015-10-01

    The present study reports the tetanus toxoid (TT)-loaded layer-by-layer nanoassemblies (layersomes) with enhanced protection, permeation, and presentation for comprehensive oral immunization. The stable and lyophilized TT-loaded layersomes were prepared by a thin-film hydration method followed by alternate layer-by-layer coating of an electrolyte. The developed system was assessed for in vitro stability of antigen and formulation, cellular uptake, ex vivo intestinal uptake, and immunostimulatory response using a suitable experimental protocol. Layersomes improved the stability in simulated biological media as well as protected the integrity/conformation and native 3D structure of TT as confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. The cell culture studies demonstrated a 3.8-fold higher permeation of layersomes in Caco-2 cells and an 8.5-fold higher uptake by antigen-presenting cells (RAW 264.7). The TT-loaded layersomes elicited a complete immunostimulatory profile consisting of higher systemic (serum IgG titer), mucosal (sIgA titer), and cellular (interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels) immune response after peroral administration in mice. The modified TT inhibition assay further confirmed the elicitation of complete protective levels of anti-TT antibody (>0.1 IU/mL) by layersomes. In conclusion, the proposed strategy is expected to contribute significantly in the field of stable liposome technology for mass immunization through the oral route.

  9. Cellular response of human neuroblastoma cells to α-synuclein fibrils, the main constituent of Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Laura; Chafey, Philippe; Le Gall, Morgane; Clary, Guilhem; Melki, Ronald; Redeker, Virginie

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-Syn) fibrils are the main constituent of Lewy bodies and a neuropathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The propagation of α-Syn assemblies from cell to cell suggests that they are involved in PD progression. We previously showed that α-Syn fibrils are toxic because of their ability to bind and permeabilize cell membranes. Here, we document the cellular response in terms of proteome changes of SH-SY5Y cells exposed to exogenous α-Syn fibrils. We compare the proteomes of cells of neuronal origin exposed or not either to oligomeric or fibrillar α-Syn using two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry. Only α-Syn fibrils induce significant changes in the proteome of SH-SY5Y cells. In addition to proteins associated to apoptosis and toxicity, or proteins previously linked to neurodegenerative diseases, we report an overexpression of proteins involved in intracellular vesicle trafficking. We also report a remarkable increase in fibrillar α-Syn heterogeneity, mainly due to C-terminal truncations. Our results show that cells of neuronal origin adapt their proteome to exogenous α-Syn fibrils and actively modify those assemblies. Cells of neuronal origin adapt their proteome to exogenous toxic α-Syn fibrils and actively modify those assemblies. Our results bring insights into the cellular response and clearance events the cells implement to face the propagation of α-Syn assemblies associated to pathology.

  10. Molecular and cellular profiling of acute responses to total body radiation exposure in ovariectomized female cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    DeBo, Ryne J; Register, Thomas C; Caudell, David L; Sempowski, Gregory D; Dugan, Gregory; Gray, Shauna; Owzar, Kouros; Jiang, Chen; Bourland, J Daniel; Chao, Nelson J; Cline, J Mark

    2015-06-01

    The threat of radiation exposure requires a mechanistic understanding of radiation-induced immune injury and recovery. The study objective was to evaluate responses to ionizing radiation in ovariectomized (surgically post-menopausal) female cynomolgus macaques. Animals received a single total-body irradiation (TBI) exposure at doses of 0, 2 or 5 Gy with scheduled necropsies at 5 days, 8 weeks and 24 weeks post-exposure. Blood and lymphoid tissues were evaluated for morphologic, cellular, and molecular responses. Irradiated animals developed symptoms of acute hematopoietic syndrome, and reductions in thymus weight, thymopoiesis, and bone marrow cellularity. Acute, transient increases in plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) were observed in 5 Gy animals along with dose-dependent alterations in messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) signatures in thymus, spleen, and lymph node. Expression of T cell markers was lower in thymus and spleen, while expression of macrophage marker CD68 (cluster of differentiation 68) was relatively elevated in lymphoid tissues from irradiated animals. Ovariectomized female macaques exposed to moderate doses of radiation experienced increased morbidity, including acute, dose-dependent alterations in systemic and tissue-specific biomarkers, and increased macrophage/T cell ratios. The effects on mortality exceeded expectations based on previous studies in males, warranting further investigation.

  11. Cellular immune responses in patients with hepatitis B surface antigen seroclearance induced by antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The mechanisms by which chronic hepatitis B is completely resolved through antiviral therapy are unknown, and the contribution of acquired T cell immunity to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroclearance has not been investigated. Therefore, we measured the T-cell responses to core and envelope antigens in patients with HBsAg seroclearance. Methods Fourteen subjects with HBsAg seroclearance following antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B, 7 HBeAg-positive immunotolerant HBV carriers and 9 HBeAg-negative inactive HBsAg carriers were recruited. HBV-specific T-cell responses to recombinant HBV core (rHBcAg) and envelope (rHBsAg) proteins and pools of core and envelope peptides were measured using an ELISPOT assay detecting interferon-gamma and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assays detecting interferon-gamma or interleukin 2. Results Interferon-gamma ELISPOT assays showed a low frequency of weak responses to the rHBsAg and S peptide pool in the HBsAg seroclearance group, and the response frequency to the rHBcAg and the C peptide pool was higher than to the rHBsAg (P < 0.001) and S peptide pool (P = 0.001) respectively. A higher response frequency to C than S peptide pools was confirmed in the interferon-gamma ICS assays for both CD4+ (P = 0.033) and CD8+ (P = 0.040) T cells in the HBsAg seroclearance group. The responses to C and S antigens in the inactive carriers were similar. Conclusions There was a low frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune responses to envelope antigens in Chinese subjects with HBsAg seroclearance following antiviral therapy. It is unlikely that these immune responses are responsible for HBsAg seroclearance in these subjects. PMID:21320337

  12. Response to Early AED Therapy and Its Prognostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    French, Jacqueline A.

    2002-01-01

    Determining the prognosis of patients when they first present with epilepsy is a difficult task. Several clinical studies have shed light on this very important topic. Potential predictors of the refractory state, including seizure etiology, duration of epilepsy before treatment, and epilepsy type, have not been successful indicators of long-term outcome. One predictor of the refractory state appears to be early response to AED therapy. Inadequate seizure control after initial treatment is a poor prognostic sign. Recent research into genetic causes of the refractory state has included investigation of the multiple drug resistance gene, and polymorphisms at drug targets. More work is needed to determine the causes and predictors of drug resistance. PMID:15309146

  13. Infusing Culturally Responsive Science Curriculum into Early Childhood Teacher Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jiyoon; Martin, Leisa A.

    2017-08-01

    Previous research studies in early childhood teacher education have indicated that teacher candidates are not adequately prepared to demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to teach science to all children including culturally and linguistically diverse students. To address this issue, the researchers provided 31 early childhood teacher candidates with instructions through a culturally responsive science education curriculum that integrates American and Korean science curriculum corresponding to the American and Korean standards for teacher education. The results showed a statistically significant increase in their Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PSTE). In addition, the teacher candidates were able to create a multicultural/diverse lesson in the developing and proficiency levels based on Ambrosio's lesson matrix. This study provides teacher candidates' knowledge as well as an additional resource for developing their self-efficacy and understanding the role of multicultural/diverse lesson planning for science instruction. Also, teacher candidates could be better prepared by understanding how other countries approach science education and integrating this knowledge to enrich their own science instruction.

