Science.gov

Sample records for early decomposition observation

  1. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition: Combining Masked Priming with Magnetoencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, Minna; Monahan, Philip J.; Poeppel, David

    2015-01-01

    Are words stored as morphologically structured representations? If so, when during word recognition are morphological pieces accessed? Recent masked priming studies support models that assume early decomposition of (potentially) morphologically complex words. The electrophysiological evidence, however, is inconsistent. We combined masked morphological priming with magneto-encephalography (MEG), a technique particularly adept at indexing processes involved in lexical access. The latency of an MEG component peaking, on average, 220 msec post-onset of the target in left occipito-temporal brain regions was found to be sensitive to the morphological prime– target relationship under masked priming conditions in a visual lexical decision task. Shorter latencies for related than unrelated conditions were observed both for semantically transparent (cleaner–CLEAN) and opaque (corner–CORN) prime–target pairs, but not for prime–target pairs with only an orthographic relationship (brothel–BROTH). These effects are likely to reflect a prelexical level of processing where form-based representations of stems and affixes are represented and are in contrast to models positing no morphological structure in lexical representations. Moreover, we present data regarding the transitional probability from stem to affix in a post hoc comparison, which suggests that this factor may modulate early morphological decomposition, particularly for opaque words. The timing of a robust MEG component sensitive to the morphological relatedness of prime–target pairs can be used to further understand the neural substrates and the time course of lexical processing. PMID:21557645

  2. A system decomposition approach to the design of functional observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Tyrone; Trinh, Hieu

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a system decomposition that allows the construction of a minimum-order functional observer using a state observer design approach. The system decomposition translates the functional observer design problem to that of a state observer for a smaller decomposed subsystem. Functional observability indices are introduced, and a closed-form expression for the minimum order required for a functional observer is derived in terms of those functional observability indices.

  3. Observations on the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkooz, Gal

    1992-01-01

    The Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (P.O.D.), also known as the Karhunen-Loeve expansion, is a procedure for decomposing a stochastic field in an L(2) optimal sense. It is used in diverse disciplines from image processing to turbulence. Recently the P.O.D. is receiving much attention as a tool for studying dynamics of systems in infinite dimensional space. This paper reviews the mathematical fundamentals of this theory. Also included are results on the span of the eigenfunction basis, a geometric corollary due to Chebyshev's inequality and a relation between the P.O.D. symmetry and ergodicity.

  4. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition: Combining Masked Priming with Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehtonen, Minna; Monahan, Philip J.; Poeppel, David

    2011-01-01

    Are words stored as morphologically structured representations? If so, when during word recognition are morphological pieces accessed? Recent masked priming studies support models that assume early decomposition of (potentially) morphologically complex words. The electrophysiological evidence, however, is inconsistent. We combined masked…

  5. Decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    A cornerstone of ecosystem ecology, decomposition was recognized as a fundamental process driving the exchange of energy in ecosystems by early ecologists such as Lindeman 1942 and Odum 1960). In the history of ecology, studies of decomposition were incorporated into the International Biological Program in the 1960s to compare the nature of organic matter breakdown in various ecosystem types. Such studies still have an important role in ecological studies of today. More recent refinements have brought debates on the relative role microbes, invertebrates and environment in the breakdown and release of carbon into the atmosphere, as well as how nutrient cycling, production and other ecosystem processes regulated by decomposition may shift with climate change. Therefore, this bibliography examines the primary literature related to organic matter breakdown, but it also explores topics in which decomposition plays a key supporting role including vegetation composition, latitudinal gradients, altered ecosystems, anthropogenic impacts, carbon storage, and climate change models. Knowledge of these topics is relevant to both the study of ecosystem ecology as well projections of future conditions for human societies.

  6. Young Children's Thinking about Decomposition: Early Modeling Entrees to Complex Ideas in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ero-Tolliver, Isi; Lucas, Deborah; Schauble, Leona

    2013-01-01

    This study was part of a multi-year project on the development of elementary students' modeling approaches to understanding the life sciences. Twenty-three first grade students conducted a series of coordinated observations and investigations on decomposition, a topic that is rarely addressed in the early grades. The instruction included…

  7. Young Children's Thinking About Decomposition: Early Modeling Entrees to Complex Ideas in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ero-Tolliver, Isi; Lucas, Deborah; Schauble, Leona

    2013-01-01

    This study was part of a multi-year project on the development of elementary students' modeling approaches to understanding the life sciences. Twenty-three first grade students conducted a series of coordinated observations and investigations on decomposition, a topic that is rarely addressed in the early grades. The instruction included in-class observations of different types of soil and soil profiling, visits to the school's compost bin, structured observations of decaying organic matter of various kinds, study of organisms that live in the soil, and models of environmental conditions that affect rates of decomposition. Both before and after instruction, students completed a written performance assessment that asked them to reason about the process of decomposition. Additional information was gathered through one-on-one interviews with six focus students who represented variability of performance across the class. During instruction, researchers collected video of classroom activity, student science journal entries, and charts and illustrations produced by the teacher. After instruction, the first-grade students showed a more nuanced understanding of the composition and variability of soils, the role of visible organisms in decomposition, and environmental factors that influence rates of decomposition. Through a variety of representational devices, including drawings, narrative records, and physical models, students came to regard decomposition as a process, rather than simply as an end state that does not require explanation.

  8. Early BHs: simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelluti, Nico; di-Matteo, Tiziana; Schawinski, Kevin; Fragos, Tassos

    We report recent investigations in the field of Early Black Holes. We summarize recent theoretical and observational efforts to understand how Black Holes formed and eventually evolved into Super Massive Black Holes at high-z. This paper makes use of state of the art computer simulations and multiwavelength surveys. Although non conclusive, we present results and hypothesis that pose exciting challenges to modern astrophysics and to future facilities.

  9. Polar decomposition for attitude determination from vector observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    1993-01-01

    This work treats the problem of weighted least squares fitting of a 3D Euclidean-coordinate transformation matrix to a set of unit vectors measured in the reference and transformed coordinates. A closed-form analytic solution to the problem is re-derived. The fact that the solution is the closest orthogonal matrix to some matrix defined on the measured vectors and their weights is clearly demonstrated. Several known algorithms for computing the analytic closed form solution are considered. An algorithm is discussed which is based on the polar decomposition of matrices into the closest unitary matrix to the decomposed matrix and a Hermitian matrix. A somewhat longer improved algorithm is suggested too. A comparison of several algorithms is carried out using simulated data as well as real data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The comparison is based on accuracy and time consumption. It is concluded that the algorithms based on polar decomposition yield a simple although somewhat less accurate solution. The precision of the latter algorithms increase with the number of the measured vectors and with the accuracy of their measurement.

  10. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition in Visual Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomyak, Olla; Marantz, Alec

    2010-01-01

    We employ a single-trial correlational MEG analysis technique to investigate early processing in the visual recognition of morphologically complex words. Three classes of affixed words were presented in a lexical decision task: free stems (e.g., taxable), bound roots (e.g., tolerable), and unique root words (e.g., vulnerable, the root of which…

  11. Comparing the Scoring of Human Decomposition from Digital Images to Scoring Using On-site Observations.

    PubMed

    Dabbs, Gretchen R; Bytheway, Joan A; Connor, Melissa

    2017-01-25

    When in forensic casework or empirical research in-person assessment of human decomposition is not possible, the sensible substitution is color photographic images. To date, no research has confirmed the utility of color photographic images as a proxy for in situ observation of the level of decomposition. Sixteen observers scored photographs of 13 human cadavers in varying decomposition stages (PMI 2-186 days) using the Total Body Score system (total n = 929 observations). The on-site TBS was compared with recorded observations from digital color images using a paired samples t-test. The average difference between on-site and photographic observations was -0.20 (t = -1.679, df = 928, p = 0.094). Individually, only two observers, both students with <1 year of experience, demonstrated TBS statistically significantly different than the on-site value, suggesting that with experience, observations of human decomposition based on digital images can be substituted for assessments based on observation of the corpse in situ, when necessary.

  12. An Observation Protocol for Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaver, Judith W.; Orlando, Lynn S.

    The paper describes a systematic observation instrument designed to describe settings in which young children and adults interact. The Early Childhood Setting Observation Instrument (ECSOI) provides a comprehensive matrix of categories useful in describing and analyzing adult-child interactions. Adult behavior categories included in the matrix…

  13. Evidence from neglect dyslexia for morphological decomposition at the early stages of orthographic-visual analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reznick, Julia; Friedmann, Naama

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether and how the morphological structure of written words affects reading in word-based neglect dyslexia (neglexia), and what can be learned about morphological decomposition in reading from the effect of morphology on neglexia. The oral reading of 7 Hebrew-speaking participants with acquired neglexia at the word level—6 with left neglexia and 1 with right neglexia—was evaluated. The main finding was that the morphological role of the letters on the neglected side of the word affected neglect errors: When an affix appeared on the neglected side, it was neglected significantly more often than when the neglected side was part of the root; root letters on the neglected side were never omitted, whereas affixes were. Perceptual effects of length and final letter form were found for words with an affix on the neglected side, but not for words in which a root letter appeared in the neglected side. Semantic and lexical factors did not affect the participants' reading and error pattern, and neglect errors did not preserve the morpho-lexical characteristics of the target words. These findings indicate that an early morphological decomposition of words to their root and affixes occurs before access to the lexicon and to semantics, at the orthographic-visual analysis stage, and that the effects did not result from lexical feedback. The same effects of morphological structure on reading were manifested by the participants with left- and right-sided neglexia. Since neglexia is a deficit at the orthographic-visual analysis level, the effect of morphology on reading patterns in neglexia further supports that morphological decomposition occurs in the orthographic-visual analysis stage, prelexically, and that the search for the three letters of the root in Hebrew is a trigger for attention shift in neglexia. PMID:26528159

  14. Loop for the observation of film temperature effects on decomposition (LOFTED)

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.; Christian, Joshua Mark; Ray, Daniel A; Gill, David.; Kelton, John W.; Chisman, Kye Martin

    2014-09-01

    Molten nitrate salt Loop for the Observation of Film Temperature Effects on Decomposition (LOFTED) was designed, fabricated, and tested. This unique experimental arrangement allowed a 60/40 molten nitrate salt to be continuously pumped through a Haynes 230 pipe, allowing simulation of a solar receiver. The wall temperature was held at 670°C during the test and the bulk temperature range from 600-610°C for approximately 1200 hours. Salt decomposition was tested using a calibrated total alkalinity methodology to assess oxide content over time. Several alloys (347SS, HR-224, In625-SQ, Haynes 230) were tested for corrosion performance over the duration of the study and compared to previous static tests. Results yielded nearly a tenfold increase in corrosion rate as compared to 600°C, owing to the need to understand the effects of flow and mass transport on corrosion in molten salt environments.

  15. Early diagenesis of vascular plant tissues: Lignin and cutin decomposition and biogeochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opsahl, Stephen; Benner, Ronald

    1995-12-01

    Long-term subaqueous decomposition patterns of five different vascular plant tissues including mangrove leaves and wood ( Avicennia germinans), cypress needles and wood ( Taxodium distichum) and smooth cordgrass ( Spartina alternifora) were followed for a period of 4.0 years, representing the longest litter bag decomposition study to date. All tissues decomposed under identical conditions and final mass losses were 97, 68, 86, 39, and 93%, respectively. Analysis of the lignin component of herbaceous tissues using alkaline CuO oxidation was complicated by the presence of a substantial ester-bound phenol component composed primarily of cinnamyl phenols. To overcome this problem, we introduce a new parameter to represent lignin, Λ6. Λ6 is comprised only of the six syringyl and vanillyl phenols and was found to be much less sensitive to diagenetic variation than the commonly used parameter Λ, which includes the cinnamyl phenols. Patterns of change in lignin content were strongly dependent on tissue type, ranging from 77% enrichment in smooth cordgrass to 6% depletion in cypress needles. In contrast, depletion of cutin was extensive (65-99%) in all herbaceous tissues. Despite these differences in the overall reactivity of lignin and cutin, both macromolecules were extensively degraded during the decomposition period. The long-term decomposition series also provided very useful information about the compositional parameters which are derived from the specific oxidation products of both lignin and cutin. The relative lability of ester-bound cinnamyl phenols compromised their use in parameters to distinguish woody from herbaceous plant debris. The dimer to monomer ratios of lignin-derived phenols indicated that most intermonomeric linkages in lignin degraded at similar rates. Acid to aldehyde ratios of vanillyl and syringyl phenols became elevated, particularly during the latter stages of decomposition supporting the use of these parameters as indicators of diagenetic

  16. Fungal decomposition of terrestrial organic matter accelerated Early Jurassic climate warming

    PubMed Central

    Pieńkowski, Grzegorz; Hodbod, Marta; Ullmann, Clemens V.

    2016-01-01

    Soils – constituting the largest terrestrial carbon pool - are vulnerable to climatic warming. Currently existing uncertainties regarding carbon fluxes within terrestrial systems can be addressed by studies of past carbon cycle dynamics and related climate change recorded in sedimentary successions. Here we show an example from the Early Jurassic (early Toarcian, c. 183 mya) marginal-marine strata from Poland, tracking the hinterland response to climatic changes through a super-greenhouse event. In contrast to anoxia-related enhanced carbon storage in coeval open marine environments, Total Organic Carbon (TOC) concentrations in the Polish successions are substantially reduced during this event. Increasing temperature favoured fungal-mediated decomposition of plant litter – specifically of normally resistant woody tissues. The associated injection of oxidized organic matter into the atmosphere corresponds to abrupt changes in standing vegetation and may have contributed significantly to the amplified greenhouse climate on Earth. The characteristic Toarcian signature of multiple warm pulses coinciding with rapidly decreasing carbon isotope ratios may in part be the result of a radical reduction of the terrestrial carbon pool as a response to climate change. PMID:27554210

  17. Fungal decomposition of terrestrial organic matter accelerated Early Jurassic climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieńkowski, Grzegorz; Hodbod, Marta; Ullmann, Clemens V.

    2016-08-01

    Soils – constituting the largest terrestrial carbon pool - are vulnerable to climatic warming. Currently existing uncertainties regarding carbon fluxes within terrestrial systems can be addressed by studies of past carbon cycle dynamics and related climate change recorded in sedimentary successions. Here we show an example from the Early Jurassic (early Toarcian, c. 183 mya) marginal-marine strata from Poland, tracking the hinterland response to climatic changes through a super-greenhouse event. In contrast to anoxia-related enhanced carbon storage in coeval open marine environments, Total Organic Carbon (TOC) concentrations in the Polish successions are substantially reduced during this event. Increasing temperature favoured fungal-mediated decomposition of plant litter – specifically of normally resistant woody tissues. The associated injection of oxidized organic matter into the atmosphere corresponds to abrupt changes in standing vegetation and may have contributed significantly to the amplified greenhouse climate on Earth. The characteristic Toarcian signature of multiple warm pulses coinciding with rapidly decreasing carbon isotope ratios may in part be the result of a radical reduction of the terrestrial carbon pool as a response to climate change.

  18. Fungal decomposition of terrestrial organic matter accelerated Early Jurassic climate warming.

    PubMed

    Pieńkowski, Grzegorz; Hodbod, Marta; Ullmann, Clemens V

    2016-08-24

    Soils - constituting the largest terrestrial carbon pool - are vulnerable to climatic warming. Currently existing uncertainties regarding carbon fluxes within terrestrial systems can be addressed by studies of past carbon cycle dynamics and related climate change recorded in sedimentary successions. Here we show an example from the Early Jurassic (early Toarcian, c. 183 mya) marginal-marine strata from Poland, tracking the hinterland response to climatic changes through a super-greenhouse event. In contrast to anoxia-related enhanced carbon storage in coeval open marine environments, Total Organic Carbon (TOC) concentrations in the Polish successions are substantially reduced during this event. Increasing temperature favoured fungal-mediated decomposition of plant litter - specifically of normally resistant woody tissues. The associated injection of oxidized organic matter into the atmosphere corresponds to abrupt changes in standing vegetation and may have contributed significantly to the amplified greenhouse climate on Earth. The characteristic Toarcian signature of multiple warm pulses coinciding with rapidly decreasing carbon isotope ratios may in part be the result of a radical reduction of the terrestrial carbon pool as a response to climate change.

  19. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of phenol and d5-phenol: Direct observation of cyclopentadiene formation via cyclohexadienone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Adam M.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Barney Ellison, G.

    2012-01-01

    The pyrolyses of phenol and d5-phenol (C6H5OH and C6D5OH) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor. Product detection is via both photon ionization (10.487 eV) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (375 K-1575 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time in the μtubular reactor of approximately 50-100 μs. The expansion from the reactor into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. We find that the initial decomposition steps at the onset of phenol pyrolysis are enol/keto tautomerization to form cyclohexadienone followed by decarbonylation to produce cyclopentadiene; C6H5OH → c-C6H6 = O → c-C5H6 + CO. The cyclopentadiene loses a H atom to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical which further decomposes to acetylene and propargyl radical; c-C5H6 → c-C5H5 + H → HC≡CH + HCCCH2. At higher temperatures, hydrogen loss from the PhO-H group to form phenoxy radical followed by CO ejection to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical likely contributes to the product distribution; C6H5O-H → C6H5O + H → c-C5H5 + CO. The direct decarbonylation reaction remains an important channel in the thermal decomposition mechanisms of the dihydroxybenzenes. Both catechol (o-HO-C6H4-OH) and hydroquinone (p-HO-C6H4-OH) are shown to undergo decarbonylation at the onset of pyrolysis to form hydroxycyclopentadiene. In the case of catechol, we observe that water loss is also an important decomposition channel at the onset of pyrolysis.

  20. Collision-free photochemistry of methylazide: Observation of unimolecular decomposition of singlet methylnitrene

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Christopher; Ji Yuanyuan; Samartzis, Petros; Wodtke, Alec M.; Lee, S.-H.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min; Chaudhuri, Chanchal; Ching, T.-T.

    2006-10-07

    Methylazide photolysis at 248 nm has been investigated by ionizing photofragments with synchrotron radiation in a photofragmentation translational spectroscopy study. CH{sub 3}N and N{sub 2} were the only observed primary products. The translational energy release suggests a simple bond rupture mechanism forming singlet methylnitrene, {sup 1}CH{sub 3}N, and N{sub 2}. Thus, these experiments reveal the unimolecular decomposition of this highly unstable species. We explain our observations through a mechanism which is initiated by the isomerization of {sup 1}CH{sub 3}N to a highly internally excited methanimine H{sub 2}C=NH isomer, which decomposes by 1,1-H{sub 2} elimination forming HNC+H{sub 2} as well as sequential H-atom loss (N-H followed by C-H bond cleavage), to form HCN. No evidence for dynamics on the triplet manifold of surfaces is found.

  1. COBE DMR observations of early universe physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoot, George F.

    1992-02-01

    The COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument has observed that the full microwave sky is remarkably uniform in the millimeter to centimeter wavelength range. However at a small level (<=10-5), there is large-scale structure. The natural interpretation of this structure is as the imprint of spatial curvature fluctuations, primarily due to density variations, in the early universe. The results are supportive of gravitational instability theories of structure formation and inflation/quantum cosmology models. The natural energy scale for inflation then is ~1016 GeV. A failure to find fluctuations within a factor of two of the COBE DMR level would have contradicted gravitational instability models with a near scale-invariant spectra.

  2. Simulation of the early stage of binary alloy decomposition, based on the free energy density functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, P. E.; Svetukhin, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Based on the free energy density functional method, the early stage of decomposition of a onedimensional binary alloy corresponding to the approximation of regular solutions has been simulated. In the simulation, Gaussian composition fluctuations caused by the initial alloy state are taken into account. The calculation is performed using the block approach implying discretization of the extensive solution volume into independent fragments for each of which the decomposition process is calculated, and then a joint analysis of the formed second phase segregations is performed. It was possible to trace all stages of solid solution decomposition: nucleation, growth, and coalescence (initial stage). The time dependences of the main phase distribution characteristics are calculated: the average size and concentration of the second phase particles, their size distribution function, and the nucleation rate of the second phase particles (clusters). Cluster trajectories in the size-composition space are constructed for the cases of growth and dissolution.

  3. Decomposition of Fe5C2 catalyst particles in carbon nanofibers during TEM observation.

    PubMed

    Blank, Vladimir D; Kulnitskiy, Boris A; Perezhogin, Igor A; Alshevskiy, Yuriy L; Kazennov, Nikita V

    2009-02-01

    The effect of an electron beam on nanoparticles of two Fe carbide catalysts inside a carbon nanofiber was investigated in a transmission electron microscope. Electron beam exposure does not result in significant changes for cementite (θ-Fe3C). However, for Hägg carbide nanoparticles (χ-Fe5C2), explosive decay is observed after exposure for 5-10 s. This produces small particles of cementite and γ-Fe, each covered with a multilayer carbon shell, and significantly modifies the carbon-fiber structure. It is considered that the decomposition of Hägg carbide is mostly due to the damage induced by high-energy electron collisions with the crystal lattice, accompanied by the heating of the particle and by mechanical stress provided by the carbon layers of the nanofiber.

  4. An approach using ensemble empirical mode decomposition to remove noise from prototypical observations on dam safety.

    PubMed

    Su, Huaizhi; Li, Hao; Chen, Zhexin; Wen, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    It is very important for dam safety control to identify reasonably dam behavior according to the prototypical observations on deformation, seepage, stress, etc. However, there are many cases in which the noise corrupts the prototypical observations, and it must be removed from the data. Considering the nonlinear and non-stationary characteristics of data series with signal intermittency, an ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD)-based method is presented to remove noise from prototypical observations on dam safety. Its basic principle and implementation process are discussed. The key parameters and rules, which can adapt the noise removal requirements of prototypical observations on dam safety, are given. The displacement of one actual dam is taken as an example. The noise removal capability of EEMD-based method is assessed. It is indicated that the dam displacement feature can be reflected more clearly by removing noise from prototypical observations on dam displacement. The statistical model, which is built according to noise-removed data series, can provide the more precise forecast for structural behavior.

  5. Early Asymptotic Giant Branch: Theory and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantsman, Ju.

    1995-08-01

    While on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), a star passes through two evolutionary phases: an early stage (E-AGB), and thermally pulsing AGB (TP-AGB). The theory of two AGB stages was developed more than a decade ago but till now some authors do not take into account the E-AGB phase in spite of the fact that E-AGB phase lasts for some stars considerably longer than the TP-AGB phase. The typical outcomes of such ignoration are shown in the report (wrong conclusions about the evolution of Large Magellanic Cloud, the mistakes in the determination of the ages of Magellanic Cloud clusters). The results are obtained using the "population simultaion" technique. The origin of some types of chemically peculiar stars is investigated (S-stars, faint carbon stars, carbon stars bluer and somewhat brighter than in the mean N-Type stars in the Magellanic Clouds). A suggestion is proposed that these stars are on the E-AGB evolutionary stage. They develop chemical peculiarities in the process of mass transfer in close binaries. It was assumed that during the TP-AGB phase, the primary (more massive) component, when being the carbon star, transfered the carbon enriched material by Roche-lobe overflow to the secondary component, which becomes the star with carbon overabundance. During the subsequent evolution the former secondary (and now after mass transfer carbon enriched) component reaches the E-AGB phase. The results of calculations are discussed and compared with observations.

  6. Unimolecular Thermal Decomposition of Phenol and d5-Phenol: Direct Observation of Cyclopentadiene Formation via Cyclohexadienone

    SciTech Connect

    Scheer, A. M.; Mukarakate, C.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.; Carstensen, H. H.; Barney, E. G.

    2012-01-28

    The pyrolyses of phenol and d{sub 5}-phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 6}D{sub 5}OH) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular ({mu}tubular) SiC reactor. Product detection is via both photon ionization (10.487 eV) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (375 K-1575 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time in the {mu}tubular reactor of approximately 50-100 {micro}s. The expansion from the reactor into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. We find that the initial decomposition steps at the onset of phenol pyrolysis are enol/keto tautomerization to form cyclohexadienone followed by decarbonylation to produce cyclopentadiene; C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH {yields} c-C{sub 6}H{sub 6} = O {yields} c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6} + CO. The cyclopentadiene loses a H atom to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical which further decomposes to acetylene and propargyl radical; c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6} {yields} c-C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + H {yields} HC {triple_bond} CH + HCCCH{sub 2}. At higher temperatures, hydrogen loss from the PhO-H group to form phenoxy radical followed by CO ejection to generate the cyclopentadienyl radical likely contributes to the product distribution; C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O-H {yields} C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O + H {yields} c-C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO. The direct decarbonylation reaction remains an important channel in the thermal decomposition mechanisms of the dihydroxybenzenes. Both catechol (o-HO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OH) and hydroquinone (p-HO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OH) are shown to undergo decarbonylation at the onset of pyrolysis to form hydroxycyclopentadiene. In the case of catechol, we observe that water loss is also an important decomposition channel at the onset of pyrolysis.

  7. An observation on the decomposition process of gasoline-ingested monkey carcasses in a secondary forest in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rumiza, A R; Khairul, O; Zuha, R M; Heo, C C

    2010-12-01

    This study was designed to mimic homicide or suicide cases using gasoline. Six adult long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis), weighing between 2.5 to 4.0 kg, were equally divided into control and test groups. The control group was sacrificed by a lethal dose of phenobarbital intracardiac while test group was force fed with two doses of gasoline LD50 (37.7 ml/kg) after sedation with phenobarbital. All carcasses were then placed in a decomposition site to observe the decomposition and invasion process of cadaveric fauna on the carcasses. A total of five decomposition stages were recognized during this study. This study was performed during July 2007. Fresh stage of control and test carcasses occurred between 0 to 15 and 0 to 39 hours of exposure, respectively. The subsequent decomposition stages also exhibited the similar pattern whereby the decomposition process of control carcasses were faster than tested one. The first larvae were found on control carcasses after 9 hours of death while the test group carcasses had only their first blowfly eggs after 15 hours of exposure. Blow flies, Achoetandrus rufifacies and Chrysomya megacephala were the most dominant invader of both carcasses throughout the decaying process. Diptera collected from control carcasses comprised of scuttle fly, Megaselia scalaris and flesh fly, sarcophagid. We concluded that the presence of gasoline and its odor on the carcass had delayed the arrival of insect to the carcasses, thereby slowing down the decomposition process in the carcass by 6 hours.

  8. Global Warming Potential from early phase decomposition of soil organic matter amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Organic matter amendments to soil are widely used as a method of enhancing nutrient availability for crops or grassland. Amendments such as composted manure or greenwaste also have the co-benefits of potentially increasing soil carbon (C) stocks (DeLonge et al., 2013) and diverting organic waste from landfills or manure lagoons. However, application of organic matter amendments can also stimulate emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). In this study we determined how the chemical quality of organic matter amendments affected soil C and N content and GHG emissions during early stage decomposition. California grassland soils were amended with six different amendments of varying C and N content including three composts and three feedstocks (goat and horse bedding and cattle manure). Amendments and soils were incubated in the laboratory for 7 weeks; GHG fluxes were measured weekly. The three feedstocks emitted significantly more GHGs than the composted materials. With the exception of cow manure, N content of the amendment was linearly correlated with global warming potential emitted (R2= 0.66, P <0.0001). C:N ratios were not a significant predictor of GHG emissions. Cow manure stimulated a net loss of C (or C equivalents) in the mineral soil, as expected. However, greenwaste compost also surprisingly resulted in net C losses, while goat bedding, horse bedding, and the other compost were either C neutral or a slight net C sink at the end of the incubation. Ongoing analyses are examining the fate of the C incorporated from the amendment to the soil as occluded or free light fraction, as well as N mineralization rates. Our data suggest that N content of organic matter amendments is a good predictor of initial GHG emissions. The study also indicates that composting greenwaste with N-rich bedding and manure can result in lower GHG emissions and C sequestration compared to the individual uncomposted components.

  9. Early stages of spinodal decomposition in Fe–Cr resolved by in-situ small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hörnqvist, M. Thuvander, M.; Steuwer, A.; King, S.; Odqvist, J.; Hedström, P.

    2015-02-09

    In-situ, time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) investigations of the early stages of the spinodal decomposition process in Fe–35Cr were performed at 773 and 798 K. The kinetics of the decomposition, both in terms of characteristic distance and peak intensity, followed a power-law behaviour from the start of the heat treatment (a′{sup  }= 0.10–0.11 and a″ = 0.67–0.86). Furthermore, the method allows tracking of the high–Q slope, which is a sensitive measure of the early stages of decomposition. Ex-situ SANS and atom probe tomography were used to verify the results from the in-situ investigations. Finally, the in-situ measurement of the evolution of the characteristic distance at 773 K was compared with the predictions from the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook model, which showed good agreement with the experimental data (a′{sup  }= 0.12–0.20 depending on the assumed mobility)

  10. Early Childhood: Learning to Observe Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Margaret, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests: (1) activities to enhance interest during observations of animals in the elementary science classroom; (2) possible questions to ask during these observations; and (3) sources for observing animals such as pet stores and farms, as well as bringing pets into the classroom. (DS)

  11. Direct observation of spinodal decomposition phenomena in InAlN alloys during in-situ STEM heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palisaitis, J.; Hsiao, C.-L.; Hultman, L.; Birch, J.; Persson, P. O. Å.

    2017-03-01

    The spinodal decomposition and thermal stability of thin In0.72Al0.28N layers and In0.72Al0.28N/AlN superlattices with AlN(0001) templates on Al2O3(0001) substrates was investigated by in-situ heating up to 900 °C. The thermally activated structural and chemical evolution was investigated in both plan-view and cross-sectional geometries by scanning transmission electron microscopy in combination with valence electron energy loss spectroscopy. The plan-view observations demonstrate evidence for spinodal decomposition of metastable In0.72Al0.28N after heating at 600 °C for 1 h. During heating compositional modulations in the range of 2–3 nm-size domains are formed, which coarsen with applied thermal budgets. Cross-sectional observations reveal that spinodal decomposition begin at interfaces and column boundaries, indicating that the spinodal decomposition has a surface-directed component.

  12. Direct observation of spinodal decomposition phenomena in InAlN alloys during in-situ STEM heating

    PubMed Central

    Palisaitis, J.; Hsiao, C.-L.; Hultman, L.; Birch, J.; Persson, P. O. Å.

    2017-01-01

    The spinodal decomposition and thermal stability of thin In0.72Al0.28N layers and In0.72Al0.28N/AlN superlattices with AlN(0001) templates on Al2O3(0001) substrates was investigated by in-situ heating up to 900 °C. The thermally activated structural and chemical evolution was investigated in both plan-view and cross-sectional geometries by scanning transmission electron microscopy in combination with valence electron energy loss spectroscopy. The plan-view observations demonstrate evidence for spinodal decomposition of metastable In0.72Al0.28N after heating at 600 °C for 1 h. During heating compositional modulations in the range of 2–3 nm-size domains are formed, which coarsen with applied thermal budgets. Cross-sectional observations reveal that spinodal decomposition begin at interfaces and column boundaries, indicating that the spinodal decomposition has a surface-directed component. PMID:28290508

  13. [Early Western observations of moxibustion and acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Michel, W

    1993-01-01

    Earlier research has maintained that the earliest passage of written information about acupuncture and moxibustion to Western Europe took place around the middle of the 17th century. But an investigation into the letters, 'historias', dictionaries, grammars, etc. of the Jesuit mission in Japan, which started in 1549, shows that the missionaries there already enjoyed a considerable knowledge of both methods of treatment. These sources also reveal indications of the use of needles and moxa on horses as well as the use of 'hammer-needles', a Japanese invention which was later described in detail by Willem ten Rhijne and Engelbert Kaempfer. Furthermore some central Sinojapanese terms of anatomy, physiology and pulse diagnosis in the light of their European interpretations, and a hitherto unknown outline of Japanese medicine found in an early French book on Chinese sphygmology are presented.

  14. Evaluation of two decomposition schemes in Earth System Models against LIDET, C14 observations and global soil carbon maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciuto, D. M.; Yang, X.; Thornton, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain the largest pool of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. Soil carbon dynamics and associated nutrient dynamics play significant roles in regulating global carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Our capability to predict future climate change depends to a large extent on a well-constrained representation of soil carbon dynamics in ESMs. Here we evaluate two decomposition schemes - converging trophic cascade (CTC) and Century - in CLM4.5/ACME V0 using data from the long-term intersite decomposition experiment team (LIDET), radiocarbon (14C) observations, and Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD). For the evaluation against LIDET, We exercise the full CLM4.5/ ACME V0 land model, including seasonal variability in nitrogen limitation and environmental scalars (temperature, moisture, O2), in order to represent LIDET experiment in a realistic way. We show that the proper design of model experiments is crucial to model evaluation using data from field experiments such as LIDET. We also use 14C profile data at 10 sites to evaluate the performance of CTC and CENTURY decomposition scheme. We find that the 14C profiles at these sites are most sensitive to the depth dependent decomposition parameters, consistent with previous studies.

  15. Some observations on early military anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Houghton, I T

    2006-06-01

    Although anaesthesia was discovered in 1846, pain relief had been used for many years previously. Opium, mandragora, and Indian hemp amongst others have been used since the earliest times as alluded to by many of the classical writers. The use of refrigeration anaesthesia is known to have been recommended a millennium ago although it never had much usage. Very soon after the introduction of ether anaesthesia, it was recommended for military use and the first use by the American forces was in Buena Vista early in 1847 and then again at Vera Cruz. Pirogoff taught and used ether anaesthesia on active service with the Russian forces in the Caucasus in the summer of 1847. Meanwhile Spencer Wells, who was serving with the Royal Navy in Malta, was the first British service medical officer recorded to have used anaesthesia. He went on to write up a series of 106 anaesthetics. The Danes were probably next to use anaesthesia in battle using chloroform in 1848. However, it was not until the Crimean War that anaesthesia began to play an important part in battle surgery with many anaesthetics being given with varying results. The War of the Rebellion was the next war in which anaesthesia was important and the first one in which proper statistics were kept allowing useful analysis. Anaesthesia had irrevocably found its place in battlefield surgery.

  16. SOAR remote observing: tactics and early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Gerald N.; Crain, J. Adam

    2004-09-01

    Travel from North America to the 4.1m SOAR telescope atop Cerro Pachon exceeds $1000, and takes >16 hours door to door (20+ hours typically). SOAR aims to exploit best seeing, requiring dynamic scheduling that is impossible to accomplish when catering to peripatetic astronomers. According to technical arguments at www.peakoil.org, we are near the peak rate of depleting world petroleum, so can expect travel costs to climb sharply. With the telecom bubble's glut of optical fiber, we can transmit data more efficiently than astronomers and "observe remotely". With data compression, less than half of the 6 Mbps bandwidth shared currently by SOAR and CTIO is enough to enable a high-fidelity observing presence for SOAR partners in North America, Brazil, and Chile. We discuss access from home by cable modem/DSL link.

  17. Microscopic observations of X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herley, P. J.; Levy, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was studied by optical, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. This material is a commonly used oxidizer in solid propellents which could be employed in deep-space probes, and where they will be subjected to a variety of radiations for as long as ten years. In some respects the radiation-induced damage closely resembles the effects produced by thermal decomposition, but in other respects the results differ markedly. Similar radiation and thermal effects include the following: (1) irregular or ill-defined circular etch pits are formed in both cases; (2) approximately the same size pits are produced; (3) the pit density is similar; (4) the c face is considerably more reactive than the m face; and (5) most importantly, many of the etch pits are aligned in crystallographic directions which are the same for thermal or radiolytic decomposition. Thus, dislocations play an important role in the radiolytic decomposition process.

  18. Early Magnetic Field Observations from HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, Jon Todd; HMI Magnetic Field Team

    2010-05-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is beginning to produce a synoptic series of full-disk arc-second resolution magnetograms. Line-of-sight magnetograms are available every 45 seconds and the vector field will be routinely calculated every 12 minutes in automatically identified active region patches. Select quick-look products are available within minutes and definitive science data will be published within a day or two. The larger team has developed programs to routinely produce a comprehensive set of higher level products, including synoptic maps and frames, local surface-flow maps, a variety of local and global coronal field models, and time series of tracked active-region parameters - all useful in learning to forecast space weather events. Comparisons with AIA, EVE, MDI, SOLIS and other ground-based observations will ultimately help understand uncertainties in the observations. This work was supported by NASA through contract NAS5-02139 to Stanford University.

  19. Decomposition Rate and Pattern in Hanging Pigs.

    PubMed

    Lynch-Aird, Jeanne; Moffatt, Colin; Simmons, Tal

    2015-09-01

    Accurate prediction of the postmortem interval requires an understanding of the decomposition process and the factors acting upon it. A controlled experiment, over 60 days at an outdoor site in the northwest of England, used 20 freshly killed pigs (Sus scrofa) as human analogues to study decomposition rate and pattern. Ten pigs were hung off the ground and ten placed on the surface. Observed differences in the decomposition pattern required a new decomposition scoring scale to be produced for the hanging pigs to enable comparisons with the surface pigs. The difference in the rate of decomposition between hanging and surface pigs was statistically significant (p=0.001). Hanging pigs reached advanced decomposition stages sooner, but lagged behind during the early stages. This delay is believed to result from lower variety and quantity of insects, due to restricted beetle access to the aerial carcass, and/or writhing maggots falling from the carcass.

  20. Time since death and decomposition of the human body: variables and observations in case and experimental field studies.

    PubMed

    Mann, R W; Bass, W M; Meadows, L

    1990-01-01

    Much of the difficulty in determining the time since death stems from the lack of systematic observation and research on the decomposition rate of the human body. Continuing studies conducted at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, provide useful information on the impact of carrion insect activity, ambient temperature, rainfall, clothing, burial and depth, carnivores, bodily trauma, body weight, and the surface with which the body is in contact. This paper reports findings and observations accumulated during eight years of research and case studies that may clarify some of the questions concerning bodily decay.

  1. Using soil enzymes to explain observed differences in the response of soil decomposition to nitrogen fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M.; Weiss, M.; Goodale, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    Soil microbes produce extracellular enzymes that degrade a variety of carbon-rich polymers contained within soil organic matter (SOM). These enzymes are key regulators of the terrestrial carbon cycle. However, basic information about the kinetics of extracellular enzymes and key environmental variables that regulate their catalytic ability is lacking. This study aims to clarify the mechanisms by which microbial carbon-degrading enzymes drive different responses to nitrogen (N) fertilization in soil decomposition at two sites with long-term N fertilization experiments, the Bear Brook (BB) forest in Maine and Fernow Forest (FF) in West Virginia. We examined a suite of cellulolytic and lignolytic enzymes that break down common SOM constituents. We hypothesized that enzymes derived from the site with a higher mean annual temperature (FF) would be more heat-tolerant, and retain their catalytic efficiency (Km) as temperature rises, relative to enzymes from the colder environment (BB). We further hypothesized that cellulolytic enzyme activity would be unaffected by N, while oxidative enzyme activity would be suppressed in N-fertilized soils. To test these hypotheses and examine the interactive effects of temperature and N, we measured enzyme activity in unfertilized and N-fertilized soils under a range of laboratory temperature manipulations. Preliminary results show a significant decrease in cellulolytic enzyme efficiency with temperature at the colder site (BB), as well as a significant increase in efficiency due to N-fertilization for two cellulolytic enzymes. Oxidative enzyme activity shows a marginally significant reduction due to N-fertilization at BB. These results suggest that soil warming may produce a negative feedback on carbon turnover in certain climates, while N-fertilization may alter the relative decomposition rates of different soil organic matter constituents. FF activity will be analyzed in a similar manner and the two sites will be compared in order to

  2. Early Decomposition in Visual Word Recognition: Dissociating Morphology, Form, and Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Bozic, Mirjana; Randall, Billi

    2008-01-01

    The role of morphological, semantic, and form-based factors in the early stages of visual word recognition was investigated across different SOAs in a masked priming paradigm, focusing on English derivational morphology. In a first set of experiments, stimulus pairs co-varying in morphological decomposability and in semantic and orthographic…

  3. Early decomposition in visual word recognition: Dissociating morphology, form, and meaning

    PubMed Central

    Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Bozic, Mirjana; Randall, Billi

    2008-01-01

    The role of morphological, semantic, and form-based factors in the early stages of visual word recognition was investigated across different SOAs in a masked priming paradigm, focusing on English derivational morphology. In a first set of experiments, stimulus pairs co-varying in morphological decomposability and in semantic and orthographic relatedness were presented at three SOAs (36, 48, and 72 ms). No effects of orthographic relatedness were found at any SOA. Semantic relatedness did not interact with effects of morphological decomposability, which came through strongly at all SOAs, even for pseudo-suffixed pairs such as archer-arch. Derivational morphological effects in masked priming seem to be primarily driven by morphological decomposability at an early stage of visual word recognition, and are independent of semantic factors. A second experiment reversed the order of prime and target (stem-derived rather than derived-stem), and again found that morphological priming did not interact with semantic relatedness. This points to an early segmentation process that is driven by morphological decomposability and not by the structure or content of central lexical representations. PMID:18923643

  4. TEMPORAL SIGNATURES OF AIR QUALITY OBSERVATIONS AND MODEL OUTPUTS: DO TIME SERIES DECOMPOSITION METHODS CAPTURE RELEVANT TIME SCALES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time series decomposition methods were applied to meteorological and air quality data and their numerical model estimates. Decomposition techniques express a time series as the sum of a small number of independent modes which hypothetically represent identifiable forcings, thereb...

  5. Observational effects of the early episodically dominating dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Lee, Jae-heon; Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the observational consequences of the early episodically dominating dark energy on the evolution of cosmological structures. For this aim, we introduce the minimally coupled scalar-field dark energy model with the Albrecht-Skordis potential, which allows a sudden ephemeral domination of a dark energy component during the radiation or early matter era. The conventional cosmological parameters in the presence of such an early dark energy are constrained with WMAP and Planck cosmic microwave background radiation data including other external data sets. It is shown that in the presence of such an early dark energy, the estimated cosmological parameters can deviate substantially from the currently known Λ cold dark matter (Λ CDM )-based parameters, with best-fit values differing by several percent for WMAP and by a percent level for Planck data. For the latter case, only a limited amount of dark energy with episodic nature is allowed since the Planck data strongly favor the Λ CDM model. Compared with the conventional dark energy model, the early dark energy dominating near the radiation-matter equality or at the early matter era results in the shorter cosmic age or the presence of tensor-type perturbation, respectively. Our analysis demonstrates that the alternative cosmological parameter estimation is allowed based on the same observations even in Einstein's gravity.

  6. Constraints on decaying early modified gravity from cosmological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Nelson A.; Smer-Barreto, Vanessa; Lombriser, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Most of the information on our cosmos stems from either late-time observations or the imprint of early-time inhomogeneities on the cosmic microwave background. We explore to what extent early modifications of gravity, which become significant after recombination but then decay toward the present, can be constrained by current cosmological observations. For the evolution of the gravitational modification, we adopt the decaying mode of a hybrid metric-Palatini f (R ) gravity model which is designed to reproduce the standard cosmological background expansion history and due to the decay of the modification is naturally compatible with Solar System tests. We embed the model in the effective field theory description of Horndeski scalar-tensor gravity with an early-time decoupling of the gravitational modification. Since the quasistatic approximation for the perturbations in the model breaks down at high redshifts, where modifications remain relevant, we introduce a computationally efficient correction to describe the evolution of the scalar field fluctuation in this regime. We compare the decaying early-time modification against geometric probes and recent Planck measurements and find no evidence for such effects in the observations. Current data constrains the scalar field value at |fR(z =zon)|≲10-2 for modifications introduced at redshifts zon˜(500 - 1000 ) with the present-day value |fR 0|≲10-8. Finally, we comment on constraints that will be achievable with future 21-cm surveys and gravitational wave experiments.

  7. Spectral types for early-type stars observed by Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, N. G.

    1978-01-01

    MK spectral types are presented for 246 early-type stars observed with the S-019 ultraviolet stellar astronomy experiment on Skylab. K-line types are also given where applicable, and various peculiar stars are identified. The peculiar stars include five silicon stars, a shell star, a helium-rich star, a silicon-strontium star, a chromium-europium star, and two marginal metallic-line stars.

  8. Observed Global Historical Changes in Soil Decomposition Rates (1900-2011) and Plant Production (1981-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parton, W. J.; Smith, W. K.; Derner, J. D.; Del Grosso, S.; Chen, M.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a unique analysis of changes in global soil decomposition rates from 1900 to 2011, determine which climatic factors have caused the observed historical changes in soil decay rates, and compares changes in soil decay rates with observed changes in plant production from 1981 to 2011. This analysis allows us to determine the impact of climatic changes from 1981 to 2011 on soil carbon (C) sequestration. We use observed global monthly global Climatic Research Unit (CRU) weather data from 1900 to 2011 (0.5° x 0.5° spatial scale) to calculate annual changes in the climatic decomposition index (CDI), an analog for soil decay rates. The CRU data was also used to calculate annual changes in precipitation, mean annual temperature, potential evapotranspiration and actual evapotranspiration (AET) rates at the 0.5° x 0.5° spatial scale. Annual changes in plant production (NPP) at the global scale were calculated using global satellite derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data sets. At the global scale CDI showed little change from 1900 to 1980 but increased by 4% from 1980 to 2011. CDI increased by more than 10% in tundra and boreal forest systems from 1980 to 2011 (< 4% for all other biomes). Changes in CDI are well correlated to changes in AET rates (r2 > 0.8) with a 2 to 4% increase in AET for most biomes (no change for dry grassland and desert biomes). NPP increased by > 6% for tundra, boreal forest and temperate forest from 1980 to 2011 with latitudinal average changes in NPP and CDI following similar patterns (greatest increases in the +40° to +75° latitudes). Global patterns in NPP are well correlated to AET and CDI (r2 > 0.8) but have different patterns (linear for AET and curvilinear for CDI). Latitudinal averaged ratio of NPP:CDI is correlated to Harmonized World Soil Database soil C levels (r = 0.67). Statistically significant trends (1980-2011) in NPP:CDI suggest increases in soil C for the boreal forest and temperate dry

  9. Theoretical evidence of the observed kinetic order dependence on temperature during the N(2)O decomposition over Fe-ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Guesmi, Hazar; Berthomieu, Dorothee; Bromley, Bryan; Coq, Bernard; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2010-03-28

    The characterization of Fe/ZSM5 zeolite materials, the nature of Fe-sites active in N(2)O direct decomposition, as well as the rate limiting step are still a matter of debate. The mechanism of N(2)O decomposition on the binuclear oxo-hydroxo bridged extraframework iron core site [Fe(II)(mu-O)(mu-OH)Fe(II)](+) inside the ZSM-5 zeolite has been studied by combining theoretical and experimental approaches. The overall calculated path of N(2)O decomposition involves the oxidation of binuclear Fe(II) core sites by N(2)O (atomic alpha-oxygen formation) and the recombination of two surface alpha-oxygen atoms leading to the formation of molecular oxygen. Rate parameters computed using standard statistical mechanics and transition state theory reveal that elementary catalytic steps involved into N(2)O decomposition are strongly dependent on the temperature. This theoretical result was compared to the experimentally observed steady state kinetics of the N(2)O decomposition and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments. A switch of the reaction order with respect to N(2)O pressure from zero to one occurs at around 800 K suggesting a change of the rate determining step from the alpha-oxygen recombination to alpha-oxygen formation. The TPD results on the molecular oxygen desorption confirmed the mechanism proposed.

  10. Acquiring Comprehensive Observations using an Integrated Sensorweb for Early Warning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid; Ambrose, Steve

    2006-01-01

    As an integrated observing strategy, the concept of sensorweb for Earth observations is appealing in many aspects. For instance, by increasing the spatial and temporal coverage of observations from space and other vantage points, one can eventually aid in increasing the accuracy of the atmospheric models which are precursor to hurricane track prediction, volcanic eruption forecast, and trajectory path of transcontinental transport of dust, harmful nuclear and chemical plumes. In reality, there is little analysis'available in terms of benefits, costs and optimized set of sensors needed to make these necessary observations. This is a complex problem that must be carefully studied and balanced over many boundaries such as science, defense, early warning security, and surveillance. Simplistically, the sensorweb concept from the technological point of view alone has a great appeal in the defense, early warning and security applications. In fact, it can be relatively less expensive in per unit cost as opposed to building and deploying it for the scientific use. However, overall observing approach should not be singled out and aligned somewhat . orthogonally to serve a particular need. On the other hand, the sensorweb should be designed and deployed to serve multiple subject areas and customers simultaneously; and can behave as directed measuring systems for both science and operational entities. Sensorweb can be designed to act as expert systems, and/or also provide a dedicated integrated surveillance network. Today, there is no system in the world that is fully integrated in terms of reporting timely multiple hazards warnings, computing the lass of life and property damage estimates, and is also designed to cater to everyone's needs. It is not an easier problem to undertake and more so is not practically solvable. At this time due to some recent events in the world, the scientific community, social scientists, and operational agencies are more cognizant and getting

  11. Acquiring Comprehensive Observations using an integrated Sensorweb for Early Warning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid; Ambrose, Steve

    2006-01-01

    As an integrated observing strategy, the concept of sensorweb for Earth observations is appealing in many aspects. For instance, by increasing the spatial and temporal coverage of observations from space and other vantage points, one can eventually aid in increasing the accuracy of the atmospheric models which are precursor to hurricane track prediction, volcanic eruption forecast, and trajectory path of transcontinental transport of dust, harmful nuclear and chemical plumes. In reality, there is little analysis'available in terms of benefits, costs and optimized set of sensors needed to make these necessary observations. This is a complex problem that must be carefully studied and balanced over many boundaries such as science, defense, early warning, security, and surveillance. Simplistically, the sensorweb concept from the technological point of view alone has a great appeal in the defense, early warning and security applications. In fact, it can be relatively less expensive in per unit cost as opposed to building and deploying it for the scientific use. However, overall observing approach should not be singled out and aligned somewhat orthogonally to serve a particular need. On the other hand, the sensorweb should be designed and deployed to serve multiple subject areas and customers simultaneously; and can behave as directed measuring systems for both science and operational entities. Sensorweb can be designed to act as expert systems, and/or also provide a dedicated integrated surveillance network. Today, there is no system in the world that is fully integrated in terms of reporting timely multiple hazards warnings, computing the loss of life and property damage estimates, and is also designed to cater to everyone's needs. It is not an easier problem to undertake and more so is not practically solvable. At this time due to some recent events in the world, the scientific community, social scientists, and operational agencies are more cognizant and getting

  12. Early-stage changes in natural (13)C and (15)N abundance and nutrient dynamics during different litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Song, Byeong-Yeol; Lee, Dongho; Bong, Yeon-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Decomposition, nutrient, and isotopic (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) dynamics during 1 year were studied for leaf and twig litters of Pinus densiflora, Castanea crenata, Erigeron annuus, and Miscanthus sinensis growing on a highly weathered soil with constrained nutrient supply using litterbags in a cool temperate region of South Korea. Decay constant (k/year) ranged from 0.58 to 1.29/year, and mass loss ranged from 22.36 to 58.43 % among litter types. The results demonstrate that mass loss and nutrient dynamics of decomposing litter were influenced by the seasonality of mineralization and immobilization processes. In general, most nutrients exhibited alternate phases of rapid mineralization followed by gradual immobilization, except K, which was released throughout the field incubation. At the end of study, among all the nutrients only N and P showed net immobilization. Mobility of different nutrients from decomposing litter as the percentage of initial litter nutrient concentration was in the order of K > Mg > Ca > N ≈ P. The δ(13)C (0.32-6.70 ‰) and δ(15)N (0.74-3.90 ‰) values of residual litters showed nonlinear increase and decrease, respectively compared to initial isotopic values during decomposition. Litter of different functional types and chemical quality converged toward a conservative nutrient use strategy through mechanisms of slow decomposition and slow nutrient mobilization. Our results indicate that litter quality and season, are the most important regulators of litter decomposition in these forests. The results revealed significant relationships between litter decomposition rates and N, C:N ratio and P, and seasonality (temperature). These results and the convergence of different litters towards conservative nutrient use in these nutrient constrained ecosystems imply optimization of litter management because litter removal can have cascading effects on litter decomposition and nutrient availability in these systems.

  13. Early Observations with the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, Dale E.

    2016-05-01

    The Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA) is a newly expanded and upgraded, solar-dedicated radio array consisting of 13 antennas of 2.1 m diameter equipped with receivers designed to cover the 1-18 GHz frequency range. Two large (27-m diameter) dishes are being outfitted with He-cooled receivers for use in calibration of the small dishes. During 2015, the array obtained observations from dozens of flares in total power mode on 8 antennas. Since February 2016, it has begun taking solar data on all 13 small antennas with full interferometric correlations, as well as calibration observations with the first of the two large antennas equipped with its He-cooled receiver. The second He-cooled receiver is nearly complete, and will be available around the time of the meeting. We briefly review the commissioning activities leading up to full operations, including polarization and gain measurements and calibration methods, and resulting measures of array performance. We then present some early imaging observations with the array, emphasizing the remarkable temporal and spectral resolution of the instrument, together with joint RHESSI hard X-ray and SDO EUV observations.

  14. Simulation Study Of Early Afterglows Observed With Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-09-01

    A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code has been used to simulate the dynamics of forward and reverse shocks with thin and thick shells within the parameter constraints provided by present Swift observations and the present models of GRB emission. Our 3-D RPIC simulations have provided the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields and revealed the importance of ``jitter radiation'' with prompt and afterglow spectra due to the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated by the Weibel instability. It is different from synchrotron radiation, which is usually assumed to be the dominant radiation process. We have investigated gamma-ray burst emissions from prompt, early, and late afterglows considering microscopic processes. Based on our previous investigation of the Weibel instability for each stage of evolution of ejecta propagating in the ISM, we have incorporated the plasma conditions (relativistic jets) with the density and composition of the plasmas, the magnetic field strength ($\\sigma$-values (the ratio of the electromagnetic energy flux to the particle energy flux)) and its direction, and the Lorentz factor for the different stages in prompt and afterglows. Systematic simulation studies of the relativistic collisionless shocks, associated particle acceleration, magnetic field generation and self-consistent radiation provide insight into undetermined issues in prompt and afterglows observed by Swift. Self-consistently calculated lightcurves, spectra, spectral evolutions, and polarization as function of viewing angle will be done to light a shed on recent new observations by Swift, in particular, X-ray flares, early steep decay, and shallow decay.

  15. ROSAT HRI observations of six early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Stuhrmann, Norbert

    1998-04-01

    High-resolution ROSAT HRI soft X-ray observations of four E/S0 galaxies were conducted by us. The data show no signs of Seyfert activity in the X-ray regime. The central emission peaks of the four galaxies, NGC533, NGC2832, NGC4104 and NGC6329, are associated with their cooling flows. The half intensity radii of the cooling flows range from 0.8 to 3.5 kpc. We find a trend (based up to now on only five objects) of the radio power of the cores in E/S0 galaxies to increase with the size and the accretion rates of their cooling flows. In one galaxy, NGC4921, no centrally peaked extended gaseous envelope was found, which is most likely due to the fact that it is not an E/S0 galaxy, but an early-type spiral. NGC2885, the sixth galaxy in our initial sample, shows signs of X-ray emission from an AGN. It has also been classified as a Sy-1 AGN by Bade et al. (1995). However, optical imaging suggests that this galaxy is probably not an E or S0 type system either, but rather an early-type spiral galaxy. Thus, in the context of accretion rate vs. galaxy type models of low-luminosity AGNs, the presence of an X-ray luminous Sy-1 nucleus in NGC2885 is no surprise.

  16. Early Hinode Observations of a Solar Filament Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    We use Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) filtergraph (FG) Stokes-V magnetogram observations to study the early onset of a solar eruption that includes an erupting filament that we observe in TRACE EUV images; this is one of the first filament eruptions seen with Hinode. The filament undergoes a slow rise for at least 30 min prior to its fast eruption and strong soft X-ray flaring, and the new Hinode data elucidate the physical processes occurring during the slow-rise period: During the slow-rise phase, a soft X-ray (SXR) sigmoid forms from apparent reconnection low in the sheared core field traced by the filament, and there is a low-level intensity peak in both EUV and SXRs during the slow rise. The SOT data show that magnetic flux cancellation occurs along the neutral line of the filament in the hours before eruption, and this likely caused the low-lying reconnection that produced the microflaring and the slow rise leading up to the eruption.

  17. A study of the human decomposition sequence in central Texas.

    PubMed

    Parks, Connie L

    2011-01-01

    Decomposition studies utilizing nonhuman subjects as human analogues are well established, but fewer studies utilizing intact human remains exist. This study provides data from a controlled decomposition study involving human remains in Central Texas. A 63.5-kg unmodified cadaver was placed in an open-air site and observed over a 10-week period from April 11 through June 19, 2008. A wire enclosure restricted scavenger access. State of decomposition and environmental conditions were recorded daily for the first 36 days and then every 2 weeks thereafter. Results indicated a high degree of correlation with other decomposition studies originating in the southwestern United States, although slight deviations for the average duration of early events were noted. The data were also utilized to test a quantitative method for estimating the postmortem interval. Results indicated preliminary support for a quantitative approach. Additional research is encouraged to further establish the human decomposition data set for Central Texas.

  18. Implementing Observation Protocols: Lessons for K-12 Education from the Field of Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pianta, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    This report draws from decades of experience using observation in early childhood education, which has implications for administrative decisions, evaluation practices, and policymaking in K-12. Early childhood education has long embraced the value of observing classrooms and teacher-child interactions. In early childhood education the features of…

  19. Prescriptive Early Intervention With Culturally Diverse Populations: Some Initial Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Walter S.; Pedro-Carroll, JoAnne

    The Social Skills Development Program (SSDP) is a prevention program for inner-city primary-age school children. The services provided by SSDP are for children experiencing moderate school maladjustment. Included are descriptions of program rationale and operations, staffing, prescriptive early intervention, preventive health interventions and…

  20. Chemical Properties, Decomposition, and Methane Production of Tertiary Relict Plant Litters: Implications for Atmospheric Trace Gas Production in the Early Tertiary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavitt, J. B.; Bartella, T. M.; Williams, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    Throughout the early Tertiary (ca. 65-38 Ma) Taxodiaceae-dominated (redwood) wetland forests occupied the high latitudes and were circumpolar in their distribution. Many of these forests had high standing biomass with moderate primary productivity. The geographic extent and amount of Tertiary coals and fossil forests throughout Arctic Canada suggests large areas of wetland forests that may have cycled substantial quantities of carbon, particularly methane until they were replaced by cold tolerant Pinus, Picea, and Larix following climatic cooling associated with the Terminal Eocene Event. To test this hypothesis we compared physiochemical properties, decomposition, and trace gas production of litter from extant Metasequoia, Pinus, Picea, and Larix. Initial results from plantation-grown trees indicate Metasequoia litter is a better source of labile organic substrate than pinaceous litter. Metasequoia litter contained the least lignin and highest amounts of water-soluble compounds of the four litter types studied. Analysis of the lignin structure using cupric oxide oxidation indicates that Metasequoia lignin is enriched in 4'-hydroxyacetophenone and 4'- Hydroxy-3'-methoxyacetophenone relative to the pinaceous litter. In a 12-month decomposition study using litterbags, average litter mass loss was greater for Metasequoia litter (62%) compared to the pinaceous species (50%). Moreover, Metasequoia litter incubated under anoxic conditions produced nearly twice as much CO2 (ca. 4.2 umol/g.day) and CH4 (2.1 umol/g.day) as the pinaceous litter (2.4 umol/g.day for CO2; 1.2 umol/g.day for CH4). Our results support the idea of greater decomposability and palatability of Metasequoia litter as compared to Larix, Picea, or Pinus. Provided that the biochemical properties of Metasequoia have remained relatively stable through geologic time, it appears that early Tertiary Metasequoia-dominated wetland forests may have had higher microbial driven trace gas production than the

  1. Scoring of Decomposition: A Proposed Amendment to the Method When Using a Pig Model for Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Keough, Natalie; Myburgh, Jolandie; Steyn, Maryna

    2016-12-29

    Decomposition studies often use pigs as proxies for human cadavers. However, differences in decomposition sequences/rates relative to humans have not been scientifically examined. Descriptions of five main decomposition stages (humans) were developed and refined by Galloway and later by Megyesi. However, whether these changes/processes are alike in pigs is unclear. Any differences can have significant effects when pig models are used for human PMI estimation. This study compared human decomposition models to the changes observed in pigs. Twenty pigs (50-90 kg) were decomposed over five months and decompositional features recorded. Total body scores (TBS) were calculated. Significant differences were observed during early decomposition between pigs and humans. An amended scoring system to be used in future studies was developed. Standards for PMI estimation derived from porcine models may not directly apply to humans and may need adjustment. Porcine models, however, remain valuable to study variables influencing decomposition.

  2. The Swift XRT: Observations of Early X-ray Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, David N.; Kennea, J. A.; Nousek, J. A.; Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P. T.; Chincarini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Giommi, P.; Zhang, B.

    2006-05-19

    During the first year of operations of the Swift observatory, the X-ray Telescope has made a number of discoveries concerning the nature of X-ray afterglows of both long and short GRBs. We highlight the key findings, which include rapid declines at early times, a standard template of afterglow light curve shapes, common flaring, and the discovery of the first short GRB afterglow.

  3. Innovation in observation: a vision for early outbreak detection

    PubMed Central

    Fefferman, NH; Naumova, EN

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of new infections and resurgence of old ones—health threats stemming from environmental contamination or purposeful acts of bioterrorism—call for a worldwide effort in improving early outbreak detection, with the goal of ameliorating current and future risks. In some cases, the problem of outbreak detection is logistically straightforward and mathematically easy: a single case of a disease of great concern can constitute an outbreak. However, for the vast majority of maladies, a simple analytical solution does not exist. Furthermore, each step in developing reliable, sensitive, effective surveillance systems demonstrates enormous complexities in the transmission, manifestation, detection, and control of emerging health threats. In this communication, we explore potential future innovations in early outbreak detection systems that can overcome the pitfalls of current surveillance. We believe that modern advances in assembling data, techniques for collating and processing information, and technology that enables integrated analysis will facilitate a new paradigm in outbreak definition and detection. We anticipate that moving forward in this direction will provide the highly desired sensitivity and specificity in early detection required to meet the emerging challenges of global disease surveillance. PMID:22460396

  4. Observations of Glide and Decomposition of a<101> Dislocations at High Temperatures in Ni-Al Single Crystals Deformed along the Hard Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Daw, M. S.; Noebe, R. D.; Mills, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Ni-44at.% Al and Ni-50at.% single crystals were tested in compression in the hard (001) orientations. The dislocation processes and deformation behavior were studied as a function of temperature, strain and strain rate. A slip transition in NiAl occurs from alpha(111) slip to non-alphaaaaaaaaaaa9111) slip at intermediate temperatures. In Ni-50at.% Al single crystal, only alpha(010) dislocations are observed above the slip transition temperature. In contrast, alpha(101)(101) glide has been observed to control deformation beyond the slip transition temperature in Ni-44at.%Al. alpha(101) dislocations are observed primarily along both (111) directions in the glide plane. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations show that the core of the alpha(101) dislocations along these directions is decomposed into two alpha(010) dislocations, separated by a distance of approximately 2nm. The temperature window of stability for these alpha(101) dislocations depends upon the strain rate. At a strain rate of 1.4 x 10(exp -4)/s, lpha(101) dislocations are observed between 800 and 1000K. Complete decomposition of a alpha(101) dislocations into alpha(010) dislocations occurs beyond 1000K, leading to alpha(010) climb as the deformation mode at higher temperature. At lower strain rates, decomposition of a alpha(101) dislocations has been observed to occur along the edge orientation at temperatures below 1000K. Embedded-atom method calculations and experimental results indicate that alpha(101) dislocation have a large Peieris stress at low temperature. Based on the present microstructural observations and a survey of the literature with respect to vacancy content and diffusion in NiAl, a model is proposed for alpha(101)(101) glide in Ni-44at.%Al, and for the observed yield strength versus temperature behavior of Ni-Al alloys at intermediate and high temperatures.

  5. Peer Observation of Teaching: Reflections of an Early Career Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eri, Rajaraman

    2014-01-01

    Peer observation of teaching (POT) is a reciprocal process where a peer observes another's teaching (classroom, virtual, on-line or even teaching resource such as unit outlines, assignments). Peers then provide constructive feedbacks that would enable teaching professional development through the mirror of critical reflection by both the observer…

  6. Home ultraviolet phototherapy of early mycosis fungoides: preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Milstein, H J; Vonderheid, E C; Van Scott, E J; Johnson, W C

    1982-03-01

    Thirty-one patients with early mycosis fungoides (MF) and three patients with parapsoriasis en plaques were treated with ultraviolet phototherapy (280 to 350 nm) at home using a commercially available light source containing four Westinghouse FS40 lamps. A complete clinical and histologic remission of disease, lasting for a median duration in excess of 18 months, was achieved in nineteen patients (61%) with MF. Although higher complete response rates generally are achieved with other therapeutic modalities, ultraviolet phototherapy with its minimal adverse effects may be indicated for selected patients. Controlled studies are encouraged to evaluate the full potential of conventional phototherapy in the management of MF.

