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  1. Effects of early parenteral iron combined erythropoietin in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Linxia; Tang, Qingya; Zhu, Wenying; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhu, Yuefang; Wang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Backgroud: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of early parenteral iron supplementation combined erythropoietin for prevention of anemia in preterm infants. Methods: In total, 96 preterm infants were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a control group receiving standard parenteral nutrition (group 1: n = 31), an iron-supplemented group (group 2: IS, n = 33), and an iron-supplemented combined erythropoietin group (group 3: IS+EPO, n = 32). The primary objective was to assess hemoglobin (Hb) levels. The secondary objectives included assessment of red blood cell counts (RBC), mean cell volume (MCV), serum iron, ferritin, percentages of reticulocyte (RET), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and oxidative stress, which was assessed by measuring plasma levels of malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase at baseline and at 2 weeks. The blood routine indices including Hb, RBC, MCV, and percentages of RET were measured at corrected age of 1 and 3 months. Results: At 2 weeks of life, the percentages of reticulocyte in group 2 and group 3 were significantly higher than those in group 1 (2.1±0.4, 2.5±0.3, and 1.7±0.3, respectively, P < 0.001, P<0.001), whereas TIBC were significantly lower than those in group 1 (36.7±4.6, 36.0±4.7, and 41.6 ± 5.2 respectively, P = 0.011, P = 0.006). There were no significant differences in RBC counts, the levels of hemoglobin, ferritin, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase among the 3 groups at 2weeks of life. RBC, Hb, MCV, body weight, body length, and head circumference at a corrected age of 1 month did not differ among 3 groups. At corrected age of 3months, more infants in the control group had abnormal Hb and MCV levels (Hb levels: 114.3 ± 21.3, 123.7 ± 31.6, and 125.1 ± 21.2, P = 0.021, P = 0.034, respectively; MCV: 74.1 ± 3.5, 78.3 ± 4.7 and 79.1 ± 5.2, P = 0.017, P = 0.012, respectively), whereas cases of oral iron, cases of breastfeeding

  2. Early Enteral Combined with Parenteral Nutrition Treatment for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on Immune Function, Nutritional Status and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mingchao; Wang, Qiaoling; Fang, Wei; Jiang, Yunxia; Li, Liandi; Sun, Peng; Wang, Zhihong

    2016-11-20

    Objective To compare the conjoint effect of enteral nutrition (EN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) with single EN or PN on immune function, nutritional status, complications and clinical outcomes of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (STBI). Methods A prospective randomized control trial was carried out from January 2009 to May 2012 in Neurological Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Patients of STBI who met the enrolment criteria (Glasgow Coma Scale score 6~8; Nutritional Risk Screening ≥3) were randomly divided into 3 groups and were admi- nistrated EN, PN or EN+PN treatments respectively. The indexes of nutritional status, immune function, complications and clinical outcomes were examined and compared statistically. Results There were 120 patients enrolled in the study, with 40 pationts in each group. In EN+PN group, T lymthocyte subsets CD3+%, CD4+%, ratio of CD3+/CD25+, ratio of CD4+/CD8+, the plasma levels of IgA, IgM, and IgG at 20 days after nutritional treatment were significantly increased compared to the baseline(t=4.32-30.00, P<0.01), and they were significantly higher than those of PN group (t=2.44-14.70; P<0.05,or P<0.01) with exception of CD4+/CD8+, higher than those of EN group (t=2.49-13.31, P<0.05, or P<0.01) with exceptions of CD3+/CD25+, CD4+/CD8+, IgG and IgM. For the nutritional status, the serum total protein, albumin, prealbumin and hemoglobin were significantly higher in the EN (t=5.87-11.91; P<0.01) and EN+PN groups (t=6.12-13.12; P<0.01) than those in PN group after nutrition treatment. The serum prealbumin was higher in EN+PN group than that in EN group (t=2.08; P<0.05). Compared to the PN group, the complication occurrence rates of EN+PN group were significantly lower in stress ulcer (22.5% vs. 47.5%; χ(2)= 8.24, P<0.01), intracranial infection (12.5% vs 32.5%;χ(2)= 6.88, P<0.01) and pyemia (25.0% vs. 47.5%; χ(2)= 6.57, P<0.05). Compared to the EN group, the complication occurrence rates of EN+PN group were significantly lower in

  3. Management and effects of parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Angie

    Despite nutrition being a basic human need, malnutrition in hospitals remains surprisingly common, with the effects clearly documented (Taylor and Goodison-McLaren, 1992). Malnourished patients are more likely to suffer from complications; are at increased risk of developing infections; have poor or delayed wound healing, increased mortality rates and longer hospital stays. This article focuses on the basics of parenteral nutrition in the adult, addressing a small selection of potential complications.

  4. The Technical and Financial Effects of Parenteral Supplementation with Selenium and Vitamin E during Late Pregnancy and the Early Lactation Period on the Productivity of Dairy Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bayril, T.; Yildiz, A. S.; Akdemir, F.; Yalcin, C.; Köse, M.; Yilmaz, O.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of parenteral selenium (Se) and vitamin E supplementation on economic impact, milk yield, and some reproductive parameters in high-yield dairy cows in the dry period and in those at the beginning of lactation. At the beginning of the dry period, cows (n = 323) were randomly divided into three groups as follows: Treatment 1 (T1), Treatment 2 (T2), and Control (C). Cows in group T1 received this preparation 21 days before calving and on calving day, and cows in group T2 received it only on calving day. The cows in the control group did not receive this preparation. Supplementation with Se increased Se serum levels of cows treated at calving day (p<0.05). Differences in milk yield at all weeks and the electrical conductivity values at the 8th and 12th weeks were significant (p<0.05). Supplementation with Se and Vitamin E decreased the incidence of metritis, the number of services per conception and the service period, but had no effects on the incidence of retained fetal membrane. A partial budgeting analysis indicated that Se supplementation was economically profitable; cows in group T1 averaged 240.6$ per cow, those in group T2 averaged 224.6$ per cow. Supplementation with Se and Vitamin E has been found to increase serum Se levels, milk yield, and has positive effects on udder health by decreasing milk conductivity values and incidence of sub-clinical mastitis. PMID:26104521

  5. Effect of fasting and parenteral alimentation on PIPIDA scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T.; McClain, C.J.; Shafer, R.B.

    1983-08-01

    Ten patients were prospectively studied using 99mTc-PIPIDA imaging to evaluate the effects of fasting and parenteral alimentation on gallbladder function. Three of ten patients had initial nonvisualization of the gallbladder for up to 2 hr, yet had normal visualization on repeat imaging performed after resumption of oral intake or after parenteral alimentation was discontinued. 99mTc-PIPIDA imaging should be interpreted with caution in patients fitting into either of these groups.

  6. Early combined parenteral and enteral nutrition for pancreaticoduodenectomy - Retrospective cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Probst, Pascal; Keller, Daniel; Steimer, Johannes; Gmür, Emanuel; Haller, Alois; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Rühlin, Maya; Gelpke, Hans; Breitenstein, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Suggested guidelines for nutritional support after pancreaticoduodenectomy are still controversial. Recent evidence suggests that combining enteral nutrition (EN) with parenteral nutrition (PN) improves outcome. For ten years, patients have been treated with Early Combined Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ECPEN) after PD. The aim of this study was to report on rationale, safety, effectiveness and outcome associated with this method. Consecutive PD performed between 2003 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Early EN and PN was standardized and started immediately after surgery. EN was increased to 40 ml/h (1 kcal/ml) over 24 h, while PN was supplemented based on a daily energy target of 25 kcal/kg. Standard enteral and parenteral products were used. Sixty-nine patients were nutritionally supplemented according to ECPEN. The median coverage of kcal per patients related to the total caloric requirements during the entire hospitalization (nutrition balance) was 93.4% (range: 100%-69.3%). The nutritional balance in patients with needle catheter jejunostomy (NCJ) was significantly higher than in the group with nasojejunal tube (97.1% vs. 91.6%; p < 0.0001). Mortality rate was 5.8%, while major complications (Clavien-Dindo 3-5) occurred in 21.7% of patients. Neither the presence of preoperative malnutrition nor the application of preoperative immunonutrition was associated with postoperative clinical outcome. This is the first European study of ECPEN after PD. ECPEN is safe and, especially in combination with NCJ, provides comprehensive coverage of caloric requirements during the postoperative phase. Clinical controlled trials are needed to investigate potential benefits of complete energy supplementation during the early postoperative phase after PD.

  7. Early combined parenteral and enteral nutrition for pancreaticoduodenectomy – Retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Pascal; Keller, Daniel; Steimer, Johannes; Gmür, Emanuel; Haller, Alois; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Rühlin, Maya; Gelpke, Hans; Breitenstein, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Suggested guidelines for nutritional support after pancreaticoduodenectomy are still controversial. Recent evidence suggests that combining enteral nutrition (EN) with parenteral nutrition (PN) improves outcome. For ten years, patients have been treated with Early Combined Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ECPEN) after PD. The aim of this study was to report on rationale, safety, effectiveness and outcome associated with this method. Methods Consecutive PD performed between 2003 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Early EN and PN was standardized and started immediately after surgery. EN was increased to 40 ml/h (1 kcal/ml) over 24 h, while PN was supplemented based on a daily energy target of 25 kcal/kg. Standard enteral and parenteral products were used. Results Sixty-nine patients were nutritionally supplemented according to ECPEN. The median coverage of kcal per patients related to the total caloric requirements during the entire hospitalization (nutrition balance) was 93.4% (range: 100%–69.3%). The nutritional balance in patients with needle catheter jejunostomy (NCJ) was significantly higher than in the group with nasojejunal tube (97.1% vs. 91.6%; p < 0.0001). Mortality rate was 5.8%, while major complications (Clavien-Dindo 3–5) occurred in 21.7% of patients. Neither the presence of preoperative malnutrition nor the application of preoperative immunonutrition was associated with postoperative clinical outcome. Conclusion This is the first European study of ECPEN after PD. ECPEN is safe and, especially in combination with NCJ, provides comprehensive coverage of caloric requirements during the postoperative phase. Clinical controlled trials are needed to investigate potential benefits of complete energy supplementation during the early postoperative phase after PD. PMID:26955477

  8. The effect of a parenteral ivermectin/closantel injection on the growth and reproductive development of early immature Fasciola hepatica in cattle.

    PubMed

    Hanna, R E B; Cromie, L; Taylor, S M; Couper, A

    2006-11-30

    Sixteen calves approximately 6 months old were each infected with 500 metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica. Thirty-two days later they were weighed and divided into two groups, and on day 35 all calves in one of the groups were injected subcutaneously with an ivermectin/closantel combination. Both groups were sacrificed between days 70 and 72 to enable counting and examination of the flukes recovered from the bile ducts. Eggs released by the flukes were collected for incubation, hatching and estimation of egg viability. Flukes were counted, flat-fixed in 70% ethanol, stained with catechol and carmine and measured. The reproductive organs, namely testis, vitelline glands, ovary and uterus, were examined and scored on a 0-3 scale according to their state of development. This was visually assessed on the basis of size, distribution and staining density of their constituent tissues and the abundance of eggs in the uterus. A representative sample of flukes from each animal was fixed in formalin for histological sectioning to enable more detailed examination of the reproductive structures. Treatment of the immature flukes reduced the population in cattle by 42.6% as compared with the controls and as a result of the stunting effect due to the presence of closantel during early development the size of treated flukes was reduced by 43.9%. A bimodal pattern of size and reproductive score was also observed in flukes from treated cattle, suggesting that the stunting effect on individual flukes differed depending on whether or not they had gained access to the bile ducts or were still migrating in the hepatic parenchymal tissue at the time of drug exposure with the effect being greater once the fluke had gained access to the bile ducts. The mean reproductive score for untreated flukes was 8.76 and for treated flukes 5.64, a 35.6% reduction. This difference was highly significant (p<0.001). Egg shedding from treated flukes was significantly less than that from controls (p<0

  9. Parenteral Vaccination Can Be an Effective Means of Inducing Protective Mucosal Responses

    PubMed Central

    Freytag, Lucy C.

    2016-01-01

    The current paradigm in vaccine development is that nonreplicating vaccines delivered parenterally fail to induce immune responses in mucosal tissues. However, both clinical and experimental data have challenged this concept, and numerous studies have shown that induction of mucosal immune responses after parenteral vaccination is not a rare occurrence and might, in fact, significantly contribute to the protection against mucosal infections afforded by parenteral vaccines. While the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood, the realization that parenteral vaccination can be an effective means of inducing protective mucosal responses is paradigm-shifting and has potential to transform the way vaccines are designed and delivered. PMID:27122485

  10. Standardized parenteral nutrition in preterm infants: early impact on fluid and electrolyte balance.

    PubMed

    Iacobelli, Silvia; Bonsante, Francesco; Vintéjoux, Amélie; Gouyon, Jean-Bernard

    2010-06-01

    Parenteral nutrition is commonly given to premature infants. It has previously been suggested that standardized parenteral nutrition (SPN) may offer nutritional advantages compared to individualized parenteral nutrition (IPN). However, whether the same level of biochemical control is assured with SPN and with IPN remains uncertain. To compare fluid and electrolyte balance in preterm infants receiving IPN versus SPN in the first week of life. 107 infants born at <33 weeks gestation were prospectively evaluated. Serum and urinary creatinine and electrolyte concentration, urine volume, body weight, fluid, electrolyte and energy intakes were recorded daily. 40 infants received IPN and 67 SPN. Infants in IPN had significantly more water and less sodium intake than those receiving SPN. Energy and amino acid intakes were significantly lower in IPN than in SPN groups. Incidence of hypernatremia and hyponatremia was similar in both groups. Nonoliguric hyperkalemia (NOHK) was significantly more frequent in IPN than in SPN (20.0 vs. 2.9%) and mean serum K(+) peak over the first 3 days was higher in IPN than in SPN (5.63 +/- 1.05 vs. 4.91 +/- 0.78 mmol/l). Weight loss (% of birth weight) at day 7 was significantly higher in IPN than in SPN (7.7 +/- 5.8 vs. 4.2 +/- 6.5) without differences in urine output/input fluid intake ratio and glomerular renal function between the two groups. There were no significant differences in water and sodium balance in preterm infants who received IPN versus SPN. The risk of NOHK was higher in IPN. Also, SPN significantly increased amino acid and caloric intakes, and it reduced early weight loss.

  11. Early enteral nutrition vs parenteral nutrition following pancreaticoduodenectomy: Experience from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian-Wen; Liu, Chang; Du, Zhao-Qing; Liu, Xue-Min; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze and compare postoperative morbidity between patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and early enteral nutrition supplemented with parenteral nutrition (EEN + PN). METHODS: Three hundred and forty patients receiving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) from 2009 to 2013 at our center were enrolled retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups depending on postoperative nutrition support scheme: an EEN + PN group (n = 87) and a TPN group (n = 253). Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters, pathological diagnosis, intraoperative information, and postoperative complications of the two groups were analyzed. RESULTS: The two groups did not differ in demographic characteristics, preoperative comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters or pathological findings (P > 0.05 for all). However, patients with EEN + PN following PD had a higher incidence of delayed gastric emptying (16.1% vs 6.7%, P = 0.016), pulmonary infection (10.3% vs 3.6%, P = 0.024), and probably intraperitoneal infection (18.4% vs 10.3%, P = 0.059), which might account for their longer nasogastric tube retention time (9 d vs 5 d, P = 0.006), postoperative hospital stay (25 d vs 20 d, P = 0.055) and higher hospitalization expenses (USD10397 vs USD8663.9, P = 0.008), compared to those with TPN. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that TPN might be safe and sufficient for patient recovery after PD. Postoperative EEN should only be performed scrupulously and selectively. PMID:27076767

  12. Early enteral nutrition compared with parenteral nutrition for esophageal cancer patients after esophagectomy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, J; Cai, J; Niu, Z-X; Chen, L-Q

    2016-05-01

    Early postoperative enteral nutrition (EN) after esophagectomy in esophageal cancer patient has been reported to be correlated with a better rehabilitation than parenteral nutrition (PN). However, a robust conclusion has not been achieved. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to compare the postoperative EN and PN in patients with esophageal cancer undergoing esophagectomy. Three electronic databases were searched for eligible studies to be included in the meta-analysis. The summary relative risk/weighted mean difference (RR/WMD) estimates and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using fixed- and random-effects models. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. The analysis demonstrated that the early postoperative EN could significantly decrease the pulmonary complications (RR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.22-0.62, P = 0.00, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.89) and anastomotic leakage (RR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.22-0.96, P = 0.04, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.66) compared with PN. On the eighth postoperative day, the EN group had a higher levels of albumin (WMD = 1.84, 95% CI = 0.47-3.21, P = 0.01, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 84.5%, P = 0.00) and prealbumin (WMD = 12.96, 95% CI = 3.63-22.29, P = 0.01, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.63) compared with the PN group. However, there was no difference in digestive complications between these two approaches (RR = 1.30, 95% CI = 0.79-2.13, P = 0.30, test for heterogeneity: I(2) = 0.0%, P = 0.97). For patients with esophageal cancer following esophagectomy, the early postoperative EN support could decrease the morbidity of severe complications, such as pulmonary complications and anastomotic leakage, and maintain patients at a better nutritional status than parenteral nutrion support.

  13. Parenteral Lipid Tolerance and Adverse Effects: Fat Chance for Trouble?

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A

    2015-09-01

    Lipid emulsions (LEs) are indispensable sources of fuel calories and (essential) fatty acids (FAs) in modern parenteral nutrition formulations. The use of LE, however, also remains associated with the development of adverse effects. Intolerance for LE mostly becomes apparent upon the development of patient complaints or disturbed blood function tests, mainly of the liver. These issues may be associated with the composition, stability, or the infusion rate of the emulsion. Also, altered balances of (anti)oxidants or the presence or absence of protective or toxic bioactive agents such as phytosterols and tocopherol in LE may lead to complications, especially in already vulnerable patients with an inflammatory condition. While the oldest available LEs are based on pure soybean oil (SO-LE), rich in the proinflammatory ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid, more recent next-generation LEs where alternative FA sources such as olive and fish oil (partially) replace soybean oil to lower the content of linoleic acid seem safe and effective. Especially LEs containing fish oil (FO-LE) have less proinflammatory characteristics that promise to convey beneficial effects on immune system and organ functions, although much of the available evidence awaits more robust clinical validation.

  14. Effect of intradialytic parenteral nutrition on delivered Kt/V.

    PubMed

    McCann, L; Feldman, C; Hornberger, J; Belanger, S; Maru, L; Torres, M; Tootell, F; Gotch, F

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the effect of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) and its components on delivered Kt/V (Kt/Vd). Nineteen patients undergoing routine outpatient hemodialysis and receiving IDPN were enrolled onto this prospective, crossover study. To reduce the confounding of time, assigned treatment in the first week was random, with patient crossover in the fourth week. Patients served as their own controls. In the successive 6 weeks, patients received IDPN solutions differing in whether amino acids (AAs), dextrose, or lipids were included or excluded. The primary end point was Kt/Vd, measured with a single-pool, variable-volume urea kinetic model. Other factors with the potential to impact on Kt/Vd were controlled and/or monitored. The administration of IDPN with all three components resulted in a significantly reduced mean Kt/Vd. When patients received AA-containing solutions, mean Kt/Vd was significantly less than when IDPN was withheld. Administration of solutions without AA resulted in a mean Kt/Vd not significantly different from mean Kt/Vd when IDPN was withheld. The mean prescribed Kt/V did not differ from mean Kt/Vd when IDPN was withheld. Simulation analyses of increased urea generation (Gu) showed an increase in patient urea volume and decreased Kt/V similar to the study findings. AA-containing IDPN solutions resulted in a significant reduction in Kt/Vd, possibly mediated by increased Gu. Administration of IDPN solutions may have important clinical and economic consequences that warrant further investigation.

  15. Early nasogastric feeding versus parenteral nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yulong; Tang, Chengwu; Feng, Wenming; Bao, Ying; Yu, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and safety of early nasogastric enteral nutrition (EN) with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Methods: From July 2008 to July 2014,185 patients with SAP admitted to our centre were enrolled in this retrospective study. They were divided into EN group (n=89) and TPN group (n=96) based on the nutrition support modes. Patients in EN group received nasogastric EN support, while patients in TPN group received TPN support within 72 hours of disease onset. The medical records were reviewed and clinical factors were retrospectively analyzed. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between two groups. EN group had significantly lower incidence of pancreatic infections (P=0.0333) and extrapancreatic infections (P=0.0431). Significantly shorter hospital stay (P=0.0355) and intensive-care stay (P=0.0313) were found in EN group. TPN group was found to have significantly greater incidence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (P=0.0338) and mortality (P=0.0382). Moreover, the incidence of hyperglycemia was significantly higher in TPN group (P=0.0454). Conclusions: Early nasogastric EN was feasible and significantly decreased the incidence of infectious complications as well as the frequency of MODS and mortality caused by SAP. PMID:28083056

  16. Early Parenteral Nutrition in Patients with Biliopancreatic Mass Lesions, a Prospective, Randomized Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Janine; Meffert, Peter J.; Vogt, Lena J.; Gärtner, Simone; Steveling, Antje; Kraft, Matthias; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Aghdassi, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with biliopancreatic tumors frequently suffer from weight loss and cachexia. The in-hospital work-up to differentiate between benign and malignant biliopancreatic lesions requires repeated pre-interventional fasting periods that can aggravate this problem. We conducted a randomized intervention study to test whether routine in-hospital peripheral intravenous nutrition on fasting days (1000 ml/24 h, 700 kcal) has a beneficial effect on body weight and body composition. Material and Methods 168 patients were screened and 100 enrolled in the trial, all undergoing in-hospital work-up for biliopancreatic mass lesions and randomized to either intravenous nutrition or control. Primary endpoint was weight loss at time of hospital discharge; secondary endpoints were parameters determined by bioelectric impedance analysis and quality of life recorded by the EORTC questionnaire. Results Within three months prior to hospital admission patients had a median self-reported loss of 4.0 kg (25*th: -10.0 kg and 75*th* percentile: 0.0kg) of body weight. On a multivariate analysis nutritional intervention increased body weight by 1.7 kg (95% CI: 0.204; 3.210, p = 0.027), particularly in patients with malignant lesions (2.7 kg (95% CI: 0.71; 4.76, p < 0.01). Conclusions In a hospital setting, patients with suspected biliopancreatic mass lesions stabilized their body weight when receiving parenteral nutrition in fasting periods even when no total parenteral nutrition was required. Analysis showed that this effect was greatest in patients with malignant tumors. Further studies will be necessary to see whether patient outcome is affected as well. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02670265 PMID:27861546

  17. Early enteral and parenteral nutrition on immune functions of neurocritically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Qi, S Y; Wang, W T; Chen, C Y; Chu, Z D; Liu, X J; Liu, X J

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of early enteral and parenteral nutrition on immune functions of neurocritically ill patients. Patients who were admitted to the neurological intensive care unit (ICU) of The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University between May 2014 and January 2016 were selected. They had been hospitalized for more than one week and received enteral nutrition (EN) via nasogastric tube, with a gross energy of 25 kcal/(Kg • d). Patients were divided into EN group, EN + early PN (EPN) group and EN + supplemental PN (SPN) group according to the time of PN support. Differences in patients’ general information and changes in serum protein and immune indexes were compared between the three groups. On admission, patients’ Glasgow coma scale (GCS), age, immune functions and protein indexes had no obvious differences between the three groups. After nutritional support, serum protein level reduced in the EN group while prealbumin (PALB) and retinol binding protein (RBP) increased in the EN + EPN group and EN + SPN group after one week of admission to hospital, and the differences were statistically significant (p less than 0.05). Total protein (TP), albumin (ALB), PALB and transferrin (TRF) increased significantly in the EN + EPN group and EN + SPN group compared with the EN group (p < 0.05); before and after treatment, an increase was found in ALB in the EN + EPN group in comparison with EN + SPN group, with a notable difference (p < 0.05); C3, C4, immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) increased in the EN + SPN group after nutritional support compared with before treatment, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Moreover, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA in the EN + EPN group increased after nutritional support comparing to prior to nutritional support, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). After nutritional treatment, IgA and IgG increased markedly in the EN + EPN group

  18. Early versus late parenteral nutrition in ICU patients: cost analysis of the EPaNIC trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The EPaNIC randomized controlled multicentre trial showed that postponing initiation of parenteral nutrition (PN) in ICU-patients to beyond the first week (Late-PN) enhanced recovery, as compared with Early-PN. This was mediated by fewer infections, accelerated recovery from organ failure and reduced duration of hospitalization. Now, the trial's preplanned cost analysis (N = 4640) from the Belgian healthcare payers' perspective is reported. Methods Cost data were retrieved from individual patient invoices. Undiscounted total healthcare costs were calculated for the index hospital stay. A cost tree based on acquisition of new infections and on prolonged length-of-stay was constructed. Contribution of 8 cost categories to total hospitalization costs was analyzed. The origin of drug costs was clarified in detail through the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system. The potential impact of Early-PN on total hospitalization costs in other healthcare systems was explored in a sensitivity analysis. Results ICU-patients developing new infection (24.4%) were responsible for 42.7% of total costs, while ICU-patients staying beyond one week (24.3%) accounted for 43.3% of total costs. Pharmacy-related costs represented 30% of total hospitalization costs and were increased by Early-PN (+608.00 EUR/patient, p = 0.01). Notably, costs for ATC-J (anti-infective agents) (+227.00 EUR/patient, p = 0.02) and ATC-B (comprising PN) (+220.00 EUR/patient, p = 0.006) drugs were increased by Early-PN. Sensitivity analysis revealed a mean total cost increase of 1,210.00 EUR/patient (p = 0.02) by Early-PN, when incorporating the full PN costs. Conclusions The increased costs by Early-PN were mainly pharmacy-related and explained by higher expenditures for PN and anti-infective agents. The use of Early-PN in critically ill patients can thus not be recommended for both clinical (no benefit) and cost-related reasons. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00512122

  19. The effect of acute discontinuation of total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Wagman, L D; Newsome, H H; Miller, K B; Thomas, R B; Weir, G C

    1986-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the impact of acute discontinuation (AD) of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on serum glucose, insulin, and glucagon levels and on the generation of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Fifty studies were performed in 48 patients. In none of the 30 studies of 1 hour duration nor in the 20 studies of 8 hours duration was there a single episode of symptomatic hypoglycemia. One patient had a glucose below normal (60 mg/dl) during the first hour after AD. Glucose and insulin concentrations were elevated at the start of TPN discontinuation but returned to normal values within 60 minutes and remained there during the successive 7 hours of study. Although glucagon levels were slightly elevated at zero time, no significant decrease occurred. There was no evidence for counter-regulation based on the patterns of glucose and hormone levels. With some restrictions, acute discontinuation is a safe, rapid method of ending a prolonged TPN infusion. PMID:3094465

  20. Effects of Formulation Variables and Storage Conditions on Light Protected Vitamin B12 Mixed Parenteral Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this research the effect of vitamin B1 and B6 on cyanocobalamin stability in commercial light protected parenteral formulations and upon adding stabilizing agents will be investigated and best formulation composition and proper storage condition will be introduced. Methods: In this research some additives such as co solvents and tonicity adjusters, surfactants, antioxidants and chelating agents as well as buffer solutions, were used to improve the stability of the parenteral mixed formulations of B12 in the presence of other B vitamins (B1 and B6). Screening tests and accelerated stability tests were performed according to ICH guidelines Q1A (R2). Results: Shelf life evaluation revealed the best formulation and the proper storage condition. The results indicated the first kinetic models for all tested formulations and the optimum pH value was determined to be 5.8. There was no evidence of B12 loss when mixed with B1 and B6 in a medical syringe at room temperature for maximum of 8 hours. Conclusion: It is necessary to formulate vitamin B12 mixed parenteral solutions using proper phosphate buffers (pH=5.8) and to indicate “Store in refrigerator” on the mixed parenteral formulations of vitamin B12 with other B vitamins, which has not been expressed on the label of tested Brand formulations at the time of this study. PMID:25436187

  1. Effects of oral and parenteral selenium supplements on residues in meat, milk and eggs.

    PubMed

    Beale, A M; Fasulo, D A; Craigmill, A L

    1990-01-01

    Oral and parenteral preparations of Se are used worldwide to prevent and treat nutritional muscular dystrophy and other Se deficiency syndromes. There are extensive published data on the effects of oral supplementation on Se residues in food animal products. Very little published data exist on the effects of parenteral administration on Se residues, even for cattle and swine in which parenteral preparations are used extensively. The distribution of Se into kidney and liver appears to be equivalent for both forms of supplementation. Elimination of Se in milk is greater after parenteral administration and correlates with high plasma Se levels, however the milk excretion drops quickly and after 4 d returns to control levels (Little et al. 1979). Of particular interest is the finding that up to 18% of Se in an oral diet may be excreted in milk (Maus et al. 1980). Use of Se supplements in poultry results in increased levels of Se in liver, kidney, and eggs. Distribution of Se into liver and kidney is much greater than into breast muscle indicating a greater capacity of these organs to accumulate Se. Excretion of Se into eggs results in Se levels equivalent to those in liver and kidney, indicating that eggs are an important route of Se excretion in laying hens (Ort and Latshaw 1978). When Se supplementation stops, the liver, kidney, and egg white and yolk residues decline quickly to control values within 1-2 wk. Breast muscle Se content changes little during supplementation and after withdrawal of supplementation. Oral and parenteral selenium supplementation in swine result in greater accumulation of Se in liver and kidney than in muscle. Oral selenium supplementation also increases the excretion of Se into milk. This method has been used to prevent Se deficiency disease in piglets (Mahan et al. 1975). Oral supplementation with 0.1 ppm Se, as sodium selenate, did not result in levels of Se in blood, meat, or viscera at slaughter (Jenkins and Winter 1973). Despite the

  2. Early high calcium and phosphorus intake by parenteral nutrition prevents short-term bone strength decline in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Pereira-da-Silva, L; Costa, Ab; Pereira, L; Filipe, Af; Virella, D; Leal, E; Moreira, Ac; Rosa, Ml; Mendes, L; Serelha, M

    2011-02-01

    Very premature newborns have an increased risk of low bone mass and metabolic bone disease. Most longitudinal studies report a significant decline in bone strength in the first weeks after birth. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether higher early calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) intake delivered by parenteral nutrition (PN) can prevent bone strength decline in preterm infants, within the first weeks after birth. This was a randomized controlled trial of consecutively admitted neonates born with ≤ 33 weeks of gestational age, assigned to receive either Ca 45 mg · kg⁻¹ · day⁻¹ (low dose [LD]) or Ca 75 mg · kg⁻¹ · day⁻¹ (high dose [HD]) by PN. P was added to the PN solutions at a fixed Ca:P ratio (mg) of 1.7:1. Bone strength was assessed by the speed of sound (SOS) using the quantitative ultrasound method. Measurements were performed weekly from birth until discharge. Low bone strength (SOS < 10th centile of reference values) was the main outcome. Eighty-six infants were enrolled, 40 assigned to LD group and 46 to HD group. Mean (standard error) gestational age was 29.6 weeks (2.1) and birth weight was 1262 g (0.356). In the HD group, the SOS values never fell below those recorded at birth and, up to the sixth week of life, low bone strength was significantly less frequent as compared with that in the LD group, in spite of progressive reduction in parenteral mineral intake and/or establishment of full enteral feeding. Early assigned parenteral intake of Ca 75 mg · kg⁻¹ · day⁻¹ and P 44 mg · kg⁻¹ · day⁻¹ significantly contributed to preventing short-term bone strength decline in preterm infants.

  3. Early enteral nutrition in combination with parenteral nutrition in elderly patients after surgery due to gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dongping; Sun, Zhufeng; Huang, Jianwei; Shen, Zhaozai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of nutritional support via different routes in elderly patients after surgery for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Methods: 105 patients with GI cancer were randomly divided into early enteral nutrition (EEN) group (n = 35), total parenteral nutrition (TPN) group (n = 35) and EN+PN group (n = 35). Results: The nutrition status and immunity were significantly compromised in all patients, while the liver function was improved at 3 days after surgery as compared to those before surgery. At 7 days after surgery, they returned to preoperative level. The nutrition status was comparable among 3 groups at 3 and 7 days after surgery (P > 0.05). ALT, AST, ALP and GGT in TNP group were significantly higher than those in EEN group and EN+PN group (P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference in the liver function between EEN group and EN+PN group (P > 0.05). The CD3+ cells, CD4+ cells and CD4/CD8 in EEN group and EN+PN group were significantly higher than those in TPN group (P < 0.05), but significant difference was not observed between EEN group and EN+PN group (P > 0.05). The NK cells in EN+PN group were significantly higher than in TPN group (P < 0.01). The incidence of diarrhea in EEN group was significantly higher than in TPN group and EN+PN group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: EN+PN is superior to EEN alone and TPN alone in the old patients with GI cancer in reducing the postoperative complications, improving the immunity and decreasing the hospital stay. PMID:26550350

  4. Effect of decreased parenteral soybean lipid emulsion on hepatic function in infants at risk for parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rollins, Michael D; Ward, Robert M; Jackson, W Daniel; Mulroy, Cecilia W; Spencer, Cindy P; Ying, Jian; Greene, Tom; Book, Linda S

    2013-06-01

    We performed a pilot trial to compare reduced dose versus standard soybean lipid emulsion in neonates at risk for parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. A prospective randomized controlled trial was performed (2009-2011) enrolling surgical patients ≥ 26 weeks' gestation anticipated to require >50% of daily caloric intake from parenteral nutrition (PN) for at least 4 weeks. Randomization occurred into either reduced (1.0 g/kg/day) or standard (3g/kg/day) groups. Co-primary outcomes for interpretation of the results were conjugated bilirubin and total bile acids. Additional outcomes included ALT, AST, GGT, alkaline phosphatase, growth, and essential fatty acid levels. Outcomes were compared between treatment groups using Wilcoxon rank sums tests. Twenty-eight patients (47% enrollment rate) were included in the study with an average treatment duration of 5.4 weeks. Groups had similar PN calories and protein intake throughout the study. Total increase from baseline was smaller in the reduced vs. standard group for conjugated bilirubin (p=0.04) and total bile acids (p=0.02). Weight z-score increased more in the standard group, and no patient experienced essential fatty acid deficiency. Markers of cholestasis rose at a slower rate using reduced lipid doses. This pilot study demonstrates feasibility and need for a larger study evaluating the effects of reduced lipids in patients at risk for developing parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Study of teduglutide effectiveness in parenteral nutrition-dependent short-bowel syndrome subjects.

    PubMed

    Vipperla, Kishore; O'Keefe, Stephen J

    2013-11-01

    Loss of intestinal absorptive capacity from congenital defect, surgical resection or mucosal disease results in short bowel syndrome (SBS)-associated intestinal failure. In the past, few medical management options were available besides dietary modification, controlling diarrhea or high stomal output, and providing parenteral fluid, electrolyte and nutrient support (parenteral support). Recent research on strategies to enhance the intestinal absorptive capacity focused on glucagon-like peptide-2, an intestinotrophic hormone that has been shown to increase the villus height and crypt depth, and decrease gastric motility and intestinal secretory losses. STEPS is a Phase III randomized double-blinded controlled trial in which teduglutide, a recombinant analog of glucagon-like peptide-2, or placebo was given subcutaneously to SBS patients for 24 weeks. A clinically meaningful response, defined as a 20-100% reduction in parenteral support volume, was achieved in 63% of the treatment group compared with 30% in the placebo group (p = 0.002) without an increase in serious side effects. Teduglutide offers a new targeted approach to SBS-associated intestinal failure management. Its specific role in clinical practice remains to be evaluated.

  6. Effects of different parenteral nutrition infusions in a patient with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chia-Chee; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, we demonstrate the effects of different lipid emulsions on liver function in a 52-year-old woman with short bowel syndrome who was totally dependent on parenteral nutrition. Over a 13-month period after small bowel resection and jejunostomy, we followed the patient's plasma triglycerides and liver enzyme levels as well as body weight and discomfort levels. During the first 3 months when parenteral nutrition including a lipid emulsion containing 50% soybean oil/50% medium-chain triglyerides was administered daily, the patient reported feeling unwell (experiencing dizziness and palpitations) and her triglycerides and liver enzyme levels rose to 366 mg/dL and 145 U/L (alanine aminotransferase [ALT]), respectively; these levels recovered when this emulsion was discontinued. For the following 9 months, an emulsion containing 80% olive oil and 20% soybean oil was administered, and the patient's triglycerides (182 mg/dL) did not increase to abnormal levels and liver enzyme levels were only mildly elevated (109 U/L). The patient felt well and her body weight increased from 51 kg to 55 kg during this period. These results suggest that parenteral nutrition with a reduced soybean oil content may better preserve liver function in patients with short bowel syndrome.

  7. Enteral versus parenteral feeding. Effects on septic morbidity after blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Kudsk, K A; Croce, M A; Fabian, T C; Minard, G; Tolley, E A; Poret, H A; Kuhl, M R; Brown, R O

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the importance of route of nutrient administration on septic complications after blunt and penetrating trauma, 98 patients with an abdominal trauma index of at least 15 were randomized to either enteral or parenteral feeding within 24 hours of injury. Septic morbidity was defined as pneumonia, intra-abdominal abscess, empyema, line sepsis, or fasciitis with wound dehiscence. Patients were fed formulas with almost identical amounts of fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Two patients died early in the study. The enteral group sustained significantly fewer pneumonias (11.8% versus total parenteral nutrition 31.%, p less than 0.02), intra-abdominal abscess (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and line sepsis (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and sustained significantly fewer infections per patient (p less than 0.03), as well as significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.05). Although there were no differences in infection rates in patients with injury severity score less than 20 or abdominal trauma index less than or equal to 24, there were significantly fewer infections in patients with an injury severity score greater than 20 (p less than 0.002) and abdominal trauma index greater than 24 (p less than 0.005). Enteral feeding produced significantly fewer infections in the penetrating group (p less than 0.05) and barely missed the statistical significance in the blunt-injured patients (p = 0.08). In the subpopulation of patients requiring more than 20 units of blood, sustaining an abdominal trauma index greater than 40 or requiring reoperation within 72 hours, there were significantly fewer infections per patient (p = 0.03) and significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.01). There is a significantly lower incidence of septic morbidity in patients fed enterally after blunt and penetrating trauma, with most of the significant changes occurring in the

  8. Safety, therapeutic effectiveness, and cost of parenteral iron therapy.

    PubMed

    Asma, Suheyl; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan

    2009-07-01

    Patients have to discontinue the use of oral iron therapy due to the development of side effects and lack of long-term adherence to medication for iron deficiency anemia. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness, safety, and cost of intravenous iron sucrose therapy. The computerized database and medical records of 453 patients diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia who received intravenous iron sucrose therapy for iron deficiency anemia between 2004 and 2008 were reviewed. The improvement of hematologic parameters and cost of therapy were evaluated 4 weeks after therapy. 453 patients (443 females, 10 males; age: 44.2 +/- 12.3 years) received iron sucrose therapy. Mean hemoglobin, hematocrit, and mean corpuscular volume values were 8.2 +/- 1.4 g/dL, 26.9 +/- 3.8%, and 66.1 +/- 7.8 fL, respectively, before therapy and 11.5 +/- 1.0 g/dL, 35.8 +/- 2.5%, 76.5 +/- 6.1 fL, respectively, after therapy (P < 0.001). A mean ferritin level of 3.4 +/- 2.4 ng/mL before therapy increased to 65.9 +/- 40.6 ng/mL after therapy (P < 0.001). All patients responded to intravenous iron therapy (transferrin saturation values of the patients were >50%). The mean cost of therapy was 143.07 +/- 29.13 US dollars. The therapy was well tolerated. Although the cost of intravenous iron sucrose therapy may seem high, a lack of adherence to therapy and side effects including gastrointestinal irritation during oral iron therapy were not experienced during intravenous therapy.

  9. Effect of glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition on mortality in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Gordon S

    2011-02-01

    Glutamine is recognized as a critical amino acid involved in immunity, intestinal health, and nitrogen transport between organs. Prior to the pivotal study by Griffiths and colleagues in 1997, no clinical trials had demonstrated a positive effect from glutamine supplementation on improving long-term survival in critically ill intensive care unit patients receiving parenteral nutrition. Subsequent investigations have confirmed these findings, but further data are needed to determine the optimal dose and timing of glutamine as well as the form of glutamine (ie, free vs dipeptide) that produces the most significant improvement in outcome parameters.

  10. [Effects of supply with glutamine on antioxidant system and lipid peroxidation in patients with parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Abilés, J; Moreno-Torres, R; Moratalla, G; Castaño, J; Pérez Abúd, R; Mudarra, A; Machado, Ma J; Planells, E; Pérez de la Cruz, A

    2008-01-01

    In the critically ill patient, there is a continuous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that need to be neutralized to prevent oxidative stress (OS). Quantitatively speaking, the glutathione system (GSH) is the most important anti-oxidant endogenous defense. To increase it, glutamine supplementation has been shown to be effective by protecting against the oxidative damage and reducing the morbimortality. To assess the effect of adding an alanylglutamine dipeptide to PN on lipid peroxidation lipidica and glutathione metabolism, as well as its relationship with morbidity in critically ill patients. Determination through spectrophotometry techniques of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, total glutathione, and maloniladdehyde at admission adn after seven days of hospitalization at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in 20 patients older than 18 years on parenteral nutrition therapy. The group of patients receiving parenteral nutrition with glutamine supplementation had significant increases in total glutathione (42.35+/-13 vs 55.29+/-12 micromol/l; p<0.05) and the enzymatic activity of glutathione peroxidasa (470+/-195 vs 705+/-214 micromol/l; p<0.05) within one week of nutritional therapy, whereas the group on conventional parenteral nutrition did not show significant changes of any of the parameters studied (p>0.05). However, both mortality and ICU stay were not different between the study group, whereas the severity (assessed by the SOFA score) was lower in the group of patients receiving glutamine (SOFA 5+/-2 vs 8+/-1.8; p<0.05). Glutamine intake in critically ill patients improves the antioxidant defenses, which leads to lower lipid peroxidation and lower morbidity during admission at the ICU.

  11. Effectiveness and tolerability of parenteral testosterone undecanoate: a post-marketing surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jan; Keipert, Dieter; Motazedi, Heiko; Ernst, Michael; Nettleship, Joanne; Gooren, Louis

    2017-08-16

    This observational post-marketing study of parenteral testosterone undecanoate (TU) in a non-selected population aimed to: examine the effectiveness of TU as treatment of hypogonadism; record adverse drug reactions (ADR) quantitatively particularly regarding polycythemia, prostate safety and cardiovascular-related metabolic risk factors; and verify whether recommended injection intervals apply to routine clinical practice. Eight hundred and seventy subjects from 259 outpatient units scheduled to visit the clinic six times were included. Effectiveness and tolerability of TU administration were assessed on a 4-point scale. Body weight, waist girth, blood pressure, hemoglobin levels, hematocrit, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and digital rectal prostate examination were assessed. Over 90% of subjects completed the observational duration of 52.8 ± 9.7 weeks (mean ± SD) and 56% judged effectiveness as very good, 30.8% as good. 63.1% judged tolerability as very good, and 24.4% as good. No adverse effects on indicators of cardiovascular risk were observed. Polycythemia occurred in one subject and a supranormal hematocrit in one subject. Four subjects developed supranormal PSA levels. Prostate carcinoma was found in one subject, one subject had recurrence of a previously surgically treated prostate carcinoma, and the other two showed no indication of malignancy. Parenteral TU is safe, effective, and well-tolerated in clinical practice proving a good therapeutic option for hypogonadism.

  12. Metabolic effects of recombinant human growth hormone in patients receiving parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, T R; Young, L S; Manson, J M; Wilmore, D W

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant human methionyl growth hormone (Protropin) (Genetech, Inc., San Francisco, CA) administered to normal volunteers receiving hypocaloric parenteral nutrition minimized weight loss and induced positive nitrogen balance. To evaluate whether growth hormone (GH) can promote anabolism in surgical patients, 11 stable malnourished individuals were studied. In the initial trial, subjects received a constant parenteral infusion of a hypocaloric diet that provided approximately 1100 kcal/24 hr and 1.3 g protein/kg/24 hr for at least 2 weeks. During 1 week, GH 10 mg was given subcutaneously daily, whereas the other week served as the control. Daily balance studies demonstrated that administration of GH resulted in significant retention of nitrogen (+3.4 g/24 h) and phosphorus (+218 mg/24 h), despite provision of only 60% of caloric requirements. With GH, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and potassium fell, whereas glucose and insulin tended to rise, and levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 increased three to fourfold. Weight gain occurred with GH and was associated with positive mineral and water balance. Six patients received GH (10 mg subcutaneously daily) for 13-25 consecutive days after an initial control week. Significant nitrogen and phosphorus retention occurred over the entire period of GH administration, and no significant side effects were observed. In these depleted patients, GH caused significant and sustained nitrogen retention over a wide range of nutritional support. GH appears to enhance the efficacy of parenteral nutrition in stable individuals requiring repletion of body protein. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3133995

  13. Preventive effect of ursodeoxycholic acid on parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in infants.

    PubMed

    Simić, Dusica; Milojević, Irina; Bogićević, Dragana; Milenović, Miodrag; Radlović, Vladimir; Drasković, Biljana; Benka, Anna Uram; Sindjić, Sanja; Maksimović, Ruzica

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis is well recognized phenomenon in the term and preterm infant receiving long-term parenteral nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) use on cholestasis in newborns on prolonged TPN. A total of 56 infants were enrolled in this retrospective study: control group consisted of lower (1500 g) birth weight infants (n = 30), as well as the group of pediatric (n = 11) and surgical patients (n = 15) treated with UDCA. Blood chemistries were obtained two times weekly. All of 56 newborns developed cholestasis but duration of parenteral nutrition (PN) before onset of cholestasis was significantly longer in UDCA treated patients. Average duration of PN before the onset of cholestasis in control group of patients was 25 days in distinction from treated pediatric and surgical patients (39 and 34 days, respectively).The peak serum conjugated bilirubin (CB), AST, ALT and alkaline phosphatase (AP) levels were significantly lower in the treated groups.There was no significant difference among treated pediatric and surgical patients and between lower and higher birth weight infants considering the CB, ALT, AST and AP peak. Duration of cholestasis was significantly decreased in all treated groups.There was a significant difference in time needed to achieve complete enteral intake between pediatric and surgical patient group. Cholestasis developed significantly later in treated groups than in the controls. UDCA appears to be very successful in reducing the symptoms of cholestasis. The difference in efficacy of UDCA treatment between lower and higher birth weight infants could not be proven.

  14. Comparison of the effects of enteral feeding with continuous and intermittent parenteral nutrition on hepatic triglyceride secretion in human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Isabel-Martinez, L.; Skinner, C.; Parkin, A.; Hall, R.I.

    1989-03-01

    Plasma triglyceride turnover was measured during steady-state conditions in 22 postoperative patients. Nine had received nutritional support with an enteral regimen, seven had received an equivalent regimen as continuous parenteral nutrition, and six received the same parenteral regimen as a cyclical infusion. After 5 days of nutritional support, each patient received an intravenous bolus of tritiated glycerol. Plasma radiolabeled triglyceride content was measured during the subsequent 24 hours. The data were analyzed by means of a simple deterministic model of plasma triglyceride kinetics and compared with the results obtained by stochastic analysis. The rates of hepatic triglyceride secretion obtained by deterministic analysis were higher than those obtained by the stochastic approach. However, the mode of delivery of the nutritional regimen did not affect the rate of hepatic triglyceride secretion regardless of the method of analysis. The results suggest that neither complete nutritional bypass of the gastrointestinal tract nor interruption of parenteral nutrition in an attempt to mimic normal eating has any effect on hepatic triglyceride secretion. Any beneficial effect that enteral feeding or cyclical parenteral nutrition may have on liver dysfunction associated with standard parenteral nutrition appears to be unrelated to changes in hepatic triglyceride secretion.

  15. Early enteral feeding, compared with parenteral, reduces postoperative septic complications. The results of a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, F A; Feliciano, D V; Andrassy, R J; McArdle, A H; Booth, F V; Morgenstein-Wagner, T B; Kellum, J M; Welling, R E; Moore, E E

    1992-01-01

    This two-part meta-analysis combined data from eight prospective randomized trials designed to compare the nutritional efficacy of early enteral (TEN) and parenteral (TPN) nutrition in high-risk surgical patients. The combined data gave sufficient patient numbers (TEN, n = 118; TPN, n = 112) to adequately address whether route of substrate delivery affected septic complication incidence. Phase I (dropouts excluded) meta-analysis confirmed data homogeneity across study sites, that TEN and TPN groups were comparable, and that significantly fewer TEN patients experienced septic complications (TEN, 18%; TPN, 35%; p = 0.01). Phase II meta-analysis, an intent-to-treat analysis (dropouts included), confirmed that fewer TEN patients developed septic complications. Further breakdown by patient type showed that all trauma and blunt trauma subgroups had the most significant reduction in septic complications when fed enterally. In conclusion, this meta-analysis attests to the feasibility of early postoperative TEN in high-risk surgical patients and that these patients have reduced septic morbidity rates compared with those administered TPN. PMID:1386982

  16. Parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Paul; Forbes, Alastair

    2003-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition remains a topic of intense research interest. It has now been shown to offer no advantage over, but to be associated with an increased frequency of complications, compared to enteral nutrition in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. Nutritional support administered via an intraportal route, combined with multimodal analgesia, appears to offer certain metabolic and clinical advantages compared with that delivered via systemic veins. Parenteral nutrition, however, does not prevent the decrease in antioxidant capacity seen after major surgery, and feeding lines present an additional risk factor for systemic candidiasis in the intensive care setting. Nonetheless, use of the conventional percutaneous access route is reconfirmed, even in infants, to be a safe technique. Addition of choline to intravenous nutrition admixtures may improve some of the hepatic abnormalities associated with parenteral nutrition, but clodronate has only limited ability to prevent the progression of osteoporosis in patients on long-term treatment.

  17. [Isoforms A and B of lysosomal N-acetyl-beta-D-hexosaminidase in serum and urine of parenterally fed patients].

    PubMed

    Raczkowska, Katarzyna; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Kepka, Alina; Raczkowski, Krzysztof; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Siedlecka-Czykier, Edyta; Dadan, Jacek; Snarska, Jadwiga; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Ładny, Jerzy Robert; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2013-05-01

    Parenteral nutrition entails numerous metabolic complications resulting from food bypass of the gastrointestinal tract. Up to now have not been established all complications of parenteral nutrition, despite intensive research and clinical observations. Knowledge of the biochemical changes resulting from parenteral nutrition is essential to effective prevention, early detection and effective treatment of the metabolic disorders induced by parenteral nutrition. The aim of the study was to evaluate the catabolism of glycoconjugates of parenterally fed patients, reflected by the activity of N-acetyl-beta-D-hexosaminidase (HEX): HEX A and HEX B isoenzymes in serum and urine. Samples of blood and urine were collected from 23 patients: before intravenous alimentation, at start, as well as of fifth and tenth day of parenteral nutrition. The activity of HEX A and HEX B in serum and urine was determined by the colorimetric method of Zwierz et al. as modified by Marciniak et al. The activity of urinary HEXA and HEX B has been calculated per 1 mg of creatinine. The activity of serum HEXA significantly decreased at fifth day, in comparison to the activity before parenteral alimentation, and significantly increased at tenth day of parenteral nutrition. The activity of HEX B in serum increased significantly at fifth and tenth day of the parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition alter the catabolism of glycoconjugates, reflected by significant changes in serum HEX A and HEX B activities. Urine was the not appropriate material to evaluate the catabolism of glycoconjugates in view of HEX A and HEX B activities.

  18. Updated cost-effectiveness analysis of supplemental glutamine for parenteral nutrition of intensive-care patients

    PubMed Central

    Pradelli, L; Povero, M; Muscaritoli, M; Eandi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Intravenous (i.v.) glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition (PN) can improve clinical outcomes, reduce mortality and infection rates and shorten the length of hospital and/or intensive care unit (ICU) stays compared with standard PN. This study is a pharmacoeconomic analysis to determine whether i.v. glutamine supplementation of PN remains both a highly favourable and cost-effective option for Italian ICU patients. Subjects/Methods: A previously published discrete event simulation model was updated by incorporating the most up-to-date and clinically relevant efficacy data (a clinically realistic subgroup analysis from a published meta-analysis), recent cost data from the Italian health-care system and the latest epidemiology data from a large Italian ICU database (covering 230 Italian ICUs and more than 77 000 patients). Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the results. Results: Parenteral glutamine supplementation can significantly improve ICU efficiency in Italy, as the additional cost of supplemented treatment is more than completely offset by cost savings in hospital care. Supplementation was more cost-effective (cost-effectiveness ratio (CER)=€35 165 per patient discharged alive) than standard, non-supplemented PN (CER=€40 156 per patient discharged alive), and it resulted in mean cost savings of €4991 per patient discharged alive or €1047 per patient admitted to the hospital. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results. Conclusions: Alanyl-glutamine supplementation of PN is a clinically and economically attractive strategy for ICU patients in Italy and may be applicable to selected ICU patient populations in other countries. PMID:25469466

  19. Effect of intradialytic parenteral nutrition on quality of life in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Siskind, M S; Lien, Y H

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) on the quality of life of malnourished patients with end-stage renal disease on high-efficiency and high-flux hemodialysis therapy. Patients, who met the Medicare eligibility requirements for IDPN, were asked to fill out and extensive questionnaire covering several measures of quality of life prior to initiating and again after completing four months of IDPN therapy. Although the IDPN improved serum albumin levels significantly, aside from improved sleep patterns, no significant improvements in quality of life could be demonstrated. The mortality rate of these enrolled patients was as high as 28% within 4 months. We concluded that the limited amount of nutrition delivered over the course of a short dialysis session may not be enough to appreciably change the lives of our malnourished patients.

  20. Changes in Parenteral Nutrition During the First Week of Life Influence Early but Not Late Postnatal Growth in Very Low-Birth-Weight Infants.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Montserrat; Martínez-Monseny, Antonio Federico; Pociello, Neus; Gonzalez, Paloma; Del Rio, Ruth; Iriondo, Martin; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel

    2016-10-01

    Postnatal growth restriction remains a serious problem in very low-birth-weight infants. Enhanced parenteral supply of nutrients as soon as possible after birth is one of the strategies addressed to avoid extrauterine growth restriction. We aimed to analyze changes in growth patterns and in clinical outcomes in our unit after a change in our parenteral nutrition (PN) protocol. We collected data from 2 time periods, comprising the 2 years before (period I) and the 2 years after (period II) the change of protocol. We included 142 very low-birth-weight infants ≤32 weeks of gestation with a birth weight ≤1500 g. Data regarding nutrition intakes (parenteral and enteral) in the first week of life, growth during admission, and clinical outcomes were retrieved from clinical charts. Babies in period II received a higher nutrition supply during the first week of life, but no further differences were found after this period. Weight at 14 days of life was significantly higher in period II but not at day 28 of life or discharge. In our population, an enhanced PN regimen for very low-birth-weight infants led to a better growth at 14 days of life. However, this positive effect had disappeared at day 28 of life. Strategies to improve nutrient supply once the preterm baby is stable and on full enteral feeds should be implemented and analyzed. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Effectiveness of enteral and parenteral nutrition in the nutritional management of children with Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed

    Rickard, K A; Kirksey, A; Baehner, R L; Grosfeld, J L; Provisor, A; Weetman, R M; Boxer, L A; Ballantine, T V

    1980-12-01

    The effectiveness of enteral and parenteral feeding in supporting a satisfactory nutrition status and/or reversing protein-energy malnutrition was evaluated in nine children, ages 1 to 7 years (eight female), with Wilms' tumors. At the onset of treatment, eight patients received comprehensive enteral nutrition (CEN) which included intense nutritional counseling and oral supplements while one received total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Despite CEN, the initial, intense treatment period was associated with a decreased energy intake (64 +/- 27% Recommended Dietary Allowances), dramatic weight loss (22 +/- 7% by 26 +/- 17 days from the beginning of treatment), decreased skinfold thickness (< 10th percentile), and decreased albumin concentrations (< 3.2 g/dl). Four of those who initially received CEN subsequently required TPN. A total of five patients received TPN for a mean of 31 days (range 11 to 60); kcal averaged 105 +/- 9% Recommended Dietary Allowances during weight gain. At onset of TPN, the mean albumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count were 3.02 +/- 0.45 g/dl, 155 +/- 40 mg/dl, and, 655 +/- 437/mm3, respectively; all children had abnormal anthropometric measurements and anergy to recall skin test antigens. TPN for 28 or more days supported weight gain (+ 2.44 kg), increased serum albumin (+ 0.58 +/- 0.47 g/dl) and transferrin (+ 76 +/- 34 mg/dl), and reversed anergy despite low total lymphocyte counts. During maintenance treatment, nutritional status was maintained or restored with CEN in the group who responded. These preliminary data document the severity of protein-energy malnutrition which accompanies initial, intense treatment of children with Wilms' tumors, the nutritional and immunological benefits of TPN during continuing intense treatment and the effectiveness of CEN in maintaining a satisfactory nutritional status during maintenance treatment.

  2. Effects of short-chain fatty acid-supplemented total parenteral nutrition on intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokine abundance.

    PubMed

    Milo, L A; Reardon, K A; Tappenden, K A

    2002-09-01

    We examined the effect of short-chain fatty acid-supplemented total parenteral nutrition on proinflammatory cytokine levels in piglets. Piglets (N = 22) received either standard total parenteral nutrition or total parenteral nutrition supplemented with short-chain fatty acids. After seven days of continuous nutrient infusion, proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6) abundance in plasma, jejunal, and ileal samples and small intestinal myeloperoxidase was determined using western blotting. No differences were seen in TNF-alpha small intestinal abundance. IL-1beta was higher in the small intestine of the short-chain fatty acid group (P < 0.05). IL-6 was higher in intestinal samples of the short-chain fatty acid group (P = 0.05), with the ileum having a greater abundance of IL-6 than the jejunum (P < 0.005). No differences in proinflammatory cytokine abundance in the plasma or tissue myeloperoxidase were seen. These results indicate short-chain fatty acids beneficially increase small intestinal abundance of IL-1beta and IL-6 during total parenteral nutrition administration, while not affecting systemic production of these cytokines or intestinal inflammation.

  3. Parenteral lipid administration to very-low-birth-weight infants--early introduction of lipids and use of new lipid emulsions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; Veldhorst, Margriet A B; Spronk, Sandra; van den Akker, Chris H P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2012-08-01

    The use of intravenous lipid emulsions in preterm infants has been limited by concerns regarding impaired lipid tolerance. As a result, the time of initiation of parenteral lipid infusion to very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants varies widely among different neonatal intensive care units. However, lipids provide energy for protein synthesis and supply essential fatty acids that are necessary for central nervous system development. The objective was to summarize the effects of initiation of lipids within the first 2 d of life and the effects of different lipid compositions on growth and morbidities in VLBW infants. A systematic review and meta-analysis of publications identified in a search of PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was undertaken. Randomized controlled studies were eligible if information on growth was available. The search yielded 14 studies. No differences were observed in growth or morbidity with early lipid initiation. We found a weak favorable association of non-purely soybean-based emulsions with the incidence of sepsis (RR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.56, 1.00). The initiation of lipids within the first 2 d of life in VLBW infants appears to be safe and well tolerated; however, beneficial effects on growth could not be shown for this treatment nor for the type of lipid emulsion. Emulsions that are not purely soybean oil-based might be associated with a lower incidence of sepsis. Large-scale randomized controlled trials in preterm infants are warranted to determine whether early initiation of lipids and lipid emulsions that are not purely soybean oil-based results in improved long-term outcomes.

  4. Early parenteral nutrition alone or accompanying enteral nutrition in critically ill patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiao; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wu, Chao; Wang, Xinying

    2015-01-01

    背景:尽管一些大样本临床研究已经探究了早期肠外营养(early parenteral nutrition, ePN)在危重症患者的作用,但对于其疗效并没有达成共识,而且在 这一领域也未见相关的meta 分析报道。本研究的目的就是探究早期肠外营养 在危重症患者中的治疗作用。方法:选取含有早期肠外营养的临床治疗的文 献,对其数据进行meta 分析,并根据患者是否合并使用早期肠内营养(early enteral nutrition,eEN)再进行亚组分析。结果:本研究总计纳入5 篇随机对 照研究(randomized control trials,RCTs)。结果显示,早期肠外营养组患者 与对照组患者死亡率无明显差异(相对危险度:1.05, 95%置信区间:0.96, 1.16) 。此外, 与对照组相比, 早期肠外营养组患者机械通气时间缩短 (p=0.007,相对危险度:-0.95,95%置信区间:-1.64, -0.27),但是总住院时 间延长(p<0.001,相对危险度:3.76,95%置信区间:2.25, 5.28)。结论:本 meta 分析表明,入院24-48 小时以内的早期肠外营养并不会影响危重症患者死 亡率。因此,肠内营养禁忌或者仅可使用低剂量肠内营养的患者无需使用早期 肠外营养进行补充。.

  5. In vitro hemorheological effects of parenteral agents used in peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Katalin; Sandor, Barbara; Toth, Andras; Koltai, Katalin; Papp, Judit; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Kalman; Kesmarky, Gabor

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis. In PAD hemorheological parameters were defined as risk factors in a number of studies and several therapeutic agents were tried in these conditions. Our study aims to investigate and compare the in vitro hemorheological effects of various drugs generally used in the parenteral treatment of intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia. Blood samples of healthy male volunteers were incubated with iloprost, alprostadil, pentoxifylline, sulodexide or pentosan polysulfate at calculated therapeutic serum concentration. Hematocrit (Hct) was determined by microhematocrit centrifuge. Plasma and apparent whole blood viscosities (WBV) were evaluated by capillary viscometer. Red blood cell aggregation was measured by LORCA (laserassisted optical rotational cell analyzer) aggregometer, and LORCA ektacytometer was used for measuring erythrocyte deformability at 37°C. Iloprost, alprostadil, and pentoxifylline incubation did not have any significant effect on plasma and apparent WBV. Elongation index increased in samples incubated with alprostadil at low shear stresses 0.95 and 0.53 Pa (p < 0.05). Sulodexide significantly improved WBV and Hct/WBV ratio (p < 0.05). Incubation with pentosan polysulfate resulted in higher WBV, lower Hct/WBV ratio and deterioration in the aggregation parameters (p < 0.05). Sulodexide may have beneficial effect on a macrorheological parameter; alprostadil may improve a microrheological parameter. Hemorheological alterations could be important in PAD patients with hampered vasodilator capacity.

  6. Exercise augments the acute anabolic effects of intradialytic parenteral nutrition in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Pupim, Lara B; Flakoll, Paul J; Levenhagen, Deanna K; Ikizler, T Alp

    2004-04-01

    Decreased dietary protein intake and hemodialysis (HD)-associated protein catabolism are among several factors that predispose chronic hemodialysis (CHD) patients to uremic malnutrition and associated muscle wasting. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) acutely reverses the net negative whole body and forearm muscle protein balances observed during the HD procedure. Exercise has been shown to improve muscle protein homeostasis, especially if performed with adequately available intramuscular amino acids. We hypothesized that exercise performance would provide additive anabolic effects to the beneficial effects of IDPN. We studied six CHD patients at two separate HD sessions: 1) IDPN administration only and 2) IDPN + exercise. Patients were studied 2 h before, during, and 2 h after an HD session by use of a primed constant infusion of l-[1-(13)C]leucine and l-[ring-(2)H(5)] phenylalanine. Exercise combined with IDPN promoted additive twofold increases in forearm muscle essential amino acid uptake (455 +/- 105 vs. 229 +/- 38 nmol.100 ml(-1).min(-1), P < 0.05) and net muscle protein accretion (125 +/- 37 vs. 56 +/- 30 microg.100 ml(-1).min(-1), P < 0.05) during HD compared with IDPN alone. Measurements of whole body protein homeostasis and energy expenditure were not altered by exercise treatment. In conclusion, exercise in the presence of adequate nutritional supplementation has potential as a therapeutic intervention to blunt the loss of muscle mass in CHD patients.

  7. Effects of postoperative parenteral nutrition with different lipid emulsions in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Demirer, Seher; Sapmaz, Ali; Kepenekci, Ilknur; Aydintug, Semih; Balci, Deniz; Sonyurek, Pinar; Kose, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to investigate the effects of total parenteral nutrition (PN) using different lipid emulsions in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Methods Fifty-two patients were randomized to receive soybean oil + medium chain triglycerides (MCT) (group I), soybean oil + olive oil (group II), soybean oil + olive oil + fish oil (group III) as a lipid source. PN was started on postoperative day 1 and patients were maintained on PN for a minimum period of 4 days. Laboratory variables (CRP, prealbumin, transferrin) were measured before surgery and on postoperative days. Results Three treatment groups were included in the study. Patients in group I received long chain triglycerides (LCT) + LCT/MCT emulsion (%75 LCT + %25 LCT/MCT); Patients in group II received olive oil based emulsion (80% olive oil + 20% soybean oil, ClinOleic); Patients in group III received fish oil in addition to olive oil based emulsion (%85 ClinOleic + %15 Omegaven; Fresenius Kabi). The following 14 parameters were assessed: body weight, CRP, prealbumin, transferrin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, total antioxidant status, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, oxidized low density lipoprotein-2, complete blood cell, international normalized ratio, D-dimer, activated partially thromboplastin time, prothrombin time. All other parameters showed no differences among the groups. Conclusion The results of our trial demonstrate a potential beneficial effect of soybean oil/olive oil based lipid emulsions for use in PN regarding inflammatory response and oxidant capacity in the treatment of patients. PMID:27904853

  8. Effects of Lipid Emulsion and Multivitamins on the Growth of Microorganisms in Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Kaneda, Shinya; Shimono, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Blood stream infections caused by Bacillus cereus or Serratia marcescens in patients receiving peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) have occasionally been reported in Japan, but these microorganisms are not major causes of blood stream infections in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition via a central venous catheter. In Japan, commercially available PPN solutions contain amino acids, glucose, and electrolytes, but not contain lipid emulsion (LE) and multivitamins (MV). In this study, the effects of LE and MV on the growth of microorganisms such as Bacillus cereus, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans in PPN solutions were investigated. Methods: A commercial 3% amino acid and 7.5% glucose solution with electrolytes (AF) was used as the base solution to prepare test solutions (LAF, AFV, and LAFV) containing LE, MV, or both. Specifically, 20% LE was added to AF in a ratio of 1:9 to prepare LAF. MV was added to AF and LAF to prepare AFV and LAFV, respectively. A specified number of each microorganism was added to each 100 mL of AF, LAF, AFV, and LAFV in sterile plastic flasks, and all flasks were allowed to stand at room temperature. The number of colony forming units per mL of each microorganism was counted at 0, 24, and 48 hours after the addition of each microorganism. Results: Both Bacillus cereus and Serratia marcescens increased rapidly in AF as well as in LAF, AFV, and LAFV. Staphylococcus aureus did not increased in AF, but increased slightly in LAF and increased rapidly in AFV and LAFV. Candida albicans increased slightly in AF and increased rapidly in LAF, AFV, and LAFV. Conclusions: The results suggest the followings: if microbial contamination occurs, 1) Bacillus cereus and Serratia marcescens can grow rapidly in PPN solutions consisting of amino acids, glucose and electrolytes; 2) Staphylococcus aureus cannot grow without LE and MV, but can grow rapidly with MV; 3) Candida albicans can grow slowly without LE

  9. Using failure mode and effects analysis to improve the safety of neonatal parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Arenas Villafranca, Jose Javier; Gómez Sánchez, Araceli; Nieto Guindo, Miriam; Faus Felipe, Vicente

    2014-07-15

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) was used to identify potential errors and to enable the implementation of measures to improve the safety of neonatal parenteral nutrition (PN). FMEA was used to analyze the preparation and dispensing of neonatal PN from the perspective of the pharmacy service in a general hospital. A process diagram was drafted, illustrating the different phases of the neonatal PN process. Next, the failures that could occur in each of these phases were compiled and cataloged, and a questionnaire was developed in which respondents were asked to rate the following aspects of each error: incidence, detectability, and severity. The highest scoring failures were considered high risk and identified as priority areas for improvements to be made. The evaluation process detected a total of 82 possible failures. Among the phases with the highest number of possible errors were transcription of the medical order, formulation of the PN, and preparation of material for the formulation. After the classification of these 82 possible failures and of their relative importance, a checklist was developed to achieve greater control in the error-detection process. FMEA demonstrated that use of the checklist reduced the level of risk and improved the detectability of errors. FMEA was useful for detecting medication errors in the PN preparation process and enabling corrective measures to be taken. A checklist was developed to reduce errors in the most critical aspects of the process. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of total parenteral nutrition, systemic sepsis, and glutamine on gut mucosa in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, S.; Leskiw, M. J.; Schluter, M. D.; Bush, K. T.; Nagele, R. G.; Lanza-Jacoby, S.; Stein, T. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the combination of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and systemic sepsis on mucosal morphology and protein synthesis was investigated. Rats were given a standard TPN mixture consisting of glucose (216 kcal.kg-1.day-1), lipid (24 kcal.kg-1.day-1), and amino acids (1.5 g N.kg-1.day-1) for 5 days. On the 5th day the rats (n = 37) were randomized into four groups according to diet as follows: 1) control nonseptic on standard TPN, 2) control nonseptic on TPN with glutamine, 3) septic on standard TPN, and 4) septic with the TPN supplemented with glutamine. Twenty hours after the injection of Escherichia coli, the rats were given a 4-h constant infusion of [U-14C]leucine to determine the mucosal fractional protein synthesis rates. The following results were obtained. 1) Histological examination showed that systemic sepsis caused tissue damage to the ileum and jejunum. 2) Glutamine supplementation attenuated these changes. 3) There were no visible changes to the colon either from glutamine supplementation or sepsis. 4) Sepsis was associated with an increase in mucosal protein synthesis and decreased muscle synthesis. 5) Addition of glutamine to the TPN mix further increased protein synthesis in the intestinal mucosa of septic rats.

