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Sample records for early colorectal cancer

  1. [Early flat colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Castelletto, R H; Chiarenza, C; Ottino, A; Garay, M L

    1991-01-01

    We report three cases of flat early colorectal carcinoma which were detected during the examination of 51 surgical specimens of colorectal resection. Two of them were endoscopically diagnosed, but the smallest one was not seen in the luminal instrumental examination. From the bibliographic analysis and our own experience we deduce the importance of flat lesions in the development of early colorectal carcinoma, either originated from pre-existent adenoma or de novo. Flat variants of adenoma, and presumably flush or depressed ones, must be considered as important factors in the early sequence adenoma-cancer. An appropriate endoscopic equipment with employment of additional staining techniques (such as carmine indigo and methylene blue) and the correct investigation during inflation-deflation procedures facilitates the identification of small lesions, their eradication and prevention from advanced forms of colorectal carcinoma.

  2. Colorectal Cancer: The Importance of Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer The Importance of Early Detection Past Issues / Summer ... Cancer of the colon or rectum is called colorectal cancer. The colon and the rectum are part of ...

  3. Total colonoscopy detects early colorectal cancer more frequently than advanced colorectal cancer in patients with fecal occult blood.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Takuji; Tokunaga, Akira; Chihara, Naoto; Yoshino, Masanori; Bou, Hideki; Ogata, Masao; Watanabe, Masanori; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Uchida, Eiji

    2010-08-01

    The efficacy of total colonoscopy following a positive result of the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) for the early detection of colorectal cancer and polyps was evaluated. A total of 1,491 patients with positive FOBT results underwent total colonoscopy at the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nippon Medical School, Musashi Kosugi Hospital, from April 2002 through July 2009. Abnormalities were found in 1,312 of the 1,491 patients (88.0%). Ninety-six of the 1,491 patients (6.4%) were found to have early cancer, but 59 patients (4.0%) were found to have advanced cancer. The early cancers were treated with endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection in 81 patients, with laparoscopy-assisted colectomy in 10 patients, and with open surgery in 5 patients. Fifty-one of the 59 patients with advanced colorectal cancer underwent conventional open surgery, and 8 patients underwent laparoscopic surgery. The cancers detected were more likely to be early cancers than advanced cancers. In addition to malignancies, other abnormalities found included inner or external hemorrhoids, diverticula of the colon, ulcerative colitis, ischemic colitis, infectious colitis, and colorectal polyps. Our results show that a high percentage of lesions detected with total colonoscopy following a positive FOBT result are early colorectal cancers and polyps.

  4. Evaluation of a 5-Marker Blood Test for Colorectal Cancer Early Detection in a Colorectal Cancer Screening Setting.

    PubMed

    Werner, Simone; Krause, Friedemann; Rolny, Vinzent; Strobl, Matthias; Morgenstern, David; Datz, Christian; Chen, Hongda; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    In initial studies that included colorectal cancer patients undergoing diagnostic colonoscopy, we had identified a serum marker combination able to detect colorectal cancer with similar diagnostic performance as fecal immunochemical test (FIT). In this study, we aimed to validate the results in participants of a large colorectal cancer screening study conducted in the average-risk, asymptomatic screening population. We tested serum samples from 1,200 controls, 420 advanced adenoma patients, 4 carcinoma in situ patients, and 36 colorectal cancer patients with a 5-marker blood test [carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)+anti-p53+osteopontin+seprase+ferritin]. The diagnostic performance of individual markers and marker combinations was assessed and compared with stool test results. AUCs for the detection of colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas with the 5-marker blood test were 0.78 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.68-0.87] and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.53-0.59), respectively, which now is comparable with guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT) but inferior to FIT. With cutoffs yielding specificities of 80%, 90%, and 95%, the sensitivities for the detection of colorectal cancer were 64%, 50%, and 42%, and early-stage cancers were detected as well as late-stage cancers. For osteopontin, seprase, and ferritin, the diagnostic performance in the screening setting was reduced compared with previous studies in diagnostic settings while CEA and anti-p53 showed similar diagnostic performance in both settings. Performance of the 5-marker blood test under screening conditions is inferior to FIT even though it is still comparable with the performance of gFOBT. CEA and anti-p53 could contribute to the development of a multiple marker blood-based test for early detection of colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  6. Future Directions for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Avery S.; Johnson, Eric K.; Maykel, Justin A.; Stojadinovic, Alex; Nissan, Aviram; Brucher, Bjorn; Champagne, Bradley J.; Steele, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical resection remains a mainstay of treatment and is highly effective for localized colorectal cancer. However, ~30-40% of patients develop recurrence following surgery and 40-50% of recurrences are apparent within the first few years after initial surgical resection. Several variables factor into the ultimate outcome of these patients, including the extent of disease, tumor biology, and patient co-morbidities. Additionally, the time from initial treatment to the development of recurrence is strongly associated with overall survival, particularly in patients who recur within one year of their surgical resection. Current post-resection surveillance strategies involve physical examination, laboratory, endoscopic and imaging studies utilizing various high and low-intensity protocols. Ultimately, the goal is to detect recurrence as early as possible, and ideally in the asymptomatic localized phase, to allow initiation of treatment that may still result in cure. While current strategies have been effective, several efforts are evolving to improve our ability to identify recurrent disease at its earliest phase. Our aim with this article is to briefly review the options available and, more importantly, examine emerging and future options to assist in the early detection of colon and rectal cancer recurrence. PMID:24790655

  7. Is early-onset microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer a hallmark of a genetic susceptibility syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kets, C M; van Krieken, J H J M; van Erp, P E J; Feuth, T; Jacobs, Y H A; Brunner, H G; Ligtenberg, M J L; Hoogerbrugge, N

    2008-02-15

    Most colorectal cancers show either microsatellite or chromosomal instability. A subset of colorectal cancers, especially those diagnosed at young age, is known to show neither of these forms of genetic instability and thus might have a distinct pathogenesis. Colorectal cancers diagnosed at young age are suggestive for hereditary predisposition. We investigate whether such early-onset microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancers are a hallmark of a genetic susceptibility syndrome. The ploidy status of microsatellite stable (familial) colorectal cancers of patients diagnosed before age 50 (n = 127) was analyzed in relation to the histopathological characteristics and family history. As a control the ploidy status of sporadic colorectal cancer, with normal staining of mismatch repair proteins, diagnosed at the age of 69 years or above (n = 70) was determined. A diploid DNA content was used as a marker for chromosomal stability. Within the group of patients with (familial) early onset microsatellite stable colorectal cancer the chromosomally stable tumors did not differ from chromosomally unstable tumors with respect to mean age at diagnosis, fulfillment of Amsterdam criteria or pathological characteristics. Segregation analysis did not reveal any family with microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer in 2 relatives. The prevalence of microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer was not significantly different for the early and late onset group (28 and 21%, respectively). We find no evidence that early-onset microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer is a hallmark of a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Mathematical models for the early detection and treatment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Harper, P R; Jones, S K

    2005-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of death for men and women in the Western world. When the cancer is detected through an awareness of the symptoms by a patient, typically it is at an advanced stage. It is possible to detect cancer at an early stage through screening and the marked differences in survival for early and late stages provide the incentive for the primary prevention or early detection of colorectal cancer. This paper considers mathematical models for colorectal cancer screening together with models for the treatment of patients. Illustrative results demonstrate that detailed attention to the processes involved in diseases, interventions and treatment enable us to combine data and expert knowledge from various sources. Thus a detailed operational model is a very useful tool in helping to make decisions about screening at national and local levels.

  9. COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Ernst J.; Grady, William M.; Lieberman, David; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sung, Joseph J.; Boelens, Petra G.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer had a low incidence several decades ago. However, it has become a predominant cancer and now accounts for approximately 10% of cancer-related mortality in western countries. The ‘rise’ of colorectal cancer in developed countries can be attributed to the increasingly ageing population, unfavourable modern dietary habits and an increase in risk factors such as smoking, low physical exercise and obesity. New treatments for primary and metastatic colorectal cancer have emerged, providing additional options for patients; these treatments include laparoscopic surgery for primary disease, more-aggressive resection of metastatic disease (such as liver and pulmonary metastases), radiotherapy for rectal cancer and neoadjuvant and palliative chemotherapies. However, these new treatment options have had limited impact on cure rates and long-term survival. For these reasons, and the recognition that colorectal cancer is long preceded by a polypoid precursor, screening programmes have gained momentum. This Primer provides an overview of the current state of art knowledge on the epidemiology and mechanisms of colorectal cancer, as well as on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27189416

  10. [Colonoscopy for early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Niv, Yaron

    2010-08-01

    Colonoscopy has a limited success in the prevention of colorectal cancer of the right colon. Thus, there is place for improvement. The potential reasons for colonoscopy failure are the different biology of polyps on the right side of the colon or procedure quality. Preparation, withdrawal time, detection of all polyps and their removal using the best technique will overcome this problem. Furthermore, the implementation of a computerized database and report that includes quality assurance fields, will improve colonoscopy success rates.

  11. Label-free visualization of collagen in submucosa as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jingting; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Guan, Guoxian; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    The collagen signature in colorectal submucosa is changed due to remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the malignant process and plays an important role in noninvasive early detection of human colorectal cancer. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to monitor the changes of collagen in normal colorectal submucosa (NCS) and cancerous colorectal submucosa (CCS). What's more, the collagen content was quantitatively measured. It was found that in CCS the morphology of collagen becomes much looser and the collagen content is significantly reduced compared to NCS. These results suggest that MPM has the ability to provide collagen signature as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of colorectal cancer.

  12. Advance in plasma SEPT9 gene methylation assay for colorectal cancer early detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Pei-Min; Liu, Rong-Bin

    2018-01-01

    This review article summarizes the research advances of the plasma-based SEPT9 gene methylation assay for the clinical detection of colorectal cancer and its limitations. Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy with a poor prognosis and a high mortality, for which early detection and diagnosis are particularly crucial for the high-risk groups. Increasing evidence supported that SEPT9 gene methylation is associated with the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and that detecting the level of methylation of SEPT9 in the peripheral blood can be used for screening of colorectal cancer in susceptible populations. In recent years, the data obtained in clinical studies demonstrated that the SEPT9 gene methylation assay has a good diagnostic performance with regard to both sensitivity and specificity with the advantage of better acceptability, convenience and compliance with serological testing compared with fecal occult blood tests and carcinoembryonic antigen for colorectal cancer (CRC). Furthermore, the combination of multiple methods or markers has become a growing trend for CRC detection and screening. Nevertheless, the clinical availability of the methylated SEPT9 assay is still limited because of the large degree of sample heterogeneity caused by demographic characteristics, pathological features, comorbidities and/or technique selection. Another factor is the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening strategies that hinders its large-scale application. In addition, improvements in its accuracy in detecting adenomas and premalignant polyps are required. PMID:29375744

  13. Advance in plasma SEPT9 gene methylation assay for colorectal cancer early detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Pei-Min; Liu, Rong-Bin

    2018-01-15

    This review article summarizes the research advances of the plasma-based SEPT9 gene methylation assay for the clinical detection of colorectal cancer and its limitations. Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy with a poor prognosis and a high mortality, for which early detection and diagnosis are particularly crucial for the high-risk groups. Increasing evidence supported that SEPT9 gene methylation is associated with the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and that detecting the level of methylation of SEPT9 in the peripheral blood can be used for screening of colorectal cancer in susceptible populations. In recent years, the data obtained in clinical studies demonstrated that the SEPT9 gene methylation assay has a good diagnostic performance with regard to both sensitivity and specificity with the advantage of better acceptability, convenience and compliance with serological testing compared with fecal occult blood tests and carcinoembryonic antigen for colorectal cancer (CRC). Furthermore, the combination of multiple methods or markers has become a growing trend for CRC detection and screening. Nevertheless, the clinical availability of the methylated SEPT9 assay is still limited because of the large degree of sample heterogeneity caused by demographic characteristics, pathological features, comorbidities and/or technique selection. Another factor is the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening strategies that hinders its large-scale application. In addition, improvements in its accuracy in detecting adenomas and premalignant polyps are required.

  14. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. The number ... new colorectal cancer cases and the number of deaths from colorectal cancer are both decreasing a little ...

  15. Detection of early primary colorectal cancer with upconversion luminescent NP-based molecular probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyan; Qi, Yifei; Qiao, Ruirui; Hou, Yi; Chan, Kaying; Li, Ziqian; Huang, Jiayi; Jing, Lihong; Du, Jun; Gao, Mingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Early detection and diagnosis of cancers is extremely beneficial for improving the survival rate of cancer patients and molecular imaging techniques are believed to be relevant for offering clinical solutions. Towards early cancer detection, we developed a primary animal colorectal cancer model and constructed a tumor-specific imaging probe by using biocompatible NaGdF4:Yb,Er@NaGdF4 upconversion luminescent NPs for establishing a sensitive early tumor imaging method. The primary animal tumor model, which can better mimic the human colorectal cancer, was built upon continual administration of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in Kunming mice and the tumor development was carefully monitored through histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses to reveal the pathophysiological processes and molecular features of the cancer microenvironment. The upconversion imaging probe was constructed through covalent coupling of PEGylated core-shell NPs with folic acid whose receptor is highly expressed in the primary tumors. Upon 980 nm laser excitation, the primary colorectal tumors in the complex abdominal environment were sensitively imaged owing to the ultralow background of the upconversion luminescence and the high tumor-targeting specificity of the nanoprobe. We believe that the current studies provide a highly effective and potential approach for early colorectal cancer diagnosis and tumor surgical navigation.Early detection and diagnosis of cancers is extremely beneficial for improving the survival rate of cancer patients and molecular imaging techniques are believed to be relevant for offering clinical solutions. Towards early cancer detection, we developed a primary animal colorectal cancer model and constructed a tumor-specific imaging probe by using biocompatible NaGdF4:Yb,Er@NaGdF4 upconversion luminescent NPs for establishing a sensitive early tumor imaging method. The primary animal tumor model, which can better mimic the human colorectal cancer, was built upon continual

  16. Label-free nanoplasmonic sensing of tumor-associate autoantibodies for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Soler, Maria; Estevez, M-Carmen; Villar-Vazquez, Roi; Casal, J Ignacio; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-08-03

    Colorectal cancer is treatable and curable when detected at early stages. However there is a lack of less invasive and more specific screening and diagnosis methods which would facilitate its prompt identification. Blood circulating autoantibodies which are immediately produced by the immune system at tumor appearance have become valuable biomarkers for preclinical diagnosis of cancer. In this work, we present the rapid and label-free detection of colorectal cancer autoantibodies directly in blood serum or plasma using a recently developed nanoplasmonic biosensor. Our nanoplasmonic device offers sensitive and real-time quantification of autoantibodies with excellent selectivity and reproducibility, achieving limits of detection around 1 nM (150-160 ng mL(-1)). A preliminary evaluation of clinical samples of colorectal cancer patients has shown good correlation with ELISA. These results demonstrate the reliability of the nanobiosensor strategy and pave the way towards the achievement of a sensitive diagnostic tool for early detection of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigations in the possibility of early detection of colorectal cancer by gas chromatography/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kawana, Shuichi; Unno, Yumi; Sakai, Takero; Okamoto, Koji; Yamada, Yasuhide; Sudo, Kazuki; Yamaji, Taiki; Saito, Yutaka; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Okita, Natsuko Tsuda; Saito, Hiroshi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Azuma, Takeshi; Ojima, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    In developed countries, the number of patients with colorectal cancer has been increasing, and colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death. To improve the quality of life of colorectal cancer patients, it is necessary to establish novel screening methods that would allow early detection of colorectal cancer. We performed metabolome analysis of a plasma sample set from 282 stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer patients and 291 healthy volunteers using gas chromatography/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry in an attempt to identify metabolite biomarkers of stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer. The colorectal cancer patients included patients with stage 0 (N=79), I (N=80), and II (N=123) in whom invasion and metastasis were absent. Our analytical system detected 64 metabolites in the plasma samples, and the levels of 29 metabolites differed significantly (Bonferroni-corrected p=0.000781) between the patients and healthy volunteers. Based on these results, a multiple logistic regression analysis of various metabolite biomarkers was carried out, and a stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer prediction model was established. The area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity values of this model for detecting stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer were 0.996, 99.3%, and 93.8%, respectively. The model's sensitivity and specificity values for each disease stage were >90%, and surprisingly, its sensitivity for stage 0, specificity for stage 0, and sensitivity for stage II disease were all 100%. Our predictive model can aid early detection of colorectal cancer and has potential as a novel screening test for cases of colorectal cancer that do not involve lymph node or distant metastasis. PMID:28179577

  18. Investigations in the possibility of early detection of colorectal cancer by gas chromatography/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nishiumi, Shin; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kawana, Shuichi; Unno, Yumi; Sakai, Takero; Okamoto, Koji; Yamada, Yasuhide; Sudo, Kazuki; Yamaji, Taiki; Saito, Yutaka; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Okita, Natsuko Tsuda; Saito, Hiroshi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Azuma, Takeshi; Ojima, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Masaru

    2017-03-07

    In developed countries, the number of patients with colorectal cancer has been increasing, and colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death. To improve the quality of life of colorectal cancer patients, it is necessary to establish novel screening methods that would allow early detection of colorectal cancer. We performed metabolome analysis of a plasma sample set from 282 stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer patients and 291 healthy volunteers using gas chromatography/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry in an attempt to identify metabolite biomarkers of stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer. The colorectal cancer patients included patients with stage 0 (N=79), I (N=80), and II (N=123) in whom invasion and metastasis were absent. Our analytical system detected 64 metabolites in the plasma samples, and the levels of 29 metabolites differed significantly (Bonferroni-corrected p=0.000781) between the patients and healthy volunteers. Based on these results, a multiple logistic regression analysis of various metabolite biomarkers was carried out, and a stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer prediction model was established. The area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity values of this model for detecting stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer were 0.996, 99.3%, and 93.8%, respectively. The model's sensitivity and specificity values for each disease stage were >90%, and surprisingly, its sensitivity for stage 0, specificity for stage 0, and sensitivity for stage II disease were all 100%. Our predictive model can aid early detection of colorectal cancer and has potential as a novel screening test for cases of colorectal cancer that do not involve lymph node or distant metastasis.

  19. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  20. EARLY AND LATE COMPLICATIONS AMONG LONG-TERM COLORECTAL CANCER SURVIVORS WITH OSTOMY OR ANASTOMOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liyan; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Grant, Marcia; Krouse, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Among long-term (≥5 years) colorectal cancer survivors with permanent ostomy or anastomosis, we compared the incidence of medical and surgical complications and examined the relationship of complications with health-related quality of life. Background The incidence and effects of complications on long-term health-related quality of life among colorectal cancer survivors are not adequately understood. Methods Participants (284 ostomy/395 anastomosis) were long-term colorectal cancer survivors enrolled in an integrated health plan. Health-related quality of life was assessed via mailed survey questionnaire in 2002–2005. Information on colorectal cancer, surgery, co-morbidities, and complications was obtained from computerized data and analyzed using survival analysis and logistic regression. Results Ostomy and anastomosis survivors were followed an average 12.1 and 11.2 years, respectively. Within 30 days of surgery, 19% of ostomy and 10% of anastomosis survivors experienced complications (p<0.01). From 31 days on, the percentages were 69% and 67% (after adjustment, p<0.001). Bleeding and post-operative infection were common early complications. Common long-term complications included hernia, urinary retention, hemorrhage, skin conditions, and intestinal obstruction. Ostomy was associated with long-term fistula (odds ratio 5.4; 95% CI 1.4–21.2), and among ostomy survivors, fistula was associated with reduced health-related quality of life (p<0.05). Conclusions Complication rates remain high despite recent advances in surgical treatment methods. Survivors with ostomy have more complications early in their survivorship period, but complications among anastomosis survivors catch up after 20 years, when the two groups have convergent complication rates. Among colorectal cancer survivors with ostomy, fistula has especially important implications for health-related quality of life. PMID:20087096

  1. Early and late complications among long-term colorectal cancer survivors with ostomy or anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyan; Herrinton, Lisa J; Hornbrook, Mark C; Wendel, Christopher S; Grant, Marcia; Krouse, Robert S

    2010-02-01

    Among long-term (>or=5 y) colorectal cancer survivors with permanent ostomy or anastomosis, we compared the incidence of medical and surgical complications and examined the relationship of complications with health-related quality of life. The incidence and effects of complications on long-term health-related quality of life among colorectal cancer survivors are not adequately understood. Participants (284 survivors with ostomies and 395 survivors with anastomoses) were long-term colorectal cancer survivors enrolled in an integrated health plan. Health-related quality of life was assessed via mailed survey questionnaires from 2002 to 2005. Information on colorectal cancer, surgery, comorbidities, and complications was obtained from computerized data and analyzed by use of survival analysis and logistic regression. Ostomy and anastomosis survivors were followed up for an average of 12.1 and 11.2 years, respectively. Within 30 days of surgery, 19% of ostomy survivors and 10% of anastomosis survivors experienced complications (P < .01). From 31 days on, the percentages were 69% and 67% (after adjustment, P < .001). Bleeding and postoperative infection were common early complications. Common long-term complications included hernia, urinary retention, hemorrhage, skin conditions, and intestinal obstruction. Ostomy was associated with long-term fistula (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% CI 1.4-21.2), and among ostomy survivors, fistula was associated with reduced health-related quality of life (P < .05). Complication rates remain high despite recent advances in methods of surgical treatment. Survivors with ostomy have more complications early in their survivorship period, but complications among anastomosis survivors catch up after 20 years, when the 2 groups have convergent complication rates. Among colorectal cancer survivors with ostomy, fistula has especially important implications for health-related quality of life.

  2. Early skin toxicity predicts better outcomes, and early tumor shrinkage predicts better response after cetuximab treatment in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, T; Doi, A; Shimokawa, M; Fouad, T M; Osuga, T; Tamura, F; Mizushima, T; Kimura, T; Abe, S; Ihara, H; Kukitsu, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yoshizaki, N; Hirayama, M; Sasaki, T; Kawarada, Y; Kitashiro, S; Okushiba, S; Kondo, H; Tsuji, Y

    2015-03-01

    Cetuximab-containing treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer have been shown to have higher overall response rates and longer progression-free and overall survival than other systemic therapies. Cetuximab-related manifestations, including severe skin toxicity and early tumor shrinkage, have been shown to be predictors of response to cetuximab. We hypothesized that early skin toxicity is a predictor of response and better outcomes in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. We retrospectively evaluated 62 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma who had unresectable tumors and were treated with cetuximab in our institution. Skin toxicity grade was evaluated on each treatment day. Tumor size was evaluated using computed tomography prior to treatment and 4-8 weeks after the start of treatment with cetuximab.Patients with early tumor shrinkage after starting treatment with cetuximab had a significantly higher overall response rate (P = 0.0001). Patients with early skin toxicity showed significantly longer overall survival (P = 0.0305), and patients with higher skin toxicity grades had longer progression-free survival (P = 0.0168).We have shown that early tumor shrinkage, early onset of skin toxicity, and high skin toxicity grade are predictors of treatment efficacy and/or outcome in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma treated with cetuximab.

  3. Downregulation of serum metabolite GTA-446 as a novel potential marker for early detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hata, Tsuyoshi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2017-07-11

    We previously reported that GTA-446 may be a useful biomarker for early detection of colorectal cancer. In the present study, we confirmed the clinical feasibility of GTA-446 as a screening tool for colorectal cancer with a novel measurement system developed for clinical use. We also improved sensitivity by analysing GTA-446 levels according to gender. Serum samples were collected from 225 colorectal cancer patients and 916 healthy volunteers to measure GTA-446 levels by flow injection analysis-mass spectrometry. GTA-446 levels were downregulated in colorectal cancer patients compared with the healthy volunteers, and in females compared with the males in both groups. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed an optimal cut-off of 2.72 μmol l -1 in males and 1.87 μmol l -1 in females, with a large area under the curve of 0.89-0.93. The sensitivity and specificity were 90.4% and 84.9% for males, 85.2% and 80.5% for females, and 83.3% and 84.8% for all subjects, respectively. GTA-446 is a clinically relevant biomarker for colorectal cancer with high sensitivity when analysed by gender. Thus, GTA-446 is a promising tool for primary colorectal cancer screening to identify populations at a higher risk of colorectal cancer, with an emphasis on early detection.

  4. A Novel Method to Detect Early Colorectal Cancer Based on Chromosome Copy Number Variation in Plasma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun-Feng; Kang, Qian; Ma, Xing-Yong; Pan, Yuan-Ming; Yang, Lang; Jin, Peng; Wang, Xin; Li, Chen-Guang; Chen, Xiao-Chen; Wu, Chao; Jiao, Shao-Zhuo; Sheng, Jian-Qiu

    2018-01-01

    Colonoscopy screening has been accepted broadly to evaluate the risk and incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) during health examination in outpatients. However, the intrusiveness, complexity and discomfort of colonoscopy may limit its application and the compliance of patients. Thus, more reliable and convenient diagnostic methods are necessary for CRC screening. Genome instability, especially copy-number variation (CNV), is a hallmark of cancer and has been proved to have potential in clinical application. We determined the diagnostic potential of chromosomal CNV at the arm level by whole-genome sequencing of CRC plasma samples (n = 32) and healthy controls (n = 38). Arm level CNV was determined and the consistence of arm-level CNV between plasma and tissue was further analyzed. Two methods including regular z score and trained Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier were applied for detection of colorectal cancer. In plasma samples of CRC patients, the most frequent deletions were detected on chromosomes 6, 8p, 14q and 1p, and the most frequent amplifications occurred on chromosome 19, 5, 2, 9p and 20p. These arm-level alterations detected in plasma were also observed in tumor tissues. We showed that the specificity of regular z score analysis for the detection of colorectal cancer was 86.8% (33/38), whereas its sensitivity was only 56.3% (18/32). Applying a trained SVM classifier (n = 40 in trained group) as the standard to detect colorectal cancer relevance ratio in the test samples (n = 30), a sensitivity of 91.7% (11/12) and a specificity 88.9% (16/18) were finally reached. Furthermore, all five early CRC patients in stages I and II were successfully detected. Trained SVM classifier based on arm-level CNVs can be used as a promising method to screen early-stage CRC. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. APC hypermethylation for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Hong-Xu; Zheng, Yan-Yan; Cao, Ying-Qing; Wu, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Xin; Dong, Shu-Xiao

    2017-07-11

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) promoter hypermethylation has been frequently observed in colorectal cancer (CRC). The association between APC promoter methylation and clinicopathological significance in CRC is under investigation. We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the significance of APC methylation in CRC. The study included a total of 24 articles and 2025 CRC patients. The frequency of APC promoter hypermethylation was significantly higher in colorectal adenoma than in normal colorectal tissue, OR was 5.76, 95% CI, 2.45-13.56; p<0.0001, I2=0%. APC promoter more frequently hypermethylated in CRC stage I compared to normal colorectal tissue, OR was 13.42, 95% CI, 3.66-49.20; p<0.0001, I2=31%. The risk of incidence of CRC was significantly correlated to APC promoter hypermethylation, pooled OR was 9.80, 95%CI, 6.07-15.81; p<0.00001, I2=43%. APC methylation was not associated with grade, stage of CRC as well as tumor location, patients' gender, and smoking behavior. The results indicate that APC promoter hypermethylation is an early event in carcinogenesis of CRC, could be a valuable diagnostic marker for early-stage CRC. APC methylation is not significantly associated with overall survival in patients with CRC. APC is a potential drug target for development of personalized treatment.

  6. Quality of life of early stage colorectal cancer patients in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Mrabti, Hind; Amziren, Mounia; ElGhissassi, Ibrahim; Bensouda, Youssef; Berrada, Narjiss; Abahssain, Halima; Boutayeb, Saber; El Fakir, Samira; Nejjari, Chakib; Benider, Abdellatif; Mellas, Nawfel; El Mesbahi, Omar; Bennani, Maria; Bekkali, Rachid; Zidouh, Ahmed; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-10-12

    A multicentre cohort study was held in Morocco, designed to evaluate the quality of life of cancer patients. The aim of this paper is to report the assessment of the quality of life of early colorectal cancer patients, before and after cancer treatment, to identify other factors which are related to this quality of life. We used the third version of the QLQ-C30 questionnaire of the European organization for Research and treatment of Cancer (EORTC) after a transcultural validation. The Data collection was done at inclusion and then every twelve weeks to achieve one year of follow up. Overall 294 patients presented with early colorectal cancer, the median age was 56 years (range: 21-88). The male-female sex ratio was 1.17. At inclusion, the global health status was the most affected functional dimension. For symptoms: financial difficulties and fatigue scores were the highest ones. Emotional and social functions were significantly worse in rectal cancer. Most symptoms were more present in rectal cancer. At inclusion, global health status score was significantly worse in stage III. Anorexia was significantly more important among colorectal female patients. For Patients over 70 years-old, the difference was statistically significant for the physical function item which was lower. Overall, Functional dimensions scores were improved after chemotherapy. The symptoms scores did not differ significantly for patients treated by radiotherapy, between inclusion and at one year. Our EORTC QLQ C30 scores are overall comparable to the reference values. Neither chemotherapy, nor radiotherapy worsened the quality of life at one year.

  7. POLE and POLD1 screening in 155 patients with multiple polyps and early-onset colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Giménez-Zaragoza, David; Muñoz, Jenifer; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Álvarez-Barona, Miriam; Ocaña, Teresa; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Carballal, Sabela; López-Cerón, María; Marti-Solano, Maria; Díaz-Gay, Marcos; van Wezel, Tom; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Balmaña, Judith; Gonzalo, Victoria; Llort, Gemma; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Aligué, Rosa; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2017-01-01

    Germline mutations in POLE and POLD1 have been shown to cause predisposition to colorectal multiple polyposis and a wide range of neoplasms, early-onset colorectal cancer being the most prevalent. In order to find additional mutations affecting the proofreading activity of these polymerases, we sequenced its exonuclease domain in 155 patients with multiple polyps or an early-onset colorectal cancer phenotype without alterations in the known hereditary colorectal cancer genes. Interestingly, none of the previously reported mutations in POLE and POLD1 were found. On the other hand, among the genetic variants detected, only two of them stood out as putative pathogenic in the POLE gene, c.1359 + 46del71 and c.1420G > A (p.Val474Ile). The first variant, detected in two families, was not proven to alter correct RNA splicing. Contrarily, c.1420G > A (p.Val474Ile) was detected in one early-onset colorectal cancer patient and located right next to the exonuclease domain. The pathogenicity of this change was suggested by its rarity and bioinformatics predictions, and it was further indicated by functional assays in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This is the first study to functionally analyze a POLE genetic variant outside the exonuclease domain and widens the spectrum of genetic changes in this DNA polymerase that could lead to colorectal cancer predisposition. PMID:28423643

  8. Occult Blood Testing for Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer: Diagnostic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, T. Gregory; Morrison, Brenda J.; Hoogewerf, Peter E.; Burns, Sheilagh D.; Sizto, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Three thousand five hundred and fifty-four asymptomatic persons from 32 family practices returned hemoccult II tests for colorectal cancer; 2.2% of these returned tests were positive. The diagnoses for the 47 persons with positive tests which were done while on meat restriction included six cancers (1.7/1000) and five polyps (1.4/1000); 18 were diagnosed with other known sources, and 18 were undiagnosed. All polyps and four of six cancers were diagnosed by combined barium enema with sigmoidoscopy or by colonoscopy. Five of six cancers were diagnosed at early stages. Meat restriction, the method of returning the test for analysis, the number of holes completed in the test, and the delay time from completing the test to analysis did not influence the likelihood of a positive test. PMID:20469468

  9. Germline TP53 Mutations in Patients With Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer in the Colon Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Yurgelun, Matthew B.; Masciari, Serena; Joshi, Victoria A.; Mercado, Rowena C.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Gallinger, Steven; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Haile, Robert W.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Syngal, Sapna

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Li-Fraumeni syndrome, usually characterized by germline TP53 mutations, is associated with markedly elevated lifetime risks of multiple cancers, and has been linked to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal cancer. OBJECTIVE To examine the frequency of germline TP53 alterations in patients with early-onset colorectal cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This was a multicenter cross-sectional cohort study of individuals recruited to the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) from 1998 through 2007 (genetic testing data updated as of January 2015). Both population-based and clinic-based patients in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand were recruited to the CCFR. Demographic information, clinical history, and family history data were obtained at enrollment. Biospecimens were collected from consenting probands and families, including microsatellite instability and DNA mismatch repair immunohistochemistry results. A total of a 510 individuals diagnosed as having colorectal cancer at age 40 years or younger and lacking a known hereditary cancer syndrome were identified from the CCFR as being potentially eligible. Fifty-three participants were excluded owing to subsequent identification of germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (n = 47) or biallelic MUTYH mutations (n = 6). INTERVENTIONS Germline sequencing of the TP53 gene was performed. Identified TP53 alterations were assessed for pathogenicity using literature and international mutation database searches and in silico prediction models. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Frequency of nonsynonymous germline TP53 alterations. RESULTS Among 457 eligible participants (314, population-based; 143, clinic-based; median age at diagnosis, 36 years [range, 15–40 years]), 6 (1.3%; 95%CI, 0.5%–2.8%) carried germline missense TP53 alterations, none of whom met clinical criteria for Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Four of the identified TP53 alterations have been previously described in the literature

  10. Early Colorectal Cancer Detected by Machine Learning Model Using Gender, Age, and Complete Blood Count Data.

    PubMed

    Hornbrook, Mark C; Goshen, Ran; Choman, Eran; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen; Kinar, Yaron; Liles, Elizabeth G; Rust, Kristal C

    2017-10-01

    Machine learning tools identify patients with blood counts indicating greater likelihood of colorectal cancer and warranting colonoscopy referral. To validate a machine learning colorectal cancer detection model on a US community-based insured adult population. Eligible colorectal cancer cases (439 females, 461 males) with complete blood counts before diagnosis were identified from Kaiser Permanente Northwest Region's Tumor Registry. Control patients (n = 9108) were randomly selected from KPNW's population who had no cancers, received at ≥1 blood count, had continuous enrollment from 180 days prior to the blood count through 24 months after the count, and were aged 40-89. For each control, one blood count was randomly selected as the pseudo-colorectal cancer diagnosis date for matching to cases, and assigned a "calendar year" based on the count date. For each calendar year, 18 controls were randomly selected to match the general enrollment's 10-year age groups and lengths of continuous enrollment. Prediction performance was evaluated by area under the curve, specificity, and odds ratios. Area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for detecting colorectal cancer was 0.80 ± 0.01. At 99% specificity, the odds ratio for association of a high-risk detection score with colorectal cancer was 34.7 (95% CI 28.9-40.4). The detection model had the highest accuracy in identifying right-sided colorectal cancers. ColonFlag ® identifies individuals with tenfold higher risk of undiagnosed colorectal cancer at curable stages (0/I/II), flags colorectal tumors 180-360 days prior to usual clinical diagnosis, and is more accurate at identifying right-sided (compared to left-sided) colorectal cancers.

  11. [Aspirin and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Grancher, Adrien; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Sefrioui, David

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. Aspirin has been identified as a protective factor against the apparition of colorectal cancer. There are several mechanisms about the actions by aspirin on colorectal tumorogenesis. These are not perfectly known nowadays. On one hand, there are direct mechanisms on colorectal mucosa, on the other hand there are indirect mechanisms through platelet functions. Aspirin also plays a role by its anti-inflammatory action and the stimulation of antitumor immunity. Several studies show that long-term treatment with low-doses of aspirin decreases the incidence of adenomas and colorectal cancers. In the United States, aspirin is currently recommended for primary prevention of the risk of colorectal cancer in all patients aged 50 to 59, with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular event greater than 10 %. However, primary prevention with aspirin should not be a substitute for screening in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, aspirin seems to be beneficial when used in post-diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It could actually decrease the risk of metastasis in case of a localized colorectal cancer, and increase the survival in particular, concerning PIK3CA mutated tumors. The association of aspirin with neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer by radiochimiotherapy seems to have beneficial effects. French prospective randomized study is currently being conducted to investigate postoperative aspirin in colorectal cancers with a PIK3CA mutation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Importance of histological evaluation in endoscopic resection of early colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Naohisa; Naito, Yuji; Yagi, Nobuaki; Yanagisawa, Akio

    2012-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria for colonic intraepithelial tumors vary from country to country. While intramucosal adenocarcinoma is recognized in Japan, in Western countries adenocarcinoma is diagnosed only if the tumor invades to the submucosa and accesses the muscularis mucosae. However, endoscopic therapy, including endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), is used worldwide to treat adenoma and early colorectal cancer. Precise histopathological evaluation is important for the curativeness of these therapies as inappropriate endoscopic therapy causes local recurrence of the tumor that may develop into fatal metastasis. Therefore, colorectal ESD and EMR are not indicated for cancers with massive submucosal invasion. However, diagnosis of cancer with massive submucosal invasion by endoscopy is limited, even when magnifying endoscopy for pit pattern and narrow band imaging and flexible spectral imaging color of enhancement are performed. Therefore, occasional cancers with massive submucosal invasion will be treated by ESD and EMR. Precise histopathological evaluation of these lesions should be performed in order to determine the necessity of additional therapy, including surgical resection. PMID:22532932

  13. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  14. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ross, C C

    1988-12-01

    Efforts to decrease the number of deaths from colorectal cancer have focused on screening techniques, since no etiologic agent has been identified. Current screening regimens are designed to detect colorectal cancer in a large population in a cost-efficient manner and to minimize the risks associated with work-ups for false-positive tests. A two-part screening questionnaire for colorectal cancer helps identify patients who are at moderate risk for this cancer.

  15. The utility of abbreviated patient-reported outcomes for predicting survival in early stage colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tina; Speers, Caroline H; Kennecke, Hagen F; Cheung, Winson Y

    2017-05-15

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly used in clinical settings. Prior research suggests that PROs collected at baseline may be associated with cancer survival, but most of those studies were conducted in patients with breast or lung cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between prospectively collected PROs and cancer-specific outcomes in patients with early stage colorectal cancer. Patients who had newly diagnosed stage II or III colorectal cancer from 2009 to 2010 and had a consultation at the British Columbia Cancer Agency completed the brief Psychosocial Screen for Cancer (PSSCAN) questionnaire, which collects data on patients' perceived social supports, quality of life (QOL), anxiety and depression, and general health. PROs from the PSSCAN were linked with the Gastrointestinal Cancers Outcomes Database, which contains information on patient and tumor characteristics, treatment details, and cancer outcomes. Cox regression models were constructed for overall survival (OS), and Fine and Gray regression models were developed for disease-specific survival (DSS). In total, 692 patients were included. The median patient age was 67 years (range, 26-95 years), and the majority had colon cancer (61%), were diagnosed with stage III disease (54%), and received chemotherapy (58%). In general, patients felt well supported and reported good overall health and QOL. On multivariate analysis, increased fatigue was associated with worse OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.99; P = .00007) and DSS (HR, 1.63; P = .03), as was lack of emotional support (OS: HR, 4.36; P = .0003; DSS: HR, 1.92; P = .02). Although most patients described good overall health and QOL and indicated that they were generally well supported, patients who experienced more pronounced fatigue or lacked emotional support had a higher likelihood of worse OS and DSS. These findings suggest that abbreviated PROs can inform and assist clinicians to identify patients who have a worse

  16. Early detection of colorectal cancer relapse by infrared spectroscopy in ``normal'' anastomosis tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Ahmad; Sebbag, Gilbert; Argov, Shmuel; Mordechai, Shaul; Sahu, Ranjit K.

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers usually occurring in people above the age of 50 years. In the United States, colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer. The American Cancer Society has estimated 96,830 new cases of colon cancer and 40,000 new cases of rectal cancer in 2014 in the United States. According to the literature, up to 55% of colorectal cancer patients experience a recurrence within five years from the time of surgery. Relapse of colorectal cancer has a deep influence on the quality of patient life. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. Abnormalities in the colonic crypts, which are not detectable using standard histopathological methods, could be determined using IR spectroscopic methods. The IR measurements were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tissues from eight patients (one control, four local recurrences, three distant recurrences). A total of 128 crypts were measured. Our results showed the possibility of differentiating among control, local, and distant recurrence crypts with more than a 92% success rate using spectra measured from the crypts' middle sites.

  17. Prevalence and Spectrum of Germline Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations Among Patients With Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pearlman, Rachel; Frankel, Wendy L.; Swanson, Benjamin; Zhao, Weiqiang; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Miller, Kristin; Bacher, Jason; Bigley, Christopher; Nelsen, Lori; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Paskett, Electra; Shields, Peter G.; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Stanich, Peter P; Lattimer, Ilene; Arnold, Mark; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Kalady, Matthew; Heald, Brandie; Greenwood, Carla; Paquette, Ian; Prues, Marla; Draper, David J.; Lindeman, Carolyn; Kuebler, J. Philip; Reynolds, Kelly; Brell, Joanna M.; Shaper, Amy A.; Mahesh, Sameer; Buie, Nicole; Weeman, Kisa; Shine, Kristin; Haut, Mitchell; Edwards, Joan; Bastola, Shyamal; Wickham, Karen; Khanduja, Karamjit S.; Zacks, Rosemary; Pritchard, Colin C.; Shirts, Brian H.; Jacobson, Angela; Allen, Brian; de la Chapelle, Albert; Hampel, Heather

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Hereditary cancer syndromes infer high cancer risks and require intensive cancer surveillance, yet the prevalence and spectrum of these conditions among unselected patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) is largely undetermined. OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and spectrum of cancer susceptibility gene mutations among patients with early-onset CRC. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Overall, 450 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer younger than 50 years were prospectively accrued from 51 hospitals into the Ohio Colorectal Cancer Prevention Initiative from January 1, 2013, to June 20, 2016. Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency was determined by microsatellite instability and/or immunohistochemistry. Germline DNA was tested for mutations in 25 cancer susceptibility genes using next-generation sequencing. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Mutation prevalence and spectrum in patients with early-onset CRC was determined. Clinical characteristics were assessed by mutation status. RESULTS In total 450 patients younger than 50 years were included in the study, and 75 gene mutations were found in 72 patients (16%). Forty-eight patients (10.7%) had MMR-deficient tumors, and 40 patients (83.3%) had at least 1 gene mutation: 37 had Lynch syndrome (13, MLH1 [including one with constitutional MLH1 methylation]; 16, MSH2; 1, MSH2/monoallelic MUTYH; 2, MSH6; 5, PMS2); 1 patient had the APC c.3920T>A, p.I1307K mutation and a PMS2 variant; 9 patients (18.8%) had double somatic MMR mutations (including 2 with germline biallelic MUTYH mutations); and 1 patient had somatic MLH1 methylation. Four hundred two patients (89.3%) had MMR-proficient tumors, and 32 patients (8%) had at least 1 gene mutation: 9 had mutations in high-penetrance CRC genes (5, APC; 1, APC/PMS2; 2, biallelic MUTYH; 1, SMAD4); 13 patients had mutations in high- or moderate-penetrance genes not traditionally associated with CRC (3, ATM; 1, ATM/CHEK2; 2, BRCA1; 4, BRCA2; 1, CDKN2A; 2, PALB2); 10

  18. The biological complexity of colorectal cancer: insights into biomarkers for early detection and personalized care

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Marina; Rega, Daniela; Costabile, Valeria; Duraturo, Francesca; Niglio, Antonello; Izzo, Paola; Pace, Ugo; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been ranked the third and second most prevalent of all cancers in men and women, respectively, and it represents the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths. In 2012, there were 1.4 million estimated cases of colorectal cancer worldwide, and 700,000 estimated deaths, which implies significant impact on public health, especially in economically-developed countries. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of tumors, although this has been accompanied by decreased mortality, due to more appropriate and available information, earlier diagnosis, and improvements in treatment. Colorectal cancers are characterized by great genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, including tumor microenvironment and interactions between healthy and cancer cells. All of these traits confer a unique peculiarity to each tumor, which can thus be considered as an individual disease. Well conducted molecular and clinical characterization of each colorectal cancer is essential with a view to the implementation of precision oncology, and thus personalized care. This last aims at standardization of therapeutic plans chosen according to the genetic background of each specific neoplasm, to increase overall survival and reduce treatment side effects. Thus, prognostic and predictive molecular biomarkers assume a critical role in the characterization of colorectal cancer and in the determination of the most appropriate therapy. PMID:27803741

  19. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood test Sigmoidoscopy Colonoscopy Virtual colonoscopy DNA stool test Studies have shown that screening for colorectal cancer using ... decrease the risk of dying from cancer. Scientists study screening tests to find those with the fewest risks and ...

  20. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    MedlinePlus

    ... 11/12/2014 Risk Calculator About the Tool Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors Download SAS and Gauss Code Page ... Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps Cancer Risk Prediction Resources Update November ...

  1. Chemoprevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Michaela; Gasche, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has become one of the most prevalent malignant diseases for both men and women. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or certain inherited cancer syndromes are at extremely high risk of developing colorectal cancer and have naturally the highest need for cancer prevention. In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome most of the underlying germline mutations can be detected by DNA sequencing, and medical counselling of affected individuals involves both surveillance tests and chemopreventive measures. However, as the mechanisms leading to colorectal cancer differ in these high risk groups, the molecular action of chemopreventive drugs needs to be adjusted to the certain pathway of carcinogenesis. In the last decades a number of drugs have been tested, including sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib, and mesalazine, but some of them are still controversially discussed. This review summarizes the advances and current standards of colorectal cancer prevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, FAP and Lynch syndrome. PMID:25531498

  2. Potential of fecal microbiota for early-stage detection of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Georg; Tap, Julien; Voigt, Anita Y; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Kultima, Jens Roat; Costea, Paul I; Amiot, Aurélien; Böhm, Jürgen; Brunetti, Francesco; Habermann, Nina; Hercog, Rajna; Koch, Moritz; Luciani, Alain; Mende, Daniel R; Schneider, Martin A; Schrotz-King, Petra; Tournigand, Christophe; Tran Van Nhieu, Jeanne; Yamada, Takuji; Zimmermann, Jürgen; Benes, Vladimir; Kloor, Matthias; Ulrich, Cornelia M; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Sobhani, Iradj; Bork, Peer

    2014-01-01

    Several bacterial species have been implicated in the development of colorectal carcinoma (CRC), but CRC-associated changes of fecal microbiota and their potential for cancer screening remain to be explored. Here, we used metagenomic sequencing of fecal samples to identify taxonomic markers that distinguished CRC patients from tumor-free controls in a study population of 156 participants. Accuracy of metagenomic CRC detection was similar to the standard fecal occult blood test (FOBT) and when both approaches were combined, sensitivity improved > 45% relative to the FOBT, while maintaining its specificity. Accuracy of metagenomic CRC detection did not differ significantly between early- and late-stage cancer and could be validated in independent patient and control populations (N = 335) from different countries. CRC-associated changes in the fecal microbiome at least partially reflected microbial community composition at the tumor itself, indicating that observed gene pool differences may reveal tumor-related host–microbe interactions. Indeed, we deduced a metabolic shift from fiber degradation in controls to utilization of host carbohydrates and amino acids in CRC patients, accompanied by an increase of lipopolysaccharide metabolism. PMID:25432777

  3. Molecular approach to genetic and epigenetic pathogenesis of early-onset colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tezcan, Gulcin; Tunca, Berrin; Ak, Secil; Cecener, Gulsah; Egeli, Unal

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer type and the incidence of this disease is increasing gradually per year in individuals younger than 50 years old. The current knowledge is that early-onset CRC (EOCRC) cases are heterogeneous population that includes both hereditary and sporadic forms of the CRC. Although EOCRC cases have some distinguishing clinical and pathological features than elder age CRC, the molecular mechanism underlying the EOCRC is poorly clarified. Given the significance of CRC in the world of medicine, the present review will focus on the recent knowledge in the molecular basis of genetic and epigenetic mechanism of the hereditary forms of EOCRC, which includes Lynch syndrome, Familial CRC type X, Familial adenomatous polyposis, MutYH-associated polyposis, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome and sporadic forms of EOCRC. Recent findings about molecular genetics and epigenetic basis of EOCRC gave rise to new alternative therapy protocols. Although exact diagnosis of these cases still remains complicated, the present review paves way for better predictions and contributes to more accurate diagnostic and therapeutic strategies into clinical approach. PMID:26798439

  4. Systematic genomic identification of colorectal cancer genes delineating advanced from early clinical stage and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The initial assessment of colorectal cancer involves clinical staging that takes into account the extent of primary tumor invasion, determining the number of lymph nodes with metastatic cancer and the identification of metastatic sites in other organs. Advanced clinical stage indicates metastatic cancer, either in regional lymph nodes or in distant organs. While the genomic and genetic basis of colorectal cancer has been elucidated to some degree, less is known about the identity of specific cancer genes that are associated with advanced clinical stage and metastasis. Methods We compiled multiple genomic data types (mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation status) as well as clinical meta-data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We used an elastic-net regularized regression method on the combined genomic data to identify genetic aberrations and their associated cancer genes that are indicators of clinical stage. We ranked candidate genes by their regression coefficient and level of support from multiple assay modalities. Results A fit of the elastic-net regularized regression to 197 samples and integrated analysis of four genomic platforms identified the set of top gene predictors of advanced clinical stage, including: WRN, SYK, DDX5 and ADRA2C. These genetic features were identified robustly in bootstrap resampling analysis. Conclusions We conducted an analysis integrating multiple genomic features including mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation. This integrated approach in which one considers all of these genomic features performs better than any individual genomic assay. We identified multiple genes that robustly delineate advanced clinical stage, suggesting their possible role in colorectal cancer metastatic progression. PMID:24308539

  5. Early Adoption of a Multitarget Stool DNA Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Finney Rutten, Lila J; Jacobson, Robert M; Wilson, Patrick M; Jacobson, Debra J; Fan, Chun; Kisiel, John B; Sweetser, Seth; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M; St Sauver, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    To characterize early adoption of a novel multitarget stool DNA (MT-sDNA) screening test for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and to test the hypothesis that adoption differs by demographic characteristics and prior CRC screening behavior and proceeds predictably over time. We used the Rochester Epidemiology Project research infrastructure to assess the use of the MT-sDNA screening test in adults aged 50 to 75 years living in Olmsted County, Minnesota, in 2014 and identified 27,147 individuals eligible or due for screening colonoscopy from November 1, 2014, through November 30, 2015. We used electronic Current Procedure Terminology and Health Care Common Procedure codes to evaluate early adoption of the MT-sDNA screening test in this population and to test whether early adoption varies by age, sex, race, and prior CRC screening behavior. Overall, 2193 (8.1%) and 974 (3.6%) individuals were screened by colonoscopy and MT-sDNA, respectively. Age, sex, race, and prior CRC screening behavior were significantly and independently associated with MT-sDNA screening use compared with colonoscopy use after adjustment for all other variables (P<.05 for all). The rates of adoption of MT-sDNA screening increased over time and were highest in those aged 50 to 54 years, women, whites, and those who had a history of screening. The use of the MT-sDNA screening test varied predictably by insurance coverage. The rates of colonoscopy decreased over time, whereas overall CRC screening rates remained steady. The results of the present study are generally consistent with predictions derived from prior research and the diffusion of innovation framework, pointing to increasing use of the new screening test over time and early adoption by younger patients, women, whites, and those with prior CRC screening. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Early Adoption of a Multi-target Stool DNA Test for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Finney Rutten, Lila J.; Jacobson, Robert M.; Wilson, Patrick M.; Jacobson, Debra J.; Fan, Chun; Kisiel, John B.; Sweetser, Seth R.; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To characterize early adoption of a novelmulti-target stool deoxyribonucleic acid (MTsDNA) screening test for colorectal cancer (CRC) and test the hypothesis that adoption differs by demographic characteristics, prior CRC screening behavior, and proceeds predictably over time. Patients and Methods We used the Rochester Epidemiology Project infrastructure to assess MTsDNA screening test use among adults aged 50–75 years, and identified 27,147 individuals eligible/due for screening colonoscopy from November 1, 2014 through November 30, 2015, and living in Olmsted County, Minnesota in2014. We used electronic Current Procedure Terminology and Health Care Common Procedure codes to evaluate early adoption of MTsDNA screening test in this population and to test whether early adoption varies by age, sex, race, and prior screening behavior. Results Overall, 2,193 (8.1%) and 974 (3.6%) of individuals were screened by colonoscopy and MT-sDNA, respectively. Age, sex, race, and prior screening were significantly and independently associated with MT-sDNA screening use compared to colonoscopy use after adjustment for all other variables. Rates of adoption of MTsDNA screening increased over time and were highest among those aged 50–54 years, females, whites, and had a prior history of screening. MT-sDNA screening use varied predictably by insurance coverage. Rates of colonoscopy decreased over time, while overall CRC screening rates remained steady. Conclusion Our results are generally consistent with predictions derived from prior research and Diffusion of Innovation framework, pointing to increasing use of the new screening test over time, and early adoption by younger patients, females, whites and those with prior CRC screening. PMID:28473037

  7. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test.

  8. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial Etiologic and Early Marker Studies (EEMS), 2016 Winter Review Cycle Has New Website | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial Etiologic and Early Marker Studies (EEMS) has a new application process for specimen requests. Researchers planning to submit a grant application in response to the Funding Opportunity Announcement PAR-15-297 must use a new website to submit applications. |

  9. Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer Recurrence in Patients Undergoing Surgery with Curative Intent: Current Status and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Young, Patrick. E.; Womeldorph, Craig M.; Johnson, Eric K.; Maykel, Justin A.; Brucher, Bjorn; Stojadinovic, Alex; Avital, Itzhak; Nissan, Aviram; Steele, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy, attention to proper surgical technique, and improved pathological staging for both the primary and metastatic lesions, almost half of all colorectal cancer patients will develop recurrent disease. More concerning, this includes ~25% of patients with theoretically curable node-negative, non-metastatic Stage I and II disease. Given the annual incidence of colorectal cancer, approximately 150,000 new patients are candidates each year for follow-up surveillance. When combined with the greater population already enrolled in a surveillance protocol, this translates to a tremendous number of patients at risk for recurrence. It is therefore imperative that strategies aim for detection of recurrence as early as possible to allow initiation of treatment that may still result in cure. Yet, controversy exists regarding the optimal surveillance strategy (high-intensity vs. traditional), ideal testing regimen, and overall effectiveness. While benefits may involve earlier detection of recurrence, psychological welfare improvement, and greater overall survival, this must be weighed against the potential disadvantages including more invasive tests, higher rates of reoperation, and increased costs. In this review, we will examine the current options available and challenges surrounding colorectal cancer surveillance and early detection of recurrence. PMID:24790654

  10. Advances in Hereditary Colorectal and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Germansky, Katharine A.; Yurgelun, Matthew B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Innovations in genetic medicine have lead to improvements in the early detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer for patients with inherited risks of gastrointestinal cancer, particularly hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. Methods This review provides an update on recent data and key advances that have improved the identification, understanding, and management of patients with hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. Findings This review details recent and emerging data that highlight the developing landscape of genetics in hereditary colorectal and pancreatic cancer risk. A summary is provided of the current state-of-the-art practices for identifying, evaluating, and managing patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer risk. The impact of next-generation sequencing technologies in the clinical diagnosis of hereditary gastrointestinal cancer and also in discovery efforts of novel genes linked to familial cancer risk are discussed. Emerging targeted therapies that may play a particularly important role in the treatment of patients with hereditary forms of colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer are also reviewed. Current approaches for pancreatic cancer screening and the psychosocial impact of such procedures are also detailed. Implications Given the availability of novel diagnostic, risk-reducing, and therapeutic strategies that exist for patients with hereditary risk for colorectal or pancreatic cancer, it is imperative that clinicians be vigilant about evaluating patients for hereditary cancer syndromes. Continuing to advance genetics research in hereditary gastrointestinal cancers will allow for more progress to be made in personalized medicine and prevention. PMID:27045993

  11. Rurality and Other Determinants of Early Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis in Nebraska: A 6-Year Cancer Registry Study, 1998-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankaranarayanan, Jayashri; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Sun, Junfeng; Qiu, Fang; Boilesen, Eugene; Thorson, Alan G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There are no studies of rurality, and other determinants of colorectal cancer (CRC) stage at diagnosis with population-based data from the Midwest. Methods: This retrospective study identified, incident CRC patients, aged 19 years and older, from 1998-2003 Nebraska Cancer Registry (NCR) data. Using federal Office of Management and…

  12. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-In; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Se Hyung; Hong, Sung Noh; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Suck-Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Hyo Jong; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Now colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in males and the fourth most common cancer in females in Korea. Since most of colorectal cancers occur after the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are one of the most effective methods to prevent colorectal cancer. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish Korean guideline for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The guideline was developed by the Korean Multi-Society Take Force and we tried to establish the guideline by evidence-based methods. Parts of the statements were draw by systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Herein we discussed epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea and optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations. PMID:22741131

  13. Randomized trial of subfascial infusion of ropivacaine for early recovery in laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Go Eun; Kim, Hee Cheol; Jun, Joo Hyun; Lee, Jin Young; Shin, Byung-Seop; Yoo, Heejin; Jung, Sin-Ho; Kim, Joungyoun; Lee, Seung Hyeon; Yo, Deok Kyu; Na, Yu Ri

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a need for investigating the analgesic method as part of early recovery after surgery tailored for laparoscopic colorectal cancer (LCRC) surgery. In this randomized trial, we aimed to investigate the analgesic efficacy of an inverse ‘v’ shaped bilateral, subfascial ropivacaine continuous infusion in LCRC surgery. Methods Forty two patients undergoing elective LCRC surgery were randomly allocated to one of two groups to receive either 0.5% ropivacaine continuous infusion at the subfascial plane (n = 20, R group) or fentanyl intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IV PCA) (n = 22, F group) for postoperative 72 hours. The primary endpoint was the visual analogue scores (VAS) when coughing at postoperative 24 hours. Secondary end points were the VAS at 1, 6, 48, and 72 hours, time to first flatus, time to first rescue meperidine requirement, rescue meperidine consumption, length of hospital stay, postoperative nausea and vomiting, sedation, hypotension, dizziness, headache, and wound complications. Results The VAS at rest and when coughing were similar between the groups throughout the study. The time to first gas passage and time to first rescue meperidine at ward were significantly shorter in the R group compared to the F group (P = 0.010). Rescue meperidine was administered less in the R group; however, without statistical significance. Other study parameters were not different between the groups. Conclusions Ropivacaine continuous infusion with an inverse ‘v ’ shaped bilateral, subfascial catheter placement showed significantly enhanced bowel recovery and analgesic efficacy was not different from IV PCA in LCRC surgery. PMID:27924202

  14. Early onset of colorectal cancer in a 13-year-old girl with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Do Hee; Rho, Jung Hee; Tchah, Hann; Jeon, In-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common inherited colon cancer syndrome. Patients with Lynch syndrome develop a range of cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC) and carry a mutation on one of the mismatched repair (MMR) genes. Although CRC usually occurs after the fourth decade in patients with Lynch syndrome harboring a heterozygous MMR gene mutation, it can occur in children with Lynch syndrome who have a compound heterozygous or homozygous MMR gene mutation. We report a case of CRC in a 13-year-old patient with Lynch syndrome and congenital heart disease. This patient had a heterozygous mutation in MLH1 (an MMR gene), but no compound MMR gene defects, and a K-RAS somatic mutation in the cancer cells.