  7. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates.

  8. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  9. Decomposition techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sample decomposition is a fundamental and integral step in the procedure of geochemical analysis. It is often the limiting factor to sample throughput, especially with the recent application of the fast and modern multi-element measurement instrumentation. The complexity of geological materials makes it necessary to choose the sample decomposition technique that is compatible with the specific objective of the analysis. When selecting a decomposition technique, consideration should be given to the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the sample, elements to be determined, precision and accuracy requirements, sample throughput, technical capability of personnel, and time constraints. This paper addresses these concerns and discusses the attributes and limitations of many techniques of sample decomposition along with examples of their application to geochemical analysis. The chemical properties of reagents as to their function as decomposition agents are also reviewed. The section on acid dissolution techniques addresses the various inorganic acids that are used individually or in combination in both open and closed systems. Fluxes used in sample fusion are discussed. The promising microwave-oven technology and the emerging field of automation are also examined. A section on applications highlights the use of decomposition techniques for the determination of Au, platinum group elements (PGEs), Hg, U, hydride-forming elements, rare earth elements (REEs), and multi-elements in geological materials. Partial dissolution techniques used for geochemical exploration which have been treated in detail elsewhere are not discussed here; nor are fire-assaying for noble metals and decomposition techniques for X-ray fluorescence or nuclear methods be discussed. ?? 1992.

  10. Nighttime Bracing Versus Observation for Early Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Suken A.; Price, Charles T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spinal bracing is widely utilized in patients with moderate severity adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with the goal of preventing curve progression and therefore preventing the need for surgical correction. Bracing is typically initiated in patients with a primary curve angle between 25 and 40 degrees, who are Risser sign 0 to 2 and <1-year postmenarchal. The purpose of this study is to determine whether nighttime bracing using a Charleston bending brace is effective in preventing progression of smaller curves (15 to 25 degrees) in skeletally immature, premenarchal female patients relative to current standard of care (observation for curves <25 degrees). Methods: Premenarchal, Risser 0 female patients presenting to 2 pediatric orthopaedic specialty practices for evaluation of idiopathic scoliosis with Cobb angle measurements between 15 and 25 degrees were selected. They were randomized by location to receive nighttime bending brace treatment or observation. Patients in the observation group were converted to fulltime TLSO wear if they progressed to >25 degrees primary curve Cobb angle. Curve progression was monitored with minimum 2-year follow-up. Results: Sixteen patients in the observation group and 21 patients in the bracing group completed 2-year follow-up. All patients in the observation group progressed to fulltime bracing threshold. In the nighttime bracing group, 29% of the patients did not progress to 25 degrees primary curve magnitude. Rate of progression to surgical magnitude was similar in the 2 groups. Conclusions: Risser 0 patients presenting with mild idiopathic scoliosis are at high risk for progression to >25 degrees primary curve magnitude. Treatment with the Charleston nighttime bending brace may reduce progression to full-time bracing threshold. No difference in progression to surgical intervention was shown between nighttime bracing and observation for small curves. Level of Evidence: Level II—therapeutic study (prospective

  11. Determining the progenitors of supernovae with early robotic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    We present results from the LCOGT Supernova Key Project, a three year program to obtain lightcurves and spectra of 600 supernovae. The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network is a network of eleven robotic 1m and 2m telescopes located at 5 sites around the world. With this facility long term monitoring of transient phenomena is possible, as are nearly instantaneous observations. We report on both core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae observed within days of explosion, allowing insight into their progenitor stars.

  12. Determining the progenitors of supernovae with early robotic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Andrew

    We present results from the LCOGT Supernova Key Project, a three year program to obtain lightcurves and spectra of 600 supernovae. The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network is a network of eleven robotic 1m and 2m telescopes located at 5 sites around the world. With this facility long term monitoring of transient phenomena is possible, as are nearly instantaneous observations. We report on both core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae observed within days of explosion, allowing insight into their progenitor stars.

  13. Early Childhood Education: A Guide for Observation and Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindberg, Lucile; Swedlow, Rita

    This guide for teachers of 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds focuses on the observation and direction of learning through play. Each chapter covers a specific curriculum area: Block Building, The Graphic Arts, Woodworking, Manipulative Materials, Modeling Materials, Paste and Collage, Sand, Water, Food, Housekeeping, Music and Movement, Physical Activities,…

  14. Geotechnical Trainspotting: Early Observations From the New Seattle Liquefaction Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, P.; Yelin, T.; Weaver, C. S.; Steidl, J. H.; Steller, R. A.; Gomberg, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Seattle Liquefaction Array (SLA) is a geotechnical monitoring array established by the US Geological Survey earlier this year in industrialized Seattle, Washington. Funding for the array was provided by the Advanced National Seismic System, at the behest of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network's regional advisory committee. The SLA aims to further the understanding of earthquake-induced liquefaction, particularly the processes associated with repeatedly liquefied soils and the liquefaction of deeply buried deposits. The SLA occupies a site at which shaking-induced liquefaction was observed during earthquakes in 1949, 1965, and 2001. The SLA site is seismically noisy but important as it is similar to sites that host many structures in Seattle. The site is comprised chiefly by loose-to-dense interbedded coastal and river outwash sands. Instrumentation at the site includes four 3-component accelerometers at the surface and at depths of 5.4, 44.9, and 56.4 meters, a surface barometer, and six piezometers at depths of 6.9, 22.9, 28.9, 43.1, 46.9, and 51.9 meters. Emplacement depths were selected to sample a variety of liquefaction susceptibilities. Continuous data from all sensors are sampled at 200 samples per second, and are available from the IRIS DMC archive, with a buffer of data stored on site in the event of telemetry failure. To date, only a handful of earthquakes have produced shaking strong enough at the SLA to be observed within the high levels of background noise. However, the noise itself provides data useful to constrain the low-strain seismic and pressure response of the site. Notably, the array is within a few meters of a set of busy railroad tracks. Passing and parked trains expose the site to a broad bandwidth of deformations, including seismic frequencies, albeit with a source at the surface. Many times each day the site experiences both high levels of shaking, and step changes in the pressure field of a variety of amplitudes that may last from

  15. Woodland Decomposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, J.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the role of the main organisms involved in woodland decomposition and discusses some of the variables affecting the rate of nutrient cycling. Suggests practical work that may be of value to high school students either as standard practice or long-term projects. (CW)

  16. Spinodal Decomposition of Ni-Nb-Y metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mattern, Norbert; G, Goerigk; Vainio, U; Miller, Michael K; Gemming, T; Eckert, J

    2009-01-01

    Phase-separated Ni-Nb-Y metallic glasses were prepared by rapid quenching from the melt. The early stages of decomposition were characterized in Ni-Nb-Y alloys with Ni contents of more than 60 at.%. Strongly correlated chemical fluctuations with a nanometer length scale were found to exist in the as-quenched state. The observed fluctuation lengths range from 5 to 12 nm, depending on the actual composition of the glass. The 'frozen-in' early stages of decomposition occur in the deeply undercooled melt due to the reduction in the critical temperature of liquid-liquid phase separation with Ni content. Annealing of the phase-separated Ni{sub 70}Nb{sub 15}Y{sub 15} glass below the crystallization temperature leads to an increase in the amplitude of the fluctuations. However, the wavelength was unchanged, which provides evidence for the spinodal character of the decomposition.

  17. Thermal Decomposition of IMX-104: Ingredient Interactions Govern Thermal Insensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean; Wiese-Smith, Deneille; Highley, Aaron M.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Behrens, Richard; Kay, Jeffrey J.

    2015-04-01

    This report summarizes initial studies into the chemical basis of the thermal insensitivity of INMX-104. The work follows upon similar efforts investigating this behavior for another DNAN-based insensitive explosive, IMX-101. The experiments described demonstrate a clear similarity between the ingredient interactions that were shown to lead to the thermal insensitivity observed in IMX-101 and those that are active in IMX-104 at elevated temperatures. Specifically, the onset of decomposition of RDX is shifted to a lower temperature based on the interaction of the RDX with liquid DNAN. This early onset of decomposition dissipates some stored energy that is then unavailable for a delayed, more violent release.

  18. The Effect of Body Mass on Outdoor Adult Human Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Spencer, Jessica R; Dabbs, Gretchen R

    2017-02-23

    Forensic taphonomy explores factors impacting human decomposition. This study investigated the effect of body mass on the rate and pattern of adult human decomposition. Nine males and three females aged 49-95 years ranging in mass from 73 to 159 kg who were donated to the Complex for Forensic Anthropology Research between December 2012 and September 2015 were included in this study. Kelvin accumulated degree days (KADD) were used to assess the thermal energy required for subjects to reach several total body score (TBS) thresholds: early decomposition (TBS ≥6.0), TBS ≥12.5, advanced decomposition (TBS ≥19.0), TBS ≥23.0, and skeletonization (TBS ≥27.0). Results indicate no significant correlation between body mass and KADD at any TBS threshold. Body mass accounted for up to 24.0% of variation in decomposition rate depending on stage, and minor differences in decomposition pattern were observed. Body mass likely has a minimal impact on postmortem interval estimation.

  19. A Study of Early/Slow VLF Perturbations Observed at Agra, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Uma; Singh, Ashutosh K.; Singh, Om P.; Singh, Birbal; Saraswat, Vibhav K.

    2016-06-01

    We present here the results of sub-ionospheric VLF perturbations observed on NWC (19.8 kHz) transmitter signal propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, monitored at our low latitude station Agra. During the period of observation (June-December 2011), we found 89 cases of VLF perturbation, while only 73 cases showing early character associated with strong lightning discharges. Out of 73 events, 64 ( 84%) of the early VLF perturbations are found to be early/slow in nature; the remaining 9 events are early/fast. The onset duration of these early/slow VLF perturbations is up to 5 s. A total of 54 observed early events show amplitude change lying between ± 3.0 dB, and phase change ± 12 degree, respectively, and found to occur mainly during nighttime. One of the interesting results we found is that the events with larger recovery time lie far away from the VLF propagation path, while events with smaller duration of recovery are within the ± 50-100 km of signal path. The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) data is analysed to find the location of causative lightning and temporal variation. The lightning discharge and associated processes that lead to early VLF events are discussed.

  20. An Observational Study of the Interactions of Socially Withdrawn/Anxious Early Adolescents and Their Friends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Barry H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The friendships of socially withdrawn/anxious children and early adolescents have been found to lack critical rewarding qualities. Observational research may help elucidate the obstacles they face in forming and maintaining high-quality friendships with sociable peers. Method: We observed the interactions of 38 socially withdrawn early…

  1. A Validation of the Early Childhood Classroom Observation Measure in Finnish and Estonian Kindergartens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Kikas, Eve; Pakarinen, Eija; Trossmann, Kaili; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Siekkinen, Martti; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: The aim of the study was to examine the applicability and psychometric properties of the Early Childhood Classroom Observation Measure (ECCOM; D. J. Stipek & P. Byler, 2005) outside the United States. The ECCOM was used to observe 83 kindergarten teachers (49 in Finland and 34 in Estonia) in classroom situations.…

  2. Factors Associated with South Korean Early Childhood Educators' Observed Behavior Support Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yeon Ha; Stormont, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    This study was an exploratory study of 34 South Korean early childhood educators' strategies for addressing behavior problems in natural settings. Factors related to teachers' strategy implementation were also explored. Four specific teacher behaviors were observed: precorrection, behavioral-specific praise, redirection, and reprimand/punishment.…

  3. Naturalistic Observations of Schoolyard Social Participation: Marker Variables for Socio-Emotional Functioning in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplan, Robert J.; Ooi, Laura L.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine links between observed social participation in the schoolyard and indices of socio-emotional functioning in early adolescence. Participants were children (N = 290) aged 9 to 12 years. Social participation (e.g., solitary play, dyadic interaction, group interaction) was assessed in the schoolyard during recess…

  4. Chao Yuanfang: Imperial Physician of the Sui Dynasty and an Early Pertussis Observer?

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Salim, Abdulbaset M.; Wu, Wendy; Kilgore, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Early Chinese texts contain extensive disease descriptions, including various texts that contain descriptions of modern-day conditions. During the Sui Dynasty, a leading scholar, Chao Yuanfang, may have authored a leading treatise 1400 years ago. Although these texts are the subject of ongoing research, evidence suggests that a clinical syndrome consistent with pertussis was observed in ancient China. PMID:26977422

  5. Interactions of tissue and fertilizer nitrogen on decomposition dynamics of lignin-rich conifer litter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Matkins, Joselin J.; Hibbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    High tissue nitrogen (N) accelerates decomposition of high-quality leaf litter in the early phases of mass loss, but the influence of initial tissue N variation on the decomposition of lignin-rich litter is less resolved. Because environmental changes such as atmospheric N deposition and elevated CO2 can alter tissue N levels within species more rapidly than they alter the species composition of ecosystems, it is important to consider how within-species variation in tissue N may shape litter decomposition and associated N dynamics. Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii ) is a widespread lignin-rich conifer that dominates forests of high carbon (C) storage across western North America, and displays wide variation in tissue and litter N that reflects landscape variation in soil N. We collected eight unique Douglas-fir litter sources that spanned a two-fold range in initial N concentrations (0.67–1.31%) with a narrow range of lignin (29–35%), and examined relationships between initial litter chemistry, decomposition, and N dynamics in both ambient and N fertilized plots at four sites over 3 yr. High initial litter N slowed decomposition rates in both early (0.67 yr) and late (3 yr) stages in unfertilized plots. Applications of N fertilizer to litters accelerated early-stage decomposition, but slowed late-stage decomposition, and most strongly affected low-N litters, which equalized decomposition rates across litters regardless of initial N concentrations. Decomposition of N-fertilized litters correlated positively with initial litter manganese (Mn) concentrations, with litter Mn variation reflecting faster turnover of canopy foliage in high N sites, producing younger litterfall with high N and low Mn. Although both internal and external N inhibited decomposition at 3 yr, most litters exhibited net N immobilization, with strongest immobilization in low-N litter and in N-fertilized plots. Our observation for lignin-rich litter that high initial N can slow decomposition

  6. [Contribution of soil fauna to the mass loss of Betula albosinensis leaf litter at early decomposition stage of subalpine forest litter in western Sichuan].

    PubMed

    Xia, Lei; Wu, Fu-Zhong; Yang, Wan-Qin; Tan, Bo

    2012-02-01

    In order to quantify the contribution of soil fauna to the decomposition of birch (Betula albosinensis) leaf litter in subalpine forests in western Sichuan of Southwest China during freeze-thaw season, a field experiment with different mesh sizes (0.02, 0.125, 1 and 3 mm) of litterbags was conducted in a representative birch-fir (Abies faxoniana) forest to investigate the mass loss rate of the birch leaf litter from 26 October, 2010 to 18 April, 2011, and the contributions of micro-, meso- and macro-fauna to the decomposition of the leaf litter. Over the freeze-thaw season, 11.8%, 13.2%, 15.4% and 19.5% of the mass loss were detected in the litterbags with 0.02, 0. 125, 1 and 3 mm mesh sizes, respectively. The total contribution of soil fauna to the litter decomposition accounted for 39.5% of the mass loss, and the taxa and individual relative density of the soil fauna in the litterbags had the similar variation trend with that of the mass loss rate. The contribution rate of soil fauna to the leaf litter mass loss showed the order of micro- < meso- < macro-fauna, with the highest contribution of micro-fauna (7.9%), meso-fauna (11.9%), and macro-fauna (22.7%) at the onset of freezing stage, deeply frozen stage, and thawing stage, respectively. The results demonstrated that soil fauna played an important role in the litter decomposition in subalpine forests of western Sichuan during freeze-thaw season.

  7. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation: A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics,of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales will reveal the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. The validity of inflationary models will be tested and, if agreement is found, accurate values for most of the key cosmological parameters will result. If disagreement is found, we will need to rethink our basic ideas about the physics of the early universe. I will present an overview of the physical processes at work in forming the anisotropy and discuss what we have already learned from current observations. I will conclude with a brief overview of the recently launched Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission which will observe the anisotropy over the full sky with 0.21 degree angular resolution. At the time of this meeting, MAP will have just arrived at the L2 Lagrange point, marking the start of its observing campaign. The MAP hardware is being produced by Goddard in partnership with Princeton University.

  8. Results from UV Imaging in the HST/WFC3 Early Release Science Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Seth H.; WFC3-SOC

    2013-01-01

    A portion of the GOOD-S field was observed with the HST Wide Field Camera 3 with both the UVIS and IR channels, as part of the Early Release Science Observations. Here we present a summary of our results from imaging intermediate redshift galaxies with an emphasis on what was learned from the ultraviolet portion of the observations. We discuss the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies, the assembly of massive spheroids during the peak epoch of the cosmic star-formation rate, the evolution and properties of UV-selected star-forming galaxies, analysis of AGN host galaxies, and the UV properties of z<1.5 early-type galaxies. Additionally, we will discuss how the UV data affect derived galaxy properties such as photometric redshifts and SED parameters. This work is based on the Early Release Science observations made by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this program. Support for program 11359 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  9. The early ELF signals of the gigantic jets captured by the Taiwan ground observation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. B. C.; Huang, P. H.; Su, H. T.; Hsu, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The in-cloud ignition process of gigantic jets and blue jets receives attentions and discussions in the past years. The polarity and the position of their breakdown were proposed by Krehbiel et al. [2008] but no concrete observational evidence to support it directly. ELF spectrogram is a good tool to explore the electric activities, but traditional spectrograms are generated by a Fourier transform which obtain the frequency information through an integration operation. However the integration greatly limits the lowest frequency revealed by spectrogram and buries the important transient features. In this study, we applied a new but widely-used method, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), to explore the spectrogram. Instead of the integration, HHT obtains the frequency information by differentiating on the phase angle, and become a powerful tool to reveal the fast frequency variation associated with transient luminous events. More than 100 transient luminous events including 25 gigantic jets observed by Taiwan ground optical observation network were analyzed. The results indicate that approximately 70% of gigantic jets can identify a rapid frequency variation in the interval of 300-600 milliseconds before main surge discharge, and this early feature can not find a clear corresponding amplitude variation in its sferic. Since this early signal can not be identified from the traditional Fourier spectrogram, but clear in-cloud lightning was registered correspondingly by the ground optical observation. In contrast to gigantic jets, this feature of early frequency change can be seen only in less than 30% of sprites and elves. These observational evidences are able to provide new constraints on the early discharge process of gigantic jets in clouds.

  10. Overlooked sunspot observations by Hevelius in the early Maunder Minimum, 1653 1684

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Douglas V.; Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1995-09-01

    In the bookMachina Coelestis (1679), Johannes Hevelius lists his daily solar observations from 1653 to 1679. He mentions 19 sunspot groups during this interval, of which 14 are unique to Hevelius and five are confirmed by other observers. There are an additional 9 sunspot groups during this interval that were not observed by Hevelius. In five cases he was not observing, but in the other four cases he did observe but failed to comment upon sunspots. The spots he missed or failed to observe tend to occur near the end of his career. This suggests Hevelius occasionally missed sunspots but usually was a reliable observer. These observations are important because they provide us the only known daily listing of solar observations during the early years of the Maunder Minimum. They are also important because they were overlooked by Wolf, Spoerer, Maunder, Eddy, and others in their study of solar activity in the seventeenth century. They provide us the best record of the sunspot maximum of 1660 when one sunspot lasted at least 86 days as it traversed the solar disk four times. The same region was active for seven solar rotations.

  11. Neural mirroring and social interaction: Motor system involvement during action observation relates to early peer cooperation.

    PubMed

    Endedijk, H M; Meyer, M; Bekkering, H; Cillessen, A H N; Hunnius, S

    2017-01-07

    Whether we hand over objects to someone, play a team sport, or make music together, social interaction often involves interpersonal action coordination, both during instances of cooperation and entrainment. Neural mirroring is thought to play a crucial role in processing other's actions and is therefore considered important for social interaction. Still, to date, it is unknown whether interindividual differences in neural mirroring play a role in interpersonal coordination during different instances of social interaction. A relation between neural mirroring and interpersonal coordination has particularly relevant implications for early childhood, since successful early interaction with peers is predictive of a more favorable social development. We examined the relation between neural mirroring and children's interpersonal coordination during peer interaction using EEG and longitudinal behavioral data. Results showed that 4-year-old children with higher levels of motor system involvement during action observation (as indicated by lower beta-power) were more successful in early peer cooperation. This is the first evidence for a relation between motor system involvement during action observation and interpersonal coordination during other instances of social interaction. The findings suggest that interindividual differences in neural mirroring are related to interpersonal coordination and thus successful social interaction.

  12. Near Real-Time Determination of Earthquake Source Parameters for Tsunami Early Warning from Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manneela, Sunanda; Srinivasa Kumar, T.; Nayak, Shailesh R.

    2016-06-01

    Exemplifying the tsunami source immediately after an earthquake is the most critical component of tsunami early warning, as not every earthquake generates a tsunami. After a major under sea earthquake, it is very important to determine whether or not it has actually triggered the deadly wave. The near real-time observations from near field networks such as strong motion and Global Positioning System (GPS) allows rapid determination of fault geometry. Here we present a complete processing chain of Indian Tsunami Early Warning System (ITEWS), starting from acquisition of geodetic raw data, processing, inversion and simulating the situation as it would be at warning center during any major earthquake. We determine the earthquake moment magnitude and generate the centroid moment tensor solution using a novel approach which are the key elements for tsunami early warning. Though the well established seismic monitoring network, numerical modeling and dissemination system are currently capable to provide tsunami warnings to most of the countries in and around the Indian Ocean, the study highlights the critical role of geodetic observations in determination of tsunami source for high-quality forecasting.

  13. The initial changes of fat deposits during the decomposition of human and pig remains.

    PubMed

    Notter, Stephanie J; Stuart, Barbara H; Rowe, Rebecca; Langlois, Neil

    2009-01-01

    The early stages of adipocere formation in both pig and human adipose tissue in aqueous environments have been investigated. The aims were to determine the short-term changes occurring to fat deposits during decomposition and to ascertain the suitability of pigs as models for human decomposition. Subcutaneous adipose tissue from both species after immersion in distilled water for up to six months was compared using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Changes associated with decomposition were observed, but no adipocere was formed during the initial month of decomposition for either tissue type. Early-stage adipocere formation in pig samples during later months was detected. The variable time courses for adipose tissue decomposition were attributed to differences in the distribution of total fatty acids between species. Variations in the amount of sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium were also detected between species. The study shows that differences in total fatty acid composition between species need to be considered when interpreting results from experimental decomposition studies using pigs as human body analogs.

  14. Observations of Early/Fast VLF Events on Vieques Island, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasko, V. P.; Inan, U. S.; Wood, T. G.; Stanley, M. A.; Mathews, J. D.; George, J. J.; Fong, N. T.

    2002-12-01

    Early/Fast VLF events are registered as sudden (i.e., "fast" < 20 ms) subionospheric VLF signal changes, occurring simultaneously (i.e., "early", <20 ms) with lightning discharges [e.g., Inan et al., GRL, 20, 2355, 1993]. These events constitute evidence of the direct energetic coupling between tropospheric thunderstorms and the overlying mesospheric and lower ionospheric regions. In August-September 2001 Penn State University organized an experimental campaign in Puerto Rico to perform correlative studies of lightning and lightning-induced ionospheric effects. A set of instruments employed for these studies included Arecibo Observatory 430 MHz UHF radar, New Mexico Tech Interferometer, and a video system. As part of this campaign Stanford University deployed broadband and narrowband VLF receivers at Casa Cielo, Vieques Island, Puerto Rico (18.12 deg N, 65.50 deg W), which were operated continuously during the time period August 21- September 15, 2001. The narrowband measurements of the NAU (Aguadilla, Puerto Rico), NLK (Jim Creek, Washington) and NAA (Cutler, Maine) signals were performed every day from 1500UT to 1400UT while broadband recordings were made 1 minute out of every 5 minutes from 1630UT to 1000UT. In this talk we report observations of spectacular early/fast VLF events, which were detected on the 40.75 kHz NAU signal on multiple occasions during August 31, September 1, 2 and 13, 2001. The observed signal amplitude changes ranged from a fraction of a dB up to 19 dB, with both positive and negative field changes. The unusually large events were superposed on top of a very high degree of variability of signal amplitude, caused by the fact that the magnetic loop antenna was aligned to null the ground signal and was thus disposed to only detect the sky wave signal. Some of the observed events exhibited recovery signatures with duration on the order of several tens of seconds, while a subset of events did not exhibit clear recovery signatures, possibly

  15. Clinical practice. Later orthodontic complications caused by risk factors observed in the early years of life.

    PubMed

    Emerich, Katarzyna; Wojtaszek-Slominska, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Primary preventive strategies for oral health are an essential public health priority. Paediatricians have frequent contact with families during routine preventive visits in the child's first few years of life and are in an ideal and unique position, to advise families about the prevention of oral diseases in their children. Primary prevention is always recommended in very young children, to promote positive outcomes during childhood and later adulthood. The knowledge paediatricians acquire about orofacial growth may enhance the implementation and eventual success of a preventive programme. In view of the widespread lack of any orthodontic knowledge amongst paediatricians, this paper describes most common and distinctive symptoms appearing frequently in the early stages of a child's development that are easily detectable by clinicians. It is difficult to define preventive strategies to prevent malocclusion owing to its multifactorial origin. There are some recognised behaviours, however, that should be discouraged to allow for ideal craniofacial development and some that require early referral to the orthodontist. The following disorders are easily diagnosed by the paediatrician or parents and represent conditions in which early intervention might be appropriate to prevent future possible orofacial dysfunction: different sucking habits persisting beyond 3 years of age, mouth breathing and significant deviations from established teeth eruption norms. It is suggested that early referral to a paediatric dentist or orthodontist is indicated when any of these conditions are observed. In general, measures to prevent malocclusion should be based on providing good incentives to promote normal growth and development of the face and the elimination of potential interferences that may harm these processes.

  16. Early Temperatures Observed with the Extremely Sensitive Rayleigh Lidar at Utah State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickwar, Vincent B.; Sox, Leda; Emerick, Matthew T.; Herron, Joshua P.; Barton, David L.

    2016-06-01

    Rayleigh-scatter lidar observations were made at the Atmospheric Lidar Observatory (ALO) at Utah State University (USU) from 1993-2004 from 45-90 km. The lidar operated at 532 nm with a power-aperture-product (PAP) of ~3.1 Wm2. The sensitivity of the lidar has since been increased by a factor of 66 to 205 Wm2, extending the maximum altitude into new territory, the lower thermosphere. Observations have been extended up to 115 km, almost to the 120 km goal. Early temperatures from four ~4-week periods starting in June 2014 are presented and discussed. They are compared to each other, to the ALO climatology from the original lidar [1], and to temperatures from the NRLMSISe00 empirical model [2].

  17. Observation of x-ray resonant Raman scattering: The early days

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    My early observation of Raman scattering came as a serendipitous by-product of our efforts to achieve the best possible signal for x-ray fluorescent analysis. We were also investigating the x-ray spectrum produced by a monochromatic x-ray beam striking metal targets which might contribute to the inelastic background. This background could contaminate the very weak diffusively distributed elastically scattered radiation associated with defects in the perfect periodicity of crystals. Energy analysis of the x-ray spectra created by monochromatic Cu K{sub {alpha}} and Mo K{sub {alpha}} radiation impinging on highly pure metal targets showed an inelastically scattered intensity related to the energy difference between the exciting radiation and the nearest bound state. Confirmation of these observations and availability of synchrotron radiation has led to wide application of this new x-ray spectroscopy in atomic physics including its use as a probe of the unoccupied density of states.

  18. Histological observations of early gonadal development to form asymmetrically in the dwarf gourami Colisa lalia.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Youichi; Kobayashi, Makito

    2012-12-01

    The asymmetrical and latitudinal formation of the gonads during early development in the dwarf gourami Colisa lalia was histologically observed using fish reared in laboratory. Hatching larvae obtained 33 hours after spawning possessed primordial germ cells (PGCs), which aggregated to the dorsal surface of the gut. In prolarvae on day 7, the gonadal anlagen were still situated on the dorsal surface of the gut, however, in those on day 10, the left gonadal anläge began to shift leftward, although the coelom did not develop sufficiently. In prolarvae on day 20, the right gonadal anlage also began to move leftward. During this period, the gut developed considerably in the right side of the coelom. On day 25, the developing gonads were located in the interspace of the developing spiral valve intestine. Sex differentiation of gonads appeared to begin by day 25. From those observations, we concluded that asymmetricity of gonads in C. lalia is caused by a limited space of the coelom opened on the left side of the body during the early phase of the formation of gonadal anlagen, which may be accurately determined by the position in which the gut develops.

  19. [Leaf litter decomposition and nutrient release of different stand types in a shelter belt in Xinjiang arid area].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Hai; Zheng, Lu; Duan, Yong-Zhao

    2011-06-01

    From October 2007 to November 2008, an in situ mesh bag experiment was conducted to study the leaf litter decomposition and nutrient release of forest stands Populus alba var. pyramidalis, Amorpha fruticosa, and P. alba var. pyramidalis + A. fruticosa in a shelter belt in Karamay, Xinjiang. It was observed that the mass loss rate of leaf litter differed with tree species, and was significantly affected by leaf litter composition. The leaf litter of P. alba var. pyramidalis + A. fruticosa was more easily decomposed than that of the other two mono-dominance forest trees. The analysis with improved Olson' s exponential model indicated that P. alba var. pyramidalis leaf litter had the lowest decomposition coefficient (k = 0.167), while P. alba var. pyramidalis + A. fruticosa leaf litter had the highest one (k = 0.275). According to the model, it would cost for about 2.41-4.19 years and 10.79-17.98 years to have 50% and 95% decomposition of the three kind leaf litters, respectively. The residual rates of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in the three kind leaf litters differed with decomposition period. After one year decomposition, potassium was wholly released, while nitrogen and phosphorus were immobilized or enriched via the absorption from surrounding environment. Except that the A. fruticosa leaf litter had a decreased organic carbon decomposition rate in the mid period of decomposition, the leaf litters of P. alba var. pyramidalis and P. alba var. pyramidalis + A. fruticosa all had an increasing organic carbon decomposition rate with the decomposition, which was about 35.5%-44.2% after one year decomposition. The C/N value of the leaf litters had a decreasing trend, and the decrement was smaller in the early and mid periods but larger in the late period of decomposition.

  20. Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Joshua Evan

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are the current standard-bearers for dark energy but face several hurdles for their continued success in future large surveys. For example, spectroscopic classification of the myriad SNe soon to be discovered will not be possible, and systematics from uncertainties in dust corrections and the evolution of SN demographics and/or empirical calibrations used to standardize SNe Ia must be studied. Through the identification of low-dust host galaxies and through increased understanding of both the SN - progenitor connections and empirical calibrations, host galaxy information may offer opportunities to improve the cosmological utility of SNe Ia. The first half of this thesis analyzes the sample of SNe Ia discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. Correlations between properties of SNe and their host galaxies are examined at high redshift. Using galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters, a model is developed to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, 6 early-type cluster member hosts and 11 SN Ia early-type field hosts are identified. For the first time at z > 0.9, the correlation between host galaxy type and the rise and fall time of SN Ia light curves is confirmed. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions of early-type galaxies also enables stellar mass measurements for these hosts. In combination with literature host mass measurements, these measurements are used to show, at z > 0.9, a hint of the correlation between host mass and Hubble residuals reported at lower redshift. By simultaneously fitting cluster galaxy formation histories and dust content to the scatter of the cluster red sequences, it is shown that dust reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely less

  1. Early observational research and registries during the 2009–2010 influenza A pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Robert A.; Webb, Steven A. R.; Rowan, Kathy M.; Sprung, Charles L.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Randolph, Adrienne G.; Jouvet, Philippe; Lapinsky, Stephen; Rubinson, Lewis; Rello, Jordi; Cobb, J. Perren; Rice, Todd W.; Uyeki, Tim; Marshall, John C.

    2013-01-01

    As a critical care community, we have an obligation to provide not only clinical care but also the research that guides initial and subsequent clinical responses during a pandemic. There are many challenges to conducting such research. The first is speed of response. However, given the near inevitability of certain events, for example, viral respiratory illness such as the 2009 pandemic, geographically circumscribed natural disasters, or acts of terror, many study and trial designs should be preplanned and modified quickly when specific events occur. Template case report forms should be available for modification and web entry; centralized research ethics boards and funders should have the opportunity to preview and advise on such research beforehand; and national and international research groups should be prepared to work together on common studies and trials for common challenges. We describe the early international critical care research response to the influenza A 2009 (H1N1) pandemic, including specifics of observational study case report form, registry, and clinical trial design, cooperation of international critical care research organizations, and the early results of these collaborations. PMID:20101176

  2. Observing preschoolers' social-emotional behavior: structure, foundations, and prediction of early school success.

    PubMed

    Denham, Susanne A; Bassett, Hideko Hamada; Thayer, Sara K; Mincic, Melissa S; Sirotkin, Yana S; Zinsser, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Social-emotional behavior of 352 3- and 4-year-olds attending private child-care and Head Start programs was observed using the Minnesota Preschool Affect Checklist, Revised (MPAC-R). Goals of the investigation included (a) using MPAC-R data to extract a shortened version, MPAC-R/S, comparing structure, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and stability of both versions; and, using the shortened measure, to examine (b) age, gender, and risk status differences in social-emotional behaviors; (c) contributions of emotion knowledge and executive function to social-emotional behaviors; and (d) contributions of social-emotional behaviors to early school adjustment and kindergarten academic success. Results show that reliability of MPAC-R/S was as good, or better, than the MPAC-R. MPAC-R/S structure, at both times of observation, included emotionally negative/aggressive, emotionally regulated/prosocial, and emotionally positive/productive behaviors; MPAC-R structure was similar but less replicable over time. Age, gender, and risk differences were found. Children's emotion knowledge contributed to later emotionally regulated/prosocial behavior. Finally, preschool emotionally negative/aggressive behaviors were associated with concurrent and kindergarten school success, and there was evidence of social-emotional behavior mediating relations between emotion knowledge or executive function, and school outcomes. The importance of portable, empirically supported observation measures of social-emotional behaviors is discussed along with possible applications, teacher utilization, and implementation barriers.

  3. Early experiences in evolving an enterprise-wide information model for laboratory and clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Elizabeth S; Zhou, Li; Kashyap, Vipul; Schaeffer, Molly; Dykes, Patricia C; Goldberg, Howard S

    2008-11-06

    As Electronic Healthcare Records become more prevalent, there is an increasing need to ensure unambiguous data capture, interpretation, and exchange within and across heterogeneous applications. To address this need, a common, uniform, and comprehensive approach for representing clinical information is essential. At Partners HealthCare System, we are investigating the development and implementation of enterprise-wide information models to specify the representation of clinical information to support semantic interoperability. This paper summarizes our early experiences in: (1) defining a process for information model development, (2) reviewing and comparing existing healthcare information models, (3) identifying requirements for representation of laboratory and clinical observations, and (4) exploring linkages to existing terminology and data standards. These initial findings provide insight to the various challenges ahead and guidance on next steps for adoption of information models at our organization.

  4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation or acute coagulopathy of trauma shock early after trauma? An observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It is debated whether early trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) in severely injured patients reflects disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) with a fibrinolytic phenotype, acute coagulopathy of trauma shock (ACoTS) or yet other entities. This study investigated the prevalence of overt DIC and ACoTS in trauma patients and characterized these conditions based on their biomarker profiles. Methods An observational study was carried out at a single Level I Trauma Center. Eighty adult trauma patients (≥18 years) who met criteria for full trauma team activation and had an arterial cannula inserted were included. Blood was sampled a median of 68 minutes (IQR 48 to 88) post-injury. Data on demography, biochemistry, injury severity score (ISS) and mortality were recorded. Plasma/serum was analyzed for biomarkers reflecting tissue/endothelial cell/glycocalyx damage (histone-complexed DNA fragments, Annexin V, thrombomodulin, syndecan-1), coagulation activation/inhibition (prothrombinfragment 1+2, thrombin/antithrombin-complexes, antithrombin, protein C, activated protein C, endothelial protein C receptor, protein S, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, vWF), factor consumption (fibrinogen, FXIII), fibrinolysis (D-dimer, tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and inflammation (interleukin (IL)-6, terminal complement complex (sC5b-9)). Comparison of patients stratified according to the presence or absence of overt DIC (International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH) criteria) or ACoTS (activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and/or international normalized ratio (INR) above normal reference). Results No patients had overt DIC whereas 15% had ACoTS. ACoTS patients had higher ISS, transfusion requirements and mortality (all P < 0.01) and a biomarker profile suggestive of enhanced tissue, endothelial cell and glycocalyx damage and consumption coagulopathy with low protein C, antithrombin, fibrinogen and FXIII levels

  5. Thermal decomposition products of butyraldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatten, Courtney D.; Kaskey, Kevin R.; Warner, Brian J.; Wright, Emily M.; McCunn, Laura R.

    2013-12-01

    The thermal decomposition of gas-phase butyraldehyde, CH3CH2CH2CHO, was studied in the 1300-1600 K range with a hyperthermal nozzle. Products were identified via matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectrometry in separate experiments. There are at least six major initial reactions contributing to the decomposition of butyraldehyde: a radical decomposition channel leading to propyl radical + CO + H; molecular elimination to form H2 + ethylketene; a keto-enol tautomerism followed by elimination of H2O producing 1-butyne; an intramolecular hydrogen shift and elimination producing vinyl alcohol and ethylene, a β-C-C bond scission yielding ethyl and vinoxy radicals; and a γ-C-C bond scission yielding methyl and CH2CH2CHO radicals. The first three reactions are analogous to those observed in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde, but the latter three reactions are made possible by the longer alkyl chain structure of butyraldehyde. The products identified following thermal decomposition of butyraldehyde are CO, HCO, CH3CH2CH2, CH3CH2CH=C=O, H2O, CH3CH2C≡CH, CH2CH2, CH2=CHOH, CH2CHO, CH3, HC≡CH, CH2CCH, CH3C≡CH, CH3CH=CH2, H2C=C=O, CH3CH2CH3, CH2=CHCHO, C4H2, C4H4, and C4H8. The first ten products listed are direct products of the six reactions listed above. The remaining products can be attributed to further decomposition reactions or bimolecular reactions in the nozzle.

  6. Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua Launch and Early Mission Attitude Support Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracewell, D.; Glickman, J.; Hashmall, J.; Natanson, G.; Sedlak, J.

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite was successfully launched on May 4,2002. Aqua is the second in the series of EOS satellites. EOS is part of NASA s Earth Science Enterprise Program, whose goals are to advance the scientific understanding of the Earth system. Aqua is a three-axis stabilized, Earth-pointing spacecraft in a nearly circular, sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 705 km. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics attitude team supported all phases of the launch and early mission. This paper presents the main results and lessons learned during this period, including: real-time attitude mode transition support, sensor calibration, onboard computer attitude validation, response to spacecraft emergencies, postlaunch attitude analyses, and anomaly resolution. In particular, Flight Dynamics support proved to be invaluable for successful Earth acquisition, fine-point mode transition, and recognition and correction of several anomalies, including support for the resolution of problems observed with the MODIS instrument.

  7. ARE HEALTH VISITORS' OBSERVATIONS OF EARLY PARENT-INFANT INTERACTIONS RELIABLE? A CROSS-SECTIONAL DESIGN.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Ingeborg H; Trillingsgaard, Tea; Simonsen, Marianne; Kronborg, Hanne

    2017-03-01

    Health visitors need competences to promote healthy early parent-infant relationships. The aims of this study were to explore whether there are differences between groups of health visitors with and without additional parenting program education in terms of their knowledge of infant-parent interaction and their observation and assessment skills of such interactions. The cross-sectional study included 36 health visitors' certified Marte Meo therapists and 85 health visitors without additional parenting program education. Health visitors' observation skills were measured assessing five video-recorded mother-infant interactions. A questionnaire was used to measure their intention, self-efficacy, and knowledge. More certified Marte Meo therapists than health visitors without additional parenting program education reported a significantly higher mean level of knowledge of the early relationship, 6.42 (95% CI; 6.18-6.66) versus 5.05 (95% CI; 4.86-6.10), p = .04; and more certified Marte Meo therapists than health visitors without additional parenting program education reported a higher mean level of knowledge of infant self-regulation, 2.44 (95% CI; 2.18-2.71) versus 1.83 (95% CI; 1.62-2.03), p < .001. In the latter group, 54% (95% CI; 0.43-0.64) reported a significantly higher need for further education versus 22% (95% CI; 0.11-0.39), p = .001. Compared to health visitors without any parenting program education, health visitors certified as Marte Meo therapists reported a significantly higher frequency of correct assessment of mothers' sensitivity in two of five video-recordings, with 77.78% (95% CI; 0.61-0.87) compared to 45.88% (95% CI; 0.35-0.57) in Video 3, p = .001, and 69.44% (95% CI; 0.52-0.82) compared to 49.41% (95% CI; 0.39-0.60) in Video 4, p = .04, respectively. The results of the present study support the use of video-based education of health visitors to increase their knowledge of and skills in assessing parent-infant interactions. Randomized controlled

  8. Sustained acceleration of soil carbon decomposition observed in a 6-year warming experiment in a warm-temperate forest in southern Japan

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Munemasa; Liang, Naishen; Takagi, Masahiro; Zeng, Jiye; Grace, John

    2016-01-01

    To examine global warming’s effect on soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition in Asian monsoon forests, we conducted a soil warming experiment with a multichannel automated chamber system in a 55-year-old warm-temperate evergreen broadleaved forest in southern Japan. We established three treatments: control chambers for total soil respiration, trenched chambers for heterotrophic respiration (Rh), and warmed trenched chambers to examine warming effect on Rh. The soil was warmed with an infrared heater above each chamber to increase soil temperature at 5 cm depth by about 2.5 °C. The warming treatment lasted from January 2009 to the end of 2014. The annual warming effect on Rh (an increase per °C) ranged from 7.1 to17.8% °C−1. Although the warming effect varied among the years, it averaged 9.4% °C−1 over 6 years, which was close to the value of 10.1 to 10.9% °C−1 that we calculated using the annual temperature–efflux response model of Lloyd and Taylor. The interannual warming effect was positively related to the total precipitation in the summer period, indicating that summer precipitation and the resulting soil moisture level also strongly influenced the soil warming effect in this forest. PMID:27748424

  9. Sustained acceleration of soil carbon decomposition observed in a 6-year warming experiment in a warm-temperate forest in southern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Munemasa; Liang, Naishen; Takagi, Masahiro; Zeng, Jiye; Grace, John

    2016-10-01

    To examine global warming’s effect on soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition in Asian monsoon forests, we conducted a soil warming experiment with a multichannel automated chamber system in a 55-year-old warm-temperate evergreen broadleaved forest in southern Japan. We established three treatments: control chambers for total soil respiration, trenched chambers for heterotrophic respiration (Rh), and warmed trenched chambers to examine warming effect on Rh. The soil was warmed with an infrared heater above each chamber to increase soil temperature at 5 cm depth by about 2.5 °C. The warming treatment lasted from January 2009 to the end of 2014. The annual warming effect on Rh (an increase per °C) ranged from 7.1 to17.8% °C‑1. Although the warming effect varied among the years, it averaged 9.4% °C‑1 over 6 years, which was close to the value of 10.1 to 10.9% °C‑1 that we calculated using the annual temperature–efflux response model of Lloyd and Taylor. The interannual warming effect was positively related to the total precipitation in the summer period, indicating that summer precipitation and the resulting soil moisture level also strongly influenced the soil warming effect in this forest.

  10. Low-energy reaction rate constants for the Ni+-assisted decomposition of acetaldehyde: observation of C-H and C-C activation.

    PubMed

    Dee, S Jason; Castleberry, Vanessa A; Villarroel, Otsmar J; Laboren, Ivanna E; Bellert, Darrin J

    2010-02-04

    Rate constants for the low-energy Ni(+)-assisted dissociative reaction of acetaldehyde have been measured under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. The rate constants are acquired through monitoring the time dependence of fragment Ni(+)CO formation. The decomposition of the precursor Ni(+)-acetaldehyde cluster ion proceeds via consecutive, parallel reaction coordinates that originate with the Ni(+)-assisted cleavage of either a C-C or an aldehyde C-H bond. The energies used to initiate these reactions are well below that required to cleave sigma-bonds in the isolated acetaldehyde molecule. Direct measurement of the reaction kinetics over a range of energies indicates that the rate-limiting step in the dissociative mechanism changes at cluster ion internal energies = 17,200 +/- 400 cm(-1). Arguments are presented that this energy marks the closure of the dissociative coordinate that initiates with C-H sigma-bond activation and thus provides a measure of the activation energy of this dissociative pathway.

  11. Sustained acceleration of soil carbon decomposition observed in a 6-year warming experiment in a warm-temperate forest in southern Japan.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Munemasa; Liang, Naishen; Takagi, Masahiro; Zeng, Jiye; Grace, John

    2016-10-17

    To examine global warming's effect on soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition in Asian monsoon forests, we conducted a soil warming experiment with a multichannel automated chamber system in a 55-year-old warm-temperate evergreen broadleaved forest in southern Japan. We established three treatments: control chambers for total soil respiration, trenched chambers for heterotrophic respiration (Rh), and warmed trenched chambers to examine warming effect on Rh. The soil was warmed with an infrared heater above each chamber to increase soil temperature at 5 cm depth by about 2.5 °C. The warming treatment lasted from January 2009 to the end of 2014. The annual warming effect on Rh (an increase per °C) ranged from 7.1 to17.8% °C(-1). Although the warming effect varied among the years, it averaged 9.4% °C(-1) over 6 years, which was close to the value of 10.1 to 10.9% °C(-1) that we calculated using the annual temperature-efflux response model of Lloyd and Taylor. The interannual warming effect was positively related to the total precipitation in the summer period, indicating that summer precipitation and the resulting soil moisture level also strongly influenced the soil warming effect in this forest.

  12. SHOCK BREAKOUT AND EARLY LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVAE OBSERVED WITH KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Garnavich, P. M.; Tucker, B. E.; Rest, A.; Shaya, E. J.; Olling, R. P.; Kasen, D; Villar, A.

    2016-03-20

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P). Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5 ± 0.4 and 13.3 ± 0.4 rest-frame days, respectively. Based on fits to idealized analytic models, we find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280 ± 20 R{sub ⊙}) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490 ± 20 R{sub ⊙}), but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0 ± 0.3 × 10{sup 51} erg. The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict, possibly due to the supernova shock wave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass-loss rate of 10{sup −4}M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve. No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a SNe II-P.

  13. Shock Breakout and Early Light Curves of Type II-P Supernovae Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, P. M.; Tucker, B. E.; Rest, A.; Shaya, E. J.; Olling, R. P.; Kasen, D.; Villar, A.

    2016-03-01

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P). Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5 ± 0.4 and 13.3 ± 0.4 rest-frame days, respectively. Based on fits to idealized analytic models, we find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280 ± 20 R⊙) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490 ± 20 R⊙), but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0 ± 0.3 × 1051 erg. The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict, possibly due to the supernova shock wave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass-loss rate of 10-4M⊙ yr-1 from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve. No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a SNe II-P.

  14. Abundance patterns in the interstellar medium of early-type galaxies observed with Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Konami, Saori; Matsushita, Kyoko; Tamagawa, Toru; Nagino, Ryo

    2014-03-01

    We have analyzed 17 early-type galaxies, 13 ellipticals and 4 S0 galaxies, observed with Suzaku, and investigated metal abundances (O, Mg, Si, and Fe) and abundance ratios (O/Fe, Mg/Fe, and Si/Fe) in the interstellar medium (ISM). The emission from each on-source region, which is four times the effective radius, r {sub e}, is reproduced with one-temperature (1T) or two-temperature (2T) thermal plasma models as well as a multi-temperature model, using APEC plasma code version 2.0.1. The multi-temperature model gave almost the same abundances and abundance ratios with the 1T or 2T models. The weighted averages of the O, Mg, Si, and Fe abundances of all the sample galaxies derived from the multi-temperature model fits are 0.83 ± 0.04, 0.93 ± 0.03, 0.80 ± 0.02, and 0.80 ± 0.02 solar, respectively, in solar units according to the solar abundance table by Lodders in 2003. These abundances show no significant dependence on the morphology and environment. The systematic differences in the derived metal abundances between versions 2.0.1 and 1.3.1 of the APEC plasma codes were investigated. The derived O and Mg abundances in the ISM agree with the stellar metallicity within an aperture with a radius of one r {sub e} derived from optical spectroscopy. From these results, we discuss the past and present Type Ia supernova rates and star formation histories in early-type galaxies.

  15. The Martian atmosphere above great volcanoes: Early planetary Fourier spectrometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, D.; Fiorenza, C.; Zasova, L. V.; Ignatiev, N. I.; Maturilli, A.; Formisano, V.; Giuranna, M.

    2005-08-01

    This work reports the first observations of the Martian atmosphere returned by the planetary Fourier spectrometer (PFS) on board of Mars express (MEX) satellite in the vicinity of the greatest volcanic domes of the planet. Two of the early MEX orbits have already covered the region of Olympus Mons and Ascraeus Mons. These measurements are very similar in terms of local time (14LT) and season ( L=337 and 342, respectively). The long wavelength channel (LWC) of the instrument works in the thermal IR (300-1500 cm -1); its data allow the simultaneous retrieval of surface temperature, integrated content of water ice and dust suspended in the atmosphere and air thermal field up to an altitude of about 50 km. Results of the code described in the companion paper by Grassi et al. for the two orbits are presented and compared with the state expected by the European Martian climate dataset v3.1. The parent global circulation model LMD-Oxford-AAS is able to take into account a wide number of physical phenomena, but the results included in EMCD are affected by a relatively coarse spatial resolution, that does not properly describe the great volcanic domes. The comparison demonstrated that observed data follow quite strictly the trends foreseen by the model in low altitude regions, while the behavior shows remarkable differences above the relief, where orography likely plays an important role. Namely, extended mid-altitude minima in air temperature fields above the summit of volcanic domes are observed. The integrated content of dust shows a minima above Olympus, as expected for a dust particle concentration that decays with height. Measurements are consistent with an exponential decay characterized by a scale height of ˜10 km. Consistently, the surface temperature presents a maxima over the dome, as expected for conditions of clearer sky. Water ice clouds are clearly detected around Ascreus Mons, with a strong asymmetry in latitude. Further comparison with the results of the

  16. [Effects of elevated O3 on leaf litter decomposition and nutrient release of Quercus mongolica in city].

    PubMed

    Su, Li-li; Xu, Sheng; Fu, Wei; He, Xing-yuan; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Yi; Ping, Qin

    2016-02-01

    The leaf litters of 10-year-old Quercus mongolica were put in nylon bags and exposed to elevated 03 level (120 nmol . mol-1) with the control of 40 nmol . mol-1 in open top chambers (OTCs) for 150 days to test the effect of high O3 on the litter decomposition. The results showed that no significant difference was observed in residual mass between elevated O3 treatment and the control. Elevated 03 inhibited the release of C and K during the decomposition, the residual rate of K under elevated O3 treatment (23.9%) was significantly higher than that of the control (17.1%) after 150-day decomposition. Compared with the control, N mineralization and lignin degradation in elevated O3 treatment were inhibited during early period of decomposition (0-60 d), but were promoted in later period (90-150 d). The changes of lignin/N showed no significant difference between elevated O3 treatment and the control during the decomposition. Elevated O3 generally promoted the release of P in leaf litter of Q. mongolica during the decomposition. C/P ratio was higher under elevated 03 than that under control. Significant positive correlation was shown between residual dry mass of leaf litters and the residual rate of C, N, K, C/N ratio during decomposition. Elevated 03 might play an important role in the nutrient cycle of forest ecosystem in high-O3 pollution area.

  17. Newly observed several peroxides from the gas phase ozonolysis of isoprene using a flow tube reactor and the water vapor effect on their formation and decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Chen, Z.; Zhao, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, one has been paying more and more attention to the formation of hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) because peroxides play important roles, such as reservoir of OH, HO2 and RO2 radicals, intermediate of Criegee radical chemistry and contributor to secondary organic aerosol. However, to the best of our knowledge, in the reaction of ozone with VOCs, only several small peroxides such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), and methyl hydroperoxide (MHP) were separately identified, and their yields varied widely between different studies. Moreover, the information on the formation mechanism of peroxides in the ozonolysis of VOCs was mostly from a speculation rather than experimental evidence. Notably, a static chamber was employed in most of the previous studies, potentially resulting in the decomposition and heterogeneous reaction of peroxides on the chamber walls within an experiment time of tens of minutes to several hours, and possibly missing the details about the generation of peroxides. In the present study, we have used a flow quartz tube reactor to investigate the formation of peroxides in the ozonolysis of isoprene at various relative humidities (RH). A variety of peroxides have been detected on the tens of seconds of time scale using an online high performance liquid chromatography coupled with post-column derivatization using p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and fluorescence detection. Our experimental results show that in addition to the three peroxides mentioned previously, more four ones, those are peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and three unknown peroxides, have been found. Furthermore, the total yield of the three small peroxides (H2O2, HMHP and MHP) is found to be similar to the result of literature; while for PAA and three unknown peroxides, they highlight a combined molar yield, for example, ~ 40% at 5% RH, much higher than that of the three small peroxides

  18. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Dickey, John

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  19. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-04-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  20. Decomposition of Sodium Tetraphenylborate

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-11-20

    The chemical decomposition of aqueous alkaline solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the determination of additives and/or variables which influence NaTBP decomposition. This document describes work aimed at providing better understanding into the relationship of copper (II), solution temperature, and solution pH to NaTPB stability.

  1. On the early onset of the NLC season 2013 as observed at ALOMAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Jens; Baumgarten, Gerd; Berger, Uwe; Gabriel, Axel; Latteck, Ralph; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2015-05-01

    On 21 May the ALOMAR RMR-lidar in Northern Norway detected the first noctilucent clouds (NLC) in 2013. This unusual early NLC onset was accompanied by ∼6 K lower temperatures and higher water vapor mixing ratios at NLC altitudes from the end of April until the beginning of June. The zonal mean temperature and dynamic conditions in the Arctic middle atmosphere deviated in spring 2013 significantly from the mean conditions of the last 20 years. Furthermore the planetary wave activity in the high latitude stratosphere was enhanced from 20 April to beginning of May. The colder and wetter upper mesosphere in May 2013 is attributed to this unusual late planetary wave activity in the stratosphere, introducing a strong upwelling in the mesosphere, lower temperatures and an upward transport of water vapor, which finally resulted in earlier existence conditions for mesospheric ice particles. We regard this as a first evidence for intra-hemispheric coupling in the northern hemisphere extending from the stratosphere into the mesopause region. Yet it is unclear whether this is an unusual extreme event or an indicator for a change in the circulation due to the observed long-term cooling of the middle atmosphere.

  2. Constraint on the early Universe by relic gravitational waves: From pulsar timing observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Wen

    2011-05-15

    Recent pulsar timing observations by the Parkers Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) and European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) teams obtained the constraint on the relic gravitational waves at the frequency f{sub *}=1/yr, which provides the opportunity to constrain H{sub *}, the Hubble parameter, when these waves crossed the horizon during inflation. In this paper, we investigate this constraint by considering the general scenario for the early Universe: we assume that the effective (average) equation-of-state w before the big bang nucleosynthesis stage is a free parameter. In the standard hot big-bang scenario with w=1/3, we find that the current PPTA result follows a bound H{sub *{<=}}1.15x10{sup -1}m{sub Pl}, and the EPTA result follows H{sub *{<=}}6.92x10{sup -2}m{sub Pl}. We also find that these bounds become much tighter in the nonstandard scenarios with w>1/3. When w=1, the bounds become H{sub *{<=}}5.89x10{sup -3}m{sub Pl} for the current PPTA and H{sub *{<=}}3.39x10{sup -3}m{sub Pl} for the current EPTA. In contrast, in the nonstandard scenario with w=0, the bound becomes H{sub *{<=}}7.76m{sub Pl} for the current PPTA.

  3. Hubble's Early Release Observations Student Pilot Project: Implementing Formal and Informal Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Ryer, H.; McCallister, D.

    2012-08-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Early Release Observations (EROs) were revealed to the public on September 9, 2009, and K-12 students and educators in five states across the country were able to join the celebration. To date, students and educators in Maryland, Ohio, New York, California, and Florida have participated in the Hubble Space Telescope's ERO Pilot Project. This is an interdisciplinary project created by the Space Telecope Science Institute's (STScI) Office of Public Outreach in which students use skills from subject areas such as language arts, science, art, and technology to research the four ERO objects and create compositions. In recognition of their participation, the students' compositions are displayed at host institutions in each state (a museum, science center, school, planetarium or library) during a special public event for participating students, their families, and teachers. As part of its evaluation program, STScI's Office of Public Outreach has been conducting an evaluation of the project to determine the viability and potential of conducting large-scale, formal/informal collaborative projects in the future and to share lessons learned. Lessons learned will be applied to a new interdisciplinary project, the James Webb Space Telescope Student Innovation Project.

  4. Use of 13C NMR and ftir for elucidation of degradation pathways during natural litter decomposition and composting I. early stage leaf degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Leenheer, J.A.; Kennedy, K.R.; Noyes, T.I.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative degradation of plant tissue leads to the formation of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and humus. Infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry have been used to elucidate the chemical reactions of the early stages of degradation that give rise to DOC derived from litter and compost. The results of this study indicate that oxidation of the lignin components of plant tissue follows the sequence of O-demethylation, and hydroxylation followed by ring-fission, chain-shortening, and oxidative removal of substituents. Oxidative ring-fission leads to the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the cleaved ends of the rings and, in the process, transforms phenolic groups into aliphatic alcoholic groups. The carbohydrate components are broken down into aliphatic hydroxy acids and aliphatic alcohols.

  5. An overview of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and its observations - New sky maps of the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the three instruments aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite and presents early results obtained from the first six months of observations. The three instruments (FIRAS, DMR, and DIRBE) have operated well and produced significant new results. The FIRAS measurement of the CMB spectrum supports the standard Big Bang model. The maps made from the DMR instrument measurements show a spatially smooth early universe. The maps of galactic and zodiacal emission produced by the DIRBE instrument are needed to identify the foreground emissions from extragalactic and thus to interpret its and the other COBE results in terms of events in the early universe.

  6. Variable Deformation Rates at Sierra Negra Volcano: Geodetic Observations from 2008 to Early 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, N. J.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.; Ruiz, G.

    2014-12-01

    Sierra Negra is a basaltic shield volcano located at the southern end of Isabela Island, Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. The volcano, along with the rest of the Galápagos Islands, has formed by hotspot volcanism. The volcano has erupted twice over the last 35 years, producing VEI-3 eruptions in November 1979 and October 2005. Previous studies suggest that deformation is due to a flat-topped chamber or sill centered 1.9-2.2 km beneath the caldera (Amelung et al. 2000; Yun et al. 2006; Geist et al. 2007). Ten continuous Global Positioning System (cGPS) stations were installed within and on the rim of the caldera of Sierra Negra (i.e., sites GV01 - GV10) in 2002, 2006, and 2009 to track ongoing deformation. In addition, there is one cGPS site on the nearby (90 km) island of Santa Cruz (GLPS), where no recent volcanism has been observed. We analyzed the cGPS data for the period 2008 to 2014 using GIPSY-OASIS II and produced daily position time series for each site. We then estimated yearly velocities for each site assuming linear deformation. We subtract the velocity vector for site GLPS from all Sierra Negra cGPS sites to remove the motion of the Nazca plate. The resulting horizontal and vertical velocity fields indicate significant upward and outward displacement of the volcanic edifice, which we interpret as caused by the influx of new magma or magma chamber pressurization. There are significant yearly variations in both the direction and magnitude of station velocities. For the period covering 2008 to 2011 there is accelerating inflation. Maximum rates of deformation (mm/yr) are seen at GV07 in 2008 (87.02), GV09 in 2009 (161.18), and GV03 in 2010 (191.03). Inflation continues for the period 2011-2013, but at a slower rate. Maximum rates are seen at GV03 in 2011 (78.53) and GV06 in 2012 (22.44). The rate then increases again for the period covering mid-2013 through early 2014. Maximum rates are seen at GV06 in both 2013 (318.27) and early 2014 (308.53). The maximum

  7. The metal abundance of circumnuclear star-forming regions in early-type spirals. Spectrophotometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Ángeles I.; Terlevich, Elena; Castellanos, Marcelo; Hägele, Guillermo F.

    2007-11-01

    We have obtained long-slit observations in the optical and near-infrared of 12 circumnuclear HII regions [circumnuclear star-forming regions (CNSFR)] in the early-type spiral galaxies NGC2903, 3351 and 3504 with the aim of deriving their chemical abundances. Only for one of the regions, the [SIII] λ6312Å was detected providing, together with the nebular [SIII] lines at λλ9069, 9532Å, a value of the electron temperature of . A semi-empirical method for the derivation of abundances in the high metallicity regime is presented. We obtain abundances which are comparable to those found in high metallicity disc HII regions from direct measurements of electron temperatures and consistent with solar values within the errors. The region with the highest oxygen abundance is R3+R4 in NGC3504, 12 + log(O/H) = 8.85, about 1.5 solar if the solar oxygen abundance is set at the value derived by Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval, 12 + log(O/H)solar = 8.66 +/- 0.05. Region R7 in NGC3351 has the lowest oxygen abundance of the sample, about 0.6 times solar. In all the observed CNSFR the O/H abundance is dominated by the O+/H+ contribution, as is also the case for high metallicity disc HII regions. For our observed regions, however, also the S+/S2+ ratio is larger than one, contrary to what is found in high metallicity disc HII regions for which, in general, the sulphur abundances are dominated by S2+/H+. The derived N/O ratios are in average larger than those found in high metallicity disc HII regions and they do not seem to follow the trend of N/O versus O/H which marks the secondary behaviour of nitrogen. On the other hand, the S/O ratios span a very narrow range between 0.6 and 0.8 of the solar value. As compared to high metallicity disc HII regions, CNSFR show values of the O23 and the N2 parameters whose distributions are shifted to lower and higher values, respectively, hence, even though their derived oxygen and sulphur abundances are similar, higher values would in principle be

  8. Methanethiol decomposition on Ni(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, M.E.; Ahkter, S.; Golchet, A.; White, J.M. ); Sahin, T. )

    1991-01-01

    Static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SSIMS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were used under ultrahigh vacuum conditions to study the decomposition of CH{sub 3}SH on Ni(100). Only methane, hydrogen, and the parent molecule are observed in TPD. Complete decomposition to C(a), S(a) and desorbing H{sub 2} is the preferred reaction pathway for low exposures, while desorption of methane is observed at higher coverages. Preadsorbed hydrogen promoted methane desorption. Upon adsorption, and for low coverages, SSIMS evidence indicates S-H bond cleavage into CH{sub 3}S and surface hydrogen. S-H bond cleavage is inhibited for high coverages. The TP-SSIMS data are consistent with an activated C-S bond cleavage in CH{sub 3}S, with an activation energy of 8.81 kcal/mol and preexponential factor of 10{sup 6.5}s{sup {minus}1}. The low preexponential factor is taken as indicating a complex decomposition pathway. A mechanism consistent with the observed data is discussed.