  11. Effect of parenteral administration of erythromycin, tilmicosin, and tylosin on abomasal emptying rate in suckling calves.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mohammad; Constable, Peter D

    2007-12-01

    To determine the effect of parenteral administration of erythromycin, tilmicosin, and tylosin on abomasal emptying rate in suckling calves. 8 male Holstein-Friesian calves < 35 days old. Calves received each of 4 treatments in random order (2 mL of saline [0.9% NaCl] solution, IM [control treatment]; erythromycin, 8.8 mg/kg, IM; tilmicosin, 10 mg/kg, SC; and tylosin, 17.6 mg/kg, IM). Calves were fed 2 L of milk replacer containing acetaminophen (50 mg/kg) 30 minutes later. Jugular venous blood samples and transabdominal ultrasonographic abomasal dimensions were obtained periodically after suckling. Abomasal emptying rate was assessed on the basis of the time to maximal plasma acetaminophen concentration and ultrasonographic determination of the halftime of abomasal emptying. One-tailed Dunnett post tests were conducted whenever the F value for group was significant. Emptying rate was faster for erythromycin, tilimicosin, and tylosin than for the control treatment, as determined on the basis of time to maximal plasma acetaminophen concentration. Ultrasonography indicated that the half-time of abomasal emptying was significantly shorter for erythromycin than for the control treatment. Tylosin and tilmicosin accelerated the abomasal emptying rate, but not significantly, relative to the emptying rate for the control treatment. Administration of erythromycin, tilmicosin, and tylosin at the label dosage increased abomasal emptying rate in calves. The clinical importance of an increase in abomasal emptying rate in cattle remains to be determined.

  12. Cost and effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in Chinese ICU patients receiving parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo Hao; Gao, Jian; Ji, Chun Yan; Pradelli, Lorenzo; Xi, Qiu Lei; Zhuang, Qiu Lin

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence supports the use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-enriched lipid emulsions in place of standard lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition (PN) for intensive care unit (ICU) patients, but uptake may be limited by higher costs. We compared clinical and economic outcomes for these two types of lipid emulsion in the Chinese ICU setting. We developed a pharmacoeconomic discrete event simulation model, based on efficacy data from an international meta-analysis and patient characteristics, resource consumption, and unit costs from a Chinese institutional setting. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess the effects of uncertainty around input parameters. Model predictive validity was assessed by comparing results with data observed in a patient subset not used in the modeling. The model predicted that omega-3 PUFA-enriched emulsion (Omegaven(®) 10% fish oil emulsion) would dominate standard lipid emulsions, with better clinical outcomes and lower overall health care costs (mean savings ~10,000 RMB), mainly as a result of faster recovery and shorter hospital stay (by ~6.5 days). The external validation process confirmed the reliability of the model predictions. Omega-3 PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions improved clinical outcome and decreased overall costs in Chinese ICU patients requiring PN.

  13. Effects of oral and parenteral quinine on rats with ventromedial hypothalamic knife-cut obesity.

    PubMed

    Oku, J; Bray, G A; Fisler, J S

    1984-06-01

    The addition of quinine to the food reversed the obesity in rats with hypothalamic hyperphagia induced by knife cuts. Similarly, the injection of quinine into rats with hypothalamic knife cuts reduced food intake and body weight but the effects were smaller than those observed when quinine was added to the diet. Urinary quinine excretion was similar by the oral and parenteral routes. The food intake of the knife-cut animals receiving quinine gradually fell to the same level as in the sham-operated animals receiving quinine by either route. The weights of retroperitoneal fat pads were related to the weights of the animals and were reduced in the quinine-treated groups. Plasma insulin concentrations were significantly higher in the knife-cut animals and were reduced toward control levels by quinine treatment. Gluconeogenesis, measured by incorporation of radioactivity from labeled bicarbonate into glucose, was unaffected by treatment with quinine or by knife cuts. Lipogenesis from tritiated water in vivo was not different between treatment groups in the liver or retroperitoneal fat pads. However, in vivo lipogenesis was reduced in knife-cut rats fed ad libitum compared with quinine-treated rats. The response of lipogenesis to insulin in vitro was also not different between treatment groups. These data suggest that a major part of the reduction in food intake in hyperphagic rats eating a quinine-adulterated diet is due to postingestional events.

  14. Effect of intradialytic parenteral nutrition on mortality rates in end-stage renal disease care.

    PubMed

    Capelli, J P; Kushner, H; Camiscioli, T C; Chen, S M; Torres, M A

    1994-06-01

    Several studies have now demonstrated that low serum albumin and/or low protein catabolic rates correlate with increased risk of death in the chronic hemodialysis patient. A study involving 81 patients receiving thrice-weekly hemodialysis treatments and who had either a low serum albumin and/or protein catabolic rate was conducted to compare the effect of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) on mortality rates. Fifty patients received IDPN and 31 patients did not. Thirty-eight of the patients were black (47%), 34 were white (42%), and 9 were Hispanic (11%). The study included 33 diabetic patients (41%), 20 of whom received IDPN. Nondiabetic patients received an average of 725 kcal/hemodialysis treatment and diabetic patients received an average of 670 kcal/hemodialysis treatment. The average length of treatment was 9 months. The results of the study revealed a better survival rate (64% v 52%) for patients treated with IDPN. Using Cox analysis, the IDPN-treated group had a significantly better survival rate (P < 0.01). Serum albumin increased by 12% in the survivors. There was no difference in survival when considered separately for diabetic and nondiabetic patients who received IDPN (mortality rate for diabetics: 50% for treated patients and 54% for untreated patients; mortality rate for nondiabetics: 26% for treated patients and 44% for untreated patients). However, the nondiabetic treated patients had the lowest mortality rates. In conclusion, correction of hypoalbuminemia by IDPN significantly reduced mortality rates overall.

  15. Cost and effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in Chinese ICU patients receiving parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo Hao; Gao, Jian; Ji, Chun Yan; Pradelli, Lorenzo; Xi, Qiu Lei; Zhuang, Qiu Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Clinical evidence supports the use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-enriched lipid emulsions in place of standard lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition (PN) for intensive care unit (ICU) patients, but uptake may be limited by higher costs. We compared clinical and economic outcomes for these two types of lipid emulsion in the Chinese ICU setting. Methods We developed a pharmacoeconomic discrete event simulation model, based on efficacy data from an international meta-analysis and patient characteristics, resource consumption, and unit costs from a Chinese institutional setting. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess the effects of uncertainty around input parameters. Model predictive validity was assessed by comparing results with data observed in a patient subset not used in the modeling. Results The model predicted that omega-3 PUFA-enriched emulsion (Omegaven® 10% fish oil emulsion) would dominate standard lipid emulsions, with better clinical outcomes and lower overall health care costs (mean savings ~10,000 RMB), mainly as a result of faster recovery and shorter hospital stay (by ~6.5 days). The external validation process confirmed the reliability of the model predictions. Conclusion Omega-3 PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions improved clinical outcome and decreased overall costs in Chinese ICU patients requiring PN. PMID:26170701

  16. Effect of various lipid emulsions on total parenteral nutrition-induced hepatosteatosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M; Hiramatsu, Y; Mitsuyoshi, K; Yamamura, M; Hioki, K; Yamamoto, M

    1991-01-01

    The effect of various lipid emulsions on the development of fatty liver during total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was investigated in rats given TPN for 7 days. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), long-chain triglycerides (LCT), chemically defined triglycerides (CDT; structured lipid with a high purity of 94.3%), and a mixture of MCT and LCT (MIX) were prepared as the lipid emulsions. TPN provided 350 kcal/kg/day, with a nonprotein calorie/nitrogen ratio of 160. The TPN-1 group received 10% nonprotein calories and the TPN-2 group received 30% nonprotein calories. MCT TPN was found to have some disadvantages, especially with regard to nitrogen balance and plasma albumin levels. Total cholesterol and phospholipids tended to be high in the MCT TPN group. The hepatic lipid content was higher in the lipid-free TPN and the MCT TPN groups, and lower in the CDT and LCT TPN groups. Histologically, the livers of the MIX, CDT, and LCT TPN groups showed less fatty change than those of the FREE and MCT groups.

  17. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy for infective endocarditis: a cost-effective strategy.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, A; Revest, M; Patrat-Delon, S; Lemaître, F; Donal, E; Lorléac'h, A; Arvieux, C; Michelet, C; Tattevin, P

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated the benefit/risk ratio of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) in infective endocarditis (IE). We performed an observational retrospective study of definite IE (Duke criteria) treated in an infectious diseases unit in 2012. We compared patients having completed the treatment in hospital (H), and those deemed sufficiently stable, and with adequate home environment, for OPAT. The costs were estimated through hospital bills, and, for OPAT, through the costs of drugs and their administration (material, staff), transportation, and outpatient visits. Eighteen out of 39 consecutive patients presenting with IE received OPAT, with a mean hospital stay of 23.5days (vs 34.7days for H group, P=0.014). No severe adverse event related to OPAT was reported. The global saving was estimated at 267,307euros, or 14,850euros per patient. OPAT in selected patients presenting with IE seems effective, safe, and reduces costs by approximately 15,000euros per patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Dry influenza vaccines: towards a stable, effective and convenient alternative to conventional parenteral influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Jasmine; Born, Philip A; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2016-11-01

    Cold-chain requirements, limited stockpiling potential and the lack of potent immune responses are major challenges of parenterally formulated influenza vaccines. Decreased cold chain dependence and stockpiling can be achieved if vaccines are formulated in a dry state using suitable excipients and drying technologies. Furthermore, having the vaccine in a dry state enables the development of non-parenteral patient friendly dosage forms: microneedles for transdermal administration, tablets for oral administration, and powders for epidermal, nasal or pulmonary administration. Moreover, these administration routes have the potential to elicit an improved immune response. This review highlights the rationale for the development of dried influenza vaccines, as well as processes used for the drying and stabilization of influenza vaccines; it also compares the immunogenicity of dried influenza vaccines administered via non-invasive routes with that of parenterally administered influenza vaccines. Finally, it discusses unmet needs, challenges and future developments in the field of dried influenza vaccines.

  19. [Effects of parenteral glutamine in patients submitted to bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gómez Candela, C; Castillo, R; de Cos, A I; Iglesias, C; Martín, M C; Aguado, M J; Ojeda, E

    2006-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a therapy used for hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Associated chemotherapy and radiotherapy to which these patients are submitted induce secondary effects, with a high metabolic stress. Glutamine is considered a conditionally essential amino acid, and has been shown effective in severe catabolic states. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy supplemented with glutamine on duration of nutritional support in a group of patients with BMT. We have also analyzed associated complications, the nutritional status, the clinical course at 6 months, differences as to type of transplantation, and oral ingestion capability. This is a phase IV, randomized, double blind, and parallel clinical trial, done at a single center. The study was performed on 49 patients, 29% male and 71% female patients, with ages between 21-63 years, distributed in 3 diagnostic groups (leukemia, lymphoma, and solid tumors), and admitted to the Hematology Department of our Hospital. Fifty percent of the patients in each group have received PN supplemented with glutamine (0.4 g/kg/day of L-alanine-L-glutamine), and the other 50% have received standard PN. we have not found significant differences nor at the beginning nor at the end of the study between both groups with regards to studied variables. PN is and effective therapy for maintenance of the nutritional status in patients submitted to a therapy with a, highly catabolic effect such as BMT. Although we have not been able to show the efficacy of glutamine supplementation in this study with the used dose, it does have been effective in other reports.

  20. Depletion of plasma antioxidants in surgical intensive care unit patients requiring parenteral feeding: effects of parenteral nutrition with or without alanyl-glutamine dipeptide supplementation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Menghua; Fernandez-Estivariz, Concepcion; Jones, Dean P; Accardi, Carolyn R; Alteheld, Birgit; Bazargan, Niloofar; Hao, Li; Griffith, Daniel P; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Galloway, John R; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    Antioxidant depletion is common in critically ill patients. This study was designed to determine the effects of parenteral nutrition (PN), with or without glutamine (Gln) supplementation, on systemic antioxidant status in adult patients after major surgery who required PN in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) setting. Fifty-nine patients in the SICU who required PN after pancreatic surgery or cardiac, vascular, or colonic (non-pancreatic) surgery were randomized in a double-blinded study to receive standard PN (Gln-free) or Gln-supplemented PN (Gln-PN) in which Gln was provided as alanyl-Gln dipeptide. Conventional PN vitamin and mineral doses were administered to all subjects. Plasma concentrations of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and the antioxidant nutrients alpha-tocopherol, vitamin C, and zinc were determined at baseline (initiation of study PN) and again after 7 d of study PN. Data were analyzed for the total study cohort and within the pancreatic surgery and non-pancreatic (cardiac, vascular, and colonic) surgery patient subgroups. Mean plasma antioxidant concentrations were within or slightly below the normal ranges at baseline. However, a larger percentage of patients demonstrated below-normal baseline plasma concentrations of GSH (59%), vitamin C (59%), and zinc (68%), respectively. A smaller percentage of patients exhibited below-normal plasma alpha-tocopherol levels (21%). Study PN significantly improved plasma zinc levels in the entire study group and in each surgical subgroup. Gln-PN significantly improved the change in plasma levels of reduced GSH from baseline to day 7 in the non-pancreatic surgery patients (PN -0.27 microM versus Gln-PN +0.26 microM, P < 0.03). Low plasma levels of key antioxidants were common in this group of patients in the SICU despite administration of PN containing conventional micronutrients. Compared with standard PN, Gln-supplemented PN improved plasma GSH levels in patients in the SICU after cardiac, vascular, or

  1. [Micronutrients in parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    García de Lorenzo, A; Alvarez, J; Bermejo, T; Gomis, P; Piñeiro, G

    2009-01-01

    At a multidisciplinary debate, and after reviewing the evidence available as well as experts' opinion, the IV Baxter-SENPE Working Panel established the indications and managemente guidelines for micronutrients (water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins, and oligoelements or trace elements) in parenteral nutrition. It was concluded about the convenience of daily intake of micronutrients with diferent options regarding deficiente or excessive dosages, administration systems, interactions, monitoring, and cots-effectiveness.

  2. The choleretic effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in total parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Nussinovitch, M; Zahavi, I; Marcus, H; Hackelman, B; Dinari, G

    1996-12-01

    Cholestasis is a frequent problem in patients on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), especially aspirin, cause choleresis in animals. We studied the effect of aspirin on bile flow and bile salt secretion in TPN-associated cholestasis in rats. Four groups of 6-10 animals each received either 154 mM NaCl (saline) or 2.5% amino acid solution (TRAVASOL, Travenol, Israel) and 10% glucose i.v. (TPN) for 3 h. During the second and third hours, taurocholate, the main bile salt in rats, was infused at a rate of 10 micromol/min per kg to prevent bile salt pool depletion. Aspirin, one of the main NSAIDs, was infused during the last 2 h into animals with or without TPN treatment at a rate of 100 mg/kg. Bile was directly collected from the common bile duct for 3 h. Rats given TPN showed a significant reduction in bile flow and bile salt secretion rate compared to control groups: 20.89 vs. 29.60 microl/min per kg (P <0.02) and 0.37 vs. 0.65 micromol/min per kg (P <0.0001), respectively. Aspirin had a significant choleretic effect and was able to overcome the bile flow and bile salt secretion rate reduction caused by TPN; 33.07 vs. 20.89 microl/min per kg (P <0.002) and 0.66 vs. 0.37 micromol/min per kg (P <0.0001), respectively. These results may have clinical implications for TPN-associated cholestasis.

  3. Effect of parenteral zinc sulfate on colon anastomosis repair in the rat.

    PubMed

    Agren, M S; Andersen, L; Heegaard, A M; Jorgensen, L N

    2008-09-01

    To prevent colonic anastomotic dehiscence, pharmaceutical interventions should inhibit degradation of existing submucosal collagen fibers and accelerate the synthesis of new collagen molecules. Zinc has multiple functions in collagen metabolism and was recently found beneficial in colonic anastomosis repair. We have investigated the effect of daily intraperitoneal zinc (2 mg/kg) injections on the development of the biomechanical integrity of left colon anastomoses. Sixty Sprague-Dawley male rats (median 245 g) were allocated to treatment with zinc sulfate in saline (n = 30) or with saline alone (n = 30) starting 1 h before the anastomoses were made. Serum zinc levels and anastomotic breaking strength were determined on postoperative days 3 (n = 30) and 7 (n = 30). The initial breaking strength or suture-binding capacity was determined in additional ten non-treated animals (277 g). The breaking strength of the anastomoses decreased in the two groups combined (n = 30) by 50% (p < 0.001) on day 3 but was regained by postoperative day 7 compared with the initial anastomotic biomechanical strength. Serum zinc levels also increased from day 3 to day 7 in both intervention groups and correlated significantly with breaking strength (r = 0.57, p < 0.001). Although the median serum zinc level was 14% higher (p < 0.01) on day 7 in zinc-treated than in saline-treated animals, the breaking strength did not differ significantly between zinc-treated and saline-treated rats on either day 3 (p = 0.95) or day 7 (p = 0.70). In contrast to previous report in rabbits, we failed to demonstrate the beneficial effects of parenteral zinc supplementation on colon anastomosis repair in a rat model.

  4. Effect of retrograde aminophylline administration on calcium and phosphate solubility in neonatal total parenteral nutrient solutions.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, A E; Holcombe, B J; Sawyer, W T

    1989-12-01

    The effect of retrograde administration of aminophylline injection on calcium and phosphate solubility in neonatal total parenteral nutrient (TPN) solutions was studied. Neonatal TPN solutions containing two amino acids solutions in three concentrations (Travasol 1% and 2% and TrophAmine 2%) were formulated. Calcium and phosphate salts were added to achieve calcium concentrations of 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, or 40 meq/L and phosphorus concentrations of 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, or 40 mmol/L. Samples were inspected visually after 18-24 hours; solutions free of precipitation were then infused through two parallel syringe-pump systems designed to simulate clinical conditions for TPN solution administration to a 1-kg neonate. To one system, a 7.5-mg aminophylline dose was added as a manual retrograde injection; sterile water for injection was added as a manual retrograde injection to the other system. The solutions were inspected throughout a one-hour infusion period for precipitate formation in the i.v. apparatus, and the pH of the effluents was determined. Concurrent aminophylline administration resulted in visible precipitate in all but a few of the solutions tested. The solution containing Travasol 2%, calcium 10 meq/L, and phosphorus 10 mmol/L remained clear, as did the solutions containing TrophAmine 2% and the following concentrations of calcium and phosphorus: calcium 10 meq/L and phosphorus 10, 15, or 20 mmol/L; calcium 15 meq/L and phosphorus 10 or 15 mmol/L; and calcium 20 meq/L and phosphorus 10 or 15 mmol/L. An average increase in pH of 0.63 unit was noted in all solutions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Urinary saturation and nephrocalcinosis in preterm infants: effect of parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, B; Hesse, A; Neuhaus, T; Fanconi, S; Forster, I; Blau, N; Leumann, E

    1993-01-01

    Urinary lithogenic and inhibitory factors were studied in 27 preterm infants; 16 had total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and 11 had breastmilk with an additional glucose-sodium chloride infusion. Urines were collected for 24 hours on day 2 (period A), day 3 (B), and once between days 4 and 10 (C). Urinary calcium oxalate saturation was calculated by the computer program EQUIL 2. Renal ultrasonography was performed every second week until discharge. The calcium/creatinine ratio increased in infants on TPN (A 0.91; C 1.68 mol/mol) and was significantly higher at period C than that in infants on breastmilk/infusion (A 0.52; C 0.36). The oxalate/creatinine ratio was persistently higher with TPN (203 mmol/mol) than with breastmilk/infusion (98; 137). The citrate/creatinine remained constant with TPN (0.44 mol/mol), whereas it increased significantly with breastmilk/infusion (0.26; 0.49). Calcium/citrate rose considerably with TPN, but decreased with breastmilk/infusion to a significantly lower level than with TPN. The urinary calcium oxalate saturation increased with TPN (2.4; 4.5) and decreased with breastmilk/infusion (2.1; 1.5) to a significantly lower value than with TPN. Nephrocalcinosis developed in two infants on TPN. Mean daily calcium intake was similar in both groups, whereas protein, sodium, and phosphorus intake were significantly higher on TPN. It is concluded that the increase in urinary calcium oxalate saturation observed with TPN is due to the combined effect of an increased urinary calcium excretion and higher urinary oxalate/creatinine and calcium/citrate ratios. The changes observed are likely to be caused by TPN itself, which differs in several respects from breastmilk feeding. PMID:8215570

  6. The effects of recombinant human growth hormone and intradialytic parenteral nutrition in malnourished hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Schulman, G; Wingard, R L; Hutchison, R L; Lawrence, P; Hakim, R M

    1993-05-01

    Malnutrition in hemodialysis patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The use of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) to improve nutritional parameters has been shown to be of limited benefit in most studies. We studied the use of recombinant human growth hormone (rHuGH) in potentiating the effects of IDPN in seven hemodialysis patients dialyzed with a Kt/V of 1.03 +/- 0.11 (mean +/- SEM), but with evidence of malnutrition: albumin, 3.2 +/- 0.18 g/dL; transferrin, 215 +/- 30 mg/dL; insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), 115 +/- 19 ng/mL, protein catabolic rate (PCR), 0.70 +/- 0.05 g/kg/d; and weight, 12.3% +/- 4.0% below ideal body weight. During 6 weeks of IDPN, resulting in an additional 18 +/- 4 kcal and 0.69 +/- 0.03 g of protein/kg body weight per dialysis session, albumin concentration increased to 3.5 +/- 0.14 g/dL (compared with baseline, P = NS), transferrin increased to 279 +/- 36 mg/dL (P < 0.002), IGF-1 increased to 152 +/- 32 ng/mL (P = NS), and PCR increased to 0.81 +/- 0.04 g/kg/d (P = NS). During the next 6 weeks, IDPN administration was continued and rHuGH, at a dose of 5 mg subcutaneously during each dialysis, was added to the regimen. This resulted in an increase in albumin concentration to 3.8 +/- 0.08 g/dL (P < or = 0.04 compared with end of IDPN phase), an increase in transferrin to 298 +/- 41 mg/dL (P = NS compared with end of IDPN phase), and an increase in IGF-1 to 212 +/- 45 ng/mL (P = 0.05 compared with end of IDPN phase).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. [Artificial nutrition in children (II): parenteral access].

    PubMed

    Estevão-Costa, José

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial when the use of the gastrointestinal tract is not feasible. This article addresses the main techniques for parenteral access in children, its indications, insertion details and maintenance, and complications. The type of venous access is mainly dictated by the expected duration of parenteral nutrition and by the body weight/stature. The peripheral access is viable and advantageous for parenteral nutrition of short duration (< 2 weeks); a tunneled central venous catheter (Broviac) is usually necessary in long-term parenteral nutrition (> 3 weeks); a peripherally introduced central catheter is an increasingly used alternative. Parenteral accesses are effective and safe, but the morbidity and mortality is not negligible particularly in cases of short bowel syndrome. Most complications are related to the catheter placement and maintenance care, and can be largely avoided when the procedures are carried out by experienced staff under strict protocols.

  8. Inflammatory response in preterm infants is induced early in life by oxygen and modulated by total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Pascal M; Lavoie, Jean-Claude; Watson, Carla; Rouleau, Thérèse; Chang, Brent A; Chessex, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    The i.v. lipid emulsion (LIP) is a source of oxidants, which may stimulate inflammation. Coadministration of parenteral multivitamins (MVP) with LIP prevents lipid peroxidation in light-exposed total parenteral nutrition (TPN). We hypothesized that this modality of TPN administration affects systemic inflammation, which may be modulated by exposure to oxygen. Premature infants were allocated to three TPN regimens: control regimen - MVP coadministered with amino acid/dextrose exposed to ambient light, LIP provided separately (n = 9) - LIP+MVP light exposed (LE): MVP coadministered with light-exposed LIP (n = 9) - LIP+MVP light protected (LP): MVP coadministered with light-protected LIP (n = 8). In LE and LP, amino acid/dextrose was provided separately. On reaching full TPN, infants were sampled for IL-6 and IL-8 in plasma and the redox potential of glutathione in whole blood (E, mV). Data were compared (ANOVA) in infants exposed to low (<0.25) versus high (> or =0.25) FiO2. Patients (mean +/- SD: birth weight 797 +/- 172 g; GA 26 +/- 1 wk) had similar clinical characteristics in TPN groups. Cytokine levels correlated positively (p < 0.01) with FiO2 and E. High FiO2 stimulated an increase (p < 0.01) in cytokines in control regimen, whereas these markers remained unaffected by oxygen in the LE and LP groups. The choice of a TPN admixture may have important consequences on the systemic inflammatory response triggered by an oxidant stress.

  9. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007239.htm Total parenteral nutrition - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  10. Parenteral safflower oil emulsion (Liposyn 10%): safety and effectiveness in treating or preventing essential fatty acid deficiency in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bivins, B A; Rapp, R P; Record, K; Meng, H C; Griffen, W O

    1980-01-01

    The safety and effectiveness of a 10% safflower oil emulsion in treating or preventing essential fatty acid deficiency was tested in a prospective study of 15 surgical patients requiring total parenteral nutrition for two to four weeks. Three dosage regimens were evaluated including: Group I: 4% of calories as linoleate daily (five patients), Group II: 4% of calories as linoleate every other day (two patients), and Group III: 8% of calories every other day (eight patients). Patients were monitored for laboratory changes from baseline specifically in those areas where previous fat emulsions have caused serious deviations. No significant changes were noted in hematologic parameters, coagulation studies, cholesterol and triglyceride serum levels. Although there were sporadic mild deviations in liver function changes in several patients, no clinically significant adverse effects could be directly attributed to infusion of the fat emulsion. Three patients had baseline triene/tetraene ratios of 0.4 or greater, indicative of essential fatty/acid deficiency, and these ratios dropped to less than 0.4 within eight days of beginning therapy with the parenteral fat emulsion. The remaining 12 patients maintained a normal triene/tetraene ratio of less than 0.4 throughout the 28 day study period. All three dosage regimens were considered effective for treatment and prevention of essential fatty acid deficiency. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6767452

  11. Effect of sodium metabisulfite on hydrogen peroxide production in light-exposed pediatric parenteral amino acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Brawley, V; Bhatia, J; Karp, W B

    1998-06-15

    The effect of sodium metabisulfite (MBS) on hydrogen peroxide (HP) production in model and commercial amino acid solutions exposed to phototherapy light was studied. Model and commercial pediatric amino acid solutions were prepared such that the amino acid concentration was 1%. MBS concentration, riboflavin concentration, and duration of exposure to phototherapy light were varied to determine the effect on HP production. Control solutions were kept in the dark. HP production was assayed in the model amino acid solutions by using potassium iodide in the presence of ammonium molybdate. In all experiments, HP production was measured at 360 nm in the presence and absence of catalase. In light-exposed solutions, HP production increased linearly for several hours and reached a plateau by eight hours. A mean maximum of 940 microM was produced (data pooled for all solutions). No detectable HP was generated in the solutions kept in the dark. After two hours of light exposure, it was necessary to add at least 10 times more MBS than is typically found in commercial total parenteral nutrient solutions to scavenge all the HP produced. An average of up to 940 microM of HP was produced in model and commercial pediatric parenteral 1% amino acid solutions in the presence of phototherapy light and clinically relevant concentrations of riboflavin and MBS. Light exposure decreased the antioxidant effect of MBS.

  12. Carnitine deficiency in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition: effect of L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E; Penn, D; Wolf, H

    1983-06-01

    To investigate whether L-carnitine supplementation may correct nutritional carnitine deficiency and associated metabolic disturbances in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition, an intravenous fat tolerance test (1 gm/kg Intralipid over four hours) was performed in 29 premature infants 6 to 10 days of age (15 receiving carnitine supplement 10 mg/kg . day L-carnitine IV, and 14 receiving no supplement). Total carnitine plasma values were normal or slightly elevated in supplemented but decreased in nonsupplemented infants. In both groups, fat infusion resulted in an increase in plasma concentrations of triglycerides, free fatty acids, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, and short-chain and long-chain acylcarnitine, but total carnitine values did not change. After fat infusion, the free fatty acids/D-beta-hydroxybutyrate ratios were lower and the increase of acylcarnitine greater in supplemented infants of 29 to 33 weeks' gestation than in nonsupplemented infants of the same gestational age. This study provides evidence that premature infants of less than 34 weeks' gestation requiring total parenteral nutrition develop nutritional carnitine deficiency with impaired fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis. Carnitine supplementation improves this metabolic disturbance.

  13. Home initiation of parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Newton, Alyce F; DeLegge, Mark H

    2007-02-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) has been successfully initiated in the home since the early 1990s. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Standards for Specialized Nutrition Support: Home Care Patients, Safe Practices for Parenteral Nutrition, and Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients do not contain specific information on the initiation of home PN (HPN). Peer-reviewed, published guidelines are necessary to provide safe and appropriate initiation of HPN. Certain patients should not have PN initiated in the home, such as those with organ failure, uncontrolled diabetes, or uncorrectable electrolyte abnormalities. Excellent candidates for initiation of HPN include patients who have failed enteral feedings, have gastrointestinal (GI) diseases without excessive GI losses, or those with an oncology diagnosis and inability to tube feed. One concern of initiation of HPN is the potential for refeeding syndrome. Refeeding syndrome can be prevented when patients are properly evaluated and managed before initiation of PN. Refeeding syndrome can be avoided by rehydration with fluid and electrolytes before initiation of HPN to normalize blood chemistry when necessary and by starting with a moderate-volume, low-carbohydrate HPN solution compounded with optimal potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium content, and slowly advanced to goal. The "start low and go slow" motto of nutrition support should continue to be followed, but more specific guidelines are needed to assist nutrition support clinicians with safe and appropriate initiation of HPN.

  14. Effect of high calcium and phosphate concentrations on the physicochemical properties of two lipid emulsions used as total parenteral nutrition for neonates.

    PubMed

    Chaieb, Sonia Driss; Chaumeil, Jean-Claude; Jebnoun, Sami; Khrouf, Naima; Hedhili, Abderrazek; Sfar, Souad

    2009-01-01

    Premature infants require protein and energy for their growth and an adequate intake of calcium and phosphorus for their bone formation. However, several factors can affect the stability of intravenous lipid emulsions intended to be administered as neonatal total parenteral nutrition. This study evaluated the effect of additives and various concentrations of both calcium gluconate and glucose-1-phosphate on two intravenous lipid emulsions (Clinoleic 20% and Ivelip 20%) when using Primene 10% as source of amino acids and simulating clinical conditions (24-h storage at 37 degrees C). Two series of experiments for each lipid emulsion were carried out. One used separate ingredients (water, glucose, or amino acids) with various calcium phosphate concentrations; and the second included total parenteral nutrition admixtures with varied amino acid (1%, 2%, or 3.5%) and glucose (8% or 14%) concentrations. Evaluation was performed by visual and microscopic examination and pH, particle size, and zeta potential measurements. Calcium concentrations were determined before and after filtration by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Samples were stored 24 h at 37 degrees C. Investigations of lipid-nutrient admixtures showed a significant decrease of the pH with Primene and a visual instability when mixing with sterile water alone, while total parenteral nutrition admixtures made of Clinoleic 20% or Ivelip 20% were stable regarding pH, particle sizing, and zeta potential after storage conditions. Samples containing only calcium have their zeta potential charge reduced compared to samples containing both calcium and phosphate. Also, the evaluation of calcium phosphate solubility showed a significant decrease of the calcium concentration after filtration of the samples. Our data indicated that total parenteral nutrition admixtures could contribute to protect the lipid emulsion from its physicochemical degradation and that using organic phosphate with calcium gluconate has a less

  15. Parenteral iron dextran therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Burns, D L; Mascioli, E A; Bistrian, B R

    1995-01-01

    Iron dextran was introduced more than 30 yr ago for the parenteral treatment of iron deficiency anemia that is refractory to oral therapy. Iron dextran is a preparation of ferric hydroxide complexed with a low molecular weight fraction of dextran. Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most common nutritional deficiency diseases and occurs worldwide secondary to inadequate dietary iron, usually with excessive gastrointestinal blood losses. Repletion of iron stores is often complicated by intolerance to oral iron supplementation and may require parenteral iron. Parenteral iron can be administered via the intramuscular or intravenous route either directly or as an additive to total parenteral nutrition. Both routes of administration can cause various side effects and a test dose is recommended before therapeutic administration to assess the risk for anaphylaxis. Although the efficacy and safety of parenteral iron dextran have been convincingly demonstrated, supplementation may be contraindicated in the setting of infection.

  16. Effects of luminal nutrient absorption, intraluminal physical stimulation, and intravenous parenteral alimentation on the recovery responses of duodenal villus morphology following feed withdrawal in chickens.

    PubMed

    Tarachai, P; Yamauchi, K

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify which of the following three factors induces villus morphological recovery best: enteral nutrient absorption, intraluminal physical stimulation, or intravenous parenteral alimentation. At 142 d, male White Leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) were divided into eight groups of five birds each as follows: 1) access given ad libitum to a commercial layer mash diet (CP, 17.5%; ME, 2,830 kcal/kg) (control), 2) 5-d feed withdrawal (feed withdrawal), 3) 3-d feed withdrawal (3-FW), followed by refeeding the same diet as the control for 2 d (refeeding), 4) 3-FW followed by force-feeding enteral hyperalimentation (enteral), 5) 3-FW followed by force-feeding an indigestible (nonabsorbable) substance (kaolin), 6) 3-FW followed by force-feeding water for 2 d (force-fed control), 7) 3-FW followed by parenteral hyperalimentation (parenteral), and 8) 3-FW followed by no alimentation (sham control) for 2 d. In the refeeding and enteral groups, BW significantly recovered (P < 0.05), and in the parenteral group, BW tended to increase, suggesting that nutrients were enterally and parenterally absorbed, respectively. The BW in the remaining three groups showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05), indicating that kaolin could not be absorbed enterally. Compared with the feed withdrawal group, villus height, cell mitosis, and villus tip surface morphology of refeeding and enteral groups exhibited rapid villus morphological recovery. Villus morphological recovery of the enteral group appears to have been caused by enteral nutrient absorption. However, villus morphology in the kaolin treatment was not different from that in the feed withdrawal group, which suggests that intraluminal physical stimulation had no effect on villus morphological recovery. On the other hand, the parenteral group showed no effect on villus morphological recovery, which suggests that the parenteral nutrient supplied to the villi via the blood could not induce villus

  17. Initial amino acid intake influences phosphorus and calcium homeostasis in preterm infants--it is time to change the composition of the early parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bonsante, Francesco; Iacobelli, Silvia; Latorre, Giuseppe; Rigo, Jacques; De Felice, Claudio; Robillard, Pierre Yves; Gouyon, Jean Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Early aggressive parenteral nutrition (PN), consisting of caloric and nitrogen intake soon after birth, is currently proposed for the premature baby. Some electrolyte disturbances, such as hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia, considered unusual in early life, were recently described while using this PN approach. We hypothesize that, due to its impact on cell metabolism, the initial amino acid (AA) amount may specifically influence the metabolism of phosphorus, and consequently of calcium. We aim to evaluate the influence of AA intake on calcium-phosphorus metabolism, and to create a calculation tool to estimate phosphorus needs. Prospective observational study. Phosphate and calcium plasma concentrations and calcium balance were evaluated daily during the first week of life in very preterm infants, and their relationship with nutrition was studied. For this purpose, infants were divided into three groups: high, medium and low AA intake (HAA, MAA, LAA). A calculation formula to assess phosphorus needs was elaborated, with a theoretical model based on AA and calcium intake, and the cumulative deficit of phosphate intake was estimated. 154 infants were included. Hypophosphatemia (12.5%) and hypercalcemia (9.8%) were more frequent in the HAA than in the MAA (4.6% and 4.8%) and in the LAA group (0% and 1.9%); both p<0.001. Calcium-phosphorus homeostasis was influenced by the early AA intake. We propose to consider phosphorus and calcium imbalances as being part of a syndrome, related to incomplete provision of nutrients after the abrupt discontinuation of the placental nutrition at birth (PI-ReFeeding syndrome). We provide a simple tool to calculate the optimal phosphate intake. The early introduction of AA in the PN soon after birth might be completed by an early intake of phosphorus, since AA and phosphorus are (along with potassium) the main determinants of cellular growth.

  18. Initial Amino Acid Intake Influences Phosphorus and Calcium Homeostasis in Preterm Infants – It Is Time to Change the Composition of the Early Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Bonsante, Francesco; Iacobelli, Silvia; Latorre, Giuseppe; Rigo, Jacques; De Felice, Claudio; Robillard, Pierre Yves; Gouyon, Jean Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Background Early aggressive parenteral nutrition (PN), consisting of caloric and nitrogen intake soon after birth, is currently proposed for the premature baby. Some electrolyte disturbances, such as hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia, considered unusual in early life, were recently described while using this PN approach. We hypothesize that, due to its impact on cell metabolism, the initial amino acid (AA) amount may specifically influence the metabolism of phosphorus, and consequently of calcium. We aim to evaluate the influence of AA intake on calcium-phosphorus metabolism, and to create a calculation tool to estimate phosphorus needs. Methods Prospective observational study. Phosphate and calcium plasma concentrations and calcium balance were evaluated daily during the first week of life in very preterm infants, and their relationship with nutrition was studied. For this purpose, infants were divided into three groups: high, medium and low AA intake (HAA, MAA, LAA). A calculation formula to assess phosphorus needs was elaborated, with a theoretical model based on AA and calcium intake, and the cumulative deficit of phosphate intake was estimated. Results 154 infants were included. Hypophosphatemia (12.5%) and hypercalcemia (9.8%) were more frequent in the HAA than in the MAA (4.6% and 4.8%) and in the LAA group (0% and 1.9%); both p<0.001. Discussion Calcium-phosphorus homeostasis was influenced by the early AA intake. We propose to consider phosphorus and calcium imbalances as being part of a syndrome, related to incomplete provision of nutrients after the abrupt discontinuation of the placental nutrition at birth (PI-ReFeeding syndrome). We provide a simple tool to calculate the optimal phosphate intake. The early introduction of AA in the PN soon after birth might be completed by an early intake of phosphorus, since AA and phosphorus are (along with potassium) the main determinants of cellular growth. PMID:23977367

  19. Parenteral nutrition supplemented with short-chain fatty acids: effect on the small-bowel mucosa in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Koruda, M J; Rolandelli, R H; Bliss, D Z; Hastings, J; Rombeau, J L; Settle, R G

    1990-04-01

    When enteral nutrition is excluded from animals maintained solely with total parenteral nutrition (TPN), atrophy of the intestinal mucosa is observed. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are produced in the colon by the fermentation of dietary carbohydrates and fiber polysaccharides and have been shown to stimulate mucosal-cell mitotic activity in the intestine. This study compared the effects of an intravenous and an intracecal infusion of SCFAs on the small-bowel mucosa. Rats received standard TPN, TPN with SCFAs (sodium acetate, propionate, and butyrate), TPN with an intracecal infusion of SCFAs, or rat food. After 7 d jejunal and ileal mucosal weights, DNA, RNA, and protein were determined. Standard TPN produced significant atrophy of the jejunal and ileal mucosa. Both the intracecal and intravenous infusion of SCFAs significantly reduced the mucosal atrophy associated with TPN. The intravenous and intracolonic infusion of SCFAs were equally effective in inhibiting small-bowel mucosal atrophy.

  20. Beneficial effect of prolonged total parenteral nutrition in a very malnourished cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, M; Cappello, G; Cortinovis, A M; De Pinto, M; Bertasi, S

    1990-01-01

    A very malnourished Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patient was treated with integrative Parenteral Nutrition (PN). With a mean caloric supplementation of 2,550 Kcal/day a weight gain of 6.5 Kg was achieved. In spite of severe pulmonary complications (pneumotorax and pneumomediastinum), pO2 increased from 53 to 72 mmHg and pCO2 from 38 to 56 mm Hg. General conditions improved, appetite was restored and the patient cleared off continuous oxygen therapy; he left the hospital and did not present any more pulmonary exacerbations. In the following 8-month period he maintained a daily caloric intake of 80 Kcal/kg with a further weight gain of 4.5 Kg.

  1. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  2. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness. PMID:28287411

  3. Odd-numbered medium-chain triglycerides (trinonanoin) in total parenteral nutrition: effects on parameters of fat metabolism in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Linseisen, J; Wolfram, G

    1993-01-01

    Odd-numbered medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) might combine the advantages of "usual" MCTs applied in clinical nutrition with lower ketogenic action and the release of three carbon units. To test subacute toxicity, trinonanoin/long-chain triglyceride (LCT) (7/3 wt/wt) fat emulsions were given to rabbits (n = 8) for 11 days (7 h/d) within a total parenteral nutrition regimen at a dose of 46.5% of total daily energy. Comparisons were made with rabbits receiving equicaloric amounts of MCT/LCT (7/3, wt/wt) or pure LCT fat emulsions, as well as with orally fed controls. The trinonanoin/LCT emulsion was well tolerated by all animals. Body weight changes showed no statistically significant differences between groups. The enzymatic determination of triglycerides, non-esterified fatty acids, and free glycerol concentrations in plasma samples revealed similar results for both MCT groups. However, ketone body concentrations (3-hydroxybutyrate) were significantly lower after trinonanoin/LCT emulsion administration. In the trinonanoin/LCT group, the plasma concentrations of propionic acid as well as of other short-chain fatty acids continuously increased; on days 10 and 11, elevated amounts of propionic acid were also detected in the urine. The histologic examination of the gut mucosa revealed no distinct differences between groups. On the basis of the presented data, the trinonanoin/LCT emulsion showed no inferiority to "usual" MCT/LCT emulsions. The lower ketogenic effect as well as the marked increase in plasma short-chain fatty acid concentrations may encourage further testing of this substrate for total parenteral nutrition.

  4. Effects of glucose or fat calories in total parenteral nutrition on fat metabolism and systemic inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Ling, Pei-Ra; Andersson, Charlotte; Strijbosch, Robert; Lee, Sang; Silvestri, Anthony; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark; Bistrian, Bruce R

    2011-02-01

    This study compared the effects of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) by central vein with or without fat provided at maintenance energy requirement on fatty acid metabolism, de novo lipogenesis, and the risk of hepatic and systemic inflammation in rats. Study 1 was conducted in 2 groups: high glucose (HG), where fat-free TPN was given at maintenance levels of 180 kcal/(kg d), and low glucose (LG), where fat-free TPN containing 30% fewer calories at 126 kcal/(kg d) was provided by reducing 54 kcal/(kg d) from parenteral glucose. Study 2 contained 3 TPN groups: 1 LG group at 126 kcal/(kg d) and 2 groups at 180 kcal/(kg d) with 30% of total calories (54 kcal/[kg d]) either from soybean or fish oil emulsion. In both studies, animals fed a chow diet ad libitum were included. Plasma and hepatic triglyceride and phospholipid fatty acid profiles, enzymes indicating hepatic injury, and C-reactive protein levels (CRP) reflecting systemic injury were measured. In study 1, evidence of de novo lipogenesis was noted in LG and was more prominent in HG with elevation of CRP in HG. In study 2, de novo lipogenesis was reduced by adding either fat to LG to achieve maintenance energy levels. Moreover, adding fat as soybean oil but not fish oil significantly increased plasma and hepatic triglyceride and also elevated aspartate aminotransferase and CRP levels, reflecting inflammation. Thus, in rats, either hypocaloric feeding as glucose-based TPN or TPN provided at maintenance energy levels with the addition of fish oil limits hepatic lipid accumulation and prevents the evidence of hepatic and systemic injury found with maintenance level TPN as glucose only or glucose plus soybean oil.

  5. Antifertility and mutagenic effects in mice from parenteral administration of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.K.; Lawrence, W.H.; Autian, J.

    1985-01-01

    The subcutaneous administration of 1-10 mg of undiluted di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) to adult male ICR mice on d 1, 5, and 10 was followed by mating, one to one, with untreated adult virgin females. A single mating at d 21 resulted in a reduction in the incidence of pregnancies in the DEHP-treated groups. On the other hand, repeated matings with fresh females starting on d 2, 6, 11, 16, and 21, and at weekly intervals through 8 wk, revealed no perceptible effect of DEHP on the incidence of pregnancy. Examination of surgically exposed uteri and ovaries of pregnant females on d 13 of gestation revealed an increase in the incidence of preimplantation losses and early fetal deaths in the DEHP-treated groups; consequently, there were fewer viable fetuses per pregnancy. Mutagenic indices for DEHP, calculated as percent ratios of (1) preimplantation losses/implantations per pregnancy and (2) early fetal deaths/implantations per pregnancy, suggested a dominant lethal mutation effect in the treated mice. These effects tend to be more pronounced on the postmiotic stage of germ-cell development.

  6. Impact of early enteral versus parenteral nutrition on mortality in patients requiring mechanical ventilation and catecholamines: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (NUTRIREA-2).

    PubMed

    Brisard, Laurent; Le Gouge, Amélie; Lascarrou, Jean-Baptiste; Dupont, Hervé; Asfar, Pierre; Sirodot, Michel; Piton, Gael; Bui, Hoang-Nam; Gontier, Olivier; Hssain, Ali Ait; Gaudry, Stéphane; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Quenot, Jean-Pierre; Maxime, Virginie; Schwebel, Carole; Thévenin, Didier; Nseir, Saad; Parmentier, Erika; El Kalioubie, Ahmed; Jourdain, Mercé; Leray, Véronique; Rolin, Nathalie; Bellec, Frédéric; Das, Vincent; Ganster, Frédérique; Guitton, Christophe; Asehnoune, Karim; Bretagnol, Anne; Anguel, Nadia; Mira, Jean-Paul; Canet, Emmanuel; Guidet, Bertrand; Djibre, Michel; Misset, Benoit; Robert, René; Martino, Frédéric; Letocart, Philippe; Silva, Daniel; Darmon, Michael; Botoc, Vlad; Herbrecht, Jean Etienne; Meziani, Ferhat; Devaquet, Jérôme; Mercier, Emmanuelle; Richecoeur, Jack; Martin, Stéphanie; Gréau, Emilie; Giraudeau, Bruno; Reignier, Jean

    2014-12-23

    Nutritional support is crucial to the management of patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) and the most commonly prescribed treatment in intensive care units (ICUs). International guidelines consistently indicate that enteral nutrition (EN) should be preferred over parenteral nutrition (PN) whenever possible and started as early as possible. However, no adequately designed study has evaluated whether a specific nutritional modality is associated with decreased mortality. The primary goal of this trial is to assess the hypothesis that early first-line EN, as compared to early first-line PN, decreases day 28 all-cause mortality in patients receiving IMV and vasoactive drugs for shock. The NUTRIREA-2 study is a multicenter, open-label, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial comparing early PN versus early EN in critically ill patients requiring IMV for an expected duration of at least 48 hours, combined with vasoactive drugs, for shock. Patients will be allocated at random to first-line PN for at least 72 hours or to first-line EN. In both groups, nutritional support will be started within 24 hours after IMV initiation. Calorie targets will be 20 to 25 kcal/kg/day during the first week, then 25 to 30 kcal/kg/day thereafter. Patients receiving PN may be switched to EN after at least 72 hours in the event of shock resolution (no vasoactive drugs for 24 consecutive hours and arterial lactic acid level below 2 mmol/L). On day 7, all patients receiving PN and having no contraindications to EN will be switched to EN. In both groups, supplemental PN may be added to EN after day 7 in patients with persistent intolerance to EN and inadequate calorie intake. We plan to recruit 2,854 patients at 44 participating ICUs. The NUTRIREA-2 study is the first large randomized controlled trial designed to assess the hypothesis that early EN improves survival compared to early PN in ICU patients. Enrollment started on 22 March 2013 and is expected to end in

  7. The Effect of Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion and Soybean Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion on Cholestasis Associated with Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Jiejin; Qian, Yan; Ling, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively study the effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsion and soybean oil-based lipid emulsion on cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. Methods. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsion and fish oil-based lipid emulsion had been applied in our neonatology department clinically between 2010 and 2014. There were 61 qualified premature infants included in this study and divided into two groups. Soybean oil group was made up of 32 premature infants, while fish oil group was made up of 29 premature infants. Analysis was made on the gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, age at which feeding began, usage of lipid emulsions, and incidence of cholestasis between the two groups. Results. There were no statistical differences in terms of gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, and age at which feeding began. Besides, total incidence of cholestasis was 21.3%, and the days of life of occurrence of cholestasis were 53 ± 5.0 days. Incidence of cholestasis had no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusion. This study did not find the different role of fish oil-based lipid emulsions and soybean oil-based lipid emulsions in cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. PMID:27110237

  8. Parenteral iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, V J

    1996-08-01

    Indications for the use of parenteral iron are limited to conditions in which the oral supplementation of iron is not possible or fails. An overview of iron balance and iron requirements is presented to describe situations in which iron supplementation may be required. When parenteral iron supplementation is required, careful attention to proper dosing and administration is necessary to optimize efficacy and safety. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding the clinical use of parenteral iron therapy and provide guidelines on dosing and administration. Methods of iron dextran administration, including the IV and intramuscular injection of undiluted drug and total dose infusion, are compared. Complications associated with the use of parenteral iron are also be reviewed. Finally, the use of iron supplementation in patients receiving parenteral nutrition care explored.

  9. Total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Cherit, Guillermo; Borunda, Delia; Rivero-Sigarroa, Eduardo

    2002-08-01

    In recent months, numerous reports concerning total parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients have been published, including the guidelines and recommendations of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. The old controversy regarding the use of the enteral versus parenteral route still exists. Although the enteral route is indicated in those patients with normal gastrointestinal function, the parenteral route is obviously beneficial in several clinical conditions and appears to be associated with few procedure-related complications when performed by experienced clinicians. There is also continued interest in the supplementation of parenteral formulas with nutrients that were previously considered nonessential, such as arginine, glutamine, and omega-3 fatty acids, but that may become essential in the setting of critical illness.

  10. Effects of selenium supplementation on immune parameters in gut failure patients on home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Peretz, A; Nève, J; Duchateau, J; Siderova, V; Huygen, K; Famaey, J P; Carpentier, Y A

    1991-01-01

    The relationships between some parameters of the immune response and selenium were investigated in five patients receiving home parenteral nutrition for short-bowel syndrome. They were first submitted to a relative depletion by providing 20 micrograms selenium/day as L-selenomethionine for 1 mo. Then, daily selenium intake was raised to 200 micrograms for 2-4 mo. On entering the study, the patients presented a relatively good health status, and immunological parameters were at the lowest limit of the normal range. Four patients rapidly responded to the 200-micrograms supplementation by a continuous increase in their plasma selenium levels, whereas the fifth patient showed a moderate and late increase. At the end of the trial, there was an improvement in the lymphocyte response to pokeweed and phytohemagglutinin mitogens in four patients and to CD3 in three patients. The response to two of three antigens (Candidin, Varidase) tested was also enhanced in the same patients, but the response to the third antigen (tetanus toxoid) was uniformly low in all patients. The only patient showing essentially no immune improvement after selenium supplementation was the one with a low and delayed increase in plasma selenium. This study supports a role for selenium in the maintenance of an optimal immune response in humans.

  11. The Effect of Individualized Versus Standardized Parenteral Nutrition on Body Weight in Very Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Evering, Vincent H. M.; Andriessen, Peter; Duijsters, Carola E. P. M.; Brogtrop, Jeroen; Derijks, Luc J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate whether standardizing total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is at least non-inferior to TPN with individualized composition in premature infants with a gestational age (GA) < 32 weeks. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, all preterm born in or transferred to Maxima Medical Center (MMC) within 24 hours after birth with a GA < 32 weeks were included. The individualized group (2011) was compared to the partially standardized group (2012) and completely standardized group (2014) consequently. The primary endpoint was difference in growth. Secondary endpoints included differences in electrolyte concentrations. Results A total of 299 preterm were included in this study. When comparing weight gain, the infants in the (partially) standardized group demonstrated significantly (P < 0.05) less weight loss during the first days of life and grew faster subsequently in the following days than the individualized TPN regimen. Furthermore, significant differences in abnormal serum sodium, chloride, calcium, creatinine, magnesium and triglycerides values were demonstrated. Conclusion TPN with a (partially) standardized composition revealed to be at least non-inferior to TPN with an individualized composition. PMID:28270894

  12. [The effect of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) on the amino acid pool, a kinetic study].

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Marco; Mancini, Elena; Valente, Fabrizio; Righetti, Francesca; Brunori, Giuliano; Santoro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition in dialysis patients could be offset by intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN), provided it is possible to demonstrate that this technique improves the aminoacid (AA) pool, despite clearance during dialysis. A kinetic study was conducted in 10 malnourished patients, undergoing thrice- weekly low-flux HD, 240 mins/session (Bologna Malpighi and Trento Hospitals, Italy). After an HD session without IDPN (baseline), the patients received an IDPN solution with 16 AAs (all-in-one bag,NutriSpecialipid: 625 ml, Prot 35.9 gr) over a one-month period. At baseline, after 2 and 4 weeks, pre- and post-HD plasma and dialysate AA concentrations were measured. Even with a low-flux dialyzer and in the absence of IDPN infusion, AA loss in the dialysate occurred, increasing with the addition of IDPN infusion (3.9+0.3 gr/session with no IDPN compared to 7.7+0.5 with IDPN, p=0.00043), accounting foralmost 26% of the infused AA mass. Nevertheless, the AA mass balance was positive in the patients studied (+21.06+0.95 gr AA/session). After a one-month period with IDPN, the pre-dialysis concentration of each AA infused had indeed increased when compared with baseline concentrations, with a mean overall increase of 36.8%. No severe glucose imbalance was reported. After a one-month period, overall increase in the plasma concentration of all the infused AAs was observed, supporting the hypothesis that the use of IDPN for longer periods may result in increased protein synthesis.

  13. [Complete parenteral nutrition in childhood].

    PubMed

    Berger, H; Frisch, H; Kofler, J; Resch, R

    1977-02-01

    Complete parenteral nutrition by means of continuous intravenous drip into large veins, over a long period, has already shown itself to be of therapeutic use in the field of pediatrics. While the nutritional-physiological aspect of this therapeutic method is clear -- it depends on an accurate and sufficient supply of water, salts, glucose, amino-acids, triglycerides and essential fatty acids, vitamins and trace elements -- in practice it presents difficulties which though often serious are not insurmountable. Especially are to cite the septic complications, which are nearly imperceptible during their development. They are only to accept in view of the often almost hopeless condition of the child, who would be lost without complete parenteral feeding. Similar problems arise through metabolic complications which are caused non rarely only by insufficient dosages and lack of careful supervision but it is generally possible to correct these at an early stage. Complete parenteral nutrition must be exactly indicated. It is indeed a great therapeutic help, particularly when over a longer period -- at least a week or longer -- oral nutrition is impossible or insufficient. Practicall experiences will be reported. A retrospective assessment of 50 cases has shown the tendency (through taking too much care?) to hold the quantity of liquids and supply of calories too short and to administer too much carbohydrates and too little fat.

  14. Parenteral iron therapy options.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Scott B; Rodgers, George M

    2004-05-01

    Parenteral iron therapy is occasionally necessary for patients intolerant or unresponsive to oral iron therapy, for receiving recombinant erythropoietin therapy, or for use in treating functional iron deficiency. There are now three parenteral iron products available: iron dextran, ferric gluconate, and iron sucrose. We summarize the advantages and disadvantages of each product, including risk of anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity, dosage regimens, and costs. The increased availability of multiple parenteral iron preparations should decrease the need to use red cell transfusions in patients with iron-deficiency anemia.

  15. Parenteral iron dextran therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, V J; Holland, E G

    1990-02-01

    Parenteral iron therapy is indicated in patients with iron-deficiency anemia associated with conditions that interfere with the ingestion or absorption of oral iron. Replacement doses of iron required to replenish iron stores are based on body weight and the observed hemoglobin value. Methods of administering iron dextran are reviewed, including intramuscular and intravenous injections of the undiluted drug, intravenous infusion of a diluted preparation, and as an addition to parenteral nutrition solutions. The overall incidence of adverse reactions associated with the parenteral administration of iron is low, but the potential for an anaphylactic reaction requires that an initial test dose be given followed by careful patient observation.

  16. Parenteral microemulsions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Date, Abhijit A; Nagarsenker, M S

    2008-05-01

    Parenteral delivery of the hydrophobic drugs is a very challenging task. The conventional approaches such as use of co-solvents, oily vehicles and modern approaches such as mixed micelles, liposomes, complexation with cyclodextrins and emulsions have several limitations. Microemulsions have evolved as a novel vehicle for parenteral delivery of the hydrophobic drugs. Their interesting features such as spontaneity of formation, ease of manufacture, high solubilization capacity and self-preserving property make them the vehicle of choice. The review focuses on the excipients available for formulation of the parenteral microemulsions and describes the investigations reported for the various classes of therapeutic agents.

  17. Parenteral nutrition: never say never

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes the benefits of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients, when prescribed for relevant indications, in adequate quantities, and in due time. Critically ill patients are at risk of energy deficit during their ICU stay, a condition which leads to unfavorable outcomes, due to hypercatabolism secondary to the stress response and the difficulty to optimize feeding. Indirect calorimetry is recommended to define the energy target, since no single predictive equation accurately estimates energy expenditure. Energy metabolism is intimately associated with protein metabolism. Recent evidence calls for adequate protein provision, but there is no accurate method to estimate the protein requirements, and recommendations are probably suboptimal. Enteral nutrition (EN) is the preferred route of feeding, but gastrointestinal intolerance limits its efficacy and PN allows for full coverage of energy needs. Seven recent articles concerning PN for critically ill patients were identified and carefully reviewed for the clinical and scientific relevance of their conclusions. One article addressed the unfavorable effects of early PN, although this result should be more correctly regarded as a consequence of glucose load and hypercaloric feeding. The six other articles were either in favor of PN or concluded that there was no difference in the outcome compared with EN. Hypercaloric feeding was not observed in these studies. Hypocaloric feeding led to unfavorable outcomes. This further demonstrates the beneficial effects of an early and adequate feeding with full EN, or in case of failure of EN with exclusive or supplemental PN. EN is the first choice for critically ill patients, but difficulties providing optimal nutrition through exclusive EN are frequently encountered. In cases of insufficient EN, individualized supplemental PN should be administered to reduce the infection rate and the duration of mechanical ventilation. PN is a safe therapeutic option

  18. Effects of parenteral fish oil lipid emulsions on colon morphology and cytokine expression after experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Garib, Ricardo; Garla, Priscila; Torrinhas, Raquel S; Bertevello, Pedro L; Logullo, Angela F; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Estudiar los efectos de los diferentes protocolos de infusión de la emulsion de lípidos de aceite de pescado (Fole) sobre la inflamación aguda en el modelo de colitis en la rata. Material y métodos: Ratas Wistar macho adultas (n = 51) fueron asignados al azar en 5 grupos para recibir infusión parenteral de solución salina (SS) o emulsión de lípidos de aceite de soja (SO), como controles, y Fole compone de: aceite de pescado solo (FO), una mezcla (9:1 v/v) de SO con FO (SO/FO), o 30% de aceite de soja, 30% triglicéridos de cadena media, 25% de aceite de oliva, y 15% de aceite de pescado (SMOF). Después de 72 h de infusión intravenosa, colitis experimental fue inducida con ácido acético. Después de 24 h, las muestras de colon se analizaron para determinar cambios histológicos y citoquinas. Resultados: En relación en el SS grupo, necrosis macroscópica fue menos frecuente en el grupo FO y necrosis histológica fue más frecuente en el grupo de SMOF. Existe una relación directa e inversa de colon interleuquina (IL) -1 e IL-4, respectivamente, con necrosis histológica. En comparación con el grupo SS, en el FO hubo aumento de IL-4 e IFN-gamma y disminución de TNF-alfa, SO/FO disminuyó TNF-alfa, y en el SMOF hubo aumento de IL-1 y la disminución de IL-4. Conclusión: En la colitis inducida por ácido acético, la infusion aislada de Fole compuesto de aceite de pescado por sí solo fue más ventajosa en la atenuacion de la inflamacióndo que la infusión de Fole contiendo otros aceites, y esta diferencia puede ser debida las influencias de su diferente contenido de ácido graso.

  19. Effect of myrrh and thyme on Trichinella spiralis enteral and parenteral phases with inducible nitric oxide expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Rasha AH; Mahmoud, Abeer E; Farrag, Haiam Mohammed Mahmoud; Makboul, Rania; Mohamed, Mona Embarek; Ibraheim, Zedan

    2015-01-01

    Trichinellosis is a serious disease with no satisfactory treatment. We aimed to assess the effect of myrrh (Commiphora molmol) and, for the first time, thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) against enteral and encysted (parenteral) phases of Trichinella spiralis in mice compared with albendazole, and detect their effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Oral administration of 500 mg/kg of myrrh and thyme led to adult reduction (90.9%, 79.4%), while 1,000 mg/kg led to larvae reduction (79.6%, 71.3%), respectively. Administration of 50 mg/kg of albendazole resulted in adult and larvae reduction (94.2%, 90.9%). Positive immunostaining of inflammatory cells infiltrating intestinal mucosa and submucosa of all treated groups was detected. Myrrh-treated mice showed the highest iNOS expression followed by albendazole, then thyme. On the other hand, both myrrh and thyme-treated groups showed stronger iNOS expression of inflammatory cells infiltrating and surrounding encapsulated T. spiralis larvae than albendazole treated group. In conclusion, myrrh and thyme extracts are highly effective against both phases of T. spiralis and showed strong iNOS expressions, especially myrrh which could be a promising alternative drug. This experiment provides a basis for further exploration of this plant by isolation and retesting the active principles of both extracts against different stages of T. spiralis. PMID:26676322

  20. Effect of myrrh and thyme on Trichinella spiralis enteral and parenteral phases with inducible nitric oxide expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Attia, Rasha A H; Mahmoud, Abeer E; Farrag, Haiam Mohammed Mahmoud; Makboul, Rania; Mohamed, Mona Embarek; Ibraheim, Zedan

    2015-12-01

    Trichinellosis is a serious disease with no satisfactory treatment. We aimed to assess the effect of myrrh (Commiphora molmol) and, for the first time, thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) against enteral and encysted (parenteral) phases of Trichinella spiralis in mice compared with albendazole, and detect their effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Oral administration of 500 mg/kg of myrrh and thyme led to adult reduction (90.9%, 79.4%), while 1,000 mg/kg led to larvae reduction (79.6%, 71.3%), respectively. Administration of 50 mg/kg of albendazole resulted in adult and larvae reduction (94.2%, 90.9%). Positive immunostaining of inflammatory cells infiltrating intestinal mucosa and submucosa of all treated groups was detected. Myrrh-treated mice showed the highest iNOS expression followed by albendazole, then thyme. On the other hand, both myrrh and thyme-treated groups showed stronger iNOS expression of inflammatory cells infiltrating and surrounding encapsulated T. spiralis larvae than albendazole treated group. In conclusion, myrrh and thyme extracts are highly effective against both phases of T. spiralis and showed strong iNOS expressions, especially myrrh which could be a promising alternative drug. This experiment provides a basis for further exploration of this plant by isolation and retesting the active principles of both extracts against different stages of T. spiralis.

  1. Parenteral nutrition: indications, risks and nursing care.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jane

    Parenteral nutrition is a recognised method of feeding patients with specific clinical conditions, most notably those with various forms of intestinal failure who cannot be fed enterally. However, it has several associated risks including sepsis, and metabolic and electrolyte imbalances. The aim of this article is to enhance nurses' understanding of parenteral nutrition and how this differs from oral or enteral nutrition, indications for use and the potential risks involved. Appropriate vascular access is discussed as well as the clinical monitoring that is required to ensure complications of therapy are detected quickly. A greater understanding of the issues associated with parenteral nutrition allows nurses caring for patients receiving parenteral nutrition to ensure safe and effective care.

  2. Long-term effects of intravenous iloprost in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension deteriorating on non-parenteral therapy.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Lars; Schurawlew, Alexander; Nickel, Nils; Tiede, Henning; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Wilkens, Heinrike; Ewert, Ralf; Halank, Michael; Klose, Hans; Bäzner, Carlos; Behr, Jürgen; Hoeper, Marius M

    2011-12-01

    The majority of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) in functional classes II and III are currently being treated with non-parenteral therapies, including endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA), phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitors, inhaled iloprost or combinations of these substances. If these treatments fail, current guidelines recommend the addition of parenteral prostanoid therapy. There is, however, limited evidence for the efficacy of parenteral prostanoids when added to combinations of non-parenteral therapies. In this retrospective, multicentre study we collected data from consecutive IPAH patients receiving intravenous iloprost in addition to optimized non-parenteral therapy between Jan 2002 and Dec 2009. Analyses included 6 min walk distance (6MWD), functional class, need for transplantation, and survival. During the observation period, 50 patients were treated with intravenous iloprost in addition to non-parenteral therapy; 44% of the patients were on dual combination therapy and 52% on triple combination. Three months after initiation of iloprost, functional class had improved in 24% of the patients and the median 6MWD had increased from 289 m to 298 m (n.s.). During the observation period, 22 patients (44%) died and 14 (28%) underwent lung transplantation. The probabilities of LuTx-free survival at 1, 3 and 5 years following iloprost initiation were 38%, 17% and 17%, respectively. A 6MWD < 300 m and persistent functional class IV at 3 months after initiation of intravenous iloprost were predictors of an adverse outcome. In essence, late initiation of intravenous iloprost in IPAH patients who previously failed to respond to non-parenteral therapies appears to be of limited efficacy in the majority patients. Alternative therapeutic options are currently not available, underlying the need for the development of new drugs.