  14. Early disaster response in Haiti: the Israeli field hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, Yitshak; Merin, Ofer; Peleg, Kobi; Levy, Gad; Vinker, Shlomo; Sagi, Ram; Abargel, Avi; Bartal, Carmi; Lin, Guy; Bar, Ariel; Bar-On, Elhanan; Schwaber, Mitchell J; Ash, Nachman

    2010-07-06

    The earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010 caused an estimated 230,000 deaths and injured approximately 250,000 people. The Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps Field Hospital was fully operational on site only 89 hours after the earthquake struck and was capable of providing sophisticated medical care. During the 10 days the hospital was operational, its staff treated 1111 patients, hospitalized 737 patients, and performed 244 operations on 203 patients. The field hospital also served as a referral center for medical teams from other countries that were deployed in the surrounding areas. The key factor that enabled rapid response during the early phase of the disaster from a distance of 6000 miles was a well-prepared and trained medical unit maintained on continuous alert. The prompt deployment of advanced-capability field hospitals is essential in disaster relief, especially in countries with minimal medical infrastructure. The changing medical requirements of people in an earthquake zone dictate that field hospitals be designed to operate with maximum flexibility and versatility regarding triage, staff positioning, treatment priorities, and hospitalization policies. Early coordination with local administrative bodies is indispensable.

  15. The Dual Role of Cellular Senescence in Developing Tumors and Their Response to Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schosserer, Markus; Grillari, Johannes; Breitenbach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence describes an irreversible growth arrest characterized by distinct morphology, gene expression pattern, and secretory phenotype. The final or intermediate stages of senescence can be reached by different genetic mechanisms and in answer to different external and internal stresses. It has been maintained in the literature but never proven by clearcut experiments that the induction of senescence serves the evolutionary purpose of protecting the individual from development and growth of cancers. This hypothesis was recently scrutinized by new experiments and found to be partly true, but part of the gene activities now known to happen in senescence are also needed for cancer growth, leading to the view that senescence is a double-edged sword in cancer development. In current cancer therapy, cellular senescence is, on the one hand, intended to occur in tumor cells, as thereby the therapeutic outcome is improved, but might, on the other hand, also be induced unintentionally in non-tumor cells, causing inflammation, secondary tumors, and cancer relapse. Importantly, organismic aging leads to accumulation of senescent cells in tissues and organs of aged individuals. Senescent cells can occur transiently, e.g., during embryogenesis or during wound healing, with beneficial effects on tissue homeostasis and regeneration or accumulate chronically in tissues, which detrimentally affects the microenvironment by de- or transdifferentiation of senescent cells and their neighboring stromal cells, loss of tissue specific functionality, and induction of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, an increased secretory profile consisting of pro-inflammatory and tissue remodeling factors. These factors shape their surroundings toward a pro-carcinogenic microenvironment, which fuels the development of aging-associated cancers together with the accumulation of mutations over time. We are presenting an overview of well-documented stress situations and signals, which

  16. Ceftiofur hydrochloride affects the humoral and cellular immune response in pigs after vaccination against swine influenza and pseudorabies.

    PubMed

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Czyżewska-Dors, Ewelina; Kwit, Krzysztof; Wierzchosławski, Karol; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2015-10-22

    Cephalosporins are a class of antibiotics that are active against many Gram-positive and some Gram-negative bacteria. Beyond their antibacterial activity, they are reported to have various immunomodulatory properties. It has been shown that they reduce the secretion of cytokines as well as influence the humoral and cellular immune response. In the field conditions antibiotics are frequently administered at the same time as vaccines in pigs and, in the view of their potential immunomodulatory properties, it is important to examine their effect on the development and persistence of the post-vaccinal immune response. Ceftiofur is a very popular veterinary medicine third-generation cephalosporin with a broad spectrum of activity. It has been shown that it can inhibit cytokines secretion and in this way can potentially affect host immune response. The influence of ceftiofur on the immune response has not yet been investigated in pigs. In the present study we evaluated the influence of therapeutic doses of ceftiofur hydrochloride on the post-vaccinal immune response after vaccination with two model vaccines (live and inactivated). Seventy pigs were divided into five groups: control, unvaccinated (C), control vaccinated against swine influenza (SI-V), control vaccinated against pseudorabies (PR-V), vaccinated against SI during ceftiofur administration (SI-CEF) and vaccinated against PR during ceftiofur administration (PR-CEF). Pigs from SICEF and PR-CEF groups received therapeutic dose of ceftiofur for five days. Pigs from SI-CEF, PR-CEF, SIV and PR-V groups were vaccinated against SI and PR. Antibodies to PRV were determined with the use of blocking ELISA tests (IDEXX Laboratories, USA). Humoral responses to SIV were assessed based on haemagglutination inhibition assay. T-cell response was analyzed with the use of proliferation test. The concentrations of IFN- γ and IL-4 in culture supernatant were determined with the use of ELISA kits Invitrogen Corporation, USA). The

  17. HTLV-1 Tax Oncoprotein Subverts the Cellular DNA Damage Response via Binding to DNA-dependent Protein Kinase*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Sarah S.; Guo, Xin; Fryrear, Kimberly A.; Mihaylova, Valia T.; Gupta, Saurabh K.; Belgnaoui, S. Mehdi; Haoudi, Abdelali; Kupfer, Gary M.; Semmes, O. John

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 is the causative agent for adult T-cell leukemia. Previous research has established that the viral oncoprotein Tax mediates the transformation process by impairing cell cycle control and cellular response to DNA damage. We showed previously that Tax sequesters huChk2 within chromatin and impairs the response to ionizing radiation. Here we demonstrate that DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a member of the Tax·Chk2 nuclear complex. The catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs, and the regulatory subunit, Ku70, were present. Tax-containing nuclear extracts showed increased DNA-PK activity, and specific inhibition of DNA-PK prevented Tax-induced activation of Chk2 kinase activity. Expression of Tax induced foci formation and phosphorylation of H2AX. However, Tax-induced constitutive signaling of the DNA-PK pathway impaired cellular response to new damage, as reflected in suppression of ionizing radiation-induced DNA-PK phosphorylation and γH2AX stabilization. Tax co-localized with phospho-DNA-PK into nuclear speckles and a nuclear excluded Tax mutant sequestered endogenous phospho-DNA-PK into the cytoplasm, suggesting that Tax interaction with DNA-PK is an initiating event. We also describe a novel interaction between DNA-PK and Chk2 that requires Tax. We propose that Tax binds to and stabilizes a protein complex with DNA-PK and Chk2, resulting in a saturation of DNA-PK-mediated damage repair response. PMID:18957425

  18. Cellular redistribution of Rad51 in response to DNA damage: novel role for Rad51C.

    PubMed

    Gildemeister, Otto S; Sage, Jay M; Knight, Kendall L

    2009-11-13

    Exposure of cells to DNA-damaging agents results in a rapid increase in the formation of subnuclear complexes containing Rad51. To date, it has not been determined to what extent DNA damage-induced cytoplasmic to nuclear transport of Rad51 may contribute to this process. We have analyzed subcellular fractions of HeLa and HCT116 cells and found a significant increase in nuclear Rad51 levels following exposure to a modest dose of ionizing radiation (2 grays). We also observed a DNA damage-induced increase in nuclear Rad51 in the Brca2-defective cell line Capan-1. To address a possible Brca2-independent mechanism for Rad51 nuclear transport, we analyzed subcellular fractions for two other Rad51-interacting proteins, Rad51C and Xrcc3. Rad51C has a functional nuclear localization signal, and although we found that the subcellular distribution of Xrcc3 was not significantly affected by DNA damage, there was a damage-induced increase in nuclear Rad51C. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated depletion of Rad51C in HeLa and Capan-1 cells resulted in lower steady-state levels of nuclear Rad51 as well as a diminished DNA damage-induced increase. Our results provide important insight into the cellular regulation of Rad51 nuclear entry and a role for Rad51C in this process.