  9. Increasing Accountability Measures for Early Childhood Teachers Using Evaluation Models: Observation, Feedback, and Self-Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Anna Krummel

    2015-01-01

    President Barack Obama and U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan are promoting an early learning initiative focusing on the agenda of every four year old having equal access to high-quality early learning environments (Administration for Children and Families, 2013). One way the Federal government is supporting this proposal is through a grant;…

  10. Herschel and JCMT observations of the early-type dwarf galaxy NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, I.; Baes, M.; Parkin, T. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Cooray, A.; Cormier, D.; Fritz, J.; Galliano, F.; Gear, W.; Gentile, G.; Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S. C.; Roussel, H.; Sauvage, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Verstappen, J.; Young, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present Herschel dust continuum, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope CO (3-2) observations and a search for [C II] 158 ?m and [O I] 63 ?m spectral line emission for the brightest early-type dwarf satellite of Andromeda, NGC 205. While direct gas measurements [Mg˜ 1.5 × 106 M⊙, H I+ CO (1-0)] have proven to be inconsistent with theoretical predictions of the current gas reservoir in NGC 205 (>107 M⊙), we revise the missing interstellar medium mass problem based on new gas mass estimates (CO (3-2), [C II], [O I]) and indirect measurements of the interstellar medium content through dust continuum emission. Based on Herschel observations, covering a wide wavelength range from 70 to 500 ?m, we are able to probe the entire dust content in NGC 205 (? M⊙ at Td˜ 18-22 K) and rule out the presence of a massive cold dust component (? M⊙, Td˜ 12 K), which was suggested based on millimetre observations from the inner 18.4 arcsec. Assuming a reasonable gas-to-dust ratio of ˜400, the dust mass in NGC 205 translates into a gas mass Mg˜ 4-7 × 106 M⊙. The non-detection of [O I] and the low L[C II]-to-LCO(1-0) line intensity ratio (˜1850) imply that the molecular gas phase is well traced by CO molecules in NGC 205. We estimate an atomic gas mass of 1.5 × 104 M⊙ associated with the [C II] emitting photodissociation regions in NGC 205. From the partial CO (3-2) map of the northern region in NGC 205, we derive a molecular gas mass of ? M⊙. Upon comparison with the molecular gas mass estimated from CO (1-0) observations (? M⊙), we find most of the H2 gas in NGC 205 to be locked in diffuse regions of low density and/or temperature, characteristic for an interstellar medium with little star formation activity. New total gas mass estimates from Herschel dust continuum (4-7 × 106 M⊙), Herschel [C II] line spectroscopic mapping (1.5 × 104 M⊙) and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope CO (3-2) observations (7 × 105 M⊙), including the H I mass (? M⊙) and a correction

  11. Early results on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko observed by Rosetta/OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierks, H.; Tubiana, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Agarwal, J.; Güttler, C.; Oklay, N.; Vincent, J.; Küppers, M.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P.; Rickman, H.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Hviid, S.; Mottola, S.; Osiris Team

    2014-07-01

    67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is the target comet of the ESA Rosetta mission. Launched in 2004, the Rosetta spacecraft woke up on the 20th of January 2014. After 36 months of deep space hibernation, Rosetta is now traveling to rendezvous with the comet at 4.1 au from the Sun, and it will follow 67P along its orbit, investigating how the comet changes and evolves while approaching the Sun. The Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System OSIRIS (Keller et al., 2007) is the scientific imaging system onboard Rosetta. It comprises the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) with wavelength range 250--1000 nm and the Wide Angle Camera (WAC) with wavelength range 240--720 nm. The NAC (FOV = 2.20×2.22 deg) is a system with high spatial resolution that allows an initial detection of the nucleus, studies its structure and rotation from relatively great distances, investigates the mineralogy of the surface, and studies the dust ejection processes. The WAC has much lower spatial resolution but, accordingly, a much wider field of view (about 11.35×12.11 deg). This allows observations of the 3-dimensional flow field of dust and gas near the nucleus and, in addition, provides a synoptic view of the whole nucleus. In summary, the WAC would provide long-term monitoring of the entire nucleus from close distances, while the NAC studies the details. The two camera units have been designed as a complementary pair, which, on one hand, addresses the study of the nucleus surface, and on the other hand, investigates the dynamics of the sublimation process. After commissioning in March 2014, OSIRIS took first images of comet 67P and its dust environment. Ground-based observations performed in 2007/08 when 67P was in the same orbital arc as it will be in March/April 2014, show that the comet was already active at 4.3 au inbound and that its behavior was repetitive during the last three apparitions (Snodgrass et al. 2013). We therefore expect to detect early comet activity by OSIRIS in

  12. “Triple positive” early breast cancer: an observational multicenter retrospective analysis of outcome

    PubMed Central

    Vici, Patrizia; Pizzuti, Laura; Sperduti, Isabella; Frassoldati, Antonio; Natoli, Clara; Gamucci, Teresa; Tomao, Silverio; Michelotti, Andrea; Moscetti, Luca; Gori, Stefania; Baldini, Editta; Giotta, Francesco; Cassano, Alessandra; Santini, Daniele; Giannarelli, Diana; Di Lauro, Luigi; Corsi, Domenico Cristiano; Marchetti, Paolo; Sini, Valentina; Sergi, Domenico; Barba, Maddalena; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Russillo, Michelangelo; Mentuccia, Lucia; D'Onofrio, Loretta; Iezzi, Laura; Scinto, Angelo Fedele; Da Ros, Lucia; Bertolini, Ilaria; Basile, Maria Luisa; Rossi, Valentina; De Maria, Ruggero; Montemurro, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    We recently found that trastuzumab benefit may be lower in a small subset of early breast cancer (BC) patients (pts) with tumors expressing high levels of both hormonal receptors (HRs), i.e. triple positive (TP). To better investigate the role of HRs in HER2 positive BC, we retrospectively identified 872 TP BC pts treated with adjuvant chemotherapy alone (cohort A-366 pts), or plus trastuzumab (cohort B-506 pts). Relapse-free-survival (RFS) and breast-cancer-specific-survival (BCSS) were evaluated. Trastuzumab improved RFS and BCSS in all the subsets analyzed, but the effect on BCSS in tumors expressing both HRs in >30% of cells (TP30), and even on RFS in tumors with both HRs expressed in >50% of cells (TP50) was not significant. Distinct patterns of relapse were observed in TP50 and no-TP50 tumors, the former showing low and constant risk in the first 5 years, a late increase beyond 5 years and modest trastuzumab effect. Trastuzumab effect tended to disappear in pts whose tumors expressed ER in >50% of cells. Multivariate analysis of RFS confirmed a significant interaction between trastuzumab and ER expression, with benefit confined to pts whose tumors expressed ER in ≤50% of cells. Our data suggest that the pattern of relapse of TP tumors with high HRs is similar to that of “luminal”, HER2 negative tumors, without clear benefit from adjuvant trastuzumab, which remains the standard treatment even in TP tumors. Confirmatory findings on the extent to which quantitative expression of HRs may impact clinical behavior of HER2 positive BC are warranted. PMID:26910921

  13. Titan: Preliminary results on surface properties and photometry from VIMS observations of the early flybys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Hicks, M.D.; Clark, R.N.; Mosher, J.A.; McCord, T.B.; Jaumann, R.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.; Momary, T.; Simonelli, D.P.; Sicardy, B.

    2006-01-01

    Cassini observations of the surface of Titan offer unprecedented views of its surface through atmospheric windows in the 1-5 ??m region. Images obtained in windows for which the haze opacity is low can be used to derive quantitative photometric parameters such as albedo and albedo distribution, and physical properties such as roughness and particle characteristics. Images from the early Titan flybys, particularly T0, Ta, and T5 have been analyzed to create albedo maps in the 2.01 and 2.73 ??m windows. We find the average normal reflectance at these two wavelengths to be 0.15??0.02 and 0.035??0.003, respectively. Titan's surface is bifurcated into two albedo regimes, particularly at 2.01 ??m. Analysis of these two regimes to understand the physical character of the surface was accomplished with a macroscopic roughness model. We find that the two types of surface have substantially different roughness, with the low-albedo surface exhibiting mean slope angles of ???18??, and the high-albedo terrain having a much more substantial roughness with a mean slope angle of ???34??. A single-scattering phase function approximated by a one-term Henyey-Greenstein equation was also fit to each unit. Titan's surface is back-scattering (g???0.3-0.4), and does not exhibit substantially different backscattering behavior between the two terrains. Our results suggest that two distinct geophysical domains exist on Titan: a bright region cut by deep drainage channels and a relatively smooth surface. The two terrains are covered by a film or a coating of particles perhaps precipitated from the satellite's haze layer and transported by eolian processes. Our results are preliminary: more accurate values for the surface albedo and physical parameters will be derived as more data is gathered by the Cassini spacecraft and as a more complete radiative transfer model is developed from both Cassini orbiter and Huygens Lander measurements. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Highlights of early VIRTIS/ROSETTA observations: 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko seen from orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erard, Stéphane; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianricco; Arnold, Gabriele; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Capria, Teresa; DeSanctis, Maria Cristina; Leyrat, Cédric; Tosi, Federico; Drossart, Pierre; Ciarniello, Mauro; Raponi, Andrea; Quirico, Eric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    VIRTIS is the imaging spectrometer of the Rosetta mission, devoted to remote sensing studies of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (1). The instrument is made of a mapping channel covering the 0.3-5 μm range at moderate spectral resolution (VIRTIS-M), and of a cross-dispersion spectrometer covering the 2-5um range with resolution ~3000 (VIRTIS-H). The most recent results will be presented at the meeting; early ones are discussed here.The nucleus is observed from a wide range of illumination conditions and spatial resolution (down to 2.5 m). Albedo, spectral parameters, and compositional maps have been derived for areas out of the polar night. The nucleus surface appears to be extremely homogeneous and dark. The inferred normal albedo is 0.060 ± 0.003 at 0.55 μm (2), with distinct spectral slopes in the VIS and IR regions (5-25 and 1.5-5 % kÅ-1 respectively). The main spectral feature is a ubiquitous absorption in the 2.9-3.6 μm range, consistent with non-volatile organic macromolecular materials (2,3). The most likely absorbents include carboxylic groups, alcoholic OH, and possibly NH4+ ions. However, the low albedo and marked slope suggest a mixture with opaque minerals (e.g. sulfides) or Fe-Ni alloys in the refractory crust. Ice is so far marginally detected in areas just emerging from shadow (4).The surface temperature is measured on the dayside as a function of local time and heliocentric distance. A maximum of 220K has been derived, with fast variations controlled by low thermal inertia. This is consistent with a surface covered by a porous crust, mainly devoid of water ice (5,6).Water vapor and carbon dioxide have been observed in the coma and their variability with altitude, geographic location and heliocentric distance has been studied. CO2/H2O ratio averages to 3-7%, but both species display different distributions. This suggests either different source regions, or seasonal variability (7).1- Coradini et al, SSR, 20072- Capaccioni et al., Science, 20153

  15. Nucleon spin decomposition and orbital angular momentum in the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamatsu, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    To get a complete decomposition of nucleon spin is a fundamentally important homework of QCD. In fact, if our researches end up without accomplishing this task, a tremendous efforts since the 1st discovery of the nucleon spin crisis would end in the air. We now have a general agreement that there are at least two physically inequivalent gauge-invariant decompositions of the nucleon. In these two decompositions, the intrinsic spin parts of quarks and gluons are just common. What discriminate these two decompositions are the orbital angular momentum (OAM) parts. The OAMs of quarks and gluons appearing in the first decomposition are the so-called ``mechanical'' OAMs, while those appearing in the second decomposition are the generalized (gauge-invariant) ``canonical'' ones. By this reason, these decompositions are broadly called the ``mechanical'' and ``canonical'' decompositions of the nucleon spin. Still, there remains several issues, which have not reached a complete consensus among the experts. (See the latest recent). In the present talk, I will mainly concentrate on the practically most important issue, i.e. which decomposition is more favorable from the observational viewpoint. There are two often-claimed advantages of canonical decomposition. First, each piece of this decomposition satisfies the SU(2) commutation relation or angular momentum algebra. Second, the canonical OAM rather than the mechanical OAM is compatible with free partonic picture of constituent orbital motion. In the present talk, I will show that both these claims are not necessarily true, and push forward a viewpoint that the ``mechanical'' decomposition is more physical in that it has more direct connection with observables. I also emphasize that the nucleon spin decomposition accessed by the lattice QCD analyses is the ``mechanical'' decomposition not the ``canonical'' one. The recent lattice QCD studies of the nucleon spin decomposition are also briefly overviewed.

  16. Time dependence of ethylene decomposition and byproducts formation in a continuous flow dielectric-packed plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, M Sanjeeva; Ananth, Antony; Mok, Young Sun; Song, Jun-Ik; Park, Kyu-Hyun

    2013-04-01

    This work investigated the decomposition of ethylene in a continuous flow dielectric-packed bed plasma reactor filled with various packing materials at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. When compared to the case without any packing material, the reactor filled with packing materials remarkably facilitated the plasma-induced decomposition of ethylene in the order of α-alumina>silica>zirconia>glass wool (GW). Under identical condition, the increase in the decomposition efficiency (DE) with increasing the specific energy input was more rapid in the plasma reactor filled with the packing materials than in the blank plasma reactor. In the early stage, almost complete decomposition of ethylene was observed with the α-alumina, but after a certain period of time, the DE decreased with time. Unlike the α-alumina, the other packing materials examined did not show any significant deterioration in the decomposition over time during 10-h operation. After the regeneration of the used packing materials by using the plasma in the presence of oxygen, the original decomposition performance was nearly recovered. The decrease in the BET surface area due to the formation of polymer deposits was observed in the used α-alumina and silica; however the surface area was almost regained by the regeneration. While no other byproducts except carbon oxides and N2O were detected with the α-alumina and silica, methane, acetylene, formaldehyde and N2O were identified in the effluent gas with the zirconia and GW packing materials.

  17. Temporal dynamics of biotic and abiotic drivers of litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Shaw, E Ashley; Wall, Diana H; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Climate, litter quality and decomposers drive litter decomposition. However, little is known about whether their relative contribution changes at different decomposition stages. To fill this gap, we evaluated the relative importance of leaf litter polyphenols, decomposer communities and soil moisture for litter C and N loss at different stages throughout the decomposition process. Although both microbial and nematode communities regulated litter C and N loss in the early decomposition stages, soil moisture and legacy effects of initial differences in litter quality played a major role in the late stages of the process. Our results provide strong evidence for substantial shifts in how biotic and abiotic factors control litter C and N dynamics during decomposition. Taking into account such temporal dynamics will increase the predictive power of decomposition models that are currently limited by a single-pool approach applying control variables uniformly to the entire decay process.

  18. Dominant modal decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombovari, Zoltan

    2017-03-01

    The paper deals with the automatic decomposition of experimental frequency response functions (FRF's) of mechanical structures. The decomposition of FRF's is based on the Green function representation of free vibratory systems. After the determination of the impulse dynamic subspace, the system matrix is formulated and the poles are calculated directly. By means of the corresponding eigenvectors, the contribution of each element of the impulse dynamic subspace is determined and the sufficient decomposition of the corresponding FRF is carried out. With the presented dominant modal decomposition (DMD) method, the mode shapes, the modal participation vectors and the modal scaling factors are identified using the decomposed FRF's. Analytical example is presented along with experimental case studies taken from machine tool industry.

  19. Simulated NASA Satellite Data Products for the NOAA Integrated Coral Reef Observation Network/Coral Reef Early Warning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, Leland; Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    This RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) experiment will demonstrate the use of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) and LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission) sensor data as significant input to the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) ICON/ CREWS (Integrated Coral Reef Observation System/Coral Reef Early Warning System). The project affects the Coastal Management Program Element of the Applied Sciences Program.

  20. On the Helmert-blocking technique: its acceleration by block Choleski decomposition and formulae to insert observations into an adjusted network

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Eduardo; Oliveira, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The Helmert-blocking technique is a common approach to adjust large geodetic networks like Europeans and Brazilians. The technique is based upon a division of the network into partial networks called blocks. This way, the global network adjustment can be done by manipulating these blocks. Here we show alternatives to solve the block system that arises from the application of the technique. We show an alternative that optimizes its implementation as the elapsed processing time is decreased by about 33%. We also show that to insert observations into an adjusted network it is not necessary to readjust the whole network. We show the formulae to insert new observations into an adjusted network that are more efficient than simply readjusting the whole new network. PMID:26064634

  1. Parenting and the Family Check-Up: Changes in Observed Parent-Child Interaction Following Early Childhood Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sitnick, Stephanie L.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Gill, Anne; Dishion, Thomas; Winter, Charlotte; Waller, Rebecca; Gardner, Frances; Wilson, Melvin

    2016-01-01

    Coercion theory posits a cyclical relationship between harsh and coercive parent–child interactions and problem behavior beginning in early childhood. As coercive interactions have been theorized and found to facilitate the development and growth of early conduct problems, early interventions often target parenting to prevent or reduce early disruptive problem behavior. This study utilizes direct observations of parent–child interactions from the Early Steps Multisite study (N = 731; 369 boys) to examine the effect of the Family Check-Up, a family-centered intervention program, on measures of parent–child positive engagement and coercion from age 2 through 5, as well as on childhood problem behavior at age 5. Results indicate that high levels of parent–child positive engagement were associated with less parent–child coercion the following year, but dyadic coercion was unrelated to future levels of positive engagement. In addition, families assigned to the Family Check-Up showed increased levels of positive engagement at ages 3 and 5, and the association between positive engagement at age 3 and child problem behavior at age 5 was mediated by reductions in parent–child coercion at age 4. These findings provide longitudinal confirmation that increasing positive engagement in parent–child interaction can reduce the likelihood of coercive family dynamics in early childhood and growth in problem behavior. PMID:25133754

  2. Parenting and the Family Check-Up: Changes in Observed Parent-Child Interaction Following Early Childhood Intervention.

    PubMed

    Sitnick, Stephanie L; Shaw, Daniel S; Gill, Anne; Dishion, Thomas; Winter, Charlotte; Waller, Rebecca; Gardner, Frances; Wilson, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    Coercion theory posits a cyclical relationship between harsh and coercive parent-child interactions and problem behavior beginning in early childhood. As coercive interactions have been theorized and found to facilitate the development and growth of early conduct problems, early interventions often target parenting to prevent or reduce early disruptive problem behavior. This study utilizes direct observations of parent-child interactions from the Early Steps Multisite study (N = 731; 369 boys) to examine the effect of the Family Check-Up, a family-centered intervention program, on measures of parent-child positive engagement and coercion from age 2 through 5, as well as on childhood problem behavior at age 5. Results indicate that high levels of parent-child positive engagement were associated with less parent-child coercion the following year, but dyadic coercion was unrelated to future levels of positive engagement. In addition, families assigned to the Family Check-Up showed increased levels of positive engagement at ages 3 and 5, and the association between positive engagement at age 3 and child problem behavior at age 5 was mediated by reductions in parent-child coercion at age 4. These findings provide longitudinal confirmation that increasing positive engagement in parent-child interaction can reduce the likelihood of coercive family dynamics in early childhood and growth in problem behavior.

  3. The Stone Cold Truth: The Effect of Concrete Encasement on the Rate and Pattern of Soft Tissue Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Martin, D C; Dabbs, Gretchen R; Roberts, Lindsey G; Cleary, Megan K

    2016-03-01

    This study provides a descriptive analysis of taphonomic changes observed in the soft tissue of ten pigs (Sus scrofa) after being encased in Quickrete (®) concrete and excavated at monthly or bimonthly intervals over the course of 2 years. The best method of subject excavation was investigated. Rate and pattern of decomposition were compared to a nonencased control subject. Results demonstrate subjects interred in concrete decomposed significantly slower than the control subject (p < 0.01), the difference being observable after 1 month. After 1 year, the encased subject was in the early stage of decomposition with purging fluids and intact organs present, versus complete skeletonization of the control subject. Concrete subjects also display a unique decomposition pattern, exhibiting a chemically burned outer layer of skin and a common separation of the dermal and epidermal layers. Results suggest using traditional methods to estimate postmortem interval on concrete subjects may result in underestimation.

  4. Aflatoxin decomposition in various soils

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J.S.

    1986-08-01

    The persistence of aflatoxin in the soil environment could potentially result in a number of adverse environmental consequences. To determine the persistence of aflatoxin in soil, /sup 14/C-labeled aflatoxin B1, was added to silt loam, sandy loam, and silty clay loam soils and the subsequent release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was determined. After 120 days of incubation, 8.1% of the original aflatoxin added to the silt loam soil was released as CO/sub 2/. Aflatoxin decomposition in the sandy loam soil proceeded more quickly than the other two soils for the first 20 days of incubation. After this time, the decomposition rate declined and by the end of the study, 4.9% of the aflatoxin was released as CO/sub 2/. Aflatoxin decomposition proceeded most slowly in the silty clay loam soil. Only 1.4% of aflatoxin added to the soil was released as CO/sub 2/ after 120 days incubation. To determine whether aflatoxin was bound to the silty clay loam soil, aflatoxin B1 was added to this soil and incubated for 20 days. The soil was periodically extracted and the aflatoxin species present were determined using thin layer chromatographic (TLC) procedures. After one day of incubation, the degradation products, aflatoxins B2 and G2, were observed. It was also found that much of the aflatoxin extracted from the soil was not mobile with the TLC solvent system used. This indicated that a conjugate may have formed and thus may be responsible for the lack of aflatoxin decomposition.

  5. Early Metalinguistic Awareness of Derivational Morphology: Observations from a Comparison of English and French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Lynne G.; Casalis, Severine; Cole, Pascale

    2009-01-01

    This cross-linguistic comparison of metalinguistic development in French and English examines early ability to manipulate derivational suffixes in oral language games as a function of chronological age, receptive vocabulary, and year of schooling. Data from judgment and production tasks are presented for children aged between 5 and 8 years in…

  6. Early Childhood Development and School Readiness: Some Observations about "Homework" for New Century Working Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter-Defoe, Diana T.

    This keynote address examines the relationship between early childhood development and school readiness. The address begins with basic statistical data indicative of the well-being of children in Pennsylvania and Illinois and maintains that advocacy embracing and encouraging interdisciplinary professional collaboration for supporting and…

  7. From Home to the Home Corner: Observing Children's Identity-Maintenance in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooker, Liz

    2006-01-01

    This article draws on data from two recent studies of young children in early childhood settings. One study was of children in a Korean private kindergarten, the other of children in a UK reception class. In each study, the data discussed include both evidence from "home" (including parent interviews) and evidence from "school"…

  8. Small-scale early aggregation of green tide macroalgae observed on the Subei Bank, Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Jianheng; Chen, Changsheng; He, Peimin

    2014-04-15

    Massive green algae blooms became an environmental disaster in the Yellow Sea from 2008 to 2013. Recent studies suggested that recurrences of early aggregates of macroalgae were found over the Subei Bank, a unique shallow radial sand ridge system off the Jiangsu coast, China. Yearly field surveys have been carried out over this bank during the past five years (2009-2013), with an aim at identifying and qualifying the physical-biological mechanism for the early aggregation of algae. Data synthesis showed that early aggregation of macroalgae usually occurred from April-May as small-scale patches either over the intertidal mudflat of the Subei Bank or along local isobaths in the northern coastal area north of the bank. Both hydrographic and current measurements were performed by tracking a narrow patchy area of floating macroalgae (nearly 4 km in length and 5-10 m in width) on April 26, 2013, and the results showed that the algae aggregation was mainly caused by tide-induced convergence. This convergence was produced by the local geometrically controlled interaction of tidal currents with mudflats, which is believed to be a key physical mechanism for the early development of algal blooms in addition to marine ecosystem responses and human aquaculture activities.

  9. The potential role of real-time geodetic observations in tsunami early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Stefano; Armigliato, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Tsunami warning systems (TWS) have the final goal to launch a reliable alert of an incoming dangerous tsunami to coastal population early enough to allow people to flee from the shore and coastal areas according to some evacuation plans. In the last decade, especially after the catastrophic 2004 Boxing Day tsunami in the Indian Ocean, much attention has been given to filling gaps in the existing TWSs (only covering the Pacific Ocean at that time) and to establishing new TWSs in ocean regions that were uncovered. Typically, TWSs operating today work only on earthquake-induced tsunamis. TWSs estimate quickly earthquake location and size by real-time processing seismic signals; on the basis of some pre-defined "static" procedures (either based on decision matrices or on pre-archived tsunami simulations), assess the tsunami alert level on a large regional scale and issue specific bulletins to a pre-selected recipients audience. Not unfrequently these procedures result in generic alert messages with little value. What usually operative TWSs do not do, is to compute earthquake focal mechanism, to calculate the co-seismic sea-floor displacement, to assess the initial tsunami conditions, to input these data into tsunami simulation models and to compute tsunami propagation up to the threatened coastal districts. This series of steps is considered nowadays too time consuming to provide the required timely alert. An equivalent series of steps could start from the same premises (earthquake focal parameters) and reach the same result (tsunami height at target coastal areas) by replacing the intermediate steps of real-time tsunami simulations with proper selection from a large archive of pre-computed tsunami scenarios. The advantage of real-time simulations and of archived scenarios selection is that estimates are tailored to the specific occurring tsunami and alert can be more detailed (less generic) and appropriate for local needs. Both these procedures are still at an

  10. Color distributions in early-type galaxies. I. BVRI observations with a scanning CCD

    SciTech Connect

    Boroson, T.A.; Thompson, I.B.; Shectman, S.A.

    1983-12-01

    An RCA CCD has been used in a scanning mode on the Palomar 1.5-m telescope to obtain high precision photometric images of three early-type galaxies. Advantages of this mode of operation include much reduced pixel-to-pixel sensitivity variations and more accurate sky subtraction. Frames in B, V, R, and I of NGC 4486 (M87) have been used to show, by comparison with published high quality surface photometry and aperture photometry, that this instrument produces measurements accurate at the 0.02-mag level at surface brightnesses above that of the sky. These frames of M87 and similar images of NGC 2300 and NGC 2768 reveal several interesting features of color variations in the inner regions of these early-type galaxies. NGC 2768 is found to have a dust ring or disk perpendicular to its plane of symmetry. All the colors appear to become bluer gradually outward from the center, with M87 showing the strongest gradients. The shapes of the contours of constant color are rounder, at small radii (<20 arcsec), than the isophotes in NGC 2300 and NGC 2768. This is not predicted by any galaxy formation picture, but would seem to support dissipationless collapse or mergers as the dominant processes in the formation of early-type galaxies.

  11. EARLY-TIME VLA OBSERVATIONS AND BROADBAND AFTERGLOW ANALYSIS OF THE FERMI/LAT DETECTED GRB 130907A

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, Péter; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at ≈4 hr after the γ-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and at late times showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at >10 GHz, to attempt to identify reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broadband data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter (A{sub *}), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well-sampled light curves) for unambiguously identifying the potential contribution of the reverse shock.

  12. Decomposing Nekrasov decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Zenkevich, Y.

    2016-02-01

    AGT relations imply that the four-point conformal block admits a decomposition into a sum over pairs of Young diagrams of essentially rational Nekrasov functions — this is immediately seen when conformal block is represented in the form of a matrix model. However, the q-deformation of the same block has a deeper decomposition — into a sum over a quadruple of Young diagrams of a product of four topological vertices. We analyze the interplay between these two decompositions, their properties and their generalization to multi-point conformal blocks. In the latter case we explain how Dotsenko-Fateev all-with-all (star) pair "interaction" is reduced to the quiver model nearest-neighbor (chain) one. We give new identities for q-Selberg averages of pairs of generalized Macdonald polynomials. We also translate the slicing invariance of refined topological strings into the language of conformal blocks and interpret it as abelianization of generalized Macdonald polynomials.

  13. The generalized triangular decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Hager, William W.; Li, Jian

    2008-06-01

    Given a complex matrix mathbf{H} , we consider the decomposition mathbf{H} = mathbf{QRP}^* , where mathbf{R} is upper triangular and mathbf{Q} and mathbf{P} have orthonormal columns. Special instances of this decomposition include the singular value decomposition (SVD) and the Schur decomposition where mathbf{R} is an upper triangular matrix with the eigenvalues of mathbf{H} on the diagonal. We show that any diagonal for mathbf{R} can be achieved that satisfies Weyl's multiplicative majorization conditions: prod_{iD1}^k \\vert r_{i}\\vert le prod_{iD1}^k sigma_i, ; ; 1 le k < K, quad prod_{iD1}^K \\vert r_{i}\\vert = prod_{iD1}^K sigma_i, where K is the rank of mathbf{H} , sigma_i is the i -th largest singular value of mathbf{H} , and r_{i} is the i -th largest (in magnitude) diagonal element of mathbf{R} . Given a vector mathbf{r} which satisfies Weyl's conditions, we call the decomposition mathbf{H} = mathbf{QRP}^* , where mathbf{R} is upper triangular with prescribed diagonal mathbf{r} , the generalized triangular decomposition (GTD). A direct (nonrecursive) algorithm is developed for computing the GTD. This algorithm starts with the SVD and applies a series of permutations and Givens rotations to obtain the GTD. The numerical stability of the GTD update step is established. The GTD can be used to optimize the power utilization of a communication channel, while taking into account quality of service requirements for subchannels. Another application of the GTD is to inverse eigenvalue problems where the goal is to construct matrices with prescribed eigenvalues and singular values.

  14. Optimal domain decomposition strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Yonghyun; Soni, Bharat K.

    1995-01-01

    The primary interest of the authors is in the area of grid generation, in particular, optimal domain decomposition about realistic configurations. A grid generation procedure with optimal blocking strategies has been developed to generate multi-block grids for a circular-to-rectangular transition duct. The focus of this study is the domain decomposition which optimizes solution algorithm/block compatibility based on geometrical complexities as well as the physical characteristics of flow field. The progress realized in this study is summarized in this paper.

  15. Decomposition of blackberry and broomsedge bluestem as influenced by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Chappelka, A.H.; Miller-Goodman, M.S.

    1998-07-01

    Many researchers have reported on individual plant responses to O{sub 3}, but few have investigated the effects of this pollutant on ecosystem function. This investigation examined the influence of O{sub 3} on short-term (Phase 1) litter decomposition of blackberry (Rubus cuneifolus Pursh.) and broomsedge bluestem (Andropogon virginicus L.), two plant species native to early successional forest communities in the southern US. Mixed blackberry/broomsedge litter (1:1) collected from plants exposed to different levels of O{sub 3} for one growing season was placed in open-top chambers and exposed to different O{sub 3} levels of treatments for 24 weeks. Litter also was incubated in microcosms in the laboratory t 25 or 30 C to determine the effects of climate change on O{sub 3}-treated litter. Initial C and N concentrations of the collected foliage did not differ significantly among treatments for either species. Blackberry litter had approximately twice as much N as broomsedge, and when collected from 2X O{sub 3} chambers, had significantly greater permanganate lignin than the other treatments. Initial permanganate lignin concentration of blackberry, over all O{sub 3} treatments, correlated significantly with remaining mass of the litter mixture after 24 wk exposure. Litter decomposed more slowly in the 2X chambers than in the other treatment chambers, regardless of litter source. Elevated O{sub 3}-exposed litter (2X) decomposed the slowest regardless of treatment applied. There were significant temperature and time effects observed with litter decomposition: litter incubated at 30 C decomposed faster than at 25 C. The data suggest O{sub 3} may influence substrate quality and microbial activity, thus reducing the rate of litter decomposition in early successional forest communities.

  16. Screening Kindergarten Children for Early Intervention through Direct Observation of Classroom Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forness, Steven R.

    The purpose of this study is to determine if children identified as "at risk" on the basis of their observable classroom behavior at the beginning of their kindergarten year are also the same children whom teachers see as having problems much later in the year. Kindergarten children were observed in the fall and spring. Teachers were asked to rate…

  17. Systematic Observation of Early Adolescents in Educational Settings: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Anne; Mikami, Amori Yee

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of systematic, empirically tested observational frameworks in school-based research is crucial for increasing the replicability and generalizability of findings across settings. That said, observations are often mistakenly assumed to be the "gold standard" assessment, without more nuanced discussions about the best uses…

  18. Ataxic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: diagnostic techniques and neuropathologic observations in early disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, H R; Hedley-Whyte, E T; Freidberg, S R; Baker, R A

    1985-02-01

    We studied two cases of ataxic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. EEG, CT, evoked responses, and CSF were normal in one purely ataxic patient. Diagnosis was established by cerebellar biopsy. Autopsy demonstrated devastating spongiform changes in the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and thalamus with rare focal changes in cerebral cortex. In the second patient, late generalized changes developed with dementia. Diagnostic studies included abnormal visual evoked responses, CSF with abnormal oligoclonal bands and IgG, and subacute spongiform encephalopathy in frontal lobe biopsy. Early diagnosis is best established by biopsy of brain areas most likely to be involved on the basis of clinical neurologic findings.

  19. Proposed Observations of Gravitational Waves from the Early Universe via "MILLIKAN Oil DROPS"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, Raymond Y.

    Pairs of Planck-mass drops of superfluid helium coated by electrons (i.e. "Millikan oil drops"), when levitated in a superconducting magnetic trap, can be efficient quantum transducers between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation. This leads to the possibility of a Hertz-like experiment, in which EM waves are converted at the source into GR waves, and then back-converted at the receiver from GR waves into EM waves. Detection of the gravitational-wave analog of the cosmic microwave background using these drops can discriminate between various theories of the early Universe.

  20. Proposed Observations of Gravitational Waves from the Early Universe via "millikan Oil Drops"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, Raymond Y.

    Pairs of Planck-mass drops of superfluid helium coated by electrons (i.e. "Millikan oil drops"), when levitated in a superconducting magnetic trap, can be efficient quantum transducers between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation. This leads to the possibility of a Hertz-like experiment, in which EM waves are converted at the source into GR waves, and then back-converted at the receiver from GR waves into EM waves. Detection of the gravitational-wave analog of the cosmic microwave background using these drops can discriminate between various theories of the early Universe.

  1. Early-infantile galactosialidosis: Clinical, biochemical, and molecular observations in a new patient

    SciTech Connect

    Zammarchi, E.; Donati, M.A.; Morrone, A.

    1996-08-23

    Few patients with the early-infantile form of galactosialidosis have been described to date. Presented here is the first Italian case. Fetal hydrops was detected by ultrasound at week 24 of gestation. At birth, the infant presented with hypotonial, massive edema, a flattened coarse facies. telangiectasias, and hepatosplenomegaly, but no dysostosis multiplex. The patient died 72 days postpartum. Excessive sialyloligosaccharides in urine, as well as vacuolation of lymphocytes and eosinophilic granulocytes in peripheral blood, were indicative of a lysosomal storage disease. In the patient`s fibroblasts, both {alpha}-neuraminidase and {beta}-galactosidase activities were severely reduced, and cathepsin A activity was <1% of control levels, confirming the biochemical diagnosis of galactosialidosis. However, in contrast to previously reported early-infantile cases, a normal amount of protective protein/cathepsin A mRNA was detected on Northern blots. This mutant transcript was translated into a precursor protein that was not processed into the mature enzyme and lacked both protective and catalytic activities. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Excess optical enhancement observed with arcons for early crab giant pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Strader, M. J.; Johnson, M. D.; Mazin, B. A.; ...

    2013-11-26

    Here, we observe an extraordinary link in the Crab pulsar between the enhancement of an optical pulse and the timing of the corresponding giant radio pulse. At optical through infrared wavelengths, our observations use the high time resolution of ARray Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry, a unique superconducting energy-resolving photon-counting array at the Palomar 200 inch telescope. At radio wavelengths, we observe with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument backend. We see an 11.3% ± 2.5% increase in peak optical flux for pulses that have an accompanying giant radio pulsemore » arriving near the peak of the optical main pulse, in contrast to a 3.2% ± 0.5% increase when an accompanying giant radio pulse arrives soon after the optical peak. We also observe that the peak of the optical main pulse is 2.8% ± 0.8% enhanced when there is a giant radio pulse accompanying the optical interpulse. We also observe no statistically significant spectral differences between optical pulses accompanied by and not accompanied by giant radio pulses. These results extend previous observations of optical-radio correlation to the time and spectral domains. Our refined temporal correlation suggests that optical and radio emission are indeed causally linked, and the lack of spectral differences suggests that the same mechanism is responsible for all optical emission.« less

  3. EXCESS OPTICAL ENHANCEMENT OBSERVED WITH ARCONS FOR EARLY CRAB GIANT PULSES

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, M. J.; Mazin, B. A.; Spiro Jaeger, G. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Meeker, S. R.; Szypryt, P.; Van Eyken, J. C.; Marsden, D.; Walter, A. B.; Ulbricht, G.; Johnson, M. D.; O'Brien, K.; Stoughton, C.; Bumble, B.

    2013-12-10

    We observe an extraordinary link in the Crab pulsar between the enhancement of an optical pulse and the timing of the corresponding giant radio pulse. At optical through infrared wavelengths, our observations use the high time resolution of ARray Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry, a unique superconducting energy-resolving photon-counting array at the Palomar 200 inch telescope. At radio wavelengths, we observe with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument backend. We see an 11.3% ± 2.5% increase in peak optical flux for pulses that have an accompanying giant radio pulse arriving near the peak of the optical main pulse, in contrast to a 3.2% ± 0.5% increase when an accompanying giant radio pulse arrives soon after the optical peak. We also observe that the peak of the optical main pulse is 2.8% ± 0.8% enhanced when there is a giant radio pulse accompanying the optical interpulse. We observe no statistically significant spectral differences between optical pulses accompanied by and not accompanied by giant radio pulses. Our results extend previous observations of optical-radio correlation to the time and spectral domains. Our refined temporal correlation suggests that optical and radio emission are indeed causally linked, and the lack of spectral differences suggests that the same mechanism is responsible for all optical emission.

  4. Excess optical enhancement observed with arcons for early crab giant pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, M. J.; Johnson, M. D.; Mazin, B. A.; Spiro Jaeger, G. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Meeker, S. R.; Szypryt, P.; van Eyken, J. C.; Marsden, D.; O'Brien, K.; Walter, A. B.; Ulbricht, G.; Stoughton, C.; Bumble, B.

    2013-11-26

    Here, we observe an extraordinary link in the Crab pulsar between the enhancement of an optical pulse and the timing of the corresponding giant radio pulse. At optical through infrared wavelengths, our observations use the high time resolution of ARray Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry, a unique superconducting energy-resolving photon-counting array at the Palomar 200 inch telescope. At radio wavelengths, we observe with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument backend. We see an 11.3% ± 2.5% increase in peak optical flux for pulses that have an accompanying giant radio pulse arriving near the peak of the optical main pulse, in contrast to a 3.2% ± 0.5% increase when an accompanying giant radio pulse arrives soon after the optical peak. We also observe that the peak of the optical main pulse is 2.8% ± 0.8% enhanced when there is a giant radio pulse accompanying the optical interpulse. We also observe no statistically significant spectral differences between optical pulses accompanied by and not accompanied by giant radio pulses. These results extend previous observations of optical-radio correlation to the time and spectral domains. Our refined temporal correlation suggests that optical and radio emission are indeed causally linked, and the lack of spectral differences suggests that the same mechanism is responsible for all optical emission.

  5. Decomposition of free chlorine with tertiary ammonium.

    PubMed

    Katano, Hajime; Uematsu, Kohei; Tatsumi, Hirosuke; Tsukatani, Toshihide

    2010-01-01

    The reaction of free chlorine with tertiary ammonium or amine compounds in aqueous solution was studied by the amperometry at a rotating Pt-disk electrode. The amperometric method can be applied to follow the concentration of free chlorine (c(Cl)) even in the presence of chloramine species. By addition of mono- and dibutylammonium to the solution containing free chlorine, the step-like decrease in c(Cl) was observed, indicating the rapid formation of the stable chloramine species. By addition of tributylammonium, the c(Cl) was decreased exponentially to nearly zero even if the free chlorine was present initially in excess. The c(Cl)-t curves can be explained by tributylammonium-species-catalyzed decomposition of free chlorine to chloride ion. The catalytic decomposition was observed also with the tertiary-ammonium-based anion-exchange resins. Furthermore, the anion-exchange resins exhibited the decomposition of not only free chlorine but also chloramines in water.

  6. UIT Observations of Early-Type Galaxies and Analysis of the FUSE Spectrum of a Subdwarf B Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work covers Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) observations of early-type galaxies (155 nm) and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of a Galactic subdwarf B star (sdB). Early UV space astronomy missions revealed that early-type galaxies harbor a population of stars with effective temperatures greater than that of the main sequence turn-off (about 6,000 K) and UV emission that is very sensitive to characteristics of the stellar population. We present UV (155 nm) surface photometry and UV-B color profiles for 8 E and SO galaxies observed by UIT. Some objects have de Vaucouleurs surface brightness profiles, while others have disk-like profiles, but we find no other evidence for the presence of a disk or young, massive stars. There is a wide range of UV-B color gradients, but there is no correlation with metallicity gradients. SdB stars are the leading candidate UV emitters in old, high metallicity stellar populations (e.g., early-type galaxies). We observed the Galactic sdB star PG0749+658 with FUSE and derived abundances with the aim of constraining models of the heavy element distribution in sdB atmospheres. All of the elements measured are depleted with respect to solar, except for Cr and Mn, which are about solar, and Ni, which is enhanced. This work was supported in part by NASA grants NAG5-700 and NAG5-6403 to the University of Virginia and NAS5-32985 to Johns Hopkins University.

  7. A possible space-based tsunami early warning system using observations of the tsunami ionospheric hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamogawa, Masashi; Orihara, Yoshiaki; Tsurudome, Chiaki; Tomida, Yuto; Kanaya, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Daiki; Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-12-01

    Ionospheric plasma disturbances after a large tsunami can be detected by measurement of the total electron content (TEC) between a Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite and its ground-based receivers. TEC depression lasting for a few minutes to tens of minutes termed as tsunami ionospheric hole (TIH) is formed above the tsunami source area. Here we describe the quantitative relationship between initial tsunami height and the TEC depression rate caused by a TIH from seven tsunamigenic earthquakes in Japan and Chile. We found that the percentage of TEC depression and initial tsunami height are correlated and the largest TEC depressions appear 10 to 20 minutes after the main shocks. Our findings imply that Ionospheric TEC measurement using the existing ground receiver networks could be used in an early warning system for near-field tsunamis that take more than 20 minutes to arrive in coastal areas.

  8. Analysis of Early Neurovascular Complications of Pediatric Supracondylar Humerus Fractures: A Long-Term Observation

    PubMed Central

    Wozowicz, Artur; Wysocka-Wojakiewicz, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Analysis of early vascular and nerve complications of supracondylar humerus fractures in children. Material and Methods. 220 children hospitalized in the Pediatric Trauma-Orthopedic Department in the years 2004–2014. The group consisted of 143 males and 77 females. Results. Acute neurovascular complications occurred in 16.81% of patients with displaced supracondylar fracture (37 children). Nerve damage was found in 10% of patients with displaced fracture (22 children). The most injured nerve was median nerve; this complication occurred in 15 patients (68.18%). The total nerve function returned after average of 122 days (0–220 days after surgery). Symptoms of vascular injury occurred in 7.7% children with displaced fracture (17 children). Conclusions. (1) In children with supracondylar fracture the most often injured nerve is median nerve. (2) The incidence of vascular and nerve complications positively correlates with the progression of fracture according to Gartland classification. PMID:28367440

  9. A possible space-based tsunami early warning system using observations of the tsunami ionospheric hole

    PubMed Central

    Kamogawa, Masashi; Orihara, Yoshiaki; Tsurudome, Chiaki; Tomida, Yuto; Kanaya, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Daiki; Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Ionospheric plasma disturbances after a large tsunami can be detected by measurement of the total electron content (TEC) between a Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite and its ground-based receivers. TEC depression lasting for a few minutes to tens of minutes termed as tsunami ionospheric hole (TIH) is formed above the tsunami source area. Here we describe the quantitative relationship between initial tsunami height and the TEC depression rate caused by a TIH from seven tsunamigenic earthquakes in Japan and Chile. We found that the percentage of TEC depression and initial tsunami height are correlated and the largest TEC depressions appear 10 to 20 minutes after the main shocks. Our findings imply that Ionospheric TEC measurement using the existing ground receiver networks could be used in an early warning system for near-field tsunamis that take more than 20 minutes to arrive in coastal areas. PMID:27905487

  10. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (uffo) for Observation of Early Photons from Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Eyles, C.; Grossan, B.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Jung, A.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. B.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Krasnov, A. S.; Lee1, J.; Lim, H.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Lund, N.; Min, K. W.; Na, G. W.; Nam, J. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Ripa, J.; Reglero, V.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.

    2013-12-01

    One of the least documented and understood aspects of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) is the rise phase of the optical light curve. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is an effort to address this question through extraordinary opportunities presented by a series of space missions including a small spacecraft observatory. The UFFO is equipped with a fast-response Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) which uses rapidly moving mirror or mirror arrays to redirect the optical beam rather than slewing the entire spacecraft to aim the optical instrument at the GRB position. The UFFO will probe the early optical rise of GRBs with a sub-second response, for the first time, opening a completely new frontier in GRB and transient studies, the only GRB system which can point and measure on these time scales. Its fast response measurements of the optical emission of dozens of GRB each year will provide unique probes of the burst mechanism, shock breakouts in core-collapse supernovae, tidal disruptions around black holes, test Lorentz violation, be the electromagnetic counterpart to neutrino and gravitational wave signatures of the violent universe, and verify the prospect of GRB as a new standard candle potentially opening up the z>10 universe. As a first step, we employ a motorized slewing stage in SMT which can point to the event within 1s after X-ray trigger, in the UFFO-pathfinder payload onboard the Lomonosov satellite to be launched in 2012. The pathfinder was a small and limited, yet remarkably powerful micro-observatory for rapid optical response to bright gamma-ray bursts, the first part of our GRB and rapid-response long-term program. We describe the early photon science, the space mission of UFFO-pathfinder, and our plan for the next step.

  11. Early observations of the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2015F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, R.; Sullivan, M.; Firth, R. E.; Pignata, G.; Mazzali, P.; Maguire, K.; Childress, M. J.; Arcavi, I.; Ashall, C.; Bassett, B.; Crawford, S. M.; Frohmaier, C.; Galbany, L.; Gal-Yam, A.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Inserra, C.; Johansson, J.; Kasai, E. K.; McCully, C.; Prajs, S.; Prentice, S.; Schulze, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K. W.; Smith, M.; Valenti, S.; Young, D. R.

    2017-02-01

    We present photometry and time series spectroscopy of the nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2015F over -16 d to +80 d relative to maximum light, obtained as part of the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects. SN 2015F is a slightly sub-luminous SN Ia with a decline rate of Δm15(B) = 1.35 ± 0.03 mag, placing it in the region between normal and SN 1991bg-like events. Our densely sampled photometric data place tight constraints on the epoch of first light and form of the early-time light curve. The spectra exhibit photospheric C II λ6580 absorption until -4 days, and high-velocity Ca II is particularly strong at <-10 d at expansion velocities of ≃23 000 km s-1. At early times, our spectral modelling with SYN++ shows strong evidence for iron-peak elements (Fe II, Cr II, Ti II, and V II) expanding at velocities >14 000 km s-1, suggesting mixing in the outermost layers of the SN ejecta. Although unusual in SN Ia spectra, including V II in the modelling significantly improves the spectral fits. Intriguingly, we detect an absorption feature at ˜6800 Å that persists until maximum light. Our favoured explanation for this line is photospheric Al II, which has never been claimed before in SNe Ia, although detached high-velocity C II material could also be responsible. In both cases, the absorbing material seems to be confined to a relatively narrow region in velocity space. The nucleosynthesis of detectable amounts of Al II would argue against a low-metallicity white dwarf progenitor. We also show that this 6800 Å feature is weakly present in other normal SN Ia events and common in the SN 1991bg-like sub-class.

  12. TEST FUSION IN ADULT FORAMINIFERA: A REVIEW WITH NEW OBSERVATIONS OF AN EARLY EOCENE NUMMULITES SPECIMEN

    PubMed Central

    Ferràndez-Cañadell, Carles; Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann; Wöger, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In foraminifera, so-called “double tests” usually arise due to abnormal growth originating mainly from twinning, but may also be caused by irregularities in the early chambers and by regeneration after test injury that modifies the direction of growth. A fourth cause of double tests has only rarely been reported: the fusion of the tests of two adult individuals. We studied an early Eocene Nummulites double test consisting of two adult individuals that fused after an extended period of independent growth. The specimen was studied using computed tomography with micrometric resolution (micro-CT) that allowed bi- and three-dimensional visualization of the internal structure. Before fusion each individual test had 30–36 chambers, which, by comparison with growth rates in recent nummulitids, implies at least three months of independent growth. After fusion, the compound test grew in two spirals that fused after about one whorl and then continued in a single spiral. To fuse their tests, either adult individuals have to be forced to do so or the allorecognition (ability to distinguish between self and another individual) mechanisms must fail. A possible explanation for the merged Nummulites tests in this study is forced fusion in attached individuals after surviving ingestion and digestion by a metazoan. Alternatively, environmental stress could lead to a failure of allorecognition mechanisms and/or foraminiferal motility. Once fused, subsequent growth seems to be determined mainly by the relative orientation of individual tests. In any case, the frequency in which adult fusion occurs remains unknown. PMID:26166916

  13. Early cranial ultrasound findings among infants with neonatal encephalopathy in Uganda: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Tann, Cally J.; Nakakeeto, Margaret; Hagmann, Cornelia; Webb, Emily L.; Nyombi, Natasha; Namiiro, Flaviah; Harvey-Jones, Kelly; Muhumuza, Anita; Burgoine, Kathy; Elliott, Alison M.; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J.; Robertson, Nicola J.; Cowan, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In sub-Saharan Africa, the timing and nature of brain injury and their relation to mortality in neonatal encephalopathy (NE) are unknown. We evaluated cranial ultrasound (cUS) scans from term Ugandan infants with and without NE for evidence of brain injury. Methods: Infants were recruited from a national referral hospital in Kampala. Cases (184) had NE and controls (100) were systematically selected unaffected term infants. All had cUS scans <36 h reported blind to NE status. Results: Scans were performed at median age 11.5 (interquartile range (IQR): 5.2–20.2) and 8.4 (IQR: 3.6–13.5) hours, in cases and controls respectively. None had established antepartum injury. Major evolving injury was reported in 21.2% of the cases vs. 1.0% controls (P < 0.001). White matter injury was not significantly associated with bacteremia in encephalopathic infants (odds ratios (OR): 3.06 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98–9.60). Major cUS abnormality significantly increased the risk of neonatal death (case fatality 53.9% with brain injury vs. 25.9% without; OR: 3.34 (95% CI: 1.61–6.95)). Conclusion: In this low-resource setting, there was no evidence of established antepartum insult, but a high proportion of encephalopathic infants had evidence of major recent and evolving brain injury on early cUS imaging, suggesting prolonged or severe acute exposure to hypoxia–ischemia (HI). Early abnormalities were a significant predictor of death. PMID:27064242

  14. Mid-Infrared Observational and Theoretical Studies of Star Formation and Early Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    The first 2 years of this program were used to make mid-IR observations of regions of star formation in the Orion nebula with the UCSD mid-IR camera at the UCSD/University of Minnesota telescope at Mt. Lemmon. These observations attempted to make the first systematic study of an extended region, known to have newly forming stars, and expected to have complex mid-IR emission. We discovered, to our surprise, that most of the thermal emission originated from extended sources rather than from point sources. This interesting observation made the analysis of the data much more complex, since the chop/nod procedures used at these wavelengths produce a differential measurement of the emission in one region compared to that in the adjacent region. Disentangling complex extended emission in such a situation is very difficult. In parallel with this work we were also observing comets in the thermal infrared, the other component of the original proposal. Some spectacular data on the comet Swift-Tuttle was acquired and published. A changing jet structure observed over a 2 week period is described. The rotation period of the comet can be measured at 66 hours. The size of the nucleus can also be estimated (at 30 km) from the observed excess flux from the nucleus. These data have lead to the development of models describing the action of dust particles of differing sizes and composition leaving the nucleus. The spatial distribution of the predicted IR emission has been compared to the observed jet structures, leading to estimates of both particles sizes, relative amounts of silicate vs organic grains, and the amounts of dust emitted in the jets vs isotopic emission.

  15. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Helfrich addresses two perspectives from which to think about observation in the classroom: that of the teacher observing her classroom, her group, and its needs, and that of the outside observer coming into the classroom. Offering advice from her own experience, she encourages and defends both. Do not be afraid of the disruption of outside…

  16. Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    Joosten begins his article by telling us that love and knowledge together are the foundation for our work with children. This combination is at the heart of our observation. With this as the foundation, he goes on to offer practical advice to aid our practice of observation. He offers a "List of Objects of Observation" to help guide our…

  17. Early-20th-century visual observations of M13 variable stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, W.; Barnard, E. E.

    2016-08-01

    In 1900 E. E. Barnard published 37 visual observations of Variable 2 (V2) in the globular clustter M13 made in 1899 and 1900. A review of Barnard's notebooks revealed he made many additional brightness estimates up to 1911, and he had also recorded the variations of V1 starting in 1904. These data provide the earliest-epoch light curves for these stars and thus are useful for studying their period changes. This paper presents Barnard's observations of the M13 variables along with their derived heliocentric Julian Dates and approximate V magnitudes. These include 231 unpublished observations of V2 and 94 of V1. How these data will be of value for determing period changes by these stars is described.

  18. Torsional oscillations and observed rotational period variations in early-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, J.; Mikulášek, Z.; Henry, G. W.; Kurfürst, P.; Karlický, M.

    2017-01-01

    Some chemically peculiar stars in the upper main sequence show rotational period variations of unknown origin. We propose that these variations are a consequence of the propagation of internal waves in magnetic rotating stars that lead to the torsional oscillations of the star. We simulate the magnetohydrodynamic waves and calculate resonant frequencies for two stars that show rotational variations: CU Vir and HD 37776. We provide updated analyses of rotational period variations in these stars and compare our results with numerical models. For CU Vir, the length of the observed rotational period cycle, Π=67.6(5) yr, can be well reproduced by the models, which predict a cycle length of 51 yr. However, for HD 37776, the observed lower limit of the cycle length, Π ≥ 100 yr, is significantly longer than the numerical models predict. We conclude that torsional oscillations provide a reasonable explanation at least for the observed period variations in CU Vir.

  19. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  20. The Observed State of the Water Cycle in the Early Twenty-First Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Olson, W. S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Houser, P. R.; Adler, R.; Bosilovich, M. G.; Clayson, C. A.; Chambers, D.; Clark, E.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Gao, X.; Gu, G.; Hilburn, K.; Huffman, G. J.; Lettenmier, D. P.; Liu, W. T.; Robertson, F. R.; Schlosser, C. A.; Sheffield, J.; Wood, E. F.

    2015-01-01

    This study quantifies mean annual and monthly fluxes of Earth's water cycle over continents and ocean basins during the first decade of the millennium. To the extent possible, the flux estimates are based on satellite measurements first and data-integrating models second. A careful accounting of uncertainty in the estimates is included. It is applied within a routine that enforces multiple water and energy budget constraints simultaneously in a variational framework in order to produce objectively determined optimized flux estimates. In the majority of cases, the observed annual surface and atmospheric water budgets over the continents and oceans close with much less than 10% residual. Observed residuals and optimized uncertainty estimates are considerably larger for monthly surface and atmospheric water budget closure, often nearing or exceeding 20% in North America, Eurasia, Australia and neighboring islands, and the Arctic and South Atlantic Oceans. The residuals in South America and Africa tend to be smaller, possibly because cold land processes are negligible. Fluxes were poorly observed over the Arctic Ocean, certain seas, Antarctica, and the Australasian and Indonesian islands, leading to reliance on atmospheric analysis estimates. Many of the satellite systems that contributed data have been or will soon be lost or replaced. Models that integrate ground-based and remote observations will be critical for ameliorating gaps and discontinuities in the data records caused by these transitions. Continued development of such models is essential for maximizing the value of the observations. Next-generation observing systems are the best hope for significantly improving global water budget accounting.

  1. Early Results on Energetic Particle Precipitation Observed by the ABOVE Instrument Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cully, C. M.; Chaddock, D.; Daniel, C.; Davis, E.; Galts, D.; McGuffin, N.; Quinn, C.; Sheldon, A.; Wilson, C.

    2014-12-01

    ABOVE, the Array for Broadband Observations of VLF/ELF Emissions, is a network of radio instruments located across western Canada. The instruments monitor natural and artificial electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 75 kHz. The primary scientific focus is on energetic particle precipitation: we infer precipitation into the atmosphere based on the observed amplitude and phase of remotely transmitted artificial signals, and simultanesouly monitor natural whistler-mode waves (chorus and hiss) that drive the precipitation. Instrument deployment began during the summer of 2014. We report here on the instrument design and the first results.

  2. Development of the action observation network during early adolescence: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Daniel J.; Grosbras, Marie-Helene; Leonard, Gabriel; Pike, G. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence places high demands on inter-personal interactions and, hence, on the extraction and processing of social cues. Here we assess longitudinally the development of brain activity within a network implicated in social cognition—the action observation network. We performed activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses to define regions of interest based upon the mature action observation network of adults. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we then examined developmental trajectories of functional brain activity within these brain regions. Using this approach, we reveal quadratic trajectories within a fronto-parietal network previously shown to demonstrate correlated morphological development. PMID:21278194

  3. Early-time observations of gamma-ray burst error boxes with the Livermore optical transient imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G G

    2000-08-01

    Despite the enormous wealth of gamma-ray burst (GRB) data collected over the past several years the physical mechanism which causes these extremely powerful phenomena is still unknown. Simultaneous and early time optical observations of GRBs will likely make an great contribution t o our understanding. LOTIS is a robotic wide field-of-view telescope dedicated to the search for prompt and early-time optical afterglows from gamma-ray bursts. LOTIS began routine operations in October 1996 and since that time has responded to over 145 gamma-ray burst triggers. Although LOTIS has not yet detected prompt optical emission from a GRB its upper limits have provided constraints on the theoretical emission mechanisms. Super-LOTIS, also a robotic wide field-of-view telescope, can detect emission 100 times fainter than LOTIS is capable of detecting. Routine observations from Steward Observatory's Kitt Peak Station will begin in the immediate future. During engineering test runs under bright skies from the grounds of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Super-LOTIS provided its first upper limits on the early-time optical afterglow of GRBs. This dissertation provides a summary of the results from LOTIS and Super-LOTIS through the time of writing. Plans for future studies with both systems are also presented.

  4. Educative Experiences and Early Childhood Science Education: A Deweyan Perspective on Learning to Observe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Elaine V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a report of work conducted at an urban elementary professional development school in the eastern US. John Dewey's explication of "educative experiences" is applied to describe curriculum involving small animals as a basis for teaching science inquiry processes, particularly the process of observation. The analysis is qualitative and…

  5. Explicit Instructional Interactions: Observed Stability and Predictive Validity during Early Literacy and Beginning Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doabler, Christian T.; Nelson-Walker, Nancy; Kosty, Derek; Baker, Scott K.; Smolkowski, Keith; Fien, Hank

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors conceptualize teaching episodes such as an integrated set of observable student-teacher interactions. Instructional interactions that take place between teachers and students around critical academic content are a defining characteristic of classroom instruction and a component carefully defined in many education…

  6. An Observational Analysis of Behavior in Depressed Preschoolers: Further Validation of Early-Onset Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luby, Joan L.; Sullivan, Jill; Belden, Andy; Stalets, Melissa; Blankenship, Samantha; Spitznagel, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether higher levels of negative and lower levels of positive behaviors could be observed in a sample of depressed preschoolers. Support for the validity of preschool depression is now available; however, objective evidence of negative behaviors among depressed preschoolers is needed. Method: A structured observational…

  7. An Observational Study of Early Heterosexual Interaction at Middle School Dances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrini, Anthony D.; Long, Jeffery D.

    2007-01-01

    In this longitudinal, observational study of heterosexual interaction at middle school dances we examined the degree to which boys' and girls' groups became more gender integrated over time. The results show groups became more integrated over time with the pattern differing by gender. Boys had a relatively low level of contact with girls over the…

  8. Observing Preschoolers' Social-Emotional Behavior: Structure, Foundations, and Prediction of Early School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko Hamada; Thayer, Sara K.; Mincic, Melissa S.; Sirotkin, Yana S.; Zinsser, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Social-emotional behavior of 352 3- and 4-year-olds attending private childcare and Head Start programs was observed using the Minnesota Preschool Affect Checklist, Revised (MPAC-R). Goals of the investigation included (a) using MPAC-R data to extract a shortened version, MPAC-R/S, comparing structure, internal consistency, test-retest…

  9. Observations of Nucleation and Early Stage Growth of Amorphous Silica on Carboxyl-Terminated Model Biosubstrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; Dove, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    surface. While controlling solution chemistry, we can make in situ measurements of nucleation and early stage growth at these interfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Preliminary experiments show that at pH 4 to 7, and supersaturations of 0.76 to 1.45 (σ = ln([H4SiO4]/Ksp)), silica nucleates on carboxyl-terminated areas of the surface, that are less than 30 nm in diameter. The nuclei evolve during early stages of growth to spread over the surface into a sheet like form.

  10. Integrating observation and statistical forecasts over sub-Saharan Africa to support Famine Early Warning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, C.; Verdin, J.P.; Husak, G.

    2007-01-01

    Famine early warning in Africa presents unique challenges and rewards. Hydrologic extremes must be tracked and anticipated over complex and changing climate regimes. The successful anticipation and interpretation of hydrologic shocks can initiate effective government response, saving lives and softening the impacts of droughts and floods. While both monitoring and forecast technologies continue to advance, discontinuities between monitoring and forecast systems inhibit effective decision making. Monitoring systems typically rely on high resolution satellite remote-sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and rainfall imagery. Forecast systems provide information on a variety of scales and formats. Non-meteorologists are often unable or unwilling to connect the dots between these disparate sources of information. To mitigate these problem researchers at UCSB's Climate Hazard Group, NASA GIMMS and USGS/EROS are implementing a NASA-funded integrated decision support system that combines the monitoring of precipitation and NDVI with statistical one-to-three month forecasts. We present the monitoring/forecast system, assess its accuracy, and demonstrate its application in food insecure sub-Saharan Africa.

  11. Implementing the Bedside Paediatric Early Warning System in a community hospital: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Parshuram, Christopher S; Bayliss, Ann; Reimer, Janette; Middaugh, Kristen; Blanchard, Nadeene

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Late transfer of children with critical illness from community hospitals undermines the advantages of community-based care. It was hypothesized that implementation of the Bedside Paediatric Early Warning System (Bedside PEWS) would reduce late transfers. METHODS: A prospective before-and-after study was performed in a community hospital 22-bed inpatient paediatric ward. The primary outcome, significant clinical deterioration, was a composite measure of circulatory and respiratory support before transfer. Secondary outcomes were stat calls and resuscitation team calls, paediatrician workload and perceptions of frontline staff. RESULTS: Care was evaluated for 842 patient-days before and 2350 patient-days after implementation. The median inpatient census was 13. Implementation of the Bedside PEWS was associated with fewer stat calls to paediatricians (22.6 versus 5.1 per 1000 patient-days; P<0.0001), fewer significant clinical deterioration events (2.4 versus 0.43 per 1000 patient-days; P=0.013), reduced apprehension when calling the physician and no change in paediatrician workload. DISCUSSION: Implementation of the Bedside PEWS is feasible and safe, and may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:22379384

  12. Childhood Maltreatment and Prospectively Observed Quality of Early Care as Predictors of Antisocial Personality Disorder Features.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenyu; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Easterbrooks, M Ann; Zhao, Xudong; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the separate contributions of maltreatment and ongoing quality of parent-child interaction to the etiology of antisocial personality features using a prospective longitudinal design. 120 low-income young adults (aged 18-23) were assessed for extent of ASPD features on the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnosis-Axis II, for presence of maltreatment on the Conflict Tactics Scale, Traumatic Experiences Scale, and Adult Attachment Interview, and for referral in infancy to parent-infant clinical services. Fifty-six of these families had been studied longitudinally since the first year of life. In infancy, attachment disorganization and disrupted mother-infant interaction were assessed; in middle childhood, disorganized-controlling attachment behaviors were reliably rated. In kindergarten and second grade, behavior problems were assessed by teacher report. In cross-sectional analyses, maltreatment was significantly associated with ASPD features but did not account for the independent effect of early referral to parent-infant services on ASPD features. In longitudinal analyses, maternal withdrawal in infancy predicted the extent of ASPD features twenty years later, independently of childhood abuse. In middle childhood, disorganized attachment behavior and maladaptive behavior at school added to prediction of later ASPD features. Antisocial features in young adulthood have precursors in the minute-to-minute process of parent-child interaction beginning in infancy.

  13. The decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: Studies in a high-temperature flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Melius, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane (MTS), a common silicon carbide precursor, in a high-temperature flow reactor are presented. The results indicate that methane and hydrogen chloride are major products of the decomposition. No chlorinated silane products were observed. Hydrogen carrier gas was found to increase the rate of MTS decomposition. The observations suggest a radical-chain mechanism for the decomposition. The implications for silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition are discussed.

  14. Early stages of solar flares - Current status of our understanding and opportunities for future observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    Current models of the energy release and transport mechanisms occurring in solar flares are updated to include the input from data collected with the SMM satellite. The new data cover numerous solar flares observed in X-ray and gamma ray bands over a 6 yr period, combined with data from the Japanese Hinori satellite in 1981-82 and ground-based radio observations. The 300 keV gamma ray data have been instrumental in revealing a 152-158 day period in the frequency of solar flares. Recent analysis has indicated that the periodicity is connected to the rotational spectrum of g-modes in the sun. Other data have shown that hard X-rays are emitted from the footpoints and interactions among coronal magnetic loops, where electron acceleration processes occur that are not well understood. The footpoint emission appear in impulsive events, while the interaction emissions are connected with gradual flares.

  15. Early Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observations of the Quasar 3C454.3

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A

    2009-05-07

    This is the first report of Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope observations of the quasar 3C 454.3, which has been undergoing pronounced long-term outbursts since 2000. The data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT), covering 2008 July 7-October 6, indicate strong, highly variable {gamma}-ray emission with an average flux of {approx} 3 x 10{sup -6} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, for energies > 100 MeV. The {gamma}-ray flux is variable, with strong, distinct, symmetrically-shaped flares for which the flux increases by a factor of several on a time scale of about three days. This variability indicates a compact emission region, and the requirement that the source is optically thin to pair-production implies relativistic beaming with Doppler factor {delta} > 8, consistent with the values inferred from VLBI observations of superluminal expansion ({delta} {approx} 25). The observed {gamma}-ray spectrum is not consistent with a simple power-law, but instead steepens strongly above {approx} 2 GeV, and is well described by a broken power-law with photon indices of {approx} 2.3 and {approx} 3.5 below and above the break, respectively. This is the first direct observation of a break in the spectrum of a high luminosity blazar above 100 MeV, and it is likely direct evidence for an intrinsic break in the energy distribution of the radiating particles. Alternatively, the spectral softening above 2GeV could be due to -ray absorption via photonphoton pair production on the soft X-ray photon field of the host AGN, but such an interpretation would require the dissipation region to be located very close ({approx}< 100 gravitational radii) to the black hole, which would be inconsistent with the X-ray spectrum of the source.