  3. Long-term effects of intravenous iloprost in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension deteriorating on non-parenteral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The majority of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) in functional classes II and III are currently being treated with non-parenteral therapies, including endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA), phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitors, inhaled iloprost or combinations of these substances. If these treatments fail, current guidelines recommend the addition of parenteral prostanoid therapy. There is, however, limited evidence for the efficacy of parenteral prostanoids when added to combinations of non-parenteral therapies. Methods In this retrospective, multicentre study we collected data from consecutive IPAH patients receiving intravenous iloprost in addition to optimized non-parenteral therapy between Jan 2002 and Dec 2009. Analyses included 6 min walk distance (6MWD), functional class, need for transplantation, and survival. Results During the observation period, 50 patients were treated with intravenous iloprost in addition to non-parenteral therapy; 44% of the patients were on dual combination therapy and 52% on triple combination. Three months after initiation of iloprost, functional class had improved in 24% of the patients and the median 6MWD had increased from 289 m to 298 m (n.s.). During the observation period, 22 patients (44%) died and 14 (28%) underwent lung transplantation. The probabilities of LuTx-free survival at 1, 3 and 5 years following iloprost initiation were 38%, 17% and 17%, respectively. A 6MWD < 300 m and persistent functional class IV at 3 months after initiation of intravenous iloprost were predictors of an adverse outcome. Conclusion In essence, late initiation of intravenous iloprost in IPAH patients who previously failed to respond to non-parenteral therapies appears to be of limited efficacy in the majority patients. Alternative therapeutic options are currently not available, underlying the need for the development of new drugs. PMID:22133492

  4. Diverse effects of parenteral arginine on systemic and local oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis and nitrosative stress in rats with subacute peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Hui; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Hsiao, Chien-Chou; Hsu, Li-Sung; Lo, Hui-Chen

    2014-03-01

    The beneficial effects of arginine on oxidative stress have been previously reported; however, excess production of nitric oxide, an arginine metabolite, may cause hemodynamic instability and inflammatory response. Previous studies have demonstrated that parenteral arginine levels at 2%-4% of total calories may alleviate inflammation and enhance immunity, whereas greater than 6% of total calories may have adverse effects in rats with subacute peritonitis. Herein, we investigated the effects of parenteral arginine dose on lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) and antioxidant enzyme activities in the plasma and organs. Male Wistar rats with cecal puncture-induced subacute peritonitis were infused with parenteral nutrition solutions containing 1.61% (CP group), 2.85% (LA group), 4.08% (MA group), and 6.54% (HA group) of total calories as arginine for 7 d. Healthy, orally fed rats (NC group) were used as references. Subacute peritonitis significantly elevated the levels of nitrate, nitrite and TBARS in the plasma and decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in the kidneys. These changes were significantly reversed in the MA and HA groups. The MA and HA groups had significantly increased nitrotyrosine levels in the plasma. The LA, MA, and HA groups had significantly increased glutathione peroxidase activity in the plasma, cytochrome P450 levels in the liver, and nitrotyrosine levels in the heart and had significantly decreased TBARS levels in the kidneys compared with the CP group. Our results suggest that parenteral arginine at a dose less than 4% of total calories may attenuate lipid peroxidation and increase antioxidant enzyme activities without leading to nitrosative stress in subacute peritonitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Indication and effectiveness of endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation for the home care patient].

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Hida, S; Higasa, K; Shinomiya, S; Matsumoto, T; Fukuoka, K; Yamanaka, E; Ozaki, S; Takayama, E

    2000-12-01

    We are managing 8 home care patients who have a gastrostomy made using an endoscopic percutaneous technique as a route of parenteral alimentation. Based on our experience, the preconditions for an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation are 1. normal gastrointestinal function, 2. difficulty in swallowing, 3. possibility that the caregiver can manage the gastrostomy. When we performed an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation for 8 home care patients, we obtained the several advantages mentioned below. 1. Swallowing pneumonia was prevented. 2. Adequate amount of alimental liquid could be infused. 3. Patient could take a bath or shower with the gastrostomy, and good QOL was realized. 4. The home care patient with the gastrostomy could have a satisfactorily long life.

  6. New parenteral anticoagulants in development.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Maria Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Rocha, Eduardo; Pozo-Hernández, Carmen; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2011-02-01

    The therapeutic armamentarium of parenteral anticoagulants available to clinicians is mainly composed by unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), fondaparinux, recombinant hirudins (i.e. bivalirudin, desirudin, lepirudin) and argatroban. These drugs are effective and safe for prevention and/or treatment of thromboembolic diseases but they have some drawbacks. Among other inconveniences, UFH requires regular anticoagulant monitoring as a result of variability in the anticoagulant response and there is a risk of serious heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT). LMWH, fondaparinux and recombinant hirudins are mainly cleared through the kidneys and their use in patients with severe renal insufficiency may be problematic. LMWH is only partially neutralized by protamine while fondaparinux and recombinant hirudins have no specific antidote. Novel anticoagulants in development for parenteral administration include new indirect activated factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors (idrabiotaparinux, ultra-low-molecular-weight heparins [semuloparin, RO-14], new LMWH [M118]), direct FXa inhibitors (otamixaban), direct FIIa inhibitors (flovagatran sodium, pegmusirudin, NU172, HD1-22), direct FXIa inhibitors (BMS-262084, antisense oligonucleotides targeting FXIa, clavatadine), direct FIXa inhibitors (RB-006), FVIIIa inhibitors (TB-402), FVIIa/tissue factor inhibitors (tifacogin, NAPc2, PCI-27483, BMS-593214), FVa inhibitors (drotrecogin alpha activated, ART-123) and dual thrombin/FXa inhibitors (EP217609, tanogitran). These new compounds have the potential to complement established parenteral anticoagulants. In the present review, we discuss the pharmacology of new parenteral anticoagulants, the results of clinical studies, the newly planned or ongoing clinical trials with these compounds, and their potential advantages and drawbacks over existing therapies.

  7. [Impact of the creation of a nutritional support team on the quality, safety and effectiveness of total parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    López-Martín, C; Abilés, J; Garrido Siles, M; Faus Felipe, V

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is an essential component in the treatment of many hospitalized patients; however its use is associated to severe complications. The monitoring of these patients has been demonstrated as an effective method for the success of nutrition therapy; therefore, nutritional support teams play an important role to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the PN. In Spain, there is no data available about the situation of nutritional support teams in hospitals. Develop a nutritional support team in our hospital and analyze the interventions and outcomes in terms of quality, effectiveness and safety. Retrospective, cross-sectional study. Patients with PN were selected during two months, corresponding to the period before and after the creation of the nutritional support team (group 1 and 2, respectively). The functions of the nutritional team include: nutritional evaluation, daily monitoring of vital signs and glycemia, detailed analytical control, management of PN complications, between others. 67% of patients in group 1 (n = 24) maintain the PN < 7 days, versus 22% in group 2 (n = 38). In group 1, no patient had a nutritional assessment, neither daily vital signs monitoring (100% in group 2). Detailed analytical control was carried out in the 4% of group 1 and 79% of group 2. In group 2, albumin and prealbumin levels remain stable or increased in the 66% and 88% of patients, respectively. No patient reached triglyceride > 400 mg/dl. 34% of patients showed glycemia > 140 mg/dl (100% of them were solved), and 26% of patients underwent hepatic dysfunction (50% were solved). No refeeding syndrome was reported (thiamine was added to PN in 34% of patients). the nutritional support team work has notably increased the quality, safety and effectiveness of PN. This study demonstrates the need to incorporate multidisciplinary nutritional teams in hospitals and the benefit obtained in the patient medical care.

  8. Nutritional support teams: the cooperation among physicians and pharmacists helps improve cost-effectiveness of home parenteral nutrition (HPN).

    PubMed

    Pietka, Magdalena; Watrobska-Swietlikowska, Dorota; Szczepanek, Kinga; Szybinski, Piotr; Sznitowska, Małgorzata; Kłęk, Stanisław

    2014-09-12

    Modern home parenteral nutrition (HPN) requires the preparation of tailored admixtures. The physicians' demands for their composition are often at the variance with pharmaceutical principles, which causes the necessity of either the preparation of ex tempore admixtures or stability testing ensuring long shelf life. Both approaches are not cost-effective. The aim of the study was to use the cooperation among physicians and pharmacists to assure both: cost-effectiveness and patient-tailored HPN admixtures. The first part of the study consisted of the thorough analysis of prescriptions for the most demanding 47 HPN patients (27 females and 20 males, mean age 53.1 year) treated at one HPN center to create few as possible long-shelf life admixtures. The second part of the study consisted of stability testing and modifications. The analysis showed over 137 variations needed to cover all macro- and micronutrients requirements. Their cost as ex-tempore solutions was extremely high (over 110 000 EURO/month) due to logistics and similarly high if stability test for variation were to be performed (68 500 EURO). Therefore prescription was prepared de novo within team of physicians and pharmacists and four base models were designed. Water and electrolytes, particularly magnesium and calcium showed to be the major issues. Stability tests failed in one admixture due to high electrolytes concentration. It was corrected, and the new formula passes the test. Five basic models were then used for creation of new bags. Cost of such an activity were 3 700 EURO (p<0.01) CONCLUSIONS: The cooperation within the members of nutritional support team could improve the cost-effectiveness and quality of HPN. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of parenteral artesunate for treating children with severe malaria in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Riewpaiboon, Arthorn; Dondorp, Arjen M; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Mokuolu, Olugbenga A; Nansumba, Margaret; Gesase, Samwel; Kent, Alison; Mtove, George; Olaosebikan, Rasaq; Ngum, Wirichada Pan; Fanello, Caterina I; Hendriksen, Ilse; Day, Nicholas PJ; White, Nicholas J; Yeung, Shunmay

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the cost-effectiveness of parenteral artesunate for the treatment of severe malaria in children and its potential impact on hospital budgets. Methods The costs of inpatient care of children with severe malaria were assessed in four of the 11 sites included in the African Quinine Artesunate Malaria Treatment trial, conducted with over 5400 children. The drugs, laboratory tests and intravenous fluids provided to 2300 patients from admission to discharge were recorded, as was the length of inpatient stay, to calculate the cost of inpatient care. The data were matched with pooled clinical outcomes and entered into a decision model to calculate the cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted and the cost per death averted. Findings The mean cost of treating severe malaria patients was similar in the two study groups: 63.5 United States dollars (US$) (95% confidence interval, CI: 61.7–65.2) in the quinine arm and US$ 66.5 (95% CI: 63.7–69.2) in the artesunate arm. Children treated with artesunate had 22.5% lower mortality than those treated with quinine and the same rate of neurological sequelae: (artesunate arm: 2.3 DALYs per patient; quinine arm: 3.0 DALYs per patient). Compared with quinine as a baseline, artesunate showed an incremental cost per DALY averted and an incremental cost per death averted of US$ 3.8 and US$ 123, respectively. Conclusion Artesunate is a highly cost-effective and affordable alternative to quinine for treating children with severe malaria. The budgetary implications of adopting artesunate for routine use in hospital-based care are negligible. PMID:21734764

  10. Effects unrelated to anti-inflammation of lipid emulsions containing fish oil in parenteral nutrition for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Mateu de Antonio, Javier; Florit-Sureda, Marta

    2017-02-01

    Several reviews and meta-analyses on modulated inflammatory and immunologic responses after the administration of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in different diseases and conditions have been published. However, omega-3 PUFAs exert several other actions which are not directly related to immunologic or inflammatory responses. The aim of this paper was to review the effects which are not directly related to immunologic and inflammatory responses of intravenous lipid emulsions (IVLEs) containing fish oil (FO) in parenteral nutrition (PN) for adult patients. IVLEs containing FO could have a role in the prevention of alterations in liver enzyme tests (LETs) or PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). Studies using FO doses of ≥ 0.150 mg/kg/day or IVLEs with high FO concentration reported more positive results than those with lower doses. Once PNALD was developed, the use of IVLEs exclusively composed of FO at doses of 0.25-1 g of FO/kg/day for several weeks could attenuate or even eradicate cholestasis and liver alteration. IVLEs containing FO seemed to have faster blood clearance, and this could be beneficial for some patients. Some studies also suggested a possible improvement of respiratory function by the administration of these IVLEs. In general, IVLEs containing FO were safe. Their use did not increase oxidative stress but, in contrast, increased plasma tocopherol content. They did not alter insulin sensitivity or glycemic control, and studies have found no relevant clinical effect on platelet aggregation or hemostasis. In conclusion, the use of IVLEs containing FO in PN may be beneficial with regard to older IVLEs, in addition to the modulation of systemic inflammation response.

  11. Surgery and transplantation – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 18

    PubMed Central

    Weimann, A.; Ebener, Ch.; Holland-Cunz, S.; Jauch, K. W.; Hausser, L.; Kemen, M.; Kraehenbuehl, L.; Kuse, E. R.; Laengle, F.

    2009-01-01

    In surgery, indications for artificial nutrition comprise prevention and treatment of catabolism and malnutrition. Thus in general, food intake should not be interrupted postoperatively and the re-establishing of oral (e.g. after anastomosis of the colon and rectum, kidney transplantation) or enteral food intake (e.g. after an anastomosis in the upper gastrointestinal tract, liver transplantation) is recommended within 24 h post surgery. To avoid increased mortality an indication for an immediate postoperatively artificial nutrition (enteral or parenteral nutrition (PN)) also exists in patients with no signs of malnutrition, but who will not receive oral food intake for more than 7 days perioperatively or whose oral food intake does not meet their needs (e.g. less than 60–80%) for more than 14 days. In cases of absolute contraindication for enteral nutrition, there is an indication for total PN (TPN) such as in chronic intestinal obstruction with a relevant passage obstruction e.g. a peritoneal carcinoma. If energy and nutrient requirements cannot be met by oral and enteral intake alone, a combination of enteral and parenteral nutrition is indicated. Delaying surgery for a systematic nutrition therapy (enteral and parenteral) is only indicated if severe malnutrition is present. Preoperative nutrition therapy should preferably be conducted prior to hospital admission to lower the risk of nosocomial infections. The recommendations of early postoperative re-establishing oral feeding, generally apply also to paediatric patients. Standardised operative procedures should be established in order to guarantee an effective nutrition therapy. PMID:20049072

  12. [Effect of increasing protein ingestion on the nitrogen balance of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients receiving total parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, A; Verbeek, M J; Schreurs, V V; Akkermans, L M; Vos, A

    1993-01-01

    The amount of protein recommended to minimise N loss in critically ill patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) varies in the literature. Therefore, we studied the effect of increased protein intake on the N balance, administering TPN with either 1.2 g protein/kg/day (low N diet) or 1.8 g protein/kg/day (high N diet). Fifteen mechanically ventilated critically ill patients were studied in a surgical intensive care unit. After at least two days of standard TPN, patients were randomly assigned to either the low or the high N diet. Ten patients were studied on the low N diet and 11 on the high N diet; 6 patients were studied on both diets. Nonprotein energy was supplied according to estimated energy requirements. For five consecutive days, the N balance was measured daily. Total urinary nitrogen (TUN) was analysed using the Kjeldahl method. There was no difference in N balance between the groups. On the low N diet, N balance was -0.113 +/- 0.088 and on the high N diet -0.113 +/- 0.109 g N/kg/day. In patients studied twice, N balance was -0.087 +/- 0.054 and -0.050 +/- 0.060 g N/kd/day respectively. Results of a previous pilot study showed that in 20 similar patients the N balance became 80% less negative (from -5.7 +/- 5.1 to -1.1 +/- 8.2 g N/day) when protein intake was increased from 0.9 to 1.5 g/kg/day. Since these results are consistent with other studies, we conclude that the optimal range of protein supply in this type of critically ill patients is approximately 1.1-1.5 g protein/kg/day.

  13. Intestinal growth in parenterally-fed rats induced by the combined effects of glucagon-like peptide 2 and epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Paul A; Goodlad, Robert A; FitzGerald, Anthony J; Mandir, Nikki; Ghatei, Mohammed A; Bloom, Stephen R; Berlanga-Acosta, Jorge; Playford, Raymond J; Forbes, Alastair; Walters, Julian R F

    2005-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition and the absence of luminal feeding result in impaired intestinal growth and differentiation of enterocytes. Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) have each been shown to have trophic effects on the intestine, and thus have the potential to benefit patients fed parenterally, such as those with intestinal failure from short bowel syndrome. We report studies aimed to determine whether there may be synergistic effects of these 2 peptides. Rats were established on parenteral nutrition (PN) and infused for 6 days with GLP-2 (20 microg/d), EGF (20 microg/d), or GLP-2 + EGF (20 microg/d of each). These groups were compared with untreated PN-fed and orally-fed controls. Tissue was obtained from small intestine and colon to determine growth, proliferation, and representative gene expression. Small intestinal weight was increased by 75%, 43%, and 116% in the GLP-2, EGF, and GLP-2 + EGF groups, respectively, compared with PN controls (all p < .001). Cell proliferation increased with GLP-2, EGF, and GLP-2 + EGF in proximal small intestine by factors of 2.3, 1.7, and 3.4 respectively (p < .001). A synergistic effect on villous and crypt area was observed in the proximal small intestine when GLP-2 and EGF were combined (p < .05). GLP-2 had no effect in the colon, unlike EGF. Further studies showed GLP-2 + EGF significantly increased expression in distal small intestine of transcripts for the bile acid transport protein IBABP (p < .05) and showed a significant correlation between the expression of IBABP and the transcription factor HNF-4. Both GLP-2 and EGF upregulate growth of the small intestine, and this is augmented when GLP-2 and EGF are combined. These findings may lead to improved treatment of patients receiving PN.

  14. Effects of phosphate buffer in parenteral drugs on particle formation from glass vials.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of inorganic particles generated in glass vials filled with phosphate buffer solutions were investigated. During storage, particles were visually detected in the phosphate buffer solution in particular glass vials which pass compendial tests of containers for injectable drugs. These particles were considered to be different from ordinal glass delamination, which has been reported in a number of papers because the particles were mainly composed of Al, P and O, but not Si. The formation of the particles accelerated at higher storage temperatures. Among the surface treatments tested for the glass vials, sulfur treatment showed a protective effect on the particle formation in the vials, whereas the SiO(2) coating did not have any protective effects. It was found that the elution ratio of Al and Si in the solution stored in the glass vials after the heating was similar to the ratio of Al and Si in borosilicate glass. However, the Al concentration decreased during storage (5°C, 6 months), and consequently, particle formation was observed in the solution. Adding citrate, which is a chelating agent for Al, effectively suppressed the particle formation in the heated solution. When 50 ppb and higher concentrations of Al ion were added to the phosphate buffer solution, the formation of white particles containing Al, P and O was detected. It is suggested that a phosphate buffer solution in a borosilicate glass vial has the ability to form particles due to interactions with the Al that is eluted from the glass during storage.

  15. Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy: principles and practice.

    PubMed

    Seaton, R A; Barr, D A

    2013-10-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) refers to the administration of a parenteral antimicrobial in a non inpatient or ambulatory setting with the explicit aim of facilitating admission avoidance or early discharge. Whilst OPAT has predominantly been the domain of the infection specialist, the internal medicine specialist has a key role in service development and delivery as a component of broader ambulatory care initiatives such as "hospital at home". Main drivers for OPAT are patient welfare, reduction of risk of health care associated infection and cost-effective use of hospital resources. The safe practice of OPAT is dependent on a team approach with careful patient selection and antimicrobial management with programmed and adaptable clinical monitoring and assessment of outcome. Gram-positive infections, including cellulitis, bone and joint infection, bacteraemia and endocarditis are key infections potentially amenable to OPAT whilst resistant Gram-negative infections are of increasing importance. Ceftriaxone, teicoplanin, daptomycin and ertapenem lend themselves well to OPAT due to daily (or less frequent) bolus administration, although any antimicrobial may be administered if the patient is trained to administer and/or an appropriate infusion device is employed. Clinical experience from NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde is presented to illustrate the key principles of OPAT as practised in the UK. Increasingly complex patients with multiple medical needs, the relative scarcity of inpatient resources and the broader challenge of ambulatory care and "hospital at home" will ensure the internal medicine specialist will have a key role in the future development of OPAT. Copyright © 2013 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of parenteral magnesium sulfate on pulmonary functions in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S K; Bhargava, A; Pande, J N

    1994-01-01

    Eighteen patients with bronchial asthma were studied in a single-blind fashion. Each patient received an infusion of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4.7H2O 50% W/V) in a dose equivalent to 10 mmol of elemental magnesium. The airways resistance showed a significant decrease (p < 0.01) while SGaw increased significantly (p < 0.001) with MgSO4 infusion. FEV1 (p < 0.01), FEF25-75% (p < 0.05), and V50 (p < 0.05) also showed statistically significant increase (p < 0.001) with MgSO4 infusion. Significant changes in Raw (p < 0.01) and SGaw (p < 0.01) persisted at 10 and 20 min following MgSO4 infusion. No significant side effects were observed with MgSO4 infusion. It is concluded that modest improvement in airways resistance and specific conductance and only small improvement in maximal expiratory flow rates is consistent with a predominant effect of MgSO4 on large airways in patients with bronchial asthma.

  17. Effects of enteral and parenteral feeding of malnourished rats on body composition.

    PubMed

    Kudsk, K A; Stone, J M; Carpenter, G; Sheldon, G F

    1982-11-01

    Many studies have reported similar weight gains and nitrogen balance in groups of well-nourished animals fed either orally or intravenously, but none have investigated the effects on malnourished animals. After protein depleting for 14 days, rats were refed with a D25-4.25% amino acid solution orally ad lib, by gastrostomy, or intravenously. IV animals gained more weight with greater body fat formation than either enteral group but had lower intestinal mass and nitrogen. Route of administration influenced substrate utilization in malnourished animals fed identical diets. We conclude that weight gain cannot be used as a comparative indicator of nitrogen retention between malnourished animals fed enterally and those fed intravenously.

  18. Differential effects of orally versus parenterally administered qinghaosu derivative artemether in dogs.

    PubMed

    Classen, W; Altmann, B; Gretener, P; Souppart, C; Skelton-Stroud, P; Krinke, G

    1999-11-01

    Artemether (AM) is an antimalarial drug derived from artemisinin (Qinghaosu), an extract of the herb Artemisia annua L., sweet wormwood. Its antiparasitic effect is that of a schizontocide and is explained by rapid uptake by parasitized erythrocytes and interaction with a component of hemoglobin degradation resulting in formation of free radicals. It has been shown to exhibit a high clinical cure rate. Previous animal safety studies with Qinghaosu derivatives revealed dose-dependent neurotoxicity with movement disturbances and neuropathic changes in the hindbrain of intramuscularly treated dogs, rats and monkeys. Such effects have not been seen in man. The objective of our present studies was to compare the effects of high levels of AM administered to dogs p.o. versus i.m. In a pilot study 20 mg/kg/day of AM was given i.m. to groups of 3 male Beagle dogs for 5 and 30 days, respectively. Clinical signs of neurotoxicity were noted in some individual dogs from test day 23 on. One dog had to be sacrificed pre-term. Hematologic findings indicated a hypochromic, microcytic anemia. Microscopic examination demonstrated neuropathic changes only at 30 days, but not at 5 days. The animals had neuronal and secondary axonal damage, most prominent in the cerebellar roof, pontine and vestibular nuclei, and in the raphe/paralemniscal region. The affected neurons showed loss of Nissl substance, cytoplasmic eosinophilia, shrinkage of the nucleus and in advanced stages scavenging by microglia. In a subsequent experiment, AM was administered to groups of 4 male and 4 female dogs, respectively, at 8 daily doses of 0, 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg i.m., or 0, 50, 150 and 600 mg/kg p.o. Neurologic signs were seen at high i.m. doses only. In most animals they were inconspicuous and consisted of reduced activity with convulsions seen in single dogs shortly before death. Neuronal damage occurred in all animals at 40 and 80 mg/kg following i.m. treatment. At 20 mg/kg minimal effects occurred in 5

  19. Aerosol and parenteral pneumocandins are effective in a rat model of pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, M B; Bernard, E M; Edwards, F F; Marrinan, J A; Dropinski, J; Douglas, C M; Armstrong, D

    1995-01-01

    The pneumocandins are semisynthetic analogs of echinocandin-like compounds that have shown efficacy in animal models of systemic candidiasis, disseminated aspergillosis, and pneumocystis pneumonia. However, the most common form of Aspergillus infection in susceptible patients is pulmonary aspergillosis, which was not directly tested in the mouse models used in the past. We have evaluated three pneumocandins, L-693,989, L-731,373, and L-733,560, in a rat model of pulmonary aspergillosis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 2 weeks with cortisone and tetracycline and fed a low-protein diet before being inoculated via the trachea with 10(6) conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus H11-20. In the absence of drug treatment, the animals developed a progressive, rapidly fatal bronchopneumonia. All three pneumocandins at doses of 5 mg/kg (intraperitoneally [i.p.] every 12 h [q12h]) were effective in delaying mortality in this model. Survival at day 7 postinfection was 20% among controls (n = 10 for all groups), while it was 60, 80, and 90% in groups that were treated with L-693,989, L-731,373, and L-733,560, respectively. In another trial, survival at day 7 postinfection was 25% among controls (n = 8 for all groups); it was 87.5% in a group treated with amphotericin B (0.5 mg/kg i.p. q12h) and was 100% in a group treated with L-733,560 (0.625 mg/kg i.p. q12h). In a separate trial, aerosol L-693,989 administered 2 h before infection (5 mg/kg) delayed mortality. Eight of the 10 animals treated with aerosol L-693,989 survived for 7 days, whereas only 2 of 10 control animals survived. We conclude that the pneumocandins we tested were highly effective in an animal model of pulmonary aspergillosis. PMID:7486919

  20. Effect of parenteral iron on serum electrolytes of the baby pig.

    PubMed

    Ku, P K; Miller, E R; Ullrey, D E

    1983-09-01

    Twenty-eight 4-d-old nursing pigs were used in two trials to evaluate the effects of im injection of iron (Fe) from Fe-dextran upon subsequent serum mineral concentrations. An im injection of 150 mg of Fe from Fe-dextran was given to all pigs (n = 17) in trial 1. Serum Fe concentration increased rapidly from an initial mean of 65 to 3,466 micrograms/dl at 6 h postinjection (PI), 5,712 micrograms/dl at 24 h PI, then fell to 317 micrograms/dl at 4 d PI, 143 micrograms/dl at 7 d PI and remained about 100 micrograms/dl at 14, 21 and 28 d PI. Concentrations of other serum minerals did not appear to be influenced by the Fe-dextran injection. Treatments of Pigs (n = 11) in trial 2 were no injection, injection of dextran only, injection of 100 mg Fe from Fe-dextran and injection of 200 mg Fe from Fe-dextran. Serum Fe concentration increased rapidly after Fe-dextran injection, rising to a peak of 11,028 micrograms/dl at 6 h PI from the 100-mg Fe injection and 17,012 micrograms/dl at 6 h PI from the 200-mg Fe injection. Serum Fe concentration dropped steadily in pigs that were given no injection or injected with dextran only. Seven days after trial 2 started, all pigs that had received no injection or dextran only were injected with 100 mg Fe from Fe-dextran.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian F

    2016-10-02

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like 'clean' surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost.

  2. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like ‘clean’ surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost. PMID:27295449

  3. Efficacy and Effects of Parenteral Pethidine or Meptazinol and Regional Analgesia for Pain Relief during Delivery. A Comparative Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J.; Jank, A.; Amara, S.; Stepan, P. D. H.; Kaisers, U.; Hoehne, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peripartum anesthesia may consist of parenteral opioids and/or regional analgesia. There is only limited data in the literature comparing both methods in daily obstetric practice. This observational study investigated the opioids pethidine and meptazinol as well as regional analgesics with regard to their administration, efficacy, side effects and subjective maternal satisfaction with therapy. The rates of secondary regional analgesia administration after administration of the respective opioid served as a means of evaluating treatment. Methods: This study collected data on pain management during vaginal delivery in a German university hospital over a twelve month period. Severity of pain was measured intrapartum using a numerical rating scale. Maternal, neonatal and delivery-related data were obtained postpartum from the clinical records and from the mothers using a questionnaire. Results: The study is based on data obtained from 449 deliveries. Pain relief achieved by the administration of pethidine and meptazinol was similarly low; maternal satisfaction with the respective therapy was high. Meptazinol was usually administered intravenously (83 % vs. 6 %; p < 0.001), repeatedly (27 % vs. 6 %; p < 0.001) and closer to the birth (1.9 ± 2.7 h vs. 2.6 ± 2.8 h; p < 0.05) compared to pethidine. Secondary regional analgesia was more common after the administration of pethidine (16 % vs. 8 %; p < 0.05). Regional analgesia resulted in greater pain relief compared to opioid therapy (78 % vs. 24 % after 30 min; p < 0.001) and was associated with longer times to delivery (7.6 ± 2.5 h vs. 5.7 ± 2.5 h; p < 0.001) and higher levels of maternal satisfaction with therapy (6.1 ± 1.2 vs. 4.8 ± 1.6 on a 7-point scale; p < 0.001). Conclusion: In daily clinical practice, meptazinol can be adapted more readily to changes during birth and requires less secondary analgesia. Regional neuraxial

  4. Economics of home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Cade, A; Puntis, J

    1997-09-01

    The past 30 years have seen long term parenteral nutrition evolve from a novel technique to an accepted intervention for gastrointestinal failure. The development of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) has parallelled a shift in resources from hospital to community care and has been driven by technological advances, the growth of commercial home care companies and patient choice. Costs for HPN per patient year have been estimated to range from $US 150,000 to $US 250,000 in the US, and are around 55,000 pounds in the UK, perhaps only 25 to 50% of in-hospital costs. In the absence of any alternative treatment for many patients with gastrointestinal disease, parenteral nutrition is life saving and offers the prospect of maintaining a good quality of life. The cost of 1 quality-adjusted life-year for HPN has been estimated as 69,000 pounds in the UK (1995 values), and $Can 14,600 in Canada (1984 values), making HPN relatively cost effective compared with other ways of spending money to improve health. HPN is also given to patients in whom life expectancy is unlikely to be influenced, such as those with cancer or AIDS. Although there is considerable heterogeneity between countries in the proportion of HPN patients with a particular disease, malignancy is now the single most common indication. HPN can be expected to improve quality of life over a short period of terminal care, and whilst a strong case can be made for use of HPN in some of these patients, its use has not been subjected to detailed medical or economic appraisal.

  5. [Future perspectives in parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Wretlind, A

    1989-10-01

    Some of the future perspectives of parenteral nutrition will most likely be related to the possibilities of improving the infusion solutions used. There are studies indicating that intravenous amino acid mixtures may produce better biochemical and clinical effects either by increasing the content of histidin, arginine, tyrosine, cysteine/cystine and branched chain amino acids or by adding glutamine, ornithin, ornithin-ketoglutaric acid, taurine and glutathion. Several possibilities of improving the intravenous fat emulsions have been studied and discussed. The use of medium chain fatty acid glycerides (MCT) instead of long chain fatty acid glycerides (LCT) may be of some value. Physical mixtures of LCT and MCT have been studied. Glycerides of both medium chain and long chain fatty acids of the same glycerol molecule ('structured lipids') have also been investigated. The omega-3-fatty acids (alfalinolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid) have unique biochemical properties which may be beneficial in various clinical situations when parenteral nutrition is indicated. Intravenous fat emulsions containing triglycerides of these fatty acids are now being extensively investigated. The omega-3-fatty acids will change the pattern of eicosanoids formed, reduce the tendency to platelet aggregation, increase the resistance to endotoxins, and reduce the viscosity of the blood. Triglycerides of gamma linolenic acid have been considered to be of value in situations when there may be a reduced activity of delta-6-desaturase to transform linoleic acid to arachidonic acid. Many other known (carnitine, non-protein sources, vitamins and trace elements) or unknown nutrients may be found to be useful in order to improve the infusion solutions used in parenteral nutrition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Parenteral Nutrition and Lipids.

    PubMed

    Raman, Maitreyi; Almutairdi, Abdulelah; Mulesa, Leanne; Alberda, Cathy; Beattie, Colleen; Gramlich, Leah

    2017-04-14

    Lipids have multiple physiological roles that are biologically vital. Soybean oil lipid emulsions have been the mainstay of parenteral nutrition lipid formulations for decades in North America. Utilizing intravenous lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition has minimized the dependence on dextrose as a major source of nonprotein calories and prevents the clinical consequences of essential fatty acid deficiency. Emerging literature has indicated that there are benefits to utilizing alternative lipids such as olive/soy-based formulations, and combination lipids such as soy/MCT/olive/fish oil, compared with soybean based lipids, as they have less inflammatory properties, are immune modulating, have higher antioxidant content, decrease risk of cholestasis, and improve clinical outcomes in certain subgroups of patients. The objective of this article is to review the history of IVLE, their composition, the different generations of widely available IVLE, the variables to consider when selecting lipids, and the complications of IVLE and how to minimize them.

  7. History of parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Dudrick, Stanley J

    2009-06-01

    The concept of feeding patients entirely parenterally by injecting nutrient substances or fluids intravenously was advocated and attempted long before the successful practical development of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) four decades ago. Realization of this 400 year old seemingly fanciful dream initially required centuries of fundamental investigation coupled with basic technological advances and judicious clinical applications. Most clinicians in the 1950's were aware of the negative impact of starvation on morbidity, mortality, and outcomes, but only few understood the necessity for providing adequate nutritional support to malnourished patients if optimal clinical results were to be achieved. The prevailing dogma in the 1960's was that, "Feeding entirely by vein is impossible; even if it were possible, it would be impractical; and even if it were practical, it would be unaffordable." Major challenges to the development of TPN included: (1) formulate complete parenteral nutrient solutions (did not exist), (2) concentrate substrate components to 5-6 times isotonicity without precipitation (not easily done), (3) demonstrate utility and safety of long-term central venous catheterization (not looked upon with favor by the medical hierarchy), (4) demonstrate efficacy and safety of long-term infusion of hypertonic nutrient solutions (contrary to clinical practices at the time), (5) maintain asepsis and antisepsis throughout solution preparation and delivery (required a major culture change), and (6) anticipate, avoid, and correct metabolic imbalances or derangements (a monumental challenge and undertaking). This presentation recounts approaches to, and solution of, some of the daunting problems as really occurred in a comprehensive, concise and candid history of parenteral nutrition.

  8. Screening for stability and compatibility conditions of recombinant human epidermal growth factor for parenteral formulation: effect of pH, buffers, and excipients.

    PubMed

    Santana, Héctor; González, Yaima; Campana, Patricia Targon; Noda, Jesús; Amarantes, Odalys; Itri, Rosangela; Beldarraín, Alejandro; Páez, Rolando

    2013-08-16

    A successful parenteral formulation can be developed by studying stability and compatibility of biopharmaceuticals as a function of solution composition. Here, we evaluate the influence of pH, buffers, ionic strength, protein concentration and presence of excipients on recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) stability. The stability was accessed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), size exclusion chromatography (SEC-HPLC), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and light scattering. The overall maximal stability was obtained in pH near to 7.0 in phosphate, Tris and histidine buffers as the results of the different methods revealed. The CD results revealed that this protein is stable in an extensive pH range. Aggregation of rhEGF was minimized at pH values ranged from 6.0 to 8.0 as indicated the SEC-HPLC and light scattering results. Nor the ionic strength neither the rhEGF concentration had significant effect on the reaction rate constants. Most rhEGF-excipient instability occurs among this protein and reducing sugars. Polymers like poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polysorbates increased methionine oxidation. The rhEGF oxidation and deamidation were the most common degradation pathways. This research identified critical solution factors to be considered for the development of a successful rhEGF parenteral formulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effectiveness of Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J., Ed.

    This book reviews research on the effectiveness of early intervention for children with disabilities or who are at risk. Program factors for children at risk and with disabilities, the effects of early intervention on different types of disabilities, and the outcomes of early intervention are explored. Chapters include: "Second-Generation Research…

  10. The Effectiveness of Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J., Ed.

    This book reviews research on the effectiveness of early intervention for children with disabilities or who are at risk. Program factors for children at risk and with disabilities, the effects of early intervention on different types of disabilities, and the outcomes of early intervention are explored. Chapters include: "Second-Generation Research…

  11. Compatibility: drugs and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Talita Muniz Maloni; Ferraresi, Andressa de Abreu

    2016-01-01

    Standardization and systematization of data to provide quick access to compatibility of leading injectable drugs used in hospitals for parenteral nutrition. We selected 55 injectable drugs analyzed individually with two types of parenteral nutrition: 2-in-1 and 3-in-1. The following variables were considered: active ingredient, compatibility of drugs with the parenteral nutrition with or without lipids, and maximum drug concentration after dilution for the drugs compatible with parenteral nutrition. Drugs were classified as compatible, incompatible and untested. After analysis, relevant information to the product's compatibility with parental nutrition was summarized in a table. Systematization of compatibility data provided quick and easy access, and enabled standardizing pharmacists work.

  12. Liver membrane composition after short-term parenteral nutrition with and without taurine in guinea pigs: the effect to taurine.

    PubMed

    Guertin, F; Roy, C C; Lepage, G; Yousef, I; Tuchweber, B

    1993-09-01

    Having recently demonstrated that taurine supplementation prevents total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-induced cholestasis, we chose to use this model to examine plasma membrane composition in relation to bile formation. Male guinea pigs received daily a mixture of glucose and of the amino acid solution Travasol with or without added taurine (1.2 mM). After 3 days, bile was collected and liver plasma membrane fractions enriched in sinusoidal lateral membrane and bile canalicular membrane domains were isolated. In animals receiving TPN alone, bile flow and biliary secretory rate of bile acid and bicarbonate decreased significantly compared with controls. Although membrane ATPases (Na+K+ and Mg+) were unchanged, TPN induced an increase in the lipid to protein ratio and a decrease of polyunsaturated fatty acids, in conjunction with a higher content of diene conjugates in sinusoidal lateral membrane fractions. Taurine corrected these changes and, in addition, reduced significantly the cholesterol to phospholipid ratio in both membrane fractions. The data show that changes in liver cell membranes occur in TPN-induced cholestasis and suggest that free radical injury may play a role. As taurine prevented cholestasis as well as membrane changes, it is suggested that taurine should be added to amino acid solutions used for parenteral nutrition.

  13. Standardised parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Simmer, Karen; Rakshasbhuvankar, Abhijeet; Deshpande, Girish

    2013-03-28

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) has become an integral part of clinical management of very low birth weight premature neonates. Traditionally different components of PN are prescribed individually considering requirements of an individual neonate (IPN). More recently, standardised PN formulations (SPN) for preterm neonates have been assessed and may have advantages including better provision of nutrients, less prescription and administration errors, decreased risk of infection, and cost savings. The recent introduction of triple-chamber bag that provides total nutrient admixture for neonates may have additional advantage of decreased risk of contamination and ease of administration.

  14. The Development of Total Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Don K

    2017-01-01

    The first patient to receive complete nourishment of a patient by intravenous infusion independent of the alimentary tract was an infant girl born with near-total small bowel atresia. Total parenteral nutrition, the intravenous infusion of nutrients, has been attempted since Harvey's description of the circulatory system in the early 17th century. The modern era of parenteral nutrition began in the early 20th century, when infusions of glucose, plasma, and emulsified fat into humans proved feasible. Robert Elman, working in the 1930s and 1940s, demonstrated that carefully prepared protein hydrolysates could be safely infused intravenously and incorporated by the body. Stanley Dudrick and Douglas Wilmore, surgeon researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, worked through the many details of preparation, administration, and clinical monitoring in beagle puppies before testing them on adult patients malnourished from a variety of surgical complications and gastrointestinal conditions. They applied their techniques and formulations on a newborn wasting away from congenital absence of the small bowel, the baby growing and developing for several months while being nourished completely by total parenteral nutrition. Their techniques, inspired by patients with progressive malnutrition from devastating intestinal conditions and malformations, form the basis of the practice of intravenous nutrition practiced today.

  15. Parenteral nutrition-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Pomeranz, S; Gimmon, Z; Ben Zvi, A; Katz, S

    1987-01-01

    A case report of a 4-yr-old child who developed an anaphylactic reaction to parenteral nutrition is presented. Dermal allergy tests demonstrated a sensitivity to Travasol solution and Armour multivitamin 2 solution. This is the first reported case known to us of such a response to elemental parenteral nutrition.

  16. The effect of registry-based performance feedback via short text messages and traditional postal letters on prescribing parenteral steroids by general practitioners--A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Afshin Sarafi; Noori, Mohammad Reza Farrokhi; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-03-01

    It is conjectured that providing feedback on physicians' prescribing behavior improves quality of drug prescriptions. However, the effectiveness of feedback provision and mode of feedback delivery is not well understood. The objective of this study was to assess and compare the effect of traditional paper letters (TPL) and short text message (STM) feedback on general practitioners' prescribing behavior of parenteral steroids (PSs). In a single-blind randomized controlled trial, 906 general practitioners (GPs) having at least 10 monthly prescriptions were randomly recruited into two interventions and one control study arms with 1:1 allocation, stratified by percentage of prescriptions. The intervention was the provision of 3 feedback messages containing prescribing indices in TPL and STM (in the first two arms) versus the control arm (CG) with an interval of 3 months between these messages. We calculated the PS Defined Daily Dose (DDD) for every GP, every month, and compared between the 3 arms, before and after the interventions. The expected primary outcome was to reduce prescription of parenteral steroids by participants. The study was performed in the Kerman Social Security Organization in Iran. A total of 906 GPs were selected for the trial, but only 721 of them (TPL=191, STM=228, CG=302) were recruited for the 1st feedback. The mean age of GPs was 44 and 59% of them were male. The prescribed parenteral steroid DDDs at baseline were similar (TPL=121.62, STM=127.49, CG=115.68, P>0.5). At the end of the study, DDDs in the TPL and STM arms were similar (TPL=104.38, STM=101.90, P>0.9) but DDDs in each intervention arm was statistically significantly lower than in CG (CG=156.17, P<0.0001). Being in TPL and STM arms resulted in 36.1 and 41.7 units of decrease in DDD respectively, compared to the control arm (P<0.02 and P<0.005) after the one-year duration of the study. Feedback by TPLs and STMs on prescribing performance effectively reduced prescribing PSs by GPs. STM

  17. Early initiation of low-level parenteral dextrose induces an accelerated diabetic phenotype in septic C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Singamsetty, Srikanth; Shah, Faraaz Ali; Guo, Lanping; Watanabe, Yoshio; McDonald, Sherie; Sharma, Rohit; Zhang, Yingze; Alonso, Laura C; O'Donnell, Christopher P; McVerry, Bryan J

    2016-01-01

    Development of hyperglycemia during sepsis is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Nutritional support is common practice in the intensive care unit, but the metabolic effects are not well understood. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of early low-level calorie provision on the development of hyperglycemia in a clinically relevant murine model of sepsis. C57BL/6J mice underwent femoral arterial and venous catheterization followed by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham surgery and low-dose intravenous dextrose or saline infusion. Blood glucose, plasma insulin, and cytokines were measured after 24 h. Additional septic mice underwent hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps or received intravenous insulin concurrent with dextrose to determine whole-body insulin sensitivity and test the efficacy of insulin to reverse hyperglycemia. Neither dextrose infusion nor CLP alone induced hyperglycemia. Early initiation of low-level dextrose in septic mice produced a variable glycemic response: 49% maintained euglycemia (blood glucose < 200) and 27% developed severe hyperglycemia (blood glucose ≥ 600). Hyperglycemia was associated with increased inflammation and reduced insulin secretion and sensitivity compared with control mice or CLP mice maintaining euglycemia. Insulin prevented the progression to severe hyperglycemia but was ineffective in reestablishing glycemic control once hyperglycemia had developed. In conclusion, early initiation of clinically relevant low-level dextrose (∼ 20% daily caloric requirements) precipitated hyperglycemia akin to an acute diabetic phenotype in septic mice characterized by decreased insulin sensitivity, decreased insulin secretion, and an increased inflammatory response.

  18. Early initiation of low-level parenteral dextrose induces an accelerated diabetic phenotype in septic C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Singamsetty, Srikanth; Shah, Faraaz Ali; Guo, Lanping; Watanabe, Yoshio; McDonald, Sherie; Sharma, Rohit; Zhang, Yingze; Alonso, Laura C.; O’Donnell, Christopher P.; McVerry, Bryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Development of hyperglycemia during sepsis is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Nutritional support is common practice in the intensive care unit, but the metabolic effects are not well understood. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of early low-level calorie provision on the development of hyperglycemia in a clinically relevant murine model of sepsis. C57BL/6J mice underwent femoral arterial and venous catheterization followed by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham surgery and low-dose intravenous dextrose or saline infusion. Blood glucose, plasma insulin, and cytokines were measured after 24 h. Additional septic mice underwent hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps or received intravenous insulin concurrent with dextrose to determine whole-body insulin sensitivity and test the efficacy of insulin to reverse hyperglycemia. Neither dextrose infusion nor CLP alone induced hyperglycemia. Early initiation of low-level dextrose in septic mice produced a variable glycemic response: 49% maintained euglycemia (blood glucose <200) and 27% developed severe hyperglycemia (blood glucose≥600). Hyperglycemia was associated with increased inflammation and reduced insulin secretion and sensitivity compared with control mice or CLP mice maintaining euglycemia. Insulin prevented the progression to severe hyperglycemia but was ineffective in reestablishing glycemic control once hyperglycemia had developed. In conclusion, early initiation of clinically relevant low-level dextrose (~20% daily caloric requirements) precipitated hyperglycemia akin to an acute diabetic phenotype in septic mice characterized by decreased insulin sensitivity, decreased insulin secretion, and an increased inflammatory response. PMID:26624964

  19. Phase IV prospective clinical study to evaluate the effect of taurine on liver function in postsurgical adult patients requiring parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Francisco; Balsa, José Antonio; de la Puerta, Cristina; Botella, José Ignacio; Zamarrón, Isabel; Elías, Elena; Del Río, José Ignacio Pérez; Alonso, Paloma; Candela, Angel; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Egido, Jesús; Navarro, Pilar; Vázquez, Clotilde

    2014-10-01

    Taurine's role in bile acid metabolism and anti-inflammatory activity could exert a protective effect on hepatobiliary complications associated with parenteral nutrition (PN). In this study, the effects of 2 amino acid solutions, with and without taurine, on liver function administered to nonacutely ill postsurgical patients as part of a short-term PN regimen were prospectively compared. Adult patients randomly received (double-blind) Tauramin 10% or a standard PN solution without taurine as the control (1.5 g amino acid/kg body weight [bw]/d; infusion rate of ≤4 mg glucose/kg bw/d) for a period of 5-30 days. γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and other indicators of liver function, glucose metabolism, lipid profile, inflammation markers, and treatment safety data were collected. Thirty-five patients receiving taurine PN and 39 receiving control PN were enrolled (intention-to-treat [ITT] population). Most patients (n = 62) discontinued after day 7 of follow-up (per-protocol [PP] population: n = 24 and n = 27, respectively). ITT patients with high GGT values after 5 days of PN comprised 68.6% and 64.1%, respectively. The mean change in GGT values with respect to the baseline values was 167 ± 192 and 157 ± 185 IU/L, respectively. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels after 7 days of PN were significantly decreased in the taurine PN group of PP patients (-2.83 ± 30.9 vs 23.9 ± 27.0 mg/dL for control PN; P < .05). None of the adverse events reported (taurine PN: n = 6; control PN: n = 7) were treatment related. PN solutions with and without taurine had similar effects on liver function parameters, except for an LDL reduction in PN with taurine, when administered to nonacutely ill postsurgical patients in the short term (5-7 days). © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  20. Parenteral packaging waste reduction.

    PubMed

    Baetz, B W

    1990-08-01

    The consumption of pharmaceutical products generates waste materials which can cause significant environmental impact when incinerated or landfilled. The purpose of this work is to stimulate discussion among hospital pharmacists and purchasing managers relating to the waste management aspects of their purchasing decisions. As a case study example, a number of commercially available "single use" parenterals are evaluated from a waste reduction perspective, for both the product container and for the packaging of these containers. Glass vials are non-incinerable, and are currently non-recyclable due to the higher melting temperatures required for borosilicate glass. However, plastic vials are potentially both incinerable and recyclable. Packaging quantities are considerably lower for plastic vials on a unit container basis, and also vary to a measurable degree between different manufacturers for a given type of container material. From an environmental perspective, waste reduction potential should become an important criterion in the selection of pharmaceutical products for hospital use.

  1. Effect of parenteral nutrition supplemented with short-chain fatty acids on adaptation to massive small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Koruda, M J; Rolandelli, R H; Settle, R G; Zimmaro, D M; Rombeau, J L

    1988-09-01

    After massive small bowel resection, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is prescribed to maintain nutritional status. However, TPN reduces the mass of the remaining intestinal mucosa, whereas adaptation to small bowel resection is associated with increased mucosal mass. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been shown to stimulate mucosal cell mitotic activity. This study determined whether the addition of SCFAs to TPN following small bowel resection would prevent intestinal mucosal atrophy produced by TPN. Adult rats underwent an 80% small bowel resection and then received either standard TPN or TPN supplemented with SCFAs (sodium acetate, propionate, and butyrate). After 1 wk, jejunal and ileal mucosal weights, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein contents were measured and compared with the parameters obtained at the time of resection. Animals receiving TPN showed significant loss of jejunal mucosal weight, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein and ileal mucosal weight and deoxyribonucleic acid after small bowel resection, whereas animals receiving SCFA-supplemented TPN showed no significant change in the jejunal mucosal parameters and a significant increase in ileal mucosal protein. These data demonstrate that SCFA-supplemented TPN reduces the mucosal atrophy associated with TPN after massive bowel resection and thys may facilitate adaptation to small bowel resection.

  2. Third generation cephalosporins in the parenteral to oral switch.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, D

    1994-01-01

    In the present economic climate, it is increasingly necessary to ensure the cost-effectiveness of all aspects of healthcare. The expenditure on medications in a hospital is largely determined by the workload and throughput, but efforts to rationalise the use of medications will result in benefits both in patient care and overall costs. The purpose of this report is to discuss the advantages of switching from parenteral to oral cephalosporin therapy after the initial stage of infection treatment, the potential of presently available oral cephalosporins for use in a parenteral-to-oral switch regimen, and the outcome of a parenteral-to-oral switch programme, which used parenteral cefotaxime and oral cefixime, implemented at Hillingdon Hospital.

  3. Compatibility: drugs and parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Talita Muniz Maloni; Ferraresi, Andressa de Abreu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Standardization and systematization of data to provide quick access to compatibility of leading injectable drugs used in hospitals for parenteral nutrition. Methods We selected 55 injectable drugs analyzed individually with two types of parenteral nutrition: 2-in-1 and 3-in-1. The following variables were considered: active ingredient, compatibility of drugs with the parenteral nutrition with or without lipids, and maximum drug concentration after dilution for the drugs compatible with parenteral nutrition. Drugs were classified as compatible, incompatible and untested. Results After analysis, relevant information to the product’s compatibility with parental nutrition was summarized in a table. Conclusion Systematization of compatibility data provided quick and easy access, and enabled standardizing pharmacists work. PMID:27074235

  4. Acute Effects of a Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 Analogue, Teduglutide, on Gastrointestinal Motor Function and Permeability in Adult Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome on Home Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Iturrino, Johanna; Camilleri, Michael; Acosta, Andres; O'Neill, Jessica; Burton, Duane; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Carlson, Paula J; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Hurt, Ryan

    2016-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) agonists decrease the need for parenteral nutrition (PN) in short bowel syndrome (SBS); mechanisms evaluated to date have focused on the intestinotrophic effect of GLP-2 agonists such as increased absorptive capacity of the remnant intestine and increased citrulline levels. Other mechanisms may also play a role in effects of GLP-2 agonists. To measure effects of a GLP-2 agonist, teduglutide (TED), compared with placebo (PLA) on gastric emptying (GE), overall gut transit, fluid balance, intestinal monosaccharide absorption, and permeability in patients with SBS on home PN (HPN). In 8 adults with SBS on HPN, we compared daily subcutaneous TED (0.05 mg/kg) and PLA (crossover design, each treatment 7 days with a 14-day washout) on gut transit, intestinal absorption, and permeability after oral mannitol (200 mg) and lactulose (1 g), as well as stool weight and urine volume over 8 hours. Analysis used the paired t test. Of 8 patients, 4 were men, with a mean ± SD age of 54 ± 1 years, body mass index of 25 ± 4 kg/m(2), residual small intestine of 63 ± 12 cm, and 25% ± 15% of residual colon. The overall gut transit (% emptied at 6 hours) was 53.4% ± 15% for TED vs 62.4% ± 15.2% for PLA (P = .075), with no effect on GE (P = .74). TED increased urine mannitol excretion at 0-2 hours (16.2 ± 3.6 mg TED vs 11.3 ± 2.2 mg PLA, P = .20) and 0-8 hours (32.7 ± 5.9 mg PLA vs 48.8 ± 8.9 mg TED, P = .17). There were no differences in urine lactulose excretion or lactulose/mannitol ratio (0.024 ± 0.005 TED vs 0.021 ± 0.005 PLA). Over 8 hours, TED (vs PLA) numerically reduced stool weight (mean ± SEM, 77 ± 18 g TED vs 106 ± 43 g PLA, P = .42) and increased urine volume (408.9 ± 52.2 mL TED vs 365.7 ± 57.3 mL PLA, P = .34). Seven-day TED treatment in 8 participants suggests beneficial effects on fluid balance and monosaccharide absorption, and it retarded overall gut transit with no effects on GE or mucosal permeability. Larger, longer

  5. Cost-effectiveness of employing a total parenteral nutrition surveillance nurse for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Fraher, M H; Collins, C J; Bourke, J; Phelan, D; Lynch, M

    2009-10-01

    The cost of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is substantial in terms of morbidity, mortality and financial resources. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a recognised risk factor for CRBSI. In 1997, an intravenous nutrition nurse was promoted to TPN surveillance clinical nurse manager (CNM) and quarterly infection audit meetings were introduced to monitor trends in CRBSI. Data were prospectively collected over a 15-year period using specific TPN records in a 535-bed tertiary acute university hospital. A total of 20 439 CVC-days and 307 CRBSIs were recorded. Mean number of infections before, and after, the introduction of a dedicated TPN surveillance CNM were compared. Mean CRBSI per 1000 catheter-days+/-SD was 20.5+/-6.34 prior to 1997 and 14.64+/-7.81 after 1997, representing a mean reduction of 5.84 CRBSIs per 1000 catheter-days (95% CI: -4.92 to 16.60; P=0.05). Mean number of CRBSIs per year+/-SD was 28.3+/-4.93 prior to 1997 and 18.5+/-7.37 after 1997, representing a mean decrease of 9.8 infections per year (95% CI: 0.01 to 19.66; P<0.05). The savings made by preventing 9.8 infections per year were calculated from data on bed-days obtained from the hospital finance office. The cost in hospital days saved per annum was euro135,000. Introduction of a TPN surveillance CNM saved the hospital at least euro78,300 per annum and led to a significant decrease in CRBSIs in TPN patients.

  6. Self-administered outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (S-OPAT) for infective endocarditis: a safe and effective model.

    PubMed

    Pajarón, Marcos; Fernández-Miera, Manuel F; Allende, Iciar; Arnaiz, Ana M; Gutiérrez-Cuadra, Manuel; Cobo-Belaustegui, Manuel; Armiñanzas, Carlos; de Berrazueta, Jose R; Fariñas, Maria C; Sanroma, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    The safety and efficacy of treatment of infectious endocarditis (IE) was evaluated within a program of hospital-in-home (HIH) based on self-administered outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (S-OPAT). IE episodes (n=48 in 45 patients; 71% middle-aged males) were recruited into the HIH program between 1998 and 2012. Following treatment stabilization at the hospital they returned home for HIH in which a physician and/or a nurse supervised the S-OPAT. Safety and efficacy were evaluated as mortality, re-occurrence, and unexpected re-admission to hospital. Of the episodes of IE, 83.3% had comorbidities with a mean score of 2.3 on the Charlson index and 1.5 on the Profund index; 60.4% had pre-existing valve disease (58.6% having had surgical intervention); 8.3% of patients had suffered a previous IE episode; 62.5% of all episodes affected a native valve; 45.8% being mitral; 70.8% of infection derived from the community. In 75% of the episodes there was micro-organism growth, of which 83.3% were Gram positive. Overall duration of antibiotic treatment was 4.8 weeks; 60.4% of this time corresponding to HIH. Re-admission occurred in 12.5% of episodes of which 33.3% returned to HIH to complete the S-OPAT. No deaths occurred during HIH. One year after discharge, 2 patients had recurrence and 5 patients died, in 2 of whom previous IE as cause-of-death could not be excluded. In conclusion, the S-OPAT schedule of hospital-in-home is safe and efficacious in selected patients with IE.

  7. Effects of parenteral infusion with fish-oil or safflower-oil emulsion on hepatic lipids, plasma amino acids, and inflammatory mediators in septic rats.

    PubMed

    Chao, C Y; Yeh, S L; Lin, M T; Chen, W J

    2000-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of preinfusion with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) using fish-oil (FO) versus safflower-oil (SO) emulsion as fat sources on hepatic lipids, plasma amino-acid profiles, and inflammatory-related mediators in septic rats. Normal rats, with internal jugular catheters, were assigned to two different groups and received TPN. TPN provided 300 kcal. kg(-1). d(-1), with 40% of the non-protein energy as fat. All TPN solutions were isonitrogenous and identical in nutrient composition except for the fat emulsion, which was made of SO or FO. After receiving TPN for 6 d, each group of rats was further divided into control and sepsis subgroups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture; control rats received sham operation. All rats were classified into four groups as follows: FO control group (FOC; n = 7), FO sepsis group (FOS; n = 8), SO control group (SOC; n = 8), and SO sepsis group (SOS; n = 9). The results of the study demonstrated that plasma concentrations of triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acids did not differ between the FO and SO groups, regardless of whether the animals were septic. SOS had significantly higher total lipids and cholesterol content in the liver than did the SOC group. The FOS group, however, showed no difference from the FOC group. Plasma leucine and isoleucine levels were significantly lower in the SOS group than in the SOC group, whereas no difference in these two amino acids was observed between the FOC and FOS groups. Plasma arginine levels were significantly lower in both septic groups than in the groups without sepsis when either FO or SO was infused. Plasma glutamine levels, however, did not differ across groups. No differences in interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or leukotriene B(4) concentrations in peritoneal lavage fluid were observed between the two septic groups. These results suggest that catabolic reaction in septic rats preinfused with FO

  8. Metabolic effects of enteral versus parenteral alanyl-glutamine dipeptide administration in critically ill patients receiving enteral feeding: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Menghua; Bazargan, Niloofar; Griffith, Daniel P.; Fernández-Estívariz, Concepción; Leader, Lorraine M.; Easley, Kirk A.; Daignault, Nicole M.; Hao, Li; Meddings, Jon B.; Galloway, John R.; Blumberg, Jeffrey B.; Jones, Dean P.; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Glutamine (Gln) may become conditionally indispensable during critical illness. The short-term metabolic effects of enteral versus parenteral Gln supplementation are unknown in this clinical setting. Objectives We studied metabolic effects of intravenous (IV) alanyl-Gln dipeptide (AG) supplementation and enteral (EN) AG supplementation on plasma Gln concentration, antioxidant status, plasma lymphocyte subset number, gut permeability and nitrogen balance in adult critically ill patients requiring tube feeding compared to a control group not receiving Gln supplementation. Methods In a double-blind, pilot clinical trial, forty-four medical and surgical ICU patients received identical Gln-free tube feedings 24 h/day and were randomized to either isonitrogenous control (n=15), EN AG (n=15) or IV AG (n=14) groups (AG). Twelve patients were discontinued from the study. The goal AG dose was 0.5 g/kg/day. Biochemical and metabolic endpoints were measured at baseline and on day 9 (plasma Gln, antioxidant indices, lymphocyte subsets; serum IGF-1 and IGF binding protein-3; intestinal permeability). Nitrogen balance was determined between study days 6 to 8. Results Illness severity indices, clinical demographics, enteral energy and nitrogen intake and major biochemical indices were similar between groups during study. Plasma Gln was higher in the IV AG (565±119 μM, mean±SEM) vs the EN AG (411±27μM) group by day 9 (P=0.039); however, subjects in the IV AG group received a higher dose of AG (IV AG 0.50 versus EN AG 0.32±0.02 g/kg/day; P<0.001). EN AG subjects showed a significant increase in plasma γ-tocopherol levels over time and maintained plasma γ-tocopherol concentrations. There were no differences between groups for plasma concentrations of vitamin C, glutathione, malondialdehyde (MDA), T-lymphocyte subsets, intestinal permeability or nitrogen balance. Conclusions This study showed that alanyl-Gln administration by enteral or parenteral routes did not

  9. Plasma trace metals during total parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Solomons, N W; Layden, T J; Rosenberg, I H; Vo-Khactu, K; Sandstead, H H

    1976-06-01

    The plasma concentrations of the trace metals zinc and copper were studied prospectively in 13 patients with gastrointestinal diseases treated with parenteral alimentation (TPA) for periods of from 8 days to 7 1/2 weeks. Plasma copper levels fell rapidly and consistently in all patients, with an overall rate of - 11 mug per 100 ml per week. Zinc concentrations declined in 10 of 13 patients at a more gradual rate. Analysis of the standard parenteral alimentation fluids revealed zinc content equivalent to 50% of the daily requirement and a negligible content of copper. From combined analysis of plasma zinc, hair zinc, and taste acuity, there is evidence that increased utilization or redistribution within the body may effect plasma concentrations in some patients. Neither an increase in urinary excretion nor a primary decrease in plasma binding proteins appeared to be a major factor in lowering plasma trace metal concentrations. These findings indicate that a marked decrease in plasma copper is regular and a decline in plasma zinc is common during TPA using fluids unsupplemented with trace metals. Supplementation of parenteral alimentation fluids with the trace metals zinc and copper is recommended.

  10. The effect of parenteral alimentation fluid, undiluted with saline or fresh sera, on the growth of Candida albicans in vitro at 37 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Lederer, T; Rippon, J; Baldwin, S; Pachman, L M

    1975-02-28

    Parenteral alimentation is often complicated by Candida albicans infection which may be fatal. This study investigated the effect of alimentation fluid (Aminosol) on C. albicans' growth in vitro. It was found that concentrated Aminosol (1400 millisomoles) maintained C. albicans in a viable state but inhibited replication. Dilution of alimentation fluid to physiological concentrations (300 milliosmoles) with either saline or aged pooled normal sera promoted in vitro growth of C. albicans which was equivalent to that obtained in BHI broth and was slightly less than that obtained in Sabouraud's broth. The effects of fresh sera with full complement activity were also investigated. In fresh sera appropriately diluted with physiological saline, some clumping of the yeasts was observed and all formed germ tubes. Growth as defined by budding or the formation of hyphae was inhibited. When Aminosol was diluted to 300 milliosomoles with fresh sera, all yeasts were noted to be in clumps with germ tubes as well as continually growing hyphae. Growth was approximately equal to that seen in Aminosol similarly diluted with saline.

  11. Long-term parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ladefoged, Karin; Jarnum, Stig

    1978-01-01

    Nineteen patients (11 women and eight men) aged 20-68 received long-term parenteral nutrition, mostly at home, for six to 63 months (mean 19 months). Indications for LTPN were extensive, active Crohn's disease in three patients, intestinocutaneous fistulas in three, and short-bowel syndrome in the remaining 13 patients. Subclavian or intra-atrial (Broviac) catheters were most commonly used, for which the average life was four and seven months respectively. Complications of long-term parenteral nutrition included pneumothorax in four out of 48 subclavian vein punctures. Catheter-induced thrombosis of central veins was shown by phlebography 17 times in nine patients, and eight episodes of total occlusion occurred. Two of these patients had pulmonary infarction. Nineteen episodes of catheter sepsis occurred in 11 patients, but only one was fatal. Complications related to intestinal disease included intra-abdominal abscesses and intestinal fistulas, and disturbances of liver function. Five patients died, though in only two was death related to long-term parenteral nutrition. One of these patients died from catheter sepsis, the other had subdural haematoma possibly caused by anticoagulant treatment. Eight of the 14 surviving patients still needed parenteral nutrition. All received a disability pension, but six had an acceptable quality of life with almost normal social activities. Despite problems such as difficulties in maintaining standardised infusion programmes, it was concluded that long-term parenteral nutrition at home is practicable and consistent with an acceptable quality of life. ImagesFIG 2 PMID:98199

  12. Oral and parenteral therapy with saperconazole (R 66905) of invasive aspergillosis in normal and immunocompromised animals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Cutsem, J; Van Gerven, F; Janssen, P A

    1989-01-01

    Saperconazole (R 66905) is a broad-spectrum antifungal triazole with potent in vitro activity against Aspergillus spp. A total of 279 strains were tested in brain heart infusion broth. Development of the Aspergillus spp. was completely inhibited at 0.1 and 1 microgram of saperconazole per ml for 80.3 and 99.6% of the strains, respectively. Normal and immunocompromised guinea pigs were infected intravenously with Aspergillus fumigatus and treated orally, intravenously, or intraperitoneally with saperconazole or intraperitoneally with amphotericin B. Leukopenia, neutropenia, lymphocytosis, and monocytosis were obtained with mechlorethamine hydrochloride; leukopenia, neutrophilia, and lymphopenia were obtained with cyclophosphamide. Saperconazole was dissolved for oral treatment in polyethylene glycol and for parenteral treatment in cyclodextrins. Amphotericin B was given parenterally as Fungizone (E.R. Squibb & Sons). Treatment was given once daily for 14 days. An early starting treatment was efficacious, but the activity of saperconazole was maintained even when the onset of the treatment was delayed to the moribund state. The activity of saperconazole was not altered in immunocompromised animals. Saperconazole was clearly superior to amphotericin B and free of side effects. The oral and parenteral formulations of saperconazole were equipotent. The systemic activity of saperconazole in guinea pigs was confirmed in invasive aspergillosis in pigeons. PMID:2619273

  13. Effect of intradialytic parenteral nutrition in patients with malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome on body weight, inflammation, serum lipids and adipocytokines: results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Joannidis, M; Rauchenzauner, M; Leiner, B; Rosenkranz, A; Ebenbichler, C F; Laimer, M; Tatarczyk, T; Meusburger, E; Mayer, G

    2008-06-01

    Evaluation of the influence of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) in patients suffering from Malnutrition-Inflammation Complex Syndrome (MICS) on nutritional status, inflammation, adipocytokines and serum lipids. Six patients with MICS were assigned to IDPN, whereas six patients matched for age, sex, body mass index (BMI) and co-morbidity without malnutrition served as controls. Patients were recruited from Outpatient Dialysis Unit, Medical University Innsbruck and from Dialysis Unit, Hospital Feldkirch. In all patients with IDPN, dry body weight increased during the interventional period whereas body weight remained stable in patients without IDPN. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels were higher in patients with MICS compared with controls at all time points. Total cholesterol, LDL- and HDL-levels significantly increased during dialysis at all time points in controls but not in patients with MICS. Albumin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) and adipocytokines did not differ between patients and controls during the study period. IDPN in patients with MICS increases body weight despite not influencing inflammatory status. Furthermore, IDPN does not induce a pro-atherogenic lipid composition enhancing the risk for atherosclerosis. Thus, IDPN is a safe and effective treatment of malnutrition in patients with MICS.