  15. Meat and colo-rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hill, M J

    1999-05-01

    In early epidemiological studies of diet and cancer the stress was on the search for causal factors. Population (ecological) studies tended to show a strong correlation between meat intake, particularly red meat, and the risk of colo-rectal cancer. They also tended to show meat to be strongly inversely correlated with cancers of the stomach and oesophagus and liver. Early case-control studies tended to support the postulated role for red meat in colo-rectal carcinogenesis, although more recent case-control studies, particularly those from Europe, have tended to show no relationship. The cohort studies in general failed to detect any relationship between meat intake and colo-rectal cancer risk. The available evidence points to the intake of protective factors such as vegetables and whole-grain cereals being the main determinants of colo-rectal cancer risk, with meat intake only coincidentally related.

  16. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  17. Breast, Cervical, and Colorectal Cancers - Early Detection Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  18. Adenomas - Genetic factors in colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Witold, Kycler; Anna, Kubiak; Maciej, Trojanowski; Jakub, Janowski

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common type of cancer both in Europe and Poland. During the last 30 years more than a 3-fold increase has been observed in Poland due to environmental and genetic factors. Almost all colorectal malignancies are related to the formation and malignant transformation of colorectal dysplasia and adenoma. Efforts aiming to decrease the number of colorectal cancer deaths are focused on the disease early detection. Genetic diagnosis for hereditary syndromes predisposing to colorectal cancer has been developed and is a part of the routine treatment. Most cancers are sporadic. They often develop from polyps in the colon. In addition to the genetic events described in the 1990s, showing the adenoma transformation into carcinoma that has been a prime example of malignant transformation for a long time, there are also other possibilities of neoplastic transformation. The recognition of colorectal cancer risk factors make sense as their nature is lifestyle- and diet-related. In this review paper those risk factors are presented and the prevention of colorectal cancer is discussed taking into account genetic factors.

  19. Radiology of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pijl, M E J; Chaoui, A S; Wahl, R L; van Oostayen, J A

    2002-05-01

    In the past 20 years, the radiology of colorectal cancer has evolved from the barium enema to advanced imaging modalities like phased array magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), virtual colonoscopy and positron emission tomography (PET). Nowadays, primary rectal cancers are preferably imaged with transrectal ultrasound or MRI, while barium enema is still the most often used technique for imaging of colonic cancers. Virtual colonoscopy is rapidly evolving and might considerably change the imaging of colorectal cancer in the near future. The use of virtual colonoscopy for screening purposes and imaging of the colon in occlusive cancer or incomplete colonoscopies is currently under evaluation. The main role of PET is in detecting tumour recurrences, both locally and distantly. Techniques to fuse cross-sectional anatomical (computer tomography (CT) and MRI) and functional (PET) images are being developed. Apart from diagnostic imaging, the radiologists has added image-guided minimally invasive treatments of colorectal liver metastases to their arsenal. The radio-frequency ablation technique is now widely available, and can be used during laparotomy or percutaneously in selected cases.

  20. [Future of laparoscopy in colorectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Grotowski, Maciej

    2004-07-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been associated with less postoperative pain, an early return of bowel function, a shorter period of hospitalization and disability, and better cosmetic results. In the past decade laparoscopic techniques are increasingly being applied to colorectal surgical procedures. Diagnostic laparoscopy, the creation of stomas, and limited resections are becoming reasonable indications for benign diseases. However, the application of laparoscopic techniques to the curative resection of colorectal cancer is still controversial, owing to reports of cancer recurrence at the port site wounds. Port-site recurrence remains a leading concern regarding the widespread acceptance of laparoscopic resection for colorectal carcinoma. The last reports has presented that with careful technique, training and experience wound recurrences are rarely seen, suggesting that this phenomenon is primarily technique and advanced cancer stages related. The final results of the large randomized prospective studies may well determine the role of laparoscopy for colorectal cancer in the near future.

  1. Early life body fatness and risk of colorectal cancer in US women and men – results from two large cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Ma, Jing; Colditz, Graham A.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Willett, Walter C.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Nimptsch, Katharina; Ogino, Shuji; Wei, Esther K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between body fatness before adulthood and later risk of colorectal cancer remains unclear. We hypothesized that, independent of adult body fatness, early life body fatness would be associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. Methods We assessed body fatness during childhood and adolescence using a validated 9-level somatotype and inquired body weight in young adulthood in the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We used Cox proportional hazard regression modeling to estimate relative risks (RRs, 95% CIs) adjusting for adult body mass index (BMI) and other known colorectal cancer risk factors. Results We identified 2,100 incident colorectal cancer cases (1,292 in women and 808 in men) during 22 years of follow-up. Among women, the RR(95% CI) for childhood body fatness of level 5 or higher versus level 1 was 1.28(1.04-1.58, p-trend=0.08) and for adolescent body fatness, it was 1.27(1.01-1.60, p-trend = 0.23). The corresponding RRs for men were 1.04(0.82-1.31, p-trend=0.48) and 0.98(0.75-1.27, p-trend=0.20), respectively. Results were generally similar across anatomic subsites within the colorectum. Additionally, the RRs comparing BMI categories ≥ 27.5 to < 19 kg/m2 were 1.44(1.06-1.95, at age 18, p-trend=0.009) for women and 1.18(0.84-1.65, at age 21, p-trend=0.57) for men. Conclusion Increased body fatness in early life, independent of adult obesity, might be a risk factor for colorectal cancer in women, but we observed a weaker association in men. Impact Our findings support the growing evidence that early life body fatness affects the risk of colorectal cancer many decades later. PMID:25777804

  2. Head-to-Head Comparison and Evaluation of 92 Plasma Protein Biomarkers for Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer in a True Screening Setting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongda; Zucknick, Manuela; Werner, Simone; Knebel, Phillip; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-07-15

    Novel noninvasive blood-based screening tests are strongly desirable for early detection of colorectal cancer. We aimed to conduct a head-to-head comparison of the diagnostic performance of 92 plasma-based tumor-associated protein biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer in a true screening setting. Among all available 35 carriers of colorectal cancer and a representative sample of 54 men and women free of colorectal neoplasms recruited in a cohort of screening colonoscopy participants in 2005-2012 (N = 5,516), the plasma levels of 92 protein biomarkers were measured. ROC analyses were conducted to evaluate the diagnostic performance. A multimarker algorithm was developed through the Lasso logistic regression model and validated in an independent validation set. The .632+ bootstrap method was used to adjust for the potential overestimation of diagnostic performance. Seventeen protein markers were identified to show statistically significant differences in plasma levels between colorectal cancer cases and controls. The adjusted area under the ROC curves (AUC) of these 17 individual markers ranged from 0.55 to 0.70. An eight-marker classifier was constructed that increased the adjusted AUC to 0.77 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-0.91]. When validating this algorithm in an independent validation set, the AUC was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.65-0.85), and sensitivities at cutoff levels yielding 80% and 90% specificities were 65% (95% CI, 41-80%) and 44% (95% CI, 24-72%), respectively. The identified profile of protein biomarkers could contribute to the development of a powerful multimarker blood-based test for early detection of colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Storytelling for promoting colorectal cancer prevention and early detection among Latinos.

    PubMed

    Larkey, Linda K; Gonzalez, Julie

    2007-08-01

    Health promotion efforts directed at Latinos may be more effective when culturally adapted methods are used. Our study was designed to test a novel communication modality for promoting colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention and screening messages among Latinos. We compared a culturally aligned, brief storytelling educational intervention (ST) to a numeric risk tool intervention (NR) based on the Harvard Cancer Risk Index. Both interventions included risk factor information and recommendations for primary prevention and screening for CRC. Sixty-four Latinos (mean age 46.8, 86% female) were randomized and completed pre- and post-tests. Participants in ST indicated intent to add significantly more servings of vegetables (p=.030) and more minutes of exercise (p=.018) to daily routines than those in NR. Most respondents (ST and NR) reported intentions to recommend CRC screening to friends and relatives. These data provide support for storytelling's potential to promote health behavior change with cultural relevance for Latinos. Storytelling shows promise as an effective method for reaching one of the historically underserved ethnic groups with cancer prevention and screening information.

  4. Colorectal specialization and survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hall, G M; Shanmugan, S; Bleier, J I S; Jeganathan, A N; Epstein, A J; Paulson, E C

    2016-02-01

    It is recognized that higher surgeon volume is associated with improved survival in colorectal cancer. However, there is a paucity of national studies that have evaluated the relationship between surgical specialization and survival. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Medicare cancer registry to examine the association between colorectal specialization (CRS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) between 2001 and 2009. A total of 21,432 colon cancer and 5893 rectal cancer patients who underwent elective surgical resection between 2001 and 2009 were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate Cox survival analysis was used to identify the association between surgical specialization and cancer-specific survival. Colorectal specialists performed 16.3% of the colon and 27% of the rectal resections. On univariate analysis, specialization was associated with improved survival in Stage II and Stage III colon cancer and Stage II rectal cancer. In multivariate analysis, however, CRS was associated with significantly improved DSS only in Stage II rectal cancer [hazard ratio (HR) 0.70, P = 0.03]. CRS was not significantly associated with DSS in either Stage I (colon HR 1.14, P = 0.39; rectal HR 0.1.26, P = 0.23) or Stage III (colon HR 1.06, P = 0.52; rectal HR 1.08, P = 0.55) disease. When analysis was limited to high volume surgeons only, the relationship between CRS and DSS was unchanged. CRS is associated with improved DSS following resection of Stage II rectal cancer. A combination of factors may contribute to long-term survival in these patients, including appropriate surgical technique, multidisciplinary treatment decisions and guideline-adherent surveillance. CRS probably contributes positively to these factors resulting in improved survival. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood test Sigmoidoscopy Colonoscopy Virtual colonoscopy DNA stool test Studies have shown that screening for colorectal cancer using ... decrease the risk of dying from cancer. Scientists study screening tests to find those with the fewest risks and ...

  6. Prospective evaluation of 64 serum autoantibodies as biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer in a true screening setting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongda; Werner, Simone; Butt, Julia; Zörnig, Inka; Knebel, Phillip; Michel, Angelika; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Jäger, Dirk; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-03-29

    Novel blood-based screening tests are strongly desirable for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to identify and evaluate autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers for early detection of CRC. 380 clinically identified CRC patients and samples of participants with selected findings from a cohort of screening colonoscopy participants in 2005-2013 (N=6826) were included in this analysis. Sixty-four serum autoantibody markers were measured by multiplex bead-based serological assays. A two-step approach with selection of biomarkers in a training set, and validation of findings in a validation set, the latter exclusively including participants from the screening setting, was applied. Anti-MAGEA4 exhibited the highest sensitivity for detecting early stage CRC and advanced adenoma. Multi-marker combinations substantially increased sensitivity at the price of a moderate loss of specificity. Anti-TP53, anti-IMPDH2, anti-MDM2 and anti-MAGEA4 were consistently included in the best-performing 4-, 5-, and 6-marker combinations. This four-marker panel yielded a sensitivity of 26% (95% CI, 13-45%) for early stage CRC at a specificity of 90% (95% CI, 83-94%) in the validation set. Notably, it also detected 20% (95% CI, 13-29%) of advanced adenomas. Taken together, the identified biomarkers could contribute to the development of a useful multi-marker blood-based test for CRC early detection.

  7. Prospective evaluation of 64 serum autoantibodies as biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer in a true screening setting

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongda; Werner, Simone; Butt, Julia; Zörnig, Inka; Knebel, Phillip; Michel, Angelika; Eichmüller, Stefan B.; Jäger, Dirk; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Novel blood-based screening tests are strongly desirable for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to identify and evaluate autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers for early detection of CRC. 380 clinically identified CRC patients and samples of participants with selected findings from a cohort of screening colonoscopy participants in 2005–2013 (N=6826) were included in this analysis. Sixty-four serum autoantibody markers were measured by multiplex bead-based serological assays. A two-step approach with selection of biomarkers in a training set, and validation of findings in a validation set, the latter exclusively including participants from the screening setting, was applied. Anti-MAGEA4 exhibited the highest sensitivity for detecting early stage CRC and advanced adenoma. Multi-marker combinations substantially increased sensitivity at the price of a moderate loss of specificity. Anti-TP53, anti-IMPDH2, anti-MDM2 and anti-MAGEA4 were consistently included in the best-performing 4-, 5-, and 6-marker combinations. This four-marker panel yielded a sensitivity of 26% (95% CI, 13–45%) for early stage CRC at a specificity of 90% (95% CI, 83–94%) in the validation set. Notably, it also detected 20% (95% CI, 13–29%) of advanced adenomas. Taken together, the identified biomarkers could contribute to the development of a useful multi-marker blood-based test for CRC early detection. PMID:26909861

  8. Evidence for possible non-canonical pathway(s) driven early-onset colorectal cancer in India

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Ratheesh; Kotapalli, Viswakalyan; Adduri, Raju; Gowrishankar, Swarnalata; Bashyam, Leena; Chaudhary, Ajay; Vamsy, Mohana; Patnaik, Sujith; Srinivasulu, Mukta; Sastry, Regulagadda; Rao, Subramanyeshwar; Vasala, Anjayneyulu; Kalidindi, NarasimhaRaju; Pollack, Jonathan; Murthy, Sudha; Bashyam, Murali

    2012-01-01

    Two genetic instability pathways viz. chromosomal instability, driven primarily by APC mutation induced deregulated Wnt signaling, and microsatellite instability (MSI) caused by mismatch repair (MMR) inactivation, together account for greater than 90% of late-onset colorectal cancer. Our understanding of early-onset sporadic CRC is however comparatively limited. In addition, most seminal studies have been performed in the western population and analyses of tumorigenesis pathway(s) causing CRC in developing nations have been rare. We performed a comparative analysis of early and late-onset CRC from India with respect to common genetic aberrations including Wnt, KRAS and p53 (constituting the classical CRC progression sequence) in addition to MSI. Our results revealed the absence of Wnt and MSI in a significant proportion of early-onset as against late-onset CRC in India. In addition, KRAS mutation frequency was significantly lower in early-onset CRC indicating that a significant proportion of CRC in India may follow tumorigenesis pathways distinct from the classical CRC progression sequence. Our study has therefore revealed the possible existence of non-canonical tumorigenesis pathways in early-onset CRC in India. PMID:23168910

  9. Fluorescence-based endoscopic imaging of Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen to improve early detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Shinji; Yu, James Y H; Quang, Timothy; Hiwatari, Ken-Ichiro; Kumagai, Hironori; Kao, Stephanie; Holt, Alex; Erskind, Jalysa; McClure, Richard; Siuta, Michael; Kitamura, Tokio; Tobita, Etsuo; Koike, Seiji; Wilson, Kevin; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Liu, Eric; Washington, Kay; Omary, Reed; Gore, John C; Pham, Wellington

    2015-03-01

    Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen belongs to the mucin-type tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen. Notably, TF antigen is overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) but is rarely expressed in normal colonic tissue. Increased TF antigen expression is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. In this study, we sought to validate a novel nanobeacon for imaging TF-associated CRC in a preclinical animal model. We developed and characterized the nanobeacon for use with fluorescence colonoscopy. In vivo imaging was performed on an orthotopic rat model of CRC. Both white light and fluorescence colonoscopy methods were utilized to establish the ratio-imaging index for the probe. The nanobeacon exhibited specificity for TF-associated cancer. Fluorescence colonoscopy using the probe can detect lesions at the stage which is not readily confirmed by conventional visualization methods. Further, the probe can report the dynamic change of TF expression as tumor regresses during chemotherapy. Data from this study suggests that fluorescence colonoscopy can improve early CRC detection. Supplemented by the established ratio-imaging index, the probe can be used not only for early detection, but also for reporting tumor response during chemotherapy. Furthermore, since the data obtained through in vivo imaging confirmed that the probe was not absorbed by the colonic mucosa, no registered toxicity is associated with this nanobeacon. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel probe for imaging TF antigen as a biomarker for the early detection and prediction of the progression of CRC at the molecular level. © 2014 UICC.

  10. Translational Research in Familial Colorectal Cancer Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ford, Molly M

    2018-05-01

    Growing knowledge of inherited colorectal cancer syndromes has led to better surveillance and better care of this subset of patients. The most well-known entities, including Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis, are continually being studied and with the advent of more sophisticated genetic testing, additional genetic discoveries have been made in the field of inherited cancer. This article will summarize many of the updates to both the familiar and perhaps less familiar syndromes that can lead to inherited or early-onset colorectal cancer.

  11. Identifying patients with undetected colorectal cancer: an independent validation of QCancer (Colorectal).

    PubMed

    Collins, G S; Altman, D G

    2012-07-10

    Early identification of colorectal cancer is an unresolved challenge and the predictive value of single symptoms is limited. We evaluated the performance of QCancer (Colorectal) prediction model for predicting the absolute risk of colorectal cancer in an independent UK cohort of patients from general practice records. A total of 2.1 million patients registered with a general practice surgery between 01 January 2000 and 30 June 2008, aged 30-84 years (3.7 million person-years) with 3712 colorectal cancer cases were included in the analysis. Colorectal cancer was defined as incident diagnosis of colorectal cancer during the 2 years after study entry. The results from this independent and external validation of QCancer (Colorectal) prediction model demonstrated good performance data on a large cohort of general practice patients. QCancer (Colorectal) had very good discrimination with an area under the ROC curve of 0.92 (women) and 0.91 (men), and explained 68% (women) and 66% (men) of the variation. QCancer (Colorectal) was well calibrated across all tenths of risk and over all age ranges with predicted risks closely matching observed risks. QCancer (Colorectal) appears to be a useful tool for identifying undetected cases of undiagnosed colorectal cancer in primary care in the United Kingdom.

  12. Molecular alterations and biomarkers in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grady, William M.; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of precision medicine is now a clinical reality. Advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of colorectal cancer genetics is leading to the development of a variety of biomarkers that are being used as early detection markers, prognostic markers, and markers for predicting treatment responses. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we update a prior review published in 2010 and describe our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:24178577

  13. Exercise and Low-Dose Ibuprofen for Cognitive Impairment in Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-13

    Cognitive Impairment; Stage 0 Colorectal Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  14. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  15. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. Biomarkers for the early detection of relapses in metastatic colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Chereches, Gabriela; Barbos, Otilia; Buiga, Rares; Balacescu, Ovidiu; Iancu, Dana; Todor, Nicolae; Balacescu, Loredana; Miron, Nicu; Bejinariu, Nona; Ciuleanu, Tudor-Eliade

    2017-01-01

    To assess prognostic/predictive value of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), transthyretin (TRT), αenolase (NNE), β2-microglobulin (β2-micro), B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. 72 histologically confirmed mCRC patients treated at Oncology Institute Cluj were included. Biomarker levels were measured through validated methods. A manual method was used for CTCs, involving hemolysis, cytospin centrifugation and immunocytochemical staining for pan-cytokeratin. Statistical endpoints were response, progression- free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Initial chemotherapy was fluoropyrimidine/oxaliplatin-based in 93.1%; bevacizumab was added in 58.3% of the patients. Median PFS and OS were 16.4 and 24.4 months. Two-year OS for CR & PR vs SD vs PD were 90% vs 48% vs 12%, respectively (p<0.01). Two-year OS for chemo/ bevacizumab vs chemotherapy: 65% vs 42% (p=0.09). Baseline CEA ≥5 ng/ml had a negative prognostic impact on OS and PFS (p<0.01). High baseline CEA was predictive of improved OS when adding bevacizumab (2-year OS chemo/bevacizumab vs chemo: 60% vs 17%, p<0.01); adding bevacizumab in patients with normal CEA did not improve OS (p=0.29). Higher than cut-off values for TRT had a positive OS prognostic value (p<0.01); higher levels for NNE, β2-microglobulin and BAFF had a negative impact (p<0.01). Two-year OS for baseline <1 CTC/ml vs ≥1 CTC/ ml was 74% vs 64% respectively (p=0.15). The evaluated biomarkers could be useful prognostic factors for survival. Baseline CEA also has predictive value, suggesting that patients with low levels do not benefit from bevacizumab. A non-statistically significant correlation was observed between the number of CTCs and outcome.

  17. The value of reasons for encounter in early detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel-Wilms, Susan J M; van Boven, Kees; Bor, J H Hans; Bakx, J Carel; Lucassen, Peter; Oskam, Sibo; van Weel, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Symptoms with a high predictive power for colorectal cancer (CRC) do not exist. To explore the predictive value of patients' reason for encounter (RFE) in the two years prior to the diagnosis of CRC. A retrospective nested case-control study using prospectively collected data from electronic records in general practice over 20 years. Matching was done based on age (within two years), gender and practice. The positive likelihood ratios (LR+) and odds ratios (OR) were calculated for RFE between cases and controls in the two years before the index date. We identified 184 CRC cases and matched 366 controls. Six RFEs had significant LR + and ORs for CRC, which may have high predictive power. These RFEs are part of four chapters in the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC) that include tiredness (significant at 3-6 months prior to the diagnosis; LR+ 2.6 and OR 3.07; and from 0 to 3 months prior to the diagnosis; LR+ 2.0 and OR 2.36), anaemia (significant at three months before diagnosis; LR+ 9.8 and OR 16.54), abdominal pain, rectal bleeding and constipation (significant at 3-6 months before diagnosis; LR+ 3.0 and OR 3.33; 3 months prior to the diagnosis LR+ 8.0 and OR 18.10) and weight loss (significant at three months before diagnosis; LR+ 14.9 and OR 14.53). Data capture and organization in ICPC permits study of the predictive value of RFE for CRC in primary care.

  18. [Colorectal cancer in spouses of colorectal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Matsumata, T; Shikada, Y; Hasuda, S; Kishihara, F; Suehiro, T; Funahashi, S; Nagamatsu, Y; Iso, Y; Shima, I; Koga, C; Osamura, S; Ueda, M; Furuya, K; Sakino, I

    2000-06-01

    Married couples share home environments and life style for years. In the case of colorectal cancer, an association with insulin resistance was reported. We determined the presence of the insulin-resistance syndrome (IRS, 1 or more of the following: body mass index of > 25 kg/m2, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia) in 84 colorectal cancer patients, of whom 61 patients (73%) had IRS. The incidence of the distal colorectal cancer, which has been declining in the United States, was significantly higher in the IRS group than in the non-IRS group (75.4 vs 52.2%, p = 0.0400). Some mechanisms may promote the progression of mucosal lesions to invasive cancers in the distal colorectum. There were no significant differences with respect to the age (64.6 +/- 9.4 vs 64.3 +/- 11.3 yr, p = 0.8298), height (159 +/- 9 vs 157 +/- 8 cm, p = 0.1375), and body mass index (22.2 +/- 3.6 vs 22.4 +/- 2.7 kg/m2, p = 0.6364) between the patients and their spouses. In 84 couples in whom colorectal cancer develops at least in one may then not illustrate the nursery rhyme: "Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean...". The spouses had been married for an average of 38 years, and in 30 spouses who had been followed in a colorectal cancer screening, 5 developed colorectal cancer. To diminish the incidence of colorectal cancer in Japan, we might advise screening colonoscopy to the spouses of colorectal cancer patients, or déjà vu all over again?

  19. The expression and significance of feces cyclooxygensae-2 mRNA in colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofeng; Kong, Lixia; Liao, Suhuan; Lu, Jing; Ma, Lin; Long, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the expression and significance of feces cyclooxygensae-2 (COX-2) mRNA in colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas. The expression of feces COX-2 mRNA in colorectal cancer (n = 28), colorectal adenomas (n = 54), and normal control group (n = 11) were examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The positive rate of fecal occult blood test (FOBT) were detected in colorectal cancer (n = 30), colorectal adenomas (n = 56), and normal control group (n = 11); the sensitivity of the two methods was also compared. The positive rate of feces COX-2 mRNA in colorectal cancer was 82.1% (25/28), which was significantly higher than colorectal adenomas 59.3% (32/54), and normal tissues 18.2% (2/11), the difference being significant between the three groups (χ2= 13.842,P= 0.001). The positive rate of FOBT in colorectal cancer was 73.3% (10/30), which was significantly higher than colorectal adenomas 10.7% (6/56) and normal tissues 9.1% (1/11), the difference being significant between these three groups (χ2= 7.525,P= 0.023). There was no significant association between feces COX-2 expression and various clinical pathological features of colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas (P > 0.05). The sensitivity of the RT-PCR method is higher than FOBT, however, the specificity of FOBT is slightly higher than RT-PCR. High expression of feces COX-2 mRNA in colorectal adenomas and colorectal cancer is a common event; it is an early event in the development of colorectal adenomas to colorectal cancer. Feces COX-2 mRNA has a high sensitivity for detect colorectal cancer; combination with FOBT will be the best alternative. Feces COX-2 can be potentially used in the early diagnosis and screening of colorectal cancer.

  20. Colorectal Cancer: What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Colorectal Cancer: What You Should Know Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... with—and more than 50,000 died from—colorectal cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. It is ...

  1. [The role of colonoscopy in early diagnosis of intraluminal recurrences in patients already treated for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Barillari, P; Manetti, G; Bovino, A; Puce, Y; Piovanello, P; Cioè, I; Sammartino, P; Stipa, V

    1996-11-01

    It is a common opinion that the more often and the more rigorously the colon is examined, the more lesions will be discovered and diagnosed. However it has not been shown which methods of colonic examination and which regimen of surveillance should be used. Chart review was conducted on 481 patients who underwent curative resection for colorectal cancer between 1980 and 1990. Colonoscopy was performed preoperatively, after 12-15 months from surgical treatment, and then at an interval of 12-24 months, or when symptoms appeared. About ten percent of patients developed intraluminal recurrences, and more than 25% adenomatous polyps. More than one half of the metachronous lesions arise within the first 24 months. The median time to diagnosis was 25 months for intraluminal recurrences and 22 months for adenomatous polyps. Patients with left sited tumor at an advanced stage run a higher risk of developing recurrent intraluminal disease, and patients who presented associated polyps at the time of the operation for the index cancer have a higher risk of developing new polyps. About 50% of recurrences were detected when patients were asymptomatic. Colonoscopy must be performed within the first 12-15 months after operation, while an interval of 24 months between each examination seems sufficient to guarantee an early detection of metachronous lesion. Asymptomatic patients are more frequently reoperated for cure and thus have a better survival rate.

  2. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  3. A model-based assessment of the cost-utility of strategies to identify Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Snowsill, Tristan; Huxley, Nicola; Hoyle, Martin; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Coelho, Helen; Cooper, Chris; Frayling, Ian; Hyde, Chris

    2015-04-25

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian and other cancers. Lynch syndrome remains underdiagnosed in the UK. Reflex testing for Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients is proposed as a method to identify more families affected by Lynch syndrome and offer surveillance to reduce cancer risks, although cost-effectiveness is viewed as a barrier to implementation. The objective of this project was to estimate the cost-utility of strategies to identify Lynch syndrome in individuals with early-onset colorectal cancer in the NHS. A decision analytic model was developed which simulated diagnostic and long-term outcomes over a lifetime horizon for colorectal cancer patients with and without Lynch syndrome and for relatives of those patients. Nine diagnostic strategies were modelled which included microsatellite instability (MSI) testing, immunohistochemistry (IHC), BRAF mutation testing (methylation testing in a scenario analysis), diagnostic mutation testing and Amsterdam II criteria. Biennial colonoscopic surveillance was included for individuals diagnosed with Lynch syndrome and accepting surveillance. Prophylactic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (H-BSO) was similarly included for women diagnosed with Lynch syndrome. Costs from NHS and Personal Social Services perspective and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated and discounted at 3.5% per annum. All strategies included for the identification of Lynch syndrome were cost-effective versus no testing. The strategy with the greatest net health benefit was MSI followed by BRAF followed by diagnostic genetic testing, costing £5,491 per QALY gained over no testing. The effect of prophylactic H-BSO on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is uncertain and could outweigh

  4. Colorectal cancer complicating Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, H J

    2001-04-01

    Some earlier studies have indicated that patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially those with long-standing and extensive ulcerative colitis, have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Moreover, others in tertiary care centres have suggested that patients with Crohn's disease also have a higher risk of colorectal cancer. Canadian data on colorectal cancer in Crohn's disease appear to be limited. For this investigation, a single clinician database of 877 patients with Crohn's disease was used. Altogether, there were six patients with colorectal cancer (ie, overall rate of 0.7%). All of these patients were men with an initial diagnosis of Crohn's disease established at a mean age of approximately 28 years, with either ileocolonic disease or colonic disease alone, but not with ileal disease alone. Although there was a predominance of women in the overall study population (ie, 56.1%), no women developed colorectal cancer. The clinical behaviour of Crohn's disease was classified as nonstricturing in all six patients with colorectal cancer, but in two patients, Crohn's disease was complicated by a perirectal abscess or a fistula. All cancers were located in the rectum and were diagnosed 30 years, 22 years, seven years, 18 years, 20 years and 40 years after Crohn's disease was initially diagnosed. In three patients, the cancer was detected in a residual rectal stump after a partial colon resection at least 10 years earlier. In five patients, localized extension of disease through the serosa, nodal or distant metastases (ie, liver, lung) was found at the time of cancer diagnosis; two patients have since died. The present study confirms that Crohn's disease involving the colon may be a possible risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer, at least in younger men, but, in this study, not in women. However, part of this increased risk in men may have been related to the presence of a rectal stump, rather than to Crohn's disease per se.

  5. Colorectal cancer detection and screening.

    PubMed

    Gruber, M; Lance, P

    1998-01-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of death in the United States and is estimated to cause 56,500 deaths during 1998. Most cancers evolve from adenomatous polyps. Screening asymptomatic average-risk individuals is recommended to reduce colorectal cancer mortality by detection and removal of adenomatous polyps.

  6. C-reactive protein level as a possible predictor for early postoperative ileus following elective surgery for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takaaki; Sutoh, Toshinaga; Kigure, Wakako; Morita, Hiroki; Katoh, Toshihide; Yajima, Reina; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory reactions are par- tially responsible for postoperative ileus (POI). Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acknowledged marker of inflammation. In this study the CRP response with respect to POI in elective colorectal surgery was exam- ined to define the role of serum CRP as an early predic- tor of POI. Three hundred eighty-three patients who underwent elective colorectal resection were identified for inclusion in this study. We defined early POI as that occurring within 30 days following the surgery. Thirty-five patients with POI were com- pared to a subgroup of 348 patients with an unevent- ful postoperative course, and the correlation between postoperative serum CRP levels and POI in colorectal surgery was investigated. In the univariate analysis, length of operation, surgical blood loss, and serum CRP were factors significantly associated with POI following colorectal surgery; however, these fac- tors lost their significance on multivariate analysis. Our results suggest that an increase in CRP levels alone is not a predictor for POI following surgery for colorectal surgery. Although inflammatory responses are known to contribute to the ileus, ad- ditional study is required to identify risk factors that would be more useful for prediction of POI.

  7. [Colorectal cancer screening: follow-up of patients with adenomatous and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Antonino, Anca-Teodora; Anca, Antonino; Frei, Alain; Ali-el-Wafa, Abdou; Kessler-Brondolo, Véra; Dorta, Gian

    2008-01-23

    The different methods of colorectal cancer screening are discussed. Our recommendations had not changed: we recommend as colorectal cancer screening a colonoscopy at the age of 50 years in all healthy persons with average risk for colorectal cancer. A 2007 interdisciplinary consensus conference revised the Swiss recommendations for the follow-up of patients with operated colorectal cancer or after polypectomy.

  8. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-01-29

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  9. Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-23

    Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  10. Reduced miR-433 expression is associated with advanced stages and early relapse of colorectal cancer and restored miR-433 expression suppresses the migration, invasion and proliferation of tumor cells in vitro and in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Tong; Dong, Xin-Min; Zhu, Yu; Chen, Long-Hua

    2018-05-01

    The expression of microRNA (miR-433) is altered in various types of human cancer. The present study analyzed the prognostic and biological value of miR-433 expression in colorectal cancer using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 125 colorectal tissue specimens (including a test cohort of 40 cases of paired colorectal cancer and adjacent normal mucosae and a confirmation cohort of 85 cases of stage I-III colorectal cancer). In vitro and nude mouse xenograft experiments were subsequently used to assess the effects of miR-433 expression on the regulation of colorectal cancer cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion. The data indicated that miR-433 expression was significantly downregulated in colorectal cancer tissues in the test and confirmation patient cohorts and that low miR-433 expression was associated with advanced tumor stage and early relapse. Furthermore, the restoration of miR-433 expression was able to significantly inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells by inducing G1-S cell cycle arrest, suppressing cyclinD1 and CDK4 expression, and markedly inhibited the migratory and invasive capacities of tumor cells in vitro . The restoration of miR-433 expression or liposome-based delivery of miR-433 mimics suppressed the growth of colorectal cancer cell xenografts in nude mice. In conclusion, miR-433 may be a putative tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer, and the detection of low miR-433 expression will be investigated in further studies as a putative biomarker for the detection of early relapse in patients with colorectal cancer.

  11. Reduced miR-433 expression is associated with advanced stages and early relapse of colorectal cancer and restored miR-433 expression suppresses the migration, invasion and proliferation of tumor cells in vitro and in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Tong; Dong, Xin-Min; Zhu, Yu; Chen, Long-Hua

    2018-01-01

    The expression of microRNA (miR-433) is altered in various types of human cancer. The present study analyzed the prognostic and biological value of miR-433 expression in colorectal cancer using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 125 colorectal tissue specimens (including a test cohort of 40 cases of paired colorectal cancer and adjacent normal mucosae and a confirmation cohort of 85 cases of stage I–III colorectal cancer). In vitro and nude mouse xenograft experiments were subsequently used to assess the effects of miR-433 expression on the regulation of colorectal cancer cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion. The data indicated that miR-433 expression was significantly downregulated in colorectal cancer tissues in the test and confirmation patient cohorts and that low miR-433 expression was associated with advanced tumor stage and early relapse. Furthermore, the restoration of miR-433 expression was able to significantly inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells by inducing G1-S cell cycle arrest, suppressing cyclinD1 and CDK4 expression, and markedly inhibited the migratory and invasive capacities of tumor cells in vitro. The restoration of miR-433 expression or liposome-based delivery of miR-433 mimics suppressed the growth of colorectal cancer cell xenografts in nude mice. In conclusion, miR-433 may be a putative tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer, and the detection of low miR-433 expression will be investigated in further studies as a putative biomarker for the detection of early relapse in patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:29740483

  12. Controversies in colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Pox, Christian P

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and a good candidate for screening programmes. However, there is controversy concerning which of the available screening tests should be used. There is general agreement that screening for CRC in the asymptomatic population should begin at the age of 50. Several different screening methods are available which can be separated into those that mainly detect cancers: faecal occult blood tests [guaiac (FOBT) and immunochemical (FIT)], genetic stool tests, blood tests and the M2-pyruvate kinase (M2-PK) test. Methods that detect cancers and polyps are colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, CT-colonography (CT-C) and colon capsule endoscopy. The only tests for which a reduction in CRC mortality compared to no screening have been proven in randomized trials are FOBT and sigmoidoscopy. Several trials suggest that FIT are superior to FOBT in terms of detection rates of cancers and advanced adenomas and possibly compliance. There is indirect evidence suggesting efficacy of colonoscopy as a screening test. The role of CT-C is controversial. There is data suggesting a good sensitivity for neoplasia >9 mm with a lower sensitivity for smaller neoplasia. However, radiation exposure is considered a major limitation in some countries. Unresolved questions include the lesion cut-off for referral to colonoscopy and work-up of extracolonic findings. For other methods, like genetic stool testing using newer markers, blood tests, capsule endoscopy and M2-PK, there is currently insufficient data on screening of the asymptomatic population. Key Messages: Colorectal screening is recommended and should be performed in the form of an organized programme. If detection of early-stage cancers is the aim of a screening programme, FIT seem to be superior to FOBT. If detection and removal of adenomas is the aim of a screening programme, endoscopic methods seem to be good alternatives. Sigmoidoscopy is easier to perform but will likely only

  13. Improving detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Orbell, James; West, Nicholas J

    2010-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.K., with an annual incidence of 36,100 in England and Wales. It is also the second leading cause of death from cancer in the U.K. However, there has been a significant increase in five-year survival over the past decade, from 22% to 50% despite more than 55% of patients presenting with lymph node or distant metastases. Around 80% of colorectal cancer is sporadic, i.e., caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors via the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and cancer may take up to ten years to develop in this way. Adenomas are more common with age and one in four of the population aged over 50 will develop one or more polyps, with 10% of these polyps progressing to cancer over time. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include: age over 60; K-ras and p53 mutations; a diet high in saturated animal fat and low in fibre and vegetables; lack of exercise, obesity and excessive alcohol intake. Inflammatory bowel disease is a risk factor for development of colorectal cancer through the association of chronic inflammation and development of malignancy. Around 20% of colorectal cancer cases are familial and in a primary care setting taking a family history may determine those with a higher than average risk who may need onward referral. A large proportion of patients with rectal or sigmoid cancers present with a combination of rectal bleeding and a change in bowel habit (usually an increased frequency of defecation and/or looser stools). Rectal bleeding in the absence of anal symptoms occurs in over 60% of those with cancer, and a palpable rectal mass with or without tenesmus is present in 40-80% of those with rectal cancer.

  14. Intraoperative radiotherapy and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeung, J M C; Ngan, S; Lynch, C; Heriot, A G

    2010-04-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is a highly specialized component of multidisciplinary management of advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer. The aim of this review was to assess its role and effectiveness in the management of colorectal cancer. A literature search was performed using Medline, Embase, Ovid and Cochrane to identify English language studies which have used IORT in the multidisciplinary management of primary and recurrent colon and rectal cancers. Improved survival and local control in patients with involved surgical margins treated with IORT have been shown in many studies, but these results have been mainly from retrospective studies. There is associated morbidity from IORT. IORT does have a role in the management of colorectal cancer. Further research needs to be performed to optimize the application of this therapy.

  15. Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... are placed directly into or near the cancer. Colorectal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ...

  16. Surveillance of colorectal cancer: effectiveness of early detection of intraluminal recurrences on prognosis and survival of patients treated for cure.

    PubMed

    Barillari, P; Ramacciato, G; Manetti, G; Bovino, A; Sammartino, P; Stipa, V

    1996-04-01

    The authors evaluate the effectiveness of routine colonoscopy and marker evaluation in diagnosis of intraluminal recurrent cancer. Chart review was conducted on 481 patients who underwent curative resection for colorectal cancer between 1980 and 1990. Clinical visits were scheduled and carcinoembryonic antigen evaluation was performed every three months, and colonoscopy was performed preoperatively, 12 to 15 months after surgical treatment, and then with intervals of 12 to 24 months or when symptoms appeared. About 10 percent of patients developed intraluminal recurrences. More than one-half of metachronous lesions arose within the first 24 months, and median time to diagnosis was 25 months. Patients with left-sited tumors in the advanced stage had a higher risk of developing recurrent intraluminal disease. Twenty-nine patients underwent a second surgical operation, of which 17 cases were radical. In this group, the five-year survival was 70.6 percent, although no nonradically treated or nonresected patients survived longer than 31 months. Twenty-two patients were asymptomatic at time of diagnosis of recurrence, and of these, 12 patients underwent radical operation; on the other hand, of the 24 symptomatic patients, only 5 were treated radically. Carcinoembryonic antigen was the first sign of recurrence in eight cases. Colonoscopy must be performed within the first 12 to 15 months after operation, whereas an interval of 24 months between examinations seems sufficient to guarantee early detection of metachronous lesions. Serial tumor marker evaluation is of help in earlier diagnosis of local recurrences. Asymptomatic patients more frequently undergo another operation for cure and thus have a better survival rate.

  17. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  18. Toward the Elimination of Colorectal Cancer Disparities Among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Blumenthal, Daniel S; Seay, Shirley Jordan; Smith, Selina A

    2016-12-01

    In the USA, race and socioeconomic status are well-known factors associated with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates. These are higher among blacks than whites and other racial/ethnic groups. In this article, we review opportunities to address disparities in colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, and survivorship among African Americans. First, we summarize the primary prevention of colorectal cancer and recent advances in the early detection of the disease and disparities in screening. Then, we consider black-white disparities in colorectal cancer treatment and survival including factors that may contribute to such disparities and the important roles played by cultural competency, patient trust in one's physician, and health literacy in addressing colorectal cancer disparities, including the need for studies involving the use of colorectal cancer patient navigators who are culturally competent. To reduce these disparities, intervention efforts should focus on providing high-quality screening and treatment for colorectal cancer and on educating African Americans about the value of diet, weight control, screening, and treatment. Organized approaches for delivering colorectal cancer screening should be accompanied by programs and policies that provide access to diagnostic follow-up and treatment for underserved populations.

  19. Toward the Elimination of Colorectal Cancer Disparities Among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Daniel S.; Seay, Shirley Jordan; Smith, Selina A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the USA, race and socioeconomic status are well-known factors associated with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates. These are higher among blacks than whites and other racial/ethnic groups. Methods In this article, we review opportunities to address disparities in colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, and survivorship among African Americans. Results First, we summarize the primary prevention of colorectal cancer and recent advances in the early detection of the disease and disparities in screening. Then, we consider black-white disparities in colorectal cancer treatment and survival including factors that may contribute to such disparities and the important roles played by cultural competency, patient trust in one’s physician, and health literacy in addressing colorectal cancer disparities, including the need for studies involving the use of colorectal cancer patient navigators who are culturally competent. Conclusion To reduce these disparities, intervention efforts should focus on providing high-quality screening and treatment for colorectal cancer and on educating African Americans about the value of diet, weight control, screening, and treatment. Organized approaches for delivering colorectal cancer screening should be accompanied by programs and policies that provide access to diagnostic follow-up and treatment for underserved populations. PMID:27294749

  20. Acceleration of leukocytes' epigenetic age as an early tumor and sex-specific marker of breast and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Durso, Danielle Fernandes; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Sala, Claudia; Pirazzini, Chiara; Marasco, Elena; Bonafé, Massimiliano; do Valle, Ítalo Faria; Gentilini, Davide; Castellani, Gastone; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Franceschi, Claudio; Garagnani, Paolo; Nardini, Christine

    2017-04-04

    Changes in blood epigenetic age have been associated with several pathological conditions and have recently been described to anticipate cancer development. In this work, we analyze a publicly available leukocytes methylation dataset to evaluate the relation between DNA methylation age and the prospective development of specific types of cancer. We calculated DNA methylation age acceleration using five state-of-the-art estimators (three multi-site: Horvath, Hannum, Weidner; and two CpG specific: ELOV2 and FHL2) in a cohort including 845 subjects from the EPIC-Italy project and we compared 424 samples that remained cancer-free over the approximately ten years of follow-up with 235 and 166 subjects who developed breast and colorectal cancer, respectively. We show that the epigenetic age estimated from blood DNA methylation data is statistically significantly associated to future breast and male colorectal cancer development. These results are corroborated by survival analysis that shows significant association between age acceleration and cancer incidence suggesting that the chance of developing age-related diseases may be predicted by circulating epigenetic markers, with a dependence upon tumor type, sex and age estimator. These are encouraging results towards the non-invasive and perspective usage of epigenetic biomarkers.

  1. Colorectal cancer epidemiology in minorities: a review.

    PubMed

    Baquet, C R; Commiskey, P

    1999-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In 1997, more than 131,000 new cases and more than 54,000 deaths were estimated. Racial and ethnic disparities in incidence, mortality and survival rates, and trends exist for this disease. Differences in colorectal cancer screening, early detection, and treatment in minority communities are related to therapeutic outcomes. Age-adjusted incidence rates for men with colorectal cancer are highest for Alaskan native men, followed by Japanese, then African-American men. For women, the incidence is highest for Alaskan native women, followed by African-American, then Japanese women. Mortality rates in men are highest for African Americans, followed by Alaskan natives and then Hawaiians. In women, mortality rates are highest for Alaskan natives, then African Americans and whites. Colorectal cancer screening rates vary by race, income, and education. It is interesting that, when compared with whites, African-American men demonstrate the higher reported rate of screening for this disease. In addition, site specificity is different for African Americans compared with whites. Findings also reveal that stage at diagnosis is an influential factor with regard to mortality and survival. This may be related in part to socioeconomic factors, differences in anatomic site, and treatment differences in African Americans. Risk factor data for this disease are scarce for minority populations. Documented differences in colorectal cancer incidence, mortality, and survival rates exist between minorities and whites. Additional research is needed on risk factors specific to African Americans and other minorities, differences in treatment, and the role of socioeconomic status.

  2. [Cost-effectiveness analysis on colorectal cancer screening program].

    PubMed

    Huang, Q C; Ye, D; Jiang, X Y; Li, Q L; Yao, K Y; Wang, J B; Jin, M J; Chen, K

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening program in different age groups from the view of health economics. Methods: The screening compliance rates, detection rates in different age groups were calculated by using the data from colorectal cancer screening program in Jiashan county, Zhejiang province. The differences in indicator among age groups were analyzed with χ (2) test or trend χ (2) test. The ratios of cost to the number of case were calculated according to cost statistics. Results: The detection rates of immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) positivity, advanced adenoma and colorectal cancer and early stage cancer increased with age, while the early diagnosis rates were negatively associated with age. After exclusion the younger counterpart, the cost-effectiveness of individuals aged >50 years could be reduced by 15 %- 30 % . Conclusion: From health economic perspective, it is beneficial to start colorectal cancer screening at age of 50 years to improve the efficiency of the screening.

  3. Use of early tumor shrinkage to predict long-term outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Piessevaux, Hubert; Buyse, Marc; Schlichting, Michael; Van Cutsem, Eric; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Heeger, Steffen; Tejpar, Sabine

    2013-10-20

    Early tumor shrinkage (ETS) is associated with long-term outcome in patients with chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) receiving cetuximab. This association was investigated in the first-line setting in the randomized CRYSTAL and OPUS mCRC trials, after controlling for KRAS tumor mutation status. Radiologic assessments at week 8 were used to calculate the relative change in the sum of the longest diameters of the target lesions. Time-dependent receiver operating characteristics provided Cτ-indices (time-dependent c-index). Cox regression models and subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot analysis investigated associations between ETS (radiologic tumor size decrease at week 8) and survival and progression-free survival (PFS). In both trials, in patients with KRAS wild-type mCRC, Cτ values for PFS and survival were higher (P < .001) in those receiving chemotherapy plus cetuximab versus chemotherapy alone, indicating a stronger predictive value of ETS for long-term outcome in these patients. In the CRYSTAL and OPUS trials, respectively, the cutoff value of ETS ≥ 20% (v < 20%) identified patients with KRAS wild-type mCRC receiving chemotherapy plus cetuximab with longer PFS (medians 14.1 v 7.3 months, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.32; P < .001, and medians 11.9 v 5.7 months, HR = 0.22; P < .001) and survival (medians 30.0 v 18.6 months, HR = 0.53; P < .001 and medians 26.0 v 15.7 months, HR = 0.43; P = .006). ETS was significantly associated with long-term outcome in patients with KRAS wild-type mCRC treated first-line with chemotherapy plus cetuximab. Validation in prospective trials is required to assess the value of this on-treatment marker in the clinical decision-making process.

  4. Genetic variants in the cell cycle control pathways contribute to early onset colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyun; Etzel, Carol J; Amos, Christopher I; Zhang, Qing; Viscofsky, Nancy; Lindor, Noralane M; Lynch, Patrick M; Frazier, Marsha L

    2009-11-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome of familial malignancies resulting from germ line mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Our goal was to take a pathway-based approach to investigate the influence of polymorphisms in cell cycle-related genes on age of onset for Lynch syndrome using a tree model. We evaluated polymorphisms in a panel of cell cycle-related genes (AURKA, CDKN2A, TP53, E2F2, CCND1, TP73, MDM2, IGF1, and CDKN2B) in 220 MMR gene mutation carriers from 129 families. We applied a novel statistical approach, tree modeling (Classification and Regression Tree), to the analysis of data on patients with Lynch syndrome to identify individuals with a higher probability of developing colorectal cancer at an early age and explore the gene-gene interactions between polymorphisms in cell cycle genes. We found that the subgroup with CDKN2A C580T wild-type genotype, IGF1 CA-repeats >or=19, E2F2 variant genotype, AURKA wild-type genotype, and CCND1 variant genotype had the youngest age of onset, with a 45-year median onset age, while the subgroup with CDKN2A C580T wild-type genotype, IGF1 CA-repeats >or=19, E2F2 wild-type genotype, and AURKA variant genotype had the latest median age of onset, which was 70 years. Furthermore, we found evidence of a possible gene-gene interaction between E2F2 and AURKA genes related to CRC age of onset. Polymorphisms in these cell cycle-related genes work together to modify the age at the onset of CRC in patients with Lynch syndrome. These studies provide an important part of the foundation for development of a model for stratifying age of onset risk among those with Lynch syndrome.

  5. Nutrients, Foods, and Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigation have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grain have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits and vegetables. Nutrients and foods may also interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of over-nutrition and obesity—risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:25575572

  6. Participation and barriers to colorectal cancer screening in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Harmy Mohamed; Daud, Norwati; Noor, Norhayati Mohd; Rahim, Amry Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia, colorectal cancer is the most common cancer in males and the third most common in females. Mortality due to colorectal cancer can be effectively reduced with early diagnosis. This study was designed to look into colorectal cancer screening participation and its barriers among average risk individuals in Malaysia. A cross sectional study was conducted from August 2009 till April 2010 involving average risk individuals from 44 primary care clinics in West Malaysia. Each individual was asked whether they have performed any of the colorectal cancer screening methods in the past five years. The barrier questions had three domains: patient factors, test factors and health care provider factors. Descriptive analysis was achieved using Statistical Program for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 12.0. A total of 1,905 average risk individuals responded making a response rate of 93.8%. Only 13 (0.7%) respondents had undergone any of the colorectal cancer screening methods in the past five years. The main patient and test factors for not participating were embarrassment (35.2%) and feeling uncomfortable (30.0%), respectively. There were 11.2% of respondents who never received any advice to do screening. The main reason for them to undergo screening was being advised by health care providers (84.6%). The study showed that participation in colorectal cancer screening in Malaysia is extremely low and multiple factors contribute to this situation. Given the importance of the disease, efforts should be made to increase colorectal cancer screening activities in Malaysia.

  7. N-glycosylation of Colorectal Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Crina I. A.; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Fung, Wesley L. J.; Koeleman, Carolien A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Verhoeven, Aswin; Mesker, Wilma E.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of ∼1 million cases and an annual mortality rate of ∼655,000 individuals. There is an urgent need for identifying novel targets to develop more sensitive, reliable, and specific tests for early stage detection of colon cancer. Post-translational modifications are known to play an important role in cancer progression and immune surveillance of tumors. In the present study, we compared the N-glycan profiles from 13 colorectal cancer tumor tissues and corresponding control colon tissues. The N-glycans were enzymatically released, purified, and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid. Aliquots were profiled by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) with fluorescence detection and by negative mode MALDI-TOF-MS. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis to investigate the N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer, an excellent separation and prediction ability were observed for both HILIC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS data. For structure elucidation, information from positive mode ESI-ion trap-MS/MS and negative mode MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was combined. Among the features with a high separation power, structures containing a bisecting GlcNAc were found to be decreased in the tumor, whereas sulfated glycans, paucimannosidic glycans, and glycans containing a sialylated Lewis type epitope were shown to be increased in tumor tissues. In addition, core-fucosylated high mannose N-glycans were detected in tumor samples. In conclusion, the combination of HILIC and MALDI-TOF-MS profiling of N-glycans with multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated its potential for identifying N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer tissues and provided new leads that might be used as candidate biomarkers. PMID:22573871

  8. General Aspects of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Centelles, Josep J.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments. PMID:23209942

  9. [Oligometastasized colorectal cancer-modern treatment strategies].

    PubMed

    Binnebösel, M; Lambertz, A; Dejong, K; Neumann, U P

    2018-06-05

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer in UICC stage IV has been improved in the last decades by improvements in interdisciplinary treatment. Treatment strategies for oligometastasized colorectal cancer are developing more and more into an individualized treatment. An overview of the current literature of modern treatment concepts in oligometastasized colorectal cancer UICC stage IV is given. Surgery still has the supreme mandate in resectable colorectal liver metastases, as neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment strategies to not provide any benefits for these patients. In marginal or non-resectable stages systemic treatment is superior in these patients depending on the prognostic parameters. Also in curative settings local treatment options should be considered as a reasonable additive tool. An interesting treatment approach for isolated liver metastases and non-resectable colorectal cancer is liver transplantation. Irrespective of new developments in treatment strategies for metastasized colorectal cancer, resection of colorectal liver metastases remains the gold standard whenever possible.

  10. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Premalignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's esophagus, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and adenomatous polyps, have a significantly increased risk for development of adenocarcinoma, most often through an intermediate stage of dysplasia. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the second most common cancer in the United States. Because patients with colorectal cancer often present with advanced disease, the outcomes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective methods of early detection are essential. As non-polypoid dysplasia is not visible using conventional endoscopy, surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus and ulcerative colitis is performed via a system in which multiple random biopsies are obtained at prescribed intervals. Sampling error and missed diagnoses occur frequently and render current screening methods inadequate. Also, the examination of a tissue biopsy is time consuming and costly, and significant intra- and inter-observer variation may occur. The newer methods discussed herein demonstrate the potential to solve these problems by early detection of disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Conventional endoscopy is based on the observation of white light reflected off the tissue surface. Subtle changes in color and shadow reveal structural changes. New developments in optical imaging go beyond white light, exploiting other properties of light. Several promising methods will be discussed at this meeting and shall be briefly discussed below. However, few such imaging modalities have arrived at our clinical practice. Some much more practical methods to improve colorectal cancer screening are currently being evaluated for their clinical impact. These methods seek to overcome limitations other than those of detecting dysplasia not visible under white light endoscopy. The current standard practice of colorectal cancer screening utilizes colonoscopy, an uncomfortable, sometimes difficult medical

  11. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database.

    PubMed

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001-2003 to <2% since 2013. The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an

  12. [Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy recognition of metabolic patterns in fecal extracts for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Wang, Z N; Ma, C C; Liu, C K; Yang, J R; Shen, Z W; Wu, R H

    2016-09-06

    Objective: To characterize the metabolic " fingerprint" of fecal extracts for diagnosis of early-stage colorectal cancer(CRC)using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy( 1 H-NMR)-based metabolomics coupled with pattern recognition. Methods: From January 2014 to December 2014, we collected fecal samples at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, from 25 patients with colorectal adenomas(CR-Ad), 20 with stage Ⅰ/Ⅱ CRC, and 32 healthy controls(HCs). The patients were diagnosed by histopathology. No subjects had any complicating diseases. HCs showed no abnormalities from blood tests, endoscopic examination, diagnostic imaging, and/or medical interviews. We excluded participants who used antibiotics, NSAIDS, statins, or probiotics within two months of study participation, and any patients who underwent chemotherapy or radiation treatments prior to surgery. We used orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis(OPLS-DA)for pattern recognition(dimension reduction)on 1 H-NMR processed data( 1 H frequency of 400.13 MHz), to find metabolic differences among CR-Ad, carcinoma and HC fecal samples; and receiver operating characteristic(ROC)analysis to determine the diagnostic value of the fecal metabolic biomarkers. Results: Fecal samples were collected from 20 patients with Stage Ⅰ/Ⅱ CRC(11 M, 9 F, median age(52±13)years), 25 with CR-Ad(14 M, 11 F, median age(53 ± 11)years)and 32 HCs(15 M, 17 F, median age(53 ± 14)years). OPLS-DA clearly distinguished CR-Ad and stage Ⅰ/Ⅱ CRC from HC samples, based on their metabolomic profiles. Relative signal intensities in HCs were significantly lower than in the cancer patients for butyrate(HC: 23.0±6.0; CR-Ad: 18.0±5.0; CRC: 14.0±6.0; Z =-2.07, P =0.008), acetate(HC: 45.0±11.0; CR-Ad: 31.0±11.0; CRC: 24.0±8.0; Z =- 2.32, P =0.011), propionate(HC: 26.0 ± 7.0; CR-Ad: 22.0 ± 6.0; CRC: 19.0 ± 5.0; Z =- 2.43, P =0.032), glucose(HC: 37.0±7.0; CR-Ad: 31.0±7.0; CRC: 26.0±8

  13. Molecular Triage Trials in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Mark H; Hamilton, Stanley R; O'Dwyer, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of genomic alterations in cancer, and the various therapies targeted to these alterations have permitted the design of trials directed to bringing this science to the clinic, with the ultimate goal of tailoring therapy to the individual. There is a high need for advances in targeted therapy in colorectal cancer, a disease in which only 2 classes of targeted therapies are approved for use in colorectal cancer, despite the majority of colorectal cancers containing a potentially targetable mutation. Here we outline the key elements to the design of these clinical trials and summarize the current active molecular triage trials in colorectal cancer.

  14. Multiple polyps and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Alecu, M; Simion, L; Straja, Nd; Brătucu, E

    2014-01-01

    Malignant degeneration as a possible course of evolution of colorectal polyps renders their diagnosis and therapeutic management a prophylactic act in the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). The study was conducted over a period of 3 years (2008-2011), during which 1,368 colonoscopies were performed in our service. The aim of the study was to identify patients presenting multiple colorectal polyps and to determine their risk factors for developing CRC, as well as to establish the appropriate therapeutic conduct. Presence of multiple polyps was recorded in over 40% of the patients identified with colorectal polyps of any kind. Dysplastic modifications observed during the histopathology exam presented a high incidence in the case of patients with multiple polyps, ranging from low-grade dysplasia to incipient CRC. Dysplastic modifications and carcinomatous foci were identified mostly among patients with multiple polyps.Only benign lesions or in situ carcinomas benefited from endoscopic treatment, poorly differentiated carcinomas or those invading the submucosa being treated by conventional surgery. Patients diagnosed with colorectal polyps require a rigorous post-therapy follow-up protocol, able to identify any eventual polyposis recurrence. Celsius.