  16. Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility Assay (MODS) for Early Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dang Thi Minh; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Wolbers, Marcel; Duong, Tran Ngoc; Quang, Nguyen Dang; Thi Van Thinh, Tran; Thi Hong Ngoc, Le; Thi Ngoc Anh, Nguyen; Van Quyet, Tran; Thi Bich Tuyen, Nguyen; Thi Ha, Vo; Day, Jeremy; Thi Thanh Hang, Hoang; Kiet, Vo Sy; Thi Nho, Nguyen; Hoa, Dai Viet; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Huu Lan, Nguyen; Farrar, Jeremy; Caws, Maxine

    2009-01-01

    MODS is a novel liquid culture based technique that has been shown to be effective and rapid for early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated the MODS assay for diagnosis of TB in children in Viet Nam. 217 consecutive samples including sputum (n = 132), gastric fluid (n = 50), CSF (n = 32) and pleural fluid (n = 3) collected from 96 children with suspected TB, were tested by smear, MODS and MGIT. When test results were aggregated by patient, the sensitivity and specificity of smear, MGIT and MODS against “clinical diagnosis” (confirmed and probable groups) as the gold standard were 28.2% and 100%, 42.3% and 100%, 39.7% and 94.4%, respectively. The sensitivity of MGIT and MODS was not significantly different in this analysis (P = 0.5), but MGIT was more sensitive than MODS when analysed on the sample level using a marginal model (P = 0.03). The median time to detection of MODS and MGIT were 8 days and 13 days, respectively, and the time to detection was significantly shorter for MODS in samples where both tests were positive (P<0.001). An analysis of time-dependent sensitivity showed that the detection rates were significantly higher for MODS than for MGIT by day 7 or day 14 (P<0.001 and P = 0.04), respectively. MODS is a rapid and sensitive alternative method for the isolation of M.tuberculosis from children. PMID:20020056

  17. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  18. A word of the Empirics: the ancient concept of observation and its recovery in early modern medicine.

    PubMed

    Pomata, Gianna

    2011-01-01

    The genealogy of observation as a philosophical term goes back to the ancient Greek astronomical and medical traditions, and the revival of the concept in the Renaissance also happened in the astronomical and medical context. This essay focuses primarily on the medical genealogy of the concept of observation. In ancient Greek culture, an elaboration of the concept of observation (tērēsis) first emerged in the Hellenistic age with the medical sect of the Empirics, to be further developed by the ancient Sceptics. Basically unknown in the Middle Ages, the Empirics' conceptualisation of tērēsis trickled back into Western medicine in the fourteenth century, but its meaning seems to have been fully recovered by European scholars only in the 1560s, concomitantly with the first Latin translation of the works of Sextus Empiricus. As a category originally associated with medical Scepticism, observatio was a new entry in early modern philosophy. Although the term gained wide currency in general scholarly usage in the seventeenth century, its assimilation into standard philosophical language was very slow. In fact, observatio does not even appear as an entry in the philosophical dictionaries until the eighteenth century--with one significant exception, the medical lexica, which featured the lemma, reporting its ancient Empiric definition, as early as 1564.

  19. Early Chromospheric Response During a Solar Microflare Observed with SOHO's CDS and RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Holman, Gordon D.

    2010-01-01

    We observed a solar microflare with RHESSI and SOHO's Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on 2009 July 5. With CDS we obtained rapid cadence (7 s) stare spectra within a narrow field of view toward the center of AR 11024. The spectra contain emission lines from ions that cover a wide range of temperature, including He I (< 0.025 MK), O V (0.25 MK), Si XII (2 MK), and Fe XIX (8 MK). The start of a precursor burst of He I and O V line emission preceded the steady increase of Fe XIX line emission by about 1 minute, and the emergence of 3-12 keV X-ray emission by about 4 minutes. Thus the onset of the microflare was observed in upper chromospheric (He I) and transition region (O V) line emission before it was detected in high temperature flare plasma emission. Redshifted O V emission during the precursor suggests explosive chromospheric evaporation, but no corresponding blueshifts were found with either Fe XIX (which was very weak) or Si XII. Similarly, in subsequent microflare brightenings the O V and He I intensities increased (between 49 s and almost 2 minutes) before emissions from the hot flare plasma. Although these time differences likely indicate heating by a nonthermal particle beam, the RHESSI spectra provide no additional evidence for such a beam. In intervals lasting up to about 3 minutes during several bursts, the He I and O V emission line profiles showed secondary, highly blueshifted ( approximately 200 km/s) components; during intervals lasting nearly 1 minute the velocities of the primary and secondary components were oppositely directed. Combined with no corresponding blueshifts in either Fe XIX or Si XII, this indicates that explosive chromospheric evaporation occurred predominantly at either comparatively cool temperatures (< 2 MK) or within a hot temperature range to which our observations were not sensitive (e.g., between 2 and 8 MK).

  20. The accelerations of the earth and moon from early astronomical observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, P. M.; Stephenson, F. R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation has compiled a very large amount of data on central or near central solar eclipses as recorded in four principal ancient sources (Greek and Roman classics, medieval European chronicles, Chinese annals and astronomical treatises, and Late Babylonian astronomical texts) and applied careful data selectivity criteria and statistical methods to obtain reliable dates, magnitudes, and places of observation of the events, and thereby made estimates of the earth acceleration and lunar acceleration. The basic conclusion is that the lunar acceleration and both tidal and nontidal earth accelerations have been essentially constant during the period from 1375 B.C. to the present.

  1. Carbon recombination line observations of the sharpless 140 region. [of early stars in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, G. R.; Brown, R. L.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Kakar, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon recombination-line emission has been detected at two frequencies from a dark cloud contiguous with the small H II region Sharpless 140. The observations show the dark cloud to be of unusually low temperature and to have a markedly inhomogeneous density distribution, with localized region of high density surrounding one or more embedded stars. The carbon is probably ionized by photons from both the exciting star of S140 and the embedded stars. The dark cloud and S140 apparently represent two stages of star formation which have occurred over a period of at least 500,000 years in adjacent regions of the same dark cloud.

  2. The early Earth Observing System reference handbook: Earth Science and Applications Division missions, 1990-1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Prior to the launch of the Earth Observing System (EOS) series, NASA will launch and operate a wide variety of new earth science satellites and instruments, as well as undertake several efforts collecting and using the data from existing and planned satellites from other agencies and nations. These initiatives will augment the knowledge base gained from ongoing Earth Science and Applications Division (ESAD) programs. This volume describes three sets of ESAD activities -- ongoing exploitation of operational satellite data, research missions with upcoming launches between now and the first launch of EOS, and candidate earth probes.

  3. The Early History of Photometric Observations of Asteroids made at the Table Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, James W.; Harris, Alan W.

    2009-05-01

    An Ascop S-20 photomultiplier tube mounted in a Mt. Wilson designed dry-ice cold-box assembly was used with a pulse-counting system to measure the colors, magnitudes, rotational rates, and phase coefficients of over 300 different asteroids between 1978 and 1993. During this time period, nearly one third of all known asteroid rotational rates (~150) were obtained from this effective system. All observations were made with manual telescopic pointing, with data written out long-hand utilizing the 0.6 meter telescope at JPL's Table Mountain Facility. Nearly 40 refereed journal (mostly ICARUS) papers were published containing these results, with yet a few more to come.

  4. A SOLAR CYCLE LOST IN 1793-1800: EARLY SUNSPOT OBSERVATIONS RESOLVE THE OLD MYSTERY

    SciTech Connect

    Usoskin, Ilya G.; Mursula, Kalevi; Arlt, Rainer; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.

    2009-08-01

    Because of the lack of reliable sunspot observations, the quality of the sunspot number series is poor in the late 18th century, leading to the abnormally long solar cycle (1784-1799) before the Dalton minimum. Using the newly recovered solar drawings by the 18-19th century observers Staudacher and Hamilton, we construct the solar butterfly diagram, i.e., the latitudinal distribution of sunspots in the 1790s. The sudden, systematic occurrence of sunspots at high solar latitudes in 1793-1796 unambiguously shows that a new cycle started in 1793, which was lost in the traditional Wolf sunspot series. This finally confirms the existence of the lost cycle that has been proposed earlier, thus resolving an old mystery. This Letter brings the attention of the scientific community to the need of revising the sunspot series in the 18th century. The presence of a new short, asymmetric cycle implies changes and constraints to sunspot cycle statistics, solar activity predictions, and solar dynamo theories, as well as for solar-terrestrial relations.

  5. Early observations on an emerging Great Lakes invader Hemimysis anomala in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Maureen G.; Lantry, Brian F.; Boscarino, Brent; Bowen, Kelly; Gerlofsma, Jocelyn; Schaner, Ted; Back, Richard; Questel, Jennifer; Smythe, A. Garry; Cap, Roberta; Goehle, Michael; Young, Bryan; Chalupnicki, Marc A.; Johnson, James H.; McKenna, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Hemimysis anomala, a Ponto-Caspian littoral mysid, is an emerging Great Lakes invader that was discovered in Lakes Michigan and Ontario in 2006. Similar to the native mysid Mysis diluviana, Hemimysis exhibits a diel vertical migration pattern but generally inhabits shallower and warmer waters than M. diluviana. Because basic information on the distribution, habitat use, and biology of Hemimysis in the Great Lakes is scarce, the potential for food web disruption by Hemimysis cannot easily be predicted. Preliminary observations indicate widespread invasion of Hemimysis in Lake Ontario. In this study, we confirm the presence of Hemimysis at sites spanning the northern and southern shores of Lake Ontario and the presence of the individuals during winter months. In one horizontal tow in November 2007, over 26,000 individuals were collected with a length range of 4.4 to 9.0. mm and an average caloric density of 611. cal/g wet weight. The most effective methods for sampling Hemimysis were horizontal tows with either a zooplankton net in the water column or a benthic sled near the lake bottom. Although more quantitative data on the life history and distribution of this species is necessary, our preliminary observations support the prediction that the potential for Hemimysis to impact the nearshore food web in Lake Ontario appears high.

  6. High-resolution observations of tungsten liner collapse and early jet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Winer, K.A.; Breithaupt, R.D.; Muelder, S.A.; Baum, D.W.

    1996-07-01

    High-resolution photography of collapsing tungsten-lined shaped charges has revealed surface texturing both similar to and strikingly different from that previously observed during copper liner collapse. The behavior of three types of tungsten-lined shaped charges, with different liner designs and high explosives but with similar tungsten processing, were characterized by image-converter camera and fast- framing camera photography, and flash x-ray radiography. 120-mm- diameter, trumpet-shaped Octol charges produced surface blistering near the base of the tungsten liner, probably due to inhomogeneities near the liner-explosive interface resulting from cast loading. 148- mm-diameter, quasi-conical LX-14 charges produced smooth shocked- surface texture similar to that observed in conical, copper-lined LX- 14 (Viper) charges. 81-mm-diameter, conical LX-20 charges produced severe radial texturing throughout the collapsing tungsten liner, which transitioned to azimuthal banding on the jet surface. For each type of charge, obscuring debris from the tungsten jet tip prevented clear imaging of the jet surface at late time. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C.; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E.

    1998-06-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of their technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. Their method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) the authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing; (2) they also show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  8. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C. |; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E. |

    1997-12-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of the technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. The method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) The authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing. (2) They show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  9. Looking Into the Fireball: ROTSE-III and Swift Observations of Early Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykoff, E. S.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C. W.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Flewelling, H. A.; Gehrels, N.; Göǧüş, E.; Güver, T.; Kiziloǧlu, Ü.; Krimm, H. A.; McKay, T. A.; Özel, M.; Phillips, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Rowell, G.; Rujopakarn, W.; Schaefer, B. E.; Smith, D. A.; Vestrand, W. T.; Wheeler, J. C.; Wren, J.; Yuan, F.; Yost, S. A.

    2009-09-01

    We report on a complete set of early optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) obtained with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE-III) telescope network from 2005 March through 2007 June. This set is comprised of 12 afterglows with early optical and Swift/X-Ray Telescope observations, with a median ROTSE-III response time of 45 s after the start of γ-ray emission (8 s after the GCN notice time). These afterglows span 4 orders of magnitude in optical luminosity, and the contemporaneous X-ray detections allow multi-wavelength spectral analysis. Excluding X-ray flares, the broadband synchrotron spectra show that the optical and X-ray emission originate in a common region, consistent with predictions of the external forward shock in the fireball model. However, the fireball model is inadequate to predict the temporal decay indices of the early afterglows, even after accounting for possible long-duration continuous energy injection. We find that the optical afterglow is a clean tracer of the forward shock, and we use the peak time of the forward shock to estimate the initial bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow, and find 100 lsim Γ0 lsim 1000, consistent with expectations.

  10. EARLY OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS OF THE TYPE Ia SN 2014J IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, G. H.; Vinkó, J.; Sand, D. J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Joshi, V.; Venkataraman, V.; Ashok, N. M.; Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Amanullah, R.; Johansson, J.; Binzel, R. P.; Bochanski, J. J.; Bryngelson, G. L.; Burns, C. R.; Drozdov, D.; Fieber-Beyer, S. K.; Graham, M. L.; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near infrared (NIR) observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. Seventeen optical and 23 NIR spectra were obtained from 10 days before (–10d) to 10 days after (+10d) the time of maximum B-band brightness. The relative strengths of absorption features and their patterns of development can be compared at one day intervals throughout most of this period. Carbon is not detected in the optical spectra, but we identify C I λ1.0693 in the NIR spectra. Mg II lines with high oscillator strengths have higher initial velocities than other Mg II lines. We show that the velocity differences can be explained by differences in optical depths due to oscillator strengths. The spectra of SN 2014J show that it is a normal SN Ia, but many parameters are near the boundaries between normal and high-velocity subclasses. The velocities for O I, Mg II, Si II, S II, Ca II, and Fe II suggest that SN 2014J has a layered structure with little or no mixing. That result is consistent with the delayed detonation explosion models. We also report photometric observations, obtained from –10d to +29d, in the UBVRIJH and K{sub s} bands. The template fitting package SNooPy is used to interpret the light curves and to derive photometric parameters. Using R{sub V} = 1.46, which is consistent with previous studies, SNooPy finds that A{sub V} = 1.80 for E(B – V){sub host} = 1.23 ± 0.06 mag. The maximum B-band brightness of –19.19 ± 0.10 mag was reached on February 1.74 UT ± 0.13 days and the supernova has a decline parameter, Δm {sub 15}, of 1.12 ± 0.02 mag.

  11. HST WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-Line Galaxies from IR Grism Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straughn, A. N.; Kuntschner, H.; Kuemmel, M.; Walsh, J. R.; Cohen, S. H.; Gardner, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.; O'Connell, R. W.; Pirzkal, N.; Meurer, G.; McCarthy, P. J.; Hathi, N. P.; Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimlbe, R. A.; Trauger, J. T.; Young, E. T.

    2010-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6-1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L (0.6-0.95 micron) grism data in GOODS South, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the Ha, [O III ], and [OII] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 1.6, 1.2 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 2.4 and 2.0 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 3.6 respectively in the G102 (0.8-1.1 microns; R approximately 210) and C141 (1.1-1.6 microns; R approximately 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 25 ELGs to M(sub AB)(F098M) approximately 25 mag. The faintest source in our sample with a strong but unidentified emission line--is MAB(F098M)=26.9 mag. We also detect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample, indicative of downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes.

  12. Passive microwave observations of the Wedell Sea during austral winter and early spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenfell, T. C.; Comiso, J. C.; Lange, M. A.; Eicken, H.; Wensnahan, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The results of multispectral passive microwave observations (6.7 to 90-GHz) are presented from the cruises of the FS Polarstern in the Weddell Sea from July to December 1986. This paper includes primarily the analysis of radiometric observations taken at ice station sites. Averaged emissivity spectra for first-year (FY) ice were relatively constant throughout the experiment and were not statistically different from FY ice signatures in the Arctic. Detailed ice characterization was carried out at each site to compare the microwave signatures of the ice with the physical properties. Absorption optical depths of FY ice were found to be sufficiently high that only the structure in the upper portions of the ice contributed significantly to interstation emissivity variations. The emissivities at 90-GHz, e(90), had the greatest variance. Both e(90) at vertical polarization and GR(sub e)(90, 18.7)(defined as (e(sub V)(90)-e(sub V)(18.7))/e(sub V)(90 + e(sub V)(18.7)) depended on the scattering optical depth which is a function of the snow grain diameter and layer thickness. The variance showed a latitude dependence and is probably due to an increase in the strength of snow metamorphism nearer the northern edge of the ice pack. The contribution of variations of near-surface brine volume to the emissivity was not significant over the range of values encountered at the station sites. Emissivity spectra are presented for a range of thin ice types. Unsupervised principal component analysis produced three significant eigenvectors and showed a separation among four different surface types: open water, thin ice, FY ice, and FY ice with a thick snow cover. A comparison with SMMR satellite data showed that average ice concentrations derived from the ship's ice watch log were consistent with the satellite concentrations. The surface based emissivities for FY ice were also compared with emissivities calculated from scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) satellite radiances

  13. Estimates for Lorentz factors of gamma-ray bursts from early optical afterglow observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hascoët, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Daigne, Frédéric; Mochkovitch, Robert

    2014-02-10

    The peak time of optical afterglow may be used as a proxy to constrain the Lorentz factor Γ of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta. We revisit this method by including bursts with optical observations that started when the afterglow flux was already decaying; these bursts can provide useful lower limits on Γ. Combining all analyzed bursts in our sample, we find that the previously reported correlation between Γ and the burst luminosity L {sub γ} does not hold. However, the data clearly show a lower bound Γ{sub min} that increases with L {sub γ}. We suggest an explanation for this feature: explosions with large jet luminosities and Γ < Γ{sub min} suffer strong adiabatic cooling before their radiation is released at the photosphere; they produce weak bursts, barely detectable with present instruments. To test this explanation, we examine the effect of adiabatic cooling on the GRB location in the L {sub γ} – Γ plane using a Monte Carlo simulation of the GRB population. Our results predict detectable on-axis 'orphan' afterglows. We also derive upper limits on the density of the ambient medium that decelerates the explosion ejecta. We find that the density in many cases is smaller than expected for stellar winds from normal Wolf-Rayet progenitors. The burst progenitors may be peculiar massive stars with weaker winds, or there might exist a mechanism that reduces the stellar wind a few years before the explosion.

  14. The performance of field scientists undertaking observations of early life fossils while in simulated space suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, D.; Rask, J. C.; George, S. C.; de Leon, P.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Blank, J.; Slocombe, J.; Silburn, K.; Steele, H.; Gargarno, M.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulated Apollo Extravehicular Activity's (EVA) at the 3.45 Ga Australian 'Pilbara Dawn of life' (Western Australia) trail with field and non-field scientists using the University of North Dakota's NDX-1 pressurizable space suit to overview the effectiveness of scientist astronauts employing their field observation skills while looking for stromatolite fossil evidence. Off-world scientist astronauts will be faced with space suit limitations in vision, human sense perception, mobility, dexterity, the space suit fit, time limitations, and the psychological fear of death from accidents, causing physical fatigue reducing field science performance. Finding evidence of visible biosignatures for past life such as stromatolite fossils, on Mars, is a very significant discovery. Our preliminary overview trials showed that when in simulated EVAs, 25% stromatolite fossil evidence is missed with more incorrect identifications compared to ground truth surveys but providing quality characterization descriptions becomes less affected by simulated EVA limitations as the science importance of the features increases. Field scientists focused more on capturing high value characterization detail from the rock features whereas non-field scientists focused more on finding many features. We identified technologies and training to improve off-world field science performance. The data collected is also useful for NASA's "EVA performance and crew health" research program requirements but further work will be required to confirm the conclusions.

  15. Relativistic Particle-in-Cell Simulation Studies of Prompt and Early Afterglows Observed by GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2007-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "'jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  16. [CII] At 1 < z < 2: Observing Star Formation in the Early Universe with Zeus (1 and 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Oberst, T.; Parshley, S.; Stacey, G.; Benford, D.; staguhn, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of the [CII] 158 micron fine structure line from six submillimeter galaxies with redshifts between 1.12 and 1.73. This more than doubles the total number of [CII] 158 micron detections reported from high redshift sources. These observations were made with the Redshift(z) and Early Universe Spectrometer(ZEUS) at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii between December 2006 and March 2009. ZEUS is a background limited submm echelle grating spectrometer (Hailey-Dunsheath 2009). Currently we are constructing ZEUS-2. This new instrument will utilize the same grating but will feature a two dimensional transition-edge sensed bolometer array with SQUID multiplexing readout system enabling simultaneous background limited observations in the 200, 340,450 and 650 micron telluric windows. ZEUS-2 will allow for long slit imaging spectroscopy in nearby galaxies and a [CII] survey from z 0.25 to 2.5.

  17. Observations and theory of Mg II lines in early type stars. II - Theory and predicted profiles. III - The observations and a comparison with the predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snijders, M. A. J.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Profiles of the UV Mg II lines in the spectra of early type stars are computed in a grid of model atmospheres with effective temperatures between 8000 and 35,000 K and log g values of 2.5 to 4.0 using the LTE and non-LTE theories of line formation. The theoretical results indicate that the line cores are strengthened by non-LTE effects over the entire temperature range, resonance-line wings are weaker in the cooler models than in the LTE case, and very large deviations from LTE occur in the hot low-gravity models. These predictions are compared with the equivalent widths of the UV Mg II lines in 106 stars and of the visual lines in 48 stars (spectral types O4 to A3). The observed equivalent widths of normal stars in luminosity classes II through V are found to agree with the predictions over the entire range from O8 to A2 if a certain Mg/H abundance is adopted. The line intensities observed in supergiants, Be, Bp, and Ap stars are discussed.

  18. Doxycycline in early CJD: a double-blinded randomised phase II and observational study

    PubMed Central

    Varges, Daniela; Manthey, Henrike; Heinemann, Uta; Ponto, Claudia; Schmitz, Matthias; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Krasnianski, Anna; Breithaupt, Maren; Fincke, Fabian; Kramer, Katharina; Friede, Tim; Zerr, Inga

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The main objective of the present study is to study the therapeutic efficiency of doxycycline in a double-blinded randomised phase II study in a cohort of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Methods From the National Reference Center of TSE Surveillance in Germany, patients with probable or definite sCJD were recruited for a double-blinded randomised study with oral doxycycline (EudraCT 2006-003934-14). In addition, we analysed the data from patients with CJD who received compassionate treatment with doxycycline in a separate group. Potential factors which influence survival such as age at onset, gender, codon 129 polymorphism and cognitive functions were evaluated. The primary outcome measure was survival. Results Group 1: in the double-blinded randomised phase II study, 7 patients in the treatment group were compared with 5 controls. Group 2: 55 patients with sCJD treated with oral doxycycline were analysed and compared with 33 controls by a stratified propensity score applied to a Cox proportional hazard analysis. The results of both studies were combined by means of a random-effects meta-analysis. A slight increase in survival time in the doxycycline treatment group was observed (p=0.049, HR=0.63 (95% CI 0.402 to 0.999)). Conclusions On the basis of our studies, a larger trial of doxycycline should be performed in persons in the earliest stages of CJD. Trial registration number EudraCT 2006-003934-14; Results. PMID:27807198

  19. Early evolution of a stratospheric volcanic eruption cloud as observed with TOMS and AVHRR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, D.J.; Rose, William I.; Coke, L.R.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Sprod, I.E.; Krueger, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a detailed study of remote sensing data from the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) satellite detectors, of the 1982 eruption of El Chichón, Mexico. The volcanic cloud/atmosphere interactions in the first four days of this eruption were investigated by combining ultraviolet retrievals to estimate the mass of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic cloud [Krueger et al., 1995] with thermal infrared retrievals of the size, optical depth, and mass of fine-grained (1–10 μm radius) volcanic ash [Wen and Rose, 1994]. Our study provides the first direct evidence of gravitational separation of ash from a stratospheric, gas-rich, plinian eruption column and documents the marked differences in residence times of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide in volcanic clouds. The eruption column reached as high as 32 km [Carey and Sigurdsson, 1986] and was injected into an atmosphere with a strong wind shear, which allowed for an observation of the separation of sulfur dioxide and volcanic ash. The upper, more sulfur dioxide-rich part of the cloud was transported to the west in the stratosphere, while the fine-grained ash traveled to the south in the troposphere. The mass of sulfur dioxide released was estimated at 7.1 × 109 kg with the mass decreasing by approximately 4% 1 day after the peak. The mass of fine-grained volcanic ash detected was estimated at 6.5 × 109 kg, amounting to about 0.7% of the estimated mass of the ash which fell out in the mapped ash blanket close to the volcano. Over the following days, 98% of this remaining fine ash was removed from the volcanic cloud, and the effective radius of ash in the volcanic cloud decreased from about 8 μm to about 4 μm.

  20. Earth Observations for Early Detection of Agricultural Drought in Countries at Risk: Contributions of the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdin, J. P.; Rowland, J.; Senay, G. B.; Funk, C. C.; Budde, M. E.; Husak, G. J.; Jayanthi, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Group on Earth Observations' Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) implementation plan emphasizes the information needs of countries at risk of food insecurity emergencies. Countries in this category are often vulnerable to disruption of agricultural production due to drought, while at the same time they lack well developed networks of in-situ observations to support early drought detection. Consequently, it is vital that Earth observations by satellites supplement those available from surface stations. The USGS, in its role as a FEWS NET implementing partner, has recently developed a number of new applications of satellite observations for this purpose. (1) In partnership with the University of California, Santa Barbara, a 30+ year time series of gridded precipitation estimates (CHIRPS) has been developed by blending NOAA GridSat B1 geostationary thermal infrared imagery with station observations using robust geostatistical methods. The core data set consists of pentadal (5-daily) accumulations from 1981-2013 at 0.05 degree spatial resolution between +/- 50 degrees latitude. Validation has been recently completed, and applications for gridded crop water balance calculations and mapping the Standardized Precipitation Index are in development. (2) Actual evapotranspiration (ETa) estimates using MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data at 1-km have been successfully demonstrated using the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance model with 8-day composites from the LPDAAC. A new, next-day latency implementation using daily LST swath data from the NASA LANCE server is in development for all the crop growing regions of the world. This ETa processing chain follows in the footsteps of (3) the expedited production of MODIS 250-meter NDVI images every five days at USGS EROS, likewise using LANCE daily swath data as input since 2010. Coverage includes Africa, Central Asia, the Middle East, Central America, and the Caribbean. (4) A surface water point monitoring

  1. Real time observations of coastal algal blooms by an early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H. W.; Hodgkiss, I. J.; Wong, K. T. M.; Lam, I. H. Y.

    2005-10-01

    In eutrophic sub-tropical coastal waters around Hong Kong, phytoplankton or unicellular microalgae can grow rapidly to very high concentrations under favourable environmental conditions. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) have led to massive fish kills, hypoxia, and beach closures. However, to date the causality and mechanism of coastal algal blooms are still poorly understood. A remotely controlled autonomous real time field monitoring system has been developed to continuously track the changes in chlorophyll fluorescence, dissolved oxygen and other hydro-meteorological variables at two representative mariculture zones. The system can give an alarm when a bloom is detected, so that timely manual water quality sampling can be carried out to supplement the telemetric data. During 2000-2003, the system has successfully tracked 19 algal blooms. In the shallow weakly flushed coastal water (depth 7-10 m, tidal current 5-19 cm s -1), the bloom is short-lived, typically lasting a few days to over a week, with chlorophyll and DO concentrations in the range of 20-40 mg m -3 and 2-15 g m -3, respectively. It is found that: (1) the chlorophyll concentration is strongly correlated with its past values in the previous week, suggesting an auto-regressive type of algal dynamics; (2) the dissolved oxygen can reach highly super-saturated levels (12 g m -3) during a diatom bloom, and decreases to below 4 g m -3 at the tail of the growth phase; (3) in contrast, a dinoflagellate bloom is characterized by a much more pronounced vertical structure. Diel vertical migration and aggregation to dense layers are clearly observed. Significant dissolved oxygen consumption is associated with the migration, resulting in DO drops by as much as 6 g m -3 during the bloom; (4) the predominance of diatoms and dinoflagellates at the two sites can be explained in terms of the different hydrographic and nutrient conditions (the N:P ratio). Net algal growth rate, sinking and swimming velocities are

  2. Variation of Soil Mycoflora in Decomposition of Rice Stubble from Rice-wheat Cropping System

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Asha

    2007-01-01

    The colonization pattern and extent of decay produced in paddy stubble by soil inhabiting mycoflora were done by using nylon net bag technique. Among the three methods used for isolation of fungi, dilution plate technique recorded the highest number of fungi followed by damp chamber and direct observation method. Nutrient availability and climatic conditions (temperature, humidity and rainfall) influenced the occurrence and colonization pattern of fungi. Maximum fungal population was recorded in October (48.99 × 104/g dry litter) and minimum in May (11.41 × 104/g dry litter). Distribution of Deuteromycetous fungi was more in comparison to Zygomycetes, oomycetes and ascomycetes. In the early stage of decomposition Mucor racemosus, Rhizopus nigricans, Chaetomium globosum and Gliocladium species were found primarly whereas at later stages of decomposition preponderance of Aspergillus candidus, Torula graminis, Cladosporiun cladosporioides and Aspergillus luchuensis was recorded. PMID:24015096

  3. Soil-litter mixing accelerates decomposition in a Chihuahuan Desert grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decomposition models typically under-predict decomposition relative to observed rates in drylands. This discrepancy indicates a significant gap in our mechanistic understanding of carbon and nutrient cycling in these systems. Recent research suggests that certain drivers of decomposition that are of...

  4. Wide-bandwidth drift-scan pulsar surveys of globular clusters: application to early science observations with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Hobbs, George; Li, Di; Lorimer, Duncan; Zhang, Jie; Yu, Meng; Yue, You-Ling; Wang, Pei; Pan, Zhi-Chen; Dai, Shi

    2016-10-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) will begin its early-science operations during 2016. Drift-scan pulsar surveys will be carried out during this period using an ultra-wide-band receiver system (covering ˜ 270 to 1620 MHz). We describe a method for accounting for the changes in the telescope beam shape and the pulsar parameters when searching for pulsars over such a wide bandwidth. We applied this method to simulated data sets of pulsars in globular clusters that are visible to FAST and found that a representative observation would have a sensitivity of ˜ 40 μJy. Our results showed that a single drift-scan (lasting less than a minute) is likely to find at least one pulsar for observations of four globular clusters. Repeated observations will increase the likely number of detections. We found that pulsars in ˜16 clusters are likely to be found if the data from 100 drift-scan observations of each cluster are incoherently combined.

  5. Real & Simulated IFU Observations of Low-Mass Early-Type Galaxies: Environmental Influence Probed for Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybilska, Agnieszka; Łokas, Ewa Luiza; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    We combine high-quality IFU data with a new set of numerical simulations to study low-mass early type galaxies (dEs) in dense environments. Our earlier study of dEs in the Virgo cluster has produced the first large-scale maps of kinematic and stellar population properties of dEs in those environments (Ryś et al. 2013, 2014, 2015). A quantitative discrimination between various (trans)formation processes proposed for these objects is, however, a complex issue, requiring a priori assumptions about the progenitors of galaxies we observe and study today. To bridge this gap between observations and theoretical predictions, we use the expertise gained in the IFU data analysis to look ``through the eye of SAURON'' at our new suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of dEs in the Virgo cluster. Mimicking the observers perspective as closely as possible, we can also indicate the existing instrumental and viewer limitations regarding what we are/are not able to detect as observers.

  6. Wood decomposition as influenced by invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ulyshen, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    The diversity and habitat requirements of invertebrates associated with dead wood have been the subjects of hundreds of studies in recent years but we still know very little about the ecological or economic importance of these organisms. The purpose of this review is to examine whether, how and to what extent invertebrates affect wood decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems. Three broad conclusions can be reached from the available literature. First, wood decomposition is largely driven by microbial activity but invertebrates also play a significant role in both temperate and tropical environments. Primary mechanisms include enzymatic digestion (involving both endogenous enzymes and those produced by endo- and ectosymbionts), substrate alteration (tunnelling and fragmentation), biotic interactions and nitrogen fertilization (i.e. promoting nitrogen fixation by endosymbiotic and free-living bacteria). Second, the effects of individual invertebrate taxa or functional groups can be accelerative or inhibitory but the cumulative effect of the entire community is generally to accelerate wood decomposition, at least during the early stages of the process (most studies are limited to the first 2-3 years). Although methodological differences and design limitations preclude meta-analysis, studies aimed at quantifying the contributions of invertebrates to wood decomposition commonly attribute 10-20% of wood loss to these organisms. Finally, some taxa appear to be particularly influential with respect to promoting wood decomposition. These include large wood-boring beetles (Coleoptera) and termites (Termitoidae), especially fungus-farming macrotermitines. The presence or absence of these species may be more consequential than species richness and the influence of invertebrates is likely to vary biogeographically.

  7. ROSAT PSPC observations of two X-ray-faint early-type galaxies: NGC 4365 and NGC 4382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Trinchieri, G.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT Positive Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations of the two early-type galaxies NGC 4365 and NGC 4382. These galaxies are among those observed with Einstein to have the lowest X-ray to optical flux ratios of early-type galaxies. The PSCP data show that for radii r greater than 50 arcsec the radial distributions of the X-ray surface brightness are consistent with the optical distributions of King (1978). We also find that these galaxies have X-ray spectra significantly different from those observed in X-ray-bright ellipticals, with a relative excess of counts detected in the softest spectral channels. This confirms earlier Einstein results. The characteristics of the ROSAT PSPC do not allow us to discriminate between possible spectral models. If we adopt a two-component thermal model on the grounds of physical plausibility, we find that the spectral data can be fitted with a very soft optically thin component, with kT approximately 0.2 keV, and a hard component with kT greater than (1.0-1.5) keV. The hard component has a luminosity consistent with that expected from the integrated emission of a population of low mass-X-ray binaries in these galaxies; the nature of the very soft component is more speculative. Candidates include the coronal emission of late-type stars, supersoft X-ray sources, RS CVn, and perhaps a hot Interstellar Medium (ISM). Alternatively, the spectal data may be fitted with a 0.6-1 keV bremsstrahlung spectrum (expontential plus Gaunt), and may suggest the presence of a totally new population of X-ray sources.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  9. Mode decomposition evolution equations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  10. Hydrogen iodide decomposition

    DOEpatents

    O'Keefe, Dennis R.; Norman, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen iodide is decomposed to form hydrogen and iodine in the presence of water using a soluble catalyst. Decomposition is carried out at a temperature between about 350.degree. K. and about 525.degree. K. and at a corresponding pressure between about 25 and about 300 atmospheres in the presence of an aqueous solution which acts as a carrier for the homogeneous catalyst. Various halides of the platinum group metals, particularly Pd, Rh and Pt, are used, particularly the chlorides and iodides which exhibit good solubility. After separation of the H.sub.2, the stream from the decomposer is countercurrently extracted with nearly dry HI to remove I.sub.2. The wet phase contains most of the catalyst and is recycled directly to the decomposition step. The catalyst in the remaining almost dry HI-I.sub.2 phase is then extracted into a wet phase which is also recycled. The catalyst-free HI-I.sub.2 phase is finally distilled to separate the HI and I.sub.2. The HI is recycled to the reactor; the I.sub.2 is returned to a reactor operating in accordance with the Bunsen equation to create more HI.

  11. Early science with the Large Millimetre Telescope: Deep LMT/AzTEC millimetre observations of ɛ Eridani and its surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez-Dagostino, M.; Bertone, E.; Cruz-Saenz de Miera, F.; Marshall, J. P.; Wilson, G. W.; Sánchez-Argüelles, D.; Hughes, D. H.; Kennedy, G.; Vega, O.; De la Luz, V.; Dent, W. R. F.; Eiroa, C.; Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Greaves, J. S.; Lizano, S.; López-Valdivia, R.; Mamajek, E.; Montaña, A.; Olmedo, M.; Rodríguez-Montoya, I.; Schloerb, F. P.; Yun, Min S.; Zavala, J. A.; Zeballos, M.

    2016-11-01

    ɛ Eridani is a nearby, young Sun-like star that hosts a ring of cool debris analogous to the Solar system's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. Early observations at (sub-)mm wavelengths gave tentative evidence of the presence of inhomogeneities in the ring, which have been ascribed to the effect of a putative low eccentricity planet, orbiting close to the ring. The existence of these structures has been recently challenged by high-resolution interferometric millimetre observations. Here, we present the deepest single-dish image of ɛ Eridani at millimetre wavelengths, obtained with the Large Millimetre Telescope Alfonso Serrano (LMT). The main goal of these LMT observations is to confirm (or refute) the presence of non-axisymmetric structure in the disc. The dusty ring is detected for the first time along its full projected elliptical shape. The radial extent of the ring is not spatially resolved and shows no evidence, to within the uncertainties, of dust density enhancements. Additional features of the 1.1 mm map are: (i) the presence of significant flux in the gap between the ring and the star, probably providing the first exo-solar evidence of Poynting-Robertson drag, (ii) an unambiguous detection of emission at the stellar position with a flux significantly above that expected from ɛ Eridani's photosphere, and (iii) the identification of numerous unresolved sources which could correspond to background dusty star-forming galaxies.

  12. Matrix isolation study of the early intermediates in the ozonolysis of cyclopentene and cyclopentadiene: observation of two Criegee intermediates.

    PubMed

    Hoops, Michael D; Ault, Bruce S

    2009-03-04

    Matrix isolation studies, combined with infrared spectroscopy, of the twin jet codeposition of ozone into matrices containing either cyclopentadiene or cyclopentene have led to the first observation of several early intermediates in these ozonolysis reactions. Specifically, evidence is presented for the formation, identification, and characterization of the long sought-after Criegee intermediate for each system, as well as the primary and secondary ozonides. These were observed after initial twin jet deposition and grew approximately 300% upon annealing to 35 K. Extensive isotopic labeling ((2)H, (18)O and mixtures) experiments provided important supporting data. Detailed theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,2p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) levels were carried out as well to augment the experimental work. Merged jet (flow reactor) experiments followed by cryogenic trapping in solid argon led to the formation of "late" stable oxidation products of cyclopentadiene and cyclopentene. In contrast, no thermal reaction between ozone and cyclopentane was observed. Photochemical reactions of ozone with all three organic substrates were studied as well.

  13. Early Healing Events after Periodontal Surgery: Observations on Soft Tissue Healing, Microcirculation, and Wound Fluid Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, Doğan; Soudan, Mouaz; Zhao, Han; Gaßmann, Georg; Schönhauser, Anna; Friedmann, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Early wound healing after periodontal surgery with or without enamel matrix derivative/biphasic calcium phosphate (EMD/BCP) was characterized in terms of soft tissue closure, changes of microcirculation, and expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in gingival crevicular fluid/wound fluid (GCF/WF). Periodontal surgery was carried out in 30 patients (18 patients: application of EMD/BCP for regeneration of bony defects; 12 patients: surgical crown lengthening (SCL)). Healthy sites were observed as untreated controls. GCF/WF samples were collected during two post-surgical weeks. Flap microcirculation was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Soft tissue healing was evaluated after two weeks. GCF/WF levels of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-10 were determined using a multiplex immunoassay. Surgery caused similar reductions of flap microcirculation followed by recovery within two weeks in both EMD/BCP and SCL groups. GCF/WF and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were immediately increased after surgery, and returned only partially to baseline levels within the two-week observation period. Levels of IL-10 were temporarily reduced in all surgical sites. Flap dehiscence caused prolonged elevated levels of GCF/WF, IL-1β, and TNF-α. These findings show that periodontal surgery triggers an immediate inflammatory reaction corresponding to the early inflammatory phase of wound healing, and these inflammation measures are temporary in case of maintained closure of the flap. However, flap dehiscence causes prolonged inflammatory exudation from the periodontal wound. If the biological pre-conditions for periodontal wound healing are considered important for the clinical outcome, care should be taken to maintain primary closure of the flap. PMID:28134829

  14. Shrub encroachment in Arctic tundra: Betula nana effects on above- and belowground litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Jennie R; Buckeridge, Kate M; van de Weg, Martine J; Shaver, Gaius R; Schimel, Joshua P; Gough, Laura

    2017-03-06

    Rapid arctic vegetation change as a result of global warming includes an increase in the cover and biomass of deciduous shrubs. Increases in shrub abundance will result in a proportional increase of shrub litter in the litter community, potentially affecting carbon turnover rates in arctic ecosystems. We investigated the effects of leaf and root litter of a deciduous shrub, Betula nana, on decomposition, by examining species-specific decomposition patterns, as well as effects of Betula litter on the decomposition of other species. We conducted a 2-yr decomposition experiment in moist acidic tundra in northern Alaska, where we decomposed three tundra species (Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Rhododendron palustre, and Eriophorum vaginatum) alone and in combination with Betula litter. Decomposition patterns for leaf and root litter were determined using three different measures of decomposition (mass loss, respiration, extracellular enzyme activity). We report faster decomposition of Betula leaf litter compared to other species, with support for species differences coming from all three measures of decomposition. Mixing effects were less consistent among the measures, with negative mixing effects shown only for mass loss. In contrast, there were few species differences or mixing effects for root decomposition. Overall, we attribute longer-term litter mass loss patterns to patterns created by early decomposition processes in the first winter. We note numerous differences for species patterns between leaf and root decomposition, indicating that conclusions from leaf litter experiments should not be extrapolated to below-ground decomposition. The high decomposition rates of Betula leaf litter aboveground, and relatively similar decomposition rates of multiple species below, suggest a potential for increases in turnover in the fast-decomposing carbon pool of leaves and fine roots as the dominance of deciduous shrubs in the Arctic increases, but this outcome may be tempered by

  15. Low Temperature Decomposition Rates for Tetraphenylborate Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1998-11-18

    Previous studies indicated that palladium is catalyzes rapid decomposition of alkaline tetraphenylborate slurries. Additional evidence suggest that Pd(II) reduces to Pd(0) during catalyst activation. Further use of tetraphenylborate ion in the decontamination of radioactive waste may require removal of the catalyst or cooling to temperatures at which the decomposition reaction proceeds slowly and does not adversely affect processing. Recent tests showed that tetraphenylborate did not react appreciably at 25 degrees Celsius over six months suggesting the potential to avoid the decomposition at low temperatures. The lack of reaction at low temperature could reflect very slow kinetics at the lower temperature, or may indicate a catalyst ''deactivation'' process. Previous tests in the temperature range 35 to 70 degrees Celsius provided a low precision estimate of the activation energy of the reaction with which to predict the rate of reaction at 25 percent Celsius. To understand the observations at 25 degrees Celsius, experiments must separate the catalyst activation step and the subsequent reaction with TPB. Tests described in this report represent an initial attempt to separate the two steps and determine the rate and activation energy of the reaction between active catalyst and TPB. The results of these tests indicate that the absence of reaction at 25 degrees Celsius was caused by failure to activate the catalyst or the presence of a deactivating mechanism. In the presence of activated catalyst, the decomposition reaction rate is significant.

  16. Contextual variation in young children’s observed disruptive behavior on the DB-DOS: implications for early identification

    PubMed Central

    Petitclerc, Amélie; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Estabrook, Ryne; Burns, James L.; Anderson, Erica L.; McCarthy, Kimberly J.; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Contextual variation in child disruptive behavior is well documented but remains poorly understood. We first examine how variation in observed disruptive behavior across interactional contexts is associated with maternal reports of contextual variation in oppositional-defiant behavior and functional impairment. Second, we test whether child inhibitory control explains the magnitude of contextual variation in observed disruptive behavior. Methods Participants are 497 young children (mean age = 4 years, 11 months) from a subsample of the MAPS, a sociodemographically diverse pediatric sample, enriched for risk of disruptive behavior. Observed anger modulation and behavioral regulation problems were coded on the Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule (DB-DOS) during interactions with parent and examiner. Oppositional-defiant behavior, and impairment in relationships, with parents and nonparental adults, were measured with the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment (PAPA) interview with the mother. Functional impairment in the home and out-and-about was assessed with the Family Life Impairment Scale (FLIS), and expulsion from child care/school was measured with the baseline survey and FLIS. Results Observed disruptive behavior on the DB-DOS Parent Context was associated with oppositional-defiant behavior with parents, and with impairment at home and out-and-about. Observed disruptive behavior with the Examiner was associated with oppositional-defiant behavior with both parents and nonparental adults, impairment in relationships with nonparental adults, and child care/school expulsion. Differences in observed disruptive behavior in the Parent versus Examiner Contexts was related to the differences in maternal reports of oppositional-defiant behavior with parents versus nonparental adults. Children with larger decreases in disruptive behavior from Parent to Examiner Context had better inhibitory control and fewer attention

  17. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 4342, AN OPTICALLY FAINT, X-RAY GAS-RICH EARLY-TYPE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan, Akos; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jones, Christine; Randall, Scott W.; Li Zhiyuan; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Blom, Christina; Zhang Zhongli; Zhuravleva, Irina; Churazov, Eugene; Schindler, Sabine

    2012-08-10

    Chandra x-ray observations of NGC 4342, a low-stellar mass (M{sub K} = -22.79 mag) early-type galaxy, show luminous, diffuse x-ray emission originating from hot gas with temperature of kT {approx} 0.6 keV. The observed 0.5-2 keV band luminosity of the diffuse x-ray emission within the D{sub 25} ellipse is L{sub 0.5-2keV} = 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. The hot gas has a significantly broader distribution than the stellar light, and shows strong hydrodynamic disturbances with a sharp surface brightness edge to the northeast and a trailing tail. We identify the edge as a cold front and conclude that the distorted morphology of the hot gas is produced by ram pressure as NGC 4342 moves through external gas. From the thermal pressure ratios inside and outside the cold front, we estimate the velocity of NGC 4342 and find that it moves supersonically (M {approx} 2.6) toward the northeast. Outside the optical extent of the galaxy, we detect {approx}17 bright (L{sub 0.5-8keV} > or approx. 3 x 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}) excess x-ray point sources. The excess sources are presumably LMXBs located in metal-poor globular clusters (GCs) in the extended dark matter halo of NGC 4342. Based on the number of excess sources and the average frequency of bright LMXBs in GCs, we estimate that NGC 4342 may host roughly 850-1700 GCs. In good agreement with this, optical observations hint that NGC 4342 may harbor 1200 {+-} 500 GCs. This number corresponds to a GC specific frequency of S{sub N} = 19.9 {+-} 8.3, which is among the largest values observed in full-size galaxies.

  18. The 3-D effects in the long-term solar wind speed rise observed by Voyager 2 in early 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.; Paularena, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Belcher, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    In early 1994, Voyager 2 at 42-43 AU near heliolatitude 10 deg S observed over a period of approximately 100 days a remarkable sequence of quasi-recurrent stream fronts, wherein the background (ambient) speed rose steadily from approximately 450 to approximately 550 km/s while the mean period of the streams decreased from the usual 25 days down to approximately 20 days. A qualitative explanation for this effect can be derived from IMP observations, which show that the amplitude of the stream structure at 1 AU increased monotonically in late 1993, concurrent with major secular evolution in the corona. The reduction in period, then, amounts to a doppler shift due to the progressive overtaking of successively faster streams in the sequence. Attempts to model this process quantitatively with 1-D dynamic simulations falter on three accounts: (1) the reduction in period is overestimated, (2) the simulation predicts many more fronts surviving to 43 AU than are observed by Voyager; (3) the density variations are much too large. It is argued that inclusion of the 3-D geometry in the simulation would resolve most all these shortcomings. Using a series of calculations executed with 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D MHD models of hypothetical tilted-dipole flows, we show that: (1) the radial propagation velocities of 3-D fronts are less than those of 1-D or 2-D fronts, owing to the tilt of (and increased shearing across) the interaction surfaces hence the overtaking rate of successive streams is reduced; (2) in a tilted-dipole geometry, the reverse fronts should largely disappear from the equatorial plane by 43 AU, effectively halving the number of fronts to be observed (see companion paper on predominance of forward fronts at Voyager); and (3) the density enhancements would be much smaller than predicted by a 1-D model.

  19. The Kinetics of Formation and Decomposition of Austenite in Relation to Carbide Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarenga, Henrique Duarte; Van Steenberge, Nele; Sietsma, Jilt; Terryn, Herman

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the carbide morphology on the kinetics of austenite formation and its decomposition was investigated by a combination of measurements of austenite fraction by dilatometry and metallography. These measurements show that coarse carbide morphology is generated by fast cooling through the early stages of eutectoid transformation, enabling fast precipitation of pro-eutectoid ferrite, followed by slow cooling during the final stages of transformation, during the precipitation of carbides. Additionally, a strong influence of the morphology of carbides on the kinetics of austenite formation is observed. The presence of coarse carbides can determine the rate of austenite formation during intercritical annealing as a result of its slow dissolution kinetics.

  20. HF radar observations of Pc 5 field line resonances in the midnight/early morning MLT sector

    SciTech Connect

    Ruohoniemi, J.M.; Greenwald, R.A.; Baker, K.B. ); Samson, J.C. )

    1991-09-01

    On a number of occasions The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory HF radar at Goose Bay, Labrador, has observed the effects of field line resonances on the drift velocities of irregularities in the F region of the high-latitude ionosphere. One of the most interesting sets of resonances occurs near midnight MLT and may be associated with shear in the convective flow in the magnetotail. This paper discusses in detail a particularly clear example which shows field line resonance equatorward of a region of shear flow in the early morning sector. The motions were predominantly in the geomagnetic east-west direction, indicating north-south electric fields. As expected of field line resonance pulsations, these oscillations had pronounced peaks in their latitudinal power distribution. The pulsations could occur simultaneously but remained distinct as the latitude of peak response was observed to vary inversely with the frequency of the pulsation. The authors interpret these features in terms of field line resonance theory and discuss the possible sources of the pulsation energy.

  1. Subtle effects of environmental stress observed in the early life stages of the Common frog, Rana temporaria

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Rebecca; Martin, Francis L.; Jones, Kevin C.; Shore, Richard F.; Halsall, Crispin J.

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide amphibian populations are declining due to habitat loss, disease and pollution. Vulnerability to environmental contaminants such as pesticides will be dependent on the species, the sensitivity of the ontogenic life stage and hence the timing of exposure and the exposure pathway. Herein we investigated the biochemical tissue ‘fingerprint’ in spawn and early-stage tadpoles of the Common frog, Rana temporaria, using attenuated total reflection-Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy with the objective of observing differences in the biochemical constituents of the respective amphibian tissues due to varying water quality in urban and agricultural ponds. Our results demonstrate that levels of stress (marked by biochemical constituents such as glycogen that are involved in compensatory metabolic mechanisms) can be observed in tadpoles present in the pond most impacted by pollution (nutrients and pesticides), but large annual variability masked any inter-site differences in the frog spawn. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is capable of detecting differences in tadpoles that are present in selected ponds with different levels of environmental perturbation and thus serves as a rapid and cost effective tool in assessing stress-related effects of pollution in a vulnerable class of organism. PMID:28317844

  2. The combination of high sensitivity troponin T and copeptin facilitates early rule-out of ACS: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The combination of the new high sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) assays and copeptin, a biomarker of endogenous stress, has been suggested to have the potential of early rule-out of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study was to examine the ability of this combination to rule out ACS in patients presenting with chest pain and to compare the diagnostic performance to hsTnT alone. Method In this prospective observational study, patients with chest pain admitted for observation were consecutively included. Patients presenting with ST elevation were excluded. Copeptin and hsTnT were analyzed at admission and hsTnT was thereafter determined approximately every 3rd hour as long as clinically indicated. The follow-up period was 60 days. A combined primary endpoint of ACS, non-elective percutanous coronary intervention, non-elective coronary artery bypass surgery and death of all causes was used. Results 478 patients were included. 107 (22%) patients were diagnosed with ACS during hospital stay. 70 (14%) had non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and 37 (8%) had unstable angina pectoris (UAP). The combination of hsTnT >14 ng/L or copeptin ≥14 pmol/L at admission identified ACS with a higher sensitivity than hsTnT alone: 0.83 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74-0.89) versus 0.69 (95% CI: 0.59-0.77), p <0.001. Negative predictive values (NPV) 91% (95% CI: 86-94) versus 89% (95% CI: 84-92). A repeated hsTnT analyzed 3-4 hours after admission resulted in a sensitivity of: 0.77 (95% CI: 0.65-0.86), p =0.031 for comparison with the combination analyzed at admission. Conclusions In patients presenting with chest pain admitted for observation, the combination of hsTnT and copeptin analyzed at admission had a significantly higher sensitivity to diagnose ACS than hsTnT alone. We report a sensitivity of 83% and a NPV of 91% for the combination of hsTnT and copeptin and we conclude that biomarkers alone are not sufficient to rule out ACS

  3. Art of spin decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiangsong; Sun Weimin; Wang Fan; Goldman, T.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the problem of spin decomposition for an interacting system from a natural perspective of constructing angular-momentum eigenstates. We split, from the total angular-momentum operator, a proper part which can be separately conserved for a stationary state. This part commutes with the total Hamiltonian and thus specifies the quantum angular momentum. We first show how this can be done in a gauge-dependent way, by seeking a specific gauge in which part of the total angular-momentum operator vanishes identically. We then construct a gauge-invariant operator with the desired property. Our analysis clarifies what is the most pertinent choice among the various proposals for decomposing the nucleon spin. A similar analysis is performed for extracting a proper part from the total Hamiltonian to construct energy eigenstates.

  4. The Vector Decomposition Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Maki; Mitsunari, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Toru

    This paper introduces a new computational problem on a two-dimensional vector space, called the vector decomposition problem (VDP), which is mainly defined for designing cryptosystems using pairings on elliptic curves. We first show a relation between the VDP and the computational Diffie-Hellman problem (CDH). Specifically, we present a sufficient condition for the VDP on a two-dimensional vector space to be at least as hard as the CDH on a one-dimensional subspace. We also present a sufficient condition for the VDP with a fixed basis to have a trapdoor. We then give an example of vector spaces which satisfy both sufficient conditions and on which the CDH is assumed to be hard in previous work. In this sense, the intractability of the VDP is a reasonable assumption as that of the CDH.

  5. Direct Sum Decomposition of Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaheem, A. B.

    2005-01-01

    Direct sum decomposition of Abelian groups appears in almost all textbooks on algebra for undergraduate students. This concept plays an important role in group theory. One simple example of this decomposition is obtained by using the kernel and range of a projection map on an Abelian group. The aim in this pedagogical note is to establish a direct…

  6. Early algorithm development efforts for the National Ecological Observatory Network Airborne Observation Platform imaging spectrometer and waveform lidar instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Keith S.; Kuester, Michele A.; Johnson, Brian R.; McCorkel, Joel; Kampe, Thomas U.

    2011-10-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be the first observatory network of its kind designed to detect and enable forecasting of ecological change at continental scales over multiple decades. NEON will collect data at sites distributed at 20 ecoclimatic domains across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on natural resources and biodiversity. The NEON Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) is an aircraft platform carrying remote sensing instrumentation designed to achieve sub-meter to meter scale ground resolution, bridging the scales from organisms and individual stands to satellite-based remote sensing. AOP instrumentation consists of a VIS/SWIR imaging spectrometer, a scanning small-footprint waveform LiDAR, and a high resolution airborne digital camera. AOP data will provide quantitative information on land use change and changes in ecological structure and chemistry including the presence and effects of invasive species. A Pathfinder Flight Campaign was conducted over a two week period during late August to early September 2010 in order to collect representative AOP data over one NEON domain site. NASA JPL flew the AVIRIS imaging spectrometer and NCALM flew an Optech Gemini waveform LiDAR over the University of Florida Ordway-Swisher Biological Station and Donaldson tree plantation near Gainesville Florida. The pathfinder data are discussed in detail along with how the data are being used for early algorithm and product development prototyping activities. The data collected during the campaign and prototype products are openly available to scientists to become more familiar with representative NEON AOP data.

  7. Early-type galaxies at intermediate redshift observed with Hubble space telescope WFC3: perspectives on recent star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, Michael J.; Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Ryan, Russell E. Jr.; Koekemoer, Anton; Hathi, Nimish P.; Dopita, Michael A.

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of the stellar populations of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) with spectroscopic redshifts (0.35 ≲ z ≲ 1.5) from observations in the Early Release Science program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We fit one- and two-component synthetic stellar models to the ETGs UV-optical-near-IR spectral energy distributions and find that a large fraction (∼40%) are likely to have experienced a minor (f{sub YC} ≲ 10% of stellar mass) burst of recent (t{sub YC} ≲ 1 Gyr) star formation. The measured age and mass fraction of the young stellar populations do not strongly trend with measurements of galaxy morphology. We note that massive (M > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉}) recent star-forming ETGs appear to have larger sizes. Furthermore, high-mass, quiescent ETGs identified with likely companions populate a distinct region in the size-mass parameter space, in comparison with the distribution of massive ETGs with evidence of recent star formation (RSF). We conclude that both mechanisms of quenching star formation in disk-like ETGs and (gas-rich, minor) merger activity contribute to the formation of young stars and the size-mass evolution of intermediate redshift ETGs. The number of ETGs for which we have both HST WFC3 panchromatic (especially UV) imaging and spectroscopically confirmed redshifts is relatively small, therefore, a conclusion about the relative roles of both of these mechanisms remains an open question.

  8. Environmental effects of solar-thermal power systems: ecological observations during early testing of the Barstow 10-MWe pilot STPS

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, F.B.

    1982-11-01

    Environmental measurements were continued at Solar One during 1982, while final steps in construction and early testing were carried out. Measurements of sand depths downwind (east) of the heliostat field indicated that some of the sand blown off the field (most of it between September 1979 and March 1980) has been carried farther east, reducing sand depths somewhat in areas just east of the field. Observations of birds between March and June 1982 revealed that (1) the natural avifauna of the field has been altered, although the area is still used for feeding by some icterids (larks, blackbirds) and aerial insectivores (swallows, swifts); (2) of 15 bird casualties ascribable to the presence and/or operation of Solar One, 12 followed collisions with heliostats, three resulted from incineration in heliostat beams; (3) the central receiver tower does not appear to be a source of mortality. Numbers of rodents (particularly kangaroo rats) trapped in areas downwind of the site declined steadily between 1978 and 1982 in areas both clost to the field and as far east as 600 m from the fence. The most likely interpretation of these changes is a reduction in reproductivity and/or early survival caused by four consecutive years (1978, 1979, 1980, 1981) of suboptimal autumn rainfall. Micrometeorological measurements in areas downwind of Solar One showed small effects on air temperatures (<0.5/sup 0/C), wind speeds (<0.4 m/sec), and evaporation rates (<1.5 ml/hr).Effects were detected only in areas 100 to 190 m from the east perimeter fence. Because these differences are so small, relative to natural heterogeneities, the effects of Solar One on rates of evaporation, air temperatures and wind speed will not affect the downwind biological community. The relavance of these findings to construction of a larger solar thermal power plant (e.g., Solar 100) are considered.

  9. Educator engagement and interaction and children's physical activity in early childhood education and care settings: an observational study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rachel A; Hagenbuchner, Markus; Nguyen, Tuc V; Okely, Anthony D

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The benefits of regular physical activity for children are significant. Previous research has addressed the quantity and quality of children's physical activity while in early childhood education and care (ECEC) settings, yet little research has investigated the social and physical environmental influences on physical activity in these settings. The outcomes of this study will be to measure these social and physical environmental influences on children's physical activity using a combination of a real-time location system (RTLS) (a closed system that tracks the location of movement of participants via readers and tags), accelerometry and direct observation. Methods and analysis This study is the first of its kind to combine RTLSs and accelerometer data in ECEC settings. It is a cross-sectional study involving ∼100 educators and 500 children from 11 ECEC settings in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia. A RTLS and Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers will be concurrently used to measure the level and location of the children's and educators' physical activity while in outside environments. Children and educators will wear accelerometers on their hip that record triaxial acceleration data at 100 Hz. Children and educators will also wear a tag watch on their wrist that transmits a signal to anchors of the RTLS and the triangulation of signals will identify their specific location. In addition to these, up to three random periods (10–25 min in length) will be used to collect observational data each day and assessed with the classroom assessment and scoring system to measure the quality of interactions. In conjunction with the real-time location system (RTLS) and accelerometers, these observations will measure the relationship between the quality of interactions and children's physical activity. Ethics and dissemination The results of this study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and presentations. Ethical approval was

  10. Purely Dry Mergers do not Explain the Observed Evolution of Massive Early-type Galaxies since z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Nipoti, Carlo; Treu, Tommaso

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have suggested that the observed size evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) can be explained as a combination of dry mergers and progenitor bias, at least since z ~ 1. In this paper we carry out a new test of the dry-merger scenario based on recent lensing measurements of the evolution of the mass density profile of ETGs. We construct a theoretical model for the joint evolution of the size and mass density profile slope γ' driven by dry mergers occurring at rates given by cosmological simulations. Such dry-merger model predicts a strong decrease of γ' with cosmic time, inconsistent with the almost constant γ' inferred from observations in the redshift range 0 < z < 1. We then show with a simple toy model that a modest amount of cold gas in the mergers—consistent with the upper limits on recent star formation in ETGs—is sufficient to reconcile the model with measurements of γ'. By fitting for the amount of gas accreted during mergers, we find that models with dissipation are consistent with observations of the evolution in both size and density slope, if ~4% of the total final stellar mass arises from the gas accreted since z ~ 1. Purely dry merger models are ruled out at >99% CL. We thus suggest a scenario where the outer regions of massive ETGs grow by accretion of stars and dark matter, while small amounts of dissipation and nuclear star formation conspire to keep the mass density profile constant and approximately isothermal.

  11. Purely dry mergers do not explain the observed evolution of massive early-type galaxies since z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Nipoti, Carlo

    2014-05-10

    Several studies have suggested that the observed size evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) can be explained as a combination of dry mergers and progenitor bias, at least since z ∼ 1. In this paper we carry out a new test of the dry-merger scenario based on recent lensing measurements of the evolution of the mass density profile of ETGs. We construct a theoretical model for the joint evolution of the size and mass density profile slope γ' driven by dry mergers occurring at rates given by cosmological simulations. Such dry-merger model predicts a strong decrease of γ' with cosmic time, inconsistent with the almost constant γ' inferred from observations in the redshift range 0 < z < 1. We then show with a simple toy model that a modest amount of cold gas in the mergers—consistent with the upper limits on recent star formation in ETGs—is sufficient to reconcile the model with measurements of γ'. By fitting for the amount of gas accreted during mergers, we find that models with dissipation are consistent with observations of the evolution in both size and density slope, if ∼4% of the total final stellar mass arises from the gas accreted since z ∼ 1. Purely dry merger models are ruled out at >99% CL. We thus suggest a scenario where the outer regions of massive ETGs grow by accretion of stars and dark matter, while small amounts of dissipation and nuclear star formation conspire to keep the mass density profile constant and approximately isothermal.

  12. Formaldehyde decomposition and oxidation on Pt(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, G. A.; Ebert, H. D.; Parsons, R.

    1990-12-01

    The decomposition reactions of formaldehyde on clean and oxygen dosed Pt(110) have been studied by LEED, XPS and TPRS. Formaldehyde is adsorbed in two states, a monolayer phase and a multilayer phase which were distinguishable by both TPRS and XPS. The saturated monolayer (corresponding to 8.06 × 10 14 molecules cm -2) desorbed at 134 K and the multilayer phase (which could not be saturated) desorbed at 112 K. The only other reaction products observed at higher temperatures were CO and H 2 produced in desorption limited processes and these reached a maximum upon saturation of the formaldehyde monolayer. The desorption spectrum of hydrogen was found to be perturbed by the presence of CO as reported by Weinberg and coworkers. It is proposed that local lifting of the clean surface (1 × 2) reconstruction is responsible for this behaviour. Analysis of the TPRS and XPS peak areas demonstrated that on the clean surface approximately 50% of the adsorbed monolayer dissociated with the remainder desorbing intact. Reaction of formaldehyde with preadsorbed oxygen resulted in the formation of H 2O (hydroxyl recombination) and CO 2 (decomposition of formate) desorbing at 200 and 262 K, respectively. The CO and H 2 desorption peaks were both smaller relative to formaldehyde decomposition on the clean surface and in particular, H 2 desorbed in a reaction limited process associated with decomposition of the formate species. No evidence was found for methane or hydrocarbon evolution in the present study under any circumstances. The results of this investigation are discussed in the light of our earlier work on the decomposition of methanol on the same platinum surface.