  19. Highly Dynamic Cellular-Level Response of Symbiotic Coral to a Sudden Increase in Environmental Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, C.; Pernice, M.; Domart-Coulon, I.; Djediat, C.; Spangenberg, J. E.; Alexander, D. T. L.; Hignette, M.; Meziane, T.; Meibom, A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metabolic interactions with endosymbiotic photosynthetic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium spp. are fundamental to reef-building corals (Scleractinia) thriving in nutrient-poor tropical seas. Yet, detailed understanding at the single-cell level of nutrient assimilation, translocation, and utilization within this fundamental symbiosis is lacking. Using pulse-chase 15N labeling and quantitative ion microprobe isotopic imaging (NanoSIMS; nanoscale secondary-ion mass spectrometry), we visualized these dynamic processes in tissues of the symbiotic coral Pocillopora damicornis at the subcellular level. Assimilation of ammonium, nitrate, and aspartic acid resulted in rapid incorporation of nitrogen into uric acid crystals (after ~45 min), forming temporary N storage sites within the dinoflagellate endosymbionts. Subsequent intracellular remobilization of this metabolite was accompanied by translocation of nitrogenous compounds to the coral host, starting at ~6 h. Within the coral tissue, nitrogen is utilized in specific cellular compartments in all four epithelia, including mucus chambers, Golgi bodies, and vesicles in calicoblastic cells. Our study shows how nitrogen-limited symbiotic corals take advantage of sudden changes in nitrogen availability; this opens new perspectives for functional studies of nutrient storage and remobilization in microbial symbioses in changing reef environments. PMID:23674611

  20. Cellular responses of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) gametes exposed in vitro to polystyrene nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Carmen; Tallec, Kevin; Le Goïc, Nelly; Lambert, Christophe; Soudant, Philippe; Huvet, Arnaud; Suquet, Marc; Berchel, Mathieu; Paul-Pont, Ika

    2018-06-06

    While the detection and quantification of nano-sized plastic in the environment remains a challenge, the growing number of polymer applications mean that we can expect an increase in the release of nanoplastics into the environment by indirect outputs. Today, very little is known about the impact of nano-sized plastics on marine organisms. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the toxicity of polystyrene nanoplastics (NPs) on oyster (Crassostrea gigas) gametes. Spermatozoa and oocytes were exposed to four NPs concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100 mg L -1 for 1, 3 and 5 h. NPs coated with carboxylic (PS-COOH) and amine groups (PS-NH 2 ) were used to determine how surface properties influence the effects of nanoplastics. Results demonstrated the adhesion of NPs to oyster spermatozoa and oocytes as suggested by the increase of relative cell size and complexity measured by flow-cytometry and confirmed by microscopy observations. A significant increase of ROS production was observed in sperm cells upon exposure to 100 mg L -1 PS-COOH, but was not observed with PS-NH 2 , suggesting a differential effect according to the NP-associated functional group. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the effects of NPs occur rapidly, are complex and are possibly associated with the cellular eco-corona, which could modify NPs behaviour and toxicity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Cellular metabolic responses of the marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries associated with cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Luo, Chun-Shan; Liang, Jun-Rong; Chen, Dan-Dan; Zhuo, Wen-Hao; Gao, Ya-Hui; Chen, Chang-Ping; Song, Si-Si

    2014-08-01

    In this study a comparative proteomics approach involving a mass spectrometric analysis of synchronized cells was employed to investigate the cellular-level metabolic mechanisms associated with siliceous cell wall formation in the pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries. Cultures of P. multiseries were synchronized using the silicate limitation method. Approximately 75% of cells were arrested at the G2+M phase of the cell cycle after 48 h of silicate starvation. The majority of cells progressed to new valve synthesis within 5h of silicon replenishment. We compared the proteome of P. multiseries at 0, 4, 5, and 6h of synchronization progress upon silicon replenishment using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Forty-eight differentially expressed protein spots were identified in abundance (greater than two-fold change; P<0.005), some of which are predicted to be involved in intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton, photosynthesis, lipid metabolism, and protein biosynthesis. Cytoskeleton proteins and clathrin coat components were also hypothesized to play potential roles in cell wall formation. The proteomic profile analysis suggests that P. multiseries most likely employs multiple synergistic biochemical mechanisms for cell wall formation. These results improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying silicon cell wall formation and enhance our understanding of the important role played by diatoms in silicon biogeochemical cycling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcium mobilizations in response to changes in the gravity vector in Arabidopsis seedlings: possible cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Toyota, Masatsugu; Furuichi, Takuya; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Gravity influences the growth direction of higher plants. Changes in the gravity vector (gravistimulation) immediately promote the increase in the cytoplasmic free calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. When the seedlings are gravistimulated by reorientation at 180°, a transient two peaked (biphasic) [Ca(2+)]c-increase arises in their hypocotyl and petioles. Parabolic flights (PFs) can generate a variety of gravity-stimuli, and enables us to measure gravity-induced [Ca(2+)]c-increases without specimen rotation, which demonstrate that Arabidopsis seedlings possess a rapid gravity-sensing mechanism linearly transducing a wide range of gravitational changes into Ca(2+) signals on a sub-second timescale. Hypergravity by centrifugation (20 g or 300 g) also induces similar transient [Ca(2+)]c-increases. In this review, we propose models for possible cellular processes of the garavi-stimulus-induced [Ca(2+)]c-increase, and evaluate those by examining whether the model fits well with the kinetic parameters derived from the [Ca(2+)]c-increases obtained by applying gravistimulus with different amplitudes and time sequences.

  3. Cellular responses of bioabsorbable polymeric material and Guglielmi detachable coil in experimental aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuichi; Viñuela, Fernando; Tateshima, Satoshi; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Song, Joon K; Mahdavieh, Haleh; Iruela-Arispe, Luisa

    2002-04-01

    Acceleration of healing mechanisms is a promising approach to improve current limitations of endovascular aneurysm therapy with the use of platinum coils. We evaluated a new endovascular therapeutic, bioabsorbable polymeric material (BPM), which may promote cellular reaction in the aneurysms. Four different concentrations of lactide/glycolic acid copolymer [poly(D-L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)] (PLGA), 85/15, 75/25, 65/35, and 50/50, were used as BPMs. Sixteen experimental aneurysms were created in 8 swine. Eight-millimeter-long spiral-shaped BPMs were surgically implanted in the aneurysms without tight packing (n=3 for each BPM). Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) were used as control (n=4). The animals were killed 14 days after embolization, and angiographic, histological, and immunohistochemical analyses were performed. Despite loose packing of aneurysms with BPMs, faster BPMs such as 50/50 or 65/35 PLGA demonstrated more mature collagen formation and fibrosis in the sac and neck of the aneurysm. One aneurysm treated with 65/35 PLGA, 1 treated with 75/25 PLGA, and all 3 treated with 85/15 PLGA showed a neck remnant on angiography. There was a linear relationship between collagen levels and polymer degradation properties (r=-0.9513). This preliminary animal study indicates that acceleration of aneurysm healing with the use of BPM is feasible. This concept can be applied to decrease and perhaps prevent aneurysmal recanalization after endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms.