  14. Parenteral nutrition dysregulates bile salt homeostasis in a rat model of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease.

    PubMed

    Koelfat, Kiran V K; Schaap, Frank G; Hodin, Caroline M J M; Visschers, Ruben G J; Svavarsson, Björn I; Lenicek, Martin; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2017-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN), a lifesaving therapy in patients with intestinal failure, has been associated with hepatobiliary complications including steatosis, cholestasis and fibrosis, collectively known as parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). To date, the pathogenesis of PNALD is poorly understood and therapeutic options are limited. Impaired bile salt homeostasis has been proposed to contribute PNALD. The objective of this study was to establish a PNALD model in rats and to evaluate the effects of continuous parenteral nutrition (PN) on bile salt homeostasis. Rats received either PN via the jugular vein or received normal diet for 3, 7 or 14 days. Serum biochemistry, hepatic triglycerides, circulating bile salts and C4, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, and lipogenic and bile salt homeostatic gene expression in liver and ileum were assessed. PN increased hepatic triglycerides already after 3 days of administration, and resulted in conjugated bilirubin elevation after 7 or more days. This indicates PN-induced steatosis and impaired canalicular secretion of bilirubin, the latter which is in line with reduced hepatic expression of Mrp2 mRNA. There was no histological evidence for liver inflammation after PN administration, and circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, were comparable in all groups. Hepatic expression of Fxr mRNA was decreased after 7 days of PN, without apparent effect on expression of Fxr targets Bsep and Shp. Nonetheless, Cyp7a1 expression was reduced after 7 days of PN, indicative for lowered bile salt synthesis. Circulating levels of C4 (marker of bile salt synthesis) were also decreased after 3, 7 and 14 days of PN. Levels of circulating bile salts were not affected by PN. This study showed that PN in rats caused early mild steatosis and cholestasis, while hepatic and systemic inflammation were not present. The onset of these abnormalities was associated with alterations in bile salt synthesis and transport. This

  15. Total parenteral nutrition decreases liver oxidative metabolism and antioxidant defenses in healthy rats: comparative effect of dietary olive and soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Lespine, A; Fernandez, Y; Periquet, B; Galinier, A; Garcia, J; Anglade, F; Ghisolfi, J; Thouvenot, J P

    2001-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is used for critically ill patients undergoing surgery, after trauma, or during disease conditions that favor oxidative stress. We studied the effect of TPN on liver oxidative metabolism and antioxidant defenses in rats, and we compared the effect of soybean oil- and olive oil-based diets. Seven-week-old rats (n = 28) were divided into four groups. Two experimental groups received a TPN solution containing soybean oil (TPN-S) or a mixture of olive/soybean oil, 80/20 (TPN-O), IV for 6 days. Orally fed animals received a solid diet including soybean oil (Oral-S) or olive/soybean oil, 80/20 (Oral-O). The following parameters were measured: DL-alpha-tocopherol, vitamin A, malondialdehyde and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (MDA-TBARS), and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP) in serum; DL-alpha-tocopherol, vitamin A, glutathione (GSH), and catalase (Cat) activity in liver homogenate; fatty acids from phospholipid, cytochrome P-450 content, NADPH-cytochrome c2 reductase activity in liver microsomes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione transferase (GST), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) in liver cytosol. The soybean or olive oil diets modified the liver microsomal fatty acid phospholipid composition, but the unsaturation index remained unchanged. TPN specifically increased the saturation of the membrane. The cytochrome P-450 level and the NADPH-cytochrome c2 reductase, SOD, Gpx, Cat, and GST activities were unchanged by soybean oil or olive oil diet but decreased receiving TPN. In rats, TPN decreased the liver oxidative metabolism and enzymatic antioxidant defenses. This may be related to saturation of the liver microsomal fatty acids.

  16. Multimodal analgesia without routine parenteral narcotics for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditya Vikram; Boutary, Myriam; Yun, Andrew G; Sirianni, Leigh Ellen; Dorr, Lawrence D

    2006-12-01

    Methods for managing pain after a total hip replacement have changed substantially in the past 5 years. We documented the outcome of patients treated with a multimodal pain program designed to avoid parenteral narcotics. Avoidance of parenteral narcotics can essentially eliminate the complications of respiratory depression, ileus, and narcotic-induced hypotension. It can minimize nausea and vomiting which cause dissatisfaction with an operation. Twenty-one of 140 patients (15%) needed parenteral narcotics postoperatively with only nine patients (6.4%) using parenteral narcotics after the day of surgery. Mean pain scores were below 3 of 10 on all postoperative days. There were no patients with respiratory depression or ileus, and four (2.9%) with urinary retention. Nausea occurred with 35 patients (25%) in the recovery room and in 28 patients (20%) thereafter. Emesis occurred in five patients (3.6%) with two incidences in the recovery room. One hundred and thirty-eight patients (98.6%) were discharged home at a mean of 2.7 seven days postoperatively with 98 (70%) on a single assistive device. The multimodal pain management program, which avoided parenteral narcotics, was effective in providing pain relief, nearly eliminating emesis, and eliminating the severe complications of respiratory depression, urinary tract infection and ileus, as well as accelerating function.

  17. Cimetidine and parenteral nutrition in the ICU patient.

    PubMed

    Baptista, R J

    1986-01-01

    Cimetidine is often prescribed for hospitalized patients requiring intravenous nutritional support (ie, total parenteral nutrition). When administered parenterally, the drug may prevent excessive fluid and electrolyte loss in patients with short-bowel syndrome, particularly after resection. It may also help prevent anastomotic ulcers in patients following partial gastrectomy. In patients with hypersecretory disease or high-volume ostomy drainage, cimetidine is clinically useful in moderating secretions, thus reducing fluid and electrolyte loss. Cimetidine can prevent, and perhaps treat, metabolic alkalosis associated with significant losses of nasogastric aspirate. Intravenous administration of the drug to patients requiring nasogastric suction often eliminates the need for addition of hydrochloric acid to their parenteral nutrition admixtures. Cimetidine has been found to be physically compatible and chemically stable in crystalline amino acid/dextrose solutions and in crystalline amino acid/dextrose/lipid admixtures. As cimetidine is widely used in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition, it has become acceptable practice to deliver the drug via parenteral nutrition admixtures. Admixing the drug may be of particular advantage for patients with limited vascular access or for those who are fluid restricted. Cimetidine when given by continuous infusion may be more effective and require less drug per day than if administered via intermittent injection. Moreover, administration of cimetidine by continuous infusion to hyperalimentation patients has been documented to save the institution more than $22,000 a year in materials and labor costs.

  18. Parenteral patent drug S/GSK1265744 has the potential to be an effective agent in pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Taha, Huda; Morgan, James; Das, Archik; Das, Satyajit

    2013-12-01

    The continuing HIV epidemic has driven advancements in antiretroviral therapy. New therapeutic targets have been identified over the past years, one of which has been the Integrase enzyme. This is responsible for integrating HIV pro-DNA into the host cell genome and has proved a successful drug target. Efforts have also been made to improve the pharmacokinetic parameters of current drug therapy and utilise these techniques in maximising drug therapeutic effect whilst minimising adverse events. An exciting example of new technologies is that of nanotechnology where drugs can be specifically targeted to certain tissues and drug delivery can be improved by utilising biological molecules and structures. Pre-exposure prophylaxis is also an area of much interest currently both on an individual and population level. Compliance is however a major issue with daily medication to prevent HIV acquisition as has been demonstrated with contraceptive agents. However if long acting compounds can be developed, compliance can be improved. The patent drug currently being developed through nanotechnology as an analogue of Dolutegravir, GSK1265744 LAP (Long Acting Parenteral) has shown promise as a Long Acting Integrase Inhibitor with potential action both as a therapeutic agent but also in pre-exposure prophylaxis. The favourable pharmacokinetic profile and therapeutic efficacy in comparison to other compounds of the same class demonstrate it to be a promising advance. However given current limitations in study material, further randomised studies with long term follow up are required to fully evaluate the value of the patent drug GSK1265744 LAP in action in both seropositive and seronegative individuals.

  19. Ertapenem: a new opportunity for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alan D

    2004-06-01

    Ertapenem is a parenteral carbapenem antimicrobial with pharmacological properties that allow it to be given once daily. This makes it a consideration for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT). In comparison with information from the OPAT Outcomes Registry, ertapenem seems well suited for the types of infections and bacteria that are commonly treated with OPAT, plus it has additional activity against anaerobic bacteria. This added spectrum makes it possible to treat complicated skin/skin-structure, complicated intra-abdominal and pelvic infections with a single antibiotic instead of the multiple agents that have usually been required. Ertapenem is also comparable to other OPAT antimicrobials in terms of adverse effects and clinical outcomes. This antimicrobial can be given with any delivery model, although its stability when mixed is such that daily preparation or self-mixing systems need to be considered. Ertapenem should be added to the growing list of once-daily parenteral antibiotics that can be given to outpatients.

  20. Immune modulation by parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A; Calder, Philip C

    2007-05-01

    Total parenteral nutrition is the final option for nutritional support of patients with severe intestinal failure. Lipid emulsions constitute the main source of fuel calories and fatty acids (FAs) in parenteral nutrition formulations. However, adverse effects on patient outcomes have been attributed to the use of lipids, mostly in relation to impaired immune defenses and altered inflammatory responses. Over the years, this issue has remained in the limelight, also because technical advances have provided no safeguard against the most daunting problems, ie, infectious complications. Nevertheless, numerous investigations have failed to produce a clear picture of the immunologic characteristics of the most commonly used soybean oil-derived lipid emulsions, although their high content of n-6 polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) has been considered a drawback because of their proinflammatory potential. This concern initiated the development of emulsions in which part of the n-6 FA component is replaced by less bioactive FAs, such as coconut oil (rich in medium-chain saturated FAs) or olive oil (rich in the n-9 monounsaturated FA oleic acid). Another approach has been to use fish oil (rich in n-3 PUFA), the FAs of which have biological activities different from those of n-6 PUFAs. Recent studies on the modulation of host defenses and inflammation by fish-oil emulsions have yielded consistent data, which indicate that these emulsions may provide a tool to beneficially alter the course of immune-mediated conditions. Although most of these lipids have not yet become available on the US market, this review synthesizes available information on immunologic characteristics of the different lipids that currently can be applied via parenteral nutrition support.

  1. Compartment syndrome due to extravasation of peripheral parenteral nutrition: extravasation injury of parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Park, Huee Jin; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Hyuk Jin; Jeong, Eui Cheol; Kim, Kee Won

    2015-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a rare but devastating condition that can result in permanent neuromuscular or soft tissue injuries. Extravasation injuries, among the iatrogenic causes of compartment syndrome, occur under a wide variety of circumstances in the inpatient setting. Total parenteral nutrition via a peripheral route is an effective alternative for the management of critically ill children who do not obtain adequate nutrition via the oral route. However, there is an inherent risk of extravasation, which can cause compartment syndrome, especially when detected at a later stage. Herein, we report a rare case of compartment syndrome and skin necrosis due to extravasation, requiring emergency fasciotomy and skin graft in a 7-month-old boy who was treated with peripheral parenteral nutrition via a pressurized infusion pump. Although we cannot estimate the exact time at which extravasation occurred, the extent and degree of the wound suggest that the ischemic insult was prolonged, lasting for several hours. Pediatric clinicians and medical teams should carefully examine the site of insertion of the intravenous catheter, especially in patients receiving parenteral nutrition via a peripheral intravenous catheter with a pressurized infusion pump. PMID:26692883

  2. [Use of ready-to-use (RTU) products in home-based parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Planas, M; Puiggrós, C; Sánchez, J R; Cots, I; Tutusaus, M; Rodríguez, T; Pérez-Portabella, C; Gómez, R

    2006-01-01

    To analyze the real possibility to use ready-to-use multichamber bags for total parenteral nutrition in adult patients on home parenteral nutrition. In June 2005 we studied the adult patients on home parenteral nutrition treatment controlled by the Nutritional Support Unit from an University Hospital. Demographic data, data relating to underlying disease state; infusion regimen and the necessity to modify it; body mass index, fat free mass index, and Karnofsky index evolution, and complications related to parenteral nutrition were assessed. At the time of the study, 8 patients aged 48,9 +/- 17,7 years, were on home parenteral nutrition. The artificial nutrition treatment was administered due to short-bowel syndrome (2); motility disorders (2); suboclusion (2); rapid intestinal transit (1), and malabsorption syndrome (1). With the exception of the patient who started more recently the treatment, all the others needed changes in the parenteral nutrition treatment (number of days for week, or formula modification). In general, both the body mass index and the fat free mass index increased during the treatment. The Karnofsky index was maintained or increased. In relation to catheter-related infection, 4 episodes were observed (0.85/1.000 d of HPN). Due to the effectiveness, safety and the diversity of multichamber bags available for parenteral nutrition, and the few complications observed in the patients studied, although more studied are necessary, our results suggest that we can use this commercial bags for adult patients on home parenteral nutrition.

  3. [The effect of parenteral citicoline on visual functions and life quality of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Frolov, M A; Gonchar, P A; Barashkov, V I; Kumar, V; Morozova, N S; Frolov, A M; Kazakova, K A

    2011-01-01

    The effect of nootropic drug citicoline on visual functions, perimetric indexes of static automated perimetry, morphometric characteristics of retinal tomography and life quality of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) stage I-III and normalized intraocular pressure (IOP) was studied. 40 patients aged 46-78 years old with POAG stage I-III and normalized IOP were treated with citicoline. Among them there were 24 female and 16 male. The patients were divided into 2 equal groups--experimental and control. Patients of both groups were treated with intravenous citicoline for 10 days. The dose of citicoline in experimental group was 1000 mg/day, in control--500 mg/day. After treatment in both groups visual functions, perimetric indexes of static automated perimetry, morphometric characteristics of retinal tomography and life quality showed improvement. Citicoline has significant neuroprotective effect preventing apoptosis.

  4. Effects of parenteral infusion with medium-chain triglycerides and safflower oil emulsions on hepatic lipids, plasma amino acids and inflammatory mediators in septic rats.

    PubMed

    Yeh, S; Chao, C; Lin, M; Chen, W

    2000-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of preinfusion with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) using medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) versus safflower oil (SO) emulsion as fat sources on hepatic lipids, plasma amino acid profiles, and inflammatory-related mediators in septic rats. Normal rats, with internal jugular catheters, were divided into two groups and received TPN. TPN provided 300kcal/kg/day with 40% of the non-protein energy provided as fat. All TPN solutions were isonitrogenous and identical in nutrient composition except for the fat emulsion, which was made of SO or a mixture of MCT and soybean oil (9:1) (MO). After receiving TPN for 6 days, each group of rats was further divided into control and sepsis subgroups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture, whereas control rats received sham operation. All rats were classified into four groups as follows: MCT control group (MOC, n= 8), MCT sepsis group (MOS, n= 8), safflower oil control group (SOC, n= 8), and safflower oil sepsis group (SOS, n= 11). The results of the study demonstrated that the MOS group had lower hepatic lipids than did the SOS group. Plasma leucine and isoleucine levels were significantly lower in the SOS than in the SOC group, but no differences in these two amino acids were observed between the MOC and MOS groups. Plasma arginine levels were significantly lower in septic groups than in those without sepsis despite whether MCT or safflower oil was infused. Plasma glutamine and alanine levels, however, did not differ between septic and non-septic groups either in the SO or MO groups. No differences in interleukin-1b, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and leukotriene B(4)concentrations in peritoneal lavage fluid were observed between the two septic groups. These results suggest that catabolic reaction is septic rats preinfused MCT is not as obvious as those preinfused safflower oil. Compared with safflower oil, TPN with MCT administration has better effects on

  5. Cholestasis induced by total parenteral nutrition: effects of the addition of Taurine (Tauramin®) on hepatic function parameters; possible synergistic action of structured lipids (SMOFlipid®).

    PubMed

    González-Contreras, J; Villalobos Gámez, J L; Gómez-Sánchez, A I; García-Almeida, J M; Enguix Armanda, A; Rius Díaz, F; Lucena González, M I

    2012-01-01

    Assess the hepatoprotective effect of Taurine (Tau) in cases of hepatic cholestasis induced by Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN). We describe a retrospective series of 54 patients who received TPN, in which cholestasis was detected at an (Intermediate) point that separates the duration of TPN into 2 Phases. From this moment -Phase 2- on, and according to clinical criteria, some patients (Group A, n = 27) received amino acids with Tau (22.41 ± 3.57 mg/kg/day)(Tauramin®), while the rest (Group B, n = 27) received the standard solution without Tau. The mean TPN durations were 39.2 ± 17.1 and 36.4 ± 18.1 days respectively, with the Intermediate points on days 19.56 ± 10.51 and 17.89 ± 11.14. They all received diets that were homogeneous in terms of kcal and macronutrients. In Phase 2, 21 patients from Group A received structured lipids (SMOFlipid®); while 20 from Group B received soy MCT/LCT [ Medium Chain Triglycerides/Long Chain Triglycerides ] (physical or structured mixture). In a retrospective study, differences could not be avoided. The analytical parameters from three periods (Initial, Intermediate, and Final) were obtained from Nutridata® and Servolab®. We compared interperiod values using the Wilcoxon test SPSS® (p < 0.05). After introducing Taurine AST, ALT, and GGT were significantly reduced; Bilirubin was also reduced, but not significantly. The values obtained for GGT in Group A were (Mean(σ)/median): Initial 48.6 (23.1)/46; Intermediate 473.7 (276.2)/438, and Final 328.9 (190.4)/305. We stress that the mean GGT value is reduced by 30.56% after adding Taurine, while in its absence all parameters are elevated, and mean GGT increases 45.36%. These results show Taurine's hepatoprotective effect and support its use in cases of TPN-induced cholestasis. We acknowledge the possibility that the differences between SMOF and the MCT/LCT mixtures also may have influenced the results in a combined effect with taurine.

  6. [Effects of parenterally administered dicarboxylic amino acids and their amides on the secretory function of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Ignatenko, L G; Vasilevskaia, L S; Poriadkov, L F

    1987-01-01

    The effect of dicarboxylic amino acids and their amides on gastric secretion stimulated by sham-feeding (100 g of raw meat), as well as of amides of dicarboxylic amino acids on the gastric secretory function was studied in 119 tests on 8 dogs with gastric fistulas according to Basov. The tests were started 16-18 h after feeding under neutral or alkaline reactions of gastric excretion. The tests demonstrated that dicarboxylic amino acids inhibited gastric secretion induced by sham-feeding. It was shown that dicarboxylic amino acid amines, in contrast to these amino acids, did not inhibit gastric secretion induced by sham-feeding. On the contrary, asparagine and glutamine administered into the blood are capable of inducing gastric secretion, per se.

  7. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Halilovic, Jenana; Christensen, Cinda L; Nguyen, Hien H

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and high quality care. One of the keys to developing and sustaining a high quality OPAT program is to understand the common challenges or barriers to OPAT delivery. We review the most common challenges to starting and managing an OPAT program and give practical advice on addressing these issues. PMID:24971015

  8. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Snyder, S; Bergen, C; Sigler, M H; Teehan, B P

    1991-01-01

    The effects of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) were studied in chronic hemodialysis (CHD) patients who had a normalized protein catabolic rate (PCRN) of less than or equal to 0.8 g/kg/day, and KT/V = 0.94 +/- 0.04. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition was administered during thrice weekly CHD for 3-6 months, and consisted of essential and nonessential amino acids (42.5 g), glucose (125 g), and lipid emulsion (50 g). Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, total protein, albumin, transferrin, pre-albumin, total lymphocyte count, anthropometrics, protein catabolic rate, 3 day historic dietary protein intake, and dietary energy intake (DEI) were measured at baseline, before IDPN, during IDPN, and at completion of IDPN. Six of nine enrolled patients completed the study. Reasons for withdrawal included nausea and hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. DPI normalized for body weight (DPIN) increased significantly from 0.75 +/- 0.1 to 1.02 +/- 0.18 (p = 0.02). Increases in PCRN (0.57 +/- 0.18 to 0.78 +/- 0.2) and DEI (1495 +/- 266 to 1681 +/- 358) did not reach statistical significance. More aggressive IDPN or a longer study period may be necessary to assess this form of nutritional intervention.

  9. Zinc deficiency in a parenteral nutrition-dependent patient during a parenteral trace element product shortage.

    PubMed

    Franck, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Parenteral nutrition product shortages are common and place vulnerable patients at risk for nutrient deficiencies. This case report describes a parenteral nutrition-dependent patient who was found to have zinc deficiency during a parenteral nutrition product shortage. The management of the patient's zinc deficiency is described.

  10. Effects of parenteral fish oil on plasma nonesterified fatty acids and systemic inflammatory mediators in dogs following ovariohysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Kaoru; Backus, Robert C; DeClue, Amy E; Fritsche, Kevin L; Mann, Fred A

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of intravenous (IV) infusion of fish oil (FO) emulsion following ovariohysterectomy (OVH) on inflammatory mediators and plasma omega-3 nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations in dogs. Prospective clinical study. University teaching hospital. Twenty-nine privately owned dogs undergoing routine OVH. Postoperative 3-hour IV infusion of saline (n = 9), FO (Omegaven, n = 10), or soybean oil (SO, intralipid, n = 10) emulsion and blood collected before, 5 and 24 hours following OVH for plasma NEFA and RBC membrane fatty acids (FAs) concentrations, leukocyte cytokine production capacity, and C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement. Plasma omega-3 NEFA, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and total long-chain omega-3 FA significantly increased shortly after FO infusion (8.8 ± 3.3 μM, 13.6 ± 5.6 μM, and 25.1 ± 9.6 μM, respectively) compared to SO (0.7 ± 0.9, 2.3 ± 1.8, and 4.2 ± 3.0 μM, respectively) and saline infusion (1.6 ± 2.5, 2.6 ± 3.1, and 5.9 ± 6.4 μM, respectively). Plasma CRP concentration significantly increased after OVH, but with no significant group differences. A weak negative correlation occurred between post-OVH CRP and postinfusion total long-chain omega-3 FA concentrations (r(2) = 0.21, P = 0.014). Stimulated leukocyte interleukin (IL) 6 production capacity increased (P = 0.001) after OVH in all groups; SO infusion resulted in reduced leukocyte IL-6 production capacity (1048.1 ± 277.7 pg/mL) compared to FO (1299.9 ± 302.1 pg/mL, P = 0.048) and saline infusions (1499.0 ± 363.1 pg/mL, P = 0.01). No significant group difference was observed in leukocyte IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor α production capacities. Postoperative administration of FO emulsion increases plasma omega-3 NEFA concentrations promptly, but does not significantly attenuate CRP production or leukocyte cytokine production capacity. FO infusion at the dosage used in the present study can be safely used in dogs

  11. Parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Bizari, Letícia; da Silva Santos, Andressa Feijó; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi; Marchini, Júlio Sérgio; Suen, Vivian Marques Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a severe malabsorption disorder, and prolonged parenteral nutrition is essential for survival in some cases. Among the undesirable effects of long-term parenteral nutrition is an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to measure the serum levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and transforming growth factor beta, in patients with short bowel syndrome on cyclic parenteral nutrition and patients who had previously received but no longer require parenteral nutrition. The study was cross-sectional and observational. Three groups were studied as follows: Parenteral nutrition group, 9 patients with short bowel syndrome that receive cyclic parenteral nutrition; Oral nutrition group, 10 patients with the same syndrome who had been weaned off parenteral nutrition for at least 1 year prior to the study; Control group, 13 healthy adults, matched for age and sex to parenteral and oral groups. The following data were collected: age, tobacco use, drug therapies, dietary intake, body weight, height, blood collection. All interleukins were significantly higher in the parenteral group compared with the control group as follows: interleukin-6: 22 ± 19 vs 1.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL, P= .0002; transforming growth factor β: 854 ± 204 vs 607 ± 280 pg/mL, P= .04; interleukin-10: 8 ± 37 vs 0.6 ± 4, P= .03; tumor necrosis factor α: 20 ± 8 vs 8 ± 4 pg/mL, P< .0001. We concluded that parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines.

  12. Safety surrounding parenteral nutrition systems.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Gordon S

    2012-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is one of the most complex medications administered to hospitalized and ambulatory patients. Despite the successful clinical use of PN for over 3 decades, adverse events continue to occur, resulting in serious morbidity or even mortality. There are multiple points within the PN process for errors to occur: prescribing, transcription, preparation, and administration. Because of the lack of published literature about PN errors, a formal study was conducted to document the nature and severity of harm resulting from medication errors during the PN process.

  13. Perspectives on parenteral micronutrient shortages.

    PubMed

    Mirtallo, Jay M

    2015-02-01

    Micronutrients are essential components of parenteral nutrition (PN). Problems related to deficiency and toxicity occur during routine practice, which could be related to the content of commercial sources, inadequate prescribed doses, and the high frequency of at-risk patients receiving PN. Shortages of commercial products result in increased risk of deficiency. Even though there are recommendations to conserve supplies for those at highest risk, practices that provide no micronutrients or doses less than desired are not safe. This article reviews the evidence describing patients at risk for micronutrient deficiency, the rationale for micronutrient product reformulation, and characteristics of deficiency observed during shortages of micronutrient products.

  14. Glutamine effects on heat shock protein 70 and interleukines 6 and 10: Randomized trial of glutamine supplementation versus standard parenteral nutrition in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Iolanda; Balaguer, Mònica; Esteban, M Esther; Cambra, Francisco José; Felipe, Aida; Hernández, Lluïsa; Alsina, Laia; Molero, Marta; Villaronga, Miquel; Esteban, Elisabeth

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether glutamine (Gln) supplementation would have a role modifying both the oxidative stress and the inflammatory response of critically ill children. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, interventional clinical trial. Selection criteria were children requiring parenteral nutrition for at least 5 days diagnosed with severe sepsis or post major surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to standard parenteral nutrition (SPN, 49 subjects) or standard parenteral nutrition with glutamine supplementation (SPN + Gln, 49 subjects). Glutamine levels failed to show statistical differences between groups. At day 5, patients in the SPN + Gln group had significantly higher levels of HSP-70 (heat shock protein 70) as compared with the SPN group (68.6 vs 5.4, p = 0.014). In both groups, IL-6 (interleukine 6) levels showed a remarkable descent from baseline and day 2 (SPN: 42.24 vs 9.39, p < 0.001; SPN + Gln: 35.20 vs 13.80, p < 0.001) but only the treatment group showed a statistically significant decrease between day 2 and day 5 (13.80 vs 10.55, p = 0.013). Levels of IL-10 (interleukine 10) did not vary among visits except in the SPN between baseline and day 2 (9.55 vs 5.356, p < 0.001). At the end of the study, no significant differences between groups for PICU and hospital stay were observed. No adverse events were detected in any group. Glutamine supplementation in critically-ill children contributed to maintain high HSP-70 levels for longer. Glutamine supplementation had no influence on IL-10 and failed to show a significant reduction of IL-6 levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. Parenteral nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Matuchansky, C

    1986-01-01

    Nutritional support, administered via the enteral or parenteral routes, has been widely introduced in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease over the past decade. The precise place of total parenteral nutrition, however, as a sole or adjunct treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, has yet to be defined. PMID:3098647

  16. Innovative Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Therapy for Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hau D.; Fallon, Erica M.; de Meijer, Vincent E.; Malkan, Alpin D.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Children with intestinal failure suffer from insufficient intestinal length or function, making them dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) for growth and survival. PN and its components are associated with many complications ranging from simple electrolyte abnormalities to life-threatening PN-associated liver disease, which is also called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (ILALD). From a nutrition perspective, the ultimate goal is to provide adequate caloric requirements and make the transition from PN to full enteral Nutrition (EN) successful. Upon review of the literature, we have summarized the most effective and innovative PN and EN therapies for this patient population. Antibiotic-coated catheters and antibiotic or ethanol locks can be implemented, as they appear effective in reducing catheter-related infection and thus further reduce the risk of IFALD. Lipid emulsions should be given judiciously. The use of an omega-3 fatty acid-based formulation should be considered in patients who develop IFALD. Trophic feeding is important for intestinal adaptation, and EN should be initiated early to help wean patients from PN. Long term management of children with IF continues to be an emerging field. We have entered uncharted territory as more children survive complications of IF, including IFALD. Careful monitoring and individualized management to ensure maintenance of growth with avoidance of complications are the keys to successful patient outcomes. PMID:20123271

  17. Intravenous lipids in home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pironi, Loris; Agostini, Federica; Guidetti, Mariacristina

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsions (IVLEs) are an important component of the nutritional admixtures for patients on long-term home parenteral nutrition (HPN) for chronic intestinal failure (CIF). IVLEs are primarily used as a source of energy and essential fatty acids, and the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is the most important characteristic of IVLEs. IVLEs rich in n-6 PUFAs may have a pro-inflammatory effect, whereas those rich in n-3 PUFAs may exert an anti-inflammatory effect. Other components to be considered are the risk of lipid peroxidation and the contents of α-tocopherol and phytosterols. Published studies were reviewed to determine the effects of the commercially available IVLEs on essential fatty acid status, liver function tests, lipid peroxidation and inflammatory indices, and α-tocopherol status, as well as their clinical safety and efficacy in patients on HPN. Investigations on the efficacy of fish oil-based IVLEs, which are rich in n-3 PUFAs, in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) in adult patients on HPN for CIF were also analyzed. The current commercial IVLE formulations have similar clinical safety profiles and efficacies and can prevent the development of essential fatty acid deficiency in adults on HPN for CIF. IVLE with a low content of n-6 PUFAs and with or without increased n-3 PUFA content may reduce the risk of PNALD. Fish oil-based IVLE, which is rich in n-3 PUFAs, may be effective in reversing hepatic cholestasis due to PNALD.

  18. Parenteral lipids: safety aspects and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions (LEs) used in modern parenteral nutrition formulations are indispensable sources of calories and (essential) fatty acids ((E)FAs). Several generations of LEs based on various FA sources have been developed, and issues related to their safe use deserve attention. The relevant issues concern LE composition, stability and sterility, while other problems are related to the lipid infusion rate, including hypertriglyceridemia and lipid overload syndrome. The FA structure of LEs translates into effects on inflammatory processes and immune cell function and affects the functions of organs, such as the liver and lungs. In addition, disturbed balances of (anti)oxidants and the presence of other bioactive agents in LEs, such as phytosterols, are mechanisms that may underlie the potential adverse effects. Lipid emulsions (LEs) are key components of parenteral nutrition (PN) that bypass the need for (essential) fatty acids ((E)FAs) and provide sufficient energy to decrease the need for the infusion of large amounts of dextrose, thus preventing its associated complications. The oldest available LEs are based on soybean oil (SO-LE) and meet these requirements. (Pre)clinical evidence suggests that various, next-generation LEs based on alternative oil sources are safe and effective; particularly, those based on fish oil (FO-LEs) have less pro-inflammatory characteristics that may convey beneficial effects on the immune system and organ functions. With the exception of decreased liver damage with the use of FO-LEs instead of SO-LEs, the clinical relevance of many of these data needs further validation.

  19. Pediatric Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Israelite, Jill C

    Pediatric parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is typically defined as a decrease in bile flow that is independent of a mechanical obstruction and of any other underlying liver disease. It is most often seen in pediatric patients receiving parenteral nutrition support. Up to 50% to 66% of children receiving long-term parenteral nutrition are reported to be diagnosed with PNALD. The goal of treatment for PNALD is advancement to full enteral nutrition and elimination of dependence on parenteral nutrition support. Achieving this goal is not always possible, especially in patients with short bowel syndrome. The following review article highlights some of the current treatment strategies focused on prevention or correction of PNALD as noted in current American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines.

  20. Effect of amino acid composition of parenteral solutions on nitrogen retention and metabolic response in very-low-birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Chessex, P; Zebiche, H; Pineault, M; Lepage, D; Dallaire, L

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of amino acid preparations on the metabolic response of parenterally fed immature newborn infants, nitrogen retention and plasma amino acid concentrations were compared in very-low-birth-weight infants given two parenteral regimens differing only by the composition of the infused amino acids (Travasol 10% blend B and Vamin 7%). The intakes of fluid, nitrogen, and calories were comparable. The nitrogen retention was 72% +/- 7% with Vamin and 65% +/- 6% with Travasol. The differences in plasma amino acid concentrations were consistent with the composition of the amino acid solutions. During the infusion of Vamin the increased intake of aromatic amino acids resulted in high plasma levels of tyrosine (256 +/- 233 mumol/L, range 67 to 894 mumol/L). The infusion of Travasol resulted in high plasma levels of methionine (114 +/- 39 mumol/L, range 53 to 260 mumol/L) and an elevated load of glycine, which was accompanied by an abnormally high urinary loss of this amino acid. Despite these metabolic imbalances, the growth rate over the whole study was adequate. These results emphasize the importance of the composition of amino acid solutions on the metabolic response of the very immature preterm infant.

  1. Total parenteral nutrition for the very low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pinkal; Bhatia, Jatinder

    2017-02-01

    Preterm infants, especially very low birth weight (VLBW; <1500 g) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW; <1000 g) infants, are susceptible to growth failure in postnatal life if nutritional demands are not met. Poor postnatal growth in preterm infants is associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes during childhood. Early parental nutrition is of paramount importance to provide appropriate protein and energy in VLBW infants when enteral nutrition is not feasible or is suboptimal. An "early and aggressive" approach of parenteral nutrition in preterm infants has been shown to prevent protein catabolism, induce positive nitrogen balance and improve postnatal growth.

  2. Oral versus parenteral antimicrobials for the treatment of cellulitis: a randomized non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Aboltins, Craig A; Hutchinson, Anastasia F; Sinnappu, Rabindra N; Cresp, Damian; Risteski, Chrissie; Kathirgamanathan, Rajasutharsan; Tacey, Mark A; Chiu, Herman; Lim, Kwang

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether outcomes for patients with cellulitis treated with oral antimicrobials are as good as for those who are treated with parenteral antimicrobials. A prospective randomized non-inferiority trial was conducted at a tertiary teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Participants were patients referred by the emergency department for treatment of uncomplicated cellulitis with parenteral antimicrobials. Patients were randomized to receive either oral cefalexin or parenteral cefazolin. Parenteral antimicrobials were changed to oral after the area of cellulitis ceased progressing. The primary outcome was days until no advancement of the area of cellulitis. A non-inferiority margin of 15% was set for the oral arm compared with the parenteral arm. Secondary outcomes were failure of treatment, pain, complications and satisfaction with care. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12611000685910). Twenty-four patients were randomized to oral antimicrobials and 23 to parenteral antimicrobials. Mean days to no advancement of cellulitis was 1.29 (SD 0.62) for the oral arm and 1.78 (SD 1.13) for the parenteral arm, with a mean difference of -0.49 (95% CI: -1.02 to +0.04). The upper limit of the 95% CI of the difference in means of +0.04 was below the 15% non-inferiority margin of +0.27 days, indicating non-inferiority. More patients failed treatment in the parenteral arm (5 of 23, 22%) compared with the oral arm (1 of 24, 4%), although this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.10). Pain, complications and satisfaction with care were similar for both groups. Oral antimicrobials are as effective as parenteral antimicrobials for the treatment of uncomplicated cellulitis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Refeeding syndrome: screening, incidence, and treatment during parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Russell S

    2013-12-01

    The possible deleterious effects of feeding after a period of prolonged starvation have been known for over 60 years. The resultant biochemical disturbance, symptoms, and signs have been termed the refeeding syndrome (RS). The key to the pathophysiology is the stimulation of insulin release resulting in anabolic activity. Depleted electrolyte and micronutrient stores are overwhelmed and cellular function disrupted. A concise definition of RS is not agreed and hampers interpretation of clinical data. Hypophosphatemia and appearance of tissue edema/pathological fluid shifts are the most often agreed diagnostic criteria. The characteristics of particular patient groups at risk have been recognized for some time, and there are guidelines from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence in the UK to aid recognition of individuals at high risk along with protocols for initiating nutrition. Using loose diagnostic criteria, RS appears to occur in 4% of cases of parenteral nutrition (PN) when case records were reviewed by experts in a large study into PN care in the UK. Disappointingly, prescribers recognized only 50% of at risk cases. Early data from a similar study in New Zealand appear to show a similar pattern. Prospective series looking at patients receiving nutrition support in institutions with Nutrition Support Teams have found an incidence of 1-5%. RS is still underrecognized. Patients receiving PN should be counted as being in a high-risk category and feeding protocols to avoid RS applied. Low rates of RS then occur and death from this cause be avoided.

  4. Preliminary study on the effect of parenteral naloxone, alone and in association with calcium gluconate, on bone healing in an ovine "drill hole" model system

    PubMed Central

    Petrizzi, Lucio; Mariscoli, Massimo; Valbonetti, Luca; Varasano, Vincenzo; Langhoff, Jens D; Von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    Background Several diseases affect bone healing and physiology. Many drugs that are commonly used in orthopaedics as "analgesics" or anti-inflammatory agents impair bone healing. Stressful conditions are associated with decreased serum osteocalcin concentration. High endorphin levels alter calcium metabolism, blocking the membrane channels by which calcium normally enters cells. The consequent decrease of intracellular calcium impairs the activities of calcium-related enzymes. Naloxone is a pure opioid antagonist. Morphine-induced osteocalcin inhibition was abolished when osteoblasts were incubated with naloxone. Naloxone restored the altered cellular and tissue physiology by removing β-endorphins from specific receptors. However, this is only possible if the circulating Ca concentration is adequate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of parenteral naloxone administration in inducing fast mineralization and callus remodelling in a group of sheep with a standardised bone lesion. Methods Twenty ewes were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups. Group A acted as control, group B received a solution of calcium gluconate, group C a solution of naloxone, and group D a solution of calcium gluconate and naloxone. A transverse hole was drilled in the left metacarpus, including both cortices, then parenteral treatment was administered intramuscularly, daily for four weeks. Healing was evaluated by weekly radiographic examination for eight weeks. For quantitative evaluation, the ratio of the radiographic bone density between the drill area and the adjacent cortical bone was calculated. After eight weeks the sheep were slaughtered and a sample of bone was collected for histopathology Results Group D showed a higher radiographic ratio than the other groups. Sheep not treated with naloxone showed a persistently lower ratio in the lateral than the medial cortex (P < 0.01). Histopathology of bone samples showed more caverns and fewer osteoblasts in group D

  5. Total management of short gut secondary to midgut volvulus without prolonged total parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J; MacLean, W C; Kolbach, S; Shermeta, D W

    1978-12-01

    Absorption studies in rats have shown that intestinal adaptation after catastrophic injury can be stimulated by early enteral feeding. Using this concept, we have devised a technique of early initiation and advancement of oral feedings that begins with Cho-Free and Polycose and gradually adds sucrose and MCT in increasing proportions. The increasing complexity and caloric density of this diet provide sufficient nutrition to allow weaning from total parenteral alimentation within 2--3 wk. Our preliminary experience in babies with midgut volvulus, necrotizing enterocolitis, and gastroschisis has been successful and uncomplicated. These patients have demonstrated consistent weight gain and have been spared the complications associated with prolonged parenteral alimentation.

  6. Toxicity of parenteral iron dextran therapy.

    PubMed

    Burns, D L; Pomposelli, J J

    1999-03-01

    Parenteral iron dextran is efficacious and safe for iron repletion in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. The risk for developing reactions to parenteral iron infusion can be attenuated if patients are carefully selected. Patients with underlying autoimmune disease, malnutrition with indolent infection, and risk for iron overload syndromes should be carefully monitored for complications. Further, the rate of infusion and the route of administration of iron dextran play roles in the risk of adverse reactions. The purpose of this review is to identify and elucidate the mechanisms of the acute and chronic toxicities associated with parenteral iron dextran use.

  7. Parenteral nutrition in hospital pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Katoue, Maram Gamal; Al-Taweel, Dalal; Matar, Kamal Mohamed; Kombian, Samuel B

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore parenteral nutrition (PN) practices in hospital pharmacies of Kuwait and identify potential avenues for quality improvement in this service. Design/methodology/approach - A descriptive, qualitative study about PN practices was conducted from June 2012 to February 2013 in Kuwait. Data were collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews with the head total parenteral nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at seven hospitals using a developed questionnaire. The questionnaire obtained information about the PN service at each hospital including the existence of nutritional support teams (NSTs), PN preparation practices, quality controls and guidelines/protocols. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for content. Findings - Seven hospitals in Kuwait provided PN preparation service through TPN units within hospital pharmacies. Functional NSTs did not exist in any of these hospitals. All TPN units used paper-based standard PN order forms for requesting PN. The content of PN order forms and PN formulas labeling information were inconsistent across hospitals. Most of the prepared PN formulas were tailor-made and packed in single compartment bags. Quality controls used included gravimetric analysis and visual inspection of PN formulations, and less consistently reported periodic evaluation of the aseptic techniques. Six TPN units independently developed PN guidelines/protocols. Originality/value - This study revealed variations in many aspects of PN practices among the hospitals in Kuwait and provided recommendations to improve this service. Standardization of PN practices would enhance the quality of care provided to patients receiving PN and facilitate national monitoring. This can be accomplished through the involvement of healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition support working within proactive NSTs.

  8. Behavioural motor effects of MK-801 and DNQX parenteral administration in adult cats: dose-response analysis. Modulatory role of dopaminergic D1 and D2 antagonists on MK-801 induced motor behaviours.

    PubMed

    Motles, E; Infante, C; Gonzalez, M

    2000-04-01

    1. Administration of MK-801 a selective antagonist of the NMDA receptors (50, 100 and 150 micrograms/kg, s.c.) elicited in adult cats ataxia and loss of equilibrium. A dose-response effect was observed. 2. Administration of DNQX, a selective antagonist of the non-NMDA receptors, even with doses 20 times higher than those employed with MK-801, did not produce any behavioural disturbances. 3. Previous injection of SCH 23390, a selective parenteral antagonist of dopamine D1 receptor, reduced significantly the intense ataxic effects of MK-801, while sulpiride only increased the latency of the symptoms. 4. The results are discussed considering the reported interactions between the dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems.

  9. WHO sponsored collaborative studies on nutritional anaemia in India. The effect of parenteral iron administration in the control of anaemia of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sood, S K; Ramachandran, K; Rani, K; Ramalingaswami, V; Mathan, V I; Ponniah, J; Baker, S J

    1979-11-01

    1. The relative efficacy of oral and parenteral iron administration in the prophylaxis and treatment of Fe-deficiency anaemia of pregnancy has been studied. 2. Intravenous administration of Fe by total dose infusion of Fe dextran was not superior to oral Fe 120 mg/d, 6 d/week for 10-12 weeks. 3. Intramuscular Fe dextran, 100 mg twice per week for 10-12 weeks, produced a significantly greater rise in mean haemoglobin concentration than oral Fe therapy. 4. The superiority of intramuscular Fe as compared with intravenous Fe is probably related to the different handling of the Fe dextran by the reticulo-endothelial system. 5. In spite of the better response to intramuscular Fe dextran, it is not recommended for public health practice because of the risks associated with its use and the much higher cost of the preparation and its delivery.

  10. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  11. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  12. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  13. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  14. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert of...

  15. Community parenteral therapy project: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Foster, L; McMurray, A

    1998-01-01

    The pilot study reported in this paper was devised to develop and compare service delivery models that would achieve the provision of high quality parenteral therapy care to patients in the Gold Coast District Health Service community. All data were collected on 113 patients for a 12-month period, January to December 1996. The study compared the provision of outreach nursing services and contracted nursing services on measures of satisfaction and cost. The study showed that patient and carers indicated a preference for community care, medical officers advocated the benefits of administering parenteral therapies in the community, general practitioners were interested in managing future community parenteral therapies, and contracted (nurse) service providers endorsed the development of a parenteral therapy resource centre. The findings also revealed considerable potential cost savings in community-based care.

  16. American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preliminary Program Now Available! View Now ASPEN Enteral Nutrition by the Numbers ASPEN’s new report is a ... large, complex Enteral Nutrition Market. Learn More Parenteral Nutrition: Back to the Basics Join us October 10 ...

  17. Cost of a home parenteral nutrition program.

    PubMed

    Wateska, L P; Sattler, L L; Steiger, E

    1980-11-21

    We analyzed the costs to a hospital of providing complete home parenteral nutrition (HPN) services for eight patients. Identified cost components include patient training, equipment, supplies, and follow-up. The average annual cost of maintaining parenteral nutrition at home was 73% lower than it would have been in the hospital. The establishment of private companies to provide patients with HPN supplies and services will reduce the financial burden of HPN programs for hospitals.

  18. Parenteral nutrition in the elderly cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Orrevall, Ylva

    2015-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition may be considered when oral intake and/or enteral nutrition are not sufficient to maintain nutritional status and the patient is likely to die sooner from starvation than from the cancer. A detailed assessment should be made prior to the decision about whether parenteral nutrition should be started. A follow up plan should be documented with objective and patient centred treatment goals as well as specific time points for evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ROLE OF PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN ONCOLOGIC PATIENTS WITH INTESTINAL OCCLUSION AND PERITONEAL CARCINOMATOSIS.

    PubMed

    Aría Guerra, Eva; Cortés-Salgado, Alfonso; Mateo-Lobo, Raquel; Nattero, Lía; Riveiro, Javier; Vega-Piñero, Belén; Valbuena, Beatriz; Carabaña, Fátima; Carrero, Carmen; Grande, Enrique; Carrato, Alfredo; Botella-Carretero, José Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    the precise role of parenteral nutrition in the management of oncologic patients with intestinal occlusion is not well defined yet. We aimed to identify the effects of parenteral nutrition in these patients regarding prognosis. 55 patients with intestinal occlusion and peritoneal carcinomatosis were included. Parenteral nutrition aimed at 20-35 kcal/Kg/day, and 1.0 g/kg/day of amino-acids. Weight, body mass index, type of tumor, type of chemotherapy, and ECOG among others were recorded and analyzed. 69.1% of the patients had gastrointestinal tumors, 18.2% gynecologic and 12.7% others. Age was 60 ± 13y, baseline ECOG 1.5 ± 0.5 and body mass index 21.6 ± 4.3. Malnutrition was present in 85%. Survival from the start of parenteral nutrition was not significant when considering baseline ECOG (log rank = 0.593, p = 0.743), previous lines of chemotherapy (log rank = 2.117, p = 0.548), baseline BMI (log rank = 2.686, p = 0.261), or type of tumor (log rank = 2.066, p = 0.356). Survival in patients who received home parenteral nutrition after hospital discharge was higher than those who stayed in-hospital (log rank = 7.090, p = 0.008). Survival in patients who started chemotherapy during or after parenteral nutrition was higher than those who did not so (log rank = 17.316, p < 0.001). A total of 3.6% of patients presented catheter related infection without affecting survival (log rank = 0.061, p = 0.804). Parenteral nutrition in patients with advanced cancer and intestinal occlusion is safe, and in tho se who respond to chemotherapy, further administration of home parenteral nutrition together with chemotherapy may enhance prolonged survival. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Early and intensive nutritional strategy combining parenteral and enteral feeding promotes neurodevelopment and growth at 18months of corrected age and 3years of age in extremely low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Satoshi; Ichiba, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yuko; Harada, Sayaka; Matsumura, Hisako; Kan, Ayako; Asada, Yuki; Shintaku, Haruo

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate whether aggressive nutrition can improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes and growth in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). This single-center cohort study included 137 ELBW AGA infants born in two epochs. The first group received standard nutrition (SN; n=79) consisting of amino acids started at 0.5g/kg/day on Day 4 of life and increased to 1.0g/kg/day. The second aggressive nutrition (AN) group received amino acids started at 1.5-2.0g/kg/day within 24h of life and increased to 3.5g/kg/day. Parenteral and enteral feedings were combined in both groups. Neurodevelopmental outcomes by the Kyoto Scale of Psychological Development and growth were followed up to 18months of corrected age or 3years of age and compared by univariate and multivariate analyses. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. At 3years of age, AN children had a significantly greater mean value of head circumference, but not length or weight, than SN children (49.1 vs 48.0cm, p=0.014). The cognitive-adaptive (C-A) score in the AN group was also significantly higher than that in the SN group (98.3 vs 91.9 at 18months, p=0.039 and 89.5 vs 83.1 at 3years, p=0.047). AN infants born ≥26weeks of gestation were less likely to develop borderline disability in C-A, language-social and overall developmental scores compared to gestational age-matched SN infants. Parenteral and enteral AN after birth improved the long-term cognitive neurodevelopment in ELBW AGA infants, especially in those born ≥26weeks of gestational age, however results need to be confirmed in a larger, multi-site randomized trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Call to Action to Bring Safer Parenteral Micronutrient Products to the U.S. Market.

    PubMed

    Vanek, Vincent W; Borum, Peggy; Buchman, Alan; Fessler, Theresa A; Howard, Lyn; Shenkin, Alan; Valentine, Christina J

    2015-08-01

    The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) started an intensive review of commercially available parenteral vitamin and trace element (TE) products in 2009. The chief findings were that adult multi-TE products currently available in the United States (U.S.) provide potentially toxic amounts of manganese, copper, and chromium, and neonatal/pediatric multi-TE products provide potentially toxic amounts of manganese and chromium. The multivitamin products appeared safe and effective; however, a separate parenteral vitamin D product is needed for those patients on standard therapy who continue to be vitamin D depleted and are unresponsive to oral supplements. The review process also extended to parenteral choline and carnitine. Although choline and carnitine are not technically vitamins or trace elements, choline is an essential nutrient in all age groups, and carnitine is an essential nutrient in infants, according to the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. A parenteral choline product needs to be developed and available. Efforts are currently under way to engage the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the parenteral nutrient industry so A.S.P.E.N.'s recommendations can become a commercial reality.

  2. Asbestos fibers in parenteral medication.

    PubMed

    Addison, J; Browne, K; Davis, J M; Gruber, U F

    1993-12-01

    The adequacy of current regulations for the control of particulate matter in injectable medicines has been brought into question by a recent television program which reported that asbestos fibers had been found in a number of such preparations. The fibers were identified as chrysotile, which occurs very widely as a secondary mineral in rocks, and is almost ubiquitous among minerals derived from natural erosion. Fibers are found in almost all drinking water and air samples unrelated to any contamination of fiber resulting from industrial exploitation. Because of this, even extreme laboratory precautions may fail to eliminate every fine fiber. A normal person living in an urban environment inhales about 10(5) asbestos fibers daily and ingests 10(10). There is evidence that a small proportion of these fibers regularly enters the circulation, and some fibers may be excreted in the urine. Elimination also occurs because retained chrysotile fibers fragment and disappear relatively quickly from human tissues, probably through macrophage action. Fiber length and dose are also important in disease causation. Established evidence on fiber length, durability, and quantitative exposure required for disease production does not indicate that the fibers reported to have been found in parenteral preparations constitute any hazard.

  3. [The partial parenteral nutrition of preterm infants with a body weight < 1000 g: the effects of an infusion of human albumin on plasma amino acid concentration].

    PubMed

    Cassata, N; Didato, M; Faranda, C; Fazio, M; Giaccone, G; Gioeli, R; La Francesca, G; Sulliotti, G; Priolisi, A

    1993-01-01

    This paper concerns with the changes of plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations of N. 10 ELBW infants receiving a regimen of partial parenteral nutrition including human serum albumin (HSA) as a protein supply. The plasma AA concentration has been compared with VLBW infants orally fed with human milk (HM) or human milk supplemented with human milk protein (HMP). As for the essential AA: in comparison to VLBW infants fed HM, the plasma concentration of VAL, PHE and LYS is significantly higher, that of THR, MET, LEU and HIS is similar, whereas that of ILE is significantly lower; in comparison to VLBW infants fed HMP, with the exception of PHE whose plasma concentration is higher, concentration of essential AA significantly lower; the percentage ratio between plasma concentration and intake is in the range of 1,4 to 3,3, except for LYS (= 0.83), indicating a good efficacy of the i.v. administered HSA as AA source, or a slow plasma clearance or a sustained flux of AA from body protein catabolism. Further researches are needed to investigate these aspects and the intermediate steps between i.v. infusion of HSA and the utilization of the component AA for body protein synthesis.

  4. Total parenteral nutrition induces liver steatosis and apoptosis in neonatal piglets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) induces a high rate of liver disease in infants, yet the pathogenesis remains elusive. We used neonatal piglets as an animal model to assess early events leading to TPN-mediated liver injury. Newborn piglets (n = 7) were nourished for 7 d on TPN or enteral nutrition ...

  5. Lysine requirement in parenterally fed postsurgical human neonates.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Karen P; Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Moore, Aideen M; Langer, Jacob C; Tomlinson, Christopher; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B

    2010-04-01

    The lysine requirement of human neonates receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) has not been determined experimentally. The objective was to determine the parenteral lysine requirement for human neonates by using the minimally invasive indicator amino acid oxidation technique with l-[1-(13)C] phenylalanine as the indicator amino acid. Eleven postsurgical neonates were randomly assigned to 15 lysine intakes ranging from 50 to 260 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1). Breath and urine samples were collected at baseline and at plateau for (13)CO(2) (F(13)CO(2)) and amino acid enrichment, respectively. The mean lysine requirement was determined by applying a 2-phase linear regression crossover analysis to the measured rates of F(13)CO(2) release and l-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine oxidation. The mean parenteral lysine requirement determined by F(13)CO(2) release oxidation was 104.9 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) (upper and lower CIs: 120.6 and 89.1 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1), respectively). The mean lysine parenteral requirement determined by phenylalanine oxidation was 117.6 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) (upper and lower CIs: 157.5 and 77.6 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1), respectively). Graded intakes of lysine had no effect on phenylalanine flux. We recommend a mean lysine requirement for the postsurgical PN-fed neonate of 104.9 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1), which is 32-43% of the lysine concentration presently found in commercial PN solutions (246-330 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1)). This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00779753.

  6. [Routine comparison of trace element deficiencies during parenteral alimentation].

    PubMed

    du Cailar, J; Mathieu-Daudé, J C; Kienlen, J; Béssou, D; Griffe, O; Bélé-Binda

    1977-01-01

    In 50 patients aged between 3 and 84 years treated in a multidisciplinary Intensive Care Unit and receiving parenteral alimentation, deficiency in certain trace elements or electrolytes (Cu++, Zn++, Mn++, Co++, PO-4, Mg++) was prevented or treated by the administration of a glucose solution (MB 147 G) enriched in trace elements. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate, on the basis of assay of serum levels of the trace elements involved, with the exception of Mn and Co, the effectiveness of treatment. Reference values were determined on the one hand in healthy individuals for normal figures and secondly on subjects included in the study, already on parenteral alimentation for several days, before treatment with MB 147 G, in order to demonstrate the existence of a deficiency (patient control values). In the case of PO--4, however, the patient control values concerned at one and the same time subjects in the study before treatment with MB 147 G and other patients receiving parenteral alimentation who were not part of the trial. MB 147 G solution was presented in units of 500 ml associated with glucose of varying concentrations (15 p. 100, 30 p. 100, 50 p. 100). The average daily amount administered, over a period of 236 days, was 3 unites per 24 hours, corresponding to an intake of copper of 3.78 mg, 3.90 mg of zinc, 0.20 mg of manganese, 0.24 mg of cobalt, 363 mg of magnesium, 240 mg of calcium and 15 mEz of phosphates. The results show that levels of copper, zinc, magnesium and phosphates were low during parenteral alimentation. The administration of MB 147 G resulted in a significant increase in these values, without there being any evidence of accumulation.

  7. [Protocol for the diagnosis and treatment of catheter related infections in patients with home parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    de la Cuerda Compés, C; Bretón Lesmes, I; Bonada Sanjaume, A; Planas Vila, M

    2005-08-01

    One of the most frequent complications of home parenteral nutrition is parenteral nutrition catheter infection. Prevention of these complications by adequate protocols on the catheter cares manages to decrease significantly the number of infections. Diagnosis and treatment of these infections should be done early to avoid loss of central venous accesses that may affect the treatment with this nutritional support modality in the long term. The existence of a protocol for the diagnosis and treatment of infections related with the catheter is, thus, of great value in the treatment of these patients.

  8. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: intensive care.

    PubMed

    Singer, Pierre; Berger, Mette M; Van den Berghe, Greet; Biolo, Gianni; Calder, Philip; Forbes, Alastair; Griffiths, Richard; Kreyman, Georg; Leverve, Xavier; Pichard, Claude; ESPEN

    2009-08-01

    Nutritional support in the intensive care setting represents a challenge but it is fortunate that its delivery and monitoring can be followed closely. Enteral feeding guidelines have shown the evidence in favor of early delivery and the efficacy of use of the gastrointestinal tract. Parenteral nutrition (PN) represents an alternative or additional approach when other routes are not succeeding (not necessarily having failed completely) or when it is not possible or would be unsafe to use other routes. The main goal of PN is to deliver a nutrient mixture closely related to requirements safely and to avoid complications. This nutritional approach has been a subject of debate over the past decades. PN carries the considerable risk of overfeeding which can be as deleterious as underfeeding. Therefore the authors will present not only the evidence available regarding the indications for PN, its implementation, the energy required, its possible complementary use with enteral nutrition, but also the relative importance of the macro- and micronutrients in the formula proposed for the critically ill patient. Data on long-term survival (expressed as 6 month survival) will also be considered a relevant outcome measure. Since there is a wide range of interpretations regarding the content of PN and great diversity in its practice, our guidance will necessarily reflect these different views. The papers available are very heterogeneous in quality and methodology (amount of calories, nutrients, proportion of nutrients, patients, etc.) and the different meta-analyses have not always taken this into account. Use of exclusive PN or complementary PN can lead to confusion, calorie targets are rarely achieved, and different nutrients continue to be used in different proportions. The present guidelines are the result of the analysis of the available literature, and acknowledging these limitations, our recommendations are intentionally largely expressed as expert opinions.

  9. Marchiafava: Bignami Disease Treated with Parenteral Thiamine

    PubMed Central

    Nemlekar, Saumitra Shankar; Mehta, Ritambhara Yeshwant; Dave, Kamlesh Rushikray; Shah, Nilima Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Marchiafava - Bignami disease is rare sequelae of chronic alcohol use. We present a case with transient ischemic attack like presentation and its management with parenteral thiamine. A 53 year old male with history of country liquor use since 32 years was brought to hospital with acute onset of delirium & mild weakness involving motor functions of left side of the body, non-reactive planters and exaggerated tendon reflexes on left side. The MRI showed bilateral hyper intense signal on T2W and FLAIR images & Hypo intense lesion on T1W images involving body, genu and splenium of corpus callosum. The features are suggestive of Marchiafava - Bignami Disease. There have been few guidelines for management of MBD and literature supports use of parenteral thiamine 500mg leading to remission of symptoms and symptomatic improvement. It is advisable to use parenteral thiamine in all cases as it overlaps management of other co-morbidities of chronic alcoholism. PMID:27114628

  10. Prefilled syringes: An innovation in parenteral packaging.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Sagar; Basu, Biswajit; Makasana, Yogita; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-10-01

    Parenteral administration of pharmaceutical products is one of the most popular methods used to produce quick onset of action and also 100% bioavailability. Main problem occurs with the parenteral drug delivery is lack of convenience, affordability, accuracy, sterility, safety etc. Such drawbacks with this delivery system makes it less preferable. Hence, all the disadvantages of these systems can be easily overcome by use of prefilled syringes. The objective of this review article is to provide information regarding prefilled syringes; it's method of preparation, direction to use, advantages, its future scope, and development.

  11. Prefilled syringes: An innovation in parenteral packaging

    PubMed Central

    Makwana, Sagar; Basu, Biswajit; Makasana, Yogita; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral administration of pharmaceutical products is one of the most popular methods used to produce quick onset of action and also 100% bioavailability. Main problem occurs with the parenteral drug delivery is lack of convenience, affordability, accuracy, sterility, safety etc. Such drawbacks with this delivery system makes it less preferable. Hence, all the disadvantages of these systems can be easily overcome by use of prefilled syringes. The objective of this review article is to provide information regarding prefilled syringes; it's method of preparation, direction to use, advantages, its future scope, and development. PMID:23071944

  12. Chromium deficiency during total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Freund, H; Atamian, S; Fischer, J E

    1979-02-02

    Chromium is required for maintenance of normal glucose tolerance. After complete bowel resection and five months of total parenteral nutrition, severe glucose intolerance, weight loss, and a metabolic encephalopathy-like confusional state developed in a patient. Serum chromium levels were at the lowest normal level. Supplementation of 150 microgram of chromium per day reversed the glucose intolerance, reduced insulin requirements, and resulted in weight gain and the disappearance of encephalopathy. The low levels of chromium and response to chromium supplementation suggest that chromium deficiency can arise in long-term total parenteral nutrition.

  13. Parenteral amino acid intakes in critically ill children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Parenteral amino acid formulas used in parenteral nutrition have a variable composition. To determine the amino acid intake of parenterally fed, critically ill children, and compare it with recommended dietary allowances (RDA) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), we retrospectively review...

  14. Parenteral opioids for maternal pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Roz; Smith, Lesley A; Burns, Ethel; Mori, Rintaro; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenteral opioids are used for pain relief in labour in many countries throughout the world. Objectives To assess the acceptability, effectiveness and safety of different types, doses and modes of administration of parenteral opioids given to women in labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 April 2011) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials examining the use of intramuscular or intravenous opioids (including patient controlled analgesia) for women in labour. We looked at studies comparing an opioid with another opioid, placebo, other non-pharmacological interventions (TENS) or inhaled analgesia. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, collected data and assessed risk of bias. Main results We included 57 studies involving more than 7000 women that compared an opioid with placebo, another opioid administered intramuscularly or intravenously or compared with TENS to the back. The 57 studies reported on 29 different comparisons, and for many outcomes only one study contributed data. Overall, the evidence was of poor quality regarding the analgesic effect of opioids, satisfaction with analgesia, adverse effects and harm to women and babies. There were few statistically significant results. Many of the studies had small sample sizes, and low statistical power. Overall findings indicated that parenteral opioids provided some pain relief and moderate satisfaction with analgesia in labour, although up to two-thirds of women who received opioids reported moderate or severe pain and/or poor or moderate pain relief one or two hours after administration. Opioid drugs were associated with maternal nausea, vomiting and drowsiness, although different opioid drugs were associated with different adverse effects. There was no clear evidence of adverse effects of opioids on the newborn. We

  15. Effects of early enteral micro-feeding on neonatal serum Vitamin D levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang; Yin, Xiangdang; Chu, Haifeng; Zheng, Guangli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral micro-feeding on neonatal serum vitamin D levels, and to analyze the application value of glutamine. Methods: One hundred ninty neonates enrolled in intensive care unit were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group (n=95) that were both given enteral and parenteral nutrition support. Meanwhile, the treatment group was fed formula milk containing 0.3 g/(kg·d) glutamine as enteral nutrition support for 14 days. Results: The weight of the treatment group increased significantly faster than that of the control group did (P<0.05). The treatment group had significantly higher milk amount and calorie intake than those of the control group (P<0.05), and neonates in the treatment group who reached calorie intake of 50/80/100 kcal/kg/d were significantly younger (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the treatment group was significantly less prone to feeding intolerance than the control group (P<0.05). After 14 days of feeding, the serum motilin, gastrin and vitamin D levels of both groups all increased, with significant intra-group and inter-group differences. Such levels of the treatment group significantly exceeded those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Supplementing early enteral micro-feeding with glutamine promoted the absorption of neonatal routine nutrients and vitamin D, obviously regulated gastrointestinal hormones, and elevated weight as a result. PMID:26870119

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Modern Parenteral Nutrition: A Review of the Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Klek, Stanislaw

    2016-03-07

    Intravenous lipid emulsions are an essential component of parenteral nutrition regimens. Originally employed as an efficient non-glucose energy source to reduce the adverse effects of high glucose intake and provide essential fatty acids, lipid emulsions have assumed a larger therapeutic role due to research demonstrating the effects of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on key metabolic functions, including inflammatory and immune response, coagulation, and cell signaling. Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that the effects of omega-3 PUFA on inflammation and immune response result in meaningful therapeutic benefits in surgical, cancer, and critically ill patients as well as patients requiring long-term parenteral nutrition. The present review provides an overview of the mechanisms of action through which omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA modulate the immune-inflammatory response and summarizes the current body of evidence regarding the clinical and pharmacoeconomic benefits of intravenous n-3 fatty acid-containing lipid emulsions in patients requiring parenteral nutrition.

  17. [Parenteral periferic nutrition: non surgical indications].

    PubMed

    Ayúcar Ruiz de Galarreta, A; Pita Gutiérrez, F; Mosteiro Pereira, F; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Gómez Canosa, S; Seco Vilariño, C

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition, defined as a mixture of micronutrients, vitamins and minerals with lower osmolarity of 800 mOsm/L, it avoids the risk of the central catheter. It has traditionally been used in postoperative patients, but really medical conditions can also benefit from it either as complementary, or as the only one source of nutrients, since a high number of patients require less caloric intake than previously believed. Evaluation of the use of peripheral parenteral nutrition in non postoperative hospitalized patients, reasons for its prescription and duration. 368 patients who required peripheral parenteral nutrition were studied by the Nutrition Support Unit for 54 months, in a Tertiary Hospital of 1,560 beds, from all, specialties excluding postoperative patients. The study include the mechanisms that led to its use in all its forms: the only one nutritional support or complementing insufficient Enteral Nutrition or Oral Diet. Oncology and Critical Care were the most prescribed pathologies, followed by Pancreatitis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease and HIV and a miscellany of clinical pathologies. Gastrointestinal pathology (pain, diarrhea or vomiting) was the most frequent cause, both in critically ill as in non-critical patients. Although enteral route is preferred and raised primarily in most patients studied, there are many causes that might impair or nullify it. Peripheral parenteral nutrition is an alternative when caloric intake is impossible or insufficient or refused by the patient, as it minimizes the complications of the central catheter.

  18. [Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, J M

    2008-05-01

    Parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD) is an important problem in patients who require longterm parenteral nutrition as well as in preterm infants. Prevalence varies according to different series. Clinical presentation is different in adults and infants. Although since its first descriptions several hypothesis have been elucidated, the aetiology is not quite clear. It is possible that different factors could be involved. PNALD risk factors can be classified in three groups: 1) those derived from the lack of enteral nutrition stimulus; 2) parenteral nutrition components acting as toxic or the lack of specific nutrients and 3) those due to the underlying disease. If PNALD appears in short-term PN and it presents only as a mild elevation of liver enzymes, there is no need to treat. On the contrary, when direct bilirubin is > 2 mg/dL and lasts longer, there is a need to consider different causes and to minimize risk factors. We review the different approaches to manage PNALD, including optimizing enteral nutrition, modify parenteral solutions, use of specific nutrients -taurine, choline, etc.- or the use of drugs (mainly ursodeoxicolic acid). If liver disease progresses to cirrhosis a liver transplant must be considered.