  13. Solid-state decomposition kinetics of pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Decomposition of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) was monitored at constant volume under variable pressures of NO{sub 2} using differential scanning calorimetry(DSC). Decomposition involved a slow initial reaction followed by an autocatalytic transition at longer times. The apparent induction time(time-to-maximum rate) for autocatalysis was found to be dependent upon sample mass and the initial pressure of NO{sub 2}. A global kinetic model consistent with observed product distributions and the free radical chain decomposition mechanisms proposed for simpler alkyl nitrates was found to yield calculated induction times in accord with experiment. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Sunspot numbers based on historic records in the 1610s: Early telescopic observations by Simon Marius and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, R.; Neuhäuser, D. L.

    2016-07-01

    Hoyt & Schatten (1998) claim that Simon Marius would have observed the sun from 1617 Jun 7 to 1618 Dec 31 (Gregorian calendar) all days, except three short gaps in 1618, but would never have detected a sunspot - based on a quotation from Marius in Wolf (1857), but mis-interpreted by Hoyt & Schatten. Marius himself specified in early 1619 that for one and a half year ... rather few or more often no spots could be detected ... which was never observed before (Marius 1619). The generic statement by Marius can be interpreted such that the active day fraction was below 0.5 (but not zero) from fall 1617 to spring 1619 and that it was 1 before fall 1617 (since August 1611). Hoyt & Schatten cite Zinner (1952), who referred to Zinner (1942), where observing dates by Marius since 1611 are given but which were not used by Hoyt & Schatten. We present all relevant texts from Marius where he clearly stated that he observed many spots in different form on and since 1611 Aug 3 (Julian) = Aug 13 (Greg.) (on the first day together with Ahasverus Schmidnerus); 14 spots on 1612 May 30 (Julian) = Jun 9 (Greg.), which is consistent with drawings by Galilei and Jungius for that day, the latter is shown here for the first time; at least one spot on 1611 Oct 3 and/or 11 (Julian), i.e. Oct 13 and/or 21 (Greg.), when he changed his sunspot observing technique; he also mentioned that he has drawn sunspots for 1611 Nov 17 (Julian) = Nov 27 (Greg.); in addition to those clearly datable detections, there is evidence in the texts for regular observations. For all the information that can be compared to other observers, the data from Marius could be confirmed, so that his texts are highly credible. We also correct several shortcomings or apparent errors in the database by Hoyt & Schatten (1998) regarding 1612 (Harriot), 1615 (Saxonius, Tardé), 1616 (Tardé), 1617-1619 (Marius, Riccioli/Argoli), and Malapert (for 1618, 1620, and 1621). Furthermore, Schmidnerus, Cysat, David & Johann Fabricius

  15. UV-DROPOUT GALAXIES IN THE GOODS-SOUTH FIELD FROM WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hathi, N. P.; Ryan, R. E.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Yan, H.; McCarthy, P. J.; O'Connell, R. W.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E.; Balick, B.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimble, R. A.; Paresce, F.; Saha, A.

    2010-09-10

    We combine new high sensitivity ultraviolet (UV) imaging from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with existing deep HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys optical images from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) program to identify UV-dropouts, which are Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z {approx_equal} 1-3. These new HST/WFC3 observations were taken over 50 arcmin{sup 2} in the GOODS-South field as a part of the Early Release Science program. The uniqueness of these new UV data is that they are observed in three UV/optical (WFC3 UVIS) channel filters (F225W, F275W, and F336W), which allows us to identify three different sets of UV-dropout samples. We apply Lyman break dropout selection criteria to identify F225W-, F275W-, and F336W-dropouts, which are z {approx_equal} 1.7, 2.1, and 2.7 LBG candidates, respectively. We use multi-wavelength imaging combined with available spectroscopic and photometric redshifts to carefully access the validity of our UV-dropout candidates. Our results are as follows: (1) these WFC3 UVIS filters are very reliable in selecting LBGs with z {approx_equal} 2.0, which helps to reduce the gap between the well-studied z {approx}> 3 and z {approx} 0 regimes; (2) the combined number counts with average redshift z {approx_equal} 2.2 agree very well with the observed change in the surface densities as a function of redshift when compared with the higher redshift LBG samples; and (3) the best-fit Schechter function parameters from the rest-frame UV luminosity functions at three different redshifts fit very well with the evolutionary trend of the characteristic absolute magnitude, M*, and the faint-end slope, {alpha}, as a function of redshift. This is the first study to illustrate the usefulness of the WFC3 UVIS channel observations to select z {approx}< 3 LBGs. The addition of the new WFC3 on the HST has made it possible to uniformly select LBGs from z {approx_equal} 1 to z {approx_equal} 9 and

  16. A Fantastic Decomposition: Unsettling the Fury of Having to Wait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on data from a single element of a larger project, which focused on the issue of "how children develop a reputation as "naughty" in the early years classroom." The author draws attention to the (in)corporeal (re)formation of the line in school, undertaking a decomposition of the topological spaces of research/art/education. She…

  17. Decomposition in northern Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Farrish, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    Decomposition in peatlands was investigated in northern Minnesota. Four sites, an ombrotrophic raised bog, an ombrotrophic perched bog and two groundwater minerotrophic fens, were studied. Decomposition rates of peat and paper were estimated using mass-loss techniques. Environmental and substrate factors that were most likely to be responsible for limiting decomposition were monitored. Laboratory incubation experiments complemented the field work. Mass-loss over one year in one of the bogs, ranged from 11 percent in the upper 10 cm of hummocks to 1 percent at 60 to 100 cm depth in hollows. Regression analysis of the data for that bog predicted no mass-loss below 87 cm. Decomposition estimates on an area basis were 2720 and 6460 km/ha yr for the two bogs; 17,000 and 5900 kg/ha yr for the two fens. Environmental factors found to limit decomposition in these peatlands were reducing/anaerobic conditions below the water table and cool peat temperatures. Substrate factors found to limit decomposition were low pH, high content of resistant organics such as lignin, and shortages of available N and K. Greater groundwater influence was found to favor decomposition through raising the pH and perhaps by introducing limited amounts of dissolved oxygen.

  18. Electron microscopic observation of the early stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual multiplication and development in in vitro axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    The stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual exogenous development were investigated at high ultra-structural resolution in cell-free culture using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Early C. parvum trophozoites were ovoid in shape, 1.07 × 1.47 μm(2) in size, and contained a large nucleus and adjacent Golgi complex. Dividing and mature meronts containing four to eight developing merozoites, 2.34 × 2.7 μm(2) in size, were observed within the first 24h of cultivation. An obvious peculiarity was found within the merozoite pellicle, as it was composed of the outer plasma membrane with underlying middle and inner membrane complexes. Further novel findings were vacuolization of the meront's residuum and extension of its outer pellicle, as parasitophorous vacuole-like membranes were also evident. The asexual reproduction of C. parvum was consistent with the developmental pattern of both eimerian coccidia and Arthrogregarinida (formerly Neogregarinida). The unique cell-free development of C. parvum described here, along with the establishment of meronts and merozoite formation, is the first such evidence obtained from in vitro cell-free culture at the ultrastructural level.

  19. INDISCRIMINATE BEHAVIOR OBSERVED IN THE STRANGE SITUATION AMONG INSTITUTIONALIZED TODDLERS: RELATIONS TO CAREGIVER REPORT AND TO EARLY FAMILY RISK

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Paula S.; Soares, Isabel; Martins, Carla; Silva, Joana R.; Marques, Sofia; Baptista, Joana; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

    2014-01-01

    Socially disinhibited or indiscriminate behavior (IB) has traditionally been investigated using caregiver reports. More recently, an observational measure based on the Strange Situation Procedure (M. Ainsworth, M. Blehar, E. Waters, & S. Wall, 1978), the Rating of Infant and Stranger Engagement (RISE; C. Riley, A. Atlas-Corbett, & K. Lyons-Ruth, 2005), was validated in home-reared at-risk children. The present study aimed to validate the RISE in an institutionally reared sample using the caregiver report, to assess whether IB assessed with the RISE was elevated among the institutionalized children, and to explore potential risk factors associated with IB. The study was conducted among 74 institutionalized toddlers aged 11 to 30 months. Sociodemographic questionnaires were used to assess pre-admission experiences, and aspects of institutional placement were coded from the children’s files in the institution and staff’s report. Institutionalized children displayed high frequencies of IB as assessed on the RISE, and this instrument was validated against caregiver report. Pre-admission experiences of the institutionalized children in their biological families—namely, prenatal risk and maternal emotional neglect risk—predicted IB. Results suggest that the RISE is adequate to use among institutionally reared toddlers and point to aspects of the early familial environment that may be implicated in IB. PMID:25552781

  20. Structural optimization by multilevel decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; James, B.; Dovi, A.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for decomposing an optimization problem into a set of subproblems and a coordination problem which preserves coupling between the subproblems. The method is introduced as a special case of multilevel, multidisciplinary system optimization and its algorithm is fully described for two level optimization for structures assembled of finite elements of arbitrary type. Numerical results are given for an example of a framework to show that the decomposition method converges and yields results comparable to those obtained without decomposition. It is pointed out that optimization by decomposition should reduce the design time by allowing groups of engineers, using different computers to work concurrently on the same large problem.

  1. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  2. Dynamic mode decomposition analysis of detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, L.; Kumar, R.; Ravindran, P.

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition is applied to study the self-excited fluctuations supported by transversely unstable detonations. The focus of this study is on the stability of the limit cycle solutions and their response to forcing. Floquet analysis of the unforced conditions reveals that the least stable perturbations are almost subharmonic with ratio between global mode and fundamental frequency λi/ωf = 0.47. This suggests the emergence of period doubling modes as the route to chaos observed in larger systems. The response to forcing is analyzed in terms of the coherency of the four fundamental energy modes: acoustic, entropic, kinetic, and chemical. Results of the modal decomposition suggest that the self-excited oscillations are quite insensitive to vortical forcing, and maintain their coherency up to a forcing turbulent Mach number of 0.3.

  3. Catalyst for sodium chlorate decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Production of oxygen by rapid decomposition of cobalt oxide and sodium chlorate mixture is discussed. Cobalt oxide serves as catalyst to accelerate reaction. Temperature conditions and chemical processes involved are described.

  4. Some nonlinear space decomposition algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Xue-Cheng; Espedal, M.

    1996-12-31

    Convergence of a space decomposition method is proved for a general convex programming problem. The space decomposition refers to methods that decompose a space into sums of subspaces, which could be a domain decomposition or a multigrid method for partial differential equations. Two algorithms are proposed. Both can be used for linear as well as nonlinear elliptic problems and they reduce to the standard additive and multiplicative Schwarz methods for linear elliptic problems. Two {open_quotes}hybrid{close_quotes} algorithms are also presented. They converge faster than the additive one and have better parallelism than the multiplicative method. Numerical tests with a two level domain decomposition for linear, nonlinear and interface elliptic problems are presented for the proposed algorithms.

  5. Decomposition and insect succession on cadavers inside a vehicle environment.

    PubMed

    Voss, Sasha C; Forbes, Shari L; Dadour, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    This study presents differences in rate of decomposition and insect succession between exposed carcasses on the soil surface and those enclosed within a vehicle following carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Nine 45-kg pigs were used as models for human decomposition. Six animals were sacrificed by CO gas, half of which were placed within the driver's side of separate enclosed vehicles and half were placed under scavenger-proof cages on the soil surface. A further three animals were sacrificed by captive headbolt and placed under scavenger proof cages on the soil surface. The pattern of insect succession and rate of decomposition were similar between surface carcasses within trials regardless of the mode of death. Progression through the physical stages of decomposition was 3-4 days faster in the enclosed vehicle due to higher temperatures there compared to external ambient temperatures. Patterns of insect succession also differed between the vehicle and surface treatments. Carcass attendance by representatives of the Calliphoridae was delayed within the vehicle environment by 16-18 h, while oviposition was not observed until 24-28 h following death. In contrast, attendance by Calliphoridae at surface carcasses occurred within 1 h of death, and oviposition occurred within 6-8 h of death. Typical patterns of insect succession on the carcasses were also altered. Carcass attendance by representatives of the Coleoptera occurred during the bloat stage of decomposition at surface carcasses but was delayed until the onset of wet decomposition (as defined by carcass deflation and breakage of the skin) within the vehicle environment. This study provides baseline data outlining the decomposition patterns of a carcass enclosed within a vehicle following CO poisoning in Western Australia. Understanding how variations in decomposition situations impact on the rate of decomposition and patterns of insect succession is essential to obtaining an accurate estimate of minimum post

  6. Early Outcomes Of Decentralized Care for Rifampicin-Resistant Tuberculosis in Johannesburg, South Africa: An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Schnippel, Kathryn; Mohr, Erika; Hirasen, Kamban; Evans, Denise; Rosen, Sydney; Sanne, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Objective We describe baseline characteristics, time to treatment initiation and interim patient outcomes at a decentralized, outpatient treatment site for rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB). Methods Prospective observational cohort study of RR-TB patients from March 2013 until December 2014. Study subjects were followed until completion of the intensive phase of treatment (6 months), transfer out, or a final outcome (loss from treatment (LFT) or death). Results 214 patients with RR-TB were enrolled in the study. Xpert MTB/RIF was the diagnostic test of rifampicin resistance for 87% (n = 186), followed by direct PCR on AFB positive specimen in 14 (7%) and indirect PCR on cultured isolate in 5 (2%). Median time between sputum testing and treatment initiation was 10 days (IQR 6–21). Interim outcomes were available in 148 patients of whom 78% (n = 115) were still on treatment, 9% (n = 13) had died, and 14% (n = 20) were LFT. Amongst 131 patients with culture positive pulmonary TB, 85 (64.9%) were culture negative at 6 months, 12 were still sputum culture positive (9.2%) and 34 had no culture documented or contaminated culture (26%). Patients who initiated as outpatients within 1 week of sputum collection for diagnosis of RR-TB had a significantly lower incidence of LFT (IRR 0.30, 95% CI: 0.09–0.98). HIV co-infection occurred in 178 patients (83%) with a median CD4 count 88 cells/ml3 (IQR 27–218). Conclusions Access to decentralized treatment coupled with the rapid diagnosis of RR-TB has resulted in short time to treatment initiation. Despite the lack of treatment delays, early treatment outcomes remain poor with high rates of death and loss from care. PMID:27812140

  7. Use of the Earth Observing One (EO-1) Satellite for the Namibia SensorWeb Flood Early Warning Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart; Cappelaere, Pat; Handy, Matthew; Policelli, Fritz; Katjizeu, McCloud; Van Langenhove, Guido; Aube, Guy; Saulnier, Jean-Francois; Sohlberg, Rob; Silva, Julie; Kussul, Nataliia; Skakun, Sergii; Ungar, Stephen; Grossman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite was launched in November 2000 as a one year technology demonstration mission for a variety of space technologies. After the first year, it was used as a pathfinder for the creation of SensorWebs. A SensorWeb is the integration of variety of space, airborne and ground sensors into a loosely coupled collaborative sensor system that automatically provides useful data products. Typically, a SensorWeb is comprised of heterogeneous sensors tied together with a messaging architecture and web services. Disasters are the perfect arena to use SensorWebs. One SensorWeb pilot project that has been active since 2009 is the Namibia Early Flood Warning SensorWeb pilot project. The Pilot Project was established under the auspices of the Namibian Ministry of Agriculture Water and Forestry (MAWF)/Department of Water Affairs, the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS)/Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) and moderated by the United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER). The effort began by identifying and prototyping technologies which enabled the rapid gathering and dissemination of both space-based and ground sensor data and data products for the purpose of flood disaster management and water-borne disease management. This was followed by an international collaboration to build small portions of the identified system which was prototyped during that past few years during the flood seasons which occurred in the February through May timeframe of 2010 and 2011 with further prototyping to occur in 2012. The SensorWeb system features EO-1 data along with other data sets from such satellites as Radarsat, Terra and Aqua. Finally, the SensorWeb team also began to examine the socioeconomic component to determine the impact of the SensorWeb technology and how best to assist in the infusion of this technology in lesser affluent areas with low levels of basic

  8. Tribochemical Decomposition of Light Ionic Hydrides at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Nevshupa, Roman; Ares, Jose Ramón; Fernández, Jose Francisco; Del Campo, Adolfo; Roman, Elisa

    2015-07-16

    Tribochemical decomposition of magnesium hydride (MgH2) induced by deformation at room temperature was studied on a micrometric scale, in situ and in real time. During deformation, a near-full depletion of hydrogen in the micrometric affected zone is observed through an instantaneous (t < 1 s) and huge release of hydrogen (3-50 nmol/s). H release is related to a nonthermal decomposition process. After deformation, the remaining hydride is thermally decomposed at room temperature, exhibiting a much slower rate than during deformation. Confocal-microRaman spectroscopy of the mechanically affected zone was used to characterize the decomposition products. Decomposition was enhanced through the formation of the distorted structure of MgH2 with reduced crystal size by mechanical deformation.

  9. Mechanism of thermal decomposition of hydrated copper nitrate in vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, Boris V.; Novichikhin, Alexander V.

    1995-10-01

    The general scheme of three-stage thermal decomposition of Cu(NO 3) 2·3H 2O to CuO has been refined based on evolved-gas-analysis data with a quadrupole mass analyzer (Jackson et al., Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 50 (1995) 1423). Quantitative evaluation of the composition of the gaseous products shows that the first stage involves primarily deaquation, and the second stage, primarily denitration of the original hydrated nitrate. The basic nitrate formed in the second stage most probably has the formula Cu(NO 3) 2·3Cu(OH) 2. It has been established that the molecular oxygen observed in the third stage of decomposition is produced by catalytic decomposition of NO 2 on the surface of CuO. The presence of Cu-containing ions in all stages of the process is consistent with the gasification mechanism of thermal decomposition.

  10. The influence of preburial insect access on the decomposition rate.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Jutta; Simmons, Tal

    2010-07-01

    This study compared total body score (TBS) in buried remains (35 cm depth) with and without insect access prior to burial. Sixty rabbit carcasses were exhumed at 50 accumulated degree day (ADD) intervals. Weight loss, TBS, intra-abdominal decomposition, carcass/soil interface temperature, and below-carcass soil pH were recorded and analyzed. Results showed significant differences (p < 0.001) in decomposition rates between carcasses with and without insect access prior to burial. An approximately 30% enhanced decomposition rate with insects was observed. TBS was the most valid tool in postmortem interval (PMI) estimation. All other variables showed only weak relationships to decomposition stages, adding little value to PMI estimation. Although progress in estimating the PMI for surface remains has been made, no previous studies have accomplished this for buried remains. This study builds a framework to which further comparable studies can contribute, to produce predictive models for PMI estimation in buried human remains.

  11. Long-term litter decomposition controlled by manganese redox cycling

    PubMed Central

    Keiluweit, Marco; Nico, Peter; Harmon, Mark E.; Mao, Jingdong; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition is a keystone ecosystem process impacting nutrient cycling and productivity, soil properties, and the terrestrial carbon (C) balance, but the factors regulating decomposition rate are still poorly understood. Traditional models assume that the rate is controlled by litter quality, relying on parameters such as lignin content as predictors. However, a strong correlation has been observed between the manganese (Mn) content of litter and decomposition rates across a variety of forest ecosystems. Here, we show that long-term litter decomposition in forest ecosystems is tightly coupled to Mn redox cycling. Over 7 years of litter decomposition, microbial transformation of litter was paralleled by variations in Mn oxidation state and concentration. A detailed chemical imaging analysis of the litter revealed that fungi recruit and redistribute unreactive Mn2+ provided by fresh plant litter to produce oxidative Mn3+ species at sites of active decay, with Mn eventually accumulating as insoluble Mn3+/4+ oxides. Formation of reactive Mn3+ species coincided with the generation of aromatic oxidation products, providing direct proof of the previously posited role of Mn3+-based oxidizers in the breakdown of litter. Our results suggest that the litter-decomposing machinery at our coniferous forest site depends on the ability of plants and microbes to supply, accumulate, and regenerate short-lived Mn3+ species in the litter layer. This observation indicates that biogeochemical constraints on bioavailability, mobility, and reactivity of Mn in the plant–soil system may have a profound impact on litter decomposition rates. PMID:26372954

  12. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  13. Long-term litter decomposition controlled by manganese redox cycling.

    PubMed

    Keiluweit, Marco; Nico, Peter; Harmon, Mark E; Mao, Jingdong; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus

    2015-09-22

    Litter decomposition is a keystone ecosystem process impacting nutrient cycling and productivity, soil properties, and the terrestrial carbon (C) balance, but the factors regulating decomposition rate are still poorly understood. Traditional models assume that the rate is controlled by litter quality, relying on parameters such as lignin content as predictors. However, a strong correlation has been observed between the manganese (Mn) content of litter and decomposition rates across a variety of forest ecosystems. Here, we show that long-term litter decomposition in forest ecosystems is tightly coupled to Mn redox cycling. Over 7 years of litter decomposition, microbial transformation of litter was paralleled by variations in Mn oxidation state and concentration. A detailed chemical imaging analysis of the litter revealed that fungi recruit and redistribute unreactive Mn(2+) provided by fresh plant litter to produce oxidative Mn(3+) species at sites of active decay, with Mn eventually accumulating as insoluble Mn(3+/4+) oxides. Formation of reactive Mn(3+) species coincided with the generation of aromatic oxidation products, providing direct proof of the previously posited role of Mn(3+)-based oxidizers in the breakdown of litter. Our results suggest that the litter-decomposing machinery at our coniferous forest site depends on the ability of plants and microbes to supply, accumulate, and regenerate short-lived Mn(3+) species in the litter layer. This observation indicates that biogeochemical constraints on bioavailability, mobility, and reactivity of Mn in the plant-soil system may have a profound impact on litter decomposition rates.

  14. The early development of joint attention in infants with autistic disorder using home video observations and parental interview.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Sally M; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2008-05-01

    The aim in the current study was to investigate the early development of joint attention, eye contact and affect during the first 2 years of life, by using retrospective parental interviews and analyses of home videos of infants who were later diagnosed with Autistic Disorder (AD). The 36 children with AD and the 27 matched control children were all aged between 3 and 5 years at recruitment. Reported anomalies in gaze and affect emerged in the children with AD as early as the first 6 months of life, generally becoming more severe just prior to the second birthday. Video data confirmed these anomalies from as early as the first year. Joint attention impairments were found throughout the second year of life. The results suggest that early dyadic behaviours-eye contact and affect-may play a role in the joint attention impairment in AD.

  15. Decomposition rates and termite assemblage composition in semiarid Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuurman, G.

    2005-01-01

    Outside of the humid tropics, abiotic factors are generally considered the dominant regulators of decomposition, and biotic influences are frequently not considered in predicting decomposition rates. In this study, I examined the effect of termite assemblage composition and abundance on decomposition of wood litter of an indigenous species (Croton megalobotrys) in five terrestrial habitats of the highly seasonal semiarid Okavango Delta region of northern Botswana, to determine whether natural variation in decomposer community composition and abundance influences decomposition rates. 1 conducted the study in two areas, Xudum and Santawani, with the Xudum study preceding the Santawani study. I assessed termite assemblage composition and abundance using a grid of survey baits (rolls of toilet paper) placed on the soil surface and checked 2-4 times/month. I placed a billet (a section of wood litter) next to each survey bait and measured decomposition in a plot by averaging the mass loss of its billets. Decomposition rates varied up to sixfold among plots within the same habitat and locality, despite the fact that these plots experienced the same climate. In addition, billets decomposed significantly faster during the cooler and drier Santawani study, contradicting climate-based predictions. Because termite incidence was generally higher in Santawani plots, termite abundance initially seemed a likely determinant of decomposition in this system. However, no significant effect of termite incidence on billet mass loss rates was observed among the Xudum plots, where decomposition rates remained low even though termite incidence varied considerably. Considering the incidences of fungus-growing termites and non-fungus-growing termites separately resolves this apparent contradiction: in both Santawani and Xudum, only fungus-growing termites play a significant role in decomposition. This result is mirrored in an analysis of the full data set of combined Xudum and Santawani data

  16. [Decomposition dynamics of leaf litter in logging residue of a secondary Castanopsis carlesii plantation and its chemical composition changes].

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei-ling; Guo, Jian-fen; Wu, Bo-bo; Wan, Jing-juan; Ji, Shu-rong; Liu, Xiao-fei

    2015-04-01

    A field experiment was conducted to understand the decomposition rates and chemical composition changes of leaf litter in logging residues of a 35-year-old secondary Castanopsis carlesii plantation over a period of one year. Mass loss rate of leaf litter showed an exponential decrease with time from May 2012 to April 2013, with a total 80% loss of initial dry mass. Net potassium (K) release was observed during this period, with only 5% of initial K remained. Nitrogen ( N) featured a pattern of accumulation at the early stage and release later, while phosphorus (P) exhibited a sequence of release, accumulation, and release. The remaining of N and P were 19% and 16% of their initial mass, respectively. The release rate was highest for K and the lowest for N. Decomposition of lignin indicated a trend of release-accumulation-release from May 2012 to October 2012, with no further significant change from November 2012 to the end of the experiment. The concentration of cellulose nearly unchanged during the experiment. The N/P rate increased with decomposition, ranging from 18.6 to 21.1. The lignin/N rate fluctuated greatly at the early stage and then almost stabilized thereafter.

  17. Clinical characteristics of early- and late-onset gout: A cross-sectional observational study from a Chinese gout clinic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingqing; Fang, Weigang; Zeng, Xuejun; Zhang, Yun; Ma, Ya; Sheng, Feng; Zhang, Xinlei

    2016-11-01

    A retrospective cross-sectional study using data from an outpatient clinic in China was conducted to investigate the clinical features of early-onset gout patients.All patients diagnosed with gout were asked about clinical characteristics of their gout and comorbid diseases. Patients presenting with acute flares were asked about common triggers before the flare. "Early-onset" gout was defined as onset of gout before 40 years and "late-onset" as onset ≥40 years. Major joint involvement, flare frequency before presentation, the cumulative number of involved joints, proportions of tophi complications at presentation, flare triggers, as well as any metabolic, cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal comorbidities, were compared between the 2 groups.A total of 778 gout patients were enrolled in this study, including 449 (57.7%) in the early-onset group and 329 (42.3%) in the late-onset group. Compared with the late-onset gout patients, the early-onset gout patients had a higher proportion of ankle/mid-foot involvement (62.8% vs 48.2%, P < 0.001), more frequent flares before presentation (11.2 ± 1.17 vs 6.97 ± 1.03 times per year, P = 0.01), higher cumulative number of involved joints (5.2 ± 0.26 vs 3.8 ± 0.26, P < 0.001), and more likely to have alcohol consumption as a flare trigger (65.2% vs 53.9%, P = 0.03); whereas early-onset gout patients had fewer metabolic, cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, or renal complications.Early- and late-onset gout patients had different clinical features. Early-onset seems to be influenced more by lifestyle, while late-onset patients have more complications because of comorbidities.

  18. The Association between Parent Early Adult Drug Use Disorder and Later Observed Parenting Practices and Child Behavior Problems: Testing Alternate Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jennifer A.; Hill, Karl G.; Guttmannova, Katarina; Oesterle, Sabrina; Hawkins, J. David; Catalano, Richard F.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the association between parent illicit drug use disorder (DUD) in early adulthood and observed parenting practices at ages 27-28 and examined the following 3 theoretically derived models explaining this link: (a) a disrupted parent adult functioning model,(b) a preexisting parent personality factor model, and (c) a disrupted…

  19. Observed Differences between Early Childhood Programs in the U.S. and Korea: Reflections of "Developmentally Appropriate Practices" in Two Cultural Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; Lee, Young; Allhusen, Virginia D.; Kim, Myoung Soon; McDowell, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Ninety children from South Korea and 119 children from the United States were observed in early childhood programs, and differences in classroom environments and teachers' and children's behavior in the two countries were identified. In both countries, there was evidence that preschool education is guided by ideas about "developmentally…

  20. Seasonal necrophagous insect community assembly during vertebrate carrion decomposition.

    PubMed

    Benbow, M E; Lewis, A J; Tomberlin, J K; Pechal, J L

    2013-03-01

    Necrophagous invertebrates have been documented to be a predominant driver of vertebrate carrion decomposition; however, very little is understood about the assembly of these communities both within and among seasons. The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal differences in insect taxa composition, richness, and diversity on carrion over decomposition with the intention that such data will be useful for refining error estimates in forensic entomology. Sus scrofa (L.) carcasses (n = 3-6, depending on season) were placed in a forested habitat near Xenia, OH, during spring, summer, autumn, and winter. Taxon richness varied substantially among seasons but was generally lower (1-2 taxa) during early decomposition and increased (3-8 taxa) through intermediate stages of decomposition. Autumn and winter showed the highest richness during late decomposition. Overall, taxon richness was higher during active decay for all seasons. While invertebrate community composition was generally consistent among seasons, the relative abundance of five taxa significantly differed across seasons, demonstrating different source communities for colonization depending on the time of year. There were significantly distinct necrophagous insect communities for each stage of decomposition, and between summer and autumn and summer and winter, but the communities were similar between autumn and winter. Calliphoridae represented significant indicator taxa for summer and autumn but replaced by Coleoptera during winter. Here we demonstrated substantial variability in necrophagous communities and assembly on carrion over decomposition and among seasons. Recognizing this variation has important consequences for forensic entomology and future efforts to provide error rates for estimates of the postmortem interval using arthropod succession data as evidence during criminal investigations.

  1. Early-Career EBD Teacher Knowledge, Ratings of Competency Importance, and Observed Use of Instruction and Management Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lori F.; Hendrickson, Jo M.

    2007-01-01

    The empirical, conceptual, and theoretical knowledge of early-career EBD teachers was assessed two years after student teaching and compared to their ratings of the importance of specific instruction and classroom management competencies as well as to their application of those competencies. Twelve teachers, six elementary and six secondary, with…

  2. Observation of Early Cleavage in Animal Development: A Simple Technique for Obtaining the Eggs of Rhabditis (Nematoda)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchliffe, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Outlines the advantages of using the readily available eggs of the nematode Rhabditis in studying the early cleavage stages of animal development. Discusses the identification and life history of Rhabditis, how to culture and examine the organism, the cleavage stages and cell lineage, and sources of visual aids. (JR)

  3. A Descriptive-Comparative Study of Professional Development and Observed Quality in Early Care and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeyn, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    With over 12 million children enrolled in early care and education programming across the U.S., families with children under the age of 5 years old are dependent on these programs. Although highly important, little regulation exists regarding qualifications necessary for individuals to work in these programs. Consequently, individuals in the field…

  4. Managing Student Behavior with Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: An Observational Study in Early Elementary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldarella, Paul; Williams, Leslie; Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive evidence-based interventions are needed to help early childhood educators manage challenging student behaviors. One such intervention, class-wide function-related intervention teams (CW-FIT), is a multi-tiered behavioral intervention program based on positive behavior support principles, including four main elements: (a) teaching…

  5. Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition Analysis of EEG Data Collected during a Contour Integration Task

    PubMed Central

    Al-Subari, Karema; Al-Baddai, Saad; Tomé, Ana Maria; Volberg, Gregor; Hammwöhner, Rainer; Lang, Elmar W.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a data-driven analysis of EEG data recorded during a combined EEG/fMRI study of visual processing during a contour integration task. The analysis is based on an ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and discusses characteristic features of event related modes (ERMs) resulting from the decomposition. We identify clear differences in certain ERMs in response to contour vs noncontour Gabor stimuli mainly for response amplitudes peaking around 100 [ms] (called P100) and 200 [ms] (called N200) after stimulus onset, respectively. We observe early P100 and N200 responses at electrodes located in the occipital area of the brain, while late P100 and N200 responses appear at electrodes located in frontal brain areas. Signals at electrodes in central brain areas show bimodal early/late response signatures in certain ERMs. Head topographies clearly localize statistically significant response differences to both stimulus conditions. Our findings provide an independent proof of recent models which suggest that contour integration depends on distributed network activity within the brain. PMID:25910061

  6. Loss of diversity in wood-inhabiting fungal communities affects decomposition activity in Norway spruce wood

    PubMed Central

    Valentín, Lara; Rajala, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Pennanen, Taina; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of wood-inhabiting fungal species are now threatened, principally due to a lack of dead wood in intensively managed forests, but the consequences of reduced fungal diversity on ecosystem functioning are not known. Several experiments have shown that primary productivity is negatively affected by a loss of species, but the effects of microbial diversity on decomposition are less studied. We studied the relationship between fungal diversity and the in vitro decomposition rate of slightly, moderately and heavily decayed Picea abies wood with indigenous fungal communities that were diluted to examine the influence of diversity. Respiration rate, wood-degrading hydrolytic enzymes and fungal community structure were assessed during a 16-week incubation. The number of observed OTUs in DGGE was used as a measure of fungal diversity. Respiration rate increased between early- and late-decay stages. Reduced fungal diversity was associated with lower respiration rates during intermediate stages of decay, but no effects were detected at later stages. The activity of hydrolytic enzymes varied among decay stages and fungal dilutions. Our results suggest that functioning of highly diverse communities of the late-decay stage were more resistant to the loss of diversity than less diverse communities of early decomposers. This indicates the accumulation of functional redundancy during the succession of the fungal community in decomposing substrates. PMID:24904544

  7. Early postoperative serum S100β levels predict ongoing brain damage after meningioma surgery: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Sharon; Shoshan, Yigal; Ovadia, Haim; Matot, Idit; Hersch, Moshe; Itshayek, Eyal

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Elevated serum levels of S100β, an astrocyte-derived protein, correlate with unfavourable neurological outcomes following cardiac surgery, neurotrauma, and resuscitation. This study evaluated whether pre-/postoperative serum S100β levels correlate with unfavourable clinical and radiological findings in patients undergoing elective meningioma resection. Methods In 52 consecutive patients admitted for meningioma surgery, serum S100β levels were determined upon admission and immediately, 24 hours, and 48 hours after surgery. All patients underwent complete pre- and postoperative neurological examination and mini-mental state examination. Radiological evaluation included preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and postoperative computed tomography. Tumour volume, brain edema, and bleeding volume were calculated using BrainSCAN™ software. Results Preoperative S100β levels did not correlate with the tumour characteristics demonstrated by preoperative MRI (for example, tumour volume, edema volume, ventricular asymmetry, and/or midline shift). Preoperative serum S100β levels (0.065 ± 0.040 μg/l) were significantly lower than the levels measured immediately (0.138 ± 0.081 μg/l), 24 hours (0.142 ± 0.084 μg/l), and 48 hours (0.155 ± 0.119 μg/l) postoperatively (p < 0.0001). Significantly greater postcraniotomy S100β levels were observed with prolonged surgery (p = 0.039), deterioration in the mini-mental state examination (p = 0.005, 0.011, and 0.036 for pre versus immediate, 24 hours, and 48 hours postsurgery, respectively), and with postoperative brain computed tomography evidence of brain injury; bleeding was associated with higher serum S100β levels at 24 and 48 hours after surgery (p = 0.046, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.095 to -0.001 and p = 0.034, 95% CI -0.142 to -0.006, respectively) as was the presence of midline shift (p = 0.005, 95% CI -0.136 to -0.025 and p = 0.006, 95% CI -0.186 to -0.032, respectively). Edema was

  8. Improving the Skills and Confidence of Early Childhood Public School Teachers in Their Use of Observation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arzoumanian, Linda Lee

    This practicum report describes an intervention to increase teachers' skill and confidence in the use of classroom observation techniques in a school serving children from kindergarten through second grade. Goals of the intervention were that teachers would: (1) recognize six types of observation; (2) implement two types of observation in their…

  9. Kinetics of the pyrolytic and hydrothermal decomposition of water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guang'en; Strong, P James; Wang, Hailong; Ni, Wuzhong; Shi, Weiyong

    2011-07-01

    The kinetics of water hyacinth decomposition using pyrolysis and hydrothermal treatment was compared. With pyrolysis, initial vaporization occurred at 453 K as determined by thermogravimetric analysis, while initial solubilisation occurred at 433 K with subcritical hydrothermal treatment. The "kinetic triplet" was determined for the ranges of 423-483 K (range I) and 473-553 K (range II) using the Coats-Redfern method for both treatments. The calculated activation energies for ranges I and II were 110 and 116 kJ/mol for conventional pyrolysis and 145 and 90 kJ/mol for hydrothermal treatment. The similar activation energies for the two temperature ranges observed for pyrolysis implied that only hemicellulose decomposition occurred. For hydrothermal treatment, both hemicellulose and cellulose decomposition occurred in temperature range II, in which a notable lower activation energy was observed. This implied hydrothermal treatment was more suitable for conversion lignocellulosic biomass under these conditions.

  10. The ecology of carrion decomposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrion, or the remains of dead animals, is something that most people would like to avoid. It is visually unpleasant, emits foul odors, and may be the source of numerous pathogens. Decomposition of carrion, however, provides a unique opportunity for scientists to investigate how nutrients cycle t...

  11. Microbial interactions during carrion decomposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This addresses the microbial ecology of carrion decomposition in the age of metagenomics. It describes what is known about the microbial communities on carrion, including a brief synopsis about the communities on other organic matter sources. It provides a description of studies using state-of-the...

  12. Cadaver decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, David O.; Yellowlees, David; Tibbett, Mark

    2007-01-01

    A dead mammal (i.e. cadaver) is a high quality resource (narrow carbon:nitrogen ratio, high water content) that releases an intense, localised pulse of carbon and nutrients into the soil upon decomposition. Despite the fact that as much as 5,000 kg of cadaver can be introduced to a square kilometre of terrestrial ecosystem each year, cadaver decomposition remains a neglected microsere. Here we review the processes associated with the introduction of cadaver-derived carbon and nutrients into soil from forensic and ecological settings to show that cadaver decomposition can have a greater, albeit localised, effect on belowground ecology than plant and faecal resources. Cadaveric materials are rapidly introduced to belowground floral and faunal communities, which results in the formation of a highly concentrated island of fertility, or cadaver decomposition island (CDI). CDIs are associated with increased soil microbial biomass, microbial activity (C mineralisation) and nematode abundance. Each CDI is an ephemeral natural disturbance that, in addition to releasing energy and nutrients to the wider ecosystem, acts as a hub by receiving these materials in the form of dead insects, exuvia and puparia, faecal matter (from scavengers, grazers and predators) and feathers (from avian scavengers and predators). As such, CDIs contribute to landscape heterogeneity. Furthermore, CDIs are a specialised habitat for a number of flies, beetles and pioneer vegetation, which enhances biodiversity in terrestrial ecosystems.

  13. An analysis of scatter decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Saltz, Joel H.

    1990-01-01

    A formal analysis of a powerful mapping technique known as scatter decomposition is presented. Scatter decomposition divides an irregular computational domain into a large number of equal sized pieces, and distributes them modularly among processors. A probabilistic model of workload in one dimension is used to formally explain why, and when scatter decomposition works. The first result is that if correlation in workload is a convex function of distance, then scattering a more finely decomposed domain yields a lower average processor workload variance. The second result shows that if the workload process is stationary Gaussian and the correlation function decreases linearly in distance until becoming zero and then remains zero, scattering a more finely decomposed domain yields a lower expected maximum processor workload. Finally it is shown that if the correlation function decreases linearly across the entire domain, then among all mappings that assign an equal number of domain pieces to each processor, scatter decomposition minimizes the average processor workload variance. The dependence of these results on the assumption of decreasing correlation is illustrated with situations where a coarser granularity actually achieves better load balance.

  14. Naphthalene and acenaphthene decomposition by electron beam generated plasma application

    SciTech Connect

    Ostapczuk, A.; Hakoda, T.; Shimada, A.; Kojima, T.

    2008-08-15

    The application of non-thermal plasma generated by electron beam (EB) was investigated in laboratory scale to study decomposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like naphthalene and acenaphthene in flue gas. PAH compounds were treated by EB with the dose up to 8 kGy in dry and humid base gas mixtures. Experimentally established G-values gained 1.66 and 3.72 mol/100 eV for NL and AC at the dose of 1 kGy. NL and AC removal was observed in dry base gas mixtures showing that the reaction with OH radical is not exclusive pathway to initialize PAH decomposition; however in the presence of water remarkably higher decomposition efficiency was observed. As by-products of NL decomposition were identified compounds containing one aromatic ring and oxygen atoms besides CO and CO{sub 2}. It led to the conclusion that PAH decomposition process in humid flue gas can be regarded as multi-step oxidative de-aromatization analogical to its atmospheric chemistry.

  15. Assessing the effect of different treatments on decomposition rate of dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Tariq M; Higgins, Stewart S; Ndegwa, Pius M; Frear, Craig S; Stöckle, Claudio O

    2016-11-01

    Confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) contribute to greenhouse gas emission, but the magnitude of these emissions as a function of operation size, infrastructure, and manure management are difficult to assess. Modeling is a viable option to estimate gaseous emission and nutrient flows from CAFOs. These models use a decomposition rate constant for carbon mineralization. However, this constant is usually determined assuming a homogenous mix of manure, ignoring the effects of emerging manure treatments. The aim of this study was to measure and compare the decomposition rate constants of dairy manure in single and three-pool decomposition models, and to develop an empirical model based on chemical composition of manure for prediction of a decomposition rate constant. Decomposition rate constants of manure before and after an anaerobic digester (AD), following coarse fiber separation, and fine solids removal were determined under anaerobic conditions for single and three-pool decomposition models. The decomposition rates of treated manure effluents differed significantly from untreated manure for both single and three-pool decomposition models. In the single-pool decomposition model, AD effluent containing only suspended solids had a relatively high decomposition rate of 0.060 d(-1), while liquid with coarse fiber and fine solids removed had the lowest rate of 0.013 d(-1). In the three-pool decomposition model, fast and slow decomposition rate constants (0.25 d(-1) and 0.016 d(-1) respectively) of untreated AD influent were also significantly different from treated manure fractions. A regression model to predict the decomposition rate of treated dairy manure fitted well (R(2) = 0.83) to observed data.

  16. Electrical field-assisted thermal decomposition of boron nitride nanotube: Experiments and first principle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2009-09-01

    We directly observed the Joule-heating-induced decomposition of multiwalled BN nanotubes using a transmission electron microscope equipped with a scanning tunneling microscope unit. The decomposition temperature is found to be dependent on an applied electrical field. We propose a model that due to the partially ionic nature of the B-N bond, the decomposition energy is both temperature- and electrical field-related: it is named as electrical field-assisted thermal decomposition. The model fits the experimental data very well and is considered to be general for all nanostructures with polar bonds.

  17. A characterization of the two-step reaction mechanism of phenol decomposition by a Fenton reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, Cristian; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Osorio, Edison; Villaseñor, Jorge; Navarro-Retamal, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Phenol is one of the worst contaminants at date, and its degradation has been a crucial task over years. Here, the decomposition process of phenol, in a Fenton reaction, is described. Using scavengers, it was observed that decomposition of phenol was mainly influenced by production of hydroxyl radicals. Experimental and theoretical activation energies (Ea) for phenol oxidation intermediates were calculated. According to these Ea, phenol decomposition is a two-step reaction mechanism mediated predominantly by hydroxyl radicals, producing a decomposition yield order given as hydroquinone > catechol > resorcinol. Furthermore, traces of reaction derived acids were detected by HPLC and GS-MS.

  18. A Large Web-Based Observer Reliability Study of Early Ischaemic Signs on Computed Tomography. The Acute Cerebral CT Evaluation of Stroke Study (ACCESS)

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M.; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Farrall, Andrew J.; Chappell, Francesca M.; Hill, Michael; Perry, David

    2010-01-01

    Background Early signs of ischaemic stroke on computerised tomography (CT) scanning are subtle but CT is the most widely available diagnostic test for stroke. Scoring methods that code for the extent of brain ischaemia may improve stroke diagnosis and quantification of the impact of ischaemia. Methodology and Principal Findings We showed CT scans from patients with acute ischaemic stroke (n = 32, with different patient characteristics and ischaemia signs) to doctors in stroke-related specialties world-wide over the web. CT scans were shown twice, randomly and blindly. Observers entered their scan readings, including early ischaemic signs by three scoring methods, into the web database. We compared observers' scorings to a reference standard neuroradiologist using area under receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) analysis, Cronbach's alpha and logistic regression to determine the effect of scales, patient, scan and observer variables on detection of early ischaemic changes. Amongst 258 readers representing 33 nationalities and six specialties, the AUCs comparing readers with the reference standard detection of ischaemic signs were similar for all scales and both occasions. Being a neuroradiologist, slower scan reading, more pronounced ischaemic signs and later time to CT all improved detection of early ischaemic signs and agreement on the rating scales. Scan quality, stroke severity and number of years of training did not affect agreement. Conclusions Large-scale observer reliability studies are possible using web-based tools and inform routine practice. Slower scan reading and use of CT infarct rating scales improve detection of acute ischaemic signs and should be encouraged to improve stroke diagnosis. PMID:21209901

  19. Actual-Waste Tests of Enhanced Chemical Cleaning for Retrieval of SRS HLW Sludge Tank Heels and Decomposition of Oxalic Acid - 12256

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Christopher J.; King, William D.; Ketusky, Edward T.

    2012-07-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge. During ECC actual waste testing, the introduction of ozone was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels. This testing did not identify physical or chemical changes in the ECC product sludge that would impact downstream processing. The results from these tests confirm observations made by AREVA NP during larger scale testing with waste simulants. This testing, however, had a decreased utilization of ozone, requiring approximately 5 moles of ozone per mole of oxalate decomposed. Decomposition of oxalates in sludge dissolved in 2 wt% OA to levels near 100 ppm oxalate using ECC process conditions required 8 to 12.5 hours without the aid of UV light and 4.5 to 8 hours with the aid of UV light. The pH and ORP were tracked during decomposition testing. Sludge components were tracked during OA decomposition, showing that most components have the highest soluble levels in the initial dissolved sludge and early decomposition samples and exhibit lower soluble levels as OA decomposition progresses. The Deposition Tank storage conditions that included pH adjustment to approximately 1 M free hydroxide tended to bring the soluble concentrations in the ECC product to nearly the same level for each test regardless of storage time, storage temperature, and contact with other tank sludge material. (authors)

  20. The early stage of formation of self-organized nanocolumns in thin films: Monte Carlo simulations versus atomic-scale observations in Ge-Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Mouton, I.; Talbot, E. Pareige, C.; Lardé, R.; Blavette, D.

    2014-02-07

    Formation kinetics of self-organized nanocolumns during epitaxial growth of a thin film composed of immiscible elements (A,B) has been investigated using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Simulated nanostructures show a good agreement with those observed in Ge-Mn using Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Self organisation is observed although the rigid lattice simulations used do not account for misfit elastic strain. Simulations reveal that the final nanostructure, in term of number density and diameter of nanocolumns, is controlled by the early stages of growth of the film. The influence of both growth temperature and solute concentration on the nanostructure features is discussed in details.

  1. IN SITU INFRARED STUDY OF CATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF NO

    SciTech Connect

    KHALID ALMUSAITEER; RAM KRISHNAMURTHY; STEVEN S.C. CHUANG

    1998-08-18

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccessful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  2. Investigating hydrogel dosimeter decomposition by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The chemical oxidative decomposition of leucocrystal violet micelle hydrogel dosimeters was investigated using the reaction of ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide or sodium bicarbonate with hydrogen peroxide. The second reaction is more effective at dye decomposition in gelatin hydrogels. Additional chemical analysis is required to determine the decomposition products.

  3. Pressure-induced decomposition of indium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Gurlo, Aleksander; Dzivenko, Dmytro; Andrade, Miria; Riedel, Ralf; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim

    2010-09-15

    A static pressure-induced decomposition of indium hydroxide into metallic indium that takes place at ambient temperature is reported. The lattice parameter of c-In(OH)(3) decreased upon compression from 7.977(2) to approximately 7.45 A at 34 GPa, corresponding to a decrease in specific volume of approximately 18%. Fitting the second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state to the obtained compression data gave a bulk modulus of 99 +/- 3 GPa for c-In(OH)(3). The c-In(OH)(3) crystals with a size of approximately 100 nm are comminuted upon compression, as indicated by the grain-size reduction reflected in broadening of the diffraction reflections and the appearance of smaller (approximately 5 nm) incoherently oriented domains in TEM. The rapid decompression of compressed c-In(OH)(3) leads to partial decomposition of indium hydroxide into metallic indium, mainly as a result of localized stress gradients caused by relaxation of the highly disordered indium sublattice in indium hydroxide. This partial decomposition of indium hydroxide into metallic indium is irreversible, as confirmed by angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy imaging, Raman scattering, and FTIR spectroscopy. Recovered c-In(OH)(3) samples become completely black and nontransparent and show typical features of metals, i.e., a falling absorption in the 100-250 cm(-1) region accompanied by a featureless spectrum in the 250-2500 cm(-1) region in the Raman spectrum and Drude-like absorption of free electrons in the region of 4000-8000 cm(-1) in the FTIR spectrum. These features were not observed in the initial c-In(OH)(3), which is a typical white wide-band-gap semiconductor.

  4. Early Anti-Pseudomonal Acquisition in Young Patients with Cystic Fibrosis: Rationale and Design of the EPIC Clinical Trial and Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Treggiari, Miriam M; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Retsch-Bogart, George; Gibson, Ronald L.; Williams, Judy; Emerson, Julia; Kronmal, Richard A; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2009-01-01

    Background The primary cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is progressive obstructive pulmonary disease due to chronic endobronchial infection, particularly with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa). Risk factors for and clinical impact of early Pa infection in young CF patients are less well understood. Purpose The present studies are designed to evaluate risk factors and outcomes associated with early Pa acquisition, and the benefits and harms of four anti-pseudomonal treatment regimens in young CF patients initiated after the first Pa positive respiratory culture. Methods The Early Pseudomonas Infection Control (EPIC) program consists of two studies, a randomized multicenter trial in CF patients ages 1–12 years at first isolation of Pa from a respiratory culture, and a longitudinal cohort study enrolling Pa-negative patients. Using a factorial design, trial participants are assigned for 18 months to either anti-pseudomonal treatment on a scheduled quarterly basis (cycled therapy) or based on recovery of Pa from quarterly respiratory cultures (culture-based therapy). The study drugs include inhaled tobramycin (300 mg BID) for 28 days, combined with either oral ciprofloxacin (15–20 mg/kg BID) or oral placebo for 14 days. The primary endpoints of the trial are the time to pulmonary exacerbation requiring IV antibiotics or hospitalization for respiratory symptoms, and the proportion of patients with new Pa-positive respiratory cultures during the study. The broad goals of the observational study are to describe the risk factors and outcomes associated with early acquisition of Pa. 306 patients were randomized in the clinical trial and 1,787 were enrolled in the cohort study. Conclusions These companion studies will provide valuable epidemiological and microbiological information on early CF lung disease and Pa acquisition, and safety and clinical efficacy data on anti-pseudomonal treatment strategies for early Pa infections in the

  5. Thermal decomposition and non-isothermal decomposition kinetics of carbamazepine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhen-li; Zhang, Duan-feng; Chen, Fei-xiong; Miao, Jun-yan; Ren, Bao-zeng

    2014-12-01

    The thermal stability and kinetics of isothermal decomposition of carbamazepine were studied under isothermal conditions by thermogravimetry (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at three heating rates. Particularly, transformation of crystal forms occurs at 153.75°C. The activation energy of this thermal decomposition process was calculated from the analysis of TG curves by Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Doyle, distributed activation energy model, Šatava-Šesták and Kissinger methods. There were two different stages of thermal decomposition process. For the first stage, E and log A [s-1] were determined to be 42.51 kJ mol-1 and 3.45, respectively. In the second stage, E and log A [s-1] were 47.75 kJ mol-1 and 3.80. The mechanism of thermal decomposition was Avrami-Erofeev (the reaction order, n = 1/3), with integral form G(α) = [-ln(1 - α)]1/3 (α = ˜0.1-0.8) in the first stage and Avrami-Erofeev (the reaction order, n = 1) with integral form G(α) = -ln(1 - α) (α = ˜0.9-0.99) in the second stage. Moreover, Δ H ≠, Δ S ≠, Δ G ≠ values were 37.84 kJ mol-1, -192.41 J mol-1 K-1, 146.32 kJ mol-1 and 42.68 kJ mol-1, -186.41 J mol-1 K-1, 156.26 kJ mol-1 for the first and second stage, respectively.

  6. Nonlinear mode decomposition: A noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool—nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)—which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques—which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust—and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  7. Nonlinear mode decomposition: a noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V E; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool-nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)-which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques-which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust-and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  8. Primary observation of early transtympanic steroid injection in patients with delayed treatment of noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yide; Zheng, Guiliang; Zheng, Hongliang; Zhou, Ronjue; Zhu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 5% of the population worldwide suffer from varieties of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Prevention and early identification remain the best methods of approaching NIHL. Over the years, numerous methods of improving the outcome in patients presenting with NIHL have been evaluated; however, these are far from sufficient. The present trial aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of early transtympanic steroid injection in patients with delayed treatment of NIHL. Because systemic steroid treatment is the most common treatment of choice in the management of NIHL, it was considered unethical to replace the first-line systemic steroid treatment with transtympanic treatment. Therefore, the present study evaluated the combination of conventional steroid treatment with a transtympanic steroid injection. A total of 53 patients diagnosed with delayed treatment of NIHL were randomized into a transtympanic group (TR group, n=27) and a control group (n=26). The TR group received the conventional steroid treatment plus four courses of additional transtympanic injections of methylprednisolone 3 days after NIHL onset, and the control group received the conventional steroid treatment. Transtympanic injection was performed through laser-assisted myringotomy (a 0.5- to 1-mm perforation was made in the tympanic membrane) under an operation microscope. A total of 51.9% of the patients in the TR group had a ≥15-dB HL improvement in pure-tone average, compared with 23.1% of the patients in the control group, at the 8-week follow-up audiogram. A total of 66.7% of the patients in the TR group had an improvement of ≥15% in the speech discrimination score, compared with 30.8% of patients in the control group, 8 weeks after the treatment. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant. The outcome of this trial indicates that delayed treatment of NIHL may be preferable if transtympanic therapy can be applied earlier. The large variability in the

  9. Prognostic value of hematogenous dissemination and biological profile of the tumor in early breast cancer patients: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and prognostic value of disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow of breast carcinoma patients with early disease, and to analyze this finding in relation to lymph node involvement, determined by sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy analysis, and to prognostic factors of interest. Methods 104 patients with operable (T < 3 cm) breast cancer and clinically- and sonographically-negative axillary lymph nodes were scheduled for SLN biopsy. Bone marrow aspirates were collected before the start of surgery from both iliac crests, and mononuclear cell layers were separated by density centrifugation (Lymphoprep). Slide preparations were then examined for the presence of disseminated tumor cells by immunocytochemistry with anti-cytokeratin antibodies (A45-B/B3). Lymphoscintigraphy was performed 2 hours after intratumor administration of 2 mCi (74 MBq) of 99mTc colloidal albumin. The SLN was evaluated for the presence of tumor cells by hematoxylin-eosin staining and, when negative, by immunocytochemistry using anti-cytokeratin antibody (CAM 5.2). Survival analyses and comparative analyses were performed on the results of bone marrow determinations, SLN biopsy, and known prognostic factors, including breast cancer subtypes according to the simplified classification based on ER, PR and HER2. Results Lymph node and hematogenous dissemination occur in one-third of patients with early-stage breast cancer, although not necessarily simultaneously. In our study, disseminated tumor cells were identified in 22% of bone marrow aspirates, whereas 28% of patients had axillary lymph node involvement. Simultaneous lymph node and bone marrow involvement was found in only 5 patients (nonsignificant). In the survival study (60 months), a higher, although nonsignificant rate of disease-related events (13%) was seen in patients with disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow, and a significant association of events was documented with the

  10. The ACS LCID Project. XI. On the Early Time Resolution of SFHs of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies: Comparing the Effects of Reionization in Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Antonio; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan; Cassisi, Santi; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio; Cole, Andrew; Gallart, Carme; Monelli, Matteo; Weisz, Daniel; Bernard, Edouard; Dolphin, Andrew; Stetson, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The analysis of the early star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies, obtained from their resolved stellar populations, is relevant as a test for cosmological models. However, the early time resolution of observationally derived SFHs is limited by several factors. Thus, direct comparison of observationally derived SFHs with those derived from theoretical models of galaxy formation is potentially biased. Here we investigate and quantify this effect. For this purpose, we analyze the duration of the early star formation activity in a sample of four Local Group dwarf galaxies and test whether they are consistent with being true fossils of the pre-reionization era; i.e., if the quenching of their star formation occurred before cosmic reionization by UV photons was completed. Two classical dSph (Cetus and Tucana) and two dTrans (LGS-3 and Phoenix) isolated galaxies with total stellar masses between 1.3× {10}6 and 7.2× {10}6 {M}⊙ have been studied. Accounting for time resolution effects, the SFHs peak as much as 1.25 Gyr earlier than the optimal solutions. Thus, this effect is important for a proper comparison of model and observed SFHs. It is also shown that none of the analyzed galaxies can be considered a true fossil of the pre-reionization era, although it is possible that the outer regions of Cetus and Tucana are consistent with quenching by reionization. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #10505.

  11. Slewing Mirror Telescope optics for the early observation of UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S; Nam, J W; Ahn, K B; Park, I H; Kim, S W; Lee, J; Lim, H; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chen, P; Cho, M H; Choi, J N; Grossan, B; Huang, M A; Jung, A; Kim, J E; Kim, M B; Kim, Y W; Linder, E V; Min, K W; Na, G W; Panasyuk, M I; Ripa, J; Reglero, V; Smoot, G F; Suh, J E; Svertilov, S; Vedenkin, N; Yashin, I

    2013-01-28

    We report on design, manufacture, and testing of a Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT), the first of its kind and a part of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-pathfinder (UFFO-p) for space-based prompt measurement of early UV/optical light curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Using a fast slewing mirror of 150 mm diameter mounted on a 2 axis gimbal stage, SMT can deliver the images of GRB optical counterparts to the intensified CCD detector within 1.5~1.8 s over ± 35 degrees in the slewing field of view. Its Ritchey-Chrétien telescope of 100 mm diameter provides a 17 × 17 arcmin² instantaneous field of view. Technical details of design, construction, the laboratory performance tests in space environments for this unique SMT are described in conjunction with the plan for in-orbit operation onboard the Lomonosov satellite in 2013.

  12. Mass decomposition of SLACS lens galaxies in Weyl conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexander A.; Izmailov, Ramil N.; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2016-06-01

    We study here, using the Mannheim-Kazanas solution of Weyl conformal theory, the mass decomposition in the representative subsample of 57 early-type elliptical lens galaxies of the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys (SLACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We begin by showing that the solution need not be an exclusive solution of conformal gravity but can also be viewed as a solution of a class of f (R ) gravity theories coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics thereby rendering the ensuing results more universal. Since lensing involves light bending, we shall first show that the solution adds to Schwarzschild light bending caused by the luminous mass (M*) a positive contribution +γ R contrary to the previous results in the literature, thereby resolving a long-standing problem. The cause of the error is critically examined. Next, applying the expressions for light bending together with an input equating Einstein and Weyl angles, we develop a novel algorithm for separating the luminous component from the total lens mass (luminous+dark ) within the Einstein radius. Our results indicate that the luminous mass estimates differ from the observed total lens masses by a linear proportionality factor across the subsample, which qualitatively agrees with the common conclusion from a number of different simulations in the literature. In quantitative detail, we observe that the ratios of luminous over total lens mass (f*) within the Einstein radius of individual galaxies take on values near unity, many of which remarkably fall inside or just marginally outside the specified error bars obtained from a simulation based on the Bruzual-Charlot stellar population synthesis model together with the Salpeter initial mass function favored on the ground of metallicity [Grillo et al., Astron. Astrophys. 501, 461 (2009)]. We shall also calculate the average dark matter density ⟨ρ⟩ av of individual galaxies within their respective Einstein spheres. To our knowledge, the present

  13. Trade-Offs in Resource Allocation Among Moss Species Control Decomposition in Boreal Peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Turetsky, M. R.; Crow, S. E.; Evans, R. J.; Vitt, D. H.; Wieder, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    We separated the effects of plant species controls on decomposition rates from environmental controls in northern peatlands using a full factorial, reciprocal transplant experiment of eight dominant bryophytes in four distinct peatland types in boreal Alberta, Canada. Standard fractionation techniques as well as compound-specific pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry were used to identify a biochemical mechanism underlying any interspecific differences in decomposition rates. We found that over a 3-year field incubation, individual moss species and not micro-environmental conditions controlled early stages of decomposition. Across species, Sphagnum mosses exhibited a trade-off in resource partitioning into metabolic and structural carbohydrates, a pattern that served as a strong predictor of litter decomposition. Decomposition rates showed a negative co-variation between species and their microtopographic position, as species that live in hummocks decomposed slowly but hummock microhabitats themselves corresponded to rapid decomposition rates. By forming litter that degrades slowly, hummock mosses appear to promote the maintenance of macropore structure in surface peat hummocks that aid in water retention. Many northern regions are experiencing rapid climate warming that is expected to accelerate the decomposition of large soil carbon pools stored within peatlands. However, our results suggest that some common peatland moss species form tissue that resists decomposition across a range of peatland environments, suggesting that moss resource allocation could stabilize peatland carbon losses under a changing climate.

  14. Photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone acetate in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Romão, Joana Sobral; Hamdy, Mohamed S; Mul, Guido; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2015-01-23

    The photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone 21-acetate (CA), a model compound for the commonly used steroid, cortisone, was studied. CA was photocatalytically decomposed in a slurry reactor with the initial rates between 0.11 and 0.46 mg L(-1)min(-1) at 10 mg L(-1) concentration, using the following heterogeneous photocatalysts in decreasing order of their catalytic activity: ZnO>Evonik TiO2 P25>Hombikat TiO2>WO3. Due to the lack of ZnO stability in aqueous solutions, TiO2 P25 was chosen for further experiments. The decomposition reaction was found to be pseudo-first order and the rate constant decreased as a function of increasing initial CA concentration. Changing the initial pH of the CA solution did not affect the reaction rate significantly. The decomposition reaction in the presence of the oxidizing sacrificial agent sodium persulfate showed an observed decomposition rate constant of 0.004 min(-1), lower than that obtained for TiO2 P25 (0.040 min(-1)). The highest photocatalytic degradation rate constant was obtained combining both TiO2 P25 and S2O8(2-) (0.071 min(-1)) showing a synergistic effect. No reactive intermediates were detected using LC-MS showing fast photocatalytic decomposition kinetics of CA.

  15. Kinetic modeling of Pt-catalyzed glycolaldehyde decomposition to syngas.

    PubMed

    Salciccioli, Michael; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2012-05-10

    Fundamental knowledge of the elementary reaction mechanisms involved in oxygenate decomposition on transition metal catalysts can facilitate the optimization of future catalyst and reactor systems for biomass upgrade to fuels and chemicals. Pt-catalyzed decomposition of glycolaldehyde, as the smallest oxygenate with alcohol and aldehyde functionality, was studied via a DFT-based microkinetic model. It was found that two decomposition pathways exist. Under conditions of low hydrogen surface coverage, the initial C-H bond breaking reaction to HOCH(2)CO* is prevalent, while under conditions of high hydrogen coverage, the rather unexpected O-H bond forming reaction to HOCH(2)CHOH* is more active (subsequent decomposition is energetically favorable from HOCH(2)CHOH*). Our results indicate the possibility that (de)hydrogenation chemistry is rate-controlling in many small polyoxygenate biomass derivatives, and suitable catalysts are needed. Finally, DFT was used to understand the increased decomposition activity observed on the surface segregated Ni-Pt-Pt bimetallic catalyst. It was found that the initial O-H bond breaking of glycolaldehyde to OCH(2)CHO* has an activation barrier of just 0.21 eV. This barrier is lower than that of any glycolaldehyde consuming reaction on Pt. These computational predictions are in qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  16. Anisotropic decomposition of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Quine, Zachary; Romano, Edward; Bajar, Sean; Yulga, Brian; Yang Wenge; Hooks, Daniel

    2007-12-12

    Using a white x-ray synchrotron beam, we have dynamically studied radiation-induced decomposition in single crystalline PETN and TATB. By monitoring the integrated intensity of selected diffraction spots via a CCD x-ray camera as a function of time, we have found that the decomposition rate varies dramatically depending upon the orientation of the crystalline axes relative to polarized x-ray beam and for differing diffracting conditions (spots) within the same crystalline orientation. We suggest that this effect is due to Compton scattering of the polarized x-rays with electron clouds that is dependent upon their relative orientation. This novel effect may yield valuable insight regarding anisotropic detonation sensitivity in energetic materials such as PETN.

  17. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Le Maître, O. P.; Knio, O. M.; Moraes, A.

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  18. Exsolution by spinodal decomposition in multicomponent mineral solutions

    PubMed Central

    Petrishcheva, E.; Abart, R.