  15. The Expression and Significance of Feces Cyclooxygensae-2 mRNA in Colorectal Cancer and Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Kong, Lixia; Liao, Suhuan; Lu, Jing; Ma, Lin; Long, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: This study aims to explore the expression and significance of feces cyclooxygensae-2 (COX-2) mRNA in colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas. Materials and Methods: The expression of feces COX-2 mRNA in colorectal cancer (n = 28), colorectal adenomas (n = 54), and normal control group (n = 11) were examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The positive rate of fecal occult blood test (FOBT) were detected in colorectal cancer (n = 30), colorectal adenomas (n = 56), and normal control group (n = 11); the sensitivity of the two methods was also compared. Results: The positive rate of feces COX-2 mRNA in colorectal cancer was 82.1% (25/28), which was significantly higher than colorectal adenomas 59.3% (32/54), and normal tissues 18.2% (2/11), the difference being significant between the three groups (χ2= 13.842, P = 0.001). The positive rate of FOBT in colorectal cancer was 73.3% (10/30), which was significantly higher than colorectal adenomas 10.7% (6/56) and normal tissues 9.1% (1/11), the difference being significant between these three groups (χ2= 7.525, P = 0.023). There was no significant association between feces COX-2 expression and various clinical pathological features of colorectal cancer and colorectal adenomas (P > 0.05). The sensitivity of the RT-PCR method is higher than FOBT, however, the specificity of FOBT is slightly higher than RT-PCR. Conclusions: High expression of feces COX-2 mRNA in colorectal adenomas and colorectal cancer is a common event; it is an early event in the development of colorectal adenomas to colorectal cancer. Feces COX-2 mRNA has a high sensitivity for detect colorectal cancer; combination with FOBT will be the best alternative. Feces COX-2 can be potentially used in the early diagnosis and screening of colorectal cancer. PMID:28139497

  16. Intra-operative peritoneal lavage for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Guillaume; Mohkam, Kayvan; Cotte, Eddy; Glehen, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Free cancer cells can be detected in peritoneal fluid at the time of colorectal surgery. Peritoneal lavage in colorectal surgery for cancer is not used in routine, and the prognostic significance of intraperitoneal free cancer cells (IPCC) remains unclear. Data concerning the technique of peritoneal lavage to detect IPCC and its timing regarding colorectal resection are scarce. However, positive IPCC might be the first step of peritoneal spread in colorectal cancers, which could lead to early specific treatments. Because of the important heterogeneity of IPCC determination in reported studies, no treatment have been proposed to patients with positive IPCC. Herein, we provide an overview of IPCC detection and its impact on recurrence and survival, and we suggest further multi-institutional studies to evaluate new treatment strategies. PMID:24616569

  17. Dietary Practices, Addictive Behavior and Bowel Habits and Risk of Early Onset Colorectal Cancer: a Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naveed Ali; Hussain, Mehwish; ur Rahman, Ata; Farooqui, Waqas Ahmed; Rasheed, Abdur; Memon, Amjad Siraj

    2015-01-01

    The abrupt rise of colorectal cancer in developing countries is raising concern in healthcare settings. Studies on assessing relationships with modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors in the Pakistani population have been limited. The present investigation was designed to examine associations of dietary practices, addictive behavior and bowel habits in developing colorectal cancer (CRC) among patients in a low-resource setup. An age-gender matched case control study was conducted from October 2011 to July 2015 in Karachi, Pakistan. Cases were from the surgical oncology department of a public sector tertiary care hospital, while their two pair-matched controls were recruited from the general population. A structured questionnaire was used which included questions related to demographic characteristics, family history, dietary patterns, addictive behavior and bowel habits. A family history of cancer was associated with a 2.2 fold higher chance of developing CRC. Weight loss reduced the likelihood 7.6 times. Refraining from a high fat diet and consuming more vegetables showed protective effects for CRC. The risk of CRC was more than twice among smokers and those who consumed Asian specific addictive products as compared to those who avoid using these addictions (ORsmoking: 2.12, 95% CI: 1.08 - 4.17, ORpan: 2.92, 95% CI: 1.6 - 5.33, ORgutka: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.14 - 3.97). Use of NSAID attenuated risk of CRC up to 86% (OR: 0.14, 95% CI: 0.07 - 0.31). Most of the findings showed concordance with the literature elucidating protective effects of consuming vegetables and low fat diet while documenting adverse associations with family history, weight loss, constipation and hematochezia. Moreover, this study highlighted Asian specific indigenous addictive products as important factors. Further studies are needed to validate the findings produced by this research.

  18. Immunotherapy and immunoescape in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazzolini, Guillermo; Murillo, Oihana; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Dubrot, Juan; Tirapu, Iñigo; Rizzo, Miguel; Arina, Ainhoa; Alfaro, Carlos; Azpilicueta, Arantza; Berasain, Carmen; Perez-Gracia, José L; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Melero, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques with the common goal of eliciting tumor cell destructive immune responses. Colorectal carcinoma often presents as metastatic disease that impedes curative surgery. Novel strategies such as active immunization with dendritic cells (DCs), gene transfer of cytokines into tumor cells or administration of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (such as anti-CD137 or anti-CTLA-4) have been assessed in preclinical studies and are at an early clinical development stage. Importantly, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be combined in the treatment of some cases with colorectal cancer, with synergistic potentiation as a result of antigens cross-presented by dendritic cells and/or elimination of competitor or suppressive T lymphocyte populations (regulatory T-cells). However, genetic and epigenetic unstable carcinoma cells frequently evolve mechanisms of immunoevasion that are the result of either loss of antigen presentation, or an active expression of immunosuppressive substances. Some of these actively immunosuppressive mechanisms are inducible by cytokines that signify the arrival of an effector immune response. For example, induction of 2, 3 indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) by IFNγ in colorectal carcinoma cells. Combinational and balanced strategies fostering antigen presentation, T-cell costimulation and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms will probably take the stage in translational research in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:17990348

  19. Attributable causes of colorectal cancer in China.

    PubMed

    Gu, Meng-Jia; Huang, Qiu-Chi; Bao, Cheng-Zhen; Li, Ying-Jun; Li, Xiao-Qin; Ye, Ding; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Kun; Wang, Jian-Bing

    2018-01-05

    Colorectal cancer is the 4th common cancer in China. Most colorectal cancers are due to modifiable lifestyle factors, but few studies have provided a systematic evidence-based assessment of the burden of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality attributable to the known risk factors in China. We estimated the population attributable faction (PAF) for each selected risk factor in China, based on the prevalence of exposure around 2000 and relative risks from cohort studies and meta-analyses. Among 245,000 new cases and 139,000 deaths of colorectal cancer in China in 2012, we found that 115,578 incident cases and 63,102 deaths of colorectal cancer were attributable to smoking, alcohol drinking, overweight and obesity, physical inactivity and dietary factors. Low vegetable intake was the main risk factor for colorectal cancer with a PAF of 17.9%. Physical inactivity was responsible for 8.9% of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. The remaining factors, including high red and processed meat intake, low fruit intake, alcohol drinking, overweight/obesity and smoking, accounted for 8.6%, 6.4%, 5.4%, 5.3% and 4.9% of colorectal cancer, respectively. Overall, 45.5% of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality were attributable to the joint effects of these seven risk factors. Tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, overweight or obesity, physical inactivity, low vegetable intake, low fruit intake, and high red and processed meat intake were responsible for nearly 46% of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in China in 2012. Our findings could provide a basis for developing guidelines of colorectal cancer prevention and control in China.

  20. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective.

  1. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  2. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Stool DNA and Other Noninvasive Modalities.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James R; Aggarwal, Ashish; Imperiale, Thomas F

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer screening dates to the discovery of precancerous adenomatous tissue. Screening modalities and guidelines directed at prevention and early detection have evolved and resulted in a significant decrease in the prevalence and mortality of colorectal cancer via direct visualization or using specific markers. Despite continued efforts and an overall reduction in deaths attributed to colorectal cancer over the last 25 years, colorectal cancer remains one of the most common causes of malignancy-associated deaths. In attempt to further reduce the prevalence of colorectal cancer and associated deaths, continued improvement in screening quality and adherence remains key. Noninvasive screening modalities are actively being explored. Identification of specific genetic alterations in the adenoma-cancer sequence allow for the study and development of noninvasive screening modalities beyond guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing which target specific alterations or a panel of alterations. The stool DNA test is the first noninvasive screening tool that targets both human hemoglobin and specific genetic alterations. In this review we discuss stool DNA and other commercially available noninvasive colorectal cancer screening modalities in addition to other targets which previously have been or are currently under study.

  3. Systems Support Mapping in Guiding Self-Management in Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-30

    Cancer Survivor; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8

  4. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  5. Lifestyle modification: A primary prevention approach to colorectal cancer

    Early detection of cancer through screening is an important step in decreasing both morbidity and mortality. Likewise, specific modifiable lifestyle behaviors are associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer. Lifestyle practices have also been shown to maximize health after the primary treatmen...

  6. Lower or Standard Dose Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-22

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  7. Detection of colorectal cancer using time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Kwek, Leong-Chuan; Chia, Teck-Chee; Lim, Chu-Sing; Tang, Choong-Leong; Ang, Wuan-Suan; Zhou, Miao-Chang; Loke, Po-Ling

    2006-04-01

    As we know Quantum mechanics is a mathematical theory that can describe the behavior of objects that are at microscopic level. Time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer monitors events that occur during the lifetime of the excited state. This time ranges from a few picoseconds to hundreds of nanoseconds. That is an extremely important advance as it allows environmental parameters to be monitored in a spatially defined manner in the specimen under study. This technique is based on the application of Quantum Mechanics. This principle is applied in our project as we are trying to use different fluorescence spectra to detect biological molecules commonly found in cancerous colorectal tissue and thereby differentiate the cancerous and non-cancerous colorectal polyps more accurately and specifically. In this paper, we use Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer (Edinburgh Instruments FL920) to measure decay time of autofluorescence of colorectal cancerous and normal tissue sample. All specimens are from Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singapore General Hospital. The tissues are placed in the time-resolved autofluorescence instrument, which records and calculates the decay time of the autofluorescence in the tissue sample at the excitation and emission wavelengths pre-determined from a conventional spectrometer. By studying the decay time,τ, etc. for cancerous and normal tissue, we aim to present time-resolved autofluorescence as a feasible technique for earlier detection of malignant colorectal tissues. By using this concept, we try to contribute an algorithm even an application tool for real time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer for clinical services.

  8. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  9. Economic Burden of Colorectal Cancer in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Ju-Young; Oh, In-Hwan; Kim, Young Ae; Seo, Hye-Young; Lee, Yo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The incidence and survival rate of colorectal cancer in Korea are increasing because of improved screening, treatment technologies, and lifestyle changes. In this aging population, increases in economic cost result. This study was conducted to estimate the economic burden of colorectal cancer utilizing claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Methods Economic burdens of colorectal cancer were estimated using prevalence data and patients were defined as those who received ambulatory treatment from medical institutions or who had been hospitalized due to colorectal cancer under the International Classification of Disease 10th revision codes from C18-C21. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer were calculated as direct costs and indirect costs. Results The prevalence rate (per 100 000 people) of those who were treated for colorectal cancer during 2010 was 165.48. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer in 2010 were 3 trillion and 100 billion Korean won (KRW), respectively. Direct costs included 1 trillion and 960 billion KRW (62.85%), respectively and indirect costs were 1 trillion and 160 billion (37.15%), respectively. Conclusions Colorectal cancer has a large economic burden. Efforts should be made to reduce the economic burden of the disease through primary and secondary prevention. PMID:24744825

  10. Colorectal Cancer Awareness for Women via Facebook: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Brittain, Kelly; Pennings Kamp, Kendra J; Salaysay, Zachary

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death among U.S. women. Women report being screened for colorectal cancer less often than men, and if colorectal cancer screening guidelines were routinely followed, approximately 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented. Many colorectal cancer screening interventions have not used Facebook, which is the most popular social media site among women. Little is known about engaging women in colorectal cancer screening and risk reduction information using Facebook. The "Colorectal Cancer Screening Awareness for Women" Facebook page was created to promote colorectal cancer screening and risk reduction awareness among women. Facebook posts targeted women aged 45-64 years and highlighted colorectal cancer screening methods, guidelines, and colorectal cancer risk reduction strategies. Demographics and data about the women's interactions with the page were collected using Facebook analytics and analyzed. The majority of the 391 users of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Awareness for Women Facebook page were women aged 45-54 years (56.5%). The most "liked" posts were related to colorectal cancer risk reduction behaviors. In an effort to increase routine colorectal cancer screening and colorectal cancer risk reduction behaviors, gastroenterology nurses and practices should consider Facebook as a good method to regularly engage women in colorectal cancer screening and colorectal cancer risk reduction information.

  11. Autofluorescence polarization spectroscopy of cancerous and normal colorectal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Ts.; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Vladimirov, B.; Terziev, I.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Avramov, L.

    2016-01-01

    The wide spread of colorectal cancer and high mortality rate among the patients, brings it to a level of high public health concern. Implementation of standard endoscopic surveillance proves to be effective for reduction of colorectal cancer patients' mortality, since its early diagnosis allows eradication of the disease prior to invasive cancer development, but its application in common clinical practice is still limited. Therefore the development of complimentary diagnostic techniques of the standard white-light endoscopy is on high demand. The non-invasive and highly informative nature of the fluorescence spectroscopy allow to use it as the most realistic prospect of an add-on "red flag" technique for early endoscopy detection of colorectal cancer. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) is a steady-state approach that is used for evaluation of specific fluorescence characteristics of cancerous colorectal tissues in our studies. The feasibility of polarization fluorescence technique to enhance the contrast between normal and cancerous tissues was investigated as well. Additional linear polarizing optics was used on the way of the excitation and emission fluorescence light beams. The polarizing effects were investigated in parallel and perpendicular linear polarization modes respectively. The excitation applied was in the region of 280 - 440 nm, with 10 nm scanning step, and the fluorescence emission was detected in the region of 300 - 800 nm. Our previous experience with SFS technique showed its great potential for accurate, highly sensitive and specific discrimination between cancerous and normal colorectal tissue. Since one of the major sources of endogenous fluorescence with diagnostic meaning is the structural protein - collagen, which is characterized with high anisotropy, we've expected and observed an enhancement of the spectral differences between cancerous and normal colorectal tissue, which could be beneficial for the colorectal tumour' diagnostics

  12. Menopause and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, S; Gallus, S; Talamini, R; Tavani, A; Negri, E; Vecchia, C La

    2000-01-01

    Post-menopausal women who have never used hormone replacement therapy have a higher risk of colon, but not rectal, cancer than do premenopausal women of the same age, socio-cultural class and dietary habits. Such risk increase seems to last about 10 years and to be restricted to lean women, a group who have lower levels of oestradiol after ovarian function ceases after menopause. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10839302

  13. Colorectal Cancer Screening: An Educational Intervention for Nurse Practitioners to Increase Screening Awareness and Participation
.

    PubMed

    Slyne, Tai C; Gautam, Ramraj; King, Valerie

    2017-10-01

    Colorectal cancer screening aims to detect colorectal cancer at an early stage, when treatment is more likely to be curative. Lack of participation in such screening is a major issue in primary care practices, where nurse practitioners (NPs) often provide care. This study aimed to determine whether an educational intervention for NPs would increase their awareness of, and increase patients' participation in, colorectal cancer screening. 
.

  14. Estrogen and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality.

    PubMed

    Lavasani, Sayeh; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Prentice, Ross L; Kato, Ikuko; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C; Young, Alicia; Rodabough, Rebecca; Hubbell, F Allan; Mahinbakht, Ali; Simon, Michael S

    2015-09-15

    The preponderance of observational studies describe an association between the use of estrogen alone and a lower incidence of colorectal cancer. In contrast, no difference in the incidence of colorectal cancer was seen in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) randomized, placebo-controlled trial with estrogen alone after a mean intervention of 7.1 years and cumulative follow-up of 13.2 years. This study extends these findings by providing detailed analyses of the effects of estrogen alone on the histology, grade, and stage of colorectal cancer, relevant subgroups, and deaths from and after colorectal cancer. The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 10,739 postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy. Participants were assigned to conjugated equine estrogen at 0.625 mg/d (n = 5279) or a matching placebo (n = 5409). Rates of colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths from and after colorectal cancer were assessed throughout the study. Colorectal cancer rates in the estrogen-alone and placebo groups were comparable: 0.14% and 0.12% per year, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.58; P = .43). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between the 2 groups throughout the study. The grade, stage, and location of colorectal cancer did not differ between the randomization groups. There were more colorectal cancer deaths in the estrogen-alone group (34 [0.05%] vs 24 [0.03%]; HR, 1.46, 95% CI, 0.86-2.46; P = .16), but the difference was not statistically significant. The colorectal cancer incidence was higher for participants with a history of colon polyp removal in the estrogen-alone group (0.23% vs 0.02%; HR, 13.47; nominal 95% CI, 1.76-103.0; P < .001). The use of estrogen alone in postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy does not influence the incidence of colorectal cancer or deaths from or after colorectal cancer. A possibly higher risk of colorectal cancer in women with

  15. Personalizing therapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ashley; Ma, Brigette B Y

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. Several important scientific discoveries in the molecular biology of CRC have changed clinical practice in oncology. These included the comprehensive genome-wide profiling of CRC by the Cancer Genome Atlas Network, the discovery of mutations along the RAS-RAF signaling pathway as major determinants of response to antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor, the elucidation of new molecular subsets of CRC or gene signatures that may predict clinical outcome after adjuvant chemotherapy, and the innovative targeting of the family of vascular endothelial growth factor and receptors. These new data have allowed oncologists to individualize drug therapy on the basis of a patient's tumor's unique molecular profile, especially in the management of metastatic CRC. This review article will discuss the progress of personalized medicine in the contemporary management of CRC. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and addresses the issues that arise in diagnosing and treating this patient group. By highlighting these difficulties, this review aims to improve understanding and to provide clearer insight into both surgical and non-surgical management.

  17. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and addresses the issues that arise in diagnosing and treating this patient group. By highlighting these difficulties, this review aims to improve understanding and to provide clearer insight into both surgical and non-surgical management. PMID:24334910

  18. Early PET/CT scan is more effective than RECIST in predicting outcome of patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer treated with preoperative chemotherapy plus bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Lastoria, Secondo; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Caracò, Corradina; Nasti, Guglielmo; Aloj, Luigi; Arrichiello, Cecilia; de Lutio di Castelguidone, Elisabetta; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Romano, Giovanni; Giordano, Pasqualina; Signoriello, Simona; Gallo, Ciro; Perrone, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Markers predictive of treatment effect might be useful to improve the treatment of patients with metastatic solid tumors. Particularly, early changes in tumor metabolism measured by PET/CT with (18)F-FDG could predict the efficacy of treatment better than standard dimensional Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) response. We performed PET/CT evaluation before and after 1 cycle of treatment in patients with resectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer, within a phase 2 trial of preoperative FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. For each lesion, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and the total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were determined. On the basis of previous studies, a ≤ -50% change from baseline was used as a threshold for significant metabolic response for maximum SUV and, exploratively, for TLG. Standard RECIST response was assessed with CT after 3 mo of treatment. Pathologic response was assessed in patients undergoing resection. The association between metabolic and CT/RECIST and pathologic response was tested with the McNemar test; the ability to predict progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was tested with the Log-rank test and a multivariable Cox model. Thirty-three patients were analyzed. After treatment, there was a notable decrease of all the parameters measured by PET/CT. Early metabolic PET/CT response (either SUV- or TLG-based) had a stronger, independent and statistically significant predictive value for PFS and OS than both CT/RECIST and pathologic response at multivariate analysis, although with different degrees of statistical significance. The predictive value of CT/RECIST response was not significant at multivariate analysis. PET/CT response was significantly predictive of long-term outcomes during preoperative treatment of patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer, and its predictive ability was higher than that of CT/RECIST response after 3 mo of treatment. Such findings need to be confirmed

  19. [Diagnostic value of dynamic monitoring of C-reactive protein in drain drainage to predict early anastomotic leakage after colorectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia; Zheng, Lei; Li, Runtian; Hao, Chunmin; Gao, Wenbin; Feng, Ziwei; Yin, Guangya; Wang, Yue

    2017-09-25

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic monitoring of C-reactive protein (CRP) in drainage fluid in predicting early anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. This study enrolled 172 patients, who were diagnosed as colorectal cancer before operation and underwent radical surgery, without residual tumor tissues by postoperative pathology and perioperative infection, at the Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital between July 2015 and January 2016. The C-reactive(CRP) protein level in drainage fluid was continuously monitored from postoperative days (POD) 1 to 5. CRP level was compared between anastomotic leakage (AL) group and non-anastomotic leakage (NAL) group. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was used to estimate the value of monitoring CRP in drainage fluid to predict anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. Among 172 patients, 101 cases were male and 71 cases were female, with age of (59.9±10.3) years. Anastomotic leakage occurred after colorectal surgery in 24 cases(14.0%, AL group ) and other 148 cases were defined as NAL group. Other than body mass index (BMI), differences in baseline data were not statistically significant between two groups. The CRP lever in AL group and NAL group showed rising trend from POD1 to POD4 [Day 1: (6.7±8.4) g/L vs. (8.0±10.6) g/L; Day 2: (24.8±14.6) g/L vs. (28.3±21.1) g/L, Day 3: (54.8±26.5) g/L vs. (53.8±27.6)g/L, Day 4: (62.0±32.2) g/L vs. (58.4±30.7) g/L], while the differences were not significant (all P>0.05). At POD 5, the CRP lever of AL group increased continuously, while that of NAL group decreased with significant difference [(65.3±38.9) g/L vs. (44.7±39.5) g/L, t=-2.85, P=0.005]. Further stratification analysis on AL group revealed CRP level in early AL (AL occurrence POD 10) showed rising trend from POD 1 to 4, then decreased slightly at POD 5, but whose differences were not significant

  20. Colorectal Cancer - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali ( ... हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Japanese (日本語) Expand Section Cancer of the Colon and ...

  1. Colorectal cancer screening with virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yaorong; Vining, David J.; Ahn, David K.; Stelts, David R.

    1999-05-01

    Early detection and removal of colorectal polyps have been proven to reduce mortality from colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Unfortunately, traditional techniques for CRC examination (i.e., barium enema, sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy) are unsuitable for mass screening because of either low accuracy or poor public acceptance, costs, and risks. Virtual colonoscopy (VC) is a minimally invasive alternative that is based on tomographic scanning of the colon. After a patient's bowel is optimally cleansed and distended with gas, a fast tomographic scan, typically helical computed tomography (CT), of the abdomen is performed during a single breath-hold acquisition. Two-dimensional (2D) slices and three-dimensional (3D) rendered views of the colon lumen generated from the tomographic data are then examined for colorectal polyps. Recent clinical studies conducted at several institutions including ours have shown great potential for this technology to be an effective CRC screening tool. In this paper, we describe new methods to improve bowel preparation, colon lumen visualization, colon segmentation, and polyp detection. Our initial results show that VC with the new bowel preparation and imaging protocol is capable of achieving accuracy comparable to conventional colonoscopy and our new algorithms for image analysis contribute to increased accuracy and efficiency in VC examinations.

  2. MicroRNA-93 inhibits tumor growth and early relapse of human colorectal cancer by affecting genes involved in the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Yang, I-Ping; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chen, Ku-Chung; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Huang, Szu-Wei; Chou, Wen-Wen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank

    2012-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with high recurrence and mortality. Because deregulation of microRNAs is associated with CRC development and recurrence, the expression levels of microRNAs can be a simple and reliable biomarker to detect postoperative early relapse, thereby helping physicians to treat high-risk patients more efficiently. We used microRNA arrays and observed that microRNA-93 had substantially different expression levels in early (recurrence within 12 months after surgery) and non-early relapse CRC patients. The replication study, which included 35 early relapse and 42 non-early relapse subjects, further confirmed overexpression of microRNA-93 in non-early relapse samples. The in vitro and in vivo effects of microRNA-93 were investigated by examining cell proliferation, migration and invasion, as well as cell cycles, target-gene expression and xenograft in null mice. Cellular studies showed that the overexpression of microRNA-93 inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and migration but not invasion. The cell cycle studies also revealed that microRNA-93 caused an accumulation of the G2 population. However, microRNA-93 could not induce cell apoptosis or necrosis. Functional studies showed that microRNA-93 could suppress CCNB1 protein expression leading to cell cycle arrest in the G2 phase. Moreover, microRNA-93 repressed expression of ERBB2, p21 and VEGF, all of which are involved in cell proliferation. MicroRNA-93 also suppressed tumor growth in null mice. This study showed that microRNA-93 can inhibit tumorigenesis and reduce the recurrence of CRC; these findings may have potential clinical applications for predicting the recurrence of CRC.

  3. Colorectal cancer mortality in Poland – analysis of regional variation

    PubMed Central

    Kempińska-Mirosławska, Bogumiła; Mik, Michał; Dziki, Łukasz; Dziki, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In 1999 in Poland 7,139 people died of colon cancer, while in 2008 this number rose to 9,915. Among malignant tumours, colorectal cancer is the second most commonly occurring one, frequently leading to death. The main reason for this is the fact that in 50% of patients with this cancer the illness is diagnosed at an advanced stage already. The risk increases significantly after 60 years of age. The aim of study was analysing the mortality of patients with colorectal cancer over 10 years in Poland (1999-2008), in both men and women from all provinces in the country. Material and methods The basis for the study was the number of deaths caused by colorectal cancer taking into account sex. Statistical data were drawn from the National Cancer Registry. Results In 1999 in Poland 3,706 men and 3,433 women died of colorectal cancer, while in 2008 the number of deaths stood at 5,385 and 4,530 respectively. In the years 1999-2008, colorectal cancer mortality rates among men were approximately 1.5 times higher than among women, and the majority of provinces demonstrate an upward trend. Among women the differences in the values of the coefficients are less clear. Conclusions Early detection of cancer could significantly reduce mortality among patients with colon cancer. Screening for colorectal cancer and colonoscopy are tests that should permanently become a part of preventive measures aimed at detecting disease and teaching risk factors, particularly in males and people over 60 years of age. PMID:24701216

  4. The evolving role of monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer: early presumptions and impact on clinical trial development.

    PubMed

    Eng, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Targeted biologic agents have an established role in treating metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Bevacizumab, a recombinant monoclonal antibody against the vascular endothelial growth factor ligand is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bevacizumab-naïve patients. Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is FDA approved as a single agent, or in combination with irinotecan, in both irinotecan-naïve and refractory patients, and has additional efficacy in combination with oxaliplatin. Panitumumab, a fully human EGFR mAb, is FDA approved as a single agent in refractory patients but has additional efficacy in combination with chemotherapy. After reaching a temporary therapeutic plateau of FDA-approved agents for the treatment of mCRC, pivotal results have developed that critically affect the care for these patients. Correlative data from randomized trials of EGFR inhibitors across disease settings have demonstrated higher response rates, specifically for patients with wild-type K-RAS tumors. The interpretation of the B-RAF mutation and other molecular markers may further define the appropriateness of anti-EGFR therapy. Recent literature revealed that the first-line use of combined anti-EGFR therapy plus bevacizumab resulted in inferior outcomes and additional toxicities. Furthermore, the role of biologic agents for locally advanced colon cancer cannot be advocated at this time. With impending changes in the health care system, the economic impact of mAbs will continue to be scrutinized. Hence, as the significance of molecular markers continues to develop, their role as it pertains to the appropriate use of biologic agents in the treatment of mCRC will continue to evolve.

  5. Examining racial disparities in colorectal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jamillah; Bumpers, Kevin; Ogunlade, Vickie; Glover, Roni; Davis, Sharon; Counts-Spriggs, Margaret; Kauh, John; Flowers, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately burdened with colorectal cancer. Although incidence and mortality rates have declined in the past two decades, the disparity in health outcomes has progressively increased. This comprehensive review examines the existing literature regarding racial disparities in colorectal cancer screening, stage at diagnosis, and treatment to determine if differences exist in the quality of care delivered to African Americans. A comprehensive review of relevant literature was performed. Two databases (EBSCOHOST Academic Search Premier and Scopus) were searched from 2000 to 2007. Articles that assessed racial disparities in colorectal cancer screening, stage of disease at diagnosis, and treatment were selected. The majority of studies identified examined colorectal cancer screening outcomes. Although racial disparities in screening have diminished in recent years, African American men and women continue to have higher colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and are diagnosed at more advanced stages. Several studies regarding stage of disease at diagnosis identified socioeconomic status (SES) and health insurance status as major determinants of disparity. However, some studies found significant racial disparities even after controlling for these factors. Racial disparities in treatment were also found at various diagnostic stages. Many factors affecting disparities between African Americans and Whites in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality remain unexplained. Although the importance of tumor biology, genetics, and lifestyle risk factors have been established, prime sociodemographic factors need further examination to understand variances in the care of African Americans diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

  6. Update on Sporadic Colorectal Cancer Genetics.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Karin M

    2018-05-01

    Our understanding of the genetics of colorectal cancer has changed dramatically over recent years. Colorectal cancer can be classified in multiple different ways. Along with the advent of whole-exome sequencing, we have gained an understanding of the scale of the genetic changes found in sporadic colorectal cancer. We now know that there are multiple pathways that are commonly involved in the evolution of colorectal cancer including Wnt/β-catenin, RAS, EGFR, and PIK3 kinase. Another recent leap in our understanding of colorectal cancer genetics is the recognition that many, if not all tumors, are actually genetically heterogeneous within individual tumors and also between tumors. Recent research has revealed the prognostic and possibly therapeutic implications of various specific mutations, including specific mutations in BRAF and KRAS . There is increasing interest in the use of mutation testing for screening and surveillance through stool and circulating DNA testing. Recent advances in translational research in colorectal cancer genetics are dramatically changing our understanding of colorectal cancer and will likely change therapy and surveillance in the near future.

  7. Tailored telephone counseling increases colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Rawl, Susan M; Christy, Shannon M; Monahan, Patrick O; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L; Rex, Douglas

    2015-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were randomly assigned to receive one of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening. Participants received either a tailored telephone counseling plus brochures intervention or a non-tailored print brochures intervention. Data were collected at baseline and 3 months post-baseline. Group differences and the effect of the interventions on adherence and stage movement for colorectal cancer screening were examined using t-tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression. Individuals in the tailored telephone counseling plus brochures group were significantly more likely to complete colorectal cancer screening and to move forward on stage of change for fecal occult blood test, any colorectal cancer test stage and stage of the risk-appropriate test compared with individuals in the non-tailored brochure group at 3 months post-baseline. A tailored telephone counseling plus brochures intervention successfully promoted forward stage movement and colorectal cancer screening adherence among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Establishment of apoptotic regulatory network for genetic markers of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yibin; Shan, Guoyong; Nan, Kejun

    2017-03-01

    Our purpose is to screen out genetic markers applicable to early diagnosis for colorectal cancer and to establish apoptotic regulatory network model for colorectal cancer, thereby providing theoretical evidence and targeted therapy for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Taking databases including CNKI, VIP, Wanfang data, Pub Med, and MEDLINE as main sources of literature retrieval, literatures associated with genetic markers applied to early diagnosis of colorectal cancer were searched to perform comprehensive and quantitative analysis by Meta analysis, hence screening genetic markers used in early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were employed to establish apoptotic regulatory network model based on screened genetic markers, and then verification experiment was conducted. Through Meta analysis, seven genetic markers were screened out, including WWOX, K-ras, COX-2, p53, APC, DCC and PTEN, among which DCC shows highest diagnostic efficiency. GO analysis of genetic markers found that six genetic markers played role in biological process, molecular function and cellular component. It was indicated in apoptotic regulatory network built by KEGG analysis and verification experiment that WWOX could promote tumor cell apoptotic in colorectal cancer and elevate expression level of p53. The apoptotic regulatory model of colorectal cancer established in this study provides clinically theoretical evidence and targeted therapy for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  9. Radioimmunoguided surgery for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, D J; Burak, W E; Young, D C; Arnold, M W; Martin, E W

    1996-05-01

    Operations for patients with colorectal cancer are based on traditions established by historical experience. Radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) provides new information that challenges these traditions. Thirty-two patients with primary colorectal cancer underwent RIGS after being injected with anti-TAG-72 murine monoclonal antibody CC49 labeled with iodine-125. Sixteen of the patients had all gross tumor and RIGS-positive tissue removed (RIGS-negative group), and 16 had only traditional extirpation of the tumor because RIGS-positive tissue was too diffuse (RIGS-positive group). In the 16 patients having all RIGS-positive tissue removed, five had traditional regional en bloc resections and 11 had additional extraregional tissues resected. Identification of extraregional disease added two liver resections and 25 lymphadenectomies: 10 of the gastrohepatic ligament, five celia axis, six retroperitoneal, and four iliac. With a median follow-up of 37 months, survival in the RIGS-negative group is 100%. In 14 of 16 patients (87.5%) there is no evidence of disease. In the RIGS-positive group, follow-up shows 14 of 16 patients are dead and two are alive with disease (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that RIGS identifies patterns of disease dissemination different from those identified by traditional staging techniques. Removal of additional RIGS-positive tissues in nontraditional areas may improve survival.

  10. Clinical endpoints for developing pharmaceuticals to manage patients with sporadic or genetic risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rial, Nathaniel S.; Zell, Jason A.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Gerner, Eugene W.

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer, current clinical practice focuses on screening for early detection and polypectomy as a form of secondary prevention, complemented with surgical interventions when appropriate. No pharmaceutical agent is currently approved for use in clinical practice for the management of patients with risk of colorectal cancer. This article will review earlier attempts to develop pharmaceuticals for use in managing patients with sporadic or genetic risk of colorectal cancer. It will also discuss therapeutic endpoints under evaluation in current efforts to develop drugs for treating colorectal cancer risk factors. PMID:22928902

  11. Colorectal Cancer Screening in Asia.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Han-Mo; Hsu, Wen-Feng; Chang, Li-Chun; Wu, Ming-Hsiang

    2017-08-10

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing in Asia, especially in regions with higher levels of economic development. Several Asian countries have launched population CRC screening programs to combat this devastating disease because previous studies have demonstrated that either fecal occult blood test or lower gastrointestinal endoscopy can effectively reduce CRC mortality. Screening includes engaging the population, testing, administering a confirmation examination, and treating screening-detected neoplasms; thus, monitoring the whole process using measurable indicators over time is of utmost importance. Only when the quality of every step is secured can the effectiveness of CRC screening be maximized. Screening and verification examination rates remain low in Asian countries, and important infrastructure, including cancer or death registry systems, colonoscopy capacity, and reasonable subsidization for screening, is lacking or insufficient. Future research should identify potential local barriers to screening. Good communication and dialog among screening organizers, clinicians, professional societies, and public health workers are indispensible for successful screening programs.

  12. Impact of screening colonoscopy on outcomes in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takahisa; Ono, Akiko; Kakugawa, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Minori; Saito, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in both men and women worldwide and a good candidate for screening programs. There are two modalities of colorectal cancer screening: (i) population-based screening and (ii) opportunistic screening. The first one is based on organized, well-coordinated, monitored and established programs with a systematic invitation covering the entire target population. In contrast, opportunistic screening tests are offered to people who are being examined for other reasons. Recently, a variety of colorectal cancer screening tests have become available; each country should make a choice, based on national demographics and resources, on the screening method to be used. Fecal occult blood test, especially the fecal immunochemical test, would be the best modality for decreasing colorectal cancer mortality through population-based screening. In contrast, if the aim includes the early detection of colorectal cancer and adenomas, endoscopic methods are more appropriate. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Chemoprevention, chemotherapy, and chemoresistance in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jose J G; Sanchez de Medina, Fermin; Castaño, Beatriz; Bujanda, Luis; Romero, Marta R; Martinez-Augustin, Olga; Moral-Avila, Rosario Del; Briz, Oscar

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in industrialized countries. Chemoprevention is a promising approach, but studies demonstrating their usefulness in large populations are still needed. Among several compounds with chemopreventive ability, cyclooxygenase inhibitors have received particular attention. However, these agents are not without side effects, which must be weighed against their beneficial actions. Early diagnosis is critical in the management of CRC patients, because, in early stages, surgery is curative in >90% of cases. If diagnosis occurs at stages II and III, which is often the case, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy before surgery are, in a few cases, recommended. Because of the high risk of recurrence in advanced cancers, chemotherapy is maintained after tumor resection. Chemotherapy is also indicated when the patient has metastases and in advanced cancer located in the rectum. In the last decade, the use of anticancer drugs in monotherapy or in combined regimens has markedly increased the survival of patients with CRC at stages III and IV. Although the rate of success is higher than in other gastrointestinal tumors, adverse effects and development of chemoresistance are important limitations to pharmacological therapy. Genetic profiling regarding mechanisms of chemoresistance are needed to carry out individualized prediction of the lack of effectiveness of pharmacological regimens. This would minimize side effects and prevent the selection of aggressive, cross-resistant clones, as well as avoiding undesirable delays in the use of the most efficient therapeutic approaches to treat these patients.

  14. A Blueprint to Advance Colorectal Cancer Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Le, Dung T; Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Morse, Michael A; Heery, Christopher R; Dwyer, Andrea; Marsilje, Thomas H; Brodsky, Arthur N; Chan, Emily; Deming, Dustin A; Diaz, Luis A; Fridman, Wolf H; Goldberg, Richard M; Hamilton, Stanley R; Housseau, Franck; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Kang, S Peter; Krishnamurthi, Smitha S; Lieu, Christopher H; Messersmith, Wells; Sears, Cynthia L; Segal, Neil H; Yang, Arvin; Moss, Rebecca A; Cha, Edward; O'Donnell-Tormey, Jill; Roach, Nancy; Davis, Anjelica Q; McAbee, Keavy; Worrall, Sharyn; Benson, Al B

    2017-11-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard of care for many cancers. However, colorectal cancer had been generally resistant to immunotherapy, despite features in common with sensitive tumors. Observations of substantial clinical activity for checkpoint blockade in colorectal cancers with defective mismatch repair (microsatellite instability-high tumors) have reignited interest in the search for immunotherapies that could be extended to the larger microsatellite stable (MSS) population. The Cancer Research Institute and Fight Colorectal Cancer convened a group of scientists, clinicians, advocates, and industry experts in colorectal cancer and immunotherapy to compile ongoing research efforts, identify gaps in translational and clinical research, and provide a blueprint to advance immunotherapy. We identified lack of a T-cell inflamed phenotype (due to inadequate T-cell infiltration, inadequate T-cell activation, or T-cell suppression) as a broad potential explanation for failure of checkpoint blockade in MSS. The specific cellular and molecular underpinnings for these various mechanisms are unclear. Whether biomarkers with prognostic value, such as the immunoscores and IFN signatures, would also predict benefit for immunotherapies in MSS colon cancer is unknown, but if so, these and other biomarkers for measuring the potential for an immune response in patients with colorectal cancer will need to be incorporated into clinical guidelines. We have proposed a framework for research to identify immunologic factors that may be modulated to improve immunotherapy for colorectal cancer patients, with the goal that the biomarkers and treatment strategies identified will become part of the routine management of colorectal cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(11); 942-9. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. 5-FU Based Maintenance Therapy in RAS Wild Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer After Induction With FOLFOX Plus Panitumumab

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-28

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; RAS Wild Type; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  16. Extent of field change in colorectal cancers with BRAF mutation

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Aaron; Chang, Heidi Sian Ying; Tan, Kok Yang; Sam, Xin Xiu; Khoo, Avery; Choo, Shoa Nian; Nga, Min En; Wan, Wei Keat

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sporadic colorectal cancers with BRAF mutations constitute two distinct subgroups of colorectal cancers. Recent studies have linked the presence of the BRAF mutation to a familial inheritance pattern. This was a proof-of-concept study that aimed to examine: (a) the extent of field change in sporadic colorectal cancers with BRAF mutation; and (b) the extent of resection margins required and the pattern of DNA mismatch repair protein loss in these tumours. METHODS Eight microsatellite instability-high tumours with positive BRAF mutation from an existing histopathological database were selected for BRAF mutation and mismatch repair protein analysis. RESULTS All the resection margins were negative for BRAF mutation. Three tumours had loss of MLH1 and PMS2 expressions, and five tumours had no protein loss. Six peritumoral tissues were negative and one was positive for BRAF mutation. CONCLUSION The results suggest that any early field change effect is restricted to the immediate vicinity of the tumour and is not a pan-colonic phenomenon. Current guidelines on resection margins are adequate for BRAF mutation-positive colorectal cancers. Any suggestion of a hereditary link to these tumours is likely not related to germline BRAF gene mutations. The pattern of protein loss reinforces previous findings for the two subgroups of BRAF mutation-positive colorectal cancers. PMID:28210747

  17. Diet, microbiota, and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akin, Hakan; Tözün, Nurdan

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world causing nearly 500,000 deaths every year. In addition to genetic background, environmental factors including diet and lifestyle are accepted as major contributors to adenoma and CRC development. Lifestyle factors include high BMI, obesity, and reduced physical activity. Growing interest and accumulating data on human microbiota implicate that host-microbe interplay has an important role in the development of metabolic, neoplastic, and inflammatory diseases. Findings from recent studies suggest that colon cancer risk is determined by the interaction between diet and gut microbiota. Dietary changes affect gut microbiota and conversely microbiota mediates the generation of dietary factors triggering colon cancer. Identification of the microbial communities associated with carcinogenesis is of crucial importance. Nowadays, with the evolvement of culture-independent molecular techniques, it has become possible to identify main bacterial species in healthy individuals, inflammatory conditions, and CRC. Some recent studies have shown the differences in intestinal microbiota between colon cancer patients and healthy individuals. Animal studies have provided a better understanding of interaction between pathobionts and symbionts in the development of colon cancer. There is no single causative organism identified in CRC; however, there is strong evidence that reduction of protective bacteria, increase in some bacteria (ie, fusobacterium members; Bacteroides/Prevotella), and age-related changes in microbiota have an impact on adenoma or cancer development. Future studies will enable us to understand procarcinogenic and anticarcinogenic mechanisms and give insights to rational manipulation of the microbiota with prebiotics, probiotics, or dietary modifications.

  18. Molecular Classification and Correlates in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; Goel, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    Molecular classification of colorectal cancer is evolving. As our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis improves, we are incorporating new knowledge into the classification system. In particular, global genomic status [microsatellite instability (MSI) status and chromosomal instability (CIN) status] and epigenomic status [CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) status] play a significant role in determining clinical, pathological and biological characteristics of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss molecular classification and molecular correlates based on MSI status and CIMP status in colorectal cancer. Studying molecular correlates is important in cancer research because it can 1) provide clues to pathogenesis, 2) propose or support the existence of a new molecular subtype, 3) alert investigators to be aware of potential confounding factors in association studies, and 4) suggest surrogate markers in clinical or research settings. PMID:18165277

  19. Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... colonoscopy. People are usually not sedated for this test. Studies have shown that people who have regular screening ... patients receive some form of sedation during the test. Studies suggest that colonoscopy reduces deaths from colorectal cancer ...

  20. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kanthan, Rani; Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Kanthan, Selliah Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer. PMID:22969796

  1. The stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairudin, Nur Izzati; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. To better understand about the kinetics of cancer growth, mathematical models are used to provide insight into the progression of this natural process which enables physicians and oncologists to determine optimal radiation and chemotherapy schedules and develop a prognosis, both of which are indispensable for treating cancer. This thesis investigates the stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models. We found that continuous saturating feedback is the best available model of colorectal cancer growth. We also performed stability analysis. The result shows that cancer progress in sequence of genetic mutations or epigenetic which lead to a very large number of cells population until become unbounded. The cell population growth initiate and its saturating feedback is overcome when mutation changes causing the net per-capita growth rate of stem or transit cells exceed critical threshold.

  2. Primary and secondary prevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tárraga López, Pedro J; Albero, Juan Solera; Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer in men, after lung and prostate cancer, and is the second most frequent cancer in women after breast cancer. It is also the third cause of death in men and women separately, and is the second most frequent cause of death by cancer if both genders are considered together. CRC represents approximately 10% of deaths by cancer. Modifiable risk factors of CRC include smoking, physical inactivity, being overweight and obesity, eating processed meat, and drinking alcohol excessively. CRC screening programs are possible only in economically developed countries. However, attention should be paid in the future to geographical areas with ageing populations and a western lifestyle.19,20 Sigmoidoscopy screening done with people aged 55-64 years has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of CRC by 33% and mortality by CRC by 43%. To assess the effect on the incidence and mortality of CRC diet and lifestyle and to determine the effect of secondary prevention through early diagnosis of CRC. A comprehensive search of Medline and Pubmed articles related to primary and secondary prevention of CRC and subsequently, a meta-analysis of the same blocks are performed. 225 articles related to primary or secondary prevention of CRC were retrieved. Of these 145 were considered valid on meta-analysis: 12 on epidemiology, 56 on diet and lifestyle, and over 77 different screenings for early detection of CRC. Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. There is no doubt whatsoever which environmental factors, probably diet, may account for these cancer rates. Excessive alcohol consumption and cholesterol-rich diet are associated with a high risk of colon cancer. A diet poor in folic acid and vitamin B6 is also associated with a higher risk of developing colon

  3. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tárraga López, Pedro J; Albero, Juan Solera; Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer in men, after lung and prostate cancer, and is the second most frequent cancer in women after breast cancer. It is also the third cause of death in men and women separately, and is the second most frequent cause of death by cancer if both genders are considered together. CRC represents approximately 10% of deaths by cancer. Modifiable risk factors of CRC include smoking, physical inactivity, being overweight and obesity, eating processed meat, and drinking alcohol excessively. CRC screening programs are possible only in economically developed countries. However, attention should be paid in the future to geographical areas with ageing populations and a western lifestyle.19,20 Sigmoidoscopy screening done with people aged 55–64 years has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of CRC by 33% and mortality by CRC by 43%. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect on the incidence and mortality of CRC diet and lifestyle and to determine the effect of secondary prevention through early diagnosis of CRC. METHODOLOGY: A comprehensive search of Medline and Pubmed articles related to primary and secondary prevention of CRC and subsequently, a meta-analysis of the same blocks are performed. RESULTS 225 articles related to primary or secondary prevention of CRC were retrieved. Of these 145 were considered valid on meta-analysis: 12 on epidemiology, 56 on diet and lifestyle, and over 77 different screenings for early detection of CRC. Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. There is no doubt whatsoever which environmental factors, probably diet, may account for these cancer rates. Excessive alcohol consumption and cholesterol-rich diet are associated with a high risk of colon cancer. A diet poor in folic acid and vitamin B6 is also

  4. Profile of colorectal cancer in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Snigdha; Mukherjee, Ramanuj; Paira, Susil Kumar; Roy, Bipradas; Banerjee, Shubhabrata; Mukherjee, Saibal Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Although colorectal cancer is a major cause of concern in the western population, recent studies are showing the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer to be rapidly rising in Asia. The present study is an insight into the epidemiological profile of colorectal cancer of a representative Eastern Indian population. Over a period of three years, all histologically proved patients with colorectal cancer were assessed for age, sex, body mass index, dietary habits, socioeconomic status and stage of disease. Of a total of 168 patients male to female ratio was 1.7:1.The mean age of presentation was 47.01 years. Although colorectal cancer has been known as a disease of sedentary obese men, 41.66% of the patients were from a low socioeconomic rural set-up and 40.47% were involved in heavy physical labour with only 15% of being obese; 62% patients were harbouring a locally advanced disease at the time of presentation. The epidemiological pattern of colorectal cancer in India is different from that of the west as regards to earlier age of presentation, prevalence in low socio economic class with low fat diet and scanty meat intake.

  5. Abundance of the Organic Anion-transporting Polypeptide OATP4A1 in Early-Stage Colorectal Cancer Patients: Association With Disease Relapse.

    PubMed

    Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Sheikh, Maidah; Ausch, Christoph; Zotter, Simone; Bauer, Heike; Mollik, Marina; Reiner, Angelika; Gleiss, Andreas; Jäger, Walter; Sebesta, Christian; Kriwanek, Stephan; Thalhammer, Theresia

    2018-05-03

    The abundance of OATP4A1 in colorectal cancer (CRC) might be related to tumor progression. This was studied by immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded samples obtained from 178 patients (43 patients with a relapse within 5 y) with early-stage CRC. Positivity for OATP4A1 in tumor cells and noncancerous mucosal cells was proved by double-immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against OATP4A1 and keratin 8, whereas antibodies against appropriate CD markers were used to identify immune cells. Automated microscopic image analysis was used to measure the percentage of OATP4A1-positive cells and OATP4A1 staining intensity in tumor, immune, and adjacent normal-looking mucosal cells separately, as well as in the mucosal and immune cells of 14 nonmalignant tissue samples. In CRC the percentage of OATP4A1-positive cells, but not staining intensity, was significantly higher in tumor and mucosal cells adjacent to the tumor compared to the mucosa of nonmalignant samples (P<0.001 each). No difference was registered between immune cells in malignant and nonmalignant samples. Importantly, high levels of OATP4A1 in immune (odds ratio, 0.73; confidence interval, 0.63-0.85; P<0.001), and tumor cells (odds ratio, 0.79; confidence interval, 0.69-0.91; P<0.001) are significantly associated with a low risk of recurrence and also significantly enhance the discriminative power of other clinical parameters [such as International Union Against Cancer (UICC), adjuvant therapy, localization of the primary tumor] of the risk of relapse (receiver operating characteristics analysis; P=0.002). Using an advanced digital microscopic quantification procedure, we showed that OATP4A1 abundance is negatively associated with tumor recurrence in early-stage CRC. This digital scoring procedure may serve as a novel tool for the assessment of potential prognostic markers in early-stage CRC.

  6. Association between Fusobacterium nucleatum and colorectal cancer: Progress and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Cai, Sanjun; Ma, Yanlei

    2018-01-01

    The initiation and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) involves genetic and epigenetic alterations influenced by dietary and environmental factors. Increasing evidence has linked the intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer. More recently, Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), an opportunistic commensal anaerobe in the oral cavity, has been associated with CRC. Several research teams have reported an overabundance of Fn in human CRC and have elucidated the possible mechanisms by which Fn is involved in colorectal carcinogenesis in vitro and in mouse models. However, the mechanisms by which Fn promotes colorectal carcinogenesis remain unclear. To provide new perspectives for early diagnosis, the identification of high risk populations and treatment for colorectal cancer, this review will summarize the relative research progresses regarding the relationship between Fn and colorectal cancer. PMID:29760804

  7. Association between Fusobacterium nucleatum and colorectal cancer: Progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Cai, Sanjun; Ma, Yanlei

    2018-01-01

    The initiation and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) involves genetic and epigenetic alterations influenced by dietary and environmental factors. Increasing evidence has linked the intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer. More recently, Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), an opportunistic commensal anaerobe in the oral cavity, has been associated with CRC. Several research teams have reported an overabundance of Fn in human CRC and have elucidated the possible mechanisms by which Fn is involved in colorectal carcinogenesis in vitro and in mouse models. However, the mechanisms by which Fn promotes colorectal carcinogenesis remain unclear. To provide new perspectives for early diagnosis, the identification of high risk populations and treatment for colorectal cancer, this review will summarize the relative research progresses regarding the relationship between Fn and colorectal cancer.

  8. Oestrogen receptor beta isoform expression in sporadic colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis and progressive stages of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stevanato Filho, Paulo Roberto; Aguiar Júnior, Samuel; Begnami, Maria Dirlei; Kuasne, Hellen; Spencer, Ranyell Matheus; Nakagawa, Wilson Toshihiko; Bezerra, Tiago Santoro; Kupper, Bruna Catin; Takahashi, Renata Maymi; Barros Filho, Mateus; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Lopes, Ademar

    2017-11-13

    Among the sex hormones, oestrogen may play a role in colorectal cancer, particularly in conjunction with oestrogen receptor-β (ERβ). The expression of ERβ isoform variants and their correlations with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome and sporadic colorectal carcinomas are poorly described. This study aimed to investigate the expression levels of the ERβ1, ERβ2, ERβ4 and ERβ5 isoform variants using quantitative RT-PCR (921 analyses) in FAP, normal mucosa, adenomatous polyps and sporadic colorectal carcinomas. Decreased expression of ERβ isoforms was identified in sporadic polyps and in sporadic colorectal cancer as well as in polyps from FAP syndrome patients compared with normal tissues (p < 0.001). In FAP patients, ERβ1 and ERβ5 isoforms showed significant down-expression in polyps (p < 0.001) compared with matched normal tissues. However, no differences were observed when sporadic colorectal carcinomas were compared to normal mucosa tissues. These findings suggest an association of the ERβ isoform variants in individuals affected by germline mutations of the APC gene. Progressively decreased expression of ERβ was found in polyps at early stages of low-grade dysplasia, followed by T1-T2 and T3-T4 tumours (p < 0.05). In sporadic colorectal cancer, the loss of expression was an independent predictor of recurrence, and ERβ1 and ERβ5 expression levels were associated with better disease-free survival (p = 0.002). These findings may provide a better understanding of oestrogens and their potential preventive and therapeutic effects on sporadic colorectal cancer and cancers associated with FAP syndrome.

  9. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy. PMID:24216997

  10. Epigenetics and colorectal cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  11. Potential roles of microRNAs and ROS in colorectal cancer: diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jingmei; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Zuo, Li

    2017-01-01

    As one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide, colorectal adenocarcinoma often occurs sporadically in individuals aged 50 or above and there is an increase among younger patients under 50. Routine screenings are recommended for this age group to improve early detection. The multifactorial etiology of colorectal cancer consists of both genetic and epigenetic factors. Recently, studies have shown that the development and progression of colorectal cancer can be attributed to aberrant expression of microRNA. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a key role in cancer cell survival, can also lead to carcinogenesis and cancer exacerbations. Given the rapid accumulating knowledge in the field, an updated review regarding microRNA and ROS in colorectal cancer is necessary. An extensive literature search has been conducted in PubMed/Medline databases to review the roles of microRNAs and ROS in colorectal cancer. Unique microRNA expression in tumor tissue, peripheral blood, and fecal samples from patients with colorectal cancer is outlined. Therapeutic approaches focusing on microRNA and ROS in colorectal cancer treatment is also delineated. This review aims to summarize the newest knowledge on the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer in the hopes of discovering novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic techniques. PMID:28061475

  12. Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Colorectal cancer prevention strategies can include avoiding known risk factors, having a healthy lifestyle, taking aspirin, and removing polyps. Learn more about preventing colorectal cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  13. CRCHD Launches National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI CRCHD launches National Screen to Save Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative which aims to increase colorectal cancer screening rates among racially and ethnically diverse and rural communities.

  14. Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Circle of Health for Alaskans

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the colon and rectum is often called colorectal cancer. But in this brochure we use the term ... tests can be used to find polyps or colorectal cancer. Each can be used alone. Sometimes they are ...

  15. Altered Polyamine Profiles in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Markus K; Roine, Antti N; Häkkinen, Merja R; Vepsäläinen, Jouko J; Kumpulainen, Pekka S; Kiviniemi, Mikko S; Lehtimäki, Terho; Oksala, Niku K; Rantanen, Tuomo K

    2018-06-01

    The declining mortality rate of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) can be explained, at least partially, with early diagnosis. Simple diagnostic methods are needed to achieve a maximal patient participation rate in screening. Liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to determine urinary polyamine (PA) profiles. In a prospective setting, 116 patients were included in the study: 57 with CRC, 13 with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 12 with adenoma, and 34 controls. N1,N12-diacetylspermine (DiAcSPM) level was significantly higher in patients with CRC than controls (sensitivity=78.0%, specificity=70.6%; p=0.00049). The level of diacetylated cadaverine (p=0.0068) was lower and that of diacetylated putrescine (p=0.0078) was higher in patients with CRC than in those with IBD. Cadaverine (p=0.00010) and spermine (p=0.042) levels were lower and that of DiAcSPM (p=0.018) higher in patients with CRC than in those with adenoma. The simultaneous determination of urinary PAs by means of LC-MS/MS can be used to discriminate CRC from controls and patients with benign colorectal diseases. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Altered JS-2 expression in colorectal cancers and its clinical pathological relevance.

    PubMed

    Lam, Alfred King-Yin; Gopalan, Vinod; Nassiri, Mohammad Reza; Kasim, Kais; Dissanayake, Jayampathy; Tang, Johnny Chuek-On; Smith, Robert Anthony

    2011-10-01

    JS-2 is a novel gene located at 5p15.2 and originally detected in primary oesophageal cancer. There is no study on the role of JS-2 in colorectal cancer. The aim of this study is to determine the gene copy number and expression of JS-2 in a large cohort of patients with colorectal tumours and correlate these to the clinicopathological features of the cancer patients. We evaluated the DNA copy number and mRNA expression of JS-2 in 176 colorectal tissues (116 adenocarcinomas, 30 adenomas and 30 non-neoplastic tissues) using real-time polymerase chain reaction. JS-2 expression was also evaluated in two colorectal cancer cell lines and a benign colorectal cell line. JS-2 amplification was noted in 35% of the colorectal adenocarcinomas. Significant differences in relative expression levels for JS-2 mRNA between different colorectal tissues were noted (p = 0.05). Distal colorectal adenocarcinoma had significantly higher copy number than proximal adenocarcinoma (p = 0.005). The relative expression level of JS-2 was different between colonic and rectal adenocarcinoma (p = 0.007). Mucinous adenocarcinoma showed higher JS-2 expression than non-mucinous adenocarcinoma (p = 0.02). Early T-stage cancers appear to have higher JS-2 copy number and lower expression of JS-2 mRNA than later stage cancers (p = 0.001 and 0.03 respectively). Colorectal cancer cell lines showed lower expression of JS-2 than the benign colorectal cell line. JS-2 copy number change and expression were shown for the first time to be altered in the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. In addition, genetic alteration of JS-2 was found to be related to location, pathological subtypes and staging of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... colorectal cancer screening. Photo Courtesy of: Phil Fisch Photography Designer Carmen Marc Valvo says “it’s always fashionable ... early detection is.” Photo Courtesy of: Phil Fisch Photography Determined to Fight He remembers experiencing a number ...