  19. Bell's palsy and parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nick; Wise, Lesley; Miller, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Concern about a possible increased risk of Bell's palsy after parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine was raised following the publication in 2004 of a Swiss study in which there was an increased risk following the nasal inactivated formulation of the vaccine. When data from passive reporting systems in the United States and the United Kingdom were examined there was some evidence of increased reporting following the parenteral vaccine. A large population based study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD) was therefore performed to test the hypothesis that there was an increased risk of Bell's palsy in the three months following parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine. The risk was also assessed for the same period following pneumococcal vaccine and was stratified into three age groups (<45, 45-64 and 65+ years). Relative incidence (RI) estimates were calculated using the self-controlled case-series method and showed no evidence of an increased risk in the three months following parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine RI 0.92 (95% confidence interval 0.78-1.08). There was also no evidence of an increased risk in any age group or following pneumococcal vaccine. A significant increase was seen on the day of vaccination (day 0) probably due to opportunistic recording of cases.

  20. PARENTERAL NUTRITION INDICATIONS, ADMINISTRATION, AND MONITORING

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) can be lifesaving or life threatening, depending on when and how it is used. In infants and children who are unable to meet their nutritional requirements over extended periods, it can prevent death from malnutrition. On the other hand, if appropriate attention is not paid ...

  1. Pediatric parenteral nutrition: putting the microscope on macronutrients and micronutrients.

    PubMed

    Slicker, Julie; Vermilyea, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition can be a life-saving therapy, but its benefits need to be balanced with a unique set of risks and complications. Methods of practice vary because there is a dearth of research in the area of pediatric parenteral nutrition. This article reviews the available literature on parenteral nutrition in children and provides suggestions on prevention and management of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. Some of the issues discussed in this article include glucose infusion rates, cycling of parenteral nutrition, copper and manganese toxicity, and the provision of glutamine, selenium, and carnitine.

  2. The Effects of Early Language Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William; Ogston, Karen; Roberts, Gloria; Swenson, Amy

    2006-01-01

    Over two decades, six studies evaluated the effects of a home-based early language program on the development of 101 infants. Parents engaged in enrichment activities with their infants over a one-year period that began when the infants were between three and 13 months of age. Participants from families with varied levels of education were…

  3. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  4. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia: are monomeric iron compounds suitable for parenteral administration?

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Crumbliss, A L

    2000-11-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional problem worldwide, especially in the developing countries. Oral iron supplementation programs have failed because of noncompliance and gastrointestinal toxicity, thereby necessitating parenteral administration of iron. For parenteral administration, only iron-carbohydrate complexes are currently used, because monomeric iron salts release free iron, thereby causing oxidant injury. However, iron-carbohydrate complexes also have significant toxicity, and they are expensive. We have proposed the hypothesis that monomeric iron salts can be safely administered by the parenteral route if iron is tightly complexed to the ligand, thereby causing clinically insignificant release of free iron, and the kinetic properties of the compound allow rapid transfer of iron to plasma transferrin. A detailed analysis of the physicochemical and kinetic properties reveals that ferric iron complexed to pyrophosphate or acetohydroxamate anions may be suitable for parenteral administration. We have demonstrated that infusion of ferric pyrophosphate into the circulation via the dialysate is safe and effective in maintaining iron balance in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Parenteral administration of monomeric iron compounds is a promising approach to the treatment of iron deficiency in the general population and merits further investigation.

  5. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods for extended-release parenteral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J

    2012-07-01

    This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in-vitro drug release testing of extended-release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in-situ depot-forming systems and implants. Extended-release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, 'real-time' in-vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in-vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in-vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended-release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in-vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended-release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in-vitro-in-vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable; however, for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  6. Accelerated in vitro release testing methods for extended release parenteral dosage forms

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in vitro drug release testing of extended release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in situ depot-forming systems, and implants. Key findings Extended release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, “real-time” in vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Conclusions Accelerated in vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable, however for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. PMID:22686344

  7. Reversal of growth arrest in adolescents with Crohn's disease after parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Layden, T; Rosenberg, F; Nemchausky, G; Elson, C; Rosenberg, I

    1976-06-01

    Growth arrest and delayed onset of puberty often complicate childhood onset Crohn's disease of the small bowel (granulomatous enteritis). Nutritional deficits arising from inadequate dietary intake, malabsorption, and increased caloric needs may contribute to growth retardation. To assess whether a sustained high caloric and nitrogen intake could reestablish growth, 4 children with extensive Crohn's disease of the small bowel were studied before and after parenteral alimentation which was instituted for symtomatic disease control. Weight gain, positive nitrogen balance, and improved nutritional status were achieved during parenteral alimentation in each patient. In 2 patients weight gain was sustained using oral nutritional supplements, and a substantial increase in linear skeletal growth continued in the ensuing months. One patient entered puberty within 4 months of parenteral alimentation and another had the onset of menarche and the development of secondary sex characteristics 4 months after parenteral alimentation and resection of diseased bowel. Growth may be reestablished in some growth-arrested children if intake is sufficient to establish a sustained positive caloric and nitrogen balance. Nutritional requirements imposed by the demands of growth and active disease and often compounded by the catabolic effects of corticosteroids may be excessive; growth may occur only if these needs are met orally and/or parenterally.

  8. Supplementation of total parenteral nutrition solutions with ferrous citrate.

    PubMed

    Sayers, M H; Johnson, D K; Schumann, L A; Ivey, M F; Young, J H; Finch, C A

    1983-01-01

    Daily infusion of a total parenteral nutrition (TPN) formulation containing 1 liter of 5.5% Travasol provides less than 0.1 milligrams of iron. By comparison, a formulation which includes a liter of 10% Travamin provides 2 milligrams of iron per day. To meet iron requirements in patients infusing formulations containing Travasol, iron was added as ferrous citrate. In in virto experiments, 74% of this iron was available to transferrin. In seven patients in whom in vivo availability was tested by red cell incorporation, the mean availability was 81%. Ferrous citrate is recommended as a safe, effective additive to TPN solutions for adult patients requiring iron supplements.

  9. Single-dose parenteral antibiotic prophylaxis in gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Creve, U; Hubens, A

    1980-01-01

    In the course of two consecutive, double-blind and prospective studies, the authors evaluated the prophylactic effect of a single peroperative intravenous dose of gentamicin (this study included 166 patients) or the combination gentamicin and clindamycin (this study included 127 patients), on the wound infection rate following interventions involving the incision of an abdominal hollow viscus. Antibiotic prophylaxis lowered the post-operative wound sepsis rate, especially following clinically contaminated interventions, but this reduction did not reach statistical significance. It is concluded that a single peroperative parenteral dose of antibiotics does not constitute an entirely satisfactory means of wound infection prophylaxis in digestive surgery.

  10. Sodium N-(methylsulfonyl)-N-(4-nitro-2-phenoxyphenyl)sulfamate: a water-soluble nimesulide prodrug for parenteral use.

    PubMed

    Rapposelli, Simona; Digiacomo, Maria; Franchi, Silvia; Moretti, Sara; Pinza, Mario; Sacerdote, Paola; Balsamo, Aldo

    2010-10-04

    Several nimesulide preparations (i.e., tablet form, gels) have been marketed, but no parenteral solution has achieved the market because of their low wettability and unsatisfactory chemical-physical properties required for parenteral use. In this paper we describe the synthesis of the nimesulide prodrug 1 and its anti-inflammatory and antihyperalgesic properties. Pharmacological studies, carried out to evaluate the in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of compound 1 and nimesulide, showed that sodium sulfamate 1 is an effective nimesulide prodrug that can be administered by parenteral route, undergoing a satisfactory absorption and an extensive transformation into the active nimesulide compound. Moreover, the evaluation of the plasma concentrations of nimesulide after rat treatment with compound 1 showed an increased and dose-dependent release of nimesulide. In contrast, the plasma concentrations of nimesulide, after "native" drug administration, still remain substantially unchanged. These preliminary results prompt further investigations on this prodrug as a possible candidate for parenteral use.

  11. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): gastrointestinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Álvarez, C; Zabarte Martínez de Aguirre, M; Bordejé Laguna, L

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal surgery and critical illness place tremendous stress on the body, resulting in a series of metabolic changes that may lead to severe malnutrition, which in turn can increase postsurgical complications and morbidity and mortality and prolong the hospital length of stay. In these patients, parenteral nutrition is the most widely used form of nutritional support, but administration of enteral nutrition early in the postoperative period is effective and well tolerated, reducing infectious complications, improving wound healing and reducing length of hospital stay. Calorie-protein requirements do not differ from those in other critically-ill patients and depend on the patient's underlying process and degree of metabolic stress. In patients intolerant to enteral nutrition, especially if the intolerance is due to increased gastric residual volume, prokinetic agents can be used to optimize calorie intake. When proximal sutures are used, tubes allowing early jejunal feeding should be used. Pharmaconutrition is indicated in these patients, who benefit from enteral administration of arginine, omega 3 and RNA, as well as parenteral glutamine supplementation. Parenteral nutrition should be started in patients with absolute contraindication for use of the gastrointestinal tract or as complementary nutrition if adequate energy intake is not achieved through the enteral route.

  12. Epigenetic effects of early developmental experiences.

    PubMed

    Gudsnuk, Kathryn M A; Champagne, Frances A

    2011-12-01

    Early-life adversity can affect brain development and behavior. Emerging evidence from studies on both humans and rodents suggests that epigenetic mechanisms may play a critical role in shaping our biology in response to the quality of the environment. This article highlights the research findings suggesting that prenatal maternal stress, postnatal maternal care, and infant neglect/abuse can lead to epigenetic variation, which may have long-term effects on stress responsivity, neuronal plasticity, and behavior.

  13. Parenteral nutrition in the malnourished: dialysis, cancer, obese, and hyperemesis gravidarum patients.

    PubMed

    Lau, Mary Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition is a complication of many disease processes and can have deleterious effects on patient care outcomes. Providing adequate nutritional support requires a plan that is tailored to the individual needs of the patient and occasionally requires the use of parenteral nutrition. The varied nutritional needs of malnourished dialysis, cancer, obese, and hyperemesis gravidarum patients will be discussed. The infusion nurse specialist is a vital member of the nutrition support team in the care and recovery of the malnourished patient who requires parenteral nutrition.

  14. A novel self emulsifying parenteral drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Krishna, G; Sheth, B B

    1999-01-01

    The application of three polyhydroxy alcohols for improving parenteral emulsion formulations was investigated. A mixture of lecithin, as the primary emulsifier, and Span 20 as the secondary emulsifier, was used as the emulsifier system. The polyhydroxy alcohols selected were glycerol, propylene glycol and sorbitol. Soybean oil-in-water emulsions were prepared with the addition of increasing concentrations of each polyhydroxy alcohol. It was found that anhydrous mixtures of oil, surfactants and 30% or higher concentration of glycerol formed self emulsifying isotropic liquids, suitable for preparing Parenteral Self Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems (PSEDDS). Spontaneous emulsification to submicron particle size of 0.4 micron occurred when these isotropic liquids were gently mixed with water. A PSEDDS formulation, containing 0.5% lidocaine, as the model drug showed similar spontaneous emulsification with particle size of 0.39 micron. Formulations containing propylene glycol, or sorbitol or lower concentrations of glycerol did not form self emulsifying mixtures. There were substantial differences in the particle size reduction pattern with each polyhydroxy alcohol. Glycerol was most effective, with minimum particle size obtained at 30% concentration. Addition of propylene glycol resulted in minimum particle size at 60% concentration. But there was increase in particle size at higher concentrations. Sorbitol was not very effective in reducing particle size. Alteration of the surfactant phase distribution at the interface was found to be the primary effect of polyhydroxy alcohols.

  15. Economic evaluation of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Psaltikidis, Eliane Molina; Silva, Everton Nunes da; Bustorff-Silva, Joaquim Murray; Moretti, Maria Luiza; Resende, Mariângela Ribeiro

    2017-08-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) consists of providing antimicrobial therapy by parenteral infusion without hospitalization. A systematic review was performed to compare OPAT and hospitalization as health care modalities from an economic perspective. Areas covered: We identified 1455 articles using 13 electronic databases and manual searches. Two independent reviewers identified 35 studies conducted between 1978 and 2016. We observed high heterogeneity in the following: countries, infection site, OPAT strategies and outcomes analyzed. Of these, 88% had a retrospective observational design and one was a randomized trial. With respect to economic analyses, 71% of the studies considered the cost-consequences, 11% cost minimization, 6% cost-benefit, 6% cost-utility analyses and 6% cost effectiveness. Considering all 35 studies, the general OPAT cost saving was 57.19% (from -13.03% to 95.47%). Taking into consideration only high-quality studies (6 comparative studies), the cost saving declined by 16.54% (from -13.03% to 46.86%). Expert commentary: Although most studies demonstrate that OPAT is cost-effective, the magnitude of this effect is compromised by poor methodological quality and heterogeneity. Economic assessments of the issue are needed using more rigorous methodologies that include a broad range of perspectives to identify the real magnitude of economic savings in different settings and OPAT modalities.

  16. Current trends and future challenges in neonatal parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Adamkin, D H; Radmacher, P G

    2014-01-01

    A number of adaptations in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) protocols and practices for preterm neonates have been realized in the past several years, resulting in better survival and developmental outcomes. The early provision of appropriate concentrations of amino acids and energy are now recommended in evidence-based guidelines. Standardized TPN formulations are now available for many patients and may be associated with cost savings and improved adherence to guidelines. Several advantages of these preparations, including promotion of safer administration, consistent adherence to guidelines, and overall best practices, have been well documented. However, careful monitoring is still required to optimize nutrition for individual patients and to support overall safety as TPN practices continue to change. Additional research is needed to develop new lipid formulations that are tailored for safe use by very low birth weight (VLBW) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. This review presents recent research and improvements to guidelines, as well as future product needs for VLBW and ELBW neonates.

  17. [Elevated serum lithium concentration due to switch from parenteral nutrition alone to parenteral with enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Goto, Hidekazu; Tomita, Takashi; Doki, Shotaro; Nakanishi, Rie; Kojima, Chikako; Yoneshima, Mihoko; Yoshida, Tadashi; Tanaka, Katsuya; Kohda, Yukinao

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient with elevated serum lithium concentration caused by switching from parenteral nutrition alone to parenteral with enteral nutrition. A 73-year-old female inpatient was treated with lithium carbonate 600 mg/d for manic episodes of bipolar disorder. Her serum lithium level was maintained at 0.57-0.79 mEq/L. She was administered total parenteral nutrition owing to difficulty in oral intake. Her diet contained 4.8-5.8 g/d of sodium chloride. After this, parenteral with enteral nutrition was initiated. The total sodium chloride intake decreased from 6.3 to 3.0-4.0 g/d following this change. On day 15 after initiation of parenteral with enteral nutrition, her serum lithium level increased to 1.17 mEq/L, which is closer to the upper therapeutic range limit. Therefore enteral nutrition was stopped immediately, and an electrolyte solution was administered instead of enteral nutrition. An antibiotic agent was also simultaneously administered because of infection. The total amount of sodium chloride administered was increased to 7.0 g/d during this treatment. Four days after treatment, the serum lithium level returned to 0.57 mEq/L. This case suggests that administration of appropriate sodium chloride nutrition is important during treatment with lithium carbonate, because disposition of lithium ion is paralleled to that of sodium.

  18. Metabolic acidosis during parenteral nutrition: Pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Zikou, Xanthi; Koulouras, Vasilis; Katopodis, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with metabolic complications including metabolic acidosis (MA), one of the main disorders of acid-base balance. The main causes involved in the appearance of MA during TPN administration are the metabolism of cationic amino acids and amino acids containing sulfuric acid (exogenous addition), the titratable acidity of the infused parenteral solution, the addition of acidificant agents (hydrochloric acid, acetic acid), thiamine deficiency, disruption of carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways and D-fructose administration. Moreover, hypophosphatemia that appears during TPN therapy contributes significantly to the maintenance of MA. This review describes in a comprehensive way the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the appearance of MA induced by intravenous administration of TPN products most commonly used in critically ill-patients. PMID:25983433

  19. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition123

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10–15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  20. [Neonatal parenteral nutrition prescription practices in Portugal].

    PubMed

    Neves, A; Pereira-da-Silva, L; Fernandez-Llimos, F

    2014-02-01

    The use of guidelines for neonatal parenteral nutrition (PN) improves its clinical efficiency and the safety of prescription. To evaluate the practices of neonatal parenteral nutrition prescription in Portugal, and the adherence to the National Consensus on neonatal PN (2008). A questionnaire based on a multiple choice response on parenteral nutrition prescription was conducted, and sent to the coordinators of the 50 public and private Portuguese neonatal special care units, 25 being level III and 25 level II. Parenteral nutrition was prescribed in 32 neonatal units, 23 of which (71.9%) responded to the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 19 (82.6%) refer to follow the National Consensus, the remaining following local guidelines; 17 (73.9%) of units referred to using an electronic based system for prescription. In preterm neonates, most mentioned: administering judiciously the fluid intake during the first post-natal week; starting amino acids from the first post-natal day with 1.5-3g/kg/d, increasing up to 3-4g/kg/d; starting lipids from the first three post-natal days with 1g/kg/d, increasing up to 3g/kg/d; administering 40-70mg/kg/d of calcium and of phosphorus with the fixed calcium:phosphorus ratio of 1.7: 1 (mg:mg); and estimating the osmolality of the solutions, and weekly monitoring of serum triglycerides, blood urea, serum phosphorus and liver function. The high response rate is probably representative of the practice of PN prescription in Portugal. Most of the units used the National Consensus on neonatal PN as a reference, thus contributing to better nutritional support for neonates. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Aluminium in parenteral nutrition: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, A; Tejada-González, P; Arteta-Jiménez, M

    2013-03-01

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity problem in parenteral nutrition solutions (PNS) is decades old and is still unresolved. The aim of this review is to gather updated information about this matter, regarding legislation, manifestations, diagnostics and treatment, patient population at risk and the actions to be taken to limit its accumulation. A structured search using MeSH vocabulary and Title/Abstract searches was conducted in PubMed (http://www.pubmed.gov) up to November 2012. Al is ubiquitous, facilitating its potential for exposure. Nevertheless, humans have several mechanisms to prevent significant absorption and to aid its elimination; therefore, the vast majority of the population is not at risk for Al toxicity. However, when protective gastrointestinal mechanisms are bypassed (for example, parenteral fluids), renal function is impaired (for example, adult patients with renal compromise and neonates) or exposure is high (for example, long-term PNS), Al is prone to accumulate in the body, including manifestations such as impaired neurological development, Alzheimer's disease, metabolic bone disease, dyslipemia and even genotoxic activity. A high Al content in PNS is largely the result of three parenteral nutrient additives: calcium gluconate, inorganic phosphates and cysteine hydrochloride. Despite the legislative efforts, some factors make difficult to comply with the rule and, therefore, to limit the Al toxicity. Unfortunately, manufacturers have not universally changed their processes to obtain a lower Al content of parenteral drug products (PDP). In addition, the imprecise information provided by PDP labels and the high lot-to-lot variation make the prediction of Al content rather inaccurate.

  2. Taurolidine in Pediatric Home Parenteral Nutrition Patients.

    PubMed

    Hulshof, Emma Claire; Hanff, Lidwien Marieke; Olieman, Joanne; de Vette, Susanna; Driessen, Gert-Jan; Meeussen, Conny; Escher, Johanna Caroline

    2017-02-01

    To reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in home parenteral nutrition patients, the use of taurolidine was introduced in the Sophia Children's Hospital in 2011. This introduction led to a reduction in catheter-related bloodstream infections: 12.7/1000 catheter days before the use of taurolidine, compared with 4.3/1000 catheter days afterwards (n = 7) [relative risk = 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.20-0.65 (P = 0.018)].

  3. Studies with a safflower oil emulsion in total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K. H.; Deitel, M.

    1981-01-01

    The prevention of essential fatty acid deficiency and the provision of adequate amounts of energy are two major concerns in total parenteral nutrition. Since earlier preparations of fat emulsion used to supplement the usual regimen of hypertonic glucose and amino acids have widely varying clinical acceptability, a new product, a safflower oil emulsion available in two concentrations (Liposyn), was evaluated. In four clinical trials the emulsion was used as a supplement to total parenteral nutrition. In five surgical patients 500 ml of the 10% emulsion infused every third day prevented or corrected essential fatty acid deficiency; however, in some cases in infusion every other day may be necessary. In 40 patients in severe catabolic states the emulsion provided 30% to 50% of the energy required daily: 10 patients received the 10% emulsion for 14 to 42 days, 9 patients received each emulsion in turn for 7 days, and 21 patient received the 20% emulsion for 14 to 28 days. All the patients survived and tolerated the lipid well; no adverse clinical effects were attributable to the lipid infusions. Transient mild, apparently clinically insignificant abnormalities in the results of one or more liver function tests and eosinophilia were observed in some patients. Thus, the safflower oil emulsion, at both concentrations, was safe and effective as a source of 30% to 50% of the energy required daily by seriously ill patients. PMID:6799182

  4. Total parenteral nutrition in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Norcross, E.D.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Parenteral Nutrition with hypertonic glucose is frequently given to diabetic patients. Large amounts of insulin can be required. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a totally parenterally nourished diabetic rat model. 200 g Female Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by i.v. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Rats were then allowed to recover for at least 1 week before undergoing surgical insertion of a central venous catheter for parenteral feeding. TPN was begun 3 days after surgery. Prior to this they were allowed unlimited access to food and water. Control (non-streptozotocin treated) rats were run at the same time. Protein turnover was investigated by using /sup 15/N glycine. Preliminary results: diabetic rats given mostly fat as a calorie source survived well in the absence of exogenous insulin whereas those that were given glucose only as their non-protein calorie source showed poor survival even with exogenous insulin. N balance and protein turnover in the lipid treated diabetic rats were comparable to the non-diabetic control rats.

  5. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  6. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Parenteral Nutrition Preparation, Including Compounding: The ASPEN Model.

    PubMed

    Boullata, Joseph I; Holcombe, Beverly; Sacks, Gordon; Gervasio, Jane; Adams, Stephen C; Christensen, Michael; Durfee, Sharon; Ayers, Phil; Marshall, Neil; Guenter, Peggi

    2016-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication with a complex drug use process. Key steps in the process include the review of each PN prescription followed by the preparation of the formulation. The preparation step includes compounding the PN or activating a standardized commercially available PN product. The verification and review, as well as preparation of this complex therapy, require competency that may be determined by using a standardized process for pharmacists and for pharmacy technicians involved with PN. An American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standardized model for PN order review and PN preparation competencies is proposed based on a competency framework, the ASPEN-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines, and is intended for institutions and agencies to use with their staff. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  7. L-carnitine and cancer cachexia. II. Effects of lipid emulsion used in total parenteral nutrition on parameters of hemostasis and inflammatory state in L-carnitine deficiency in myocytes.

    PubMed

    Szefel, Jarosław; Kruszewski, Wiesław Janusz; Ciesielski, Maciej; Szajewski, Mariusz; Kawecki, Krzysztof; Jankun, Jerzy; Lysiak-Szydłowska, Wiesława

    2012-07-01

    Cancer cachexia (CC), a progressive loss of body mass, leads to malnutrition and deficiencies of essential substances including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and L-carnitine (LC). The availability of these 2 compounds determines the rate of eicosanoid synthesis, which modulates inflammatory processes and hemostasis. We compared the effects of administration of emulsions containing long chain triglycerides (LCTs) relative to a 50:50 mix of medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) with LCTs on hemostasis and inflammatory reactions in patients with CC. The study was conducted on 50 patients with CC (23 women, 27 men) aged 66 ± 11 years with a mean loss in body weight of 21 ± 9% in the previous 6 months. Twenty patients received MCTs/LCTs while 30 received LCTs. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was administered using the 'all in one' method (25 kcal/kg/day, protein 1.2 g/kg/day). Selected parameters of coagulation and inflammatory state were evaluated on days 1, 5, 7 and 11 of TPN. Initial concentrations of D-dimers, fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), fibronectin, CRP and IL-6 significantly exceeded the upper limit of the reference values. After 10 days of TPN, we detected significant differences in inflammatory state and hemostasis. Immunological state and hemostasis varied depending on the type of fat emulsion administered. The most likely reasons are the 2-fold higher concentrations of PUFAs in LCTs relative to MCTs/LCTs and a deficiency of LC in skeletal muscles. Both of these factors may contribute to the observed increase in the rate of eicosanoid synthesis.

  8. Effect of large doses of parenteral vitamin D on glycaemic control and calcium/phosphate metabolism in patients with stable type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomised, placebo-controlled, prospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jehle, Sigrid; Lardi, Alessia; Felix, Barbara; Hulter, Henry N; Stettler, Christoph; Krapf, Reto

    2014-03-20

    Vitamin D (D₃) status is reported to correlate negatively with insulin production and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, few placebo-controlled intervention data are available. We aimed to assess the effect of large doses of parenteral D3 on glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(₁c)) and estimates of insulin action (homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance: HOMA-IR) in patients with stable T2DM. We performed a prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study at a single university care setting in Switzerland. Fifty-five patients of both genders with T2DM of more than 10 years were enrolled and randomised to either 300,000 IU D₃ or placebo, intramuscularly. The primary endpoint was the intergroup difference in HbA(₁c) levels. Secondary endpoints were: changes in insulin sensitivity, albuminuria, calcium/phosphate metabolism, activity of the renin-aldosterone axis and changes in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure values. After 6 months of D₃ supply, there was a significant intergroup difference in the change in HbA(₁c) levels (relative change [mean ± standard deviation] +2.9% ± 1.5% in the D₃ group vs +6.9% ± 2.1% the in placebo group, p = 0.041) as HOMA-IR decreased by 12.8% ± 5.6% in the D₃ group and increased by 10% ± 5.4% in the placebo group (intergroup difference, p = 0.032). Twenty-four-hour urinary albumin excretion decreased in the D₃ group from 200 ± 41 to 126 ± 39, p = 0.021). There was no significant intergroup difference for the other secondary endpoints. D₃ improved insulin sensitivity (based on HOMA-IR) and affected the course of HbA(₁c) positively compared with placebo in patients with T2DM.

  9. [Safety aspects of parenteral iron supplementation therapies in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Potthoff, S A; Münch, H G

    2013-06-01

    Iron deficiency often occurs in patients with chronic kidney disease and can be effectively treated with parenteral supplementation of iron. In these patients, prompt application of iron therapy can help to reduce the dependence of erythropoietin-stimulating agents and effectively treat anemia. Correct evaluation of iron metabolism in CKD patients can be difficult. Duration of and response to therapy should always be considered while planning parenteral supplementation of iron. The main safety aspects of parenteral iron preparations relate to their possible anaphylactic potential and the potential induction of oxidative stress due to the release of free iron. However, parenteral iron supplementation is usually safe and without major side effects. Regarding current data, none of the iron preparations is showing definitive superiority. Although uncommon, iron preparations containing dextran can lead to severe side effects, therefore these preparations appear to have an inferior safety profile. Due to limited data, a comparison of third-generation iron preparations with previous preparations is not possible. Recently, for the first time, the third generation iron preparation ferumoxytol has been directly compared to iron sucrose. From this data and others, it remains unclear whether third generation iron preparations show safety-relevant superiority.

  10. Course and outcome of parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis in neonates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (TPN-Chol) leads to significant morbidity and mortality. To assess the safety and effectiveness of potential interventions, it is necessary to evaluate the natural history of TPN-Chol. This retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the typical course...

  11. Chronic parenteral nutrition reduces lean tissue growth and induces insulin resistance in neonatal piglets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most very low birthweight infants receive their nutrition parenterally prior to achieving full enteral feedings. Recent studies indicate that infants born less than 32 weeks gestation showed evidence of insulin resistance at 4 to 10 years. However, there is little information regarding the effect of...

  12. Stability of sulbactam/ampicillin in diluents for parenteral administration.

    PubMed

    Mushinsky, R F; Reynolds, M L; Nicholson, C A; Crider, L L; Forcier, G A

    1986-01-01

    Compatibility studies were conducted of sulbactam/ampicillin in infusion diluents that are reported to be compatible with ampicillin sodium. A high-performance liquid chromatographic system that simultaneously detects sulbactam and ampicillin was used to determine whether the infusion diluents and the conditions of use recommended for ampicillin sodium are applicable to sulbactam/ampicillin. The results show that the sulbactam/ampicillin preparation for parenteral administration is compatible with all diluents recommended for ampicillin sodium. In all diluents sulbactam was more stable than ampicillin. At the end of the reported use periods, the average retention value for sulbactam in the combination solutions was 96% (range, 91%-101%), whereas the average retention value for ampicillin in the same solutions was 90% (range, 84%-95%). The presence of sulbactam had no adverse effect on the stability of ampicillin. The average retention value for ampicillin alone in the same diluents was 92% (range, 82%-99%). The conditions of use for sulbactam/ampicillin in diluents for parenteral administration are unrestricted by the presence of sulbactam and are, in fact, governed by those of ampicillin sodium.

  13. Parenteral arginine infusion in humans: nutrient substrate or pharmacologic agent?

    PubMed

    Sigal, R K; Shou, J; Daly, J M

    1992-01-01

    When given as a dietary supplement, arginine enhances lymphocyte mitogenesis and improves nitrogen balance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate arginine's ability to mediate these same effects when given as the sole nitrogen source with minimum additional calories. Thirty patients were randomized to receive 20 g/day arginine hydrochloride or a mixed amino acid solution (Travasol) by intravenous infusion for 7 days after abdominal operations. Mean patient age, body weight, gender ratios, and preoperative degree of weight loss were similar between groups. Mean plasma arginine and ornithine levels rose to 228 +/- 50 mumol/L and 191 +/- 76 mumol/L in the arginine group during infusion. Mean nitrogen balance was -8.8 g/day and -9.2 g/day in the arginine and Travasol groups, respectively. Mean lymphocyte stimulation indices to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin fell on postoperative day 1 in both groups. No significant differences in patterns of lymphocyte mitogenesis changes were noted between groups. The mean total number of circulating T cells increased in the arginine group at postoperative day 7. Thus, parenteral arginine infusion in postoperative patients provided comparable nitrogen balance to a balanced amino acid solution but did not increase peripheral blood lymphocyte mitogenesis. When arginine is given parenterally as the sole nitrogen source with minimal additional calories to postoperative patients, no enhancement of mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation could be demonstrated.

  14. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  15. Micronutrients in parenteral nutrition: boron, silicon, and fluoride.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Forrest H

    2009-11-01

    Boron may be beneficial for bone growth and maintenance, central nervous system function, and the inflammatory response, and silicon may be beneficial for bone maintenance and wound healing. Fluoride is not an essential element but amounts provided by contamination may be beneficial for bone strength. Fluoride toxicity may be a concern in parenteral nutrition. Further studies are warranted to determine whether there are optimal amounts of boron and silicon that should be delivered to typical and special population patients receiving parenteral nutrition. In addition, further studies are needed to determine whether providing the dietary guideline of adequate intake amounts of fluoride parenterally would prevent or treat parenteral nutrition osteopenia.

  16. Parenteral anticoagulation in ambulatory patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Akl, Elie A; Kahale, Lara A; Hakoum, Maram B; Matar, Charbel F; Sperati, Francesca; Barba, Maddalena; Yosuico, Victor E D; Terrenato, Irene; Synnot, Anneliese; Schünemann, Holger

    2017-09-11

    Anticoagulation may improve survival in patients with cancer through a speculated anti-tumour effect, in addition to the antithrombotic effect, although may increase the risk of bleeding. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of parenteral anticoagulants in ambulatory patients with cancer who, typically, are undergoing chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, immunotherapy or radiotherapy, but otherwise have no standard therapeutic or prophylactic indication for anticoagulation. A comprehensive search included (1) a major electronic search (February 2016) of the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1946 to February 2016; accessed via OVID) and Embase (1980 to February 2016; accessed via OVID); (2) handsearching of conference proceedings; (3) checking of references of included studies; (4) use of the 'related citation' feature in PubMed and (5) a search for ongoing studies in trial registries. As part of the living systematic review approach, we are running searches continually and we will incorporate new evidence rapidly after it is identified. This update of the systematic review is based on the findings of a literature search conducted on 14 August, 2017. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the benefits and harms of parenteral anticoagulation in ambulatory patients with cancer. Typically, these patients are undergoing chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, immunotherapy or radiotherapy, but otherwise have no standard therapeutic or prophylactic indication for anticoagulation. Using a standardized form we extracted data in duplicate on study design, participants, interventions outcomes of interest, and risk of bias. Outcomes of interested included all-cause mortality, symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE), symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), major bleeding, minor bleeding, and quality of life. We assessed the certainty of evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach

  17. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically ill-patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bordejé Laguna, L; Lorencio Cárdenas, C; Acosta Escribano, J

    2011-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) causes local and systemic complications leading to high catabolic, hypermetabolic and hyperdynamic stress states with marked morbidity and mortality. In the last decade, nutritional support has become a key element in the treatment of SAP. Thus, specialized nutrition is indicated from admission, with enteral nutrition being preferred to parenteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition should be initiated early using infusion through the jejunum beyond the ligament of Treitz to minimize pancreatic stress. There are no specific studies that establish the type of diet to be used but experts recommend the use of polymeric diets. Parenteral nutrition, without a specific formula, is indicated in patients with SAP who are intolerant to enteral nutrition or when the clinical signs of pancreatitis are exacerbated or aggravated by enteral nutrition. Even so, a minimal level of enteral infusion should be maintained to preserve the trophic effect of the intestinal mucosa. In the last few years, several studies of the administration of immunomodulatory diets in patients with SAP have been carried out to demonstrate their effects on the course of the disease. However, there are few clear recommendations on the prognostic benefits of pharmaconutrient enriched diets in these patients. There is substantial scientific evidence suggesting that the only clear indication for pharmaconutrition in patients with SAP is parenteral glutamine administration, which is recommended by all clinical guidelines with distinct grades of evidence.

  18. Fish oils in parenteral nutrition: Why could these be important for gastrointestinal oncology?

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2015-01-01

    By the time a gastroenterology patient is moved to parenteral nutrition, he or she is usually in poor health. All parenteral nutrition formulae contain essential nutrients, avoiding components that could cause an adverse reaction. The lipid component is often provided by a soy extract, containing all the fatty acids considered to be essential in the diet. Several trials have considered parenteral nutrition formulas with added fish oils, high in the long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Given the range of biological functions associated with such compounds, especially in reducing inflammatory symptoms, this move would appear rational. However, while data from such trials are often positive, there has been variability among results. Some of this variability could be caused by environmental contaminants in the fish, and/or oxidation of the lipids because of poor storage. The situation is complicated by a recent report that fish oils may counter the effects of platinum chemotherapy. However, this effect associated with a minor component, hexadeca-4,7,10,13-tetraenoic acid. It is suggested that pure DHA and EPA would be beneficial additions to parenteral nutrition, reducing the probability of carcinogenesis and enhancing rational disease management. However, the jury is still out on fish oils more generally. PMID:26380055

  19. Home parenteral nutrition in children: the Polish experience.

    PubMed

    Ksiazyk, J; Lyszkowska, M; Kierkus, J; Bogucki, K; Ratyńska, A; Tondys, B; Socha, J

    1999-02-01

    Home parenteral nutrition has become routine for management of intestinal failure in patients. In Poland the main obstacle to widespread use of home parenteral nutrition is the lack of interest of commercial companies in delivering feedings and ancillaries to patients. Twenty-five home parenteral nutrition patients aged from 4 months to more than 13 years were reviewed. The mother or both parents were trained in home parenteral nutrition techniques for 4 to 6 weeks and compounded the nutrients themselves at home. The mean duration of home parenteral nutrition was 10,117 patient days. Hospital stays of patients receiving parenteral feedings were significantly shorter than the duration of administration of home parenteral nutrition (p < 0.001). Eleven children are continuing the home parenteral nutrition program. Eighty-three catheters were used in these patients. The rate of catheter occlusion decreased within the observation period, and in 1997 not one case of occlusion was observed. In 1997 only three catheters were removed during 7.8 patient years, and the overall incidence of catheter-related complications was 0.38 per patient year. The overall occurrence of septicemia was one case in 516 days and of catheter infection was one in 459 days. In 1997 a catheter was infected on average of once every 1419 days. There was significant improvement in the z score for weight during therapy. The average monthly cost of nutrients and ancillary items was approximately $1200 (4200 Polish zlotys [PLN]). These costs are 1.6 to 3 times lower than those recorded in other studies. Home parenteral nutrition in children with nutrients mixed by caregivers in the home setting is a safe and appropriate method of treatment that can be used in countries where home parenteral nutrition solutions are not manufactured or where commercial home parenteral nutrition is not economically feasible.

  20. Early Agriculture: Land Clearance and Climate Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddiman, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    In the 2003 AGU Emiliani Lecture, I proposed the 'early anthropogenic hypothesis' --the idea that major anthropogenic effects on greenhouse gases and climate occurred thousands of years before the industrial era. In the decade since then, several dozen published papers have argued its pros and cons. In the 2013 Tyndall History of Global Change Lecture I will update where matters now stand. I will show figures from the 2003 Climate Change paper that laid out the initial hypothesis, and then update subsequent evidence from ice-core drilling, archeology, and land-use histories. The primary claims in the 2003 hypothesis were these: (1) the CH4 rise since 5000 years ago is anthropogenic; (2) the CO2 rise since 7000 years ago is also anthropogenic; (3) the amount of carbon emitted from preindustrial deforestation was roughly twice the amount released during the industrial era; (4) global temperature would have been cooler by about 0.8oC by the start of the industrial era if agricultural CO2 and CH4 emissions had not occurred; (5) early anthropogenic warming prevented the inception of new ice sheets at high northern latitudes; and (6) pandemics and other population catastrophes during the last 2000 years caused CO2 decreases lasting decades to centuries. The new evidence shows that these claims have held up well. The late-Holocene CO2 and CH4 rises are anomalous compared to average gas trends during previous interglaciations of the last 800,000 years. Land-use models based on historical data simulate pre-industrial CO2 carbon releases more than twice the industrial amounts. Archeological estimates of CH4 emissions from expanding rice irrigation account for much of the late Holocene CH4 rise, even without including livestock emissions or biomass burning. Model simulations show that the large pre-industrial greenhouse-gas emissions indicated by these historical and archeological estimates would have warmed global climate by more than 1oC and prevented northern glacial

  1. Australasian Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines for supplementation of trace elements during parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Osland, Emma J; Ali, Azmat; Isenring, Elizabeth; Ball, Patrick; Davis, Melvyn; Gillanders, Lyn

    2014-01-01

    This work represents the first part of a progressive review of AuSPEN's 1999 Guidelines for Provision of Micronutrient Supplementation in Adult Patients receiving Parenteral Nutrition, in recognition of the developments in the literature on this topic since that time. A systematic literature review was undertaken and recommendations were made based on the available evidence and with consideration to specific elements of the Australian and New Zealand practice environment. The strength of evidence underpinning each recommendation was assessed. External reviewers provided feedback on the guidelines using the AGREE II tool. Reduced doses of manganese, copper, chromium and molybdenum, and an increased dose of selenium are recommended when compared with the 1999 guidelines. Currently the composition of available multi-trace element formulations is recognised as an obstacle to aligning these guidelines with practice. A paucity of available literature and limitations with currently available methods of monitoring trace element status are acknowledged. The currently unknown clinical impact of changes to trace element contamination of parenteral solutions with contemporary practices highlights need for research and clinical vigilance in this area of nutrition support practice. Trace elements are essential and should be provided daily to patients receiving parenteral nutrition. Monitoring is generally only required in longer term parenteral nutrition, however should be determined on an individual basis. Industry is encouraged to modify existing multi-trace element solutions available in Australia and New Zealand to reflect changes in the literature outlined in these guidelines. Areas requiring research are highlighted.

  2. [Complications of peripheral parenteral nutrition. Clinical observations of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Tomàs Tomàs, M M; Pérez Juan, E; Amorós Cerdá, S M

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) is artificial nutrition used when digestive absorption is insufficient. It supplies the nutritional needs of the patient and permits administration through a peripheral catheter. WE PRESENT 2 CLINICAL CASES: The first one entails an epidermolisis through extravasation masked by temporo-spatial disorientation of the patient with appearance of flictenes (blisters). Prolonged treatment and consultation with plastic surgery were required. The second case entails a chemical phlebitis with early detection by nursing professionals. It was resolved with short term treatment and did not require consultation with the plastic surgeon. We elaborated a care plan aimed at identifying real or potential problems related with possible complications of intravenous PPN administration, such as phlebitis and extravasation. The aim of this research was prevention, early detection and treatment. Phlebitis is related with catheter characteristics, in-dwelling time and high osmolarity of PPN. Early action decreases injury of the affected tissue. In case 1, the patient requires 19 days of curing. This was only 72 h in case 2. The nursing staff plays an essential role in catheter election, localization, administration and preventing complications. Staff training and a procedure protocol greatly reduce the incidence of phlebitis, avoid discomfort for the patient and reduce health care cost. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Activity of alpha-fucosidase and beta-glucuronidase in serum and urine of patients administered parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Raczkowska, Katarzyna; Szajda, Slawomir Dariusz; Raczkowski, Krzysztof; Zasadowska, Wioletta; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Kepka, Alina; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Knaś, Malgorzata; Snarska, Jadwiga; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Ladny, Jerzy Robert

    2013-01-01

    In hospital patients suffering from adverse clinical and biochemical symptoms of malnutrition, it is often necessary to employ parenteral nutrition to avoid the body's tissue becoming broken down by being metabolised. Thus, the patient's welfare and survival can be supported throughout any periods of medical crisis. Two of the enzymes responsible for metabolising glycoconjugates are alpha-fucosidase (FUC) and beta-glucuronidase (GLU), present in lysosomes. They release fucose or glucuronic acid from the non-reducing end of oligosaccharide chains. To determine the effect of parenteral nutrition administered to ill patients, on glycoconjugate metabolism, by measuring serum and urinary activities of FUC and GLU. Material and methods. Blood samples and the daily urine collection were taken from 23 patients' who had been undergoing parenteral nutrition for either 5 or 10 days, as well as from a baseline sample. Enzyme activities in serum and urine were determined by the method of Zwierz et al. Serum FUC activities were significantly lower after 10 days compared to 5, (p< 0.0172), whereas GLU activities were significantly lower after both 5 and 10 days, (p< 0.0007 and p< 0.0208 respectively), compared to levels before starting parenteral nutrition. GLU activities were however higher after 10 days than those after 5 days, (p< 0.0023). In urine, FUC activities were significantly decreased after 10 days compared to 5 days after starting parenteral nutrition, (p< 0.0245). Urine GLU activities were unaffected by parenteral nutrition nor was any effect seen on FUC or GLU activities when calculated per 1mg creatinine. Serum FUC and GLU activities can be used for assessing the effect of parenteral nutrition on glycoconjugate metabolism. The significant decreases of serum GLU activity observed after 5 and 10 days, may serve to indicate that the components of parental nutrition are appropriate and that the body has become suitably adapted to this form of nutrition.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of early responders versus early nonresponders to atypical antipsychotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaomei; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Faries, Douglas E; Stauffer, Virginia L; Kollack-Walker, Sara; Kinon, Bruce J; Kane, John M

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the cost-effectiveness of treating early responders versus early nonresponders to an atypical antipsychotic (risperidone) and the cost-effectiveness of treating early nonresponders maintained on risperidone versus those switched to olanzapine. Methods: This post hoc analysis used data from a randomized, double-blind, 12-week schizophrenia study (Study Code: HGMN, n = 628). Participants were initially assigned to risperidone therapy. Early response was defined as a ≥ 20% improvement on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score from baseline to two weeks. Early responders continued on risperidone, whereas early nonresponders were randomized in a double-blind manner to continue on risperidone or switch to olanzapine for 10 additional weeks. Early responders and early nonresponders maintained on risperidone were compared for health-state utilities (benefits) and total cost over the 12-week study; early nonresponders maintained on risperidone or switched to olanzapine were compared from randomization (10-week period). Utilities were derived from the PANSS and adverse events. Mixed models were used to assess group differences in utilities. Treatment costs were calculated based on health states. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were then utilized to compare treatment groups. Results: Early responders to risperidone had significantly greater total utility and lower total treatment costs than early nonresponders to risperidone. Compared with early nonresponders who continued on risperidone, those who were switched to olanzapine had significantly higher total utility scores at endpoint and numerically lower total treatment costs, reflecting significantly lower nonmedication treatment costs, even though medication costs were significantly higher compared with generic risperidone. Conclusion: Treatment of early responders was more cost-effective than treatment of early nonresponders to atypical antipsychotic therapy. Switching

  5. Analgesic Effects of Inhalation of Nitric Oxide (Entonox) and Parenteral Morphine Sulfate in Patients with Renal Colic; A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kariman, Hamid; Majidi, Alireza; Taheri, Sara; Shahrami, Ali; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the analgesiceffects of Nitrous oxide and morphine sulfate in patients with acute renal colic due to urolithiasis. Methods: This was randomized clinical trial being performed in Imam Hossein hospital affiliated with Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences during a 1-year period from May2013 to May2014.  A total of number of 100 patients, with an age range of 20-50 years, who presented with renal colic secondary to urolithiasis confirmed by ultrasonography were randomly assigned to receive morphine sulfate injection (0.1 mg/kg) with 100 mg diclofenac suppository (n=50) or Entonox exhalation (50% nitric oxide and 50% oxygen) for 30-minutes with 100 mg diclofenac suppository (n=50). Quantitative measurement was of pain was performed according to a visual analogue scale (VAS), before, 3, 5, 10 and 30-minute after the intervention. The pain severity and side effects were measured between two study groups. Results: The baseline characteristics of the patients in two study groups were comparable. The frequencies of pain persistence (at least 50%) at 3-, 5-, 10- and 30-minute intervals in morphine sulfategroup were 96%, 80%, 50% and 8%, respectively; these frequencies in Entonex  were 82%, 42%, 12% and 2%, respectively (p<0.001). Cox regression modeling showed that use of Entonox was the only effective agent in the success of treatment, compared to the use of morphine, i.e. use of Entonox increased the success of treatment up to 2.1 folds compared to the use of morphine (HR=2.1; 95% CI: 1.2-3.6; p=0.006). Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrate that inhalation of Entonox is an effective and safe analgesic regimen for acute renal colic. It acts more rapidly and is more potent in relieving renal colic when compared to morphine sulfate.Entonox can be regarded as an appropriate alternative to analgesics like opioids in this ground. PMID:27162902

  6. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  7. Iron distribution and histopathological characterization of the liver and heart of β-thalassemic mice with parenteral iron overload: Effects of deferoxamine and deferiprone.

    PubMed

    Yatmark, Paranee; Morales, Noppawan Phumala; Chaisri, Urai; Wichaiyo, Surasak; Hemstapat, Warinkarn; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Svasti, Saovaros; Fucharoen, Suthat

    2014-09-01

    The liver and heart are the major target organs for iron accumulation and iron toxicity in β-thalassemia. To mimic the phenomenon of heavy iron overload resulting from repeated blood transfusions, a total of 180 mg of iron dextran was intraperitoneally injected into C57BL/6J mice (WT) and heterozygous β-globin knockout mice ((mu)β(th-3/+), BKO). The effects of deferiprone and deferoxamine in this model were investigated. The iron was distributed homogenously throughout the 4 liver lobes (left, caudate, right and median) and was present in hepatocytes, Kupffer cells and the sinusoidal space. Iron accumulation in phagocytic macrophages, recruitment of hepatic lymphocytes and nucleus membrane degeneration were observed as a result of iron overload in the WT and BKO mice. However, the expansion of hepatic extramedullary hematopoiesis was observed only in the BKO mice with iron overload. In the heart, the iron accumulated in the cardiac interstitium and myocytes, and moderate hypertrophy of the myocardial fibers and cardiac myocyte degeneration were observed. Although the total liver iron was not significantly altered by iron chelation therapy, image analysis demonstrated a difference in the efficacies of two iron chelators. The major site of chelation was the extracellular compartment, but treatment with deferiprone also resulted in intracellular iron chelation. Interestingly, iron chelators reversed the pathological changes resulting from iron overload in WT and BKO mice despite being used for only a short treatment period. We suggest that some of these effects may be secondary to the anti-inflammatory activity of the chelators.

  8. Oxidation of parenteral lipid emulsion by ambient and phototherapy lights: potential toxicity of routine parenteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Neuzil, J; Darlow, B A; Inder, T E; Sluis, K B; Winterbourn, C C; Stocker, R

    1995-05-01

    Vitamin E can be a prooxidant in isolated lipoprotein suspensions. Because lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition are lipoprotein-like suspensions rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E, we hypothesized that vitamin E may act as a prooxidant in lipid emulsions, as it is in lipoprotein suspensions. We therefore exposed an intravenously administered lipid emulsion (Intralipid) to a single spotlight commonly used in the treatment of neonatal jaundice, and measured the formation of triglyceride hydroperoxides by using high-performance liquid chromatography with postcolumn chemiluminescence detection. Concentrations of these hydroperoxides in different batches of fresh intralipid were usually approximately 10 mumol/L but increased up to 60 times after exposure to phototherapy light for a period of 24 hours, even though significant amounts of vitamin E were present at the end of the exposure. Triglyceride hydroperoxides were formed during phototherapy light exposure whether the intralipid was in plastic tubing used routinely for infusion or in glass containers. Ambient light also caused significant peroxidation of the formula lipids, although to a much lesser extent than observed with phototherapy light. For infants in the neonatal intensive care unit who were receiving intralipid but not phototherapy, solutions being infused at the end of 24 hours contained a mean of 40 mumol/L hydroperoxides. For infants receiving phototherapy, the mean was 97 mumol/L. Phototherapy light-induced formation of triglyceride hydroperoxides was prevented by covering the intralipid with aluminum foil or supplementation with sodium ascorbate before light exposure. We conclude that intralipid is highly susceptible to oxidation and that elevated levels of oxidized lipids can be formed during its clinical use, especially when intralipid infusion is combined with phototherapy. Because lipid hydroperoxides are cytotoxic and can cause adverse effects, inadvertent infusion of rancid

  9. Ursodiol in patients with parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis.

    PubMed

    San Luis, Valerie A; Btaiche, Imad F

    2007-11-01

    To review the role of ursodeoxycholic acid (ursodiol) in treating parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC). A MEDLINE (1950-May 2007) search was performed using the key terms parenteral nutrition, cholestasis, ursodeoxycholic acid, and ursodiol. All English-language articles that evaluated the safety and efficacy of ursodiol for PNAC were included in this review. The benefits of exogenous ursodiol administration in the treatment of cholestasis can be explained by its alteration of effects on bile composition and flow and provision of cytoprotective, membrane stabilizing, and immunomodulatory effects. Two animal studies, 2 case reports, and 6 human studies (2 prospective and 3 retrospective pediatric studies, 1 adult prospective study) evaluated the efficacy of ursodiol in patients with PNAC. Ursodiol 10-30 mg/kg/day in children and 10-15 mg/kg/day in adults administered in 2-3 doses improved the biochemical and clinical signs and symptoms of PNAC. However, short-term improvement in biochemical parameters may not necessarily predict the outcome of PNAC patients. At recommended doses, ursodiol may not be effective in patients with short bowel syndrome or in those with resected terminal ileum because of reduced ursodiol absorption. Studies supporting the efficacy of ursodiol in treatment of PNAC are limited by small sample size, absence of randomization and controls, short duration, and lack of accountancy to confounding variables. Large, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, long-term follow-up studies evaluating the efficacy and optimal dosing and duration of ursodiol therapy for PNAC are not yet available. Ursodiol may improve the biochemical signs and clinical symptoms of PNAC. However, optimal dosing, timing, duration of therapy, and long-term effects on PNAC outcome and prognosis require further studies.

  10. Effective Early Learning: Mapping Diversity and Tracking Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascal, Christine

    This paper describes and reviews the Effective Early Learning (EEL) Research Project's approach to quality evaluation and improvement in early childhood settings in the United Kingdom which focuses primarily on enhancing the effectiveness of the early learning experiences of young children. The project began work in May 1993 and is completing its…

  11. Two doses of parenterally administered split influenza virus vaccine elicited high serum IgG concentrations which effectively limited viral shedding upon challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Hovden, A-O; Cox, R J; Madhun, A; Haaheim, L R

    2005-10-01

    We have previously found that whole influenza virus vaccine induced a more rapid and stronger humoral response, particularly after the first dose of vaccine, than split virus vaccine in mice. In this study, we have evaluated the protective efficacy of whole and split influenza virus vaccines in mice using a nonlethal upper respiratory tract challenge model. We have also investigated the immunological correlates associated with no or very little viral shedding after viral challenge. Vaccination resulted in reduced viral shedding and shortened the duration of infection by at least 2 days. After one dose of vaccine, whole virus vaccine generally resulted in less viral shedding than split virus vaccine. In contrast, two doses of split virus vaccine, particularly the highest vaccine strengths of 15 and 30 microg HA, most effectively limited viral replication and these mice had high concentrations of prechallenge influenza-specific serum IgG. The vaccine formulation influenced the IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, and this IgG subclass profile was maintained upon challenge to some extent, although it did not influence the level of viral shedding. The concentration of postvaccination serum IgG showed an inverse relationship with the level of viral shedding after viral challenge. Therefore, serum IgG is an important factor in limiting viral replication in the upper respiratory tract upon challenge of an antigenically similar virus.

  12. Timing of (supplemental) parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bost, Rianne Bc; Tjan, Dave Ht; van Zanten, Arthur Rh

    2014-01-01

    Supplemental parenteral nutrition (SPN) is used in a step-up approach when full enteral support is contraindicated or fails to reach caloric targets. Recent nutrition guidelines present divergent advices regarding timing of SPN in critically ill patients ranging from early SPN (<48 h after admission; EPN) to postponing initiation of SPN until day 8 after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission (LPN). This systematic review summarizes results of prospective studies among adult ICU patients addressing the best timing of (supplemental) parenteral nutrition (S)PN. A structured PubMed search was conducted to identify eligible articles. Articles were screened and selected using predetermined criteria and appraised for relevance and validity. After critical appraisal, four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and two prospective observational studies remained. One RCT found a higher percentage of alive discharge from the ICU at day 8 in the LPN group compared to EPN group (p = 0.007) but no differences in ICU and in-hospital mortality. None of the other RCTs found differences in ICU or in-hospital mortality rates. Contradicting or divergent results on other secondary outcomes were found for ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay, infection rates, nutrition targets, duration of mechanical ventilation, glucose control, duration of renal replacement therapy, muscle wasting and fat loss. Although the heterogeneity in quality and design of relevant studies precludes firm conclusions, it is reasonable to assume that in adult critically ill patients, there are no clinically relevant benefits of EPN compared with LPN with respect to morbidity or mortality end points, when full enteral support is contraindicated or fails to reach caloric targets. However, considering that infectious morbidity and resolution of organ failure may be negatively affected through mechanisms not yet clearly understood and acquisition costs of parenteral nutrition are higher, the early

  13. Effects of parenteral administration of doramectin or a combination of ivermectin and clorsulon on control of gastrointestinal nematode and liver fluke infections and on growth performance in cattle.

    PubMed

    Loyacano, A F; Skogerboe, T L; Williams, J C; DeRosa, A A; Gurie, J A; Shostrom, V K

    2001-05-01

    To compare effects of an injectable doramectin preparation with those of an injectable ivermectin-clorsulon preparation on control of gastrointestinal nematodes and liver flukes and on growth performance in cattle. Randomized complete block design. 60 crossbred calves. Calves (20/treatment group) were treated with doramectin or ivermectin-clorsulon or were not treated. Fecal samples were collected for nematode and Fasciola hepatica egg counts on day 0 and for up to 140 days after treatment. Cattle were weighed before treatment and at 28-day intervals until day 140. From day 7 through day 49, nematode egg counts for calves treated with doramectin or with ivermectin-clorsulon were significantly lower than those for untreated control calves. As the study progressed beyond day 56, the percentages of cattle with fluke eggs in their feces increased, but differences in regard to these percentages were not detected among the 3 groups. Average daily gain for the doramectin-treated cattle (0.79 kg/d [1.74 lb/d]) was significantly greater than that for the cattle treated with ivermectin-clorsuIon (0.71 kg/d [1.56 lb/d]); values for both groups were significantly greater than that for the control cattle (0.62 kg/d [1.37 lb/d]). Results suggest that doramectin had a greater impact on subclinical gastrointestinal tract parasitism in calves, as demonstrated by growth performance, than did ivermectin-clorsulon. In the Gulf Coast region of the United States, spring-born nursing beef calves may have minimal grazing exposure to F hepatica during the peak fluke transmission period; therefore, mature fluke burdens may be negligible at the beginning of the fall season.

  14. Parenteral nutrition product shortages: impact on safety.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Beverly

    2012-03-01

    The drug shortage crisis continues in the United States and threatens the integrity of the pharmaceutical supply chain and compromises patient care, especially patients requiring parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy. The number of new drug shortages has increased rapidly over the past 5 years, with the most significant increase in sterile injectable products. The most common reason for a shortage of a sterile injectable medication is a product quality issue. Two surveys of healthcare professionals have assessed the impact of drug shortages on patient safety. Participants in one survey reported over 1000 medication errors or patient adverse events as the result of shortages. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition also conducted a survey of healthcare professionals regarding PN product shortages and the associated patient care implications. Safety risks were reported throughout the entire PN process, from procurement of PN products to patient outcomes. Providing PN therapy during product shortages requires vigilance and continuous assessment of the entire PN process to optimize patient care quality and avoid patient harm.

  15. [Parenteral nutrition in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gómez Alvarez, M E

    2004-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a sophisticated procedure used in the treatment of solid tumors, haematological diseases and autoimmune disorders, which were characterized by an extremely poor prognosis only a few years earlier. Thousands of patients receive high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy around the world every year in order to treat these diseases. Therapy can induce aggressive changes associated with multiple organ failure, which is usually reversible, that can lead to special nutritional and metabolic conditions. Artificial nutrition, total parenteral nutrition in particular, is provided to patients undergoing HSCT to help minimize nutritional consequences of both conditioning regimens (mucositis, malabsorption, etc.) as well as complications resulting from the procedure (graft versus host disease, venoocclusive disease of the liver). This study reviews published guidelines for the use of parenteral nutrition in HSCT and includes important aspects for nutritional support in children, including controversy on potential benefits of special nutrients (glutamine, antioxidants, etc.) and furthermore discusses future trends. This paper also addresses the pharmacists role and the necessity for multidisciplinary teams to develop specific protocols.

  16. Home parenteral nutrition in chronic intestinal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Bisset, W M; Stapleford, P; Long, S; Chamberlain, A; Sokel, B; Milla, P J

    1992-01-01

    In children with severe failure of intestinal function, intravenous nutrition is at present the only treatment able to maintain adequate nutrition for prolonged periods of time. Over the last five years we have discharged 10 patients home on parenteral nutrition for a total of 25 patient years and here the outcome of these children is presented. Of the 10 patients, one has discontinued home parenteral nutrition (HPN), seven patients remain well, one patient has recently moved to the USA, and one patient has died after major abdominal surgery. All children had either normal or an accelerated rate of growth on HPN and developmentally all have progressed well. All the children over 5 years attend normal schools. The major complication of treatment was line sepsis with an overall rate of one episode in 476 days and a total of nine central lines (five patients) have required replacement giving an average line life of 680 days. For those children unfortunate enough to suffer from severe intestinal failure, HPN is preferable to prolonged hospital treatment and offers the chance of a good quality of life with prolonged survival. PMID:1739322

  17. ASPEN statement on parenteral nutrition standardization.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, Marty; Guenter, Peggi; Holcombe, Beverly; Malone, Ainsley; Mirtallo, Jay

    2007-01-01

    In response to questions regarding use of standardized parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) developed a Task Force to address some of these issues. A.S.P.E.N. envisions standardized PN as a broader issue rather than simply using a standardized, commercially available PN product. A standardized process for PN must be explored in order to improve patient safety and clinical appropriateness, and to maximize resource efficiency. A standardized process may include use of standardized PN formulations (including standardized, commercial PN products) but also includes aspects of ordering, labeling, screening, compounding, and administration of PN. A safe PN system must exist which minimizes procedural incidents and maximizes the ability to meet individual patient requirements. Using clinicians with nutrition support therapy expertise will contribute to that safe PN system. The purpose of this statement is to present the published literature associated with standardized PN formulations, to provide recommendations, and to identify areas in need of future research.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of chlorambucil delivered in parenteral emulsion.

    PubMed

    Ganta, Srinivas; Paxton, James W; Baguley, Bruce C; Garg, Sanjay

    2008-08-06

    The aim was to assess the pharmacokinetics and anticancer activity of chlorambucil (CHL) incorporated in a parenteral emulsion (PE). A chlorambucil-loaded PE was prepared by a high energy ultrasonication method. Soybean oil was chosen as a triglyceride oil core and egg phosphatidylcholine as an emulsifier in the formulation. The particle size distribution and zeta potential were measured using Zetasizer. The results showed that the average encapsulation efficiency of chlorambucil-loaded parenteral emulsion (CHL-PE) was 98.6+/-3.2% with a particle size of 182.7+/-0.8 nm, and a zeta-potential of -37.2+/-1.1 mV. Osmolality and pH of the formulation were 305.6+/-2.3 mOsm/kg and 7.4, respectively. The chlorambucil was stable in the PE for at least 6 months stored at 4-8 degrees C. The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and anticancer activity of CHL-PE and chlorambucil solution were studied after intravenous administration to C57 BL/6 male mice. CHL-PE exhibited a significantly greater AUC 0-infinity (32.4+/-0.1 microg/ml h vs. 16.9+/-0.1 microg/ml h), mean residence time (MRT) (1.32+/-0.01 h vs. 0.30+/-0.01 h), volume of distribution (409+/-15 ml/kg vs. 180+/-7 ml/kg) and elimination half-life (1.83+/-0.1h vs. 0.27+/-0.02 h) (all P<0.01), and a significantly reduced plasma clearance (309+/-16 ml/(h kg) vs. 591+/-4 ml/(h kg), P<0.01) compared to the CHL. In addition CHL-PE treatment caused significantly greater tumour growth suppression rate (% T/C) of the colon-38 adenocarcinoma in the mouse compared to CHL treatment (% T/C, 75+/-3.4% vs. 49+/-7.4%, P<0.01). These results suggest that CHL-PE could be an effective parenteral carrier for chlorambucil delivery in cancer treatment.

  19. Commercial premixed parenteral nutrition: Is it right for your institution?

    PubMed

    Miller, Sarah J

    2009-01-01

    Two-compartment premixed parenteral nutrition (PN) products are heavily promoted in the United States. These products may present safety advantages over PN solutions mixed by a local pharmacy, although clinical data to support this assertion are scarce. Multicompartment products can be labor-saving for pharmacy and therefore may be cost-effective for some institutions. Before adopting such products for use, an institution must determine that standardized PN solutions are acceptable for many or most of their patients compared with customized PN compounded specifically for individual patients. A larger selection of premixed products is available in Europe and some other parts of the world compared with the United States. Availability of a broader selection of products in the United States, including 3-compartment bags and a wider range of macronutrient concentrations and volumes, may make the use of such products more desirable in the future.

  20. An exclusively based parenteral fish-oil emulsion reverses cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Triana Junco, Miryam; García Vázquez, Natalia; Zozaya, Carlos; Ybarra Zabala, Marta; Abrams, Steven; García de Lorenzo, Abelardo; Sáenz de Pipaón Marcos, Miguel

    2014-10-25

    Prolonged parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to liver damage. Recent interest has focused on the lipid component of PN. A lipid emulsion based on w-3 fatty acids decrease conjugated bilirubin. A mixed lipid emulsion derived from soybean, coconut, olive, and fish oils reverses jaundice. Here we report the reversal of cholestasis and the improvement of enteral feeding tolerance in 1 infant with intestinal failure-associated liver disease. Treatment involved the substitution of a mixed lipid emulsion with one containing primarily omega-3 fatty acids during 37 days. Growth and biochemical tests of liver function improved significantly. This suggests that fat emulsions made from fish oils may be more effective means of treating this condition compared with an intravenous lipid emulsion containing soybean oil, medium -chain triglycerides, olive oil, and fish oil.

  1. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition in hemodialysis patients: Acute and chronic intervention.

    PubMed

    Avery-Lynch, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Protein and calorie malnutrition have been encountered more frequently than expected in the hemodialysis patients. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) has been documented to improve nutritional status in hemodialysis patients in both acute and chronic settings (Henrich, 1996). The aim of this study was to support the usage of IDPN in our malnourished hemodialysis patients. Serum concentration of albumin is one of the main indicators of mortality in the dialysis population. The serum albumin concentration for six out of eight of our hemodialysis (HD) patients receiving IDPN increased significantly. There was a mean increase of 7.0 g/L of plasma albumin for the eight patients assessed. These results demonstrate that IDPN is an effective nutritional intervention for malnourished hemodialysis patients.

  2. Effect of Early Expressed Human Milk on Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 and Short-Term Outcomes in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Francesca; Papacci, Patrizia; Costa, Simonetta; Giannantonio, Carmen; Cota, Francesco; Vento, Giovanni; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    Aims Preterm breast milk contains high levels of bioactive components, including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), that are reduced by Holder pasteurization. Animal studies have shown that milk-borne IGF-1 is likely absorbed intact in a bioactive form by the intestines. The aim of this study was to assess if early non-pasteurized expressed breast milk nutrition may affect IGF-1 plasma levels in premature infants. We also investigated the possible association between early expressed milk nutrition and short-term outcomes. Methods Fifty-two preterm infants with gestational age < 31 weeks were divided into two groups according to expressed breast milk intake (< or ≥ 50 mL/Kg/day) until 32 weeks of postmenstrual age when blood sampling for IGF-1 analysis was performed. Results In our population, early expressed breast milk does not affect IGF-1 plasma levels (p 0.48). An association was observed between early expressed milk nutrition and a lower incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, sepsis, feeding intolerance, need for parenteral nutrition and length of hospitalization. Conclusions Contrary to the results in some animal studies, our results did not seem to show that early expressed breast milk can help to maintain postnatal IGF-1 near foetal levels in preterm infants. The observed protective effect of expressed breast milk on short-term outcomes can be the starting point for further study of the effects of non-pasteurized human milk in preterm infants. PMID:27973552

  3. High-dose parenteral ascorbate enhanced chemosensitivity of ovarian cancer and reduced toxicity of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Chapman, Julia; Levine, Mark; Polireddy, Kishore; Drisko, Jeanne; Chen, Qi

    2014-02-05

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) was an early, unorthodox therapy for cancer, with an outstanding safety profile and anecdotal clinical benefit. Because oral ascorbate was ineffective in two cancer clinical trials, ascorbate was abandoned by conventional oncology but continued to be used in complementary and alternative medicine. Recent studies provide rationale for reexamining ascorbate treatment. Because of marked pharmacokinetic differences, intravenous, but not oral, ascorbate produces millimolar concentrations both in blood and in tissues, killing cancer cells without harming normal tissues. In the interstitial fluid surrounding tumor cells, millimolar concentrations of ascorbate exert local pro-oxidant effects by mediating hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) formation, which kills cancer cells. We investigated downstream mechanisms of ascorbate-induced cell death. Data show that millimolar ascorbate, acting as a pro-oxidant, induced DNA damage and depleted cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), activated the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)/adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway, and resulted in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition and death in ovarian cancer cells. The combination of parenteral ascorbate with the conventional chemotherapeutic agents carboplatin and paclitaxel synergistically inhibited ovarian cancer in mouse models and reduced chemotherapy-associated toxicity in patients with ovarian cancer. On the basis of its potential benefit and minimal toxicity, examination of intravenous ascorbate in combination with standard chemotherapy is justified in larger clinical trials.