  4. Cellular responses to nicotinic receptor activation are decreased after prolonged exposure to galantamine in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Barik, Jacques; Dajas-Bailador, Federico; Wonnacott, Susan

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we have examined cellular responses of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after chronic treatment with galantamine, a drug used to treat Alzheimer's disease that has a dual mechanism of action: inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and allosteric potentiation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Acute experiments confirmed that maximum potentiation of nicotinic responses occurs at 1 microM galantamine; hence this concentration was chosen for chronic treatment. Exposure to 1 microM galantamine for 4 days decreased Ca(2+) responses (by 19.8+/-3.6%) or [(3)H]noradrenaline ([(3)H]NA) release (by 23.9+/-3.3%) elicited by acute application of nicotine. KCl-evoked increases in intracellular Ca(2+) were also inhibited by 10.0+/-1.9% after 4 days' treatment with galantamine. These diminished responses are consistent with the downregulation of downstream cellular processes. Ca(2+) responses evoked by activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors were unaffected by chronic galantamine treatment. Exposure to the more potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine (1 microM) for 4 days failed to alter nicotine-, KCl-, or muscarinic receptor-evoked increases in intracellular Ca(2+). These observations support the hypothesis that chronic galantamine exerts its effects through interaction with nAChR in this cell line. Exposure to 10 microM nicotine for 4 days produced decreases in acute nicotine- (18.0+/-3.5%) and KCl-evoked Ca(2+) responses (10.6+/-2.5%) and nicotine-evoked [(3)H]NA release (26.0+/-3.3%) that are comparable to the effects of a corresponding exposure to galantamine. Treatment with 1 microM galantamine did not alter numbers of [(3)H]epibatidine-binding sites in SH-SY5Y cells, in contrast to 62% upregulation of these sites in response to 10 microM nicotine. Thus, chronic galantamine acts at nAChR to decrease subsequent functional responses to acute stimulation with nicotine or KCl. This effect appears to be independent of the upregulation of n

  5. Immune activation alters cellular and humoral responses to yellow fever 17D vaccine.

    PubMed

    Muyanja, Enoch; Ssemaganda, Aloysius; Ngauv, Pearline; Cubas, Rafael; Perrin, Helene; Srinivasan, Divya; Canderan, Glenda; Lawson, Benton; Kopycinski, Jakub; Graham, Amanda S; Rowe, Dawne K; Smith, Michaela J; Isern, Sharon; Michael, Scott; Silvestri, Guido; Vanderford, Thomas H; Castro, Erika; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Singer, Joel; Gillmour, Jill; Kiwanuka, Noah; Nanvubya, Annet; Schmidt, Claudia; Birungi, Josephine; Cox, Josephine; Haddad, Elias K; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Fast, Patricia; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Trautmann, Lydie; Gaucher, Denis

    2014-07-01

    Defining the parameters that modulate vaccine responses in African populations will be imperative to design effective vaccines for protection against HIV, malaria, tuberculosis, and dengue virus infections. This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of the patient-specific immune microenvironment to the response to the licensed yellow fever vaccine 17D (YF-17D) in an African cohort. We compared responses to YF-17D in 50 volunteers in Entebbe, Uganda, and 50 volunteers in Lausanne, Switzerland. We measured the CD8+ T cell and B cell responses induced by YF-17D and correlated them with immune parameters analyzed by flow cytometry prior to vaccination. We showed that YF-17D-induced CD8+ T cell and B cell responses were substantially lower in immunized individuals from Entebbe compared with immunized individuals from Lausanne. The impaired vaccine response in the Entebbe cohort associated with reduced YF-17D replication. Prior to vaccination, we observed higher frequencies of exhausted and activated NK cells, differentiated T and B cell subsets and proinflammatory monocytes, suggesting an activated immune microenvironment in the Entebbe volunteers. Interestingly, activation of CD8+ T cells and B cells as well as proinflammatory monocytes at baseline negatively correlated with YF-17D-neutralizing antibody titers after vaccination. Additionally, memory T and B cell responses in preimmunized volunteers exhibited reduced persistence in the Entebbe cohort but were boosted by a second vaccination. Together, these results demonstrate that an activated immune microenvironment prior to vaccination impedes efficacy of the YF-17D vaccine in an African cohort and suggest that vaccine regimens may need to be boosted in African populations to achieve efficient immunity. Registration is not required for observational studies. This study was funded by Canada's Global Health Research Initiative, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  6. Immune activation alters cellular and humoral responses to yellow fever 17D vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Muyanja, Enoch; Ssemaganda, Aloysius; Ngauv, Pearline; Cubas, Rafael; Perrin, Helene; Srinivasan, Divya; Canderan, Glenda; Lawson, Benton; Kopycinski, Jakub; Graham, Amanda S.; Rowe, Dawne K.; Smith, Michaela J.; Isern, Sharon; Michael, Scott; Silvestri, Guido; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Castro, Erika; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Singer, Joel; Gillmour, Jill; Kiwanuka, Noah; Nanvubya, Annet; Schmidt, Claudia; Birungi, Josephine; Cox, Josephine; Haddad, Elias K.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Fast, Patricia; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Trautmann, Lydie

    2014-01-01

    Background. Defining the parameters that modulate vaccine responses in African populations will be imperative to design effective vaccines for protection against HIV, malaria, tuberculosis, and dengue virus infections. This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of the patient-specific immune microenvironment to the response to the licensed yellow fever vaccine 17D (YF-17D) in an African cohort. Methods. We compared responses to YF-17D in 50 volunteers in Entebbe, Uganda, and 50 volunteers in Lausanne, Switzerland. We measured the CD8+ T cell and B cell responses induced by YF-17D and correlated them with immune parameters analyzed by flow cytometry prior to vaccination. Results. We showed that YF-17D–induced CD8+ T cell and B cell responses were substantially lower in immunized individuals from Entebbe compared with immunized individuals from Lausanne. The impaired vaccine response in the Entebbe cohort associated with reduced YF-17D replication. Prior to vaccination, we observed higher frequencies of exhausted and activated NK cells, differentiated T and B cell subsets and proinflammatory monocytes, suggesting an activated immune microenvironment in the Entebbe volunteers. Interestingly, activation of CD8+ T cells and B cells as well as proinflammatory monocytes at baseline negatively correlated with YF-17D–neutralizing antibody titers after vaccination. Additionally, memory T and B cell responses in preimmunized volunteers exhibited reduced persistence in the Entebbe cohort but were boosted by a second vaccination. Conclusion. Together, these results demonstrate that an activated immune microenvironment prior to vaccination impedes efficacy of the YF-17D vaccine in an African cohort and suggest that vaccine regimens may need to be boosted in African populations to achieve efficient immunity. Trial registration. Registration is not required for observational studies. Funding. This study was funded by Canada’s Global Health Research Initiative, Defense

  7. Humoral and cellular responses to a non-adjuvanted monovalent H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine in hospital employees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The efficacy of the H1N1 influenza vaccine relies on the induction of both humoral and cellular responses. This study evaluated the humoral and cellular responses to a monovalent non-adjuvanted pandemic influenza A/H1N1 vaccine in occupationally exposed subjects who were previously vaccinated with a seasonal vaccine. Methods Sixty healthy workers from a respiratory disease hospital were recruited. Sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained prior to and 1 month after vaccination with a non-adjuvanted monovalent 2009 H1N1 vaccine (Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine Panenza, Sanofi Pasteur). Antibody titers against the pandemic A/H1N1 influenza virus were measured via hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization assays. Antibodies against the seasonal HA1 were assessed by ELISA. The frequency of IFN-γ-producing cells as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation specific to the pandemic virus A/H1N peptides, seasonal H1N1 peptides and seasonal H3N2 peptides were assessed using ELISPOT and flow cytometry. Results At baseline, 6.7% of the subjects had seroprotective antibody titers. The seroconversion rate was 48.3%, and the seroprotection rate was 66.7%. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) were significantly increased (from 6.8 to 64.9, p < 0.05). Forty-nine percent of the subjects had basal levels of specific IFN-γ-producing T cells to the pandemic A/H1N1 peptides that were unchanged post-vaccination. CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to specific pandemic A/H1N1 virus peptides was also unchanged; in contrast, the antigen-specific proliferation of CD8+ T cells significantly increased post-vaccination. Conclusion Our results indicate that a cellular immune response that is cross-reactive to pandemic influenza antigens may be present in populations exposed to the circulating seasonal influenza virus prior to pandemic or seasonal vaccination. Additionally, we found that the pandemic vaccine induced a