    2012-01-01

    Phase separation in a three-component system that results from the uphill diffusion of chemical components is considered. The binary decomposition model of Cahn and Hilliard is generalized to account for the interdiffusion of several chemical components with considerably different diffusion constants. Thereafter the decomposition dynamics and the phase relations of the final system state are investigated by means of finite-element modeling. Examples from a hypothetical regular solution and from ternary feldspar are addressed. Special attention is given to situations in which different diffusivities affect decomposition dynamics and the final system states. Good qualitative agreement between our modeling and petrographic observations on exsolved feldspar is achieved. Our model explains systematic deviations from equilibrium element partitioning between the two phases exsolving from an initially homogeneous ternary feldspar during slow cooling. PMID:23888123

  19. Reactive Goal Decomposition Hierarchies for On-Board Autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, L.

    2002-01-01

    to state and environment and in general can terminate the execution of a decomposition and attempt a new decomposition at any level in the hierarchy. This goal decomposition system is suitable for workstation, microprocessor and fpga implementation and thus is able to support the full range of prototyping activities, from mission design in the laboratory to development of the fpga firmware for the flight system. This approach is based on previous artificial intelligence work including (1) Brooks' subsumption architecture for robot control, (2) Firby's Reactive Action Package System (RAPS) for mediating between high level automated planning and low level execution and (3) hierarchical task networks for automated planning. Reactive goal decomposition hierarchies can be used for a wide variety of on-board autonomy applications including automating low level operation sequences (such as scheduling prerequisite operations, e.g., heaters, warm-up periods, monitoring power constraints), coordinating multiple spacecraft as in formation flying and constellations, robot manipulator operations, rendez-vous, docking, servicing, assembly, on-orbit maintenance, planetary rover operations, solar system and interstellar probes, intelligent science data gathering and disaster early warning. Goal decomposition hierarchies can support high level fault tolerance. Given models of on-board resources and goals to accomplish, the decomposition hierarchy could allocate resources to goals taking into account existing faults and in real-time reallocating resources as new faults arise. Resources to be modeled include memory (e.g., ROM, FPGA configuration memory, processor memory, payload instrument memory), processors, on-board and interspacecraft network nodes and links, sensors, actuators (e.g., attitude determination and control, guidance and navigation) and payload instruments. A goal decomposition hierarchy could be defined to map mission goals and tasks to available on-board resources. As

  20. Phlogopite Decomposition, Water, and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. M.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is a hot and dry planet with a surface temperature of 660 to 740 K and 30 parts per million by volume (ppmv) water vapor in its lower atmosphere. In contrast Earth has an average surface temperature of 288 K and 1-4% water vapor in its troposphere. The hot and dry conditions on Venus led many to speculate that hydrous minerals on the surface of Venus would not be there today even though they might have formed in a potentially wetter past. Thermodynamic calculations predict that many hydrous minerals are unstable under current Venusian conditions. Thermodynamics predicts whether a particular mineral is stable or not, but we need experimental data on the decomposition rate of hydrous minerals to determine if they survive on Venus today. Previously, we determined the decomposition rate of the amphibole tremolite, and found that it could exist for billions of years at current surface conditions. Here, we present our initial results on the decomposition of phlogopite mica, another common hydrous mineral on Earth.

  1. The Things We Care to See: The Effects of Rotated Protocol Immersion on the Emergence of Early Observing Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keohane, Dolleen-Day; Luke, Nicole; Greer, R. Douglas

    2008-01-01

    We tested the effect of a Rotated Protocol Immersion package on the emergence of observing responses as prerequisites for more complex verbal developmental capabilities. Three elementary aged students between the ages of 6 and 7 participated. They were diagnosed with autism spectrum disabilities. The treatment condition consisted of total…

  2. Considerations for the Use of the Observation Experience to Aid in Early Socialization and Retention of Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Context: Retention of quality students in athletic training programs (ATPs) is important. Many factors contribute to retention of students, including their motivation level, peer support, positive interactions with instructors, clinical integration, and mentorship. Objective: Highlight the use of the observation period for preparatory athletic…

  3. From Dogmatic Discussions to Observations and Planned Experiments: Some Examples from Early Aurora Borealis Research in Finland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmberg, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Traces the evolution of physics research methods in Finland from passive observations to planned experiments. Presents examples of planned experiments designed to solve particular problems with the goal of establishing a theory of the phenomenon under study. Contains 16 references. (JRH)

  4. Refining signal decomposition for GRETINA detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasher, V. S.; Campbell, C. M.; Cromaz, M.; Crawford, H. L.; Wiens, A.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Lister; Merchan, E.; Chowdhury, P.; Radford, D. C.

    2013-04-01

    The reconstruction of the original direction and energy of gamma rays through locating their interaction points in solid state detectors is a crucial evolving technology for nuclear physics, space science and homeland security. New arrays AGATA and GRETINA have been built for nuclear science based on highly segmented germanium crystals. The signal decomposition process fits the observed waveform from each crystal segment with a linear combination of pre-calculated basis signals. This process occurs on an event-by-event basis in real time to extract the position and energy of γ-ray interactions. The methodology for generating a basis of pulse shapes, varying according to the position of the charge generating interactions, is in place. Improvements in signal decomposition can be realized by better modeling the crystals. Specifically, a better understanding of the true impurity distributions, internal electric fields, and charge mobilities will lead to more reliable bases, more precise definition of the interaction points, and hence more reliable tracking. In this presentation we will cover the current state-of-the-art for basis generation and then discuss the sensitivity of the predicted pulse shapes when varying some key parameters.

  5. Interannual variations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric cloud formation and nitric acid observed by CALIOP and MLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Alyn; Santee, Michelle L.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.

    2016-12-01

    We use satellite-borne measurements collected over the last decade (2006-2015) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) to investigate the nitric acid distribution and the properties of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the early winter Antarctic vortex. Frequently, at the very start of the winter, we find that synoptic-scale depletion of HNO3 can be detected in the inner vortex before the first lidar detection of geophysically associated PSCs. The generation of "sub-visible" PSCs can be explained as arising from the development of a solid particle population with low number densities and large particle sizes. Assumed to be composed of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), the sub-visible PSCs form at ambient temperatures well above the ice frost point, but also above the temperature at which supercooled ternary solution (STS) grows out of the background supercooled binary solution (SBS) distribution. The temperature regime of their formation, inferred from the simultaneous uptake of ambient HNO3 into NAT and their Lagrangian temperature histories, is at a depression of a few kelvin with respect to the NAT existence threshold, TNAT. Therefore, their nucleation requires a considerable supersaturation of HNO3 over NAT, and is consistent with a recently described heterogeneous nucleation process on solid foreign nuclei immersed in liquid aerosol. We make a detailed investigation of the comparative limits of detection of PSCs and the resulting sequestration of HNO3 imposed by lidar, mid-infrared, and microwave techniques. We find that the temperature history of air parcels, in addition to the local ambient temperature, is an important factor in the relative frequency of formation of liquid/solid PSCs. We conclude that the initiation of NAT nucleation and the subsequent development of large NAT particles capable of sedimentation and denitrification in the early winter do not emanate from an ice

  6. Initiation and early evolution of a Coronal Mass Ejection on May 13, 2009 from EUV and white-light observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reva, Anton; Kuzin, Sergey; Bogachev, Sergey; Ulyanov, Artyom

    In this talk we present results of the observations of a CME, which occurred on May 13, 2009. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very beginning stage (the solar surface) up to the distance of 15 solar radii (R_⊙). Below 2 R_⊙ we used the data from the TESIS EUV telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R_⊙ we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. Using data of these three instruments, we have studied the evolution of the CME in details. The CME had a curved trajectory -- its helio-latitude decreased with time. The mass ejection originated at a latitudes of about 50(°) and reached the ecliptic plane at a distance of 2.5 R_⊙ from the Sun’s center. The CME velocity and acceleration increased as the CME went away from the Sun. At the distance of 15 R_⊙ from the Sun’s center the CME had a velocity of 250 km/s and an acceleration of 5 m/s(2) . The CME was not associated with a flare, and didn’t have an impulsive acceleration phase. The mass ejection had U-shaped structure which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in white-light. The CME was formed at a distance of about 0.2 -- 0.5 R_⊙ from the Sun’s surface. Observations in the line 304 Å showed that the CME was associated with the erupting prominence, which was located in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the X-point of the magnetic reconnection. The prominence disappeared at the height of 0.4 R_⊙ above the solar limb. Some aspects of these observations can’t be explained in the standard CME model, which predicts that the prominence should be located inside the U-shaped structure, and the CME should be associated with a flare and have an impulsive acceleration phase.

  7. The decomposition of fine and coarse roots: their global patterns and controlling factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Wei

    2015-05-05

    Fine root decomposition represents a large carbon (C) cost to plants, and serves as a potential soil C source, as well as a substantial proportion of net primary productivity. Coarse roots differ markedly from fine roots in morphology, nutrient concentrations, functions, and decomposition mechanisms. Still poorly understood is whether a consistent global pattern exists between the decomposition of fine (<2 mm root diameter) and coarse (≥2 mm) roots. A comprehensive terrestrial root decomposition dataset, including 530 observations from 71 sampling sites, was thus used to compare global patterns of decomposition of fine and coarse roots. Fine roots decomposed significantly faster than coarse roots in middle latitude areas, but their decomposition in low latitude regions was not significantly different from that of coarse roots. Coarse root decomposition showed more dependence on climate, especially mean annual temperature (MAT), than did fine roots. Initial litter lignin content was the most important predictor of fine root decomposition, while lignin to nitrogen ratios, MAT, and mean annual precipitation were the most important predictors of coarse root decomposition. Our study emphasizes the necessity of separating fine roots and coarse roots when predicting the response of belowground C release to future climate changes.

  8. An analysis of the thermal decomposition reactions of organic electrolytes used in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campion, Christopher Lawrence

    The thermal decomposition of LiPF6 in solution with carbonate solvents has been investigated. The thermal dissociation of LiPF6 into LiF and PF5 is known. In solution, PF 5 reacts with carbonates to form a variety of decomposition products including: carbon dioxide (CO2), ethers (R2O), alkylfluorides (RF), phosphorus oxyfluoride (OPF3), and fluorophosphates (OPF 2OR, OPF(OR)2), assignment of structure is supported by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography with Mass Selective Detection (GC-MS). Similar decomposition products are observed during the thermal decomposition of carbonate solutions of LiPF6. Since solutions of LiPF6 are widely used as Li-ion battery electrolytes, there is interest among battery manufacturers and researchers as to the thermal decomposition of this electrolyte. Here we describe the structural and mechanistic investigations of the thermal decomposition of lithium-ion battery electrolytes. The electrolyte undergoes autocatalytic decomposition reactions at moderately elevated temperatures (80--100°C) to produce a large number of decomposition products. Results indicate that the thermal decomposition reactions are suppressed by the electrode, particularly the cathode, or intended stabilizing additives.

  9. Interactions among temperature, moisture, and oxygen concentrations in controlling decomposition rates in a boreal forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Carlos A.; Malghani, Saadatullah; Loescher, Henry W.

    2017-02-01

    Determining environmental controls on soil organic matter decomposition is of importance for developing models that predict the effects of environmental change on global soil carbon stocks. There is uncertainty about the environmental controls on decomposition rates at temperature and moisture extremes, particularly at high water content levels and high temperatures. It is uncertain whether observed declines in decomposition rates at high temperatures are due to declines in the heat capacity of extracellular enzymes as predicted by thermodynamic theory, or due to simultaneous declines in soil moisture. It is also uncertain whether oxygen limits decomposition rates at high water contents. Here we present the results of a full factorial experiment using organic soils from a boreal forest incubated at high temperatures (25 and 35 °C), a wide range of water-filled pore space (WFPS; 15, 30, 60, 90 %), and contrasting oxygen concentrations (1 and 20 %). We found support for the hypothesis that decomposition rates are high at high temperatures, provided that enough moisture and oxygen are available for decomposition. Furthermore, we found that decomposition rates are mostly limited by oxygen concentrations at high moisture levels; even at 90 % WFPS, decomposition proceeded at high rates in the presence of oxygen. Our results suggest an important degree of interaction among temperature, moisture, and oxygen in determining decomposition rates at the soil core scale.

  10. The decomposition of fine and coarse roots: their global patterns and controlling factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Fine root decomposition represents a large carbon (C) cost to plants, and serves as a potential soil C source, as well as a substantial proportion of net primary productivity. Coarse roots differ markedly from fine roots in morphology, nutrient concentrations, functions, and decomposition mechanisms. Still poorly understood is whether a consistent global pattern exists between the decomposition of fine (<2 mm root diameter) and coarse (≥2 mm) roots. A comprehensive terrestrial root decomposition dataset, including 530 observations from 71 sampling sites, was thus used to compare global patterns of decomposition of fine and coarse roots. Fine roots decomposed significantly faster than coarse roots in middle latitude areas, but their decomposition in low latitude regions was not significantly different from that of coarse roots. Coarse root decomposition showed more dependence on climate, especially mean annual temperature (MAT), than did fine roots. Initial litter lignin content was the most important predictor of fine root decomposition, while lignin to nitrogen ratios, MAT, and mean annual precipitation were the most important predictors of coarse root decomposition. Our study emphasizes the necessity of separating fine roots and coarse roots when predicting the response of belowground C release to future climate changes. PMID:25942391

  11. [Litter decomposition of typical forests along an altitude gradient in Mt. Shennongjia, Hubei, China].

    PubMed

    Pan, Dong-Rong; Liu, Xiao-Ni; Shen, Guo-Zhen; Xie, Zong-Qiang; Luo, Lu; Liu, Lei

    2013-12-01

    Based on the litterbag method, we explored the decomposition dynamics of the litter from the evergreen broad-leaved forests, the mixed evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved forests, and the deciduous broad-leaved forests along an altitude gradient in Mt. Shennongjia, Hubei, China. According to the decomposition rate, the decomposition of the litter could be divided into early stage (0-360 days) and later stage (361-720 days). With the increase of altitude, the mass loss rates of the litter from the three types of forests at the early stage were 2.62-4.08 times that of the later stage, the litter decomposition rates at the early stage were 2.71, 1.72 and 2.69 times of that at the later stage, respectively, and 95% decomposition of the litter needed 3.84, 4.54 and 4.16 years respectively. The decomposition rate at the later stage was significantly correlated with C/N, and the contents of N, hemicelluloses, cellulose and lignin.

  12. Radio-cesium accumulation during decomposition of leaf litter in a deciduous forest after the Fukushima NPP accident.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Nobuhiro; Huang, Yao; Nakamori, Taizo; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Nonaka, Masanori

    2013-04-01

    Fukusima NPP accident contaminated vast area in eastern Japan with radio isotopes. Most of the area is covered by natural and plantation forest. The forest floor in deciduous forests, and canopy of evergreen forest were most contaminated by fall out. Radio-cesium is known to stay bioavailable in forest ecosystems for long time, and it is necessary to cut the cycling process to decontaminate the forest ecosystem. Ecological process to recycle radio-Cs in forest ecosystem should be studied to enhance decontamination of radio-Cs. Mushrooms show high concentration of Cs. Although mushroom biomass in a forest ecosystem is small, fungal mycelium in detritus and soil is large, thus fungi contain substantial amount of radio-Cs. It is well known that concentration of some nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, increase, whereas potassium decreases during the leaf litter decomposition. We observed radio-Cs concentration of leaf litter during decomposition on a forest floor where 134-Cs and 137-Cs of surface soil were 5,700, and 6,800 Bq/kg, respectively. We put 16 g (dry weight) of newly fallen mixed deciduous leaf litter (half of which was oak, Quercus serrata) into 25 cm x 25 cm litter bag (2 mm mesh size) in a deciduous forest about 50 km from Fukushima NPP. Fresh litter 137-Cs concentration was ca. 1,000 Bq/kg in December 2011. During the decomposition process on the forest floor, litter Cs increased exponentially and exceeded 10,000 Bq/kg after 6 months, indicating that Cs and K show contrasting dynamics during early decomposition phase. Increase in fungal biomass in the early stage of litter decomposition was observed. Therefore, this upward movement of Cs from humus and soil layer suggests fungal translocation of nutrients from outside of litter substrate. Retrieving the litter after 6 months can remove 18.0% of 134-Cs. Interaction between fungal species, grazing effect on fungi by fungivorous invertebrates will change the amount of translocation of radio-Cs from

  13. Observations of high-plasma density region in the inner coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during early activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Paulsson, J. J. P.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Odelstad, E.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Koenders, C.; Eriksson, A. I.; Miloch, W. J.

    2016-11-01

    In 2014 September, as Rosetta transitioned to close bound orbits at 30 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the Rosetta Plasma Consortium Langmuir probe (RPC-LAP) data showed large systematic fluctuations in both the spacecraft potential and the collected currents. We analyse the potential bias sweeps from RPC-LAP, from which we extract three sets of parameters: (1) knee potential, that we relate to the spacecraft potential, (2) the ion attraction current, which is composed of the photoelectron emission current from the probe as well as contributions from local ions, secondary emission, and low-energy electrons, and (3) an electron current whose variation is, in turn, an estimate of the electron density variation. We study the evolution of these parameters between 4 and 3.2 au in heliocentric and cometocentric frames. We find on September 9 a transition into a high-density plasma region characterized by increased knee potential fluctuations and plasma currents to the probe. In conjunction with previous studies, the early cometary plasma can be seen as composed of two regions: an outer region characterized by solar wind plasma, and small quantities of pick-up ions, and an inner region with enhanced plasma densities. This conclusion is in agreement with other RPC instruments such as RPC-MAG, RPC-IES and RPC-ICA, and numerical simulations.

  14. A collection of sub-daily pressure and temperature observations for the early instrumental period with a focus on the "year without a summer" 1816

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnara, Y.; Auchmann, R.; Brönnimann, S.; Allan, R. J.; Auer, I.; Barriendos, M.; Bergström, H.; Bhend, J.; Brázdil, R.; Compo, G. P.; Cornes, R. C.; Dominguez-Castro, F.; van Engelen, A. F. V.; Filipiak, J.; Holopainen, J.; Jourdain, S.; Kunz, M.; Luterbacher, J.; Maugeri, M.; Mercalli, L.; Moberg, A.; Mock, C. J.; Pichard, G.; Řezníčková, L.; van der Schrier, G.; Slonosky, V.; Ustrnul, Z.; Valente, M. A.; Wypych, A.; Yin, X.

    2015-08-01

    The eruption of Mount Tambora (Indonesia) in April 1815 is the largest documented volcanic eruption in history. It is associated with a large global cooling during the following year, felt particularly in parts of Europe and North America, where the year 1816 became known as the "year without a summer". This paper describes an effort made to collect surface meteorological observations from the early instrumental period, with a focus on the years of and immediately following the eruption (1815-1817). Although the collection aimed in particular at pressure observations, correspondent temperature observations were also recovered. Some of the series had already been described in the literature, but a large part of the data, recently digitised from original weather diaries and contemporary magazines and newspapers, is presented here for the first time. The collection puts together more than 50 sub-daily series from land observatories in Europe and North America and from ships in the tropics. The pressure observations have been corrected for temperature and gravity and reduced to mean sea level. Moreover, an additional statistical correction was applied to take into account common error sources in mercury barometers. To assess the reliability of the corrected data set, the variance in the pressure observations is compared with modern climatologies, and single observations are used for synoptic analyses of three case studies in Europe. All raw observations will be made available to the scientific community in the International Surface Pressure Databank.

  15. Observations of energetic particle escape at the magnetopause: Early results from the MMS Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Westlake, J. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Craft, J. V.; Spence, H. E.; Niehof, J. T.; Reeves, G. D.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.; Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly, irrespective of conditions that engender reconnection and boundary-normal magnetic fields. A signature observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, simultaneous monohemispheric streaming of multiple species (electrons, H+, Hen+), is reported here as unexpectedly common in the dayside, dusk quadrant of the magnetosheath even though that region is thought to be drift-shadowed from energetic electrons. This signature is sometimes part of a pitch angle distribution evolving from symmetric in the magnetosphere, to asymmetric approaching the magnetopause, to monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath. While monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath may be possible without a boundary-normal magnetic field, the additional pitch angle depletion, particularly of electrons, on the magnetospheric side requires one. Observations of this signature in the dayside dusk sector imply that the static picture of magnetospheric drift-shadowing is inappropriate for energetic particle dynamics in the outer magnetosphere.

  16. Deep Chandra Observations of NGC 1404: Cluster Plasma Physics Revealed by an Infalling Early-type Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Kraft, Ralph P.; Roediger, Elke; Nulsen, Paul; Forman, William R.; Churazov, Eugene; Randall, Scott W.; Jones, Christine; Machacek, Marie E.

    2017-01-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM), as a magnetized and highly ionized fluid, provides an ideal laboratory to study plasma physics under extreme conditions that cannot be achieved on Earth. NGC 1404 is a bright elliptical galaxy that is being gas stripped as it falls through the ICM of the Fornax Cluster. We use the new Chandra X-ray observations of NGC 1404 to study ICM microphysics. The interstellar medium of NGC 1404 is characterized by a sharp leading edge, 8 kpc from the Galaxy center, and a short downstream gaseous tail. Contact discontinuities are resolved on unprecedented spatial scales (0.″5 = 45 pc) due to the combination of the proximity of NGC 1404, the superb spatial resolution of Chandra, and the very deep (670 ks) exposure. At the leading edge, we observe sub-kiloparsec-scale eddies generated by Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) and put an upper limit of 5% Spitzer on the isotropic viscosity of the hot cluster plasma. We also observe mixing between the hot cluster gas and the cooler galaxy gas in the downstream stripped tail, which provides further evidence of a low viscosity plasma. The assumed ordered magnetic fields in the ICM ought to be smaller than 5 μG to allow KHI to develop. The lack of an evident magnetic draping layer just outside the contact edge is consistent with such an upper limit.

  17. Early Radio and X-Ray Observations of the Youngest Nearby Type Ia Supernova PTF 11kly (SN 2011fe)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R.; Fox, Derek B.; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, S. Bradley; deBruyn, A. G.; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; vanderHorst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter E.; Gehrels, Neil; Law, Nicolas M.; Poznanski, Dovi; Shara, Michael

    2012-01-01

    On August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion time. We present our analysis of the radio and X-ray observations, yielding the tightest constraints yet placed on the pre-explosion mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of this supernova. We find a robust limit of M(raised dot) less than or equal to 10(exp -8) (w /100 kilometers per second ) solar mass yr(exp -1) from sensitive X-ray non-detections, as well as a similar limit from radio data, which depends, however, on assumptions about microphysical parameters. We discuss our results in the context of single-degenerate models for SNe Ia and find that our observations modestly disfavor symbiotic progenitor models involving a red giant donor, but cannot constrain systems accreting from main sequence or sub-giant stars, including the popular supersoft channel. In view of the proximity of PTF11kly and the sensitivity of our prompt observations we would have to wait for a long time (decade or longer) in order to more meaningfully probe the circumstellar matter of Ia supernovae.

  18. EARLY RADIO AND X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNGEST NEARBY TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PTF 11kly (SN 2011fe)

    SciTech Connect

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R.; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Fox, Derek B.; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, S. Bradley; De Bruyn, A. G.; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter E.; Gehrels, Neil; and others

    2012-02-10

    On 2011 August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion time. We present our analysis of the radio and X-ray observations, yielding the tightest constraints yet placed on the pre-explosion mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of this supernova. We find a robust limit of M-dot {approx}<10{sup -8}(w/100 km s{sup -1}) M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} from sensitive X-ray non-detections, as well as a similar limit from radio data, which depends, however, on assumptions about microphysical parameters. We discuss our results in the context of single-degenerate models for SNe Ia and find that our observations modestly disfavor symbiotic progenitor models involving a red giant donor, but cannot constrain systems accreting from main-sequence or sub-giant stars, including the popular supersoft channel. In view of the proximity of PTF11kly and the sensitivity of our prompt observations, we would have to wait for a long time (a decade or longer) in order to more meaningfully probe the circumstellar matter of SNe Ia.

  19. [Characteristics of the biochemical composition of plant litter at different stages of decomposition (according to thermal analysis data)].

    PubMed

    Kosheleva, Iu P; Trofimov, S Ia

    2008-01-01

    The composition of samples of needles, leaves, sheaved cottongrass (Eriophorum vaginatum) tissues, and the L horizon of the forest floor of different degree of decomposition, isolated from the plant litter in southern taiga ecosystems, was studied by thermal analysis. It was established that plant litter decomposition is accompanied by structural changes in celluloses and that the decomposition rates of hemicellulose and structured cellulose vary at different stages of decomposition. The structural specificity and incongruent thermal decomposition of grass lignocellulose were observed in all samples of plant material. The rates at which the content of components of the plant litter decreased depended on the type and stage of decomposition of plant material. The decomposition rate of biochemical components tended to increase in better drained soils.

  20. In situ spectroscopic studies on vapor phase catalytic decomposition of dimethyl oxalate.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shweta; Tharpa, Kalsang; Akuri, Satyanarayana Reddy; K, Rakesh; Kumar, Ajay; Deshpande, Raj; Nair, Sreejit A

    2017-03-15

    Dimethyl Oxalate (DMO) has recently gained prominence as a valuable intermediate for the production of compounds of commercial importance. The stability of DMO is poor and hence this can result in the decomposition of DMO under reaction conditions. The mechanism of DMO decomposition is however not reported and more so on catalytic surfaces. Insights into the mechanism of decomposition would help in designing catalysts for its effective molecular transformation. It is well known that DMO is sensitive to moisture, which can also be a factor contributing to its decomposition. The present work reports the results of decomposition of DMO on various catalytic materials. The materials studied consist of acidic (γ-Al2O3), basic (MgO), weakly acidic (ZnAl2O4) and neutral surfaces such as α-Al2O3 and mesoporous precipitated SiO2. Infrared spectroscopy is used to identify the nature of adsorption of the molecule on the various surfaces. The spectroscopy study is done at a temperature of 200 °C, which is the onset of gas phase decomposition of DMO. The results indicate that the stability of DMO is lower than the corresponding acid, i.e. oxalic acid. It is also one of the products of decomposition. Spectroscopic data suggest that DMO decomposition is related to surface acidity and the extent of decomposition depends on the number of surface hydroxyl groups. Decomposition was also observed on α-Al2O3, which was attributed to the residual surface hydroxyl groups. DMO decomposition to oxalic acid was not observed on the basic surface (MgO).

  1. A review of myrmecophily in ant nest beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Paussinae): linking early observations with recent findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiselhardt, Stefanie F.; Peschke, Klaus; Nagel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Myrmecophily provides various examples of how social structures can be overcome to exploit vast and well-protected resources. Ant nest beetles (Paussinae) are particularly well suited for ecological and evolutionary considerations in the context of association with ants because life habits within the subfamily range from free-living and predatory in basal taxa to obligatory myrmecophily in derived Paussini. Adult Paussini are accepted in the ant society, although parasitising the colony by preying on ant brood. Host species mainly belong to the ant families Myrmicinae and Formicinae, but at least several paussine genera are not host-specific. Morphological adaptations, such as special glands and associated tufts of hair (trichomes), characterise Paussini as typical myrmecophiles and lead to two different strategical types of body shape: while certain Paussini rely on the protective type with less exposed extremities, other genera access ant colonies using glandular secretions and trichomes (symphile type). We compare these adaptations with other taxonomic groups of insects by joining contemporary research and early sources and discuss the possibility of an attracting or appeasing effect of the secretion. Species that are ignored by their host ants might use chemical mimicry instead. Furthermore, vibrational signals may contribute to ant-beetle communication, and chemical signals have proven to play a role in host finding. The powerful defense chemistry of paussines as “bombardier beetles” is not used in contact with host ants. We attempt to trace the evolution of myrmecophily in paussines by reviewing important aspects of the association between paussine beetles and ants, i.e. morphological and potential chemical adaptations, life cycle, host specificity, alimentation, parasitism and sound production.

  2. The Size Evolution of Passive Galaxies: Observations From the Wide-Field Camera 3 Early Release Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Mccarthy, P.J.; Cohen, S. H.; Yan, H.; Hathi, N. P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Mechtley, M. R.; Windhorst, R. A.; O’Connell, R. W.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Bushouse, H.; Calzetti, D.; Crockett, R. M.; Disney, M.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D., N., B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kaviraj, S.; Kimble, R. A.; MacKenty, J.; Trauger, J.; Young, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at z approximately 2 identified in Wide-Field Camera 3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK galaxy selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation at z greater than approximately 1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in approximately 40 arcmin(sup 2) to H less than 25 mag. By fitting the 10-band Hubble Space Telescope photometry from 0.22 micrometers less than approximately lambda (sub obs) 1.6 micrometers with stellar population synthesis models, we simultaneously determine photometric redshift, stellar mass, and a bevy of other population parameters. Based on the six galaxies with published spectroscopic redshifts, we estimate a typical redshift uncertainty of approximately 0.033(1+z).We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical point-spread function. By supplementing our data with published samples, we propose a mass-dependent size evolution model for passively evolving galaxies, where the most massive galaxies (M(sub *) approximately 10(sup 11) solar mass) undergo the strongest evolution from z approximately 2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1 + z)(sup - alpha), we find a tentative scaling of alpha approximately equals (-0.6 plus or minus 0.7) + (0.9 plus or minus 0.4) log(M(sub *)/10(sup 9 solar mass), where the relatively large uncertainties reflect the poor sampling in stellar mass due to the low numbers of highredshift systems. We discuss the implications of this result for the redshift evolution of the M(sub *)-R(sub e) relation for red galaxies.

  3. EPISODIC ACCRETION AT EARLY STAGES OF EVOLUTION OF LOW-MASS STARS AND BROWN DWARFS: A SOLUTION FOR THE OBSERVED LUMINOSITY SPREAD IN H-R DIAGRAMS?

    SciTech Connect

    Baraffe, I.; Chabrier, G.; Gallardo, J. E-mail: chabrier@ens-lyon.fr

    2009-09-01

    We present evolutionary models for young low-mass stars and brown dwarfs taking into account episodic phases of accretion at early stages of the evolution, a scenario supported by recent large surveys of embedded protostars. An evolution including short episodes of vigorous accretion followed by longer quiescent phases can explain the observed luminosity spread in H-R diagrams of star-forming regions at ages of a few Myr, for objects ranging from a few Jupiter masses to a few tenths of a solar mass. The gravitational contraction of these accreting objects strongly departs from the standard Hayashi track at constant T{sub eff}. The best agreement with the observed luminosity scatter is obtained if most of the accretion shock energy is radiated away. The obtained luminosity spread at 1 Myr in the H-R diagram is equivalent to what can be misinterpreted as an {approx}10 Myr age spread for non-accreting objects. We also predict a significant spread in radius at a given T{sub eff}, as suggested by recent observations. These calculations bear important consequences for our understanding of star formation and early stages of evolution and on the determination of the initial mass function for young ({<=} a few Myr) clusters. Our results also show that the concept of a stellar birthline for low-mass objects has no valid support.

  4. A First Comparison between 3D Model Predictions of Mars' Oxygen Corona and Early MAVEN IUVS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.; Bougher, S. W.; Deighan, J.; Schneider, N. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Earlier observations of the Mars' atmosphere have provided evidence that Mars was once abundance in water and CO2, which had been depleted via various mechanisms from the surface and atmosphere throughout the history of the planet. At the current epoch, the main mechanism that induces the loss of atomic O is suggested as dissociative recombination of O2+, which yields the hot O corona in the upper thermosphere and exosphere. To quantitatively understand the loss process, it is crucial to characterize the Martian hot O corona in detail by constraining the model in accordance with the analysis of the observed features of the atmosphere, allowing estimation of the global escape rate of atomic O. Here, we present a comparison between our 3D Martian hot O corona model predictions and the OI 130.4 nm emission detected by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) [McClintock et al., 2014] onboard Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutiN (MAVEN) [Jakosky et al., 2015]. We have simulated the hot O corona by coupling our Mars application of the 3D Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (M-AMPS) [Tenishev et al., 2008, 2013] and the Mars Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (M-GITM) [Bougher et al., 2015], based completely on our best pre-MAVEN understanding of the 3D structure of the thermosphere and ionosphere. The model predictions showed good agreement with the transition altitude from the cold thermosphere to the hot O corona, the altitude variation of the hot O density, and the spatial variation of the dayside-dominated corona. The model estimates the O escape rate of 3.46 × 1025 s-1 for the case considered. The brightness of the modeled hot O densities are a factor of a few lower than the IUVS measurement, which requires further analysis of MAVEN measurements to constrain our model as well as the possible consideration of other source mechanisms to close the gap with the observed brightness.

  5. A closer look at arrested spinodal decomposition in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Gibaud, Thomas; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2009-08-12

    Concentrated aqueous solutions of the protein lysozyme undergo a liquid-solid transition upon a temperature quench into the unstable spinodal region below a characteristic arrest temperature of T(f) = 15 °C. We use video microscopy and ultra-small angle light scattering in order to investigate the arrested structures as a function of initial concentration, quench temperature and rate of the temperature quench. We find that the solid-like samples show all the features of a bicontinuous network that is formed through an arrested spinodal decomposition process. We determine the correlation length ξ and demonstrate that ξ exhibits a temperature dependence that closely follows the critical scaling expected for density fluctuations during the early stages of spinodal decomposition. These findings are in agreement with an arrest scenario based on a state diagram where the arrest or gel line extends far into the unstable region below the spinodal line. Arrest then occurs when during the early stage of spinodal decomposition the volume fraction φ(2) of the dense phase intersects the dynamical arrest threshold φ(2,Glass), upon which phase separation gets pinned into a space-spanning gel network with a characteristic length ξ.

  6. Spectral decomposition of broad-line agns and host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Shen, Jiajian; Yip, Ching-Wa; Schneider, Donald P.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Burton, Ross E.; Jester, Sebastian; Hall, Patrick B.; Szalay, Alex S.; Brinkmann, John; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-09-01

    Using an eigenspectrum decomposition technique, we separate the host galaxy from the broad line active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a set of 4666 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), from redshifts near zero up to about 0.75. The decomposition technique uses separate sets of galaxy and quasar eigenspectra to efficiently and reliably separate the AGN and host spectroscopic components. The technique accurately reproduces the host galaxy spectrum, its contributing fraction, and its classification. We show how the accuracy of the decomposition depends upon S/N, host galaxy fraction, and the galaxy class. Based on the eigencoefficients, the sample of SDSS broad-line AGN host galaxies spans a wide range of spectral types, but the distribution differs significantly from inactive galaxies. In particular, post-starburst activity appears to be much more common among AGN host galaxies. The luminosities of the hosts are much higher than expected for normal early-type galaxies, and their colors become increasingly bluer than early-type galaxies with increasing host luminosity. Most of the AGNs with detected hosts are emitting at between 1% and 10% of their estimated Eddington luminosities, but the sensitivity of the technique usually does not extend to the Eddington limit. There are mild correlations among the AGN and host galaxy eigencoefficients, possibly indicating a link between recent star formation and the onset of AGN activity. The catalog of spectral reconstruction parameters is available as an electronic table.

  7. Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Interactions During Early Autumn Freeze-up: Boundary-Layer and Surface Observations from the ACSE Field Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Ola; Brooks, Barbara; Tjernström, Michael; Sedlar, Joseph; Brooks, Ian; Shupe, Matthew; Björck, Göran; Prytherch, John; Salisbury, Dominic; Achtert, Peggy; Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Johnston, Paul; Wolfe, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Surface energy fluxes are key to the annual summer melt and autumn freeze-up of Arctic sea ice, but are strongly modulated by atmospheric, ocean, and sea-ice processes. This paper will examine direct observations of energy fluxes during the onset of autumn freeze-up from the Arctic Clouds in Summer Experiment (ACSE), and place them in context of those from other observational campaigns. The ACSE field program obtained measurements of surface energy fluxes, boundary-layer structure, cloud macro- and microphysical structure, and upper-ocean thermal and salinity structure from pack-ice and open-water regions in the eastern Arctic from early July to early October 2014. Late August and September measurements showed periods of energy flux deficits, leading to freeze-up of sea ice and the ocean surface. The surface albedo and processes impacting the energy content of the upper ocean appear key to producing a temporal difference between the freeze-up of the sea ice and adjacent open water. While synoptic conditions, atmospheric advection, and the annual solar cycle have primary influence determining when energy fluxes are conducive for melt or freeze, mesoscale atmospheric phenomena unique to the ice edge region appear to also play a role. For instance, low-level jets were often observed near the ice edge during the latter part of ACSE, and may have enhanced the turbulent energy loss. In conjunction with observations of summer melt, these observations of the onset of freeze-up suggest scenarios of key atmospheric processes, including thermal advection on various scales, that are important for the annual evolution of melt and freeze-up.

  8. X-Ray, UV, and Optical Observations of Supernova 2006bp with Swift: Detection of Early X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, S.; Brown, P. J.; Milne, P.; Dessart, L.; Mazzali, P. A.; Landsman, W.; Gehrels, N.; Petre, R.; Burrows, D. N.; Nousek, J. A.; Chevalier, R. A.; Williams, C. L.; Koss, M.; Stockdale, C. J.; Kelley, M. T.; Weiler, K. W.; Holland, S. T.; Pian, E.; Roming, P. W. A.; Pooley, D.; Nomoto, K.; Greiner, J.; Campana, S.; Soderberg, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    We present results on the X-ray and optical/UV emission from the Type IIP supernova (SN) 2006bp and the interaction of the SW shock with its environment, obtained with the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on-board the Swift observatory. SN 2006bp is detected in X-rays at a 4.5 sigmalevel of significance in the merged XRT data from days 1 to 12 after the explosion. If the (0.2-10 keV band) X-ray luminosity of L(sub 0.2-10) = (1.8 plus or minus 0.4) x l0(exp 39 ergs s(exp -1) is caused by interaction of the SN shock with circumstellar material (CSM), deposited by a stellar wind from the progenitor's companion star, a mass-loss rate of M is approximately 2x10(exp -6) solar mass yr(exp -1) (v(sub w)/10 km s(exp -l) is inferred. The mass-loss rate is one of the lowest ever recorded for a core-collapse SN and consistent with the non-detection in the radio with the VLA on days 2, 9, and 11 after the explosion. The Swift data further show a fading of the X-ray emission starting around day 12 after the explosion. In combination with a follow-up XMM-Newton observation obtained on day 21 after the explosion, an X-ray rate of decline Lx, varies as t(exp -n) with index n = 1.2 plus or minus 0.6 is inferred. Since no other SN has been detected in X-rays prior to the optical peak and since Type IIP SNe have an extended 'plateau' phase in the optical, we discuss the scenario that the X-rays might be due to inverse Compton scattering of photospheric optical photons off relativistic electrons produced in circumstellar shocks. However, due to the high required value of the Lorentz factor (approximately 10-100), inconsistent with the ejecta velocity inferred from optical line widths, we conclude that Inverse Compton scattering is an unlikely explanation for the observed X-ray emission. The fast evolution of the optical/ultraviolet (1900-5500A) spectral energy distribution and the spectral changes observed with Swift reveal the onset of metal line-blanketing and

  9. Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2006D: On SporadicCarbon Signatures in Early Type Ia Supernova Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.C.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey,S.; Baltay, C.; Baron, E.; Bauer, A.; Buton, C.; Bongard, S.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; Gilles, S.; Kessler, R.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Parrent, J.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigaudier, G.; Runge, K.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Wang, L.; Weaver, B.A.

    2006-10-12

    We present four spectra of the Type Ia supernova SN Ia 2006Dextending from -7 to +13 days with respect to B-band maximum. The spectrainclude the strongest signature of unburned material at photosphericvelocities observed in a SN Ia to date. The earliest spectrum exhibits CII absorption features below 14,000 km/s, including a distinctive C IIlambda 6580 absorption feature. The carbon signatures dissipate as the SNapproaches peak brightness. In addition to discussing implications ofphotospheric-velocity carbon for white dwarf explosion models, we outlinesome factors that may influence the frequency of its detection before andaround peak brightness. Two effects are explored in this regard,including depopulation of the C II optical levels by non-LTE effects, andline-of-sight effects resulting from a clumpy distribution of unburnedmaterial with low volume-filling factor.

  10. DIADECOMP: A new approach to analyze decompositions from projection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, Jonas; de Paula, Viviane S.; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fabio C. L.; Billeter, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate for the first time a complete small protein characterization with the projection-decomposition approach, including full assignments as well as determination of the 3D fold. In TOCSY- and NOESY-type 4D experiments, pairing of signals from hydrogens and from their respective heavy atoms in decompositions represents a new problem. An approach, referred to as "DIADECOMP" (diagonal decomposition), is introduced to solve this problem; it consists of two separate decompositions of the input projections, differing in a 45° rotation of the spectral axes. While DIADECOMP requires a somewhat complex formulation, in practice it results in observing signals in the rotated decompositions that correspond to sums or differences of frequencies. When applied to a small protein, human defensin β6, the analysis of a HCC(CO)NH-TOCSY with DIADECOMP results in largely unambiguous assignments of the aliphatic side chain groups. Furthermore, DIADECOMP applied to a 15N-HSQC-NOESY-15N-HSQC provides all expected short distances between amide groups (defined as all HN-HN distances <3.5 Å in a reference structure). It is worth noting that short HN-HN distances unambiguously define α-helices, the alignment of β-strands in sheets, as well as the presence of β-bulges. This approach of using a minimal amount of NMR data, namely four projection experiments recorded in ∼2.5 days, resulted for the human defensin β6 in complete assignments and a backbone fold with a RMSD of the non-flexible structure of 0.6 Å. Uniqueness of decompositions specifically from TOCSY- and NOESY-type 4D experiments is discussed.

  11. Radiocesium immobilization to leaf litter by fungi during first-year decomposition in a deciduous forest in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao; Kaneko, Nobuhiro; Nakamori, Taizo; Miura, Toshiko; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Nonaka, Masanori; Takenaka, Chisato

    2016-02-01

    Vast forest areas in eastern Japan have been contaminated with radio-isotopes by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Radiocesium (radioCs) is known to remain bioavailable in forest ecosystems for a long time, and it is necessary to terminate the cycling process to decontaminate the forest ecosystem. We observed radiocesium concentrations of leaf litter during decomposition on a forest floor where radiocesium ((137)Cs) contamination was ∼155 kBq/m(2). Litter bag experiments were conducted with newly fallen mixed deciduous leaf litter in a deciduous forest (alt. 610 m) about 50 km from the FDNPP. Litter bags were retrieved in April, June, August, October, and December 2012. Fresh litter (137)Cs concentration was ∼3000 Bq/kg in December 2011. During the decomposition process on the forest floor, litter (137)Cs concentration increased rapidly and exceeded 25,000 Bq/kg after 6 months, whereas potassium (K) concentration in the litter was rather stable, indicating that radiocesium and K showed contrasting dynamics during the early decomposition phase. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and (137)Cs contents were positively correlated to fungal biomass, evaluated by phospholipid fatty acids in the litter during decomposition. The increase of radiocesium concentration mainly occurred during from April to October, when fungal growth peaked. Therefore, this suggests fungal translocation of nutrients from outside the litter substrate (immobilization) is the mechanism to increase radiocesium in the decomposing litter. The amount of (137)Cs contained in the 1-year-old decomposed leaf litter was estimated to be 4% per area of the soil-contaminated (137)Cs.

  12. Nanoscale decomposition of Nb-Ru-O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Geyer, Richard W.; Chen, Yen-Ting

    2016-11-01

    A correlative theoretical and experimental methodology has been employed to explore the decomposition of amorphous Nb-Ru-O at elevated temperatures. Density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations reveal that amorphous Nb-Ru-O is structurally modified within 10 ps at 800 K giving rise to an increase in the planar metal - oxygen and metal - metal population and hence formation of large clusters, which signifies atomic segregation. The driving force for this atomic segregation process is 0.5 eV/atom. This is validated by diffraction experiments and transmission electron microscopy of sputter-synthesized Nb-Ru-O thin films. Room temperature samples are amorphous, while at 800 K nanoscale rutile RuO2 grains, self-organized in an amorphous Nb-O matrix, are observed, which is consistent with our theoretical predictions. This amorphous/crystalline interplay may be of importance for next generation of thermoelectric devices.

  13. Impact of Pre-Pregnancy BMI on B Vitamin and Inflammatory Status in Early Pregnancy: An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Ulvik, Arve; Nilsen, Roy M.; Midttun, Øivind; Roth, Christine; Magnus, Per; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Vollset, Stein Emil; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Ueland, Per Magne

    2016-01-01

    Maternal nutrition and inflammation have been suggested as mediators in the development of various adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with maternal obesity. We have investigated the relation between pre-pregnancy BMI, B vitamin status, and inflammatory markers in a group of healthy pregnant women. Cobalamin, folate, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, and riboflavin; and the metabolic markers homocysteine, methylmalonic acid, and 3-hydroxykynurenine/xanthurenic acid ratio (HK/XA); and markers of cellular inflammation, neopterin and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio (KTR) were determined in pregnancy week 18 and related to pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), in 2797 women from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Pre-pregnancy BMI was inversely related to folate, cobalamin, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP), and riboflavin (p < 0.001), and associated with increased neopterin and KTR levels (p < 0.001). Inflammation seemed to be an independent predictor of low vitamin B6 status, as verified by low PLP and high HK/XA ratio. A high pre-pregnancy BMI is a risk factor for low B vitamin status and increased cellular inflammation. As an optimal micronutrient status is vital for normal fetal development, the observed lower B vitamin levels may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with maternal obesity and B vitamin status should be assessed in women with high BMI before they get pregnant. PMID:27916904

  14. Impact of Pre-Pregnancy BMI on B Vitamin and Inflammatory Status in Early Pregnancy: An Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Ulvik, Arve; Nilsen, Roy M; Midttun, Øivind; Roth, Christine; Magnus, Per; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Vollset, Stein Emil; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Ueland, Per Magne

    2016-11-30

    Maternal nutrition and inflammation have been suggested as mediators in the development of various adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with maternal obesity. We have investigated the relation between pre-pregnancy BMI, B vitamin status, and inflammatory markers in a group of healthy pregnant women. Cobalamin, folate, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, and riboflavin; and the metabolic markers homocysteine, methylmalonic acid, and 3-hydroxykynurenine/xanthurenic acid ratio (HK/XA); and markers of cellular inflammation, neopterin and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio (KTR) were determined in pregnancy week 18 and related to pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), in 2797 women from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Pre-pregnancy BMI was inversely related to folate, cobalamin, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), and riboflavin (p < 0.001), and associated with increased neopterin and KTR levels (p < 0.001). Inflammation seemed to be an independent predictor of low vitamin B6 status, as verified by low PLP and high HK/XA ratio. A high pre-pregnancy BMI is a risk factor for low B vitamin status and increased cellular inflammation. As an optimal micronutrient status is vital for normal fetal development, the observed lower B vitamin levels may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with maternal obesity and B vitamin status should be assessed in women with high BMI before they get pregnant.

  15. Observational Evidence Against Mountain-Wave Generation of Ice Nuclei as a Prerequisite for the Formation of Three Solid Nitric Acid Polar Stratospheric Clouds Observed in the Arctic in Early December 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, Kathy L.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Hervig, Mark E.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Browell, Edward V.; Legg, Marion J.; Foschi, Patricia G.

    2004-01-01

    A number of recently published papers suggest that mountain-wave activity in the stratosphere, producing ice particles when temperatures drop below the ice frost point, may be the primary source of large NAT particles. In this paper we use measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting satellites to map out regions of ice clouds produced by stratospheric mountain-wave activity inside the Arctic vortex. Lidar observations from three DC-8 flights in early December 1999 show the presence of solid nitric acid (Type Ia or NAT) polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). By using back trajectories and superimposing the position maps on the AVHRR cloud imagery products, we show that these observed NAT clouds could not have originated at locations of high-amplitude mountain-wave activity. We also show that mountain-wave PSC climatology data and Mountain Wave Forecast Model 2.0 (MWFM-2) raw hemispheric ray and grid box averaged hemispheric wave temperature amplitude hindcast data from the same time period are in agreement with the AVHRR data. Our results show that ice cloud formation in mountain waves cannot explain how at least three large scale NAT clouds were formed in the stratosphere in early December 1999.

  16. Theoretical study of the thermal decomposition of dimethyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Aäron G; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Marin, Guy B

    2010-10-07

    Despite its use in a wide variety of industrially important thermochemical processes, little is known about the thermal decomposition mechanism of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). To obtain more insight, the radical decomposition mechanism of DMDS is studied theoretically and a kinetic model is developed accounting for the formation of all the decomposition products observed in the experimental studies available in literature. Thermochemical data and rate coefficients are obtained using the high-level CBS-QB3 composite method. Among five methods tested (BMK/6-311G(2d,d,p), MPW1PW91/6-311G(2d,d,p), G3, G3B3, and CBS-QB3), the CBS-QB3 method was found to reproduce most accurately the experimental standard enthalpies of formation for a set of 17 small organosulfur compounds and the bond dissociation energies for a set of 10 sulfur bonds. Enthalpies of formation were predicted within 4 kJ mol(-1) while the mean absolute deviation on the bond dissociation enthalpies amounts to 7 kJ mol(-1). From the theoretical study, a new reaction path is identified for the formation of carbon disulfide via dithiirane (CH(2)S(2)). A reaction mechanism was constructed containing 36 reactions among 25 species accounting for the formation of all the decomposition products reported in literature. High-pressure limit rate coefficients for the 36 reactions in the reaction mechanism are presented. The kinetic model is able to grasp the experimental observations. With the recombination of thiyl radicals treated as being in the low-pressure limit, the experimentally reported first-order rate coefficients for the decomposition of DMDS are reproduced within 1 order of magnitude, while the observed product selectivities of most compounds are reproduced satisfactory. Simulations indicate that at high conversions most of the carbon disulfide forms according to the newly identified reaction path involving the formation of dithiirane.

  17. Potential role of gas hydrate decomposition in generating submarine slope failures: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pauli, Charles K.; mUssler, William III; Dillon, William P.; Max, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    Gas hydrate decomposition is hypothesized to be a factor in generating weakness in continental margin sediments that may help explain some of the observed patterns of continental margin sediment instability. The processes associated with formation and decomposition of gas hydrate can cause the strengthening of sediments in which gas hydrate grow and the weakening of sediments in which gas hydrate decomposes. The weakened sediments may form horizons along which the potential for sediment failure is increased. While a causal relationship between slope failures and gas hydrate decomposition has not been proven, a number of empirical observations support their potential connection.

  18. Investigating early-type galaxy evolution with a multiwavelength approach - I. X-ray properties of 12 galaxies observed with Swift and XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchieri, G.; Rampazzo, R.; Mazzei, P.; Marino, A.; Wolter, A.

    2015-05-01

    We report here the results from the X-ray observations of 12 early-type galaxies (ETGs) observed with Swift and XMM-Newton, originally selected from a sample of galaxies with Spitzer and/or GALEX data. With the combined analysis of new X-ray and optical-UV observations and of previously available data from archives, we aim at investigating the relation between X-ray luminosity and evolutionary phases of ETGs. We will interpret the results with the additional aid of smoothed particle hydrodynamics chemo-photometric simulations. All galaxies have been detected in the X-ray band, with luminosities Lx > 1039 erg s-1. X-ray emitting gas has been detected in about half of the sample, with luminosities from ≥1039 to 1040 erg s-1. UVOT images show a variety of morphologies, from absence of peculiar features relative to optical wavelengths typical of red and dead early-types, to well defined almost circular rings clearly emerging in the U band, to more spectacular and complex features connected to recent or even ongoing star formation (SF). We find little evidence of any influence of the SF activity on their global X-ray properties, and in particular, on the luminosity-weighted age of the system, usually estimated in the nuclear region. However, with the present data we cannot exclude that such a relation exists on smaller scales, related to the specific sites where we see evidence of newly formed stars, such as outer rings and arcs and peculiar features observed in UV images.

  19. The autoimmunity-associated BLK haplotype exhibits cis-regulatory effects on mRNA and protein expression that are prominently observed in B cells early in development

    PubMed Central

    Simpfendorfer, Kim R.; Olsson, Lina M.; Manjarrez Orduño, Nataly; Khalili, Houman; Simeone, Alyssa M.; Katz, Matthew S.; Lee, Annette T.; Diamond, Betty; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    The gene B lymphocyte kinase (BLK) is associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and several other autoimmune disorders. The disease risk haplotype is known to be associated with reduced expression of BLK mRNA transcript in human B cell lines; however, little is known about cis-regulation of BLK message or protein levels in native cell types. Here, we show that in primary human B lymphocytes, cis-regulatory effects of disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in BLK are restricted to naïve and transitional B cells. Cis-regulatory effects are not observed in adult B cells in later stages of differentiation. Allelic expression bias was also identified in primary human T cells from adult peripheral and umbilical cord blood (UCB), thymus and tonsil, although mRNA levels were reduced compared with B cells. Allelic regulation of Blk expression at the protein level was confirmed in UCB B cell subsets by intracellular staining and flow cytometry. Blk protein expression in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was documented by western blot analysis; however, differences in protein expression levels by BLK genotype were not observed in any T cell subset. Blk allele expression differences at the protein level are thus restricted to early B cells, indicating that the involvement of Blk in the risk for autoimmune disease likely acts during the very early stages of B cell development. PMID:22678060

  20. Weak and Compact Radio Emission in Early High-mass Star-forming Regions. I. VLA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; Claussen, M.; Kurtz, S.; Cesaroni, R.; Araya, E. D.; Carrasco-González, C.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Loinard, L.; Ellingsen, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a high-sensitivity radio continuum survey at 6 and 1.3 cm using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array toward a sample of 58 high-mass star-forming regions. Our sample was chosen from dust clumps within infrared dark clouds with and without IR sources (CMC-IRs and CMCs, respectively), and hot molecular cores (HMCs), with no previous, or relatively weak radio continuum detection at the 1 mJy level. Due to the improvement in the continuum sensitivity of the Very Large Array, this survey achieved map rms levels of ˜3-10 μJy beam-1 at sub-arcsecond angular resolution. We extracted 70 continuum sources associated with 1.2 mm dust clumps. Most sources are weak, compact, and prime candidates for high-mass protostars. Detection rates of radio sources associated with the millimeter dust clumps for CMCs, CMC-IRs, and HMCs are 6%, 53%, and 100%, respectively. This result is consistent with increasing high-mass star formation activity from CMCs to HMCs. The radio sources located within HMCs and CMC-IRs occur close to the dust clump centers, with a median offset from it of 12,000 au and 4000 au, respectively. We calculated 5-25 GHz spectral indices using power-law fits and obtained a median value of 0.5 (i.e., flux increasing with frequency), suggestive of thermal emission from ionized jets. In this paper we describe the sample, observations, and detections. The analysis and discussion will be presented in Paper II.

  1. The Resolved Stellar Population in 50 Regions of M83 from HST/WFC3 Early Release Science Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hwihyun; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, Rupali; Saha, Abhijit; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Mutchler, Max; Cohen, Seth H.; Calzetti, Daniela; O’Connell, Robert W.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Paresce, Francesco; Silk, Joe I; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Young, Erick T.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric study of approximately 15,000 resolved stars in the nearby spiral galaxy M83 (NGC 5236, D = 4.61 Mpc) based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations using four filters: F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W. We select 50 regions (an average size of 260 pc by 280 pc) in the spiral arm and inter-arm areas of M83 and determine the age distribution of the luminous stellar populations in each region. This is accomplished by correcting for extinction toward each individual star by comparing its colors with predictions from stellar isochrones.We compare the resulting luminosity-weighted mean ages of the luminous stars in the 50 regions with those determined from several independent methods, including the number ratio of red-to-blue supergiants, morphological appearance of the regions, surface brightness fluctuations, and the ages of clusters in the regions. We find reasonably good agreement between these methods. We also find that young stars are much more likely to be found in concentrated aggregates along spiral arms, while older stars are more dispersed. These results are consistent with the scenario that star formation is associated with the spiral arms, and stars form primarily in star clusters and then disperse on short timescales to form the field population. The locations ofWolf-Rayet stars are found to correlate with the positions of many of the youngest regions, providing additional support for our ability to accurately estimate ages. We address the effects of spatial resolution on the measured colors, magnitudes, and age estimates. While individual stars can occasionally show measurable differences in the colors and magnitudes, the age estimates for entire regions are only slightly affected.

  2. THE RESOLVED STELLAR POPULATION IN 50 REGIONS OF M83 FROM HST/WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwihyun; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Mutchler, Max; Bond, Howard E.; Chandar, Rupali; Saha, Abhijit; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Calzetti, Daniela; O'Connell, Robert W.; Balick, Bruce; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; and others

    2012-07-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric study of {approx}15,000 resolved stars in the nearby spiral galaxy M83 (NGC 5236, D = 4.61 Mpc) based on Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations using four filters: F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W. We select 50 regions (an average size of 260 pc by 280 pc) in the spiral arm and inter-arm areas of M83 and determine the age distribution of the luminous stellar populations in each region. This is accomplished by correcting for extinction toward each individual star by comparing its colors with predictions from stellar isochrones. We compare the resulting luminosity-weighted mean ages of the luminous stars in the 50 regions with those determined from several independent methods, including the number ratio of red-to-blue supergiants, morphological appearance of the regions, surface brightness fluctuations, and the ages of clusters in the regions. We find reasonably good agreement between these methods. We also find that young stars are much more likely to be found in concentrated aggregates along spiral arms, while older stars are more dispersed. These results are consistent with the scenario that star formation is associated with the spiral arms, and stars form primarily in star clusters and then disperse on short timescales to form the field population. The locations of Wolf-Rayet stars are found to correlate with the positions of many of the youngest regions, providing additional support for our ability to accurately estimate ages. We address the effects of spatial resolution on the measured colors, magnitudes, and age estimates. While individual stars can occasionally show measurable differences in the colors and magnitudes, the age estimates for entire regions are only slightly affected.

  3. ROSAT PSPC observations of the early-type galaxies NGC 507 and NGC 499: Central cooling and mass determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, G.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a deep observation of NGC 507 and NGC 499 with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC). The X-ray emission of NGC 507 is extended at least out to 1000 sec (458 kpc at a distance of 94.5 Mpc). The radial profile of X-ray surface brightness goes as Sigma(sub x) is approximately r(exp -1.8) outside the core region. The radial profile is a function of energy such that the softer X-rays have a smaller core radius and a flatter slope. Spectral analysis reveals that the emission temperature, with an average of 1 keV, peaks at an intermediate radius of 2-3 min and falls toward the center (possibly decreases outward as well). The absorption column density is consistent with the Galactic line-of-sight value. The X-ray emission of NGC 499 is extended to 300 sec and suggests a similarly cooler core. The cooler cores of NGC 507 and NGC 499 are strong evidence of the presence of cooling flows in these galaxies. Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium outside the cooling radius, the estimated mass-to-light ratio of NGC 507 is 97 +/- 16 within 458 kpc, indicative of the presence of a heavy halo. Similarly, the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 499 is 89 +/- 14 within 137 kpc. Near the edge of the X-ray-emitting region of NGC 507 we detect 19 soft, unresolved sources. These sources do not have optical counterparts and are significantly in excess of the expected number of background serendipitous sources. We speculate that they may represent cooling clumps in the halo of NGC 507. If there are many undetected cooling clumps distributed at large radii, then the radial profile of the X-ray surface brightness does not directly reflect the potential, adding uncertainty to the measurement of the binding mass; the gas mass could also be overestimated.

  4. Conductimetric determination of decomposition of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, C.; Lieck, K.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a procedure is given to detect decomposition of silicate systems in the liquid state by conductivity measurements. Onset of decomposition can be determined from the temperature curves of resistances measured on two pairs of electrodes, one above the other. Degree of decomposition can be estimated from temperature and concentration dependency of conductivity of phase boundaries. This procedure was tested with systems PbO-B2O3 and PbO-B2O3-SiO2.

  5. Measurement System for Energetic Materials Decomposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    Measurement System for Energetic Materials Decomposition This DURIP grant was used to purchase: 1. Q600 SDT Simultaneous DSC-TGA 2... Decomposition Report Title This DURIP grant was used to purchase: 1. Q600 SDT Simultaneous DSC-TGA 2. Pfeiffer Vacuum Benchtop Thermostar Mass...Spectrometer 3. Vision Research Phantom V12.1-8G-M high speed camera These instruments have been used to evaluate and study decomposition and

  6. Mixing effects on litter decomposition rates in a young tree diversity experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Nuri Nurlaila; Vanhellemont, Margot; De Schrijver, An; Schelfhout, Stephanie; Baeten, Lander; Verheyen, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Litter decomposition is an essential process for biogeochemical cycling and for the formation of new soil organic matter. Mixing litter from different tree species has been reported to increase litter decomposition rates through synergistic effects. We assessed the decomposition rates of leaf litter from five tree species in a recently established tree diversity experiment on a post-agriculture site in Belgium. We used 20 different leaf litter compositions with diversity levels ranging from 1 up to 4 species. Litter mass loss in litterbags was assessed 10, 20, 25, 35, and 60 weeks after installation in the field. We found that litter decomposition rates were higher for high-quality litters, i.e., with high nitrogen content and low lignin content. The decomposition rates of mixed litter were more affected by the identity of the litter species within the mixture than by the diversity of the litter per se, but the variability in litter decomposition rates decreased as the litter diversity increased. Among the 15 different mixed litter compositions in our study, only three litter combinations showed synergistic effects. Our study suggests that admixing tree species with high-quality litter in post-agricultural plantations helps in increasing the mixture's early-stage litter decomposition rate.

  7. Temperature sensitivity of soil carbon decomposition and feedbacks to climate change.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Eric A; Janssens, Ivan A

    2006-03-09

    Significantly more carbon is stored in the world's soils--including peatlands, wetlands and permafrost--than is present in the atmosphere. Disagreement exists, however, regarding the effects of climate change on global soil carbon stocks. If carbon stored belowground is transferred to the atmosphere by a warming-induced acceleration of its decomposition, a positive feedback to climate change would occur. Conversely, if increases of plant-derived carbon inputs to soils exceed increases in decomposition, the feedback would be negative. Despite much research, a consensus has not yet emerged on the temperature sensitivity of soil carbon decomposition. Unravelling the feedback effect is particularly difficult, because the diverse soil organic compounds exhibit a wide range of kinetic properties, which determine the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of their decomposition. Moreover, several environmental constraints obscure the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of substrate decomposition, causing lower observed 'apparent' temperature sensitivity, and these constraints may, themselves, be sensitive to climate.

  8. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of shock-wave induced decomposition in cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) crystals: anisotropic response.

    PubMed

    Dang, Nhan C; Dreger, Zbigniew A; Gupta, Yogendra M; Hooks, Daniel E

    2010-11-04

    Plate impact experiments on the (210), (100), and (111) planes were performed to examine the role of crystalline anisotropy on the shock-induced decomposition of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) crystals. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy was used to probe the decomposition of single crystals shocked to peak stresses ranging between 7 and 20 GPa. Emission produced by decomposition intermediates was analyzed in terms of induction time to emission, emission intensity, and the emission spectra shapes as a function of stress and time. Utilizing these features, we found that the shock-induced decomposition of RDX crystals exhibits considerable anisotropy. Crystals shocked on the (210) and (100) planes were more sensitive to decomposition than crystals shocked on the (111) plane. The possible sources of the observed anisotropy are discussed with regard to the inelastic deformation mechanisms of shocked RDX. Our results suggest that, despite the anisotropy observed for shock initiation, decomposition pathways for all three orientations are similar.