  4. Intestine, immunity and parenteral nutrition in an era of preferred enteral feeding

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Meredith; Demehri, Farokh R.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW To review the benefits of enteral nutrition (EN) in contrast to the inflammatory consequences of administration of parenteral nutrition (PN) and enteral deprivation. To present the most recent evidence for the mechanisms of these immunologic changes and discuss potential areas for modification to decrease infectious complications of its administration. RECENT FINDINGS There is significant data supporting the early initiation of EN in both medical and surgical patients unable to meet their caloric goals via oral intake alone. Despite the preference for EN, some patients are unable to utilize their gut for nutritious gain and therefore require PN administration, along with its infectious complications. The mechanisms behind these complications are multifactorial and have yet to be fully elucidated. Recent study utilizing both animal and human models has provided further information regarding PN's deleterious effect on intestinal epithelial barrier function along with the complications associated with enterocyte deprivation. SUMMARY Changes associated with PN administration and enteral deprivation are complex with multiple potential areas for modification to allow for safer administration. Recent discovery of the mechanisms behind these changes present exciting areas for future study as to make PN administration in the enterally deprived patient safer. PMID:26154279

  5. Development and current use of parenteral nutrition in critical care - an opinion paper.

    PubMed

    Berger, Mette M; Pichard, Claude

    2014-08-08

    Critically ill patients depend on artificial nutrition for the maintenance of their metabolic functions and lean body mass, as well as for limiting underfeeding-related complications. Current guidelines recommend enteral nutrition (EN), possibly within the first 48 hours, as the best way to provide the nutrients and prevent infections. EN may be difficult to realize or may be contraindicated in some patients, such as those presenting anatomic intestinal continuity problems or splanchnic ischemia. A series of contradictory trials regarding the best route and timing for feeding have left the medical community with great uncertainty regarding the place of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. Many of the deleterious effects attributed to PN result from inadequate indications, or from overfeeding. The latter is due firstly to the easier delivery of nutrients by PN compared with EN increasing the risk of overfeeding, and secondly to the use of approximate energy targets, generally based on predictive equations: these equations are static and inaccurate in about 70% of patients. Such high uncertainty about requirements compromises attempts at conducting nutrition trials without indirect calorimetry support because the results cannot be trusted; indeed, both underfeeding and overfeeding are equally deleterious. An individualized therapy is required. A pragmatic approach to feeding is proposed: at first to attempt EN whenever and as early as possible, then to use indirect calorimetry if available, and to monitor delivery and response to feeding, and finally to consider the option of combining EN with PN in case of insufficient EN from day 4 onwards.

  6. Early effect of SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, He-Ming; Hu, Hui-Yong; Qu, Jiang-Tao

    2012-06-01

    The standard Early voltage of the SGP model is generalized for SiGe NPN heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). A new compact formulation of the Early voltage compatible with the SGP model is presented. The impact of the Ge profile on Early effect is shown and validated by experiments. The model can be applied to the SGP model for circuit simulation.

  7. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on or...

  8. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on or...

  9. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on or...

  10. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on or...

  11. Pediatric parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and cholestasis: Novel advances in pathomechanisms-based prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Orso, Giuseppe; Mandato, Claudia; Veropalumbo, Claudio; Cecchi, Nicola; Garzi, Alfredo; Vajro, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition constitutes a life-saving therapeutic tool in patients unable to ingest/absorb oral or enteral delivered nutrients. Liver function tests abnormalities are a common therapy-related complication, thus configuring the so-called Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease (PNALD) or cholestasis (PNAC). Although the damage is frequently mild, and resolves after discontinuation of parenteral nutrition, in some cases it progresses into cirrhotic changes, especially in neonates and infants. We present a literature review focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms-driven prevention and therapies for the cases where parenteral nutrition cannot be discontinued. Ursodeoxycholic acid has been proposed in patients with cholestatic hepatopathy, but its efficacy needs to be better established. Little evidence is available on efficacy of anti-oxidants, antibiotics, probiotics and anti TNFα. Lipid emulsions based on fish oil with a high content of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 appear effective both in decreasing intrahepatic inflammation and in improving biliary flow. Most recent promising variations such as soybean/MCT/olive/fish oil emulsion [third generation lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid)] are under investigation. In conclusion, we remark the emergence of a number of novel pathomechanisms underlying the severe liver impairment damage (PNALD and PNAC) in patients treated with parenteral nutrition. Only few traditional and innovative therapeutic strategies have hitherto been shown promising.

  12. Parenteral nutrition-induced hepatobiliary dysfunction in infants and prepubertal rabbits.

    PubMed

    Loff, S; Kränzlin, B; Moghadam, M; Dzakovic, A; Wessel, L; Back, W; Hosie, S; Wirth, H; Waag, K L

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed clinical, biochemical, and histo- logic parameters of ten infants with parenteral nutrition-induced hepatobiliary dysfunction. The data were compared with the results of a rabbit model. All infants were born prematurely with low birth weight. Their clinical diagnoses were necrotizing enterocolitis (6), gastroschisis (1), intrauterine volvulus (1), and lung hypoplasia (2). All required total (TPN) or partial parenteral nutrition for at least 8 weeks. All had repeated episodes of infections or sepsis. A rise in bilirubin and aminotransferase levels occurred after a minimum of 5 weeks; peak bilirubin levels ranged from 4 to 14 mg% and aminotransferases from 40 to 140 IU/l. One child later developed gallstones. Liver biopsies after 1 to 24 months showed fibrosis, bile-duct proliferation, cholestasis, and hydropic degeneration. All of the above-mentioned clinical factors have been accused of causing the observed biochemical and histologic changes. In our rabbit model we were able to produce almost identical symptoms by TPN alone: gallbladder distension, sludge, and stones developed after 1-4 weeks of TPN as well as uncharacteristic changes in aminotransferases and bilirubin after 4 weeks. Liver histology revealed severe hydropic degeneration of zone 3 as early as 1 week after beginning TPN. A rise of fibrosis and bile-duct proliferation after 1 to 4 weeks of infusion was statistically significant. Cholestasis, as was observed in the infants, could not be detected. In our model, all alterations observed could be attributed exclusively to TPN. We therefore assume that TPN was the true cause of the dysfunction. In a second experimental series infusions were reduced to 80% PN and free access to lab chow. These animals produced normal feces, indicating physiologic enteral stimulation. They developed the same degenerative and proliferative histologic changes, whereas gallbladder distension, sludge, and stones were not noted. We conclude that: (1) The TPN solution

  13. Immunonutrition – the influence of early postoperative glutamine supplementation in enteral/parenteral nutrition on immune response, wound healing and length of hospital stay in multiple trauma patients and patients after extensive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kai J.; Schallert, Reiner; Daniel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the postoperative phase, the prognosis of multiple trauma patients with severe brain injuries as well as of patients with extensive head and neck surgery mainly depends on protein metabolism and the prevention of septic complications. Wound healing problems can also result in markedly longer stays in the intensive care unit and general wards. As a result, the immunostimulation of patients in the postoperative phase is expected to improve their immunological and overall health. Patients and methods: A study involving 15 patients with extensive ENT tumour surgery and 7 multiple-trauma patients investigated the effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on immune induction, wound healing and length of hospital stay. Half of the patients received a glutamine-supplemented diet. The control group received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous diet. Results: In summary, we found that total lymphocyte counts, the percentage of activated CD4+DR+ T helper lymphocytes, the in-vitro response of lymphocytes to mitogens, as well as IL-2 plasma levels normalised faster in patients who received glutamine-supplemented diets than in patients who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets and that these parameters were even above normal by the end of the second postoperative week. Summary: We believe that providing critically ill patients with a demand-oriented immunostimulating diet is fully justified as it reduces septic complications, accelerates wound healing, and shortens the length of ICU (intensive care unit) and general ward stays. PMID:26734536

  14. Toxicity potential of compounds found in parenteral solutions with rubber stoppers

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, J.W. )

    1992-03-01

    Leached stopper components found in parenteral solutions produced by several manufacturers were identified and quantitated. Their toxicity potential was determined by comparing the types and quantities of the leached components with known toxicity levels and/or harmful effects. Toxicity potentials for benzaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, cyclohexanone, ethylbenzene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene are listed. Breakdown products of dextrose (furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural), which may also have harmful effects, were quantitated.

  15. Recent developments in home total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fish, J; Steiger, E; Seidner, D L

    2000-08-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) support has been an advancing therapy in the past 30 years. Patients who previously had no options to sustain their lives are now able to live at home, maintain employment, and continue with most daily activities. Although this therapy has been innovative and successful, it requires great financial and professional resources. The expense of HPN makes most patients dependent on third-party payment, and the complications can result in frequent hospitalizations and may be life-threatening. For these reasons, extensive training of the patient and caregivers is necessary. Thorough and time-consuming monitoring by a multidisciplinary team of professionals is also essential. Home care and supply companies offer services that make the process of home TPN easier for the patient and the healthcare team. Advances in the area of home nutrition support are expected to continue as the demand for this therapy rises.

  16. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition after small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Jones, S A; Bushman, M; Cohen, R

    1996-02-01

    Malnutrition is frequently observed in the hemodialysis patient population. It may be associated with increased morbidity and mortality as well as affect overall quality of life, which may already be compromised from dialytic physical and psychological demands. In the past, intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) has been available to hemodialysis patients as an adjunct to their dietary intake. In this time of cost containment and the increasing need to scientifically justify the benefit of such therapies to have them paid for by third party reimbursers, IDPN is coming under much scrutiny. This report describes a case of inadequate enteral nutrient absorption in a malnourished hemodialysis patient. This is a case in which IDPN was beneficial and without which other alternatives would have proven more costly physically, emotionally, and economically to the patient.

  17. Stability issues of parenteral chemotherapy drugs.

    PubMed

    de Lemos, Mário L; Hamata, Linda

    2007-03-01

    The pharmacist often needs to have all the information required to prepare and to assign an expiry date for parenteral products of antineoplastic agents. The pharmaceutical manufacturers usually provide data on how to prepare their products and the associated physicochemical stability. Standard reference texts also provide additional summary information of other primary data. However, it is not uncommon to find knowledge gaps in this area. Hence, additional extrapolation and consensus on interpretation is often needed to address issues not covered by data from the pharmaceutical manufacturers, standard reference texts, or official guidelines. Some of the key issues have been identified in our recent development of a chemotherapy preparation and stability chart. These include use of data from different brands, expiry date of original vial and final products, risk of contamination, infusion volume and stability, multi-day home-use products, syringe preparations, and products to be used immediately. Potential approaches to address these common issues are described in this article.

  18. Severe Hypothyroidism From Iodine Deficiency Associated With Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Golekoh, Marjorie C; Cole, Conrad R; Jones, Nana-Hawa Yayah

    2016-11-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial for supply of nutrients in children who cannot tolerate a full enteral diet. In the United States, it is not standard of care to give iodine to children dependent on parenteral nutrition, hence iodine is not routinely included in the micronutrient package. Herein, we present a case of a boy with hypothyroidism secondary to iodine deficiency after prolonged exclusive use of parenteral nutrition. Our case highlights the importance of screening for iodine deficiency and administering timely iodine supplementation in these at-risk children to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of early treatment for retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Kamholz, Karen L; Cole, Cynthia H; Gray, James E; Zupancic, John A F

    2009-01-01

    The Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity trial demonstrated that peripheral retinal ablation of eyes with high-risk prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity (early treatment) is associated with improved visual outcomes at 9 months' corrected gestational age compared with treatment at threshold disease (conventional management). However, early treatment increased the frequency of laser therapy, anesthesia with intubation, treatment-related systemic complications, and the need for repeat treatments. To determine the cost-effectiveness of an early treatment strategy for retinopathy of prematurity compared with conventional management. We developed a stochastic decision analytic model to assess the incremental cost of early treatment per eye with severe visual impairment prevented. We derived resource-use and efficacy estimates from the Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity trial's published outcome data. We used a third-party payer perspective. Our primary analysis focused on outcomes from birth through 9 months' corrected gestational age. A secondary analysis used a lifetime horizon. Parameter uncertainty was quantified by using probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses. The incremental cost-effectiveness of early treatment was $14,200 per eye with severe visual impairment prevented. There was a 90% probability that the cost-effectiveness of early treatment would be less than $40,000 per eye with severe visual impairment prevented and a 0.5% probability that early treatment would be cost-saving (less costly and more effective). Limiting early treatment to more severely affected eyes (eyes with "type 1 retinopathy of prematurity" as defined by the Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity trial) had a cost-effectiveness of $6,200 per eye with severe visual impairment prevented. Analyses that considered long-term costs and outcomes found that early treatment was cost-saving. Early treatment of retinopathy of prematurity is both

  20. Antitoxic immunity in experimental cholera: protection, and serum and local antibody responses in rabbits after enteral and parenteral immunization.

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A M; Ouchterlony, O; Anderson, A; Walletström, G; Westerberg-Berndtsson, U

    1975-01-01

    The protective effect of enternal and parenteral immunization with cholera toxin antigen against experimental cholera in rabbits was studied by using the small-bowel loop technique. Subcutaneous injection of crude toxin as well as purified toxin or toxoids gave rise to significant protection against toxin challenge. The enhanced resistance to toxin was found to correspond to a many-fold higher magnitude of protection against challenge with live vibrios. In the primary response the protection increased during the first month. Booster immunization gave rise to a further increased immunity which, however, declined rapidly. Multiple oral or repeated intraintestinal antigen administrations also induced protective antitoxic immunity although of less magnitude than that obtained by parenteral immunization. Enteral and, to a lesser extent, parenteral immunization gave rise to increased antitoxic antibody titers and immunoglobulin levels in intestinal washings and mucosa scraping. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG antitoxins predominated, but after enteral immunization total IgA and specific IgA antibodies occasionally reached levels similar to those for IgG. In serum, significantly increased antibody levels (IgG) were only recorded after parenteral immunization. Both the primary binding and the neutralizing antitoxin titers showed a stayistically significant correlation with the degree of protection against toxin challenge; however, for the neutralizing antibodies this correlation was not without exceptions. No relation to protection was found for intestinal antibodies. The results of the present study indicate that enternal as well as parenteral immunization with toxin antigen can give rise to effective cholera immunity. After enternal immunization, the protection appears to be medicated by locally synthesized antibodies. After parenteral vaccination both serum-derived and locally produced antibodies seem to be effective. PMID:54337

  1. Changes in levels of the tripeptide Tyr-Gly-Gly as an index of enkephalin release in the spinal cord: effects of noxious stimuli and parenterally-active peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Llorens-Cortes, C; Gros, C; Schwartz, J C; Clot, A M; Le Bars, D

    1989-01-01

    The tripeptide Tyr-Gly-Gly (YGG), representing the product of enkephalin hydrolysis by enkephalinase (EC 3.4.24.11), was characterized and its levels measured in spinal cord perfusates of halothane-anaesthetized rats. During noxious pinching of the muzzle, which is known to trigger enkephalin release, YGG levels were enhanced more markedly and for longer than were those of [Met5]enkephalin (YGGFM), in the same samples. By contrast, neither YGG nor YGGFM levels were affected by pinching the tail. Treatment with carbaphethiol, a parenterally-active aminopeptidase inhibitor, markedly increased YGG levels and lengthened the duration of the increase produced by pinching the muzzle. Treatment with acetorphan, a parenterally-active enkephalinase inhibitor, given alone or in combination with carbaphethiol, completely prevented the rise in YGG triggered by noxious stimulation. By contrast, [Met5]enkephalin levels in the perfusates were increased by the combined administration of the two peptidase inhibitors but these levels were not further enhanced by noxious stimulation. Thus, spinal cord YGG appears to be formed under the influence of enkephalinase and to constitute a sensitive index of enkephalin release.

  2. Parenteral treatment of episodic tension-type headache: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Weinman, Danielle; Nicastro, Olivia; Akala, Olabiyi; Friedman, Benjamin W

    2014-02-01

    continuous outcomes otherwise. Our search returned 640 results. One hundred eighty-seven abstracts were reviewed, and 8 studies involving 486 patients were included in our analysis. The most common reasons for exclusion of abstracts were no assessment of acute pain relief, use of nonparenteral medications only, and no differentiation of headache type. Risk of bias ranged from low to high. The following medications were more effective than placebo for acute pain (NNT, 95%CI): metamizole (4, 2-26), chlorpromazine (4, 2-26), and metoclopramide (2, 1-3). The combination of metoclopramide + diphenhydramine was superior to ketorolac (4, 2-8) The following medications were not more effective than placebo: mepivacaine, meperidine + promethazine, and sumatriptan. Various parenteral medications other than salicylates or nonsteroidals provide acute relief of tension-type headache. Comparative efficacy studies are needed. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  3. Pharmaceutical development of a parenteral formulation of conivaptan hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Ban, Kazutoshi; Sonohara, Ritsu; Yoshida, Mitsunobu; Sako, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Sinya; Namiki, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Conivaptan hydrochloride injection (Vaprisol®) was developed for the treatment of hyponatremia. Because the drug is very slightly soluble in water, pH control and cosolvency techniques were used to achieve the optimum concentration required for clinical trial material. Stability studies on retained samples of the clinical trial material for early-phase trials showed white visible particulates mainly in the headspace of the glass ampoule long after completion of the trials. The mechanism for generation of the particulate matter was formation of freebase of conivaptan hydrochloride because of increase in pH. The pH of the formulation for late-phase clinical trials, primary stability studies, and commercial production was fine-tuned to prevent particulate formation. The formulation contains propylene glycol and ethanol. Considering the nature of the cosolvent used in the formulation, the amount of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) delivered from an infusion system was evaluated, and we confirmed that the level of DEHP was lesser than that mentioned in the guideline. In the course of the scale-up studies for commercialization, the formulation failed the filter integrity test after the compounding solution was filtered. The dimethylsiloxane extracted from the silicon tubing used for solvent transfer coated the filter surface, which resulted in suppression of the bubble point value. The formulation and manufacturing process enabled conivaptan hydrochloride to be approved and launched in the market as a parenteral formulation. Formulation scientists have recognized a trend that promising new chemical entities in the drug discovery phase often do not have ideal physicochemical properties for formulation. In particular, poor solubility is one of the challenges for development of a parenteral dosage form. Here, we describe the case of such a new chemical entity, a very slightly soluble hydrochloric salt, which was handed over from a drug discovery research laboratory to a

  4. Early sport specialization: roots, effectiveness, risks.

    PubMed

    Malina, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    Year-round training in a single sport beginning at a relatively young age is increasingly common among youth. Contributing factors include perceptions of Eastern European sport programs, a parent's desire to give his or her child an edge, labeling youth as talented at an early age, pursuit of scholarships and professional contracts, the sporting goods and services industry, and expertise research. The factors interact with the demands of sport systems. Limiting experiences to a single sport is not the best path to elite status. Risks of early specialization include social isolation, overdependence, burnout, and perhaps risk of overuse injury. Commitment to a single sport at an early age immerses a youngster in a complex world regulated by adults, which is a setting that facilitates manipulation - social, dietary, chemical, and commercial. Youth sport must be kept in perspective. Participants, including talented young athletes, are children and adolescents with the needs of children and adolescents.

  5. Parenteral glutamine supplementation in critical illness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The potential benefit of parenteral glutamine (GLN) supplementation has been one of the most commonly studied nutritional interventions in the critical care setting. The aim of this systematic review was to incorporate recent trials of traditional parenteral GLN supplementation in critical illness with previously existing data. Methods All randomized controlled trials of parenterally administered GLN in critically ill patients conducted from 1997 to 2013 were identified. Studies of enteral GLN only or combined enteral/parenteral GLN were excluded. Methodological quality of studies was scored and data was abstracted by independent reviewers. Results A total of 26 studies involving 2,484 patients examining only parenteral GLN supplementation of nutrition support were identified in ICU patients. Parenteral GLN supplementation was associated with a trend towards a reduction of overall mortality (relative risk (RR) 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75, 1.03, P = 0.10) and a significant reduction in hospital mortality (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.51, 0.90, P = 0.008). In addition, parenteral GLN was associated with a strong trend towards a reduction in infectious complications (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.73, 1.02, P = 0.09) and ICU length of stay (LOS) (WMD –1.91, (95% CI -4.10, 0.28, P = 0.09) and significant reduction in hospital LOS (WMD -2.56, 95% CI -4.71, -0.42, P = 0.02). In the subset of studies examining patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN), parenteral GLN supplementation was associated with a trend towards reduced overall mortality (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71, 1.01, P = 0.07). Conclusions Parenteral GLN supplementation given in conjunction with nutrition support continues to be associated with a significant reduction in hospital mortality and hospital LOS. Parenteral GLN supplementation as a component of nutrition support should continue to be considered to improve outcomes in critically ill patients. PMID:24745648

  6. [Sea-blue histiocyte syndrome associated with home parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Egaña, N; Parón, L; Cuerda, C; Bretón, I; Camblor, M; Velasco, C; García-Peris, P

    2009-01-01

    A case of a 55 years-old male with long-term Crohn's disease without response to medical treatment and many intestinal fistula is presented. After the last bowel resection, home parenteral nutrition was started. He presented chronic hepatopathy and pancytopaenia. After 9 months of home parenteral nutrition hepatic function and pancytopaenia began to deteriorate. Bone marrow examination revealed an infiltrate of sea-blue histiocytes. He made unsatisfactory progress and died due to a multiorganic failure.

  7. Copper and Zinc Deficiency in a Patient Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition During a Shortage of Parenteral Trace Element Products.

    PubMed

    Palm, Eric; Dotson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Drug shortages in the United States, including parenteral nutrition (PN) components, have been common in recent years and can adversely affect patient care. Here we report a case of copper and zinc deficiency in a patient receiving PN during a shortage of parenteral trace element products. The management of the patient's deficiencies, including the use of an imported parenteral multi-trace element product, is described. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  8. Sexism and Early Parenting: Cause and Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusick, Theresa

    1987-01-01

    Sexism and sex role stereotyping exacerbate teen pregnancy rates in several ways. This article attempts to synthesize relevant research and uses existing research to detail the specific ways sexism abets early parenting. Several recommendations for addressing teen pregnancy issues are made. (IAH)

  9. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Modern Parenteral Nutrition: A Review of the Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Klek, Stanislaw

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsions are an essential component of parenteral nutrition regimens. Originally employed as an efficient non-glucose energy source to reduce the adverse effects of high glucose intake and provide essential fatty acids, lipid emulsions have assumed a larger therapeutic role due to research demonstrating the effects of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on key metabolic functions, including inflammatory and immune response, coagulation, and cell signaling. Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that the effects of omega-3 PUFA on inflammation and immune response result in meaningful therapeutic benefits in surgical, cancer, and critically ill patients as well as patients requiring long-term parenteral nutrition. The present review provides an overview of the mechanisms of action through which omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA modulate the immune-inflammatory response and summarizes the current body of evidence regarding the clinical and pharmacoeconomic benefits of intravenous n-3 fatty acid-containing lipid emulsions in patients requiring parenteral nutrition. PMID:26959070

  10. Enhanced antimalarial activity by a novel artemether-lumefantrine lipid emulsion for parenteral administration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufan; Lu, Tingli; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Ying; Chen, Ting; Mei, Qibing; Chen, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Artemether and lumefantrine (also known as benflumetol) are difficult to formulate for parenteral administration because of their low aqueous solubility. Cremophor EL as an emulsion excipient has been shown to cause serious side effects. This study reports a method of preparation and the therapeutic efficacies of novel lipid emulsion (LE) delivery systems with artemether, lumefantrine, or artemether in combination with lumefantrine, for parenteral administration. Their physical and chemical stabilities were also evaluated. Furthermore, the in vivo antimalarial activities of the lipid emulsions developed were tested in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. Artemether, lumefantrine, or artemether in combination with lumefantrine was encapsulated in an oil phase, and the in vivo performance was assessed by comparison with artesunate for injection. It was found that the lumefantrine lipid emulsion (LUM-LE) and artemether-lumefantrine lipid emulsion (ARM-LUM-LE-3) (1:6) began to decrease the parasitemia levels after only 3 days, and the parasitemia inhibition was 90% at doses of 0.32 and 0.27 mg/kg, respectively, with immediate antimalarial effects greater than those of the positive-control group and constant antimalarial effects over 30 days. LUM-LE and ARM-LUM-LE-3 demonstrated the best performance in terms of chemical and physical stabilities and antiplasmodial efficacy, with a mean particle size of 150 nm, and they have many favorable properties for parenteral administration, such as biocompatibility, physical stability, and ease of preparation.

  11. Enhanced Antimalarial Activity by a Novel Artemether-Lumefantrine Lipid Emulsion for Parenteral Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yufan; Lu, Tingli; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Ying; Chen, Ting; Mei, Qibing

    2014-01-01

    Artemether and lumefantrine (also known as benflumetol) are difficult to formulate for parenteral administration because of their low aqueous solubility. Cremophor EL as an emulsion excipient has been shown to cause serious side effects. This study reports a method of preparation and the therapeutic efficacies of novel lipid emulsion (LE) delivery systems with artemether, lumefantrine, or artemether in combination with lumefantrine, for parenteral administration. Their physical and chemical stabilities were also evaluated. Furthermore, the in vivo antimalarial activities of the lipid emulsions developed were tested in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. Artemether, lumefantrine, or artemether in combination with lumefantrine was encapsulated in an oil phase, and the in vivo performance was assessed by comparison with artesunate for injection. It was found that the lumefantrine lipid emulsion (LUM-LE) and artemether-lumefantrine lipid emulsion (ARM-LUM-LE-3) (1:6) began to decrease the parasitemia levels after only 3 days, and the parasitemia inhibition was 90% at doses of 0.32 and 0.27 mg/kg, respectively, with immediate antimalarial effects greater than those of the positive-control group and constant antimalarial effects over 30 days. LUM-LE and ARM-LUM-LE-3 demonstrated the best performance in terms of chemical and physical stabilities and antiplasmodial efficacy, with a mean particle size of 150 nm, and they have many favorable properties for parenteral administration, such as biocompatibility, physical stability, and ease of preparation. PMID:24982079

  12. Parenteral midazolam is superior to diazepam for treatment of prehospital seizures.

    PubMed

    Clemency, Brian M; Ott, Jamie A; Tanski, Christopher T; Bart, Joseph A; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Diazepam and midazolam are commonly used by paramedics to treat seizures. A period of drug scarcity was used as an opportunity to compare their effectiveness in treating prehospital seizures. A retrospective chart review of a single, large, commercial agency during a 29-month period was performed. The period included alternating shortages of both medications. Ambulances were stocked with either diazepam or midazolam based on availability of the drugs. Adult patients who received at least 1 parenteral dose of diazepam or midazolam for treatment of seizures were included. The regional prehospital protocol recommended 5 mg intravenous (IV) diazepam, 5 mg intramuscular (IM) diazepam, 5 mg IM midazolam, or 2.5 mg IV midazolam. Medication effectiveness was compared with respect to the primary end point: cessation of seizure without repeat seizure during the prehospital encounter. A total of 440 study subjects received 577 administrations of diazepam or midazolam and met the study criteria. The subjects were 52% male, with a mean age of 48 (range 18-94) years. A total of 237 subjects received 329 doses of diazepam, 64 (27%) were treated with first-dose IM. A total of 203 subjects received 248 doses of midazolam; 71 (35%) were treated with first-dose IM. Seizure stopped and did not recur in 49% of subjects after parenteral diazepam and 65% of subjects after parenteral midazolam (p = 0.002). Diazepam and midazolam exhibited similar first dose success for IV administration (58 vs. 62%; p = 0.294). Age, gender, seizure history, hypoglycemia, the presence of trauma, time to first administration, prehospital contact time, and frequency of IM administration were similar between groups. For parenteral administration, midazolam demonstrated superior first-dose seizure suppression. This study demonstrates how periods of drug scarcity can be utilized to study prehospital medication effectiveness.

  13. A multicenter, retrospective study of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension transitioned from parenteral prostacyclin therapy to inhaled iloprost

    PubMed Central

    Channick, Richard N.; Frantz, Robert P.; Kawut, Steven M.; Palevsky, Harold; Tumuluri, Ramagopal; Sulica, Roxana; Lauto, Paula O.; Benton, Wade W.; de Boisblanc, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by progressive increases in pulmonary vascular resistance, leading to right heart failure and death. Guidelines recommend customization of treatment, necessitating the development of effective strategies for transitioning patients among treatments. In this study, we characterized our experience with patient transitions from parenteral prostacyclin to inhaled iloprost. We retrospectively assessed records from 11 centers of 37 consecutive patients with PAH aged ≥ 18 years who were treated with intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) prostacyclin analogues and transitioned to inhaled iloprost. The transition period began on the first day of inhaled iloprost with the intent of discontinuing parenteral prostacyclin and ended on the first day on inhaled iloprost free of parenteral prostacyclin. Persistence was defined as the absence of (1) parenteral prostacyclin while remaining on inhaled iloprost during post-transition Days 1-90 and (2) no reinitiation of parenteral prostacyclin during post-transition Days 90-365. All patients were clinically stable before transitioning to inhaled iloprost. The mean age was 46.5 years, 70.3% were female, 51.4% had idiopathic PAH, and 43.0% were in New York Heart Association Functional Class III. Among patients with an overlapping transition, the mean transition period was 10.5 days. A transition dosing algorithm was used in 10 patients (27.0%). At one year, 78.4% of the patients remained persistent on inhaled iloprost and 81.1% were free of clinical worsening. In selected patients on background oral PAH therapy, transitioning from parenteral prostacyclin to inhaled iloprost appears safe and feasible and is associated with long-term success. Further study is needed to define the optimal patient selection criteria and transition algorithm. PMID:24015339

  14. [Home parenteral nutrition. A six-year combined program (adult and pediatric patients)].

    PubMed

    Moreno, J M; Gomis, P; Valero, M A; León-Sanz, M

    2000-04-29

    To describe the outcomes of an adult-pediatric home parenteral nutrition (HPN) program. Retrospective protocol between 1993 and 1999. Sixteen adults (average 45.7 years) and eight children (3.1 years) were included in the program. Mean length of parenteral nutrition was 507 (SD: 624) and 155 (SD: 129) days respectively. Total follow-up time was 8,119 days for adults and 1,242 for children. Cancer was the main diagnosis in adults and intractable diarrhea in children. Central venous catheter related infections were the most usual complication (0.63 and 1.2 episodes/patient/year). There were no deceases due to the HPN in the period of study. HPN is an effective and safe technique, although prevalence and incidence in Spain are low.

  15. Right atrial thrombus associated with subclavian catheter developed due to total parenteral nutrition application

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Nursel; Basarici, Ibrahim; Erbasan, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheterization as a frequent routine clinical procedure may have significant complications. Mechanical complications may occur during catheter placement, whereas thromboembolic and infectious complications can be seen during follow-up. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) associated central venous catheterizations may result in early mechanical complications and thrombotic and infectious complications in the long term. This paper describes a patient diagnosed as mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy requiring long-term central venous catheterization for TPN implementation, who had an infected thrombus on the catheter tip resected by cardiac surgery. PMID:27212985

  16. Anchoring effects on early autobiographical memories.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Daniel L; Bishara, Anthony J; Mugayar-Baldocchi, Marino A

    2017-10-01

    Studies of childhood memory typically show that our earliest memories come from between three and four years of age. This finding is not universal, however. The age estimate varies across cultures and is affected by social influences. Research from the judgments and decision-making literature suggests that these estimates might also involve a judgment under uncertainty. Therefore, they might be susceptible to less social influences such as heuristics and biases. To investigate this possibility, we conducted two experiments that used anchoring paradigms to influence participants' estimates of their age during early autobiographical memories. In Experiment 1, participants answered either a high-anchor or a low-anchor question, and were warned that the anchor was uninformative; they went on to estimate their age during their earliest autobiographical memory. In Experiment 2, we replicated Experiment 1 and extended the design to examine additional early autobiographical memories. In both experiments, participants in the low-anchor condition gave earlier age estimates than those in the high-anchor condition. These results provide new insights into the methods used to investigate autobiographical memory. Moreover, they show that reports of early autobiographical memories can be influenced by a relatively light touch - a change to a single digit in a single question.

  17. Alterations in pentobarbital pharmacokinetics in response to parenteral and enteral alimentation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Knodell, R G; Spector, M H; Brooks, D A; Keller, F X; Kyner, W T

    1980-12-01

    Recent in vitro observations suggest that the intestine, in addition to the liver, may be an important organ of first-pass drug metabolism. While a variety of changes in intestinal morphology and function in response to continuous parenteral and enteral nutrition have been documented, the effect of different routes of alimentation on intestinal drug metabolism has not been previously investigated. Objectives of this study were to assess the contribution of intestinal pentobarbital metabolism to overall in vivo pentobarbital pharmacokinetics in the rat and to determine if differences in pentobarbital pharmacokinetics were seen between parenterally and enterally nourished animals. After 7 days of continuous infusion of amino acid-glucose mixture via a gastric or jugular vein catheter, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined after 40 mg/kg of pentobarbital was given orally or into the portal or femoral vein. Reduced systemic availability of pentobarbital after oral administration as compared to portal vein injection was seen in both alimentation groups indicating that significant intestinal metabolism of pentobarbital occurred in vivo. Total area under the pentobarbital plasma concentration-time curve was significantly greater in parenterally nourished animals as compared with enterally alimented animals after oral, portal vein and systemic vein drug administration. Differences in pentobarbital, pharmacokinetics between the two alimentation groups appeared to be primarly due to effects on hepatic pentobarbital metabolism. While the mechanism producing these changes has not been defined, differences in gut hormones release and/or pancreatic secretion in response to the two routes of alimentation may be contributory. The widespread use of enteral and parenteral alimentation in clinical medicine suggests that studies to determine if nutrition route of administration similarly influences drug metabolism in humans may be indicated.

  18. Lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition of intensive care patients: current thinking and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Gordon L.; Koletzko, Berthold V.; Singer, Pierre; Wanten, Geert J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Energy deficit is a common and serious problem in intensive care units and is associated with increased rates of complications, length of stay, and mortality. Parenteral nutrition (PN), either alone or in combination with enteral nutrition, can improve nutrient delivery to critically ill patients. Lipids provide a key source of calories within PN formulations, preventing or correcting energy deficits and improving outcomes. Discussion In this article, we review the role of parenteral lipid emulsions (LEs) in the management of critically ill patients and highlight important biologic activities associated with lipids. Soybean-oil-based LEs with high contents of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were the first widely used formulations in the intensive care setting. However, they may be associated with increased rates of infection and lipid peroxidation, which can exacerbate oxidative stress. More recently developed parenteral LEs employ partial substitution of soybean oil with oils providing medium-chain triglycerides, ω-9 monounsaturated fatty acids or ω-3 PUFA. Many of these LEs have demonstrated reduced effects on oxidative stress, immune responses, and inflammation. However, the effects of these LEs on clinical outcomes have not been extensively evaluated. Conclusions Ongoing research using adequately designed and well-controlled studies that characterize the biologic properties of LEs should assist clinicians in selecting LEs within the critical care setting. Prescription of PN containing LEs should be based on available clinical data, while considering the individual patient’s physiologic profile and therapeutic requirements. PMID:20072779

  19. Intrauterine-like growth rates can be achieved with premixed parenteral nutrition solution in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Jacques; Senterre, Thibault

    2013-12-01

    Growth failure in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge for pediatricians and neonatologists. The use of early "aggressive" parenteral nutrition (PN), with >2.5 g/(kg ·d) of amino acids and at least 40 kcal/(kg ·d) of energy from the first day of life, has been shown to provide nutritional intakes in the range recommended by international guidelines, reducing nutritional deficit and the incidence of postnatal growth restriction in preterm infants. However, nutritional practices and adherence to recommendations may vary in different hospitals. Two ready-to-use (RTU), premixed parenteral solutions (PSs) designed for preterm infants have been prospectively evaluated: a binary RTU premixed PS from our hospital pharmacy and a commercially premixed 3-chamber bag (Baxter Healthcare). These premixed PSs provide nitrogen and energy intakes in the range of the most recent recommendations, reducing or eliminating the early cumulative nutritional deficit in very-low-birth-weight infants, and avoiding the development of postnatal growth restriction. A further rationale for RTU premixed PSs is that preterm infants require balanced PN that contains not only amino acids and energy but also minerals and electrolytes from the first day of life in order to reduce the incidence of metabolic disorders frequently reported in extremely-low-birth-weight infants during the early weeks of life.

  20. Hyperammonemia during total parenteral nutrition in children.

    PubMed

    Seashore, J H; Seashore, M R; Riely, C

    1982-01-01

    Serial blood ammonia (NH3) determinations in 19 low birth weight (LBW) infants, 14 term neonates and 12 children receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) have shown that 73% of patients had one or more elevated NH3 values (greater than 150 micrograms/dl). The mean blood NH3 was 220 +/- 13 micrograms/dl in LBW infants, 180 +/- 9 micrograms/dl in 10 infants, and 140 +/- 7 micrograms/dl in children. All of these values are significantly higher than normal (p less than 0.001). There was no difference in incidence or mean blood ammonia concentration between patients receiving casein hydrolysate and those receiving a crystalline amino acid solution. Only four patients were symptomatic and several infants remained fully alert despite blood NH3 concentration in excess of 400 micrograms/dl. One infant who had sustained hyperammonemia was given another amino acid source (Travasol) containing 1.2 mmol/dl of arginine; blood NH3 promptly fell to the normal range. However, six of seven additional infants had hyperammonemia while receiving Travasol (mean = 184 micrograms/dl). Hyperammonemia is common during TPN in children, often is not recognized clinically, and occurs with equal frequency in infants and older children. The high levels observed in LBW infants may be due to hepatic immaturity. Blood NH3 concentration should be monitored frequently during TPN. Persistent hyperammonemia should be treated by decreasing protein content of the infusate. The role of supplemental arginine is unclear.

  1. A new glass option for parenteral packaging.

    PubMed

    Schaut, Robert A; Peanasky, John S; DeMartino, Steven E; Schiefelbein, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    Glass is the ideal material for parenteral packaging because of its chemical durability, hermeticity, strength, cleanliness, and transparency. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time, but they do have some issues relating to breakage, delamination, and variation in hydrolytic performance. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the compendial requirements, and to have similar thermal, optical, and mechanical attributes as the current alkali borosilicate glasses. In addition, the alkali aluminosilicate performed as well or better than the current alkali borosilicates in extractables tests and stability studies, which suggests that it would be suitable for use with the studied liquid product formulation. The physical, mechanical, and optical properties of glass make it an ideal material for packaging injectable drugs and biologics. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time for these applications, but there are some issues. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the requirements for packaging injectable drugs and biologics, and to be suitable for use with a particular liquid drug. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  2. Fish oil–based lipid emulsions in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: An ongoing positive experience

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, in the use of FOLE in treatment of P...

  3. Effects of Critical Thinking Intervention for Early Childhood Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Heejeong Sophia; Brown, E. Todd

    2013-01-01

    This study is based on an intervention designed to enhance early childhood teacher candidates' critical thinking abilities. The concept, elements, standards, and traits of critical thinking were integrated into the main course contents, and the effects of the intervention were examined. The results indicated that early childhood teacher…

  4. Effects of Critical Thinking Intervention for Early Childhood Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Heejeong Sophia; Brown, E. Todd

    2013-01-01

    This study is based on an intervention designed to enhance early childhood teacher candidates' critical thinking abilities. The concept, elements, standards, and traits of critical thinking were integrated into the main course contents, and the effects of the intervention were examined. The results indicated that early childhood teacher…

  5. Early Intervention Services: Effectively Supporting Maori Children and their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryman, Mere; Woller, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines Early Intervention (EI) service provision from within one Ministry of Education region in New Zealand. It does this in order to better understand what works well and what needs to change if children from Maori families, of Early Childhood age, are to be provided with the most effective EI services. By engaging with Maori…

  6. Biological Perspectives on the Effects of Early Psychosocial Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Peter J.; Kenney, Justin W.

    2009-01-01

    There is much current interest in how adverse experiences early in life might affect certain elements of physiological, behavioral, and psychological functioning across the lifespan. Recent conceptual frameworks for studying the effects of early experience have involved constructs such as experience-expectant, experience-dependent, and…

  7. Evidence of Effective Early Numeracy Models. CEELO FastFacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilder, D.

    2014-01-01

    In this "Fast Facts," a state requested information on supporting districts' use of effective models and approaches to improve children's early literacy and numeracy outcomes. In response, Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) staff reviewed key research including information from the What Works Clearinghouse obtained by…

  8. Therapeutic Interchange of Parenteral Anticoagulants: Challenges for Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committees.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2011-11-07

    This is a review of key factors for pharmacy and therapeutics committees to consider when developing a therapeutic interchange (TI) program for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis. Recent patient safety initiatives aimed at reducing the incidence of hospital-acquired VTE may increase the prescribing of thromboprophylactic agents recommended in VTE management guidelines. As a result, more pharmacy and therapeutics committees may consider TI programs for parenteral anticoagulants. However, the TI of anticoagulants appears challenging at this time. Firstly, the therapeutic equivalence of the commonly prescribed parenteral anticoagulants, enoxaparin, dalteparin and fondaparinux, has not been established. Secondly, because of the wide range of clinical indications for these anticoagulants, a blanket agent-specific TI program could lead to off-label use. Use of an indication-specific TI program could be difficult to manage administratively, and may cause prescribing confusion and errors. Thirdly, careful dosing and contraindications of certain parenteral anticoagulants in special patient populations, such as those with renal impairment, further impact the suitability of these agents for inclusion in TI programs. Finally, although TI may appear to offer lower drug-acquisition costs, it is important to determine its effect on all cost parameters and ultimately ensure that the care of patients requiring VTE prophylaxis is not compromised.

  9. Drug delivery and drug targeting with parenteral lipid nanoemulsions - A review.

    PubMed

    Hörmann, Karl; Zimmer, Andreas

    2016-02-10

    Lipid nanosized emulsions or nanoemulsions (NE) are oil in water dispersions with an oil droplet size of about 200nm. This size of oil droplets dispersed in a continuous water phase is a prerequisite for the parenteral, namely intravenous administration. Many parenteral nutrition and drug emulsions on the market confirm the safe use of NE over years. Parenteral emulsions loaded with APIs (active pharmaceutical ingredients) are considered as drug delivery systems (DDS). DDS focuses on the regulation of the in vivo dynamics, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, and extended bioavailability, thereby improving the effectiveness and the safety of the drugs. Using an emulsion as a DDS, or through the use of surface diversification of the dispersed oil droplets of emulsions, a targeted increase of the API concentration in some parts of the human body can be achieved. This review focuses on NE similar to the marketed once with no or only low amount of additional surfactants beside the emulsifier from a manufacturing point of view (technique, used raw materials).

  10. Growth and hepatic composition in the guinea pig after long-term parenteral hyperalimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.J.H.; Redmond, D.; Baggs, R.B.; Schecter, A.; Gasiewicz, T.A.

    1986-08-01

    This study examined the feasibility of maintaining male Hartley guinea pigs on long-term hyperalimentation. Data from animals fed ad libitum, but infused with 0.9% saline, indicated that there was minimal effect from catheter implantation, sepsis, or the infusion of large volumes of fluid. This group compared with animals fed and watered ad libitum demonstrated a nearly identical growth rate serum chemistry, tissue weights, and hepatic composition and morphology. Animals infused with a total parenteral diet demonstrated growth rates of 4.06 +/- 1.46 g/day for up to 25 days. Loss of infused animals was due in varying degrees to sepsis, mechanical failure, improper placement of the cannula, loss of patency, and death from unknown causes. Morphological analysis of animals fed by total parenteral nutrition revealed an altered distribution and increased size of lipid droplets in hepatic parenchymal and Kupffer cells and glycogen accumulation by the parenchymal cells. Decreased hepatic content of total protein and lipid, as well as cytochrome P450, was also observed. Similarly, serum values of triglyceride were decreased in animals fed by the total parenteral diet. This study indicated that the guinea pig fed by hyperalimentation may be a useful animal model for a number of clinical and basic research applications.

  11. Engineering Oral and Parenteral Amorphous Amphotericin B Formulations against Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi Infections.

    PubMed

    Rolón, Miriam; Serrano, Dolores R; Lalatsa, Aikaterini; de Pablo, Esther; Torrado, Juan Jose; Ballesteros, Maria Paloma; Healy, Anne Marie; Vega, Celeste; Coronel, Cathia; Bolás-Fernández, Francisco; Dea-Ayuela, Maria Auxiliadora

    2017-04-03

    Chagas disease (CD) is a parasitic zoonosis endemic in most mainland countries of Central and South America affecting nearly 10 million people, with 100 million people at high risk of contracting the disease. Treatment is only effective if received at the early stages of the disease. Only two drugs (benznidazole and nifurtimox) have so far been marketed, and both share various limitations such as variable efficacy, many side effects, and long duration of treatment, thus reducing compliance. The in vitro and in vivo efficacy of poly-aggregated amphotericin B (AmB), encapsulated poly-aggregated AmB in albumin microspheres (AmB-AME), and dimeric AmB-sodium deoxycholate micelles (AmB-NaDC) was evaluated. Dimeric AmB-NaDC exhibited a promising selectivity index (SI = 3164) against amastigotes, which was much higher than those obtained for licensed drugs (benznidazole and nifurtimox). AmB-AME, but not AmB-NaDC, significantly reduced the parasitemia levels (3.6-fold) in comparison to the control group after parenteral administration at day 7 postinfection. However, the oral administration of AmB-NaDC (10-15 mg/kg/day for 10 days) resulted in a 75% reduction of parasitemia levels and prolonged the survival rate in 100% of the tested animals. Thus, the results presented here illustrate for the first time the oral efficacy of AmB in the treatment of trypanosomiasis. AmB-NaDC is an easily scalable, affordable formulation prepared from GRAS excipients, enabling treatment access worldwide, and therefore it can be regarded as a promising therapy for trypanosomiasis.

  12. Postoperative total parenteral nutrition in patients with liver disorders.

    PubMed

    Okuno, M; Nagayama, M; Takai, T; Rai, A; Nakao, S; Kamino, K; Umeyama, K

    1985-08-01

    Sixty-one patients with liver disorders receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for about 14 postoperative days were divided into three groups based on the parenteral nutritional regimen. The influence of these TPN solutions on the liver function tests and the nutritional assessments, and the availability of the specially formulated amino acid solution were studied. Glucose alone as energy source was infused in Group Ia. The mixture of glucose and fructose was infused in Group Ib. In these patients (Group I), a commercially available amino acid solution was administered simultaneously. A specially formulated amino acid, rich in branched-chain amino acids but poor in aromatic amino acids was infused with the mixture of glucose and fructose in Group II. There was no remarkable elevation of blood glucose and lactate levels in all patients. Blood glucose levels in Group Ib were maintained lower than that in Group Ia. Except for serum alkaline phosphatase, no remarkable abnormality was observed in liver function tests. Body weight changes were less than 5% in each group. Average nitrogen balances were -44.5 mg/kg/day in Group Ia, -5.5 mg/kg/day in Group Ib, -51.5 mg/kg/day in Group II. While the abnormalities in serum amino acid pattern and molar ratio of leucine, isoleucine, and valine to phenylalanine and tyrosine tend to be more enhanced in Group I, these abnormalities returned to near normal in Group II during TPN. By multiple linear regression analyses, 45 kcal/kg/day of energy intake would be required to maintain nitrogen equilibrium and zero body weight change. And when nitrogen intakes were 159 mg/kg/day in Group Ia, 114 mg/kg/day in Group Ib, and 189 mg/kg/day in Group II at 45 kcal/kg/day in energy intake, nitrogen balances were expected to be equivalent. These results suggest that postoperative TPN is good for nutritional support in patients with liver disorders. And also, the combination of glucose and fructose has better effect on nitrogen balance. The

  13. [Survey on parenteral nutrition preparation variability in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, J M; Fernández-Shaw Toda, C; Muñoz García, M J; Gomis Muñoz, P

    2002-01-01

    The prescription and preparation of paediatric parenteral nutrition in Spain are subject to great variability. To identify how paediatric parenteral nutrition is prescribed and prepared in Spain. During the first quarter of 2001, a telephone survey was carried out among most of the hospitals in which parenteral nutrition is habitually prepared. The survey included questions on who was in charge of the prescription, the use of different solutions, addition of supplements (carnitine, heparin and glutamine), as well as information on the shelf-life of the mixtures. Subsequently, the results of the survey were compared with the following guidance documents: "Enteral and parenteral nutrition in paediatrics", drafted under the auspices of the Spanish Association for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (2000) and the "Guidelines for the use of parenteral and enteral nutrition in adult and paediatric patients"/"Nutrition support practice manual" from the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (1998). Of the 48 hospitals surveyed, paediatric parenteral nutrition was not prepared in 12 of them. the number of food bags prepared daily correlated directly with the size of the hospital. In all cases, the paediatricians were responsible for prescription. In 87% of the centres, this prescription was customized (i.e. solutions adapted to each individual patient). All of the hospitals used dextrose as the source of carbohydrates and specific amino acid solutions for paediatric medicine. Basically, lipid emulsions with long chain triglycerides were used in 65% of cases and another 19% used physical mixtures of MCT and LCT. Only half of the hospitals routinely used all-in-one mixtures. Inorganic phosphate continued to be used in most cases (78%) versus sodium glycerol phosphate. Vitamins and trace elements were added daily in 65% of the hospitals, with alternate administration in the remainder. In half of the centres, heparin was added to the mixture

  14. Percutaneous central venous catheters versus peripheral cannulae for delivery of parenteral nutrition in neonates.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Sean; McGuire, William

    2015-10-06

    Neonatal parenteral nutrition may be delivered via peripheral cannulas or central venous catheters (umbilical or percutaneous). As the result of complications associated with umbilical catheters, many neonatal units prefer to use percutaneous catheters after initial stabilisation. Although they can be difficult to place, these catheters may be more stable than peripheral cannulae and require less frequent replacement. These delivery methods may be associated with different risks of adverse events, including acquired invasive infection and extravasation injury. To determine the effects of infusion of parenteral nutrition via percutaneous central venous catheters versus peripheral cannulae on nutrient input, growth and development and complications among hospitalised neonates receiving parenteral nutrition in terms of adverse consequences such as bacteraemia or invasive fungal infection, cardiac tamponade or other extravasation injuries. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2015) and EMBASE (1980 to June 2015), as well as conference proceedings and previous reviews. Randomised controlled trials that compared delivery of intravenous fluids (primarily parenteral nutrition) via percutaneous central venous catheters versus peripheral cannulae in hospitalised neonates. We extracted data using standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Group, with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by two review authors. We found six trials recruiting a total of 549 infants. One trial showed that use of a percutaneous central venous catheter was associated with a smaller deficit between prescribed and actual nutrient intake during the trial period (mean difference (MD) -7.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -11.02 to -3.2). Infants in the percutaneous central venous catheter group needed significantly fewer catheters/cannulae (MD -4.3, 95% CI -5.24, -3.43). Meta-analysis of data from all trials

  15. Safety of refrigerated storage of admixed parenteral fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, D C; Arnow, P M

    1988-01-01

    Many hospital pharmacies are reluctant to store admixed parenteral fluids longer than 24 to 48 h because of concern about possible microbial contamination. We evaluated the safety of prolonged refrigerated storage of admixtures by culturing mixtures in 471 bags prepared routinely in a hospital pharmacy and stored at 4 degrees C for up to 15 days. Low-level contamination (1 CFU per bag) was found in 3 of 253 solutions of saline and/or glucose into which nonantibiotic additives had been injected. None of 171 saline and/or glucose solutions with antibiotic additives or 47 parenteral nutrition fluids was culture positive. The risk of contamination did not increase with duration of storage, and none of 107 bags stored greater than or equal to 5 days was culture positive. Laboratory studies to measure growth of bacteria and fungi in glucose infusate and parenteral nutrition solutions confirmed that storage at 4 degrees C suppresses growth. Eight of twelve bacterial isolates grew in glucose solutions at 25 degrees C, while none grew at 4 degrees C. Of 13 species of bacteria and fungi inoculated in parenteral nutrition fluids, 8 proliferated at 25 degrees C and none proliferated at 4 degrees C. We conclude that refrigerated storage of parenteral fluids for up to 1 week following admixture, as permitted by Centers for Disease Control guidelines, does not appear to increase the risk of microbial contamination when standard aseptic procedures for admixing and storage are followed. PMID:3183025

  16. Premixed Parenteral Nutrition Solution Use in Children

    PubMed Central

    Crill, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In response to national drug shortages, our institution established criteria for the use of commercial premixed parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions in select pediatric patients. Although these solutions have been marketed for use in children, there are no data in this patient population. The objective of this study was to review our use of commercial premixed PN solutions in children. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of patients ≤18 years of age who received a premixed PN solution from October 2010 to April 2012. All premixed PN courses were assessed for incidence of premixed PN discontinuation due to laboratory abnormalities. Estimated goal and actual protein and total caloric intake were evaluated for premixed PN courses that were continued for >48 hours. RESULTS: Sixty-nine patients received 74 courses of premixed PN solutions for a mean duration of 5.6 ± 6.2 (range, 1–31) days. Fifteen courses (20%) required discontinuation of premixed PN as a result of mild laboratory abnormalities. No changes in clinical status were observed in patients and all abnormalities were corrected after switching to individualized PN. In patients receiving PN for >48 hours, premixed PN solutions provided goal protein in 48/49 (98%) courses and goal calories in 33/49 (67%) courses. CONCLUSIONS: Premixed PN solutions were used in a wide range of pediatric patients and provide a potential option for PN support in pediatric patients when drug shortages limit PN product supply. Close monitoring for electrolyte abnormalities and protein and caloric intake is recommended when using premixed PN solutions in children. PMID:26472952

  17. Trial of the route of early nutritional support in critically ill adults.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Sheila E; Parrott, Francesca; Harrison, David A; Bear, Danielle E; Segaran, Ella; Beale, Richard; Bellingan, Geoff; Leonard, Richard; Mythen, Michael G; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2014-10-30

    Uncertainty exists about the most effective route for delivery of early nutritional support in critically ill adults. We hypothesized that delivery through the parenteral route is superior to that through the enteral route. We conducted a pragmatic, randomized trial involving adults with an unplanned admission to one of 33 English intensive care units. We randomly assigned patients who could be fed through either the parenteral or the enteral route to a delivery route, with nutritional support initiated within 36 hours after admission and continued for up to 5 days. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 30 days. We enrolled 2400 patients; 2388 (99.5%) were included in the analysis (1191 in the parenteral group and 1197 in the enteral group). By 30 days, 393 of 1188 patients (33.1%) in the parenteral group and 409 of 1195 patients (34.2%) in the enteral group had died (relative risk in parenteral group, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.86 to 1.08; P=0.57). There were significant reductions in the parenteral group, as compared with the enteral group, in rates of hypoglycemia (44 patients [3.7%] vs. 74 patients [6.2%]; P=0.006) and vomiting (100 patients [8.4%] vs. 194 patients [16.2%]; P<0.001). There were no significant differences between the parenteral group and the enteral group in the mean number of treated infectious complications (0.22 vs. 0.21; P=0.72), 90-day mortality (442 of 1184 patients [37.3%] vs. 464 of 1188 patients [39.1%], P=0.40), in rates of 14 other secondary outcomes, or in rates of adverse events. Caloric intake was similar in the two groups, with the target intake not achieved in most patients. We found no significant difference in 30-day mortality associated with the route of delivery of early nutritional support in critically ill adults. (Funded by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health Research; CALORIES Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN17386141.).

  18. Parenteral iron therapy in obstetrics: 8 years experience with iron-sucrose complex.

    PubMed

    Perewusnyk, G; Huch, R; Huch, A; Breymann, C

    2002-07-01

    Fe is an essential component of haem in myoglobin and accounts for 70 % of haemoglobin. The balance of Fe, unlike that of other metals such as Na or Ca, is regulated solely by gastrointestinal absorption, which itself depends on the bioavailability of Fe in food, i.e. the chemical Fe species. Factors that maintain Fe homeostasis by modulating Fe transfer through the intestinal mucosa are found at the luminal, mucosal and systemic levels. Fe deficiency and its consequence, Fe-deficiency anaemia, form the commonest nutritional pathology in pregnant women. The current gold standard to detect Fe deficiency remains the serum ferritin value. Previously there was general consensus against parenteral Fe administration, i.e. parenteral Fe was only recommended for special conditions such as unresponsiveness to oral Fe, intolerance to oral Fe, severe anaemia, lack of time for therapy etc. However, especially in hospital settings, clinicians regularly face these conditions but are still worried about reactions that were described using Fe preparations such as Fe-dextrans. A widely used and safe alternative is the Fe-sucrose complex, which has become of major interest to prevent functional Fe deficiency after use of recombinant erythropoietin Numerous reports show the effectiveness and safety of the Fe-sucrose complex. Good tolerance to this Fe formulation is partly due to the low allergenic effect of the sucrose complex, partly due to slow release of elementary Fe from the complex. Accumulation of Fe-sucrose in parenchyma of organs is low compared with Fe-dextrans or Fe-gluconate, while incorporation into the bone marrow for erythropoiesis is considerably faster. Oral Fe is only started if haemoglobin levels are below 110 g/l. If levels fall below 100 g/l or are below 100 g/l at time of diagnosis, parenteral Fe-sucrose is used primarily. In cases of severe anaemia (haemoglobin <90 g/l) or non-response to parenteral Fe after 2 weeks, recombinant erythropoietin is considered in

  19. Randomised trial of glutamine, selenium, or both, to supplement parenteral nutrition for critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J D; Avenell, Alison; Noble, David W; Campbell, Marion K; Croal, Bernard L; Simpson, William G; Vale, Luke D; Battison, Claire G; Jenkinson, David J; Cook, Jonathan A

    2011-03-17

    To determine whether inclusion of glutamine, selenium, or both in a standard isonitrogenous, isocaloric preparation of parenteral nutrition influenced new infections and mortality among critically ill patients. Randomised, double blinded, factorial, controlled trial. Level 2 and 3 (or combined) critical care units in Scotland. All 22 units were invited, and 10 participated. 502 adults in intensive care units and high dependency units for ≥ 48 hours, with gastrointestinal failure and requiring parenteral nutrition. Parenteral glutamine (20.2 g/day) or selenium (500 μg/day), or both, for up to seven days. Primary outcomes were participants with new infections in the first 14 days and mortality. An intention to treat analysis and a prespecified analysis of patients who received ≥ 5 days of the trial intervention are presented. Secondary outcomes included critical care unit and acute hospital lengths of stay, days of antibiotic use, and modified SOFA (Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment) score. Selenium supplementation did not significantly affect patients developing a new infection (126/251 v 139/251, odds ratio 0.81 (95% CI 0.57 to 1.15)), except for those who had received ≥ 5 days of supplementation (odds ratio 0.53 (0.30 to 0.93)). There was no overall effect of glutamine on new infections (134/250 v 131/252, odds ratio 1.07 (0.75 to 1.53)), even if patients received ≥ 5 days of supplementation (odds ratio 0.99 (0.56 to 1.75)). Six month mortality was not significantly different for selenium (107/251 v 114/251, odds ratio 0.89 (0.62 to 1.29)) or glutamine (115/250 v 106/252, 1.18 (0.82 to 1.70)). Length of stay, days of antibiotic use, and modified SOFA score were not significantly affected by selenium or glutamine supplementation. The primary (intention to treat) analysis showed no effect on new infections or on mortality when parenteral nutrition was supplemented with glutamine or selenium. Patients who received parenteral nutrition supplemented with

  20. Comparative analysis of immunological responses to oral (Ty21a) and parenteral (TAB) typhoid vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    D'Amelio, R; Tagliabue, A; Nencioni, L; Di Addario, A; Villa, L; Manganaro, M; Boraschi, D; Le Moli, S; Nisini, R; Matricardi, P M

    1988-01-01

    The clinical and immunological responses to typhoid vaccination with parenteral (TAB) and oral (Ty21a) vaccines in two groups of 30 adult male subjects were studied. Parameters monitored included specific anti-Salmonella typhi cell-mediated immunity and total and specific antilipopolysaccharide fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) titers in Ty21a-vaccinated subjects. Peripheral blood lymphocytes antibacterial activity was significantly increased only in Ty21a-vaccinated subjects. Serum arming activity and results of human F(ab')2 anti-IgG and -IgA inhibition tests suggest antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by IgA in those vaccinated with Ty21a. Interestingly enough, the cells of TAB-vaccinated subjects were able to mediate IgG-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, as was observable from the results of blocking experiments. Moreover, total and specific antilipopolysaccharide fecal IgA levels were observed to be significantly increased with Ty21a, up to 8 months post-vaccination schedule. An early-onset, transitory increase in serum IgM rheumatoid factor was also found, exclusively in subjects treated with TAB, and was no longer detectable on day 240. Ty21a was well tolerated and free of side effects, whereas 65% of subjects administered TAB reported fever, headache, malaise, and local tenderness at the injection site. Our data show that the two typhoid vaccines induce different cell-mediated specific immune responses. The role of these responses in protection against Salmonella infection, however, requires further investigation. PMID:3417354

  1. Risk Factors for Subclavian Vein Thrombosis in Cancer Patients With Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Berea-Baltierra, Ricardo; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Vela-Martinez, Elpidia; Sevilla-Gonzalez, Maria de la Luz; Talavera-Pina, Juan Osvaldo; Valencia-Jimenez, Elena; Perez-Franco, Irene; Escobedo-Hernandez, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few reports on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and its possible prothrombotic effect. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for subclavian vein thrombosis (SVT) in patients receiving TPN. Method Cancer patients with indwelling subclavian catheters and TPN were followed in a cohort study. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed 8 and 30 days after catheter placement. Results One hundred twenty-one patients were included, with a mean of 61 (± 11.8) years of age. We detected 36 SVT events at day 8 (29.8%) and 47 (38.8%) at day 30 after central catheter placement. Mean length of subclavian catheterization was 17.2 (± 8.2) days. Fifty-three point three percent of patients receiving ≥ 3,050 mOsm TPN in 24 hours developed SVT (relative risk (RR) = 2.01, 95% CI, 1.14 - 3.57; P = 0.016) at day 8 and 60% (RR = 1.67, 95% CI, 1.30 - 2.71; P = 0.038) at day 30 post-catheter placement. Protein administration of > 97.5 g/day was shown to be a risk factor for early thrombosis with a mean of 16.88 days for the development of SVT (95% CI, 10 - 23.7) versus 27.8 days (95% CI, 25.8 - 29.9) in the group with nutritional protein content < 97.5 g/day (P = 0.000). Conclusion High-osmolarity and high-protein nutrition formulas were shown to be risk factors for SVT in cancer patients receiving TPN. PMID:25110538

  2. The use of intradialytic parenteral nutrition to treat malnutrition: a case study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Petula; Smith, Pamela; Rodger, Diane

    2003-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition in dialysis patients has been well-described in the literature. Most malnourished patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer from a mixed marasmus-kwashiorkor type of malnutrition with loss of both somatic and visceral protein mass. Malnutrition is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Up to 50% of patients on dialysis have protein energy malnutrition (Mortelmans & Vanholder, 1999). Malnutrition may be under-recognized and under-reported in dialysis patients. Malnutrition may result from inadequate food intake secondary to the uremic condition, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, altered taste and other physiologic conditions that impede food intake or metabolism. The usual indices of nutritional assessment--body weight, body mass index (BMI), anthropometrics, etc., may be inaccurate in patients with ESRD, as the results are often skewed by fluid retention. Therefore, we often rely on weight loss, bloodwork, a pre-dialysis low serum potassium, phosphorus and urea, as early signs of a decreased food intake. When patients are malnourished, measures such as oral supplements and/or tube feedings may be used to augment protein and calorie intake. However, when these interventions are inadequate to reverse the malnutrition condition, intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) should be implemented. Although there is no definite supportive data to show that the use of IDPN improves morbidity and mortality of dialysis patients, there are data to support that IDPN has positive effects on numerous nutritional parameters (Acchiardo, 2000; Capelli et al., 1994; Foulks, 1999; Hiroshige et al., 1998; Ikizler et al., 1995; Korzets et al., 1999; Mortelmans & Vanholder, 1999; Saunders et al., 1999; Smolle et al., 1995). In this article, we will discuss the causes of malnutrition in dialysis patients, the use of IDPN on one of our patients, and the potential complications associated with IDPN.

  3. Vitamin D deficiency in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Patti; Duerksen, Donald R

    2011-07-01

    In addition to its role in bone metabolism, vitamin D has important immunomodulatory and antineoplastic effects. Patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) receive most of their vitamin D from intravenous (IV) supplementation. Vitamin D deficiency is common in the general population, and the adequacy of vitamin D supplementation in HPN patients is unclear. The purpose of this study is to determine the vitamin D status of patients on HPN. Consecutive patients seen in a regional home nutrition program had their oral and IV vitamin D intakes determined. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured in all patients. Intake of calcium, magnesium, and phosphate were also determined. The mean 25-hydroxyvitamin D level in 22 patients receiving HPN for a mean of 33.5 months (range, 1-177) was 42 nmol/L. Vitamin D deficiency was present in 15 (68%) patients and vitamin D insufficiency in 6 (27%) patients. The mean dietary vitamin D intake was 79.5 IU per day, while the mean IV supplementation was 166 IU per day. In this study of a regional Canadian HPN program, there was a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency affecting virtually all patients. All patients receiving HPN should be supplemented with vitamin D and have their 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels monitored. Further studies are required to determine optimal methods and dosing of vitamin D replacement using oral supplements or ultraviolet light therapy.

  4. Fundamental understanding of drug absorption from a parenteral oil depot.

    PubMed

    Kalicharan, Raween W; Schot, Peter; Vromans, Herman

    2016-02-15

    Oil depots are parenteral drug formulations meant for sustained release of lipophilic compounds. Until now, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of drug absorption from oil depots is lacking. The aim of this paper was to fill this gap. A clinical study with healthy volunteers was conducted. An oil depot with nandrolone decanoate and benzyl alcohol was subcutaneously administered in the upper arm of female volunteers. Pharmacokinetic profiles of both substances were related to each other and to literature data. Benzyl alcohol absorbs much more rapidly than nandrolone. In detail, it appears that benzyl alcohol enters the central compartment directly, while nandrolone decanoate is recovered in serum after a lag time. This lag time is also seen in literature data, although not reported explicitly. The absorption of nandrolone is enhanced by the presence of benzyl alcohol. This is most likely an effect of altered oil viscosity and partition coefficient between the oil and aqueous phase. The absorption rate constant of compounds is found to be related to the logP of the solubilized prodrug. The absorption rate is however not only determined by the physico-chemical properties of the formulation but also by the tissue properties. Here, it is argued that lymphatic flow must be considered as a relevant parameter.

  5. Efficacy of intradialytic parenteral nutrition in malnourished hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Nancy; Shalansky, Karen

    2002-09-15

    The efficacy of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) in malnourished hemodialysis patients was studied. All patients at a large tertiary care institution who received IDPN for one month or longer between June 1997 and December 2000 were included in the study. The IDPN formulation contained 10% amino acids 250 or 500 mL, 50% dextrose 250 mL, and 20% fat emulsion 250 mL. IDPN was administered during each thrice-weekly hemodialysis session. Patient data were collected 6 and 3 months before IDPN therapy began, at baseline, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the therapy began. Therapeutic efficacy was assessed by the percent change from baseline in dry body weight and serum albumin concentration. Twenty-six courses of IDPN in 24 patients met the study's inclusion criteria. The mean duration of treatment was 4.3 months. Dry body weights were significantly lower 6 and 3 months before the start of IDPN therapy than at baseline and significantly higher 6, 9, and 12 months after the start of therapy. Serum albumin levels were also significantly higher at 3 and 9 months than at baseline. The percentage of treatment courses in which patients had a serum albumin concentration of > or = 34 g/L was 12% at baseline, 39% at 6 months, and 47% at 9 months. Adverse effects consisted primarily of excess fluid gain and hyperglycemia. IDPN therapy significantly increased body weight and serum albumin levels in malnourished hemodialysis patients.