  8. The early epigenetic response to ozone: impacts on DNA ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Epigenetics have been increasingly recognized as a mechanism linking environment and gene expression. Despite awareness of the role of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation as potential drivers of the response to air pollutants, very little work has been performed investigating the direct epigenetic effects following exposure to ambient air pollution. Thus the purpose of this study was to investigate the early epigenetic response to ozone in comparison to the epigenetic modifier 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) in rats. 12 week old, male Long-Evans rats (n=16) were exposed to 4 hours of whole-body 1.0 ppm ozone or air and immediately euthanized. A subset of animals were additionally treated with 5-Aza (n=16) to serve as an epigenetic control to ozone exposure. Neither 5-Aza nor ozone by itself induced changes to the global methylome or hydroxmethylome of the lung measured by ELISA. Despite this finding, ozone exposure induced a significant increase in the activity of the DNA methyltransferase enzymes in the lung which was reversed with 5-Aza treatment. Interestingly, a significant interaction between 5-Aza treatment and ozone exposure was found in a large array of data. The interaction between 5-Aza and ozone produced indicators of pulmonary edema and elevated lung damage. Along with these adverse changes, expression of major epigenetic enzymes (Tet 1-3, Dnmt3 a-b) were found to be perturbed in both the lung and hepatic tissues. While ozone exposure appears to in

  9. Early response to therapy and survival in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schaar, C G; Kluin-Nelemans, J C; le Cessie, S; Franck, P F H; te Marvelde, M C; Wijermans, P W

    2004-04-01

    Whether the response to chemotherapy is a prognosticator in multiple myeloma (MM) is still not known. Therefore, the relationship between survival and the rate of monoclonal protein (M-protein) decrement during the first cycles of therapy was prospectively assessed in 262 patients with newly diagnosed MM that were included in a phase III trial (HOVON-16). M-proteins were collected monthly during melphalan-prednisone therapy (MP: melphalan 0.25 mg/kg, prednisone 1.0 mg/kg orally for 5 d every 4 weeks). Patients with light chain disease (n = 18), immunoglobulin M (IgM)-MM (n = 1) and no immunotyping (n = 1) were excluded. Of the 242 patients studied, 75% had IgG M-protein and 25% IgA; MM stages: I: 1%, II: 35% and III: 64%. The median M-protein decrease after the first cycle of MP was 21% for IgG and 27% for IgA, and declined to < 5% after four cycles. An obvious survival advantage was seen for patients who had an M-protein decrease of at least 30% after the first MP cycle, which became significant when an M-protein decrease of 40% or more was reached. As established prognostic parameters (Salmon & Durie stage, serum creatinine, and haemoglobin) also remained prognostically significant, we concluded that early response to MP predicts for survival in MM.

  10. Highly dynamic cellular-level response of symbiotic coral to a sudden increase in environmental nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Kopp, C; Pernice, M; Domart-Coulon, I; Djediat, C; Spangenberg, J E; Alexander, D T L; Hignette, M; Meziane, T; Meibom, A

    2013-05-14

    Metabolic interactions with endosymbiotic photosynthetic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium spp. are fundamental to reef-building corals (Scleractinia) thriving in nutrient-poor tropical seas. Yet, detailed understanding at the single-cell level of nutrient assimilation, translocation, and utilization within this fundamental symbiosis is lacking. Using pulse-chase (15)N labeling and quantitative ion microprobe isotopic imaging (NanoSIMS; nanoscale secondary-ion mass spectrometry), we visualized these dynamic processes in tissues of the symbiotic coral Pocillopora damicornis at the subcellular level. Assimilation of ammonium, nitrate, and aspartic acid resulted in rapid incorporation of nitrogen into uric acid crystals (after ~45 min), forming temporary N storage sites within the dinoflagellate endosymbionts. Subsequent intracellular remobilization of this metabolite was accompanied by translocation of nitrogenous compounds to the coral host, starting at ~6 h. Within the coral tissue, nitrogen is utilized in specific cellular compartments in all four epithelia, including mucus chambers, Golgi bodies, and vesicles in calicoblastic cells. Our study shows how nitrogen-limited symbiotic corals take advantage of sudden changes in nitrogen availability; this opens new perspectives for functional studies of nutrient storage and remobilization in microbial symbioses in changing reef environments. The methodology applied, combining transmission electron microscopy with nanoscale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) imaging of coral tissue labeled with stable isotope tracers, allows quantification and submicrometric localization of metabolic fluxes in an intact symbiosis. This study opens the way for investigations of physiological adaptations of symbiotic systems to nutrient availability and for increasing knowledge of global nitrogen and carbon biogeochemical cycling.

  11. Remnant Cholesterol Elicits Arterial Wall Inflammation and a Multilevel Cellular Immune Response in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bernelot Moens, Sophie J; Verweij, Simone L; Schnitzler, Johan G; Stiekema, Lotte C A; Bos, Merijn; Langsted, Anne; Kuijk, Carlijn; Bekkering, Siroon; Voermans, Carlijn; Verberne, Hein J; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Stroes, Erik S G; Kroon, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Mendelian randomization studies revealed a causal role for remnant cholesterol in cardiovascular disease. Remnant particles accumulate in the arterial wall, potentially propagating local and systemic inflammation. We evaluated the impact of remnant cholesterol on arterial wall inflammation, circulating monocytes, and bone marrow in patients with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (FD). Arterial wall inflammation and bone marrow activity were measured using 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Monocyte phenotype was assessed with flow cytometry. The correlation between remnant levels and hematopoietic activity was validated in the CGPS (Copenhagen General Population Study). We found a 1.2-fold increase of 18 F-FDG uptake in the arterial wall in patients with FD (n=17, age 60±8 years, remnant cholesterol: 3.26 [2.07-5.71]) compared with controls (n=17, age 61±8 years, remnant cholesterol 0.29 [0.27-0.40]; P <0.001). Monocytes from patients with FD showed increased lipid accumulation (lipid-positive monocytes: Patients with FD 92% [86-95], controls 76% [66-81], P =0.001, with an increase in lipid droplets per monocyte), and a higher expression of surface integrins (CD11b, CD11c, and CD18). Patients with FD also exhibited monocytosis and leukocytosis, accompanied by a 1.2-fold increase of 18 F-FDG uptake in bone marrow. In addition, we found a strong correlation between remnant levels and leukocyte counts in the CGPS (n=103 953, P for trend 5×10-276). In vitro experiments substantiated that remnant cholesterol accumulates in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells coinciding with myeloid skewing. Patients with FD have increased arterial wall and cellular inflammation. These findings imply an important inflammatory component to the atherogenicity of remnant cholesterol, contributing to the increased cardiovascular disease risk in patients with FD. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. OCT4B1 Regulates the Cellular Stress Response of Human Dental Pulp Cells with Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Huang, Rong; Yang, Ruiqi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Infection and apoptosis are combined triggers for inflammation in dental tissues. Octamer-binding transcription factor 4-B1 (OCT4B1), a novel spliced variant of OCT4 family, could respond to the cellular stress and possess antiapoptotic property. However, its specific role in dental pulpitis remains unknown. Methods. To investigate the effect of OCT4B1 on inflammation of dental pulp cells (DPCs), its expression in inflamed dental pulp tissues and DPCs was examined by in situ hybridization, real-time PCR, and FISH assay. OCT4B1 overexpressed DPCs model was established, confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence staining, and then stimulated with Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Apoptotic rate was determined by Hoechst/PI staining and FACS. Cell survival rate was calculated by CCK8 assay. Results. In situ hybridization, real-time PCR, and FISH assay revealed that OCT4B1 was extensively expressed in inflamed dental pulp tissues and DPCs with LPS stimulation. Western blot and immunofluorescence staining showed the expression of OCT4B1 and OCT4B increased after OCT4B1 transfection. Hoechst/PI staining and FACS demonstrated that less red/blue fluorescence was detected and apoptotic percentage decreased (3.45%) after transfection. CCK8 demonstrated that the survival rate of pCDH-OCT4B1-flag cells increased. Conclusions. OCT4B1 plays an essential role in inflammation and apoptosis of DPCs. OCT4B might operate synergistically with OCT4B1 to reduce apoptosis. PMID:28473980