  9. Resolving Some Paradoxes in the Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Michael, Joe V; Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2015-07-16

    The mechanism for the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde has been revisited with an analysis of literature kinetics experiments using theoretical kinetics. The present modeling study was motivated by recent observations, with very sensitive diagnostics, of some unexpected products in high temperature microtubular reactor experiments on the thermal decomposition of CH3CHO and its deuterated analogs, CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO. The observations of these products prompted the authors of these studies to suggest that the enol tautomer, CH2CHOH (vinyl alcohol), is a primary intermediate in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde. The present modeling efforts on acetaldehyde decomposition incorporate a master equation reanalysis of the CH3CHO potential energy surface (PES). The lowest-energy process on this PES is an isomerization of CH3CHO to CH2CHOH. However, the subsequent product channels for CH2CHOH are substantially higher in energy, and the only unimolecular process that can be thermally accessed is a reisomerization to CH3CHO. The incorporation of these new theoretical kinetics predictions into models for selected literature experiments on CH3CHO thermal decomposition confirms our earlier experiment and theory-based conclusions that the dominant decomposition process in CH3CHO at high temperatures is C-C bond fission with a minor contribution (∼10-20%) from the roaming mechanism to form CH4 and CO. The present modeling efforts also incorporate a master-equation analysis of the H + CH2CHOH potential energy surface. This bimolecular reaction is the primary mechanism for removal of CH2CHOH, which can accumulate to minor amounts at high temperatures, T > 1000 K, in most lab-scale experiments that use large initial concentrations of CH3CHO. Our modeling efforts indicate that the observation of ketene, water, and acetylene in the recent microtubular experiments are primarily due to bimolecular reactions of CH3CHO and CH2CHOH with H-atoms and have no bearing on

  10. NKG2D ligand tumor expression and association with clinical outcome in early breast cancer patients: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell surface NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL) bind to the activating NKG2D receptor present on NK cells and subsets of T cells, thus playing a role in initiating an immune response. We examined tumor expression and prognostic effect of NKG2DL in breast cancer patients. Methods Our study population (n = 677) consisted of all breast cancer patients primarily treated with surgery in our center between 1985 and 1994. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue was immunohistochemically stained with antibodies directed against MIC-A/MIC-B (MIC-AB), ULBP-1, ULBP-2, ULBP-3, ULBP-4, and ULBP-5. Results NKG2DL were frequently expressed by tumors (MIC-AB, 50% of the cases; ULBP-1, 90%; ULBP-2, 99%; ULBP-3, 100%; ULBP-4, 26%; ULBP-5, 90%) and often showed co-expression: MIC-AB and ULBP-4 (p = 0.043), ULBP-1 and ULBP-5 (p = 0.006), ULBP-4 and ULBP-5 (p < 0.001). MIC-AB (p = 0.001) and ULBP-2 (p = 0.006) expression resulted in a statistically significant longer relapse free period (RFP). Combined expression of these ligands showed to be an independent prognostic parameter for RFP (p < 0.001, HR 0.41). Combined expression of all ligands showed no associations with clinical outcome. Conclusions We demonstrated for the first time that NKG2DL are frequently expressed and often co-expressed in breast cancer. Expression of MIC-AB and ULBP-2 resulted in a statistically significant beneficial outcome concerning RFP with high discriminative power. Combination of all NKG2DL showed no additive or interactive effect of ligands on each other, suggesting that similar and co-operative functioning of all NKG2DL can not be assumed. Our observations suggest that among driving forces in breast cancer outcome are immune activation on one site and tumor immune escape on the other site. PMID:22257486

  11. On Schubert decompositions of quiver Grassmannians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorscheid, Oliver

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce Schubert decompositions for quiver Grassmannians and investigate certain classes of quiver Grassmannians with a Schubert decomposition into affine spaces. The main theorem puts the cells of a Schubert decomposition into relation to the cells of a certain simpler quiver Grassmannian. This allows us to extend known examples of Schubert decompositions into affine spaces to a larger class of quiver Grassmannians. This includes exceptional representations of the Kronecker quiver as well as representations of forests with block matrices of the form (0100). Finally, we draw conclusions on the Euler characteristics and the cohomology of quiver Grassmannians.

  12. On symmetric decompositions of positive operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasia Jivulescu, Maria; Nechita, Ion; Găvruţa, Paşc

    2017-04-01

    We present results concerning decompositions of positive operators acting on finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces. Our motivation is the study of a generalized version of the SIC–POVM problem, which has applications to Quantum Information Theory. We relax some of the conditions in the SIC–POVM setting (the elements sum up to the identity, resp. the elements have unit rank), and we focus on equiangular decompositions (the elements of the decomposition should have the same length, and pairs of distinct elements should have constant angles). We characterize all such decompositions, comparing our results with the case of SIC–POVMs. We also generalize some existing Welch-type inequalities.

  13. The effect of body size on the rate of decomposition in a temperate region of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, A; Myburgh, J; Steyn, M; Becker, P J

    2013-09-10

    Forensic anthropologists rely on the state of decomposition of a body to estimate the post-mortem-interval (PMI) which provides information about the natural events and environmental forces that could have affected the remains after death. Various factors are known to influence the rate of decomposition, among them temperature, rainfall and exposure of the body. However, conflicting reports appear in the literature on the effect of body size on the rate of decay. The aim of this project was to compare decomposition rates of large pigs (Sus scrofa; 60-90 kg), with that of small pigs (<35 kg), to assess the influence of body size on decomposition rates. For the decomposition rates of small pigs, 15 piglets were assessed three times per week over a period of three months during spring and early summer. Data collection was conducted until complete skeletonization occurred. Stages of decomposition were scored according to separate categories for each anatomical region, and the point values for each region were added to determine the total body score (TBS), which represents the overall stage of decomposition for each pig. For the large pigs, data of 15 pigs were used. Scatter plots illustrating the relationships between TBS and PMI as well as TBS and accumulated degree days (ADD) were used to assess the pattern of decomposition and to compare decomposition rates between small and large pigs. Results indicated that rapid decomposition occurs during the early stages of decomposition for both samples. Large pigs showed a plateau phase in the course of advanced stages of decomposition, during which decomposition was minimal. A similar, but much shorter plateau was reached by small pigs of >20 kg at a PMI of 20-25 days, after which decomposition commenced swiftly. This was in contrast to the small pigs of <20 kg, which showed no plateau phase and their decomposition rates were swift throughout the duration of the study. Overall, small pigs decomposed 2.82 times faster than

  14. Direct and indirect effects of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinzhang; Peng, Changhui; Jiang, Hong; Zhu, Qiuan; Wang, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure in the course of litter decomposition may have a direct effect on decomposition rates via changing states of photodegradation or decomposer constitution in litter while UV-B exposure during growth periods may alter chemical compositions and physical properties of plants. Consequently, these changes will indirectly affect subsequent litter decomposition processes in soil. Although studies are available on both the positive and negative effects (including no observable effects) of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition, a comprehensive analysis leading to an adequate understanding remains unresolved. Using data from 93 studies across six biomes, this introductory meta-analysis found that elevated UV-B directly increased litter decomposition rates by 7% and indirectly by 12% while attenuated UV-B directly decreased litter decomposition rates by 23% and indirectly increased litter decomposition rates by 7%. However, neither positive nor negative effects were statistically significant. Woody plant litter decomposition seemed more sensitive to UV-B than herbaceous plant litter except under conditions of indirect effects of elevated UV-B. Furthermore, levels of UV-B intensity significantly affected litter decomposition response to UV-B (P<0.05). UV-B effects on litter decomposition were to a large degree compounded by climatic factors (e.g., MAP and MAT) (P<0.05) and litter chemistry (e.g., lignin content) (P<0.01). Results suggest these factors likely have a bearing on masking the important role of UV-B on litter decomposition. No significant differences in UV-B effects on litter decomposition were found between study types (field experiment vs. laboratory incubation), litter forms (leaf vs. needle), and decay duration. Indirect effects of elevated UV-B on litter decomposition significantly increased with decay duration (P<0.001). Additionally, relatively small changes in UV-B exposure intensity (30%) had significant direct effects on litter

  15. Observation of Magnetic Signals from Earthquake Faulting Using High-resolution HTS-SQUID Magnetometer: Feasibility of Super-early Warning of Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, Y.; Okubo, K.; Hato, T.; Tsukamoto, A.; Tanabe, K.; Onishi, N.; Furukawa, H.; Isogami, S.; Takeuchi, N.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic changes associated with earthquakes have been investigated previously. Our research group has also employed the magnetometers for seismomagnetic observations since March 2004. Our observation site happened to be situated at an epicentral distance of 26 km from the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake ofM7.2, NE Japan. In this earthquake, we have reported successful observation of "co-faulting" Earth's magnetic field changes (Okubo et al., 2011 EPSL). Magnetic fields began to change almost simultaneously with the onset of the earthquake rupture and grew before the first P wave arrival. Such magnetic signals are most probably generated by the changing stress field due to earthquake rupturing, i.e. the piezomagnetic effect. On the other hand, this observation result suggested that the geomagnetic variation signal accompanying fault movement, whose sources are the piezomagnetic effects, is very small. The observed change of geomagnetic field might be approximately less than several hundred pico-tesla. Therefore, to obtain more observation data of "co-faulting" magnetic field change, development of a higher-sensitive magnetometer system is very important. Then, our research group tried to develop the HTS-SQUID (high-temperature-superconductor based superconducting-quantum-interference-device) magnetometer systems for high-resolution observation of Earth's magnetic field. Since March 2012 we have introduced long-term precise geomagnetic observations using the HTS-SQUID magnetometer system Unit No.1 (mark I) at Iwaki observation site (IWK) in Fukushima, Japan. Additionally, since October 2014, we have also introduced the new HTS- SQUID magnetometer system Unit No.2 (mark II). The sampling interval of the magnetometers is 0.02 sec (50Hz). The system clock has been synchronized by use of GPS signals. A high-resolution accelerometer is also installed at observation point. In this study, we show the observation results of geomagnetic field changes associated

  16. Decreases in Soil Moisture and Organic Matter Quality Suppress Microbial Decomposition Following a Boreal Forest Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Sandra R.; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2015-08-01

    Climate warming is projected to increase the frequency and severity of wildfires in boreal forests, and increased wildfire activity may alter the large soil carbon (C) stocks in boreal forests. Changes in boreal soil C stocks that result from increased wildfire activity will be regulated in part by the response of microbial decomposition to fire, but post-fire changes in microbial decomposition are poorly understood. Here, we investigate the response of microbial decomposition to a boreal forest fire in interior Alaska and test the mechanisms that control post-fire changes in microbial decomposition. We used a reciprocal transplant between a recently burned boreal forest stand and a late successional boreal forest stand to test how post-fire changes in abiotic conditions, soil organic matter (SOM) composition, and soil microbial communities influence microbial decomposition. We found that SOM decomposing at the burned site lost 30.9% less mass over two years than SOM decomposing at the unburned site, indicating that post-fire changes in abiotic conditions suppress microbial decomposition. Our results suggest that moisture availability is one abiotic factor that constrains microbial decomposition in recently burned forests. In addition, we observed that burned SOM decomposed more slowly than unburned SOM, but the exact nature of SOM changes in the recently burned stand are unclear. Finally, we found no evidence that post-fire changes in soil microbial community composition significantly affect decomposition. Taken together, our study has demonstrated that boreal forest fires can suppress microbial decomposition due to post-fire changes in abiotic factors and the composition of SOM. Models that predict the consequences of increased wildfires for C storage in boreal forests may increase their predictive power by incorporating the observed negative response of microbial decomposition to boreal wildfires.

  17. The Validation of Macro and Micro Observations of Parent-Child Dynamics Using the Relationship Affect Coding System in Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    Dishion, Thomas J; Mun, Chung Jung; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Kim, Hanjoe; Shaw, Daniel S; Gardner, Frances; Wilson, Melvin N; Peterson, Jenene

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the validity of micro social observations and macro ratings of parent-child interaction in early to middle childhood. Seven hundred and thirty-one families representing multiple ethnic groups were recruited and screened as at risk in the context of Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) Nutritional Supplement service settings. Families were randomly assigned to the Family Checkup (FCU) intervention or the control condition at age 2 and videotaped in structured interactions in the home at ages 2, 3, 4, and 5. Parent-child interaction videotapes were micro-coded using the Relationship Affect Coding System (RACS) that captures the duration of two mutual dyadic states: positive engagement and coercion. Macro ratings of parenting skills were collected after coding the videotapes to assess parent use of positive behavior support and limit setting skills (or lack thereof). Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that the measurement model of macro ratings of limit setting and positive behavior support was not supported by the data, and thus, were excluded from further analyses. However, there was moderate stability in the families' micro social dynamics across early childhood and it showed significant improvements as a function of random assignment to the FCU. Moreover, parent-child dynamics were predictive of chronic behavior problems as rated by parents in middle childhood, but not emotional problems. We conclude with a discussion of the validity of the RACS and on methodological advantages of micro social coding over the statistical limitations of macro rating observations. Future directions are discussed for observation research in prevention science.

  18. Initiation and early evolution of the coronal mass ejection on 2009 May 13 from extreme-ultraviolet and white-light observations

    SciTech Connect

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R {sub ☉}). Below 2 R {sub ☉}, we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R {sub ☉}, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R {sub ☉} from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R {sub ☉}. The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  19. Initiation and Early Evolution of the Coronal Mass Ejection on 2009 May 13 from Extreme-ultraviolet and White-light Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R ⊙). Below 2 R ⊙, we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R ⊙, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R ⊙ from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R ⊙. The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  20. The helical decomposition and the instability assumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleffe, Fabian A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations show that the triadic transfer function T(k,p,q) peaks sharply when q (or p) is much smaller than k. The triadic transfer function T(k,p,q) gives the rate of energy input into wave number k from all interactions with modes of wave number p and q, where k, p, q form a triangle. This observation was thought to suggest that energy is cascaded downscale through non-local interactions with local transfer and that there was a strong connection between large and small scales. Both suggestions were in contradiction with the classical Kolmogorov picture of the energy cascade. The helical decomposition was found useful in distinguishing between kinematically independent interactions. That analysis has gone beyond the question of non-local interaction with local transfer. In particular, an assumption about the statistical direction of triadic energy transfer in any kinematically independent interaction was introduced (the instability assumption). That assumption is not necessary for the conclusions about non-local interactions with local transfer recalled above. In the case of turbulence under rapid rotation, the instability assumption leads to the prediction that energy is transferred in spectral space from the poles of the rotation axis toward the equator. The instability assumption is thought to be of general validity for any type of triad interactions (e.g. internal waves). The helical decomposition and the instability assumption offer detailed information about the homogeneous statistical dynamics of the Navier-Stokes equations. The objective was to explore the validity of the instability assumption and to study the contributions of the various types of helical interactions to the energy cascade and the subgrid-scale eddy-viscosity. This was done in the context of spectral closures of the Direct Interaction or Quasi-Normal type.

  1. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    J Abrefah GS Klinger

    2000-09-26

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the

  2. Energy Transfer Dynamics of Formate Decomposition on Cu(110).

    PubMed

    Quan, Jiamei; Kondo, Takahiro; Wang, Guichang; Nakamura, Junji

    2017-03-20

    Energy transfer dynamics of formate (HCOOa ) decomposition on a Cu(110) surface has been studied by measuring the angle-resolved intensity and translational energy distributions of CO2 emitted from the surface in a steady-state reaction of HCOOH and O2 . The angular distribution of CO2 shows a sharp collimation with the direction perpendicular to the surface, as represented by cos(n) θ (n=6). The mean translational energy of CO2 is measured to be as low as 100 meV and is independent of the surface temperature (Ts ). These results clearly indicate that the decomposition of formate is a thermal non-equilibrium process in which a large amount of energy released by the decomposition reaction of formate is transformed into the internal energies of CO2 molecules. The thermal non-equilibrium features observed in the dynamics of formate decomposition support the proposed Eley-Rideal (ER)-type mechanism for formate synthesis on copper catalysts.

  3. Plasma Catalysis of Methane Decomposition in Pulse Microwave Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapkin, B.; Rusanov, V.; Jivotov, V.; Babaritski, A.; Potechin, S.; Etievant, C.

    1997-10-01

    Investigation of plasma catalysis effects in various chemical reactions, such as SO2 and hydrocarbons oxidation, ammonia and nitrogen oxides synthesis, has been of interest for many decades. Present work describes the first experimental observation and theoretical analysis of plasma catalysis effects in the case of endothermic methane decomposition into molecular hydrogen and carbon black. Process energy requirements are coverd mainly by low potential gas thermal energy while plasma is used for acceleration of chemical reactions via active species generation. The experiments were done as follows: (i) methane was preheated in a conventional heat exchanger up to about 40-65 ^oC where thermal methane decomposition is limited by process kinetics, (ii) methane was passed through a non-equilibrium pulse microwave discharge (9.04 GHz, pulse duration 1 μs). Experiments have shown a strong catalytic effect of plasma on methane decomposition. The degree of conversion after discharge increased drastically, despite gas cooling, because of heat absorption in the methane decomposition reaction. Theoretical analysis of process kinetics and energy balance gave clear evidence of the catalytic effect of plasma under experimental conditions. The estimated chain length was about 300. The possible mechanism of plasma catalysis, the ion-molecular chain Winchester mechanism, is proposed and described.

  4. Untangling galaxy components: full spectral bulge-disc decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Martha; Merrifield, Michael; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Cappellari, Michele; Bamford, Steven P.; Johnston, Evelyn

    2017-04-01

    To ascertain whether photometric decompositions of galaxies into bulges and discs are astrophysically meaningful, we have developed a new technique to decompose spectral data cubes into separate bulge and disc components, subject only to the constraint that they reproduce the conventional photometric decomposition. These decompositions allow us to study the kinematic and stellar population properties of the individual components and how they vary with position, in order to assess their plausibility as discrete elements, and to start to reconstruct their distinct formation histories. An initial application of this method to Calar Alto Integral Field Area integral field unit observations of three isolated S0 galaxies confirms that in regions where both bulge and disc contribute significantly to the flux, they can be physically and robustly decomposed into a rotating dispersion-dominated bulge component and a rotating low-dispersion disc component. Analysis of the resulting stellar populations shows that the bulges of these galaxies have a range of ages relative to their discs, indicating that a variety of processes are necessary to describe their evolution. This simple test case indicates the broad potential for extracting from spectral data cubes the full spectral data of a wide variety of individual galaxy components, and for using such decompositions to understand the interplay between these various structures, and hence how such systems formed.

  5. Use of cumulative mortality data in patients with acute myocardial infarction for early detection of variation in clinical practice: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Richard A; Dorsch, Micha F; Sapsford, Robert J; Mackintosh, Alan F; Greenwood, Darren C; Jackson, Beryl M; Morrell, Christine; Robinson, Michael B; Hall, Alistair S

    2001-01-01

    Objectives Use of cumulative mortality adjusted for case mix in patients with acute myocardial infarction for early detection of variation in clinical practice. Design Observational study. Setting 20 hospitals across the former Yorkshire region. Participants All 2153 consecutive patients with confirmed acute myocardial infarction identified during three months. Main outcome measures Variable life-adjusted displays showing cumulative differences between observed and expected mortality of patients; expected mortality calculated from risk model based on admission characteristics of age, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure. Results The performance of two individual hospitals over three months was examined as an example. One, the smallest district hospital in the region, had a series of 30 consecutive patients but had five more deaths than predicted. The variable life-adjusted display showed minimal variation from that predicted for the first 15 patients followed by a run of unexpectedly high mortality. The second example was the main tertiary referral centre for the region, which admitted 188 consecutive patients. The display showed a period of apparently poor performance followed by substantial improvement, where the plot rose steadily from a cumulative net lives saved of −4 to 7. These variations in patient outcome are unlikely to have been revealed during conventional audit practice. Conclusions Variable life-adjusted display has been integrated into surgical care as a graphical display of risk-adjusted survival for individual surgeons or centres. In combination with a simple risk model, it may have a role in monitoring performance and outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction. What is already known on this topicThe national service framework for coronary artery disease requires minimal standards of care and audit of patients with acute myocardial infarction but does not integrate clinical status into the audit toolPredictive models using only a few

  6. Deep Chandra observations of NGC 7457, the X-ray point source populations of a low mass early-type galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Kundu, Arunav; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Maraston, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    We present the X-ray point source population of NGC 7457 based on 124 ks of Chandra observations. Previous deep Chandra observations of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in early-type galaxies have typically targeted the large populations of massive galaxies. NGC 7457 is a nearby, early-type galaxy with a stellar luminosity of 1.7× 10^{10} {L_{K⊙}}, allowing us to investigate the populations in a relatively low mass galaxy. We classify the detected X-ray sources into field LMXBs, globular cluster LMXBs, and background AGN based on identifying optical counterparts in new HST/ACS images. We detect 10 field LMXBs within the rext ellipse of NGC 7457 (with semi-major axis ˜ 9.1 kpc, ellipticity = 0.55). The corresponding number of LMXBs with {Lx} > 2 × 10^{37} {{erg s^{-1}}} per stellar luminosity is consistent with that observed in more massive galaxies, ˜7 per 10^{10} {L_{K⊙}}. We detect a small globular cluster population in these HST data and show that its colour distribution is likely bimodal and that its specific frequency is similar to that of other early type galaxies. However, no X-ray emission is detected from any of these clusters. Using published data for other galaxies, we show that this non-detection is consistent with the small stellar mass of these clusters. We estimate that 0.11 (and 0.03) LMXBs are expected per 106 {M_{⊙}} in metal-rich (and metal-poor) globular clusters. This corresponds to 1100 (and 330) LMXBs per 10^{10} {L_{K⊙}}, highlighting the enhanced formation efficiency of LMXBs in globular clusters. A nuclear X-ray source is detected with Lx varying from 2.8-6.8× 10^{38} {{erg s^{-1}}}. Combining this Lx with a published dynamical mass estimate for the central SMBH in NGC 7457, we find that {Lx}/L_{Edd} varies from 0.5 - 1.3 × 10-6.

  7. Decomposition-Based Decision Making for Aerospace Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borer, Nicholas K.; Mavris, DImitri N.

    2005-01-01

    reader to observe how this technique can be applied to aerospace systems design and compare the results of this so-called Decomposition-Based Decision Making to more traditional design approaches.

  8. Observations of an early Agulhas current retroflection event in 2001: A temporary cessation of inter-ocean exchange south of Africa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aken, H. M.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.; Rouault, M.; Whittle, C.; de Ruijter, W. P. M.

    2013-02-01

    The exchange of heat and salt between the South Indian Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean, at the southern terminus of the Agulhas current, forms a crucial link in the global ocean circulation. It has been surmised that upstream retroflections in this current could produce temporary interruptions to the exchange, but that their impact would depend on the vertical extent of such retroflections and on their duration. The fortuitous presence at sea of a research vessel has now enabled us to investigate such an episode at subsurface levels in combination with remote sensing of the sea surface. We present here the first in situ evidence that an upstream or early retroflection can extend to a depth of well over 750 m and last for 5 months. This event was likely triggered upstream by the happenstance of two Natal Pulses, large cyclonic eddies inshore of the Agulhas current. These eddies short-circuited the Agulhas with its Return current, leading to the shedding of three large Agulhas rings in quick succession. The arrival of a third cyclonic eddy when the Retroflection was still quite retracted did not lead to another ring shedding event. The resulting early retroflection may have had the effect of stalling the shedding of Agulhas rings and their motion towards the Cape Basin. However, these early retroflections are too scarce to allow generic statements on their generation or consequences, and the relation with large-scale environmental factors. It is likely that the observed withdrawal of the retroflection into the Transkei Basin is a fortuitous result of a series of contingent interactions.

  9. Metallo-organic decomposition films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, B. D.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of metallo-organic deposition (MOD) films for solar cells was presented. The MOD materials are metal ions compounded with organic radicals. The technology is evolving quickly for solar cell metallization. Silver compounds, especially silver neodecanoate, were developed which can be applied by thick-film screening, ink-jet printing, spin-on, spray, or dip methods. Some of the advantages of MOD are: high uniform metal content, lower firing temperatures, decomposition without leaving a carbon deposit or toxic materials, and a film that is stable under ambient conditions. Molecular design criteria were explained along with compounds formulated to date, and the accompanying reactions for these compounds. Phase stability and the other experimental and analytic results of MOD films were presented.

  10. Sampling Stoichiometry: The Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide an interesting, quantitative illustration of the stoichiometric relationship between the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and the formation of oxygen gas. This 10-minute demonstration uses ordinary hydrogen peroxide and yeast that can be purchased in a supermarket.…

  11. 9 CFR 354.131 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Decomposition. 354.131 Section 354.131 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... Carcasses and Parts § 354.131 Decomposition. Carcasses of rabbits deleteriously affected by...

  12. 9 CFR 354.131 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Decomposition. 354.131 Section 354.131 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... Carcasses and Parts § 354.131 Decomposition. Carcasses of rabbits deleteriously affected by...

  13. 9 CFR 381.93 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Decomposition. 381.93 Section 381.93 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.93 Decomposition. Carcasses of poultry deleteriously affected by post mortem changes shall...

  14. 9 CFR 381.93 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Decomposition. 381.93 Section 381.93 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.93 Decomposition. Carcasses of poultry deleteriously affected by post mortem changes shall...

  15. 9 CFR 354.131 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Decomposition. 354.131 Section 354.131 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... Carcasses and Parts § 354.131 Decomposition. Carcasses of rabbits deleteriously affected by...

  16. Chinese Orthographic Decomposition and Logographic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chao-Ming; Lin, Shan-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    "Chinese orthographic decomposition" refers to a sense of uncertainty about the writing of a well-learned Chinese character following a prolonged inspection of the character. This study investigated the decomposition phenomenon in a test situation in which Chinese characters were repeatedly presented in a word context and assessed…

  17. 9 CFR 381.93 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Decomposition. 381.93 Section 381.93 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.93 Decomposition. Carcasses of poultry deleteriously affected by post mortem changes shall...

  18. 9 CFR 354.131 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Decomposition. 354.131 Section 354.131 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... Carcasses and Parts § 354.131 Decomposition. Carcasses of rabbits deleteriously affected by...

  19. 9 CFR 381.93 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Decomposition. 381.93 Section 381.93 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.93 Decomposition. Carcasses of poultry deleteriously affected by post mortem changes shall...

  20. 9 CFR 354.131 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Decomposition. 354.131 Section 354.131 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... Carcasses and Parts § 354.131 Decomposition. Carcasses of rabbits deleteriously affected by...

  1. English and Turkish Pupils' Understanding of Decomposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Gulcan

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to describe seventh grade English and Turkish students' levels of understanding of decomposition. Data were analyzed descriptively from the students' written responses to four diagnostic questions about decomposition. Results revealed that the English students had considerably higher sound understanding and lower no understanding…

  2. 9 CFR 381.93 - Decomposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Decomposition. 381.93 Section 381.93 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.93 Decomposition. Carcasses of poultry deleteriously affected by post mortem changes shall...

  3. Helmholtz Hodge decomposition of scalar optical fields.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Monika; Senthilkumaran, P

    2012-11-01

    It is shown that the vector field decomposition method, namely, the Helmholtz Hodge decomposition, can also be applied to analyze scalar optical fields that are ubiquitously present in interference and diffraction optics. A phase gradient field that depicts the propagation and Poynting vector directions can hence be separated into solenoidal and irrotational components.

  4. Regular Decompositions for H(div) Spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, Tzanio; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2012-01-01

    We study regular decompositions for H(div) spaces. In particular, we show that such regular decompositions are closely related to a previously studied “inf-sup” condition for parameter-dependent Stokes problems, for which we provide an alternative, more direct, proof.

  5. Metallo-Organic Decomposition (MOD) film development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J.

    1986-01-01

    The processing techniques and problems encountered in formulating metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) films used in contracting structures for thin solar cells are described. The use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques performed at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in understanding the decomposition reactions lead to improvements in process procedures. The characteristics of the available MOD films were described in detail.

  6. A global HMX decomposition model

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1996-12-01

    HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) decomposes by competing reaction pathways to form various condensed and gas-phase intermediate and final products. Gas formation is related to the development of nonuniform porosity and high specific surface areas prior to ignition in cookoff events. Such thermal damage enhances shock sensitivity and favors self-supported accelerated burning. The extent of HMX decomposition in highly confined cookoff experiments remains a major unsolved experimental and modeling problem. The present work is directed at determination of global HMX kinetics useful for predicting the elapsed time to thermal runaway (ignition) and the extent of decomposition at ignition. Kinetic rate constants for a six step engineering based global mechanism were obtained using gas formation rates measured by Behrens at Sandia National Laboratories with his Simultaneous Modulated Beam Mass Spectrometer (STMBMS) experimental apparatus. The six step global mechanism includes competition between light gas (H[sub 2]Awe, HCN, CO, H[sub 2]CO, NO, N[sub 2]Awe) and heavy gas (C[sub 2]H[sub 6]N[sub 2]Awe and C[sub 4]H[sub 10]N0[sub 2]) formation with zero order sublimation of HMX and the mononitroso analog of HMX (mn-HMX), C[sub 4]H[sub 8]N[sub 8]Awe[sub 7]. The global mechanism was applied to the highly confined, One Dimensional Time to eXplosion (ODTX) experiment and hot cell experiments by suppressing the sublimation of HMX and mn-HMX. An additional gas-phase reaction was also included to account for the gas-phase reaction of N[sub 2]Awe with H[sub 2]CO. Predictions compare adequately to the STMBMS data, ODTX data, and hot cell data. Deficiencies in the model and future directions are discussed.

  7. Measurement of the energy dependence of X-ray-induced decomposition of potassium chlorate.

    PubMed

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Sneed, Daniel; Park, Changyong

    2013-03-21

    We report the first measurements of the X-ray induced decomposition of KClO3 as a function of energy in two experiments. KClO3 was pressurized to 3.5 GPa and irradiated with monochromatic synchrotron X-rays ranging in energy from 15 to 35 keV in 5 keV increments. A systematic increase in the decomposition rate as the energy was decreased was observed, which agrees with the 1/E(3) trend for the photoelectric process, except at the lowest energy studied. A second experiment was performed to access lower energies (10 and 12 keV) using a beryllium gasket; suggesting an apparent resonance near 15 keV or 0.83 Ǻ maximizing the chemical decomposition rate. A third experiment was performed using KIO3 to ascertain the anionic dependence of the decomposition rate, which was observed to be far slower than in KClO3, suggesting that the O-O distance is the critical factor in chemical reactions. These results will be important for more efficiently initiating chemical decomposition in materials using selected X-ray wavelengths that maximize decomposition to aid useful hard X-ray-induced chemistry and contribute understanding of the mechanism of X-ray-induced decomposition of the chlorates.

  8. Novel Transgenic Mouse Models Develop Retinal Changes Associated with Early Diabetic Retinopathy Similar to Those Observed in Rats with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changmei; Zhang, Zifeng; Zhang, Peng; Makita, Jun; Kawada, Hiroyoshi; Blessing, Karen; Kador, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal capillary pericyte degeneration has been linked to aldose reductase (AR) activity in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since the development of DR in mice and rats has been reported to differ and that this may be linked to differences in retinal sorbitol levels, we have established new murine models of early onset diabetes mellitus as tools for investigating the role of AR in DR. Transgenic diabetic mouse models were developed by crossbreeding diabetic C57BL/6-Ins2Akita/J (AK) with transgenic C57BL mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), human aldose reductase (hAR) or both in vascular tissues containing smooth muscle actin-α (SMAA). Changes in retinal sorbitol levels were determined by HPLC while changes of growth factors and signaling were investigated by Western Blots. Retinal vascular changes were quantitatively analyzed on elastase-digestion flat mounts. Results show that sorbitol levels were higher in neural retinas of diabetic AK-SMAA-GFP-hAR compared to AK-SMAA-GFP mice. AK-SMAA-GFP-hAR mice showed induction of the retinal growth factors VEGF, IGF-1, bFGF and TGFβ, as well as signaling changes in P-Akt, P-SAPK/JNK, and P-44/42 MAPK. Increased loss of nuclei per capillary length and a significant increase in the percentage of acellular capillaries presented in 18 week old AK-SMAA-GFP-hAR mice. These changes are similar to those observed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Retinal changes in both mice and rats were prevented by inhibition of AR. These studies confirm that the increased expression of AR in mice results in the development of retinal changes associated with the early stages of DR that are similar to those observed in rats. PMID:24370601

  9. Multilinear operators for higher-order decompositions.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2006-04-01

    We propose two new multilinear operators for expressing the matrix compositions that are needed in the Tucker and PARAFAC (CANDECOMP) decompositions. The first operator, which we call the Tucker operator, is shorthand for performing an n-mode matrix multiplication for every mode of a given tensor and can be employed to concisely express the Tucker decomposition. The second operator, which we call the Kruskal operator, is shorthand for the sum of the outer-products of the columns of N matrices and allows a divorce from a matricized representation and a very concise expression of the PARAFAC decomposition. We explore the properties of the Tucker and Kruskal operators independently of the related decompositions. Additionally, we provide a review of the matrix and tensor operations that are frequently used in the context of tensor decompositions.

  10. Nitrogen Addition Significantly Affects Forest Litter Decomposition under High Levels of Ambient Nitrogen Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Peng, Yong; Xiao, Yin-long; Hu, Ting-xing; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xian-wei; Liu, Li; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Background Forest litter decomposition is a major component of the global carbon (C) budget, and is greatly affected by the atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition observed globally. However, the effects of N addition on forest litter decomposition, in ecosystems receiving increasingly higher levels of ambient N deposition, are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a two-year field experiment in five forests along the western edge of the Sichuan Basin in China, where atmospheric N deposition was up to 82–114 kg N ha–1 in the study sites. Four levels of N treatments were applied: (1) control (no N added), (2) low-N (50 kg N ha–1 year–1), (3) medium-N (150 kg N ha–1 year–1), and (4) high-N (300 kg N ha–1 year–1), N additions ranging from 40% to 370% of ambient N deposition. The decomposition processes of ten types of forest litters were then studied. Nitrogen additions significantly decreased the decomposition rates of six types of forest litters. N additions decreased forest litter decomposition, and the mass of residual litter was closely correlated to residual lignin during the decomposition process over the study period. The inhibitory effect of N addition on litter decomposition can be primarily explained by the inhibition of lignin decomposition by exogenous inorganic N. The overall decomposition rate of ten investigated substrates exhibited a significant negative linear relationship with initial tissue C/N and lignin/N, and significant positive relationships with initial tissue K and N concentrations; these relationships exhibited linear and logarithmic curves, respectively. Conclusions/Significance This study suggests that the expected progressive increases in N deposition may have a potential important impact on forest litter decomposition in the study area in the presence of high levels of ambient N deposition. PMID:24551152

  11. Factors controlling bark decomposition and its role in wood decomposition in five tropical tree species.

    PubMed

    Dossa, Gbadamassi G O; Paudel, Ekananda; Cao, Kunfang; Schaefer, Douglas; Harrison, Rhett D

    2016-10-04

    Organic matter decomposition represents a vital ecosystem process by which nutrients are made available for plant uptake and is a major flux in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have investigated decomposition of different plant parts, but few considered bark decomposition or its role in decomposition of wood. However, bark can comprise a large fraction of tree biomass. We used a common litter-bed approach to investigate factors affecting bark decomposition and its role in wood decomposition for five tree species in a secondary seasonal tropical rain forest in SW China. For bark, we implemented a litter bag experiment over 12 mo, using different mesh sizes to investigate effects of litter meso- and macro-fauna. For wood, we compared the decomposition of branches with and without bark over 24 mo. Bark in coarse mesh bags decomposed 1.11-1.76 times faster than bark in fine mesh bags. For wood decomposition, responses to bark removal were species dependent. Three species with slow wood decomposition rates showed significant negative effects of bark-removal, but there was no significant effect in the other two species. Future research should also separately examine bark and wood decomposition, and consider bark-removal experiments to better understand roles of bark in wood decomposition.

  12. Factors controlling bark decomposition and its role in wood decomposition in five tropical tree species

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Gbadamassi G. O.; Paudel, Ekananda; Cao, Kunfang; Schaefer, Douglas; Harrison, Rhett D.

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter decomposition represents a vital ecosystem process by which nutrients are made available for plant uptake and is a major flux in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have investigated decomposition of different plant parts, but few considered bark decomposition or its role in decomposition of wood. However, bark can comprise a large fraction of tree biomass. We used a common litter-bed approach to investigate factors affecting bark decomposition and its role in wood decomposition for five tree species in a secondary seasonal tropical rain forest in SW China. For bark, we implemented a litter bag experiment over 12 mo, using different mesh sizes to investigate effects of litter meso- and macro-fauna. For wood, we compared the decomposition of branches with and without bark over 24 mo. Bark in coarse mesh bags decomposed 1.11–1.76 times faster than bark in fine mesh bags. For wood decomposition, responses to bark removal were species dependent. Three species with slow wood decomposition rates showed significant negative effects of bark-removal, but there was no significant effect in the other two species. Future research should also separately examine bark and wood decomposition, and consider bark-removal experiments to better understand roles of bark in wood decomposition. PMID:27698461

  13. Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickings, Kyle; Grandy, A. Stuart; Reed, Sasha; Cleveland, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Current conceptual models predict that changes in plant litter chemistry during decomposition are primarily regulated by both initial litter chemistry and the stage-or extent-of mass loss. Far less is known about how variations in decomposer community structure (e.g., resulting from different ecosystem management types) could influence litter chemistry during decomposition. Given the recent agricultural intensification occurring globally and the importance of litter chemistry in regulating soil organic matter storage, our objectives were to determine the potential effects of agricultural management on plant litter chemistry and decomposition rates, and to investigate possible links between ecosystem management, litter chemistry and decomposition, and decomposer community composition and activity. We measured decomposition rates, changes in litter chemistry, extracellular enzyme activity, microarthropod communities, and bacterial versus fungal relative abundance in replicated conventional-till, no-till, and old field agricultural sites for both corn and grass litter. After one growing season, litter decomposition under conventional-till was 20% greater than in old field communities. However, decomposition rates in no-till were not significantly different from those in old field or conventional-till sites. After decomposition, grass residue in both conventional- and no-till systems was enriched in total polysaccharides relative to initial litter, while grass litter decomposed in old fields was enriched in nitrogen-bearing compounds and lipids. These differences corresponded with differences in decomposer communities, which also exhibited strong responses to both litter and management type. Overall, our results indicate that agricultural intensification can increase litter decomposition rates, alter decomposer communities, and influence litter chemistry in ways that could have important and long-term effects on soil organic matter dynamics. We suggest that future

  14. Lumley decomposition of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutkun, Murat; George, William K.

    2017-02-01

    The decomposition proposed by Lumley in 1966 is applied to a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. The experimental database was created by a hot-wire rake of 143 probes in the Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille wind tunnel. The Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness (Reθ) are 9800 and 19 100. Three-dimensional decomposition is performed, namely, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in the inhomogeneous and bounded wall-normal direction, Fourier decomposition in the homogeneous spanwise direction, and Fourier decomposition in time. The first POD modes in both cases carry nearly 50% of turbulence kinetic energy when the energy is integrated over Fourier dimensions. The eigenspectra always peak near zero frequency and most of the large scale, energy carrying features are found at the low end of the spectra. The spanwise Fourier mode which has the largest amount of energy is the first spanwise mode and its symmetrical pair. Pre-multiplied eigenspectra have only one distinct peak and it matches the secondary peak observed in the log-layer of pre-multiplied velocity spectra. Energy carrying modes obtained from the POD scale with outer scaling parameters. Full or partial reconstruction of turbulent velocity signal based only on energetic modes or non-energetic modes revealed the behaviour of urms in distinct regions across the boundary layer. When urms is based on energetic reconstruction, there exists (a) an exponential decay from near wall to log-layer, (b) a constant layer through the log-layer, and (c) another exponential decay in the outer region. The non-energetic reconstruction reveals that urms has (a) an exponential decay from the near-wall to the end of log-layer and (b) a constant layer in the outer region. Scaling of urms using the outer parameters is best when both energetic and non-energetic profiles are combined.

  15. Observation of wavelength-sensitive mass-independent sulfur isotope effects during SO2 photolysis: Implications for the early atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, James; Savarino, Joel; Airieau, Sabine; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2001-12-01

    Mass-independent isotopic signatures for δ33S, δ34S, and δ36S produced in the photolysis of sulfur dioxide exhibit a strong wavelength dependence. Photolysis experiments with three light sources (ArF excimer laser (193 nm), mercury resonance lamp (184.9 and 253.7 nm), and KrF excimer laser (248 nm) are presented. Products of sulfur dioxide photolysis undertaken with 193-nm radiation exhibit characteristics that are similar to sulfur multiple-isotope data for terrestrial sedimentary rock samples older than 2450 Ma (reported by Farquhar et al. [2000a]), while photolysis experiments undertaken with radiation at other wavelengths (longer than 220 nm and at 184.9 nm) exhibit different characteristics. The spectral window between 190 and 220 nm falls between the Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen and the Hartley bands of ozone, and its absorption is therefore more sensitive to changes in altitude and atmospheric oxygen content than neighboring wavelengths. These two observations are used to suggest a link between sulfur dioxide photolysis at 193 nm and sulfur isotope anomalies in Archean rocks. This hypothesis includes the suggestion that UV wavelengths shorter than 200 nm penetrated deep in the Earth's atmosphere during the Archean. Potential implications of this hypothesis for the chemistry, composition, and UV absorption of the atmosphere are explored. We also explore the implications of these observations for documentation of bacterial sulfur metabolisms early in Earth's history.

  16. Decomposition of conifer tree bark under field conditions: effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes de Gerenyu, Valentin; Kurganova, Irina; Kapitsa, Ekaterina; Shorokhova, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    In forest ecosystems, the processes of decomposition of coarse woody debris (CWD) can contribute significantly to the emission component of carbon (C) cycle and thus accelerate the greenhouse effect and global climate change. A better understanding of decomposition of CWD is required to refine estimates of the C balance in forest ecosystems and improve biogeochemical models. These estimates will in turn contribute to assessing the role of forests in maintaining their long-term productivity and other ecosystems services. We examined the decomposition rate of coniferous bark with added nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilizers in experiment under field conditions. The experiment was carried out in 2015 during 17 weeks in Moscow region (54o50'N, 37o36'E) under continental-temperate climatic conditions. The conifer tree bark mixture (ca. 70% of Norway spruce and 30% of Scots pine) was combined with soil and placed in piles of soil-bark substrate (SBS) with height of ca. 60 cm and surface area of ca. 3 m2. The dry mass ratio of bark to soil was 10:1. The experimental design included following treatments: (1) soil (Luvisols Haplic) without bark, (S), (2) pure SBS, (3) SBS with N addition in the amount of 1% of total dry bark mass (SBS-N), and (4) SBS with N and P addition in the amount of 1% of total dry bark mass for each element (SBS-NP). The decomposition rate expressed as CO2 emission flux, g C/m2/h was measured using closed chamber method 1-3 times per week from July to early November using LiCor 6400 (Nebraska, USA). During the experiment, we also controlled soil temperature at depths of 5, 20, 40, and 60 cm below surface of SBS using thermochrons iButton (DS1921G, USA). The pattern of CO2 emission rate from SBS depended strongly on fertilizing. The highest decomposition rates (DecR) of 2.8-5.6 g C/m2/h were observed in SBS-NP treatment during the first 6 weeks of experiment. The decay process of bark was less active in the treatment with only N addition. In this

  17. Mass spectral studies of thermal decomposition of metal nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jason G.; Fonseca, Rodney W.; Holcombe, James A.

    1995-10-01

    Residual gas analysis and static secondary ion mass spectrometry are used in an attempt to elucidate the process responsible for the appearance of metal oxides in the gas phase during low temperature nitrate decomposition of Pb, Cu, Cd and Ag nitrates in vacuo. Observed signals for MO, MNO 3+ together with M 2+ species in the gas phase during the decomposition of some of the metal nitrates indicate that a physical expulsion mechanism is probably responsible for the low temperature production of these metal-containing species. The "gasification mechanism" provided by L'vov states that metal nitrates decompose in a single mechanistic step to product MO(g), O 2 and NO 2 and that the temperature of the decomposition is predictable from thermodynamics. The observation of unexplained gas phase species, the absence of O 2 during CuO + production, and the lack of agreement between activation energies and appearance temperatures fail to support the gasification model. Instead, it is suggested that during the decomposition, which is governed by the kinetics of the process, the evolution of the gaseous products, such as O 2 and NO 2, carry the observed metal-containing species into the vapor phase when the liquid state is present on the surface (e.g. AgNO 3, Cu(NO 3) 2 or Cd(NO 3) 2). The crystal rearrangement of the solid (e.g. conversion of Pb(NO 3) 2 to PbO) and subsequent loss of integrity of the crystal lattice results in the dislocation of the metal-containing species, which are swept from the surface during the O 2 and NO 2 evolution.

  18. Effect of the early intensive multifactorial therapy on the cardiovascular risk in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: an observational, prospective study

    PubMed Central

    STEFAN, RAMONA MARIA; NITA, CRISTINA; CRACIUN, ANCA; RUSU, ADRIANA; HANCU, NICOLAE

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims We assessed if early intensive interventions improve the glycemic control and the modifiable cardiovascular diseases risk factors in Romanian patients with newly diagnosed type-2 diabetes during the first year follow-up period. Patients and methods This was an observational, prospective study: 69 subjects were included in the analysis; each of them received intensive multi-factorial pharmacologic treatment and therapeutic education targeting hyperglycemia, weight, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Disease monitoring was done at months 0, 1, 3, 6 and 12 by assessment of anthropometric measurements, arterial blood pressure and biochemical parameters. The cardiovascular diseases risk factors were calculated using the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Risk Engine. Results The mean age at diagnosis was 53.61±10.66 years. All anthropometric variables (body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, visceral fat area, percentage of body fat), except for skeletal muscle mass, significantly decreased overtime. The majority of the biochemical parameters significantly decreased overtime. The non-fatal/fatal coronary heart disease risk significantly decreased at month 12 (9.74 [p<0.05] and 4.84 [p<0.05], respectively) compared to month 0 (19.66 and 11.10, respectively); a similar trend of the non-fatal/fatal stroke (risk at month 12, 8.30 [p<0.05] and 1.04 [p<0.05], respectively, while at month 0, 7.89 and 1.38, respectively) was recorded. Conclusions Early multi-factorial treatment and intensive lifestyle interventions in patients newly diagnosed with type-2 diabetes could decrease with approximately 50% the rate of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26528067

  19. Relation of early tumor shrinkage (ETS) observed in first-line treatment to efficacy parameters of subsequent treatment in FIRE-3 (AIOKRK0306).

    PubMed

    Modest, Dominik P; Stintzing, Sebastian; Fischer von Weikersthal, Ludwig; Decker, Thomas; Kiani, Alexander; Vehling-Kaiser, Ursula; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Heintges, Tobias; Lerchenmüller, Christian; Kahl, Christoph; Seipelt, Gernot; Kullmann, Frank; Scheithauer, Werner; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas; Stauch, Martina; von Einem, Jobst Christian; Moehler, Markus; Held, Swantje; Heinemann, Volker

    2017-04-15

    We explored the association of early tumor shrinkage (ETS) and non-ETS with efficacy of first-line and consecutive second-line treatment in patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer treated in FIRE-3. Assessment of tumor shrinkage was based on the sum of longest diameters of target lesions, evaluated after 6 weeks of treatment. Shrinkage was classified as ETS (shrinkage by ≥ 20%), mETS (shrinkage by 0 to <20%), mPD (minor progression >0 to <20%) and PD (progression ≥20%). Overall survival (OS) was 33.2 (95% CI 28.0-38.4) months in ETS patients, while non-ETS was associated with less favorable outcome (mETS 24.0 (95% CI 21.2-26.9) months, mPD 19.0 (95% CI 13.0-25.0) months, PD 12.8 (95% CI 11.1-14.5) months). Differences in PFS of first-line therapy were less pronounced. ETS subgroups defined in first-line therapy also correlated with efficacy of second-line therapy. Progression-free survival in second-line (PFS2nd) was 6.5 months (5.8-7.2) for ETS, and was 5.6 (95% CI 4.7-6.5) months for mETS, 4.9 (95% CI 3.7-6.1) months for mPD and 3.3 (95% CI 2.3-4.3) months for PD. PFS of first-line and PFS2nd showed a linear correlation (Bravais-Pearson coefficient: 0.16, p = 0.006). While ETS is associated with the most favorable outcome, non-ETS represents a heterogeneous subgroup with distinct characteristics of less favorable initial tumor response to treatment. This is the first analysis to demonstrate that early tumor response observed during first-line FOLFIRI-based therapy may also relate to efficacy of second-line treatment. Early response parameters may serve as stratification factors in trials recruiting pretreated patients.

  20. Role of phyllosphere fungi of forest trees in the development of decomposer fungal communities and decomposition processes of leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Osono, T

    2006-08-01

    The ecology of endophytic and epiphytic phyllosphere fungi of forest trees is reviewed with special emphasis on the development of decomposer fungal communities and decomposition processes of leaf litter. A total of 41 genera of phyllosphere fungi have been reported to occur on leaf litter of tree species in 19 genera. The relative proportion of phyllosphere fungi in decomposer fungal communities ranges from 2% to 100%. Phyllosphere fungi generally disappear in the early stages of decomposition, although a few species persist until the late stages. Phyllosphere fungi have the ability to utilize various organic compounds as carbon sources, and the marked decomposing ability is associated with ligninolytic activity. The role of phyllosphere fungi in the decomposition of soluble components during the early stages is relatively small in spite of their frequent occurrence. Recently, the roles of phyllosphere fungi in the decomposition of structural components have been documented with reference to lignin and cellulose decomposition, nutrient dynamics, and accumulation and decomposition of soil organic matter. It is clear from this review that several of the common phyllosphere fungi of forest trees are primarily saprobic, being specifically adapted to colonize and utilize dead host tissue, and that some phyllosphere fungi with marked abilities to decompose litter components play important roles in decomposition of structural components, nutrient dynamics, and soil organic matter accumulation.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL CATALYST FOR NO DECOMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2004-05-01

    Air pollution arising from the emission of nitrogen oxides as a result of combustion taking place in boilers, furnaces and engines, has increasingly been recognized as a problem. New methods to remove NO{sub x} emissions significantly and economically must be developed. The current technology for post-combustion removal of NO is the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ammonia or possibly by a hydrocarbon such as methane. The catalytic decomposition of NO to give N{sub 2} will be preferable to the SCR process because it will eliminate the costs and operating problems associated with the use of an external reducing species. The most promising decomposition catalysts are transition metal (especially copper)-exchanged zeolites, perovskites, and noble metals supported on metal oxides such as alumina, silica, and ceria. The main shortcoming of the noble metal reducible oxide (NMRO) catalysts is that they are prone to deactivation by oxygen. It has been reported that catalysts containing tin oxide show oxygen adsorption behavior that may involve hydroxyl groups attached to the tin oxide. This is different than that observed with other noble metal-metal oxide combinations, which have the oxygen adsorbing on the noble metal and subsequently spilling over to the metal oxide. This observation leads one to believe that the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts may have a potential as NO decomposition catalysts in the presence of oxygen. This prediction is also supported by some preliminary data obtained for NO decomposition on a Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalyst in the PI's laboratory. The main objective of the proposed research is the evaluation of the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts for the decomposition of NO in simulated power plant stack gases with particular attention to the resistance to deactivation by O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and elevated temperatures. Therefore, it is proposed to perform temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) studies on Pt/SnO{sub 2

  2. Synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography study on gas hydrate decomposition in a sedimentary matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Falenty, Andrzej; Chaouachi, Marwen; Haberthür, David; Kuhs, Werner F.

    2016-09-01

    In-situ synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography with sub-micrometer voxel size was used to study the decomposition of gas hydrates in a sedimentary matrix. Xenon-hydrate was used instead of methane hydrate to enhance the absorption contrast. The microstructural features of the decomposition process were elucidated indicating that the decomposition starts at the hydrate-gas interface; it does not proceed at the contacts with quartz grains. Melt water accumulates at retreating hydrate surface. The decomposition is not homogeneous and the decomposition rates depend on the distance of the hydrate surface to the gas phase indicating a diffusion-limitation of the gas transport through the water phase. Gas is found to be metastably enriched in the water phase with a concentration decreasing away from the hydrate-water interface. The initial decomposition process facilitates redistribution of fluid phases in the pore space and local reformation of gas hydrates. The observations allow also rationalizing earlier conjectures from experiments with low spatial resolutions and suggest that the hydrate-sediment assemblies remain intact until the hydrate spacers between sediment grains finally collapse; possible effects on mechanical stability and permeability are discussed. The resulting time resolved characteristics of gas hydrate decomposition and the influence of melt water on the reaction rate are of importance for a suggested gas recovery from marine sediments by depressurization.

  3. Changes of the phenol-degrading bacterial community during the decomposition of submersed Platanus acerifolia leaves.

    PubMed

    Ramió-Pujol, Sara; Bañeras, Lluís; Artigas, Joan; Romaní, Anna M

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are responsible for the decomposition of plant litter due to their enhanced enzyme capabilities. Among extracellular enzymes, those involved in lignin decomposition are especially relevant in leaf degradation. However, the knowledge of the bacterial contribution to the decomposition of phenol-derived compounds in submerged leaf litter is limited. We have used the large unit of the multicomponent bacterial phenol hydroxylase (LmpH) as a genetic proxy to describe changes in the phenol-degrading bacterial community during the decomposition of Platanus acerifolia leaves in a forested stream. Significant differences were found in the phenol-degrading community when three decomposition stages, initial (day 7), midterm (day 58), and late (day 112), were compared. Estimated Shannon's diversity values decreased significantly from 1.93 (initial) to 0.98 (late). According to the deduced amino acid sequences and the corresponding theoretical kinetic parameters of phenol hydroxylases, the initial community showed a low degree of specialization, presumably resulting from random colonization of leaves. At the late decomposition stage, the bacterial community became more specialized, and LmpH genes similar to high-affinity phenol hydroxylases of Comamonas sp. and Burkholderia cepacia increased. The observed changes in the bacterial community suggested an active role of bacteria during litter decomposition in aquatic environments.

  4. Decomposition patterns in terrestrial and intertidal habitats on Oahu Island and Coconut Island, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Davis, J B; Goff, M L

    2000-07-01

    Decomposition studies were conducted at two sites on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii, to compare patterns of decomposition and arthropod invasion in intertidal and adjacent terrestrial habitats. The animal model used was the domestic pig. One site was on Coconut Island in Kaneohe Bay on the northeast side of Oahu, and the second was conducted in an anchialine pool located at Barber's Point Naval Air Station on the southwest shore of Oahu. At both sites, the terrestrial animal decomposed in a manner similar to what has been observed in previous studies in terrestrial habitats on the island of Oahu. Rate of biomass depletion was slower in both intertidal studies, and decomposition was primarily due to tide and wave activity and bacterial decomposition. No permanent colonization of carcasses by insects was seen for the intertidal carcass at Coconut Island. At the anchialine pool at Barber's Point Naval Air Station, Diptera larvae were responsible for biomass removal until the carcass was reduced below the water line and, from that point on, bacterial action was the means of decomposition. Marine and terrestrial scavengers were present at both sites although their impact on decomposition was negligible. Five stages of decomposition were recognized for the intertidal sites: fresh, buoyant/floating, deterioration/disintegration, buoyant remains, and scattered skeletal.

  5. Domain decomposition algorithms and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the new domain decomposition algorithms are applied to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics: the two-dimensional convection-diffusion problem and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. First, a brief introduction to the various approaches of domain decomposition is given, and a survey of domain decomposition preconditioners for the operator on the interface separating the subdomains is then presented. For the convection-diffusion problem, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is examined.

  6. On a Decomposition Model for Optical Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhau, Jochen; Belhachmi, Zakaria; Scherzer, Otmar

    In this paper we present a variational method for determining cartoon and texture components of the optical flow of a noisy image sequence. The method is realized by reformulating the optical flow problem first as a variational denoising problem for multi-channel data and then by applying decomposition methods. Thanks to the general formulation, several norms can be used for the decomposition. We study a decomposition for the optical flow into bounded variation and oscillating component in greater detail. Numerical examples demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach.

  7. Hamiltonian decomposition for bulk and surface states.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ken-Ichi; Shimomura, Yuji; Takane, Yositake; Wakabayashi, Katsunori

    2009-04-10

    We demonstrate that a tight-binding Hamiltonian with nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor hopping integrals can be decomposed into bulk and boundary parts for honeycomb lattice systems. The Hamiltonian decomposition reveals that next-nearest-neighbor hopping causes sizable changes in the energy spectrum of surface states even if the correction to the energy spectrum of bulk states is negligible. By applying the Hamiltonian decomposition to edge states in graphene systems, we show that the next-nearest-neighbor hopping stabilizes the edge states. The application of Hamiltonian decomposition to a general lattice system is discussed.

  8. Decomposition of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim by continuous UVA/LED/TiO2 photocatalysis: Decomposition pathways, residual antibacterial activity and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qinqing; Hu, Jiangyong

    2017-02-05

    In this study, continuous LED/UVA/TiO2 photocatalytic decomposition of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and trimethoprim (TMP) was investigated. More than 90% of SMX and TMP were removed within 20min by the continuous photoreactor (with the initial concentration of 400ppb for each). The removal rates of SMX and TMP decreased with higher initial antibiotics loadings. SMX was much easier decomposed in acidic condition, while pH affected little on TMP's decomposition. 0.003% was found to be the optimum H2O2 dosage to enhance SMX photocatalytic decomposition. Decomposition pathways of SMX and TMP were proposed based on the intermediates identified by using LC-MS-MS and GC-MS. Aniline was identified as a new intermediate generated during SMX photocatalytic decomposition. Antibacterial activity study with a reference Escherichia coli strain was also conducted during the photocatalytic process. Results indicated that with every portion of TMP removed, the residual antibacterial activity decreased by one portion. However, the synergistic effect between SMX and TMP tended to slow down the antibacterial activity removal of SMX and TMP mixture. Chronic toxicity studies conducted with Vibrio fischeri exhibited 13-20% bioluminescence inhibition during the decomposition of 1ppm SMX and 1ppm TMP, no acute toxicity to V. fischeri was observed during the photocatalytic process.

  9. Elephant dung decomposition and coprophilous fungi in two habitats of semi-arid Botswana.

    PubMed

    Masunga, Gaseitsiwe S; Andresen, Øystein; Taylor, Joanne E; Dhillion, Shivcharn S

    2006-10-01

    In order to understand the impact of habitat changes on ecosystem processes caused by increased populations of elephants, elephant dung decomposition was studied in semi-arid Botswana. Dung decomposition rates were studied with and without the presence of arthropods, using pairs of exposed dung and dung enclosed in nylon-mesh bags, respectively. Dung decomposition rates were lower in the absence of arthropods. The rates in the late wet season were higher in the scrubland than in the woodland. In the early dry season, immediately after the wet season, the rates were higher in the woodland than in the scrubland. The difference in decomposition rates between habitats was attributed to microclimatic conditions created by vegetation cover. With regard to fungal succession, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Eurotium brefeldianum occurred only in the late stages of dung decomposition whereas Talaromyces helicus, Cercophora coprophila and Sporormiella minima occurred in all the stages. Although there was no significant difference in Shannon-Weiner fungal species diversity index between habitats, seasons, dung ages and laboratory incubation periods, there were significant differences in fungal community composition between these parameters. Species richness was higher in the late wet season than in the early dry season, indicating the importance of moist conditions for a large diversity of fungal species.

  10. A Longitudinal Study on Human Outdoor Decomposition in Central Texas.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Joanna K; Spradley, M Katherine; Godde, Kanya

    2016-01-01

    The development of a methodology that estimates the postmortem interval (PMI) from stages of decomposition is a goal for which forensic practitioners strive. A proposed equation (Megyesi et al. 2005) that utilizes total body score (TBS) and accumulated degree days (ADD) was tested using longitudinal data collected from human remains donated to the Forensic Anthropology Research Facility (FARF) at Texas State University-San Marcos. Exact binomial tests examined the rate of the equation to successfully predict ADD. Statistically significant differences were found between ADD estimated by the equation and the observed value for decomposition stage. Differences remained significant after carnivore scavenged donations were removed from analysis. Low success rates for the equation to predict ADD from TBS and the wide standard errors demonstrate the need to re-evaluate the use of this equation and methodology for PMI estimation in different environments; rather, multivariate methods and equations should be derived that are environmentally specific.

  11. Surgical Data and Early Postoperative Outcomes after Minimally Invasive Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Prospective, Multicenter, Observational Data-Monitored Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Paulo; Buzek, David; Franke, Jörg; Senker, Wolfgang; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Hubbe, Ulrich; Manson, Neil; Rosenberg, Wout; Assietti, Roberto; Martens, Frederic; Barbanti Brodano, Giovanni; Scheufler, Kai-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF) offers potential for reduced operative morbidity and earlier recovery compared with open procedures for patients with degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD). Firm conclusions about advantages of MILIF over open procedures cannot be made because of limited number of large studies of MILIF in a real-world setting. Clinical effectiveness of MILIF in a large, unselected real-world patient population was assessed in this Prospective, monitored, international, multicenter, observational study. Objective: To observe and document short-term recovery after minimally invasive interbody fusion for DLD. Materials and Methods: In a predefined 4-week analysis from this study, experienced surgeons (≥30 MILIF surgeries pre-study) treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF. The primary study objective was to document patients’ short-term post-interventional recovery (primary objective) including back/leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS]), disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), health status (EQ-5D) and Patient satisfaction. Results: At 4 weeks, 249 of 252 patients were remaining in the study; the majority received one-level MILIF (83%) and TLIF was the preferred approach (94.8%). For one-level (and two-level) procedures, surgery duration was 128 (182) min, fluoroscopy time 115 (154) sec, and blood-loss 164 (233) mL. Time to first ambulation was 1.3 days and time to study-defined surgery recovery was 3.2 days. Patients reported significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced back pain (VAS: 2.9 vs 6.2), leg pain (VAS: 2.5 vs 5.9), and disability (ODI: 34.5% vs 45.5%), and a significantly (P < 0.0001) improved health status (EQ-5D index: 0.61 vs 0.34; EQ VAS: 65.4 vs 52.9) 4 weeks postoperatively. One adverse event was classified as related to the minimally invasive surgical approach. No deep site infections or deaths were reported. Conclusions: For experienced surgeons, MILIF for DLD demonstrated early benefits (short time to

  12. Observation of a nearby early merging cluster of galaxies, CIZA J1358.9-4750: new born shocks in the ICM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuichi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Akahori, Takuya; Gu, Liyi; Takizawa, Motokazu; Fujita, Yutaka; Makishima, Kazuo; Simionescu, Aurora

    2016-04-01

    Cluster merger events drive shocks in the intra-cluster plasma and activate non-thermal phenomena such as particle acceleration, magnetic field amplification, and turbulence. However, details of these processes are not well known because of a lack of observations. The known examples of merging clusters are mostly in late merger phases, wherein the shocks have already reached the low-density outer regions. Therefore, finding nearby merging clusters in early phases, in which the shock is still located in dense regions, is of great importance.In order to find suitable objects, we searched the CIZA catalog, which collects X-ray detected cluster candidates located behind the Zone of Avoidance, near the Galactic ridge. We found a very promising merging-cluster candidate CIZA J1358.9-4750, with a redshift of 0.07. It consists of a close pair of X-ray clusters of galaxies in North-west(NW) and South-east(SE), which are connected by an X-ray bright ``bridge’’ region in between. We observed this object with Suzaku and Chandra, and analyzed its archival short exposure XMM-Newton data. The Suzaku data revealed that the NW and SE clusters have temperatures of 5.2±0.2 keV and 4.6±0.2 keV, respectively. The bridge region was found to have a 1.6 times higher temperature, 9.2±1.5 keV. In the existing XMM-Newton data, we found an abrupt brightness jump coinciding in position with the Suzaku high-temperature region. With additional Chandra data, we found a bright plateau with a width of 2’, i.e. 170 kpc. The front and back jumps are presumably the forward and reverse shocks between the two clusters. Therefore, the object is likely to be a rather symmetric shock system, in which two clusters of similar masses are colliding. The Mach number of the collision was derived as 1.3±0.2 and 1.17±0.04 from the Suzaku temperature jump and the Chandra brightness jump, respectively. This Mach number and the X-ray temperature give the shock velocity as 1200 km/s. It can be combined with

  13. Analyzing spinodal decomposition of an anisotropic fluid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruhn, Thomas; Pogorelov, Evgeny; Seiferling, Felix; Emmerich, Heike

    2017-02-01

    Spinodal decomposition leads to spontaneous fluctuations of the local concentration. In the early stage, the resulting pattern provides explicit information about the material properties of the mixture. In the case of two isotropic fluids, the static structure factor shows the characteristic ring shape. If one component is a liquid crystal, the pattern is typically anisotropic and the structure factor is more complex. Using numerical methods, we investigate how structure factors can be used to extract information about material properties like the diffusion constant or the isotropic and the anisotropic contributions to the interfacial tension. The method is based on momenta taken from structure factors in the early stage of the spinodal demixing. We perform phase field calculations for an isotropic and an anisotropic spinodal decomposition. A comparison of the extracted results with analytic values is made. The calculations show that linear modes dominate in the beginning of the growth process, while non-linear modes grow monotonously in the region of the k-space for which damping is predicted by the linearized theory. As long as non-linear modes are small enough, linearized theory can be applied to extract material properties from the structure factor.

  14. High temperature phase decomposition in Ti{sub x}Zr{sub y}Al{sub z}N

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Hans; Pilemalm, Robert; Rogström, Lina; Tasnadi, Ferenc; Ghafoor, Naureen; Forsén, Rikard; Odén, Magnus; Johnson, Lars J. S.; Johansson-Jöesaar, Mats P.; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2014-12-15

    Through a combination of theoretical and experimental observations we study the high temperature decomposition behavior of c-(Ti{sub x}Zr{sub y}Al{sub z}N) alloys. We show that for most concentrations the high formation energy of (ZrAl)N causes a strong tendency for spinodal decomposition between ZrN and AlN while other decompositions tendencies are suppressed. In addition we observe that entropic effects due to configurational disorder favor a formation of a stable Zr-rich (TiZr)N phase with increasing temperature. Our calculations also predict that at high temperatures a Zr rich (TiZrAl)N disordered phase should become more resistant against the spinodal decomposition despite its high and positive formation energy due to the specific topology of the free energy surface at the relevant concentrations. Our experimental observations confirm this prediction by showing strong tendency towards decomposition in a Zr-poor sample while a Zr-rich alloy shows a greatly reduced decomposition rate, which is mostly attributable to binodal decomposition processes. This result highlights the importance of considering the second derivative of the free energy, in addition to its absolute value in predicting decomposition trends of thermodynamically unstable alloys.