  18. Effect of maternal and postweaning folic acid supplementation on colorectal cancer risk in the offspring

    Intrauterine and early life exposure to folic acid has significantly increased in North America owing to folic acid fortification, widespread supplemental use and periconceptional folic acid supplementation. The effect of maternal and postweaning folic acid supplementation on colorectal cancer risk ...

  19. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  20. Personal navigation increases colorectal cancer screening uptake.

    PubMed

    Ritvo, Paul G; Myers, Ronald E; Paszat, Lawrence F; Tinmouth, Jill M; McColeman, Joshua; Mitchell, Brian; Serenity, Mardie; Rabeneck, Linda

    2015-03-01

    Prior randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) indicate that patient navigation can boost colorectal cancer screening rates in primary care. The sparse literature on pragmatic trials of interventions designed to increase colorectal cancer screening adherence motivated this trial on the impact of a patient navigation intervention that included support for performance of the participants' preferred screening test (colonoscopy or stool blood testing). Primary care patients (n = 5,240), 50 to 74 years of age, with no prior diagnosis of bowel cancer and no record of a recent colorectal cancer screening test, were identified at the Group Health Centre in northern Ontario. These patients were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 2,629) or a usual care control group (n = 2,611). Intervention group participants were contacted by a trained nurse navigator by telephone to discuss colorectal cancer screening. Interested patients met with the navigator, who helped them identify and arrange for performance of the preferred screening test. Control group participants received usual care. Multivariate analyses were conducted using medical records data to assess intervention impact on screening adherence within 12 months after randomization. Mean patient age was 59 years, and 50% of participants were women. Colorectal cancer screening adherence was higher in the intervention group (35%) than in the control group (20%), a difference that was statistically significant (OR, 2.11; confidence interval, 1.87-2.39). Preference-based patient navigation increased screening uptake in a pragmatic RCT. Patient navigation increased colorectal cancer screening rates in a pragmatic RCT in proportions similar to those observed in explanatory RCTs. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bidel, S; Hu, G; Jousilahti, P; Antikainen, R; Pukkala, E; Hakulinen, T; Tuomilehto, J

    2010-09-01

    The possible association between coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer has been extensively studied in the many populations. The aim of this study is to examine this relationship among Finns, who are the heaviest coffee consumers in the world. A total of 60 041 Finnish men and women who were 26-74 years of age and without history of any cancer at baseline were included in the present analyses. Their coffee consumption and other study characteristics were determined at baseline, and they were prospectively followed up for onset of colon and rectal cancer, emigration, death or until 30 June 2006. During a mean follow-up period of 18 years, 538 cases of colorectal cancer (304 cases of colon cancer and 234 cases of rectal cancer) were diagnosed. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio of colorectal cancer incidence for > or =10 cups of coffee per day compared with non-drinkers was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.47-2.03) for men (P for trend=0.86), 1.24 (95% CI, 0.49-3.14) for women (p for trend=0.83) and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.58-1.83) for men and women combined (P for trend=0.61). In this study, we found no association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal, colon and rectal cancer.

  2. App Improves Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates

    Cancer.gov

    Colorectal cancer screening reduces deaths from the disease, yet about one-third of Americans aren’t up to date with screening. In this Cancer Currents blog post, learn what happened when people waiting for routine checkups could order their own screening test using a computer app.

  3. Nivolumab for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kortnye Maureen; Desai, Jayesh

    2018-05-24

    Despite a variety of therapies for advanced metastatic colorectal cancer being available, the outcomes in this malignancy remain sub-optimal. Immunotherapy has been slow to impact the management of this patient group. Checkpoint inhibitors, such as nivolumab, have had disappointing results when used broadly. However, for the subset of patients with microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer the use of checkpoint inhibitors such as nivolumab appears to be transformative, and will provide a new therapeutic option for patient with advanced disease. Areas covered: Nivolumab gained regulatory approval for the treatment of dMMR/MSI-H metastatic colorectal cancer in mid 2017. The current review will summarize the clinical evidence of checkpoint inhibitors in metastatic colorectal cancer, with a focus on nivolumab. Expert commentary: For patients with dMMR/MSI-H mCRC the use of nivolumab has now been shown to have objective and sustained clinical responses in a pivotal phase II trial. While additional data is limited, the therapeutic role for augmenting an immune response in metastatic colorectal cancer is likely to continue to expand. Further combination trials of nivolumab with immunologic and non-immunologic agents are ongoing.

  4. Devising an endoluminal bimodal probe which combines autofluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy with high resolution MRI for early stage colorectal cancer diagnosis: technique, feasibility and preliminary in-vivo (rabbit) results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramgolam, A.; Sablong, R.; Bou-Saïd, B.; Bouvard, S.; Saint-Jalmes, H.; Beuf, O.

    2011-07-01

    Conventional white light endoscopy (WLE) is the most widespread technique used today for colorectal cancer diagnosis and is considered as the gold standard when coupled to biopsy and histology. However for early stage colorectal cancer diagnosis, which is very often characterised by flat adenomas, the use of WLE is quite difficult due to subtle or quasiinvisible morphological changes of the colonic lining. Figures worldwide point out that diagnosing colorectal cancer in its early stages would significantly reduce the death toll all while increasing the 5-year survival rate. Several techniques are currently being investigated in the scope of providing new tools that would allow such a diagnostic or assist actual techniques in so doing. We hereby present a novel technique where High spatial Resolution MRI (HR-MRI) is coupled to optical spectroscopy (autofluorescence and reflectance) in a bimodal endoluminal probe to extract morphological data and biochemical information respectively. The design and conception of the endoluminal probe along with the preliminary results obtained with an organic phantom and in-vivo (rabbit) are presented and discussed.

  5. VX15/2503 and Immunotherapy in Resectable Pancreatic and Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-12-26

    Colon Carcinoma Metastatic in the Liver; Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Resectable Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  6. Gynecological malignancy risk in colorectal cancer survivors: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Chun; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Liang, Ji-An; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-10-01

    This study was carried out to assess the risk of gynecological malignancy in colorectal cancer survivors using a population-based retrospective cohort study. Using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan, we identified 37,176 patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed in 1998-2009, aged 20 years and above, without other cancer history. We also randomly selected 148,700 women without any cancer in the comparison cohort, frequency matched by age and diagnosis date. Incidences and hazards of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers were evaluated by 201l. The overall incidence of the 4 types of gynecological cancer was 39.0% higher in colorectal cancer patients than in comparisons (2.99 vs. 2.14 per 1000 person-years) with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.46 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.31-1.62). Breast cancer accounted for most subsequent cancer. The multivariable Cox method measured HR was the highest for endometrial cancer (3.40, 95% CI = 2.59-4.47) for the colorectal cohort relative to comparisons, followed by ovarian cancer and breast cancer, except cervix cancer. The risk of gynecological malignancies was apparently elevated for colorectal cancer survivors <50 years of age. Follow-up measures are suggested for women with colorectal cancer for early detection and prevention of the subsequent gynecological malignancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Screening for colorectal cancer in defunctioned colons.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Fayyaz; Quyn, Aaron; Steele, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Population-based colorectal (bowel) cancer screening using faecal occult blood tests leads to a reduction in cause-specific mortality. However, in people where the colon is defunctioned, the use of standard faecal occult blood test is not appropriate. The aim of this study was to examine the current trends of clinical practice for colorectal cancer screening in people with defunctioned colons. Methods An online survey was performed using SurveyMonkey. All members of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland were invited by email to participate. Reminders were sent to non-responders and partial responders till six weeks. All responses were included in our analysis. Results Of the 206 (34.59%) questionnaires completed, all questions were answered in 110 (55.8%). Among responders, 94 (85.4%) were colorectal consultant surgeons, 72% had worked in their current capacity for more than five years, and 105 (50.9%) had encountered colorectal cancer in defunctioned colons during their career. Some 72.2% of responders stated that a screening test for colorectal cancer in patients with defunctioned colons was currently not offered, or that they did not know whether or not it was offered in their area. Conclusions Bowel screening in the United Kingdom is currently not offered to 72.2% of the age appropriate population with defunctioned colons. Among responding colorectal surgeons, 50% had encountered colorectal cancer in such patients. There is considerable variability in clinical practice regarding the optimal age for onset of screening, time interval, and the optimal modality to offer for screening in such cases.

  8. Screening of colorectal cancer: present and future.

    PubMed

    Maida, Marcello; Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Ianiro, Gianluca; Mangiola, Francesca; Sinagra, Emanuele; Hold, Georgina; Maida, Carlo; Cammarota, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Scarpulla, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in males and second in females, and the fourth most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Currently, about 60-70% of diagnosed cases in symptomatic patients are detected at an advanced stage of disease. Earlier stage detection through the use of screening strategies would allow for better outcomes in terms of reducing the disease burden. Areas covered: The aim of this paper is to review the current published evidence from literature which assesses the performance and effectiveness of different screening tests for the early detection of CRC. Expert commentary: Adequate screening strategies can reduce CRC incidence and mortality. In the last few decades, several tests have been proposed for CRC screening. To date, there is still insufficient evidence to identify which approach is definitively superior, and no screening strategy for CRC can therefore be defined as universally ideal. The best strategy would be the one that can be economically viable and to which the patient can adhere best to over time. The latest guidelines suggest colonoscopy every 10 years or annual fecal immuno-chemical test (FIT) for people with normal risk, while for individuals with high risk or hereditary syndromes specific recommendations are provided.

  9. Predictive Value of Early Tumor Shrinkage and Density Reduction of Lung Metastases in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated With Regorafenib.

    PubMed

    Vanwynsberghe, Hannes; Verbeke, Xander; Coolen, Johan; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2017-12-01

    The benefit of regorafenib in colorectal cancer is not very pronounced. At present, there is lack of predictive biological or radiological markers. We studied if density reduction or small changes in size of lung metastases could be a predictive marker. We retrospectively measured density in size of lung metastases of all patients included in the CORRECT and CONSIGN trials at our center. Contrast-enhanced CT scan at baseline and at week 8 were compared. Data of progressive-free survival and overall survival were collected from the CORRECT and CONSIGN trials. A significant difference in progressive-free survival was seen in 3 groups: response or stable disease in size (5.36 vs. 3.96 months), response in density (6.03 vs. 2.72 months), and response in corrected density (6.14 vs. 3.08 months). No difference was seen for response in size versus stable disease or progressive disease in size. For overall survival, a difference was observed in the same 3 groups: response or stable disease in size (9.89 vs. 6.44 months), response in density (9.59 vs. 7.04 months), and response in corrected density (9.09 vs. 7.16 months). No difference was seen for response in size versus stable disease or progressive disease in size. Density reduction in lung metastases might be a good predictive parameter to predict outcome for regorafenib. Early tumor progression might be a negative predictive factor. If further validated, density reduction and early tumor progression might be useful to ameliorate the cost-benefit of regorafenib. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Subset Analysis of a Multicenter, Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare Magnifying Chromoendoscopy with Endoscopic Ultrasonography for Stage Diagnosis of Early Stage Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomonori; Shimura, Takaya; Ebi, Masahide; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Nishiwaki, Hirotaka; Mizushima, Takashi; Asukai, Koki; Togawa, Shozo; Takahashi, Satoru; Joh, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Our recent prospective study found equivalent accuracy of magnifying chromoendoscopy (MC) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for diagnosing the invasion depth of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, whether these tools show diagnostic differences in categories such as tumor size and morphology remains unclear. Hence, we conducted detailed subset analysis of the prospective data. In this multicenter, prospective, comparative trial, a total of 70 patients with early, flat CRC were enrolled from February 2011 to December 2012, and the results of 66 lesions were finally analyzed. Patients were randomly allocated to primary MC followed by EUS or to primary EUS followed by MC. Diagnoses of invasion depth by each tool were divided into intramucosal to slight submucosal invasion (invasion depth <1000 μm) and deep submucosal invasion (invasion depth ≥1000 μm), and then compared with the final pathological diagnosis by an independent pathologist blinded to clinical data. To standardize diagnoses among examiners, this trial was started after achievement of a mean κ value of ≥0.6 which was calculated from the average of κ values between each pair of participating endoscopists. Both MC and EUS showed similar diagnostic outcomes, with no significant differences in prediction of invasion depth in subset analyses according to tumor size, location, and morphology. Lesions that were consistently diagnosed as Tis/T1-SMS or ≥T1-SMD with both tools revealed accuracy of 76-78%. Accuracy was low in borderline lesions with irregular pit pattern in MC and distorted findings of the third layer in EUS (MC, 58.5%; EUS, 50.0%). MC and EUS showed the same limited accuracy for predicting invasion depth in all categories of early CRC. Since the irregular pit pattern in MC, distorted findings to the third layer in EUS and inconsistent diagnosis between both tools were associated with low accuracy, further refinements or even novel methods are still needed for such lesions. University

  11. Cancer stem cells in colorectal cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Munro, Matthew J; Wickremesekera, Susrutha K; Peng, Lifeng; Tan, Swee T; Itinteang, Tinte

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men. Adenocarcinoma accounts for 90% of CRC cases. There has been accumulating evidence in support of the cancer stem cell (CSC) concept of cancer which proposes that CSCs are central in the initiation of cancer. CSCs have been the focus of study in a range of cancers, including CRC. This has led to the identification and understanding of genes involved in the induction and maintenance of pluripotency of stem cells, and markers for CSCs, including those investigated specifically in CRC. Knowledge of the expression pattern of CSCs in CRC has been increasing in recent years, revealing a heterogeneous population of cells within CRC ranging from pluripotent to differentiated cells, with overlapping and sometimes unique combinations of markers. This review summarises current literature on the understanding of CSCs in CRC, including evidence of the presence of CSC subpopulations, and the stem cell markers currently used to identify and localise these CSC subpopulations. Future research into this field may lead to improved methods for early detection of CRC, novel therapy and monitoring of treatment for CRC and other cancer types. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. [Interdisciplinary clinical pathway for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Fischbach, W; Engemann, R

    2006-07-01

    Limited financial resources in public health care have led to the introduction of clinical pathways as a means to a better effectivity and efficacy. Colorectal cancer met the requirements for establishing such a pathway in a distinguished way: high patient volume, high costs, interdisciplinary multi-modal treatment concepts in a relevant frequency, and existing evidence based guidelines. This article gives an example of a clinical pathway for colorectal cancer as established in our hospital. The potential of such pathways to save costs as well as their implications on treatment results and patients' satisfaction will have to be critically analyzed in the future before their value can be definitely estimated.

  13. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for men Talk with your doctor about taking aspirin every day. Taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of colorectal ... for heart disease, ask your doctor if daily aspirin is right for you . Previous section Get Tested ...

  14. IgG Glycome in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vučković, Frano; Theodoratou, Evropi; Thaçi, Kujtim; Timofeeva, Maria; Vojta, Aleksandar; Štambuk, Jerko; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Rudd, Pauline M; Đerek, Lovorka; Servis, Dražen; Wennerström, Annika; Farrington, Susan M; Perola, Markus; Aulchenko, Yurii; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Campbell, Harry; Lauc, Gordan

    2016-06-15

    Alternative glycosylation has significant structural and functional consequences on IgG and consequently also on cancer immunosurveillance. Because of technological limitations, the effects of highly heritable individual variations and the differences in the dynamics of changes in IgG glycosylation on colorectal cancer were never investigated before. Using recently developed high-throughput UPLC technology for IgG glycosylation analysis, we analyzed IgG glycome composition in 760 patients with colorectal cancer and 538 matching controls. Effects of surgery were evaluated in 28 patients sampled before and three times after surgery. A predictive model was built using regularized logistic regression and evaluated using a 10-cross validation procedure. Furthermore, IgG glycome composition was analyzed in 39 plasma samples collected before initial diagnosis of colorectal cancer. We have found that colorectal cancer associates with decrease in IgG galactosylation, IgG sialylation and increase in core-fucosylation of neutral glycans with concurrent decrease of core-fucosylation of sialylated glycans. Although a model based on age and sex did not show discriminative power (AUC = 0.499), the addition of glycan variables into the model considerably increased the discriminative power of the model (AUC = 0.755). However, none of these differences were significant in the small set of samples collected before the initial diagnosis. Considering the functional relevance of IgG glycosylation for both tumor immunosurveillance and clinical efficacy of therapy with mAbs, individual variation in IgG glycosylation may turn out to be important for prediction of disease course or the choice of therapy, thus warranting further, more detailed studies of IgG glycosylation in colorectal cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 22(12); 3078-86. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Promoting Colorectal Cancer Screening Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Christy, Shannon M.; Perkins, Susan M.; Tong, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Springston, Jeffrey K.; Imperiale, Thomas F.; Rawl, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Provider recommendation is a predictor of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Purpose To compare the effects of two clinic-based interventions on patient–provider discussions about CRC screening. Design Two-group RCT with data collected at baseline and 1 week post-intervention. Participants/setting African-American patients that were non-adherent to CRC screening recommendations (n=693) with a primary care visit between 2008 and 2010 in one of 11 urban primary care clinics. Intervention Participants received either a computer-delivered tailored CRC screening intervention or a nontailored informational brochure about CRC screening immediately prior to their primary care visit. Main outcome measures Between-group differences in odds of having had a CRC screening discussion about a colon test, with and without adjusting for demographic, clinic, health literacy, health belief, and social support variables, were examined as predictors of a CRC screening discussion using logistic regression. Intervention effects on CRC screening test order by PCPs were examined using logistic regression. Analyses were conducted in 2011 and 2012. Results Compared to the brochure group, a greater proportions of those in the computer-delivered tailored intervention group reported having had a discussion with their provider about CRC screening (63% vs 48%, OR=1.81, p<0.001). Predictors of a discussion about CRC screening included computer group participation, younger age, reason for visit, being unmarried, colonoscopy self-efficacy, and family member/friend recommendation (all p-values <0.05). Conclusions The computer-delivered tailored intervention was more effective than a nontailored brochure at stimulating patient–provider discussions about CRC screening. Those who received the computer-delivered intervention also were more likely to have a CRC screening test (fecal occult blood test or colonoscopy) ordered by their PCP. Trial registration This study is registered at www

  16. Role of β1-Integrin in Colorectal Cancer: Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Bo-Young; Kim, Kwang Ho; Chung, Soon Sup; Hong, Kyoung Sook

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In the metastatic process, interactions between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and the extracellular matrix or surrounding cells are required. β1-Integrin may mediate these interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether β1-integrin is associated with the detection of CTCs in colorectal cancer. Methods We enrolled 30 patients with colorectal cancer (experimental group) and 30 patients with benign diseases (control group). Blood samples were obtained from each group, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA for CTCs marker and β1-integrin mRNA levels were estimated by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and the results were compared between the two groups. In the experimental group, preoperative results were compared with postoperative results for each marker. In addition, we analyzed the correlation between the expressions of β1-integrin and CEA. Results CEA mRNA was detected more frequently in colorectal cancer patients than in control patients (P = 0.008). CEA mRNA was significantly reduced after surgery in the colorectal cancer patients (P = 0.032). β1-Integrin mRNA was detected more in colorectal cancer patients than in the patients with benign diseases (P < 0.001). In colorectal cancer patients, expression of β1-integrin mRNA was detected more for advanced-stage cancer than for early-stage cancer (P = 0.033) and was significantly decreased after surgery (P < 0.001). In addition, expression of β1-integrin mRNA was significantly associated with that of CEA mRNA in colorectal cancer patients (P = 0.001). Conclusion In conclusion, β1-integrin is a potential factor for forming a prognosis following surgical resection in colorectal cancer patients. β1-Integrin may be a candidate for use as a marker for early detection of micrometastatic tumor cells and for monitoring the therapeutic response in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:24851215

  17. Colorectal cancer: From prevention to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Àlex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  18. Colorectal cancer: from prevention to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Alex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-06-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  19. [Analysis of community colorectal cancer screening in 50-74 years old people in Guangzhou, 2015-2016].

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Liu, H Z; Liang, Y R; Lin, G Z; Li, K; Dong, H; Xu, H; Wang, M

    2018-01-10

    Objective: To analyze the effect of colorectal cancer screening in the general population in Guangzhou, and provide evidence for the for development of colorectal cancer screening policy and strategy. Methods: The data of colorectal cancer screening in Guangzhou during 2015- 2016 were collected. The participation, the positive rate of fecal occult blood test, the detection rate of colonoscopy and screening effect of colonoscopy were evaluated. Results: A total of 220 834 residents aged 50-74 years received the screening, and the positive rate of the screening was 16.77% (37 040 cases). Colonoscopy was performed for 7 821 cases (21.12%). Colorectal lesions were found in 4 126 cases (52.76%), of which 614 (7.85%) and 73 (0.93%) and 230 (2.94%) were identified as advanced adenoma, severe dysplasia lesions and colorectal cancers, respectively. The detection rates of all colorectal lesions were higher in men than in women (all P <0.01). The diagnostic rate of early lesion was 87.24%, and 99 early cancer cases were found, accounting for 46.26% of the total cases. The overall screening detection rate of colorectal cancer was 104.15/100 000, higher than the incidence rate (81.18/100 000) in colorectal cancer surveillance ( P <0.001), but age group <70 years had higher detection rate, age group ≥70 years had higher incidence rate. Conclusions: The colorectal cancer screening strategy in Guangzhou is effective in the detection of the population at high risk, increase the detection rate of colorectal lesions, early diagnosis rate of precancerous lesions and diagnosis rate of early colorectal cancer. The benefit in those aged ≤69 years was more obvious than that in those aged 70-74 years. It is necessary to improve the compliancy of colorectal cancer screening in population at high risk.

  20. Predictors of advanced colorectal neoplasia for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Lam, Thomas Y T; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Chan, Victor C W; Hirai, Hoyee W; Ching, Jessica Y L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2014-05-01

    The Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening (APCS) score based on age, gender, family history, and smoking is useful to predict advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in asymptomatic Asian subjects. To evaluate the factors in addition to those of APCS associated with ACN colonoscopic findings. Data from 5,220 asymptomatic subjects aged between 50 and 70 years who underwent screening colonoscopy in a community center between 2008 and 2012 were analyzed. One binary logistic regression analysis was conducted in 2013 with the presence of ACN or cancer as the outcome, controlling for APCS score, alcohol consumption, BMI, hypertension, and other chronic diseases as independent variables. The average participant age was 57.7 years (SD=4.9) and 47.5% were men. Advanced neoplasms or cancers were identified at colonoscopy in 5.6% of all screening participants. From multivariate regression analysis, APCS score≥4 (adjusted OR [AOR]=1.74, 95% CI=1.34, 2.25, p<0.001); overweight (BMI=23-24.9, AOR=1.52, 95% CI=1.12, 2.07, p=0.007); obesity (BMI≥25, AOR=1.56, 95% CI=1.15, 2.10, p=0.004); hypertension (AOR=1.58, 95% CI=1.21, 2.06, p=0.001); and alcohol consumption (AOR=1.47, 95% CI=1.05, 2.06, p=0.025) were associated with ACN. The c-statistic of APCS score alone was 0.560 (95% CI=0.524, 0.595, p=0.001) and that of APCS score plus BMI, hypertension, and alcohol consumption was 0.613 (95% CI=0.578, 0.648, p<0.001). Alcohol consumption, hypertension, and BMI are independent predictors of ACN, which could be incorporated into the APCS for prioritizing Asian asymptomatic subjects for colorectal cancer screening. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Family history of prostate and colorectal cancer and risk of colorectal cancer in the Women's health initiative.

    PubMed

    Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L; Yee, Cecilia; Paskett, Electra; Schwartz, Ann G; Lane, Dorothy; Palmer, Nynikka R A; Bock, Cathryn H; Nassir, Rami; Simon, Michael S

    2017-12-13

    Evidence suggests that risk of colorectal and prostate cancer is increased among those with a family history of the same disease, particularly among first-degree relatives. However, the aggregation of colorectal and prostate cancer within families has not been well investigated. Analyses were conducted among participants of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) observational cohort, free of cancer at the baseline examination. Subjects were followed for colorectal cancer through August 31st, 2009. A Cox-proportional hazards regression modeling approach was used to estimate risk of colorectal cancer associated with a family history of prostate cancer, colorectal cancer and both cancers among first-degree relatives of all participants and stratified by race (African American vs. White). Of 75,999 eligible participants, there were 1122 colorectal cancer cases diagnosed over the study period. A family history of prostate cancer alone was not associated with an increase in colorectal cancer risk after adjustment for confounders (aHR =0.94; 95% CI =0.76, 1.15). Separate analysis examining the joint impact, a family history of both colorectal and prostate cancer was associated with an almost 50% increase in colorectal cancer risk (aHR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.04, 2.10), but similar to those with a family history of colorectal cancer only (95% CI = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.11, 1.54). Our findings suggest risk of colorectal cancer is increased similarly among women with colorectal cancer only and among those with both colorectal and prostate cancer diagnosed among first-degree family members. Future studies are needed to determine the relative contribution of genes and shared environment to the risk of both cancers.

  2. Full Robotic Colorectal Resections for Cancer Combined With Other Major Surgical Procedures: Early Experience With the da Vinci Xi.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Luca; Di Franco, Gregorio; Guadagni, Simone; Palmeri, Matteo; Gianardi, Desirée; Bianchini, Matteo; Moglia, Andrea; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Caprili, Giovanni; D'Isidoro, Cristiano; Melfi, Franca; Di Candio, Giulio; Mosca, Franco

    2017-08-01

    The da Vinci Xi has been developed to overcome some of the limitations of the previous platform, thereby increasing the acceptance of its use in robotic multiorgan surgery. Between January 2015 and October 2015, 10 patients with synchronous tumors of the colorectum and others abdominal organs underwent robotic combined resections with the da Vinci Xi. Trocar positions respected the Universal Port Placement Guidelines provided by Intuitive Surgical for "left lower quadrant," with trocars centered on the umbilical area, or shifted 2 to 3 cm to the right or to the left, depending on the type of combined surgical procedure. All procedures were completed with the full robotic technique. Simultaneous procedures in same quadrant or left quadrant and pelvis, or left/right and upper, were performed with a single docking/single targeting approach; in cases of left/right quadrant or right quadrant/pelvis, we performed a dual-targeting operation. No external collisions or problems related to trocar positions were noted. No patient experienced postoperative surgical complications and the mean hospital stay was 6 days. The high success rate of full robotic colorectal resection combined with other surgical interventions for synchronous tumors, suggest the efficacy of the da Vinci Xi in this setting.

  3. Aspirin for the prevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Albeniz, X.; Chan, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    Over 600,000 people worldwide die of colorectal cancer (CRC) annually, highlighting the importance of developing effective prevention strategies. Among proposed chemopreventive interventions, aspirin is perhaps the agent with the strongest body of evidence that supports wider spread use to significantly reduce the population burden of CRC. Several epidemiological studies, four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of colorectal polyp recurrence, and RCTs in patients with hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, have shown that aspirin reduces incidence of colorectal neoplasia. Recently, in a pooled analysis of five cardiovascular-prevention RCTs linked to cancer outcomes, daily aspirin use at any dose reduced the risk of CRC by 24% and of CRC-associated mortality by 35% after a delay of 8–10 years. In an expanded meta-analysis of 8 cardiovascular-prevention RCTs, daily aspirin use at any dose was associated with a 21% lower risk of all cancer death, including CRC, with benefit only apparent after 5 years. In this review, we will summarize human studies of aspirin in CRC prevention as well as discuss the safety profile and mechanism of aspirin in CRC prevention. PMID:22122763

  4. Colorectal cancer screening among the medically underserved.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Michael S; Satterlee, Melissa; Calhoun, Elizabeth A; Skripkauskas, Silvia; Fulwiler, Daniel; Diamond-Shapiro, Linda; Alvarez, Hugo; Eder, Mickey; Mukundan, Padmanabhan

    2006-02-01

    Prevalence of physician recommendation and patient completion of colorectal cancer screening was investigated among Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) serving low-income neighborhoods in Chicago. Medical records of 3,416 patients receiving primary care services at 1 of 31 FQHCs were randomly chosen for review. In all, 642 patients were identified by age and family history as eligible for colorectal cancer screening and included in this study. Patient demographic information and colorectal cancer screening history were collected. The physician screening recommendation rate was 9.2% (n=59); 7.0% (n=45) of patients were determined to have been appropriately screened for colorectal cancer, primarily by Fecal Occult Blood Test (94.1%, n=43). Among patients who received a recommendation from their physician, 76.2% had completed a screening test. Older patients were more likely than their younger counterparts to have received a recommendation from their physician (p<.05) and to have been screened (p<.01). Organizational interventions are needed to support physicians in medically underserved areas and to promote recommended screening practices.

  5. Association of CDX2 Expression With Survival in Early Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, Gianluca; Barni, Sandro; Turati, Luca; Ghidini, Michele; Pezzica, Ezio; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Petrelli, Fausto

    2018-02-15

    CDX2 is a homeobox gene encoding transcriptional factors for intestinal organogenesis and represents a specific marker of colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) differentiation. We have evaluated if CDX2 expression is associated with better overall and disease-free survival (OS and DFS) in patients with CRC. PubMed, SCOPUS, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and Web of Science (from inception to July 2017) were systematically reviewed for relevant studies on adult patients with CRC where OS and DFS were calculated according to CDX2 expression in uni- or multivariate analysis were included. Hazard ratio (HR) for mortality and/or disease progression was calculated. The search produced 16 studies suitable for inclusion (6291 individual patients). The meta-analysis showed a reduced risk of death for patients with CDX2-positive CRC in 14 studies (HR, 0.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38-0.66; P < .001 according to random effect model). In 6 studies where only DFS data was available, CDX2 expression led to a 52% lower risk of relapse or death (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.39-0.59; P < .001 according to random effect model). The results did not change as a function of ethnicity, type of study, CDX2 detection modality, or stage. Interestingly, in stages II to III, CDX2 expression was associated with a 70% lower risk of death (HR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.12-0.77; P = .01). CDX2 expression confirms to be a strong prognostic factor in stage II and III CRC. In this setting, along with other clinical and pathologic factors, the lack of expression of CDX2 may be considered an important variable when deciding for adjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  7. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which

  8. Choroidal and skin metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Joo Young; Oh, Edward Hynseung; Jung, Moon Ki; Park, Song Ee; Kim, Ji Tak; Hwang, In Gyu

    2016-11-21

    Choroidal and skin metastasis of colon cancer is rare. In women, the frequency of cutaneous metastasis from colon cancer as the primary lesion in is 9% and skin metastasis occurs in 0.81% of all colorectal cancers. We report a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in her right eye and scalp pain as her initial symptoms. Contrast-enhance orbital magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression revealed an infrabulbar mass, and skin biopsy of the posterior parietal scalp confirmed adenocarcinoma. These symptoms were diagnosed as being caused by choroidal and skin metastases of colonic adenocarcinoma. We started palliative chemotherapy with oral capecitabine (1000 mg/m 2 , twice a day, on days 1-14) every 3 wk, which was effective at shrinking the brain masses and improving the visual disorder. This is the first report that capecitabine is effective at reducing a choroidal and cutaneous metastatic lesion from right-sided colorectal cancer.

  9. Aberrant TET1 Methylation Closely Associated with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Norihisa; Shinjo, Keiko; An, Byonggu; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yamao, Kenji; Ohka, Fumiharu; Katsushima, Keisuke; Hatanaka, Akira; Tojo, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromu; Ueda, Minoru; Kondo, Yutaka

    2015-08-01

    Inactivation of methylcytosine dioxygenase, ten-eleven translocation (TET) is known to be associated with aberrant DNA methylation in cancers. Tumors with a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), a distinct subgroup with extensive DNA methylation, show characteristic features in the case of colorectal cancer. The relationship between TET inactivation and CIMP in colorectal cancers is not well understood. The expression level of TET family genes was compared between CIMP-positive (CIMP-P) and CIMP-negative (CIMP-N) colorectal cancers. Furthermore, DNA methylation profiling, including assessment of the TET1 gene, was assessed in colorectal cancers, as well as colon polyps. The TET1 was silenced by DNA methylation in a subset of colorectal cancers as well as cell lines, expression of which was reactivated by demethylating agent. TET1 methylation was more frequent in CIMP-P (23/55, 42%) than CIMP-N (2/113, 2%, P < 0.0001) colorectal cancers. This trend was also observed in colon polyps (CIMP-P, 16/40, 40%; CIMP-N, 2/24, 8%; P = 0.002), suggesting that TET1 methylation is an early event in CIMP tumorigenesis. TET1 methylation was significantly associated with BRAF mutation but not with hMLH1 methylation in the CIMP-P colorectal cancers. Colorectal cancers with TET1 methylation have a significantly greater number of DNA methylated genes and less pathological metastasis compared to those without TET1 methylation (P = 0.007 and 0.045, respectively). Our data suggest that TET1 methylation may contribute to the establishment of a unique pathway in respect to CIMP-mediated tumorigenesis, which may be incidental to hMLH1 methylation. In addition, our findings provide evidence that TET1 methylation may be a good biomarker for the prediction of metastasis in colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Efficacy of Cotargeting Angiopoietin-2 and the VEGF Pathway in the Adjuvant Postsurgical Setting for Early Breast, Colorectal, and Renal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Florence T.H.; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Chow, Annabelle; Paez-Ribes, Marta; Lee, Christina R.; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven R.; Emmenegger, Urban; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) that target VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) have not been effective as adjuvant treatments for micrometastatic disease in phase III clinical trials. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang2) is a proangiogenic and proinflammatory vascular destabilizer that cooperates with VEGF. The purpose of this study was to test whether CVX-060 (an Ang2-specific CovX-body) can be combined with VEGFR2-targeting TKIs (sunitinib or regorafenib) to successfully treat postsurgical metastatic disease in multiple orthotopically implanted human tumor xenograft and syngeneic murine tumor models. In the MDA-MB-231.LM2-4 human breast cancer model, adjuvant sunitinib was ineffective, whereas adjuvant CVX-060 delayed the progression of pulmonary or distant lymphatic metastases; however, overall survival was only improved with the adjuvant use of a VEGF-A/Ang2-bispecific CovX-body (CVX-241) but not when CVX-060 is combined with sunitinib. Adjuvant CVX-241 also showed promise in the EMT-6/CDDP murine breast cancer model, with or without an immune checkpoint inhibitor (anti-PD-L1). In the RENCA model of mouse renal cancer, however, combining CVX-060 with sunitinib in the adjuvant setting was superior to CVX-241 as treatment for postsurgical lung metastases. In the HCT116 and HT29 xenograft models of colorectal cancer, both CVX-060 and regorafenib inhibited liver metastases. Overall, our preclinical findings suggest differential strategies by which Ang2 blockers can be successfully combined with VEGF pathway targeting in the adjuvant setting to treat micrometastatic disease—particularly, in combination with VEGF-A blockers (but not VEGFR2 TKIs) in resected breast cancer; in combination with VEGFR2 TKIs in resected kidney cancer; and as single agents or with VEGFR2 TKIs in resected colorectal cancer. PMID:27651308

  11. Validation of Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma (GLNE 010) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    We propose a Phase 2 (large cross-sectional) PRoBE-compliant validation trial of stool-based and serum-based tests for the detection of colorectal neoplasia (1). The trial is powered to detect early stage colorectal adenocarcinoma or high grade dysplasia. This is the most stringent, conservative approach to the early diagnosis of colonic neoplasia and addresses the most important endpoint of identifying individuals with curable, early stage cancer and those with very high risk non-invasive neoplasia (high grade dysplasia).

  12. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma; Colon carcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading ... to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. ...

  13. Prospective study of blood metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Yu, Danxia; Li, Hong-Lan; Yang, Gong; Cai, Hui; Ma, Xiao; Lan, Qing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Jia, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Wei

    2018-02-26

    Few prospective studies, and none in Asians, have systematically evaluated the relationship between blood metabolites and colorectal cancer risk. We conducted a nested case-control study to search for risk-associated metabolite biomarkers for colorectal cancer in an Asian population using blood samples collected prior to cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression was performed to assess associations of metabolites with cancer risk. In this study, we included 250 incident cases with colorectal cancer and individually matched controls nested within two prospective Shanghai cohorts. We found 35 metabolites associated with risk of colorectal cancer after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Among them, 12 metabolites were glycerophospholipids including nine associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and three with increased risk [odds ratios per standard deviation increase of transformed metabolites: 0.31-1.98; p values: 0.002-1.25 × 10 -10 ]. The other 23 metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk included nine lipids other than glycerophospholipid, seven aromatic compounds, five organic acids and four other organic compounds. After mutual adjustment, nine metabolites remained statistically significant for colorectal cancer. Together, these independently associated metabolites can separate cancer cases from controls with an area under the curve of 0.76 for colorectal cancer. We have identified that dysregulation of glycerophospholipids may contribute to risk of colorectal cancer. © 2018 UICC.

  14. [Antigens (CEA and CA 19-9) in diagnosis and prognosis colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Grotowski, Maciej

    2002-01-01

    carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was first described more than three decades ago, when its presence was demonstrated in fetal gut tissue and in tumors from gastrointestinal tract. Subsequently, CEA was detected in the circulation of patients and recognized as a serum marker for colorectal cancer. This tumor marker has not been advocated as a screening test for colorectal cancer, however a preoperative CEA serum level is useful for diagnosis and prognosis of recurrence and survival in colorectal cancer patients. The levels of CEA increased with increasing tumor stage. Expression of carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9) has been described in various malignancies and also in colorectal cancer. This antigen also has not been advocated as a screening test for colorectal cancer. The levels of CA 19-9 increased in advanced stages of colorectal cancer. Despite its lower sensitivity than CEA in early stages of colorectal cancer, the combination of both antigens can provided more information than CEA alone for prognosis of recurrence and survival in those patients.

  15. Reduced levels of hydroxylated, polyunsaturated ultra long-chain fatty acids in the serum of colorectal cancer patients: implications for early screening and detection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are currently no accurate serum markers for detecting early risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We therefore developed a non-targeted metabolomics technology to analyse the serum of pre-treatment CRC patients in order to discover putative metabolic markers associated with CRC. Using tandem-mass spectrometry (MS/MS) high throughput MS technology we evaluated the utility of selected markers and this technology for discriminating between CRC and healthy subjects. Methods Biomarker discovery was performed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Comprehensive metabolic profiles of CRC patients and controls from three independent populations from different continents (USA and Japan; total n = 222) were obtained and the best inter-study biomarkers determined. The structural characterization of these and related markers was performed using liquid chromatography (LC) MS/MS and nuclear magnetic resonance technologies. Clinical utility evaluations were performed using a targeted high-throughput triple-quadrupole multiple reaction monitoring (TQ-MRM) method for three biomarkers in two further independent populations from the USA and Japan (total n = 220). Results Comprehensive metabolomic analyses revealed significantly reduced levels of 28-36 carbon-containing hydroxylated polyunsaturated ultra long-chain fatty-acids in all three independent cohorts of CRC patient samples relative to controls. Structure elucidation studies on the C28 molecules revealed two families harbouring specifically two or three hydroxyl substitutions and varying degrees of unsaturation. The TQ-MRM method successfully validated the FTICR-MS results in two further independent studies. In total, biomarkers in five independent populations across two continental regions were evaluated (three populations by FTICR-MS and two by TQ-MRM). The resultant receiver-operator characteristic curve AUCs ranged from 0.85 to 0.98 (average = 0.91 ± 0.04). Conclusions A

  16. Folate, colorectal cancer and the involvement of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elizabeth A

    2012-11-01

    Diet is a major factor in the aetiology of colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiological evidence suggests that folate confers a modest protection against CRC risk. However, the relationship is complex, and evidence from human intervention trials and animal studies suggests that a high-dose of folic acid supplementation may enhance the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis in certain circumstances. The molecular mechanisms underlying the apparent dual modulatory effect of folate on colorectal carcinogenesis are not fully understood. Folate is central to C1 metabolism and is needed for both DNA synthesis and DNA methylation, providing plausible biological mechanisms through which folate could modulate cancer risk. Aberrant DNA methylation is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis and is typically associated with the transcriptional silencing of tumour suppressor genes. Folate is required for the production of S-adenosyl methionine, which serves as a methyl donor for DNA methylation events; thereby folate availability is proposed to modulate DNA methylation status. The evidence for an effect of folate on DNA methylation in the human colon is limited, but a modulation of DNA methylation in response to folate has been demonstrated. More research is required to clarify the optimum intake of folate for CRC prevention and to elucidate the effect of folate availability on DNA methylation and the associated impact on CRC biology.

  17. Overexpression of the obesity hormone leptin in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koda, Mariusz; Sulkowska, Mariola; Kanczuga‐Koda, Luiza; Surmacz, Eva; Sulkowski, Stanislaw

    2007-01-01

    Background Leptin is an adipocyte‐derived neurohormone, high levels of which are found in obese individuals. Leptin controls energy expenditure, acting in the brain, and regulates different processes in peripheral organs. Recent studies have suggested that leptin may be involved in cancer development and progression. Aims To analyse leptin expression in human colorectal cancer as well as in colorectal mucosa and colorectal adenomas. Methods Leptin expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 166 colorectal cancers, 101 samples of colorectal mucosa and 41 adenomas. Leptin concentration in colorectal cancer was correlated with selected clinicopathological features. Results Immunoreactivity for leptin was observed in 51.2% (85/166) of primary colorectal cancers. In adenomas leptin expression was observed in 14.6% (6/41) of studied cases. In normal mucosa, leptin was present at low levels, except in tumour bordering areas where its concentration appeared to reflect levels in the adjacent cancer tissue. Leptin expression in colorectal cancer significantly correlated with tumour G2 grade (p = 0.002) as well as with histological type (adenocarcinoma) of tumours (p = 0.044). Conclusions Results indicate that leptin is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer, which suggests that the hormone might contribute to colorectal cancer development and progression. PMID:17660334

  18. Incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Robert E; Razzak, Anthony; Yu, Kelly J; Berndt, Sonja I; Firl, Kevin; Riley, Thomas L; Pinsky, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the change in risk conferred by family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) as a person ages. We evaluated the effect of family history on CRC incidence and mortality after 55 years of age, when the risk of early onset cancer had passed. We collected data from participants in the randomized, controlled Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial of flexible sigmoidoscopy versus usual care (55-74 years old, no history of CRC), performed at 10 US centers from 1993 to 2001. A detailed family history of colorectal cancer was obtained at enrollment, and subjects were followed for CRC incidence and mortality for up to 13 years. Among 144,768 participants, 14,961 subjects (10.3%) reported a family of CRC. Of 2090 incident cases, 273 cases (13.1%) had a family history of CRC; among 538 deaths from CRC, 71 (13.2%) had a family history of CRC. Overall, family history of CRC was associated with an increased risk of CRC incidence (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.50; P<.0001) and increased mortality (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.02-1.69; P = .03). Subjects with 1 first degree relative (FDR) with CRC (n = 238; HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.07-1.42) or ≥2 FDRs with CRC (n = 35; HR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.44-2.86) were at increased risk for incident CRC. However, among individuals with 1 FDR with CRC, there were no differences in risk based on age at diagnosis in the FDR (for FDR <60 years of age: HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 0.97-1.63; for FDR 60-70 years of age: HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.06-1.62; for FDR >70 years of age: HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.93-1.45; P trend = .59). After 55 years of age, subjects with 1 FDR with CRC had only a modest increase in risk for CRC incidence and death; age of onset in the FDR was not significantly associated with risk. Individuals with ≥2 FDRs with CRC had continued increased risk in older age. Guidelines and clinical practice for subjects with a family history of CRC should be modified to align CRC testing to risk

  19. MUTYH-associated colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoru; Ogata, Hideo; Katsumata, Daisuke; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fujii, Takaaki; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Sasaki, Kinro; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) was first described in 2002. MUTYH is a component of a base excision repair system that protects the genomic information from oxidative damage. When the MUTYH gene product is impaired by bi-allelic germline mutation, it leads to the mutation of cancer-related genes, such as the APC and/or the KRAS genes, via G to T transversion. MAP is a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion. The clinical features of MAP include the presence of 10-100 adenomatous polyps in the colon, and early onset of colorectal cancer. Ethnic and geographical differences in the pattern of the MUTYH gene mutations have been suggested. In Caucasian patients, c.536A>G (Y179C) and c.1187G>A (G396D) mutations are frequently detected. In the Asian population, Y179C and G396D are uncommon, whereas other variants are suggested to be the major causes of MAP. We herein review the literature on MUTYH-associated colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyposis.

  20. Microsatellite Instability of Gastric and Colorectal Cancers as a Predictor of Synchronous Gastric or Colorectal Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Beak; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-03-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) plays a crucial role in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to clarify whether MSI is a useful marker for predicting synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms. Consecutive patients who underwent both esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy before the resection of gastric or colorectal cancers were included. MSI was analyzed using two mononucleotide and three dinucleotide markers. In total, 434 gastric cancers (372 microsatellite stability [MSS], 21 low incidence of MSI [MSI-L], and 41 high incidence of MSI [MSI-H]) and 162 colorectal cancers (138 MSS, 9 MSI-L, and 15 MSI-H) were included. Patients with MSI gastric cancer had a higher prevalence of synchronous colorectal cancer, colorectal adenoma, and gastric adenoma than those with MSS gastric cancers (4.8% vs 0.5%, p=0.023; 11.3% vs 3.2%, p=0.011; 3.2% vs 1.2%, p=0.00, respectively). The prevalence of synchronous colorectal adenomas was highest in MSI-L gastric cancers (19.0%), compared with MSI-H (7.3%) or MSS (3.2%) gastric cancers (p=0.002). In addition, there were no significant differences in the prevalence rates of synchronous colorectal adenoma among the MSI-H (13.3%), MSI-L (11.1%), and MSS (12.3%) colorectal cancers (p=0.987). The presence of MSI in gastric cancer may be a predictor of synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms, whereas MSI in colorectal cancer is not a predictor of synchronous colorectal adenoma.

  1. Microsatellite Instability of Gastric and Colorectal Cancers as a Predictor of Synchronous Gastric or Colorectal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Beak; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Microsatellite instability (MSI) plays a crucial role in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to clarify whether MSI is a useful marker for predicting synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent both esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy before the resection of gastric or colorectal cancers were included. MSI was analyzed using two mononucleotide and three dinucleotide markers. Results In total, 434 gastric cancers (372 microsatellite stability [MSS], 21 low incidence of MSI [MSI-L], and 41 high incidence of MSI [MSI-H]) and 162 colorectal cancers (138 MSS, 9 MSI-L, and 15 MSI-H) were included. Patients with MSI gastric cancer had a higher prevalence of synchronous colorectal cancer, colorectal adenoma, and gastric adenoma than those with MSS gastric cancers (4.8% vs 0.5%, p=0.023; 11.3% vs 3.2%, p=0.011; 3.2% vs 1.2%, p=0.00, respectively). The prevalence of synchronous colorectal adenomas was highest in MSI-L gastric cancers (19.0%), compared with MSI-H (7.3%) or MSS (3.2%) gastric cancers (p=0.002). In addition, there were no significant differences in the prevalence rates of synchronous colorectal adenoma among the MSI-H (13.3%), MSI-L (11.1%), and MSS (12.3%) colorectal cancers (p=0.987). Conclusions The presence of MSI in gastric cancer may be a predictor of synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms, whereas MSI in colorectal cancer is not a predictor of synchronous colorectal adenoma. PMID:26087787

  2. Hereditary factors are unlikely behind unusual pattern of early - Onset colorectal cancer in Egyptians: A study of family history and pathology features in Egyptians with large bowel cancer (cross-sectional study).

    PubMed

    Abou-Zeid, Ahmed A; Jumuah, Wael A; Ebied, Essam F; Abd El Samee Atia, Karim Sabry; El Ghamrini, Yasser; Somaie, Dina A

    2017-08-01

    Colorectal cancer in Egypt has a higher incidence in young patients compared to western countries, where the disease is more prevalent in the old age group. This difference has been attributed to higher incidence of hereditary cancers in young Egyptian patients. The aim of this study is to compare the family history criteria and pathology features of tumors in young (≤40 years) and old (>40 years) Egyptian patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon and rectum. This is the analysis of our prospectively collected data on the pathology features of tumors in 313 consecutive patients (133 young, 180 old) with colorectal cancer presenting to the Department of Surgery within an eight-year period. A detailed family history was obtained from 258 patients (112 young, 146 old). 41 young and 48 old patients reported family history of cancer, the difference was not statistically significant. Ten young patients (9%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first degree relative (3 fitting into Amsterdam criteria, 7 fitting into less strict criteria) which was not significantly different from the old age group. The pathologic features of tumors in both groups resembled sporadic rather than hereditary cancer and there was no significant difference between groups in tumor location, degree of differentiation, mucin production, synchronous and metachronous colorectal tumors or polyps and grossly stricturing or ulcerating tumors. Extracolonic tumors developed in one young and two old patients. The characteristics of large bowel cancer in young Egyptian patients do not differ significantly from those in older patients. Despite the high incidence of large bowel cancer in young Egyptian patients, family history and pathologic features of tumors do not support a hereditary origin of colorectal cancer in this age group in Egypt. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  4. Special Section: Preventing, Detecting, and Treating Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... long series to promote colon and rectal (colorectal) cancer awareness and screening. Following that, research showed that the ... has helped to raise millions of dollars for cancer research and awareness programs. Fast Facts Cancers of the colon and ...

  5. Dietary polyphenols and colorectal cancer risk: The Fukuoka colorectal cancer study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Jie; Ohnaka, Keizo; Morita, Makiko; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the associations between dietary intake of polyphenols and colorectal cancer. METHODS: The study subjects were derived from the Fukuoka colorectal cancer study, a community-based case-control study. The study subjects were 816 cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community-based controls. The consumption of 148 food items was assessed by a computer-assisted interview. We used the consumption of 97 food items to estimate dietary intakes of total, tea and coffee polyphenols. The Phenol-Explorer database was used for 92 food items. Of the 5 foods which were not listed in the Phenol-Explorer Database, polyphenol contents of 3 foods (sweet potatoes, satoimo and daikon) were based on a Japanese study and 2 foods (soybeans and fried potatoes) were estimated by ORAC-based polyphenol contents in the United States Department of Agriculture Database. Odds ratios (OR) and 95%CI of colorectal cancer risk according to quintile categories of intake were obtained by using logistic regression models with adjustment for age, sex, residential area, parental history of colorectal cancer, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index 10 years before, type of job, leisure-time physical activity and dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. RESULTS: There was no measurable difference in total or tea polyphenol intake between cases and controls, but intake of coffee polyphenols was lower in cases than in controls. The multivariate-adjusted OR of colorectal cancer according to quintile categories of coffee polyphenols (from the first to top quintile) were 1.00 (referent), 0.81 (95%CI: 0.60-1.10), 0.65 (95%CI: 0.47-0.89), 0.65 (95%CI: 0.46-0.89) and 0.82 (95%CI: 0.60-1.10), respectively (Ptrend = 0.07). Similar, but less pronounced, decreases in the OR were also noted for the third and fourth quintiles of total polyphenol intake. Tea polyphenols and non-coffee polyphenols showed no association with colorectal cancer risk. The site-specific analysis

  6. [Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    2018-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. In 2012 one million thirty six thousand cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed all over the world, two hundred fifty three thousand cases were diagnosed in China (accounted for 18.6%). China has the largest number of new cases of colorectal cancer in the world. Colorectal cancer has becoming a serious threat of Chinese residents' health. In 2010, the National Ministry of Health organized colorectal cancer expertise of the Chinese Medical Association to write the "Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer" (2010edition), and publish it publicly. In recent years, the National Health and Family Planning Commission has organized experts to revised the protocol 2 times: the first time in 2015, the second time in 2017. The revised part of "Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer" (2017 edition) involves new progress in the field of imaging examination, pathological evaluation, surgery, chemotherpy and radiotherapy. The 2017 edition of the protocol not only referred to the contents of the international guidelines, but also combined with the specific national conditions and clinical practice in China, and also included many evidence-based clinical data in China recently. The 2017 edition of the protocol would further promote the standardization of diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer in China, improve the survival and prognosis of patients, and benefit millions of patients with colorectal cancer and their families.

  7. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Life Campaign Print Materials Fact Sheet Brochures Posters Postcards Public Service Announcements Personal Screening Stories Campaign Research Poster Presentation: Why Should I Get Screened? Colorectal Cancer ...

  8. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Life Campaign Print Materials Fact Sheet Brochures Posters Postcards Public Service Announcements Personal Screening Stories Campaign Research Poster Presentation: Why Should I Get Screened? Colorectal Cancer ...

  9. Racial differences in colorectal cancer mortality. The importance of stage and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Marcella, S; Miller, J E

    2001-04-01

    This investigation studies racial and socioeconomic differences in mortality from colorectal cancer, and how they vary by stage and age at diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio of dying from colorectal cancer, controlling for tumor characteristics and sociodemographic factors. Black adults had a greater risk of death from colorectal cancer, especially in early stages. The gender gap in mortality is wider among blacks than whites. Differences in tumor characteristics and socioeconomic factors each accounted for approximately one third of the excess risk of death among blacks. Effects of socioeconomic factors and race varied significantly by age. Higher stage-specific mortality rates and more advanced stage at diagnosis both contribute to the higher case-fatality rates from colorectal cancer among black adults, only some of which is due to socioeconomic differences. Socioeconomic and racial factors have their most significant effects in different age groups.

  10. Dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer and incident and recurrent adenoma in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial12

    PubMed Central

    Kunzmann, Andrew T; Coleman, Helen G; Huang, Wen-Yi; Kitahara, Cari M; Cantwell, Marie M; Berndt, Sonja I

    2015-01-01

    distal colon cancer and that this effect of dietary fiber, particularly from cereals and fruit, may begin early in colorectal carcinogenesis. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01696981. PMID:26269366

  11. Dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer and incident and recurrent adenoma in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Kunzmann, Andrew T; Coleman, Helen G; Huang, Wen-Yi; Kitahara, Cari M; Cantwell, Marie M; Berndt, Sonja I

    2015-10-01

    Dietary fiber has been associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer. However, it remains unclear at which stage in the carcinogenic pathway fiber may act or which food sources of dietary fiber may be most beneficial against colorectal cancer development. The objective was to prospectively evaluate the association between dietary fiber intake and the risk of incident and recurrent colorectal adenoma and incident colorectal cancer. Study participants were identified from the intervention arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Participants received flexible sigmoidoscopy at baseline and 3 or 5 y after. Dietary fiber intake was measured by using a self-reported dietary questionnaire. The colorectal cancer, incident adenoma, and recurrent adenoma analyses were based on 57,774, 16,980, and 1667 participants, respectively. Unconditional logistic regression was used to assess the risk of incident and recurrent adenoma, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the risk of colorectal cancer across categories of dietary fiber intake, with adjustment for potential confounders. Elevated total dietary fiber intake was associated with a significantly reduced risk of incident distal colorectal adenoma (ORhighest vs. lowest tertile of intake: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.91; P-trend = 0.003) but not recurrent adenoma (P-trend = 0.67). Although the association was not statistically significant for colorectal cancer overall (HR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.03; P-trend = 0.10), a reduced risk of distal colon cancer was observed with increased total fiber intake (HR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.41, 0.94; P-trend = 0.03). Protective associations were most notable for fiber originating from cereals or fruit. This large, prospective study within a population-based screening trial suggests that individuals consuming the highest intakes of dietary fiber have reduced risks of incident colorectal adenoma and distal colon cancer and that this effect of dietary

  12. COGENT (COlorectal cancer GENeTics) revisited

    PubMed Central

    Houlston, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers (CRCs) develop in genetically susceptible individuals most of whom are not carriers of germ line mismatch repair or APC gene mutations and much of the heritable risk of CRC appears to be attributable to the co-inheritance of multiple low-risk variants. The accumulated experience to date in identifying this class of susceptibility allele has highlighted the need to conduct statistically and methodologically rigorous studies and the need for the multi-centre collaboration. This has been the motivation for establishing the COGENT (COlorectal cancer GENeTics) consortium which now includes over 20 research groups in Europe, Australia, the Americas, China and Japan actively working on CRC genetics. Here, we review the rationale for identifying low-penetrance variants for CRC and the current and future challenges for COGENT. PMID:22294761

  13. Clinical guideline seom: hereditary colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Ponce, C; Serrano, R; Sánchez-Heras, A B; Teulé, A; Chirivella, I; Martín, T; Martínez, E; Morales, R; Robles, L

    2015-12-01

    Genetic mutations have been identified as the cause of inherited cancer risk in some colon cancer; these mutations are estimated to account for only 5-6 % of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases overall. Up to 25-30 % of patients have a family history of CRC that suggests a hereditary component, common exposures among family members, or a combination of both. Cancers in people with a hereditary predisposition typically occur at an earlier age than in sporadic cases. A predisposition to CRC may include a predisposition to other cancers, such as endometrial cancer. We describe genetics, current diagnosis and management of CRC hereditary syndromes pointing to a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best results in patients and family outcomes.

  14. Family history of colorectal cancer is not associated with colorectal cancer survival regardless of microsatellite instability status.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Amanda I; Ahnen, Dennis J; Campbell, Peter T; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark A; Lindor, Noralane M; Gryfe, Robert; Potter, John D; Newcomb, Polly A

    2014-08-01

    Individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives have an elevated risk of developing colorectal cancer themselves, particularly colorectal cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability (MSI-high). Given that MSI-high colorectal cancer is associated with a favorable prognosis, it is plausible that having a family history of colorectal cancer could, in turn, be favorably associated with colorectal cancer survival. This study comprised N = 4,284 incident colorectal cancer cases enrolled in the Colon Cancer Family Registry via population-based cancer registries. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we evaluated the association between family history and both overall and disease-specific survival, accounting for MSI status and tumor site via stratified analyses and statistical adjustment. There was no evidence of association between family history and overall [hazard ratio (HR), 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.79-1.08] or disease-specific survival (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.85-1.24) for all cases combined, after adjustment for MSI status or tumor site. Only for rectal cancer cases was colorectal cancer family history modestly associated with more favorable overall survival (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.56-0.99). Although individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer were more likely to have MSI-high tumors than those with nonfamilial disease, this did not translate to a survival benefit. Overall, there is no evidence that family history of colorectal cancer is associated with colorectal cancer survival; however, specific mechanisms underlying family history may have prognostic impact and merit further study. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Establishment of apoptotic regulatory network for genetic markers of colorectal cancer and optimal selection of traditional Chinese medicine target.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tongde; Chen, Chuanliang; Yang, Feng; Tang, Jingwen; Pei, Junwen; Shi, Bian; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    The paper aimed to screen out genetic markers applicable to early diagnosis for colorectal cancer and establish apoptotic regulatory network model for colorectal cancer, and to analyze the current situation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) target, thereby providing theoretical evidence for early diagnosis and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer. Taking databases including CNKI, VIP, Wanfang data, Pub Med, and MEDLINE as main sources of literature retrieval, literatures associated with genetic markers that are applied to early diagnosis of colorectal cancer were searched and performed comprehensive and quantitative analysis by Meta analysis, hence screening genetic markers used in early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. KEGG analysis was employed to establish apoptotic regulatory network model based on screened genetic markers, and optimization was conducted on TCM targets. Through Meta analysis, seven genetic markers were screened out, including WWOX, K-ras, COX-2, P53, APC, DCC and PTEN, among which DCC has the highest diagnostic efficiency. Apoptotic regulatory network was built by KEGG analysis. Currently, it was reported that TCM has regulatory function on gene locus in apoptotic regulatory network. The apoptotic regulatory model of colorectal cancer established in this study provides theoretical evidence for early diagnosis and TCM targeted therapy of colorectal cancer in clinic.