  13. Cellular and Matrix Response of the Mandibular Condylar Cartilage to Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Eliane H.; O’ Brien, Mara H.; Lima, Alexandro; Kalajzic, Zana; Tadinada, Aditya; Nanda, Ravindra; Yadav, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cellular and matrix effects of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) on mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and subchondral bone. Materials and Methods Botox (0.3 unit) was injected into the right masseter of 5-week-old transgenic mice (Col10a1-RFPcherry) at day 1. Left side masseter was used as intra-animal control. The following bone labels were intraperitoneally injected: calcein at day 7, alizarin red at day 14 and calcein at day 21. In addition, EdU was injected 48 and 24 hours before sacrifice. Mice were sacrificed 30 days after Botox injection. Experimental and control side mandibles were dissected and examined by x-ray imaging and micro-CT. Subsequently, MCC along with the subchondral bone was sectioned and stained with tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), EdU, TUNEL, alkaline phosphatase, toluidine blue and safranin O. In addition, we performed immunohistochemistry for pSMAD and VEGF. Results Bone volume fraction, tissue density and trabecular thickness were significantly decreased on the right side of the subchondral bone and mineralized cartilage (Botox was injected) when compared to the left side. There was no significant difference in the mandibular length and condylar head length; however, the condylar width was significantly decreased after Botox injection. Our histology showed decreased numbers of Col10a1 expressing cells, decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in the subchondral bone and mandibular condylar cartilage, decreased TRAP activity and mineralization of Botox injected side cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, we observed reduced proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan distribution and decreased expression of pSMAD 1/5/8 and VEGF in the MCC of the Botox injected side in comparison to control side. Conclusion Injection of Botox in masseter muscle leads to decreased mineralization and matrix deposition, reduced chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and increased cell apoptosis in the

  14. Cellular Imaging With MRI.

    PubMed

    Makela, Ashley V; Murrell, Donna H; Parkins, Katie M; Kara, Jenna; Gaudet, Jeffrey M; Foster, Paula J

    2016-10-01

    Cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an evolving field of imaging with strong translational and research potential. The ability to detect, track, and quantify cells in vivo and over time allows for studying cellular events related to disease processes and may be used as a biomarker for decisions about treatments and for monitoring responses to treatments. In this review, we discuss methods for labeling cells, various applications for cellular MRI, the existing limitations, strategies to address these shortcomings, and clinical cellular MRI.

  15. Is the etiology of eosinophilic esophagitis in adults a response to allergy or reflux injury? Study of cellular proliferation markers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C J; Lamb, C A; Kanakala, V; Pritchard, S; Armstrong, G R; Attwood, S E A

    2009-01-01

    Recent research suggests that allergy may be the key factor in the etiology of eosinophilic esophagitis (EE); however, historically, the condition was hypothesized as related to reflux injury to the esophageal mucosa. We studied this hypothesis by comparing markers of inflammation and cellular proliferation in EE and reflux esophagitis. Lower esophageal biopsies of adult patients with EE (n = 10), reflux esophagitis (n = 8), and normal controls (n = 13) were assessed quantitatively for the expression of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, cellular proliferation, and oncogenic resistance to apoptosis using monoclonal antibodies for COX-2, Ki-67, and Bcl-2, respectively. Normal esophageal epithelium demonstrated weak diffuse uptake of COX-2 stain in the basal layer. No COX-2 expression was demonstrated in the EE group, significantly less than the control and reflux groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively). Cellular proliferation measured by Ki-67 expression was higher in EE and reflux compared with control (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Ki-67 expression, and thus degree of hyperplasia, appeared greater in EE than reflux, but was not statistically significant (P = 0.228). The degree of apoptosis was similar in all study groups. EE and reflux esophagitis are proliferative conditions expressing Ki-67 in higher concentrations than control. Mucosal proliferation in reflux esophagitis is COX-2 dependent. This novel research in EE has demonstrated downregulation of COX-2 expression compared with reflux esophagitis and control. We hypothesize that the allergy-related cytokine IL-13 known to inhibit COX-2 expression and found in high concentrations in EE as responsible for this. The pathogenesis of EE is likely dependent on allergy rather than reflux injury to the esophagus.

  16. Cellular response of loblolly pine to wound inoculation with bark beetle-associated fungi and chitosan

    Kier D. Klepzig; Charles H. Walkinshaw

    2003-01-01

    We inoculated loblolly pines with bark beetle-associated fungi and a fungal cell wall component, chitosan, known to induce responses in some pines and many other plants. Trees in Florida were inoculated with Leptographium procerum, L. terebrantis, Ophiostoma minus, or chitosan. Trees in Louisiana were inoculated with O. minus,...

  17. Cross reactive cellular immune responses in chickens previously exposed to low pathogenic avian influenza

    Avian influenza (AI) infection in poultry can result in high morbidity and mortality, and negatively affect international trade. Because most AI vaccines used for poultry are inactivated, our knowledge of immunity against AI is based largely on humoral immune responses. In fact, little is known abo...

  18. Cellular Immune Responses to Nine Mycobacterium tuberculosis Vaccine Candidates following Intranasal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Sable, Suraj B.; Cheruvu, Mani; Nandakumar, Subhadra; Sharma, Sunita; Bandyopadhyay, Kakali; Kellar, Kathryn L.; Posey, James E.; Plikaytis, Bonnie B.; Amara, Rama Rao; Shinnick, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccines that elicit a protective immune response in the lungs is important for the development of an effective vaccine against tuberculosis. Methods and Principal Findings In this study, a comparison of intranasal (i.n.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) vaccination with the BCG vaccine demonstrated that a single moderate dose delivered intranasally induced a stronger and sustained M. tuberculosis-specific T-cell response in lung parenchyma and cervical lymph nodes of BALB/c mice than vaccine delivered subcutaneously. Both BCG and a multicomponent subunit vaccine composed of nine M. tuberculosis recombinant proteins induced strong antigen-specific T-cell responses in various local and peripheral immune compartments. Among the nine recombinant proteins evaluated, the alanine proline rich antigen (Apa, Rv1860) was highly antigenic following i.n. BCG and immunogenic after vaccination with a combination of the nine recombinant antigens. The Apa-induced responses included induction of both type 1 and type 2 cytokines in the lungs as evaluated by ELISPOT and a multiplexed microsphere-based cytokine immunoassay. Of importance, i.n. subunit vaccination with Apa imparted significant protection in the lungs and spleen of mice against M. tuberculosis challenge. Despite observed differences in the frequencies and location of specific cytokine secreting T cells both BCG vaccination routes afforded comparable levels of protection in our study. Conclusion and Significance Overall, our findings support consideration and further evaluation of an intranasally targeted Apa-based vaccine to prevent tuberculosis. PMID:21799939

  19. Correlation of Cellular Immune Responses with Protection against Culture-Confirmed Influenza Virus in Young Children▿

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Bruce D.; Pride, Michael W.; Dunning, Andrew J.; Capeding, Maria Rosario Z.; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Tam, John S.; Rappaport, Ruth; Eldridge, John H.; Gruber, William C.