  6. Telemedicine Support Groups for Home Parenteral Nutrition Users.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Eve-Lynn; Yadrich, Donna Macan; Thompson, Noreen; Wright, Shawna; Stone, Kathaleen; Adams, Natasia; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Smith, Carol E

    2017-10-01

    Patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN), a life-sustaining intravenous (IV) infusion that provides nourishment and hydration to patients with short gut or inflammatory bowel diseases, are often isolated and not in visual contact with peers or health providers. One completed clinical trial (Clinical Trials.gov NCT0190028) and 1 ongoing clinical trial (Clinical Trials.gov NCT02987569) are evaluating a mobile videoconferencing-delivered support group intervention for patients on HPN and their caregivers. This home-based telemedicine intervention uses encrypted tablet-based videoconferencing to connect multiple families in real time. The twice-daily IV regimen is challenging for patients who may experience infusion catheter-related bloodstream infections, difficulties with fatigue, loss of sleep, depressive disorders, and worry over the potential life-threatening side effects and the expenses of this therapy. Using secure telemedicine, the facilitated support group intervention aims to enhance HPN home care, daily functioning, and quality of life. The authors provide the rationale for the telemedicine approach with HPN users and caregivers. They provide "how-to" information about the content and process of the facilitated support group sessions via secure videoconferencing. They share lessons learned from the ongoing evaluation of the telemedicine approach.

  7. A familiar font drives early emotional effects in word recognition.

    PubMed

    Kuchinke, Lars; Krause, Beatrix; Fritsch, Nathalie; Briesemeister, Benny B

    2014-10-01

    The emotional connotation of a word is known to shift the process of word recognition. Using the electroencephalographic event-related potentials (ERPs) approach it has been documented that early attentional processing of high-arousing negative words is shifted at a stage of processing where a presented word cannot have been fully identified. Contextual learning has been discussed to contribute to these effects. The present study shows that a manipulation of the familiarity with a word's shape interferes with these earliest emotional ERP effects. Presenting high-arousing negative and neutral words in a familiar or an unfamiliar font results in very early emotion differences only in case of familiar shapes, whereas later processing stages reveal similar emotional effects in both font conditions. Because these early emotion-related differences predict later behavioral differences, it is suggested that contextual learning of emotional valence comprises more visual features than previously expected to guide early visual-sensory processing.

  8. The potential clinical relevance of visible particles in parenteral drugs.

    PubMed

    Doessegger, Lucette; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Szczesny, Piotr; Rockstroh, Helmut; Kallmeyer, Georg; Langenkamp, Anja; Herrmann, Joerg; Famulare, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Visible particulates (VP) are one subclass of defects seen during the final visual inspection of parenteral products and are currently one of the top ten reasons for recalls 1,2. The risk posed by particles is still unclear with limited experience reported in humans but remains an important consideration during the manufacture and use of parenteral products. From the experimental and clinical knowledge of the distribution of particulate matter in the body, clinical complications would include events occurring around parenteral administration e.g., as a result of mechanical pulmonary artery obstruction and injection site reaction, or sub-acute or chronic events e.g., granuloma. The challenge is to better understand the implication for patients of single vials with VP and align the risk with the probabilistic detection process used by manufacturers for accept/reject decisions of individual units of product.

  9. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stehle, Peter; Kuhn, Katharina S.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care. PMID:26495301

  10. Parenteral Nutrition Additive Shortages: The Short-Term, Long-Term and Potential Epigenetic Implications in Premature and Hospitalized Infants

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Corrine; Thoene, Melissa; Wagner, Julie; Collier, Dean; Lecci, Kassandra; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Nutrition support practitioners are currently dealing with shortages of parenteral nutrition micronutrients, including multivitamins (MVI), selenium and zinc. A recent survey from the American Society of Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition (ASPEN) indicates that this shortage is having a profound effect on clinical practice. A majority of respondents reported taking some aggressive measures to ration existing supplies. Most premature infants and many infants with congenital anomalies are dependent on parenteral nutrition for the first weeks of life to meet nutritional needs. Because of fragile health and poor reserves, they are uniquely susceptible to this problem. It should be understood that shortages and rationing have been associated with adverse outcomes, such as lactic acidosis and Wernicke encephalopathy from thiamine deficiency or pulmonary and skeletal development concerns related to inadequate stores of Vitamin A and D. In this review, we will discuss the current parenteral shortages and the possible impact on a population of very low birth weight infants. This review will also present a case study of a neonate who was impacted by these current shortages. PMID:23223000

  11. [Study of parenteral iron use in a health facility and its impact in terms of hospital economics].

    PubMed

    Vonesch, M-A; Grangier, G; Girard, P; Dussart, C

    2016-07-01

    Administration of parenteral iron is a mainstay of iron deficiency treatment. Evaluation and control of this element is an issue for healthcare facilities. Study of parenteral iron use is thus to be evaluated in its impact in terms of hospital economics. Parenteral iron administrations that took place on 2014 in our healthcare facility were retrospectively identified by pharmacists. Following data were extracted from Pharma™ and Crossway™ softwares: indication, diagnostic coding and total dose of iron received. They were then compared to the summary of product characteristics. Of 198 analyzed prescriptions, iron deficiency was known or suspected for 97% of patients. However, the total dose of iron administered was not in compliance for three quarters of prescriptions. Sixty-eight percent of patients appear under-dosed. Administration's traceability was found for two-thirds. Eighty-five hospital discharges did not have the right coding and 34 stays were charged like an external act instead sessions. Financial loss for the hospital is estimated at 49,300 euros. As part of improving practice, close pharmaceutical monitoring of parenteral iron prescribed dosing regimen is essential. Effective communication with the medical information department and regular awareness raising of prescribers should also allow to give more value to this act. Hospital economics is a real tool to aid decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Aluminum in Pediatric Parenteral Nutrition Products: Measured Versus Labeled Content

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Robert L.; Pieroni, Kevin P.; Gaskari, Shabnam; Dixon, Tessa K.; Park, KT; Kerner, John A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Aluminum is a contaminant in all parenteral nutrition solutions. Manufacturers currently label these products with the maximum aluminum content at the time of expiry, but there are no published data to establish the actual measured concentration of aluminum in parenteral nutrition solution products prior to being compounded in the clinical setting. This investigation assessed quantitative aluminum content of products commonly used in the formulation of parenteral nutrition solutions. The objective of this study is to determine the best products to be used when compounding parenteral nutrition solutions (i.e., those with the least amount of aluminum contamination). METHODS All products available in the United States from all manufacturers used in the production of parenteral nutrition solutions were identified and collected. Three lots were collected for each identified product. Samples were quantitatively analyzed by Mayo Laboratories. These measured concentrations were then compared to the manufacturers' labeled concentration. RESULTS Large lot-to-lot and manufacturer-to-manufacturer differences were noted for all products. Measured aluminum concentrations were less than manufacturer-labeled values for all products. CONCLUSIONS The actual aluminum concentrations of all the parenteral nutrition solutions were significantly less than the aluminum content based on manufacturers' labels. These findings indicate that 1) the manufacturers should label their products with actual aluminum content at the time of product release rather than at the time of expiry, 2) that there are manufacturers whose products provide significantly less aluminum contamination than others, and 3) pharmacists can select products with the lowest amounts of aluminum contamination and reduce the aluminum exposure in their patients. PMID:22477831

  13. [Pharmaconutrition with parenteral selenium in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Langlois, P L; de Oliveira Figliolino, L F; Hardy, G; Manzanares, W

    2014-04-01

    Critical illness is characterized by oxidative stress which leads to multiple organ failure, and sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit. Over the last 2 decades, different antioxidant therapies have been developed to improve outcomes in septic patients. According to recent evidence, selenium therapy should be considered the cornerstone of the antioxidant strategies. Selenium given as selenious acid or sodium selenite should be considered as a drug or pharmaconutrient with prooxidant and cytotoxic effects when a loading dose in intravenous bolus form is administered, particularly in the early stage of severe sepsis/septic shock. To date, several phase ii trials have demonstrated that selenium therapy may be able to decrease mortality, improve organ dysfunction and reduce infections in critically ill septic patients. The effect of selenium therapy in sepsis syndrome must be confirmed by large, well designed phase iii clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to discuss current evidence on selenium pharmaconutrition in sepsis syndrome.

  14. Early-life nutritional effects on the female reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Chan, K A; Tsoulis, M W; Sloboda, D M

    2015-02-01

    There is now considerable epidemiological and experimental evidence indicating that early-life environmental conditions, including nutrition, affect subsequent development in later life. These conditions induce highly integrated responses in endocrine-related homeostasis, resulting in persistent changes in the developmental trajectory producing an altered adult phenotype. Early-life events trigger processes that prepare the individual for particular circumstances that are anticipated in the postnatal environment. However, where the intrauterine and postnatal environments differ markedly, such modifications to the developmental trajectory may prove maladaptive in later life. Reproductive maturation and function are similarly influenced by early-life events. This should not be surprising, because the primordial follicle pool is established early in life and is thus vulnerable to early-life events. Results of clinical and experimental studies have indicated that early-life adversity is associated with a decline in ovarian follicular reserve, changes in ovulation rates, and altered age at onset of puberty. However, the underlying mechanisms regulating the relationship between the early-life developmental environment and postnatal reproductive development and function are unclear. This review examines the evidence linking early-life nutrition and effects on the female reproductive system, bringing together clinical observations in humans and experimental data from targeted animal models. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Brief history of parenteral and enteral nutrition in the hospital in the USA.

    PubMed

    Bistrian, Bruce R

    2009-01-01

    The meteoric rise in parenteral and enteral nutrition was largely a consequence of the development of total parenteral nutrition and chemically defined diets in the late 1960s and early 1970s and the recognition of the extensive prevalence of protein calorie malnutrition associated with disease in this same period. The establishment of Nutrition Support Services (NSS) using the novel, multidisciplinary model of physician, clinical nurse specialist, pharmacist, and dietitian, which, at its peak in the 1990s, approached 550 well-established services in about 10% of the US acute care hospitals, also fostered growth. The American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, a multidisciplinary society reflecting the interaction of these specialties, was established in 1976 and grew from less than 1,000 members to nearly 8,000 by 1990. Several developments in the 1990s initially slowed and then stopped this growth. A system of payments, called diagnosis-related groups, put extreme cost constraints on hospital finances which often limited financial support for NSS teams, particularly the physician and nurse specialist members. Furthermore, as the concern for the nutritional status of patients spread to other specialties, critical care physicians, trauma surgeons, gastroenterologists, endocrinologists, and nephrologists often took responsibility for nutrition support in their area of expertise with a dwindling of the model of an internist or general surgeon with special skills in nutrition support playing the key MD role across the specialties. Nutrition support of the hospitalized patient has dramatically improved in the US over the past 35 years, but the loss of major benefits possible and unacceptable risks of invasive nutritional support if not delivered when appropriate, delivered without monitoring by nutrition experts, or employed where inappropriate or ineffective will require continued attention by medical authorities, hospitals, funding agencies, and industry in

  16. Neuroimaging identifies increased manganese deposition in infants receiving parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Aschner, Judy L; Anderson, Adam; Slaughter, James Christopher; Aschner, Michael; Steele, Steven; Beller, Amy; Mouvery, Amanda; Furlong, Heather M; Maitre, Nathalie L

    2015-12-01

    Manganese, an essential metal for normal growth and development, is neurotoxic on excessive exposure. Standard trace element-supplemented neonatal parenteral nutrition (PN) has a high manganese content and bypasses normal gastrointestinal absorptive control mechanisms, which places infants at risk of manganese neurotoxicity. Magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry demonstrating short T1 relaxation time (T1R) in the basal ganglia reflects excessive brain manganese accumulation. This study tested the hypothesis that infants with greater parenteral manganese exposure have higher brain manganese accumulation, as measured by MR imaging, than do infants with lower parenteral manganese exposure. Infants exposed to parenteral manganese were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Infants classified as having high manganese exposure received >75% of their nutrition in the preceding 4 wk as PN. All others were classified as having low exposure. Daily parenteral and enteral manganese intakes were calculated. Whole-blood manganese was measured by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Brain MR relaxometry was interpreted by a masked reviewer. Linear regression models, adjusted for gestational age (GA) at birth, estimated the association of relaxometry indexes with total and parenteral manganese exposures. Seventy-three infants were enrolled. High-quality MR images were available for 58 infants, 39 with high and 19 with low manganese exposure. Four infants with a high exposure had blood manganese concentrations >30 μg/L. After controlling for GA, higher parenteral and total manganese intakes were associated with a lower T1R (P = 0.01) in the globus pallidus and putamen but were not associated with whole-blood manganese (range: 3.6-56.6 μg/L). Elevated conjugated bilirubin magnified the association between parenteral manganese and decreasing T1R. A short T1R for GA identifies infants at risk of increased brain manganese deposition associated with PN

  17. Fetal growth sustained by parenteral nutrition in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Alsina, M E; Saldana, L R; Stringer, C A

    1984-07-01

    Severe maternal nutritional deprivation has been associated with intrauterine growth retardation, premature labor, and increased perinatal mortality and morbidity. The authors present four cases in which total parenteral nutrition was used successfully to support fetal growth in such diverse complications as twin pregnancy with maternal jejunoileal bypass, regional enteritis, and acute pancreatitis. Maintenance of fetal growth as evidenced by serial sonographic examination allows achievement of fetal lung maturation before delivery. In all the cases presented there was no perinatal mortality or morbidity. The main clinical implication of the report is the possible application of total parenteral nutrition to maintain adequate growth in fetuses small for gestational age because of maternal nutritional deprivation.

  18. Standardised neonatal parenteral nutrition formulations - an Australasian group consensus 2012.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Srinivas; Osborn, David; Sinn, John; Lui, Kei

    2014-02-18

    Standardised parenteral nutrition formulations are routinely used in the neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. In 2010, a multidisciplinary group was formed to achieve a consensus on the formulations acceptable to majority of the neonatal intensive care units. Literature review was undertaken for each nutrient and recommendations were developed in a series of meetings held between November 2010 and April 2011. Three standard and 2 optional amino acid/dextrose formulations and one lipid emulsion were agreed by majority participants in the consensus. This has a potential to standardise neonatal parenteral nutrition guidelines, reduce costs and prescription errors.

  19. [Parenteral iron therapy: problems and possible solutions].

    PubMed

    Hoigné, R; Breymann, C; Künzi, U P; Brunner, F

    1998-04-04

    To investigate whether there are differences in the frequency of ADRs (adverse drug reactions) to parenteral iron preparations, we compared the results of 4 different data collections which contain observations in particular on i.m. or i.v. iron dextran and i.v. iron hydroxide sucrose complex, primarily in relation to anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions and common exanthemas. 1. In 206 patients of the department of general internal medicine in a city/teaching hospital (in association with the Swiss Foundation for Comprehensive Hospital Drug Monitoring--CHDM), 4 probably allergic reactions to i.m. iron dextran were found, one with acute severe dyspnea, cyanosis and flush, 3 with slight generalized, probably allergic reactions. Data from the USA on i.v. iron dextran do not show marked differences in the frequency of ADRs as compared with our data with i.m. administration. 2. A group of 400 otherwise healthy patients of the obstetric department of Zurich University Hospital were treated with i.v. iron sucrose for anemia due to iron loss during pregnancy or following childbirth. Seven generalized skin reactions, 4 in the form of flush and 3 of common exanthema, occurred. 3. In a retrospective study on patients on maintenance hemodialysis with chronic renal insufficiency and anemia, a questionnaire was answered by the medical heads of 17 selected hemodialysis units in Switzerland. Response was 100%. During around 8100 patient-years with approximately 160,000 ampoules of iron sucrose (with 100 mg elementary iron), not a single life threatening reaction was observed; only 5-7 situations of rapidly reversible blood pressure fall occurred, some 10 with flush, and one each with urticaria and vomiting/diarrhea. 4. The relatively good tolerance of i.v. iron sucrose in patients with chronic renal failure may be due either to reduced immune competence in patients with chronic renal insufficiency and/or to the use of the preparation itself, or probably both. 5. In ADRs of

  20. Mercury exposure and early effects: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kazantzis, G

    2002-01-01

    This paper was given as a keynote address at the conference on The Assessment of the Effects Due to Low Doses of Inorganic Mercury following Environmental and Occupational Exposures: Human and in vitro Studies on the Specific Mechanisms of Toxicity in Gargnano, Italy, in September 2001. The most relevant literature over the past 40 years has been reviewed, and in particular, the proceedings of the World Health Organisation conferences on the health effects of inorganic and organic mercury exposure have been considered. In an uncontaminated environment the general population is exposed to mercury vapour from the atmosphere and from dental amalgam, while the diet, mainly from fish, is the principal source for methyl mercury absorption. Mercury vapour release from amalgam fillings increases with chewing, with absorption and uptake by the brain and kidneys. Infants exposed to phenyl mercury from treated diapers and young children ingesting mercurous chloride in teething powders have developed acrodynia (pink disease), and Kawasaki disease and the use of mercurial skin lightening creams has been followed by the development of the nephrotic syndrome. Both mercury compounds and mercury vapour have given rise to contact dermatitis in the general population. Epidemics of mercury poisoning have followed release of mercury into the environment from industrial activity, with uptake of methyl mercury from fish eating in Minamata Bay and uptake of both inorganic and methyl mercury following release of mercury vapour and deposition into waterways from gold recovery procedures in the Amazon basin. The ingestion of wheat and barley seed treated with an alkyl mercury fungicide for sowing, by a largely illiterate population in Iraq, led to a major outbreak of poisoning with a high fatality rate. Following exposure to mercury vapour, the earliest clinically observed adverse effects at urine mercury levels of the order of 30-100 mg/g creatinine, are objectively detectable tremor

  1. Are There Long-Term Effects of Early Child Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Jay; Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Burchinal, Margaret; Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; McCartney, Kathleen; Owen, Margaret Tresch

    2007-01-01

    Effects of early child care on children's functioning from 4 1/2 years through the end of 6th grade (M age=12.0 years) were examined in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n=1,364). The results indicated that although parenting was a stronger and more consistent predictor of…

  2. A Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Early vs Late Tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Liu, C Carrie; Rudmik, Luke

    2016-10-01

    The timing of tracheostomy in critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation is controversial. An important consideration that is currently missing in the literature is an evaluation of the economic impact of an early tracheostomy strategy vs a late tracheostomy strategy. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the early tracheostomy strategy vs the late tracheostomy strategy. This economic analysis was performed using a decision tree model with a 90-day time horizon. The economic perspective was that of the US health care third-party payer. The primary outcome was the incremental cost per tracheostomy avoided. Probabilities were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials. Costs were obtained from the published literature and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database. A multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed to account for uncertainty surrounding mean values used in the reference case. The reference case demonstrated that the cost of the late tracheostomy strategy was $45 943.81 for 0.36 of effectiveness. The cost of the early tracheostomy strategy was $31 979.12 for 0.19 of effectiveness. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the late tracheostomy strategy compared with the early tracheostomy strategy was $82 145.24 per tracheostomy avoided. With a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000, the early tracheostomy strategy is cost-effective with 56% certainty. The adaptation of an early vs a late tracheostomy strategy depends on the priorities of the decision-maker. Up to a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80 000 per tracheostomy avoided, the early tracheostomy strategy has a higher probability of being the more cost-effective intervention.

  3. The Effect of Early Marriages and Early Childbearing on Women's Nutritional Status in India.

    PubMed

    Goli, Srinivas; Rammohan, Anu; Singh, Deepti

    2015-08-01

    The consequences of early childbearing on the growth and nutritional status of women in India has not been quantified in previous studies. Our study aimed to fill this gap by analysing the association between early marriage and early childbearing on nutritional status of Indian women, with a focus on Bihar and Andhra Pradesh, the two states accounting for the highest proportion of women marrying and giving first birth before 18 years of age. Our findings revealed that a substantial number of women were married before 18 years and thereby exposed to early pregnancy. Furthermore, a significantly higher proportion of women in the 'thin' category were married before 18 years, both in the Indian sample (33 %, p < 0.001) and in the selected states, Andhra Pradesh (31 %, p < 0.001) and Bihar (43 %, p < 0.001), compared to those women married at higher ages. Similarly, across all our samples women whose first birth was before age 18 years also had a significantly higher probability of being in the 'thin' category across all our samples. This pattern was also observed for associations between early childbirth and anemia levels. We conclude that the net effect of the early age at marriage and age at first birth on nutritional status is significant. Our results underline the need for preventing early marriages and the consequent high adolescent pregnancies in India, particularly in high prevalence states. This will help to improve nutritional status and health care utilisation among women, thereby, prevent maternal and child mortality and thus, achieve the MDGs 4-5.

  4. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT: EARLY LIFE EFFECTS FROM THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary Gland Development: Early Life Effects from the Environment

    S.E. Fenton. Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    As signs of precocious puberty in girls reach ...

  5. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT: EARLY LIFE EFFECTS FROM THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary Gland Development: Early Life Effects from the Environment

    S.E. Fenton. Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    As signs of precocious puberty in girls reach ...

  6. The Self-Reference Effect on Memory in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Sheila J.; Brebner, Joanne L.; Quinn, Francis; Turk, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The self-reference effect in memory is the advantage for information encoded about self, relative to other people. The early development of this effect was explored here using a concrete encoding paradigm. Trials comprised presentation of a self- or other-image paired with a concrete object. In Study 1, 4- to 6-year-old children (N = 53) were…

  7. Stayers and Leavers: Early-Career Teacher Effectiveness and Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Gary T.; Bastian, Kevin C.; Fortner, C. Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Research on teacher development reports significant early-career increases in teacher effectiveness, but the extent to which this is attributable to the development of teachers who persist or to the attrition of less effective teachers is unclear. In this study of novice teachers in North Carolina public schools, the authors investigated the…

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Childhood: Developmental Effects and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara; Lowenthal, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the unique effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on development in early childhood and offers suggestions for interventions in the cognitive, language, social-emotional, motor, and adaptive domains. Urges more intensive, long-term studies on the immediate and long-term effects of TBI. (Author/DB)

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Childhood: Developmental Effects and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara; Lowenthal, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the unique effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on development in early childhood and offers suggestions for interventions in the cognitive, language, social-emotional, motor, and adaptive domains. Urges more intensive, long-term studies on the immediate and long-term effects of TBI. (Author/DB)

  10. The Self-Reference Effect on Memory in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Sheila J.; Brebner, Joanne L.; Quinn, Francis; Turk, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The self-reference effect in memory is the advantage for information encoded about self, relative to other people. The early development of this effect was explored here using a concrete encoding paradigm. Trials comprised presentation of a self- or other-image paired with a concrete object. In Study 1, 4- to 6-year-old children (N = 53) were…

  11. Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy in an Academic Practice in Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Touzard Romo, F; Resnick, B; Perez-Cioe, M; Flanigan, TP; Kojic, E; Beckwith, CG

    2015-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is an increasingly utilized treatment modality that has been proven to be safe and cost-effective for treating infections that require prolonged antimicrobial treatment. Adequate patient selection, a structured OPAT team with an effective communication system, and routine clinical monitoring are key elements to establish a successful OPAT program. The Infectious Diseases and Immunology Center at The Miriam Hospital offers a multidisciplinary OPAT model coordinated by infectious diseases specialists and serves as a major referral center in Rhode Island. PMID:25562060

  12. LASTING BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF EARLY ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Jen; Dubos, René

    1968-01-01

    A lasting depression of body weight was consistently produced in SPF mice by infecting them orally 2 days after birth with a nonlethal, bacteria-free filtrate, prepared from the intestine of young SPF mice previously infected with an unidentified agent. Neonatal infection caused a decrease of muscle DNA and of muscle and brain protein in the adults. No other effect was detected in the chemical composition of various organs. Incorporation of 14C-amino acid into the acid precipitable fractions of liver, kidney, muscle, and brain was lower in infected than in control animals. No difference in incorporation was recognized in the thymus and spleen. The free amino acid pool of adults, measured as blood levels of free amino nitrogen, was decreased by neonatal infection. Surprisingly, the food intake of young animals infected neonatally was higher than that of the controls, measured on the basis of body weight. Their fecal excretion of nitrogen was also higher. The comparative responses of infected and control adults to a stressful situation was measured by giving them intravenously the antituberculous vaccine BCG. Under these conditions, the mice infected neonatally excreted some 20% more nitrogen in their urine and 40% more in their feces than did the controls. The mechanisms through which neonatal infection caused a lasting weight depression are discussed in the light of these metabolic findings. PMID:5691984

  13. [Suppression of cycling activity in sheep using parenteral progestagen treatment].

    PubMed

    Janett, F; Camponovo, L; Lanker, U; Hässig, M; Thun, R

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two synthetic progestagen preparations Chlormadinone acetate (CAP, Chronosyn, Veterinaria AG Zürich) and Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, Nadigest, G Streuli & Co. Uznach) on cycling activity and fertility in sheep. A flock of 28 non pregnant white alpine sheep was randomly divided into three groups, A (n = 10), B (n = 9) and C (n = 9). During a period of 4 weeks the cycling activity was confirmed by blood progesterone analysis. Thereafter, the animals of group A were treated with 50 mg CAP, those of group B with 140 mg MPA and those of group C with physiological saline solution. All injections were given intramuscularly. Suppression of endogenous progesterone secretion lasted from 28 to 49 days (mean = 39 days) in group A and from 42 to 70 days (mean = 50 days) in group B. The synchronization effect of both preparations was unsatisfactory as the occurrence of first estrus was distributed over a period of 3 weeks in group A and 4 weeks in group B. These findings could also be confirmed by the lambing period which lasted 52 days in group A and 36 days in group B. Control animals lambed within 9 days due to the synchronizing effect of the ram. The first fertile estrus was observed 36 days (group A) and 45 days (group B) after the treatment. In group A all 10 animals and in groups B and C 8 of 9 ewes each became pregnant. Parenteral progestagen application with CAP and MPA is a simple, safe and reversible method of estrus suppression in the sheep. The minimal suppressive duration of 4 (CAP) and 5 weeks (MPA) is not sufficient when a period of 3 months (alpine pasture period) is desired.

  14. Micronutrients in Parenteral Nutrition: Boron, Silicon, and Fluoride

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (providing nutrients intravenously) is a life-saving treatment for patients with severe malabsorption of nutrients caused by intestinal failure, intestinal trauma (for example, gunshot or stab wounds), and intestinal removal. Metabolic bone disease characterized by min...

  15. Phytosterols, Lipid Administration, and Liver Disease During Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2015-09-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols that are structurally and functionally analogous to cholesterol in vertebrate animals. Phytosterols are found in many foods and are part of the normal human diet. However, absorption of phytosterols from the diet is minimal. Most lipid emulsions used for parenteral nutrition are based on vegetable oils. As a result, phytosterol administration occurs during intravenous administration of lipid. Levels of phytosterols in the blood and tissues may reach high levels during parenteral lipid administration and may be toxic to cells. Phytosterols are not fully metabolized by the human body and must be excreted through the hepatobiliary system. Accumulating scientific evidence suggests that administration of high doses of intravenous lipids that are high in phytosterols contributes to the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. In this review, mechanisms by which lipids and phytosterols may cause cholestasis are discussed. Human studies of the association of phytosterols with liver disease are reviewed. In addition, clinical studies of lipid/phytosterol reduction for reversing and/or preventing parenteral nutrition associated liver disease are discussed.

  16. Gluconeogenesis continues in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine the contribution of total gluconeogenesis, to glucose production in preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) providing glucose exceeding normal infant glucose turnover rate, eight infants (0.955 +/- 0.066 kg, 26.5 - 0.5 wks, 4-1 d) were studied while receiving routine ...

  17. [Caloric substrates in postoperative parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    De Salvo, L; Romairone, E; Ansaldo, G L; Mattioli, G

    1991-05-31

    The paper describes the carbohydrate, lipidic and nitrogen metabolism of the postoperative period which is subdivided into an early and a late phase. Since the metabolism of caloric substrates in the early postoperative period is a stress metabolism with glucose intolerance and wide protein catabolism, the authors emphasise that an insufficient caloric intake is worse than the fasting state and suggest that alternative caloric sources, such as branched chain amino acids, fatty acids and, even, ketonic bodies, should be used.

  18. Comparison between Total Parenteral Nutrition Vs. Partial Parenteral Nutrition on Serum Lipids Among Chronic Ventilator Dependent Patients; A Multi Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Radpay, Rojan; Radpay, Badiozaman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is very common among chronically hospitalized patients, especially those in the intensive care unit (ICU). Identifying the patients at risk and providing suitable nutritional support can prevent and/or overcome malnutrition in them. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and partial parenteral nutrition (PPN) are two common routes to deliver nutrition to hospitalized patients. We conducted a multicenter, prospective double blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and compare their adverse effects of each method. Materials and Methods: 97 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the inclusion criteria. Serum protein, serum albumin, serum transferrin, and total lymphocyte count were measured on days 7 and 14. Results: We did not find any statistically significant differences in clinical status or laboratory values between the two groups but there were significant improvements in measured lab values between days 7 and 14 (p<0.005) indicating improved nutritional status in each groups. Conclusion: This study shows that both TPN and PPN can be used safely in chronic ICU patients to provide nutritional support and prevent catabolic state among chronic critically ill patients. We need to develop precise selection criteria in order to choose the patients who would benefit the most from TPN and PPN. In addition, appropriate laboratory markers are needed to monitor the metabolic requirements of the patients and assess their progress. PMID:27403176

  19. A study of parenteral iron regimens in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Besarab, A; Kaiser, J W; Frinak, S

    1999-07-01

    The administration of parenteral iron dextran to hemodialysis patients is typically intermittent. We sought to determine the most appropriate intervals for sampling iron parameters during intermittent need-based and continuous maintenance regimens and to quantify differences in efficacy between such regimens during long-term therapy. After a single course of 10 consecutive 100-mg iron doses administered to 14 patients on 16 occasions, transferrin saturation (TSAT) and ferritin were unreliable indices of iron status for the next 2 and 6 weeks, respectively. TSAT and ferritin levels at 1 week were virtually identical to those at 2 weeks after the administration of a single 50-mg or 100-mg iron dextran dose to 16 other patients. Twelve patients on maintenance iron therapy (25 to 100 mg/wk; TSAT, 30% to 50%) had a statistically significant decrease in the amount of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) needed to maintain hemoglobin (Hb) levels between 10 and 11 g/dL compared with 12 patients receiving intermittent need-based dosing, an effect that persisted from week 16 to week 72 of the study. Maintenance iron was feasible even in a third group of eight patients targeted to sustain an Hb level of 14 g/dL. In both iron maintenance groups, iron indices could be measured at weekly intervals, and ferritin levels did not progressively increase over time. Continuous maintenance iron dextran used to maintain TSATs of 30% to 50% significantly reduced rHuEPO requirements and resulted in no adverse side effects in chronic hemodialysis patients. After weekly maintenance 25- to 100-mg iron dextran doses, iron indices can be measured after 1 week; a delay of 2 weeks is not necessary.

  20. [Efficacy of parenteral glutamine in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Oliva García, J G; Pereyra-García Castro, F; Suárez Llanos, J P; Ríos Rull, P; Breña Atienza, J; Palacio Abizanda, J E

    2012-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow transplant (ABMT) represents a high metabolic stress. Glutamine has proven to be effective in severe catabolic states, although there are controversial studies. To assess the effect of parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy supplemented with glutamine on the occurrence of mucositis and mean hospital stay in patients submitted to ABMT. Retrospective study of patients submitted to ABMT between 2006 and 2009. In 2008, one vial of L-alanyl-L-glutamine (20 g) was added by protocol to the PN formulations of these patients. Thirteen clinical charts since that date (glutamine group) and 13 previous charts (control group) were randomly selected (n = 26). We compared the degree of mucositis and hospital stay in both groups. In the subgroup of glutamine-treated patients, we compare the glutamine dose in the patients developing some degree of mucositis with that of those not having this complication. Mean hospital stay: 27.8 ± 7.4 days (control group) vs. 20.3 ± 5.3 days (glutamine group) (p = 0.01). The severity of mucositis was lower in the glutaminetreated group (p = 0.02). The weight-adjusted dose of L-alanyl-L-glutamine in the patients not developing mucositis was higher than in the other ones (0.32 vs. 0.24 g/kg/day; p = 0.02). Glutamine supplementation reduces the degree of mucositis and hospital stay in patients submitted to autologous bone marrow transplantation. The degree of mucositis is lower in the subgroup of patients receiving higher doses of glutamine.

  1. Monoacetoacetin and protein metabolism during parenteral nutrition in burned rats.

    PubMed Central

    Maiz, A; Moldawer, L L; Bistrian, B R; Birkhahn, R H; Long, C L; Blackburn, G L

    1985-01-01

    The effect of intravenous infusion of monoacetoacetin (glycerol monoacetoacetate) as a non-protein energy source was evaluated in burned rats. During 3 days of parenteral nutrition, in which animals received 14 g of amino acids/kg body wt. per day exclusively (group I) or with the addition of isoenergetic amounts (523 kJ/kg per day) of dextrose (group II), a 1:1 mixture of dextrose and monoacetoacetin (group III) or monoacetoacetin (group IV), significant decreases in urinary nitrogen excretion and whole-body leucine oxidation were observed in the three groups given additional non-protein energy as compared with group I. Serum ketone bodies (acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate) were decreased in rats given dextrose, whereas glucose and insulin increased significantly. Monoacetoacetin-infused animals (group IV) had high concentrations of ketone bodies without changes in glucose and insulin, whereas animals infused with both monoacetoacetin and glucose (group III) showed intermediate values. On day 4 of nutritional support, whole-body L-leucine kinetics were measured by using a constant infusion of L-[1-14C]leucine. In comparison with group I, the addition of dextrose or monoacetoacetin produced a significant decrease in plasma leucine appearance and release from whole-body protein breakdown. Gastrocnemius-muscle protein-synthesis rates were also higher in the three groups receiving additional non-protein energy. These findings suggest that monoacetoacetin can effectively replace dextrose as an intravenous energy source in stressed rats. Both fuels are similar in decreasing weight loss, nitrogen excretion, leucine release from whole-body protein breakdown and oxidation, in spite of differences in energy substrate and insulin concentrations. PMID:3977880

  2. A Third-Generation Lipid Emulsion that Contains n-3 Long-Chain PUFAs Preserves Retinal Function in Parenterally Fed Neonatal Piglets.

    PubMed

    Turner, Justine M; Sauvé, Yves; Suh, Miyoung; Wales, Paul W; Wizzard, Pamela; Goruk, Susan; Field, Catherine J

    2016-11-01

    Preterm neonates and those with intestinal failure require prolonged parenteral nutrition (PN) during a critical time of early central nervous system maturation. Conventional lipid emulsions fed to preterm neonates lack n-3 (ω-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs; >20 carbon chain in length). Recently, fish oil lipid emulsions have been developed that provide both n-6 (ω-6) and n-3 LC-PUFAs, precursors of very long-chain PUFAs (VLC-PUFAs; >24 carbon chain in length). Our objective was to determine the effect of fish oil lipid on retinal function in neonatal piglets fed total PN with the use of the lipid emulsions available in clinical practice. We hypothesized that fish oil-containing parenteral lipid would preserve retinal function more than conventional parenteral lipid. Male neonatal piglets (2-5 d of age) were fed isonitrogenous (16 g · kg(-1) · d(-1)), isocaloric (1.1 MJ · kg(-1) · d(-1)) PN that varied only in the lipid emulsion: Intralipid or SMOFlipid at 10 g · kg(-1) · d(-1) (n = 8/group). Retinal function was assessed after 14 d of treatment by recording electroretinograms under various light intensity conditions. Retinas were then harvested for histology and to determine fatty acid composition. Electroretinogram intensity response curves showed greater photoreceptor a-wave amplitude in piglets fed SMOFlipid than in those fed Intralipid (percentage), for postsynaptic depolarizing bipolar cell b-waves (percentage) and for flicker electroretinogram amplitudes (percentage) (P < 0.05). Compared with those fed Intralipid, SMOFlipid-fed piglets had greater retinal total n-3 LC-PUFAs (15.7% compared with 18.4%; P = 0.04) and n-3 VLC-PUFAs (0.9% compared with 1.5%; P = 0.02), whereas Intralipid-fed piglets had greater total n-6 LC-PUFAs (13.1% compared with 10.5%; P < 0.01) and n-6 VLC-PUFAs (0.7% compared with 0.5%; P = 0.01). Histologically, retinas were indistinguishable between groups. In a neonatal piglet model of PN feeding, the

  3. Long-term parenteral nutrition in pediatric autoimmune enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Gambarara, M; Bracci, F; Diamanti, A; Ambrosini, M I; Pietrobattista, A; Knafelz, D; Ferretti, F; Castro, M

    2005-06-01

    Severe and protracted or persistent diarrhea (SPD) is the most severe form of diarrhea in infancy and has also been defined as intractable diarrhea when it leads to dependence on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). One of the rare causes of SPD is represented by autoimmune enteropathy that is characterized by life-threatening diarrhea mainly occurring within the first years of life, persistent villous atrophy in consecutive biopsies, resistance to bowel rest, and evidence of antigut autoantibodies. We evaluated 10 patients (seven boys, mean age at diagnosis 18 months; range: 0 to 160 months) fulfilling criteria of autoimmune enteropathy to assess dependence on TPN. TPN was first required in all patients to avoid dehydration and electrolytic imbalance. All patients were dependent on immunosuppressive therapy (steroid, azothioprine, cyclosporine, tacrolimus). Three patients died of sepsis: two during TPN while in the hospital, and one at home after he was weaned off TPN. Five patients are weaned off TPN after a mean period of 18 months; they are actually on oral alimentation with a cow milk-free diet after a period of enteral nutrition with elemental formula. One underwent total colectomy and bone marrow transplantation and one developed an IPEX syndrome. One patient is still dependent on TPN for 24 months. She is on home parenteral nutrition. Patients with diagnosis of IPEX syndrome require parenteral support with three or four infusion per week. TPN represents a fixed step in the management of autoimmune enteropathy, but it may be considered as an interim treatment while waiting for intestinal adaptation, at least in some selectioned case of autoimmune enteropathy. Bone marrow transplantation should be considered and reserved for those patients with severe complications due to home parenteral nutrition, or in those that are really dependent on parenteral nutrition.

  4. Lipid emulsions – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 6

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, M.; Heller, A. R.; Koch, T.; Koletzko, B.; Kreymann, K. G.; Krohn, K.; Pscheidl, E.; Senkal, M.

    2009-01-01

    The infusion of lipid emulsions allows a high energy supply, facilitates the prevention of high glucose infusion rates and is indispensable for the supply with essential fatty acids. The administration of lipid emulsions is recommended within ≤7 days after starting PN (parenteral nutrition) to avoid deficiency of essential fatty acids. Low-fat PN with a high glucose intake increases the risk of hyperglycaemia. In parenterally fed patients with a tendency to hyperglycaemia, an increase in the lipid-glucose ratio should be considered. In critically ill patients the glucose infusion should not exceed 50% of energy intake. The use of lipid emulsions with a low phospholipid/triglyceride ratio is recommended and should be provided with the usual PN to prevent depletion of essential fatty acids, lower the risk of hyperglycaemia, and prevent hepatic steatosis. Biologically active vitamin E (α-tocopherol) should continuously be administered along with lipid emulsions to reduce lipid peroxidation. Parenteral lipids should provide about 25–40% of the parenteral non-protein energy supply. In certain situations (i.e. critically ill, respiratory insufficiency) a lipid intake of up to 50 or 60% of non-protein energy may be reasonable. The recommended daily dose for parenteral lipids in adults is 0.7–1.3 g triglycerides/kg body weight. Serum triglyceride concentrations should be monitored regularly with dosage reduction at levels >400 mg/dl (>4.6 mmol/l) and interruption of lipid infusion at levels >1000 mg/dl (>11.4 mmol/l). There is little evidence at this time that the choice of different available lipid emulsions affects clinical endpoints. PMID:20049078

  5. IODINE CONTENT OF ENTERAL AND PARENTERAL NUTRITION SOLUTIONS.

    PubMed

    Willard, Devina L; Young, Lorraine S; He, Xuemei; Braverman, Lewis E; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2017-07-01

    Iodine is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis, and iodine deficiency may result in thyroid disorders including goiter and hypothyroidism. Patients on long-term enteral nutrition (EN) or parenteral nutrition (PN) may be at risk for micronutrient deficiencies. The recommended daily allowance for iodine intake is 150 μg for nonpregnant adults. However, there is no current consensus among scientific societies regarding the quantity of iodine to be added in adult EN and PN formulations. The objective of this study was to determine the iodine content of U.S. adult enteral and parenteral nutrition solutions. This study also aimed to determine whether adult patients in the United States who are receiving long-term artificial nutrition may be at risk for iodine deficiency. Ten enteral nutrition solutions and 4 parenteral nutrition solutions were evaluated. The iodine contents of these solutions were measured spectrophotometrically and compared to the labeled contents. Measured and labeled EN iodine contents were similar (range 131-176 μg/L and 106-160 μg/L, respectively). In contrast, PN formulas were found to contain small, unlabeled amounts of iodine, averaging 27 μg/L. Typical fluid requirements are 30 to 40 mL/kg/day for adults receiving either total EN (TEN) or total PN (TPN). Adults on long-term TEN likely consume enough servings to meet their daily iodine requirements. However, patients on long-term TPN would require on average 5.6 L PN/day to meet the recommended daily allowance of iodine. This volume of PN is far in excess of typical consumption. Thus, U.S. patients requiring long-term TPN may be at risk for iodine deficiency. EN = enteral nutrition; PN = parenteral nutrition; TEN = total enteral nutrition; TPN = total parenteral nutrition; UIC = urinary iodine concentration.

  6. Lipid emulsions - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 6.

    PubMed

    Adolph, M; Heller, A R; Koch, T; Koletzko, B; Kreymann, K G; Krohn, K; Pscheidl, E; Senkal, M

    2009-11-18

    The infusion of lipid emulsions allows a high energy supply, facilitates the prevention of high glucose infusion rates and is indispensable for the supply with essential fatty acids. The administration of lipid emulsions is recommended within < or =7 days after starting PN (parenteral nutrition) to avoid deficiency of essential fatty acids. Low-fat PN with a high glucose intake increases the risk of hyperglycaemia. In parenterally fed patients with a tendency to hyperglycaemia, an increase in the lipid-glucose ratio should be considered. In critically ill patients the glucose infusion should not exceed 50% of energy intake. The use of lipid emulsions with a low phospholipid/triglyceride ratio is recommended and should be provided with the usual PN to prevent depletion of essential fatty acids, lower the risk of hyperglycaemia, and prevent hepatic steatosis. Biologically active vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) should continuously be administered along with lipid emulsions to reduce lipid peroxidation. Parenteral lipids should provide about 25-40% of the parenteral non-protein energy supply. In certain situations (i.e. critically ill, respiratory insufficiency) a lipid intake of up to 50 or 60% of non-protein energy may be reasonable. The recommended daily dose for parenteral lipids in adults is 0.7-1.3 g triglycerides/kg body weight. Serum triglyceride concentrations should be monitored regularly with dosage reduction at levels >400 mg/dl (>4.6 mmol/l) and interruption of lipid infusion at levels >1000 mg/dl (>11.4 mmol/l). There is little evidence at this time that the choice of different available lipid emulsions affects clinical endpoints.

  7. Early marriage in Africa--trends, harmful effects and interventions.

    PubMed

    Walker, Judith-Ann

    2012-06-01

    This article explores the pattern of early marriage in Africa. It focuses on the sub-Saharan region as an area with the highest rates of early marriage in the world. The harmful effects of early marriage are explored in terms of impact on the health, education and economic well-being of young girls. The paper outlines a framework for analyzing global, regional and local initiatives to curb early marriage and examines the application of these interventions in sub-Saharan countries. Regional patterns are then examined and countries which have made progress in reducing age of marriage are compared to countries in which age of marriage amongst girls has reminded low. The paper concludes on the note that countries with the highest rates of early marriage are also the countries with the highest rates of poverty and highest population growth rates. The paper argues for a sub-regional strategy to address the problem of early marriage in the zone with the highest incidence.

  8. Parenteral organophosphorus poisoning in a rural emergency department: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poisoning is a common presentation in the emergency department. Oral exposures to organophosphorus compounds are especially frequent in rural and agricultural regions of South Asia and throughout the developing world. Case presentation Here we report a case of deliberate self-harm with an organophosphorus pesticide via the relatively uncommon parenteral route. A young woman injected herself with chlorpyriphos. Although the cholinergic effects were mild, cellulitis and abscess development were noted as a result. Conclusion Resource limited agricultural countries like Nepal present health care workers with numerous challenges in poisoning management. This case represents a rare but potentially morbid method of agrochemical poison exposure. PMID:24321121

  9. Features of liver tissue remodeling in intestinal failure during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Mutanen, Annika; Lohi, Jouko; Sorsa, Timo; Jalanko, Hannu; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal failure is associated frequently with liver injury, which persists after weaning off parenteral nutrition. We compared features of liver remodeling in intestinal failure during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Liver biopsies and serum samples were obtained from 25 intestinal failure patients at a median age of 9.7 years (interquartile range: 4.6-18) and from age-matched control patients. Seven patients had been receiving parenteral nutrition for 53 months (22-160), and 18 patients had been weaned off parenteral nutrition 6.3 years (2.4-17) earlier, after having received parenteral nutrition for 10 months (3.3-34). Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, collagen 1, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was measured. Significant increases in immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen 1 were observed predominantly in portal areas and were similar to increases seen in patients currently receiving parenteral nutrition and in patients weaned off parenteral nutrition. Gene and protein expressions of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen were interrelated. Gene expression of ACTA2, encoding alpha-smooth muscle actin, was increased only in patients who were receiving parenteral nutrition currently. Comparable upregulation of interleukin-1 (α and ß), epidermal growth factor, integrin-ß6, and MMP9 gene expression was observed in both patient groups, irrespective of whether they were receiving parenteral nutrition currently. Liver expression and serum levels of TIMP1 and MMP7 were increased only in the patients on parenteral nutrition currently but were not increased after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Intestinal failure is characterized by abnormal activation of hepatic myofibroblast and accumulation of collagen both during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Persistent transcriptional upregulation of proinflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines after weaning off

  10. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy in osteoarticular infections in children.

    PubMed

    Maraqa, Nizar F; Gomez, Margarita M; Rathore, Mobeen H

    2002-01-01

    There are few data on the use of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) in the management of osteoarticular infections (OAIs) in childhood. The objective of this study was to determine if OPAT is safe and effective in the management of OAIs. Using their OPAT database, the authors evaluated the use of OPAT in children younger than 18 years old treated for OAIs between January 1, 1995, and December 31, 1999. One hundred eighty-four OAIs were treated in 179 patients over 5 years. OPAT involved central venous lines (CVLs) in 110 (59.8%), peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in 71 (38.6%), and peripheral cannulas in 3 (1.6%). One hundred eighteen (64%) OPAT courses were completed without interruption. Rehospitalization occurred in 48 (26.1%) courses and occurred earlier with PICC. OPAT complications were catheter-related in 58 (30%) courses, not catheter-related in 60 (32%), and unknown in 10 (5.3%). The mechanical complication rate was 6.3 per 1,000 catheter-days (CVL 4.2, PICC 10.6), and the rate of infectious complications was 2.7 per 1,000 catheter-days (CVL 2.8, PICC 2.4). One hundred sixty-eight (98%) of 172 evaluable OAIs were cured. Four (2.2%) patients failed treatment: one had recurrence and three had persistent infection. The authors conclude that OPAT can be safely used to manage OAIs in children without compromising outcome. Mechanical complications are more common with PICCs.

  11. [Nutritional support with parenteral nutrition. Course and associated complications].

    PubMed

    Herranz Antolín, Sandra; Álvarez De Frutos, Visitación; Blasco Guerrero, Marta; García Martínez, Maria del Carmen; Gimeno Fernández, Maria del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is an integral part of medical management of patients who do not have a functioning or accessible gastrointestinal tract. This paper discusses the clinical characteristics of patients receiving PN in a 420-bed hospital from 2009 to 2011. In addition, nutritional parameters were assessed at the start and end of PN and associated complications were analyzed. retrospective, observational study of PN episodes in adults conducted at the Nutrition Unit of Hospital Universitario de Guadalajara. Variables collected included epidemiological and clinical data, number and type of routes used, anthropometric data, analytical data, number of days on PN, reason for withdrawal, caloric provision, prevalence of phlebitis, metabolic complications (hypertriglyceridemia, abnormal liver function tests, hyperglycemia, and refeeding syndrome), and prevalence of bacteremia associated with central venous catheter (BAC). There were 312 episodes of PN. The immediate indication was postoperative ileus in 53.8% of the episodes. There was a statistically significant improvement in all analytical parameters assessed (albumin, prealbumin, retinol binding protein, transferrin, cholesterol, and lymphocytes). Caloric provision (kcal per kg) was 25.1±6.6. No metabolic complication occurred in 16.3% of the episodes, and hyperglycemia was the most common complication (79.8%). There were 10 cases of phlebitis (32.2%) and 30 episodes of BAC (8.7%). Bacteriemia rate was 8.1 per 1000 days of PN. Although PN is an effective nutritional support technique, it is associated with complications of varying severity. Use of PN should therefore comply with the instructions accepted in the main clinical practice guidelines and requires careful monitoring by experienced professionals. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Computer programming: quality and safety for neonatal parenteral nutrition orders.

    PubMed

    Huston, Robert K; Markell, Andrea M; McCulley, Elizabeth A; Marcus, Matthew J; Cohen, Howard S

    2013-08-01

    Computerized software programs reduce errors and increase consistency when ordering parenteral nutrition (PN). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of our computerized neonatal PN calculator ordering program in reducing errors and optimizing nutrient intake. This was a retrospective study of infants requiring PN during the first 2-3 weeks of life. Caloric, protein, calcium, and phosphorus intakes; days above and below amino acid (AA) goals; and PN ordering errors were recorded. Infants were divided into 3 groups by birth weight for analysis: ≤1000 g, 1001-1500 g, and >1500 g. Intakes and outcomes of infants before (2007) vs after (2009) implementation of the calculator for each group were compared. There were no differences in caloric, protein, or phosphorus intakes in 2007 vs 2009 in any group. Mean protein intakes were 97%-99% of goal for ≤1000-g and 1001- to 1500-g infants in 2009 vs 87% of goal for each group in 2007. In 2007, 7.6 per 100 orders were above and 11.5 per 100 were below recommended AA intakes. Calcium intakes were higher in 2009 vs 2007 in ≤1000-g (46.6 ± 6.1 vs 39.5 ± 8.0 mg/kg/d, P < .001) and >1500-g infants (50.6 ± 7.4 vs 39.9 ± 8.3 mg/kg/d, P < .001). Ordering errors were reduced from 4.6 per 100 in 2007 to 0.1 per 100 in 2009. Our study reaffirms that computerized ordering systems can increase the quality and safety of neonatal PN orders. Calcium and AA intakes were optimized and ordering errors were minimized using the computer-based ordering program.

  13. Hypersensitivity reaction to components of parenteral nutrition in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Carlos Ruiz; Ponce, Esperanza Castejón; Busquets, Ferran Bossacoma; Hernández, Diana Sánchez; Oliva, Silvia Meavilla; Santacruz, Enrique Llerena; Pérez, Naymar; De Los Santos Pelegrini, Mariela; Flaque, Miquel Villaronga

    2016-01-01

    Very rare cases of hypersensitivity reactions to various constituents of parenteral nutrition (PN) have been reported in children. Adverse effects associated with PN administration have centered on metabolic, infectious, and mechanical complications. Here we describe three cases of hypersensitivity to components of PN. Case 1 is a 1-mo-old breastfed baby with a diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis associated with an infection with cytomegalovirus. On the second day of PN, 60 min after the initiation of the infusion, the patient had an allergic reaction with an overall diffused rash. On day 4 of PN, the multivitamin solution and the trace element mix were excluded, showing a good tolerance. Case 2 is a 4-y-old girl with a background of stage III neuroblastoma. On day 3 of PN, 15 min after the initiation of the infusion, the patient showed sudden facial edema. On day 5, suspecting the amino acid solution to be the etiology of her reaction, PN was infused with another amino acid preparation, and the patient showed good tolerance. Case 3 is a 10-y-old boy with a diagnosis of an acute peritonitis. Two h after the initiation of the infusion, the patient showed a general wheal rash. He referred a background of fish allergy. Considering that the lipid emulsion used had components from fish oil (SMOF Lipid), a new PN was infused on day 2. The new PN contained a lipid emulsion containing vegetable oil (ClinOleic). The patient showed good tolerance. In conclusion, we consider that, although the hypersensitivity to PN components is infrequent, there is an increase in reports of pediatric cases describing this allergic pathology.

  14. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition in malnourished patients on chronic haemodialysis therapy.

    PubMed

    Smolle, K H; Kaufmann, P; Holzer, H; Druml, W

    1995-01-01

    Malnutrition is frequently encountered in patients on regular haemodialysis therapy and presents an important determinant of morbidity and mortality. Usual therapeutic approaches to alleviate malnutrition have been unsuccessful. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) with amino acids (in combination with a glucose-containing dialysate) on nutritional parameters and immunocompetence in patients on regular haemodialysis treatment. Effects of IDPN were evaluated in 16 malnourished patients. After a run-in period of 4 weeks (to define stable baseline conditions) 0.8 g amino acids/kg bodyweight using a novel amino-acid solution (adapted to metabolic alteration of uraemia and including the dipeptide glycyl-tyrosine as tyrosine source) was infused thrice weekly during each haemodialysis session for 16 weeks. Intradialytic amino-acid infusion was well tolerated and the dipeptide was rapidly utilized with only traces being detectable in plasma after dialysis. Visceral protein synthesis was improved, serum albumin, prealbumin, and cholinesterase increased during IDPN (P < 0.05). As indicators of augmented immunocompetence skin test reactivity against multiple antigens was improved (P < 0.02) and total lymphocyte count was raised (P < 0.05). Plasma amino acid pattern did not deteriorate but failed to normalize during IDPN and phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio remained stable. Anthropometric measurements and eating behaviour as assessed by dietary records were not altered during IDPN. Even using a simple and limited intradialytic nutritional support with amino acids can improve visceral protein status and stimulate immunocompetence in malnourished patients on regular haemodialysis therapy.

  15. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel “myths” about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of “near zero” PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting “near zero” catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of “near zero” PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition. PMID

  16. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-02-04

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel "myths" about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of "near zero" PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting "near zero" catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of "near zero" PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition.

  17. Tissue-specific accumulation of hepatic zinc metallothionein following parenteral iron loading

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    The synthesis in various tissues of the unique metal-binding protein, metallothionein, can be influenced by the administration of certain trace elements. Zinc and cadmium, both of which bind to metallothionein, are most widely recognized as potent inducers. Preliminary results in our laboratory suggested that iron loading causes a marked accumulation of hepatic zinc metallothionein. In this report the effects of parenteral iron administration on metallothionein concentration in various tissues are presented. Male chicks (300-350 g) received (ip) either a single injection (+1 Fe) of iron (10 mg Fe/kg, as FeCl/sub 3/), two injections (+2 Fe) given 24-hr apart, three injections (+3 Fe) each given 24-hr apart, or an equivalent volume of 0.9% saline (control). Twenty-four hours following the final injection, chicks were killed and tissues analyzed for cytoplasmic zinc and metallothionein (Zn-MT). The parenteral administration of ferric iron, FeCl/sub 3/, resulted in a marked tissue-specific accumulation of zinc as metallothionein. In chicks given +2 Fe, hepatic Zn-MT increased more than 10-fold with a third injection (+3 Fe) causing no further change. The concentration of Zn-MT in renal and pancreatic tissue was unaffected by iron loading. An increase in hepatic Zn-MT was evident prior to detectable changes in total hepatic iron. The administration of other ferrous iron compounds at a similar rate produced comparable changes in hepatic Zn-MT. Feeding excess dietary iron, however, had no effect on liver Zn-MT levels even though similar hepatic iron concentrations were attained. Results indicated that parenteral administration, but not feeding, of various iron compounds causes a marked increase in zinc metallothionein, specifically in liver tissue.

  18. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Early Literacy Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Success in early literacy activities is associated with improved educational outcomes, including reduced dropout risk, in-grade retention, and special education referrals. When considering programs that will work for a particular school and context; cost-effectiveness analysis may provide useful information for decision makers. The study…

  19. HIV Infection: Transmission, Effects on Early Development, and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Describes the modes of transmission of HIV and the course of the disease in infants and toddlers. Information is provided on its effects on early development, medical screening and treatments, therapies, psychosocial assistance, and interventions, including nutritional therapy, occupational and physical therapies, and speech and language therapy.…

  20. Effects of Progress Monitoring Feedback on Early Literacy Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopuch, Jeremy Jon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of diagnostic formative assessment feedback on early literacy skills. The participants were 12 first-grade general education teachers and 51 of their students who were assigned to the following treatments, diagnostic feedback and skills feedback (control) which lasted for 10 weeks. During the…

  1. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Early Literacy Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Success in early literacy activities is associated with improved educational outcomes, including reduced dropout risk, in-grade retention, and special education referrals. When considering programs that will work for a particular school and context; cost-effectiveness analysis may provide useful information for decision makers. The study…

  2. ATRAZINE EFFECTS ON EARLY PREGNANCY AND IMPLANATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine Effects on Early Pregnancy and Implantation in the Rat.
    A.M. Cummings, B.E. Rhodes*, and R.L. Cooper*.
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC
    Atrazine (ATR), an herbicide, can induce mammary tumors in rats. ATR can also sup...

  3. The Features and Effects of Friendship in Early Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    Four features of early adolescent friendship have received the greatest attention in the literature: intimacy of conversations, friends' responsiveness to each other's needs and desires, the degree of similarity or complementarity between friends, and the stability of friendships over time. Each of these features and its potential effect on the…

  4. ATRAZINE EFFECTS ON EARLY PREGNANCY AND IMPLANATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine Effects on Early Pregnancy and Implantation in the Rat.
    A.M. Cummings, B.E. Rhodes*, and R.L. Cooper*.
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC
    Atrazine (ATR), an herbicide, can induce mammary tumors in rats. ATR can also sup...

  5. Effects of Progress Monitoring Feedback on Early Literacy Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopuch, Jeremy Jon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of diagnostic formative assessment feedback on early literacy skills. The participants were 12 first-grade general education teachers and 51 of their students who were assigned to the following treatments, diagnostic feedback and skills feedback (control) which lasted for 10 weeks. During the…

  6. The Effectiveness of Early Childhood Inclusion (Parents' Perspectives).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kyle T.

    This research examined the effectiveness of early childhood inclusion from the perspective of parents. Participating in the study were 18 parents (mothers and fathers) of 3- to 6-year-old children with a disability who had been placed in various educational settings. Half of the children were dually enrolled. Parents were interviewed separately.…

  7. Spatial Working Memory Effects in Early Visual Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munneke, Jaap; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Theeuwes, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated how spatial working memory recruits early visual cortex. Participants were required to maintain a location in working memory while changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals were measured during the retention interval in which no visual stimulation was present. We show working memory effects during the…

  8. The Effectiveness of Early Foreign Language Learning in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bot, Kees

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a number of projects on early English teaching in the Netherlands. The focus of these projects has been on the impact of English on the development of the mother tongue and the development of skills in the foreign language. Overall the results show that there is no negative effect on the mother tongue and that the gains in…

  9. HIV Infection: Transmission, Effects on Early Development, and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Describes the modes of transmission of HIV and the course of the disease in infants and toddlers. Information is provided on its effects on early development, medical screening and treatments, therapies, psychosocial assistance, and interventions, including nutritional therapy, occupational and physical therapies, and speech and language therapy.…

  10. Early Childhood Traumatic Brain Injuries: Effects on Development and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the variety of possible effects of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) on early childhood development in the cognitive, language, social-emotional, motor, and adaptive domains. Suggests interventions which can assist young survivors and their families. Suggests that more long-term, intensive studies be conducted on the short- and long-term…

  11. Early Childhood Traumatic Brain Injuries: Effects on Development and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Describes the variety of possible effects of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) on early childhood development in the cognitive, language, social-emotional, motor, and adaptive domains. Suggests interventions which can assist young survivors and their families. Suggests that more long-term, intensive studies be conducted on the short- and long-term…

  12. Spatial Working Memory Effects in Early Visual Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munneke, Jaap; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Theeuwes, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated how spatial working memory recruits early visual cortex. Participants were required to maintain a location in working memory while changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals were measured during the retention interval in which no visual stimulation was present. We show working memory effects during the…

  13. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17.

    PubMed

    Druml, W; Kierdorf, H P

    2009-11-18

    Partial EN (enteral nutrition) should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition) may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF) and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully). In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN) should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks) or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out.

  14. Access technique and its problems in parenteral nutrition – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 9

    PubMed Central

    Jauch, K. W.; Schregel, W.; Stanga, Z.; Bischoff, S. C.; Braß, P.; Hartl, W.; Muehlebach, S.; Pscheidl, E.; Thul, P.; Volk, O.

    2009-01-01

    Catheter type, access technique, and the catheter position should be selected considering to the anticipated duration of PN aiming at the lowest complication risks (infectious and non-infectious). Long-term (>7–10 days) parenteral nutrition (PN) requires central venous access whereas for PN <3 weeks percutaneously inserted catheters and for PN >3 weeks subcutaneous tunnelled catheters or port systems are appropriate. CVC (central venous catheter) should be flushed with isotonic NaCl solution before and after PN application and during CVC occlusions. Strict indications are required for central venous access placement and the catheter should be removed as soon as possible if not required any more. Blood samples should not to be taken from the CVC. If catheter infection is suspected, peripheral blood-culture samples and culture samples from each catheter lumen should be taken simultaneously. Removal of the CVC should be carried out immediately if there are pronounced signs of local infection at the insertion site and/or clinical suspicion of catheter-induced sepsis. In case PN is indicated for a short period (max. 7–10 days), a peripheral venous access can be used if no hyperosmolar solutions (>800 mosm/L) or solutions with a high titration acidity or alkalinity are used. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) can remain in situ for as long as it is clinically required unless there are signs of inflammation at the insertion site. PMID:20049083

  15. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17

    PubMed Central

    Druml, W.; Kierdorf, H. P.

    2009-01-01

    Partial EN (enteral nutrition) should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition) may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF) and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully). In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN) should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks) or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out. PMID:20049069

  16. The thermodynamic effect of atmospheric mass on early Earth's temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemke, R.; Kaspi, Y.; Halevy, I.

    2016-11-01

    Observations suggest that Earth's early atmospheric mass differed from the present day. The effects of a different atmospheric mass on radiative forcing have been investigated in climate models of variable sophistication, but a mechanistic understanding of the thermodynamic component of the effect of atmospheric mass on early climate is missing. Using a 3-D idealized global circulation model (GCM), we systematically examine the thermodynamic effect of atmospheric mass on near-surface temperature. We find that higher atmospheric mass tends to increase the near-surface temperature mostly due to an increase in the heat capacity of the atmosphere, which decreases the net radiative cooling effect in the lower layers of the atmosphere. Additionally, the vertical advection of heat by eddies decreases with increasing atmospheric mass, resulting in further near-surface warming. As both net radiative cooling and vertical eddy heat fluxes are extratropical phenomena, higher atmospheric mass tends to flatten the meridional temperature gradient.

  17. The effectiveness of early childhood development programs. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Laurie M; Shinn, Carolynne; Fullilove, Mindy T; Scrimshaw, Susan C; Fielding, Jonathan E; Normand, Jacques; Carande-Kulis, Vilma G

    2003-04-01

    Early childhood development is influenced by characteristics of the child, the family, and the broader social environment. Physical health, cognition, language, and social and emotional development underpin school readiness. Publicly funded, center-based, comprehensive early childhood development programs are a community resource that promotes the well-being of young children. Programs such as Head Start are designed to close the gap in readiness to learn between poor children and their more economically advantaged peers. Systematic reviews of the scientific literature demonstrate effectiveness of these programs in preventing developmental delay, as assessed by reductions in retention in grade and placement in special education.

  18. Parenteral metoclopramide for acute migraine: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Ian; Brown, Michael D; Innes, Grant D; Grafstein, Eric; Roberts, Ted E; Rowe, Brian H

    2004-01-01

    Objective To assess the evidence from controlled trials on the efficacy and tolerability of parenteral metoclopramide for acute migraine in adults. Data sources Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, Embase, LILACS, CINAHL, conference proceedings, clinical practice guidelines, and other sources. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of parenteral metoclopramide for acute migraine in adults. Results We reviewed 596 potentially relevant abstracts and found 13 eligible trials totalling 655 adults. In studies comparing metoclopramide with placebo, metoclopramide was more likely to provide significant reduction in migraine pain (odds ratio 2.84, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 7.68). Used as the only agent, metoclopramide showed mixed effectiveness when compared with other single agents. Heterogeneity of studies for combination treatment prevented statistical pooling. Treatments that did include metoclopramide were as, or more, effective than comparison treatments for pain, nausea, and relapse outcomes reported in all studies. Conclusions Metoclopramide is an effective treatment for migraine headache and may be effective when combined with other treatments. Given its non-narcotic and antiemetic properties, metoclopramide should be considered a primary agent in the treatment of acute migraines in emergency departments. PMID:15550401

  19. Effect of early training on the jumping technique of horses.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Susana; Bobbert, Maarten F; Back, Willem; Barneveld, Ab; van Weeren, P Rene

    2005-03-01

    To investigate the effects of early training for jumping by comparing the jumping technique of horses that had received early training with that of horses raised conventionally. 40 Dutch Warmblood horses. The horses were analyzed kinematically during free jumping at 6 months of age. Subsequently, they were allocated into a control group that was raised conventionally and an experimental group that received 30 months of early training starting at 6 months of age. At 4 years of age, after a period of rest in pasture and a short period of training with a rider, both groups were analyzed kinematically during free jumping. Subsequently, both groups started a 1-year intensive training for jumping, and at 5 years of age, they were again analyzed kinematically during free jumping. In addition, the horses competed in a puissance competition to test maximal performance. Whereas there were no differences in jumping technique between experimental and control horses at 6 months of age, at 4 years, the experimental horses jumped in a more effective manner than the control horses; they raised their center of gravity less yet cleared more fences successfully than the control horses. However, at 5 years of age, these differences were not detected. Furthermore, the experimental horses did not perform better than the control horses in the puissance competition. Specific training for jumping of horses at an early age is unnecessary because the effects on jumping technique and jumping capacity are not permanent.