  16. Herbal medicines for advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhongning; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Jian Ping; Liao, Juan; Yang, Yufei

    2012-05-16

    Herbal medicine has been widely used in patients with advanced colorectal cancer in China, but its efficacy has not been confirmed. To evaluate the beneficial effect and safety on Chinese herbal medicine therapy for advanced stage colorectal cancer, and it's influence on the patients' quality of life. The following electronic databases were searched: BIOSIS Previews, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline EMBASE, Biological Abstracts, until Aug. 2011. Manual searching was performed on 16 types of Chinese journals which started from their respective first publication dates, as well as unpublished conference proceedings. No language restriction was applied. Randomized or quasi-randomised controlled trials on the treatment of advanced stage colorectal cancer by herbal medicines or herbal medicines combined with chemotherapy, regardless of blinding. The data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Methodological quality of the included in trials was assessed according to the following parameters: randomisation, allocation concealment, double blinding, and drop-out rates. A total of 20 randomised controlled trials with 1304 participants were identified. All the 20 trials compared the use of herbal medicines with chemotherapy and chemotherapy alone in the treatment of advanced stage colorectal cancers.Compared with chemotherapy alone, the use of Quxie capsule combined with chemotherapy could decrease mortality rate (RR 0.17, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.97); the use of Jianpi Jiedu formula, Xiaozheng formula and Yiqi Huoxue herbal medicine combined with chemotherapy respectively could improve 1-year survival rate significantly; the use of Xiaozheng Formula in conjunction with chemotherapy could improve 3-year survival rate. There were 10 herbal medicines showing benefit in improving quality of life. Herbal medicines did not show additional benefit in response rate or stability rate. No trials reported serious adverse effect from herbal medicine. Some herbal medicines

  17. Current and future molecular diagnostics in colorectal cancer and colorectal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Andy Hin-Fung; Cheng, Ka-Ho; Wong, Apple Siu-Ping; Ng, Simon Siu-Man; Ma, Brigette Buig-Yue; Chan, Charles Ming-Lok; Tsui, Nancy Bo-Yin; Chan, Lawrence Wing-Chi; Yung, Benjamin Yat-Ming; Wong, Sze-Chuen Cesar

    2014-04-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent cancers in developed countries. On the other hand, CRC is also one of the most curable cancers if it is detected in early stages through regular colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy. Since CRC develops slowly from precancerous lesions, early detection can reduce both the incidence and mortality of the disease. Fecal occult blood test is a widely used non-invasive screening tool for CRC. Although fecal occult blood test is simple and cost-effective in screening CRC, there is room for improvement in terms of the accuracy of the test. Genetic dysregulations have been found to play an important role in CRC development. With better understanding of the molecular basis of CRC, there is a growing expectation on the development of diagnostic tests based on more sensitive and specific molecular markers and those tests may provide a breakthrough to the limitations of current screening tests for CRC. In this review, the molecular basis of CRC development, the characteristics and applications of different non-invasive molecular biomarkers, as well as the technologies available for the detection were discussed. This review intended to provide a summary on the current and future molecular diagnostics in CRC and its pre-malignant state, colorectal adenoma.

  18. Current and future molecular diagnostics in colorectal cancer and colorectal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Andy Hin-Fung; Cheng, Ka-Ho; Wong, Apple Siu-Ping; Ng, Simon Siu-Man; Ma, Brigette Buig-Yue; Chan, Charles Ming-Lok; Tsui, Nancy Bo-Yin; Chan, Lawrence Wing-Chi; Yung, Benjamin Yat-Ming; Wong, Sze-Chuen Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent cancers in developed countries. On the other hand, CRC is also one of the most curable cancers if it is detected in early stages through regular colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy. Since CRC develops slowly from precancerous lesions, early detection can reduce both the incidence and mortality of the disease. Fecal occult blood test is a widely used non-invasive screening tool for CRC. Although fecal occult blood test is simple and cost-effective in screening CRC, there is room for improvement in terms of the accuracy of the test. Genetic dysregulations have been found to play an important role in CRC development. With better understanding of the molecular basis of CRC, there is a growing expectation on the development of diagnostic tests based on more sensitive and specific molecular markers and those tests may provide a breakthrough to the limitations of current screening tests for CRC. In this review, the molecular basis of CRC development, the characteristics and applications of different non-invasive molecular biomarkers, as well as the technologies available for the detection were discussed. This review intended to provide a summary on the current and future molecular diagnostics in CRC and its pre-malignant state, colorectal adenoma. PMID:24744577

  19. Soy food and isoflavone intake and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Joshi, Amit Man; Ohnaka, Keizo; Yin, Guang; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that soy food and isoflavone intake may be protective against the risk of colorectal cancer. However, epidemiologic evidence remains sparse and inconsistent. We addressed this issue in the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. The study subjects were the 816 incident cases of histologically confirmed colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Intakes of soy foods and isoflavones were assessed by in-person interview using a computer-assisted dietary method. Logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of colorectal cancer with adjustment for dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as for body mass index, physical activity, alcohol use, and other lifestyle factors. Energy-adjusted intakes of soy foods (dry weight) and isoflavones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in men and postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women. The multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest versus lowest quintile was 0.65 (95% CI 0.41-1.03, p for trend = 0.03) for soy foods and 0.68 (95% CI 0.42-1.10, p for trend = 0.051) for isoflavones in men. The corresponding values for postmenopausal women were 0.60 (95% CI 0.29-1.25, p for trend = 0.053) and 0.68 (95% CI 0.33-1.40, p for trend = 0.049). The site-specific analysis showed inverse associations of soy foods (p for trend = 0.007) and isoflavones (p for trend = 0.02) with rectal cancer in men. The findings add to epidemiologic evidence for protective effects of soy foods and isoflavones in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  20. Colorectal cancer occurs earlier in those exposed to tobacco smoke: implications for screening

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Martin C.; Cummings, K. Michael; Michalek, Arthur M.; Reid, Mary E.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Hyland, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the USA. While various lifestyle factors have been shown to alter the risk for colorectal cancer, recommendations for the early detection of CRC are based only on age and family history. Methods This case-only study examined the age at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in subjects exposed to tobacco smoke. Subjects included all patients who attended RPCI between 1957 and 1997, diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and completed an epidemiologic questionnaire. Adjusted linear regression models were calculated for the various smoking exposures. Results Of the 3,540 cases of colorectal cancer, current smokers demonstrated the youngest age of CRC onset (never: 64.2 vs. current: 57.4, P < 0.001) compared to never smokers, followed by recent former smokers. Among never smokers, individuals with past second-hand smoke exposure were diagnosed at a significantly younger age compared to the unexposed. Conclusion This study found that individuals with heavy, long-term tobacco smoke exposure were significantly younger at the time of CRC diagnosis compared to lifelong never smokers. The implication of this finding is that screening for colorectal cancer, which is recommended to begin at age 50 years for persons at average risk should be initiated 5–10 years earlier for persons with a significant lifetime history of exposure to tobacco smoke. PMID:18264728

  1. Using Comics to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening in the Asian American and Pacific Islander Communities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiayan Linda; Acevedo, Nazia; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2017-06-23

    There are unaesthetic aspects in teaching people about the early detection of colorectal cancer using the fecal immunochemical test. Comics were seen as a way to overcome those unaesthetic aspects. This study used the Asian grocery store-based cancer education venue to pilot-test the clarity, cultural acceptability, and alignment of five colorectal cancer education comics intended for publication in Asian American and Pacific Islander (API) community newspapers. After developing the colorectal cancer education comics, API students asked shoppers to review a comic from their collection and provide feedback on how to make the comic clearer and more culturally pertinent to API readers. To evaluate viewers' responses, the students gathered such unobtrusive data as: (1) how many of the predetermined salient information points were discussed as the student educators interacted with shoppers and (2) how many comics the shoppers were willing to review. Shoppers were also asked to evaluate how effective the comics would be at motivating colorectal cancer screening among APIs. The students were able to cover all of the salient information points with the first comic. As evidence of the comics' capacity to engage shoppers' interest, shoppers willingly evaluated all five comics. Using multiple comics enabled the educators to repeatedly address the four salient colorectal cancer information points. Thus, the comics helped student educators to overcome the unesthetic elements of colorectal cancer discussions, while enabling them to engage shoppers in animated discussions, for far more time than with their conventional didactic educational methods.

  2. Exercise barriers in Korean colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Woo; Chung, Jae Youn; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Junga; Park, Ji-Hye; Kim, Dong-Il; Jones, Lee W; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Justin Y

    2014-01-01

    To identify barriers to exercise in Korean colorectal cancer patients and survivors, and to analyze differences in exercise barriers by age, gender, treatment status, and physical activity level. A total of 427 colorectal cancer patients and survivors from different stages and medical status completed a self-administered questionnaire that surveyed their barriers to exercise and exercise participation. The greatest perceived exercise barriers for the sampled population as a whole were fatigue, low level of physical fitness, and poor health. Those under 60-years old reported lack of time (p=0.008), whereas those over 60 reported low level of physical fitness (p=0.014) as greater exercise barriers than their counterparts. Women reported fatigue as a greater barrier than men (p<0.001). Those who were receiving treatment rated poor health (p=0.0005) and cancer-related factors as greater exercise barriers compared to those who were not receiving treatment. A multivariate model found that other demographic and medical status were not potential factors that may affect exercise participation. Further, for those who were not participating in physical activity, tendency to be physically inactive (p<0.001) and lack of exercise skill (p<0.001) were highly significant barriers, compared to those who were participating in physical activity. Also, for those who were not meeting ACSM guidelines, cancer-related exercise barriers were additionally reported (p<0.001), compared to those who were. Our study suggests that fatigue, low level of physical fitness, and poor health are most reported exercise barriers for Korean colorectal cancer survivors and there are differences in exercise barriers by age, sex, treatment status, and physical activity level. Therefore, support for cancer patients should be provided considering these variables to increase exercise participation.

  3. Analysis of metastasis associated signal regulatory network in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lu; Ding, Yanqing

    2018-06-18

    Metastasis is a key factor that affects the survival and prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. To elucidate molecular mechanism associated with the metastasis of colorectal cancer, genes related to the metastasis time of colorectal cancer were screened. Then, a network was constructed with this genes. Data was obtained from colorectal cancer expression profile. Molecular mechanism elucidated the time of tumor metastasis and the expression of genes related to colorectal cancer. We found that metastasis-promoting and metastasis-inhibiting networks included protein hubs of high connectivity. These protein hubs were components of organelles. Some ribosomal proteins promoted the metastasis of colorectal cancer. In some components of organelles, such as proteasomes, mitochondrial ribosome, ATP synthase, and splicing factors, the metastasis of colorectal cancer was inhibited by some sections of these organelles. After performing survival analysis of proteins in organelles, joint survival curve of proteins was constructed in ribosomal network. This joint survival curve showed metastasis was promoted in patients with colorectal cancer (P = 0.0022939). Joint survival curve of proteins was plotted against proteasomes (P = 7 e-07), mitochondrial ribosome (P = 0.0001157), ATP synthase (P = 0.0001936), and splicing factors (P = 1.35e-05). These curves indicate that metastasis of colorectal cancer can be inhibited. After analyzing proteins that bind with organelle components, we also found that some proteins were associated with the time of colorectal cancer metastasis. Hence, different cellular components play different roles in the metastasis of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 76 FR 41805 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... baseline, will be used to assure comparability between the screening and control groups and make... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial... and instruments, contact Dr. Christine D. Berg, Chief, Early Detection Research Group, National Cancer...

  5. Colorectal Cancer: Chemopreventive Role of Curcumin and Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaishali B.; Misra, Sabeena; Patel, Bhaumik B.; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a second leading cause of cancer deaths in the Western world. Currently there is no effective treatment except resection at a very early stage with or with-out chemotherapy. Of various epithelial cancers, CRC in particular has a potential for prevention, since most cancers follow the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, and the interval between detection of an adenoma and its progression to carcinoma is usually about a decade. However no effective chemopreventive agent except COX-2 inhibitors, limited in their scope due to cardiovascular side effects, have shown promise in reducing adenoma recurrence. To this end, natural agents that can target important carcinogenic pathways without demonstrating discernible adverse effects would serve as ideal chemoprevention agents. In this review, we discuss merits of two such naturally occurring dietary agents—curcumin and resveratrol—for chemoprevention of CRC. PMID:20924971

  6. The Role of Akt Isoforms in Colorectal Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0198 TITLE: The Role of Akt Isoforms in Colorectal Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jatin Roper...CONTRACT NUMBER The Role of Akt Isoforms in Colorectal Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0198 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...substantially reduces colorectal tumorigenesis in our genetically engineered mouse model. We also successfully ablated novel downstream targets of Akt in our

  7. Use of National Comprehensive Cancer Network and Other Guidelines and Biomarkers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christina D.; Grady, William M.; Zullig, Leah L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a common cancer and significant public health burden. CRC-related mortality is declining, in part due to the early detection of CRC through robust screening. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has established CRC screening guidelines to aid healthcare providers in making appropriate recommendations for screening according to a patient’s risk of developing CRC. The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of CRC screening guidelines for average risk individuals, discuss the role of NCCN CRC screening guidelines in cancer prevention, and comment on the current and emerging use of biomarkers for CRC screening. PMID:27799515

  8. The Impact of Colorectal Cancer (CRC) in Mississippi, and the need for Mississippi to Eliminate its CRC Burden.

    PubMed

    Duhé, Roy J

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), while highly preventable and highly treatable, is a major public health problem in Mississippi. This article reviews solutions to this problem, beginning with the relationship between modifiable behavioral risk factors and CRC incidence. It then describes the impact of CRC screening on national downward trends in CRC incidence and mortality and summarizes recent data on the burden of CRC in Mississippi. While other states have created Comprehensive Colorectal Cancer Control Programs in an organized effort to manage this public health problem, Mississippi has not. Responding to Mississippi's situation, the 70x2020 Colorectal Cancer Screening Initiative arose as an unconventional approach to increase CRC screening rates throughout the state. This article concludes by considering the current limits of CRC treatment success and proposes that improved clinical outcomes should result from research to translate recently-identified colorectal cancer subtype information into novel clinical paradigms for the treatment of early-stage colorectal cancer.

  9. TUSC7 acts as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weidan; Chen, Shuo; Liu, Guiwei; Wang, Xuesong; Ye, Haopeng; Xi, Yanguo

    2017-01-01

    Increasing studies showed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) played important roles in the development and progression of tumors. Previous evidences suggested that Tumor suppressor candidate 7 (TUSC7) was involved in several tumors initiation. However, the role of TUSC7 in colorectal cancer is still unknown. In this study, we indicated that the expression of TUSC7 was downregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. Moreover, the expression of TUSC7 was lower in the high-grade (Dukes C and D) colorectal cancer patients compared to that in the low-grade colorectal cancer patients (Dukes A and B). Colorectal cancer patients with a lower level of TUSC7 expression had worse overall survival rate. Elevated expression of TUSC7 suppressed SW480 and HT29 cell proliferation and invasion. In addition, we demonstrated that overexpression of TUSC7 inhibited the expression of miR-10a and enhanced the expression of PTEN and EphA8, which were the direct target genes of miR-10a. Furthermore, the expression of miR-10a was upregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. TUSC7 suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasion partly through targeting miR-10a. These results suggested that TUSC7 played as a tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer partly through inhibiting miR-10a expression.

  10. TUSC7 acts as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Weidan; Chen, Shuo; Liu, Guiwei; Wang, Xuesong; Ye, Haopeng; Xi, Yanguo

    2017-01-01

    Increasing studies showed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) played important roles in the development and progression of tumors. Previous evidences suggested that Tumor suppressor candidate 7 (TUSC7) was involved in several tumors initiation. However, the role of TUSC7 in colorectal cancer is still unknown. In this study, we indicated that the expression of TUSC7 was downregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. Moreover, the expression of TUSC7 was lower in the high-grade (Dukes C and D) colorectal cancer patients compared to that in the low-grade colorectal cancer patients (Dukes A and B). Colorectal cancer patients with a lower level of TUSC7 expression had worse overall survival rate. Elevated expression of TUSC7 suppressed SW480 and HT29 cell proliferation and invasion. In addition, we demonstrated that overexpression of TUSC7 inhibited the expression of miR-10a and enhanced the expression of PTEN and EphA8, which were the direct target genes of miR-10a. Furthermore, the expression of miR-10a was upregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. TUSC7 suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasion partly through targeting miR-10a. These results suggested that TUSC7 played as a tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer partly through inhibiting miR-10a expression. PMID:28979678

  11. Colorectal cancer screening: The role of the noninvasive options.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Lisa; Varcak, Susan Combs

    2016-09-01

    Recommended screening options for colorectal cancer are divided into noninvasive stool-based options, and invasive procedure-based options. Because multiple screening strategies are effective, efforts to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer should focus on maximizing the number of patients who are screened. This article reviews noninvasive stool-based screening options.

  12. NIH study finds sigmoidoscopy reduces colorectal cancer rates

    Cancer.gov

    Study finds that flexible sigmoidoscopy is effective in reducing the rates of new cases and deaths due to colorectal cancer. Researchers found that overall colorectal cancer mortality was reduced by 26 percent and incidence was reduced by 21 percent as a

  13. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Erb, Nicole L.; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L.; Cannady, Rachel; Wong, Sandra L.; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April; Stein, Kevin; Sharpe, Katherine; Brooks, Durado D.; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant disease in the United States (U.S.). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years following diagnosis. The prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the U.S. population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns following treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The following guidelines are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy. PMID:26348643

  14. Anastomotic leaks in stage IV colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ng, Suat Chin; Stupart, Douglas; Bartolo, David; Watters, David

    2018-06-12

    The purpose of this study was to determine the anastomotic leak rate for colorectal cancer resections in patients with metastases (compared to those without), and to determine the impact of anastomotic leaks on survival. This is a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent resection and primary anastomosis for colorectal adenocarcinoma at a single institution between January 2002 and December 2014. A total of 843 patients underwent a resection and primary anastomosis for colorectal adenocarcinoma (661 colon and 182 rectal). Of these, 135 (16%) had metastases and 708 (84%) did not. Anastomotic leaks occurred in 17 of 135 (13%) patients with metastases, and in 37 of 798 (5.2%) patients without metastases (P = 0.003). Peri-operative mortality occurred in 13 of 135 (9.6%) patients with metastases, compared with 19 of 708 (2.7%) patients without metastases (P = 0.0003). Anastomotic leak was associated with a reduction in overall survival (median survival 121 months without anastomotic leak versus 66 months in patients who had an anastomotic leak (P = 0.02)). If the patients who died peri-operatively are excluded from this analysis, however, long-term mortality was similar (125 months versus 101 months; P = 0.70). Metastatic disease was associated with an increased risk of anastomotic leak and a higher peri-operative mortality rate after colorectal resections for cancer. Patients with anastomotic leaks had a higher peri-operative mortality rate, but long-term survival was unaffected beyond the peri-operative phase. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. Prognostic and predictive factors in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bolocan, A; Ion, D; Ciocan, D N; Paduraru, D N

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important public health problem; it is a leading cause of cancer mortality in the industrialized world, second to lung cancer: each year there are nearly one million new cases of CRC diagnosed worldwide and half a million deaths (1). This review aims to summarise the most important currently available markers for CRC that provide prognostic or predictive information. Amongst others, it covers serum markers such as CEA and CA19-9, markers expressed by tumour tissues, such as thymidylate synthase, and also the expression/loss of expression of certain oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes such as K-ras and p53. The prognostic value of genomic instability, angiogenesis and proliferative indices, such as the apoptotic index, are discussed. The advent of new therapies created the pathway for a personalized approach of the patient. This will take into consideration the complex genetic mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis, besides the classical clinical and pathological stagings. The growing number of therapeutic agents and known molecular targets in oncology lead to a compulsory study of the clinical use of biomarkers with role in improving response and survival, as well as in reducing toxicity and establishing economic stability. The potential predictive and prognostic biomarkers which have arisen from the study of the genetic basis of colorectal cancer and their therapeutical significance are discussed. RevistaChirurgia.

  16. Do Frequent Follow-Up Tests Help Colorectal Cancer Survivors?

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies of colorectal cancer survivors examined whether more frequent follow-up testing for recurrence improved how long people lived. Read this Cancer Currents blog post to learn whether testing frequency affects survival.

  17. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog-Gli (HH-GLI), specific roles mediated by cell surface markers and micro-environmental factors are involved in the regulation of self-renewal. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind self-renewal may lead to the development of novel targeted interventions for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  18. A targeted molecular probe for colorectal cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attramadal, T.; Bjerke, R.; Indrevoll, B.; Moestue, S.; Rogstad, A.; Bendiksen, R.; Healey, A.; Johannesen, E.

    2008-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death. Morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs can be reduced if the disease can be detected at an early stage. Screening is a viable approach as there is a clear link to risk factors such as age. We have developed a fluorescent contrast agent for use during colonoscopy. The agent is administered intravenously and is targeted to an early stage molecular marker for colorectal cancer. The agent consists of a targeting section comprising a peptide, and a fluorescent reporter molecule. Clinical imaging of the agent is to be performed with a far red fluorescence imaging channel (635 nm excitation/660-700 nm emission) as an adjunct to white light colonoscopy. Preclinical proof of mechanism results are presented. The compound has a K d of ~3nM. Two human xenograft tumour models were used. Tumour cells were implanted and grown subcutaneously in nude mice. Imaging using a fluorescence reflectance imaging system and quantitative biodistribution studies were performed. Substances tested include the targeted agent, and a scrambled sequence of the peptide (no binding) used as a negative control. Competition studies were also performed by co-administration of 180 times excess unlabelled peptide. Positive imaging contrast was shown in the tumours, with a clear relationship to expression levels (confirmed with quantitative biodistribution data). There was a significant difference between the positive and negative control substances, and a significant reduction in contrast in the competition experiment.

  19. Pair-wise comparison analysis of differential expression of mRNAs in early and advanced stage primary colorectal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tze Pheng; Roslani, April Camilla; Lian, Lay Hoong; Chai, Hwa Chia; Lee, Ping Chin; Hilmi, Ida; Goh, Khean Lee; Chua, Kek Heng

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To characterise the mRNA expression patterns of early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas of Malaysian patients. Design Comparative expression analysis. Setting and participants We performed a combination of annealing control primer (ACP)-based PCR and reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR for the identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with early and advanced stage primary colorectal tumours. We recruited four paired samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) of Dukes’ A and B for the preliminary differential expression study, and a total of 27 paired samples, ranging from CRC stages I to IV, for subsequent confirmatory test. The tumouric samples were obtained from the patients with CRC undergoing curative surgical resection without preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The recruited patients with CRC were newly diagnosed with CRC, and were not associated with any hereditary syndromes, previously diagnosed cancer or positive family history of CRC. The paired non-cancerous tissue specimens were excised from macroscopically normal colonic mucosa distally located from the colorectal tumours. Primary and secondary outcome measures The differential mRNA expression patterns of early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas compared with macroscopically normal colonic mucosa were characterised by ACP-based PCR and reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR. Results The RPL35, RPS23 and TIMP1 genes were found to be overexpressed in both early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas (p<0.05). However, the ARPC2 gene was significantly underexpressed in early colorectal adenocarcinomas, while the advanced stage primary colorectal tumours exhibited an additional overexpression of the C6orf173 gene (p<0.05). Conclusions We characterised two distinctive gene expression patterns to aid in the stratification of primary colorectal neoplasms among Malaysian patients with CRC. Further work can be done to

  20. Patients' Awareness Of The Prevention And Treatment Of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dziki, Łukasz; Puła, Anna; Stawiski, Konrad; Mudza, Barbara; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Dziki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess patients' awareness of the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. Patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, hospitalised at the Department of General and Colorectal Surgery of the Medical University in Łódź during the period from January 2015 to April 2015, were asked to complete a questionnaire concerning their families' medical case record, factors predisposing them to the development of colorectal cancer, the tests applied in diagnostics, and the treatment process. The questionnaire comprised 42 closed-ended questions with one correct answer. A statistical analysis of all answers was carried out. The study group consisted of 30 men and 20 women aged 27-94 years old. A strong, statistically significant negative correlation between a patient's age and his/her awareness of the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer was noted (p<0.001; r= -0.51). The study demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of neoplasms in a patient's family (p=0.009) or, more specifically, the occurrence of colorectal cancer (p=0.008), and the awareness of the prevention programme. The women's group was characterised by statistically significantly greater awareness of colonoscopy as a screening examination (p=0.004). Patients need more information on colorectal cancer, its risk factors, prevention, the treatment process, and postoperative care. Lack of awareness of the colorectal cancer issue can be one of the major factors contributing to the high incidence of this disease.

  1. Incidence of colorectal cancer in young patients.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme C M DE; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Monteiro, Mariane; Nahas, Sérgio Carlos; Cecconello, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is traditionally diagnosed after de sixth decade of life, although a small percentage of cases are diagnosed in patients under 40 years of age, and incidence is increasing. There exists a great volume of controversy regarding clinical outcome of young patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) when compared to elder counterparts. Our aims were to evaluate the rate of CRC in young patients, to review the pertaining literature and to discuss outcomes and clinical prognosis. A retrospective review involving patients with CRC was undertaken, focusing on age at diagnosis. The information extracted from this literature review showed a trend towards a decreased incidence in older people with an opposite effect among adolescents and young adults. Moreover, biological aggressiveness in young adults diagnosed with CRC has not been fully recognized, although it is usually diagnosed later and in association with adverse histological features. Besides that, these features don't affect outcome. These apparent increase in CRC incidence among young patients during the last decades raises the need for a greater suspicious when evaluating common symptoms in this group. Thus, educational programs should widespread information for both population and physicians to improve prevention and early diagnosis results. RESUMO O câncer colorretal (CCR) esporádico é tradicionalmente diagnosticado após a sexta década de vida, embora uma pequena porcentagem de casos seja diagnosticada em doentes abaixo dos 40 anos de idade, e a incidência está aumentando. Existe uma grande controvérsia a respeito da evolução clínica de doentes jovens portadores de CCR em comparação aos mais idosos. Os objetivos deste estudo foram avaliar a prevalência de CCR em doentes jovens, rever a literatura pertinente e discutir suas características mais importantes nesta faixa etária. Para tanto realizou-se revisão da literatura envolvendo doentes com CCR com foco na

  2. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Preferences, Past Behavior, and Future Intentions.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Carol; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Tangka, Florence K L; Brown, Derek S; Smith, Judith Lee; Guy, Gery P; Li, Chunyu; Hauber, Brett

    2018-05-09

    Screening rates for colorectal cancer are below the Healthy People 2020 goal. There are several colorectal cancer screening tests that differ in terms of accuracy, recommended frequency, and administration. In this article, we compare how a set of personal characteristics correlates with preferences for colorectal cancer screening test attributes, past colorectal cancer screening behavior, and future colorectal cancer screening intentions. We conducted a discrete-choice experiment survey to assess relative preferences for attributes of colorectal cancer screening tests among adults aged 50-75 years in USA. We used a latent class logit model to identify classes of preferences and calculated willingness to pay for changes in test attributes. A set of personal characteristics were included in the latent class analysis and analyses of self-reported past screening behavior and self-assessed likelihood of future colorectal cancer screening. Latent class analysis identified three types of respondents. Class 1 valued test accuracy, class 2 valued removing polyps and avoiding discomfort, and class 3 valued cost. Having had a prior colonoscopy and a higher income were predictors of the likelihood of future screening and membership in classes 1 and 2. Health insurance and a self-reported higher risk of developing colorectal cancer were associated with prior screening and higher future screening intentions, but not class membership. We identified distinct classes of preferences focusing on different test features and personal characteristics associated with reported behavior and intentions. Healthcare providers should engage in a careful assessment of patient preferences when recommending colorectal cancer test options to encourage colorectal cancer screening uptake.

  3. History, evolution, and current status of radiologic imaging tests for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Levine, Marc S; Yee, Judy

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer screening is thought to be an effective tool with which to reduce the mortality from colorectal cancer through early detection and removal of colonic adenomas and early colon cancers. In this article, we review the history, evolution, and current status of imaging tests of the colon-including single-contrast barium enema, double-contrast barium enema, computed tomographic (CT) colonography, and magnetic resonance (MR) colonography-for colorectal cancer screening. Despite its documented value in the detection of colonic polyps, the double-contrast barium enema has largely disappeared as a screening test because it is widely perceived as a labor-intensive, time-consuming, and technically demanding procedure. In the past decade, the barium enema has been supplanted by CT colonography as the major imaging test in colorectal cancer screening in the United States, with MR colonography emerging as another viable option in Europe. Although MR colonography does not require ionizing radiation, the radiation dose for CT colonography has decreased substantially, and regular screening with this technique has a high benefit-to-risk ratio. In recent years, CT colonography has been validated as an effective tool for use in colorectal cancer screening that is increasingly being disseminated.

  4. Fusobacterium and colorectal cancer: causal factor or passenger? Results from a large colorectal cancer screening study.

    PubMed

    Amitay, Efrat L; Werner, Simone; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Höfler, Daniela; Gierse, Indra-Jasmin; Butt, Julia; Balavarca, Yesilda; Cuk, Katarina; Brenner, Hermann

    2017-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in both men and women. The gut microbiome is increasingly recognized as having an important role in human health and disease. Fusobacterium has been identified in former studies as a leading gut bacterium associated with colorectal cancer, but it is still not clear if it plays an oncogenic role. In the current study, fecal samples were collected prior to bowel preparation from participants of screening colonoscopy in the German BliTz study. Using 16S rRNA gene analysis, we examined the presence and relative abundance of Fusobacterium in fecal samples from 500 participants, including 46, 113, 110 and 231 individuals with colorectal cancer, advanced adenomas, non-advanced adenomas and without any neoplasms, respectively. We found that the abundance of Fusobacterium in feces was strongly associated with the presence of colorectal cancer (P-value < 0.0001). This was confirmed by PCR at the species level for Fusobacterium nucleatum. However, no association was seen with the presence of advanced adenomas (P-value = 0.80) or non-advanced adenomas (P-value = 0.80), nor were there any associations observed with dietary or lifestyle habits. Although a causal role cannot be ruled out, our observations, based on fecal microbiome, support the hypothesis that Fusobacterium is a passenger that multiplies in the more favorable conditions caused by the malignant tumor rather than a causal factor in colorectal cancer development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. An Optimal Mean Based Block Robust Feature Extraction Method to Identify Colorectal Cancer Genes with Integrated Data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Cheng, Yuhu; Wang, Xuesong; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Hui

    2017-08-17

    It is urgent to diagnose colorectal cancer in the early stage. Some feature genes which are important to colorectal cancer development have been identified. However, for the early stage of colorectal cancer, less is known about the identity of specific cancer genes that are associated with advanced clinical stage. In this paper, we conducted a feature extraction method named Optimal Mean based Block Robust Feature Extraction method (OMBRFE) to identify feature genes associated with advanced colorectal cancer in clinical stage by using the integrated colorectal cancer data. Firstly, based on the optimal mean and L 2,1 -norm, a novel feature extraction method called Optimal Mean based Robust Feature Extraction method (OMRFE) is proposed to identify feature genes. Then the OMBRFE method which introduces the block ideology into OMRFE method is put forward to process the colorectal cancer integrated data which includes multiple genomic data: copy number alterations, somatic mutations, methylation expression alteration, as well as gene expression changes. Experimental results demonstrate that the OMBRFE is more effective than previous methods in identifying the feature genes. Moreover, genes identified by OMBRFE are verified to be closely associated with advanced colorectal cancer in clinical stage.

  6. Peritumoral eosinophils predict recurrence in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Harbaum, Lars; Pollheimer, Marion J; Kornprat, Peter; Lindtner, Richard A; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Langner, Cord

    2015-03-01

    In colorectal cancer, the presence and extent of eosinophil granulocyte infiltration may render important prognostic information. However, it remains unclear whether an increasing number of eosinophils might simply be linked to the overall inflammatory cell reaction or represent a self-contained, antitumoral mechanism that needs to be documented and promoted therapeutically. Peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were retrospectively assessed in 381 primary colorectal cancers from randomly selected patients. Tumors were diagnosed in American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) stage I in 21%, stage II in 32%, stage III in 33%, and stage IV in 14%. Presence and extent of eosinophils was related to various histopathological parameters as well as patients' outcome. Overall, peri- and intratumoral eosinophils were observed in 86 and 75% cancer specimens. The peritumoral eosinophil count correlated strongly with the intratumoral eosinophil count (R=0.69; P<0.001) and with the intensity of the overall inflammatory cell reaction (R=0.318; P<0.001). Both increasing peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were significantly associated with lower T and N classification, better tumor differentiation, absence of vascular invasion, as well as improved progression-free and cancer-specific survival. However, only peritumoral eosinophils, but not intratumoral, were an independent prognosticator of favorable progression-free (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.98; P=0.04) and cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio 0.7; 95% confidence interval 0.52-0.93; P=0.01)-independent of the intensity of overall inflammatory cell reaction. This was also found for patients with AJCC/UICC stage II disease, wherein the presence of peritumoral eosinophils was significantly associated with favorable outcome. In conclusion, the number of peritumoral eosinophils had a significant favorable impact on prognosis of colorectal cancer patients

  7. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances.

    PubMed

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-02-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments.

  8. POLE somatic mutations in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Joana; Pinto, Carla; Pinto, Diana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Silva, Romina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Veiga, Isabel; Santos, Catarina; Santos, Rui; Cabreira, Verónica; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-12-01

    Despite all the knowledge already gathered, the picture of somatic genetic changes in colorectal tumorigenesis is far from complete. Recently, germline and somatic mutations in the exonuclease domain of polymerase epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) gene have been reported in a small subset of microsatellite-stable and hypermutated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), affecting the proofreading activity of the enzyme and leading to misincorporation of bases during DNA replication. To evaluate the role of POLE mutations in colorectal carcinogenesis, namely in advanced CRC, we searched for somatic mutations by Sanger sequencing in tumor DNA samples from 307 cases. Microsatellite instability and mutation analyses of a panel of oncogenes were performed in the tumors harboring POLE mutations. Three heterozygous mutations were found in two tumors, the c.857C>G, p.Pro286Arg, the c.901G>A, p.Asp301Asn, and the c.1376C>T, p.Ser459Phe. Of the POLE-mutated CRCs, one tumor was microsatellite-stable and the other had low microsatellite instability, whereas KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were found in one tumor each. We conclude that POLE somatic mutations exist but are rare in advanced CRC, with further larger studies being necessary to evaluate its biological and clinical implications. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Impact of proteolytic enzymes in colorectal cancer development and progression.

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Barabás, Loránd; Hritz, István; István, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-10-07

    Tumor invasion and metastasis is a highly complicated, multi-step phenomenon. In the complex event of tumor progression, tumor cells interact with basement membrane and extracellular matrix components. Proteolytic enzymes (proteinases) are involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix, but also in cancer invasion and metastasis. The four categories of proteinases (cysteine-, serine-, aspartic-, and metalloproteinases) are named and classified according to the essential catalytic component in their active site. We and others have shown that proteolytic enzymes play a major role not only in colorectal cancer (CRC) invasion and metastasis, but also in malignant transformation of precancerous lesions into cancer. Tissue and serum-plasma antigen concentrations of proteinases might be of great value in identifying patients with poor prognosis in CRC. Our results, in concordance with others indicate the potential tumor marker impact of proteinases for the early diagnosis of CRC. In addition, proteinases may also serve as potential target molecules for therapeutic agents.

  10. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-11-15

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  11. Breast Cancer Screening in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lung and Colorectal Cancer: A Population-Based Study of Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Sadigh, Gelareh; Carlos, Ruth C.; Ward, Kevin C.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Jiang, Renjian; Applegate, Kimberly E.; Duszak, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess breast cancer screening utilization in Medicare beneficiaries with colorectal and lung cancer versus cancer-free controls. Methods Female fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who were ≥67 years old and diagnosed with lung or colorectal cancer between 2000 and 2011 and who reported to a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry (case group) were followed for 2 years after their diagnoses, unless death, a diagnosis of breast cancer, or the end of 2013 came first. A similar number of cancer-free controls were individually matched to cases by age, race, registry region, and follow-up time. Screening utilization was defined as the percentage of women with ≥1 screening mammogram during follow-up. Results Overall, 104,164 cases (48% colorectal, 52% lung; 30% advanced cancer) and 104,164 controls were included. Among women with lung or colorectal cancer, 22% underwent ≥1 screening mammogram versus 26% of controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78–0.82). Stratified by cancer type, 28% of colorectal cancer cases versus 29% of controls (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.95–1.01) and 17% of lung cancer cases versus 23% of controls (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.60–0.65) received ≥1 mammogram. When stratified by stage, 8% with advanced cancer versus 18% of controls (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.31–0.35) and 30% with early-stage cancer versus 30% of controls (OR 1; 95% CI 0.97–1.02) underwent ≥1 mammogram. Conclusion Screening mammography utilization rates are similar between Medicare beneficiaries with early-stage cancer versus controls. Although the majority of patients with advanced-stage cancer appropriately do not pursue screening mammography, a small number (8%) continue with screening. PMID:28325489

  12. Serrated pathway: Alternative route to colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patai, Árpád V; Molnár, Béla; Tulassay, Zsolt; Sipos, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Serrated polyps have been an area of intense focus for gastroenterologists over the past several years. Contrary to what was thought before, a growing body of literature indicates that these polyps can be precursors of colorectal cancer (CRC). Most of these lesions, particularly those in the proximal colon, have so far been under-recognized and missed during colonoscopy, qualifying these lesions to be the main cause of interval cancers. It is estimated that 10%-20% of CRCs evolve through this alternative, serrated pathway, with a distinct genetic and epigenetic profile. Aberrant DNA methylation plays a central role in the development of this CRC subtype. This characteristic molecular background is reflected in a unique pathological and clinical manifestation different from cancers arising via the traditional pathway. In this review we would like to highlight morphological, molecular and clinical features of this emerging pathway that are essential for gastroenterologists and may influence their everyday practice. PMID:23431044

  13. NIH state-of-the-science conference statement: Enhancing use and quality of colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Steinwachs, Donald; Allen, Jennifer Dacey; Barlow, William Eric; Duncan, R Paul; Egede, Leonard E; Friedman, Lawrence S; Keating, Nancy L; Kim, Paula; Lave, Judith R; LaVeist, Thomas A; Ness, Roberta B; Optican, Robert J; Virnig, Beth A

    2010-02-04

    screening achieves high rates of cancer prevention and early detection. To close the gap in screening, this report identifies the following priority areas for implementation and research to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: • Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow up. • Widely implement interventions that have proven effective at increasing colorectal cancer screening, including patient reminder systems and one-on-one interactions with providers, educators, or navigators. • Conduct research to assess the effectiveness of tailoring programs to match the characteristics and preferences of target population groups to increase colorectal cancer screening. • Implement systems to ensure appropriate follow-up of positive colorectal cancer screening results. • Develop systems to assure high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. • Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings.

  14. Modelling multiscale aspects of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Ingeborg M. M.; Byrne, Helen M.; Johnston, Matthew D.; Edwards, Carina M.; Chapman, S. Jonathan; Bodmer, Walter F.; Maini, Philip K.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is responsible for nearly half a million deaths annually world-wide [11]. We present a series of mathematical models describing the dynamics of the intestinal epithelium and the kinetics of the molecular pathway most commonly mutated in CRC, the Wnt signalling network. We also discuss how we are coupling such models to build a multiscale model of normal and aberrant guts. This will enable us to combine disparate experimental and clinical data, to investigate interactions between phenomena taking place at different levels of organisation and, eventually, to test the efficacy of new drugs on the system as a whole.

  15. Biomechanical investigation of colorectal cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Valentina; Lucchetti, Donatella; Maiorana, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Ciasca, Gabriele; Svelto, Maria; De Spirito, Marco; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    The nanomechanical properties of SW480 colon cancer cells were investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy. SW480 cells are composed of two sub-populations with different shape and invasiveness. These two cells populations showed similar adhesion properties while appeared significantly different in term of cells stiffness. Since cell stiffness is related to invasiveness and growth, we suggest elasticity as a useful parameter to distinguish invasive cells inside the colorectal tumor bulk and the high-resolution mechanical mapping as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of malignant cells.

  16. Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations in Individuals With Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yurgelun, Matthew B.; Kulke, Matthew H.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Allen, Brian A.; Uno, Hajime; Hornick, Jason L.; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I.; Brais, Lauren K.; McNamara, Philip G.; Mayer, Robert J.; Schrag, Deborah; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Ng, Kimmie; Kidd, John; Singh, Nanda; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Wenstrup, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Hereditary factors play an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, yet the prevalence of germline cancer susceptibility gene mutations in patients with CRC unselected for high-risk features (eg, early age at diagnosis, personal/family history of cancer or polyps, tumor microsatellite instability [MSI], mismatch repair [MMR] deficiency) is unknown. Patients and Methods We recruited 1,058 participants who received CRC care in a clinic-based setting without preselection for age at diagnosis, personal/family history, or MSI/MMR results. All participants underwent germline testing for mutations in 25 genes associated with inherited cancer risk. Each gene was categorized as high penetrance or moderate penetrance on the basis of published estimates of the lifetime cancer risks conferred by pathogenic germline mutations in that gene. Results One hundred five (9.9%; 95% CI, 8.2% to 11.9%) of 1,058 participants carried one or more pathogenic mutations, including 33 (3.1%) with Lynch syndrome (LS). Twenty-eight (96.6%) of 29 available LS CRCs demonstrated abnormal MSI/MMR results. Seventy-four (7.0%) of 1,058 participants carried non-LS gene mutations, including 23 (2.2%) with mutations in high-penetrance genes (five APC, three biallelic MUTYH, 11 BRCA1/2, two PALB2, one CDKN2A, and one TP53), 15 of whom lacked clinical histories suggestive of their underlying mutation. Thirty-eight (3.6%) participants had moderate-penetrance CRC risk gene mutations (19 monoallelic MUTYH, 17 APC*I1307K, two CHEK2). Neither proband age at CRC diagnosis, family history of CRC, nor personal history of other cancers significantly predicted the presence of pathogenic mutations in non-LS genes. Conclusion Germline cancer susceptibility gene mutations are carried by 9.9% of patients with CRC. MSI/MMR testing reliably identifies LS probands, although 7.0% of patients with CRC carry non-LS mutations, including 1.0% with BRCA1/2 mutations. PMID:28135145

  17. Uracil-ftorafur: an oral fluoropyrimidine active in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sulkes, A; Benner, S E; Canetta, R M

    1998-10-01

    This review describes the early clinical development of uracil-ftorafur (UFT), an oral fluoropyrimidine, designed in 1978 by adding uracil to ftorafur. The review focuses on the treatment of colorectal cancer and summarizes the Japanese experience and the phase I and II trials performed in the United States and Europe. Clinical trials of UFT published in the Western world have included 581 patients with colorectal cancer. UFT has been administered in these trials as a single agent or biomodulated by leucovorin (LV). UFT was administered daily in split doses for periods that ranged from 14 to 28 days. The activity of oral UFT in large-bowel cancer when administered with oral LV (approximately 50 mg/dose) has resulted in objective response rates of approximately 40%. Response rates of approximately 25% (range, 17% to 39%) were reported when UFT was administered as a single agent or with lower doses of LV. The highest dose-intensities of UFT are achieved with 28-day schedules of administration. The maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of UFT with this schedule, when administered concomitantly with oral LV 150 mg daily, is 300 mg/m2 daily. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of UFT has generally been diarrhea. Other commonly described toxicities include nausea and vomiting, fatigue, and stomatitis. Myelosuppression occurs infrequently. Typically, hand-foot syndrome and neurologic toxicity are lacking. UFT is a fluoropyrimidine active in colorectal cancer. The oral route of administration and improved safety profile represent important advantages over both conventional and infusional fluorouracil (5-FU) regimens.

  18. [Attitudes of primary health care users to a colorectal cancer screening program].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Maria; Taltavull, Maria; Piñeiro, Pilar; Nieto, Raquel; Llagostera, Maria

    2013-01-01

    To describe the cultural, social and gender features that determine attitudes to colorectal cancer screening in a target group of patients aged 50 to 69 years old in the primary health care setting. We performed a qualitative ethnographic study from a gender perspective. Participants consisted of men and women aged 50 to 69 years old in the Balearic Islands and Barcelona. Group discussion and a field diary were used. The key element was diagnosis at an early stage. Until recently, cancer was considered an incurable disease but is currently perceived as a serious health problem that can be cured if diagnosed promptly. The participants requested more information on cancer and felt they were at risk, mainly because of their age. Men tended to pay attention to symptoms while women tended to ignore them. Attitudes to colorectal cancer screening were generally positive, even to colonoscopy. Some barriers to screening were identified in women, such as a fear of having cancer. The opportunity for early diagnosis is the key element in promoting participation in a colorectal cancer screening program. Perceptions-and hence willingness to participate in screening-differ between men and women. Factors to be taken into account in the design of population-based colorectal cancer programs are health concerns in men and fear of a cancer diagnosis in women. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer and Cancer Syndromes: Recent Basic and Clinical Discoveries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Erbao; Xu, Xiaojing

    2018-01-01

    Approximately one-third of individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer have a family history of cancer, suggesting that CRCs may result from a heritable component. Despite the availability of current gene-identification techniques, only 5% of all CRCs emerge from well-identifiable inherited causes for predisposition, including polyposis and nonpolyposis syndromes. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer represents a large proportion of cases, and robustly affected patients are at increased risk for early onset, synchronous, and metachronous colorectal malignancies and extracolonic malignancies. HNPCC encompasses several cancer syndromes, such as Lynch syndrome, Lynch-like syndrome, and familial colorectal cancer type X, which have remarkable clinical presentations and overlapping genetic profiles that make clinical diagnosis a challenging task. Therefore, distinguishing between the HNPCC disorders is crucial for physicians as an approach to tailor different recommendations for patients and their at-risk family members according to the risks for colonic and extracolonic cancer associated with each syndrome. Identification of these potential patients through epidemiological characteristics and new genetic testing can estimate the individual risk, which informs appropriate cancer screening, surveillance, and/or treatment strategies. In the past three years, many appealing and important advances have been made in our understanding of the relationship between HNPCC and CRC-associated syndromes. The knowledge from the genetic profile of cancer syndromes and unique genotype-phenotype profiles in the different syndromes has changed our cognition. Therefore, this review presents and discusses HNPCC and several common nonpolyposis syndromes with respect to molecular phenotype, histopathologic features, and clinical presentation. PMID:29849630

  20. Study on image feature extraction and classification for human colorectal cancer using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Shan-Yi; Huang, Wei-Cheng; Chiu, Han-Mo; Lu, Chih-Wei

    2011-06-01

    Most of the colorectal cancer has grown from the adenomatous polyp. Adenomatous lesions have a well-documented relationship to colorectal cancer in previous studies. Thus, to detect the morphological changes between polyp and tumor can allow early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and simultaneous removal of lesions. OCT (Optical coherence tomography) has been several advantages including high resolution and non-invasive cross-sectional image in vivo. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the B-scan OCT image features and histology of malignant human colorectal tissues, also en-face OCT image and the endoscopic image pattern. The in-vitro experiments were performed by a swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system; the swept source has a center wavelength at 1310 nm and 160nm in wavelength scanning range which produced 6 um axial resolution. In the study, the en-face images were reconstructed by integrating the axial values in 3D OCT images. The reconstructed en-face images show the same roundish or gyrus-like pattern with endoscopy images. The pattern of en-face images relate to the stages of colon cancer. Endoscopic OCT technique would provide three-dimensional imaging and rapidly reconstruct en-face images which can increase the speed of colon cancer diagnosis. Our results indicate a great potential for early detection of colorectal adenomas by using the OCT imaging.

  1. Seromic profiling of colorectal cancer patients with novel glycopeptide microarray.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Blixt, Ola; Bennett, Eric P; Tarp, Mads A; Dar, Imran; Mandel, Ulla; Poulsen, Steen S; Pedersen, Anders E; Rasmussen, Susanne; Jess, Per; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2011-04-15

    Cancer-associated autoantibodies hold promise as sensitive biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Aberrant post-translational variants of proteins are likely to induce autoantibodies, and changes in O-linked glycosylation represent one of the most important cancer-associated post-translational modifications (PTMs). Short aberrant O-glycans on proteins may introduce novel glycopeptide epitopes that can elicit autoantibodies because of lack of tolerance. Technical barriers, however, have hampered detection of such glycopeptide-specific autoantibodies. Here, we have constructed an expanded glycopeptide array displaying a comprehensive library of glycopeptides and glycoproteins derived from a panel of human mucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6 and MUC7) known to have altered glycosylation and expression in cancer. Seromic profiling of patients with colorectal cancer identified cancer-associated autoantibodies to a set of aberrant glycopeptides derived from MUC1 and MUC4. The cumulative sensitivity of the array analysis was 79% with a specificity of 92%. The most prevalent of the identified autoantibody targets were validated as authentic cancer immunogens by showing expression of the epitopes in cancer using novel monoclonal antibodies. Our study provides evidence for the value of glycopeptides and other PTM-peptide arrays in diagnostic measures. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  2. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Colorectal Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. Angiodrastic Chemokines in Colorectal Cancer: Clinicopathological Correlations.

    PubMed

    Emmanouil, George; Ayiomamitis, George; Zizi-Sermpetzoglou, Adamantia; Tzardi, Maria; Moursellas, Andrew; Voumvouraki, Argyro; Kouroumalis, Elias

    2018-01-01

    To study the expression of angiodrastic chemokines in colorectal tumors and correlate findings with clinicopathological parameters and survival. The proangiogenic factor VEGF, the angiogenic chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL6, and the angiostatic chemokine CXCL4 were measured by ELISA in tumor and normal tissue of 35 stage II and III patients and correlated with the histopathology markers Ki67, p53, p21, bcl2, EGFR, and MLH1 and 5-year survival. The Wilcoxon and chi-square tests were used for statistical comparisons. There was a significant increase of CXCL6 ( p = 0.005) and VEGF ( p = 0.003) in cancerous tissue compared to normal. Patients with lower levels of CXCL8 and CXCL4 lived significantly longer. Patients with loss of EGFR expression had higher levels of CXCL8 while p21 loss was associated with higher levels of CXCL6. Chemokine levels were not correlated with TNM or Dukes classification. Strong expression of p53 was accompanied by decreased survival. (1) The angiogenic factors CXCL6 and VEGF are increased in colorectal cancer tissue with no association with the clinical stage of the disease or survival. (2) However, increased levels of tissue CXCL8 and CXCL4 are associated with poor survival. (3) Strong expression of p53 is found in patients with poor survival.

  5. Colorectal cancer--applying a gender lens.

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Devesh V; Jiwa, Moyez; McManus, Alexandra; Hodder, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major global health problem with survival varying according to stage at diagnosis. The incidence of CRC is much higher in patients with lower bowel symptoms. The symptoms are non-specific and are commonly experienced in the general population. Biological and environmental factors account for the high incidence and poor prognosis of CRC in men. To review the behavioural factors influencing patient delay in seeking help for lower bowel symptoms using a gender lens. An extensive literature search was performed using various databases including Medline, PubMed, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE and PsycINFO (1993-2013). Various search terms including rectal bleeding, prevalence, colorectal cancer, consultation, help-seeking, gender differences and men were used. A systematic methodology including systematic data extraction and narrative synthesis was applied. Thirty-two studies were included in the review. All studies except four were quantitative. Although there is some evidence that men delay more compared with women, there has not been any major improvement in the help-seeking behaviour for such symptoms over the past two decades. Several behavioural and demographic factors were associated with low rates of help-seeking. There are limited studies focusing on men's help-seeking behaviour for lower bowel symptoms. To facilitate timely help-seeking in men, it is important to understand their patterns of helpseeking for such symptoms. Further research to understand men's help-seeking behaviour is warranted.

  6. KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cong; Du, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The KRAS oncogene is mutated in approximately 35%-45% of colorectal cancers, and KRAS mutational status testing has been highlighted in recent years. The most frequent mutations in this gene, point substitutions in codons 12 and 13, were validated as negative predictors of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies. Therefore, determining the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples has become an essential tool for managing patients with colorectal cancers. Currently, a variety of detection methods have been established to analyze the mutation status in the key regions of the KRAS gene; however, several challenges remain related to standardized and uniform testing, including the selection of tumor samples, tumor sample processing and optimal testing methods. Moreover, new testing strategies, in combination with the mutation analysis of BRAF, PIK3CA and loss of PTEN proposed by many researchers and pathologists, should be promoted. In addition, we recommend that microsatellite instability, a prognostic factor, be added to the abovementioned concomitant analysis. This review provides an overview of KRAS biology and the recent advances in KRAS mutation testing. This review also addresses other aspects of status testing for determining the appropriate treatment and offers insight into the potential drawbacks of mutational testing. PMID:23066310

  7. Developing Screening Services for Colorectal Cancer on Android Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Ching; Chang, Chiao-Jung; Lin, Chun-Che; Tsai, Ming-Chang; Chang, Che-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important health problem in Western countries and also in Asia. It is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in Taiwan. According to the well-known adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence, the majority of CRC develops from colorectal adenomatous polyps. This concept provides the rationale for screening and prevention of CRC. Removal of colorectal adenoma could reduce the mortality and incidence of CRC. Mobile phones are now playing an ever more crucial role in people's daily lives. The latest generation of smartphones is increasingly viewed as hand-held computers rather than as phones, because of their powerful on-board computing capability, capacious memories, large screens, and open operating systems that encourage development of applications (apps). Subjects and Methods: If we can detect the potential CRC patients early and offer them appropriate treatments and services, this would not only promote the quality of life, but also reduce the possible serious complications and medical costs. In this study, an intelligent CRC screening app on Android™ (Google™, Mountain View, CA) smartphones has been developed based on a data mining approach using decision tree algorithms. For comparison, the stepwise backward multivariate logistic regression model and the fecal occult blood test were also used. Results: Compared with the stepwise backward multivariate logistic regression model and the fecal occult blood test, the proposed app system not only provides an easy and efficient way to quickly detect high-risk groups of potential CRC patients, but also brings more information about CRC to customer-oriented services. Conclusions: We developed and implemented an app system on Android platforms for ubiquitous healthcare services for CRC screening. It can assist people in achieving early screening, diagnosis, and treatment purposes, prevent the occurrence of complications, and thus reach the goal of

  8. Developing screening services for colorectal cancer on Android smartphones.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Ching; Chang, Chiao-Jung; Lin, Chun-Che; Tsai, Ming-Chang; Chang, Che-Chia; Tseng, Ming-Hseng

    2014-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important health problem in Western countries and also in Asia. It is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in Taiwan. According to the well-known adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence, the majority of CRC develops from colorectal adenomatous polyps. This concept provides the rationale for screening and prevention of CRC. Removal of colorectal adenoma could reduce the mortality and incidence of CRC. Mobile phones are now playing an ever more crucial role in people's daily lives. The latest generation of smartphones is increasingly viewed as hand-held computers rather than as phones, because of their powerful on-board computing capability, capacious memories, large screens, and open operating systems that encourage development of applications (apps). If we can detect the potential CRC patients early and offer them appropriate treatments and services, this would not only promote the quality of life, but also reduce the possible serious complications and medical costs. In this study, an intelligent CRC screening app on Android™ (Google™, Mountain View, CA) smartphones has been developed based on a data mining approach using decision tree algorithms. For comparison, the stepwise backward multivariate logistic regression model and the fecal occult blood test were also used. Compared with the stepwise backward multivariate logistic regression model and the fecal occult blood test, the proposed app system not only provides an easy and efficient way to quickly detect high-risk groups of potential CRC patients, but also brings more information about CRC to customer-oriented services. We developed and implemented an app system on Android platforms for ubiquitous healthcare services for CRC screening. It can assist people in achieving early screening, diagnosis, and treatment purposes, prevent the occurrence of complications, and thus reach the goal of preventive medicine.

  9. Probiotics, prebiotics and colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ambalam, Padma; Raman, Maya; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), the third major cause of mortality among various cancer types in United States, has been increasing in developing countries due to varying diet and dietary habits and occupational hazards. Recent evidences showed that composition of gut microbiota could be associated with the development of CRC and other gut dysbiosis. Modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics and prebiotics, either alone or in combination could positively influence the cross-talk between immune system and microbiota, would be beneficial in preventing inflammation and CRC. In this review, role of probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention of CRC has been discussed. Various epidemiological and experimental studies, specifically gut microbiome research has effectively improved the understanding about the role of probiotics and microbial treatment as anticarcinogenic agents. A few human studies support the beneficial effect of probiotics and prebiotics; hence, comprehensive understanding is urgent to realize the clinical applications of probiotics and prebiotics in CRC prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Colorectal cancer: Metastases to a single organ

    PubMed Central

    Vatandoust, Sina; Price, Timothy J; Karapetis, Christos S

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy worldwide. In CRC patients, metastases are the main cause of cancer-related mortality. In a group of metastatic CRC patients, the metastases are limited to a single site (solitary organ); the liver and lungs are the most commonly involved sites. When metastatic disease is limited to the liver and/or lungs, the resectability of the metastatic lesions will dictate the management approach and the outcome. Less commonly, the site of solitary organ CRC metastasis is the peritoneum. In these patients, cytoreduction followed by hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy may improve the outcome. Rarely, CRC involves other organs, such as the brain, bone, adrenals and spleen, as the only site of metastatic disease. There are limited data to guide clinical practice in these cases. Here, we have reviewed the disease characteristics, management approaches and prognosis based on the metastatic disease site in patients with CRC with metastases to a single organ. PMID:26557001

  11. Role of phytochemicals in colorectal cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Hua; Niu, Yin-Bo; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chang-Xu; Fan, Lei; Mei, Qi-Bing

    2015-08-21

    Although the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been declining in recent decades, it remains a major public health issue as a leading cause of cancer mortality and morbidity worldwide. Prevention is one milestone for this disease. Extensive study has demonstrated that a diet containing fruits, vegetables, and spices has the potential to prevent CRC. The specific constituents in the dietary foods which are responsible for preventing CRC and the possible mechanisms have also been investigated extensively. Various phytochemicals have been identified in fruits, vegetables, and spices which exhibit chemopreventive potential. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of phytochemicals including curcumin, polysaccharides (apple polysaccharides and mushroom glucans), saponins (Paris saponins, ginsenosides and soy saponins), resveratrol, and quercetin on CRC and the mechanisms are discussed. This review proposes the need for more clinical evidence for the effects of phytochemicals against CRC in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these phytochemicals might be therapeutic candidates in the campaign against CRC.