    2008-01-01

    The highly sensitive gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay permits the investigation of the role of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the protection of young children against influenza. Preliminary studies of young children confirmed that the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay was a more sensitive measure of influenza memory immune responses than serum antibody and that among seronegative children aged 6 to <36 months, an intranasal dose of 107 fluorescent focus units (FFU) of a live attenuated influenza virus vaccine (CAIV-T) elicited substantial CMI responses. A commercial inactivated influenza virus vaccine elicited CMI responses only in children with some previous exposure to related influenza viruses as determined by detectable antibody levels prevaccination. The role of CMI in actual protection against community-acquired, culture-confirmed clinical influenza by CAIV-T was investigated in a large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled dose-ranging efficacy trial with 2,172 children aged 6 to <36 months in the Philippines and Thailand. The estimated protection curve indicated that the majority of infants and young children with ≥100 spot-forming cells/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells were protected against clinical influenza, establishing a possible target level of CMI for future influenza vaccine development. The ELISPOT assay for IFN-γ is a sensitive and reproducible measure of CMI and memory immune responses and contributes to establishing requirements for the future development of vaccines against influenza, especially those used for children. PMID:18448618

  20. Differential regulation of striatal motor behavior and related cellular responses by dopamine D2L and D2S isoforms.

    PubMed

    Radl, Daniela; Chiacchiaretta, Martina; Lewis, Robert G; Brami-Cherrier, Karen; Arcuri, Ludovico; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2018-01-02

    The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) is a major component of the dopamine system. D2R-mediated signaling in dopamine neurons is involved in the presynaptic regulation of dopamine levels. Postsynaptically, i.e., in striatal neurons, D2R signaling controls complex functions such as motor activity through regulation of cell firing and heterologous neurotransmitter release. The presence of two isoforms, D2L and D2S, which are generated by a mechanism of alternative splicing of the Drd2 gene, raises the question of whether both isoforms may equally control presynaptic and postsynaptic events. Here, we addressed this question by comparing behavioral and cellular responses of mice with the selective ablation of either D2L or D2S isoform. We establish that the presence of either D2L or D2S can support postsynaptic functions related to the control of motor activity in basal conditions. On the contrary, absence of D2S but not D2L prevents the inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation and, thereby, of dopamine synthesis, supporting a major presynaptic role for D2S. Interestingly, boosting dopamine signaling in the striatum by acute cocaine administration reveals that absence of D2L, but not of D2S, strongly impairs the motor and cellular response to the drug, in a manner similar to the ablation of both isoforms. These results suggest that when the dopamine system is challenged, D2L signaling is required for the control of striatal circuits regulating motor activity. Thus, our findings show that D2L and D2S share similar functions in basal conditions but not in response to stimulation of the dopamine system.

  1. Alphavirus Replicon DNA Vectors Expressing Ebola GP and VP40 Antigens Induce Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shoufeng; Wei, Qimei; Cai, Liya; Yang, Xuejing; Xing, Cuicui; Tan, Feng; Leavenworth, Jianmei W.; Liang, Shaohui; Liu, Wenquan

    2018-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans, and no approved therapeutics or vaccine is currently available. Glycoprotein (GP) is the major protective antigen of EBOV, and can generate virus-like particles (VLPs) by co-expression with matrix protein (VP40). In this study, we constructed a recombinant Alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon vector DREP to express EBOV GP and matrix viral protein (VP40). EBOV VLPs were successfully generated and achieved budding from 293 cells after co-transfection with DREP-based GP and VP40 vectors (DREP-GP+DREP-VP40). Vaccination of BALB/c mice with DREP-GP, DREP-VP40, or DREP-GP+DREP-VP40 vectors, followed by immediate electroporation resulted in a mixed IgG subclass production, which recognized EBOV GP and/or VP40 proteins. This vaccination regimen also led to the generation of both Th1 and Th2 cellular immune responses in mice. Notably, vaccination with DREP-GP and DREP-VP40, which produces both GP and VP40 antigens, induced a significantly higher level of anti-GP IgG2a antibody and increased IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T-cell responses relative to vaccination with DREP-GP or DREP-VP40 vector alone. Our study indicates that co-expression of GP and VP40 antigens based on the SFV replicon vector generates EBOV VLPs in vitro, and vaccination with recombinant DREP vectors containing GP and VP40 antigens induces Ebola antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. This novel approach provides a simple and efficient vaccine platform for Ebola disease prevention. PMID:29375526

  2. Relative Roles of the Cellular and Humoral Responses in the Drosophila Host Defense against Three Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ju Hyun; Lee, Janice; Lafarge, Marie-Céline; Kocks, Christine; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Background Two NF-kappaB signaling pathways, Toll and immune deficiency (imd), are required for survival to bacterial infections in Drosophila. In response to septic injury, these pathways mediate rapid transcriptional activation of distinct sets of effector molecules, including antimicrobial peptides, which are important components of a humoral defense response. However, it is less clear to what extent macrophage-like hemocytes contribute to host defense. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to dissect the relative importance of humoral and cellular defenses after septic injury with three different Gram-positive bacteria (Micrococcus luteus, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus), we used latex bead pre-injection to ablate macrophage function in flies wildtype or mutant for various Toll and imd pathway components. We found that in all three infection models a compromised phagocytic system impaired fly survival – independently of concomitant Toll or imd pathway activation. Our data failed to confirm a role of the PGRP-SA and GNBP1 Pattern Recognition Receptors for phagocytosis of S. aureus. The Drosophila scavenger receptor Eater mediates the phagocytosis by hemocytes or S2 cells of E. faecalis and S. aureus, but not of M. luteus. In the case of M. luteus and E. faecalis, but not S. aureus, decreased survival due to defective phagocytosis could be compensated for by genetically enhancing the humoral immune response. Conclusions/Significance Our results underscore the fundamental importance of both cellular and humoral mechanisms in Drosophila immunity and shed light on the balance between these two arms of host defense depending on the invading pathogen. PMID:21390224

  3. Analysis of cellular and humoral immune responses against cytomegalovirus in patients with autoimmune Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Kine; Hellesen, Alexander; Husebye, Eystein S; Bratland, Eirik

    2016-03-09

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Variants of genes encoding immunologically important proteins such as the HLA molecules are strongly associated with AAD, but any environmental risk factors have yet to be defined. We hypothesized that primary or reactivating infections with cytomegalovirus (CMV) could represent an environmental risk factor in AAD, and that CMV specific CD8(+) T cell responses may be dysregulated, possibly leading to a suboptimal control of CMV. In particular, the objective was to assess the HLA-B8 restricted CD8(+) T cell response to CMV since this HLA class I variant is a genetic risk factor for AAD. To examine the CD8(+) T cell response in detail, we analyzed the HLA-A2 and HLA-B8 restricted responses in AAD patients and healthy controls seropositive for CMV antibodies using HLA multimer technology, IFN-γ ELISpot and a CD107a based degranulation assay. No differences between patients and controls were found in functions or frequencies of CMV-specific T cells, regardless if the analyses were performed ex vivo or after in vitro stimulation and expansion. However, individual patients showed signs of reactivating CMV infection correlating with poor CD8(+) T cell responses to the virus, and a concomitant upregulation of interferon regulated genes in peripheral blood cells. Several recently diagnosed AAD patients also showed serological signs of ongoing primary CMV infection. CMV infection does not appear to be a major environmental risk factor in AAD, but may represent a precipitating factor in individual patients.