  20. A Comparison of Fish Oil Sources for Parenteral Lipid Emulsions in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Gillian L.; Cho, Bennet S.; Pan, Amy; Nose, Vania; Anez-Bustillos, Lorenzo; Dao, Duy; Baker, Meredith A.; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M.; Puder, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background Parenteral fat emulsions are important components of parenteral nutrition (PN). For patients who develop PN-associated liver disease (PNALD), use of fish oil (FO) fat emulsions reverses cholestasis. The European Pharmacopeia contains two FO monographs. One is “fish oil; rich in omega-3 fatty acids,” (NFO). The other is “omega-3 acids,” (PFO) derived from NFO but enriched in omega-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of 20% NFO and PFO emulsions produced in the laboratory and tested in a murine model. Methods Lipid emulsions (20% oil) were compounded containing different oils: United States Pharmacopoeia (USP)-grade soybean oil (SO), NFO, PFO with 66% of the purified fatty acids in triglyceride form (PFO66), and PFO with 90% of the purified fatty acids in triglyceride form (PFO90). Chow-fed C57BL/6 mice received saline, one of the above emulsions, or a commercial FO (OM) by tail vein injection (2.4g/kg/day) for 19 days. Effects after each dose were recorded. On day 19, animals were euthanized and livers, spleens, and lungs were procured for histologic analysis. Results Animals administered OM, SO, NFO, and PFO90 tolerated injections well clinically, while those administered PFO66 developed tachypnea and lethargy for ~1 minute following injections. At euthanasia, PFO66- and PFO90-treated animals had organomegaly compared to the other groups. On histologic analysis, PFO66 and PFO90 groups had splenic fat-laden macrophages and hepatic sinusoidal lipid-laden Kupffer cells with no inflammation or necrosis. Lungs in these groups had scattered fat deposits. All other groups had normal-appearing livers, spleens, and lungs. Conclusions Use of PFO lipid emulsions is an attractive possibility for improving systemic inflammation in PN-dependent patients and optimizing management of PNALD by concentrating anti-inflammatory EPA and DHA. However, when

  1. Examining the cost-effectiveness of early dental visits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica Y; Bouwens, Thomas J; Savage, Matthew F; Vann, William F

    2006-01-01

    The subject of early dental visits as an integral dimension of anticipatory guidance and the related supporting scientific evidence for this concept is a critical and timely issue for the dental profession. The purpose of this paper was to review the scientific evidence and rationale for early dental visits. In theory, early dental visits can prevent disease and reduce costs. During the age 1 dental visit, there is strong emphasis on prevention and parents are given: (1) counseling on infant oral hygiene; (2) home and office-based fluoride therapies; (3) dietary counseling; and (4) information relative to oral habits and dental injury prevention. There is evidence that the early preventive visits can reduce the need for restorative and emergency care, therefore reducing dentally related costs among high-risk children. Preschool Medicaid children who had an early preventive dental visit by age 1 were more likely to use subsequent preventive services and experienced less dentally related costs. These finding have significant policy implications, and more research is needed to examine this effect in a low-risk population.

  2. Parenteral lipid fatty acid composition directly determines the fatty acid composition of red blood cell and brain lipids in preterm pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies in enterally-fed infants have shown a positive effect of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) supplementatin on neurodevelopment. The effect of n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil-based parenteral (PN) lipid emulsions on neuronal tissues of PN-fed preterm infants is unknown. The objective ...

  3. Ampicillin-sulbactam: an update on the use of parenteral and oral forms in bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Betrosian, Alex P; Douzinas, Emmanuel E

    2009-09-01

    Ampicillin-sulbactam has a wide range of antibacterial activity that includes Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. However, the drug is not active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and pathogens producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases. The combination could be considered particularly active against Acinetobacter baumannii infections due to the intrinsic activity of sulbactam. The drug is indicated as empirical therapy for a broad range of community acquired infections supervened in adults or children and is effective in either parenteral (ampicillin-sulbactam) or oral (as a mutual prodrug sultamicillin) form. In clinical trials, sultamicillin has proved clinically and bacteriologically effective in adults and children against a variety of frequently encountered infections, including mild upper and lower respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, diabetic foot and skin and soft tissue infections. Furthermore, adverse effects rarely occur with the diarrhoea to represent the most commonly reported. The parenteral ampicillin-sulbactam is indicated for community infections of mild-to-moderate severity acquired infections such as intra-abdominal or gynecological. Moreover, it seems to represent the alternative of choice for the treatment of A. baumannii infections for carbapenem-resistant strains in the nosocomial setting. Thus, ampicillin-sulbactam remains a valuable agent in the physician's armamentarium in the management of adult and pediatric infections.

  4. [Practical problems and results of parenteral alimentation in 60 patients undergoing surgery for neoplasms of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Picard, J M; Vedel, F J; Debs, A; Boissel, P; Grosdidier

    1977-01-01

    Sixty patients suffering from a neoplasm of the oesophagus underwent surgery. All received parenteral alimentation in an intensive care unit and its value was studied, in particular in the immediate postoperative period. Describing the technique used, together with the qualitative and quantitative nature of the products employed, the authors analyse the results obtained and in particular the effectiveness of treatment from the standpoint of protein balance and of body weight stability in these patients.

  5. Randomised placebo-controlled trial of teduglutide in reducing parenteral nutrition and/or intravenous fluid requirements in patients with short bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, R; Pertkiewicz, M; Allard, J P; Messing, B; O'Keefe, S J

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Teduglutide, a GLP-2 analogue, may restore intestinal structural and functional integrity by promoting repair and growth of the mucosa and reducing gastric emptying and secretion, thereby increasing fluid and nutrient absorption in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). This 24-week placebo-controlled study evaluated the ability of teduglutide to reduce parenteral support in patients with SBS with intestinal failure. Methods In 83 patients randomised to receive subcutaneous teduglutide 0.10 mg/kg/day (n=32), 0.05 mg/kg/day (n=35) or placebo (n=16) once daily, parenteral fluids were reduced at 4-week intervals if intestinal fluid absorption (48 h urine volumes) increased ≥10%. Responders were subjects who demonstrated reductions of ≥20% in parenteral volumes from baseline at weeks 20 and 24. The primary efficacy end point, a graded response score (GRS), took into account higher levels and earlier onset of response, leading to longer duration of response. The intensity of the response was defined as a reduction from baseline in parenteral volume (from 20% to 100%), and the duration of the response was considered the response at weeks 16, 20 and 24. The results were tested according to a step-down procedure starting with the 0.10 mg/kg/day dose. Results Using the GRS criteria, teduglutide in a dose of 0.10 mg/kg/day did not have a statistically significant effect compared with placebo (8/32 vs 1/16, p=0.16), while teduglutide in a dose of 0.05 mg/kg/day had a significant effect (16/35, p=0.007). Since parenteral volume reductions were equal (353±475 and 354±334 ml/day), the trend towards higher baseline parenteral volume (1816±1008 vs 1374±639 ml/day, p=0.11) in the 0.10 mg/kg/day group compared with the 0.05 mg/kg/day group may have accounted for this discrepancy. Three teduglutide-treated patients were completely weaned off parenteral support. Serious adverse events were distributed similarly between active

  6. [Parenteral nutrition in gastro-intestinal surgery (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rosa, M P; Steuve, J; Houben, J J; Niederkorn, A; Govaerts, J P

    1981-01-01

    Forty-two postoperative patients received by parenteral route on 24 hours a total of 2,610 calories by means of a simultaneous infusion of 1,500 ml Trivé 1000 and 1,500 ml 10% invert sugar through a central venous line. Of those 42 cases 12 had peritonitis with 7 of them an enteric fistula, 18 underwent an extensive bowel resection and 12 suffered malnutrition secondary to their primary pathology. The average duration of parenteral nutrition was 13 days and the average hospital stay 27 days. No major metabolic derangement was noted except for a temporary transient elevation of SGOT and AF. A systematic bacteriological study of the perfusion lines disclosed an associated morbidity of about 6%. We are convinced that with the used solutions the postoperative catabolism can be managed successfully and that the association of aminoacids, lipids and glucides as used by us facilitates, nursing care.

  7. Is there a role for parenteral feeding in clinical medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Phinney, S D; Siepler, J; Bach, H T

    1996-01-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition as evidenced by loss of weight or of lean body mass is a commonly seen disorder. Although its cause is clearly multifactorial, objective measures of protein-calorie malnutrition have been repeatedly correlated with poor patient outcomes. Total parenteral nutrition was developed to halt or reverse this disorder, but its ability to improve the short- to intermediate-term outcome in patients with impaired nutrient intake has been highly inconsistent. Factors influencing this variable outcome include the degree of functional impairment in the treatment group, the underlying disease causing the impaired intake, and possibly the amount and composition of nonprotein calories delivered. In particular, considerable evidence points to intravenous soybean oil emulsion as a negative factor in the nutritional support of stressed patients. Taken in combination, current information suggests reserving the use of parenteral feeding for patients meeting objective criteria for protein-calorie malnutrition and making parsimonious use of lipid emulsion, especially in stressed patients. PMID:8775726

  8. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana; Petrina Jáuregui, Estrella; Elizondo Armendáriz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a particularly important problem in patients who need this type of nutritional support for a long time. Prevalence of the condition is highly variable depending on the series, and its clinical presentation is different in adults and children. The etiology of PNALD is not well defined, and participation of several factors at the same time has been suggested. When a bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is detected for a long time, other causes of liver disease should be ruled out and risk factors should be minimized. The composition of lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition is one of the factors related to PNALD. This article reviews the different types of lipid emulsions and the potential benefits of emulsions enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Parenteral trace element provision: recent clinical research and practical conclusions

    PubMed Central

    Stehle, P; Stoffel-Wagner, B; Kuhn, K S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review (PubMed, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed and Cochrane, www.cochrane.org; last entry 31 December 2014) was to present data from recent clinical studies investigating parenteral trace element provision in adult patients and to draw conclusions for clinical practice. Important physiological functions in human metabolism are known for nine trace elements: selenium, zinc, copper, manganese, chromium, iron, molybdenum, iodine and fluoride. Lack of, or an insufficient supply of, these trace elements in nutrition therapy over a prolonged period is associated with trace element deprivation, which may lead to a deterioration of existing clinical symptoms and/or the development of characteristic malnutrition syndromes. Therefore, all parenteral nutrition prescriptions should include a daily dose of trace elements. To avoid trace element deprivation or imbalances, physiological doses are recommended. PMID:27049031

  10. Earthquake Early Warning: User Education and Designing Effective Messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, E. R.; Sellnow, D. D.; Jones, L.; Sellnow, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and partners are transitioning from test-user trials of a demonstration earthquake early warning system (ShakeAlert) to deciding and preparing how to implement the release of earthquake early warning information, alert messages, and products to the public and other stakeholders. An earthquake early warning system uses seismic station networks to rapidly gather information about an occurring earthquake and send notifications to user devices ahead of the arrival of potentially damaging ground shaking at their locations. Earthquake early warning alerts can thereby allow time for actions to protect lives and property before arrival of damaging shaking, if users are properly educated on how to use and react to such notifications. A collaboration team of risk communications researchers and earth scientists is researching the effectiveness of a chosen subset of potential earthquake early warning interface designs and messages, which could be displayed on a device such as a smartphone. Preliminary results indicate, for instance, that users prefer alerts that include 1) a map to relate their location to the earthquake and 2) instructions for what to do in response to the expected level of shaking. A number of important factors must be considered to design a message that will promote appropriate self-protective behavior. While users prefer to see a map, how much information can be processed in limited time? Are graphical representations of wavefronts helpful or confusing? The most important factor to promote a helpful response is the predicted earthquake intensity, or how strong the expected shaking will be at the user's location. Unlike Japanese users of early warning, few Californians are familiar with the earthquake intensity scale, so we are exploring how differentiating instructions between intensity levels (e.g., "Be aware" for lower shaking levels and "Drop, cover, hold on" at high levels) can be paired with self-directed supplemental

  11. [Standard parenteral nutrition preparations in complex clinical situations].

    PubMed

    Llop Talaverón, J M; Berlana Martín, D; Badía Tahull, M B; Fort Casamartina, E; Vinent Genestar, J L; Tubau Mola, M; Jódar Massanés, R

    2004-01-01

    Binary and ternary parenteral nutrition preparations may be of limited use in certain cases. The goal of this study is to establish difficult nutritional situations to handle and analyze the type of formula used in these situations. The study included patients treated with parenteral nutrition over 9 months. Three clinically complex situations were defined: long duration, lasting more than 25 days; kidney failure, uraemia > 20 mmol/L or serum creatinine > 200 micromol/L; and liver failure, total bilirubin > 30 mmol/L or ALT > 2 microkat/L and alkaline phosphatase > 3 microkat/L or GGT > 3 microkat/L. Mortality and hypoalbuminaemia (< 35 g/L) were studied and compared by means of a chi squared test (p < 0.05) against the rest of the patients. The use of individualized formulas was studied using a multiple logarithmic regression model, the dependent variable being the administration or not of an individualized formula and the independent variables being the 3 groups of patients in clinical situations defined as complex. The Odds Ratio (OR) was studied as the measure of risk. A total of 511 patients receiving 8,015 feeds with parenteral nutrition were studied. Of these, 283 were included in one or more of the 3 complex clinical situations. All three groups presented higher levels of mortality and hypoalbuminaemia with statistically significant differences when compared to the group in a non-complex clinical situation. The use of individualized formulas was greater in the three groups defined, with statistically significant differences resulting: OR=6.7 (CI 95%; 3.78-11.91) with long duration; OR=3.66 (CI 95%; 2.68-5.68) in kidney failure; and OR=1.5 (CI 95%; 1.01-2.35) in liver failure. Patients in complex clinical situations present greater visceral malnutrition, a worse clinical evolution and, at our hospital, their nutritional treatment by parenteral means is based on a greater use of individualized formulas.

  12. Product quality of parenteral vancomycin products in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, S; Madurawe, R D; Zuk, S M; Khan, S R; Ellison, C D; Faustino, P J; Mans, D J; Trehy, M L; Hadwiger, M E; Boyne, M T; Biswas, K; Cox, E M

    2012-06-01

    In response to concerns raised about the quality of parenteral vancomycin products, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating the product quality of all FDA-approved parenteral vancomycin products available in the United States. Product quality was evaluated independently at two FDA Office of Testing and Research (FDA-OTR) sites. In the next phase of the investigation, being done in collaboration with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the in vivo activity of these products will be evaluated in an appropriate animal model. This paper summarizes results of the FDA investigation completed thus far. One site used a validated ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography method (OTR-UPLC), and the second site used the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for related substances provided in the British Pharmacopeia (BP) monograph for vancomycin intravenous infusion. Similar results were obtained by the two FDA-OTR laboratories using two different analytical methods. The products tested had 90 to 95% vancomycin B (active component of vancomycin) by the BP-HPLC method and 89 to 94% vancomycin by OTR-UPLC methods. Total impurities were 5 to 10% by BP-HPLC and 6 to 11% by OTR-UPLC methods. No single impurity was >2.0%, and the CDP-1 level was ≤ 2.0% across all products. Some variability in impurity profiles of the various products was observed. No adverse product quality issues were identified with the six U.S. vancomycin parenteral products. The quality parameters of all parenteral vancomycin products tested surpassed the United States Pharmacopeia acceptance criteria. Additional testing will characterize in vivo performance characteristics of these products.

  13. Parenteral Nutrition–Associated Liver Injury and Increased GRP94 Expression Prevented by ω-3 Fish Oil–Based Lipid Emulsion Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xueping; Xiao, Zhihui; Chen, Xiaoqian; Li, Yanhong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Xu, Yumin; Feng, Xing; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Parenteral nutrition in infants with gastrointestinal disorders can be lifesaving, but it is also associated with parenteral nutrition–associated liver disease. We investigated the effects of incorporating ω-3 fish oil in a parenteral nutrition mixture on signs of parenteral nutrition–associated liver disease and explored the mechanism involved in this process. Methods: Seven-day-old New Zealand rabbits were divided into 3 groups of 8, and for 1 week they were infused via the right jugular vein with standard total parenteral nutrition with soybean oil (TPN-soy) or TPN with ω-3 fish oil–based lipid emulsion (TPN-FO), or naturally nursed with rabbit milk (control). Serum and liver tissues were analyzed for serological indicators and pathology, respectively. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate the messenger RNA levels of the endoplasmic reticulum stress chaperone protein glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) in liver tissues and GRP94 protein levels were compared through immunohistochemistry and Western blot assays. Results: TPN-soy animals had significantly higher serum total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase and lower serum albumin than the controls (P < 0.01, each) or the TPN-FO group, which were similar to the controls (P < 0.01 cf. TPN). Damage to liver tissues of the TPN-FO group was much less than that of the TPN-soy group. GRP94 messenger RNA and protein levels in liver tissues of TPN-soy animals were significantly higher than that of the controls or TPN-FO rabbits, which were similar to the controls. Conclusions: Incorporating ω-3 fish oil in parenteral nutrition emulsion greatly prevented liver dysfunction and liver tissue damage in week-old rabbit kits, possibly by preventing endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:25199039

  14. Total parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis in rats: comparison of different amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Belli, D C; Fournier, L A; Lepage, G; Yousef, I; Weber, A M; Tuchweber, B; Roy, C C

    1987-01-01

    It has been suggested that the quantity of amino acids perfused is a pathogenetic factor in total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-associated hepatotoxicity. However, the effect of the qualitative pattern of amino acid solutions has not been studied. Rats on parenteral nutrition for 5 days received 10.2 g of dextrose and 3.4 g of amino acids daily. Bile flow (microliter/min/g liver protein) after administration of Vamin was 16.2 +/- 0.8, which was similar to that in controls given chow and dextrose iv, but it was significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than those on Travasol (12.3 +/- 0.8). The decrease in bile flow was not related to the large concentrations of alanine and glycine present in Travasol. However, the addition to Travasol of serine present only in Vamin increased bile flow significantly. Bile acid secretion rate, biliary lipid constituents, calcium, sodium, and glucose showed little change. In contrast, alpha-amino nitrogen was increased (p less than 0.05) in Vamin-perfused animals. Steatosis was noted in only a few animals in the Travasol group, and was not associated with an increase in the triglycerides content of the liver. Glycogen and protein content of the livers did not differ. The data show that the composition of amino acid solutions may be a determinant of TPN-induced cholestasis and suggest that the presence of methyl donor amino acids may have a protective effect.

  15. Influence of Preoperative Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition with Micronutrients after Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsiu-Chih; Hu, Shu-Hui; Yang, Hui-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The inflammatory reactions are stronger after surgery of malnourished preoperative patients. Many studies have shown vitamin and trace element deficiencies appear to affect the functioning of immune cells. Enteral nutrition is often inadequate for malnourished patients. Therefore, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is considered an effective method for providing preoperative nutritional support. TPN needs a central vein catheter, and there are more risks associated with TPN. However, peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) often does not provide enough energy or nutrients. Purpose. This study investigated the inflammatory response and prognosis for patients receiving a modified form of PPN with added fat emulsion infusion, multiple vitamins (MTV), and trace elements (TE) to assess the feasibility of preoperative nutritional support. Methods. A cross-sectional design was used to compare the influence of PPN with or without adding MTV and TE on malnourished abdominal surgery patients. Results. Both preoperative groups received equal calories and protein, but due to the lack of micronutrients, patients in preoperative Group B exhibited higher inflammation, lower serum albumin levels, and higher anastomotic leak rates and also required prolonged hospital stays. Conclusion. Malnourished patients who receive micronutrient supplementation preoperatively have lower postoperative inflammatory responses and better prognoses. PPN with added fat emulsion, MTV, and TE provides valid and effective preoperative nutritional support. PMID:26000296

  16. Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay for detection and quantitation of endotoxin in a small-volume parenteral product.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, K; Steindler, K A; Harrison, S J

    1980-01-01

    A Limulus amoebocyte lysate gel-clotting method for the determination of endotoxin in a small-volume parenteral product has been described. Sample dilution with 0.1 M potassium phosphate monobasic buffer (pH 8.0) effectively eliminated assay interference, whereas dilution with water did not. The threshold pyrogenic dose for Escherichia coli EC-2 and O127:B8 endotoxins was determined to be 1.0 ng of endotoxin per kg of body weight. Not more than 1.0 ng of endotoxin (the threshold pyrogenic dose) per the highest recommended human dose or the USP pyrogen test dose per kg of body weight, whichever dose is more stringent, is a logical limit for the quantity of bacterial endotoxin in small-volume parenteral products. Excellent correlation was attained when this criterion was used to compare the Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay with the USP pyrogen test. PMID:6448582

  17. [Enteral and/or parenteral nutrition in the critically ill : An algorithm as a possible basis for decision-making].

    PubMed

    Weimann, A

    2016-09-01

    Taking into account new data and recent clinical controversies regarding nutritional support within the first 7 days of critical illness, early enteral nutrition is recommended. A normocaloric goal of 25 kcal/kg body weight/day should be achieved. In case of inadequate enteral tolerance, parenteral supplementation starting between day 3 and 5 should be selectively restricted to primarily malnourished patients and those with high risk for complications and prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. This can be summarized in a clinical algorithm.

  18. An electrophysiological investigation of early effects of masked morphological priming

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Joanna; Grainger, Jonathan; Holcomb, Phillip J.

    2009-01-01

    This experiment examined event-related responses to targets preceded by semantically transparent morphologically related primes (e.g., farmer-farm), semantically opaque primes with an apparent morphological relation (cornercorn), and orthographically, but not morphologically, related primes (scandalscan) using the masked priming technique combined with a semantic categorisation task. In order to provide information about possible early effects of morphology we focused our analysis on the N250 ERP component. Priming effects for transparent and opaque items patterned together in the early phase of the N250 (200-250 ms), whereas the transparent and orthographic items patterned together in the latter phase of this component (250-300 ms). These results provide further evidence in support of the rapid extraction of morphemes from morphologically complex stimuli independently of the semantic relatedness of the whole and its parts. PMID:19779574

  19. Acetaldehyde involvement in ethanol's postabsortive effects during early ontogeny.

    PubMed

    March, Samanta M; Abate, P; Molina, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and biomedical studies sustains the notion that early ontogeny is a vulnerable window to the impact of alcohol. Experiences with the drug during these stages increase latter disposition to prefer, use or abuse ethanol. This period of enhanced sensitivity to ethanol is accompanied by a high rate of activity in the central catalase system, which metabolizes ethanol in the brain. Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first oxidation product of ethanol, has been found to share many neurobehavioral effects with the drug. Cumulative evidence supports this notion in models employing adults. Nevertheless very few studies have been conducted to analyze the role of ACD in ethanol postabsorptive effects, in newborns or infant rats. In this work we review recent experimental literature that syndicates ACD as a mediator agent of reinforcing aspects of ethanol, during early ontogenetic stages. We also show a meta-analytical correlational approach that proposes how differences in the activity of brain catalase across ontogeny, could be modulating patterns of ethanol consumption.

  20. [Effect of zuoguiwan on early embryonic development of mice].

    PubMed

    Feng, Q J; Feng, M L; Wang, Y L

    1996-11-01

    Effects of Zuoguiwan (ZGW, a prescription for reinforcing Kidney Yin) on early embryonic development were observed by using embryonic developmental retardation model of mice formed by alcohol. Drug was given in three ways: add ZGW into cultural medium directly (group A), add the serum of mice received ZGW (group B) and cultured the embryo taken from ZGW treated mice (group C). The result was compared with that treated with Bazhen decoction (BZD, a prescription for supplementing Qi and blood). Results showed that the in vitro developmental rate of embryo from 2-cell stage to blastula stage in group B and C, which approached to normal control group, was higher than that in untreated model obviously. While in BZW group, it was higher than in normal control group only in certain stage. However, adding ZGW directly into culture medium didn't reveal marked effect on early embryonic development.

  1. Intersensory coordination and the effects of early sensory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tees, R C; Symons, L A

    1987-09-01

    The effect of early visual deprivation on the ability of dark- (DR) and light-reared (LR) rats to learn temporal discriminations involving sounds and lights and to abstract the intersensory correspondence involving duration from initial modality-specific training was examined in this study. While visually inexperienced DR rats were somewhat less successful in acquiring an initial discrimination involving visual events and responding to a rule reversal per se, they were as effective as their visually experienced LR counterparts in demonstrating cross-modal transfer (CMT) to signals in a new modality. The results revealed by the investigation are discussed in terms of the consequences and lack of consequences of the manipulation of early visual experience on the ontogeny of intersensory perceptual development in mammals.

  2. Delivery of vitamins E and C from parenteral alimentation solution.

    PubMed

    Shenai, J P; Borum, P R; Duke, E A

    1982-01-01

    We have previously shown that substantial losses of fat-soluble (FS) vitamin A from parenteral alimentation solution occur due to adsorption in the intravenous tubing and photodegradation in the bottle. This study assessed the delivery of other vitamins, viz, FS vitamin E and water-soluble (WS) vitamin C, from parenteral alimentation solution. The solution containing 2.0 ml/L of an aqueous multivitamin infusion was infused at a constant rate of 10 ml/h using a standard intravenous administration set. Multiple aliquots of the solution from the bottle and the effluent obtained sequentially in a 24-h period were analyzed for concentrations of vitamins E and C. Both vitamins remained relatively stable in the bottle. A significant amount (12%) of vitamin E was lost in the intravenous tubing. No losses of vitamin C were incurred in the intravenous tubing. The data suggest that delivery of FS vitamin E from parenteral alimentation solutions is less than optimum because of adsorptive losses. Similar losses are not encountered with WS vitamin C.

  3. Abnormalities of zinc and copper during total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, S F; Goodgame, J T; Smith, J C; Maher, M M; Makuch, R W; Henkin, R I; Brennan, M F

    1979-01-01

    Changes in serum zinc and copper levels were studied in 19 tumor bearing patients undergoing parenteral nutrition (TPN) for five to 42 days. Before initiation of intravenous feeding mean serum zinc and copper concentrations were within normal limits but during TPN levels decreased significantly below those measured prior to parenteral nutrition. During TPN nitrogen, zinc, and copper intake, urinary output and serum levels were studied prospectively in nine of these patients. These nine patients exhibited positive nitrogen retention based upon urinary nitrogen excretion, but elevated urinary zinc and copper excretion and lowered serum zinc and copper concentrations. Neither blood administration nor limited oral intake was consistently able to maintain normal serum levels of zinc or copper. Zinc and copper supplementation of hyperalimentation fluids in four patients studied for five to 16 days was successful in increasing serum zinc and copper levels in only two. The data obtained suggest that patients undergoing parenteral nutrition may require supplementation of zinc and copper to prevent deficiencies of these elements. PMID:103506

  4. [Staff accreditation in parenteral nutrition production in hospital pharmacy].

    PubMed

    Vrignaud, S; Le Pêcheur, V; Jouan, G; Valy, S; Clerc, M-A

    2016-09-01

    This work aims to provide staff accreditation methodology to harmonize and secure practices for parenteral nutrition bags preparation. The methodology used in the present study is inspired from project management and quality approach. Existing training supports were used to produce accreditation procedure and evaluation supports. We first defined abilities levels, from level 1, corresponding to accredited learning agent to level 3, corresponding to expert accredited agent. Elements assessed for accreditation are: clothing assessment either by practices audit or by microbiologic test, test bags preparation and handling assessment, bag production to assess aseptic filling for both manual or automatized method, practices audit, number of days of production, and non-conformity following. At Angers Hospital, in 2014, production staff is composed of 12 agents. Staff accreditation reveals that 2 agents achieve level 3, 8 agents achieve level 2 and 2 agents are level 1. We noted that non-conformity decreased as accreditation took place from 81 in 2009 to 0 in 2014. To date, there is no incident due to parenteral bag produced by Angers hospital for neonatal resuscitation children. Such a consistent study is essential to insure a secured nutrition parenteral production. This also provides a satisfying quality care for patients. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition in malnourished children treated with hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Krause, Irit; Shamir, Raanan; Davidovits, Miriam; Frishman, Sigal; Cleper, Roxana; Gamzo, Zahava; Poraz, Irit; Eisenstein, Bella

    2002-01-01

    To examine the feasibility and effectiveness of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) in children on hemodialysis. Prospective experimental study with a single intervention group. A pediatric hemodialysis unit. Four malnourished children on hemodialysis (3 girls and 1 boy) 4 to 18 years of age were studied during a period of 1 year. IDPN, which is composed of amino acids (8.5% solution), glucose (as 10% to 15% dextrose), and 20% fat emulsion, was administered at every dialysis session (3 times a week, during 4 hours each time) for 7 to 12 weeks. Oral caloric intake (evaluated by using a 3-day diet history), dry weight (weight after dialysis), body mass index, percent ideal body weight, total lymphocyte count, and serum levels of albumin before, immediately after cessation of IDPN, and 3 months after cessation of IDPN. Oral caloric intake increased markedly after IDPN administration, from 5 to 63 kcal/kg/d (mean, 33 kcal/kg/d) before IDPN administration to 35 to 177 kcal/kg/d (mean, 86 kcal/kg/d) at the time of cessation. Weight did not change during the treatment period but it did increase from 9.5 to 36.4 kg (mean, 25 kg) to 11 to 39 kg (mean, 26.7 kg) 3 months later. Percent ideal body weight increased from 73% to 88% (mean, 78.5%) to 79% to 90% (mean, 85.1%), and body mass index increased from 12.2 to 15 kg/m(2) (mean, 13.5 kg/m(2)) to 13.4 to 15.5 kg/m(2) (mean, 14.6 kg/m(2)). Total lymphocyte count increased from 538 to 2,041 cells/mm(3) (mean, 1,403 cells/mm(3)) to 724 to 2,884 cells/mm(3) (mean, 2,066 cells/mm(3)). Plasma levels of albumin increased in 1 patient but remained unchanged in others. Short-term IDPN treatment may serve as a safe and effective nutritional intervention in malnourished children on hemodialysis. Copyright 2002 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

  6. Successful intradialytic parenteral nutrition after abdominal "Catastrophes" in chronically hemodialysed patients.

    PubMed

    Korzets, A; Azoulay, O; Chagnac, A; Weinstein, T; Avraham, Z; Ori, Y; Zevin, D; Gafter, U

    1999-10-01

    To assess the therapeutic contribution of intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) in four acutely ill, hypercatabolic, hemodialysed patients. All underwent major surgery, complicated by infection and malnutrition. A retrospective clinical study. An in-center hemodialysis unit, at a tertiary referral hospital. Patient 1: a young woman, with a good renal transplant. Developed gastric lymphoma, which required gastrectomy. After cessation of immunosuppression, "lost" her kidney and returned to hemodialysis. Received IDPN for 4 months and recovered well from severe malnourishment. Patient 2: an elderly, malnourished man, on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Developed biliary peritonitis and bacteremia. In a 3-month period, the patient had four operations. Maintained on IDPN for 4 months. Patient 3: a young and obese man, who suffered from life-threatening staphylococcal aureus peritonitis, resulting in widespread bowel adhesions. Underwent repeated aspirations of purulent ascites, laparoscopy, and explorative laparotomy. IDPN was administered for 4 months and stopped on the patient's request. Patient 4: a young man, who after cadaveric renal transplantation remained hospitalized for 6 months because of acute rejection and peritoneal and retroperitoneal abscesses. Had major surgery performed seven times. Received IDPN for 6 months, and is now well. All four patients benefited from 4 to 6 months of IDPN, as an integral part of intensive supportive and nutritional treatment. Weight loss was halted, as patient appetite returned and oral nutrition became adequate. Estimated daily protein intake reached 1.2 g/kg, while caloric intake rose to nearly 30 kcal/kg/d (Table 3). Mean serum albumin levels increased from 25.5 g/L +/- 0.9 g/L to 38.0 g/L +/- 1.5 g/L. No adverse side effects were seen from IDPN. IDPN is a worthwhile part of treatments used in the catabolic, postoperative hemodialysed patient. It is safe and efficient when used over a 6-month period in

  7. [Electrolytes content in parenteral drugs authorised in Spain].

    PubMed

    Mirchandani Jagwani, J N; Arias Rico, R

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: La fluidoterapia es una de las prácticas más habituales en la práctica clínica diaria pero para un correcto manejo de electrolitos tanto en la sueroterapia como en la Nutrición Parenteral se deben conocer todos los aportes de electrolitos y fluidos y todas aquellas situaciones fisiopatológicos que conllevan alteraciones en la homeostasis de fluidos. Objetivos: Conocer el contenido y tipo de electrolitos de los medicamentos administrados por vía parenteral comercializados y autorizados en España hasta Febrero 2012. Métodos: Revisión de todas las fichas técnicas de todos aquellos medicamentos que estuvieran comercializados en España y con presentación comercial disponible por vía parenteral. Aquellos medicamentos con un contenido menor de 1 miliequivalente o 1 milimol por presentación comercial fueron excluidos. Resultados: De los 1800 principios activos estudiados, sólo 221 formaban parte de alguna presentación comercial por vía parenteral. De estos 221, 52 principios activos cumplían los criterios de inclusión del estudio y la mayoría (51-98,07%) tenían sodio en contenido mayor de un miliequivalente por presentación comercial, luego el potasio estaba presente en 3 y el calcio únicamente en uno. Discusión: La mayoría de medicamentos objeto del estudio contenían como principal electrolito el sodio, siendo la alteración de las concentraciones de este electrolito una de las más frecuentes en el entorno hospitalario y, en algunos casos, indicador de calidad en la atención del paciente. Por ello, para un mejor manejo de la reposición de electrolitos tanto en la sueroterapia como por Nutrición Parenteral es necesario tener en cuenta el aporte recibido por la medicación prescrita en los casos en que sea necesario.

  8. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): neurocritical patient].

    PubMed

    Acosta Escribano, J; Herrero Meseguer, I; Conejero García-Quijada, R

    2011-11-01

    Neurocritical patients require specialized nutritional support due to their intense catabolism and prolonged fasting. The preferred route of nutrient administration is the gastrointestinal route, especially the gastric route. Alternatives are the transpyloric route or mixed enteral-parenteral nutrition if an effective nutritional volume of more than 60% cannot be obtained. Total calore intake ranges from 20-30 kcal/kg/day, depending on the period of the clinical course, with protein intake higher than 20% of total calories (hyperproteic diet). Nutritional support should be initiated early. The incidence of gastrointestinal complications is generally higher to other critically-ill patients, the most frequent complication being an increase in gastric residual volume. As in other critically-ill patients, glycemia should be closely monitored and maintained below 150 mg/dL. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC) and Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunkyo; Lee, Seung Min; Jung, In-Kyung; Lim, Yunsook; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. {yields} Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. {yields} These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-{kappa}B and TNF-{alpha} expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results

  10. Supplemental Parenteral Nutrition Is the Key to Prevent Energy Deficits in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Taku; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Pichard, Claude

    2016-08-01

    This review emphasizes the role of a timely supplemental parenteral nutrition (PN) for critically ill patients. It contradicts the recommendations of current guidelines to avoid the use of PN, as it is associated with risk. Critical illness results in severe metabolic stress. During the early phase, inflammatory cytokines and mediators induce catabolism to meet the increased body energy demands by endogenous sources. This response is not suppressed by exogenous energy administration, and the early use of PN to reach the energy target leads to overfeeding. On the other hand, early and progressive enteral nutrition (EN) is less likely to cause overfeeding because of variable gastrointestinal tolerance, a factor frequently associated with significant energy deficit. Recent studies demonstrate that adequate feeding is beneficial during and after the intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Supplemental PN allows for timely adequate feeding, if sufficient precautions are taken to avoid overfeeding. Indirect calorimetry can precisely define the adequate energy prescription. Our pragmatic approach is to start early EN to progressively test the gut tolerance and add supplemental PN on day 3 or 4 after ICU admission, only if EN does not meet the measured energy target. We believe that supplemental PN plays a pivotal role in the achievement of adequate feeding in critically ill patients with intolerance to EN and does not cause harm if overfeeding is avoided by careful prescription, ideally based on energy expenditure measured by indirect calorimetry.

  11. An outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) map to identify risks associated with an OPAT service.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Mark; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Patel, Jignesh P

    2008-07-01

    Administering parenteral antibiotics outside the confines of a ward setting is becoming an attractive way of treating infections in the UK. However, as well as having many advantages, an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) service potentially introduces new risks to staff and patients involved. In the United States, healthcare organizations are now prospectively analysing processes to try and prevent errors occurring using the Healthcare Failure Mode Effect Analysis (HFMEA) tool. The objectives of this study were to map out and agree the OPAT process and sub-processes and to identify potential OPAT system failures using steps 1-3 of the HFMEA tool, so that the resulting OPAT map can be used to design an OPAT service where risk is minimized. The study was undertaken using a consensus development panel to which the HFMEA process was applied. Key stakeholders in the local OPAT process were invited to join the HFMEA team with the aim of describing and agreeing (defined as 100% participant agreement) an OPAT map, its sub-processes and potential OPAT system failures. The HFMEA team identified 6 processes, 67 sub-processes and 217 possible failures over the course of four meetings. Key areas identified in the OPAT map concerned identifying and checking patient suitability for an OPAT service, involvement of a multidisciplinary team and robust communication channels. An OPAT map was developed, which may serve as a practical model for other organizations setting up a similar service.

  12. Development of a process using electron beam for a terminal sterilization for parenteral formulations of pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matagne, D.; Delbar, N.; Hartmann, H.-J.; Gray, M.; Stickelmeyer, M.

    2004-09-01

    As pharmaceutical technology advances and sensitive drug formulations demand ever-greater stability, radiation processing is likely the only alternative that can be used to terminally sterilize thermo-labile pharmaceutical products intended for parenteral administration. To this end, a radiation process using e-beam technology has been developed. A key feature of this process is the elucidation of defined conditions of radiation processing in order to achieve the homogeneity of the absorbed dose inside a single vial and throughout a tray containing several vials. Results of several dosimetry studies, using e-beam technology, demonstrate the beneficial effects of the use of aluminum or stainless-steel plates to scatter the beam and therefore to obtain an excellent Dmax/ Dmin across all dose-monitoring positions within the vial and throughout a tray containing 260 vials filled with a dry powder or a tray containing approximately 30 vials filled with an aqueous solution. This ionizing radiation process can be directly applicable, at a manufacturing level, for a terminal sterilization of parenteral formulations of pharmaceuticals.

  13. Construction and characterization of human rotavirus recombinant VP8* subunit parenteral vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2012-09-21

    Two currently licensed live oral rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in selected low-income African and Asian countries is much lower than that in middle or high-income countries. Additionally, these two vaccines have recently been associated with rare case of intussusception in vaccinated infants. We developed a novel recombinant subunit parenteral rotavirus vaccine which may be more effective in low-income countries and also avert the potential problem of intussusception. Truncated recombinant VP8* (ΔVP8*) protein of human rotavirus strain Wa P[8], DS-1 P[4] or 1076 P[6] expressed in Escherichia coli was highly soluble and was generated in high yield. Guinea pigs hyperimmunized intramuscularly with each of the ΔVP8* proteins (i.e., P[8], P[4] or P[6]) developed high levels of homotypic as well as variable levels of heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the selected ΔVP8* proteins when administered to mice at a clinically relevant dosage, route and schedule, elicited high levels of serum anti-VP8* IgG and/or neutralizing antibodies. Our data indicated that the ΔVP8* proteins may be a plausible additional candidate as new parenteral rotavirus vaccines.

  14. Construction and Characterization of Human Rotavirus Recombinant VP8* Subunit Parenteral Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W.; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2012-01-01

    Two currently licensed live oral rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in selected low-income African and Asian countries is much lower than that in middle or high-income countries. Additionally, these two vaccines have recently been associated with rare case of intussusception in vaccinated infants. We developed a novel recombinant subunit parenteral rotavirus vaccine which may be more effective in low-income countries and also avert the potential problem of intussusception. Truncated recombinant VP8* (ΔVP8*) protein of human rotavirus strain Wa P[8], DS-1 P[4] or 1076 P[6] expressed in E. coli was highly soluble and was generated in high yield. Guinea pigs hyperimmunized intramuscularly with each of the ΔVP8* proteins (i.e., (P[8], P[4] or P[6]) developed high levels of homotypic as well as variable levels of heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the selected ΔVP8* proteins when administered to mice at a clinically relevant dosage, route and schedule, elicited high levels of serum anti-VP8* IgG and/or neutralizing antibodies. Our data indicated that the ΔVP8* proteins may be a plausible additional candidate as new parenteral rotavirus vaccines. PMID:22885016

  15. Protein and Calorie Requirements with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Shizgal, Harry M.; Forse, R. Armour

    1980-01-01

    Body composition measurements, performed by multiple isotope dilution, were used to determine the protein and caloric requirements of patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). In addition the relative efficacy of lipid as opposed to carbohydrate calories were evaluated. Patients requiring TPN were randomly allocated to receive one of the following TPN solutions: a) 2.5% amino acid with 25% dextrose b) 5% amino acid with 25% dextrose c) 2.5% amino acid with 12.5% dextrose and a 5% lipid emulsion. The efficacy of each solution was evaluated by determining body composition at the onset,and at two week intervals during the course of TPN. In 204 patients who received TPN for 4447 days, 533 body composition studies were performed to evaluate 308 periods of TPN. In the normally nourished patient, as defined by the pre-TPN body composition, the body composition remained unchanged and normal with the three solutions. In the presence of preexisting malnutrition, two weeks of TPN resulted in a significant increase in body weight, arising primarily from an increase in the body cell mass. To evaluate the relative importance of the various factors responsible for the increase in the body cell mass, a multiple linear regression analysis was performed. The mean daily change in the body cell mass was correlated with the carbohydrate, protein and lipid calories infused and with the nutritional state. The resulting regression equation, which was statistically significant, indicated that the rate at which a depleted body cell mass was restored was related to the lipid and carbohydrate calories infused and to the nutritional state of the patient. Carbohydrate calories were more efficient than lipid calories. However increasing the amino acid concentration from 2.5 to 5% had no effect on the rate at which the body cell mass increased. The repletion rate was also directly related to the severity of malnutrition. Thus the correction of a malnourished individual with TPN is

  16. Effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Fengxian; Zhang, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection. Methods: A total of 120 patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection were randomly divided into an early enteral nutrition (EN) group and a parenteral nutrition (PN) group (n=60). The patients were given nutritional support intervention for 14 days, and the expression levels of serum transferrin, albumin, total protein, endotoxin, D-lactic acid and inflammatory cytokines were detected on the 1st, 7th and 14th days respectively. Results: As the treatment progressed, the levels of serum transferrin, albumin and total protein of the EN group were significantly higher than those of the PN group (P<0.05), while the levels of serum endotoxin and D-lactic acid of the form group were significantly lower (P<0.05). After treatment, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were decreased in the EN group, which were significantly different from those of the PN group (P<0.05). During treatment, the incidence rates of complications such as abdominal distension, diarrhea, sepsis, nausea, vomiting and gastric retention were similar. The mean healing time of wound surface was 9.34±0.78 days in the EN group and 12.46±2.19 days in the PN group, i.e. such time of the former was significantly shorter than that of the latter (P<0.05). Conclusion: Treating patients having burn-induced invasive fungal infection by early enteral nutrition support with arginine can safely alleviate malnutrition and stress reaction, strengthen cellular immune function and promote wound healing, thereby facilitating the recovery of gastrointestinal motility and the function of intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:27375697

  17. Parenteral adenoviral boost enhances BCG induced protection, but not long term survival in a murine model of bovine TB.

    PubMed

    Kaveh, Daryan A; Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Webb, Paul R; Wooff, Esen E; Bachy, Véronique S; Hogarth, Philip J

    2016-07-25

    Boosting BCG using heterologous prime-boost represents a promising strategy for improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccines, and adenovirus (Ad) delivery is established as an efficacious boosting vehicle. Although studies demonstrate that intranasal administration of Ad boost to BCG offers optimal protection, this is not currently possible in cattle. Using Ad vaccine expressing the mycobacterial antigen TB10.4 (BCG/Ad-TB10.4), we demonstrate, parenteral boost of BCG immunised mice to induce specific CD8(+) IFN-γ producing T cells via synergistic priming of new epitopes. This induces significant improvement in pulmonary protection against Mycobacterium bovis over that provided by BCG when assessed in a standard 4week challenge model. However, in a stringent, year-long survival study, BCG/Ad-TB10.4 did not improve outcome over BCG, which we suggest may be due to the lack of additional memory cells (IL-2(+)) induced by boosting. These data indicate BCG-prime/parenteral-Ad-TB10.4-boost to be a promising candidate, but also highlight the need for further understanding of the mechanisms of T cell priming and associated memory using Ad delivery systems. That we were able to generate significant improvement in pulmonary protection above BCG with parenteral, rather than mucosal administration of boost vaccine is critical; suggesting that the generation of effective mucosal immunity is possible, without the risks and challenges of mucosal administration, but that further work to specifically enhance sustained protective immunity is required.

  18. Frequency Effects or Context Effects in Second Language Word Learning: What Predicts Early Lexical Production?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Scott A.; Subtirelu, Nicholas; Salsbury, Tom

    2013-01-01

    This study examines frequency, contextual diversity, and contextual distinctiveness effects in predicting produced versus not-produced frequent nouns and verbs by early second language (L2) learners of English. The study analyzes whether word frequency is the strongest predictor of early L2 word production independent of contextual diversity and…

  19. Frequency Effects or Context Effects in Second Language Word Learning: What Predicts Early Lexical Production?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Scott A.; Subtirelu, Nicholas; Salsbury, Tom

    2013-01-01

    This study examines frequency, contextual diversity, and contextual distinctiveness effects in predicting produced versus not-produced frequent nouns and verbs by early second language (L2) learners of English. The study analyzes whether word frequency is the strongest predictor of early L2 word production independent of contextual diversity and…

  20. The Effective Early Learning Project: The Quality of Adult Engagement in Early Childhood Settings in the UK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascal, Christine; Bertram, Tony

    Based on the view that the quality of adult educative interactions with young children is critical in determining the effectiveness of educational provision and in improving early childhood settings, this paper examines the quality of adult engagement experienced by 3- and 4-year-olds in 9 types of early education and care settings from the…

  1. [Effectiveness of an early discharge program after normal childbirth].

    PubMed

    Teulón González, M; Martínez Pillado, M; Cuadrado Martín, M M; Rivero Martín, M J; Cerezuela Requena, J F

    To implement a program of early hospital discharge after an uncomplicated birth, in order to improve the effectiveness, as well as ensuring clinical safety and patient acceptability. Descriptive study of the effectiveness of an early discharge program after uncomplicated delivery between February 2012 and September 2013. The populations are post-partum women and newborns admitted to the University Hospital of Fuenlabrada, with a duration of less than 24h after uncomplicated delivery that met the defined inclusion criteria. Satisfaction was assessed using a Likert scale. The effectiveness of the program was monitored by safety indicators, productivity, adaptation, and continuity of care. A total of 20% of cases capable of early discharge from Fuenlabrada University Hospital completed the program. Almost all (94%) were normal deliveries. The 188 cases included were from 911 patients with uncomplicated childbirth, accounting for 6.5% of the 2,857 total births. The mean stay of patients included showed a decrease of 50% (2.4 to 1.2 days). All patients received continuity of care after hospital discharge. The review consultation was reprogrammed for 4.8% of cases, with 2% of patients re-admitted within 96h. with no serious problems. Four newborns (2%) required attention in the emergency department (mother or newborn) before 96h. The assessment of patient satisfaction achieved a score of 4.5 out of 5. The program achieved a decrease in the average stay by 50%, favouring the autonomy of midwives. This acceptance level is in line with similar interventions. The deployment of the program may be useful for other changes in care processes. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of parenteral antibiotherapy in gastrointestinal tract flora suppression. A study in children treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chastagner, P; Hartmann, O; Tancrede, C; Kalifa, C; Patte, C; Flamant, F; Lemerle, J

    1989-07-01

    In order to determine the effect of parenteral antibiotherapy on the fecal flora in patients with profound and prolonged granulocytopenia, we initiated a prospective study of 62 cases of autologous bone marrow transplantation following high-dose chemotherapy. All patients were children from 2 to 18 years old, isolated in a protective environment, receiving a diet low in viable microbial content but no oral non-absorbable prophylactic antibiotics to decontaminate the gastrointestinal tract. Bacteriological analysis of fecal flora was conducted at least once a week before and during parenteral antibiotherapy, administered at the first greater than 38 degrees C febrile episode in these granulocytopenic patients (granulocyte count less than 0.5 X 10(9)/l). The 58 evaluable patients fell into three groups with regard to the systemic antibiotherapy: group A (n = 16): moxalactam + mezlocillin; group B (n = 15): moxalactam + tobramycin; and group C (n = 27): cefotaxime plus gentamicin. Fecal flora suppression was observed in 51/58 cases (88%) (group A: 15/16, group B: 13/15, group C: 23/27). It always occurred within 5 days of initiating parenteral antibiotherapy and persisted in 88% of the 51 patients over the whole period of systemic antibiotherapy. During the latter, fecal recolonization was observed in seven cases (12%), always by Enterobacteriaceae sensitive to the prescribed systemic antibiotherapy, never responsible for septicemia. Since parenteral antibiotherapy alone was able to suppress the gastrointestinal tract flora, the effects of this treatment should be considered in all trials of digestive tract decontamination.

  3. Equitable service provision for inclusive education and effective early intervention.

    PubMed

    Wicks, K M

    1998-01-01

    This paper illustrates one model of providing an integrated paediatric speech and language therapy service which attempts to meet the demands of both inclusive education and effective early intervention. A move has been made from location-oriented therapy provision to offering children and their families equal opportunities to have appropriate intervention according to need. The model incorporates the philosophy of inclusive education and supports the development of current specialist educational establishments into resource bases of expertise for children with special needs in mainstream schools.

  4. Is early intervention for psychosis feasible and effective?

    PubMed Central

    Srihari, Vinod H.; Shah, Jai; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Services that provide comprehensive, early intervention (EI) have shown promise in improving long-term outcomes in schizophrenia. This paper reviews the rationale and salient concepts relevant to understanding the growing EI literature. A selective review of studies evaluating the effectiveness of integrated EI is followed by a discussion of feasibility, especially in the U.S. context. Finally, the authors present a framework that seeks to integrate activities traditionally categorized and separated as discovery and implementation. This framework is offered as one way to advance both goals. PMID:22929869

  5. The effectiveness of early intervention: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Parry, T S

    1992-10-01

    The following principles are now clearly defined in the management of children with developmental delay: (1) Multidisciplinary teams are more effective than individual therapeutic approaches. (2) The whole development of the child needs to be considered rather than a single deficient area alone. (3) Home-based programmes are more effective in the young preschool child than centre-based programmes alone. (4) Parent involvement in partnership with professionals is essential for sustained progress. (5) Maximum effectiveness is achieved when parental skills are increased. (6) Programmes commencing earlier in preschool years are more effective than those that commence late. This concept has been recently challenged and evidence supports benefits for the disadvantaged rather than the disabled. White also contends that there is 'simply not enough information to be confident about the long-term impact of early intervention with handicapped children and evidence in support of many of the commonly held positions about mediating variables (e.g. parental involvement, age at start) is either non-existent or contradictory. Early intervention is clearly effective in offering parental support, fostering parent/child relationships and diminishing anxiety even for those programmes that have not at present been proven in altering the developmental disability. Programmes that involve high cost, disrupt total family functioning, deflect scarce resources away from more proven areas of effectiveness should be discouraged, and they should never cause guilt in either parent or professional when they seem ineffective. Future research should include investigation of outcomes other than cognitive and physical functioning alone. We should be warned from the somewhat crisp statement of Mark Twain: 'There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment in fact'.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Safety of parenteral third-generation cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Fekety, F R

    1990-04-09

    Knowledge of side effects associated with different cephalosporins may be of help to prescribers. There are several side effects that are common to all cephalosporins, but overall, cefotaxime and ceftizoxime cause the fewest adverse reactions. Bleeding is probably the most common serious side effect of cephalosporins. Moxalactam causes coagulopathy and bleeding more often than do other cephalosporins, probably because it is carboxylated and has a methylthiotetrazole side chain. Cefoperazone also has a methylthiotetrazole side chain and may cause bleeding, particularly when used in doses greater than 4 g per day. Ceftriaxone has a similar side chain and there is some evidence that it can induce a coagulopathy. Coagulation tests should be monitored when any of the third-generation cephalosporins are given to patients with a high risk of bleeding. Disulfiram-like reactions are also related to the side chains associated with coagulation defects and have been reported when patients receiving cefoperazone, moxalactam, or ceftriaxone have ingested alcohol. Seizures have been reported with ceftazidime, but are uncommon. Hematologic reactions are rare with all third-generation cephalosporins. Benign diarrhea and Clostridium difficile colitis probably occur most often with moxalactam, cefoperazone, ceftazidime, and ceftriaxone, but there are few good data on this issue. Ceftriaxone has the unique ability to cause sludge (also referred to as pseudolithiasis) to form in the gallbladder, particularly in children. This may be associated with nausea, anorexia, epigastric distress, and colic, and is usually detected using ultrasonography. The sludge dissolves and symptoms subside after therapy is discontinued. None of the third-generation cephalosporins is clearly significantly nephrotoxic, even when combined with aminoglycosides. Most of the third-generation cephalosporins have surprisingly few serious side effects, which make them attractive for use in the treatment of a wide

  7. Parenteral diclofenac infusion significantly decreases brain-tissue oxygen tension in patients with poor-grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diclofenac, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, is commonly used as antipyretic therapy in intensive care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of parenteral diclofenac infusion on brain homeostasis, including brain-tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) and brain metabolism after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study with retrospective analysis of 21 consecutive aSAH patients with multimodal neuromonitoring. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), intracranial pressure (ICP), body temperature, and PbtO2 were analyzed after parenteral diclofenac infusion administered over a 34-minute period (20 to 45 IQR). Data are given as mean ± standard error of mean and median with interquartile range (IQR), as appropriate. Time-series data were analyzed by using a general linear model extended by generalized estimation equations (GEEs). Results One-hundred twenty-three interventions were analyzed. Body temperature decreased from 38.3°C ± 0.05°C by 0.8°C ± 0.06°C (P < 0.001). A 10% decrease in MAP and CPP (P < 0.001) necessitated an increase of vasopressors in 26% (n = 32), colloids in 33% (n = 41), and crystalloids in 5% (n = 7) of interventions. PbtO2 decreased by 13% from a baseline value of 28.1 ± 2.2 mm Hg, resulting in brain-tissue hypoxia (PbtO2 <20 mm Hg) in 38% (n = 8) of patients and 35% (n = 43) of interventions. PbtO2 <30 mm Hg before intervention was associated with brain-tissue hypoxia after parenteral diclofenac infusion (likelihood ratio, 40; AUC, 93%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 87% to 99%; P < 0.001). Cerebral metabolism showed no significant changes after parenteral diclofenac infusion. Conclusions Parenteral diclofenac infusion after aSAH effectively reduces body temperature, but may lead to CPP decrease and brain-tissue hypoxia, which were both associated with poor outcome after aSAH. PMID:23663770

  8. Drugs Used for Parenteral Sedation in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Raymond A.; Gift, Helen C.

    1988-01-01

    The relative efficacy and safety of drugs and combinations used clinically in dentistry as premedicants to alleviate patient apprehension are largely unsubstantiated. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of agents used for parenteral sedation through controlled clinical trials, it is first necessary to identify which drugs, doses, and routes of administration are actually used in practice. A survey instrument was developed to characterize the drugs used clinically for anesthesia and sedation by dentists with advanced training in pain control. A random sample of 500 dentists who frequently use anesthesia and sedation in practice was selected from the Fellows of the American Dental Society of Anesthesiology. The first mailing was followed by a second mailing to nonrespondents after 30 days. The respondents report a variety of parenteral sedation techniques in combination with local anesthesia (the response categories are not mutually exclusive): nitrous oxide (64%), intravenous conscious sedation (59%), intravenous “deep” sedation (47%), and outpatient general anesthesia (27%). Drugs most commonly reported for intravenous sedation include diazepam, methohexital, midazolam, and combinations of these drugs with narcotics. A total of 82 distinct drugs and combinations was reported for intravenous sedation and anesthesia. Oral premedication and intramuscular sedation are rarely used by this group. Most general anesthesia reported is done on an outpatient basis in private practice. These results indicate that a wide variety of drugs is employed for parenteral sedation in dental practice, but the most common practice among dentists with advanced training in anesthesia is local anesthesia supplemented with intravenous sedation consisting of a benzodiazepine and an opioid or a barbiturate. PMID:3250279

  9. Characterizing the Severe Reactions of Parenteral Vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rachel B; Brown, Jamie N

    2016-01-01

    Parenteral vitamin K1 (phytonadione) is used for anticoagulant reversal, and a boxed warning exists with intravenous and intramuscular administration due to the possibility of severe reactions, including fatalities. These reactions resemble hypersensitivity or anaphylaxis, including anaphylactoid reaction, and have led to shock and cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. The objective of this review is to summarize the available literature detailing the anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions with parenteral vitamin K1 in order to better characterize the reaction and provide a more in-depth understanding of its importance. A comprehensive literature search of MEDLINE (1946 to June 2016) and EMBASE (1947 to June 2016) was conducted using the terms vitamin K1, phytonadione, phytomenadione, vitamin K group, anaphylaxis, polyoxyethylated castor oil, and cremophor. A total of 2 retrospective surveillance studies, 2 retrospective cohort studies, and 17 case reports were identified for inclusion and assessment. Based on a review of the literature, use of parenteral vitamin K1 may result in severe hypotension, bradycardia or tachycardia, dyspnea, bronchospasm, cardiac arrest, and death. These reactions are most consistent with a nonimmune-mediated anaphylactoid mechanism. It appears that intravenous administration is more frequently associated with these reactions and occurs at an incidence of 3 per 10 000 doses of intravenous vitamin K1. The solubilizer may also increase the risk of adverse reactions, which occurred in patients with and without previous exposure to vitamin K1. Although there are known factors that increase the risk of an adverse drug event occurring, reactions have been reported despite all precautions being properly followed.

  10. Is parenteral phosphate replacement in the intensive care unit safe?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Banwari; Walecka, Agnieszka; Shaw, Steve; Davenport, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Hypophosphatemia is well recognized in the intensive care setting, associated with refeeding and continuous forms of renal replacement therapy (CCRT). However, it is unclear as to when and how to administer intravenous phosphate supplementation in the general intensive care setting. There have been recent concerns regarding phosphate administration and development of acute kidney injury. We therefore audited our practice of parenteral phosphate administration. We prospectively audited parenteral phosphate administration (20 mmol) in 58 adult patients in a general intensive care unit in a University tertiary referral center. Fifty-eight patients were audited; mean age 57.2 ± 2.0 years, 70.7% male. The median duration of the infusion was 310 min (228-417), and 50% of the patients were on CRRT. 63.8% of patients were hypophosphatemic (<0.87 mmol/L) prior to the phosphate infusion, and serum phosphate increased from 0.79 ± 0.02 to 1.07 ± 0.03 mmol/L, P < 0.001. Two patients became hyperphosphatemic (>1.45 mmol/L). There was no correlation between the change in serum phosphate and the pre-infusion phosphate. Although there were no significant changes in serum urea, creatinine or other electrolytes, arterial ionized calcium fell from 1.15 ± 0.01 to 1.13 ± 0.01 mmol/L, P < 0.01. Although infusion of 20 mmol phosphate did not appear to adversely affect renal function and corrected hypophosphatemia in 67.7% of cases, we found that around 33% of patients who were given parenteral phosphate were not hypophosphatemic, and that the fall in ionized calcium raises the possibility of the formation of calcium-phosphate complexes and potential for soft tissue calcium deposition.

  11. Malassezia Pneumonia: A Rare Complication of Parenteral Nutrition Therapy.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richelle M; Stegink, Ryan J; Manaloor, John J; Schmitt, Bryan H; Stevens, John C; Christenson, John C

    2016-11-01

    Malassezia species (formerly known as Pityrosporum) are part of normal human skin flora and have been associated with benign dermatologic conditions, such as seborrheic dermatitis and tinea versicolor. In rare cases, however, Malassezia has been associated with systemic disease in immunocompromised patients and infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Malassezia species require long-chain fatty acids for growth and therefore have a known predilection for individuals receiving lipid containing intravenous parenteral nutrition (PN). Systemic infections are characterized by prolonged fevers and illness but can include nonspecific signs and symptoms. We present the diagnosis and management of a rare case of an immunocompetent, nonneonatal, PN-dependent child with Malassezia furfur pneumonia.

  12. Malassezia furfur meningitis associated with total parenteral nutrition subdural effusion.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Cecilia M; Jackson, Mary Anne; Zwick, David

    2004-01-01

    We present a case of Malassezia furfur meningitis arising in a very low birth weight infant with chronic lung disease, necrotizing enterocolitis, and intraventricular hemorrhage. M. furfur meningitis was probably acquired late following successful treatment for earlier systemic central line-associated M. furfur infection. M. furfur meningitis has only once been previously reported. Unlike the previous case where meningitis was secondary to widespread blood-borne dissemination, infection was limited to the leptomeninges and arose in association with extravasation of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and intralipid fluid into subarachnoid space via peripheral scalp catheter.

  13. Metabolic bone diseases during long-term total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Acca, M; Ragno, A; Francucci, C M; D'Erasmo, E

    2007-01-01

    Long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a procedure commonly applied to patients with advanced forms of intestinal malabsorption. Among TPN complications, bone metabolic diseases, such as osteoporosis and osteomalacia, are a common finding. Initially considered to be a manifestation of aluminium toxicity which followed massive contamination with the element of the solutions used in TPN, metabolic osteopathy during TPN is currently considered a multiform syndrome, with a multifactorial pathogenesis, which may manifest itself with vague or clear clinical pictures. In this review, we analyse clinical, pathogenetic, and therapeutic aspects of the most common bone metabolic diseases in patients undergoing long-term TPN.

  14. Acetaldehyde involvement in ethanol's postabsortive effects during early ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    March, Samanta M.; Abate, P.; Molina, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and biomedical studies sustains the notion that early ontogeny is a vulnerable window to the impact of alcohol. Experiences with the drug during these stages increase latter disposition to prefer, use or abuse ethanol. This period of enhanced sensitivity to ethanol is accompanied by a high rate of activity in the central catalase system, which metabolizes ethanol in the brain. Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first oxidation product of ethanol, has been found to share many neurobehavioral effects with the drug. Cumulative evidence supports this notion in models employing adults. Nevertheless very few studies have been conducted to analyze the role of ACD in ethanol postabsorptive effects, in newborns or infant rats. In this work we review recent experimental literature that syndicates ACD as a mediator agent of reinforcing aspects of ethanol, during early ontogenetic stages. We also show a meta-analytical correlational approach that proposes how differences in the activity of brain catalase across ontogeny, could be modulating patterns of ethanol consumption. PMID:23801947

  15. Total parenteral nutrition in a methylcholanthrene-induced rat sarcoma model.

    PubMed

    Popp, M B; Morrison, S D; Brennan, M F

    1981-01-01

    Problems with currently available studies of the effects of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on rat tumor models include: inadequate definition of the natural history of the tumor model; use of nutritional techniques and solutions which have not been proven effective; failure to allow animals to recover from stress of catheterization before starting nutritional manipulation; short-term studies; failure to use sham-operated orally fed control animals; and inadequate evaluation of nutritional result. We have instituted TPN after a 4-day postcatheterization recovery period in a defined methylcholanthrene-induced rat sarcoma model. Preliminary results suggest that TPN increases tumor weight without changing tumor composition of water, nitrogen, or fat. TPN also increases carcass fat and water content, but not carcass protein. In tumor-bearing animals, the percentage of energy expended on activity decreases with increasing tumor burden in both TPN and orally fed controls. TPN in these studies appears to support fat stores and stimulate tumor growth.

  16. 76 FR 25358 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Glass Quality Conference; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug... Parenteral Drug Association (PDA), is announcing a public conference entitled ``PDA/FDA Glass Quality... Association (PDA), PDA Global Headquarters, Bethesda Towers, 4350 East-West Highway, suite 200, Bethesda, MD...

  17. Finding new solutions in pediatric parenteral admixtures: how to improve quality and to deal with shortages.

    PubMed

    Watrobska-Swietlikowska, Dorota; Kwidzynska, Anna; Szlagatys-Sidorkiewicz, Agnieszka; Sznitowska, Malgorzata; Klek, Stanislaw

    2014-07-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: La nutrición parenteral pediátrica permite un crecimiento normal incluso en lactantes pretérmino. Sin embargo, estos niños requieren una nutrición parenteral a medida y la formulación de tal nutrición puede suponer un reto por el riesgo de inestabilidad y el desabastecimiento.

  18. Enteral obeticholic acid prevents hepatic cholestasis in total parenteral nutrition-fed neonatal pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a vital support for neonatal infants with congenital or acquired gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and requiring small bowel resection. An adverse outcome associated with prolonged TPN use is parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis (PNAC). We previously showed t...

  19. 77 FR 47078 - 2012 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Regulatory Conference...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 2012 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug... Sustainable Global Quality Culture AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in cosponsorship with Parenteral Drug...

  20. Mechanisms of disease: update on the molecular etiology and fundamentals of parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since its introduction into clinical practice in the 1970s, parenteral nutrition has revolutionized the care of premature neonates. Serum transaminase and bilirubin levels are commonly elevated in infants on parenteral nutrition, but their normalization is typical in the setting of short-term admini...

  1. Hepatic transcriptomic profiles of preterm piglets nourished by enteral and parenteral nutrition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving nutritional support for more than half a million premature and hospitalized infants in the U.S. annually. Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the U....

  2. Evaluation of Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy at a Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Emily Sydnor; Kendall, Brian; Orlando, Patricia; Perez, Christian; De Amorim, Marina; Samore, Matthew; Pavia, Andrew T; Hersh, Adam L

    2015-09-01

    We reviewed outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center to identify opportunities for antimicrobial stewardship intervention. A definite or possible modification would have been recommended in 60% of courses. Forty-one percent of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy courses were potentially avoidable, including 22% involving infectious diseases consultation.

  3. Quantifying the effectiveness of early warning systems for natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sättele, M.; Bründl, M.; Straub, D.

    2016-01-01

    Early warning systems (EWSs) are increasingly applied as preventive measures within an integrated risk management approach for natural hazards. At present, common standards and detailed guidelines for the evaluation of their effectiveness are lacking. To support decision-makers in the identification of optimal risk mitigation measures, a three-step framework approach for the evaluation of EWSs is presented. The effectiveness is calculated in function of the technical and the inherent reliability of the EWS. The framework is applicable to automated and non-automated EWSs and combinations thereof. To address the specifics and needs of a wide variety of EWS designs, a classification of EWSs is provided, which focuses on the degree of automations encountered in varying EWSs. The framework and its implementation are illustrated through a series of example applications of EWS in an alpine environment.

  4. Quantifying the effectiveness of early warning systems for natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sättele, M.; Bründl, M.; Straub, D.

    2015-07-01

    Early warning systems (EWS) are increasingly applied as preventive measures within an integrated risk management approach for natural hazards. At present, common standards and detailed guidelines for the evaluation of their effectiveness are lacking. To support decision-makers in the identification of optimal risk mitigation measures, a three-step framework approach for the evaluation of EWS is presented. The effectiveness is calculated in function of the technical and the inherent reliability of the EWS. The framework is applicable to automated and non-automated EWS and combinations thereof. To address the specifics and needs of a wide variety of EWS designs, a classification of EWS is provided, which focuses on the degree of automations encountered in varying EWS. The framework and its implementation are illustrated through a series of example applications of EWS in an alpine environment.

  5. Early effects of duloxetine on emotion recognition in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Susan; Penton-Voak, Ian; Pinkney, Verity; Baldwin, David S; Munafò, Marcus R; Garner, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    The serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine is an effective treatment for major depression and generalised anxiety disorder. Neuropsychological models of antidepressant drug action suggest therapeutic effects might be mediated by the early correction of maladaptive biases in emotion processing, including the recognition of emotional expressions. Sub-chronic administration of duloxetine (for two weeks) produces adaptive changes in neural circuitry implicated in emotion processing; however, its effects on emotional expression recognition are unknown. Forty healthy participants were randomised to receive either 14 days of duloxetine (60 mg/day, titrated from 30 mg after three days) or matched placebo (with sham titration) in a double-blind, between-groups, repeated-measures design. On day 0 and day 14 participants completed a computerised emotional expression recognition task that measured sensitivity to the six primary emotions. Thirty-eight participants (19 per group) completed their course of tablets and were included in the analysis. Results provide evidence that duloxetine, compared to placebo, may reduce the accurate recognition of sadness. Drug