  12. Interferon-γ and Colorectal Cancer: an up-to date

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Christoforos; Sapalidis, Konstantinos; Koletsa, Triantafyllia; Kosmidou, Maria; Efthimiadis, Christoforos; Anthimidis, George; Varsamis, Nikolaos; Michalopoulos, Nikolaos; Koulouris, Charilaos; Atmatzidis, Stefanos; Liavas, Lazaros; Strati, Titika-Marina; Koimtzis, Georgios; Tsakalidis, Alexandros; Mantalovas, Stylianos; Zarampouka, Katerina; Florou, Maria; Giannakidis, Dimitrios E.; Georgakoudi, Eleni; Baka, Sofia; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Man, Yan-Gao; Kesisoglou, Isaac

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer still remains the third cause of cancer death among cancer patients. Early diagnosis is crucial and they can be either endoscopic or with blood biomarkers. Endoscopic methods consist of gastroscopy and colonoscopy, however; in recent years, endoscopic ultrasound is being used. The microenvironment is very important for the successful delivery of the treatment. Several proteins and hormones play a crucial role in the efficiency of the treatment. In the current mini review we will focus on interferon-γ. PMID:29344268

  13. Interferon-γ and Colorectal Cancer: an up-to date.

    PubMed

    Kosmidis, Christoforos; Sapalidis, Konstantinos; Koletsa, Triantafyllia; Kosmidou, Maria; Efthimiadis, Christoforos; Anthimidis, George; Varsamis, Nikolaos; Michalopoulos, Nikolaos; Koulouris, Charilaos; Atmatzidis, Stefanos; Liavas, Lazaros; Strati, Titika-Marina; Koimtzis, Georgios; Tsakalidis, Alexandros; Mantalovas, Stylianos; Zarampouka, Katerina; Florou, Maria; Giannakidis, Dimitrios E; Georgakoudi, Eleni; Baka, Sofia; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Man, Yan-Gao; Kesisoglou, Isaac

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer still remains the third cause of cancer death among cancer patients. Early diagnosis is crucial and they can be either endoscopic or with blood biomarkers. Endoscopic methods consist of gastroscopy and colonoscopy, however; in recent years, endoscopic ultrasound is being used. The microenvironment is very important for the successful delivery of the treatment. Several proteins and hormones play a crucial role in the efficiency of the treatment. In the current mini review we will focus on interferon-γ.

  14. DNA Mismatch Repair Status Predicts Need for Future Colorectal Surgery for Metachronous Neoplasms in Young Individuals Undergoing Colorectal Cancer Resection.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Melyssa; Holter, Spring; Semotiuk, Kara; Winter, Laura; Pollett, Aaron; Gallinger, Steven; Cohen, Zane; Gryfe, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of colorectal cancer in young patients involves both management of the incident cancer and consideration of the possibility of Lynch syndrome and the development of metachronous colorectal cancers. This study aims to assess the prognostic role of DNA mismatch repair deficiency and extended colorectal resection for metachronous colorectal neoplasia risk in young patients with colorectal cancer. This is a retrospective review of 285 patients identified in our GI cancer registry with colorectal cancer diagnosed at 35 years or younger in the absence of polyposis. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we assessed the prognostic role of mismatch repair deficiency and standard clinicopathologic characteristics, including the extent of resection, on the rate of developing metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in biospecimens from 44% of patients and was significantly associated with an increased risk for metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection (10-year cumulative risk, 13.5% ± 4.2%) compared with 56% of patients with mismatch repair-intact colorectal cancer (10-year cumulative risk, 5.8% ± 3.3%; p = 0.011). In multivariate analysis, mismatch repair deficiency was associated with a HR of 3.65 (95% CI, 1.44-9.21; p = 0.006) for metachronous colorectal neoplasia, whereas extended resection with ileorectal or ileosigmoid anastomosis significantly decreased the risk of metachronous colorectal neoplasia (HR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.05-0.90; p = 0.036). This study had a retrospective design, and, therefore, recommendations for colorectal cancer surgery and screening were not fully standardized. Quality of life after colorectal cancer surgery was not assessed. Young patients with colorectal cancer with molecular hallmarks of Lynch syndrome were at significantly higher risk for the development of subsequent colorectal neoplasia. This risk was significantly reduced in those who underwent extended

  15. The impact of new technology on surgery for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Gregory B; Breen, David J; Monson, John RT

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology continue at a rapid pace and affect all aspects of life, including surgery. We have reviewed some of these advances and the impact they are having on the investigation and management of colorectal cancer. Modern endoscopes, with magnifying, variable stiffness and localisation capabilities are making the primary investigation of colonic cancer easier and more acceptable for patients. Imaging investigations looking at primary, metastatic and recurrent disease are shifting to digital data sets, which can be stored, reviewed remotely, potentially fused with other modalities and reconstructed as 3 dimensional (3D) images for the purposes of advanced diagnostic interpretation and computer assisted surgery. They include virtual colonoscopy, trans-rectal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and radioimmunoscintigraphy. Once a colorectal carcinoma is diagnosed, the treatment options available are expanding. Colonic stents are being used to relieve large bowel obstruction, either as a palliative measure or to improve the patient’s overall condition before definitive surgery. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery and minimally invasive techniques are being used with similar outcomes and a lower mortality, morbidity and hospital stay than open trans-abdominal surgery. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery allows precise excision of both benign and early malignant lesions in the mid and upper rectum. Survival of patients with inoperable hepatic metastases following radiofrequency ablation is encouraging. Robotics and telemedicine are taking surgery well into the 21st century. Artificial neural networks are being developed to enable us to predict the outcome for individual patients. New technology has a major impact on the way we practice surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:11819841

  16. Mismatch repair polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Sonja I; Platz, Elizabeth A; Fallin, M Daniele; Thuita, Lucy W; Hoffman, Sandra C; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2007-04-01

    Rare germline variants in mismatch repair genes have been linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer; however, it is unknown whether common polymorphisms in these genes alter the risk of colorectal cancer. To examine the association between common variants in mismatch repair genes and colorectal cancer, we conducted a case-cohort study within the CLUE II cohort. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms in 3 mismatch repair genes (MSH3 R940Q, MSH3 T1036A, MSH6 G39E and MLH1 I219V) were genotyped in 237 colorectal cancer cases and a subcohort of 2,189 participants. Incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for each polymorphism were estimated. The MSH3 1036A variant was found to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (RR=1.28, 95% CI: 0.94-1.74 and RR=1.65, 95% CI: 1.01-2.70 for the AT and TT genotypes, respectively, with p(trend)=0.02), particularly proximal colon cancer. Although the MSH3 940Q variant was only weakly associated with colorectal cancer overall (p(trend)=0.07), it was associated with a significant increased risk of proximal colon cancer (RR=1.69, 95% CI: 1.10-2.61 and RR=2.68, 95% CI: 0.96-7.47 for the RQ and QQ genotypes, respectively with p(trend)=0.005). Processed meat intake appeared to modify the association between the MSH3 polymorphisms and colorectal cancer (p(interaction) < 0.10 for both). No association was observed with the MSH6 and MLH1 polymorphisms overall. This study suggests that common polymorphisms in the mismatch repair gene, MSH3, may increase the risk of colorectal cancer, especially proximal colon cancer. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Genetic Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Catherine S; Giannakis, Marios; Wells, Daniel K; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Quist, Michael; Nowak, Jonathan A; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Inamura, Kentaro; Morikawa, Teppei; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Abril-Rodriguez, Gabriel; Connolly, Charles; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Geybels, Milan S; Grady, William M; Hsu, Li; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Kim, Yeon Joo; Krystofinski, Paige; Leiserson, Mark D M; Montoya, Dennis J; Nadel, Brian B; Pellegrini, Matteo; Pritchard, Colin C; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Quist, Elleanor H; Raphael, Ben J; Salipante, Stephen J; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Shinbrot, Eve; Shirts, Brian; Shukla, Sachet; Stanford, Janet L; Sun, Wei; Tsoi, Jennifer; Upfill-Brown, Alexander; Wheeler, David A; Wu, Catherine J; Yu, Ming; Zaidi, Syed H; Zaretsky, Jesse M; Gabriel, Stacey B; Lander, Eric S; Garraway, Levi A; Hudson, Thomas J; Fuchs, Charles S; Ribas, Antoni; Ogino, Shuji; Peters, Ulrike

    2018-06-01

    To understand the genetic drivers of immune recognition and evasion in colorectal cancer, we analyzed 1,211 colorectal cancer primary tumor samples, including 179 classified as microsatellite instability-high (MSI-high). This set includes The Cancer Genome Atlas colorectal cancer cohort of 592 samples, completed and analyzed here. MSI-high, a hypermutated, immunogenic subtype of colorectal cancer, had a high rate of significantly mutated genes in important immune-modulating pathways and in the antigen presentation machinery, including biallelic losses of B2M and HLA genes due to copy-number alterations and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity. WNT/β-catenin signaling genes were significantly mutated in all colorectal cancer subtypes, and activated WNT/β-catenin signaling was correlated with the absence of T-cell infiltration. This large-scale genomic analysis of colorectal cancer demonstrates that MSI-high cases frequently undergo an immunoediting process that provides them with genetic events allowing immune escape despite high mutational load and frequent lymphocytic infiltration and, furthermore, that colorectal cancer tumors have genetic and methylation events associated with activated WNT signaling and T-cell exclusion. Significance: This multi-omic analysis of 1,211 colorectal cancer primary tumors reveals that it should be possible to better monitor resistance in the 15% of cases that respond to immune blockade therapy and also to use WNT signaling inhibitors to reverse immune exclusion in the 85% of cases that currently do not. Cancer Discov; 8(6); 730-49. ©2018 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 663 . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Courtney; Kim, David H; Bartel, Twyla B; Cash, Brooks D; Chang, Kevin J; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Garcia, Evelyn M; Kambadakone, Avinash R; Lambert, Drew L; Levy, Angela D; Marin, Daniele; Peterson, Christine M; Scheirey, Christopher D; Smith, Martin P; Weinstein, Stefanie; Carucci, Laura R

    2018-05-01

    This review summarizes the relevant literature regarding colorectal screening with imaging. For individuals at average or moderate risk for colorectal cancer, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening. After positive results on a fecal occult blood test or immunohistochemical test, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer detection. For individuals at high risk for colorectal cancer (eg, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis, or Crohn colitis), optical colonoscopy is preferred because of its ability to obtain biopsies to detect dysplasia. After incomplete colonoscopy, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening for individuals at average, moderate, or high risk. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma choline metabolites and colorectal cancer risk in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sajin; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Neuhouser, Marian L; Malysheva, Olga; Bailey, Lynn B; Xiao, Liren; Brown, Elissa C; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L; Zheng, Yingye; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Miller, Joshua W; Green, Ralph; Lane, Dorothy S; Beresford, Shirley A A; Caudill, Marie A

    2014-12-15

    Few studies have examined associations between plasma choline metabolites and risk of colorectal cancer. Therefore, we investigated associations between plasma biomarkers of choline metabolism [choline, betaine, dimethylglycine, and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)] and colorectal cancer risk among postmenopausal women in a case-control study nested within the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. We selected 835 matched case-control pairs, and cases were further stratified by tumor site (proximal, distal, or rectal) and stage (local/regional or metastatic). Colorectal cancer was assessed by self-report and confirmed by medical records over the mean of 5.2 years of follow-up. Baseline plasma choline metabolites were measured by LC/MS-MS. In multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression models, plasma choline tended to be positively associated with rectal cancer risk [OR (95% confidence interval, CI)(highest vs. lowest quartile) = 2.44 (0.93-6.40); P trend = 0.08], whereas plasma betaine was inversely associated with colorectal cancer overall [0.68 (0.47-0.99); P trend = 0.01] and with local/regional tumors [0.64 (0.42-0.99); P trend = 0.009]. Notably, the plasma betaine:choline ratio was inversely associated with colorectal cancer overall [0.56 (0.39-0.82); P trend = 0.004] as well as with proximal [0.66 (0.41-1.06); P trend = 0.049], rectal [0.27 (0.10-0.78); P trend = 0.02], and local/regional [0.50 (0.33-0.76); P trend = 0.001] tumors. Finally, plasma TMAO, an oxidative derivative of choline produced by intestinal bacteria, was positively associated with rectal cancer [3.38 (1.25-9.16); P trend = 0.02] and with overall colorectal cancer risk among women with lower (vs. higher) plasma vitamin B12 levels (P interaction = 0.003). Collectively, these data suggest that alterations in choline metabolism, which may arise early in disease development, may be associated with higher risk of colorectal cancer. The positive association between plasma TMAO and

  20. Examining the association between cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer using historical case-control data.

    PubMed

    Peppone, Luke J; Hyland, Andrew; Moysich, Kirsten B; Reid, Mary E; Piazza, Kenneth M; Purnell, Jason Q; Mustian, Karen M; Morrow, Gary R

    2009-10-01

    The majority of recent, well-designed studies have shown that long-term cigarette smoking increases colorectal cancer risk, but older studies with shorter durations of exposure often found no association. This study aimed to examine colorectal cancer risk by smoking exposure using data collected in the late-1950s and early-1960s. This case-control study examined colorectal cancer risk by lifetime smoking history. There were 1365 patients who visited Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) between 1957 and 1965 diagnosed with primary, incident colorectal cancers that were matched to 4096 malignancy-free controls on gender and age. Odds ratios were calculated using separate logistic regression models for each smoking exposure, while controlling for other tobacco use, county of residence, race, age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). The adjusted OR for individuals who reported their greatest level of smoking to be more than 1 pack/day was 0.87 (95% CI=0.67-1.15). Among those who smoked 42 or more years, the adjusted OR was 0.89 (95% CI=0.68-1.15) compared to those who never smoked. For individuals who smoked more than 45 pack-years, the OR was 0.92 (95% CI=0.72-1.19). The results did not differ significantly by gender, although men had considerably greater exposure compared to women. Results also did not differ by colorectal sub-site. No association was found between long-term cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer risk. These results are in accord with studies that followed cohorts throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Methodological limitations, such as missing data on covariates and the higher incidence of smoking-related illness in a hospital setting, may have contributed to the null results found in this study. Prolonged population exposure to cigarettes and perhaps a changing product may explain why more recent studies have reported a positive association between smoking and colorectal cancer.

  1. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M.; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer “epigenome” has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, is presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:26216839

  2. Microsatellite instability and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niv, Yaron

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is caused by a series of genetic or epigenetic changes, and in the last decade there has been an increased awareness that there are multiple forms of colorectal cancer that develop through different pathways. Microsatellite instability is involved in the genesis of about 15% of sporadic colorectal cancers and most of hereditary nonpolyposis cancers. Tumors with a high frequency of microsatellite instability tend to be diploid, to possess a mucinous histology, and to have a surrounding lymphoid reaction. They are more prevalent in the proximal colon and have a fast pass from polyp to cancer. Nevertheless, they are associated with longer survival than stage-matched tumors with microsatellite stability. Resistance of colorectal cancers with a high frequency of microsatellite instability to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is well established. Silencing the MLH1 gene expression by its promoter methylation stops the formation of MLH1 protein, and prevents the normal activation of the DNA repair gene. This is an important cause for genomic instability and cell proliferation to the point of colorectal cancer formation. Better knowledge of this process will have a huge impact on colorectal cancer management, prevention, treatment and prognosis. PMID:17465465

  3. Screening or Symptoms? How Do We Detect Colorectal Cancer in an Equal Access Health Care System?

    PubMed

    Hatch, Quinton M; Kniery, Kevin R; Johnson, Eric K; Flores, Shelly A; Moeil, David L; Thompson, John J; Maykel, Justin A; Steele, Scott R

    2016-02-01

    Detection of colorectal cancer ideally occurs at an early stage through proper screening. We sought to establish methods by which colorectal cancers are diagnosed within an equal access military health care population and evaluate the correlation between TNM stage at colorectal cancer diagnosis and diagnostic modality (i.e., symptomatic detection vs screen detection). A retrospective chart review of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients from January 2007 to August 2014 was conducted at the authors' equal access military institution. We evaluated TNM stage relative to diagnosis by screen detection (fecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoidoscopy, CT colonography, colonoscopy) or symptomatic evaluation (diagnostic colonoscopy or surgery). Of 197 colorectal cancers diagnosed (59 % male; mean age 62 years), 50 (25 %) had stage I, 47 (24 %) had stage II, 70 (36 %) had stage III, and 30 (15 %) had stage IV disease. Twenty-five percent of colorectal cancers were detected via screen detection (3 % by fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), 0.5 % by screening CT colonography, 17 % by screening colonoscopy, and 5 % by surveillance colonoscopy). One hundred forty-eight (75 %) were diagnosed after onset of signs or symptoms. The preponderance of these was advanced-stage disease (stages III-IV), although >50 % of stage I-II disease also had signs or symptoms at diagnosis. The most common symptoms were rectal bleeding (45 %), abdominal pain (35 %), and change in stool caliber (27 %). The most common overall sign was anemia (60 %). Screening FOBT (odds ratio (OR) 8.7, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0-78.3; P = 0.05) independently predicted early diagnosis with stage I-II disease. Patient gender and ethnicity were not associated with cancer stage at diagnosis. Despite equal access to colorectal cancer screening, diagnosis after development of symptomatic cancer remains more common. Fecal occult blood screen detection is associated with early stage at

  4. Endometrial metastasis of colorectal cancer with coincident endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Colling, Richard; Lopes, Tito; Das, Nagiindra; Mathew, Joe

    2010-11-05

    Metastasis to the uterine corpus is uncommon and secondary colorectal tumours of the endometrium are rare. We describe a uterine tumour with components of both primary endometrial and metastatic colorectal carcinomata. In this case, a 72-year-old obese woman presented with a 2-week history of postmenopausal bleeding per vaginum and weight loss. She had an abdominoperineal resection 3 years previously for a Dukes stage B rectal carcinoma. A transvaginal ultrasonography showed a thickened endometrium. Histology immunophenotyping showed a CK7+, CK20+, CA125- and CEA+ colorectal metastasis (a profile consistent with her previous cancer) associated with a primary CK7+, CK20-, CA125+ and CEA- endometroid endometrial adenocarcinoma. We conclude this represents endometrial metastasis of colorectal carcinoma with coincident primary endometrial adenocarcinoma. We speculate as to whether the endometrial carcinoma arose de novo or was induced by the colorectal metastasis, or whether the primary endometrial tumour provided a fertile site for the colorectal metastasis.

  5. Drug development for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancers from 1979 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Nancy A; Khan, Omar F; Imam, Hasiba; Tang, Patricia A; Monzon, Jose; Li, Haocheng; Sun, Gavin; Ezeife, Doreen; Parimi, Sunil; Dowden, Scot; Tam, Vincent C

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the drug development pathway is critical for streamlining the development of effective cancer treatments. The objective of the current study was to delineate the drug development timeline and attrition rate of different drug classes for common cancer disease sites. Drugs entering clinical trials for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancer were identified using a pharmaceutical business intelligence database. Data regarding drug characteristics, clinical trials, and approval dates were obtained from the database, clinical trial registries, PubMed, and regulatory Web sites. A total of 411 drugs met the inclusion criteria for breast cancer, 246 drugs met the inclusion criteria for colorectal cancer, and 315 drugs met the inclusion criteria for non-small cell lung cancer. Attrition rates were 83.9% for breast cancer, 87.0% for colorectal cancer, and 92.0% for non-small cell lung cancer drugs. In the case of non-small cell lung cancer, there was a trend toward higher attrition rates for targeted monoclonal antibodies compared with other agents. No tumor site-specific differences were noted with regard to cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunomodulatory, or small molecule kinase inhibitor drugs. Drugs classified as "others" in breast cancer had lower attrition rates, primarily due to the higher success of hormonal medications. Mean drug development times were 8.9 years for breast cancer, 6.7 years for colorectal cancer, and 6.6 years for non-small cell lung cancer. Overall oncologic drug attrition rates remain high, and drugs are more likely to fail in later-stage clinical trials. The refinement of early-phase trial design may permit the selection of drugs that are more likely to succeed in the phase 3 setting. Cancer 2017;123:4672-4679. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Design and validation of a bimodal MRI-optics endoluminal probe for colorectal cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramgolam, A.; Sablong, R.; Saint-Jalmes, H.; Beuf, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the light of the bimodal technical innovations put forward in the diagnosis of early stage colorectal cancer, we present a preliminary study based on a first prototype of a high Resolution MRI-Optics probe along with the first tests carried out and the results obtained.

  7. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Perceived Benefits and Barriers, and Intentions among College and University Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajracharya, Srijana M.; Wigglesworth, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early detection through routine screening is critical in reducing the incidence rate of colorectal cancer (CRC). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine college and university employees' knowledge of CRC issues, their perceptions of the benefits of and barriers to CRC screening, and their intentions toward it. Methods: This…

  8. Knockdown of SLC39A7 inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Nengquan; Yan, Li; You, Weiqiang; Tan, Gewen; Gong, Jianfeng; Chen, Hongqi; Yang, Yi; Hu, Landian; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-10-01

    SLC39A7 (zip7) is a zinc transporter that plays a key role in intestinal epithelial self-renewal. However, little is known about SLC39A7 in colorectal cancer. To assess the biological function of SLC39A7 in colorectal cancer, the expression of SLC39A7 in human colorectal tumors and five colorectal cancer cell lines were evaluated by Oncomine Cancer Microarray Database and western blot analysis. In addition, short hairpin RNAs specifically targeting SLC39A7 were transfected into HCT116 and SW1116 cells to knockdown SLC39A7 expression. Then, the effects of SLC39A7 knockdown on colorectal cancer cells were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, colony-forming assay and flow cytometry. Our results showed that colorectal tumors have higher expression levels of SLC39A7 than normal colon tissues. Knockdown of SLC39A7 exhibited a significant decrease in cell viability and proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. It was also shown that knockdown of SLC39A7 interfered with cell cycle progression and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, as well as boosted early and late apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. Furthermore, downregulation of SLC39A7 promoted the cleavage of PARP and enhanced the expression of Bad, Caspase-9, and cleaved-Caspase-3, as well as suppressed Bcl-2 expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that SLC39A7 plays a crucial role in the proliferation and survival of colorectal cancer cells, which associates with colorectal tumorigenesis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Improved 5-year survival of patients with immunochemical faecal blood test-screen-detected colorectal cancer versus non-screening cancers in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Parente, Fabrizio; Vailati, Cristian; Boemo, Cinzia; Bonoldi, Emanuela; Ardizzoia, Antonio; Ilardo, Antonina; Tortorella, Franco; Cereda, Danilo; Cremaschini, Marco; Moretti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening may reduce disease-related mortality by early-stage detection of cancers. To study the effect of a single immunochemical faecal occult blood test (i-FOBt) screening round on reduction in colorectal cancer-related-mortality among average risk subjects. Comparison of 5-year mortality rates in 3 cohorts from a Northern Italian province: (1) colorectal cancers detected at the 1st biennial round of a mass-screening programme targeting 50-69 years old subjects, (2) non-screening cancers symptomatically diagnosed during the same time period, and (3) cancers detected in the pre-screening biennium. Multivariate analyses were performed with the Cox regression model including tumour node metastasis (TNM) stage at diagnosis, anatomical distribution of cancers, age at diagnosis, gender and patient group. Kaplan-Meyer survival estimates and log-rank test for equality of survivor functions were calculated. Stage distribution significantly differed between screening and non-screening colorectal cancers: 73% of screen-detected colorectal cancers were stages I and II versus 43% and 40% of non-screening and pre-screening colorectal cancers. Cumulative 5-year mortality rate was significantly lower in screening compared to non-screening or pre-screening colorectal cancers patients (19% versus 37% and 41%, p < 0.001). Colorectal cancers were detected at earlier stages in i-FOBT-positive subjects in comparison with non-screening patients; colorectal cancers found at screening had a significantly improved 5-year survival. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring Maori health worker perspectives on colorectal cancer and screening.

    PubMed

    Pitama, Suzanne; Cave, Tami; Huria, Tania; Lacey, Cameron; Cuddy, Jessica; Frizelle, Frank

    2012-06-08

    To explore Maori health worker perspectives on colorectal screening and identify factors that may influence Maori participation in a colorectal screening programme. Thirty Maori health workers were interviewed to explore their experience with screening programmes, knowledge of colorectal cancer and their perspective on a potential colorectal screening programme. Health workers shared their perspective informed by both their own whanau and whanau they encountered professionally through their health work. Participants were largely positive about potential colorectal screening; however, various access barriers were identified. These included patient-clinician engagement and communication, lack of provision for patient's privacy during screening and patients feeling discouraged to take part in screening. Factors enabling screening included having an established relationship with their General Practitioner, screening clinicians taking time to build rapport, answer questions and share information, screening practices that were inclusive of Maori cultural norms and possessing high health literacy. Evidence points to growing disparity between the colorectal cancer incidence rates of Maori and non-Maori; disparities in colorectal cancer survival rates are already marked. Participants in the current pilot could provide valuable information to help ensure that the health education, promotion, and clinical practice surrounding a national colorectal screening programme are effective for Maori in reducing disparity and improving health outcomes.

  11. Key considerations in designing a patient navigation program for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    DeGroff, Amy; Coa, Kisha; Morrissey, Kerry Grace; Rohan, Elizabeth; Slotman, Beth

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality among those cancers affecting both men and women. Screening is known to reduce mortality by detecting cancer early and through colonoscopy, removing precancerous polyps. Only 58.6% of adults are currently up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening by any method. Patient navigation shows promise in increasing adherence to colorectal cancer screening and reducing health disparities; however, it is a complex intervention that is operationalized differently across institutions. This article describes 10 key considerations in designing a patient navigation intervention for colorectal cancer screening based on a literature review and environmental scan. Factors include (1) identifying a theoretical framework and setting program goals, (2) specifying community characteristics, (3) establishing the point(s) of intervention within the cancer continuum, (4) determining the setting in which navigation services are provided, (5) identifying the range of services offered and patient navigator responsibilities, (6) determining the background and qualifications of navigators, (7) selecting the method of communications between patients and navigators, (8) designing the navigator training, (9) defining oversight and supervision for the navigators, and (10) evaluating patient navigation. Public health practitioners can benefit from the practical perspective offered here for designing patient navigation programs. © 2013 Society for Public Health Education.

  12. Colorectal cancer screening and prevention in women.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Lyssa; Macaron, Carole; Burke, Carol A

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading cancers and cause of cancer deaths in American women and men. Females and males share a similar lifetime cumulative risk of CRC however, substantial differences in risk factors, tumor biology, and effectiveness of cancer prevention services have been observed between them. This review distills the evidence documenting the unique variation observed between the genders relating to CRC risk factors, screening and prevention. Consistent evidence throughout the world demonstrates that women reach equivalent levels of adenomas and CRC as men but it occurs nearly a decade later in life than in their male counterparts. Women have a higher proportion of tumors which are hypermethylated, have microsatellite instability and located in the proximal colon suggesting the serrated pathway may be of greater consequence in them than in men. Other CRC risk factors such as smoking, diet and obesity have been shown to have disparate effects on women which may related to interactions between estrogen exposure, body fat distribution, and the biologic underpinnings of their tumors. There is data showing the uptake, choice, and efficacy of different CRC screening methods in women is dissimilar to that in men. The mortality benefit from FOBT, sigmoidoscopy, and protection from interval CRC by colonoscopy appears to be lower in women than men. A greater understanding of these gender idiosyncrasies will facilitate an personalized approach to CRC prevention and should ultimately lead to a reduced burden of disease.

  13. Mediterranean Diet: Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Micah G.; Selmin, Ornella I.; Doetschman, Tom C.; Romagnolo, Donato F.

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosis and the second and third leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women, respectively. However, the majority of CRC cases are the result of sporadic tumorigenesis via the adenoma–carcinoma sequence. This process can take up to 20 years, suggesting an important window of opportunity exists for prevention such as switching toward healthier dietary patterns. The Mediterranean diet (MD) is a dietary pattern associated with various health benefits including protection against cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and various cancers. In this article, we review publications available in the PubMed database within the last 10 years that report on the impact of a MD eating pattern on prevention of CRC. To assist the reader with interpretation of the results and discussion, we first introduce indexes and scoring systems commonly used to experimentally determine adherence to a MD, followed by a brief introduction of the influence of the MD pattern on inflammatory bowel disease, which predisposes to CRC. Finally, we discuss key biological mechanisms through which specific bioactive food components commonly present in the MD are proposed to prevent or delay the development of CRC. We close with a discussion of future research frontiers in CRC prevention with particular reference to the role of epigenetic mechanisms and microbiome related to the MD eating pattern. PMID:29259973

  14. [Flow cytometry in datecting lymph node micrometastasis in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sun, Q; Ding, Y; Zhang, J

    2001-01-25

    To study the methodology and significance of flow cytometry in detecting lymph node micrometastasis of colorectal cancer. One hundred sixty-two cellular suspensions were prepared with lymph nodes which were resected radically on 25 patients with colorectal cancer and in which no cancer cells were found by HE staining. Different concentrations of cultured Lovo colorectal cancer cells were added into the celular suspension prepared from lymph node tissue of persons without colorectal cancer in order to prepare a control model. Dual staining with CK/FTTC and PI was made to the sedimetns from those 2 kinds of suspension. Flow cytometry was used to detect cancer cells. An ideal correlation was obtained between the detection value and the theoretical value of cancer cells in the specimen suspensions and control models (r = 0.097 6) with a sensitivity rate of 10/10(5). Cancer cells were detected from 7 out of the 25 patients and 30 of the 162 cellular suspensions. The detection rate was correlated with the size and infiltrating depth of the cancer. Flow cytometry is a reliable, rapid, and quantitative method for detecting lymph node micrometastasis in colorectal cancer.

  15. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  16. Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    There are five types of tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer: fecal occult blood test, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, virtual colonoscopy, and DNA stool test. Learn more about these and other tests in this expert-reviewed summary.

  17. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | FNLCR Staging

    Cancer.gov

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. From left to right: Weidong Li, principal investigator, China Academy of Chinese Medic

  18. Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention strategies include avoiding known risk factors, adopting a healthy lifestyle, polyp removal, and aspirin. Get detailed information about risk factors for CRC and potential interventions for prevention in this summary for clinicians.

  19. Colorectal Cancer in Iran: Molecular Epidemiology and Screening Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dolatkhah, Roya; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Bonyadi, Mortaza Jabbarpour; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Farassati, Faris; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the past three decades in Iran has made it a major public health burden. This study aimed to report its epidemiologic features, molecular genetic aspects, survival, heredity, and screening pattern in Iran. Methods. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to identify the relevant published articles. We used medical subject headings, including colorectal cancer, molecular genetics, KRAS and BRAF mutations, screening, survival, epidemiologic study, and Iran. Results. Age standardized incidence rate of Iranian CRCs was 11.6 and 10.5 for men and women, respectively. Overall five-year survival rate was 41%, and the proportion of CRC among the younger age group was higher than that of western countries. Depending on ethnicity, geographical region, dietary, and genetic predisposition, mutation genes were considerably diverse and distinct among CRCs across Iran. The high occurrence of CRC in records of relatives of CRC patients showed that family history of CRC was more common among young CRCs. Conclusion. Appropriate screening strategies for CRC which is amenable to early detection through screening, especially in relatives of CRCs, should be considered as the first step in CRC screening programs. PMID:25685149

  20. Significance of Infectious Agents in Colorectal Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Antonic, Vlado; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Kester, Kent E.; Weina, Peter J; Brücher, Björn LDM; Protic, Mladjan; Avital, Itzhak; Izadjoo, Mina

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major burden to healthcare systems worldwide accounting for approximately one million of new cancer cases worldwide. Even though, CRC mortality has decreased over the last 20 years, it remains the third most common cause of cancer-related mortality, accounting for approximately 600,000 deaths in 2008 worldwide. A multitude of risk factors have been linked to CRC, including hereditary factors, environmental factors and inflammatory syndromes affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, various pathogens were added to the growing list of risk factors for a number of common epithelial cancers, but despite the multitude of correlative studies, only suggestions remain about the possible relationship between selected viruses and bacteria of interest and the CRC risk. United States military service members are exposed to various risk factors impacting the incidence of cancer development. These exposures are often different from that of many sectors of the civilian population. Thereby, cancer risk identification, screening and early detection are imperative for both the military health care beneficiaries and the population as a whole. In this review, we will focus on several pathogens and their potential roles in development of CRC, highlighting the clinical trials evaluating this correlation and provide our personal opinion about the importance of risk reduction, health promotion and disease prevention for military health care beneficiaries. PMID:23459622

  1. Laparoscopic resection of synchronous colorectal cancers in separate specimens.

    PubMed

    Inada, Ryo; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Takawa, Masashi; Fujita, Shin; Akasu, Takayuki

    2014-08-01

    Laparoscopic approaches are increasingly being used in patients with colorectal cancer, but the feasibility of laparoscopic resection of synchronous colorectal cancers in separate specimens remains unknown. In such cases, it is necessary to consider the site of port placement, sequence of dissection, choice of specimen extraction sites, specimen handling, and extracorporeal anastomosis sites. Moreover, the need for complete mesenteric dissection in two areas, removal of two separate specimens containing malignancies, and two anastomoses elicit unique questions related to technical considerations. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of laparoscopic resection of two separate specimens containing malignancies for multiple synchronous colorectal cancers. Between June 2001 and January 2013, 1341 patients with colorectal cancer underwent laparoscopic surgery at our institution. Of them, 11 patients underwent laparoscopy-assisted combined resection of two separate colorectal specimens for multiple synchronous primary colorectal cancers. We retrospectively reviewed their surgical outcomes. All procedures were completed laparoscopically without perioperative mortality. Patients underwent right-sided colon resection for right-sided cancer and left-sided or rectal resection for left-sided colon or rectal cancer. The median duration of surgery was 296 min, and the median blood loss was 65 mL. Median time to first postoperative liquid and solid intake was 1 day and 3 days, respectively. Most patients were discharged on postoperative day 8. With regard to postoperative complications, two patients had a surgical-site infection. Laparoscopic resection of two separate colorectal specimens for multiple synchronous primary colorectal cancers is a feasible and safe procedure. © 2014 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Inhibition of Embryonic Genes to Control Colorectal Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    14. ABSTRACT Embryonic core transcription factors (TFs), primarily the retrogene NanogP8, are the master regulators of cancer stem cells (CSC) in...core transcription factors (TFs), primarily the retrogene NanogP8, are the master regulators of cancer stem cells (CSC) in human colorectal carcinoma...maintaining the stemness of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) as well as the identification of two different pathways by which NANOG and NANOGP8 control pluripotency

  3. Pembrolizumab, Capecitabine, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Microsatellite Stable Colorectal Cancer That Is Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-04

    Microsatellite Stable; Mismatch Repair Protein Proficient; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  4. Implementing the CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program: Wisdom From the Field

    PubMed Central

    Rohan, Elizabeth A.; Boehm, Jennifer E.; DeGroff, Amy; Glover-Kudon, Rebecca; Preissle, Judith

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Colorectal cancer, as the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women in the United States, represents an important area for public health intervention. Although colorectal cancer screening can prevent cancer and detect disease early when treatment is most effective, few organized public health screening programs have been implemented and evaluated. From 2005 to 2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded 5 sites to participate in the Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program (CRCSDP), which was designed to reach medically underserved populations. METHODS The authors conducted a longitudinal, multiple case study to analyze program implementation processes. Qualitative methods included interviews with 100 stakeholders, 125 observations, and review of 19 documents. Data were analyzed within and across cases. RESULTS Several themes related to CRCSDP implementation emerged from the cross-case analysis: the complexity of colorectal cancer screening, the need for teamwork and collaboration, integration of the program into existing systems, the ability of programs to use wisdom at the local level, and the influence of social norms. Although these themes were explored independently from 1 another, interaction across themes was evident. CONCLUSIONS Colorectal cancer screening is clinically complex, and its screening methods are not well accepted by the general public; both of these circumstances have implications for program implementation. Using patient navigation, engaging in transdisciplinary teamwork, assimilating new programs into existing clinical settings, and deferring to local-level wisdom together helped to address complexity and enhance program implementation. In addition, public health efforts must confront negative social norms around colorectal cancer screening. PMID:23868482

  5. Familial Colorectal Cancer: Understanding the Alphabet Soup.

    PubMed

    Giglia, Matthew D; Chu, Daniel I

    2016-09-01

    While most colorectal cancers (CRCs) originate from nonhereditary spontaneous mutations, one-third of cases are familial or hereditary. Hereditary CRCs, which account for < 5% of all CRCs, have identifiable germline mutations and phenotypes, such as Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Familial CRCs, which account for up to 30% of CRCs, have no identifiable germline mutation or specific pattern of inheritance, but higher-than-expected incidence within a family. Since the discovery that certain genotypes can lead to development of CRC, thousands of mutations have now been implicated in CRC. These new findings have enhanced our ability to identify at-risk patients, initiate better surveillance, and take preventative measures. Given the large number of genes now associated with hereditary and familial CRCs, clinicians should be familiar with the alphabet soup of genes to provide the highest quality of care for patients and families.

  6. The Consensus Molecular Subtypes of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guinney, Justin; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Wang, Xin; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Schlicker, Andreas; Soneson, Charlotte; Marisa, Laetitia; Roepman, Paul; Nyamundanda, Gift; Angelino, Paolo; Bot, Brian M.; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Simon, Iris M.; Gerster, Sarah; Fessler, Evelyn; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Ramay, Hena; Barras, David; Homicsko, Krisztian; Maru, Dipen; Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Broom, Bradley; Boige, Valerie; Perez-Villamil, Beatriz; Laderas, Ted; Salazar, Ramon; Gray, Joe W.; Hanahan, Douglas; Tabernero, Josep; Bernards, Rene; Friend, Stephen H.; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Medema, Jan Paul; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wessels, Lodewyk; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kopetz, Scott; Vermeulen, Louis; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression–based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data sharing and analytics across expert groups. We show marked interconnectivity between six independent classification systems coalescing into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS) with distinguishing features: CMS1 (MSI Immune, 14%), hypermutated, microsatellite unstable, strong immune activation; CMS2 (Canonical, 37%), epithelial, chromosomally unstable, marked WNT and MYC signaling activation; CMS3 (Metabolic, 13%), epithelial, evident metabolic dysregulation; and CMS4 (Mesenchymal, 23%), prominent transforming growth factor β activation, stromal invasion, and angiogenesis. Samples with mixed features (13%) possibly represent a transition phenotype or intra-tumoral heterogeneity. We consider the CMS groups the most robust classification system currently available for CRC – with clear biological interpretability – and the basis for future clinical stratification and subtype–based targeted interventions. PMID:26457759

  7. Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Sporadic CRC and Hereditary Nonpolyosis Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, M. H.

    2004-01-01

    Extent neuroendocrine differentiation can be encountered in many human neoplasm derived from different organs and systems using immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural techniques. The tumor cells' behaviors resemble those of neurons and neuroendocrine cells. The presence of neuroendocrine differentiation reputedly appears to be associated with a poorer prognosis than the adenocarcinoma counterparts in sporadic human neoplasm. In this review the neuroendocrine carcinoma and the adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation of colon and rectum both in sporadic colorectal carcinoma and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, the relationship of neuroendocrine differentiation and some possible molecular pathways in tumorogenesis of colorectal cancer will be discussed. Possible treatment strategy will also be addressed. PMID:15528794

  8. Reproductive history and risk of colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Zervoudakis, Alice; Strickler, Howard D; Park, Yikyung; Xue, Xiaonan; Hollenbeck, Albert; Schatzkin, Arthur; Gunter, Marc J

    2011-05-18

    There are conflicting data regarding the role of sex hormones in colorectal cancer development. Whereas clinical trials data indicate that hormone therapy use reduces the risk of colorectal cancer, data from prospective cohort studies suggest that circulating estrogen levels are positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. A surrogate measure of lifetime estrogen exposure is reproductive history. We investigated the relationship between reproductive factors and the risk of colorectal cancer. Subjects were postmenopausal women enrolled in the National Institutes of Health-American Association of Retired Persons Diet and Health Study, a cohort of 214,162 individuals (aged 50-71 years) that included 2014 incident cases of colorectal cancer that occurred over a mean follow-up of 8.2 years. Questionnaires were used to collect data on reproductive factors, including ages at menarche, birth of first child, and menopause; parity, and use of oral contraceptives. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to examine associations between these reproductive factors and the risk of colorectal cancer, with adjustment for established colorectal cancer risk factors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Age at menopause (≥ 55 vs < 40 years: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.83; P(trend) = .008) and age at birth of first child (≥ 30 vs ≤ 19 years: HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.58; P(trend) = .05) were positively associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. Among women with no history of hormone therapy use, age at menarche (≥ 15 vs 11-12 years: HR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.94; P(trend) = .02) and parity (≥ 5 children vs no children: HR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.63 to 1.02; P(trend) = .10) were inversely associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. These data support a role for sex hormones in colorectal tumorigenesis and suggest that greater endogenous estrogen exposure may increase the risk of colorectal cancer in

  9. Reproductive History and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Zervoudakis, Alice; Strickler, Howard D.; Xue, Xiaonan; Hollenbeck, Albert; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Background There are conflicting data regarding the role of sex hormones in colorectal cancer development. Whereas clinical trials data indicate that hormone therapy use reduces the risk of colorectal cancer, data from prospective cohort studies suggest that circulating estrogen levels are positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. A surrogate measure of lifetime estrogen exposure is reproductive history. We investigated the relationship between reproductive factors and the risk of colorectal cancer. Methods Subjects were postmenopausal women enrolled in the National Institutes of Health–American Association of Retired Persons Diet and Health Study, a cohort of 214 162 individuals (aged 50–71 years) that included 2014 incident cases of colorectal cancer that occurred over a mean follow-up of 8.2 years. Questionnaires were used to collect data on reproductive factors, including ages at menarche, birth of first child, and menopause; parity, and use of oral contraceptives. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to examine associations between these reproductive factors and the risk of colorectal cancer, with adjustment for established colorectal cancer risk factors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Age at menopause (≥55 vs <40 years: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.83; Ptrend = .008) and age at birth of first child (≥30 vs ≤19 years: HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.58; Ptrend = .05) were positively associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. Among women with no history of hormone therapy use, age at menarche (≥15 vs 11–12 years: HR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.94; Ptrend = .02) and parity (≥5 children vs no children: HR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.63 to 1.02; Ptrend = .10) were inversely associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. Conclusion These data support a role for sex hormones in colorectal tumorigenesis and suggest that greater endogenous estrogen exposure may increase

  10. Colorectal cancer prevention: Immune modulation taking the stage.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Rochelle; Wang, Yi-Jun; Schoen, Robert E; Finn, Olivera J; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lin

    2018-04-01

    Prevention or early detection is one of the most promising strategies against colorectal cancer (CRC), the second leading cause of cancer death in the US. Recent studies indicate that antitumor immunity plays a key role in CRC prevention. Accumulating evidence suggests that immunosurveillance represents a critical barrier that emerging tumor cells have to overcome in order to sustain the course of tumor development. Virtually all of the agents with cancer preventive activity have been shown to have an immune modulating effect. A number of immunoprevention studies aimed at triggering antitumor immune response against early lesions have been performed, some of which have shown promising results. Furthermore, the recent success of immune checkpoint blockade therapy reinforces the notion that cancers including CRC can be effectively intervened via immune modulation including immune normalization, and has stimulated various immune-based combination prevention studies. This review summarizes recent advances to help better harness the immune system in CRC prevention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transitions in work participation after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Louisa; Lynch, Brigid M; Newman, Beth

    2008-12-01

    How cancer adversely affects an individual's work role is an understudied survivorship issue. There are no Australian studies quantifying work participation after cancer or the potential barriers to work continuance. Using a large, population-based cohort of working adults with colorectal cancer, we assessed changes in work participation separately for men (n=621) and women (n=354). Telephone survey methods collected data on colorectal cancer survivors identified through the Queensland Cancer Registry. Status at baseline and one-year post-diagnosis were described, and logistic regression models assessed correlates of work cessation. Among working adults who were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, 33% of men and 40% of women were not working at one-year post-diagnosis. Radiation therapy among men (OR=2.55, 95%CI: 1.35-4.83) and chemotherapy among women (OR=2.49, 95% Cl: 1.23-5.04) were associated with a higher prevalence of work cessation. Having private health insurance was linked with resuming work for both men and women. A large proportion of working men and women leave the workforce by 12 months following a diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Factors correlated with work cessation after colorectal cancer appear different for men and women. A better understanding of how cancer affects working adults and contributes to unwanted work cessation is required to identify individuals who may benefit from occupational rehabilitation programs.

  12. Patients’ experiences of referral for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Outcomes for colorectal cancer patients vary significantly. Compared to other countries, Australia has a good record with patient outcomes, yet there is little information available on the referral pathway. This paper explores the views of Australian patients and their experiences of referral for colorectal cancer treatment following diagnosis; the aim was to improve our understanding of the referral pathway and guide the development of future interventions. Methods A purposive sampling strategy was used, recruiting 29 patients representing urban and rural areas from 3 Australian states who participated in 4 focus groups. Seven patients provided individual interviews to supplement the data. Recordings were transcribed verbatim, data was coded with NVivo software and analysed thematically before deductive analysis. Results Four aspects of the referral process were identified by patients, namely detection/diagnosis, referral for initial treatment/specialist care, the roles of the GP/specialist, and the patient’s perceived involvement in the process. The referral process was characterised by a lack of patient involvement, with few examples of shared decision-making and few examples of limited choice. However, patients did not always feel they had the knowledge to make informed decisions. Information exchange was highly valued by patients when it occurred, and it increased their satisfaction with the process. Other factors mediating care included the use of the public versus private health system, the quality of information exchange (GP to specialist and GP to patient), continuity of care between GP and specialist, and the extent of information provision when patients moved between specialist and GP care. Conclusions Patients described poor GP continuity, ad hoc organisational systems and limited information exchange, at both interpersonal and inter-organisational levels, all leading to sub-optimal care. Implementation of a system of information feedback

  13. Geographic disparities in colorectal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A; Niu, Xiaoling; Boscoe, Francis P

    2009-01-01

    Background Examining geographic variation in cancer patient survival can help identify important prognostic factors that are linked by geography and generate hypotheses about the underlying causes of survival disparities. In this study, we apply a recently developed spatial scan statistic method, designed for time-to-event data, to determine whether colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival varies by place of residence after adjusting survival times for several prognostic factors. Methods Using data from a population-based, statewide cancer registry, we examined a cohort of 25,040 men and women from New Jersey who were newly diagnosed with local or regional stage colorectal cancer from 1996 through 2003 and followed to the end of 2006. Survival times were adjusted for significant prognostic factors (sex, age, stage at diagnosis, race/ethnicity and census tract socioeconomic deprivation) and evaluated using a spatial scan statistic to identify places where CRC survival was significantly longer or shorter than the statewide experience. Results Age, sex and stage adjusted survival times revealed several areas in the northern part of the state where CRC survival was significantly different than expected. The shortest and longest survival areas had an adjusted 5-year survival rate of 73.1% (95% CI 71.5, 74.9) and 88.3% (95% CI 85.4, 91.3) respectively, compared with the state average of 80.0% (95% CI 79.4, 80.5). Analysis of survival times adjusted for age, sex and stage as well as race/ethnicity and area socioeconomic deprivation attenuated the risk of death from CRC in several areas, but survival disparities persisted. Conclusion The results suggest that in areas where additional adjustments for race/ethnicity and area socioeconomic deprivation changed the geographic survival patterns and reduced the risk of death from CRC, the adjustment factors may be contributing causes of the disparities. Further studies should focus on specific and modifiable individual and

  14. GCC signaling in colorectal cancer: Is colorectal cancer a paracrine deficiency syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Li, P.; Lin, J.E.; Marszlowicz, G.P.; Valentino, M.A.; Chang, C.; Schulz, S.; Pitari, G.M.; Waldman, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) is the receptor expressed by intestinal cells for the paracrine hormones guanylin and uroguanylin that coordinate mucosal homeostasis and its silencing contributes to intestinal transformation. It orchestrates proliferative and metabolic circuits by limiting the cell cycle and programming metabolic transitions central to regeneration along the crypt-villus axis. Mice deficient in GCC are more susceptible to colon cancer induced by germline mutations or carcinogens. Moreover, guanylin and uroguanylin are the most commonly lost gene products in colon cancer. The role of GCC as a tumor suppressor and the universal loss of its hormones in transformation suggest a paradigm in which colorectal cancer is a disease of paracrine hormone insufficiency. Indeed, GCC signaling reverses the tumorigenic phenotype of human colon cancer cells by regulating proliferation and metabolism. These data suggest a pathophysiological hypothesis in which GCC is a tumor suppressor coordinating proliferative homeostasis whose silencing through hormone loss initiates transformation. The correlative therapeutic hypothesis suggests that colorectal cancer is a disease of hormone insufficiency that can be prevented or treated by oral hormone replacement therapy employing GCC ligands. PMID:19771320

  15. Survival rates and predictors of survival among colorectal cancer patients in a Malaysian tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Magaji, Bello Arkilla; Moy, Foong Ming; Roslani, April Camilla; Law, Chee Wei

    2017-05-18

    Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death globally. It is the second most common cancer among both males and females in Malaysia. The economic burden of colorectal cancer is likely to increase over time owing to its current trend and aging population. Cancer survival analysis is an essential indicator for early detection and improvement in cancer treatment. However, there was a scarcity of studies concerning survival of colorectal cancer patients as well as its predictors. Therefore, we aimed to determine the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates, compare survival rates among ethnic groups and determine the predictors of survival among colorectal cancer patients. This was an ambidirectional cohort study conducted at the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. All Malaysian citizens or permanent residents with histologically confirmed diagnosis of colorectal cancer seen at UMMC from 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2010 were included in the study. Demographic and clinical characteristics were extracted from the medical records. Patients were followed-up until death or censored at the end of the study (31st December 2010). Censored patients' vital status (whether alive or dead) were cross checked with the National Registration Department. Survival analyses at 1-, 3- and 5-year intervals were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival rates, while Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was carried out to determine the predictors of 5-year colorectal cancer survival. Among 1212 patients, the median survival for colorectal, colon and rectal cancers were 42.0, 42.0 and 41.0 months respectively; while the 1-, 3-, and 5-year relative survival rates ranged from 73.8 to 76.0%, 52.1 to 53.7% and 40.4 to 45.4% respectively. The Chinese patients had the lowest 5-year survival compared to Malay and Indian patients. Based on the 814

  16. Colorectal cancer trends in Kerman province, the largest province in Iran, with forecasting until 2016.

    PubMed

    Roya, Nikbakht; Abbas, Bahrampour

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers. The aim of this study is determination its trends in Kerman province and individual cities separately until year 2016. This analytical and modeling study was based of cancer registry data of Kerman University of Medical Sciences, collected during 2001-2010. Among 20,351 cancer case, 792 were colorectal cancer cases in age group 18-93 years with a mean of 59.4 and standard deviation of 15.1. By applying time series and data trends, incidences were predicted until 2016 for the province and each city, with adjustment for population size. In colorectal cases, 413 (52%) were male, and 379 (48%) were female. The annual increasing rate in Kerman province overall was and can be expected to be 6%, and in the cities of the province Rafsanjan, Bardsir, Bam, Kerman, Baft, Sirjan, Jiroft, Kahnuj and Manujan had an increasing range from 5 to 14% by the year 2016. But in Ravar, Zarand and Shahrbabak reduction in rates of at least 2% could be predicted. The time series showed that the trend of colorectal cancer in female will increase 15% and in male 7% by year 2016. Given the trend of this cancer is increasing so that resources will be consumed in the treatment of the patients, efforts shoudlbe focused on prevention and early diagnosis of the disease. Screening could have an important role leading to improved survival.

  17. Symptom burden among young adults with breast or colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Stacy D; Zhao, Fengmin; Salsman, John M; Chang, Victor T; Wagner, Lynne I; Fisch, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Cancer incidence has increased among young adults (YAs) and survival rates have not improved compared with other age groups. Patient-reported outcomes may enhance our understanding of this vulnerable population. In a multisite prospective study, patients completed a cancer symptom inventory at the time of enrollment (T1) and 4 weeks to 5 weeks later (T2). YAs (those aged ≤ 39 years) with breast or colorectal cancer were compared with older adults (those aged ≥ 40 years) with breast or colorectal cancer with regard to symptom severity, symptom interference, changes over time, and medical care. Participants included 1544 patients with breast cancer (96 of whom were YAs) and 718 patients with colorectal cancer (37 of whom were YAs). Compared with older adults, YAs with breast cancer were more likely to report moderate/severe drowsiness, hair loss, and symptom interference with relationships at T1. YAs with colorectal cancer were more likely to report moderate/severe pain, fatigue, nausea, distress, drowsiness, shortness of breath, and rash plus interference in general activity, mood, work, relationships, and life enjoyment compared with older adults. Compared with older adults, shortness of breath, appetite, and sore mouth were more likely to improve in YAs with breast cancer; vomiting was less likely to improve in YAs with colorectal cancer. Referrals for supportive care were few, especially among patients with colorectal cancer. YAs with breast cancer were somewhat more likely to be referred to nutrition and psychiatry services than older patients. YAs reported symptom severity, symptom interference, and variations over time that were distinct from older patients. Distinctions were found to differ by diagnostic group. These findings enhance the understanding of symptom burden in YAs and inform the development of targeted interventions and future research. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  18. Association between adiponectin polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Liu, Jiaqi; You, Liuping; Li, Gang; Huang, Yuenan; Li, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the association between adiponectin (ADIPOQ) gene rs2241766 and rs1501299 polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal cancer, and to analyze the role of the interaction between these two loci and environmental factors in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. The case-control study was performed with a 1:1 match. A self-designed questionnaire was used to perform a face-to-face survey with 600 new primary colorectal cancer cases confirmed by histopathology as well as 600 cases of people receiving a physical examination at the same time. The general information, lifestyle, and diet habits, etc. were collected from two groups of study subjects. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used to identify ADIPOQ rs2241766 and rs1501299 genotypes. After adjusting for factors such as colorectal cancer family history, body-mass index (BMI), daily sedentary time, weekly red meat intake frequency, as well regular tea drinking, conditional logistic regression analysis indicated that rs2241766 TG+GG carriers had a higher risk of colorectal cancer than TT carriers (OR=1.433, 95% CI: 1.014-1.985); rs1501299 GT+TT carriers had a lower risk of colorectal cancer than GG carriers (OR=0.723, 95% CI: 0.531-0.902). Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed that ADIPOQ rs2241766 and rs1501299 could have interaction with red meat intake (p=0.001). ADIPOQ rs2241766 and rs1501299 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be associated with colorectal pathogenesis and could have interactions with red meat intake. Both factors impact colorectal cancer occurrence.