  4. Controlled Breast Cancer Microarrays for the Deconvolution of Cellular Multilayering and Density Effects upon Drug Responses

    PubMed Central

    Håkanson, Maria; Kobel, Stefan; Lutolf, Matthias P.; Textor, Marcus; Cukierman, Edna; Charnley, Mirren

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence shows that the cancer microenvironment affects both tumorigenesis and the response of cancer to drug treatment. Therefore in vitro models that selectively reflect characteristics of the in vivo environment are greatly needed. Current methods allow us to screen the effect of extrinsic parameters such as matrix composition and to model the complex and three-dimensional (3D) cancer environment. However, 3D models that reflect characteristics of the in vivo environment are typically too complex and do not allow the separation of discrete extrinsic parameters. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we used a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel-based microwell array to model breast cancer cell behavior in multilayer cell clusters that allows a rigorous control of the environment. The innovative array fabrication enables different matrix proteins to be integrated into the bottom surface of microwells. Thereby, extrinsic parameters including dimensionality, type of matrix coating and the extent of cell-cell adhesion could be independently studied. Our results suggest that cell to matrix interactions and increased cell-cell adhesion, at high cell density, induce independent effects on the response to Taxol in multilayer breast cancer cell clusters. In addition, comparing the levels of apoptosis and proliferation revealed that drug resistance mediated by cell-cell adhesion can be related to altered cell cycle regulation. Conversely, the matrix-dependent response to Taxol did not correlate with proliferation changes suggesting that cell death inhibition may be responsible for this effect. Conclusions/Significance The application of the PEG hydrogel platform provided novel insight into the independent role of extrinsic parameters controlling drug response. The presented platform may not only become a useful tool for basic research related to the role of the cancer microenvironment but could also serve as a complementary platform for in

  5. Th1 stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani: comparative cellular and protective responses of rTriose phosphate isomerase, rProtein disulfide isomerase and rElongation factor-2 in combination with rHSP70 against visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Anil Kumar; Khare, Prashant; Joshi, Sumit; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the recovery from the disease is always associated with the generation of Th1-type of cellular responses. Based on this, we have previously identified several Th1-stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani -triose phosphate isomerase (TPI), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and elongation factor-2 (EL-2) etc. including heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) which induced Th1-type of cellular responses in both cured Leishmania patients/hamsters. Since, HSPs, being the logical targets for vaccines aimed at augmenting cellular immunity and can be early targets in the immune response against intracellular pathogens; they could be exploited as vaccine/adjuvant to induce long-term immunity more effectively. Therefore, in this study, we checked whether HSP70 can further enhance the immunogenicity and protective responses of the above said Th1-stimulatory proteins. Since, in most of the studies, immunogenicity of HSP70 of L. donovani was assessed in native condition, herein we generated recombinant HSP70 and tested its potential to stimulate immune responses in lymphocytes of cured Leishmania infected hamsters as well as in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cured patients of VL either individually or in combination with above mentioned recombinant proteins. rLdHSP70 alone elicited strong cellular responses along with remarkable up-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines and extremely lower level of IL-4 and IL-10. Among the various combinations, rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI emerged as superior one augmenting improved cellular responses followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2. These combinations were further evaluated for its protective potential wherein rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI again conferred utmost protection (∼80%) followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2 (∼75%) and generated a strong cellular immune response with significant increase in the levels of iNOS transcript as well as IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines which was further supported by the high level of IgG2 antibody

  6. Th1 Stimulatory Proteins of Leishmania donovani: Comparative Cellular and Protective Responses of rTriose Phosphate Isomerase, rProtein Disulfide Isomerase and rElongation Factor-2 in Combination with rHSP70 against Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Anil Kumar; Khare, Prashant; Joshi, Sumit; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the recovery from the disease is always associated with the generation of Th1-type of cellular responses. Based on this, we have previously identified several Th1-stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani -triose phosphate isomerase (TPI), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and elongation factor-2 (EL-2) etc. including heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) which induced Th1-type of cellular responses in both cured Leishmania patients/hamsters. Since, HSPs, being the logical targets for vaccines aimed at augmenting cellular immunity and can be early targets in the immune response against intracellular pathogens; they could be exploited as vaccine/adjuvant to induce long-term immunity more effectively. Therefore, in this study, we checked whether HSP70 can further enhance the immunogenicity and protective responses of the above said Th1-stimulatory proteins. Since, in most of the studies, immunogenicity of HSP70 of L. donovani was assessed in native condition, herein we generated recombinant HSP70 and tested its potential to stimulate immune responses in lymphocytes of cured Leishmania infected hamsters as well as in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cured patients of VL either individually or in combination with above mentioned recombinant proteins. rLdHSP70 alone elicited strong cellular responses along with remarkable up-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines and extremely lower level of IL-4 and IL-10. Among the various combinations, rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI emerged as superior one augmenting improved cellular responses followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2. These combinations were further evaluated for its protective potential wherein rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI again conferred utmost protection (∼80%) followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2 (∼75%) and generated a strong cellular immune response with significant increase in the levels of iNOS transcript as well as IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines which was further supported by the high level of IgG2 antibody

  7. Cellular responses to various levels of sustained delivery of testosterone in the ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Cavett, W; Tucci, M; Cason, Z; Lemos, L; England, B; Tsao, A; Benghuzzi, H

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of various dosages of testosterone (T) delivered in a sustained manner by means of tricalcium phosphate-lysine (TCPL) delivery system on morphological changes of prostatic tissue using adult male rats as a model. In this experiment, adult male rats (250-300 g BW) were randomly divided into five equal groups (n = 8). Rats in group I, II, and III were castrated and implanted subcutaneously with TCPL loaded with three different dosages (10, 100 and 200 mg T, respectively) of T. Rats in group IV were castrated and implanted with sharm TCPL capsules, and rats in group V served as intact unimplanted controls. Surgical aseptic techniques were performed according to standard laboratory procedures. At the end of 4 and 12 weeks post implantation, four animals from each group were sacrificed and the prostate tissues were collected, weighted, and embedded for histo-pathological evaluations. Data collected from this study have shown that exogenous intake of T delivered in a sustained manner for twelve weeks induced several pathophysiological conditions in ventral prostatic tissue in comparison to the control and sham operated groups. This phenomenon was found to be directly proportional to the dose or the level of sustained delivery. The results demonstrated that the use of 10 mg filled TCPL implants decreased the total mass weight of ventral prostate. Light microscopic evaluation of this group (Group I) revealed a cellular adaptation through an atrophy in the epithelium component. Cytopathological observations such as low cuboidal and thin glands, pleomorphism, and occasional presence of connective tissue stroma were detected. In contrast, ventral prostate collected from animals implanted with TCPL filled with 200 mg T (Group III) showed a significant increase in weights of the wet prostatic tissues in comparison to all groups. Histopathological evaluations demonstrated the following. (i) prostatic hypertrophy alone, or in

  8. BK virus-specific T cells for use in cellular therapy show specificity to multiple antigens and polyfunctional cytokine responses.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Emily; Clancy, Leighton; Simms, Renee; Gaundar, Shivashni; O'Connell, Philip; Micklethwaite, Kenneth; Gottlieb, Dav