  15. Unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: RRKM calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.

    1993-06-01

    Based on reaction thermochemistry and estimates of Arrhenius A-factors, it is expected that Si-C bond cleavage, C-H bond cleavage, and HCl elimination will be the primary channels for the unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane. Using RRKM theory, we calculated rate constants for these three reactions. The calculations support the conclusion that these three reactions are the major decomposition pathways. Rate constants for each reaction were calculated in the high-pressure limit (800--1500 K) and in the falloff regime (1300--1500 K) for bath gases of both helium and hydrogen. These calculations thus provide branching fractions as well as decomposition rates. We also calculated bimolecular rate constants for the overall decomposition in the low-pressure limit. Interesting and surprising kinetic behavior of this system and the individual reactions is discussed. The reactivity of this chlorinated organosilane is compared to that of other organosilanes.

  16. A Decomposition Theorem for Finite Automata.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Coloma, Teresa L.; Tucci, Ralph P.

    1990-01-01

    Described is automata theory which is a branch of theoretical computer science. A decomposition theorem is presented that is easier than the Krohn-Rhodes theorem. Included are the definitions, the theorem, and a proof. (KR)

  17. Thermal Decomposition of Poly(methylphenylsilane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lujun; Zhang, Mei; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2000-03-01

    The thermal decomposition of poly(methylphenylsilane) was performed at constant heating rates and isothermal conditions. The evolved gases were studied by ionization-threshold mass spectroscopy. Pyrolysis under isothermal conditions reveals that the decomposition of poly(methylphenylsilane) is a type of depolymerization that has a first-order reaction. Kinetic analysis of the evolution spectra of CH3-Si-C6H5 radicals, phenyl and methyl substituents reveals the mechanism and activation energies of the decomposition reactions in main chains and substituents. It is found that the decomposition of main chains is a dominant reaction and results in the weight loss of approximately 90%. The effusion of phenyl and methyl substituents occurs in the two processes of rearrangement of main chains and the formation of stable Si-C containing residuals.

  18. Adaptive Fourier decomposition based ECG denoising.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze; Wan, Feng; Wong, Chi Man; Zhang, Liming

    2016-10-01

    A novel ECG denoising method is proposed based on the adaptive Fourier decomposition (AFD). The AFD decomposes a signal according to its energy distribution, thereby making this algorithm suitable for separating pure ECG signal and noise with overlapping frequency ranges but different energy distributions. A stop criterion for the iterative decomposition process in the AFD is calculated on the basis of the estimated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the noisy signal. The proposed AFD-based method is validated by the synthetic ECG signal using an ECG model and also real ECG signals from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database both with additive Gaussian white noise. Simulation results of the proposed method show better performance on the denoising and the QRS detection in comparing with major ECG denoising schemes based on the wavelet transform, the Stockwell transform, the empirical mode decomposition, and the ensemble empirical mode decomposition.

  19. Moisture can be the dominant environmental parameter governing cadaver decomposition in soil.

    PubMed

    Carter, David O; Yellowlees, David; Tibbett, Mark

    2010-07-15

    Forensic taphonomy involves the use of decomposition to estimate postmortem interval (PMI) or locate clandestine graves. Yet, cadaver decomposition remains poorly understood, particularly following burial in soil. Presently, we do not know how most edaphic and environmental parameters, including soil moisture, influence the breakdown of cadavers following burial and alter the processes that are used to estimate PMI and locate clandestine graves. To address this, we buried juvenile rat (Rattus rattus) cadavers (approximately 18 g wet weight) in three contrasting soils from tropical savanna ecosystems located in Pallarenda (sand), Wambiana (medium clay), or Yabulu (loamy sand), Queensland, Australia. These soils were sieved (2mm), weighed (500 g dry weight), calibrated to a matric potential of -0.01 megapascals (MPa), -0.05 MPa, or -0.3 MPa (wettest to driest) and incubated at 22 degrees C. Measurements of cadaver decomposition included cadaver mass loss, carbon dioxide-carbon (CO(2)-C) evolution, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), protease activity, phosphodiesterase activity, ninhydrin-reactive nitrogen (NRN) and soil pH. Cadaver burial resulted in a significant increase in CO(2)-C evolution, MBC, enzyme activities, NRN and soil pH. Cadaver decomposition in loamy sand and sandy soil was greater at lower matric potentials (wetter soil). However, optimal matric potential for cadaver decomposition in medium clay was exceeded, which resulted in a slower rate of cadaver decomposition in the wettest soil. Slower cadaver decomposition was also observed at high matric potential (-0.3 MPa). Furthermore, wet sandy soil was associated with greater cadaver decomposition than wet fine-textured soil. We conclude that gravesoil moisture content can modify the relationship between temperature and cadaver decomposition and that soil microorganisms can play a significant role in cadaver breakdown. We also conclude that soil NRN is a more reliable indicator of gravesoil than soil pH.

  20. Evaluating litter decomposition in earth system models with long-term litterbag experiments: an example using the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4).

    PubMed

    Bonan, Gordon B; Hartman, Melannie D; Parton, William J; Wieder, William R

    2013-03-01

    Decomposition is a large term in the global carbon budget, but models of the earth system that simulate carbon cycle-climate feedbacks are largely untested with respect to litter decomposition. We tested the litter decomposition parameterization of the community land model version 4 (CLM4), the terrestrial component of the community earth system model, with data from the long-term intersite decomposition experiment team (LIDET). The LIDET dataset is a 10-year study of litter decomposition at multiple sites across North America and Central America. We performed 10-year litter decomposition simulations comparable with LIDET for 9 litter types and 20 sites in tundra, grassland, and boreal, conifer, deciduous, and tropical forest biomes using the LIDET-provided climatic decomposition index to constrain temperature and moisture effects on decomposition. We performed additional simulations with DAYCENT, a version of the CENTURY model, to ask how well an established ecosystem model matches the observations. The results show large discrepancy between the laboratory microcosm studies used to parameterize the CLM4 litter decomposition and the LIDET field study. Simulated carbon loss is more rapid than the observations across all sites, and nitrogen immobilization is biased high. Closer agreement with the observations requires much lower decomposition rates, obtained with the assumption that soil mineral nitrogen severely limits decomposition. DAYCENT better replicates the observations, for both carbon mass remaining and nitrogen, independent of nitrogen limitation. CLM4 has low soil carbon in global earth system simulations. These results suggest that this bias arises, in part, from too rapid litter decomposition. More broadly, the terrestrial biogeochemistry of earth system models must be critically tested with observations, and the consequences of particular model choices must be documented. Long-term litter decomposition experiments such as LIDET provide a real

  1. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite to Magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Golden, D. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    The debate about fossil life on Mars includes the origin of magnetites of specific sizes and habits in the siderite-rich portions of the carbonate spheres in ALH 84001 [1,2]. Specifically [2] were able to demonstrate that inorganic synthesis of these compositionally zoned spheres from aqueous solutions of variable ion-concentrations is possible. They further demonstrated the formation of magnetite from siderite upon heating at 550 C under a Mars-like CO2-rich atmosphere according to 3FeCO3 = Fe3O4 + 2CO2 + CO [3] and they postulated that the carbonates in ALH 84001 were heated to these temperatures by some shock event. The average shock pressure for ALH 84001, substantially based on the refractive index of diaplectic feldspar glasses [3,4,5] is some 35-40 GPa and associated temperatures are some 300-400 C [4]. However, some of the feldspar is melted [5], requiring local deviations from this average as high as 45-50 GPa. Indeed, [5] observes the carbonates in ALH 84001 to be melted locally, requiring pressures in excess of 60 GPa and temperatures > 600 C. Combining these shock studies with the above inorganic synthesis of zoned carbonates it seems possible to produce the ALH 84001 magnetites by the shock-induced decomposition of siderite.

  2. Strain localization driven by thermal decomposition during seismic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. D.; Brantut, N.; Rice, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    De Paola et al. [2008] analyzed a series of faults in the Northern Apennines, Italy, hosted in anhydrite and dolomite rocks. They found a highly localized band of less than 100 microns, contained within a broader damage zone. Recent High-Velocity Friction (HVF) experiments on kaolinite-bearing gouge samples (Brantut et al. [2008]) have also shown extreme localization in samples undergoing thermal decomposition. They performed microstructural analysis on HVF samples and found an "ultralocalized deformation zone", less than ten microns wide, interpreted to be the main slipping zone in the experiment. By measuring relative humidity in the sample chamber they were also able to observe the thermal dehydration of kaolinite. These laboratory and field observations indicate that straining is extremely localized in fault materials where thermal decomposition reactions may occur. During thermal decomposition reactions pore fluid is released, leading to increases in pore pressure, and a corresponding drop in frictional heating. The reactions are endothermic, so heat is also absorbed as the reactions progress. Previous work by Sulem and Famin [2009] has investigated how these effects influence the evolution of pore pressure and temperature in a uniformly sheared gouge layer. They found that accounting for thermal decomposition reactions leads to significant pore pressure increases, and that the endothermic nature of the reaction acts to cap the maximum temperature achieved. In previous work (Platt, Rudnicki and Rice [2010]) we investigated strain localization using a model for shearing of a fluid-saturated gouge material, finding a formula for the localized zone width as a function of physical properties of the gouge. We now extend this model to include thermal decomposition. Using linear stability methods and an idealized reaction kinetic we infer a new localized zone width when decomposition is accounted for. Numerical simulations then allow us to compare this prediction to

  3. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  4. High Temperature Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydropemxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  5. Decomposition of Balanced Matrices. Part 5: Goggles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    A D-A 247 462 Management Science Research Report #MSRR-573 1~ ~~112 Eil 11 I Decomposition of Balanced Matrices . Part V: Goggles Michele Conforti 12...9001705. I Dipartimento di Matematica Pura ed Applicata, UniversitA di Padova, Via Belzoni 7, 35131 Padova, Italy.f 2 Carnegie Mellon University...NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED DECOMPOSITION OF BALANCED MATRICES . Technical Report, Oct 1991 PART V: GOGGLES 6

  6. Moisture drives surface decomposition in thawing tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks Pries, Caitlin E.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Vogel, Jason G.; Natali, Susan M.

    2013-07-01

    Permafrost thaw can affect decomposition rates by changing environmental conditions and litter quality. As permafrost thaws, soils warm and thermokarst (ground subsidence) features form, causing some areas to become wetter while other areas become drier. We used a common substrate to measure how permafrost thaw affects decomposition rates in the surface soil in a natural permafrost thaw gradient and a warming experiment in Healy, Alaska. Permafrost thaw also changes plant community composition. We decomposed 12 plant litters in a common garden to test how changing plant litter inputs would affect decomposition. We combined species' tissue-specific decomposition rates with species and tissue-level estimates of aboveground net primary productivity to calculate community-weighted decomposition constants at both the thaw gradient and warming experiment. Moisture, specifically growing season precipitation and water table depth, was the most significant driver of decomposition. At the gradient, an increase in growing season precipitation from 200 to 300 mm increased mass loss of the common substrate by 100%. At the warming experiment, a decrease in the depth to the water table from 30 to 15 cm increased mass loss by 100%. At the gradient, community-weighted decomposition was 21% faster in extensive than in minimal thaw, but was similar when moss production was included. Overall, the effect of climate change and permafrost thaw on surface soil decomposition are driven more by precipitation and soil environment than by changes to plant communities. Increasing soil moisture is thereby another mechanism by which permafrost thaw can become a positive feedback to climate change.

  7. Hardware Implementation of Singular Value Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Swanirbhar; Shaw, Anil Kumar; Sarkar, Subir Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD) is a useful decomposition technique which has important role in various engineering fields such as image compression, watermarking, signal processing, and numerous others. SVD does not involve convolution operation, which make it more suitable for hardware implementation, unlike the most popular transforms. This paper reviews the various methods of hardware implementation for SVD computation. This paper also studies the time complexity and hardware complexity in various methods of SVD computation.

  8. Domain Decomposition for the SPN Solver MINOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-12-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3® code.

  9. Tiling Models for Spatial Decomposition in AMTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J C; Clouse, C J

    2005-05-27

    Effective spatial domain decomposition for discrete ordinate (S{sub n}) neutron transport calculations has been critical for exploiting massively parallel architectures typified by the ASCI White computer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A combination of geometrical and computational constraints has posed a unique challenge as problems have been scaled up to several thousand processors. Carefully scripted decomposition and corresponding execution algorithms have been developed to handle a range of geometrical and hardware configurations.

  10. Domain decomposition for the SPN solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3 (R) code. (authors)

  11. SeismoGeodesy: Combination of High Rate, Real-time GNSS and Accelerometer Observations and Rapid Seismic Event Notification for Earth Quake Early Warning and Volcano Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael; Zimakov, Leonid; Moessmer, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Scientific GNSS networks are moving towards a model of real-time data acquisition, epoch-by-epoch storage integrity, and on-board real-time position and displacement calculations. This new paradigm allows the integration of real-time, high-rate GNSS displacement information with acceleration and velocity data to create very high-rate displacement records. The mating of these two instruments allows the creation of a new, very high-rate (200 Hz) displacement observable that has the full-scale displacement characteristics of GNSS and high-precision dynamic motions of seismic technologies. It is envisioned that these new observables can be used for earthquake early warning studies, volcano monitoring, and critical infrastructure monitoring applications. Our presentation will focus on the characteristics of GNSS, seismic, and strong motion sensors in high dynamic environments, including historic earthquakes replicated on a shake table over a range of displacements and frequencies. We will explore the optimum integration of these sensors from a filtering perspective including simple harmonic impulses over varying frequencies and amplitudes and under the dynamic conditions of various earthquake scenarios. We will also explore the tradeoffs between various GNSS processing schemes including real-time precise point positioning (PPP) and real-time kinematic (RTK) as applied to seismogeodesy. In addition we will discuss implementation of a Rapid Seismic Event Notification System that provides quick delivery of digital data from seismic stations to the acquisition and processing center and a full data integrity model for real-time earthquake notification that provides warning prior to significant ground shaking.

  12. Changes in macrophage membrane properties during early Leishmania amazonensis infection differ from those observed during established infection and are partially explained by phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Eduardo; Torres, Yolima; Alvarez, Claudia; Rojas, Angela; Forero, María Elisa; Camacho, Marcela

    2010-03-01

    Understanding the impact of intracellular pathogens on the behavior of their host cells is key to designing new interventions. We are interested in how Leishmania alters the electrical function of the plasma membrane of the macrophage it infects. The specific question addressed here is the impact of Leishmania infection on macrophage membrane properties during the first 12h post-infection. A decrease of 29% in macrophage membrane capacitance at 3h post-infection indicates that the phagolysosome membrane is donated on entry by the macrophage plasma membrane. Macrophage membrane potential depolarized during the first 12h post-infection, which associated with a decreased inward potassium current density, changed in inward rectifier conductance and increased outward potassium current density. Decreased membrane capacitance and membrane potential, with no changes in ion current density, were found in macrophages after phagocytosis of latex beads. Therefore we suggest that the macrophage membrane changes observed during early Leishmania infection appear to be associated with the phagocytic and activation processes.

  13. Researches on the Nankai trough mega thrust earthquake seismogenic zones using real time observing systems for advanced early warning systems and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    We recognized the importance of real time monitoring on Earthquakes and Tsunamis Based on lessons learned from 2004 Sumatra Earthquake/Tsunamis and 2011 East Japan Earthquake. We deployed DONET1 and are developing DONET2 as real time monitoring systems which are dense ocean floor networks around the Nankai trough seismogenic zone Southwestern Japan. Total observatories of DONE1 and DONET2 are 51 observatories equipped with multi kinds of sensors such as the accelerometer, broadband seismometer, pressure gauge, difference pressure gauge, hydrophone and thermometer in each observatory. These systems are indispensable for not only early warning of Earthquakes/ Tsunamis, but also researches on broadband crustal activities around the Nankai trough seismogenic zone for predictions. DONET1 detected offshore tsunamis 15 minutes earlier than onshore stations at the 2011 East Japan earthquake/tsunami. Furthermore, DONET1/DONET2 will be expected to monitor slow events such as low frequency tremors and slow earthquakes for the prediction researches. Finally, the integration of observations and simulation researches will contribute to estimate of seismic stage changes from the inter-seismic to pre seismic stage. I will introduce applications of DONET1/DONET2 data and advanced simulation researches.

  14. FISH and DAPI staining of the synaptonemal complex of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) allow orientation of the unpaired region of bivalent 1 observed during early pachytene.

    PubMed

    Ocalewicz, Konrad; Mota-Velasco, Jose C; Campos-Ramos, Rafael; Penman, David J

    2009-01-01

    Bivalent 1 of the synaptonemal complex (SC) in XY male Oreochromis niloticus shows an unpaired terminal region in early pachytene. This appears to be related to recombination suppression around a sex determination locus. To allow more detailed analysis of this, and unpaired regions in the karyotype of other Oreochromis species, we developed techniques for FISH on SC preparations, combined with DAPI staining. DAPI staining identified presumptive centromeres in SC bivalents, which appeared to correspond to the positions observed in the mitotic karyotype (the kinetochores could be identified only sporadically in silver-stained EM SC images). Furthermore, two BAC clones containing Dmo (dmrt4) and OniY227 markers that hybridize to known positions in chromosome pair 1 in mitotic spreads (near the centromere, Flpter 0.25, and the putative sex-determination locus, Flpter 0.57, respectively) were used as FISH probes on SCs to verify that the presumptive centromere identified by DAPI staining was located in the expected position. Visualization of both the centromere and FISH signals on bivalent 1 allowed the unpaired region to be positioned at Flpter 0.80 to 1.00, demonstrating that the unpaired region is located in the distal part of the long arm(s). Finally, differences between mitotic and meiotic measurements are discussed.

  15. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of dimethoxybenzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, David J. Mukarakate, Calvin; Nimlos, Mark R.; Scheer, Adam M.; Ormond, Thomas K.; Buckingham, Grant T.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2014-06-21

    The unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of o-, m-, and p-dimethoxybenzene (CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3}) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor with a residence time of 100 μs. Product detection was carried out using single photon ionization (SPI, 10.487 eV) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy from 400 K to 1600 K. The initial pyrolytic step for each isomer is methoxy bond homolysis to eliminate methyl radical. Subsequent thermolysis is unique for each isomer. In the case of o-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3}, intramolecular H-transfer dominates leading to the formation of o-hydroxybenzaldehyde (o-HO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CHO) and phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). Para-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3} immediately breaks the second methoxy bond to form p-benzoquinone, which decomposes further to cyclopentadienone (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}=O). Finally, the m-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3} isomer will predominantly follow a ring-reduction/CO-elimination mechanism to form C{sub 5}H{sub 4}=O. Electronic structure calculations and transition state theory are used to confirm mechanisms and comment on kinetics. Implications for lignin pyrolysis are discussed.

  16. Critical analysis of nitramine decomposition data: Activation energies and frequency factors for HMX and RDX decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of a literature review on thermal decomposition of HMX and RDX is presented. The decomposition apparently fits first order kinetics. Recommended values for Arrhenius parameters for HMX and RDX decomposition in the gaseous and liquid phases and for decomposition of RDX in solution in TNT are given. The apparent importance of autocatalysis is pointed out, as are some possible complications that may be encountered in interpreting extending or extrapolating kinetic data for these compounds from measurements carried out below their melting points to the higher temperatures and pressure characteristic of combustion.

  17. Sustaining effect of soil warming on organic matter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ruixing; Ouyang, Zhu; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Wilson, Glenn; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Global warming affects various parts of carbon (C) cycle including acceleration of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition with strong feedback to atmospheric CO2 concentration. Despite many soil warming studies showed changes of microbial community structure, only very few were focused on sustainability of soil warming on microbial activity associated with SOM decomposition. Two alternative hypotheses: 1) acclimation because of substrate exhaustion and 2) sustaining increase of microbial activity with accelerated decomposition of recalcitrant SOM pools were never proven under long term field conditions. This is especially important in the nowadays introduced no-till crop systems leading to redistribution of organic C at the soil surface, which is much susceptible to warming effects than the rest of the profile. We incubated soil samples from a four-year warming experiment with tillage (T) and no-tillage (NT) practices under three temperatures: 15, 21, and 27 °C, and related the evolved total CO2 efflux to changes of organic C pools. Warmed soils released significantly more CO2 than the control treatment (no warming) at each incubation temperature, and the largest differences were observed under 15 °C (26% increase). The difference in CO2 efflux from NT to T increase with temperature showing high vulnerability of C stored in NT to soil warming. The Q10 value reflecting the sensitivity of SOM decomposition to warming was lower for warmed than non-warmed soil indicating better acclimation of microbes or lower C availability during long term warming. The activity of three extracellular enzymes: β-glucosidase, chitinase, sulphatase, reflecting the response of C, N and S cycles to warming, were significantly higher under warming and especially under NT compared to two other respective treatments. The CO2 released during 2 months of incubation consisted of 85% from recalcitrant SOM and the remaining 15% from microbial biomass and extractable organic C based on the

  18. Development Of Polarimetric Decomposition Techniques For Indian Forest Resource Assessment Using Radar Imaging Satellite (Risat-1) Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, J.

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this work is to examine polarimetric decomposition techniques primarily focussed on Pauli decomposition and Sphere Di-Plane Helix (SDH) decomposition for forest resource assessment. The data processing methods adopted are Pre-processing (Geometric correction and Radiometric calibration), Speckle Reduction, Image Decomposition and Image Classification. Initially to classify forest regions, unsupervised classification was applied to determine different unknown classes. It was observed K-means clustering method gave better results in comparison with ISO Data method.Using the algorithm developed for Radar Tools, the code for decomposition and classification techniques were applied in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and was applied to RISAT-1 image of Mysore-Mandya region of Karnataka, India. This region is chosen for studying forest vegetation and consists of agricultural lands, water and hilly regions. Polarimetric SAR data possess a high potential for classification of earth surface.After applying the decomposition techniques, classification was done by selecting region of interests andpost-classification the over-all accuracy was observed to be higher in the SDH decomposed image, as it operates on individual pixels on a coherent basis and utilises the complete intrinsic coherent nature of polarimetric SAR data. Thereby, making SDH decomposition particularly suited for analysis of high-resolution SAR data. The Pauli Decomposition represents all the polarimetric information in a single SAR image however interpretation of the resulting image is difficult. The SDH decomposition technique seems to produce better results and interpretation as compared to Pauli Decomposition however more quantification and further analysis are being done in this area of research. The comparison of Polarimetric decomposition techniques and evolutionary classification techniques will be the scope of this work.

  19. Determination of the Thermal Decomposition Products of Terephthalic Acid by Using Curie-Point Pyrolyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begüm Elmas Kimyonok, A.; Ulutürk, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    The thermal decomposition behavior of terephthalic acid (TA) was investigated by thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and Curie-point pyrolysis. TG/DTA analysis showed that TA is sublimed at 276°C prior to decomposition. Pyrolysis studies were carried out at various temperatures ranging from 160 to 764°C. Decomposition products were analyzed and their structures were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 11 degradation products were identified at 764°C, whereas no peak was observed below 445°C. Benzene, benzoic acid, and 1,1‧-biphenyl were identified as the major decomposition products, and other degradation products such as toluene, benzophenone, diphenylmethane, styrene, benzaldehyde, phenol, 9H-fluorene, and 9-phenyl 9H-fluorene were also detected. A pyrolysis mechanism was proposed based on the findings.

  20. Decomposition of carrion in the marine environment in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G S; Hobischak, N R

    2004-08-01

    Decomposition of carrion in the marine environment is not well understood. This research involved the decomposition of pig carcasses in Howe Sound in British Columbia. Freshly killed pigs were submerged at two depths, 7.6 m and 15.2 m. The carcasses were tethered so that they could float or sink, but not drift away. Observations were made from May until October. Decomposition was more greatly influenced by sediment type of the sea floor and whether the carcass remained floating, than by depth. Decomposition stages were modified in the marine environment from that seen on land, or in freshwater and were similar to those reported in human death investigations in the marine environment.

  1. NMR analysis of diacyl peroxide decomposition in methanol in response to temperature and microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidukevich, O. A.; Skakovskii, E. D.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.; Zvereva, T. D.; Dikusar, E. A.; Lamotkin, S. A.; Rykov, S. V.

    2012-05-01

    We have studied the decomposition of benzoyl and acetyl benzoyl peroxides in methanol-d4 in response to temperature and microwave radiation. We have shown that chemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) can be observed even when the reactions are carried out in spectrometers with high magnetic fields. In this case, spin correlation persists in geminal radical pairs involving labile acyloxyl radicals. Regardless of the method used to initiate peroxide decomposition, the same amount of products are formed. Homolysis occurs according to a chain mechanism. The contribution of induced decomposition decreases over the course of the reaction. Dissolved oxygen molecules efficiently terminate the chain, decreasing the rate of peroxide decomposition. In the case of acetyl benzoyl peroxide, the product yield depends on the initiation mechanism: for microwave irradiation, the solvent molecules are more active while dissolved oxygen is less active than in thermolysis.

  2. Performance impact of stop lists and morphological decomposition on word-word corpus-based semantic space models.

    PubMed

    Keith, Jeff; Westbury, Chris; Goldman, James

    2015-09-01

    Corpus-based semantic space models, which primarily rely on lexical co-occurrence statistics, have proven effective in modeling and predicting human behavior in a number of experimental paradigms that explore semantic memory representation. The most widely studied extant models, however, are strongly influenced by orthographic word frequency (e.g., Shaoul & Westbury, Behavior Research Methods, 38, 190-195, 2006). This has the implication that high-frequency closed-class words can potentially bias co-occurrence statistics. Because these closed-class words are purported to carry primarily syntactic, rather than semantic, information, the performance of corpus-based semantic space models may be improved by excluding closed-class words (using stop lists) from co-occurrence statistics, while retaining their syntactic information through other means (e.g., part-of-speech tagging and/or affixes from inflected word forms). Additionally, very little work has been done to explore the effect of employing morphological decomposition on the inflected forms of words in corpora prior to compiling co-occurrence statistics, despite (controversial) evidence that humans perform early morphological decomposition in semantic processing. In this study, we explored the impact of these factors on corpus-based semantic space models. From this study, morphological decomposition appears to significantly improve performance in word-word co-occurrence semantic space models, providing some support for the claim that sublexical information-specifically, word morphology-plays a role in lexical semantic processing. An overall decrease in performance was observed in models employing stop lists (e.g., excluding closed-class words). Furthermore, we found some evidence that weakens the claim that closed-class words supply primarily syntactic information in word-word co-occurrence semantic space models.

  3. Insights from letter position dyslexia on morphological decomposition in reading.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Naama; Gvion, Aviah; Nisim, Roni

    2015-01-01

    We explored morphological decomposition in reading, the locus in the reading process in which it takes place and its nature, comparing different types of morphemes. We assessed these questions through the analysis of letter position errors in readers with letter position dyslexia (LPD). LPD is a selective impairment to letter position encoding in the early stage of word reading, which results in letter migrations (such as reading "cloud" for "could"). We used the fact that migrations in LPD occur mainly in word-interior letters, whereas exterior letters rarely migrate. The rationale was that if morphological decomposition occurs prior to letter position encoding and strips off affixes, word-interior letters adjacent to an affix (e.g., signs-signs) would become exterior following affix-stripping and hence exhibit fewer migrations. We tested 11 Hebrew readers with developmental LPD and 1 with acquired LPD in 6 experiments of reading aloud, lexical decision, and comprehension, at the single word and sentence levels (compared with 25 age-matched control participants). The LPD participants read a total of 12,496 migratable words. We examined migrations next to inflectional, derivational, or bound function morphemes compared with migrations of exterior letters. The results were that root letters adjacent to inflectional and derivational morphemes were treated like middle letters, and migrated frequently, whereas root letters adjacent to bound function morphemes patterned with exterior letters, and almost never migrated. Given that LPD is a pre-lexical deficit, these results indicate that morphological decomposition takes place in an early, pre-lexical stage. The finding that morphologically complex nonwords showed the same patterns indicates that this decomposition is structurally, rather than lexically, driven. We suggest that letter position encoding takes place before morphological analysis, but in some cases, as with bound function morphemes, the complex word is re

  4. Insights from letter position dyslexia on morphological decomposition in reading

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Naama; Gvion, Aviah; Nisim, Roni

    2015-01-01

    We explored morphological decomposition in reading, the locus in the reading process in which it takes place and its nature, comparing different types of morphemes. We assessed these questions through the analysis of letter position errors in readers with letter position dyslexia (LPD). LPD is a selective impairment to letter position encoding in the early stage of word reading, which results in letter migrations (such as reading “cloud” for “could”). We used the fact that migrations in LPD occur mainly in word-interior letters, whereas exterior letters rarely migrate. The rationale was that if morphological decomposition occurs prior to letter position encoding and strips off affixes, word-interior letters adjacent to an affix (e.g., signs-signs) would become exterior following affix-stripping and hence exhibit fewer migrations. We tested 11 Hebrew readers with developmental LPD and 1 with acquired LPD in 6 experiments of reading aloud, lexical decision, and comprehension, at the single word and sentence levels (compared with 25 age-matched control participants). The LPD participants read a total of 12,496 migratable words. We examined migrations next to inflectional, derivational, or bound function morphemes compared with migrations of exterior letters. The results were that root letters adjacent to inflectional and derivational morphemes were treated like middle letters, and migrated frequently, whereas root letters adjacent to bound function morphemes patterned with exterior letters, and almost never migrated. Given that LPD is a pre-lexical deficit, these results indicate that morphological decomposition takes place in an early, pre-lexical stage. The finding that morphologically complex nonwords showed the same patterns indicates that this decomposition is structurally, rather than lexically, driven. We suggest that letter position encoding takes place before morphological analysis, but in some cases, as with bound function morphemes, the complex word

  5. An Appraisal of Decomposition Cases Received at the Johannesburg Forensic Pathology Service Medico-legal Mortuary During 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Craig A; Hill, Lawrence; Gordon, Guinevere M

    2016-03-01

    Decomposed bodies pose many questions for researchers regarding environmental effects, cause of death, and patterns. This study aimed to observe the factors associated with decomposed bodies autopsied at the Johannesburg Forensic Pathology Service Medico-legal Mortuary. A total of 4876 autopsies were conducted from 2010 to 2011, of which 109 were decomposed. Black individuals made up the largest proportion (67%) followed by White (26%). Males comprised 86.2%, while 12.8% were female. The mean age was 42.78 years. Most cases were in the early stages of decomposition (49.5%), with 32.1% bloated, 11.9% in active decay, 2.8% in advanced decay, and 3.7% were skeletal. Insect activity was identified in 25.7% of decomposition cases. Cause of death was determined in 48.6% of cases. Of all the cases, 64% were found indoors and 23% outdoors, while 23% had insufficient information regarding the location. Of considerable interest was the number of cases from hospitals and clinics.

  6. Incremental k-core decomposition: Algorithms and evaluation

    DOE PAGES

    Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem; Gedik, Bugra; Jacques-SIlva, Gabriela; ...

    2016-02-01

    A k-core of a graph is a maximal connected subgraph in which every vertex is connected to at least k vertices in the subgraph. k-core decomposition is often used in large-scale network analysis, such as community detection, protein function prediction, visualization, and solving NP-hard problems on real networks efficiently, like maximal clique finding. In many real-world applications, networks change over time. As a result, it is essential to develop efficient incremental algorithms for dynamic graph data. In this paper, we propose a suite of incremental k-core decomposition algorithms for dynamic graph data. These algorithms locate a small subgraph that ismore » guaranteed to contain the list of vertices whose maximum k-core values have changed and efficiently process this subgraph to update the k-core decomposition. We present incremental algorithms for both insertion and deletion operations, and propose auxiliary vertex state maintenance techniques that can further accelerate these operations. Our results show a significant reduction in runtime compared to non-incremental alternatives. We illustrate the efficiency of our algorithms on different types of real and synthetic graphs, at varying scales. Furthermore, for a graph of 16 million vertices, we observe relative throughputs reaching a million times, relative to the non-incremental algorithms.« less

  7. Incremental k-core decomposition: Algorithms and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem; Gedik, Bugra; Jacques-SIlva, Gabriela; Wu, Kun -Lung; Catalyurek, Umit V.

    2016-02-01

    A k-core of a graph is a maximal connected subgraph in which every vertex is connected to at least k vertices in the subgraph. k-core decomposition is often used in large-scale network analysis, such as community detection, protein function prediction, visualization, and solving NP-hard problems on real networks efficiently, like maximal clique finding. In many real-world applications, networks change over time. As a result, it is essential to develop efficient incremental algorithms for dynamic graph data. In this paper, we propose a suite of incremental k-core decomposition algorithms for dynamic graph data. These algorithms locate a small subgraph that is guaranteed to contain the list of vertices whose maximum k-core values have changed and efficiently process this subgraph to update the k-core decomposition. We present incremental algorithms for both insertion and deletion operations, and propose auxiliary vertex state maintenance techniques that can further accelerate these operations. Our results show a significant reduction in runtime compared to non-incremental alternatives. We illustrate the efficiency of our algorithms on different types of real and synthetic graphs, at varying scales. Furthermore, for a graph of 16 million vertices, we observe relative throughputs reaching a million times, relative to the non-incremental algorithms.

  8. Formation and photocatalytic decomposition of a pellicle on anatase surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rupp, F; Haupt, M; Eichler, M; Doering, C; Klostermann, H; Scheideler, L; Lachmann, S; Oehr, C; Wendel, H P; Decker, E; Geis-Gerstorfer, J; von Ohle, C

    2012-01-01

    The acquired dental pellicle plays a critical role in the adhesion and detachment of dental plaque bacteria. It has been reported that titanium dioxide biomaterials decompose single-protein films by photocatalysis. However, it is not known whether this can also be achieved with complex structured pellicle films. This in vitro study investigated in real-time the formation and photocatalytic decomposition of human pellicle at anatase-saliva interfaces. Nanostructured polycrystalline anatase layers were deposited on titanium-coated quartz crystals by magnetron-sputtering, serving as a model for titanium implant surfaces. The quartz crystals were used as acoustic sensors in a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) system with dissipation. In situ UV irradiation of pellicle-covered anatase caused a statistically significant decrease of the adsorbed salivary mass. In contrast, photocatalytic decomposition of pellicle could not be observed on reference titanium surfaces. Wettability characterization revealed superhydrophilicity of anatase upon UV irradiation, whereas titanium was unaffected. XPS measurements provide further information concerning the decomposition of the salivary films. The results suggest that the photocatalytic activity of polycrystalline anatase-modified biomaterial surfaces is able to decompose complex structured macromolecular pellicle films. Therefore, this study opens the way to surface modifications supporting therapeutic approaches of biofilm removal.

  9. Social and Emotional Characteristics and Early Childhood Mathematical and Literacy Giftedness: Observations From Parents and Childcare Providers Using the ECLS-B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Hope E.

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated mixed results regarding differences in social and emotional characteristics between gifted and typical populations. The purpose of this secondary analysis of data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study: Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) is to investigate the affective characteristics of early mathematics and literacy ability…

  10. Evaluation of Early Childhood Coaching Implementation in Nebraska. Technical Report Vol. 2: Key Findings from Participant Observational and Self-Reported Data. CYFS Working Paper 2014-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaraman, Gayatri; Knoche, Lisa; Marvin, Christine; Bainter, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The Nebraska Early Childhood Coach (ECC) training was a 3 day (8 hours) professional development event sponsored by the Nebraska Department of Education, Office of Child Development in 2009-2010. Sixty-five early childhood teachers and related service providers participated for the purpose of learning the basic principles and behaviors associated…

  11. On least-order flow decompositions for aerodynamics and aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Michael; Noack, Bernd R.; Jordan, Peter

    2012-11-01

    A generalisation of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for optimal flow resolution of linearly related observables is presented, as proposed in the identically named publication of Schlegel, Noack, Jordan, Dillmann, Groeschel, Schroeder, Wei, Freund, Lehmann and Tadmor (Journal of Fluid Mechanics 2012, vol. 697, pp. 367-398). This Galerkin expansion, termed ``observable inferred decomposition'' (OID), addresses a need in aerodynamic and aeroacoustic applications by identifying the modes contributing most to these observables. Thus, OID constitutes a building block for physical understanding, least-biased conditional sampling, state estimation and control design. From a continuum of OID versions, two variants are tailored for purposes of observer and control design, respectively. Three aerodynamic and aeroacoustic observables are studied: (1) lift and drag fluctuation of a two-dimensional cylinder wake flow, (2) aeroacoustic density fluctuations measured by a sensor array and emitted from a two-dimensional compressible mixing layer, and (3) aeroacoustic pressure monitored by a sensor array and emitted from a three-dimensional compressible jet. The most ``drag-related,'' ``lift-related'' and ``loud'' structures are distilled and interpreted in terms of known physical processes. This work was partially funded by the DFG under grants SCHL 586/2-1 and ANR, Chair of Excellence, TUCOROM.

  12. Decomposition of forest products buried in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoming; Padgett, Jennifer M.; Powell, John S.; Barlaz, Morton A.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • This study tracked chemical changes of wood and paper in landfills. • A decomposition index was developed to quantify carbohydrate biodegradation. • Newsprint biodegradation as measured here is greater than previous reports. • The field results correlate well with previous laboratory measurements. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the decomposition of selected wood and paper products in landfills. The decomposition of these products under anaerobic landfill conditions results in the generation of biogenic carbon dioxide and methane, while the un-decomposed portion represents a biogenic carbon sink. Information on the decomposition of these municipal waste components is used to estimate national methane emissions inventories, for attribution of carbon storage credits, and to assess the life-cycle greenhouse gas impacts of wood and paper products. Hardwood (HW), softwood (SW), plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium-density fiberboard (MDF), newsprint (NP), corrugated container (CC) and copy paper (CP) were buried in landfills operated with leachate recirculation, and were excavated after approximately 1.5 and 2.5 yr. Samples were analyzed for cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H), lignin (L), volatile solids (VS), and organic carbon (OC). A holocellulose decomposition index (HOD) and carbon storage factor (CSF) were calculated to evaluate the extent of solids decomposition and carbon storage. Samples of OSB made from HW exhibited cellulose plus hemicellulose (C + H) loss of up to 38%, while loss for the other wood types was 0–10% in most samples. The C + H loss was up to 81%, 95% and 96% for NP, CP and CC, respectively. The CSFs for wood and paper samples ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 and 0.02 to 0.27 g OC g{sup −1} dry material, respectively. These results, in general, correlated well with an earlier laboratory-scale study, though NP and CC decomposition measured in this study were higher than

  13. The impact of shallow burial on differential decomposition to the body: a temperate case study.

    PubMed

    Schotsmans, Eline M J; Van de Voorde, Wim; De Winne, Joan; Wilson, Andrew S

    2011-03-20

    Extant literature contains a number of specific case studies on differential decomposition involving adipocere formation or desiccation, but few describe the co-occurrence of these features within a temperate climate. The case of a 65-year-old male, partially buried in a shallow grave for 7 months, is presented in which the soft tissues of the body were outwardly well preserved. The right leg was desiccated, some parts of the body were covered with adipocere (head, neck, right shoulder, upper torso and left leg) and other parts could be classified as in the early stages of decomposition. In this study the taphonomic variables resulting in differential decomposition with desiccation and adipocere formation are discussed.

  14. [Putrefaction in a mortuary cold room? Unusual progression of postmortem decomposition processes].

    PubMed

    Kunz, Sebastian N; Brandtner, Herwig; Meyer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    This article illustrates the rare case of rapid body decomposition in an uncommonly short postmortem interval. A clear discrepancy between early postmortem changes at the crime scene and advanced body decomposition at the time of autopsy were seen. Subsequent police investigation identified a failure in the cooling system of the morgue as probable cause. However, due to the postmortem status of the body, a moderate rise in temperature alone is not considered to have caused the full extent of postmortem changes. Therefore, other factors must have been present, which accelerated the postmortem decomposition processes. In our opinion, the most reasonable explanation for this phenomenon would be a rather long resting time of the corpse in a non-refrigerated hearse on a hot summer day.

  15. Outpatient management of severe early OHSS by administration of GnRH antagonist in the luteal phase: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Management of established severe OHSS requires prolonged hospitalization, occasionally in intensive care units, accompanied by multiple ascites punctures, correction of intravascular fluid volume and electrolyte imbalance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether it is feasible to manage women with severe OHSS as outpatients by treating them with GnRH antagonists in the luteal phase. Methods This is a single-centre, prospective, observational, cohort study. Forty patients diagnosed with severe OHSS, five days post oocyte retrieval, were managed as outpatients after administration of GnRH antagonist (0.25 mg) daily from days 5 to 8 post oocyte retrieval, combined with cryopreservation of all embryos. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients with severe OHSS, in whom outpatient management was not feasible. Results 11.3% (95% CI 8.3%-15.0%) of patients (40/353) developed severe early OHSS. None of the 40 patients required hospitalization following luteal antagonist administration and embryo cryopreservation. Ovarian volume, ascites, hematocrit, WBC, serum oestradiol and progesterone decreased significantly (P < 0.001) by the end of the monitoring period, indicating rapid resolution of severe OHSS. Conclusions The current study suggests, for the first time, that successful outpatient management of severe OHSS with antagonist treatment in the luteal phase is feasible and is associated with rapid regression of the syndrome, challenging the dogma of inpatient management. The proposed management is a flexible approach that minimizes unnecessary embryo transfer cancellations in the majority (88.7%) of high risk for OHSS patients. PMID:22938051

  16. The Young and Bright Type Ia Supernova ASASSN-14lp: Discovery, Early-time Observations, First-light Time, Distance to NGC 4666, and Progenitor Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappee, B. J.; Piro, A. L.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Contreras, C.; Itagaki, K.; Burns, C. R.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Alper, E.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Brimacombe, J.; Conseil, E.; Danilet, A. B.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Grupe, D.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kiyota, S.; Morrell, N.; Nicolas, J.; Phillips, M. M.; Pojmanski, G.; Simonian, G.; Stritzinger, M.; Szczygieł, D. M.; Taddia, F.; Thompson, T. A.; Thorstensen, J.; Wagner, M. R.; Woźniak, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    On 2014 December 9.61, the All-sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or “Assassin”) discovered ASASSN-14lp just ˜2 days after first light using a global array of 14 cm diameter telescopes. ASASSN-14lp went on to become a bright supernova (V = 11.94 mag), second only to SN 2014J for the year. We present prediscovery photometry (with a detection less than a day after first light) and ultraviolet through near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic data covering the rise and fall of ASASSN-14lp for more than 100 days. We find that ASASSN-14lp had a broad light curve ({{Δ }}{m}15(B)=0.80+/- 0.05), a B-band maximum at 2457015.82 ± 0.03, a rise time of {16.94}-0.10+0.11 days, and moderate host-galaxy extinction (E{(B-V)}{host}=0.33+/- 0.06). Using ASASSN-14lp, we derive a distance modulus for NGC 4666 of μ =30.8+/- 0.2, corresponding to a distance of 14.7 ± 1.5 Mpc. However, adding ASASSN-14lp to the calibrating sample of Type Ia supernovae still requires an independent distance to the host galaxy. Finally, using our early-time photometric and spectroscopic observations, we rule out red giant secondaries and, assuming a favorable viewing angle and explosion time, any nondegenerate companion larger than 0.34 {R}⊙ .

  17. El Mayor-Cucapah (Mw 7.2) earthquake: Early near-field postseismic deformation from InSAR and GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ortega, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurred on 4 April 2010 in northeastern Baja California just south of the U.S.-Mexico border. The earthquake ruptured several previously mapped faults, as well as some unidentified ones, including the Pescadores, Borrego, Paso Inferior and Paso Superior faults in the Sierra Cucapah, and the Indiviso fault in the Mexicali Valley and Colorado River Delta.We conducted several Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign surveys of preexisting and newly established benchmarks within 30 km of the earthquake rupture. Most of the benchmarks were occupied within days after the earthquake, allowing us to capture the very early postseismic transient motions. The GPS data show postseismic displacements in the same direction as the coseismic displacements; time series indicate a gradual decay in postseismic velocities with characteristic time scales of 66 ± 9 days and 20 ± 3 days, assuming exponential and logarithmic decay, respectively. We also analyzed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the Envisat and ALOS satellites. The main deformation features seen in the line-of-sight displacement maps indicate subsidence concentrated in the southern and northern parts of the main rupture, in particular at the Indiviso fault, at the Laguna Salada basin, and at the Paso Superior fault. We show that the near-field GPS and InSAR observations over a time period of 5 months after the earthquake can be explained by a combination of afterslip, fault zone contraction, and a possible minor contribution of poroelastic rebound. Far-field data require an additional mechanism, most likely viscoelastic relaxation in the ductile substrate.

  18. El Mayor-Cucapah (Mw 7.2) earthquake: Early near-field postseismic deformation from InSAR and GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ortega, Alejandro; Fialko, Yuri; Sandwell, David; Alejandro Nava-Pichardo, F.; Fletcher, John; Gonzalez-Garcia, Javier; Lipovsky, Brad; Floyd, Michael; Funning, Gareth

    2014-02-01

    El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurred on 4 April 2010 in northeastern Baja California just south of the U.S.-Mexico border. The earthquake ruptured several previously mapped faults, as well as some unidentified ones, including the Pescadores, Borrego, Paso Inferior and Paso Superior faults in the Sierra Cucapah, and the Indiviso fault in the Mexicali Valley and Colorado River Delta. We conducted several Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign surveys of preexisting and newly established benchmarks within 30 km of the earthquake rupture. Most of the benchmarks were occupied within days after the earthquake, allowing us to capture the very early postseismic transient motions. The GPS data show postseismic displacements in the same direction as the coseismic displacements; time series indicate a gradual decay in postseismic velocities with characteristic time scales of 66 ± 9 days and 20 ± 3 days, assuming exponential and logarithmic decay, respectively. We also analyzed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the Envisat and ALOS satellites. The main deformation features seen in the line-of-sight displacement maps indicate subsidence concentrated in the southern and northern parts of the main rupture, in particular at the Indiviso fault, at the Laguna Salada basin, and at the Paso Superior fault. We show that the near-field GPS and InSAR observations over a time period of 5 months after the earthquake can be explained by a combination of afterslip, fault zone contraction, and a possible minor contribution of poroelastic rebound. Far-field data require an additional mechanism, most likely viscoelastic relaxation in the ductile substrate.

  19. The young and bright Type Ia supernova ASASSN-14lp: Discovery, early-time observations, first-light time, distance to NGC 4666, and progenitor constraints

    DOE PAGES

    Shappee, B. J.; Piro, A. L.; Holoien, T. W. -S.; ...

    2016-07-27

    On 2014 December 9.61, the All-sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") discovered ASASSN-14lp just ~2 days after first light using a global array of 14 cm diameter telescopes. ASASSN-14lp went on to become a bright supernova (V = 11.94 mag), second only to SN 2014J for the year. We present prediscovery photometry (with a detection less than a day after first light) and ultraviolet through near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic data covering the rise and fall of ASASSN-14lp for more than 100 days. We find that ASASSN-14lp had a broad light curve (more » $${\\rm{\\Delta }}{m}_{15}(B)=0.80\\pm 0.05$$), a B-band maximum at 2457015.82 ± 0.03, a rise time of $${16.94}_{-0.10}^{+0.11}$$ days, and moderate host-galaxy extinction ($$E{(B-V)}_{\\mathrm{host}}=0.33\\pm 0.06$$). Using ASASSN-14lp, we derive a distance modulus for NGC 4666 of $$\\mu =30.8\\pm 0.2$$, corresponding to a distance of 14.7 ± 1.5 Mpc. However, adding ASASSN-14lp to the calibrating sample of Type Ia supernovae still requires an independent distance to the host galaxy. Lastly, using our early-time photometric and spectroscopic observations, we rule out red giant secondaries and, assuming a favorable viewing angle and explosion time, any nondegenerate companion larger than 0.34 $${R}_{\\odot }$$.« less

  20. The young and bright Type Ia supernova ASASSN-14lp: Discovery, early-time observations, first-light time, distance to NGC 4666, and progenitor constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Shappee, B. J.; Piro, A. L.; Holoien, T. W. -S.; Prieto, J. L.; Contreras, C.; Itagaki, K.; Burns, C. R.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Alper, E.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Brimacombe, J.; Conseil, E.; Danilet, A. B.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Grupe, D.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kiyota, S.; Morrell, N.; Nicolas, J.; Phillips, M. M.; Pojmanski, G.; Simonian, G.; Stritzinger, M.; Szczygieł, D. M.; Taddia, F.; Thompson, T. A.; Thorstensen, J.; Wagner, M. R.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-07-27

    On 2014 December 9.61, the All-sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") discovered ASASSN-14lp just ~2 days after first light using a global array of 14 cm diameter telescopes. ASASSN-14lp went on to become a bright supernova (V = 11.94 mag), second only to SN 2014J for the year. We present prediscovery photometry (with a detection less than a day after first light) and ultraviolet through near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic data covering the rise and fall of ASASSN-14lp for more than 100 days. We find that ASASSN-14lp had a broad light curve (${\\rm{\\Delta }}{m}_{15}(B)=0.80\\pm 0.05$), a B-band maximum at 2457015.82 ± 0.03, a rise time of ${16.94}_{-0.10}^{+0.11}$ days, and moderate host-galaxy extinction ($E{(B-V)}_{\\mathrm{host}}=0.33\\pm 0.06$). Using ASASSN-14lp, we derive a distance modulus for NGC 4666 of $\\mu =30.8\\pm 0.2$, corresponding to a distance of 14.7 ± 1.5 Mpc. However, adding ASASSN-14lp to the calibrating sample of Type Ia supernovae still requires an independent distance to the host galaxy. Lastly, using our early-time photometric and spectroscopic observations, we rule out red giant secondaries and, assuming a favorable viewing angle and explosion time, any nondegenerate companion larger than 0.34 ${R}_{\\odot }$.

  1. Spectroscopic Observations of SN 2012fr: A Luminous, Normal Type Ia Supernova with Early High-velocity Features and a Late Velocity Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, M. J.; Scalzo, R. A.; Sim, S. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B. P.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Contreras, C.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N.; Jha, S. W.; McCully, C.; Filippenko, A. V.; Anderson, J. P.; Benetti, S.; Bufano, F.; de Jaeger, T.; Forster, F.; Gal-Yam, A.; Le Guillou, L.; Maguire, K.; Maund, J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pignata, G.; Smartt, S.; Spyromilio, J.; Sullivan, M.; Taddia, F.; Valenti, S.; Bayliss, D. D. R.; Bessell, M.; Blanc, G. A.; Carson, D. J.; Clubb, K. I.; de Burgh-Day, C.; Desjardins, T. D.; Fang, J. J.; Fox, O. D.; Gates, E. L.; Ho, I.-T.; Keller, S.; Kelly, P. L.; Lidman, C.; Loaring, N. S.; Mould, J. R.; Owers, M.; Ozbilgen, S.; Pei, L.; Pickering, T.; Pracy, M. B.; Rich, J. A.; Schaefer, B. E.; Scott, N.; Stritzinger, M.; Vogt, F. P. A.; Zhou, G.

    2013-06-01

    We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia SN 2012fr, 33 of which were obtained before maximum light. At early times, SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II λ6355 line that can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity "photospheric" component. This Si II λ6355 HVF fades by phase -5 subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of ~12,000 km s-1 until at least five weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v ≈ 12,000 km s-1 with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as an HVF beginning at v ≈ 31,000 km s-1 two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the "shallow silicon" and "core-normal" subclasses in the Branch et al. classification scheme, and on the border between normal and high-velocity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Wang et al. system. Though it is a clear member of the "low velocity gradient" group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.

  2. APEX/SABOCA observations of small-scale structure of infrared-dark clouds . I. Early evolutionary stages of star-forming cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan, Sarah E.; Henning, Thomas; Beuther, Henrik

    2013-11-01

    Infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) harbor the early phases of cluster and high-mass star formation and are comprised of cold (~20 K), dense (n > 104 cm-3) gas. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of IRDCs is dominated by the far-infrared and millimeter wavelength regime, and our initial Herschel study examined IRDCs at the peak of the SED with high angular resolution. Here we present a follow-up study using the SABOCA instrument on APEX which delivers 7.8″ angular resolution at 350 μm, matching the resolution we achieved with Herschel/PACS, and allowing us to characterize substructure on ~0.1 pc scales. Our sample of 11 nearby IRDCs are a mix of filamentary and clumpy morphologies, and the filamentary clouds show significant hierarchical structure, while the clumpy IRDCs exhibit little hierarchical structure. All IRDCs, regardless of morphology, have about 14% of their total mass in small scale core-like structures which roughly follow a trend of constant volume density over all size scales. Out of the 89 protostellar cores we identified in this sample with Herschel, we recover 40 of the brightest and re-fit their SEDs and find their properties agree fairly well with our previous estimates (⟨ T ⟩ ~ 19 K). We detect a new population of "cold cores" which have no 70 μm counterpart, but are 100 and 160 μm-bright, with colder temperatures (⟨ T ⟩ ~ 16 K). This latter population, along with SABOCA-only detections, are predominantly low-mass objects, but their evolutionary diagnostics are consistent with the earliest starless or prestellar phase of cores in IRDCs. Based on observations carried out with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR), Onsala Space Observatory (OSO), and the European Southern Observatory (ESO).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Role of patient and tumor characteristics in sentinel lymph node metastasis in patients with luminal early breast cancer: an observational study.

    PubMed

    La Verde, Nicla; Biagioli, Elena; Gerardi, Chiara; Cordovana, Andrea; Casiraghi, Chiara; Floriani, Irene; Bernardin, Elena; Farina, Gabriella; Di Cosimo, Serena; Dazzani, Maria Chiara; Gherardi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the risk of sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis is important for clinical decision-making in the setting of early breast cancer (EBC). This study is aimed to identify tumor and patient characteristics that influenced the SLN metastatic involvement, with a focus on luminal subtypes. An observational study including women treated for EBC from 2005 to 2013 was conducted. Regression analyses were used to assess the association between SLN metastasis and age, menopausal status, tumor size, histological grading, presence of extensive "in situ" carcinoma components, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and expression of Ki-67, hormone receptors, and HER2. Of 345 women, 84 (24.3 %) had at least one SLN metastasis; 63.1 % were macrometastases. Among all patients, 31.6 % exhibited LVI. In univariate analyses, tumor size, histological grade, and LVI were associated with SLN metastasis. The multivariate model confirmed only the association between LVI and SLN status (OR 3.27, 95 % CI 1.85-5.68; p < 0.0001). Luminal subtypes were detected in 86.1 % of women. In this subgroup, the multivariate model confirmed a significant relationship between LVI and SLN status (OR 3.47, 95 % CI 1.90-6.33; p < 0.0001). Since a proper histopathological assessment of LVI is not possible prior to surgery, this factor cannot be used to guide decisions on performing SLN biopsies. Nevertheless, when a SLN biopsy is refused or contraindicated, an LVI assessment on an excisional biopsy of the tumor could facilitate prognosis determination and treatment management.

  4. Stellar Populations of Lyman Break Galaxies at z approx. to 1-3 in the HST/WFC3 Early Release Science Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathi, N. P.; Cohen, S. H.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Finkelstein, S. L.; McCarthy, P. J.; Windhorst, R. A.; Yan, H.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Rutkowski, M. J.; OConnell, R. W.; Straughn, A. N.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimble, R. A.; Paresce, F.; Saha, A.; Silk, J. I.; Tauger, J. T.; Young, E. T.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies . (LBGs) at z approx = 1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST /WFC3 obse,rvations cover about 50 arcmin2 in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z approx = 1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope f3 is redder than at high redshift (z > 3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at .z approx = 1-3 are massive, dustier and more highly star-forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities, though their median values are similar within 1a uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all. redshifts, find physically similar galaxies; and (4) the stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of approx 0.46, and star-formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of approx 0.90. These relations hold true - within luminosities probed in this study - for LBGs from z approx = 1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z approx = 2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z > 3, a true Lyman break selection at z approx = 2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys,. both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties, and their evolution.

  5. Decomposition is always temperature dependent, except when its not

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding of the temperature dependence of decomposition of soil organic matter has been complicated by the two following facts: (1) all enzymatic activity, including biologically mediated breakdown of organic matter in soils, is temperature dependent; and (2) much of the organic matter in soils is effectively isolated from enzymatic activity, either in space or time, through a wide variety of environmental constraints, including physical and chemical protection, spatial heterogeneity, lack of oxygen, or sub-zero temperatures. Because of the second fact, the first has been questioned in papers that report lack of observed temperature sensitivity of decomposition of soil organic matter. In my 2006 review paper with Ivan Janssens, we attempted to clarify these facts and their interactions and why temperature dependence is sometimes observed and sometimes not. However, it appears that our discussion of how Arrhenius kinetics affects enzymatic activity has become the paper's main recognized legacy, and it has been cited in support of the "carbon-quality-temperature" hypothesis. Here I will update and clarify aspects of that review as follows: (1) a Dual Arrhenius Michaelis-Menten (DAMM) model that merges these kinetic models with substrate diffusion processes can parsimoniously and mechanistically explain fast responses of carbon metabolism in soils as temperature and water content vary over time scales of minutes to months; and (2) variations in activation energies of enzymatic reactions have little or no effect on C metabolism when substrate is not available to enzymes, and this second point applies to both short and long-term turnover of soil organic matter. Because of this latter point, mean residence times and decomposition constants often do not correlate well with the chemical structure ("carbon quality") of soil organic matter, as is predicted by Arrhenius kinetics alone. While it is true that biological decomposition reactions, when they occur, are always

  6. Revisiting formic acid decomposition on metallic powder catalysts: Exploding the HCOOH decomposition volcano curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yadan; Roberts, Charles A.; Perkins, Ryan T.; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-08-01

    This study revisits the classic volcano curve for HCOOH decomposition by metal catalysts by taking a modern catalysis approach. The metal catalysts (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ni, Rh, Co and Fe) were prepared by H2 reduction of the corresponding metal oxides. The number of surface active sites (Ns) was determined by formic acid chemisorption. In situ IR indicated that both monodentate and bidentate/bridged surface HCOO* were present on the metals. Heats of adsorption (ΔHads) for surface HCOO* values on metals were taken from recently reported DFT calculations. Kinetics for surface HCOO* decomposition (krds) were determined with TPD spectroscopy. Steady-state specific activity (TOF = activity/Ns) for HCOOH decomposition over the metals was calculated from steady-state activity (μmol/g-s) and Ns (μmol/g). Steady-state TOFs for HCOOH decomposition weakly correlated with surface HCOO* decomposition kinetics (krds) and ΔHads of surface HCOO* intermediates. The plot of TOF vs. ΔHads for HCOOH decomposition on metal catalysts does not reproduce the classic volcano curve, but shows that TOF depends on both ΔHads and decomposition kinetics (krds) of surface HCOO* intermediates. This is the first time that the classic catalysis study of HCOOH decomposition on metallic powder catalysts has been repeated since its original publication.

  7. Comparison of the Decomposition VOC Profile during Winter and Summer in a Moist, Mid-Latitude (Cfb) Climate

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Shari L.; Perrault, Katelynn A.; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues; Nizio, Katie D.; Focant, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with decomposition is an emerging field in forensic taphonomy due to their importance in locating human remains using biological detectors such as insects and canines. A consistent decomposition VOC profile has not yet been elucidated due to the intrinsic impact of the environment on the decomposition process in different climatic zones. The study of decomposition VOCs has typically occurred during the warmer months to enable chemical profiling of all decomposition stages. The present study investigated the decomposition VOC profile in air during both warmer and cooler months in a moist, mid-latitude (Cfb) climate as decomposition occurs year-round in this environment. Pig carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) were placed on a soil surface to decompose naturally and their VOC profile was monitored during the winter and summer months. Corresponding control sites were also monitored to determine the natural VOC profile of the surrounding soil and vegetation. VOC samples were collected onto sorbent tubes and analyzed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography – time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). The summer months were characterized by higher temperatures and solar radiation, greater rainfall accumulation, and comparable humidity when compared to the winter months. The rate of decomposition was faster and the number and abundance of VOCs was proportionally higher in summer. However, a similar trend was observed in winter and summer demonstrating a rapid increase in VOC abundance during active decay with a second increase in abundance occurring later in the decomposition process. Sulfur-containing compounds, alcohols and ketones represented the most abundant classes of compounds in both seasons, although almost all 10 compound classes identified contributed to discriminating the stages of decomposition throughout both seasons. The advantages of GC×GC-TOFMS were demonstrated for

  8. Comparison of the decomposition VOC profile during winter and summer in a moist, mid-latitude (Cfb) climate.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Shari L; Perrault, Katelynn A; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues; Nizio, Katie D; Focant, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with decomposition is an emerging field in forensic taphonomy due to their importance in locating human remains using biological detectors such as insects and canines. A consistent decomposition VOC profile has not yet been elucidated due to the intrinsic impact of the environment on the decomposition process in different climatic zones. The study of decomposition VOCs has typically occurred during the warmer months to enable chemical profiling of all decomposition stages. The present study investigated the decomposition VOC profile in air during both warmer and cooler months in a moist, mid-latitude (Cfb) climate as decomposition occurs year-round in this environment. Pig carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) were placed on a soil surface to decompose naturally and their VOC profile was monitored during the winter and summer months. Corresponding control sites were also monitored to determine the natural VOC profile of the surrounding soil and vegetation. VOC samples were collected onto sorbent tubes and analyzed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography--time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS). The summer months were characterized by higher temperatures and solar radiation, greater rainfall accumulation, and comparable humidity when compared to the winter months. The rate of decomposition was faster and the number and abundance of VOCs was proportionally higher in summer. However, a similar trend was observed in winter and summer demonstrating a rapid increase in VOC abundance during active decay with a second increase in abundance occurring later in the decomposition process. Sulfur-containing compounds, alcohols and ketones represented the most abundant classes of compounds in both seasons, although almost all 10 compound classes identified contributed to discriminating the stages of decomposition throughout both seasons. The advantages of GC × GC-TOFMS were demonstrated

  9. Microbial Signatures of Cadaver Gravesoil During Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Finley, Sheree J; Pechal, Jennifer L; Benbow, M Eric; Robertson, B K; Javan, Gulnaz T

    2016-04-01

    Genomic studies have estimated there are approximately 10(3)-10(6) bacterial species per gram of soil. The microbial species found in soil associated with decomposing human remains (gravesoil) have been investigated and recognized as potential molecular determinants for estimates of time since death. The nascent era of high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the conserved 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene region of gravesoil microbes is allowing research to expand beyond more subjective empirical methods used in forensic microbiology. The goal of the present study was to evaluate microbial communities and identify taxonomic signatures associated with the gravesoil human cadavers. Using 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based sequencing, soil microbial communities were surveyed from 18 cadavers placed on the surface or buried that were allowed to decompose over a range of decomposition time periods (3-303 days). Surface soil microbial communities showed a decreasing trend in taxon richness, diversity, and evenness over decomposition, while buried cadaver-soil microbial communities demonstrated increasing taxon richness, consistent diversity, and decreasing evenness. The results show that ubiquitous Proteobacteria was confirmed as the most abundant phylum in all gravesoil samples. Surface cadaver-soil communities demonstrated a decrease in Acidobacteria and an increase in Firmicutes relative abundance over decomposition, while buried soil communities were consistent in their community composition throughout decomposition. Better understanding of microbial community structure and its shifts over time may be important for advancing general knowledge of decomposition soil ecology and its potential use during forensic investigations.

  10. Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Poly(3-nitratooxetane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian; Cruz, Aliza; Stoltz, Chad

    2009-06-01

    Poly(3-nitratooxetane), or PNO, is a new high-energy density polymer that is expected to increase formulation energy output without sacrificing binder stability. It is anticipated that using PNO in propellant formulations will be advantageous compared to other energetic binders such as its structural isomer poly(glycidyl nitrate) (PGN). In an effort to understand the combustion behavior of this new energetic polymer, thermal decomposition of PNO has been investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermal gravimetric analysis shows that this material is thermally stable to at least 150^oC and that exothermic decomposition peaks near 203^oC. T- Jump/FTIR was used under various conditions to identify gas- phase thermal decomposition products, including H2O, CH2O, CO2, CO, N2O, NO, NO2, and HONO (cis and trans). Additional time- resolved T-Jump/FTIR experiments suggest immediate dissociation of NO2 as the obvious first step in PNO decomposition, while previous work on the PGN polymer system suggests that the entire CH2ONO2 side chain breaks from the PGN backbone before dissociation. It is likely that different decomposition pathways are followed for each binder system due to location of available C-O and N-O moieties on each polymer.

  11. Steganography based on pixel intensity value decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulla, Alan Anwar; Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on steganography based on pixel intensity value decomposition. A number of existing schemes such as binary, Fibonacci, Prime, Natural, Lucas, and Catalan-Fibonacci (CF) are evaluated in terms of payload capacity and stego quality. A new technique based on a specific representation is proposed to decompose pixel intensity values into 16 (virtual) bit-planes suitable for embedding purposes. The pro