  19. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Lukas F.; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T.; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27148488

  20. SUMOylated MAFB promotes colorectal cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yin-Yin; Sun, Xiao-Jian; Zhao, Ren; Huang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor, v-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B (MAFB), promotes tumorigenesis in some cancers. In this study, we found that MAFB levels were increased in clinical colorectal cancer (CRC) samples, and higher expression correlated with more advanced TNM stage. We identified MAFB amplifications in a majority of tumor types in an assessment of The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Altered MAFB levels due to gene amplification, deletion, mutation, or transcription upregulation occurred in 9% of CRC cases within the database. shRNA knockdown experiments demonstrated that MAFB deficiency blocked CRC cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase in vitro. We found that MAFB could be SUMOylated by SUMO1 at lysine 32, and this modification was critical for cell cycle regulation by MAFB in CRC cells. SUMOylated MAFB directly regulated cyclin-dependent kinase 6 transcription by binding to its promoter. MAFB knockdown CRC cell xenograft tumors in mice grew more slowly than controls, and wild-type MAFB-overexpressing tumors grew more quickly than tumors overexpressing MAFB mutated at lysine 32. These data suggest that SUMOylated MAFB promotes CRC tumorigenesis through cell cycle regulation. MAFB and its SUMOylation process may serve as novel therapeutic targets for CRC treatment. PMID:27829226

  1. Colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality with screening flexible sigmoidoscopy.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Robert E; Pinsky, Paul F; Weissfeld, Joel L; Yokochi, Lance A; Church, Timothy; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Bresalier, Robert; Andriole, Gerald L; Buys, Saundra S; Crawford, E David; Fouad, Mona N; Isaacs, Claudine; Johnson, Christine C; Reding, Douglas J; O'Brien, Barbara; Carrick, Danielle M; Wright, Patrick; Riley, Thomas L; Purdue, Mark P; Izmirlian, Grant; Kramer, Barnett S; Miller, Anthony B; Gohagan, John K; Prorok, Philip C; Berg, Christine D

    2012-06-21

    The benefits of endoscopic testing for colorectal-cancer screening are uncertain. We evaluated the effect of screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy on colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality. From 1993 through 2001, we randomly assigned 154,900 men and women 55 to 74 years of age either to screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy, with a repeat screening at 3 or 5 years, or to usual care. Cases of colorectal cancer and deaths from the disease were ascertained. Of the 77,445 participants randomly assigned to screening (intervention group), 83.5% underwent baseline flexible sigmoidoscopy and 54.0% were screened at 3 or 5 years. The incidence of colorectal cancer after a median follow-up of 11.9 years was 11.9 cases per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (1012 cases), as compared with 15.2 cases per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (1287 cases), which represents a 21% reduction (relative risk, 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72 to 0.85; P<0.001). Significant reductions were observed in the incidence of both distal colorectal cancer (479 cases in the intervention group vs. 669 cases in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.80; P<0.001) and proximal colorectal cancer (512 cases vs. 595 cases; relative risk, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.97; P=0.01). There were 2.9 deaths from colorectal cancer per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (252 deaths), as compared with 3.9 per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (341 deaths), which represents a 26% reduction (relative risk, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.87; P<0.001). Mortality from distal colorectal cancer was reduced by 50% (87 deaths in the intervention group vs. 175 in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.64; P<0.001); mortality from proximal colorectal cancer was unaffected (143 and 147 deaths, respectively; relative risk, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.22; P=0.81). Screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy was associated with a significant decrease in

  2. Colorectal-Cancer Incidence and Mortality with Screening Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Robert E.; Pinsky, Paul F.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Yokochi, Lance A.; Church, Timothy; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Bresalier, Robert; Andriole, Gerald L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Crawford, E. David; Fouad, Mona N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Johnson, Christine C.; Reding, Douglas J.; O'Brien, Barbara; Carrick, Danielle M.; Wright, Patrick; Riley, Thomas L.; Purdue, Mark P.; Izmirlian, Grant; Kramer, Barnett S.; Miller, Anthony B.; Gohagan, John K.; Prorok, Philip C.; Berg, Christine D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The benefits of endoscopic testing for colorectal-cancer screening are uncertain. We evaluated the effect of screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy on colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality. Methods From 1993 through 2001, we randomly assigned 154,900 men and women 55 to 74 years of age either to screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy, with a repeat screening at 3 or 5 years, or to usual care. Cases of colorectal cancer and deaths from the disease were ascertained. Results Of the 77,445 participants randomly assigned to screening (intervention group), 83.5% underwent baseline flexible sigmoidoscopy and 54.0% were screened at 3 or 5 years. The incidence of colorectal cancer after a median follow-up of 11.9 years was 11.9 cases per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (1012 cases), as compared with 15.2 cases per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (1287 cases), which represents a 21% reduction (relative risk, 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72 to 0.85; P<0.001). Significant reductions were observed in the incidence of both distal colorectal cancer (479 cases in the intervention group vs. 669 cases in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.80; P<0.001) and proximal colorectal cancer (512 cases vs. 595 cases; relative risk, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.97; P = 0.01). There were 2.9 deaths from colorectal cancer per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (252 deaths), as compared with 3.9 per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (341 deaths), which represents a 26% reduction (relative risk, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.87; P<0.001). Mortality from distal colorectal cancer was reduced by 50% (87 deaths in the intervention group vs. 175 in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.64; P<0.001); mortality from proximal colorectal cancer was unaffected (143 and 147 deaths, respectively; relative risk, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.22; P = 0.81). Conclusions Screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy was

  3. Vegetarian Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Orlich, Michael J.; Singh, Pramil N.; Sabaté, Joan; Fan, Jing; Sveen, Lars; Bennett, Hannelore; Knutsen, Synnove F.; Beeson, W. Lawrence; Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Butler, Terry L.; Herring, R. Patti; Fraser, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Colorectal cancers are a leading cause of cancer mortality, and their primary prevention by diet is highly desirable. The relationship of vegetarian dietary patterns to colorectal cancer risk is not well established. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association between vegetarian dietary patterns and incident colorectal cancers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Adventist Health Study 2 (AHS-2) is a large, prospective, North American cohort trial including 96 354 Seventh-Day Adventist men and women recruited between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2007. Follow-up varied by state and was indicated by the cancer registry linkage dates. Of these participants, an analytic sample of 77 659 remained after exclusions. Analysis was conducted using Cox proportional hazards regression, controlling for important demographic and lifestyle confounders. The analysis was conducted between June 1, 2014, and October 20, 2014. EXPOSURES Diet was assessed at baseline by a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire and categorized into 4 vegetarian dietary patterns (vegan, lacto-ovo vegetarian, pescovegetarian, and semivegetarian) and a nonvegetarian dietary pattern. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The relationship between dietary patterns and incident cancers of the colon and rectum; colorectal cancer cases were identified primarily by state cancer registry linkages. RESULTS During a mean follow-up of 7.3 years, 380 cases of colon cancer and 110 cases of rectal cancer were documented. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) in all vegetarians combined vs nonvegetarians were 0.78 (95% CI, 0.64–0.95) for all colorectal cancers, 0.81 (95%CI, 0.65–1.00) for colon cancer, and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.47–1.06) for rectal cancer. The adjusted HR for colorectal cancer in vegans was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.59–1.19); in lacto-ovo vegetarians, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65–1.02); in pescovegetarians, 0.57 (95% CI, 0.40–0.82); and in semivegetarians, 0.92 (95% CI, 0.62–1.37) compared with

  4. Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) position statement: SBM supports the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable's (NCCRT) call to action to reach 80 % colorectal cancer screening rates by 2018.

    PubMed

    Becker, Elizabeth A; Buscemi, Joanna; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Watson, Karriem; Matthews, Kameron L; Winn, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    The Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) urges stakeholders to support the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable's (NCCRT) initiative 80 % by 2018. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is largely preventable with early detection of pre-cancerous polyps but CRC screening is underutilized, especially among the underserved. In response to low screening rates, this initiative sets an important goal of a population screening rate of 80 % in adults ages 50 and older by the year 2018. It is estimated that this screening rate could prevent more than 20,000 CRC deaths per year within 15 years. The initiative takes a multilevel approach to improving screening rates and includes recommendations for clinicians, health care organizations, insurers, policymakers, and researchers.

  5. Early Postoperative FDG-PET-CT Imaging Results in a Relevant Upstaging in the pN2 Subgroup of Stage III Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Fehr, Martin; Müller, Joachim; Knitel, Meinhard; Fornaro, Jürgen; Horber, Daniel; Koeberle, Dieter; Cerny, Thomas; Güller, Ulrich

    2017-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines regarding follow-up in patients after curative resection of colorectal cancer (CRC) vary widely. Current follow-up recommendations do not include additional postoperative imaging before starting adjuvant treatment in any patients. We evaluated the potential benefit of our institutional approach, recommending 18 fluor-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) imaging in CRC stage III patients with ≥4 locoregional lymph node metastases (pN2). Our study included all patients from a single center with complete resection of a pT1-4, pN2, cM0 CRC. All patients were considered free of distant metastases on the basis of preoperative CT imaging of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. The main objective of the present study was to assess the proportion of patients with changes of therapeutic management (defined as any other treatment than the preplanned adjuvant chemotherapy) because of the results of additional postoperative FDG-PET-CT imaging. Fifty patients (22 female/28 male) were included; the median age was 64 years (range, 37-78 years). Previously undiagnosed metastatic disease resulting in a change of the therapeutic management was detected using postoperative FDG-PET-CT imaging in 7 patients (14.0%; 95% confidence interval, 5.8%-26.7%). The number needed to screen to detect new or previously occult metastases was 7 (7 of 50). To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the role of an additional postoperative FDG-PET-CT scan before adjuvant treatment in patients with completely resected CRC with ≥4 lymph node metastases (pT1-4, pN2) and without distant metastases on preoperative CT imaging (cM0). Postoperative FDG-PET-CT imaging represents a valuable tool for the detection of new macrometastases in the subgroup of pN2 cM0 CRC patients. The low number needed to screen for consequent therapeutic changes is clinically relevant and should be further evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  6. Analysis of Fusobacterium persistence and antibiotic response in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bullman, Susan; Pedamallu, Chandra S; Sicinska, Ewa; Clancy, Thomas E; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Cai, Diana; Neuberg, Donna; Huang, Katherine; Guevara, Fatima; Nelson, Timothy; Chipashvili, Otari; Hagan, Timothy; Walker, Mark; Ramachandran, Aruna; Diosdado, Begoña; Serna, Garazi; Mulet, Nuria; Landolfi, Stefania; Ramon Y Cajal, Santiago; Fasani, Roberta; Aguirre, Andrew J; Ng, Kimmie; Élez, Elena; Ogino, Shuji; Tabernero, Josep; Fuchs, Charles S; Hahn, William C; Nuciforo, Paolo; Meyerson, Matthew

    2017-12-15

    Colorectal cancers comprise a complex mixture of malignant cells, nontransformed cells, and microorganisms. Fusobacterium nucleatum is among the most prevalent bacterial species in colorectal cancer tissues. Here we show that colonization of human colorectal cancers with Fusobacterium and its associated microbiome-including Bacteroides , Selenomonas , and Prevotella species-is maintained in distal metastases, demonstrating microbiome stability between paired primary and metastatic tumors. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that Fusobacterium is predominantly associated with cancer cells in the metastatic lesions. Mouse xenografts of human primary colorectal adenocarcinomas were found to retain viable Fusobacterium and its associated microbiome through successive passages. Treatment of mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft with the antibiotic metronidazole reduced Fusobacterium load, cancer cell proliferation, and overall tumor growth. These observations argue for further investigation of antimicrobial interventions as a potential treatment for patients with Fusobacterium -associated colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. An inverse association between tea consumption and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuetong; Wu, Yuan; Du, Mulong; Chu, Haiyan; Zhu, Lingjun; Tong, Na; Zhang, Zhengdong; Wang, Meilin; Gu, Dongying; Chen, Jinfei

    2017-06-06

    It is well known that the tea extracts, mainly polyphenols as chemo-preventive elements, could act as cancer progression blockers. Although the association between tea consumption and colorectal cancer risk has been widely investigated, the results still remain inconsistent. We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis to evaluate their relationships by enrolling qualified 29 literatures. The summary odds ratio (OR) of colorectal cancer for the highest vs. lowest tea consumption was 0.93 with 0.87-1.00 of 95% confidence intervals (CIs) among all studies with modest heterogeneity (P = 0.001, I2 = 43.4%). Stratified analysis revealed that tea, especially green tea, had a protective effect among female and rectal cancer patients. Particularly, the dose-response analysis showed that there was a significant inverse association between an increment of 1 cup/day of tea consumption and colorectal cancer risk in the subgroup of the green tea drinking (OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.96-1.01, Pnonlinear = 0.003) and female (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.56-0.81, Pnonlinear < 0.001). Our findings indicate that tea consumption has an inverse impact on colorectal cancer risk, which may have significant public health implications in the prevention of colorectal cancer and further similar researches.

  8. Immediately modifiable risk factors attributable to colorectal cancer in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Lai, Pei Kuan; Mak, Joon Wah

    2017-08-04

    This study aimed to estimate potential reductions in case incidence of colorectal cancer attributable to the modifiable risk factors such as alcohol consumption, overweight and physical inactivity amongst the Malaysian population. Gender specific population-attributable fractions (PAFs) for colorectal cancer in Malaysia were estimated for the three selected risk factors (physical inactivity, overweight, and alcohol consumptions). Exposure prevalence were sourced from a large-scale national representative survey. Risk estimates of the relationship between the exposure of interest and colorectal cancer were obtained from published meta-analyses. The overall PAF was then estimated, using the 2013 national cancer incidence data from the Malaysian Cancer Registry. Overall, the mean incidence rate for colorectal cancer in Malaysia from 2008 to 2013 was 21.3 per 100,000 population, with the mean age of 61.6 years (±12.7) and the majority were men (56.6%). Amongst 369 colorectal cancer cases in 2013, 40 cases (20 men, 20 women), 10 cases (9 men, 1 woman) or 20 cases (16 men,4 women) would be prevented, if they had done physical exercises, could reduce their body weight to normal level or avoided alcohol consumption, assuming that these factors are causally related to colorectal cancer. It was estimated that 66 (17.8%;66/369) colorectal cancer cases (42 men, 24 women) who had all these three risk factors for the last 10 years would have been prevented, if they could control these three risk factors through effective preventive measures. Findings suggest that approximately 18% of colorectal cancer cases in Malaysia would be prevented through appropriate preventive measures such as doing regular physical exercises, reducing their body weight to normal level and avoiding alcohol consumption, if these factors are causally related to colorectal cancer. Scaling-up nationwide public health campaigns tailored to increase physical activity, controlling body weight within normal

  9. The human gut microbiome as a screening tool for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zackular, Joseph P; Rogers, Mary A M; Ruffin, Mack T; Schloss, Patrick D

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the gut microbiome may be an important factor in the development of colorectal cancer. Abnormalities in the gut microbiome have been reported in patients with colorectal cancer; however, this microbial community has not been explored as a potential screen for early-stage disease. We characterized the gut microbiome in patients from three clinical groups representing the stages of colorectal cancer development: healthy, adenoma, and carcinoma. Analysis of the gut microbiome from stool samples revealed both an enrichment and depletion of several bacterial populations associated with adenomas and carcinomas. Combined with known clinical risk factors of colorectal cancer (e.g., BMI, age, race), data from the gut microbiome significantly improved the ability to differentiate between healthy, adenoma, and carcinoma clinical groups relative to risk factors alone. Using Bayesian methods, we determined that using gut microbiome data as a screening tool improved the pretest to posttest probability of adenoma more than 50-fold. For example, the pretest probability in a 65-year-old was 0.17% and, after using the microbiome data, this increased to 10.67% (1 in 9 chance of having an adenoma). Taken together, the results of our study demonstrate the feasibility of using the composition of the gut microbiome to detect the presence of precancerous and cancerous lesions. Furthermore, these results support the need for more cross-sectional studies with diverse populations and linkage to other stool markers, dietary data, and personal health information. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. The greatest challenges reported by long-term colorectal cancer survivors with stomas.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Carmit K; Hornbrook, Mark C; Grant, Marcia; Baldwin, Carol M; Wendel, Christopher S; Mohler, M Jane; Altschuler, Andrea; Ramirez, Michelle; Krouse, Robert S

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a qualitative analysis of the greatest challenges reported by long-term colorectal cancer survivors with ostomies. Surveys that included an open-ended question about challenges of living with an ostomy were administered at three Kaiser Permanente regions: Northern California, Northwest, and Hawaii. The study was coordinated at the Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs Health Care System in Tucson. The City of Hope Quality of Life Model for Ostomy Patients provided a framework for the study's design, measures, data collection, and data analysis. The study's findings may be generalized broadly to community settings across the United States. Results replicate those of previous research among veterans, California members of the United Ostomy Association, Koreans with ostomies, and colorectal cancer survivors with ostomies residing in the United Kingdom. The greatest challenges reported by 178 colorectal cancer survivors with ostomies confirmed the Institute of Medicine's findings that survivorship is a distinct, chronic phase of cancer care and that cancer's effects are broad and pervasive. The challenges reported by study participants should inform the design, testing and integration of targeted education, early interventions, and ongoing support services for colorectal cancer patients with ostomies.

  11. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch Syndrome) and Microsatellite Instability

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C. Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P.; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M.; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T.; Peltomaki, Païvi; Ramsey, Scott D.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hawk, Ernest T.; Barrett, J. Carl; Freedman, Andrew N.; Srivastava, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI). Because cancers with MSI account for approximately 15% of all colorectal cancers and because of the need for a better understanding of the clinical and histologic manifestations of HNPCC, the National Cancer Institute hosted an international workshop on HNPCC in 1996, which led to the development of the Bethesda Guidelines for the identification of individuals with HNPCC who should be tested for MSI. To consider revision and improvement of the Bethesda Guidelines, another HNPCC workshop was held at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD, in 2002. In this commentary, we summarize the Workshop presentations on HNPCC and MSI testing; present the issues relating to the performance, sensitivity, and specificity of the Bethesda Guidelines; outline the revised Bethesda Guidelines for identifying individuals at risk for HNPCC; and recommend criteria for MSI testing. PMID:14970275

  12. Racial disparity in colorectal cancer: Gut microbiome and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sachin; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Farhana, Lulu; Yu, Yingjie; Majumdar, Adhip Pn

    2016-09-26

    Over the past two decades there has been remarkable progress in cancer diagnosis, treatment and screening. The basic mechanisms leading to pathogenesis of various types of cancers are also understood better and some patients, if diagnosed at a particular stage go on to lead a normal pre-diagnosis life. Despite these achievements, racial disparity in some cancers remains a mystery. The higher incidence, aggressiveness and mortality of breast, prostate and colorectal cancers (CRCs) in African-Americans as compared to Caucasian-Americans are now well documented. The polyp-carcinoma sequence in CRC and easy access to colonic epithelia or colonic epithelial cells through colonoscopy/colonic effluent provides the opportunity to study colonic stem cells early in course of natural history of the disease. With the advent of metagenomic sequencing, uncultivable organisms can now be identified in stool and their numbers correlated with the effects on colonic epithelia. It would be expected that these techniques would revolutionize our understanding of the racial disparity in CRC and pave a way for the same in other cancers as well. Unfortunately, this has not happened. Our understanding of the underlying factors responsible in African-Americans for higher incidence and mortality from colorectal carcinoma remains minimal. In this review, we aim to summarize the available data on role of microbiome and cancer stem cells in racial disparity in CRC. This will provide a platform for further research on this topic.

  13. Colorectal cancer disparities beyond biology: Screening, treatment, access.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Casey L; Gilreath, Kelly; Keyes, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    African Americans in the United States are more likely than their white counterparts to experience greater incidence and mortality due to colorectal cancer (CRC). Present for decades, these disparities have prompted researchers to investigate underlying causes and potential explanations. While some biological variations have been observed between races, evidence shows that approximately 50% of these disparities can be attributed to differences and disparities in CRC screening, resulting in reduced polyp removal for CRC prevention and/or early detection of CRC among African Americans. Other major contributors to CRC disparities are differences in treatment and access to care. Significant efforts are needed to increase CRC screening among African Americans through targeted interventions to reduce barriers such as increasing education, promoting physician recommendations, and providing affordable and quality care. Intervention is also needed to educate the medical community about these issues and to change health policy to provide a multilevel approach with the best chance of success in reducing racial disparities in CRC.

  14. Clonal evolution of colorectal cancer in IBD.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Ho R; Bakir, Ibrahim Al; Hart, Ailsa L; Graham, Trevor A

    2017-04-01

    Optimizing the management of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in IBD requires a fundamental understanding of the evolutionary process underpinning tumorigenesis. In IBD, clonal evolution begins long before the development of overt neoplasia, and is probably accelerated by the repeated cycles of epithelial wounding and repair that are characteristic of the condition. Here, we review the biological drivers of mutant clone selection in IBD with particular reference to the unique histological architecture of the intestinal epithelium coupled with the inflammatory microenvironment in IBD, and the unique mutation patterns seen in IBD-driven neoplasia when compared with sporadic adenomas and CRC. How these data can be leveraged as evolutionary-based biomarkers to predict cancer risk is discussed, as well as how the efficacy of CRC surveillance programmes and the management of dysplasia can be improved. From a research perspective, the longitudinal surveillance of patients with IBD provides an under-exploited opportunity to investigate the biology of the human gastrointestinal tract over space and time.

  15. New genes emerging for colorectal cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Garre, Pilar; Vila, Maria; Lozano, Juan José; Pristoupilova, Anna; Beltrán, Sergi; Abulí, Anna; Muñoz, Jenifer; Balaguer, Francesc; Ocaña, Teresa; Castells, Antoni; Piqué, Josep M; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Bujanda, Luis; Caldés, Trinidad; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2014-02-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent neoplasms and an important cause of mortality in the developed world. This cancer is caused by both genetic and environmental factors although 35% of the variation in CRC susceptibility involves inherited genetic differences. Mendelian syndromes account for about 5% of the total burden of CRC, with Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis the most common forms. Excluding hereditary forms, there is an important fraction of CRC cases that present familial aggregation for the disease with an unknown germline genetic cause. CRC can be also considered as a complex disease taking into account the common disease-commom variant hypothesis with a polygenic model of inheritance where the genetic components of common complex diseases correspond mostly to variants of low/moderate effect. So far, 30 common, low-penetrance susceptibility variants have been identified for CRC. Recently, new sequencing technologies including exome- and whole-genome sequencing have permitted to add a new approach to facilitate the identification of new genes responsible for human disease predisposition. By using whole-genome sequencing, germline mutations in the POLE and POLD1 genes have been found to be responsible for a new form of CRC genetic predisposition called polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis.

  16. MUC1 and colorectal cancer pathophysiology considerations.

    PubMed

    Niv, Yaron

    2008-04-14

    Several lines of evidence point towards a biological role of mucin and particularly MUC1 in colorectal cancer. A positive correlation was described between mucin secretion, proliferation, invasiveness, metastasis and bad prognosis. But, the role of MUC1 in cancer progression is still controversial and somewhat confusing. While Mukherjee and colleagues developed MUC1-specific immune therapy in a CRC model, Lillehoj and co-investigators showed recently that MUC1 inhibits cell proliferation by a beta-catenin-dependent mechanism. In carcinoma cells the polarization of MUC1 is lost and the protein is over expressed at high levels over the entire cell surface. A competitive interaction between MUC1 and E-cadherin, through beta-catenin binding, disrupts E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions at sites of MUC1 expression. In addition, the complex of MUC1-beta-catenin enters the nucleus and activates T-cell factor/leukocyte enhancing factor 1 transcription factors and activates gene expression. This mechanism may be similar to that just described for DCC and UNC5H, which induced apoptosis when not engaged with their ligand netrin, but mediate signals for proliferation, differentiation or migration when ligand bound.

  17. MUC1 and colorectal cancer pathophysiology considerations

    PubMed Central

    Niv, Yaron

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence point towards a biological role of mucin and particularly MUC1 in colorectal cancer. A positive correlation was described between mucin secretion, proliferation, invasiveness, metastasis and bad prognosis. But, the role of MUC1 in cancer progression is still controversial and somewhat confusing. While Mukherjee and colleagues developed MUC1-specific immune therapy in a CRC model, Lillehoj and co-investigators showed recently that MUC1 inhibits cell proliferation by a β-catenin-dependent mechanism. In carcinoma cells the polarization of MUC1 is lost and the protein is over expressed at high levels over the entire cell surface. A competitive interaction between MUC1 and E-cadherin, through β-catenin binding, disrupts E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions at sites of MUC1 expression. In addition, the complex of MUC1-β-catenin enters the nucleus and activates T-cell factor/leukocyte enhancing factor 1 transcription factors and activates gene expression. This mechanism may be similar to that just described for DCC and UNC5H, which induced apoptosis when not engaged with their ligand netrin, but mediate signals for proliferation, differentiation or migration when ligand bound. PMID:18407586

  18. Ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    The association between ulcerative colitis (UC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) has been acknowledged. One of the most serious and life threatening consequences of UC is the development of CRC (UC-CRC). UC-CRC patients are younger, more frequently have multiple cancerous lesions, and histologically show mucinous or signet ring cell carcinomas. The risk of CRC begins to increase 8 or 10 years after the diagnosis of UC. Risk factors for CRC with UC patients include young age at diagnosis, longer duration, greater anatomical extent of colonic involvement, the degree of inflammation, family history of CRC, and presence of primary sclerosing cholangitis. CRC on the ground of UC develop from non-dysplastic mucosa to indefinite dysplasia, low-grade dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia and finally to invasive adenocarcinoma. Colonoscopy surveillance programs are recommended to reduce the risk of CRC and mortality in UC. Genetic alterations might play a role in the development of UC-CRC. 5-aminosalicylates might represent a favorable therapeutic option for chemoprevention of CRC. PMID:25469007

  19. Reduction in Late Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer Following Introduction of a Specialist Colorectal Surgery Service

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Amanda L; Mercer, Stuart J; Harris, Guy JC; Simson, Jay NL

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION An audit of patients presenting with colorectal cancer to our district general hospital during a 2-year period from November 1994 found that 12.1% of cases were diagnosed later than 6 months after initial presentation to a physician. This audit was repeated for a 2-year period from December 2001, to determine whether the introduction of a specialist coloproctology surgery service had led to a reduction in late diagnosis of colorectal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS Case notes were reviewed of all patients presenting with colorectal cancer between December 2001 and November 2003. Late diagnosis was defined as diagnosis of colorectal cancer more than 6 months after their first attendance to either their general practitioner or district general hospital. The results were compared with those of the previous study. RESULTS Of a total of 218 patients presenting with colorectal cancer during the study period, 14 (6.4%; 10 men and 4 women) satisfied the criteria for late diagnosis, with the longest delay being 12.5 months. Reasons for late diagnosis were false-negative reporting of barium studies (n = 3), inaccurate tumour biopsy (n = 2), concurrent pathology causing anaemia (n = 4), inappropriate delay in definitive investigation (n = 3), and refusal of investigation by patients (n = 2). CONCLUSIONS There has been a reduction of nearly 50% (12.1% to 6.4%) in the proportion of patients with a late diagnosis of colorectal cancer compared with our previous audit. It is suggested that an important factor in this improvement in diagnosis has been the introduction of a specialist coloproctology surgery service. PMID:17059718

  20. Alcohol intake and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer: The Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baiyu; Gapstur, Susan M; Newton, Christina C; Jacobs, Eric J; Campbell, Peter T

    2017-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer, but to the authors' knowledge its influence on survival after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer is unclear. The authors investigated associations between prediagnosis and postdiagnosis alcohol intake with mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. The authors identified 2458 men and women who were diagnosed with invasive, nonmetastatic colorectal cancer between 1992 (enrollment into the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort) and 2011. Alcohol consumption was self-reported at baseline and updated in 1997, 1999, 2003, and 2007. Postdiagnosis alcohol data were available for 1599 participants. Of the 2458 participants diagnosed with colorectal cancer, 1156 died during follow-up through 2012. Prediagnosis and postdiagnosis alcohol consumption were not found to be associated with all-cause mortality, except for an association between prediagnosis consumption of <2 drinks per day and a slightly lower risk of all-cause mortality (relative risk [RR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.74-1.00) compared with never drinking. Alcohol use was generally not associated with colorectal cancer-specific mortality, although there was some suggestion of increased colorectal cancer-specific mortality with postdiagnosis drinking (RR, 1.27 [95% CI, 0.87-1.86] for current drinking of <2 drinks/day and RR, 1.44 [95% CI, 0.80-2.60] for current drinking of ≥2 drinks/day). The results of the current study do not support an association between alcohol consumption and all-cause mortality among individuals with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer. The association between postdiagnosis drinking and colorectal cancer-specific mortality should be examined in larger studies of individuals diagnosed with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer. Cancer 2017;123:2006-2013. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  1. Television Watching and Colorectal Cancer Survival in Men

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Chan, Andrew T.; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the association between pre- and postdiagnostic time spent sitting watching TV as well as other sedentary behaviors (other sitting at home and at work/driving) and mortality from colorectal cancer or other causes, and overall mortality. Methods We followed stage I-III colorectal cancer patients from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986–2010). Cox models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results 926 and 714 patients were included in the analysis of pre- and postdiagnostic TV watching respectively, and 471 and 325 died during follow-up. Prolonged prediagnostic TV viewing was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality independent of leisure-time physical activity. The HRs (95% CIs) for 0–6, 7–13,14–20 and ≥21 h/wk were 1.00 (referent), 0.84 (0.56–1.25), 1.15 (0.75–1.78), 2.13 (1.31–3.45) (Ptrend=0.01). The association was observed primarily among overweight and obese individuals. Prediagnostic TV watching was also associated with overall mortality within 5 years of diagnosis, largely due to the association with colorectal cancer mortality. Other prediagnostic sitting at home or at work/driving was not associated with mortality. Postdiagnostic TV viewing was associated with non-significant increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality (HR for ≥21 vs 0–6 h/wk=1.45; 95% CI 0.73–2.87) adjusting for TV viewing before diagnosis. Conclusion Prolonged prediagnostic TV watching is associated with higher colorectal cancer-specific mortality independent of leisure-time physical activity among colorectal cancer patients. PMID:26293240

  2. Review on TAS-102 development and its use for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mota, Jose Mauricio; Fonseca, Leonardo G; Braghiroli, Maria Ignez; Hoff, Paulo M

    2016-08-01

    TAS-102 is the combination of trifluridine (TFT) with tipiracil (TPI) in a 1:0.5 molar ratio. TFT is a fluoropyrimidine that retains cytotoxic activity in 5-fluorouracil resistant cell lines. Due to TFT short half-life, early clinical development was discouraging. Thereafter, TFT was shown to be promptly degraded by thymidine phosphorylase, also known as platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor, a pro-angiogenic protein and a poor prognosis marker in colorectal cancer. TPI is a specific antagonist of thymidine phosphorylase and led to an increase in TFT serum levels when both agents are combined. Moreover, TPI is a potential anti-angiogenic molecule and could exert antitumor actions per se. TAS-102 was tested in several Phase I studies published in the early 21st century. The best regimen was settled as 70mg/m(2)/day, q12h, orally given at days 1-5 and days 8-13, each 28days. Recently, the first Phase III trial evaluating TAS-102 in refractory colorectal cancer patients was published. The RECOURSE trial demonstrated a survival advantage of the agent over supportive care, and definitely established TAS-102 as a novel strategy in the current armamentarium against colorectal cancer. Here we review the preclinical data regarding TFT and TPI that led to the development of TAS-102, and the set of clinical data that ultimately proved that TAS-102 improved outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Symer, Matthew M; Wong, Natalie Z; Abelson, Jonathan S; Milsom, Jeffrey W; Yeo, Heather L

    2018-06-01

    Hormone replacement therapy has been shown to reduce colorectal cancer incidence, but its effect on colorectal cancer mortality is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hormone replacement therapy on survival from colorectal cancer. We performed a secondary analysis of data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a large multicenter randomized trial run from 1993 to 2001, with follow-up data recently becoming mature. Participants were women aged 55 to 74 years, without recent colonoscopy. Data from the trial were analyzed to evaluate colorectal cancer incidence, disease-specific mortality, and all-cause mortality based on subjects' use of hormone replacement therapy at the time of randomization: never, current, or former users. A total of 75,587 women with 912 (1.21%) incident colorectal cancers and 239 associated deaths were analyzed, with median follow-up of 11.9 years. Overall, 88.6% were non-Hispanic white, and < 10% had not completed high school. The never-user group was slightly older than the current or former user groups (average, 63.8 vs. 61.4 vs. 63.3 years; P < .001). Almost one-half (47.1%) of the current users had undergone hysterectomy, compared with 21.6% of never-users and 34.0% of former users (P < .001). Adjusted colorectal cancer incidence in current users compared to never-users was lower (hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-0.94; P = .005), as was death from colorectal cancer (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.47-0.85; P = .002) and all-cause mortality (HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.72-0.80; P < .001). Hormone replacement therapy is associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer incidence and improved colorectal cancer-specific survival, as well as all-cause mortality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. HER2 activating mutations are targets for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kavuri, Shyam M; Jain, Naveen; Galimi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M; Migliardi, Giorgia; Searleman, Adam C; Shen, Wei; Monsey, John; Trusolino, Livio; Jacobs, Samuel A; Bertotti, Andrea; Bose, Ron

    2015-08-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified HER2 somatic mutations and gene amplification in 7% of patients with colorectal cancer. Introduction of the HER2 mutations S310F, L755S, V777L, V842I, and L866M into colon epithelial cells increased signaling pathways and anchorage-independent cell growth, indicating that they are activating mutations. Introduction of these HER2 activating mutations into colorectal cancer cell lines produced resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab by sustaining MAPK phosphorylation. HER2 mutants are potently inhibited by low nanomolar doses of the irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors neratinib and afatinib. HER2 gene sequencing of 48 cetuximab-resistant, quadruple (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA) wild-type (WT) colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX) identified 4 PDXs with HER2 mutations. HER2-targeted therapies were tested on two PDXs. Treatment with a single HER2-targeted drug (trastuzumab, neratinib, or lapatinib) delayed tumor growth, but dual HER2-targeted therapy with trastuzumab plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors produced regression of these HER2-mutated PDXs. HER2 activating mutations cause EGFR antibody resistance in colorectal cell lines, and PDXs with HER2 mutations show durable tumor regression when treated with dual HER2-targeted therapy. These data provide a strong preclinical rationale for clinical trials targeting HER2 activating mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. APN401 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-29

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Metastatic Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  6. Early tumour response as a survival predictor in previously- treated patients receiving triplet hepatic artery infusion and intravenous cetuximab for unresectable liver metastases from wild-type KRAS colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bouchahda, Mohamed; Boige, Valérie; Smith, Denis; Karaboué, Abdoulaye; Ducreux, Michel; Hebbar, Mohamed; Lepère, Céline; Focan, Christian; Guimbaud, Rosine; Innominato, Pasquale; Awad, Sameh; Carvalho, Carlos; Tumolo, Salvatore; Truant, Stephanie; De Baere, Thierry; Castaing, Denis; Rougier, Philippe; Morère, Jean-François; Taieb, Julien; Adam, René; Lévi, Francis

    2016-11-01

    Early tumour shrinkage has been associated with improved survival in patients receiving cetuximab-based systemic chemotherapy for liver metastases from colorectal cancer (LM-CRC). We tested this hypothesis for previously treated LM-CRC patients receiving cetuximab (500 mg/m 2 ) and triplet hepatic artery infusion (HAI) within European trial OPTILIV. Irinotecan (180 mg/m 2 ), 5-fluorouracil (2800 mg/m 2 ) and oxaliplatin (85 mg/m 2 ) were given as chronomodulated or conventional delivery. Patients were retrospectively categorised as early responders (complete or partial RECIST response after three courses) or non-early responders (late or no response). Prognostic factors were determined using multivariate logistic or Cox regression models. Response was assessed in 57 of 64 registered patients (89%), who had previously received one to three prior systemic chemotherapy protocols. An early response occurred at 6 weeks in 16 patients (28%; 9 men, 7 women), aged 33-76 years, with a median of 12 liver metastases (LMs) (2-50), involving five segments (1-8). Ten patients had a late response, and 31 patients had no response. Grade 3-4 fatigue selectively occurred in the non-early responders (0% versus 26%; p = 0.024). Early tumour response was jointly predicted by chronomodulation-odds ratio (OR): 6.0 (1.2-29.8; p = 0.029)-and LM diameter ≤57 mm-OR: 5.3 (1.1-25.0; p = 0.033). Early tumour response predicted for both R0-R1 liver resection-OR: 11.8 (1.4-100.2; p = 0.024) and overall survival-hazard ratio: 0.39 (0.17-0.88; p = 0.023) in multivariate analyses. Early tumour response on triplet HAI and systemic cetuximab predicted for complete macroscopic liver resection and prolonged survival for LM-CRC patients within a multicenter conversion-to-resection medicosurgical strategy. Confirmation is warranted for early response on HAI to guide decision making. Protocol numbers: EUDRACT 2007-004632-24 NCT00852228. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-coding landscapes of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Marco; Barbagallo, Cristina; Statello, Luisa; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Battaglia, Rosalia; Tamburello, Lucia; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Purrello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    For two decades Vogelstein’s model has been the paradigm for describing the sequence of molecular changes within protein-coding genes that would lead to overt colorectal cancer (CRC). This model is now too simplistic in the light of recent studies, which have shown that our genome is pervasively transcribed in RNAs other than mRNAs, denominated non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The discovery that mutations in genes encoding these RNAs [i.e., microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs, and circular RNAs] are causally involved in cancer phenotypes has profoundly modified our vision of tumour molecular genetics and pathobiology. By exploiting a wide range of different mechanisms, ncRNAs control fundamental cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis: these data have also confirmed their role as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in cancer development and progression. The existence of a sophisticated RNA-based regulatory system, which dictates the correct functioning of protein-coding networks, has relevant biological and biomedical consequences. Different miRNAs involved in neoplastic and degenerative diseases exhibit potential predictive and prognostic properties. Furthermore, the key roles of ncRNAs make them very attractive targets for innovative therapeutic approaches. Several recent reports have shown that ncRNAs can be secreted by cells into the extracellular environment (i.e., blood and other body fluids): this suggests the existence of extracellular signalling mechanisms, which may be exploited by cells in physiology and pathology. In this review, we will summarize the most relevant issues on the involvement of cellular and extracellular ncRNAs in disease. We will then specifically describe their involvement in CRC pathobiology and their translational applications to CRC diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26556998

  8. Increase of gap junction activities in SW480 human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Kristina; Nguyen, Thu A

    2014-07-09

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the United States with an early detection rate of only 39%. Colorectal cancer cells along with other cancer cells exhibit many deficiencies in cell-to-cell communication, particularly gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). GJIC has been reported to diminish as cancer cells progress. Gap junctions are intercellular channels composed of connexin proteins, which mediate the direct passage of small molecules from one cell to the next. They are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, cell differentiation, and cell signaling. Since the regulation of gap junctions is lost in colorectal cancer cells, the goal of this study is to determine the effect of GJIC restoration in colorectal cancer cells. Gap Junction Activity Assay and protein analysis were performed to evaluate the effects of overexpression of connexin 43 (Cx43) and treatment of PQ1, a small molecule, on GJIC. Overexpression of Cx43 in SW480 colorectal cancer cells causes a 6-fold increase of gap junction activity compared to control. This suggests that overexpressing Cx43 can restore GJIC. Furthermore, small molecule like PQ1 directly targeting gap junction channel was used to increase GJIC. Gap junction enhancers, PQ1, at 200 nM showed a 4-fold increase of gap junction activity in SW480 cells. A shift from the P0 to the P2 isoform of Cx43 was seen after 1 hour treatment with 200 nM PQ1. Overexpression of Cx43 and treatment of PQ1 can directly increase gap junction activity. The findings provide an important implication in which restoration of gap junction activity can be targeted for drug development.

  9. Tea, Coffee, and Milk Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Green, Chadwick John; de Dauwe, Palina; Boyle, Terry; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Fritschi, Lin; Heyworth, Jane Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Background Data regarding the effects of tea, coffee, and milk on the risk of colorectal cancer are inconsistent. We investigated associations of tea, coffee, and milk consumption with colorectal cancer risk and attempted to determine if these exposures were differentially associated with the risks of proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancers. Methods Data from 854 incident cases and 948 controls were analyzed in a case-control study of colorectal cancer in Western Australia during 2005–07. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the associations of black tea (with and without milk), green tea, herbal tea, hot coffee, iced coffee, and milk with colorectal cancer. Results Consumption of 1 or more cups of herbal tea per week was associated with a significantly decreased risk of distal colon cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.16–0.82; PTrend = 0.044), and consumption of 1 or more cups of iced coffee per week was associated with increased risk of rectal cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.91–2.54; PTrend = 0.004). Neither herbal tea nor iced coffee was associated with the risk of proximal colon cancer. Hot coffee was associated with a possible increased risk of distal colon cancer. Black tea (with or without milk), green tea, decaffeinated coffee, and milk were not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Conclusions Consumption of herbal tea was associated with reduced risk of distal colon cancer, and consumption of iced coffee was associated with increased rectal cancer risk. PMID:24531002

  10. Curcumin therapeutic promises and bioavailability in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, A; Khan, S; Shehzad, O; Lee, Y S

    2010-07-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenol and derivative of turmeric is one of the most commonly used and highly researched phytochemicals. Several research studies have provided interesting insights into the multiple mechanisms by which curcumin may mediate chemotherapy and chemopreventive effects on cancers, including colorectal cancer. Curcumin has the ability to inhibit carcinogenic promotion of colorectal cancer through the modulation of multiple molecular targets such as transcription factors, enzymes, cell cycle proteins, cell surface adhesion proteins, survival pathways and cytokines. A number of clinical trials dealing with curcumin's efficacy and safety revealed poor absorption and low bioavailability. Different factors contributing to the low bioavailability include low plasma level, tissue distribution, rapid metabolism and elimination from the body. Although, curcumin poor absorption and low systemic bioavailability limit its translation into clinics, some of the methods for its use can be approached to enhance the absorption and achieve a therapeutic level of curcumin. Recent clinical trials suggest a potential role for curcumin in regards to colorectal cancer therapy.

  11. Diagnosing lynch syndrome in absence of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Knezetic, Joseph; Lanspa, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    There are many ways in which a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can be made, most prominent of which is family history, presence of cancer, high microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry, and a mismatch repair germline mutation. There are at least four molecular pathways for colorectal cancer carcinogenesis: 1) adenoma-carcinoma sequence; 2) hereditary microsatellite instability; 3) serrated pathway; 4) epidermal growth factor receptor. The answer to diagnosing Lynch syndrome in the absence of colorectal cancer may be partially based upon the phenotypic characteristics of the colonic polyps should they be identified at colonoscopy, specifically their phenotypic characteristics of location, size, histology, number, and age of polyp onset.

  12. Early rehabilitation programs after laparoscopic colorectal surgery: Evidence and criticism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Soo-Young; Oh, Heung-Kwon; In, Myung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    During the past several decades, early rehabilitation programs for the care of patients with colorectal surgery have gained popularity. Several randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses have confirmed that the implementation of these evidence-based detailed perioperative care protocols is useful for early recovery of patients after colorectal resection. Patients cared for based on these protocols had a rapid recovery of bowel movement, shortened length of hospital stay, and fewer complications compared with traditional care programs. However, most of the previous evidence was obtained from studies of early rehabilitation programs adapted to open colonic resection. Currently, limited evidence exists on the effects of early rehabilitation after laparoscopic rectal resection, although this procedure seems to be associated with a higher morbidity than that reported with traditional care. In this article, we review previous studies and guidelines on early rehabilitation programs in patients undergoing rectal surgery. We investigated the status of early rehabilitation programs in rectal surgery and analyzed the limitations of these studies. We also summarized indications and detailed protocol components of current early rehabilitation programs after rectal surgery, focusing on laparoscopic resection. PMID:24379571

  13. Burden of colorectal cancer in Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Monica S; Forman, David

    2016-09-01

    The colorectal cancer (CRC) burden is increasing in Central and South American due to an ongoing transition towards higher levels of human development. We describe the burden of CRC in the region and review the current status of disease control. We obtained regional- and national-level incidence data from 48 population-based cancer registries in 13 countries, as well as cancer deaths from the WHO mortality database for 18 countries. We estimated world population age-standardized incidence (ASR) and mortality (ASMR) rates per 100,000 person-years for 2003-2007 and the estimated annual percentage change for 1997-2008. The CRC rate in males was 1-2 times higher than that in females. In 2003-2007, the highest ASRs were seen in Uruguayan, Brazilian and Argentinean males (25.2-34.2) and Uruguayan and Brazilian females (21.5-24.7), while El Salvador had the lowest ASR in both sexes (males: 1.5, females: 1.3). ASMRs were<10 for both sexes, except in Uruguay, Cuba and Argentina (10.0-17.7 and 11.3-12.0). CRC incidence is increasing in Chilean males. Most countries have national screening guidelines. Uruguay and Argentina have implemented national screening programs. Geographic variation in CRC and sex gaps may be explained by differences in the prevalence of obesity, physical inactivity, diet, smoking and alcohol consumption, early detection, and cancer registration practices. Establishing optimal CRC screening programs is challenging due to lack of healthcare access and coverage, funding, regional differences and inadequate infrastructure, and may not be feasible. Given the current status of CRC in the region, data generated by population-based cancer registries is crucial for cancer control planning. Copyright © 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  15. Loss of PTEN expression is associated with colorectal cancer liver metastasis and poor patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Sawai, Hirozumi; Yasuda, Akira; Ochi, Nobuo; Ma, Jiachi; Matsuo, Yoichi; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Takahashi, Hiroki; Funahashi, Hitoshi; Sato, Mikinori; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2008-01-01

    Background The tumour suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is an important negative regulator of cell-survival signaling. To evaluate the correlation between PTEN expression and clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal cancer patients with and without liver metastases, we investigated PTEN expression in primary colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer liver metastases. Methods Sixty-nine pairs of primary colorectal cancer and corresponding liver metastasis specimens were analyzed immunohistochemically, and the correlation between immunohistochemical findings and clinicopathological factors was investigated. Seventy primary colorectal cancer specimens from patients without liver metastases were used as controls. Results PTEN was strongly expressed in 44 (62.9%) colorectal cancer specimens from patients without liver metastases. In contrast, PTEN was weakly expressed in 52 (75.4%) primary colorectal cancer specimens from patients with liver metastases, and was absent in liver metastases. Weak PTEN expression in colorectal cancer tissues was significantly associated with advanced TNM stage (p < 0.01) and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.05). PTEN expression was significantly stronger in primary colorectal cancer specimens from patients without liver metastases. Furthermore, among colorectal cancer patients with liver metastases, the 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in patients with positive PTEN expression compared to those with negative PTEN expression (p = 0.012). Conclusion Our results suggest that loss of PTEN expression is involved with colorectal cancer aggressive capacity and that diagnostic evaluation of PTEN expression may provide valuable prognostic information to aid treatment strategies for colorectal cancer patients. PMID:19036165

  16. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  17. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  18. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  19. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  20. Mucinous Histology Signifies Poor Oncologic Outcome in Young Patients With Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Basem G; Karagkounis, Georgios; Church, James M; Plesec, Thomas; Kalady, Matthew F

    2018-05-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer in the young (under age 40) is increasing, and this population has worse oncologic outcomes. Mucinous histology is a potential prognostic factor in colorectal cancer, but has not been evaluated specifically in young patients. The objective of the study was to determine factors associated with poor outcome in young patients with colorectal cancer (≤40 years) and to determine relationships between mucinous histology and oncologic outcomes in this population. This is a retrospective study. Patients from a single-institution tertiary care center were studied. A total of 224 patients with colorectal cancer under 40 years of age diagnosed between 1990 and 2010 were included (mean age, 34.7 years; 51.3% female). 34 patients (15.2%) had mucinous histology. There were no interventions. Oncologic outcomes were analyzed according to the presence of mucinous histology. The mucinous and nonmucin colorectal cancer study populations were statistically similar in age, sex, tumor location, pathological stage, differentiation, and adjuvant chemotherapy use. Five-year disease-free survival was 29.1% versus 71.3% (p < 0.0001) and 5-year overall survival was 54.7% versus 80.3% (p < 0.0001) for mucinous and nonmucinous patients, respectively. Mucinous colorectal cancers recurred earlier at a median time of 36.4 months versus 94.2 months for nonmucin colorectal cancers (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, pathological stage (stage II HR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.37-9.50; stage III HR, 5.27; 95% CI, 2.12-12.33), positive margins (HR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.12-3.23), angiolymphatic invasion (HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.26-3.97), and mucinous histology (HR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.44-3.96) were independently associated with worse disease-free and overall survival. This is a retrospective study without genetic information. Mucinous histology is a negative prognostic factor in young patients with colorectal cancer. This is associated with early and high recurrence rates, despite use of

  1. Organized colorectal cancer screening in Serbia - the first round within 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Banković Lazarević, Dušica; Krivokapić, Zoran; Barišić, Goran; Jovanović, Verica; Ilić, Dragan; Veljković, Marko

    2016-04-01

    and carcinomas would reach the goals of the expected improvement in early detection of colorectal cancer in Serbia.

  2. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. Scientists from NCI at Frederick found that the natural extract cryptotanshinone (CPT) stops the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer by interfering with a protein that has been implicated in several

  3. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes include Lynch syndrome and several polyposis syndromes (familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated polyposis, juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and serrated polyposis syndrome). Learn about the genetics, clinical manifestations, management, and psychosocial aspects of these and other hereditary colon cancer syndromes in this expert-reviewed summary.

  4. Folate status and colorectal cancer risk: a 2016 update

    The consensus of epidemiologic evidence indicates that an abundant intake of foodstuffs rich in folate conveys protection against the development of colorectal cancer, and perhaps some other common cancers as well. Pre-clinical models substantiate that the relationship is a genuinely causal one. Pre...

  5. Use of NCCN Guidelines, Other Guidelines, and Biomarkers for Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina D; Grady, William M; Zullig, Leah L

    2016-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a common cancer and significant public health burden. CRC-related mortality is declining, partly due to the early detection of CRC through robust screening. NCCN has established the NCCN Guidelines for CRC Screening to help healthcare providers make appropriate screening recommendations according to the patient's risk of developing CRC. This review describes the evolution of CRC screening guidelines for average-risk individuals, discusses the role of NCCN Guidelines for CRC Screening in cancer prevention, and comments on the current and emerging use of biomarkers for CRC screening. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  6. CBD: a biomarker database for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueli; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Cao, Yang; Ye, Benchen; Peng, Qiliang; Liu, Xingyun; Shen, Bairong; Zhang, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) biomarker database (CBD) was established based on 870 identified CRC biomarkers and their relevant information from 1115 original articles in PubMed published from 1986 to 2017. In this version of the CBD, CRC biomarker data were collected, sorted, displayed and analysed. The CBD with the credible contents as a powerful and time-saving tool provide more comprehensive and accurate information for further CRC biomarker research. The CBD was constructed under MySQL server. HTML, PHP and JavaScript languages have been used to implement the web interface. The Apache was selected as HTTP server. All of these web operations were implemented under the Windows system. The CBD could provide to users the multiple individual biomarker information and categorized into the biological category, source and application of biomarkers; the experiment methods, results, authors and publication resources; the research region, the average age of cohort, gender, race, the number of tumours, tumour location and stage. We only collect data from the articles with clear and credible results to prove the biomarkers are useful in the diagnosis, treatment or prognosis of CRC. The CBD can also provide a professional platform to researchers who are interested in CRC research to communicate, exchange their research ideas and further design high-quality research in CRC. They can submit their new findings to our database via the submission page and communicate with us in the CBD.Database URL: http://sysbio.suda.edu.cn/CBD/.

  7. Gut microbiota, epigenetic modification and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rezasoltani, Sama; Asadzadeh-Aghdaei, Hamid; Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad, Ehsan; Dabiri, Hossein; Ghanbari, Reza; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Micro-organisms contain 90% of cells in human body and trillions foreign genes versus less than 30 thousand of their own. The human colon host various species of microorganisms, appraised at more than 1014 microbiota and contained of over a thousand species. Although each one’s profile is separable, the relative abundance and distribution of bacterial species is the same between healthy ones, causing conservation of each person’s overall health. Germline DNA mutations have been attributed to the less than 5% of CRC occurrence while more than 90% is associated with the epigenetic regulation. The most ubiquitous environmental factor in epigenetic modification is gut microbiota. Disruptive changes in the gut microbiome strongly contributed to the improvement of colorectal cancer. Gut microbiota may play critical role in progression of CRC via their metabolite or their structural component interacting with host intestinal epithelial cell (IEC). Herein we discuss the mechanism of epigenetic modification and its implication in CRC development, progression even metastasis by gut microbiota induction. PMID:29213996

  8. CBD: a biomarker database for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueli; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Benchen; Peng, Qiliang; Liu, Xingyun; Shen, Bairong; Zhang, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC) biomarker database (CBD) was established based on 870 identified CRC biomarkers and their relevant information from 1115 original articles in PubMed published from 1986 to 2017. In this version of the CBD, CRC biomarker data were collected, sorted, displayed and analysed. The CBD with the credible contents as a powerful and time-saving tool provide more comprehensive and accurate information for further CRC biomarker research. The CBD was constructed under MySQL server. HTML, PHP and JavaScript languages have been used to implement the web interface. The Apache was selected as HTTP server. All of these web operations were implemented under the Windows system. The CBD could provide to users the multiple individual biomarker information and categorized into the biological category, source and application of biomarkers; the experiment methods, results, authors and publication resources; the research region, the average age of cohort, gender, race, the number of tumours, tumour location and stage. We only collect data from the articles with clear and credible results to prove the biomarkers are useful in the diagnosis, treatment or prognosis of CRC. The CBD can also provide a professional platform to researchers who are interested in CRC research to communicate, exchange their research ideas and further design high-quality research in CRC. They can submit their new findings to our database via the submission page and communicate with us in the CBD. Database URL: http://sysbio.suda.edu.cn/CBD/ PMID:29846545

  9. Epigenetic silencing of miR-137 contributes to early colorectal carcinogenesis by impaired Aurora-A inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Chuan; Liu, Yao-Wen; Chen, Ying-Jen; Tseng, Joseph T.; Kang, Jui-Wen; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Lin, Bo-Wen; Hung, Liang-Yi

    2016-01-01

    MicorRNA-137 is silenced in human colorectal cancer tissues and colon polyps. Our study showed that the decreased expression of miR-137 is significantly different in various types of polyp which maintain different potentials to lead to CRC development. The expression of miR-137 gradually decreases during the process of colorectal carcinogenesis. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis indicates that the loss of miR-137 expression in colon polyps can serve as a biomarker to predict the predisposition of colorectal carcinogenesis. By cell model and xenograft animal model, the enforced expression of miR-137 in colorectal cancer cells can inhibit cell proliferation and tumor formation, induce G2/M arrest, and lead to apoptosis. The expression pattern of miR-137 and Aurora-A or PTGS2 is negatively correlated in human colorectal cancer tissues and colon polyps. Those effects induced by overexpressed miR-137 can be rescued by the overexpression of Aurora-A. In summary, our study suggests that the loss of miR-137 expression in colon polyps can serve as a biomarker to predict the tendency toward to CRC formation through the impaired inhibitory effect of Aurora-A. The investigation of the regulatory mechanism of miR-137-mediated Aurora-A inhibition may shed new light on the early prognosis of cancer therapy for CRC in the future. PMID:27764771

  10. Genetic and epigenetic markers in colorectal cancer screening: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manish Pratap; Rai, Sandhya; Suyal, Shradha; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Nand Kumar; Agarwal, Akash; Srivastava, Sameer

    2017-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogenous disease which develops from benign intraepithelial lesions known as adenomas to malignant carcinomas. Acquired alterations in Wnt signaling, TGFβ, MAPK pathway genes and clonal propagation of altered cells are responsible for this transformation. Detection of adenomas or early stage cancer in asymptomatic patients and better prognostic and predictive markers is important for improving the clinical management of CRC. Area covered: In this review, the authors have evaluated the potential of genetic and epigenetic alterations as markers for early detection, prognosis and therapeutic predictive potential in the context of CRC. We have discussed molecular heterogeneity present in CRC and its correlation to prognosis and response to therapy. Expert commentary: Molecular marker based CRC screening methods still fail to gain trust of clinicians. Invasive screening methods, molecular heterogeneity, chemoresistance and low quality test samples are some key challenges which need to be addressed in the present context. New sequencing technologies and integrated omics data analysis of individual or population cohort results in GWAS. MPE studies following a GWAS could be future line of research to establish accurate correlations between CRC and its risk factors. This strategy would identify most reliable biomarkers for CRC screening and management.

  11. High early growth response 1 (EGR1) expression correlates with resistance to anti-EGFR treatment in vitro and with poorer outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S S; Tomita, Y; Wrin, J; Bruhn, M; Swalling, A; Mohammed, M; Price, T J; Hardingham, J E

    2017-06-01

    Biomarkers, such as mutant RAS, predict resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in only a proportion of patients, and hence, other predictive biomarkers are needed. The aims were to identify candidate genes upregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines resistant to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody treatment, to knockdown (KD) these genes in the resistant cell lines to determine if sensitivity to anti-EGFR antibody was restored, and finally to perform a pilot correlative study of EGR1 expression and outcomes in a cohort of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients given cetuximab therapy. Comparative expression array analysis of resistant cell lines (SW48, COLO-320DM, and SNU-C1) vs sensitive cell lines (LIM1215, CaCo2, and SW948) was performed. The highest up-regulated gene in each resistant cell line was knocked down (KD) using RNA interference, and effect on proliferation was assessed with and without anti-EGFR treatment. Expression of the candidate genes in patients' tumours treated with cetuximab was assessed by immunohistochemistry; survival analyses were performed comparing high vs low expression. Genes significantly upregulated in resistant cell lines were EGR1 (early growth response protein 1), HBEGF (heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor), and AKT3 (AKT serine/threonine kinase 3). KD of each gene resulted in the respective cells being more sensitive to anti-EGFR treatment, suggesting that the resistant phenotype was reversed. In the pilot study of mCRC patients treated with cetuximab, both median PFS (1.38 months vs 6.79 months; HR 2.77 95% CI 1.2-19.4) and median OS (2.59 months vs 9.82 months; HR 3.0 95% CI 1.3-23.2) were significantly worse for those patients with high EGR1 expression. High EGR1 expression may be a candidate biomarker of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy.

  12. Colorectal cancer screening and adverse childhood experiences: Which adversities matter?

    PubMed

    Alcalá, Héctor E; Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Mitchell, Emma

    2017-07-01

    Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) have been associated with an increased risk of a variety of diseases, including cancer. However, research has not paid enough attention to the association between ACEs and cancer screening. As such, the present study examined the association between ACEs and ever using colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, among adults age 50 and over. Analyses used the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n=24,938) to model odds of ever engaging in CRC screening from nine different adversities. Bivariate and multivariate models were fit. In bivariate models, physical abuse, having parents that were divorced or separated, and living in a household where adults treated each other violently were associated with lower odds of engaging in CRC. In multivariate models that accounted for potential confounders, emotional and sexual abuse were each associated with higher odds of engaging in CRC. Results suggest potential pathways by which early childhood experiences can impact future health behaviors. Future research should examine this association longitudinally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CpG island methylator phenotype in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Minoru; Ahuja, Nita; Ohe-Toyota, Mutsumi; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    1999-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of promoter region CpG islands is associated with transcriptional inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes in neoplasia. To understand global patterns of CpG island methylation in colorectal cancer, we have used a recently developed technique called methylated CpG island amplification to examine 30 newly cloned differentially methylated DNA sequences. Of these 30 clones, 19 (63%) were progressively methylated in an age-dependent manner in normal colon, 7 (23%) were methylated in a cancer-specific manner, and 4 (13%) were methylated only in cell lines. Thus, a majority of CpG islands methylated in colon cancer are also methylated in a subset of normal colonic cells during the process of aging. In contrast, methylation of the cancer-specific clones was found exclusively in a subset of colorectal cancers, which appear to display a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). CIMP+ tumors also have a high incidence of p16 and THBS1 methylation, and they include the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers with microsatellite instability related to hMLH1 methylation. We thus define a pathway in colorectal cancer that appears to be responsible for the majority of sporadic tumors with mismatch repair deficiency. PMID:10411935

  14. Risk factors for metachronous colorectal cancer following a primary colorectal cancer: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jayasekara, Harindra; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Rosty, Christophe; Dashti, S Ghazaleh; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Boussioutas, Alex; Giles, Graham G; Ahnen, Dennis J; Lowery, Jan; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Parry, Susan; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2016-09-01

    Individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at risk of developing a metachronous CRC. We examined the associations between personal, tumour-related and lifestyle risk factors, and risk of metachronous CRC. A total of 7,863 participants with incident colon or rectal cancer who were recruited in the USA, Canada and Australia to the Colon Cancer Family Registry during 1997-2012, except those identified as high-risk, for example, Lynch syndrome, were followed up approximately every 5 years. We estimated the risk of metachronous CRC, defined as the first new primary CRC following an interval of at least one year after the initial CRC diagnosis. Observation time started at the age at diagnosis of the initial CRC and ended at the age at diagnosis of the metachronous CRC, last contact or death whichever occurred earliest, or were censored at the age at diagnosis of any metachronous colorectal adenoma. Cox regression was used to derive hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During a mean follow-up of 6.6 years, 142 (1.81%) metachronous CRCs were diagnosed (mean age at diagnosis 59.8; incidence 2.7/1,000 person-years). An increased risk of metachronous CRC was associated with the presence of a synchronous CRC (HR = 2.73; 95% CI: 1.30-5.72) and the location of cancer in the proximal colon at initial diagnosis (compared with distal colon or rectum, HR = 4.16; 95% CI: 2.80-6.18). The presence of a synchronous CRC and the location of the initial CRC might be useful for deciding the intensity of surveillance colonoscopy for individuals diagnosed with CRC. © 2016 UICC.

  15. Randomized trial of TAS-102 for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Robert J; Van Cutsem, Eric; Falcone, Alfredo; Yoshino, Takayuki; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Tabernero, Josep; Komatsu, Yoshito; Sobrero, Alberto; Boucher, Eveline; Peeters, Marc; Tran, Ben; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Zaniboni, Alberto; Hochster, Howard; Cleary, James M; Prenen, Hans; Benedetti, Fabio; Mizuguchi, Hirokazu; Makris, Lukas; Ito, Masanobu; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-05-14

    Early clinical trials conducted primarily in Japan have shown that TAS-102, an oral agent that combines trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride, was effective in the treatment of refractory colorectal cancer. We conducted a phase 3 trial to further assess the efficacy and safety of TAS-102 in a global population of such patients. In this double-blind study, we randomly assigned 800 patients, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive TAS-102 or placebo. The primary end point was overall survival. The median overall survival improved from 5.3 months with placebo to 7.1 months with TAS-102, and the hazard ratio for death in the TAS-102 group versus the placebo group was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58 to 0.81; P<0.001). The most frequently observed clinically significant adverse events associated with TAS-102 were neutropenia, which occurred in 38% of those treated, and leukopenia, which occurred in 21%; 4% of the patients who received TAS-102 had febrile neutropenia, and one death related to TAS-102 was reported. The median time to worsening performance status (a change in Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status [on a scale of 0 to 5, with 0 indicating no symptoms and higher numbers indicating increasing degrees of disability] from 0 or 1 to 2 or more) was 5.7 months with TAS-102 versus 4.0 months with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.78; P<0.001). In patients with refractory colorectal cancer, TAS-102, as compared with placebo, was associated with a significant improvement in overall survival. (Funded by Taiho Oncology-Taiho Pharmaceutical; RECOURSE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01607957.).

  16. Microsatellite Status of Primary Colorectal Cancer Predicts the Incidence of Postoperative Colorectal Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Takiyama, Aki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yoko; Hata, Keisuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have evaluated the risk of postoperative colorectal neoplasms stratified by the nature of primary colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we revealed it on the basis of the microsatellite (MS) status of primary CRC. We retrospectively reviewed 338 patients with CRC and calculated the risk of neoplasms during postoperative surveillance colonoscopy in association with the MS status of primary CRC. A propensity score method was applied. We identified a higher incidence of metachronous rectal neoplasms after the resection of MS stable CRC than MS instable CRC (adjusted HR 5.74, p=0.04). We also observed a higher incidence of colorectal tubular adenoma in patients with MSS CRC (adjusted hazard ratio 7.09, p<0.01) and a higher incidence of postoperative tubulovillous/villous adenoma in patients with MS instable CRC (adjusted HR=8.50, p=0.03). The MS status of primary colorectal cancer influenced the risk of postoperative colorectal neoplasms. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Cystic Fibrosis Colorectal Cancer Screening Consensus Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hadjiliadis, Denis; Khoruts, Alexander; Zauber, Ann G; Hempstead, Sarah E; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2018-02-01

    Improved therapy has substantially increased survival of persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). But the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in adults with CF is 5-10 times greater compared to the general population, and 25-30 times greater in CF patients after an organ transplantation. To address this risk, the CF Foundation convened a multi-stakeholder task force to develop CRC screening recommendations. The 18-member task force consisted of experts including pulmonologists, gastroenterologists, a social worker, nurse coordinator, surgeon, epidemiologist, statistician, CF adult, and a parent. The committee comprised 3 workgroups: Cancer Risk, Transplant, and Procedure and Preparation. A guidelines specialist at the CF Foundation conducted an evidence synthesis February-March 2016 based on PubMed literature searches. Task force members conducted additional independent searches. A total of 1159 articles were retrieved. After initial screening, the committee read 198 articles in full and analyzed 123 articles to develop recommendation statements. An independent decision analysis evaluating the benefits of screening relative to harms and resources required was conducted by the Department of Public Health at Erasmus Medical Center, Netherlands using the Microsimulation Screening Analysis model from the Cancer Innervation and Surveillance Modeling Network. The task force included recommendation statements in the final guideline only if they reached an 80% acceptance threshold. The task force makes 10 CRC screening recommendations that emphasize shared, individualized decision-making and familiarity with CF-specific gastrointestinal challenges. We recommend colonoscopy as the preferred screening method, initiation of screening at age 40 years, 5-year re-screening and 3-year surveillance intervals (unless shorter interval is indicated by individual findings), and a CF-specific intensive bowel preparation. Organ transplant recipients with CF should initiate CRC screening

  18. Stemming Colorectal Cancer Growth and Metastasis: HOXA5 Forces Cancer Stem Cells to Differentiate.

    PubMed

    Tan, Si Hui; Barker, Nick

    2015-12-14

    Wnt signaling drives colorectal cancer stem cells, but effective therapeutics targeting these cells and their signaling pathways are lacking. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Ordóñez-Morán and colleagues describe a promising therapeutic intervention for colorectal cancers that selectively induces cancer stem cell differentiation through HOXA5 expression and Wnt signaling inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Celebrity Appeal: Reaching Women to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A.; Lobb, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign works with the Entertainment Industry Foundation’s National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance to develop public service announcements (PSAs) featuring celebrities. Selection of Screen for Life celebrity spokespersons is based on a variety of factors, including their general appeal and personal connection to colorectal cancer. Screen for Life PSAs featuring celebrities have been disseminated exclusively through donated media placements and have been formatted for television, radio, print, and out-of-home displays such as dioramas in airports, other transit stations, and shopping malls. A 2012 national survey with women aged 50–75 years (n = 772) investigated reported exposure to Screen for Life PSAs featuring actor Terrence Howard. In total, 8.3% of women recalled exposure to the PSAs. Celebrity spokespersons can attract the attention of both target audiences and media gatekeepers who decide which PSAs will receive donated placements. PMID:25521047

  20. Therapeutic effect of orally administered microencapsulated oxaliplatin for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D.; Guajardo, Gonzalo; Langer, Robert S.; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the United States and other Western countries. Oral delivery of therapeutics remains the most patient accepted form of medication. The development of an oral delivery formulation for local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the gastrointestinal tract can potentially alleviate the adverse side effects including systemic cytotoxicity, as well as focus therapy to the lesions. Here we develop an oral formulation of the chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin was encapsulated in pH sensitive, mucoadhesive chitosan-coated alginate microspheres. The microparticles were formulated to release the chemotherapeutics after passing through the acidic gastric environment thus targeting the intestinal tract. In vivo, these particles substantially reduced the tumor burden in an orthotopic mouse model of colorectal cancer, and reduced mortality. PMID:22472433

  1. Celebrity appeal: reaching women to promote colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Lobb, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign works with the Entertainment Industry Foundation's National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance to develop public service announcements (PSAs) featuring celebrities. Selection of Screen for Life celebrity spokespersons is based on a variety of factors, including their general appeal and personal connection to colorectal cancer. Screen for Life PSAs featuring celebrities have been disseminated exclusively through donated media placements and have been formatted for television, radio, print, and out-of-home displays such as dioramas in airports, other transit stations, and shopping malls. A 2012 national survey with women aged 50-75 years (n=772) investigated reported exposure to Screen for Life PSAs featuring actor Terrence Howard. In total, 8.3% of women recalled exposure to the PSAs. Celebrity spokespersons can attract the attention of both target audiences and media gatekeepers who decide which PSAs will receive donated placements.

  2. The fibre-folate debate in colo-rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Sheila

    2006-02-01

    Intervention and prospective studies showing no effect of fibre in protection against colo-rectal cancer have challenged consensus recommendations that population intakes of fibre should be increased to reduce the risk of colo-rectal cancer. The European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) of 519 978 individuals aged 25-70 years is the largest prospective study of diet and cancer to date worldwide. It incorporates ten different European countries in order to increase heterogeneity in dietary habits and calibration procedures to reduce measurement error. Data for 1065 reported cases of colo-rectal cancer were reported in 2003. There was a 40% reduction in risk for the highest quintile v. lowest quintile of fibre in food after calibration. It has been suggested that these effects were a result of confounding by folate and other factors. Although there are a number of hypotheses to explain why folate should be protective in colo-rectal cancer, a meta-analysis has shown that folate in food may be protective but there is no effect of total folate (i.e. food plus supplements). In a further analysis of 1826 cases in EPIC, identified in the latest follow-up, the inclusion of an additional 761 cases has confirmed the previously published results, with a strong and significant reduction in colo-rectal cancer of approximately 9% reduction in risk for each uncalibrated quintile increase in fibre (P<0.001 for linear trend) compared with an 8% reduction in the previous report, which had not been adjusted for folate. Inclusion of the other covariates (physical activity, alcohol, smoking and red and processed meat) with folate has confirmed this significant inverse association for colon cancer and strengthened the association with left-sided colon cancer (P < 0.001).

  3. FGFR4 Role in Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Its Therapeutic Value in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Sofía; Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Teixidó, Joaquín; Bonilla, Félix; de Herreros, Antonio Garcia; Casal, J. Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is vital in early development and tissue repair. FGFR4 expression levels are very restricted in adult tissues, except in several solid tumors including colorectal cancer, which showed overexpression of FGFR4. Here, FGFR4 mutation analysis discarded the presence of activating mutations, other than Arg388, in different colorectal cancer cell lines and tumoral samples. Stable shRNA FGFR4-silencing in SW480 and SW48 cell lines resulted in a significant decrease in cell proliferation, adhesion, cell migration and invasion. This decrease in the tumorigenic and invasive capabilities of colorectal cancer cells was accompanied by a decrease of Snail, Twist and TGFβ gene expression levels and an increase of E-cadherin, causing a reversion to a more epithelial phenotype, in three different cell lines. In addition, FGFR4-signaling activated the oncogenic SRC, ERK1/2 and AKT pathways in colon cancer cells and promoted an increase in cell survival. The relevance of FGFR4 in tumor growth was supported by two different strategies. Kinase inhibitors abrogated FGFR4-related cell growth and signaling pathways at the same extent than FGFR4-silenced cells. Specific FGFR4-targeting using antibodies provoked a similar reduction in cell growth. Moreover, FGFR4 knock-down cells displayed a reduced capacity for in vivo tumor formation and angiogenesis in nude mice. Collectively, our data support a crucial role for FGFR4 in tumorigenesis, invasion and survival in colorectal cancer. In addition, FGFR4 targeting demonstrated its applicability for colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:23696849

  4. Does folic acid supplementation prevent or promote colorectal cancer? Results from model-based predictions.

    PubMed

    Luebeck, E Georg; Moolgavkar, Suresh H; Liu, Amy Y; Boynton, Alanna; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2008-06-01

    Folate is essential for nucleotide synthesis, DNA replication, and methyl group supply. Low-folate status has been associated with increased risks of several cancer types, suggesting a chemopreventive role of folate. However, recent findings on giving folic acid to patients with a history of colorectal polyps raise concerns about the efficacy and safety of folate supplementation and the long-term health effects of folate fortification. Results suggest that undetected precursor lesions may progress under folic acid supplementation, consistent with the role of folate role in nucleotide synthesis and cell proliferation. To better understand the possible trade-offs between the protective effects due to decreased mutation rates and possibly concomitant detrimental effects due to increased cell proliferation of folic acid, we used a biologically based mathematical model of colorectal carcinogenesis. We predict changes in cancer risk based on timing of treatment start and the potential effect of folic acid on cell proliferation and mutation rates. Changes in colorectal cancer risk in response to folic acid supplementation are likely a complex function of treatment start, duration, and effect on cell proliferation and mutations rates. Predicted colorectal cancer incidence rates under supplementation are mostly higher than rates without folic acid supplementation unless supplementation is initiated early in life (before age 20 years). To the extent to which this model predicts reality, it indicates that the effect on cancer risk when starting folic acid supplementation late in life is small, yet mostly detrimental. Experimental studies are needed to provide direct evidence for this dual role of folate in colorectal cancer and to validate and improve the model predictions.

  5. [Colorectal cancer the importance of primary tumor location].

    PubMed

    Ryska, M; Bauer, J

    2017-01-01

    Retrospective evaluations of the relevance of primary colorectal cancer (CRC) location consistently indicate that right-sided tumors, arising in the cecum, ascending colon, hepatic bend, transverse colon and splenic flexure, are clinically, biologically and genetically different from left-sided tumors - those located in the descending colon, sigmoid colon or rectum. Location in the right-sided colon represents a negative prognostic indicator, particularly for stage III and IV carcinomas. Irrespective of treatment, the rightward location is associated with a significantly increased risk of death when compared to the left side.Key words: colorectal cancer - location - therapy - prognosis.

  6. Identification of Patients at Risk for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nitin; Hall, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes requires clinical suspicion and knowledge of such syndromes. Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colorectal cancer. Other less common causes include familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), juvenile polyposis syndrome, and others. There have been a growing number of clinical and molecular tools used to screen and test at risk individuals. Screening tools include diagnostic clinical criteria, family history, genetic prediction models, and tumor testing. Patients who are high risk based on screening should be referred for genetic testing. PMID:23730221

  7. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert [Helsingfors, FI; Vogelstein, Bert [Baltimore, MD; Kinzler, Kenneth W [Baltimore, MD

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  8. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. Scientists from NCI at Frederick found that the natural extract cryptotanshinone (CPT) stops the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer by interfering with a protein that has been implicated in several cancers, including those of the colon and rectum. The results appear in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.

  9. Perceptions of Malaysian colorectal cancer patients regarding dietary intake: a qualitative exploration.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Afzaninawati Suria; Isa, Zaleha Md; Shah, Shamsul Azhar

    2013-01-01

    Changes in dietary practices are known to be associated with changes in the health and disease pattern of a population. This study aimed to qualitatively explore the perception of colorectal cancer patients regarding causes of colorectal cancer and the influence of diet. Twelve respondents from three major ethnicities in Malaysia were selected from the quantitative study on dietary pattern and colorectal cancer carried out earlier in this study. In-depth interviews (IDI), conducted from April until June 2012, were mainly in the Malay language with additional use of English and continued until the saturation point was reached. All interviews were autorecorded so that verbatim transcriptions could be created. Causes of colorectal cancer were categorized into internal and external factors. The majority of respondents agreed that there is an association between Western foods and colorectal cancer. Malaysian traditional diet was not related to colorectal cancer as less preservative agents were used. Malaysian diet preparation consisting of taste of cooking (spicy, salty and sour foods) plus type of cooking (fry, grilled and smoked) were considered causes of colorectal cancer. All respondents changed their dietary pattern to healthy food after being diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Advice from doctors regarding suitable food for colorectal cancer was useful in this regard. Eating outside, use of food flavoring ingredients and preservative agents were considered to be the main factors causing colorectal cancer. All respondents admitted that they changed to a healthy diet after being diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

  10. Awareness of Dietary and Alcohol Guidelines Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Nikki A; Berkowitz, Zahava; Rodriguez, Juan L

    2015-12-01

    Although dietary habits can affect colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors' health, it is unclear how familiar survivors are with dietary guidelines, what they believe about healthy eating and alcohol consumption, and what hinders healthy dietary habits after cancer. This study assessed CRC survivors' familiarity with dietary guidelines, their eating and drinking habits, and perceived facilitators and barriers to healthy eating after cancer, including social support and self-efficacy for maintaining a healthy diet and limiting alcohol. A total of 593 individuals (50% female; mean age, 74 years) diagnosed with CRC approximately 6 years prior to study entry in early 2010 were identified through California Cancer Registry records and participated in a cross-sectional mailed survey assessing health behavior after cancer (46% adjusted response rate). Analyses were conducted in 2014-2015. Survivors were most familiar with-and most likely to follow-recommendations to choose low-fat foods; 15% had never heard of recommendations to limit alcohol. Survivors were more aware of recommendations involving messages to limit/avoid versus approach/choose certain foods. The most common barrier to a healthy diet involved the effort required (26%). Survivors received more family/friend support and provider recommendations for healthy eating than limiting alcohol. Results provide an overview of awareness of and adherence to dietary recommendations among CRC survivors, highlighting the need for increasing awareness of recommendations that are especially relevant for survivors. Suggestions are made for modifying diet-related messages to facilitate comprehension and recall among CRC survivors, and increasing awareness among groups with the lowest awareness levels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Determining the familial risk distribution of colorectal cancer: a data mining approach.

    PubMed

    Chau, Rowena; Jenkins, Mark A; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Giles, Graham G; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung Ko

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed to characterize the distribution of colorectal cancer risk using family history of cancers by data mining. Family histories for 10,066 colorectal cancer cases recruited to population cancer registries of the Colon Cancer Family Registry were analyzed using a data mining framework. A novel index was developed to quantify familial cancer aggregation. Artificial neural network was used to identify distinct categories of familial risk. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of colorectal cancer were calculated for each category. We identified five major, and 66 minor categories of familial risk for developing colorectal cancer. The distribution the major risk categories were: (1) 7% of families (SIR = 7.11; 95% CI 6.65-7.59) had a strong family history of colorectal cancer; (2) 13% of families (SIR = 2.94; 95% CI 2.78-3.10) had a moderate family history of colorectal cancer; (3) 11% of families (SIR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.12-1.36) had a strong family history of breast cancer and a weak family history of colorectal cancer; (4) 9 % of families (SIR = 1.06; 95 % CI 0.96-1.18) had strong family history of prostate cancer and weak family history of colorectal cancer; and (5) 60% of families (SIR = 0.61; 95% CI 0.57-0.65) had a weak family history of all cancers. There is a wide variation of colorectal cancer risk that can be categorized by family history of cancer, with a strong gradient of colorectal cancer risk between the highest and lowest risk categories. The risk of colorectal cancer for people with the highest risk category of family history (7% of the population) was 12-times that for people in the lowest risk category (60%) of the population. Data mining was proven an effective approach for gaining insight into the underlying cancer aggregation patterns and for categorizing familial risk of colorectal cancer.

  12. Quantifying the utility of single nucleotide polymorphisms to guide colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Mark A; Makalic, Enes; Dowty, James G; Schmidt, Daniel F; Dite, Gillian S; MacInnis, Robert J; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Clendenning, Mark; Flander, Louisa B; Stanesby, Oliver K; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung K; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be used to identify people who should be screened for colorectal cancer. Methods: We simulated one million people with and without colorectal cancer based on published SNP allele frequencies and strengths of colorectal cancer association. We estimated 5-year risks of colorectal cancer by number of risk alleles. Results: We identified 45 SNPs with an average 1.14-fold increase colorectal cancer risk per allele (range: 1.05–1.53). The colorectal cancer risk for people in the highest quintile of risk alleles was 1.81-times that for the average person. Conclusion: We have quantified the extent to which known susceptibility SNPs can stratify the population into clinically useful colorectal cancer risk categories. PMID:26846999

  13. Perspectives of colorectal cancer risk and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: stigma and misperceptions.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Roberta E; Diaz, Joseph A; Kim, Ivone

    2009-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were "bad food," digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening.

  14. Modified enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols for patients with obstructive colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shida, Dai; Tagawa, Kyoko; Inada, Kentaro; Nasu, Keiichi; Seyama, Yasuji; Maeshiro, Tsuyoshi; Miyamoto, Sachio; Inoue, Satoru; Umekita, Nobutaka

    2017-02-16

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols are now well-known to be useful for elective colorectal surgery, as they result in shorter hospital stays without adversely affecting morbidity. However, the efficacy and safety of ERAS protocols for patients with obstructive colorectal cancer have yet to be clarified. We evaluated 122 consecutive resections for obstructive colorectal cancer performed between July 2008 and November 2012 at Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital. Patients with rupture or impending rupture and those who received simple colostomy were excluded. The first set of 42 patients was treated based on traditional protocols, and the latter 80 according to modified ERAS protocols. The main endpoints were length of postoperative hospital stay, postoperative short-term morbidity, rate of readmission within 30 days, and mortality. Differences in modified ERAS protocols relative to traditional care include intensive preoperative counseling (by both surgeons and anesthesiologists), perioperative fluid management (avoidance of sodium/fluid overload), shortening of postoperative fasting period and early provision of oral nutrition, intraoperative warm air body heating, enforced postoperative mobilization, stimulation of gut motility, early removal of urinary catheter, and a multidisciplinary team approach to care. Median (interquartile range) postoperative hospital stay was 10 (10-14.25) days in the traditional group, and seven (7-8.75) days in the ERAS group, showing a 3-day reduction in hospital stay (p < 0.01). According to the Clavien-Dindo classification, overall incidences of grade 2 or higher postoperative complications for the traditional and ERAS groups were 15 and 10% (p = 0.48), and 30-day readmission rates were 0 and 1.3% (p = 1.00), respectively. As for mortality, one patient in the traditional group died and none in the ERAS group (p = 0.34). Modified ERAS protocols for obstructive colorectal cancer reduced hospital stay

  15. Molecular markers for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Brandon T.; Kisiel, John; Ahlquist, David A.; Grady, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has seen a declining incidence and mortality in countries with programmatic screening. Fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and endoscopic approaches are the predominant screening methods currently. The discovery of the adenoma→carcinoma sequence and a greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive the formation of CRC have contributed to innovative research to identify molecular markers for highly accurate, non-invasive screening tests for CRC. DNA, proteins, messenger RNA, and micro-RNA have all been evaluated. The observation of tumor cell exfoliation into the mucocellular layer of the colonic epithelium and proven stability of DNA in a harsh stool environment make stool DNA a particularly promising marker. The development of a clinically useful stool DNA test has required numerous technical advances, including optimization in DNA stabilization, the development of assays with high analytical sensitivity, and the identification of specific and broadly informative molecular markers. A multi-target stool DNA (MT-sDNA) test, which combines both mutant and methylated DNA markers and a fecal immunochemical test (FIT), recently performed favorably in a large cross-sectional validation study and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the screening of asymptomatic, average risk individuals. The ultimate way in which molecular marker screening assays will be used in clinical practice will require additional studies to determine optimal screening intervals, factors affecting compliance, management of false positive results, and the use of these assays in high-risk populations, as well as other considerations. PMID:25994221

  16. Redefining early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Savio G; Windsor, John A

    2016-01-01

    The problem is that current definitions of early gastric cancer allow the inclusion of regional lymph node metastases. The increasing use of endoscopic submucosal dissection to treat early gastric cancer is a concern because regional lymph nodes are not addressed. The aim of the study was thus to critically evaluate current evidence with regard to tumour-specific factors associated with lymph node metastases in "early gastric cancer" to develop a more precise definition and improve clinical management. A systematic and comprehensive search of major reference databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library) was undertaken using a combination of text words "early gastric cancer", "lymph node metastasis", "factors", "endoscopy", "surgery", "lymphadenectomy" "mucosa", "submucosa", "lymphovascular invasion", "differentiated", "undifferentiated" and "ulcer". All available publications that described tumour-related factors associated with lymph node metastases in early gastric cancer were included. The initial search yielded 1494 studies, of which 42 studies were included in the final analysis. Over time, the definition of early gastric cancer has broadened and the indications for endoscopic treatment have widened. The mean frequency of lymph node metastases increased on the basis of depth of infiltration (mucosa 6% vs. submucosa 28%), presence of lymphovascular invasion (absence 9% vs. presence 53%), tumour differentiation (differentiated 13% vs. undifferentiated 34%) and macroscopic type (elevated 13% vs. flat 26%) and tumour diameter (≤2 cm 8% vs. >2 cm 25%). There is a need to re-examine the diagnosis and staging of early gastric cancer to ensure that patients with one or more identifiable risk factor for lymph node metastases are not denied appropriate chemotherapy and surgical resection.

  17. New insights into the roles of matrix metalloproteinases in colorectal cancer development and progression.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Matthew F; Curran, Stephanie; Murray, Graeme I

    2003-12-01

    This review outlines new concepts that are emerging for the functions of matrix metalloproteinases in colorectal cancer development and progression. The two main concepts that will be discussed are the role of matrix metalloproteinases in the early stages of colorectal tumour development and the functional mechanisms by which matrix metalloproteinases contribute to colorectal tumour invasion and metastasis. The matrix metalloproteinases are a group of enzymes, which have been best characterized for their ability to degrade extracellular matrix proteins and thus they have been extensively studied in tumour invasion. It is now becoming recognized that the matrix metalloproteinases have key roles in a variety of biological processes that are distinct from their well-defined role in matrix degradation. This group of enzymes has been shown to interact with a broad range of non-matrix proteins including growth factors and their receptors, mediators of apoptosis, and cell adhesion molecules. The elucidation of novel biological roles for the matrix metalloproteinases also challenges the current predominant concept of matrix metalloproteinases as enzymes only involved in matrix degradation. Recent studies have shown that several matrix metalloproteinases, especially matrilysin (MMP-7), interact with the specific molecular genetic and signalling pathways involved in colorectal cancer development. In particular, matrilysin is activated at an early stage of colorectal tumourigenesis by the beta-catenin signalling pathway. Furthermore, studies are now elucidating specific mechanisms by which individual matrix metalloproteinases, especially membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases, interact with specific cell adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal proteins and thus contribute dynamically to colorectal tumour invasion. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Fusobacterium nucleatum as a prognostic marker of colorectal cancer in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yuko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Hoshida, Tomomi; Fujimoto, Michiyo; Watanabe, Michiya; Imanaga, Daiki; Sakai, Kouhei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Nishioka, Mitsuaki; Takami, Taro; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Hazama, Shoichi; Nagano, Hiroaki; Sakaida, Isao; Yamasaki, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an overabundance of Fusobacterium nucleatum in colorectal tumor tissues. However, the correlation between the absolute copy number of F. nucleatum in colorectal cancer tissues and colorectal cancer progression is unclear from previous reports. Therefore, we performed a study to compare the abundance of F. nucleatum in colorectal tissues with clinicopathologic and molecular features of colorectal cancer. We collected 100 colorectal cancer tissues and 72 matched normal-appearing mucosal tissues. Absolute copy numbers of F. nucleatum were measured by droplet digital PCR. The detection rates of F. nucleatum were 63.9% (46/72) in normal-appearing mucosal tissues and 75.0% (75/100) in CRC tissue samples. The median copy number of F. nucleatum was 0.4/ng DNA in the normal-appearing colorectal mucosa in patients with colorectal cancer and 1.9/ng DNA in the colorectal cancer tissues (P = 0.0031). F. nucleatum copy numbers in stage IV colorectal cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in the normal-appearing mucosa in patients with colorectal cancer (P = 0.0016). The abundance of F. nucleatum in colorectal cancer tissues correlated with tumor size and KRAS mutation and was significantly associated with shorter overall survival times; this trend was notable in the patients with stage IV colorectal cancer. Focusing on normal-appearing mucosa in the patients with colorectal cancer, the F. nucleatum copy number was significantly higher in the patients with stage IV rather than stages I-III. These results suggest that determining F. nucleatum levels may help predict clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. Further confirmatory studies using independent datasets are required to confirm our findings.

  19. Quantitative and temporal proteome analysis of butyrate-treated colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hwee Tong; Tan, Sandra; Lin, Qingsong; Lim, Teck Kwang; Hew, Choy Leong; Chung, Maxey C M

    2008-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in developed countries, and its incidence is negatively associated with high dietary fiber intake. Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid fermentation by-product of fiber induces cell maturation with the promotion of growth arrest, differentiation, and/or apoptosis of cancer cells. The stimulation of cell maturation by butyrate in colonic cancer cells follows a temporal progression from the early phase of growth arrest to the activation of apoptotic cascades. Previously we performed two-dimensional DIGE to identify differentially expressed proteins induced by 24-h butyrate treatment of HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells. Herein we used quantitative proteomics approaches using iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation), a stable isotope labeling methodology that enables multiplexing of four samples, for a temporal study of HCT-116 cells treated with butyrate. In addition, cleavable ICAT, which selectively tags cysteine-containing proteins, was also used, and the results complemented those obtained from the iTRAQ strategy. Selected protein targets were validated by real time PCR and Western blotting. A model is proposed to illustrate our findings from this temporal analysis of the butyrate-responsive proteome that uncovered several integrated cellular processes and pathways involved in growth arrest, apoptosis, and metastasis. These signature clusters of butyrate-regulated pathways are potential targets for novel chemopreventive and therapeutic drugs for treatment of colorectal cancer.

  20. SMC1A recruits tumor-associated-fibroblasts (TAFs) and promotes colorectal cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pengyang; Xiao, Nan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Zhanhuai; Zheng, Shuchun; Shan, Siyang; Wang, Jianping; Du, Jinlin; Wang, Jianwei

    2017-01-28

    Tumor-associated-fibroblasts (TAFs) are the most important host cells in the stroma and take part in extracellular matrix construction and cancer colony development. During cancer colonization, seed cells from primary tumor can reconstruct the microenvironment by recruiting circulating cancer cells and TAFs to the metastasis site. Previous studies have established that SMC1A, a subunit of cohesin, is an important trigger signal for liver metastasis in colorectal cancer. We investigated the particular effects as well as the underlying mechanism of SMC1A on TAFs recruitment during liver metastasis of colorectal cancer. Here, We found that: first, the high expression of SMC1A in colorectal cancer cells promotes the invasiveness and the viability of these cells by recruiting circulating TAFs, facilitating early tumor construction and tumorigenesis; second, different expression levels of SMC1A influenced the reformation of fibroblasts, which assisted tumorigenesis, and third, expression of SMC1A stimulated the secretion of the inflammatory mediators of TNF-α and IL-1β, and up-regulated the transcriptional expression of MMP2 and VEGF-β, both of which were involved in the tumor-related gene pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Accuracy of early detection of colorectal tumours by stool methylation markers: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hu; Qi, Jian; Wu, Ya-Qiong; Zhang, Ping; Jiang, Jun; Wang, Qi-Xian; Zhu, You-Qing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the accuracy of methylation of genes in stool samples for diagnosing colorectal tumours. METHODS: Electronic databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Chinese Journals Full-Text Database and Wanfang Journals Full-Text Database were searched to find relevant original articles about methylated genes to be used in diagnosing colorectal tumours. A quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies tool (QADAS) was used to evaluate the quality of the included articles, and the Meta-disc 1.4 and SPSS 13.0 software programs were used for data analysis. RESULTS: Thirty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria, and 4484 patients were included. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) were 73% (95%CI: 71%-75%) and 92% (95%CI: 90%-93%), respectively. For adenoma, the sensitivity and specificity were 51% (95%CI: 47%-54%) and 92% (95%CI: 90%-93%), respectively. Pooled diagnostic performance of SFRP2 methylation for CRC provided the following results: the sensitivity was 79% (95%CI: 75%-82%), the specificity was 93% (95%CI: 90%-96%), the diagnostic OR was 47.57 (95%CI: 20.08-112.72), the area under the curve was 0.9565. Additionally, the results of accuracy of SFRP2 methylation for detecting colorectal adenomas were as follows: sensitivity was 43% (95%CI: 38%-49%), specificity was 94% (95%CI: 91%-97%), the diagnostic OR was 11.06 (95%CI: 5.77-21.18), and the area under the curve was 0.9563. CONCLUSION: Stool-based DNA testing may be useful for noninvasively diagnosing colorectal tumours and SFRP2 methylation is a promising marker that has great potential in early CRC diagnosis. PMID:25320544

  2. Accuracy of early detection of colorectal tumours by stool methylation markers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hu; Qi, Jian; Wu, Ya-Qiong; Zhang, Ping; Jiang, Jun; Wang, Qi-Xian; Zhu, You-Qing

    2014-10-14

    To evaluate the accuracy of methylation of genes in stool samples for diagnosing colorectal tumours. Electronic databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Chinese Journals Full-Text Database and Wanfang Journals Full-Text Database were searched to find relevant original articles about methylated genes to be used in diagnosing colorectal tumours. A quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies tool (QADAS) was used to evaluate the quality of the included articles, and the Meta-disc 1.4 and SPSS 13.0 software programs were used for data analysis. Thirty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria, and 4484 patients were included. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) were 73% (95%CI: 71%-75%) and 92% (95%CI: 90%-93%), respectively. For adenoma, the sensitivity and specificity were 51% (95%CI: 47%-54%) and 92% (95%CI: 90%-93%), respectively. Pooled diagnostic performance of SFRP2 methylation for CRC provided the following results: the sensitivity was 79% (95%CI: 75%-82%), the specificity was 93% (95%CI: 90%-96%), the diagnostic OR was 47.57 (95%CI: 20.08-112.72), the area under the curve was 0.9565. Additionally, the results of accuracy of SFRP2 methylation for detecting colorectal adenomas were as follows: sensitivity was 43% (95%CI: 38%-49%), specificity was 94% (95%CI: 91%-97%), the diagnostic OR was 11.06 (95%CI: 5.77-21.18), and the area under the curve was 0.9563. Stool-based DNA testing may be useful for noninvasively diagnosing colorectal tumours and SFRP2 methylation is a promising marker that has great potential in early CRC diagnosis.

  3. Interval cancers in a guaiac-based colorectal cancer screening programme: Consequences on sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Blom, Johannes; Törnberg, Sven

    2017-09-01

    Objective To evaluate interval cancers in the population-based colorectal cancer screening programme of Stockholm/Gotland, Sweden. Methods From 2008, individuals aged 60-69 were invited to colorectal cancer screening using biennial guaiac-based faecal occult blood test (Hemoccult®). Interval cancers, defined as colorectal cancer among participants not diagnosed by the screening programme but registered in the Swedish cancer register, were evaluated by cross-checking the screening histories for all cancers in the region 2008-2012. Results Of 203,848 individuals from nine different birth cohorts who participated (∼60%), 4530 (2.2%) tested positive. All invited individuals were followed up for 24 months after invitation. The cancer register reported 557 colorectal cancer, 219 (39.3%) screen-detected cancers and 338 (60.7%) interval cancers, generating both test- and episode sensitivities of approximately 40% and an interval cancer-rate of 17.1/10,000 tests. Among individuals with positive tests without colorectal cancer diagnosed at work-up colonoscopy, 37 interval cancers (10.9%) occurred. There was statistically significant lower sensitivity in women, ranging 22.4-32.2%, compared with 43.2-52.0% in men. Age-group and tumour location were not strongly correlated to screen-detected cancer rates. The programme sensitivity increased by year (20.3-25.0%), with successively more colorectal cancers diagnosed within the expanding programme (11.6-16.2%). Conclusion Interval cancer is a quality indicator of a screening programme. As the interval cancer-rate determined in a well-organized population-based screening programme was actually higher than the screen-detected cancer rate, a change to a more sensitive screening test is indicated. The lower screen-detected cancers among women, and compliance and quality of work-up colonoscopies also need attention.

  4. A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Sporadic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Betzler, Alexander M; Kochall, Susan; Blickensdörfer, Linda; Garcia, Sebastian A; Thepkaysone, May-Linn; Nanduri, Lahiri K; Muders, Michael H; Weitz, Jürgen; Reissfelder, Christoph; Schölch, Sebastian

    2017-07-06

    Despite the advantages of easy applicability and cost-effectiveness, colorectal cancer mouse models based on tumor cell injection have severe limitations and do not accurately simulate tumor biology and tumor cell dissemination. Genetically engineered mouse models have been introduced to overcome these limitations; however, such models are technically demanding, especially in large organs such as the colon in which only a single tumor is desired. As a result, an immunocompetent, genetically engineered mouse model of colorectal cancer was developed which develops highly uniform tumors and can be used for tumor biology studies as well as therapeutic trials. Tumor development is initiated by surgical, segmental infection of the distal colon with adeno-cre virus in compound conditionally mutant mice. The tumors can be easily detected and monitored via colonoscopy. We here describe the surgical technique of segmental adeno-cre infection of the colon, the surveillance of the tumor via high-resolution colonoscopy and present the resulting colorectal tumors.

  5. SEPT9: A Specific Circulating Biomarker for Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Li, Yuemin

    2015-01-01

    SEPT9 gene methylation has been implicated as a biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) for more than 10 years and has been used clinically for more than 6 years. Studies have proven it to be an accurate, reliable, fast, and convenient method for CRC. In this chapter, we will first provide the background on the role of septin9 protein and the theoretical basis of the SEPT9 gene methylation assay. We will then focus on the performance of SEPT9 gene methylation assay for CRC early detection and screening by analyzing the data obtained in clinical trials and comparing its performance with other methods or markers. Finally, we will discuss the future applications of the assay in monitoring cancer recurrence, evaluating surgery, chemotherapy, and predicting long-term survival. We hope this chapter can provide a full overview of the theoretical basis, development, validation, and clinical applications of the SEPT9 assay for both basic science researchers and clinical practitioners. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased expression of interleukin-23 associated with progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wan-Hsiang; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Yen, Shao-Lun; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Hsiao, Chang-Chun; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2017-02-01

    The prognostic significance of interleukin-23 in colorectal cancer remains unclear. We designed this study to investigate the association between colorectal cancer and interleukin-23 (IL-23) or interleukin-23 receptor (IL-23R) expression and the resulting clinical features and survival. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for IL-23 and IL-23R in colorectal cancer samples. H-score was calculated to compare the expression of IL-23 and IL-23R. The median of H-score was used as the cut-off value to separate patients into high or low expression groups. The differences in clinicopathological features were evaluated. Cox regression hazard ratios were used for survival analysis. A total of 129 colorectal cancer patients were enrolled. H-score for the late TNM stage patients was higher than that for the early TNM stage patients (P = 0.002). Patients with high IL-23 expression were associated with advanced pathological T category (P < 0.001) and late TNM stage (P = 0.003). High IL-23 expression was associated with poor 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival in patients (P = 0.048 and P = 0.028, respectively). Multivariate adjustment demonstrated a significant association between high IL-23 expression and overall survival (hazard ratio = 1.865, P = 0.041). Elevated IL-23 expression was associated with poor outcome and can be used as a prognostic biomarker for colorectal cancer. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:208-212. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The role of chemoprevention by selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in colorectal cancer patients - a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are limited population-based studies focusing on the chemopreventive effects of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors against colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the trends and dose–response effects of various medication possession ratios (MPR) of selective COX-2 inhibitor used for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. Methods A population-based case–control study was conducted using the Taiwan Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The study comprised 21,460 colorectal cancer patients and 79,331 controls. The conditional logistic regression was applied to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) for COX-2 inhibitors used for several durations (5 years, 3 years, 1 year, 6 months and 3 months) prior to the index date. Results In patients receiving selective COX-2 inhibitors, the OR was 0.51 (95% CI=0.29~0.90, p=0.021) for an estimated 5-year period in developing colorectal cancer. ORs showing significant protection effects were found in 10% of MPRs for 5-year, 3-year, and 1-year usage. Risk reduction against colorectal cancer by selective COX-2 inhibitors was observed as early as 6 months after usage. Conclusion Our results indicate that selective COX-2 inhibitors may reduce the development of colorectal cancer by at least 10% based on the MPRs evaluated. Given the limited number of clinical reports from general populations, our results add to the knowledge of chemopreventive effects of selective COX-2 inhibitors against cancer in individuals at no increased risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:23217168

  8. Breast Cancer Screening in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lung and Colorectal Cancer: A Population-Based Study of Utilization.

    PubMed

    Sadigh, Gelareh; Carlos, Ruth C; Ward, Kevin C; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Jiang, Renjian; Applegate, Kimberly E; Duszak, Richard

    2017-07-01

    To assess breast cancer screening utilization in Medicare beneficiaries with colorectal and lung cancer versus cancer-free controls. Female fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who were ≥67 years old and diagnosed with lung or colorectal cancer between 2000 and 2011 and who reported to a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry (case group) were followed for 2 years after their diagnoses, unless death, a diagnosis of breast cancer, or the end of 2013 came first. A similar number of cancer-free controls were individually matched to cases by age, race, registry region, and follow-up time. Screening utilization was defined as the percentage of women with ≥1 screening mammogram during follow-up. Overall, 104,164 cases (48% colorectal, 52% lung; 30% advanced cancer) and 104,164 controls were included. Among women with lung or colorectal cancer, 22% underwent ≥1 screening mammogram versus 26% of controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78-0.82). Stratified by cancer type, 28% of colorectal cancer cases versus 29% of controls (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.95-1.01) and 17% of lung cancer cases versus 23% of controls (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.60-0.65) received ≥1 mammogram. When stratified by stage, 8% with advanced cancer versus 18% of controls (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.31-0.35) and 30% with early-stage cancer versus 30% of controls (OR 1; 95% CI 0.97-1.02) underwent ≥1 mammogram. Screening mammography utilization rates are similar between Medicare beneficiaries with early-stage cancer versus controls. Although the majority of patients with advanced-stage cancer appropriately do not pursue screening mammography, a small number (8%) continue with screening. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Examining the Association Between Cigarette Smoking and Colorectal Cancer Using Historical Case-Control Data

    PubMed Central

    Peppone, Luke J.; Hyland, Andrew; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Reid, Mary E.; Piazza, Kenneth M.; Purnell, Jason Q.; Mustian, Karen M.; Morrow, Gary R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The majority of recent, well-designed studies have shown that long-term cigarette smoking increases colorectal cancer risk, but older studies with shorter durations of exposure often found no association. This study aimed to examine colorectal cancer risk by smoking exposure using data collected in the late 1950s and early 1960s. METHODS This case-control study examined colorectal cancer risk by lifetime smoking history. There were 1,365 patients who visited Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) between 1957 and 1965 diagnosed with primary, incident colorectal cancers that were matched to 4,096 malignancy-free controls on gender and age. Odds ratios were calculated using separate logistic regression models for each smoking exposure, while controlling for other tobacco use, county of residence, race, age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS The adjusted OR for individuals who reported their greatest level of smoking to be more than 1 pack/day was 0.87 (95% CI=0.67–1.15). Among those who smoked 42 or more years, the adjusted OR was 0.89 (95% CI=0.68–1.15) compared to those who never smoked. For individuals who smoked more than 45 pack-years, the OR was 0.92 (95% CI=0.72–1.19). The results did not differ significantly by gender, although men had considerably greater exposure compared to women. Results also did not differ by colorectal sub-site. CONCLUSION No association was found between long-term cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer risk. These results are in accord with studies that followed cohorts throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Methodological limitations, such as missing data on covariates and the higher incidence of smoking-related illness in a hospital setting, may have contributed to the null results found in this study. Prolonged population exposure to cigarettes and perhaps a changing product may explain why more recent studies have reported a positive association between smoking and colorectal cancer. PMID:19683487

  10. Potential of soluble CD26 as a serum marker for colorectal cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Oscar J; Imbernon, Monica; Chiara, Loretta De; Martinez-Zorzano, Vicenta S; Ayude, Daniel; de la Cadena, Maria Paez; Rodriguez-Berrocal, F Javier

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is characterized by a low survival rate even though the basis for colon cancer development, which involves the evolution of adenomas to carcinoma, is known. Moreover, the mortality rates continue to rise in economically transitioning countries although there is the opportunity to intervene in the natural history of the adenoma–cancer sequence through risk factors, screening, and treatment. Screening in particular accounted for most of the decline in colorectal cancer mortality achieved in the USA during the period 1975-2000. Patients show a better prognosis when the neoplasm is diagnosed early. Among the variety of screening strategies, the methods range from invasive and costly procedures such as colonoscopy to more low-cost and non-invasive tests such as the fecal occult blood test (guaiac and immunochemical). As a non-invasive biological serum marker would be of great benefit because of the performance of the test, several biomarkers, including cytologic assays, DNA and mRNA, and soluble proteins, have been studied. We found that the soluble CD26 (sCD26) concentration is diminished in serum of colorectal cancer patients compared to healthy donors, suggesting the potential utility of a sCD26 immunochemical detection test for early diagnosis. sCD26 originates from plasma membrane CD26 lacking its transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Some 90%–95% of sCD26 has been associated with serum dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) activity. DPP-IV, assigned to the CD26 cluster, is a pleiotropic enzyme expressed mainly on epithelial cells and lymphocytes. Our studies intended to validate this test for population screening to detect colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas are reviewed here. PMID:21773075

  11. The gut microbiota in conventional and serrated precursors of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brandilyn A; Dominianni, Christine; Shapiro, Jean A; Church, Timothy R; Wu, Jing; Miller, George; Yuen, Elizabeth; Freiman, Hal; Lustbader, Ian; Salik, James; Friedlander, Charles; Hayes, Richard B; Ahn, Jiyoung

    2016-12-30

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease arising from at least two precursors-the conventional adenoma (CA) and the serrated polyp. We and others have previously shown a relationship between the human gut microbiota and colorectal cancer; however, its relationship to the different early precursors of colorectal cancer is understudied. We tested, for the first time, the relationship of the gut microbiota to specific colorectal polyp types. Gut microbiota were assessed in 540 colonoscopy-screened adults by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of stool samples. Participants were categorized as CA cases (n = 144), serrated polyp cases (n = 73), or polyp-free controls (n = 323). CA cases were further classified as proximal (n = 87) or distal (n = 55) and as non-advanced (n = 121) or advanced (n = 22). Serrated polyp cases were further classified as hyperplastic polyp (HP; n = 40) or sessile serrated adenoma (SSA; n = 33). We compared gut microbiota diversity, overall composition, and normalized taxon abundance among these groups. CA cases had lower species richness in stool than controls (p = 0.03); in particular, this association was strongest for advanced CA cases (p = 0.004). In relation to overall microbiota composition, only distal or advanced CA cases differed significantly from controls (p = 0.02 and p = 0.002). In taxon-based analysis, stool of CA cases was depleted in a network of Clostridia operational taxonomic units from families Ruminococcaceae, Clostridiaceae, and Lachnospiraceae, and enriched in the classes Bacilli and Gammaproteobacteria, order Enterobacteriales, and genera Actinomyces and Streptococcus (all q < 0.10). SSA and HP cases did not differ in diversity or composition from controls, though sample size for these groups was small. Few taxa were differentially abundant between HP cases or SSA cases and controls; among them, class Erysipelotrichi was depleted in SSA cases. Our results indicate that

  12. Mucinous Adenocarcinomas Histotype Can Also be a High-Risk Factor for Stage II Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Li, Ya-Qi; Li, Qing-Guo; Ma, Yan-Lei; Peng, Jun-Jie; Cai, Sanjun

    2018-05-22

    Colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA) has been associated with a worse prognosis than adenocarcinoma (AD) in advanced stages. Little is known about the prognostic impact of a mucinous histotype on the early stages of colorectal cancer with negative lymph node (LN) metastasis. In contrast to the established prognostic factors such as T stage and grading, the histological subtype is not thought to contribute to the therapeutic outcome, although different subtypes can potentially represent different entities. In this study, we aimed to define the prognostic value of mucinous histology in colorectal cancer with negative LNs. Between 2006 and 2017, a total of 4893 consecutive patients without LN metastasis underwent radical surgery for primary colorectal cancer (MA and AD) in Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC). Clinical, histopathological, and survival data were analyzed. The incidence of MA was 11% in 4893 colorectal cancer patients without LN metastasis. The MA patients had a higher T category, a greater percentage of LN harvested, larger tumor size and worse grading than the AD patients (p < 0.001 for each). We found that MA histology was correlated with a poor prognosis in terms of relapse in node-negative patients, and MA histology combined with TNM staging may be a feasible method for predicting the relapse rate. Additionally, MA presented as a high-risk factor in patients with negative perineural or vascular invasion and well/moderate-differentiation and showed a more dismal prognosis for stage II patients. Meanwhile, the disease-free survival was identical in MA and AD patients after neo- and adjuvant chemotherapy. MA histology is an independent predictor of poor prognosis due to relapse in LN-negative colorectal cancer patients. Mucinous histology can suggest a possible high risk in early-stage colorectal carcinoma. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Colorectal and interval cancers of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in the Basque Country (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Isabel; Arana-Arri, Eunate; Idigoras, Isabel; Bilbao, Isabel; Martínez-Indart, Lorea; Bujanda, Luis; Gutierrez-Ibarluzea, Iñaki

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess proportions, related conditions and survival of interval cancer (IC). METHODS The programme has a linkage with different clinical databases and cancer registers to allow suitable evaluation. This evaluation involves the detection of ICs after a negative faecal inmunochemical test (FIT), interval cancer FIT (IC-FIT) prior to a subsequent invitation, and the detection of ICs after a positive FIT and confirmatory diagnosis without colorectal cancer (CRC) detected and before the following recommended colonoscopy, IC-colonoscopy. We conducted a retrospective observational study analyzing from January 2009 to December 2015 1193602 invited people onto the Programme (participation rate of 68.6%). RESULTS Two thousand five hundred and eighteen cancers were diagnosed through the programme, 18 cases of IC-colonoscopy were found before the recommended follow-up (43542 colonoscopies performed) and 186 IC-FIT were identified before the following invitation of the 769200 negative FITs. There was no statistically significant relation between the predictor variables of ICs with sex, age and deprivation index, but there was relation between location and stage. Additionally, it was observed that there was less risk when the location was distal rather than proximal (OR = 0.28, 95%CI: 0.20-0.40, P < 0.0001), with no statistical significance when the location was in the rectum as opposed to proximal. When comparing the screen-detected cancers (SCs) with ICs, significant differences in survival were found (P < 0.001); being the 5-years survival for SCs 91.6% and IC-FIT 77.8%. CONCLUSION These findings in a Population Based CRC Screening Programme indicate the need of population-based studies that continue analyzing related factors to improve their detection and reducing harm. PMID:28487610

  14. Novel KRAS Gene Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Walid M.; Shawarby, Mohamed A.; Al-Tamimi, Dalal M.; Seth, Arun; Al-Quorain, Abdulaziz; Nemer, Areej M. Al; Albagha, Omar M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this article, we report 7 novel KRAS gene mutations discovered while retrospectively studying the prevalence and pattern of KRAS mutations in cancerous tissue obtained from 56 Saudi sporadic colorectal cancer patients from the Eastern Province. Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancerous and noncancerous colorectal tissues. Successful and specific PCR products were then bi-directionally sequenced to detect exon 4 mutations while Mutector II Detection Kits were used for identifying mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61. The functional impact of the novel mutations was assessed using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling. Results KRAS gene mutations were detected in the cancer tissue of 24 cases (42.85%). Of these, 11 had exon 4 mutations (19.64%). They harbored 8 different mutations all of which except two altered the KRAS protein amino acid sequence and all except one were novel as revealed by COSMIC database. The detected novel mutations were found to be somatic. One mutation is predicted to be benign. The remaining mutations are predicted to cause substantial changes in the protein structure. Of these, the Q150X nonsense mutation is the second truncating mutation to be reported in colorectal cancer in the literature. Conclusions Our discovery of novel exon 4 KRAS mutations that are, so far, unique to Saudi colorectal cancer patients may be attributed to environmental factors and/or racial/ethnic variations due to genetic differences. Alternatively, it may be related to paucity of clinical studies on mutations other than those in codons 12, 13, 61 and 146. Further KRAS testing on a large number of patients of various ethnicities, particularly beyond the most common hotspot alleles in exons 2 and 3 is needed to assess the prevalence and explore the exact prognostic and predictive significance of the discovered novel mutations as well as their possible role in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25412182

  15. Estimating patient time costs associated with colorectal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Yabroff, K Robin; Warren, Joan L; Knopf, Kevin; Davis, William W; Brown, Martin L

    2005-07-01

    Nonmedical costs of care, such as patient time associated with travel to, waiting for, and seeking medical care, are rarely measured systematically with population-based data. The purpose of this study was to estimate patient time costs associated with colorectal cancer care. We identified categories of key medical services for colorectal cancer care and then estimated patient time associated with each service category using data from national surveys. To estimate average service frequencies for each service category, we used a nested case control design and SEER-Medicare data. Estimates were calculated by phase of care for cases and controls, using data from 1995 to 1998. Average service frequencies were then combined with estimates of patient time for each category of service, and the value of patient time assigned. Net patient time costs were calculated for each service category, summarized by phase of care, and compared with previously reported net direct costs of colorectal cancer care. Net patient time costs for the 3 phases of colorectal cancer care averaged dollar 4592 (95% confidence interval [CI] dollar 4427-4757) over the 12 months of the initial phase, dollar 2788 (95% CI dollar 2614-2963) over the 12 months of the terminal phase, and dollar 25 (95% CI: dollar 23-26) per month in the continuing phase of care. Hospitalizations accounted for more than two thirds of these estimates. Patient time costs were 19.3% of direct medical costs in the initial phase, 15.8% in the continuing phase, and 36.8% in the terminal phase of care. Patient time costs are an important component of the costs of colorectal cancer care. Application of this method to other tumor sites and inclusion of other components of the costs of medical care will be important in delineating the economic burden of cancer in the United States.

  16. Robotic surgery for colorectal cancer: systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis G

    2014-12-01

    Surgical practice has been changed since the introduction of robotic techniques and robotic colorectal surgery is an emerging field. Innovative robotic technologies have helped surgeons overcome many technical difficulties of conventional laparoscopic surgery. Herein, we review the clinical studies regarding the application of surgical robots in resections for colorectal cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted for articles published up to September 9, 2012, using the MEDLINE database. The keywords that were used in various combinations were: "surgical robotics," "robotic surgery," "computer-assisted surgery," "colectomy," "sigmoid resection," "sigmoidectomy," and "rectal resection." Fifty-nine articles reporting on robot-assisted resections of colon and/or rectum were identified and 41 studies were finally included in the analysis. A total of 1635 colorectal procedures were performed: 254 right colectomies, 185 left colectomies/sigmoid resections, 969 anterior resections, 182 abdominoperineal or intersphincteric resections, 34 colectomies (without being specified as right or left), and 11 total/subtotal colectomies. In general, blood loss, conversion rates, and complications were low but the operative time was longer than the open procedures, whereas the duration of hospitalization was shorter. The number of harvested lymph nodes was also quite satisfactory. Robotic colorectal operations provide favorable results, with acceptable operative times and low conversion rates and morbidity. Surgical robots may provide additional benefits treating challenging pathologies, such as rectal cancer. Further clinical studies and long-term follow-up are required to better evaluate the outcomes of robotic colorectal surgery.

  17. Genetic biomarkers for neoplastic colorectal cancer in peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Mirela; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Ionescu, Cristina; Becheanu, Gabriel; Gologan, Serban; Teiusanu, Adriana; Arbanas, Tudor; Mircea, Diculescu

    2011-04-01

    Loss of genomic stability appears as a key step in colorectal carcinogenesis. Micronucleus (MN) designates a chromosome fragment or an entire chromosme which lags behind mitosis. MN may be noticed as an additional nucleus within the cytoplasm cell during the intermediate mitosis phases. We tested the hypothesis that MN and its related anomalies may be associated with the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured and microscopically examined. The frequency of micronuclei (FMN) and the presence of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) in binucleated cells were compared in patients with of without colorectal neoplastic lesions. We included 45 patients undergoing colonoscopy, 23 males and 22 females, with a median age of 59. 17 patients had polyps, 11 colorectal cancer (CRC) and 17 had a normal colonoscopy. The FMN was significantly higher in women than in men (8.14 vs 4.17, p=0.008); NPB were significantly less frequent in patients with advanced adenomas (>10mm or vilous) or CRC (p=0.044) when compared with patients with normal colonoscopy, hiperplastic polyps or non-advanced adenomas. Micronuclei are more frequent in women, but its frequency was not significantly different in patients with advanced adenomas or CRC. Null or low frequency values for nucleoplasmic bridges presence in peripheral lymphocyte may be predictive for advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer.

  18. Genetic Biomarkers for Neoplastic Colorectal Cancer in Peripheral Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Mirela; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Ionescu, Cristina; Becheanu, Gabriel; Gologan, Serban; Teiusanu, Adriana; Arbanas, Tudor; Mircea, Diculescu

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Loss of genomic stability appears as a key step in colorectal carcinogenesis. Micronucleus (MN) designates a chromosome fragment or an entire chromosme which lags behind mitosis. MN may be noticed as an additional nucleus within the cytoplasm cell during the intermediate mitosis phases. We tested the hypothesis that MN and its related anomalies may be associated with the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions. Method: Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured and microscopically examined. The frequency of micronuclei (FMN) and the presence of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) in binucleated cells were compared in patients with of without colorectal neoplastic lesions. Results: We included 45 patients undergoing colonoscopy, 23 males and 22 females, with a median age of 59. 17 patients had polyps, 11 colorectal cancer (CRC) and 17 had a normal colonoscopy. The FMN was significantly higher in women than in men (8.14 vs 4.17, p=0.008); NPB were significantly less frequent in patients with advanced adenomas (>10mm or vilous) or CRC (p=0.044) when compared with patients with normal colonoscopy, hiperplastic polyps or non-advanced adenomas. Conclusion: Micronuclei are more frequent in women, but its frequency was not significantly different in patients with advanced adenomas or CRC. Null or low frequency values for nucleoplasmic bridges presence in peripheral lymphocyte may be predictive for advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer. PMID:22205889

  19. Potential role of probiotics on colorectal cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer represents the most common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract. Owing to differences in dietary habits and lifestyle, this neoplasm is more common in industrialized countries than in developing ones. Evidence from a wide range of sources supports the assumption that the link between diet and colorectal cancer may be due to an imbalance of the intestinal microflora. Discussion Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host, and they have been investigated for their protective anti-tumor effects. In vivo and molecular studies have displayed